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Sample records for include asthma rhinoconjunctivitis

  1. Palivizumab Exposure and the Risk of Atopic Dermatitis, Asthma and Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haerskjold, Ann; Stokholm, Lonny; Linder, Marie

    2017-01-01

    -mediated diseases atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis after palivizumab exposure. AIM: Our objective was to investigate whether exposure to palivizumab was associated with atopic dermatitis, asthma, or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in childhood. METHODS: This was a cross-national population......, and children with hemodynamic significant heart disease were defined. RESULTS: Of the 1,351,265 children included, 1192 (0.09%) were exposed to palivizumab. An increased risk of asthma after palivizumab exposure was observed in the total birth cohort (hazard ratio [HR] 1.49; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.......32-1.68) and in the sub-cohort of preterm children (HR 1.24; 95% CI 1.07-1.44). However, post hoc analyses using the propensity score to balance confounding factors found no increased risk of asthma in preterm children (HR 0.91; 95% CI 0.56-1.48). No increased risks of atopic dermatitis (HR 1.18; 95% CI 0...

  2. Temporal trends in the prevalence of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis in adolescents

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    Fernanda Agapito Pássaro Wilmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the temporal trend of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis prevalences as well as their symptoms in adolescents. METHODS Two cross-sectional studies were conducted using the same methodology and questionnaire as was used for adolescents aged 12 to 14 years in the Brazilian city of Florianopolis, SC, Southern Brazil. Based on the international protocol of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC study, adolescents were evaluated in 2001 and 3,150 in 2012. The schools included in this study were the same as in the 2001 study. These schools were randomly selected after stratification by network (public and private and geographic location. The total average percentage variation was estimated for the prevalence of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis and their symptoms. RESULTS The prevalence of reported asthma was 10.9% in 2001 and 14.8% in 2012, with an average variation of 2.8% in the period. The highest average variation in the period was observed among female adolescents (4.1%. In parallel a significant increase occurred in reported physician-diagnosed asthma, 7.3% in 2001 and 11,1% in 2012, with an annual variation of 4.5%. The largest increases in reported physician-diagnosed asthma were seen in female (5.9% and male (4.5% public school pupils. In addition, a significant increase in reported rhinoconjunctivitis occurred, with the average variation in the period being 5.2%. Reports of severe asthma symptoms remained unchanged during the period, while the annual variation for reported current wheezing (-1.3% and wheezing during exercise (-1.2% decreased. CONCLUSIONS The results showed a significant increase in the annual average variation for asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis prevalence during the 2001 to 2012 period.

  3. The association of rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma symptoms in adolescents

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    Rita de Cássia CM Brito

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Our study aimed to determine the rate of association of rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma symptoms in adolescents to analyse whether asthma symptoms are more severe and frequent in asthmatics with concomitant allergic rhinitis and assess if adolescents are aware of having rhinoconjunctivitis. Methods: A cross-sectional study, with two components: a study in prevalence and an inter-case study (rhinitis symptoms with a comparison group (no rhinitis symptoms, based on information from questionnaires applied in phase 3 of ISAAC in Recife in 2002. Results: Associated rhinoconjunctivitis and probable asthma symptoms were observed in 5.1% of adolescents (48/940; CI 95%: 3.8%-6.6%, probable asthma alone in 10.9% (103/940; CI 95%: 9.1%-13.1% and rhinoconjunctivitis alone in 9.7% (91/940; CI 95%: 7.9%-13%. Among the rhinitisbearing adolescents, almost 81.3% (39/48 had persistent probable asthma and 31.8% (48/151 of asthmatic patients rhinoconjunctivitis. 65.1% (86/132 of adolescents with diagnosed rhinitis were unaware of rhinitis symptoms. Conclusions: The association of rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma symptoms is frequent and associated to more severe asthma symptoms. Adolescents’ unawareness of rhinitis symptoms reflects the underdiagnosis that can result in downplaying the symptoms, and the consequent undertreatment. Resumo: Objectivos: Determinar a prevalência da associação de sintomas de rinoconjuntivite e asma em adolescentes, analisar se os sintomas de asma são mais intensos e frequentes entre os adolescentes com sintomas de rinoconjuntivite alérgica e avaliar se os adolescentes reconhecem os sintomas de rinoconjuntivite. Métodos: Realizou-se um estudo do tipo corte transversal com dois componentes: um estudo de prevalência e um estudo entre casos (sintomas de rinoconjuntivite, com um grupo de comparação (ausência de sintomas de rinoconjuntivite a partir de informações dos questionários aplicados na

  4. The validity of register data to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

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    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Klansø, Lotte; Jensen, Andreas; Haerskjold, Ann; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Simonsen, Jacob

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has been increasing. Register-based studies are essential for research in subpopulations with specific diseases and facilitate epidemiological studies to identify causes and evaluate interventions. Algorithms have been developed to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis using register information on disease-specific dispensed prescribed medication and hospital contacts, but the validity of the algorithms has not been evaluated. This study validated the algorithms vs gold standard deep telephone interviews with the caretaker about physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the child. The algorithms defined each of the three atopic diseases using register-based information on disease-specific hospital contacts and/or filled prescriptions of disease-specific medication. Confirmative answers to questions about physician-diagnosed atopic disease were used as the gold standard for the comparison with the algorithms, resulting in sensitivities and specificities and 95% confidence intervals. The interviews with the caretaker of the included 454 Danish children born 1997-2003 were carried out May-September 2015; the mean age of the children at the time of the interview being 15.2 years (standard deviation 1.3 years). For the algorithm capturing children with atopic dermatitis, the sensitivity was 74.1% (95% confidence interval: 66.9%-80.2%) and the specificity 73.0% (67.3%-78.0%). For the algorithm capturing children with asthma, both the sensitivity of 84.1% (78.0%-88.8%) and the specificity of 81.6% (76.5%-85.8%) were high compared with physician-diagnosed asthmatic bronchitis (recurrent wheezing). The sensitivity remained high when capturing physician-diagnosed asthma: 83.3% (74.3%-89.6%); however, the specificity declined to 66.0% (60.9%-70.8%). For allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, the sensitivity

  5. Ambient particulate pollution and the world-wide prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema in children: Phase One of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, H.R.; Ruggles, R.; Pandey, K.D.; Kapetanakis, V.; Brunekreef, B.; Lai, C.K.; Strachan, D.P.; Weiland, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of ambient particulate matter on variation in childhood prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema. METHODS: Prevalences of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema obtained in Phase One of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood

  6. The validity of register data to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Klansø, Lotte; Jensen, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    the algorithms vs gold standard deep telephone interviews with the caretaker about physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the child. Methods: The algorithms defined each of the three atopic diseases using register-based information on disease-specific hospital......Background: The incidence of atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has been increasing. Register-based studies are essential for research in subpopulations with specific diseases and facilitate epidemiological studies to identify causes and evaluate interventions....... Algorithms have been developed to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis using register information on disease-specific dispensed prescribed medication and hospital contacts, but the validity of the algorithms has not been evaluated. This study validated...

  7. Biomarkers for Monitoring Clinical Efficacy of Allergen Immunotherapy for Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis and Allergic Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamji, M H; Kappen, J H; Akdis, M

    2017-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is an effective treatment for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (AR) with or without asthma (1-12). AIT has disease modifying properties and confers long-term clinical benefit after cessation of treatment (6, 7, 13-17). AIT is routinely used in daily practice and can...

  8. Does migration affect asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema prevalence? Global findings from the international study of asthma and allergies in childhood.

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    Garcia-Marcos, Luis; Robertson, Colin F; Ross Anderson, H; Ellwood, Philippa; Williams, Hywel C; Wong, Gary Wk

    2014-12-01

    Immigrants to Westernized countries adopt the prevalence of allergic diseases of native populations, yet no data are available on immigrants to low-income or low-disease prevalence countries. We investigated these questions using data from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Standardized questionnaires were completed by 13-14-year-old adolescents and by the parent/guardians of 6-7-year-old children. Questions on the symptom prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema, and a wide range of factors postulated to be associated with these conditions, including birth in or not in the country and age at immigration, were asked. Odds ratios for risk of the three diseases according to immigration status were calculated using generalized linear mixed models. These were adjusted for: world region; language and gross national income; and individual risk factors including gender, maternal education, antibiotic and paracetamol use, maternal smoking, and diet. Effect modification by gross national income and by prevalence was examined. There were 326 691 adolescents from 48 countries and 208 523 children from 31 countries. Immigration was associated with a lower prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema in both age groups than among those born in the country studied, and this association was mainly confined to high-prevalence/affluent countries. This reduced risk was greater in those who had lived fewer years in the host country. Recent migration to high prevalence/affluent countries is associated with a lower prevalence of allergic diseases. The protective pre-migration environment quickly decreases with increasing time in the host country. © The Author 2014; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  9. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in Danish and Swedish children

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    Henriksen, Lonny; Simonsen, Jacob; Haerskjold, Ann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that the prevalence of the frequent chronic conditions of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergy has increased substantially for reasons not fully understood. Atopic diseases affect quality of life in both children and their family members. OBJECTIVE: Using...... national registers, we sought to establish up-to-date incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the Danish and Swedish child populations. METHODS: Children born in Denmark from 1997 to 2011 or born in Sweden from 2006 to 2010 participated in this cross......-national, population-based cohort study. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the Danish and Swedish child cohorts were ascertained through disease-specific dispensed prescribed medication, specific hospital contacts, or both. RESULTS: In both countries the incidence rate...

  10. Sublingual immunotherapy for the treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma: a systematic review.

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    Lin, Sandra Y; Erekosima, Nkiruka; Kim, Julia M; Ramanathan, Murugappan; Suarez-Cuervo, Catalina; Chelladurai, Yohalakshmi; Ward, Darcy; Segal, Jodi B

    2013-03-27

    Allergic rhinitis affects up to 40% of the US population. To desensitize allergic individuals, subcutaneous injection immunotherapy or sublingual immunotherapy may be administered. In the United States, sublingual immunotherapy is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration. However, some US physicians use aqueous allergens, off-label, for sublingual desensitization. To systematically review the effectiveness and safety of aqueous sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma. The databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through December 22, 2012. English-language randomized controlled trials were included if they compared sublingual immunotherapy with placebo, pharmacotherapy, or other sublingual immunotherapy regimens and reported clinical outcomes. Studies of sublingual immunotherapy that are unavailable in the United States and for which a related immunotherapy is unavailable in the United States were excluded. Paired reviewers selected articles and extracted the data. The strength of the evidence for each comparison and outcome was graded based on the risk of bias (scored on allocation, concealment of intervention, incomplete data, sponsor company involvement, and other bias), consistency, magnitude of effect, and the directness of the evidence. Sixty-three studies with 5131 participants met the inclusion criteria. Participants' ages ranged from 4 to 74 years. Twenty studies (n = 1814 patients) enrolled only children. The risk of bias was medium in 43 studies (68%). Strong evidence supports that sublingual immunotherapy improves asthma symptoms, with 8 of 13 studies reporting greater than 40% improvement vs the comparator. Moderate evidence supports that sublingual immunotherapy use decreases rhinitis or rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms, with 9 of 36 studies demonstrating greater than 40% improvement vs the comparator. Medication use for asthma and allergies decreased by

  11. Pollen immunotherapy reduces the development of asthma in children with seasonal rhinoconjunctivitis (the PAT-study)

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    Möller, Christian; Dreborg, Sten; Ferdousi, Hosne A

    2002-01-01

    rhinoconjunctivitis. METHODS: From 6 pediatric allergy centers, 205 children aged 6 to 14 years (mean age, 10.7 years) with grass and/or birch pollen allergy but without any other clinically important allergy were randomized either to receive specific immunotherapy for 3 years or to an open control group. All...... provocation tests were carried out during the season(s) and during the winter. RESULTS: Before the start of immunotherapy, 20% of the children had mild asthma symptoms during the pollen season(s). Among those without asthma, the actively treated children had significantly fewer asthma symptoms after 3 years...

  12. Pollen immunotherapy reduces the development of asthma in children with seasonal rhinoconjunctivitis (the PAT-study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Christian; Dreborg, Sten; Ferdousi, Hosne A

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with allergic rhinitis are likely to develop asthma. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether specific immunotherapy can prevent the development of asthma and reduce bronchial hyperresponsiveness in children with seasonal allergic...... rhinoconjunctivitis. METHODS: From 6 pediatric allergy centers, 205 children aged 6 to 14 years (mean age, 10.7 years) with grass and/or birch pollen allergy but without any other clinically important allergy were randomized either to receive specific immunotherapy for 3 years or to an open control group. All...

  13. Benefits and risks of the subcutaneous immunotherapy with acari extracts in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma

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    Olimpio Rodríguez-Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The records of patients from the Allergology Service in the Previsora Policlinic, Camagüey were revised to evaluate benefits and risks of the subcutaneous immunotherapy (ITSC with extracts of acari. The study was observational, analytic and retrospective of cases and controls in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma. A total of 160 subjects, older than 18 years old, were chosen. Eighty out of them had already received ITSC with dose increase during 13 weeks and maintenance with monthly injections during 18 months. A total of 80 patients who only received prevention measures and medications during the crises were paired. Questionnaires were applied for quality of rhinoconjunctivitis life and asthma, about the consumption of medications and the frequency of the crises. The adverse events were measured, as they were local and systemic to the cutaneous tests, to the ITSC and the different pharmacological treatments. There was a significant increase of the punctuation of life quality questionnaires, (p=0.011. The consumption of medications decreased in both the cases and the controls, without significant differences (p=0.083. The frequency of the rhinitis and asthma crises decrease in the group of ITSC (p=0.029. Slight local and systemic reactions were reported in both groups with Odds ratio (OR=2.029 in the ITSC group, with a 95% confidence interval of 1.114–3.967 (p=0.019. The results show that the subcutaneous immunotherapy with acari offers benefits and few risks to patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma.

  14. Early-life sensitization to hen's egg predicts asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis at 14 years of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elisabeth Soegaard; Kjaer, Henrik Fomsgaard; Eller, Esben

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sensitization to both inhalant and food allergens has been shown to be risk factors for development of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis (RC). However, few studies have addressed the role of transient or persistent IgE sensitization to specific allergens in early life for later developme......'s egg was associated with asthma and RC at 14 years. Furthermore, sensitization to HDM was associated with asthma at 14 years. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....... to groups of and to individual allergens and asthma and RC at 6 and 14 years compared to a reference group with no sensitization. RESULTS: Both transient and persistent early-life sensitization to cow's milk or hen's egg proteins were associated with asthma (aOR 3.99(1.41-11.32) and 5.95(1.78-19.92)) and RC...... (aOR 2.94(1.19-7.28) and 6.18(1.86-20.53)) at 14 years, this association being driven mainly by sensitization to hen's egg. Transient early-life sensitization to HDM had increased risk of asthma (aOR 3.80(1.17-12.41)) at 14 years. CONCLUSIONS: Early transient and persistent IgE sensitization to hen...

  15. Siblings, asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema: a worldwide perspective from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood.

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    Strachan, D P; Aït-Khaled, N; Foliaki, S; Mallol, J; Odhiambo, J; Pearce, N; Williams, H C

    2015-01-01

    Associations of larger families with lower prevalences of hay fever, eczema and objective markers of allergic sensitization have been found fairly consistently in affluent countries, but little is known about these relationships in less affluent countries. Questionnaire data for 210,200 children aged 6-7 years from 31 countries, and 337,226 children aged 13-14 years from 52 countries, were collected by Phase Three of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC). Associations of disease symptoms and labels of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema were analysed by numbers of total, older and younger siblings, using mixed (multi-level) logistic regression models to adjust for individual covariates and at the centre level for region, language and national affluence. In both age groups, inverse trends (P national GNI per capita. These global findings on sibship size and childhood asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema suggest at least two distinct trends. Inverse associations with older siblings (observations which prompted the 'hygiene hypothesis' for allergic disease) are mainly a phenomenon of more affluent countries, whereas greater severity of symptoms in larger families is globally more widespread. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Phthalate metabolites in urine and asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis in preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Michael; Bekö, Gabriel; Weschler, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    of the Danish Indoor Environment and Children's Health study, urine samples were collected from 440 children aged 3-5 years, of whom 222 were healthy controls, 68 were clinically diagnosed with asthma, 76 with rhinoconjunctivitis and 81 with atopic dermatitis (disease subgroups are not mutually exclusive; some......Phthalate esters are among the most ubiquitous of indoor pollutants and have been associated with various adverse health effects. In the present study we assessed the cross-sectional association between eight different phthalate metabolites in urine and allergic disease in young children. As part...... children had more than one disease). There were no statistically significant differences in the urine concentrations of phthalate metabolites between cases and healthy controls with the exception of MnBP and MECPP, which were higher in healthy controls compared with the asthma case group. In the crude...

  17. The pattern of sensitisation to inhalant allergens in omani patients with asthma, allergic rhinitis and rhinoconjunctivitis.

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    Al-Tamemi, Salem H; Al-Shidhani, Azza N; Al-Abri, Rashid K; Jothi, Balaji; Al-Rawas, Omar A; Al-Riyami, Bazdawi M

    2008-11-01

    Identification of relevant allergens that are prevalent in each environment which may have diagnostic and therapeutic implications in allergic diseases. This study aimed to identify the pattern of sensitisation to inhalant allergens in Omani patients with asthma, allergic rhinitis and rhinoconjunctivitis. The study was carried out during three consecutive years (2004-2006) at the allergy skin test laboratory of Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman. Records of patients who had undergone an allergy skin prick test with a referring diagnosis of asthma, allergic rhinitis or rhinoconjunctivitis were reviewed. Two panels were used during the 3 years period. The frequencies of positive skin tests were analysed. 689 patients were tested, 384 for the first panel and 305 for the second panel. In the first panel, the commonest positive allergens were: house dust mites (37.8%), hay dust (35.4%), feathers (33.3%), sheep wool (26.6%), mixed threshing dust (25.8%), cat fur (24.2%), cockroach (22.7%), straw dust (22.7%), horse hair (17.4%), maize (16.1%), grasses (11.5%), cotton flock (10.7%), trees (10.4%), cow hair (7.8%), Alternaria alternata (3.6%), Aspergillus Niger (3.4%), and Aspergillus fumigatus (1.3%). In the second panel, the commonest positive allergens were also house dust mites: Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (50.8%), Dermatophagoides farinae (47.9%); Mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) (35.7%), Russian thistle (Salsola kali) (34.4%), cockroach (32.1%), Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon) (19.7%), grass mix-five standard (18.0%), wheat cultivate (14.1%), cats (13.8%), Penicillium notatum (4.3%), Alternaria tenius (3.9%), Aspergillus Niger (3.3%), feather mix (3.0%), dog (2.6%), horse hair and dander (2.6%), and Aspergillus fumigatus (1.6%). The pattern of sensitisation to environmental allergens in Oman seems to be similar to other reports from the Arabian Peninsula. Methods to identify and characterise environment specific allergens like a pollen survey may help in the

  18. Do fast foods cause asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema? Global findings from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) phase three.

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    Ellwood, Philippa; Asher, M Innes; García-Marcos, Luis; Williams, Hywel; Keil, Ulrich; Robertson, Colin; Nagel, Gabriele

    2013-04-01

    Certain foods may increase or decrease the risk of developing asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema. We explored the impact of the intake of types of food on these diseases in Phase Three of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Written questionnaires on the symptom prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema and types and frequency of food intake over the past 12 months were completed by 13-14-year-old adolescents and by the parents/guardians of 6-7-year-old children. Prevalence ORs were estimated using logistic regression, adjusting for confounders, and using a random (mixed) effects model. For adolescents and children, a potential protective effect on severe asthma was associated with consumption of fruit ≥3 times per week (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.97; OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.76 to 0.97, respectively). An increased risk of severe asthma in adolescents and children was associated with the consumption of fast food ≥3 times per week (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.49; OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.42, respectively), as well as an increased risk of severe rhinoconjunctivitis and severe eczema. Similar patterns for both ages were observed for regional analyses, and were consistent with gender and affluence categories and with current symptoms of all three conditions. If the association between fast foods and the symptom prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema is causal, then the findings have major public health significance owing to the rising consumption of fast foods globally.

  19. Changes over time in the relationship between symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema: a global perspective from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, M I; Stewart, A W; Wong, G; Strachan, D P; García-Marcos, L; Anderson, H R

    2012-01-01

    The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) identified trends in the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema over a seven-year period. We hypothesised that environmental influences on the three diseases are different and therefore investigated the correlation over time between trends in the prevalence of these diseases and their combinations at centre and individual level. Centre level analyses were correlations between time trends in the prevalence of symptoms. At an individual level, odds ratios were calculated for associations between symptoms between Phases One and Three. We also investigated potential effect modification in the younger versus older age group; male versus female; and by average Gross National Income per capita (GNI). Both phases were completed in 66 centres in 37 countries for the 6-7 year age group and in 106 centres in 56 countries for the 13-14 year age group. We found that the correlations in time trends were stronger for the older age group than the younger one. Between symptoms of diseases, correlations of time trends were the strongest for rhinoconjunctivitis with eczema and weakest for eczema with asthma. The relationship between the three diseases was generally consistent over the seven-year period, and there was little association found with average GNI. Despite some increase in the proportion of children with symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema, the pattern between the three diseases has not changed much, suggesting that similar factors may be affecting them at a global level. Copyright © 2011 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Design and recruitment for the GAP trial, investigating the preventive effect on asthma development of an SQ-standardized grass allergy immunotherapy tablet in children with grass pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valovirta, Erkka; Berstad, Aud Katrine Herland; de Blic, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis is a risk factor for asthma development. Treating the underlying allergy may represent an attractive method of asthma prevention. No regulatory guidance exists in this area, and, to our knowledge, no clinical investigations meeting modern regulatory standards have bee...

  1. Exposure to cats and dogs, and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunekreef, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067548180; von Mutius, E.; Wong, G.; Odhiambo, J.; García-Marcos, L.; Foliaki, S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Associations between exposure to cats and dogs and respiratory and allergic outcomes in children have been reported in affluent countries, but little is known about such associations in less-affluent countries. METHODS: The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood, phase

  2. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

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    ... Diseases Resources Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  3. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have asthma if: One or both parents have asthma The child has signs of allergies, including the allergic skin ... asthma, partner with your doctor to manage your asthma or your child's asthma. Children aged 10 or older—and younger ...

  4. Case-control study of IL13 polymorphisms, smoking, and rhinoconjunctivitis in Japanese women: the Kyushu Okinawa Maternal and Child Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arakawa Masashi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Six previous studies have examined the relationships between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the IL13 gene and allergic rhinitis, but the results have been inconsistent. However, a recent meta-analysis using data from these 6 studies has shown that the A allele of IL13 SNP rs20541 was associated with an increased risk of allergic rhinitis, whereas no such relationship existed between IL13 SNP rs1800925 and allergic rhinitis. We investigated the associations between IL13 SNPs rs1800925 and rs20541 and the risk of rhinoconjunctivitis in Japanese women. Methods Included were 393 cases who met the criteria of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC for rhinoconjunctivitis. Control subjects were 767 women without rhinoconjunctivitis according to the ISAAC criteria, who had also not been diagnosed with allergic rhinitis by a doctor. Adjustment was made for age, region of residence, presence of older siblings, smoking, family history of allergic rhinitis, and education. Results Compared with the GG genotype of IL13 SNP rs20541, the AA genotype, occurring in 7.1% of control subjects, was significantly positively related to the risk of rhinoconjunctivitis: the adjusted odds ratio was 1.65 (95% confidence interval: 1.05 - 2.60. SNP rs1800925 was not associated with rhinoconjunctivitis. The haplotype comprising the rs1800925 C allele and the rs20541 A allele was significantly positively related to rhinoconjunctivitis. The multiplicative interactions between the two SNPs under study and smoking on the risk of rhinoconjunctivitis were not statistically significant. Based on the recessive model, however, the additive interaction between SNP rs1800925, but not rs20541, and smoking was significant. Conclusions This study suggests that the minor genotype of IL13 SNP rs20541 and the CA haplotype are significantly positively associated with the risk of rhinoconjunctivitis. In addition, a new pattern of

  5. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Dhami, Sangeeta; Arasi, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    Background: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is developing Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). To inform the development of recommendations, we sought to critically assess the systematic review evidence on the effective...

  6. Results from the 5-year SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet asthma prevention (GAP) trial in children with grass pollen allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovirta, Erkka; Petersen, Thomas H; Piotrowska, Teresa; Laursen, Mette K; Andersen, Jens S; Sørensen, Helle F; Klink, Rabih

    2018-02-01

    Allergy immunotherapy targets the immunological cause of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and allergic asthma and has the potential to alter the natural course of allergic disease. The primary objective was to investigate the effect of the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet compared with placebo on the risk of developing asthma. A total of 812 children (5-12 years), with a clinically relevant history of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and no medical history or signs of asthma, were included in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, comprising 3 years of treatment and 2 years of follow-up. There was no difference in time to onset of asthma, defined by prespecified asthma criteria relying on documented reversible impairment of lung function (primary endpoint). Treatment with the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet significantly reduced the risk of experiencing asthma symptoms or using asthma medication at the end of trial (odds ratio = 0.66, P year posttreatment follow-up, and during the entire 5-year trial period. Also, grass allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms were 22% to 30% reduced (P years). At the end of the trial, the use of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis pharmacotherapy was significantly less (27% relative difference to placebo, P < .001). Total IgE, grass pollen-specific IgE, and skin prick test reactivity to grass pollen were all reduced compared to placebo. Treatment with the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet reduced the risk of experiencing asthma symptoms and using asthma medication, and had a positive, long-term clinical effect on rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms and medication use but did not show an effect on the time to onset of asthma. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Results from the 5-year SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet asthma prevention (GAP) trial in children with grass pollen allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valovirta, Erkka; Petersen, Thomas H; Piotrowska, Teresa

    2018-01-01

    compared with placebo on the risk of developing asthma. METHODS: A total of 812 children (5-12 years), with a clinically relevant history of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and no medical history or signs of asthma, were included in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial......, comprising 3 years of treatment and 2 years of follow-up. RESULTS: There was no difference in time to onset of asthma, defined by prespecified asthma criteria relying on documented reversible impairment of lung function (primary endpoint). Treatment with the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet...... significantly reduced the risk of experiencing asthma symptoms or using asthma medication at the end of trial (odds ratio = 0.66, P year posttreatment follow-up, and during the entire 5-year trial period. Also, grass allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms were 22% to 30% reduced (P

  8. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Roberts, Graham

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the Management of Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AI...... appraised using established instruments. Data will be descriptively and, if possible and appropriate, quantitatively synthesised. CONCLUSION: The findings from this review will be used to inform the development of recommendations for EAACI's Guidelines on AIT....

  9. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by swelling (inflammation) in the airways. When an asthma attack occurs, the lining of the air passages swells ... or a cough may be the main symptom. Asthma attacks can last for minutes to days. Attacks can ...

  10. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... irritate your airways, like cigarette smoke , perfume, and chalk dust infections, like a cold or the flu exercising breathing in cold air How Is Asthma Diagnosed? If your doctor thinks you have asthma, you'll have to get checked out. One test that helps doctors diagnose asthma is spirometry . ...

  11. Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Harold

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma is the most common respiratory disorder in Canada. Despite significant improvement in the diagnosis and management of this disorder, the majority of Canadians with asthma remain poorly controlled. In most patients, however, control can be achieved through the use of avoidance measures and appropriate pharmacological interventions. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs represent the standard of care for the majority of patients. Combination ICS/long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA inhalers are preferred for most adults who fail to achieve control with ICS therapy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy represents a potentially disease-modifying therapy for many patients with asthma, but should only be prescribed by physicians with appropriate training in allergy. Regular monitoring of asthma control, adherence to therapy and inhaler technique are also essential components of asthma management. This article provides a review of current literature and guidelines for the appropriate diagnosis and management of asthma.

  12. Allergisk rhinoconjunctivitis behandlet med intramuskulaert injiceret glukokortikoid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Laursen, L C

    1998-01-01

    Effects and side effects of injectable depot steroid in the treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (hay fever) are described. A few controlled studies have shown injectable steroids to be superior to the effect of placebo and locally applied steroid. Over a period of 10 years from 1984-95 only...

  13. Specific immunotherapy has long-term preventive effect of seasonal and perennial asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, L; Niggemann, B; Dreborg, S

    2007-01-01

    with standardized allergen extracts of grass and/or birch or no SIT respectively. Conjunctival provocations were performed outside the season and methacholine bronchial provocations were performed during the season and winter. Asthma was assessed by clinical evaluation. RESULTS: The significant improvements....../64. The longitudinal treatment effect when adjusted for bronchial hyper-responsiveness and asthma status at baseline including all observations at 3, 5 and 10 years follow-up (children with or without asthma at baseline, n = 189; 511 observations) was statistically significant (P = 0.0075). The odds ratio for no-asthma......BACKGROUND: 3-year subcutaneous specific immunotherapy (SIT) in children with seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis reduced the risk of developing asthma during treatment and 2 years after discontinuation of SIT (5-year follow-up) indicating long-term preventive effect of SIT. OBJECTIVE: We...

  14. Prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis and eczema in 13- to 14-year-old children in Africa: the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Khaled, N; Odhiambo, J; Pearce, N; Adjoh, K S; Maesano, I A; Benhabyles, B; Bouhayad, Z; Bahati, E; Camara, L; Catteau, C; El Sony, A; Esamai, F O; Hypolite, I E; Melaku, K; Musa, O A; Ng'ang'a, L; Onadeko, B O; Saad, O; Jerray, M; Kayembe, J M; Koffi, N B; Khaldi, F; Kuaban, C; Voyi, K; M'Boussa, J; Sow, O; Tidjani, O; Zar, H J

    2007-03-01

    Phase I of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood has provided valuable information regarding international prevalence patterns and potential risk factors in the development of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema. However, in Phase I, only six African countries were involved (Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco, Kenya, South Africa and Ethiopia). Phase III, conducted 5-6 years later, enrolled 22 centres in 16 countries including the majority of the centres involved in Phase I and new centres in Morocco, Tunisia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Togo, Sudan, Cameroon, Gabon, Reunion Island and South Africa. There were considerable variations between the various centres of Africa in the prevalence of the main symptoms of the three conditions: wheeze (4.0-21.5%), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (7.2-27.3%) and eczema (4.7-23.0%). There was a large variation both between countries and between centres in the same country. Several centres, including Cape Town (20.3%), Polokwane (18.0%), Reunion Island (21.5%), Brazzaville (19.9%), Nairobi (18.0%), Urban Ivory Coast (19.3%) and Conakry (18.6%) showed relatively high asthma symptom prevalences, similar to those in western Europe. There were also a number of centres showing high symptom prevalences for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (Cape Town, Reunion Island, Brazzaville, Eldoret, Urban Ivory Coast, Conakry, Casablanca, Wilays of Algiers, Sousse and Eldoret) and eczema (Brazzaville, Eldoret, Addis Ababa, Urban Ivory Coast, Conakry, Marrakech and Casablanca).

  15. Five-grass-pollen sublingual immunotherapy tablet for the treatment of grass-pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: 5 years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Alain; Wahn, Ulrich; Horak, Friedrich; Cox, Linda S

    2014-10-01

    Oralair(®) (OA) (Stallergenes, Antony, France) is a unique pre- and co-seasonal 5-grass-pollen sublingual immunotherapy tablet launched in 2008, and now approved in 31 countries worldwide for the treatment of grass-pollen allergic rhinitis and rhinoconjunctivitis. OA is the first oral treatment with a consistent, well-balanced allergen extract that mimics natural exposure and sensitization. A wealth of data exists from over 5 years of clinical and real-world experience demonstrating the efficacy and safety of OA for grass-pollen-allergy treatment. OA is highly effective from the first pollen season in all patient subgroups, including children and those with comorbid mild asthma, irrespective of sensitization status and symptom severity. OA also has sustained long-term benefits for symptom control and quality of life. This article provides an overview of the pharmacodynamics and pharmacology of OA; its efficacy, safety, tolerability and cost-effectiveness for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and rhinoconjunctivitis and its role in clinical practice.

  16. Early childhood risk factors for rhinoconjunctivitis in adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elisabeth Soegaard; Kjaer, Henrik Fomsgaard; Eller, Esben

    2017-01-01

    the risk factors for non-allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in children finding family history of atopic diseases and gender to be of importance. The aim of this study was to investigate possible risk factors in early life for rhinoconjunctivitis, allergic as well as non-allergic, in adolescence. Methods...... between early-life risk factors and the development of rhinoconjunctivitis, allergic as well as non-allergic, in adolescence. Results: Follow-up rate at 14-years was 66.2%. The prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis was 32.8%. Family history of atopic diseases (aOR 2.25), atopic dermatitis (aOR 3.24), food...

  17. Dietary meat and fat intake and prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis in pregnant Japanese women: baseline data from the Kyushu Okinawa Maternal and Child Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyake Yoshihiro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary fat exerts numerous complex effects on proinflammatory and immunologic pathways. Several epidemiological studies have examined the relationships between intake of fatty acids and/or foods high in fat and allergic rhinitis, but have provided conflicting findings. The current cross-sectional study investigated such relationships in Japan. Methods Study subjects were 1745 pregnant women. The definition of rhinoconjunctivitis was based on criteria from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Information on dietary factors was collected using a validated self-administered diet history questionnaire. Adjustment was made for age; gestation; region of residence; number of older siblings; number of children; smoking; secondhand smoke exposure at home and at work; family history of asthma, atopic eczema, and allergic rhinitis; household income; education; and body mass index. Results The prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis in the past 12 months was 25.9%. Higher meat intake was significantly associated with an increased prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis: the adjusted odds ratio between extreme quartiles was 1.71 (95% confidence interval: 1.25-2.35, P for trend = 0.002. No measurable association was found between fish intake and rhinoconjunctivitis. Intake of total fat, saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, α-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, and cholesterol and the ratio of n-3 to n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake were not evidently related to the prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis. Conclusions The current results suggest that meat intake may be positively associated with the prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis in young adult Japanese women.

  18. Asthma: Basic Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after you use asthma medicine. What Is an Asthma Attack? An asthma attack may include coughing, chest tightness, ... to go to the hospital. What Causes an Asthma Attack? An asthma attack can happen when you are ...

  19. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Arasi, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    and critically appraised using established instruments. Our primary outcomes of interest were symptom, medication and combined symptom and medication scores. Secondary outcomes of interest included cost-effectiveness and safety. Data were descriptively summarized and then quantitatively synthesized using random...

  20. Evaluation of a novel educational strategy, including inhaler-based reminder labels, to improve asthma inhaler technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheti, Iman A; Armour, Carol L; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia Z; Reddel, Helen K

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of a brief intervention about inhaler technique, delivered by community pharmacists to asthma patients. Thirty-one pharmacists received brief workshop education (Active: n=16, CONTROL: n=15). Active Group pharmacists were trained to assess and teach dry powder inhaler technique, using patient-centered educational tools including novel Inhaler Technique Labels. Interventions were delivered to patients at four visits over 6 months. At baseline, patients (Active: 53, CONTROL: 44) demonstrated poor inhaler technique (mean+/-S.D. score out of 9, 5.7+/-1.6). At 6 months, improvement in inhaler technique score was significantly greater in Active cf. CONTROL patients (2.8+/-1.6 cf. 0.9+/-1.4, p<0.001), and asthma severity was significantly improved (p=0.015). Qualitative responses from patients and pharmacists indicated a high level of satisfaction with the intervention and educational tools, both for their effectiveness and for their impact on the patient-pharmacist relationship. A simple feasible intervention in community pharmacies, incorporating daily reminders via Inhaler Technique Labels on inhalers, can lead to improvement in inhaler technique and asthma outcomes. Brief training modules and simple educational tools, such as Inhaler Technique Labels, can provide a low-cost and sustainable way of changing patient behavior in asthma, using community pharmacists as educators.

  1. Nasal allergen deposition leads to conjunctival mast cell degranulation in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callebaut, Ina; de Vries, Annick; Steelant, Brecht; Hox, Valérie; Bobic, Sonja; van Gerven, Laura; Ceuppens, Jan L.; Hellings, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The naso-ocular interaction in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis is well recognized from epidemiological, clinical, and experimental observations. The precise mechanisms remain incompletely understood. A new mouse model of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis was used to investigate the contribution

  2. Asthma, guides for diagnostic and handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, Carlos E; Caballero A, Andres S; Garcia G, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    The paper defines the asthma, includes topics as diagnostic, handling of the asthma, special situations as asthma and pregnancy, handling of the asthmatic patient's perioperatory and occupational asthma

  3. Polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and prevalence of eczema and rhinoconjunctivitis in Japanese children: The Ryukyus Child Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki Satoshi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent increase in the prevalence of allergic disorders might be a consequence of increased intake of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs and reduced intake of n-3 PUFAs. The current cross-sectional study examined the association between intake levels and the prevalence of eczema and rhinoconjunctivitis in Japanese children. Methods Subjects were 23,388 schoolchildren aged 6-15 years residing in Okinawa. The presence of eczema and/or rhinoconjunctivitis was determined according to the criteria of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. A brief diet history questionnaire for children and adolescents was administered to acquire information on dietary factors. Adjustment was made for age, sex, residential municipality, number of siblings, smoking in the household, body mass index, paternal and maternal history of allergic diseases, and paternal and maternal educational level. Results The prevalences of eczema and rhinoconjunctivitis in the previous 12 months were 7.0% and 8.0%, respectively. Consumption of PUFAs, n-3 PUFAs, α-linolenic acid, n-6 PUFAs, and linoleic acid was positively associated with the prevalence of eczema: the adjusted odds ratios (ORs between extreme quintiles (95% confidence intervals [CIs], P for trend were 1.26 (1.07-1.48, 0.04, 1.31 (1.11-1.54, 0.009, 1.31 (1.12-1.55, 0.003, 1.26 (1.07-1.48, 0.01, and 1.27 (1.08-1.49, 0.01, respectively. Arachidonic acid intake was independently inversely related to eczema: the adjusted OR between extreme quintiles was 0.81 (0.69-0.95, 0.0008. Eczema was not associated with eicosapentaenoic or docosahexaenoic acid intake, or with the ratio of n-3 to n-6 PUFA intake. Only arachidonic acid intake was statistically significantly related to the prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis, showing a clear inverse linear trend: the adjusted OR between extreme quintiles was 0.86 (0.74-0.997, 0.03. Conclusions Consumption of n-3 and n-6 PUFAs, especially

  4. Treatment with grass allergen peptides improves symptoms of grass pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Anne K; Frankish, Charles W; O'Hehir, Robyn E; Armstrong, Kristen; Steacy, Lisa; Larché, Mark; Hafner, Roderick P

    2017-08-01

    Synthetic peptide immunoregulatory epitopes are a new class of immunotherapy to treat allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). Grass allergen peptides, comprising 7 synthetic T-cell epitopes derived from Cyn d 1, Lol p 5, Dac g 5, Hol l 5, and Phl p 5, is investigated for treatment of grass pollen-induced ARC. We sought to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of intradermally administered grass allergen peptides. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated 3 regimens of grass allergen peptides versus placebo in patients with grass pollen-induced allergy (18-65 years). After a 4-day baseline challenge to rye grass in the environmental exposure unit (EEU), subjects were randomized to receive grass allergen peptides at 6 nmol at 2-week intervals for a total of 8 doses (8x6Q2W), grass allergen peptides at 12 nmol at 4-week intervals for a total of 4 doses (4x12Q4W), or grass allergen peptides at 12 nmol at 2-week intervals for a total of 8 doses (8x12Q2W) or placebo and treated before the grass pollen season. The primary efficacy end point was change from baseline in total rhinoconjunctivitis symptom score across days 2 to 4 of a 4-day posttreatment challenge (PTC) in the EEU after the grass pollen season. Secondary efficacy end points and safety were also assessed. Two hundred eighty-two subjects were randomized. Significantly greater improvement (reduction of total rhinoconjunctivitis symptom score from baseline to PTC) occurred across days 2 to 4 with grass allergen peptide 8x6Q2W versus placebo (-5.4 vs -3.8, respectively; P = .0346). Greater improvement at PTC also occurred for grass allergen peptide 8x6Q2W versus placebo (P = .0403) in patients with more symptomatic ARC. No safety signals were detected. Grass allergen peptide 8x6Q2W significantly improved ARC symptoms after rye grass allergen challenge in an EEU with an acceptable safety profile. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

  5. Allergic rhinitis, rhinoconjunctivitis and hayfever symptoms among children are associated with frequency of truck traffic near residences: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirinde, Joyce; Wichmann, Janine; Voyi, Kuku

    2015-10-26

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is an increasing and common condition affecting many people globally, especially children. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between the frequency of truck traffic and allergic rhinitis symptoms, rhinoconjunctivitis and hayfever among 13 to 14 year old school children in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, Gauteng Province, South Africa. In a cross-sectional study design, 3764 children from 16 randomly selected high schools were eligible to participate, 3468 completed the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) Phase I questionnaire of which 3424 were suitable for analysis; the overall response rate was 92%. Data were analysed using multilevel logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of self-reported rhinitis ever, current rhinitis rhinoconjunctivitis and hayfever was 52, 40, 21 and 37% respectively. Rhinitis ever, current rhinitis and current rhinoconjunctivitis were significantly associated with the frequency of trucks passing near residences almost all day on weekdays, (OR 1.46 95% CI: 1.16 - 1.84), (OR 1.60 95% CI: 1.24-2.02) and (OR 1.42 95% CI: 1.09-1.84) respectively. No association was observed between truck traffic and hay fever in the multiple analyses. The study shows a high prevalence of allergic rhinitis symptoms amongst children. The results support the hypothesis that traffic related pollution plays a role in the prevalence of allergic rhinitis symptoms in children residing in the area.

  6. Inter-Relationship between Rhinitis and Conjunctivitis in Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis and Associated Risk Factors in Rural UK Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkin, Michael R; Bader, Tara; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Strachan, David P; Owen, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Allergic conjunctivitis (AC) is a common condition, especially in childhood. The extent to which it occurs concurrently with or independently from allergic rhinitis (AR) has not been well described. To examine the inter-relationship between rhinitis and conjunctivitis and the epidemiological risk factors for these conditions in a rural UK population. Cross-sectional study of rural school children (aged 5-11 years). Parental questionnaires were used to diagnose allergic outcomes (including conjunctivitis, rhinitis and rhinoconjunctivitis), and to collect data on atopic history, demographic and environmental exposures. Odds ratios of allergic outcome by exposure were examined adjusted for age, sex, breastfeeding, family history of allergy, number of older and younger siblings. Prevalence of conjunctivitis was 17.5%, rhinitis 15.1% and rhinoconjunctivitis 13.0%. Seasonality of symptoms varied by condition: 64.7% of those with conjunctivitis had seasonal symptoms (April-Sept only), 46.7% of those with rhinitis and 92.2% of those with rhinoconjunctivitis. Living on a farm consistently reduced the risk of conjunctivitis (odds ratio 0.47, 95%CI 0.29-0.79, p = 0.004), rhinitis (OR 0.57, 95%CI 0.33-1.01, p = 0.05) and rhinoconjunctivitis (OR 0.57, 95%CI 0.32-1.03, p = 0.06). Exposure to farm animals (particularly in early life), current consumption of unpasteurised milk and playing in a barn or stable significantly reduced the risk of all three conditions. More children had parent-reported conjunctivitis than rhinitis. The majority of children with either condition also reported symptoms with the other condition. Farmers' children have less eye and/or nasal symptoms. A number of farming variables linked with the farm microbial environment are likely to be mediating the protective effect.

  7. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihler F

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Friedrich Ihler, Martin CanisDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen, GermanyAbstract: Ragweed (Ambrosia spp. is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by

  8. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihler, Friedrich; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia spp.) is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia) poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by synthetic cytosine phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides promises a new treatment paradigm that aims to modulate the immune response, but it has

  9. A prospective cohort study on ambient air pollution and respiratory morbidities including childhood asthma in adolescents from the western Cape Province: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyib Olaniyan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence from existing literature that ambient air pollutant exposure in early childhood likely plays an important role in asthma exacerbation and other respiratory symptoms, with greater effect among asthmatic children. However, there is inconclusive evidence on the role of ambient air pollutant exposures in relation to increasing asthma prevalence as well as asthma induction in children. At the population level, little is known about the potential synergistic effects between pollen allergens and air pollutants since this type of association poses challenges in uncontrolled real life settings. In particular, data from sub-Sahara Africa is scarce and virtually absent among populations residing in informal residential settlements. Methods/design A prospective cohort study of 600 school children residing in four informal settlement areas with varying potential ambient air pollutant exposure levels in the Western Cape in South Africa is carried-out. The study has two follow-up periods of at least six-months apart including an embedded panel study in summer and winter. The exposure assessment component models temporal and spatial variability of air quality in the four study areas over the study duration using land-use regression modelling (LUR. Additionally, daily pollen levels (mould spores, tree, grass and weed pollen in the study areas are recorded. In the panel study asthma symptoms and serial peak flow measurements is recorded three times daily to determine short-term serial airway changes in relation to varying ambient air quality and pollen over 10-days during winter and summer. The health outcome component of the cohort study include; the presence of asthma using a standardised ISAAC questionnaire, spirometry, fractional exhaled nitric-oxide (FeNO and the presence of atopy (Phadiatop. Discussion This research applies state of the art exposure assessment approaches to characterize the effects of ambient air

  10. A prospective cohort study on ambient air pollution and respiratory morbidities including childhood asthma in adolescents from the western Cape Province: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaniyan, Toyib; Jeebhay, Mohamed; Röösli, Martin; Naidoo, Rajen; Baatjies, Roslynn; Künzil, Nino; Tsai, Ming; Davey, Mark; de Hoogh, Kees; Berman, Dilys; Parker, Bhawoodien; Leaner, Joy; Dalvie, Mohamed Aqiel

    2017-09-16

    There is evidence from existing literature that ambient air pollutant exposure in early childhood likely plays an important role in asthma exacerbation and other respiratory symptoms, with greater effect among asthmatic children. However, there is inconclusive evidence on the role of ambient air pollutant exposures in relation to increasing asthma prevalence as well as asthma induction in children. At the population level, little is known about the potential synergistic effects between pollen allergens and air pollutants since this type of association poses challenges in uncontrolled real life settings. In particular, data from sub-Sahara Africa is scarce and virtually absent among populations residing in informal residential settlements. A prospective cohort study of 600 school children residing in four informal settlement areas with varying potential ambient air pollutant exposure levels in the Western Cape in South Africa is carried-out. The study has two follow-up periods of at least six-months apart including an embedded panel study in summer and winter. The exposure assessment component models temporal and spatial variability of air quality in the four study areas over the study duration using land-use regression modelling (LUR). Additionally, daily pollen levels (mould spores, tree, grass and weed pollen) in the study areas are recorded. In the panel study asthma symptoms and serial peak flow measurements is recorded three times daily to determine short-term serial airway changes in relation to varying ambient air quality and pollen over 10-days during winter and summer. The health outcome component of the cohort study include; the presence of asthma using a standardised ISAAC questionnaire, spirometry, fractional exhaled nitric-oxide (FeNO) and the presence of atopy (Phadiatop). This research applies state of the art exposure assessment approaches to characterize the effects of ambient air pollutants on childhood respiratory health, with a specific focus on

  11. SQ grass sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablet for disease-modifying treatment of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Ronald; Roberts, Graham; de Blic, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergy immunotherapy is a treatment option for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). It is unique compared with pharmacotherapy in that it modifies the immunologic pathways that elicit an allergic response. The SQ Timothy grass sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet is approved in North...... America and throughout Europe for the treatment of adults and children (≥5 years old) with grass pollen-induced ARC. OBJECTIVE: The clinical evidence for the use of SQ grass SLIT-tablet as a disease-modifying treatment for grass pollen ARC is discussed in this review. METHODS: The review included...... the suitability of SQ grass SLIT-tablet for patients with clinically relevant symptoms to multiple Pooideae grass species, single-season efficacy, safety, adherence, coseasonal initiation, and cost-effectiveness. The data from the long-term SQ grass SLIT-tablet clinical trial that evaluated a clinical effect 2...

  12. Baseline asthma burden, comorbidities, and biomarkers in omalizumab-treated patients in PROSPERO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, Bradley E; Zeiger, Robert S; Luskin, Allan T; Busse, William W; Trzaskoma, Benjamin L; Antonova, Evgeniya N; Pazwash, Hooman; Limb, Susan L; Solari, Paul G; Griffin, Noelle M; Casale, Thomas B

    2017-12-01

    Patients included in clinical trials do not necessarily reflect the real-world population. To understand the characteristics, including disease and comorbidity burden, of patients with asthma receiving omalizumab in a real-world setting. The Prospective Observational Study to Evaluate Predictors of Clinical Effectiveness in Response to Omalizumab (PROSPERO) was a US-based, multicenter, single-arm, and prospective study. Patients (≥12 years of age) with allergic asthma initiating omalizumab treatment based on physician-assessed need were included and followed for 12 months. Exacerbations, health care use, adverse events, and Asthma Control Test (ACT) scores were assessed monthly. Biomarkers (blood eosinophils, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, and periostin) were evaluated and patient-reported outcomes (Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire for 12 Years and Older [AQLQ+12] and Work Productivity and Activity Impairment: Asthma questionnaire [WPAI:Asthma]) were completed at baseline and months 6 and 12. The Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (MiniRQLQ) was completed at baseline and 12 months. Most of the 806 enrollees (91.4%) were adults (mean age 47.3 years, SD 17.4), white (70.3%), and female (63.5%). Allergic comorbidity was frequently reported (84.2%), as were hypertension (35.5%) and depression (22.1%). In the 12 months before study entry, 22.1% of patients reported at least 1 asthma-related hospitalization, 60.7% reported at least 2 exacerbations, and 83.3% reported ACT scores no higher than 19 (uncontrolled asthma). Most patients had low biomarker levels based on prespecified cut-points. Baseline mean patient-reported outcome scores were 4.0 (SD 1.4) for AQLQ+12, 2.7 (SD 1.4) for MiniRQLQ, and 47.7 (SD 28.9) for WPAI:Asthma percentage of activity impairment and 33.5 (SD 28.7) for percentage of overall work impairment. The population initiating omalizumab in PROSPERO reported poorly controlled asthma and a substantial disease burden. Clinical

  13. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) Phase Three: a global synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallol, J; Crane, J; von Mutius, E; Odhiambo, J; Keil, U; Stewart, A

    2013-01-01

    This ISAAC Phase Three synthesis provides summarised information on the main findings of the study, regional tables and figures related to the prevalence and severity of current symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema in the main regions of the world. The large number of surveyed children (≈1,200,000), the large number of centres (233) and countries (98) that participated in ISAAC Phase Three makes this study the most comprehensive survey of these diseases ever undertaken. Globally, the prevalence for current asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema in the 13-14-year age group was 14.1%, 14.6% and 7.3%, respectively. In the 6-7-year age group the prevalence for current asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema was 11.7%, 8.5% and 7.9%, respectively. The study shows a wide variability in the prevalence and severity of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema which occurs not just between regions and countries but between centres in the same country and centres in the same city. This study definitively establishes that the prevalence of those diseases can be very high in non-affluent centres with low socioeconomic conditions. The large variability also suggests a crucial role of local environment characteristics to determine the differences in prevalence between one place and another. Thus, ISAAC Phase Three has provided a large body of epidemiological information on asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema in childhood from contrasting environments which is expected to yield new clues about the aetiology of those conditions and reasons for their marked global variability. Copyright © 2012 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Asthma Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asthma diary is another way to help manage asthma. Tracking your child's symptoms and medicines will help you know when ... When to Go to the ER if Your Child Has Asthma Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Allergy Shots Asthma Center ...

  15. Asthma and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the airways of the lungs. When an asthma attack happens, it is difficult for air to pass ... to reduce inflammation. Triggers that can cause an asthma attack vary from person to person. Common triggers include ...

  16. So You Have Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... includes information about common warning signs of an asthma attack and explains how to act quickly to keep ... that they are life threatening. In a severe asthma attack, your airways can narrow so much that not ...

  17. Psychopathology in difficult asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.C.; van Son, M.J.M.; Keimpema, A.R.; van Ranst, D; Pommer, A; Meijer, J.W.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed

  18. Occupational asthma caused by palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daenen, M.; Rochette, F.; Demedts, M.; Nemery, B. [K.U. Leuven, Pneumology (Belgium); Rogiers, P. [A.Z. St-Lucas, Brugge (Belgium); Walle, C. Van de [Siemens, Oostkamp (Belgium)

    1999-01-01

    Occupational exposure to complex platinum salts is a well-known cause of occupational asthma. Although there is evidence that platinum refinery workers may also be sensitized to other precious metals, such as palladium or rhodium, no instances of occupational asthma due to an isolated sensitization to palladium have been reported. A case is reported of occupational rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma in a previously healthy worker exposed to the fumes of an electroplating bath containing palladium. There was no exposure to platinum. Sensitization to palladium was documented by skin-prick tests. The skin-prick test was positive with Pd(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}Cl{sub 2}, but not with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}PdCl{sub 4}. Corresponding salts of platinum were all negative. A bronchial provocation test with Pd(NH{sub 34})Cl{sub 2} (0.0001 % for a total of 315 s, followed by 0.001 % for a total of 210 s) led to an early decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second (-35%). A similar exposure (0.001 % for a total of 16 min) in an unrelated asthmatic gave no reaction. This case shows that an isolated sensitization to palladium can occur and that respiratory exposure to palladium is a novel cause of metal-induced occupational asthma. (au) 24 refs.

  19. Asthma heterogeneity and severity

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Tara F.; Bleecker, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a common, chronic inflammatory airways disease characterized by a clinical syndrome of bronchial hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and reversible airflow obstruction. Individuals with asthma can vary widely in clinical presentation, severity, and pathobiology. The incident factors, pathogenesis, prognosis, and treatment of asthma remain incompletely understood. Utilizing measurable characteristics of asthmatic patients, including demographic, physiologic, and biologic markers, can ...

  20. Allergy in severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, S R; Bakirtas, A; Bel, E; Custovic, A; Diamant, Z; Hamelmann, E; Heffler, E; Kalayci, Ö; Saglani, S; Sergejeva, S; Seys, S; Simpson, A; Bjermer, L

    2017-02-01

    It is well recognized that atopic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma, both in adults and in children. However, the role of allergy in severe asthma is still under debate. The term 'Severe Asthma' encompasses a highly heterogeneous group of patients who require treatment on steps 4-5 of GINA guidelines to prevent their asthma from becoming 'uncontrolled', or whose disease remains 'uncontrolled' despite this therapy. Epidemiological studies on emergency room visits and hospital admissions for asthma suggest the important role of allergy in asthma exacerbations. In addition, allergic asthma in childhood is often associated with severe asthma in adulthood. A strong association exists between asthma exacerbations and respiratory viral infections, and interaction between viruses and allergy further increases the risk of asthma exacerbations. Furthermore, fungal allergy has been shown to play an important role in severe asthma. Other contributing factors include smoking, pollution and work-related exposures. The 'Allergy and Asthma Severity' EAACI Task Force examined the current evidence and produced this position document on the role of allergy in severe asthma. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Childhood Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for long periods of time before having an asthma attack. The symptoms of asthma can be confused with ... pollen and other environmental allergens can trigger an asthma attack. In some children, asthma can be caused by ...

  2. Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Asthma (Pediatric) Asthma (Pediatric) Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... meet the rising demand for asthma care. Our pediatric asthma team brings together physicians, nurses, dietitians, physical ...

  3. Childhood Asthma and Allergies in Urban, Semiurban, and Rural Residential Sectors in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Kausel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While rural living protects from asthma and allergies in many countries, results are conflicting in Latin America. We studied the prevalence of asthma and asthma symptoms in children from urban, semiurban, and rural sectors in south Chile. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted in semiurban and rural sectors in the province of Valdivia (n=559 using the ISAAC (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire. Results were compared to prevalence in urban Valdivia (n=3105 by using data from ISAAC III study. Odds ratios (+95% confidence intervals were calculated. No statistical significant differences were found for asthma ever and eczema symptoms stratified by residential sector, but a gradient could be shown for current asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms with urban living having highest and rural living having lowest prevalence. Rural living was inversely associated in a statistical significant way with current asthma (OR: 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2–0.9 and rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms (OR: 0.3; 95% CI: 0.2–0.7 in logistic regression analyses. Rural living seems to protect from asthma and respiratory allergies also in Chile, a South American country facing epidemiological transition. These data would be improved by clinical studies of allergic symptoms observed in studied sectors.

  4. The relevance of patient-reported outcomes in a grass pollen immunotherapy trial in children and adolescents with rhinoconjunctivitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roder, Esther; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Hop, Wim C. J.; de Groot, Hans; van Wijk, Roy Gerth

    Background: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are the only instruments available to assess the efficacy of an intervention in patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. As allergic rhinoconjunctivitis is a systemic disease, it is now recommended to use not only PROs focusing at classical symptoms,

  5. Bilastine: A New Nonsedating Oral H1 Antihistamine for Treatment of Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis and Urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole D. Wolthers

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilastine is a new, well-tolerated, nonsedating H1 receptor antihistamine. In the fasting state bilastine is quickly absorbed, but the absorption is slowed when it is taken with food or fruit juice. Therefore, it is recommended that bilastine is taken at least one hour before and no sooner than two hours after a meal. Clinical studies sponsored by the manufacturer have shown that bilastine 20 mg once daily is as efficacious as other nonsedating antihistamines in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and chronic urticaria in individuals from 12 and 18 years of age, respectively. Bilastine is efficacious in all nasal symptoms including obstruction and in eye symptoms. The observations indicate that non-sedating antihistamines, as opposed to what has been thought previously, may be helpful in patients with allergic rhinitis in whom nasal obstruction is a major concern. Current international guidelines need to be revised in the light of the recent evidence. Research into aspects of pharmacokinetics and efficacy and adverse effect profiles of bilastine in children under 12 years of age is needed as are dose-response assessments and studies planned rigorously with the aim of assessing quality of life effects.

  6. Asthma - control drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma - children Wheezing Patient Instructions Asthma and school Asthma - child - discharge Asthma - quick-relief drugs Asthma - what to ask the doctor - adult Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child Bronchiolitis - discharge Exercise-induced asthma Exercising and asthma ...

  7. Immunotherapy in children and adolescents with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeder, Esther; Berger, Marjolein Y.; de Groot, Hans; van Wijk, Roy Gerth

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is one of the cornerstones of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis treatment. Since the development of non-invasive administration forms with better safety profiles, there is an increasing tendency to prescribe immunotherapy in youngsters. However, no overview is available on

  8. For Parents of Children with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... likely to have asthma if: a parent has asthma the child has signs of allergies, including the allergic skin ... to provide information about your family history of asthma or allergies, your child's overall behavior, breathing patterns and responses to foods ...

  9. Asthma - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control drugs are taken every day to prevent asthma symptoms. Your child should take these medicines even if no symptoms ... you think your child has new symptoms of asthma. If your child has been diagnosed with asthma, call the provider: ...

  10. Asthma Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... plan, and environmental control measures to avoid your child's asthma triggers. By working together with your daughter's health ... which can diminish your allergies' effect on your asthma. Question 5 Once my child reaches puberty, he will outgrow his asthma. True ...

  11. [The comparison of the indoor environmental factors associated with asthma and related allergies among school-child between urban and suburban areas in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Hai-bo; Deng, Fu-rong; Sun, Ji-dong; Wu, Shao-wei; Sun, Xiu-ming; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Yan-hua; Guo, Xin-biao

    2010-07-01

    To study the indoor environmental factors associated with the prevalence of asthma and related allergies among school children. A cluster sampling method was used and the ISAAC questionnaire was conducted. A total of 4612 elementary students under Grade Five of 7 schools were enrolled in the survey for the impact of indoor environmental factors on the prevalence of asthma and related allergies in several urban and suburban schools of Beijing. A total of 4060 sample were finally analyzed including 1992 urban and 2068 suburban. The prevalence of wheeze, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic eczema in the past 12 months was 3.1% (61/1992), 5.3% (106/1992), 1.1% (22/1992) among urban children while 1.3% (27/2068), 3.1% (65/2068), 1.0% (22/2068) among suburban children respectively. The prevalence of wheeze and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis of the past 12 months in urban were both significantly higher than that in suburban (χ(2) = 14.77, 11.93, P children (5.3% (105/1992), 29.4% (586/1992)) were significantly (χ(2) = 39.03, 147.22, P allergies among school children in the two areas. The significant impact of passive smoking on having asthma ever among suburban children was observed (OR = 2.70, 95%CI = 1.17 - 6.23) while no significant result in urban (OR = 1.06, 95%CI = 0.71 - 1.58); the percentage of interior decoration was 84.0% (1673/1992) among urban children and 80.0% (1655/2068) among suburban children, there was significant impact of interior decoration on the prevalence of having eczema ever among urban children (OR = 1.57, 95%CI = 1.17 - 2.10) but no significant results were found in suburban sample (OR = 1.06, 95%CI = 0.76 - 1.48). The prevalence of asthma and related allergies among school children is much higher in urban areas than that in suburban areas and the indoor environmental factors such as passive smoking and interior decoration may differently explain the prevalence of asthma and related allergies in the two areas.

  12. Psychopathology in difficult asthma : Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.C.J.; van Son, M.A.C.; van Keimpema, A.R.J.; van Ranst, D.; Antonissen-Pommer, A.M.; Meijer, J.W.G.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed

  13. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte S

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant negative impact on asthma control and risk of exacerbations. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent studies evaluating the effects of weight reduction on asthma control in obese adults. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical studies have shown that weight...... reduction in obese patients is associated with improvements in symptoms, use of controller medication, and asthma-related quality of life together with a reduction in the risk for severe exacerbations. Furthermore, several studies have also revealed improvements in lung function and airway responsiveness...... reduction in obese adults with asthma leads to an overall improvement in asthma control, including airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Weight reduction should be a cornerstone in the management of obese patients with asthma....

  14. Occupational asthma caused by turbot allergy in 3 fish-farm workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Carral, C; Martín-Lázaro, J; Ledesma, A; de la Torre, F

    2010-01-01

    We report 3 patients (26, 31, and 33 years) who worked at the same fish farm for several years. They experienced symptoms of rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma while classifying fish by size. Their asthma gradually worsened to the extent that it became persistent and required daily medication with inhaled corticosteroids and bronchodilators. Symptoms improved during weekends and holidays. All 3 patients could eat turbot. Our study showed that the patients were allergic and that sensitization was probably by inhalation. The allergens were parvalbumin in 1 case and a different allergen in the remaining 2 patients.

  15. Tiotropium improves lung function, exacerbation rate, and asthma control, independent of baseline characteristics including age, degree of airway obstruction, and allergic status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerstjens, Huib A M; Moroni-Zentgraf, Petra; Tashkin, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients with asthma remain symptomatic despite treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) with or without long-acting β2-agonists (LABAs). Tiotropium add-on to ICS plus a LABA has been shown to improve lung function and reduce exacerbation risk in patients with symptomatic ast...

  16. Indoor combustion and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Kathleen; Triche, Elizabeth W

    2008-08-01

    Indoor combustion produces both gases (eg, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide) and particulate matter that may affect the development or exacerbation of asthma. Sources in the home include both heating devices (eg, fireplaces, woodstoves, kerosene heaters, flued [ie, vented] or nonflued gas heaters) and gas stoves for cooking. This article highlights the recent literature examining associations between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma development and severity. Since asthma is a chronic condition affecting both children and adults, both age groups are included in this article. Overall, there is some evidence of an association between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma, particularly asthma symptoms in children. Some sources of combustion such as coal stoves have been more consistently associated with these outcomes than other sources such as woodstoves.

  17. Developing and emerging clinical asthma phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekking, Pieter-Paul W.; Bel, Elisabeth H.

    2014-01-01

    For more than a century, clinicians have attempted to subdivide asthma into different phenotypes based on triggers that cause asthma attacks, the course of the disease, or the prognosis. The first phenotypes that were described included allergic asthma, intrinsic or nonallergic asthma, infectious

  18. Age at asthma onset and asthma self-management education among adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli, Maria C; Beavers, Suzanne F; Shepler, Samantha H; Chatterjee, Arjun B

    2015-01-01

    Asthma self-management education improves asthma-related outcomes. We conducted this analysis to evaluate variation in the percentages of adults with active asthma reporting components of asthma self-management education by age at asthma onset. Data from 2011 to 2012 Asthma Call-back Surveys were used to estimate percentages of adults with active asthma reporting six components of asthma self-management education. Components of asthma self-management education include having been taught to what to do during an asthma attack and receiving an asthma action plan. Differences in the percentages of adults reporting each component and the average number of components reported across categories of age at asthma onset were estimated using linear regression, adjusted for age, education, race/ethnicity, sex, smoking status, and years since asthma onset. Overall, an estimated 76.4% of adults with active asthma were taught what to do during an asthma attack and 28.7% reported receiving an asthma action plan. Percentages reporting each asthma self-management education component declined with increasing age at asthma onset. Compared with the referent group of adults whose asthma onset occurred at 5-14 years of age, the percentage of adults reporting being taught what to do during an asthma attack was 10% lower among those whose asthma onset occurred at 65-93 years of age (95% CI: -18.0, -2.5) and the average number of components reported decreased monotonically across categories of age at asthma onset of 35 years and older. Among adults with active asthma, reports of asthma self-management education decline with increasing age at asthma onset.

  19. Diagnosing Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... give your pediatrician will help determine if your child has asthma. Your pediatrician will need information about Your child’s ... function testing may be normal even if your child has asthma. Also keep in mind that not all children ...

  20. Occupational asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the airways of the lungs. When an asthma attack occurs, the lining of the air passages swells ... small amount of the substance can trigger an asthma attack. Using a respiratory device to protect or reduce ...

  1. Asthma Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is working to explore the role of common air pollutants in the development and exacerbation of asthma at different life stages as well as other environmental and genetic factors that might make a person more sensitive to developing asthma.

  2. Fertility outcomes in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Elisabeth Juul; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Lindenberg, Svend

    2016-01-01

    of fertility treatments, and the number of successful pregnancies differ significantly between women with unexplained infertility with and without asthma.245 women with unexplained infertility (aged 23-45 years) underwent questionnaires and asthma and allergy testing while undergoing fertility treatment. 96...... women entering the study had either a former doctor's diagnosis of asthma or were diagnosed with asthma when included. After inclusion they were followed for a minimum of 12 months in fertility treatment, until they had a successful pregnancy, stopped treatment, or the observation ended.The likelihood...... pregnancies during fertility treatment, 39.6 versus 60.4% (p=0.002). Increasing age was of negative importance for expected time to pregnancy, especially among asthmatic women (interaction between age and asthma on time to pregnancy, p=0.001). Female asthmatics had a longer time to pregnancy and less often...

  3. Pharmacotherapy of severe asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firszt, Rafael; Kraft, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Severe asthma is a complex and heterogeneous phenotype where management can be challenging. While many patients with severe asthma respond to high-dose inhaled corticosteroids in combination with a long-acting β-agonist, there remains a significant subset of patients that require oral corticosteroids to control symptoms. Alternative therapies are needed to help reduce the need for continuous oral corticosteroids; however, there are currently very few effective options. Several new alternatives to oral corticosteroids have been evaluated in severe asthma as add-on to conventional therapy. These include macrolide antibiotics, omalizumab, tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, cytokine receptor antagonists, and bronchial thermoplasty. The challenge with these entities is determining the appropriate phenotype of severe asthma where effectiveness is demonstrated, given the significant heterogeneity of the disease. Therefore, there is a crucial need to better understand the mechanisms and pathophysiology of severe asthma so more effective immunomodulators and biologic therapies can emerge. PMID:20462794

  4. Sustained 3-year efficacy of pre- and coseasonal 5-grass-pollen sublingual immunotherapy tablets in patients with grass pollen-induced rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Didier, Alain; Worm, Margitta; Horak, Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    Seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis affects millions of persons. The efficacy of allergen sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was demonstrated in previous short-term studies.......Seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis affects millions of persons. The efficacy of allergen sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was demonstrated in previous short-term studies....

  5. Reflux, Allergic Rhinitis, and Sleep Disorders with Asthma Control and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esat Hayat

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of comorbid diseases such as gastroesophageal reflux, allergic rhinitis, sleep disorders with asthma control test and asthma quality of life in Turkish asthma patients. Material and Method: Total of 50 patients who were followed with a diagnosis of asthma were enrolled in this study. During application, spirometric parameters, Reflux Symptom Index (RSI, Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis Symptom Index (ARSI, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Asthma Control Test (ACT, and Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaires (AQLQ were filled under the supervision of a physician, also smoking habits, body mass index of cases were recorded. The relation of spirometric parameters, RSI, ARSI and PSQI with AQLQ and ACT tests were investigated by using SPSS 15.0 statistical software. Results: Negative correlation was found between the ACT and RSI (r = - 0.314, p = 0.026, ACT and PSQI (r= -0,620; p<0.001. Positive correlation was found between ACT and AQLQ (r=0.667, p <0.001, there was no relationship between ACT and ARSI (p=0,25. Negative correlation was found between AQLQ and RSI (r= -0,551; p<0.001, AQLQ and ARSI (r= -0,390; p<0.005. There was no relationship between AQLQ and PSQI (p=0.082, also there was no relationship between FEV1 value and ACT, AQLQ, RSI, ARSI, PSQI. Discussion: In conclusion, gastroesophageal reflux and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis negatively effect the quality of life and asthma control in asthmatic patients, also poor sleep quality is associated with poor asthma control.

  6. Outpatient Management of Asthma in Children

    OpenAIRE

    André Schultz; Andrew C. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The principal aims of asthma management in childhood are to obtain symptom control that allows individuals to engage in unrestricted physical activities and to normalize lung function. These aims should be achieved using the fewest possible medications. Ensuring a correct diagnosis is the first priority. The mainstay of asthma management remains pharmacotherapy. Various treatment options are discussed. Asthma monitoring includes the regular assessment of asthma severity and asthma control, wh...

  7. AsthmaVent – Effect of Ventilation on Asthma Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogaard, Nina Viskum; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck; Halken, Susanne

    Background House dust mite (HDM) allergy is a frequent cause of allergic asthma among children. Children spend 14 hours of their time indoor everyday in aberage, where they are exposed to different components in the indoor air. These components are children with asthma and HDM allergy specially...... sensitive towards. Reducing this exposure may improve the asthma control in these children. Previous studies give conflicting information on the effect of mechanical ventilation on asthma control in children. Objectives We aim at investigating whether mechanical ventilation is capable of improving indoor...... air quality and thereby asthma symptoms and quality of life, in children with house dust mite allergy and asthma. Materials and Methods Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled intervention study, including 80 children from 3 Danish Pediatric outpatient clinics, with: Verified asthma, requiring...

  8. Critical appraisal of bilastine for the treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaba B

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Belen Sadaba, Jose Ramon Azanza, Almundena Gomez-Guiu, Raquel RodilClinical Pharmacology Service, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra, SpainAbstract: Bilastine is a second generation antihistamine indicated for the treatment of seasonal or perennial allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and chronic urticaria with a daily dose of 20 mg, in adults and children over 12 years of age. The efficacy of bilastine has been shown to be similar to that of the comparator drugs for the control of the nasal and nonnasal symptoms of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, while also showing a subjective improvement in the quality of life and in overall clinical impression. For chronic urticaria the symptoms (itching and the development of papules lessens from the second day of treatment onwards, in a similar way to other antihistamines used as comparators. Bilastine should not be administered at meal times to avoid interference with the absorption process. It is not distributed to the central nervous system, is scarcely metabolized, and elimination is through the kidneys and feces, with a 14-hour elimination half-life. It has no effect on cytochrome P450. During clinical development, bilastine was shown to be a drug that is adequately tolerated, with a similar effect to placebo with regard to drowsiness and changes in heart rate. In relation to its use, headaches were the most frequent adverse effect to be reported. No cardiotoxic effects have been observed, and the therapeutic dose does not alter the state of alertness.Keywords: bilastine, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, chronic urticaria, second generation antihistamine, drowsiness, CYP450

  9. Asthma - quick-relief drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma - children Wheezing Patient Instructions Asthma and school Asthma - child - discharge Asthma - control drugs Asthma - what to ask the doctor - adult Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child Bronchiolitis - discharge Exercise-induced asthma Exercising and asthma ...

  10. Asthma control - Practical suggestions for practicing doctors in family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the 'Goals of asthma management' as set out in the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines. Despite the availability of useful asthma therapies and treatment strategies, the morbidity from asthma has remained significant. This review includes practical suggestions on optimal asthma control for the family practitioner.

  11. Exercise-induced asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma - children Wheezing Patient Instructions Asthma and school Asthma - child - discharge Asthma - control drugs Asthma - quick-relief drugs Asthma - what to ask the doctor - adult Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child Exercising and asthma at school How to use ...

  12. Tobaksrygning og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients with ast......Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients...... with asthma. Substantial evidence suggests that smoking affects asthma adversely. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, especially maternal smoking in children, may be a significant risk factor for asthma. Such exposure in patients with established asthma is not only associated with more severe symptoms......, but also with a poorer quality of life, reduced lung function, and increased utilisation of health care including hospital admissions. Active smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for asthma, but is associated with a worse outcome with regard to both longitudinal changes in lung function...

  13. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in your house and may trigger asthma. Your asthma or your child's asthma may be worse around products such as ... You Can Take If you find that your asthma or your child's asthma gets worse when you use a certain ...

  14. Common Asthma Triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grass Other Triggers If you have asthma, an asthma attack can happen when you are exposed to “asthma ... a second person. Secondhand smoke can trigger an asthma attack. If you have asthma, people should never smoke ...

  15. Wraparound eyeglasses improve symptoms and quality of life in patients with seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comert, Sule; Karakaya, Gul; Kalyoncu, Ali Fuat

    2016-07-01

    Allergen avoidance is important for allergic rhinitis management. However, studies evaluating the efficiency of avoidance measures from pollens are lacking. We aimed to investigate the efficiency of wraparound eyeglasses in seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (SAR). Eligible patients with a diagnosis of SAR (n = 70) rated their symptom scores, filled the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ), and were randomized either to receive wraparound eyeglasses in addition to medical treatment (group 1, n = 39) or medical treatment only (group 2, n = 31) throughout the 3 pollen seasons in the years 2011, 2012, and 2013. Patients rated their symptom scores and checked the need for use of rescue medications in their diaries over a period of 4 weeks. RQLQ was reapplied 1 week and 4 weeks after randomization. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) change from baseline over 4 weeks in the eye itching (-2.51 [-3.65 to -1.36] vs -0.88 [-1.95 to 0.43], p eyeglasses can provide a safe, convenient, and effective measure for protection from pollens in patients with SAR. © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  16. Late-Onset Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2017-01-01

    the risk of systemic effects. However, most recommendations are based on extrapolation from findings in younger patients. Comorbidities are very common in patients with late-onset asthma and need to be taken into account in the management of the disease. In conclusion, late-onset asthma is poorly......Late-onset asthma is common, associated with poor outcome, underdiagnosed and undertreated, possibly due to the modifying effect of ageing on disease expression. Although the diagnostic work-up in elderly individuals suspected of having asthma follows the same steps as in younger individuals (case...... history and spirometry), it is important to acknowledge that elderly individuals are likely to have diminished bronchodilator reversibility and some degree of fixed airflow obstruction. Elderly individuals, therefore, often require further objective tests, including bronchial challenge testing...

  17. Children with Asthma and Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Yuzer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the chronic diseases which have are widely seen among the children. The disease has recently been in the increase all over the world and affects many children. In a study conducted with International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC method, it was found out that prevalence of childhood asthma was 17.1%. Participation in sportive activities by the children with asthma, which is today considered as a part of asthma treatment program, makes contributions to their physical, mental and psychological development and increases their quality of life. The most recommended sports for the children with asthma are swimming and water sports. Sports like tennis and volleyball are too advised. Choice of sports depends on severity of asthma, child and #8217;s choice and whether or not asthma is kept under control. Nursing approaches for the children with asthma include correction of symptoms, training of children and their families, assistance with disease adaptation, continuing asthma care at home and interventions to make children lead healthy activities of daily life of children. With protective measures to be taken by families and children; children should be encourage for sportive activities. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(3.000: 241-244

  18. Exercising and asthma at school

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Asthma - children Patient Instructions Asthma and school Asthma - child - discharge Asthma - control drugs Asthma - quick-relief drugs Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child Exercise-induced asthma How to use a nebulizer ...

  19. Ozone, Air Quality, and Asthma (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... probably understand triggers — those things that make your child's asthma symptoms worse, like cold weather , pet dander , or ... This can be included as part of your child's asthma action plan . You can't single-handedly solve ...

  20. Antibiotic sales and the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis, and eczema: The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foliaki, Sunia; Nielsen, Sandy Kildegaard; Björkstén, Bengt; Von Mutius, Erika; Cheng, Soo; Pearce, Neil

    2004-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that antibiotic use early in life may increase the subsequent risk of asthma. We have conducted an ecologic analysis of the relationship between antibiotics sales and the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic eczema in 99 centres from 28 countries. Data for antibiotics sales for 28 countries were obtained from the Institute for Medical Statistics (IMS), Health Global Services, UK and converted to defined daily doses (DDD). Data on the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis, and eczema in 13-14 year olds were based on the responses to the written and video questionnaires from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC). The analysis was adjusted for gross national product (GNP) as an estimate of the level of affluence. In general, there was a positive association between per capita antibiotics sales and the prevalence of symptoms for asthma, rhinitis, and eczema, but the associations generally became negative once the analyses had been adjusted for GNP. In particular, there were non-significant negative associations between total antibiotics sales and the prevalence of wheeze ever, wheeze in the last 12 months, nose problems with itchy-watery eyes, itchy rash in the last 12 months, and eczema ever. On the other hand there were weak non-significant positive associations for asthma ever, nose problems ever, nose problems in the last 12 months, and itchy rash ever. There was a statistically significant positive association with wheeze at rest as measured by the asthma video questionnaire; however, even this association was weak and would not account for more than a 1% difference in asthma prevalence between countries. These findings are generally not consistent with the hypothesis that antibiotic use increases the risk of asthma, rhinitis, or eczema. If there is a causal association of antibiotic use with asthma risk, it does not appear to explain the international differences in

  1. Svær asthma bronchiale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Bülow, Anna; Backer, Vibeke; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma is defined by persistent symptoms and frequent exacerbations despite intensive asthma therapy. The prevalence is estimated to be 5-10% of all asthmatics. Severe asthma is responsible for a major burden of illness including low quality of life and a disproportionate use of health......-care resources. The clinical assessment of severe asthma must include verification of the correct diagnosis, adherence to medication, excluding differential diagnosis and identification and treatment of aggravating co-morbidities and trigger factors....

  2. Japanese Guideline for Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Nishimuta

    2011-01-01

    JAGL differs from the Global Initiative for Asthma Guideline (GINA in that the former emphasizes long-term management of childhood asthma based on asthma severity and early diagnosis and intervention at <2 years and 2–5 years of age. However, a management method, including step-up or step-down of long-term management agents based on the status of asthma symptoms, is easy to understand and thus JAGL is suitable for routine medical treatment. JAGL also introduced treatment and management using a control test for children, recommending treatment and management aimed at complete control through avoiding exacerbation factors and appropriate use of antiinflammatory agents.

  3. Physical training for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mônica Corso

    2014-01-01

    People with asthma may show less tolerance to exercise due to worsening asthma symptoms during exercise or other reasons such as deconditioning as a consequence of inactivity. Some may restrict activities as per medical advice or family influence and this might result in reduced physical fitness. Physical training programs aim to improve physical fitness, neuromuscular coordination and self confidence. Subjectively, many people with asthma report that they are symptomatically better when fit, but results from trials have varied and have been difficult to compare because of different designs and training protocols. Also, as exercise can induce asthma, the safety of exercise programmes needs to be considered. To gain a better understanding of the effect of physical training on the respiratory and general health of people with asthma, from randomised trials. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials up to January 2013. We included randomised trials of people over eight years of age with asthma who were randomised to undertake physical training or not. Physical training had to be undertaken for at least 20 minutes, two times a week, over a minimum period of four weeks. Two review authors independently assessed eligibility for inclusion and undertook risk of bias assessment for the included studies. Twenty-one studies (772 participants) were included in this review with two additional 2012 studies identified as 'awaiting classification'. Physical training was well tolerated with no adverse effects reported. None of the studies mentioned worsening of asthma symptoms following physical training. Physical training showed marked improvement in cardiopulmonary fitness as measured by a statistically and clinically significant increase in maximum oxygen uptake (mean difference (MD) 4.92 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.98 to 5.87; P physical training may have positive effects on health-related quality of life, with four of five studies

  4. Sustained efficacy and safety of a 300IR daily dose of a sublingual solution of birch pollen allergen extract in adults with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worm, Margitta; Rak, Sabina; de Blay, Frédéric; Malling, Hans-Jorgen; Melac, Michel; Cadic, Véronique; Zeldin, Robert K

    2014-02-11

    Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) due to birch pollen is a growing health concern in Europe. Here, we report the efficacy and safety of 300IR birch pollen sublingual solution administered discontinuously for 2 consecutive years to patients with birch-associated allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Birch pollen-allergic adults were randomized in this double blind study to 300IR birch pollen sublingual solution or placebo, daily, starting 4 months before and continuing through the pollen season for two pollen seasons. Randomization was stratified according to the presence or absence of oral allergy syndrome (OAS). The primary efficacy endpoint was the Average Adjusted Symptom Score (AAdSS) over the second pollen season and was analyzed by ANCOVA. Secondary efficacy endpoints included the AAdSS over the first pollen period. Safety was evaluated by means of adverse event monitoring. 574 patients (284 in the active group and 290 in the placebo group) were randomized and 496 completed the study. Over the second pollen period, the least square (LS) mean AAdSS was significantly lower in the 300IR group than in the placebo group (LS mean difference -2.04, 95% CI [-2.69, -1.40], (p mouth edema. There were no reports of anaphylaxis. Pre- and co-seasonal treatment with 300IR birch pollen sublingual solution demonstrated sustained clinical efficacy over 2 pollen seasons and was well tolerated in adults with birch pollen-associated allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Efficacy results were consistent in patients with and without oral allergy syndrome. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01731249.

  5. Diagnosis of asthma - new theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwhagen, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown a remarkably high frequency of poorly controlled asthma. Several reasons for this treatment failure have been discussed, however, the basic question of whether the diagnosis is always correct has not been considered. Follow-up studies have shown that in many patients asthma cannot be verified despite ongoing symptoms. Mechanisms other than bronchial obstruction may therefore be responsible. The current definition of asthma may also include symptoms that are related to mechanisms other than bronchial obstruction, the clinical hallmark of asthma. Based on a review of the four cornerstones of asthma - inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, bronchial obstruction and symptoms - the aim was to present some new aspects and suggestions related to the diagnosis of adult non-allergic asthma. Recent studies have indicated that "classic" asthma may sometimes be confused with asthma-like disorders such as airway sensory hyperreactivity, small airways disease, dysfunctional breathing, non-obstructive dyspnea, hyperventilation and vocal cord dysfunction. This confusion may be one explanation for the high proportion of misdiagnosis and treatment failure. The current diagnosis, focusing on bronchial obstruction, may be too "narrow". As there may be common mechanisms a broadening to include also non-obstructive disorders, forming an asthma syndrome, is suggested. Such broadening requires additional diagnostic steps, such as qualitative studies with analysis of reported symptoms, non-effort demanding methods for determining lung function, capsaicin test for revealing airway sensory hyperreactivity, careful evaluation of the therapeutic as well as diagnostic effect of corticosteroids and testing of suggested theories.

  6. Post-treatment efficacy of discontinuous treatment with 300IR 5-grass pollen sublingual tablet in adults with grass pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Didier, A; Malling, H-J; Worm, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Sustained efficacy over three pollen seasons of pre- and co-seasonal treatment with 300IR 5-grass pollen sublingual tablet has been demonstrated in adults with moderate-severe grass pollen-associated allergic rhinoconjunctivitis....

  7. The role of trait mindfulness in quality of life and asthma control among adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillessen, Linda; van de Ven, Monique O; Karremans, Johan C

    2017-08-01

    The current study focused on the role of trait mindfulness in asthma-related quality of life (QoL) and asthma control in adolescent asthma patients. Furthermore, potential underlying mechanisms (general and asthma-specific stress) of this relationship were investigated. In this cross-sectional study, questionnaire data of 94 adolescents with asthma that were prescribed daily asthma medication were included. Two Structural Equation Models (SEMs), a direct model and an indirect model, were tested. We found that trait mindfulness was directly related to asthma-related QoL, but not to asthma control. The relationship between trait mindfulness and asthma-related QoL was explained by asthma-specific, but not by general stress. Furthermore, an indirect relation from mindfulness to asthma control via asthma-specific stress was found. Cross-sectional evidence for a relation between mindfulness and asthma-related QoL is found. These findings may point to the possibility that an intervention aimed at increasing mindfulness could be a promising tool to improve asthma-related QoL in adolescents via a decrease in asthma-specific stress. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Asthma and Environment Fact Sheet for Parents and Schools. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    Important facts about asthma and the environment include: (1) Asthma has reached epidemic proportions in the United States, affecting about 25 million people of all ages and races, including about 7 million children; (2) Nearly one in 10 school-aged children has asthma, and the percentage of children with asthma is rising more rapidly in…

  9. Role of leukotrienes in asthma pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2000-01-01

    -line anti-inflammatory therapy for asthma management. However, in some patients, especially children, the high doses of corticosteroids that may be required to control features of hyperresponsiveness, including exercise-induced asthma, raise safety concerns. Thus, there is a need for complementary anti...... and corticosteroids. These data suggest that CysLTs are important therapeutic targets in the management of inflammation in asthma....

  10. Approach to asthma in adults

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    episodic asthma attack that progresses rapidly. Therefore, early recognition and rescue medication is of high importance.13 The signs of an acute asthma attack include an increased heart rate, tachypnoea, cyanotic or pale skin, expiratory and inspiratory wheezing, a hyperinflated chest and a dry hacking cough. During an ...

  11. Early life exposure to farm animals and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema: an ISAAC Phase Three Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunekreef, B.; von Mutius, E.; Wong, G.; Odhiambo, J.; Clayton, T.O.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Associations between early life exposure to farm animals and respiratory symptoms and allergy in children have been reported in developed countries, but little is known about such associations in developing countries. OBJECTIVE: To study the association between early life exposure to

  12. Phthalate exposure through different pathways and allergic sensitization in preschool children with asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Callesen, Michael; Weschler, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    E sensitization to 20 allergens. Adjusted logistic regressions were used to look for associations between phthalate exposure indicators (mass fractions in dust from children's homes and daycares, metabolites in urine, and estimated daily indoor intakes from dust ingestion, inhalation and dermal absorption...... (mass fractions in dust or daily indoor intakes from dust ingestion, inhalation and dermal absorption) and allergic sensitization. Some exposure pathways were more strongly associated with sensitization than others, although the results are not conclusive and require confirmation. A number......) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  13. Aspirin-Exacerbated Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese Mathew

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on aspirin-exacerbated asthma (AEA. The review includes historical perspective of aspirin, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical features and treatment of AEA. The pathogenesis of AEA involves the cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway. Aspirin affects both of these pathways by inhibiting the enzyme cycooxygenase-1 (COX-1. Inhibition of COX-1 leads to a decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. The decrease in PGE2 results in an increase in cysteinyl leukotrienes by the lipooxygenase pathway involving the enzyme 5-lipooxygenase (5-LO. Leukotriene C4 (LTC4 synthase is the enzyme responsible for the production of leukotriene C4, the chief cysteinyl leukotriene responsible for AEA. There have been familial occurences of AEA. An allele of the LTC4 synthase gene in AEA is known as allele C. Allele C has a higher frequency in AEA. Clinical presentation includes a history of asthma after ingestion of aspirin, nasal congestion, watery rhinorrhea and nasal polyposis. Treatment includes leukotriene receptor antagonists, leukotriene inhibitors, aspirin desinsitaztion and surgery. AEA is the most well-defined phenotype of asthma. Although AEA affects adults and children with physician-diagnosed asthma, in some cases there is no history of asthma and AEA often goes unrecognized and underdiagnosed.

  14. Occupational Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the enzymes of the bacteria Bacillus subtilis, while bakers may develop an allergy and occupational asthma symptoms ... counts Continuing education center Find an allergist / immunologist Journals Login / My membership Search your symptoms Shop the ...

  15. Childhood Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... appropriate diagnosis, education and treatment. Should my child exercise? Once a child's asthma is controlled, (usually with the help of proper medications) exercise should become part of his or her daily ...

  16. What Is Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be to eliminate them from your environment. Preventing Asthma Attacks Step 1 - Talk to a doctor If you ... and keep you or your child from having asthma attacks. Learn what triggers asthma attacks. Identify asthma triggers ...

  17. Atopy, but not obesity is associated with asthma severity among children with persistent asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kim D; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Perzanowski, Matthew S; Balcer-Whaley, Susan; Matsui, Elizabeth C

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of asthma in children. Atopic sensitization is a major risk factor for asthma including severe asthma in children. It is unclear if obesity is associated with worse asthma control or severity in children and how its effects compare to atopy. We sought to examine relationships of weight status and atopy to asthma control and severity among a population of predominantly low income, minority children and adolescents with persistent asthma. A cross-sectional analysis of 832 children and adolescents, age range 5-17 years, with persistent asthma was performed. Clinical assessments included asthma questionnaires of symptoms, asthma severity score, health care utilization and medication treatment step, lung function testing, and skin prick testing as well as measures of adiposity. Data were collected between December 2010 and August 2014 from Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, MD and Children's Hospital of Boston, MA. Obesity was not associated with worse asthma control or severity in this group of predominantly low income, minority children and adolescents with persistent asthma. However, a greater degree of atopy was associated with lower lung function, higher asthma severity score, and higher medication treatment step. Atopy may be a more important risk factor for asthma severity than obesity among low-income minority children and adolescents with persistent asthma living in Northeastern cities in the United States.

  18. Obesity increases the prevalence and the incidence of asthma and worsens asthma severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, R; Moreira, P; Padrão, P; Teixeira, V H; Carvalho, P; Delgado, L; Moreira, A

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to explore the association between obesity and asthma prevalence, incidence and severity. The study included 32,644 adults, 52.6% female, from a representative sample of the 4th Portuguese National Health Survey. The following asthma definitions were used: ever asthma (ever medical doctor asthma diagnosis), current asthma (asthma within the last 12 months), current persistent asthma (required asthma medication within the last 12 months), current severe asthma (attending an emergency department because of asthma within the last 12 months), and incident asthma (asthma diagnosis within the last 12 months). Body mass index was calculated based on self-reported weight and height and categorised according to WHO classification. Logistic regression models adjusted for confounders were performed. Prevalence of ever asthma was 5.3%, current asthma 3.5%, current persistent asthma 3.0%, current severe asthma 1.4%, and incident asthma 0.2%. Prevalence of obesity was 16%, overweight 37.6%, normal weight 44.6% and underweight 0.2%. Being overweight, obesity class I and II, and obesity class III were associated with an OR (95% CI) with ever asthma 1.22 (1.21-1.24), 1.39 (1.36-1.41), 3.24 (3.08-3.40) respectively; current asthma 1.16 (1.14-1.18), 1.86 (1.82-1.90), 4.73 (4.49-4.98) respectively; current persistent asthma 1.08 (1.06-1.10), 2.06 (2.01-2.10), 5.24 (4.96-5.53), and current severe asthma 1.36 (1.32-1.40), 1.50 (1.45-1.55) and 3.70 (3.46-3.95), respectively. Considering the incidence of asthma, obesity more than quadrupled the odds (OR = 4.46, 95% CI 4.30, 4.62). Obesity is associated in a dose dependent way with an increase of prevalent and incident asthma, and it seems to increase the odds of a more persistent and severe asthma phenotype independently of socio-demographic determinants, physical activity, and dietary patterns. Our results provide rational for future lifestyle intervention studies for weight reduction in the obesity-asthma phenotype. Copyright

  19. Signs of an asthma attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Asthma - children Patient Instructions Asthma and school Asthma - child - discharge Asthma - control drugs Asthma - quick-relief drugs Asthma - what to ask the doctor - adult Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child Exercise-induced asthma Exercising and asthma at school ...

  20. Predictive Biomarkers for Asthma Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrek, Sarah K; Parulekar, Amit D; Hanania, Nicola A

    2017-09-19

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease characterized by multiple phenotypes. Treatment of patients with severe disease can be challenging. Predictive biomarkers are measurable characteristics that reflect the underlying pathophysiology of asthma and can identify patients that are likely to respond to a given therapy. This review discusses current knowledge regarding predictive biomarkers in asthma. Recent trials evaluating biologic therapies targeting IgE, IL-5, IL-13, and IL-4 have utilized predictive biomarkers to identify patients who might benefit from treatment. Other work has suggested that using composite biomarkers may offer enhanced predictive capabilities in tailoring asthma therapy. Multiple biomarkers including sputum eosinophil count, blood eosinophil count, fractional concentration of nitric oxide in exhaled breath (FeNO), and serum periostin have been used to identify which patients will respond to targeted asthma medications. Further work is needed to integrate predictive biomarkers into clinical practice.

  1. Current concepts of severe asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raundhal, Mahesh; Oriss, Timothy B.; Ray, Prabir; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2016-01-01

    The term asthma encompasses a disease spectrum with mild to very severe disease phenotypes whose traditional common characteristic is reversible airflow limitation. Unlike milder disease, severe asthma is poorly controlled by the current standard of care. Ongoing studies using advanced molecular and immunological tools along with improved clinical classification show that severe asthma does not identify a specific patient phenotype, but rather includes patients with constant medical needs, whose pathobiologic and clinical characteristics vary widely. Accordingly, in recent clinical trials, therapies guided by specific patient characteristics have had better outcomes than previous therapies directed to any subject with a diagnosis of severe asthma. However, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of the full scope of this disease that hinder the development of effective treatments for all severe asthmatics. In this Review, we discuss our current state of knowledge regarding severe asthma, highlighting different molecular and immunological pathways that can be targeted for future therapeutic development. PMID:27367183

  2. Endobronchial thermoplasty for asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Roy; Rao, Madhuri; Gibson, Heidi; Dincer, H. Erhan

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is an incurable chronic disease affecting approximately 24 million people in the United States. The hallmark features of asthma are reversible airflow obstruction, airway hyperresponsiveness, airway inflammation, bronchoconstriction, and excessive mucus secretion. Clinical symptoms include episodic or persistent breathlessness, wheezing, cough, or chest tightness/pressure. Forty-five percent of asthmatics continue to have yearly exacerbations and the disease is responsible for approximately 3,600 annual deaths. Pharmacologic advancements have continued to grow as the individual phenotypes of asthma are better delineated but there continues to be small population of asthmatics that are less responsive to pharmacologic therapy. Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is an innovative procedure targeted primarily at decreasing airway smooth muscle (ASM) which is considered by some to be a vestigial organ. Decreasing the ASM bulk decreases hyperresponsiveness and bronchoconstriction leading to decreased exacerbations, decreased cost on the healthcare system, and improvement in patient quality of life. PMID:29078687

  3. Asthma and obesity: does weight loss improve asthma control? a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juel CTB

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Trunk-Black Juel,1 Zarqa Ali,1 Lisbeth Nilas,2 Charlotte Suppli Ulrik11Respiratory Section, Internal Medicine Unit, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hvidovre Hospital and University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre, DenmarkAim and methods: Obesity is a major health problem, and obesity is associated with a high incidence of asthma and poor asthma control. The aim of the present paper is to systematically review the current knowledge of the effect on overall asthma control of weight reduction in overweight and obese adults with asthma.Results: Weight loss in obese individuals with doctor-diagnosed asthma is associated with a 48%–100% remission of asthma symptoms and use of asthma medication. Published studies, furthermore, reveal that weight loss in obese asthmatics improves asthma control, and that especially surgically induced weight loss results in significant improvements in asthma severity, use of asthma medication, dyspnoea, exercise tolerance, and acute exacerbations, including hospitalizations due to asthma. Furthermore, weight loss in obese asthmatics is associated with improvements in level of lung function and airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine, whereas no significant improvements have been observed in exhaled nitric oxide or other markers of eosinophilic airway inflammation.Conclusion: Overweight and obese adults with asthma experience a high symptomatic remission rate and significant improvements in asthma control, including objective measures of disease activity, after weight loss. Although these positive effects of weight loss on asthma-related health outcomes seem not to be accompanied by remission or improvements in markers of eosinophilic airway inflammation, it has potentially important implications for the future burden of asthma.Keywords: asthma, weight loss, diet, bariatric surgery, asthma control

  4. Diagnosis of childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    House dust mite, cat, dog, and even horse allergens are brought into the classroom on the clothing of class mates, and sensitise asthmatic children. The clinical history must always include questions on associated allergic conditions such as eczema and allergic rhinitis, and a family history of allergies, as asthma commonly.

  5. Asthma Home Environment Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    This checklist guides home care visitors in identifying environmental asthma triggers most commonly found in homes. It includes sections on the building, home interior and room interior and provides low-cost action steps for remediation. EPA 402-F-03-030.

  6. My Child Is Diagnosed with Asthma, Now What?: Motivating Parents to Help Their Children Control Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepney, Cesalie; Kane, Katelyn; Bruzzese, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric asthma is often undiagnosed, and therefore untreated. It negatively impacts children's functioning, including school attendance and performance, as well as quality of life. Schoolwide screening for asthma is becoming increasingly common, making identification of possible asthma particularly relevant for school nurses. Nurses may need to…

  7. Asthma management in rural New South Wales: perceptions of health care professionals and people with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovski, Biljana; Armour, Carol; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia

    2009-08-01

    To investigate the perceptions and attitudes towards asthma management of general practitioners, pharmacists and people with asthma in a rural area. Qualitative semistructured interviews. Small rural centre in New South Wales. General practitioners, pharmacists and people with asthma in a rural area. General practitioners perceived that the patient provided a barrier to the implementation of optimal asthma services. They were aware that other health care professionals had a role in asthma management but were not aware of the details, particularly in relation to that of the pharmacist and would like to improve communication methods. Pharmacists also perceived the patient to be a barrier to the delivery of optimal asthma management services and would like to improve communication with the general practitioner. The impact of the rural environment for the health care professionals included workforce shortages, availability of support services and access to continuing education. People with asthma were satisfied with their asthma management and the service provided by the health care professionals and described the involvement of family members and ambulance officers in their overall asthma management. The rural environment was an issue with regards to distance to the hospital during an emergency. General practitioners and pharmacists confirmed their existing roles in asthma management while expressing a desire to improve communication between the two professions to help overcome barriers and optimise the asthma service delivered to the patient. The patient described minimal barriers to optimising asthma management, which might suggest that they might not have great expectations of asthma care.

  8. The Prevalence of Grass Pollen-Related Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis in Elite Amateur Irish Athletes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grace, M

    2016-09-01

    Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (AR\\/C), has been shown to impact upon athletic performance. The championships of the unique, amateur Irish sports of hurling and Gaelic football (collectively known as GAA) take place during the prime pollen months of summer. Elite GAA players must perform optimally when most exposed to pollen. Elite GAA subjects (n=254) underwent skin prick testing to 6 aeroallergens and completed a validated questionnaire (AQUA), producing a score indicating likelihood of having allergy. The prevalence of allergy (positive to at least one aeroallergen on SPT and positive AQUA score) was 27.1% (n=69). Sixteen and a half percent (n=42) of the subjects tested had grass pollen AR\\/C while 22% (n=54) had house dust mite AR\\/C, though none were on standard medical therapies or had used allergen-specific immunotherapy. Grass pollen AR\\/C prevalence appears as common in elite Irish athletes as it is in other countries. It appears to be mild rather than well controlled in these subjects.

  9. Information needs of people with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ming Ley; Armour, Carol; LeMay, Kate; Smith, Lorraine

    2014-06-01

    To describe the information needs of a group of Australians with asthma and the extent to which their needs had been met. A self-administered survey was completed by people with asthma either presenting at community pharmacies or registered with a medical research institute database. The survey questions were developed based on a review of the literature, and included questions regarding participants' information needs about their asthma, their sources of asthma information and the extent to which these information needs had been met. The responses concerning information needs were analysed thematically. Responses concerning sources of asthma information and the extent to which needs were met were analysed using descriptive and correlational statistics. Seventy-one people completed the survey. Key information needs that were identified included medications, management of asthma, asthma triggers, cure, aetiology of asthma and latest research. A third of participants reported having only 'very little', 'a little' or 'some' of their information needs met. The most common source of information was from a doctor (94% respondents), followed by a pharmacist or pharmacy assistant (56%). Insights into the information needs of people with asthma have been provided. In light of the level of unmet information needs of people with asthma, and the types of information sought, pharmacists are in an ideal position to close the information gap and promote optimal asthma self-management practices. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Flavonoids and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toshio; Takahashi, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease, characterized by airway inflammation, airflow limitation, hyper-reactivity and airway remodeling. It is believed that asthma is caused by the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. The prevalence of allergic diseases, including asthma, has increased worldwide during the past two decades. Although the precise reasons that have caused this increase remain unknown, dietary change is thought to be one of the environmental factors. Flavonoids, which are polyphenolic plant secondary metabolites ubiquitously present in vegetables, fruits and beverages, possess antioxidant and anti-allergic traits, as well as immune-modulating activities. Flavonoids are powerful antioxidants and anti-allergic nutrients that inhibit the release of chemical mediators, synthesis of Th2 type cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, and CD40 ligand expression by high-affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor-expressing cells, such as mast cells and basophils. They also inhibit IL-4-induced signal transduction and affect the differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into effector T-cells through their inhibitory effect on the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Various studies of flavonoids in asthmatic animal models have demonstrated their beneficial effects. The results of several epidemiological studies suggest that an increase in flavonoid intake is beneficial for asthma. Moreover, clinical trials of flavonoids have shown their ameliorative effects on symptoms related to asthma. However, these human studies are currently limited; further validation is required to clarify whether an appropriate intake of flavonoids may constitute dietary treatment and for part of a preventive strategy for asthma. PMID:23752494

  11. Occupational asthma and food allergy due to carmine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, S; Tabar, A I; Alvarez, M J; Garcia, B E; Olaguibel, J M; Moneo, I

    1998-09-01

    Carmine (E120), a natural red dye extracted from the dried females of the insect Dactylopius coccus var. Costa (cochineal), has been reported to cause hypersensitivity reactions. We report a case of occupational asthma and food allergy due to carmine in a worker not engaged in dye manufacturing. A 35-year-old nonatopic man, who had worked for 4 years in a spice warehouse, reported asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis for 5 months, related to carmine handling in his work. Two weeks before the visit, he reported one similar episode after the ingestion of a red-colored sweet containing carmine. Peak flow showed drops higher than 25% related to carmine exposure. Prick tests with the cochineal insect and carmine were positive, but negative to common aeroallergens, several mites, foods, and spices. The methacholine test was positive. Specific bronchial challenge test with a cochineal extract was positive with a dual pattern (20% and 24% fall in FEV1). Double-blind oral challenge with E120 was positive. The patient's sera contained specific IgE for various high-molecular-weight proteins from the cochineal extract, as shown by immunoblotting. Carmine proteins can induce IgE-mediated food allergy and occupational asthma in workers using products where its presence could be easily overlooked, as well as in dye manufacture workers.

  12. Prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases in adolescents: nine-year follow-up study (2003-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Dirceu; Rosário Filho, Nelson A; Sarinho, Emanuel S; Camelo-Nunes, Inês C; Barreto, Bruno A Paes; Medeiros, Mércia L; Franco, Jackeline Motta; Camargos, Paulo A; Mallol, Javier; Gurgel, Ricardo; Andrade, Djanira M de; Furlan, Fernanda P; Silva, Almerinda R; Cardozo, Cristina; Andrade, Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis, and atopic eczema in adolescents (AD; 13-14 years) living in seven Brazilian cities, by applying the standardized written questionnaire (WQ) of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC), and to evaluate the time trend nine years after the last assessment of ISAAC phase 3 (ISP3). The ISAAC-WQ was answered by 20,099 AD from the Northern, Northeastern, Southeastern, and Southern Brazilian regions. Values obtained were compared to those observed in ISP3 using nonparametric (chi-squared or Fisher) tests, and the ratio of annual increment/decrement was established for each of the centers, according to the symptom assessed. Considering the national data and comparing to values of ISP3, there was a decrease in the mean prevalence of active asthma (18.5% vs. 17.5%) and an increase in the frequency of severe asthma (4.5% vs. 4.7%) and physician-diagnosed asthma (14.3% vs. 17.6%). An increase in prevalence of rhinitis, rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic eczema was also observed. The prevalence of asthma, rhinitis, and atopic eczema in Brazil was variable; higher prevalence values, especially of asthma and eczema, were observed in regions located closer to the Equator. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases in adolescents: nine-year follow-up study (2003-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirceu Solé

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis, and atopic eczema in adolescents (AD; 13-14 years living in seven Brazilian cities, by applying the standardized written questionnaire (WQ of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC, and to evaluate the time trend nine years after the last assessment of ISAAC phase 3 (ISP3. METHODS: The ISAAC-WQ was answered by 20,099 AD from the Northern, Northeastern, Southeastern, and Southern Brazilian regions. Values obtained were compared to those observed in ISP3 using nonparametric (chi-squared or Fisher tests, and the ratio of annual increment/decrement was established for each of the centers, according to the symptom assessed. RESULTS: Considering the national data and comparing to values of ISP3, there was a decrease in the mean prevalence of active asthma (18.5% vs. 17.5% and an increase in the frequency of severe asthma (4.5% vs. 4.7% and physician-diagnosed asthma (14.3% vs. 17.6%. An increase in prevalence of rhinitis, rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic eczema was also observed. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of asthma, rhinitis, and atopic eczema in Brazil was variable; higher prevalence values, especially of asthma and eczema, were observed in regions located closer to the Equator.

  14. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... January 2014 More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Can Kids and Teens With Asthma Play Sports? Asthma Center When to Go to the ER if Your Child Has Asthma Kids and Exercise Asthma Triggers Word! Exercise-Induced Asthma ...

  15. Do indoor environments influence asthma and asthma-related symptoms among adults in homes? A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the results of epidemiological studies focusing on the detrimental effects of home environmental factors on asthma morbidity in adults. We reviewed the literature on indoor air quality (IAQ, physical and sociodemographic factors, and asthma morbidity in homes, and identified commonly reported asthma, allergic, and respiratory symptoms involving the home environment. Reported IAQ and asthma morbidity data strongly indicated positive associations between indoor air pollution and adverse health effects in most studies. Indoor factors most consistently associated with asthma and asthma-related symptoms in adults included fuel combustion, mold growth, and environmental tobacco smoke. Environmental exposure may increase an adult’s risk of developing asthma and also may increase the risk of asthma exacerbations. Evaluation of present IAQ levels, exposure characteristics, and the role of exposure to these factors in relation to asthma morbidity is important for improving our understanding, identifying the burden, and for developing and implementing interventions aimed at reducing asthma morbidity.

  16. Chronic Diseases: Asthma and You | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get colds or respiratory infections don’t develop asthma. A child may wheeze because he or she has small ... develop asthma if: One or both parents have asthma The child has signs of allergies, including the allergic skin ...

  17. Stay away from asthma triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to ask your doctor - child Asthma and school Asthma - child - discharge Asthma - control drugs Asthma - quick-relief drugs Asthma - what to ask the doctor - adult Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child Exercise-induced asthma Exercising and asthma at school ...

  18. Physical training for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin V. Carson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: People with asthma may show less tolerance to exercise due to worsening asthma symptoms during exercise or other reasons such as deconditioning as a consequence of inactivity. Some may restrict activities as per medical advice or family influence and this might result in reduced physical fitness. Physical training programs aim to improve physical fitness, neuromuscular coordination and self confidence. Subjectively, many people with asthma report that they are symptomatically better when fit, but results from trials have varied and have been difficult to compare because of different designs and training protocols. Also, as exercise can induce asthma, the safety of exercise programmes needs to be considered.OBJECTIVE: To gain a better understanding of the effect of physical training on the respiratory and general health of people with asthma, from randomised trials.METHODS:Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials up to January 2013. Selection criteria: We included randomised trials of people over eight years of age with asthma who were randomised to undertake physical training or not. Physical training had to be undertaken for at least 20 minutes, two times a week, over a minimum period of four weeks. Data collection and analysis:Two review authors independently assessed eligibility for inclusion and undertook risk of bias assessment for the included studies.MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-one studies (772 participants were included in this review with two additional 2012 studies identified as 'awaiting classification'. Physical training was well tolerated with no adverse effects reported. None of the studies mentioned worsening of asthma symptoms following physical training. Physical training showed marked improvement in cardiopulmonary fitness as measured by a statistically and clinically significant increase in maximum oxygen uptake (mean difference (MD 4.92 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval (CI 3

  19. Indicators of asthma control among students in a rural, school-based asthma management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasberry, Catherine N; Cheung, Karen; Buckley, Rebekah; Dunville, Richard; Daniels, Brandy; Cook, Deborah; Robin, Leah; Dean, Blair

    2014-10-01

    The evaluation sought to determine if a comprehensive, school-based asthma management program in a small, rural school district helped students improve asthma control. To determine if students in the asthma program demonstrated better asthma control than students in a comparison school district, the evaluation team used a quasi-experimental, cross-sectional design and administered questionnaires assessing asthma control (which included FEV1 measurement) to 456 students with asthma in the intervention and comparison districts. Data were analyzed for differences in asthma control between students in the two districts. To determine if students in the intervention experienced increased asthma control between baseline and follow-up, the evaluation team used a one-group retrospective design. Program records for 323 students were analyzed for differences in percent of predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) between baseline and follow-up. Students with asthma in the intervention district exhibited significantly better asthma control than students with asthma in the comparison district. Percent of predicted FEV1 did not change significantly between baseline and follow-up for the intervention participants; however, post hoc analyses revealed students with poorly controlled asthma at baseline had significantly higher FEV1 scores at follow-up, and students with well-controlled asthma at baseline had significantly lower FEV1 scores at follow-up. Findings suggest that the comprehensive school-based program led to improvements in asthma control for students with poorly controlled asthma at baseline, and school-based programs need mechanisms for tracking students with initially well-controlled asthma to ensure they maintain control.

  20. School and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español School and Asthma KidsHealth / For Kids / School and Asthma ... trips. How Can I Avoid Asthma Triggers at School? Triggers are those things (like pollen or cat ...

  1. Asthma - child - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000001.htm Asthma - child - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... care for your child. Take Charge of Your Child's Asthma at Home Make sure you know the asthma ...

  2. Asthma action plan

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2014-01-01

    This action plans allow each child (or parent/carer) to record his or her asthma treatment to help manage their asthma when they are well, when their symptoms get worse and when they are suffering an asthma attack.

  3. Asthma and Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Asthma and Food Allergies Page Content Article Body A family history of ... child may develop asthma . Children with asthma and food allergies are at increased risk for anaphylaxis, a severe ...

  4. Open-label safety assessment of bilastine in elderly patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and/or urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sologuren, Ander; Vinas, Rosa; Cordon, Esther; Riesgo, Susana E; Del Mar Fores, Maria; Senan, Maria Rosa; Fernandez, Sonia; Labeaga, Luis; Ruiz-Mijan, Manuel

    2018-03-20

    Bilastine is an H1-antihistamine approved for symptomatic treatment of patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or urticaria. The safety profile of bilastine in clinical trials of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or urticaria, assessed by type and frequency of adverse events (AE), was similar to that of placebo. As part of the risk management plan for bilastine, the safety profile of bilastine in the elderly was assessed. A prospective, multicenter, observational, open-label, 3-month follow-up study was performed to assess the safetyprofile of bilastine 20 mg in patients aged greater than or equal to 65 years with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and/or urticaria. A total of 74 of 146 patients (50.7%) reported 129 treatment-emergent AEs (TEAE) during the study period. Theincidence of TEAEs was low, with monthly and quarterly rates of 0.29 (95% confidence intervals [CI], 0.229-0.367) and 0.88(95% CI, 0.688 -1.100), respectively. Monthly and quarterly incidence rates were 0.04 (95% CI, 0.016-0.082) and 0.12 (95%CI, 0.048-0.246), respectively, for related TEAEs (eight TEAEs in seven patients) and were 0.02 (95% CI, 0.003- 0.048) and0.05 (95% CI, 0.010-0.143), respectively, for serious TEAEs (five TEAES in three patients). All serious TEAEs were considered to be unrelated to bilastine. Bilastine 20 mg showed a favorable safety profile with a low incidence of TEAEs in patients aged greater than or equal to 65 years.The results were in accordance with the known safety profile of bilastine 20 mg and incidence of AEs reported in previous studies and described in the approved summary of product characteristics.

  5. Assessing asthma control and associated risk factors among persons with current asthma - findings from the child and adult Asthma Call-back Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahran, Hatice S; Bailey, Cathy M; Qin, Xiaoting; Moorman, Jeanne E

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring the level of asthma control is important in determining the effectiveness of current treatment which may decrease the frequency and intensity of symptoms and functional limitations. Uncontrolled asthma has been associated with decreased quality of life and increased health care use. The objectives of this study were to assess the level of asthma control and identify related risk factors among persons with current asthma. Using the 2006 to 2010 BRFSS child and adult Asthma Call-back Survey, asthma control was classified as well-controlled or uncontrolled (not-well-controlled or very-poorly-controlled) using three impairment measures: daytime symptoms, night-time symptoms, and taking short-acting β2-agonists for symptom control. Multivariate logistic regression identified predictors of asthma control. Fifty percent of adults and 38.4% of children with current asthma had uncontrolled asthma. About 63% of children and 53% of adults with uncontrolled asthma were on long-term asthma control medications. Among children, uncontrolled asthma was significantly associated with being younger than 5 years, having annual household income asthma (low educational attainment, low income, cigarette smoking, and co-morbid conditions including obesity and depression) could improve asthma control.

  6. Asthma essentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Greene

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic, reversible obstructive disease that when in exacerbation can present to the emergency department in a spectrum of severity. Prompt recognition of the potentially severely ill asthmatic requires a careful history and physical exam while considering alternative diagnoses for the presenting symptoms. Early administration of salbutamol and corticosteroids is indicated in almost all patients with other medications such as ipratropium and magnesium and supportive modalities like BiPAP reserved for sicker patients. The global impact of asthma is increasing, especially amongst children. While the benign clinical presentation is most common and mortality has decreased in recent decades due to improved recognition and care, the ubiquity of the condition and frequent lack of regular outpatient management contribute to the disease claiming 250,000 lives worldwide annually. The emergency physician must be prepared to assess and appropriately manage both the young child with a mild wheeze and the adult in respiratory failure.

  7. Cockroach sensitization mitigates allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptom severity in patients allergic to house dust mites and pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weijing; Jimenez, Fabio; Martinez, Hernan; Harper, Nathan L; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Carrillo, Andrew; Ingale, Puraskar; Liu, Ya-Guang; Ahuja, Seema S; Clark, Robert A; Rather, Cynthia G; Ramirez, Daniel A; Andrews, Charles P; Jacobs, Robert L; Ahuja, Sunil K

    2015-09-01

    Modifiers of symptom severity in patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (AR) are imprecisely characterized. The hygiene hypothesis implicates childhood microbial exposure as a protective factor. Cockroach sensitization (C+) might be a proxy for microbial exposure. We sought to determine whether C+ assayed by means of skin prick tests influenced AR symptom severity in controlled and natural settings. Total symptom scores (TSSs) were recorded by 21 participants with house dust mite allergy (M+) in the natural setting and during repeated exposures of 3 hours per day to house dust mite allergen in an allergen challenge chamber (ACC). In M+ participants the peripheral blood and nasal cells were assayed for T-cell activation and transcriptomic profiles (by using RNA sequencing), respectively. Participants allergic to mountain cedar (n = 21), oak (n = 34), and ragweed (n = 23) recorded TSSs during separate out-of-season exposures to these pollens (any pollen sensitization [P+]) in the ACC; a subset recorded TSSs in the pollination seasons. The hierarchy of TSSs (highest to lowest) among M+ participants tracked the following skin prick test sensitization statuses: M+P+C- > M+P+C+ > M+P-C- > M+P-C+. In nasal cells and peripheral blood the immune/inflammatory responses were rapidly resolved in M+P+C+ compared with M+P+C- participants. Among those allergic to pollen, C+ was associated with a lower TSS during pollen challenges and the pollination season. After aggregated analysis of all 4 ACC studies, C+ status was associated with a 2.8-fold greater likelihood of a lower TSS compared with C- status (odds ratio, 2.78; 95% CI, 1.18-6.67; P = .02). C+ status is associated with mitigation of AR symptom severity in adults with AR. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. The burden of allergic rhinitis and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis on adolescents: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiss, Michael S; Hammerby, Eva; Robinson, Susan; Kennedy-Martin, Tessa; Buchs, Sarah

    2018-04-04

    To evaluate the literature regarding the burden of allergic rhinitis (AR) and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) in adolescents (10-19 years). Searches were performed in MEDLINE, Embase, Health Technology Assessment Database, and National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database for studies evaluating concepts of symptoms, quality of life (QOL), daily activities, sleep, examination performance, school absenteeism and presenteeism, and treatment burden in adolescents with AR or ARC. English-language journal articles indexed in the last 15 years describing non-interventional population-based studies. Records were assessed by 2 independent reviewers. A total of 27 articles were identified; outcomes evaluated were: symptoms (n=6 studies), QOL (n=9), daily activities (n=5), emotional aspects (n=3), sleep (n=6), education (n=7), and treatment burden (n=2). AR symptoms rated most bothersome were rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and itchy eyes. QOL was worse in adolescents with AR versus controls regardless of QOL instrument used. Nasal symptoms and nasal obstruction were more likely to be associated with poor QOL in adolescents than in adults or younger children, respectively. Daily functioning and sleep were also negatively impacted by AR. In addition, a detrimental effect on absenteeism, school productivity, and academic performance was reported. Although AR and ARC are sometimes perceived as trivial conditions, this review indicates that their impact on adolescent life is negative and far-reaching. It is critical that clinicians gain a greater understanding of the unique burden of AR and ARC in adolescents to ensure they receive prompt and appropriate care and treatment in order to improve clinical and academic outcomes. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Efficacy and safety of 5-grass pollen sublingual immunotherapy tablets in patients with different clinical profiles of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malling, Hans-Jørgen; Montagut, A; Melac, M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal dose of grass pollen tablets for sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis patients was previously established in a multinational, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 628 adults. Patients were randomized to receive once-daily 5-grass...... pollen sublingual tablets of 100 IR (index of reactivity), 300 IR or 500 IR, or placebo starting 4 months before the pollen season. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this complementary analysis was to determine whether 300 IR 5-grass pollen SLIT-tablets is effective in different subtypes of patients who are allergic...

  10. Asthma in Hispanics. An 8-Year Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Franziska J.; Forno, Erick; Cooper, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    This review provides an update on asthma in Hispanics, a diverse group tracing their ancestry to countries previously under Spanish rule. A marked variability in the prevalence and morbidity from asthma remains among Hispanic subgroups in the United States and Hispanic America. In the United States, Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans have high and low burdens of asthma, respectively (the “Hispanic Paradox”). This wide divergence in asthma morbidity among Hispanic subgroups is multifactorial, likely reflecting the effects of known (secondhand tobacco smoke, air pollution, psychosocial stress, obesity, inadequate treatment) and potential (genetic variants, urbanization, vitamin D insufficiency, and eradication of parasitic infections) risk factors. Barriers to adequate asthma management in Hispanics include economic and educational disadvantages, lack of health insurance, and no access to or poor adherence with controller medications such as inhaled corticosteroids. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of asthma in Hispanic subgroups, many questions remain. Studies of asthma in Hispanic America should focus on environmental or lifestyle factors that are more relevant to asthma in this region (e.g., urbanization, air pollution, parasitism, and stress). In the United States, research studies should focus on risk factors that are known to or may diverge among Hispanic subgroups, including but not limited to epigenetic variation, prematurity, vitamin D level, diet, and stress. Clinical trials of culturally appropriate interventions that address multiple aspects of asthma management in Hispanic subgroups should be prioritized for funding. Ensuring high-quality healthcare for all remains a pillar of eliminating asthma disparities. PMID:24881937

  11. Exercise-induced bronchospasm related to different phenotypes of rhinitis without asthma in primary schoolchildren: the French Six Cities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillaud, D; Horo, K; Baiz, N; Banerjee, S; Charpin, D; Lavaud, F; de Blay, F; Raherison, C; Annesi-Maesano, I

    2014-06-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) is frequent among asthmatic children. However, opinions differ on the relation between EIB and rhinitis in the absence of asthma. We assessed the relationship between EIB and various phenotypes of rhinitis according to asthmatic status at the general population level in the Six Cities Study. Of 7781 schoolchildren with a mean age of 10 years underwent an EIB test and skin prick test to assess allergic sensitization. Their parents completed a standardized questionnaire recording asthma-like symptoms and past-year rhinoconjunctivitis, ever hay fever (EHF), and a score for allergic rhinitis (SFAR) ≥7 as a marker of 'past-year allergic rhinitis'. Exercise-induced bronchospasm was defined as a fall in peak expiratory flow rate ≥15% after exercise. Of the 6813 schoolchildren retained for analysis, 227 (3.33%) experienced EIB after exercise. Odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] between EIB and allergic rhinitis phenotypes in the absence of asthma were 1.56 [0.92-2.63] for EHF, 1.97 [1.16-3.35] for past-year rhinoconjunctivitis, and 1.84 [1.16-2.91] for a SFAR ≥7. Results were unchanged after adjustment for confounders. Multiple correspondence analysis showed that EIB, although related to asthma, constitutes a separate entity. Exercise-induced bronchospasm was not significantly related to familial history of asthma. In our large population-based sample of children, different phenotypes of atopic rhinitis were associated with EIB, independently of asthma. Exercise-induced bronchospasm, although related to asthma, seems to constitute a separate entity. In this large (6813) sample of 10-year children drawn from the general population, EIB is associated with rhinitis phenotypes in the absence of asthma. Furthermore, it constitutes an entity independent from asthma and is not related to a familial history of asthma. Thus, investigating these symptoms could be important in this disease, as a specific nasal treatment might improve EIB

  12. Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yi-Xian; Xiao, Yi

    2015-10-20

    To get a comprehensive understanding about the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and asthma by reviewing the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestation and then summarizing the latest progress on diagnosis and treatment. Articles referred in this review were mainly collected from a comprehensive search of the PubMed published in English from 1990 to 2015 with the terms "OSA" and "asthma" as the main keywords. Highly regarded older publications were also included. Information about the features of the two diseases in common, the pathophysiologic association between them and their current treatments from the literature search were identified, retrieved, and summarized. Both OSA and asthma are very prevalent conditions. The incidences of them have kept on rising in recent years. Asthma is often accompanied by snoring and apnea, and OSA often combines with asthma, as well. They have many predisposing and aggravating factors in common. Possible shared direct mechanistic links between them include mechanical effects, intermittent hypoxia, nerve reflex, inflammation, leptin, etc. Indirect mechanistic links include medication, nose diseases, smoking, obesity, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Since OSA presents many similar features with nocturnal asthma, some scholars termed them as a sole syndrome - "alternative overlap syndrome," and proved that asthma symptoms in those patients could be improved through the treatment of continuous positive airway pressure. OSA and asthma are closely associated in pathogenesis, symptoms, and therapies. With the growing awareness of the relationship between them, we should raise our vigilance on the coexistence of OSA in those difficult-to-control asthmatic patients. Further studies are still needed to guide the clinical works.

  13. Yoga for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu-Yao Yang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disorder affecting about 300 million people worldwide. As a holistic therapy, yoga has the potential to relieve both the physical and psychological suffering of people with asthma, and its popularity has expanded globally. A number of clinical trials have been carried out to evaluate the effects of yoga practice, with inconsistent results. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of yoga in people with asthma. METHODS: Search methods: We systematically searched the Cochrane Airways Group Register of Trials, which is derived from systematic searches of bibliographic databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, and PsycINFO, and handsearching of respiratory journals and meeting abstracts. We also searched PEDro. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP search portal. We searched all databases from their inception to 22 July 2015, and used no restriction on language of publication. We checked the reference lists of eligible studies and relevant review articles for additional studies. We attempted to contact investigators of eligible studies and experts in the field to learn of other published and unpublished studies. Selection criteria: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs that compared yoga with usual care (or no intervention or sham intervention in people with asthma and reported at least one of the following outcomes: quality of life, asthma symptom score, asthma control, lung function measures, asthma medication usage, and adverse events. Data collection and analysis: We extracted bibliographic information, characteristics of participants, characteristics of interventions and controls, characteristics of methodology, and results for the outcomes of our interest from eligible studies. For continuous outcomes, we used mean difference (MD with 95% confidence interval (CI to denote the treatment effects, if the

  14. Yoga for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zu-Yao; Zhong, Hui-Bin; Mao, Chen; Yuan, Jin-Qiu; Huang, Ya-Fang; Wu, Xin-Yin; Gao, Yuan-Mei; Tang, Jin-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disorder affecting about 300 million people worldwide. As a holistic therapy, yoga has the potential to relieve both the physical and psychological suffering of people with asthma, and its popularity has expanded globally. A number of clinical trials have been carried out to evaluate the effects of yoga practice, with inconsistent results. To assess the effects of yoga in people with asthma. We systematically searched the Cochrane Airways Group Register of Trials, which is derived from systematic searches of bibliographic databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, and PsycINFO, and handsearching of respiratory journals and meeting abstracts. We also searched PEDro. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP search portal. We searched all databases from their inception to 22 July 2015, and used no restriction on language of publication. We checked the reference lists of eligible studies and relevant review articles for additional studies. We attempted to contact investigators of eligible studies and experts in the field to learn of other published and unpublished studies. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared yoga with usual care (or no intervention) or sham intervention in people with asthma and reported at least one of the following outcomes: quality of life, asthma symptom score, asthma control, lung function measures, asthma medication usage, and adverse events. We extracted bibliographic information, characteristics of participants, characteristics of interventions and controls, characteristics of methodology, and results for the outcomes of our interest from eligible studies. For continuous outcomes, we used mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) to denote the treatment effects, if the outcomes were measured by the same scale across studies. Alternatively, if the outcomes were measured by different scales

  15. Probiotics (Lactobacillus gasseri KS-13, Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1, and Bifidobacterium longum MM-2) improve rhinoconjunctivitis-specific quality of life in individuals with seasonal allergies: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis-Wall, Jennifer C; Culpepper, Tyler; Nieves, Carmelo; Rowe, Cassie C; Burns, Alyssa M; Rusch, Carley T; Federico, Ashton; Ukhanova, Maria; Waugh, Sheldon; Mai, Volker; Christman, Mary C; Langkamp-Henken, Bobbi

    2017-03-01

    Background: Rhinoconjunctivitis-specific quality of life is often reduced during seasonal allergies. The Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (MRQLQ) is a validated tool used to measure quality of life in people experiencing allergies (0 = not troubled to 6 = extremely troubled). Probiotics may improve quality of life during allergy season by increasing the percentage of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and inducing tolerance. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether consuming Lactobacillus gasseri KS-13, Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1, and B. longum MM-2 compared with placebo would result in beneficial effects on MRQLQ scores throughout allergy season in individuals who typically experience seasonal allergies. Secondary outcomes included changes in immune markers as part of a potential mechanism for changes in MRQLQ scores. Design: In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel, randomized clinical trial, 173 participants (mean ± SEM: age 27 ± 1 y) who self-identified as having seasonal allergies received either a probiotic (2 capsules/d, 1.5 billion colony-forming units/capsule) or placebo during spring allergy season for 8 wk. MRQLQ scores were collected weekly throughout the study. Fasting blood samples were taken from a subgroup (placebo, n = 37; probiotic, n = 35) at baseline and week 6 (predicted peak of pollen) to determine serum immunoglobulin (Ig) E concentrations and Treg percentages. Results: The probiotic group reported an improvement in the MRQLQ global score from baseline to pollen peak (-0.68 ± 0.13) when compared with the placebo group (-0.19 ± 0.14; P = 0.0092). Both serum total IgE and the percentage of Tregs increased from baseline to week 6, but changes were not different between groups. Conclusions: This combination probiotic improved rhinoconjunctivitis-specific quality of life during allergy season for healthy individuals with self-reported seasonal allergies; however, the associated mechanism is

  16. Tartrazine exclusion for allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardern, K D; Ram, F S

    2001-01-01

    Tartrazine is the best known and one of the most commonly used food additives. Food colorants are also used in many medications as well as foods. There has been conflicting evidence as to whether tartrazine causes exacerbations of asthma with some studies finding a positive association especially in individuals with cross-sensitivity to aspirin. To assess the overall effect of tartrazine (exclusion or challenge) in the management of asthma. A search was carried out using the Cochrane Airways Group specialised register. Bibliographies of each RCT was searched for additional papers. Authors of identified RCTs were contacted for further information for their trials and details of other studies. RCTs of oral administration of tartrazine (as a challenge) versus placebo or dietary avoidance of tartrazine versus normal diet were considered. Studies which focused upon allergic asthma, were also included. Studies of tartrazine exclusion for other allergic conditions such as hay fever, allergic rhinitis and eczema were only considered if the results for subjects with asthma were separately identified. Trials could be in either adults or children with asthma or allergic asthma (e.g. sensitivity to aspirin or food items known to contain tartrazine). Study quality was assessed and data abstracted by two reviewers independently. Outcomes were analysed using RevMan 4.1.1. Ninety abstracts were found, of which 18 were potentially relevant. Six met the inclusion criteria, but only three presented results in a format that permitted analysis and none could be combined in a meta-analysis. In none of the studies did tartrazine challenge or avoidance in diet significantly alter asthma outcomes. Due to the paucity of available evidence, it is not possible to provide firm conclusions as to the effects of tartrazine on asthma control. However, the six RCTs that could be included in this review all arrived at the same conclusion. Routine tartrazine exclusion may not benefit most patients

  17. Japanese guidelines for adult asthma 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Ichinose

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Adult bronchial asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, and presents clinically with variable airway narrowing (wheezes and dyspnea and cough. Long-standing asthma induces airway remodeling, leading to intractable asthma. The number of patients with asthma has increased; however, the number of patients who die of asthma has decreased (1.2 per 100,000 patients in 2015. The goal of asthma treatment is to enable patients with asthma to attain normal pulmonary function and lead a normal life, without any symptoms. A good relationship between physicians and patients is indispensable for appropriate treatment. Long-term management by therapeutic agents and elimination of the causes and risk factors of asthma are fundamental to its treatment. Four steps in pharmacotherapy differentiate between mild and intensive treatments; each step includes an appropriate daily dose of an inhaled corticosteroid, varying from low to high levels. Long-acting β2-agonists, leukotriene receptor antagonists, sustained-release theophylline, and long-acting muscarinic antagonist are recommended as add-on drugs, while anti-immunoglobulin E antibody and oral steroids are considered for the most severe and persistent asthma related to allergic reactions. Bronchial thermoplasty has recently been developed for severe, persistent asthma, but its long-term efficacy is not known. Inhaled β2-agonists, aminophylline, corticosteroids, adrenaline, oxygen therapy, and other approaches are used as needed during acute exacerbations, by choosing treatment steps for asthma in accordance with the severity of exacerbations. Allergic rhinitis, eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis, eosinophilic otitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, aspirin-induced asthma, and pregnancy are also important issues that need to be considered in asthma therapy.

  18. Asthma management guidelines: updates, advances, and new options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Robert P; Schaecher, Kenneth L; Rice, Gary K

    2007-08-01

    Asthma still poses a substantial and unacceptable health and economic burden. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) guidelines for the management of asthma continue to evolve based on emerging clinical data, improving the understanding of asthma and approaches to its management. To examine the clinical implications of current NAEPP guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of asthma and the potential impact of the proposed 2007 guidelines update on asthma management. To examine the role of managed care organizations in fostering evidence-based asthma management. Current NAEPP guidelines recognize symptom control as the chief therapeutic target in the management of asthma. The proposed update to NAEPP guidelines places greater emphasis on symptom control by expanding its definition to not only include measures of impairment but also the risk for deteriorating pulmonary function, asthma exacerbations, and controller medication side effects. Although inhaled corticosteroids remain central to achieving long-term asthma control in both current and proposed guidelines, the latter offers greater treatment flexibility and recognizes combination therapy as a preferred choice for achieving control in many patients with moderate persistent asthma. Managed care organizations, primarily using disease management programs, provide impetus for the widespread adoption of evidence-based asthma treatment guidelines. Widespread adoption of evidence-based asthma management programs offers the opportunity for achieving and maintaining asthma control.

  19. Management of asthma: new approaches to establishing control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, Nancy; Murphy, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The high burden of asthma indicates suboptimal control of this chronic condition. This review describes approaches for establishing asthma control based on an understanding of potential issues in the achievement and maintenance of asthma control, recent changes in asthma management guidelines that facilitate attainment of treatment goals, and the importance of the healthcare provider-patient partnership to emphasize treatment based on asthma control. Review of the published literature, asthma management guidelines, and patient asthma education resources. Asthma control is best achieved by patient-oriented versus disease-oriented management strategies that incorporate a combination of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment modalities. Tools that assess and monitor asthma may facilitate the achievement and maintenance of asthma control. Key components of an optimal management strategy include solid partnerships between healthcare providers and patients, comprehensive patient and caregiver education, personalized written asthma action plans, patient-reported evaluation of symptom control, appropriate drug therapy, strategies for improving compliance with asthma medication regimens, and a treatment algorithm that outlines the facets of asthma management. Information presented in this article will guide nurse practitioners in helping patients with asthma achieve and maintain long-term disease control.

  20. Japanese guidelines for childhood asthma 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Arakawa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Diseases 2017 (JAGL 2017 includes a minor revision of the Japanese Pediatric Guideline for the Treatment and Management of Asthma 2012 (JPGL 2012 by the Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology. The section on child asthma in JAGL 2017 provides information on how to diagnose asthma between infancy and adolescence (0–15 years of age. It makes recommendations for best practices in the management of childhood asthma, including management of acute exacerbations and non-pharmacological and pharmacological management. This guideline will be of interest to non-specialist physicians involved in the care of children with asthma. JAGL differs from the Global Initiative for Asthma Guideline in that JAGL emphasizes diagnosis and early intervention of children with asthma at <2 years or 2–5 years of age. The first choice of treatment depends on the severity and frequency of symptoms. Pharmacological management, including step-up or step-down of drugs used for long-term management based on the status of asthma control levels, is easy to understand; thus, this guideline is suitable for the routine medical care of children with asthma. JAGL also recommends using a control test in children, so that the physician aims for complete control by avoiding exacerbating factors and appropriately using anti-inflammatory drugs (for example, inhaled corticosteroids and leukotriene receptor antagonists.

  1. Outcomes of the Montana Asthma Home Visiting Program: A home-based asthma education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Jessie C; Biskupiak, William W; Brokaw, Sarah M; Carpenedo, Dorota; Loveland, Katie M; Tysk, Sonja; Vogl, Shea

    2018-02-09

    Asthma is a common disease in children. Home-based, multi-trigger, multi-component interventions with an environmental focus have been shown to be effective to address asthma in children. The objective of this study was to assess the outcomes and feasibility of implementing a specific asthma home visiting (HV) program in a rural area. Children aged 0-17 years with uncontrolled asthma were enrolled in an asthma HV program that included six contacts over a 12-month period delivered by a registered nurse specifically trained in asthma education and trigger removal in eleven counties in the rural state of Montana. Between June 2010 and December 2016, data on asthma symptoms and asthma self-management skills were collected at baseline and throughout the program. In June 2017, they were analyzed to assess changes in asthma control and quality of life over time among participants completing all six contacts. Since June 2010, 152 of 338 enrolled children completed all six contacts outlined in the program (45%). Participants who completed the program reported significant improvements in asthma control test scores, self-management skills, and self-efficacy related to asthma management. These results improved the longer participants remained in the program. These findings suggest that it is feasible to implement a 12-month HV program using local public health resources in a rural area as outcomes improved over this time period.

  2. Persistent impact of cigarette smoking on asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedoszytko, Marek; Gruchała-Niedoszytko, Marta; Chełminska, Marta; Sieminska, Alicja; Jassem, Ewa

    2008-08-01

    In the present study we assessed the impact of former cigarette smoking on asthma control and treatment effectiveness. A total of 104 patients with uncontrolled asthma were included in the study. The group of former smokers consisted of 33 subjects, whereas the never smokers group consisted of 71 subjects of similar age and gender. Spirometry, classification of asthma severity, and control were assessed according to Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines. Quality of life was measured with the use of the Saint George Hospital Respiratory Questionnaire (SGHRQ). Asthma was more severe in the group of former smokers both before and after treatment; p 0.05. Cigarette smoking has a persistent, dose-dependent, negative impact on the response to treatment in patients with uncontrolled asthma even after smoking cessation. Smoking cessation should remain the ultimate goal in treatment of asthmatic patients. More efforts should be undertaken to decrease smoking initiation, especially in teenagers.

  3. Asthma affects time to pregnancy and fertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Elisabeth J; Thomsen, Simon F; Lindenberg, Svend

    2014-01-01

    Coexistence of infertility and asthma has been observed clinically. Therefore, we investigated the association between asthma and delayed pregnancy in a nationwide population-based cohort of twins. A cohort of 15 250 twins living in Denmark (aged 12-41 years) participated in a questionnaire study...... including questions about the presence of asthma and fertility. Differences in time to pregnancy and pregnancy outcome were analysed in subjects with asthma, allergy and in healthy individuals using multiple regression analysis. Asthma was associated with an increased time to pregnancy, the percentage...... in those >30 years of age (32.2% versus 24.9%, OR (95% CI) 1.44 (1.1-1.9); p=0.04). Untreated asthmatics had a significant increased risk of prolonged time to pregnancy compared to healthy individuals (OR (95% CI) 1.79 (1.20-2.66); p=0.004), while asthmatics receiving any kind of treatment for asthma...

  4. Outpatient Management of Asthma in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Schultz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal aims of asthma management in childhood are to obtain symptom control that allows individuals to engage in unrestricted physical activities and to normalize lung function. These aims should be achieved using the fewest possible medications. Ensuring a correct diagnosis is the first priority. The mainstay of asthma management remains pharmacotherapy. Various treatment options are discussed. Asthma monitoring includes the regular assessment of asthma severity and asthma control, which then informs decisions regarding the stepping up or stepping down of therapy. Delivery systems and devices for inhaled therapy are discussed, as are the factors influencing adherence to prescribed treatment. The role of the pediatric health care provider is to establish a functional partnership with the child and their family in order to minimize the impact of asthma symptoms and exacerbations during childhood.

  5. Acute severe childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of South. African children, affecting 10-20% of the population. Correct treatment of chronic asthma with regular anti- inflammatory controller therapy prevents symptoms, asthma exacerbations, hospitalisation and mortality. Modern treatment of asthma focuses on an assessment of.

  6. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their asthma under control. Do Allergies Affect Your Child's Asthma? If your child's asthma isn't under control, find out if allergies ... for testing. If it turns out that your child's asthma is triggered by certain allergens, you'll want ...

  7. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ali, Zarqa; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem, and obesity is associated with a high incidence of asthma and poor asthma control. The aim of the present paper is to systematically review the current knowledge of the effect on overall asthma control of weight reduction in overweight and obese adults with asthma....

  8. Incidence and host determinants of work-related rhinoconjunctivitis in apprentice pastry-makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautrin, D; Ghezzo, H; Infante-Rivard, C; Malo, J-L

    2002-10-01

    The authors recently assessed the incidence and determinants of immunologic sensitization to flour in apprentice pastry-makers. The aim of this work was to determine the incidence of work-related rhinoconjunctivitis (RC) symptoms and their determinants. For this 188/230 entrants (81.7%) were evaluated before starting exposure to flour, and again 10.8 and 16.8 months after. Questionnaires and skin prick testing to common and work-related allergens were administered at each visit. Bronchial responsiveness to methacholine was assessed at baseline in all subjects and in a subgroup at follow-up. Thirty subjects (16.1%) reported new work-related RC symptoms (13.1 per 100 person-years); in three subjects (1.6%), these were accompanied by incident skin prick test reactivity to flour-derived allergens. Skin prick test reactivity to grass pollens (OR = 3.0, 95% CI, 1.3-6.7) and to pets (OR = 2.5, 95% CI, 1.1-5.9), persistent rhinitis (OR = 3.1, 95% CI, 1.1-8.4), seasonal RC (OR = 2.5, 95% CI, 1.1-5.5), RC on contact with pets (OR = 2.3, 95% CI, 1.03-5.0) and skin prick test reactivity to wheat flour (OR = 10.5, 95% CI, 2.3-46.8), assessed at baseline, were significantly associated with the incidence of work-related RC symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis yielded significant OR of skin prick test reactivity to wheat flour at baseline (OR = 7.1, 95% CI, 1.7-35.1) and persistent rhinitis (OR = 3.9, 95% CI, 1.01-9.6) for the incidence of work-related RC symptoms. Increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness at follow-up was more frequent, although not significantly, in subjects positive to skin prick test to flour on entry and reporting new work-related symptoms (3/5), than in other subjects (4/17). The incidence of work-related RC symptoms among apprentice pastry-makers was high (16.1% 30/186), while a minority (3/30) also developed skin prick test reactivity to flour. Skin prick test reactivity to wheat flour and persistent allergic rhinitis on starting exposure to

  9. Emerging therapies for severe asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Many patients with asthma have poorly controlled symptoms, and particularly for those with severe disease, there is a clear need for improved treatments. Two recent therapies licensed for use in asthma are omalizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds circulating IgE antibody, and bronchial thermoplasty, which involves the delivery of radio frequency energy to the airways to reduce airway smooth muscle mass. In addition, there are new therapies under development for asthma that have good potential to reach the clinic in the next five years. These include biological agents targeting pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-5 and interleukin-13, inhaled ultra long-acting β2-agonists and once daily inhaled corticosteroids. In addition, drugs that block components of the arachidonic acid pathway that targets neutrophilic asthma and CRTH2 receptor antagonists that inhibit the proinflammatory actions of prostaglandin D2 may become available. We review the recent progress made in developing viable therapies for severe asthma and briefly discuss the idea that development of novel therapies for asthma is likely to increasingly involve the assessment of genotypic and/or phenotypic factors. PMID:21896202

  10. Emerging therapies for severe asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spears Mark

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many patients with asthma have poorly controlled symptoms, and particularly for those with severe disease, there is a clear need for improved treatments. Two recent therapies licensed for use in asthma are omalizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds circulating IgE antibody, and bronchial thermoplasty, which involves the delivery of radio frequency energy to the airways to reduce airway smooth muscle mass. In addition, there are new therapies under development for asthma that have good potential to reach the clinic in the next five years. These include biological agents targeting pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-5 and interleukin-13, inhaled ultra long-acting β2-agonists and once daily inhaled corticosteroids. In addition, drugs that block components of the arachidonic acid pathway that targets neutrophilic asthma and CRTH2 receptor antagonists that inhibit the proinflammatory actions of prostaglandin D2 may become available. We review the recent progress made in developing viable therapies for severe asthma and briefly discuss the idea that development of novel therapies for asthma is likely to increasingly involve the assessment of genotypic and/or phenotypic factors.

  11. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes...... have been shown to have a different distribution of airway inflammation and unequal response to bronchial provocative test. Elite athletes display signs of exercise-induced symptoms, for example, nonasthmatic inspiratory wheeze, vocal cord dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmias, which could limit...... their physical capacity. Elite athletes should undergo comprehensive assessment to confirm an asthma diagnosis and determine its degree of severity. Treatment should be as for any other asthmatic individual, including the use of ß2-agonist, inhaled steroid as well as leukotriene-antagonist. It should, however...

  12. Environmental issues in managing asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diette, Gregory B; McCormack, Meredith C; Hansel, Nadia N; Breysse, Patrick N; Matsui, Elizabeth C

    2008-05-01

    Management of asthma requires attention to environmental exposures both indoors and outdoors. Americans spend most of their time indoors, where they have a greater ability to modify their environment. The indoor environment contains both pollutants (eg, particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, secondhand smoke, and ozone) and allergens from furred pets, dust mites, cockroaches, rodents, and molds. Indoor particulate matter consists of particles generated from indoor sources such as cooking and cleaning activities, and particles that penetrate from the outdoors. Nitrogen dioxide sources include gas stoves, furnaces, and fireplaces. Indoor particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide are linked to asthma morbidity. The indoor ozone concentration is mainly influenced by the outdoor ozone concentration. The health effects of indoor ozone exposure have not been well studied. In contrast, there is substantial evidence of detrimental health effects from secondhand smoke. Guideline recommendations are not specific for optimizing indoor air quality. The 2007 National Asthma Education and Prevention Program asthma guidelines recommend eliminating indoor smoking and improving the ventilation. Though the guidelines state that there is insufficient evidence to recommend air cleaners, air cleaners and reducing activities that generate indoor pollutants may be sound practical approaches for improving the health of individuals with asthma. The guidelines are more specific about allergen avoidance; they recommend identifying allergens to which the individual is immunoglobin E sensitized and employing a multifaceted, comprehensive strategy to reduce exposure. Outdoor air pollutants that impact asthma include particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide, and guidelines recommend that individuals with asthma avoid exertion outdoors when these pollutants are elevated. Outdoor allergens include tree, grass, and weed pollens, which vary in concentration by season

  13. Asthma exacerbation prediction: recent insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Louise

    2018-04-01

    Asthma attacks are frequent in children with asthma and can lead to significant adverse outcomes including time off school, hospital admission and death. Identifying children at risk of an asthma attack affords the opportunity to prevent attacks and improve outcomes. Clinical features, patient behaviours and characteristics, physiological factors, environmental data and biomarkers are all associated with asthma attacks and can be used in asthma exacerbation prediction models. Recent studies have better characterized children at risk of an attack: history of a severe exacerbation in the previous 12 months, poor adherence and current poor control are important features which should alert healthcare professionals to the need for remedial action. There is increasing interest in the use of biomarkers. A number of novel biomarkers, including patterns of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath, show promise. Biomarkers are likely to be of greatest utility if measured frequently and combined with other measures. To date, most prediction models are based on epidemiological data and population-based risk. The use of digital technology affords the opportunity to collect large amounts of real-time data, including clinical and physiological measurements and combine these with environmental data to develop personal risk scores. These developments need to be matched by changes in clinical guidelines away from a focus on current asthma control and stepwise escalation in drug therapy towards inclusion of personal risk scores and tailored management strategies including nonpharmacological approaches. There have been significant steps towards personalized prediction models of asthma attacks. The utility of such models needs to be tested in the ability not only to predict attacks but also to reduce them.

  14. Low gut microbiota diversity in early infancy precedes asthma at school age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, T R; Jakobsson, H E; Andersson, A F; Björkstén, B; Engstrand, L; Jenmalm, M C

    2014-06-01

    Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first year of life is associated with allergic diseases in infancy, but little is known how early microbial diversity is related to allergic disease later in school age. To assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to the prevalence of different allergic diseases in school age, such as asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) and eczema. The microbial diversity and composition was analysed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454 pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1 week, 1 month and 12 months of age in 47 infants which were subsequently assessed for allergic disease and skin prick test reactivity at 7 years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830). Children developing asthma (n = 8) had a lower diversity of the total microbiota than non-asthmatic children at 1 week (P = 0.04) and 1 month (P = 0.003) of age, whereas allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (n = 13), eczema (n = 12) and positive skin prick reactivity (n = 14) at 7 years of age did not associate with the gut microbiota diversity. Neither was asthma associated with the microbiota composition later in infancy (at 12 months). Children having IgE-associated eczema in infancy and subsequently developing asthma had lower microbial diversity than those that did not. There were no significant differences, however, in relative abundance of bacterial phyla and genera between children with or without allergic disease. Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first month of life was associated with asthma but not ARC in children at 7 years of age. Measures affecting microbial colonization of the infant during the first month of life may impact asthma development in childhood. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The Effects of Asthma on School Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Barbara; Lowenthal, Mark

    1995-01-01

    Factors which may affect school performance in children with asthma, including absenteeism, learning disabilities, psychological functioning, and medications, are reviewed. Recommendations are made to assist teachers in creating a classroom environment which promotes optimal academic and social development of students with asthma. (Author/DB)

  16. Association between asthma and dysphonia: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bumjung; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2016-09-01

    We investigated whether asthma predisposes patients to organic laryngeal lesions or increases dysphonia in those without organic laryngeal lesions. We performed a cross-sectional study with data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey; 19,330 subjects from 2008 through 2011 were included. The associations of asthma with organic laryngeal lesions and dysphonia were analyzed using a simple/multiple logistic regression analysis with complex sampling while adjusting for confounding factors (age, sex, smoking status, stress level, and body mass index) that could contribute to dysphonia. Compared with non-asthma participants, the asthma patients tended to be older and female and to have higher stress levels. These factors were associated with dysphonia (Age, AOR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.14 = 1.23, P dysphonia. Compared with non-asthma participants, asthma patients who had not taken asthma medication recently showed a higher AOR (1.62; 95% CI = 1.0-2.42) for dysphonia, and asthma patients who had taken asthma medication recently showed the highest adjusted odds ratio for dysphonia (AOR = 1.97; 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.28-3.02, P = 0.001). On multiple logistic regression analysis, vocal nodules, laryngeal polyps, and laryngitis were not associated with asthma (all P > 0.05). Asthma patients are predisposed to subjective dysphonia due to demographic and clinical characteristics (older age, female, and higher stress level) as well as to asthma itself. However, asthma was not associated with organic laryngeal lesions in this study.

  17. Obesity and Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is more prevalent in obese compared with normal weight subjects. Our aim has been to review current knowledge of the impact of obesity on asthma severity, asthma control, and response to therapy.Several studies have shown that overweight and obesity is associated with more severe asthma...... and impaired quality of life compared with normal weight individuals. Furthermore, obesity is associated with poorer asthma control, as assessed by asthma control questionnaires, limitations in daily activities, breathlessness and wheezing, use of rescue medication, unscheduled doctor visits, emergency...... department visits, and hospitalizations for acute asthma. Studies of the impact of a high body mass index (BMI) on response to asthma therapy have, however, revealed conflicting results. Most studies show that overweight and obesity is associated with less favorable response to asthma therapy with regard...

  18. A multifaceted community-based asthma intervention in Chicago: effects of trigger reduction and self-management education on asthma morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyk, Mary; Banda, Elizabeth; Chisum, Gay; Weems, Dolores; Liu, Yangyang; Damitz, Maureen; Williams, Rhonda; Persky, Victoria

    2013-09-01

    Home-based, multifaceted interventions have been effective in reducing asthma morbidity in children. However, identification of independent components that contribute to outcomes and delineating effectiveness by level of asthma symptoms would help to refine the intervention and target appropriate populations. A community health educator led asthma intervention implemented in a low-income African-American neighborhood included asthma management education, individually tailored low-cost asthma home trigger remediation, and referrals to social and medical agencies, when appropriate. Changes in asthma morbidity measures were assessed in relation to implementation of individual intervention components using multivariable logistic regression. Among the 218 children who completed the year-long program, there were significant reductions in measures of asthma morbidity, including symptoms, urgent care visits, emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, missed school days, and missed work days for caretakers. We also found significant decreases in the prevalence of many home asthma triggers and improvements in asthma management practices. Improvement in caretaker's ability to manage the child's asthma was associated with reduction in ED visits for asthma and uncontrolled asthma. Specific home interventions, such as repair of water leaks and reduced exposure to plants, dust, clutter and stuffed toys, may be related to reduction in asthma morbidity. This program was effective in reducing asthma morbidity in low-income African-American children and identified specific interventions as possible areas to target in future projects. Furthermore, the intervention was useful in children with persistent asthma symptoms as well as those with less frequent asthma exacerbations.

  19. Asthma and aerobic exercise: a review of the empirical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avallone, Kimberly M; McLeish, Alison C

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of the present article was to provide a comprehensive review of the empirical literature on the association between asthma and aerobic exercise among adults. A literature search was conducted utilizing electronic search engines (i.e., PsycINFO and PubMed) using the following keyword algorithms: asthma AND (exercise OR physical activity). These searches resulted in approximately 5665 citations. Only results that were directly relevant were included in the present review. Overall, empirical evidence suggests that (1) individuals with asthma are less likely to engage in physical activity than those without asthma, (2) individuals with asthma are not biased in their subjective reporting of symptoms during aerobic exercise, (3) physical inactivity among individuals with asthma is associated with negative health consequences and increased asthma-related difficulties, and (4) regular aerobic exercise improves asthma symptom management, lung function, and mental health.

  20. How can adherence to asthma medication be enhanced? Triangulation of key asthma stakeholders' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez, Sandra; Bacon, Simon L; Lacoste, Guillaume; Lavoie, Kim L

    2016-12-01

    Adherence to daily asthma controller medication has been shown to be the most effective component of asthma self-management; however, patient's adherence to asthma medication remains poor. This study aimed to understand how patients' long-term asthma controller medication adherence may be improved and facilitated by comparing key asthma stakeholders' perspectives. Six focus group interviews including 38 asthma stakeholders (n = 13 patients, n = 13 pulmonologist physicians, and n = 12 allied healthcare professionals) were conducted. Interviews were qualitatively analysed. Although similar themes were brought up across different asthma stakeholders, the way in which they were framed differed across stakeholders. The most salient discussion revolved around the content and the moment in which asthma education should be approached to facilitate patients' adherence to asthma medication. Asthma medication adherence is a complex process and successful interventions aimed at its improvement would benefit from: (a) making an effort to understand patients' experiences and negotiate the treatment regimen, rather than imposing recommendations; (b) considering treatment as a shared responsibility involving the patient, the healthcare professional(s), and the patients' social networks; and, (c) taking into account different stakeholders' concerns, needs, perspectives, and knowledge.

  1. [Comparative analysis of conventional pulmonary function test results in children with asthma or cough variant asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jie; An, Shu-Hua; Gao, Wen-Jie; Du, Wen-Jin; Sun, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Man; Yao, Cong-Zhuo

    2013-03-01

    To compare the conventional pulmonary function test results of children with asthma or cough variant asthma (CVA). A total of 140 children, who were diagnosed with asthma or CVA from May 2010 to May 2011, were divided into acute asthma attack (n=50), asthma remission (n=50) and CVA groups (n=40); 30 healthy children were included as a control group. The forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory flow after 25% of vital capacity has been expelled (FEF25), forced expiratory flow after 50% of vital capacity has been expelled (FEF50), forced expiratory flow after 75% of vital capacity has been expelled (FEF75) and maximal midexpiratory flow (MMEF75/25) were measured. The mean percent predicted values of all the above indices were lower than 80% in the acute asthma attack group, with FEF50, FEF75 and MMEF75/25 declining markedly; the mean percent predicted values of FEF75 and MMEF75/25 were lower than 80% in the CVA group. All the pulmonary function indices in the acute asthma attack group were lower than those in the control group. The mean percent predicted values of FVC, FEV1, FEF25 and MMEF75/25 in the asthma remission and CVA groups were lower than in the control group. All the pulmonary function indices in the acute asthma attack group were lower than in the asthma remission and CVA groups, but there were no significant differences between the asthma remission and CVA groups. There is small and large airway dysfunction, particularly small airway dysfunction, in children with acute asthma attack. Children with CVA present mainly with mild small airway dysfunction, as do those with asthma in remission.

  2. Severe asthma and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossny, Elham; Caraballo, Luis; Casale, Thomas; El-Gamal, Yehia; Rosenwasser, Lanny

    2017-01-01

    Severe asthma has a great impact on the quality of life (QOL) of patients and their families. The magnitude of this morbidity is affected by several personal factors including age. Appropriate asthma control and modifications of social roles and activities are expected to improve QOL. Biologics, primarily monoclonal antibodies, have been developed to target specific pathways and molecules important in the pathogenesis of asthma. The use of biologics has shown some promising effects on the QOL of patients with severe recalcitrant asthma. Other potential measures involve targeting risk factors and comorbidities and improving the levels of adherence to therapy. This article briefly reviews the impact of severe asthma on QOL and the potential methods to combat this morbidity including the available therapeutic biologics.

  3. Role of Leukotrienes and Leukotriene Modifiers in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Montuschi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Leukotrienes (LTs, including cysteinyl LTs (CysLTs and LTB4, are potent lipid mediators that are pivotal in the pathophysiology of asthma phenotypes. At least two receptor subtypes for CysLTs – CysLT1 and CysLT2 – have been identified. Most of the pathophysiological effects of CysLTs in asthma, including increased airway smooth muscle activity, microvascular permeability and airway mucus secretion, are mediated by the activation of the CysLT1 receptor. LTB4 may have a role in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness, severe asthma and asthma exacerbations. Although generally less effective than inhaled glucocorticoids, CysLT1 receptor antagonists can be given orally as monotherapy in patients with persistent mild asthma. In patients with more severe asthma, CysLT1 receptor antagonists can be combined with inhaled glucocorticoids. This therapeutic strategy improves asthma control and enables the dose of inhaled glucocorticoids to be reduced, while maintaining similar efficacy. The identification of subgroups of patients with asthma who respond to CysLT1 receptor antagonists is relevant for asthma management, as the response to these drugs is variable. The potential anti-remodeling effect of CysLT1 receptor antagonists might be important for preventing or reversing airway structural changes in patients with asthma. This review discusses the role of LTs in asthma and the therapeutic implications of the pharmacological modulation of the LT pathway for asthma.

  4. High prevalence of asthma in Danish elite canoe- and kayak athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Svenningsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is common in elite athletes, but our knowledge of asthma in elite canoe and kayak athletes is limited. The aim of the present prospective cross-sectional study was therefore to investigate the prevalence of asthma, including asthma-like symptoms, exhaled nitric oxide, and airway reactivity...

  5. High prevalence of asthma in Danish elite canoe- and kayak athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Svenningsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is common in elite athletes, but our knowledge of asthma in elite canoe and kayak athletes is limited. The aim of the present prospective cross-sectional study was therefore to investigate the prevalence of asthma, including asthma-like symptoms, exhaled nitric oxide, and airway reactivity...... to mannitol in Danish elite canoe and kayak athletes...

  6. Sustained efficacy and safety of a 300IR daily dose of a sublingual solution of birch pollen allergen extract in adults with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Worm, Margitta; Rak, Sabina; de Blay, Frédéric; Malling, Hans-Jorgen; Melac, Michel; Cadic, Véronique; Zeldin, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) due to birch pollen is a growing health concern in Europe. Here, we report the efficacy and safety of 300IR birch pollen sublingual solution administered discontinuously for 2 consecutive years to patients with birch-associated allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Methods Birch pollen-allergic adults were randomized in this double blind study to 300IR birch pollen sublingual solution or placebo, daily, starting 4 months before and continuing through the ...

  7. Exercise and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asthma. So don’t give up on an active lifestyle. Find out more about asthma. Utility navigation Donate Annual meeting Browse your conditions Check pollen counts Continuing education center Find an allergist / immunologist Journals ...

  8. Asthma and school

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peak flow a habit! Signs of an asthma attack Stay away from asthma triggers Review Date 2/15/2016 Updated by: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. ...

  9. Exercise and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity ... Body Almost every child (and adult) with asthma can benefit from sports and physical activity . Also, asthma should not prevent young athletes from enjoying a full athletic career. The ...

  10. Allergies, asthma, and pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000489.htm Allergies, asthma, and pollen To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. It is ...

  11. Asthma and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Breathing Easier Asthma and Schools Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of Contents Asthma is one of the leading causes of school absenteeism. On average, in a classroom of 30 ...

  12. Smoking and asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000504.htm Smoking and asthma To use the sharing features on ... your allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Smoking is a trigger for many people who have ...

  13. Platelet aggregation, secretion, and coagulation changes in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukyilmaz, Gonul; Soyer, Ozge U; Buyuktiryaki, Betul; Alioglu, Bulent; Dallar, Yildiz

    2014-10-01

    The chronic inflammation in asthma evolves by cells including eosinophils, mast cells and lymphocytes. Despite their principal function in hemostasis, platelets contribute to pathogenesis of asthma that activation of platelets occurs following antigen provocation and during asthma attack. Our aim was to evaluate the platelet functions and other hemostatic features of children with asthma, both during symptom-free period and asthma attack. We enrolled patients with asthma attack (n = 33), mild intermittent asthma (n = 18), mild persistent asthma (n = 15) and healthy children (n = 20). Demographic characteristics and disease-related features were noted. Platelet aggregation and secretion tests (expressed as ATP release) were performed by lumiaggregometer method by stimulation with collagen, epinephrine, ADP, thrombin, ristocetin and arachidonic acid. Plasma levels of D-dimer, factor VIII (FVIII) and von Willebrand factor (vWF) were assessed. There were no differences in platelet aggregation induced by agonists between study groups. ATP release from platelets of patients with asthma exacerbation induced by ADP was lower compared with mild intermittent asthma (P asthma attack than mild intermittent (P = 0.039) and mild persistent asthma (P = 0.011) and controls (P = 0.018). vWF measurements were higher in children with asthma attack than other study groups (P = 0.001). However, FVIII was increased in patients with severe asthma attack. Asthma is a disease in which many immune cells play a role, one of which is the platelet. Distinctions in platelet secretion profiles and plasma levels of vWF and FVIII provide evidence that coagulation mechanisms might be critical for asthma pathogenesis.

  14. Asthma Severity in patients initiating controller monotherapy versus combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diette, Gregory B; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L; Allen-Ramey, Felicia; Hopper, April; Sajjan, Shiva G; Markson, Leona E

    2011-04-01

    Asthma treatment guidelines recommend medications based on the level of asthma control. To evaluate differences in asthma control between patients who initiated asthma controller monotherapy versus combination therapy. Children (5-16 years; n = 488) and adults (17-80 years; n = 530) with asthma and no controller therapy in the prior 6 months were included. Telephone surveys were conducted within 5 days of filling a new asthma controller prescription with either the caregiver of children or the adult patient. Demographics, asthma control before therapy, and asthma-related resource use were assessed for patients initiating monotherapy (filling one asthma controller prescription) and combination therapy (filling more than one controller medication or a fixed-dose combination). Mean pediatric age was 10 years; 53% were male. Mean adult age was 47 years; 25% were male. There were no significant differences in asthma control score between patients receiving monotherapy and combination therapy. Children on combination therapy did not have more nighttime awakening or short-acting β-agonist use but were more likely to have been hospitalized due to asthma attack (p = .05) and have more unscheduled (p = .0374) and scheduled (p = .009) physician visits. Adults on combination therapy were more likely to have been hospitalized due to asthma attack (p asthma (p asthma control scores in the 4 weeks before index medication suggests that asthma severity during a treatment-free period did not differ significantly for patients initiating controller monotherapy versus combination therapy. From these findings, it appears that although physicians may not focus on asthma control when choosing the intensity of initial controller therapy, the intensity of health-care encounters may be an influence.

  15. Vital Signs: Asthma in Children - United States, 2001-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahran, Hatice S; Bailey, Cathy M; Damon, Scott A; Garbe, Paul L; Breysse, Patrick N

    2018-02-09

    control strategies, including asthma trigger reduction, appropriate guidelines-based medical management, and asthma education for children, parents, and others involved in asthma care.

  16. Pseudo-asthma: when cough, wheezing, and dyspnea are not asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Miles; Abu-Hasan, Mutasim

    2007-10-01

    Although asthma is the most common cause of cough, wheeze, and dyspnea in children and adults, asthma is often attributed inappropriately to symptoms from other causes. Cough that is misdiagnosed as asthma can occur with pertussis, cystic fibrosis, primary ciliary dyskinesia, airway abnormalities such as tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia, chronic purulent or suppurative bronchitis in young children, and habit-cough syndrome. The respiratory sounds that occur with the upper airway obstruction caused by the various manifestations of the vocal cord dysfunction syndrome or the less common exercise-induced laryngomalacia are often mischaracterized as wheezing and attributed to asthma. The perception of dyspnea is a prominent symptom of hyperventilation attacks. This can occur in those with or without asthma, and patients with asthma may not readily distinguish the perceived dyspnea of a hyperventilation attack from the acute airway obstruction of asthma. Dyspnea on exertion, in the absence of other symptoms of asthma or an unequivocal response to albuterol, is most likely a result of other causes. Most common is the dyspnea associated with normal exercise limitation, but causes of dyspnea on exertion can include other physiologic abnormalities including exercise-induced vocal cord dysfunction, exercise-induced laryngomalacia, exercise-induced hyperventilation, and exercise-induced supraventricular tachycardia. A careful history, attention to the nature of the respiratory sounds that are present, spirometry, exercise testing, and blood-gas measurement provide useful data to sort out the various causes and avoid inappropriate treatment of these pseudo-asthma clinical manifestations.

  17. Genetics of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    Asthma runs in families, and children of asthmatic parents are at increased risk of asthma. Prediction of disease risk is pivotal for the clinician when counselling atopic families. However, this is not always an easy task bearing in mind the vast and ever-increasing knowledge about asthma genetics...... of methods and advances in asthma genetics in an attempt to help the clinician keep track of the most important knowledge in the field....

  18. Parent and child asthma illness representations: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonney, Jennifer T; Gerald, Lynn B; Insel, Kathleen C

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to synthesize the current literature on parent and child asthma illness representations and their consequent impact on parent-child asthma shared management. This systematic review was conducted in concordance with the PRISMA statement. An electronic search of five computerized databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane, and EMBASE) was conducted using the following key words: asthma, illness representation, and child. Due to the limited number of articles identified, the search was broadened to include illness perceptions as well. Studies were included if they were specific to asthma and included parent and/or child asthma illness representations or perception, were published after 2000, and available in English. Fifteen articles were selected for inclusion. All of the articles are descriptive studies that used cross-sectional designs. Seven of the studies used parent and child participants, eight used parents only, and none used only child participants. None of the selected studies describe child asthma illness representations, and only three describe parental asthma illness representations. Domains of illness representations, including symptoms, timeline, consequences, cause, and controllability were described in the remaining articles. Symptoms and controllability appear to have the most influence on parental asthma management practices. Parents prefer symptomatic or intermittent asthma management and frequently cite concerns regarding daily controller medication use. Parents also primarily rely on their own objective symptom observations rather than the child's report of symptoms. Asthma illness representations are an important area of future study to better understand parent-child shared asthma management.

  19. Lifestyle of young Australian adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenbin; Chikritzhs, Tanya; Lee, Andy H

    2015-03-01

    Asthma is a highly prevalent disease that may affect the lifestyle adopted by young adults. This study investigated whether asthma status influences fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity level, tobacco smoking, and alcohol drinking behavior of young adults in Australia. Information of 2619 participants aged 18 to 29 years was extracted from the 2007-2008 Australian National Health Survey database. The level of physical activity and fruit consumption were found to be similar between young adults with and without asthma. Participants with asthma symptoms in the past 12 months were more likely to achieve the dietary recommendation for vegetable intake, but they tended to smoke tobacco and consume alcohol above safe levels. It may be necessary to develop prevention strategies targeting young adults with asthma that include screening for harmful use of substances. © 2012 APJPH.

  20. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for an extended time to manage symptoms during asthma attacks. Outdoors: Get rid of water that collects around ... of allergy and asthma: latest updates. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep . 2014;14:419. PMID 24488258 ... Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. ...

  1. Clinical phenotypes of asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bel, Elisabeth H.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder and, over the years, many different clinical subtypes of asthma have been described. A precise definition of asthma phenotypes is now becoming more and more important, not only for a better understanding of pathophysiologic

  2. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data has established increasing adiposity as a risk factor for incident asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and asthma are incompletely understood. In the present paper, we review current knowledge of possible mechanisms mediating the observed...... association between obesity and asthma....

  3. Allergy in severe asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Giacco, Stefano R.; Bakirtas, A.; Bel, E.; Custovic, A.; Diamant, Z.; Hamelmann, E.; Heffler, E.; Kalayci, O.; Saglani, S.; Sergejeva, S.; Seys, S.; Simpson, A.; Bjermer, Leif

    It is well recognized that atopic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma, both in adults and in children. However, the role of allergy in severe asthma is still under debate. The term 'Severe Asthma' encompasses a highly heterogeneous group of patients who require treatment on steps

  4. Monitoring asthma in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, Marille W.; Baraldi, Eugenio; Brand, Paul L. P.; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Eber, Ernst; Frischer, Thomas; Hedlin, Gunilla; Kulkarni, Neeta; Lex, Christiane; Makela, Mika J.; Mantzouranis, Eva; Moeller, Alexander; Pavord, Ian; Piacentini, Giorgio; Price, David; Rottier, Bart L.; Saglani, Sejal; Sly, Peter D.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Tonia, Thomy; Turner, Steve; Wooler, Edwina; Carlsen, Karin C. Lodrup

    The goal of asthma treatment is to obtain clinical control and reduce future risks to the patient. To reach this goal in children with asthma, ongoing monitoring is essential. While all components of asthma, such as symptoms, lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and inflammation, may exist

  5. The circadian clock and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrington, Hannah J; Farrow, Stuart N; Loudon, Andrew S; Ray, David W

    2014-01-01

    It is characteristic of asthma that symptoms worsen overnight, particularly in the early hours of the morning. Nocturnal symptoms in asthma are common and are an important indicator for escalation of treatment. An extensive body of research has demonstrated that nocturnal symptoms of cough and dyspnea are accompanied by circadian variations in airway inflammation and physiologic variables, including airflow limitation and airways hyper-responsiveness. The molecular apparatus that underpins circadian variations, controlled by so called 'clock' genes, has recently been characterised. Clock genes control circadian rhythms both centrally, in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the brain and peripherally, within every organ of the body. Here, we will discuss how clock genes regulate circadian rhythms. We will focus particularly on the peripheral lung clock and the peripheral immune clock and discuss how these might relate to both the pathogenesis and treatment of asthma.

  6. Deciphering Asthma Biomarkers with Protein Profiling Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhizhou Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, resulting in bronchial hyperresponsiveness with every allergen exposure. It is now clear that asthma is not a single disease, but rather a multifaceted syndrome that results from a variety of biologic mechanisms. Asthma is further problematic given that the disease consists of many variants, each with its own etiologic and pathophysiologic factors, including different cellular responses and inflammatory phenotypes. These facets make the rapid and accurate diagnosis (not to mention treatments of asthma extremely difficult. Protein biomarkers can serve as powerful detection tools in both clinical and basic research applications. Recent endeavors from biomedical researchers have developed technical platforms, such as cytokine antibody arrays, that have been employed and used to further the global analysis of asthma biomarker studies. In this review, we discuss potential asthma biomarkers involved in the pathophysiologic process and eventual pathogenesis of asthma, how these biomarkers are being utilized, and how further testing methods might help improve the diagnosis and treatment strain that current asthma patients suffer.

  7. Perceptions of parents and children regarding asthma management responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekim, Ayfer; Ocakci, Ayse Ferda

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceptions of children and parents regarding shared responsibilities for asthma management. The study included 72 children with asthma who were between the ages of 7 and 12 years and their parents. Asthma management responsibilities were assessed by the "Asthma Responsibility Questionnaire." Disagreements occurred between parents and children on assuming responsibility. Children reported higher asthma management responsibility scores than reported by parents for them. It is important that nurses provide education and counseling to both children and their families to ensure that children take responsibility for disease management. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The level of diagnostic assessment in severe asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Bülow, Anna; Backer, Vibeke; Bodtger, Uffe

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Systematic assessment of patients with severe asthma is pivotal to decide which patients are eligible to new biological therapies. However, the level of diagnostic work-up in patients with severe asthma is only poorly investigated. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: To describe the diagnostic work......-up in a complete population of patients with severe asthma including: objective confirmation of the asthma diagnosis, and identification of potential treatment barriers, such as poor adherence and poor inhaler technique. METHODS: A retrospective cross-sectional multicenter study was performed in 2013. We evaluated...... patient record forms of all patients (aged 18-65 years) consecutively referred with asthma to one of five respiratory outpatient clinics over two years. Patients were included in the study, if they fulfilled ERS/ATS guidelines for having severe asthma. RESULTS: Among 1563 patients with asthma, 98 (6...

  9. The relationship between migraine headache and asthma features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirican, Nigar; Demirci, Seden; Cakir, Munire

    2017-06-01

    Migraine and asthma are comorbid chronic disorders with episodic attacks thought to involve inflammatory and neurological mechanisms. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationship of asthma features between the asthma patients with migraine and those without migraine headache. A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2015 to June 2016. Physician-diagnosed asthma patients aged 18 years and above were included. Demographic data, pulmonary function test and treatment of asthma were recorded. Asthma control was assessed using the asthma control test (ACT) and asthma control questionnaire (ACQ). The diagnosis of migraine was made by the neurologist with face-to face examinations based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition beta (ICHD-III-beta) criteria. Data about the age at onset, frequency of headache attacks, duration of headache attack, the presence of aura, and severity of headache were recorded. The severity of headache was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS). Overall 121 asthma patients were included in this study. Migraine was found to be present in 32 (26.4%) of patients. No statistically significant difference was found between asthma group and asthma with migraine groups in terms of pulmonary function test parameters. The mean ACT score in asthma with migraine patients group was significantly lower than the asthma groups. Morever, in the group asthma with migraine, a negative significant correlations were found between ACT scores with VAS scores. This study demonstrates that migraine headache may be associated with poor asthma control. On the other hand, it should not be forgotten that ACT is a subjective test and can be affected from by many clinical parameters.

  10. Parents' asthma information needs and preferences for school-based asthma support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Aloola, Noha Abdullah; Nissen, Lisa; Alewairdhi, Huda Abdullaziz; Al Faryan, Nawaf; Saini, Bandana

    2017-11-01

    This study sought to investigate parents' needs and preferences for school-based asthma support in Saudi Arabian primary schools. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted in the period between November 2015 and February 2016, with a convenience sample that comprised Saudi parents and carers of children with asthma. Recruitment of participants was primarily driven through Saudi primary schools; passive snowballing and social networks were used to boost participation rates further. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, translated and data were thematically organised using a latent content analysis approach. Twenty interviews were conducted. Six themes emerged from the interviews and were grouped into three major categories: (1) general asthma management issues; (2) school-based asthma management issues; and (3) communication dissatisfaction. Participants expressed concern at schools' social and physical environments and a lack of confidence in the ability of schools to manage their child's asthma, especially when their child was ill. Most of the participants advocated for staff training and school community engagement to improve the management of asthma in Saudi primary schools. This research clearly describes a need for school-based asthma support, including asthma-related policies, procedures and education on asthma and first aid in Saudi primary schools.

  11. Epigenetic Mechanisms in Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Avery; Vercelli, Donata

    2016-03-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases are among the most prevalent chronic noncommunicable diseases of childhood, but the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms are poorly understood. Because epigenetic mechanisms link gene regulation to environmental cues and developmental trajectories, their contribution to asthma and allergy pathogenesis is under active investigation. DNA methylation signatures associated with concurrent disease and with the development of asthma during childhood asthma have been identified, but their significance is not easily interpretable. On the other hand, the characterization of early epigenetic predictors of asthma points to a potential role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating the inception of, and the susceptibility to, this disease.

  12. Update on Exercise-Induced Asthma. A Report of the Olympic Exercise Asthma Summit Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, William W.; Joyner, David M.

    1997-01-01

    Summarizes results from the Olympic Exercise Asthma Summit Conference, offering the latest on identifying and managing exercise-induced asthma (EIA). Concludes that effective pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment is available, but EIA is underrecognized and underdiagnosed. Physicians should look for it in all patients, including school…

  13. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Diamant, Zuzana; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant impact on asthma incidence and manifestations. The purpose of the review is to discuss recent observations regarding the association between obesity and asthma focusing on underlying mechanisms, clinical presentation, response to therapy and effect...... of weight reduction. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical and epidemiological studies indicate that obese patients with asthma may represent a unique phenotype, which is more difficult to control, less responsive to asthma medications and by that may have higher healthcare utilization. A number of common comorbidities...... have been linked to both obesity and asthma, and may, therefore, contribute to the obese-asthma phenotype. Furthermore, recently published studies indicate that even a modest weight reduction can improve clinical manifestations and outcome of asthma. SUMMARY: Compared with normal-weight patients, obese...

  14. Prenatal stress, prematurity and asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medsker, Brock; Forno, Erick; Simhan, Hyagriv; Celedón, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting millions of children in the U.S. and worldwide. Prematurity is a risk factor for asthma, and certain ethnic or racial minorities such as Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic Blacks are disproportionately affected by both prematurity and asthma. In this review, we examine current evidence to support maternal psychosocial stress as a putative link between prematurity and asthma, while also focusing on disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and immune responses as potential underlying mechanisms for stress-induced “premature asthma”. Prenatal stress may not only cause abnormalities in the HPA axis but also epigenetic changes in the fetal glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1), leading to impaired glucocorticoid metabolism. Moreover, maternal stress can alter fetal cytokine balance, favoring Th2 (allergic) immune responses characteristic of atopic asthma: IL-6, which has been associated with premature labor, can promote Th2 responses by stimulating production of IL-4 and IL-13. Given a link among stress, prematurity, and asthma, future research should include birth cohorts aimed at confirming and better characterizing “premature asthma”. If confirmed, clinical trials of prenatal maternal stress reduction would be warranted to reduce the burden of these common co-morbidities. While awaiting the results of such studies, sound policies to prevent domestic and community violence (e.g. from firearms) are justified, not only by public safety but also by growing evidence of detrimental effects of violence-induced stress on psychiatric and somatic health. PMID:26676148

  15. Asthma management in New York City schools: A physical education teacher perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Qi Ying Li; Avalos, Maria Ivanna; Reznik, Marina

    2018-04-18

    Physical education (PE) teachers may be the first to assist students with asthma attacks during PE class. This study explores the PE teachers' perspectives on in-school asthma management and barriers to physical activity (PA) in children with asthma attending urban elementary schools. We conducted qualitative semi-structured interviews with 16 PE teachers from 10 Bronx, NY elementary schools. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and independently coded. Content analysis was used to identify 10 major themes common across interviews which were then categorized into 3 domains. Three domains were identified: 1) school procedures and policies for asthma management; 2) role of PE teachers in asthma management; and 3) barriers to PA for students. Most PE teachers were unaware of written procedures for acute asthma management and did not receive asthma-specific training. Many PE teachers expressed confidence regarding asthma management. PE teachers identified students with asthma most commonly through communication with students. The PE teachers utilized various methods to manage asthma but all relied on the nurse to handle acute asthma symptoms. Several barriers to PA were determined, including PE teachers' unawareness of NYS PE requirements, lack of gym facilities, inclement weather, inconsistent PE class time, asthma diagnosis, and having no asthma inhalers at the nurse's office. PE teachers' perspectives on asthma management may influence the way asthma is handled at school. The results from this study highlight several barriers that can be targeted in future interventions to improve asthma management.

  16. Role of Obesity in Asthma: Mechanisms and Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Hayley A; Wood, Lisa G; Gibson, Peter G

    2017-08-01

    Obesity is a commonly reported comorbidity in asthma, particularly in severe asthma. Obese asthmatics are highly symptomatic with a poor quality of life, despite using high-dose inhaled corticosteroids. While the clinical manifestations have been documented, the aetiologies of obese-asthma remain unclear. Several potential mechanisms have been proposed, including poor diet quality, physical inactivity and consequent accrual of excess adipose tissue. Each of these factors independently activates inflammatory pathways, potentially exerting effects in the airways. Because the origins of obesity are multifactorial, it is now believed there are multiple obese-asthma phenotypes, with varied aetiologies and clinical consequences. In this review, we will describe the clinical implications of obesity in people with asthma, our current understanding of the mechanisms driving this association and describe recently proposed obese-asthma phenotypes. We will then discuss how asthma management is complicated by obesity, and provide graded recommendations for the management of obesity in this population.

  17. Severe Asthma: The Evolution of Patient-directed Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Michael; Kamp, David

    2014-01-01

    Severe asthma has been increasingly recognized as a heterogenous disease with varied clinical characteristics and pathophysiological processes. Patients with severe asthma suffer significant impairment in their daily life and impose a substantial burden on health care resources. The recent work of consortia groups has led to an improved definition of severe asthma as well as better characterization of the patients with severe disease. Different approaches, including unbiased cluster analyses, have been utilized to identify severe asthma phenotypes (subgroups) defined by their clinical characteristics and immune processes. Recognition of severe asthma phenotypes has assisted the development of targeted therapies by identifying patients more likely to respond to the specific agent. In this article, we discuss the evolution of our understanding of severe asthma and review the currently available therapies and promising drugs in development. In addition, we examine the role of bronchoscopy in severe asthma and the emerging evidence regarding bronchial thermoplasty. PMID:25580071

  18. Barriers to Asthma Management for School Nurses: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley Nadeau, Ellen; Toronto, Coleen E

    2016-04-01

    Childhood asthma is a growing health concern. Asthma is the most common chronic illness of childhood and a leading cause of emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and school absenteeism. School nurses play a valuable role in asthma management. The purpose of this integrative review is to examine barriers to asthma management for school nurses in the school setting. Findings revealed multiple barriers school nurses encounter in managing asthma. Six themes emerged that included lack of resources and support, insufficient time, communication challenges, limited knowledge, and lack of awareness of school nurses' expertise. Students, parents, primary care physicians, school administration, staff, and school nurses themselves all play a role in constructing barriers to asthma management. There is a need for school nurses and school nurse leaders to focus efforts to develop strategies to overcome barriers to ensure evidence-based, best practice management of asthma in the school setting. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Inspiratory muscle training for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ivanizia S; Fregonezi, Guilherme A F; Dias, Fernando A L; Ribeiro, Cibele T D; Guerra, Ricardo O; Ferreira, Gardenia M H

    2013-09-08

    In some people with asthma, expiratory airflow limitation, premature closure of small airways, activity of inspiratory muscles at the end of expiration and reduced pulmonary compliance may lead to lung hyperinflation. With the increase in lung volume, chest wall geometry is modified, shortening the inspiratory muscles and leaving them at a sub-optimal position in their length-tension relationship. Thus, the capacity of these muscles to generate tension is reduced. An increase in cross-sectional area of the inspiratory muscles caused by hypertrophy could offset the functional weakening induced by hyperinflation. Previous studies have shown that inspiratory muscle training promotes diaphragm hypertrophy in healthy people and patients with chronic heart failure, and increases the proportion of type I fibres and the size of type II fibres of the external intercostal muscles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, its effects on clinical outcomes in patients with asthma are unclear. To evaluate the efficacy of inspiratory muscle training with either an external resistive device or threshold loading in people with asthma. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), ClinicalTrials.gov and reference lists of included studies. The latest search was performed in November 2012. We included randomised controlled trials that involved the use of an external inspiratory muscle training device versus a control (sham or no inspiratory training device) in people with stable asthma. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included five studies involving 113 adults. Participants in four studies had mild to moderate asthma and the fifth study included participants independent of their asthma severity. There were substantial differences between the studies, including the training protocol, duration of training sessions (10 to 30

  20. Mapping the urban asthma experience: Using qualitative GIS to understand contextual factors affecting asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddem, Shimrit; Barg, Frances K; Glanz, Karen; Jackson, Tara; Green, Sarah; George, Maureen

    2015-09-01

    Asthma is complex and connected to a number of factors including access to healthcare, crime and violence, and environmental triggers. A mixed method approach was used to examine the experiences of urban people with asthma in controlling their asthma symptoms. The study started with an initial phase of qualitative interviews in West Philadelphia, a primarily poor African American community. Data from qualitative, semi-structured interviews indicated that stress, environmental irritants, and environmental allergens were the most salient triggers of asthma. Based on the interviews, the team identified six neighborhood factors to map including crime, housing vacancy, illegal dumping, tree canopy and parks. These map layers were combined into a final composite map. These combined methodologies contextualized respondents' perceptions in the framework of the actual community and built environment which tells a more complete story about their experience with asthma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. International trends in admissions and drug sales for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R; Anderson, H R; Strachan, D P; Maier, W; Watson, L

    2006-02-01

    To test whether national patterns of asthma drug use, particularly inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), are related to the rate of acute severe asthma exacerbations. The relation of international trends in hospital admissions for asthma with asthma drug sales was examined using country-specific regressions over the period 1990-1999. Pooled estimates of the regression coefficients were calculated using random effects models. Data on asthma admissions and asthma drug sales (including the sub-category ICS) were obtained from 11 countries. There was a negative relationship between falling admissions and rising sales of respiratory drugs and ICS in 9 of these 11 countries. A pooled estimate of the change in asthma admission rate per 10,000 associated with a unit increase in sales rate was -6.3 (95% CI -10.4 - -2.3) for all asthma drugs and -11.2 (95% CI -19.7 - -2.8) for ICS. At the national level, there is good evidence that over the last decade, increased sales of asthma drugs, and ICS in particular, were associated with a decline in rates of hospital admission for asthma. This is consistent with a beneficial effect of increasing use of asthma drugs, but other explanations such as decreasing prevalence could also be responsible.

  2. Asthma & COPD--IQPC's Second Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catley, Matthew C

    2010-09-01

    The International Quality & Productivity Center's (IQPC) Second Asthma & COPD conference, held in Philadelphia, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of asthma and COPD. This conference report highlights selected presentations on mAb treatments for asthma, including targeting IL-5, IL-13, IL-9 and TNFa, CCR3 inhibitors, histamine H4 receptor inhibition, novel mouse models of COPD and inhaled antisense asthma therapies. Investigational drugs discussed include mepolizumab (GlaxoSmithKline plc), benralizumab (BioWa Inc/Kyowa Hakko Kirin Co Ltd/MedImmune LLC), AMG-317 (Amgen Inc/Takeda Bio Development Center Ltd), TPI-ASM-8 (Pharmaxis Ltd) and AIR-645 (Altair Therapeutics Inc).

  3. Monitoring asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijnenburg, Mariëlle W; Baraldi, Eugenio; Brand, Paul L P; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Eber, Ernst; Frischer, Thomas; Hedlin, Gunilla; Kulkarni, Neeta; Lex, Christiane; Mäkelä, Mika J; Mantzouranis, Eva; Moeller, Alexander; Pavord, Ian; Piacentini, Giorgio; Price, David; Rottier, Bart L; Saglani, Sejal; Sly, Peter D; Szefler, Stanley J; Tonia, Thomy; Turner, Steve; Wooler, Edwina; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C

    2015-04-01

    The goal of asthma treatment is to obtain clinical control and reduce future risks to the patient. To reach this goal in children with asthma, ongoing monitoring is essential. While all components of asthma, such as symptoms, lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and inflammation, may exist in various combinations in different individuals, to date there is limited evidence on how to integrate these for optimal monitoring of children with asthma. The aims of this ERS Task Force were to describe the current practise and give an overview of the best available evidence on how to monitor children with asthma. 22 clinical and research experts reviewed the literature. A modified Delphi method and four Task Force meetings were used to reach a consensus. This statement summarises the literature on monitoring children with asthma. Available tools for monitoring children with asthma, such as clinical tools, lung function, bronchial responsiveness and inflammatory markers, are described as are the ways in which they may be used in children with asthma. Management-related issues, comorbidities and environmental factors are summarised. Despite considerable interest in monitoring asthma in children, for many aspects of monitoring asthma in children there is a substantial lack of evidence. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  4. Asthma episodes: stigma, children, and Hollywood films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cindy Dell

    2012-03-01

    Asthma has been systematically stigmatized in Hollywood feature films, including films seen by children. Through content analysis of 66 movies containing one or more scenes showing asthma, and through informant interviews with a dozen U.S. children about representative scenes, the study explores how stigmatizing portrayals are interpreted, accepted, or resisted. Children suffering from asthma actively counterargued with incriminating excerpts, but in some respects their healthy friends were less critical. Overall, children viewed stigmatizing scenes in terms of the social interaction and the social ethics entailed. They did not scrutinize the characters for damaged selfhood, per se, but dwelled on the social processes out of which stigma is erected.

  5. Prevalence of Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis among Adults in Yaounde, Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefura-Yone, Eric Walter; Kengne, André Pascal; Balkissou, Adamou Dodo; Boulleys-Nana, Julie Raïcha; Efe-de-Melingui, Nelly Rachel; Ndjeutcheu-Moualeu, Patricia Ingrid; Mbele-Onana, Charles Lebon; Kenmegne-Noumsi, Elvira Christelle; Kolontchang-Yomi, Barbara Linda; Theubo-Kamgang, Boris Judicaël; Ebouki, Emilienne Régine; Djuikam-Kamga, Chrystelle Karen; Magne-Fotso, Christiane Gaelle; Amougou, Francine; Mboumtou, Liliane; Ngo-Yonga, Martine; Petchou-Talla, Elsie Linda; Afane-Ze, Emmanuel; Kuaban, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background Population-based estimates of asthma and allergic rhinitis in sub-Saharan African adults are lacking. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of asthma and allergic rhinitis in urban adult Cameroonians. Methods A community-based survey was conducted from December 2013 to April 2014 among adults aged 19 years and above (N = 2,304, 57.3% women), selected through multilevel stratified random sampling across all districts of Yaounde (Capital city). Internationally validated questionnaires were used to investigate the presence of allergic diseases. Logistic regressions were employed to investigate the determinants of allergic conditions. Results Prevalence rates were 2.7% (95% CI: 2.1-3.4) for asthma-ever, 6.9% (5.9-7.9) for lifetime wheezing, 2.9% (92.2-3.6) for current wheezing and 11.4% (10.1-12.7) for self-reported lifetime allergic rhinitis; while 240 (10.4%) participants reported current symptoms of allergic rhinitis, and 125 (5.4%) had allergic rhino-conjunctivitis. The prevalence of current asthma medication use and self-reported asthma attack was 0.8 (0.4-1.2) and 1 (0.6-1.4) respectively. Multivariable adjusted determinants of current wheezing were signs of atopic eczema [2.91 (1.09-7.74)] and signs of allergic rhinitis [3.24 (1.83-5.71)]. Age group 31-40 years [0.27(0.09-0.78), p = 0.016] was an independent protective factor for wheezing. Determinants of current rhinitis symptoms were active smoking [2.20 (1.37-3.54), pallergic rhinitis among adults in this population were at the lower tails of those reported in other regions of the world. Beside the classical interrelation between allergic diseases found in this study, active smoking was an independent determinant of allergic rhinitis symptoms. Nationwide surveys are needed to investigate regional variations. PMID:25853516

  6. Asthma in the elderly: a different disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Battaglia

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease that affects all ages, but does this definition also include the elderly? Traditionally, asthma has been considered a disease of younger age, but epidemiological studies and clinical experience support the concept that asthma is as prevalent in older age as it is in the young. With the ever-increasing elderly population worldwide, the detection and proper management of the disease in old age may have a great impact from the public health perspective. Whether asthma in the elderly maintains the same characteristics as in young populations is an interesting matter. The diagnostic process in older individuals with suspected asthma follows the same steps, namely a detailed history supported by clinical examination and laboratory investigations; however, it should be recognised that elderly patients may partially lose reversibility of airway obstruction. The correct interpretation of spirometric curves in the elderly should take into account the physiological changes in the respiratory system. Several factors contribute to delaying the diagnosis of asthma in the elderly, including the age-related impairment in perception of breathlessness. The management of asthma in advanced age is complicated by the comorbidities and polypharmacotherapy, which advocate for a comprehensive approach with a multidimensional assessment. It should be emphasised that older age frequently represents an exclusion criterion for eligibility in clinical trials, and current asthma medications have rarely been tested in elderly asthmatics. Ageing is associated with pharmacokinetic changes of the medications. As a consequence, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of antiasthmatic medications can be variably affected. Similarly, drug-to-drug interactions may reduce the effectiveness of inhaled medications and increase the risk of side-effects. For this reason, we propose the term “geriatric asthma” be preferred to the more generic “asthma in the

  7. The frequency of sleep-disordered breathing in children with asthma and its effects on asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginis, Tayfur; Akcan, Fatih Alper; Capanoglu, Murat; Toyran, Muge; Ersu, Refika; Kocabas, Can Naci; Civelek, Ersoy

    2017-05-01

    The presence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children with asthma may cause difficult to control asthma. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of SDB in children with asthma, to evaluate its effects on asthma control and to assess the risk factors associated with the presence of SDB. Parents of children who Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ) and the Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT). Asthma control level was assessed according to Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA). Same ear-nose-throat (ENT) specialist evaluated all patients. A 4-point tonsil grading method and adenoid-nasopharynx ratio were used to categorize tonsil and adenoid size, respectively. A total of 408 children (275 male, 67.4%) with a mean age of 8.1 ± 3.2 years were included. Nearly 40% of asthmatic children were not-well-controlled according to GINA and 34.6% of all patients had SDB according to PSQ. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that coexistence of SDB [OR: 6.62, 95% CI (4.21-10.41); p asthma in asthmatic children after other established contributors to asthma control were adjusted. Our study showed that SDB is a strong risk factor for not-well-controlled asthma in asthmatic children independent of other confounders. In addition, tonsillar hypertrophy may have a role in the association between SDB and not-well-controlled asthma in childhood.

  8. Effect of an Outpatient Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program on Exercise Tolerance and Asthma Control in Obese Asthma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, Yasemin; van Huisstede, Astrid; Franssen, Frits M E; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Rudolphus, Arjan; Taube, Cristian; Braunstahl, Gert-Jan

    2017-05-01

    To compare the effects of an outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) program on exercise tolerance and asthma control in obese and nonobese patients with asthma. Nonobese (body mass index [BMI] asthma who participated in a local multidisciplinary 12-week PR program were analyzed retrospectively. Effects of PR were assessed by changes in 6-minute walking distance (6MWD) and Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ). A total of 138 asthma patients were included: 53 (38.4%) obese and 85 (61.6%) nonobese. At baseline, obese patients with asthma had a lower level of exercise tolerance reflected by a lower 6MWD (525 m vs 621 m; P Asthma control also improved in both groups (ΔACQ -0.3 in nonobese vs ΔACQ -0.4 in obese; P = .021 and P = .019, respectively). Clinically relevant improvement was achieved by 46.5% of nonobese and 51.9% of obese patients with asthma. The improvements between the groups were not statistically different. A standardized PR program is feasible in obese patients with asthma and they benefit as much as nonobese patients with asthma. However, there are still a large number of patients who show no clinically significant improvement. Patients with more severe asthma seem to benefit the most from PR.

  9. Emergency department revisits for pediatric acute asthma exacerbations: association of factors identified in an emergency department asthma tracking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh-Kelly, Christine M; Kelly, Kevin J; Drendel, Amy L; Grabowski, Laura; Kuhn, Evelyn M

    2008-08-01

    To identify clinical variables associated with a greater likelihood of emergency department (ED) revisit for acute asthma within 7 days after an initial ED visit for acute asthma exacerbation. Cross-sectional study of subjects from a prospectively enrolled cohort of children aged 0 to 18 years with physician-diagnosed asthma in the ED Allies Tracking System. Demographics and data on quality of life, health care utilization, environmental factors, chronic asthma severity, and ED management were collected. Emergency department revisits for acute asthma within 7 days of a prior visit resulting in discharge were compared with those without a revisit, using chi2 and t tests and logistic regression. Four thousand two hundred twenty-eight ED asthma visits were enrolled; 3276 visits resulted in discharge. Persistent asthma was identified in 66% of visits. Emergency department revisits within 7 days of a prior visit occurred following 133 (4.1%) visits. There were no significant differences in environmental factors or ED management between visits with and without an ED revisit. In univariate analysis factors associated with a greater revisit likelihood included age younger than 2 years, black race or Hispanic ethnicity, persistent asthma, public insurance, lower quality of life, and greater health care utilization in the prior 12 months. Variables independently significant (P children younger than 2 years or with persistent asthma or lower asthma quality-of-life scores are at greater risk for ED revisits after acute ED asthma care.

  10. Thai pediatricians' current practice toward childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalaporn, Harutai; Chawalitdamrong, Pongpan; Preutthipan, Aroonwan

    2018-04-01

    Childhood asthma is a substantial health burden in Thailand. Due to a lack of pediatric respiratory specialists (pediatric pulmonologists and allergists; RS), most Thai children are cared for by general pediatricians (pediatric primary care providers (PCP)). We investigated whether current practices of Thai pediatricians complied with asthma guidelines and compared practices (diagnosis and treatments) provided by PCP and RS. A cross-sectional study was conducted using electronic surveys including four case scenarios of different asthma phenotypes distributed to Thai pediatricians. Asthma diagnosis and management were evaluated for compliance with standard guidelines. The practices of PCP and RS were compared. From 800 surveys distributed, there were 405 respondents (51%). Most respondents (81%) were PCP, who preferred to use clinical diagnosis rather than laboratory investigations to diagnose asthma. For acute asthmatic attacks, 58% of the pediatricians prescribed a systemic corticosteroid. For uncontrolled asthma, 89% of the pediatricians prescribed at least one controller. For exercise-induced bronchospasm, 55% of the pediatricians chose an inhaled bronchodilator, while 38% chose a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA). For virus-induced wheeze, 40% of the respondents chose an LTRA, while 15% chose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). PCP prescribed more oral bronchodilators (31% vs. 18%, p = 0.02), antibiotics (20% vs. 6%, p attack. Most of the Thai pediatricians' practices toward diagnosis and treatment of acute asthmatic attack and uncontrolled asthma conform to the guidelines. PCP prescribed more oral bronchodilators, antibiotics, and antihistamines than RS.

  11. Childhood asthma and student performance at school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taras, Howard; Potts-Datema, William

    2005-10-01

    To better understand what is known about the association between childhood asthma, school attendance, and academic outcomes, the authors reviewed published studies investigating this topic. Tables with brief descriptions of each study's research methodology and outcomes are included. Research reveals evidence that rates of absenteeism are higher among students with asthma. The exact magnitude of absenteeism is difficult to ascertain. However, the studies have helped to identify characteristics of children with asthma that are most likely to be associated with the highest absenteeism rates. Some interventions to improve rates of absenteeism among school-aged children with asthma show promise, but it cannot yet be concluded that students who adhere to medical routines for controlling asthma will as a result increase their rates of attendance. Studies thus far have shown that there is either only a weak or nonexistent association between asthma and school achievement. Further studies are required to verify if certain subpopulations of children with asthma (eg, those with severe and ongoing symptoms, those with disturbed sleep, kindergarten children) are at higher risk for poor school achievement.

  12. The Danish National Register for Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backer V

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vibeke Backer,1 Jesper Lykkegaard,2 Uffe Bodtger,3,4 Lone Agertoft,5 Lene Korshoej,6 Elvira Vaclavik Braüner7,8 1Department of Respiratory Medicine L, Bispebjerg Frederiskberg University Hospital, Copenhagen, 2Research Unit of General Practice, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Næstved Hospital, Næstved, 4Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, 5Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 6Competence Centre for Clinical Quality and Information Technology West (KCKS West, Aarhus, 7Research Center for Prevention and Health, Center for Health, Glostrup Hospital, Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, 8Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark Aim of the database: Asthma is the most prevalent chronic disease in children, adolescents, and young adults. In Denmark (with a population of 5.6 million citizens, >400,000 persons are prescribed antiasthmatic medication annually. However, undiagnosed cases, dubious diagnoses, and poor asthma management are probably common. The Danish National Database for Asthma (DNDA was established in 2015. The aim of the DNDA was to collect the data on all patients treated for asthma in Denmark and to monitor asthma occurrence, the quality of diagnosis, and management. Study population: Persons above the age of 6 years, with a specific focus on 6–44 years, are included. The DNDA links three existing nationwide registries of administrative records in the Danish health care system: the National Patient Register, the National Health Insurance Services Register, and the National Prescription Registry. For each year, the inclusion criteria are a second purchase of asthma prescription medicine within a 2-year period (National Prescription Registry or a diagnosis of asthma (National Patient

  13. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or Territory Data Archive AsthmaStats Flu Vaccination among Adults with Current Asthma Flu Vaccination among Children with ... Children aged 5–17 Years Asthma Severity among Adults with Current Asthma Asthma Severity among Children with ...

  14. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Asthma Learn How to Control Asthma Asthma and Severe Weather ... Working on Asthma Follow @CDCasthma on Twitter to learn more about helping people with asthma live healthier ...

  15. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CDC Publications on Asthma National Asthma Control Program America Breathing Easier Guide for State Programs Interventions Community ... over their asthma. Quick Links Asthma Action Plan America Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma ...

  16. Teaching Your Child about Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching your child about asthma Share | Teaching Your Child About Asthma This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, ... to respond. Give caregivers a copy of your child’s Asthma Action Plan to reference in case of an ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: allergic asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breathing difficulty. These episodes, sometimes referred to as asthma attacks, are triggered by irritation of the inflamed airways. ... tobacco smoke, in people with allergic asthma . An asthma attack is characterized by tightening of the muscles around ...

  18. Bilastine in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and urticaria: a practical approach to treatment decisions based on queries received by the medical information department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Leceta

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bilastine is a safe and effective commonly prescribed non-sedating H1-antihistamine approved for symptomatic treatment in patients with allergic disorders such as rhinoconjunctivitis and urticaria. It was evaluated in many patients throughout the clinical development required for its approval, but clinical trials generally exclude many patients who will benefit in everyday clinical practice (especially those with coexisting diseases and/or being treated with concomitant drugs. Following its introduction into clinical practice, the Medical Information Specialists at Faes Farma have received many practical queries regarding the optimal use of bilastine in different circumstances. Data sources and methods: Queries received by the Medical Information Department and the responses provided to senders of these queries. Results: The most frequent questions received by the Medical Information Department included the potential for drug-drug interactions with bilastine and commonly used agents such as anticoagulants (including the novel oral anticoagulants, antiretrovirals, antituberculosis regimens, corticosteroids, digoxin, oral contraceptives, and proton pump inhibitors. Most of these medicines are not usually allowed in clinical trials, and so advice needs to be based upon the pharmacological profiles of the drugs involved and expert opinion. The pharmacokinetic profile of bilastine appears favourable since it undergoes negligible metabolism and is almost exclusively eliminated via renal excretion, and it neither induces nor inhibits the activity of several isoenzymes from the CYP 450 system. Consequently, bilastine does not interact with cytochrome metabolic pathways. Other queries involved specific patient groups such as subjects with renal impairment, women who are breastfeeding or who are trying to become pregnant, and patients with other concomitant diseases. Interestingly, several questions related to topics that are well covered in

  19. Prematurity, atopy, and childhood asthma in Puerto Ricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Ramratnam, Sima K; Brehm, John M; Han, Yueh-Ying; Boutaoui, Nadia; Forno, Erick; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Alvarez, María; Colón-Semidey, Angel; Canino, Glorisa; Celedón, Juan C

    2014-02-01

    Puerto Rican children share a disproportionate burden of prematurity and asthma in the United States. Little is known about prematurity and childhood asthma in Puerto Rican subjects. We sought to examine whether prematurity is associated with asthma in Puerto Rican children. We performed a case-control study of 678 children aged 6 to 14 years with (n = 351) and without (n = 327) asthma living in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Prematurity was defined by parental report for our primary analysis. In a secondary analysis, we only included children whose parents reported prematurity that required admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. Asthma was defined as physician-diagnosed asthma and wheeze in the prior year. We used logistic regression for analysis. All multivariate models were adjusted for age, sex, household income, atopy (≥1 positive IgE level to common allergens), maternal history of asthma, and early-life exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. In a multivariate analysis there was a significant interaction between prematurity and atopy on asthma (P = .006). In an analysis stratified by atopy, prematurity was associated with a nearly 5-fold increased odds of asthma in atopic children (adjusted odds ratio, 4.7; 95% CI, 1.5-14.3; P = .007). In contrast, there was no significant association between prematurity and asthma in nonatopic children. Similar results were obtained in our analysis of prematurity requiring admission to the neonatal intensive care unit and asthma. Our results suggest that atopy modifies the estimated effect of prematurity on asthma in Puerto Rican children. Prematurity might explain, in part, the high prevalence of atopic asthma in this ethnic group. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of leukotrienes in asthma pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2000-01-01

    obvious targets for therapy. These cysteinyl leukotrienes, previously known as the slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A), mediate many of the features of asthma, including bronchial constriction, bronchial hyperreactivity, edema, and eosinophilia. Data show that selective cysteinyl leukotriene......Inflammation is an essential component of asthma pathophysiology. While beta(2)-agonists are often used for short-term relief of acute bronchospasm, anti-inflammatory agents are required for the long-term management of chronic inflammation in this disease. Corticosteroids have emerged as the first......-line anti-inflammatory therapy for asthma management. However, in some patients, especially children, the high doses of corticosteroids that may be required to control features of hyperresponsiveness, including exercise-induced asthma, raise safety concerns. Thus, there is a need for complementary anti...

  1. Severe Asthma in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, Bradley E; Parikh, Neil G; Maharaj, Sheena K

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize, diagnose, evaluate, and treat severe childhood asthma. Understanding the occurrence of the physiologic and clinical presentations of childhood severe asthma, the treatment and response may be predicted by biomarkers, but the patient's response is highly variable. The onset of severe asthma occurs early and is primarily predicted by severity of viral infection and coexistence of the atopic state.

  2. Effects of regular exercise on asthma control in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Sirpa A M; Mäkikyrö, Elina M S; Hugg, Timo T; Jaakkola, Maritta S; Jaakkola, Jouni J K

    2017-08-28

    According to our systematic literature review, no previous study has assessed potential effects of regular exercise on asthma control among young adults. We hypothesized that regular exercise improves asthma control among young adults. We studied 162 subjects with current asthma recruited from a population-based cohort study of 1,623 young adults 20-27 years of age. Asthma control was assessed by the occurrence of asthma-related symptoms, including wheezing, shortness of breath, cough, and phlegm production, during the past 12 months. Asthma symptom score was calculated based on reported frequencies of these symptoms (range: 0-12). Exercise was assessed as hours/week. In Poisson regression, adjusting for gender, age, smoking, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, and education, the asthma symptom score reduced by 0.09 points per 1 hour of exercise/week (95% CI: 0.00 to 0.17). Applying the "Low exercise" quartile as the reference, "Medium exercise" reduced the asthma symptom score by 0.66 (-0.39 to 1.72), and "High exercise" reduced it significantly by 1.13 (0.03 to 2.22). The effect was strongest among overweight subjects. Our results provide new evidence that regular exercising among young adults improves their asthma control. Thus, advising about exercise should be included as an important part of asthma self-management in clinical practice.

  3. Asthma among mink workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Berit; Carstensen, Ole; Petersen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    urine. The second case is about a mink farm worker, who had an asthma attack when handling mink furs. Peak flow monitoring showed a clear relation to this work, but there were no signs of allergy. We conclude that these two cases suggest an increased risk of asthma among mink workers.......We report two cases of asthma among mink workers. The first case is about a mink farmer who had asthma that was difficult to treat. In the medical history there was no clear relation to work, and no conclusive work relation with peak flow monitoring. He had a positive histamine release test to mink...

  4. Asthma among mink workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Berit; Carstensen, Ole; Petersen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    We report two cases of asthma among mink workers. The first case is about a mink farmer who had asthma that was difficult to treat. In the medical history there was no clear relation to work, and no conclusive work relation with peak flow monitoring. He had a positive histamine release test to mink...... urine. The second case is about a mink farm worker, who had an asthma attack when handling mink furs. Peak flow monitoring showed a clear relation to this work, but there were no signs of allergy. We conclude that these two cases suggest an increased risk of asthma among mink workers....

  5. Therapeutic options for severe asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Jilcy; Chandy, Dipak

    2012-01-01

    As the overall prevalence of asthma has escalated in the past decades, so has the population of patients with severe asthma. This condition is often difficult to manage due to the relative limitation of effective therapeutic options for the physician and the social and economic burden of the disease on the patient. Management should include an evaluation and elimination of modifiable risk factors such as smoking, allergen exposure, obesity and non-adherence, as well as therapy for co-morbidities like gastro-esophageal reflux disease and obstructive sleep apnea. Current treatment options include conventional agents such as inhalational corticosteroids, long acting β2 agonists, leukotriene antagonists, and oral corticosteroids. Less conventional treatment options include immunotherapy with methotrexate, cyclosporine and tacrolimus, biological drugs like monoclonal antibodies, tumor necrosis factor-α blockers and oligonucleotides, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, antimicrobials and bronchial thermoplasty. PMID:23056066

  6. Clinical Features of Fatal Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Zuei Chen

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available To characterize the clinical features of fatal asthma, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients who died of an acute asthma attack in our hospital during a 15-year period from 1989 to 2003. Twelve patients had fatal asthma during this period, including eight who were dead on arrival in the emergency room (ER and three who died within 1 hour of admission to the ER. Patients were categorized into three groups according to the clinical presentations during the fatal attack: (1 rapid (< 3 hours decompensation in four patients; (2 gradual development of respiratory failure over several days in two patients; and (3 acute deterioration after unstable asthma lasting several days in six patients. All patients in groups 1 and 2 had reported previous near-fatal attacks. The proportion of young patients was highest in group 3, with half of them (3/6 younger than 35 years of age. Only one patient in group 3 had had a previous near-fatal attack. Five of the seven patients, with previous near-fatal attacks, had a pattern of decompensation during their fatal attack that was similar to their previous attacks. In conclusion, nearly all patients with fatal asthma in this study died outside of the hospital or within 1 hour after admission to the ER. Patients had patterns of decompensation during the fatal attack that were similar to those of their previous attacks. Early detection of warning signs, early admission to the ER, adequate treatment, and extremely close observation of patients, especially within 1 hour after ER arrival, may prevent or decrease the incidence of fatal asthmatic attack.

  7. Nutrition and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Increase in the asthma prevalence in many countries over the recent decades, highlights the need for a greater understanding of the risk factors for asthma. Be-cause asthma is the result of interaction between genetic and environmental fac-tors, increasing prevalence is certainly the result of changes in environmental fac-tors because of process of wesernization. That is the reason for higher prevalence in countries where a traditional to a westernized lifestyle occurred earlier. This increasing prevalence has affected both rural and urban communities, suggesting that local environmental factors such as exposure to allergens or industrial air pol-lutions are not the sole cause. In the last few years, nutrition has represented an important conditioning factor of many cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and chronic pulmonary diseases. So it has been hypothesized that dietary constituents influence the immune system and thus, may also be actively involved in the onset of asthma and other allergic diseases. Dietary constituents can play beneficial as well as det-rimental role in asthma. The possible role of diet in the development of asthma can be described as follows: first, a food allergen can cause asthma. Second, there is role of breast-feeding for prevention of asthma later in life. Third, a low intake of antioxidative dietary constituents might be a risk factor for asthma. Moreover, role of cations such as sodium, potassium and magnesium has been described in development of asthma. Finally, intake of fatty acids specially the role of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids play important role in cause of asthma.

  8. Occupational Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... widely used in many industries, including: spray painting, insulation installation and in manufacturing plastics, rubber and foam. ... Rights Reserved. Legal Notices | Site Map | Contact Us Social navigation Facebook Twitter Mobile navigation Home Conditions & Treatments ...

  9. Leukotriene modifiers in pediatric asthma management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (Cys-LTs) are mediators released in asthma and virus-induced wheezing. Corticosteroids appear to have little or no effect on this release in vivo. Cys-LTs are both direct bronchoconstrictors and proinflammatory substances that mediate several steps in the pathophysiology...... of chronic asthma, including inflammatory cell recruitment, vascular leakage, and possibly airway remodeling. Blocking studies show that Cys-LTs are pivotal mediators in the pathophysiology of asthma. Cys-LTs are key components in the early and late allergic airway response and also contribute to bronchial...... obstruction after exercise and hyperventilation of cold, dry air in asthmatics. LT modifiers reduce airway eosinophil numbers and exhaled nitric oxide levels. Together these findings support an important role for the Cys-LTs in the asthma airway inflammation. Cys-LT receptor antagonists (Cys...

  10. Asthma and risk of myelodysplastic syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Henrik; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Risk factors for the development of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) include age, exposure to ionising radiation, and cytotoxic drug treatment. Recently, asthma also has been suggested as a risk factor for MDS. METHODS: We undertook this nationwide population-based cohort study...... on patients with a first-time hospital-based asthma diagnosis during 2002-2013 and followed them for the development of MDS/chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML). RESULTS: We identified 75 995 patients with incident asthma and no previous MDS/CMML diagnosis. Seventy-eight patients subsequently developed MDS...... and nine patients developed CMML during 402 892 person-years. The cumulative risks of developing MDS/CMML among asthma patients were 0.02% (95% CI: 0.01-0.04%) and 0.07% (95% CI: 0.05-0.09%) during the first year and the first five years of follow-up, respectively. The standardised incidence ratio of MDS...

  11. Assessment of problematic severe asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, K. C. L.; Hedlin, G.; Bush, A.

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of problematic severe asthma in children should be performed in a stepwise manner to ensure an optimal approach. A four-step assessment scheme is proposed. First, a full diagnostic work-up is performed to exclude other diseases which mimic asthma. Secondly, a multi-disciplinary assessm......Assessment of problematic severe asthma in children should be performed in a stepwise manner to ensure an optimal approach. A four-step assessment scheme is proposed. First, a full diagnostic work-up is performed to exclude other diseases which mimic asthma. Secondly, a multi......-disciplinary assessment is performed to identify issues that may need attention, including comorbidities. Thirdly, the pattern of inflammation is assessed, and finally steroid responsiveness is documented. Based upon these four steps an optimal individualised treatment plan is developed. In this article the many gaps...

  12. Virus-induced exacerbations in asthma and COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke eKurai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by chronic airway inflammation and/or airflow limitation due to pulmonary emphysema. Chronic bronchitis, pulmonary emphysema, and bronchial asthma may all be associated with airflow limitation; therefore, exacerbation of asthma may be associated with the pathophysiology of COPD. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that the exacerbation of asthma, namely virus-induced asthma, may be associated with a wide variety of respiratory viruses.COPD and asthma have different underlying pathophysiological processes and thus require individual therapies. Exacerbation of both COPD and asthma, which are basically defined and diagnosed by clinical symptoms, is associated with a rapid decline in lung function and increased mortality. Similar pathogens, including human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus and coronavirus, are also frequently detected during exacerbation of asthma and/or COPD. Immune response to respiratory viral infections, which may be related to the severity of exacerbation in each disease, varies in patients with both COPD and asthma. In this regard, it is crucial to recognize and understand both the similarities and differences of clinical features in patients with COPD and/or asthma associated with respiratory viral infections, especially in the exacerbative stage.In relation to definition, epidemiology, and pathophysiology, this review aims to summarize current knowledge concerning exacerbation of both COPD and asthma by focusing on the clinical significance of associated respiratory virus infections.

  13. Soda consumption and hospital admissions among Californian adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Mariaelena; Brown, Paul; Schweizer, Don

    2017-05-01

    Asthma prevalence has been increasing consistently since 1995 in California. Recent studies have found that consuming soda and sugar-containing drinks may pose a risk for asthma. Research that examines the relationship between soda intake and asthma among adult asthmatics is limited. This study investigated the relationship between sugar-sweetened soda consumption and asthma hospitalization among adult asthmatics in California. This cross-sectional study was based on the 2011-2012 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) data and included 3,784 adults who were diagnosed with asthma by a doctor and who currently reported either that they still had asthma, or that they had suffered from an asthma attack in the last 12 months. The analysis was survey weighted. The exposure variable was soda intake measured as the number of times soda was consumed in the last week. The health outcome measure was overnight hospital admission due to asthma. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between soda consumption and overnight hospital admission after adjusting for age, education, sex, race/ethnicity, weight status, smoking status, and self-rated health. Adults with asthma who drank soda three or more times per week reported higher odds of overnight hospitalization (adjusted odds ratio = 2.77, 95% CI: 1.51-5.10, p = 0.001). Our findings suggest that efforts designed to limit soda consumption would benefit asthma suffers by reducing hospital admissions. This, however, needs further research to confirm a direct causal association.

  14. Rhinitis in pregnant women with asthma is associated with poorer asthma control and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Heather; Murphy, Vanessa E; Hensley, Michael J; Giles, Warwick; Clifton, Vicki L; Gibson, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    To describe the pattern and severity of rhinitis in pregnancy and the impact rhinitis has on asthma control and quality of life (QoL) in pregnant women with asthma. Two hundred and eighteen non-smoking pregnant women with asthma were participants in a randomised controlled trial of exhaled nitric oxide guided treatment adjustment. Rhinitis was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) scored from 0 to 10 and classified as current (VAS > 2.5), moderate/severe versus mild (VAS > 6 vs rhinitis. At baseline, women completed the 20-Item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT20), asthma-specific (AQLQ-M) QoL questionnaires and the Six-Item Short-Form State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-6). Asthma control was assessed using the asthma control questionnaire (ACQ). Perinatal outcomes were collected after delivery. Current rhinitis was present in 142 (65%) women including 45 (20%) women who developed pregnancy rhinitis. Women with current rhinitis had higher scores for ACQ (p = 0.004), SNOT20 (p rhinitis. Current rhinitis was associated with increased anxiety symptoms (p = 0.002), rhinitis severity was associated with higher ACQ score (p = 0.004) and atopic rhinitis was associated with poorer lung function (p = 0.037). Rhinitis symptom severity improved significantly during gestation (p rhinitis. Rhinitis in pregnant women with asthma is common and associated with poorer asthma control, sino-nasal and asthma-specific QoL impairment and anxiety. In the context of active asthma management there was significant improvement in rhinitis symptoms and severity as pregnancy progressed.

  15. Air pollution and asthma control in the Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemin, Bénédicte; Kauffmann, Francine; Pin, Isabelle; Le Moual, Nicole; Bousquet, Jean; Gormand, Frédéric; Just, Jocelyne; Nadif, Rachel; Pison, Christophe; Vervloet, Daniel; Künzli, Nino; Siroux, Valérie

    2012-09-01

    The associations between exposure to air pollution and asthma control are not well known. The objective of this study was to assess the association between long-term exposure to NO(2), O(3) and PM(10) and asthma control in the follow-up of the Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA2) (2003-2007). Modelled outdoor NO(2), O(3) and PM(10) estimates were linked to each residential address using the 4 km grid air pollutant surface developed by the French Institute of Environment in 2004. Asthma control was assessed in 481 subjects with current asthma using a multidimensional approach following the 2006-2009 Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines. Multinomial and ordinal logistic regressions were conducted adjusted for sex, age, body mass index, education, smoking and use of inhaled corticosteroids. The association between air pollution and the three domains of asthma control (symptoms, exacerbations and lung function) was assessed. ORs are reported per IQR. Median concentrations (in micrograms per cubic metre) were 32 (IQR 25-38) for NO(2) (n=465), 46 (41-52) for O(3) and 21 (18-21) for PM(10) (n=481). In total, 44%, 29% and 27% had controlled, partly controlled and uncontrolled asthma, respectively. The ordinal ORs for O(3) and PM(10) with asthma control were 1.69 (95% CI 1.22 to 2.34) and 1.35 (95% CI 1.13 to 1.64), respectively. When including both pollutants in the same model, both associations persisted. Associations were not modified by sex, smoking status, use of inhaled corticosteroids, atopy, season of examination or body mass index. Both pollutants were associated with each of the three main domains of control. The results suggest that long-term exposure to PM(10) and O(3) is associated with uncontrolled asthma in adults, defined by symptoms, exacerbations and lung function.

  16. Asthma Control Test correlates well with the treatment decisions made by asthma specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Fanny W S; Leung, Ting-Fan; Hui, David S C; Chu, Hong-yin; Wong, Gary W K; Wong, Eric; Tung, Alvin H M; Lai, Christopher K W

    2009-05-01

    Poor assessment of asthma control results in suboptimal treatment. Identifying parameters that accurately assess control will benefit treatment decisions. The Asthma Control Test (ACT) is a five-item questionnaire for the assessment of asthma control. This study evaluated its correlation with the treatment decisions made by asthma specialists in an outpatient clinic setting, and compared its performance with other conventional parameters including spirometry, PEF rate (PEFR), fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and BHR. The 383 (122 men) study subjects completed a 1-month diary on symptoms and PEFR before the assessment. All subjects then completed the ACT together with same-day spirometry and FeNO measurement. BHR to methacholine was performed in 73 subjects in the week before assessment. Asthma specialists, blinded to the results of the ACT, FeNO and BHR (but not spirometry and PEFR), assessed the patients' level of control according to the 2006 version of the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines and made appropriate treatment decision. The group mean (SD) age was 46.1 (13.4) years with pre-bronchodilator FEV(1) 84.72 (20.81) % predicted. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis found that an ACT score of < or = 20 best correlated with uncontrolled asthma (area under curve (AUC) = 0.76) with a sensitivity of 70.5%, specificity 76.0%, positive predictive value 76.2% and negative predictive value 70.2% for predicting step-up of asthma therapy. On ROC analysis, the ACT score had the highest AUC (0.81 (P < 0.001)) for changing asthma therapy when compared with FeNO, spirometry, PEFR and BHR parameters The ACT correlated better with treatment decisions made by asthma specialists than spirometry, PEFR and FeNO.

  17. Associations between selected allergens, phthalates, nicotine, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and bedroom ventilation and clinically confirmed asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic dermatitis in preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, M.; Bekö, Gabriel; Weschler, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    . For most children, specific IgE's against various allergens were determined. In parallel, dust samples were collected and air change rates were measured in the children's bedrooms. The dust samples were analyzed for phthalate esters, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nicotine, and various allergens...

  18. Asthma in Children: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Asthma (For Teens) (Nemours Foundation) Patient Handouts Asthma - child - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Asthma - children ( ... updates by email What's this? GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Asthma - child - discharge Asthma - children Asthma - control drugs Asthma - quick- ...

  19. Asthma and Therapeutics: Recombinant Therapies in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cockcroft Donald W

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Numerous recombinant therapies are being investigated for the treatment of asthma. This report reviews the current status of several of these novel agents. Anti-immunoglobulin (IgE (omalizumab, Xolair markedly inhibits all aspects of the allergen challenge in subjects who have reduction of free serum IgE to undetectable levels. Several clinical studies in atopic asthma have demonstrated benefit by improved symptoms and lung function and a reduction in corticosteroid requirements. Early use in atopic asthmatics may be even more effective. Several approaches target interleukin (IL-4. Soluble IL-4 receptor has been shown to effectively replace inhaled corticosteroid; further studies are under way. Recombinant anti-IL-5 and recombinant IL-12 inhibit blood and sputum eosinophils and allergen-induced eosinophilia without any effect on airway responsiveness, allergen-induced airway responses, or allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. Efalizumab, a recombinant antibody that inhibits lymphocyte trafficking, is effective in psoriasis. A bronchoprovocation study showed a reduction in allergen-induced late asthmatic response and allergen-induced eosinophilia, which suggests that it should be effective in clinical asthma. These exciting novel therapies provide not only promise of new therapies for asthma but also valuable tools for investigation of asthma mechanisms.

  20. Use motion games in exercise with children with bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Polkovnyk-Markova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to analyze the possibility of using moving games in the rehabilitation of children with bronchial asthma. Material & Methods: the modern scientific literature on integrated prevention and treatment of children with asthma. Results: A high frequency of morphological and functional deviations at children with asthma. Classification and examples of mobile games, which can be used for this group of children. Conclusions: the results of modern research that show the effectiveness the use of physical rehabilitation, including moving games.

  1. Are high generalised and asthma-specific self-efficacy predictive of adequate self-management behaviour among adult asthma patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seydel, E.R.; van der Palen, Job; Klein, Jakob J.; Klein, J.J.; van der Palen, J.

    1997-01-01

    In asthma self-management training, often self-treatment guidelines are included, because increased knowledge of asthma alone is not sufficient to change behaviour. One way to achieve behavioural changes is by increasing the patient's general and asthma-specific self-efficacy expectancies. This

  2. Supported self-management for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Pinnock

    2015-06-01

    The evidence in favour of supported self-management for asthma is overwhelming. Self-management including provision of a written asthma action plan and supported by regular medical review, almost halves the risk of hospitalisation, significantly reduces emergency department attendances and unscheduled consultations, and improves markers of asthma control and quality of life. Demographic and cultural tailoring enables effective programmes to be implemented in deprived and/or ethnic communities or within schools. A crucial component of effective asthma self-management interventions is the provision of an agreed, written personalised action plan which advises on using regular medication, recognising deterioration and appropriate action to take. Monitoring can be based on symptoms or on peak flows and should specify thresholds for action including increasing inhaled steroids, commencing oral steroids, and when (and how to seek professional help. Plans should be personalised to reflect asthma severity and treatment regimes, avoidance of triggers, co-morbid rhinitis and the individual’s preferences. Implementation is a challenge. Systematic review evidence suggests that it is possible to implement asthma self-management in routine care, but that to be effective this requires a whole systems approach which considers implementation from the perspective of patient education and resources, professional skills and motivation and organisation priorities and routines.

  3. CRTH2 antagonists in asthma: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh D

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dave Singh, Arjun Ravi, Thomas Southworth Division of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, The Medicines Evaluation Unit, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract: Chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells (CRTH2 binds to prostaglandin D2. CRTH2 is expressed on various cell types including eosinophils, mast cells, and basophils. CRTH2 and prostaglandin D2 are involved in allergic inflammation and eosinophil activation. Orally administered CRTH2 antagonists are in clinical development for the treatment of asthma. The biology and clinical trial data indicate that CRTH2 antagonists should be targeted toward eosinophilic asthma. This article reviews the clinical evidence for CRTH2 involvement in asthma pathophysiology and clinical trials of CRTH2 antagonists in asthma. CRTH2 antagonists could provide a practical alternative to biological treatments for patients with severe asthma. Future perspectives for this class of drug are considered, including the selection of the subgroup of patients most likely to show a meaningful treatment response. Keywords: CRTH2, clinical trial, eosinophilic asthma, prostaglandin D2

  4. Asthma Medicines: Quick Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tightness, and cough, and not just reserved for asthma attacks. Anticholinergics Ipratropium bromide, a rapid-acting bronchodilator, may ... 2015 Source Guide to Your Childs Allergies and Asthma (Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Pediatrics) The information contained on this Web site should ...

  5. Traveling and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Avoid My Asthma Triggers? Staying at a hotel Ask for a sunny, dry room away from the hotel pool to avoid contact with mold. If animals trigger your asthma, ask for a room that has never had pets in it. Also, ...

  6. Treating childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    asthma is under control for at least three months, consider reducing the therapy. Apply extra cautious when reducing therapy (even if good control is achieved) in children who have experienced previous life-threatening asthma, or who have concomitant severe food allergies /anaphylaxis due to the increased risks of severe ...

  7. Asthma and psychiatric disorders in male army recruits and soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Tzion, Raffi; Friedman, Tal; Shochat, Tzippy; Gazala, Eliyahu; Wohl, Yonit

    2007-05-01

    Numerous studies have shown an association between asthma and mental disorders. While elevated rates of asthma have been noted among psychiatric patients with anxiety disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder, several studies have found elevated rates of mental disorders among asthma patients. Such studies, however, have generally relied upon questionnaires and assessment by non-specialist physicians to diagnose mental disorders and asthma. To examine a possible association between asthma and psychiatric diagnoses in Israeli military recruits and soldiers. In this cross-sectional study we compared the prevalence of mental diagnoses in asthmatic recruits and soldiers with that in non-asthmatic recruits and soldiers. A total of 195,903 recruits and soldiers were examined by Israel Defense Forces recruiting offices and fitness boards. Diagnoses of asthma were based on a pulmonologist's diagnosis, including spirometry at rest and exercise testing as indicated; diagnoses of mental disorders were based on examination by a psychiatrist. The prevalence of asthma was found to be 7.8% (current) and 9.8% (lifetime). The prevalence of mental disorders was 13.4%. Current asthma was associated with an increased likelihood of any mental disorder (OR = 1.20, 95% Cl = 1.15-1.26), and specifically with mood and anxiety disorders (1.31, 1.19-1.46), introvert personality disorders (1.20, 1.12-1.28) and adjustment disorder (1.43, 1.26-1.62). Lifetime asthma was associated with an increased likelihood of the same disorders, but the association was not as powerful. The results validate the previously documented association between asthma and mental disorders, using a sample of unprecedented size and improved methodology. A multidisciplinary approach to asthma that incorporates mental health professionals in the treatment of poorly controlled asthma and perhaps of asthma in general is recommended.

  8. Management of asthma in adults: do the patients get what they need--and want?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, V; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Harving, H

    2007-01-01

    Suboptimal asthma control may be caused by a combination of factors, such as nonadherence to guidelines, lack of compliance, and poor asthma education. The aim was to assess patients' knowledge of asthma and different management strategies, including patients' attitudes toward involvement...... of uncontrolled disease with night asthma (16%), daily symptoms (18%), or exercise-induced asthma (11%) were found. Of 285 participants with persistent asthma, 70% used inhaled corticosteroids. Lung function was measured within the preceding 6 months in 24% of patients, whereas 7% had never had their lung...

  9. Asthma control assessed in the EGEA epidemiological survey and health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroux, Valérie; Boudier, Anne; Bousquet, Jean; Vignoud, Lucile; Gormand, Frédéric; Just, Jocelyne; Le Moual, Nicole; Leynaert, Bénédicte; Nadif, Rachel; Pison, Christophe; Scheinmann, Pierre; Vervloet, Daniel; Anto, Josep Maria; Kauffmann, Francine; Pin, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    The aims were to assess 1) the relationship of asthma control assessed by combining epidemiological survey questions and lung function to Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) and 2) whether individuals with controlled asthma reach similar generic HRQL levels as individuals without asthma. The analysis included 584 individuals without asthma and 498 with asthma who participated in the follow-up of the Epidemiological study on Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA). Asthma control was assessed from survey questions and lung function, closely adapted from the 2006-2009 Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines. The Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ, scores range:1-7) and the generic SF-36 (scores range: 0-100) were used. Adjusted mean total AQLQ score decreased by 0.5 points for each asthma control steps (6.4, 5.9 and 5.4 for controlled, partly-controlled and uncontrolled asthma respectively, p < 0.0001). The differences in SF-36 scores between individuals with controlled asthma and those without asthma were minor and not significant for the PCS (-1, p = 0.09), borderline significant for the MCS (-1.6, p = 0.05) and small for the 8 domains (<5.1) although statistically significant for 4 domains. These results support the discriminative properties of the proposed asthma control grading system and its use in epidemiology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. It's the adherence, stupid (that determines asthma control in preschool children)!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A; Duiverman, Eric J; Brand, Paul L

    2014-03-01

    Although guideline-based asthma care and adherence to inhaled corticosteroids are predictors of asthma control, the role of adherence in maintaining long-term asthma control is largely unknown. This study was designed to explore the relationship between adherence to inhaled corticosteroids and long-term asthma control in young children with asthma. In this observational study, 81 2-6-year-old asthmatic children, using inhaled corticosteroids, closely followed-up in a programme with extensive self-management training, were enrolled. Adherence was measured daily for 12 months using Smartinhaler (Nexus6 Ltd, Auckland, New Zealand) devices. Long-term asthma control was assessed by parents and physicians and included clinical assessment, an asthma control questionnaire and lung function measurement. We examined the association of adherence to asthma control, adjusting for seasonal influences and clinical characteristics. Median (interquartile range) adherence was 87% (70-94%), and 64 (79%) children had well-controlled asthma throughout follow-up. Adherence >80% was associated with better asthma control, and we found no important confounders of this association. Children with persistent mild symptoms had lower adherence rates (p=0.028). Guideline-based asthma care was associated with good asthma control in most children. Adherence to inhaled corticosteroids was an independent strong predictor of long-term asthma control, with highest levels of asthma control found in children with adherence >80% of doses prescribed.

  11. Asthma as a disruption in iron homeostasis | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over several decades, asthma has evolved from being recognized as a single disease to include a diverse group of phenotypes with dissimilar natural histories, pathophysiologies, responses to treatment, and distinctive molecular pathways. With the application of Occam’s razor to asthma, it is proposed that there is one cause underlying the numerous phenotypes of this disease and that the responsible molecular pathway is a deficiency of iron in the lung tissues. This deficiency can be either absolute (e.g. asthma in the neonate and during both pregnancy and menstruation) or functional (e.g. asthma associated with infections, smoking, and obesity). Comparable associations between asthma co-morbidity (e.g. eczema, urticaria, restless leg syndrome, and pulmonary hypertension) with iron deficiency support such a shared mechanistic pathway. Therapies directed at asthma demonstrate a capacity to impact iron homeostasis, further strengthening the relationship. Finally, pathophysiologic events producing asthma, including inflammation, increases in Th2 cells, and muscle contraction, can correlate with iron availability. Recognition of a potential association between asthma and an absolute and/or functional iron deficiency suggests specific therapeutic interventions including inhaled iron. Asthma is a public health issue that has environmental triggers. Iron homeostasis is an essential mechanism whereby the body manages the impact of environmental agents on overall

  12. Risk factors of asthma exacerbation based on asthma severity: a nationwide population-based observational study in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye-Rim; Song, Hyun Jin; Nam, Jin Hyun; Hong, Sung-Hyun; Yang, So-Young; Ju, SangEun; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Tae-Bum; Kim, Hye-Lin; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2018-03-22

    Asthma exacerbation, associated with many risks factors, can reflect management failure. However, little is known about how risk factors are associated with exacerbation, according to asthma severity. We aimed to investigate differences in risk factors in patients with different asthma severity and evaluate whether risk factors differed between frequent exacerbators and patients with single exacerbation. Nationwide population-based observational study. Korean National Sample Cohort database. We included 22 130 adults with asthma diagnoses more than twice (ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth revision) codes J45 and J46) and one prescription for asthma medication from 2010 to 2011. Asthma exacerbation was defined as having a corticosteroid (CS) burst characterised by a prescription of high-dose oral CS for ≥3 days or one systemic CS injection, hospitalisation or emergency department visit. Among severities, history of CS bursts was significantly associated with exacerbation. In mild and moderate asthma, exacerbation was significantly associated with age ≥45 years, being female, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and chronic rhinitis. High medication possession ratio (MPR≥50%), compared with low MPR (factors in mild and moderate asthma, whereas no risk factors were significant in severe asthma. Different associations between risk factors and asthma exacerbations based on asthma severity suggest that patients with mild asthma require greater attention to their age and comorbidities, whereas those with severe asthma require greater attention to hospitalisation history and drug adherence. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Asthma control and productivity loss in those with work-related asthma: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alyson; Tavakoli, Hamid; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen; Carlsten, Chris; FitzGerald, J Mark

    2017-06-01

    In Canada, asthma is the third leading cause of work loss, yet little is known about the associated productivity loss. The goal of this study was to look at the relationship between asthma control and productivity loss, particularly contrasting those with work-related asthma (WRA) and non-work-related asthma (NWRA). A population-based random sample of adults with asthma in British Columbia, Canada, was prospectively recruited. Asthma control was graded according to Global Initiative for Asthma classification, while productivity loss and presence of WRA was assessed using questionnaires. Ordinal regression models were then used to associate WRA with asthma control. Generalized linear models were applied to estimate the average productivity loss associated with different levels of asthma control among those with WRA and NWRA. The study included 300 employed adults. Sixty (20%) had WRA. The odds of being controlled were significantly lower in those with WRA (OR = 0.23, 95% CI: 0.09, 0.56; P productivity loss due to presenteeism ($659.1 [95% CI: 12.9, 1581.5; P = 0.04]), but not absenteeism ($88.7 [95% CI: -86.5, 279.6; P = 0.35]), when compared to those with NWRA and uncontrolled asthma. There was no significant difference when a similar comparison was made for those with controlled or partially controlled asthma. WRA is associated with worse asthma control and increased productivity loss. Presenteeism makes a significant contribution to productivity loss and should be considered when evaluating the overall economic burden of asthma, particularly WRA.

  14. Pediatric Obesity-Related Asthma: The Role of Metabolic Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakanthi, Nandini; Greally, John M; Rastogi, Deepa

    2016-05-01

    The burden of obesity-related asthma among children, particularly among ethnic minorities, necessitates an improved understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms. Although obesity is an independent risk factor for asthma, not all obese children develop asthma. Several recent studies have elucidated mechanisms, including the role of diet, sedentary lifestyle, mechanical fat load, and adiposity-mediated inflammation that may underlie the obese asthma pathophysiology. Here, we review these recent studies and emerging scientific evidence that suggest metabolic dysregulation may play a role in pediatric obesity-related asthma. We also review the genetic and epigenetic factors that may underlie susceptibility to metabolic dysregulation and associated pulmonary morbidity among children. Lastly, we identify knowledge gaps that need further exploration to better define pathways that will allow development of primary preventive strategies for obesity-related asthma in children. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Smoking and Asthma (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth / For Teens / Smoking and Asthma Print en español Fumar y el asma Does Smoking Make Asthma Worse? Yes. If you have asthma, ...

  16. Early eczema and the risk of childhood asthma: a prospective, population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saunes Marit

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe eczema in young children is associated with an increased risk of developing asthma and rhino-conjunctivitis. In the general population, however, most cases of eczema are mild to moderate. In an unselected cohort, we studied the risk of current asthma and the co-existence of allergy-related diseases at 6 years of age among children with and without eczema at 2 years of age. Methods Questionnaires assessing various environmental exposures and health variables were administered at 2 years of age. An identical health questionnaire was completed at 6 years of age. The clinical investigation of a random subsample ascertained eczema diagnoses, and missing data were handled by multiple imputation analyses. Results The estimate for the association between eczema at 2 years and current asthma at 6 years was OR=1.80 (95% CI 1.10-2.96. Four of ten children with eczema at 6 years had the onset of eczema after the age of 2 years, but the co-existence of different allergy-related diseases at 6 years was higher among those with the onset of eczema before 2 years of age. Conclusions Although most cases of eczema in the general population were mild to moderate, early eczema was associated with an increased risk of developing childhood asthma. These findings support the hypothesis of an atopic march in the general population. Trial registration The Prevention of Allergy among Children in Trondheim study has been identified as ISRCTN28090297 in the international Current Controlled Trials database

  17. Factors associated with asthma expression in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia de Souza Campos Fernandes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate risk factors associated with asthma symptoms in adolescents in the 13- to 14-year age bracket. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving adolescents enrolled in randomly selected public schools in the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, and conducted with the use of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC questionnaire and its supplementary module for risk factor assessment. The ISAAC questionnaire was completed by the students themselves, whereas the supplementary questionnaire was completed by their parents or legal guardians. Variables showing p ≤ 0.25 in the univariate analysis were included in the multivariate analysis. Stepwise regression with backward elimination was used for variable selection. Results: We evaluated 375 adolescents, 124 (33.1% of whom had asthma symptoms. The final multivariate analysis model revealed that asthma symptoms were associated with birth weight < 2,500 g (p < 0.001, day care center or nursery attendance (p < 0.002, maternal history of asthma (p < 0.001, contact with animals during the first year of life (p < 0.027, current contact with animals outside the home (dogs, cats, or farm animals; p < 0.005, and more than 20 cigarettes per day smoked by parents or other household members (p < 0.02. Conclusions: Exposure to animals in and outside the home is associated with asthma symptoms, as is environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Families, health professionals, and administrators of health care facilities should take that into account in order to prevent asthma and reduce asthma morbidity.

  18. Caesarean delivery and risk of developing asthma in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Anette; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Jeppesen, Simone K

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association between caesarean section and risk of developing asthma. METHOD: We evaluated this association in a Danish cohort, comprising of 11,147 mothers and their babies of which 7119 mother-child pairs were included in the analyses. The mothers' reported asthma data...... on their children were linked to hospitalization records on mode of delivery. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratio for developing asthma was 1.11 (95% CI, 0.88-1.39) for caesarean sections versus vaginal births. CONCLUSION: We found no evidence that children being delivered by caesarean section have an increased risk...... of asthma....

  19. Allergic asthma biomarkers using systems approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurab eSircar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is characterized by lung inflammation caused by complex interaction between the immune system and environmental factors such as allergens and inorganic pollutants. Recent research in this field is focused on discovering new biomarkers associated with asthma pathogenesis. This review illustrates updated research associating biomarkers of allergic asthma and their potential use in systems biology of the disease. We focus on biomolecules with altered expression, which may serve as inflammatory, diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers of asthma discovered in human or experimental asthma model using genomic, proteomic and epigenomic approaches for gene and protein expression profiling. These include high-throughput technologies such as state of the art microarray and proteomics Mass Spectrometry (MS platforms. Emerging concepts of molecular interactions and pathways may provide new insights in searching potential clinical biomarkers. We summarized certain pathways with significant linkage to asthma pathophysiology by analyzing the compiled biomarkers. Systems approaches with this data can identify the regulating networks, which will eventually identify the key biomarkers to be used for diagnostics and drug discovery.

  20. Asthma Status and Risk of Incident Myocardial Infarction: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Duk Won; Wi, Chung-Il; Kim, Eun Na; Hagan, John; Roger, Veronique; Manemann, Sheila; Lahr, Brian; Ryu, Euijung; Juhn, Young J

    2016-01-01

    The role of asthma status and characteristics of asthma in the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) are poorly understood. We determined whether asthma and its characteristics are associated with risk of MI. The study was designed as a population-based retrospective case-control study, which included all eligible incident MI cases between November 1, 2002, and May 31, 2006, and their matched controls. Asthma was ascertained using predetermined criteria. Active (current) asthma was defined as the occurrence of asthma-related episodes (asthma symptoms, use of asthma medications, unscheduled medical or emergency department visit, or hospitalization for asthma) within 1 year before MI index date. There were 543 eligible incident MI cases during the study period. Of the 543 MI cases, 81 (15%) had a history of asthma before index date of MI, whereas 52 of 543 controls (10%) had such a history (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.06-2.66) adjusting for risk factors for MI and comorbid conditions (excluding chronic obstructive lung disease). Although inactive asthma did not increase the risk of MI, individuals with active asthma had a higher odds of MI, compared with those without asthma (adjusted OR: 3.18; 95% CI: 1.57-6.44) without controlling for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). After adjusting for COPD, although asthma overall was no longer statistically significant (adjusted OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 0.84-2.15), active asthma still was associated (adjusted OR: 2.33, 95% CI: 1.12-4.82). Active asthma is an unrecognized risk factor for MI. Further studies are needed to assess the role of asthma control and medications in the risk of MI. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Co-morbidities in severe asthma: Clinical impact and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsbjerg, Celeste; Menzies-Gow, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    Patients with severe asthma represent a minority of the total asthma population, but carry a majority of the morbidity and healthcare costs. Achieving better asthma control in this group of patients is therefore of key importance. Systematic assessment of patients with possible severe asthma to identify treatment barriers and triggers of asthma symptoms, including co-morbidities, improves asthma control and reduces healthcare costs and is recommended by international guidelines on management of severe asthma. This review provides the clinician with an overview of the prevalence and clinical impact of the most common co-morbidities in severe asthma, including chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyposis, allergic rhinitis, dysfunctional breathing, vocal cord dysfunction, anxiety and depression, obesity, obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), bronchiectasis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) and eosinophilic granulomatous with polyangiitis (EGPA). Furthermore, the review offers a summary of recommended diagnostic and management approaches for each co-morbidity. Finally, the review links co-morbid conditions to specific phenotypes of severe asthma, in order to guide the clinician on which co-morbidities to look for in specific patients. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  2. Medication use in Australian children with asthma: user's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Charu; Armour, Carol; Van Asperen, Peter Paul; Moles, Rebekah Jane; Saini, Bandana

    2013-04-01

    Medication use-related issues remain problematic in childhood asthma despite effective treatment strategies and public investment into improved asthma management strategies in industrialized countries. This study aimed to carry out an in-depth exploration of the views of parents/carers and children with asthma on medication use. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with a purposive convenience sample of children with asthma and their parents recruited from general practices in Sydney. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analyzed. A total of 52 interviews (26 parents/carers and 26 children with asthma) were conducted. Major themes which emerged from the children's interviews included issues such as self-image, resistance to medication use, and lack of responsibility in medication taking. Parental or carer issues included lack of clear understanding of how medications worked, as well as administration difficulties, cost constraints, and beliefs about medications contrary to quality use. This is one of the few research studies exploring the viewpoint of children with asthma about their medications in Australia. Despite investment in dissemination of professional, targeted evidence-based asthma management strategies in healthcare, there seems to be a lack of depth in terms of what parents understand about their child's asthma. Effective communication about medication usage, especially the inclusion of the child in the consultation to empower them to be involved in their own asthma care, may be the answer.

  3. Asthma in Sickle Cell Disease: Implications for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Blake

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To review issues related to asthma in sickle cell disease and management strategies. Data Source. A systematic review of pertinent original research publications, reviews, and editorials was undertaken using MEDLlNE, the Cochrane Library databases, and CINAHL from 1947 to November 2010. Search terms were [asthma] and [sickle cell disease]. Additional publications considered relevant to the sickle cell disease population of patients were identified; search terms included [sickle cell disease] combined with [acetaminophen], [pain medications], [vitamin D], [beta agonists], [exhaled nitric oxide], and [corticosteroids]. Results. The reported prevalence of asthma in children with sickle cell disease varies from 2% to approximately 50%. Having asthma increases the risk for developing acute chest syndrome , death, or painful episodes compared to having sickle cell disease without asthma. Asthma and sickle cell may be linked by impaired nitric oxide regulation, excessive production of leukotrienes, insufficient levels of Vitamin D, and exposure to acetaminophen in early life. Treatment of sickle cell patients includes using commonly prescribed asthma medications; specific considerations are suggested to ensure safety in the sickle cell population. Conclusion. Prospective controlled trials of drug treatment for asthma in patients who have both sickle cell disease and asthma are urgently needed.

  4. Asthma control in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The goal of asthma management is to achieve disease control. Poorly controlled asthma is associated with an increased number of days lost from school, exacerbations and days in hospital. Furthermore, children with uncontrolled asthma have more frequent contacts with the health-care system. Recent...... have been developed. They are all based on various questionnaires, but their validation has been difficult because we have no golden standard to compare with. It seems as if the tests are most valuable when they suggest that the disease is poorly controlled because a large proportion of children...

  5. Parental asthma education and risks for nonadherence to pediatric asthma treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Eva M; Cho, Christine S; Gildengorin, Ginny; Leibovich, Sara A; Morris, Claudia R

    2014-11-01

    Targeted parental education reduces acute visits for pediatric asthma. Whether the use of education sources readily available to parents relates to nonadherence to asthma treatments is uncertain. This study describes asthma education sources and assesses for a relationship to risks for nonadherence. Caregivers of children with asthma completed a cross-sectional survey at 2 sites: a pediatric emergency department (ED) and an asthma clinic (AC). Measured items included the use of 7 education sources (primary care, ED, AC, friends/family, TV, internet, and printed materials), scores of child asthma morbidity, parental asthma knowledge, and risks for nonadherence, the primary outcome. Recruitment site, preferred language (English/Spanish), and demographics were recorded. Descriptive statistics, bivariate analyses, and multivariate regressions were performed. A total of 260 participants, 158 from ED and 102 from AC, used a variety of education sources. They reported 4.1 (2.0) of 13 risk factors for nonadherence, with more risks in ED parents than AC parents (4.8 vs 3.9, P The ED parents worried more about medications and had worse access to primary care. The regression did not show a significant relationship between education sources and risks for nonadherence, but ED recruitment, Spanish language, and worse morbidity contributed to higher risks. The use of more asthma education sources was not associated with reduced risks for nonadherence. Of the education sources, a primary care provider may benefit ED parents, who also need refills and education about medications. Spanish-speaking parents report more risks for nonadherence, warranting further study of Spanish-language asthma education.

  6. Minor psychiatric disorders in mothers and asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto do Carmo, Maria Beatriz; Neves Santos, Darci; Alves Ferreira Amorim, Leila Denise; Fiaccone, Rosemeire Leovigildo; Souza da Cunha, Sergio; Cunha Rodrigues, Laura; Barreto, Mauricio L

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that asthma represents a major health issue not only in children of developed countries but also in urban centers in some middle-income countries. Brazil has one of the highest prevalences of asthma worldwide. Recently, interest has grown in the relationship between psychosocial factors and asthma. This article examines the relationship between maternal mental disorders and the prevalence of asthma in low-income children from an inner city area of Salvador in the state of Bahia, Brazil, and is part of the SCAALA program (Social Change, Allergy and Asthma in Latin America). A total of 1,087 children between the ages of 5 and 12 were investigated, together with their mothers. The mothers' mental health was evaluated using the SRQ-20, an instrument for the psychiatric screening of minor psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety and somatic complaints). The prevalence of asthma was investigated using the ISAAC survey, a standardized, validated questionnaire for asthma and other allergic diseases. Cases were defined as asthma if the patient reported having had wheezing in the previous 12 months in addition to at least one of the following: having asthma, wheezing while exercising, waking during the night because of wheezing, or having had at least four episodes of wheezing in the previous 12 months. Atopy was defined as a positive skin prick test to allergens. The presence of minor psychiatric disorders in the mothers was significantly associated with the presence of asthma in the children, and this association was consistent with all forms of asthma, irrespective of whether it was atopic or nonatopic. Future studies should be carried out to further investigate this association and the potential biological mechanisms involved. Programs for asthma control should include strategies for stress reduction and psychological support for the families of asthmatic children.

  7. Quality of Life in Children With Asthma: A Developmental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miadich, Samantha A; Everhart, Robin S; Borschuk, Adrienne P; Winter, Marcia A; Fiese, Barbara H

    2015-08-01

    The current study investigated whether factors associated with quality of life (QOL) in children with asthma (e.g., family functioning, asthma routines, asthma severity) differed by child age. Participants included 192 children with asthma (5-12 years) and their caregivers. Both children and caregivers completed questionnaires at an initial research session. Family functioning was determined from a mealtime observation that occurred in family homes. Child age moderated the association between asthma severity and child QOL and between routine burden and QOL in children with asthma. Post hoc probing analyses revealed that among older children, QOL levels were lower in the presence of worse asthma severity and more routine burden. Findings suggest that associations between asthma severity, routine burden, and QOL may differ by child age. Treatment programs and health-care recommendations addressing QOL in children with asthma may need to be tailored to address differences in factors associated with QOL by child age. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Occupational Asthma (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-01-18

    Deaths from asthma in adults have decreased by about 10 percent over the past 15 years, but the breathing disorder still affects millions of people in the U.S., including in the workplace. In this podcast, Dr. David Weissman discusses asthma in the workplace.  Created: 1/18/2018 by MMWR.   Date Released: 1/18/2018.

  9. Challenges in the Management of Bronchial Asthma Among Adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    industries, and the health‑care workers in general. Keywords: Asthma, Challenges, Diagnosis, Follow‑up, Nigeria, Treatment. Access this ... international guidelines in asthma management in Nigeria showed that most hospitals lacked the services of .... Narrative review articles (2). 13 articles included in systematic review ...

  10. A review of epidemiological studies of asthma in Ghana | Amoah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Asthma research in Ghana has focused mainly on children between the ages of 5-16 years with one published study that included adults. Different markers for the disease have been used such as cliniciandiagnosed asthma, exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) as well as questionnaire-derived symptoms of ...

  11. Environmental triggers and avoidance in the management of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Clarisse; Charpin, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Identifying asthma triggers forms the basis of environmental secondary prevention. These triggers may be allergenic or nonallergenic. Allergenic triggers include indoor allergens, such as house dust mites (HDMs), molds, pets, cockroaches, and rodents, and outdoor allergens, such as pollens and molds. Clinical observations provide support for the role of HDM exposure as a trigger, although avoidance studies provide conflicting results. Molds and their metabolic products are now considered to be triggers of asthma attacks. Pets, dogs, and especially cats can undoubtedly trigger asthmatic symptoms in sensitized subjects. Avoidance is difficult and rarely adhered to by families. Cockroach allergens contribute to asthma morbidity, and avoidance strategies can lead to clinical benefit. Mouse allergens are mostly found in inner-city dwellings, but their implication in asthma morbidity is debated. In the outdoors, pollens can induce seasonal asthma in sensitized individuals. Avoidance relies on preventing pollens from getting into the house and on minimizing seasonal outdoor exposure. Outdoor molds may lead to severe asthma exacerbations. Nonallergenic triggers include viral infections, active and passive smoking, meteorological changes, occupational exposures, and other triggers that are less commonly involved. Viral infection is the main asthma trigger in children. Active smoking is associated with higher asthma morbidity, and smoking cessation interventions should be personalized. Passive smoking is also a risk factor for asthma exacerbation. The implementation of public smoking bans has led to a reduction in the hospitalization of asthmatic children. Air pollution levels have been linked with asthmatic symptoms, a decrease in lung function, and increased emergency room visits and hospitalizations. Since avoidance is not easy to achieve, clean air policies remain the most effective strategy. Indoor air is also affected by air pollutants, such as cigarette smoke and

  12. Zoneterapi og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, Thor; Heinig, John Hilligsøe; Collins, Philippa

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many patients with asthma seek alternative or adjunctive therapies. One such modality is reflexology. Our aim was to examine the popular claim that reflexology treatment benefits bronchial asthma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten weeks of either active or simulated (placebo) reflexology were...... compared in an otherwise blind, controlled trial of 40 patients with asthma. RESULTS: Objective lung function tests did not change. Subjective scores and bronchial sensitivity to histamine improved on both regimens, but no differences were found in the groups receiving active or placebo reflexology....... However, a trend in favour of reflexology became significant when a supplementary analysis of symptom diaries was carried out. At the same time a significant pattern compatible with subconscious un-blinding was found. DISCUSSION: We found no evidence that reflexology has a specific effect on asthma beyond...

  13. Obesity and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranab Baruwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. The prevalence of asthma is around 300 million and is expected to increase another 100 million by 2025. Obesity, on the other hand, also affects a large number of individuals. Overweight in adults is defined when body mass index (BMI is between 25 to 30 kg/m 2 and obesity when the BMI >30 kg/m 2 . It has been a matter of interest for researchers to find a relation between these two conditions. This knowledge will provide a new insight into the management of both conditions. At present, obese asthma patients may be considered a special category and it is important to assess the impact of management of obesity on asthma symptoms.

  14. Asthma - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 简体中文) Expand Section Asthma - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Nebulizer Treatments - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual ...

  15. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Work-related Asthma NCHS Asthma FastStats Survey Questions Resources for Health Professionals and Schools Healthcare Professionals Public Health Professionals School and Childcare Providers CDC Publications on Asthma National Asthma Control Program ...

  16. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Asthma among Persons with Current Asthma Asthma and Obesity Percentage of People with Asthma who Smoke Insurance ... Program America Breathing Easier Guide for State Programs Interventions Community Guide—Evidence-based Potentially Effective Interventions Background ...

  17. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Current Asthma Overuse of quick-relief medication among persons with active asthma Use of long-term control medication among persons with active asthma Uncontrolled Asthma among Persons with ...

  18. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children with Current Asthma Overuse of quick-relief medication among persons with active asthma Use of long-term control medication among persons with active asthma Uncontrolled Asthma among ...

  19. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surveillance Most Recent Asthma Data Most Recent Asthma State or Territory Data Previous Most Recent Asthma Data 2014 National Data Archive 2014 State or Territory Data Archive AsthmaStats Flu Vaccination among ...

  20. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, and Surveillance Most Recent Asthma Data Most Recent ... care for people with asthma NACP Grantee Profile Tables and Graphs Asthma Call-back Survey Technical Information ...

  1. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma and avoid an attack by taking ... people with asthma live healthier lives by gaining control over their asthma. Quick Links Asthma Action Plan ...

  2. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Asthma & Community Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler Recommend on Facebook ... Clinical Guidelines Asthma & Community Health File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, ...

  3. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Archive 2014 State or Territory Data Archive AsthmaStats Flu Vaccination among Adults with Current Asthma Flu Vaccination among Children with Current Asthma Asthma and Fair ...

  4. Prodromal features of asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Beer, S; Laver, J; Karpuch, J; Chabut, S; Aladjem, M

    1987-01-01

    One hundred and thirty four ambulatory children with bronchial asthma were investigated in the Pediatric Pulmonary-Allergic Service. In 95 patients an interval characterised by prodromal respiratory symptoms (cough, rhinorrhoea, and wheezing), behavioural changes (irritability, apathy, anxiety, and sleep disorders), gastrointestinal symptoms (abdominal pain and anorexia), fever, itching, skin eruptions, and toothache preceded the onset of the attack of asthma. Each child had his own constant ...

  5. Posture and nocturnal asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Whyte, K F; Douglas, N J

    1989-01-01

    To investigate whether the supine posture caused sustained bronchoconstriction and could thus contribute to the development of nocturnal asthma, nine patients with nocturnal asthma were studied on two consecutive days, lying supine for four hours on one day and sitting upright for four hours on the other, the order of the two postures being randomised. Peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and forced vital capacity (FVC) were measured immediately before an...

  6. Asthma and asthma medication use among 4-year-old offspring of subfertile couples - association with IVF?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Derk B.; Seggers, Jorien; Schendelaar, Pamela; Haadsma, Maaike L.; Roseboom, Tessa J.; Heineman, Maas J.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of asthma and asthma medication use in 213 4-year-old singletons followed from birth onwards, including three groups of children born following: (i) controlled ovarian hyperstimulation IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI); (ii) modified natural cycle

  7. The value of FeNO measurement in asthma management: the motion against FeNO to help manage childhood asthma--reality bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Peter J; Stick, Stephen M

    2008-06-01

    Since exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) was first demonstrated to be raised in asthmatic patients in the early 1990s, there has been a strong interest in its potential role in the diagnosis and management of asthma. This culminated in 2003 when the US Food and Drug Administration cleared the NIOX nitric oxide analyser for clinical application in patients with asthma. The interest in FeNO is based on the assumptions that FeNO is a marker of asthma and asthma control, and that it reflects eosinophilic airway inflammation. However, the literature remains unconvincing and inconclusive. Furthermore, studies which have management algorithms that include FeNO as a guide to asthma treatment have failed to observe any improvement in asthma control compared with the use of standard asthma guidelines. At present, the cost of including FeNO in management guidelines far outweighs any potential benefits.

  8. Reducing asthma attacks in patients with severe asthma: The role of bronchial thermoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Ryan; Wechsler, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Asthma remains one of the most common diseases worldwide and results in significant societal health care costs and in morbidity and mortality to those afflicted. Despite currently available medications, 5-10% of patients with asthma have severe disease with debilitating symptoms and/or life-threatening exacerbations. Bronchial thermoplasty is a device-based therapy with proven efficacy in this subgroup of patients. Thus far, bronchial thermoplasty has been shown to reduce exacerbations and to improve important measures of asthma control. The purpose of this article is to review the pathophysiology of severe asthma, including the role of airway smooth muscle cells and the procedural aspects of bronchial thermoplasty, and to review the evidence behind this important therapy.

  9. Evolving Concepts of Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of asthma has evolved over time from a singular disease to a complex of various phenotypes, with varied natural histories, physiologies, and responses to treatment. Early therapies treated most patients with asthma similarly, with bronchodilators and corticosteroids, but these therapies had varying degrees of success. Similarly, despite initial studies that identified an underlying type 2 inflammation in the airways of patients with asthma, biologic therapies targeted toward these type 2 pathways were unsuccessful in all patients. These observations led to increased interest in phenotyping asthma. Clinical approaches, both biased and later unbiased/statistical approaches to large asthma patient cohorts, identified a variety of patient characteristics, but they also consistently identified the importance of age of onset of disease and the presence of eosinophils in determining clinically relevant phenotypes. These paralleled molecular approaches to phenotyping that developed an understanding that not all patients share a type 2 inflammatory pattern. Using biomarkers to select patients with type 2 inflammation, repeated trials of biologics directed toward type 2 cytokine pathways saw newfound success, confirming the importance of phenotyping in asthma. Further research is needed to clarify additional clinical and molecular phenotypes, validate predictive biomarkers, and identify new areas for possible interventions. PMID:26161792

  10. The effectiveness of school-based family asthma educational programs on the quality of life and number of asthma exacerbations of children aged five to 18 years diagnosed with asthma: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Helen; Sadeque-Iqbal, Fatema; Ulysse, Rose; Castillo, Doreen; Fitzpatrick, Aileen; Singleton, Joanne

    2015-10-01

    $655 million was spent on asthma for 2008-09.Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that affects millions of people of all ethnicities, ages and genders worldwide. The pathophysiology of asthma is multifaceted, and is characterized by restriction of airflow into and out of the lungs, airway inflammation with increased mucus production, and bronchial hyper-reactivity caused by exposure to environmental irritants and chemicals, often referred to as triggers, which in some cases are modifiable. Asthma triggers include respiratory infections, weather changes, stress, excitement, exercise and other physical activities, allergic hypersensitivity reactions, food additives, animal dander, dust mites, cockroaches, outdoor and indoor pollutants, certain medications and cigarette smoke. Asthma is characterized by recurrent, episodic, reversible symptoms often referred to as asthma exacerbations, or asthma attacks. Asthma symptoms include coughing, shortness of breath, chest tightness and wheezing that most frequently occur at night or in the early morning. Asthma symptoms vary in severity and frequency in affected individuals, and can occur several times a day or week. Asthma symptoms may be mild, moderate, or severe, and are classified according to presenting symptoms and quantitative measurements of lung function using a peak expiratory flow meter (PEF), or of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). Asthma symptoms can be so severe that, if left untreated, death can occur.Exacerbations of asthma symptoms often result in school and work absenteeism, activity intolerance and emergency hospital visits for asthma. Nocturnal asthma exacerbations frequently cause sleeplessness, which may result in daytime fatigue. Asthma symptoms can interfere and disrupt activities of daily life, and can have an unfavorable impact on the quality of life for people with the disease, including children and their caregivers. For this review, quality of life represents how well the asthmatic

  11. Effects of exercise and diet in nonobese asthma patients - a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Louise Lindhardt; Meteran, Howraman; Hostrup, Morten

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Behavioral interventions focusing on exercise and healthy diet improve asthma control in obese patients with asthma, but whether these interventions can lead to improvements in nonobese patients remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: In a randomized, controlled parallel-group design, we studied...... the effects of an 8-week intervention of either exercise (high-intensity interval training), diet (high protein/low glycemic index), or a combination of the 2, on asthma control and clinical outcomes in nonobese patients with asthma. METHODS: Nonobese adult patients with asthma (n = 149) were randomized to 1...... of 4 groups: an exercise group, a diet group, an exercise + diet group, or a control group. Outcomes included Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) score, asthma-related quality-of-life (Asthma-Related Quality-of-Life Questionnaire [AQLQ]) score, inflammatory cell counts in induced sputum, FEV1...

  12. EFFECTIVENESS OF SUBCUTANEOUS ALLERGEN-SPECIFIC IMMUNOTHERAPY WITH TREE POLLEN ALLERGEN EXTRACT ADSORBED ON CALCIUM PHOSPHATE IN CHILDREN WITH ALLERGIC RHINOCONJUNCTIVITIS: RESULTS OF A 2 YEAR-LONG OBSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Shakhova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at evaluating effectiveness and safety of subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (scASIT with tree pollen allergen extract adsorbed on calcium phosphate at allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in children. Patients and methods: open-label prospective study of 50 children and adolescents (5-17 years of age with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis caused by high sensitivity to tree pollen allergens. The first group involved the patients undergoing scASIT for 2 years 6 months (n = 23, the control group – the patients (n = 27 not undergoing any specific immunotherapy. Results: scASIT was accompanied by a statistically significant (in comparison with the control group reduction in intensity of rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms (6.1 ± 3.1; 11.8 ± 4.5; p = 0.00002, reduction in the use of symptomatic drugs (1.0 ± 0.4; 1.8 ± 0.3; p = 0.000004 and improvement of quality of all spheres of children’s life – physical (p = 0.001, social (p = 0.04, emotional (p = 0.001 and role functioning (p = 0.03. Systemic side reactions were not observed in the patients. Local reactions were observed in 23% of all allergen injections. Conclusions: the authors established high effectiveness and safety of scASIT with tree pollen allergen extract adsorbed on calcium phosphate suspension at allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in children. 

  13. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Asthma & Community Health Know How ... Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Asthma & Community Health File Formats ...

  14. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surveillance Most Recent Asthma Data Most Recent Asthma State or Territory Data AsthmaStats Asthma as the Underlying ... Links Asthma’s Impact on the Nation Fact Sheet State Data Profiles (2011) Work-related Asthma NCHS Asthma ...

  15. The value of pre- and co-seasonal sublingual immunotherapy in pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demoly, Pascal; Calderon, Moises A; Casale, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    (i.e. pre-seasonal alone, co-seasonal alone or pre- and co-seasonal). Pre-and co-seasonal regimens are typically used for sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT) and have economic and compliance advantages over perennial (year-round) regimens. However, these advantages must not come at the expensive......Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is a guidelines-approved, disease-modifying treatment option for respiratory allergies, including allergic rhinitis (AR) induced by pollen. The various AIT regimens employed to date in pollen-induced AR can be classified as continuous (i.e. year-round) or discontinuous...

  16. Factors associated with overestimation of asthma control: A cross-sectional study in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereznicki, Bonnie J; Chapman, Millicent P; Bereznicki, Luke R E

    2017-05-01

    To investigate actual and perceived disease control in Australians with asthma, and identify factors associated with overestimation of asthma control. This was a cross-sectional study of Australian adults with asthma, who were recruited via Facebook to complete an online survey. The survey included basic demographic questions, and validated tools assessing asthma knowledge, medication adherence, medicine beliefs, illness perception and asthma control. Items that measured symptoms and frequency of reliever medication use were compared to respondents' self-rating of their own asthma control. Predictors of overestimation of asthma control were determined using multivariate logistic regression. Of 2971 survey responses, 1950 (65.6%) were complete and eligible for inclusion. Overestimation of control was apparent in 45.9% of respondents. Factors independently associated with overestimation of asthma control included education level (OR = 0.755, 95% CI: 0.612-0.931, P = 0.009), asthma knowledge (OR = 0.942, 95% CI: 0.892-0.994, P = 0.029), total asthma control, (OR = 0.842, 95% CI: 0.818-0.867, P addictive (OR = 1.144, 95% CI: 1.017-1.287, P = 0.025), and increased feelings of control over asthma (OR = 1.261, 95% CI: 1.191-1.335), P < 0.001). Overestimation of asthma control remains a significant issue in Australians with asthma. The study highlights the importance of encouraging patients to express their feelings about asthma control and beliefs about medicines, and to be more forthcoming with their asthma symptoms. This would help to reveal any discrepancies between perceived and actual asthma control.

  17. Spirometry use in children hospitalized with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Chun; McDowell, Karen M; Fenchel, Matthew; Szczesniak, Rhonda; Kercsmar, Carolyn M

    2014-05-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disorder of childhood and continues to be a leading cause of pediatric hospital admission. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) recommends that spirometry be obtained for asthma patients upon hospital admission, after bronchodilation during the acute phase of asthma symptoms, and at least one additional time before discharge from the hospital. The objectives of this study were to describe the use of spirometry in children hospitalized with asthma and to determine association of pulmonary function with future exacerbations. A retrospective cohort study design was utilized involving review of medical records of children ≥5 years old admitted with asthma to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center from September 1, 2009 to March 31, 2011. Hospitalization or emergency department (ED) visits were identified by the ICD-9-CM codes of having either a primary diagnosis of asthma (493) or a respiratory illness (460-496) plus a secondary diagnosis of asthma. Asthma re-exacerbation was defined as either having an ED visit or hospitalization for asthma that occurred within 3 months after the index hospitalization. All spirometries were performed in a pediatric pulmonary function laboratory. Among 1,037 admissions included in this study, 89 (8.6%) had spirometry that was recommended by a consulting asthma specialist and usually performed on the day of discharge. Spirometries for forty-five of these patients (54.9%) met all acceptability and repeatability criteria of the American Thoracic Society. Patients who performed acceptable spirometry were significantly older (12.4 ± 3.8 vs. 10.7 ± 3.0 years; P = 0.041). The average forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1 ) was 84.4 ± 19.7% predicted; forced vital capacity (FVC) was 98.1 ± 16.0% predicted; FEV1 /FVC was 74.6 ± 9.6%; forced expiratory flow at 25-75% (FEF25-75 ) was 61.2 ± 30.1% predicted. Ten patients (22%) who

  18. Psychological dysfunctions in women with bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia G. Astafieva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The importance of psychosocial factors in the management of bronchial asthma (BA is discussed in clinical guidelines, including in international and national clinical guidelines. However, a specific evaluation of their role as a cause of poor asthma control in susceptible patients is required. Aim. Assessment of psychological health of women with different levels of asthma control.Materials and methods. The study included 108 women with asthma observed in Saratov center for Allergology who were stratified into 3 groups according to the control level (good, partial, uncontrolled, according to GINA. In establishing a diagnosis of asthma, standard methods were used (medical history, symptoms, spirography. To assess the level of control, ACQ-5 (Asthma Control Questionnaire 5 items-self-administered was used, to assess the quality of life, questionnaires AQLQ-S (Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire S; SF-36 (36-ltem MOS Short-Form Health Survey, a standardized and validated Russian version of the women’s health questionnaire WHQ (Women’s Health Questionnaire were used; for psychological diagnosis and evaluation of social and personal competencies that contribute to the preservation and improvement of human health (the intellectual, personal, emotional, physical, social, creative, spiritual aspects, integrated multimodal questionnaire was used. The comparison was conducted with a control group of men with bronchial asthma, comparable in age and level of control.Results. Women with poorly controlled asthma had worse performance of AQLQ-S (combined median score of 3,43 instead of 5,13 in the group of good control; p < 0,05; all scales of the SF-36, including the general condition (43,48 against 55,07, role of physical (25,93 against 57,76 and emotional problems (43,83 against 64,37; at p < 0.05. According to the WHQ questionnaire (the inverse relationship: the higher the score, the lower the quality of life in the group with poor control

  19. Community violence and urban childhood asthma: a multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternthal, M J; Jun, H-J; Earls, F; Wright, R J

    2010-12-01

    We examined the association between community violence exposure and childhood asthma risk in a multilevel, multimethod, longitudinal study controlling for individual- and neighbourhood-level confounders and pathway variables. Analyses included 2,071 children aged 0-9 yrs at enrolment from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. Multilevel logistic regression models estimated the likelihood of asthma, controlling for individual-level (child's age, sex, race/ethnicity, maternal asthma, socioeconomic status and family violence in the home) and neighbourhood-level confounders (concentrated disadvantage, collective efficacy and social disorder), and pathway variables (maternal smoking, breastfeeding). In adjusted analyses, medium (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.17-2.19) and high levels (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.12-2.18) of community violence were associated with increased asthma risk, relative to low levels. The increased asthma risk remained for African Americans when models included community violence and all other individual-level covariates, but attenuated to borderline nonsignificance when further adjusting for collective efficacy. Community violence is associated with asthma risk when controlling for individual- and neighborhood-level confounders. Neither community violence, nor the other individual-level factors, fully accounted for the excess asthma burden among African Americans. These data suggest that public health interventions outside the biomedical model may be needed to reduce asthma in disadvantaged populations.

  20. How to manage a child with difficult asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglani, Sejal; Fleming, Louise

    2016-08-01

    Children with difficult asthma have significant morbidity and fail to achieve asthma control despite being prescribed high dose maintenance treatment. If control remains poor after diagnostic confirmation, detailed assessments of the reasons for asthma being difficult-to-control are needed. Underlying modifiable factors including non-adherence to medication, persistent environmental exposures that trigger asthma symptoms and psychosocial factors contribute to poor control in these patients. The focus of this review is to provide a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of difficult asthma including an overview of long term assessments to identify potential progression to true, severe asthma. A multi-disciplinary team is critical to enable modifiable factors to be identified and addressed. Significant resources are required to manage paediatric difficult asthma optimally and only specialist centres should be tasked with the assessment of these patients. Although this may have an impact on healthcare resources, long term benefits for lung health are significant. Expert commentary: The management of paediatric difficult asthma is not simple and involves numerous professionals with varied expertise. However, if it is not undertaken with the appropriate skills, there is a significant risk of children receiving inappropriate invasive investigations and therapies that will have no impact on morbidity.

  1. Indoor Environmental Control Practices and Asthma Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Elizabeth C; Abramson, Stuart L; Sandel, Megan T

    2016-11-01

    Indoor environmental exposures, particularly allergens and pollutants, are major contributors to asthma morbidity in children; environmental control practices aimed at reducing these exposures are an integral component of asthma management. Some individually tailored environmental control practices that have been shown to reduce asthma symptoms and exacerbations are similar in efficacy and cost to controller medications. As a part of developing tailored strategies regarding environmental control measures, an environmental history can be obtained to evaluate the key indoor environmental exposures that are known to trigger asthma symptoms and exacerbations, including both indoor pollutants and allergens. An environmental history includes questions regarding the presence of pets or pests or evidence of pests in the home, as well as knowledge regarding whether the climatic characteristics in the community favor dust mites. In addition, the history focuses on sources of indoor air pollution, including the presence of smokers who live in the home or care for children and the use of gas stoves and appliances in the home. Serum allergen-specific immunoglobulin E antibody tests can be performed or the patient can be referred for allergy skin testing to identify indoor allergens that are most likely to be clinically relevant. Environmental control strategies are tailored to each potentially relevant indoor exposure and are based on knowledge of the sources and underlying characteristics of the exposure. Strategies include source removal, source control, and mitigation strategies, such as high-efficiency particulate air purifiers and allergen-proof mattress and pillow encasements, as well as education, which can be delivered by primary care pediatricians, allergists, pediatric pulmonologists, other health care workers, or community health workers trained in asthma environmental control and asthma education. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Environmental pollution and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giampaolo, L; Quecchia, C; Schiavone, C; Cavallucci, E; Renzetti, A; Braga, M; Di Gioacchino, M

    2011-01-01

    Clinical evidences and epidemiological studies show that allergic pathologies of the respiratory tract are increasing in the world areas with high pollution impact, demonstrating how many polluting substances favor both allergic sensitization and the bronchial inflammatory changes characteristic of asthma. It has been shown that asthma, as many other diseases, is a complex interaction between genetic predisposition and environmental stimuli that results in clinical expression of various phenotypes of asthma: allergic, intrinsic etc. Many pollutants have such a potential. Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) can favor allergic sensitization, induce acute asthma attacks and increase bronchial reactivity, acting both on allergen, on bronchial mucosa and on immune cells. In fact, DEP can favor B lymphocytes to shift to a production of IgE and T cells to produce Th2 cytokines. Asthma can be also induced by high exposure to many other substances as NO2 and first of all ozone (O3): strong oxidizing substance that is synthesized, in absence of ventilation, by photochemical reaction due to the combination of ultraviolet sun radiation on exhaust gases as NO2 and hydrocarbons. Ozone is abundant in cities with minimal concentration in the morning gradually increasing during the day until maximal levels in the afternoon and then decreasing during the night. Epidemiological studies show that the number of access to hospital for acute asthma and even the use of bronchodilator by asthmatics increase during the high level periods when Ozone constitute almost 90 percent of the total oxidants in the environment. Particulate matter of very small diameter have a crucial role in favoring asthma attacks, and smaller the substance deeper the penetration in the bronchial tree, with an inflammatory reaction in the peripheral bronchial mucosa characterized by increased vessel permeability, mucosal edema, inflammatory mediator production by damaged epithelium and inflammatory cells that determines

  3. Importance of education in bronchial asthma treatment - gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska-Polańska, Beata; Pleśniak, Justyna; Seń, Mariola; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress in understanding mechanisms and effective treatment there are still therapeutic failures in patients treated for bronchial asthma. Education is vital in the therapeutic process. It improves the control of the disease at the individual level by influencing the adherence and compliance. The study included 100 patients suffering from bronchial asthma and treated according to GINA 2002 guidelines in Allergy Clinic. Asthma control test (ACT), analysis of patients' medical documentation and a self-constructed questionnaire concerning health promotion and education were used in the study. Aim of this work was to assess differences in the influence of education on results of bronchial asthma control between sexes. Average duration of asthma was similar in women and men (13.0 ± 11.16 vs.12.7 ± 9.74 years). Weaker asthma control was found in women (ACT 17.7 vs. 20.4), as well as lower FEV1 values (80-50% of predicted value in 60.3% of women vs. 43.25 of men). In women an analysis of correlation concerning patients' knowledge and conducted health education with asthma control revealed a statistically significant positive correlation of knowledge acquired from the allergologist with asthma control, information about proceeding in acute attack, whereas negative correlation with asthma control with knowledge passed on by family doctor was found. Among the male respondents positive correlations of knowledge with asthma control within the scope of knowledge from allergologist and information concerning proceeding in asthmatic attack were found, while negative correlation with information coming from family doctor was revealed. Health education in patients with asthma should be conducted by a specialist in allergic diseases and well-prepared healthcare professionals.

  4. Prevalence of asthma and allergic rhinitis among adults in Yaounde, Cameroon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Walter Pefura-Yone

    Full Text Available Population-based estimates of asthma and allergic rhinitis in sub-Saharan African adults are lacking. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of asthma and allergic rhinitis in urban adult Cameroonians.A community-based survey was conducted from December 2013 to April 2014 among adults aged 19 years and above (N = 2,304, 57.3% women, selected through multilevel stratified random sampling across all districts of Yaounde (Capital city. Internationally validated questionnaires were used to investigate the presence of allergic diseases. Logistic regressions were employed to investigate the determinants of allergic conditions.Prevalence rates were 2.7% (95% CI: 2.1-3.4 for asthma-ever, 6.9% (5.9-7.9 for lifetime wheezing, 2.9% (92.2-3.6 for current wheezing and 11.4% (10.1-12.7 for self-reported lifetime allergic rhinitis; while 240 (10.4% participants reported current symptoms of allergic rhinitis, and 125 (5.4% had allergic rhino-conjunctivitis. The prevalence of current asthma medication use and self-reported asthma attack was 0.8 (0.4-1.2 and 1 (0.6-1.4 respectively. Multivariable adjusted determinants of current wheezing were signs of atopic eczema [2.91 (1.09-7.74] and signs of allergic rhinitis [3.24 (1.83-5.71]. Age group 31-40 years [0.27(0.09-0.78, p = 0.016] was an independent protective factor for wheezing. Determinants of current rhinitis symptoms were active smoking [2.20 (1.37-3.54, p<0.001], signs of atopic eczema [2.84 (1.48-5.46] and current wheezing [3.02 (1.70-5.39].Prevalence rates for asthma and allergic rhinitis among adults in this population were at the lower tails of those reported in other regions of the world. Beside the classical interrelation between allergic diseases found in this study, active smoking was an independent determinant of allergic rhinitis symptoms. Nationwide surveys are needed to investigate regional variations.

  5. Effect of a mobile health, sensor-driven asthma management platform on asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Meredith A; Humblet, Olivier; Marcus, Justine E; Henderson, Kelly; Smith, Ted; Eid, Nemr; Sublett, J Wesley; Renda, Andrew; Nesbitt, LaQuandra; Van Sickle, David; Stempel, David; Sublett, James L

    2017-11-01

    Asthma inflicts a significant health and economic burden in the United States. Self-management approaches to monitoring and treatment can be burdensome for patients. To assess the effect of a digital health management program on asthma outcomes. Residents of Louisville, Kentucky, with asthma were enrolled in a single-arm pilot study. Participants received electronic inhaler sensors that tracked the time, frequency, and location of short-acting β-agonist (SABA) use. After a 30-day baseline period during which reference medication use was recorded by the sensors, participants received access to a digital health intervention designed to enhance self-management. Changes in outcomes, including mean daily SABA use, symptom-free days, and asthma control status, were compared among the initial 30-day baseline period and all subsequent months of the intervention using mixed-model logistic regressions and χ 2 tests. The mean number of SABA events per participant per day was 0.44 during the control period and 0.27 after the first month of the intervention, a 39% reduction. The percentage of symptom-free days was 77% during the baseline period and 86% after the first month, a 12% improvement. Improvement was observed throughout the study; each intervention month demonstrated significantly lower SABA use and higher symptom-free days than the baseline month (P asthma during the baseline period, 67% during the first month of the intervention. Each intervention month demonstrated significantly higher percentages than the baseline month (P asthma management intervention demonstrated significant reductions in SABA use, increased number of symptom-free days, and improvements in asthma control. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02162576. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. What's an Asthma Action Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... zone , or safety zone, explains how to manage asthma when your child is feeling good. The yellow zone , or caution ... explains which medicines to add to bring your child's asthma back under control. The red zone , or danger ...

  7. Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Of Age Older Adults Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine Women Infant, Children and Teenagers Living With Lung ... written by Respiratory Experts Like no other health magazine, Allergy & Asthma Health Magazine is published by people ...

  8. Risk factors associated with childhood asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeed, R.; Rajar, U.D.M.

    2008-01-01

    To identify the risk factors associated with childhood asthma, in children attending Isra University Hospital, Hyderabad. The study included 398 age-matched children (200 asthmatic and 198 non-asthmatic). Information was collected concerning their familial history of atopy, birth weight, environment, breastfeeding, disease and treatment history. Odds ratio was calculated for determining the risk. The children were aged between 12 months and 8 years and 60% were male. The asthmatic children were hospitalized more frequently than the non-asthmatic children (p < 0.0001). Most of the asthmatic children lived in the urban areas of Hyderabad (odd ratio (OR) 16.7, 95% CI = 3.1-14.6, p < 0.0001), had a parental history of asthma (OR 26.8, 95% CI = 10.8-68.2, p < 0.0001) or allergic rhinitis (OR 4, 95% CI 1.2-13.4, p= 0.01), 38.5% had at least one person who smoked, and were weaned earlier than the non-asthmatic children (OR =12.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.4, p < 0.01). Childhood asthma was strongly associated with a family history of asthma and allergic rhinitis, the urban place of residence, having smokers as parents and early weaning from maternal breast milk. The results highlight the need to educate the parents about the risk of smoking and early weaning in the development of asthma. (author)

  9. Asthma referrals: a key component of asthma management that needs to be addressed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price D

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available David Price,1,2 Leif Bjermer,3 David A Bergin,4 Rafael Martinez5 1Centre of Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; 2Observational and Pragmatic Research Institute, Singapore; 3Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; 4Novartis Ireland Limited, Dublin, Ireland; 5Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland Abstract: Heterogeneity of asthma and difficulty in achieving optimal control are the major challenges in the management of asthma. To help attain the best possible clinical outcomes in patients with asthma, several guidelines provide recommendations for patients who will require a referral to a specialist. Such referrals can help in clearing the uncertainty from the initial diagnosis, provide tailored treatment options to patients with persistent symptoms and offer the patients access to health care providers with expertise in the management of the asthma; thus, specialist referrals have a substantial impact on disease prognosis and the patient’s health status. Hurdles in implementing these recommendations include lack of their dissemination among health care providers and nonadherence to these guidelines; these hurdles considerably limit the implementation of specialist referrals, eventually affecting the rate of referrals. In this review, recommendations for specialist referrals from several key international and national asthma guidelines and other relevant published literature are evaluated. Furthermore, we highlight why referrals are not happening, how this can be improved, and ultimately, what should be done in the specialist setting, based on existing evidence in published literature. Keywords: asthma, disease management, specialization, primary care physicians, referral

  10. Clinically remitted childhood asthma is associated with airflow obstruction in middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Keitaro; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Yamane, Takashi; Nakashima, Taku; Haruta, Yoshinori; Hattori, Noboru; Yokoyama, Akihito; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2017-01-01

    While adult asthma has been shown to be a risk factor for COPD, the effect of remitted childhood asthma on adult lung function has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to examine whether remitted childhood asthma is a risk factor for airflow obstruction in a middle-aged general population. A total of 9896 participants (range: 35-60 years) from five healthcare centres were included in the study. The participants were classified into four categories based on the presence or absence of physician-diagnosed childhood/adulthood asthma and asthma symptoms as follows: healthy controls (n = 9154), remitted childhood asthma (n = 287), adulthood-onset asthma (n = 354) and childhood-adulthood asthma (n = 101). The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was similar in both the participants with remitted childhood asthma and healthy controls. The prevalence of airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 )/forced vital capacity (FVC) childhood asthma, those with adult-onset asthma and those with childhood-adulthood asthma (5.2%, 14.4% and 16.8%, respectively) compared with healthy controls (2.2%). Multivariate logistic regression showed that remitted childhood asthma was independently associated with airflow obstruction. Among the participants with remitted childhood asthma, ever-smokers had significantly lower FEV 1 /FVC than never-smokers. Clinically remitted childhood asthma is associated with airflow obstruction in middle-aged adults. Smoking and remitted childhood asthma may be additive factors for the development of airflow obstruction. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  11. Urban caregiver empowerment: Caregiver nativity, child-asthma symptoms, and emergency-department use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Maria Teresa; Kopel, Sheryl J; Williams, Brittney; Dansereau, Katie; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we examined the associations between caregiver empowerment, child-asthma symptoms, and emergency-department (ED) use in a sample of school-age urban children with asthma. We examined differences in caregiver empowerment, and in the associations among caregiver empowerment, proportion of days with child-asthma symptoms, and ED use as a function of caregiver nativity. Participants for this study were part of a larger longitudinal study and included Latino, African American and non-Latino White urban caregivers and their children with asthma (ages 7-9; N = 130). Caregiver empowerment was assessed within family, asthma services, and community domains. Children whose caregivers reported greater empowerment within the family (i.e., possessing sufficient knowledge and ability to care for their families) presented with fewer asthma symptoms. Children whose caregivers reported greater empowerment within asthma services (i.e., the ability to collaborate with asthma providers and the health-care system), presented with more asthma symptoms. Foreign-born caregivers endorsed greater empowerment within the family, whereas U.S.-born caregivers reported greater empowerment within asthma services. For foreign-born caregivers, higher levels of empowerment in the family were associated with fewer child-asthma symptoms. For U.S.-born caregivers, higher levels of empowerment in asthma services were associated with more child-asthma symptoms. Results suggest that caregivers who feel more confident and better able to manage problems within their families may better manage their children's asthma symptoms. Foreign-born caregivers may benefit from increased support to more effectively navigate the asthma health-care system and manage their children's asthma. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. [Asthma control status in children and related factors in 29 cities of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the status of asthma control in the city and severity of asthma in children and to identify related factors. This study was conducted in one children's hospital or tertiary hospital in each of the 29 provinces except Xinjiang and Xizang Autonomous Regions. Totally, 2960 parents with asthmatic children ages 0 to 14 years, and all had been diagnosed with asthma at least 3 months ago and the course was more than 12 months, who visited those hospitals were selected for the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) questionnaire survey, and separated into the controlled asthma group and uncontrolled asthma group according to children's asthma conditions in the past 12 months. Multivariate analysis was carried out based on the answers to 28 tested factors; 2485 of 2960 questionnaires from 29 provinces were valid. Of the 2485 valid questionnaires, 66.0% asthmatic children had asthma attacks in the past 12 months, 26.8% asthmatic children had visited the emergency department, 16.2% asthmatic children had been hospitalized. The total cost was significantly higher in the uncontrolled group than in contro group (χ² = 23.14, P asthma control, knowledge of "3 or more times recurrent wheezing suggesting asthma", knowledge of "cough lasting for more than 4 weeks suggesting asthma", knowledge of "cough improved with bronchodilators suggesting asthma", knowledge of "awareness of using short-acting β₂ agonist for acute attack", avoiding contact with plush toys, adhere to use nasal steroid, inhaled corticosteroids/composite preparation, age of children and course of asthma in children are protective factors that affect asthma control and severity of asthma in children. Food allergies, eczema and family history of asthma are risk factors. Asthma in many children was poorly controlled. Factors that affect asthma control and severity include parents' knowledge about asthma, exposure to adverse environment, the compliance with medication and regular visits for asthma

  13. Urban vs. rural factors that affect adult asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Yu; Isa, Zaleha Md; Jie, Xu; Ju, Zhang Long; Ismail, Noor Hassim

    2013-01-01

    In this review, our aim was to examine the influence of geographic variations on asthma prevalence and morbidity among adults, which is important for improving our understanding, identifying the burden, and for developing and implementing interventions aimed at reducing asthma morbidity. Asthma is a complex inflammatory disease of multifactorial origin, and is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. The disparities in asthma prevalence and morbidity among the world's geographic locations are more likely to be associated with environmental exposures than genetic differences. In writing this article, we found that the indoor factors most consistently associated with asthma and asthma-related symptoms in adults included fuel combustion, mold growth, and environmental tobacco smoke in both urban and rural areas. Asthma and asthma-related symptoms occurred more frequently in urban than in rural areas, and that difference correlated with environmental risk exposures, SES, and healthcare access. Environmental risk factors to which urban adults were more frequently exposed than rural adults were dust mites,high levels of vehicle emissions, and a westernized lifestyle.Exposure to indoor biological contaminants in the urban environment is common.The main risk factors for developing asthma in urban areas are atopy and allergy to house dust mites, followed by allergens from animal dander. House dust mite exposure may potentially explain differences in diagnosis of asthma prevalence and morbidity among adults in urban vs. rural areas. In addition, the prevalence of asthma morbidity increases with urbanization. High levels of vehicle emissions,Western lifestyles and degree of urbanization itself, may affect outdoor and thereby indoor air quality. In urban areas, biomass fuels have been widely replaced by cleaner energy sources at home, such as gas and electricity, but in most developing countries, coal is still a major source of fuel for cooking and heating

  14. Guiding principles for use of newer biologics and bronchial thermoplasty for patients with severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiss, Michael S; Castro, Mario; Chipps, Bradley E; Zitt, Myron; Panettieri, Reynold A; Foggs, Michael B

    2017-12-01

    Severe asthma poses significant disease-related and economic burdens in the United States. Challenges in practice include how to define "severe asthma" for a given patient, knowing which are the right tests to perform and when, and having a better understanding of a patient's asthma phenotype. Furthermore, current guidelines do not address a clear, practical approach to treatment that is based on a patient's asthma phenotype. To develop a consensus on the definition of severe asthma, the role of biomarkers and phenotyping severe asthma, and the use of newer biologic therapies and bronchial thermoplasty to help guide practicing clinicians. A roundtable meeting was convened with a panel of severe asthma experts to discuss areas in practice that are not adequately addressed by current guidelines, specifically phenotype-guided treatment. We describe a consensus on the definition of severe asthma, asthma phenotyping with the use of available biomarkers, and guiding principles for newer biologic therapies and bronchial thermoplasty. To optimize therapy and improve outcomes such as daily symptoms, quality of life, exacerbations, and hospitalizations, a clear picture of a patient's asthma phenotype is needed to guide therapy. Determining asthma phenotypes is the foundation of precision medicine for this persistent, often difficult-to-treat disease. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluating the implementation of a multicomponent asthma education program for Head Start staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvalcaba, Elizabeth; Chung, Shang-En; Rand, Cynthia; Riekert, Kristin A; Eakin, Michelle

    2018-03-15

    Asthma disproportionately affects minority groups, low income populations, and young children under 5. Head Start (HS) programs predominantly serve this high-risk population, yet staff are not trained on asthma management. The objective of this study was to assess a 5-year, multicomponent HS staff asthma education program in Baltimore City HS programs. All HS programs were offered annual staff asthma education by a medical research team that included didactic lectures and hands-on training. Attendees received continuing education credits. HS staff were anonymously surveyed on asthma knowledge and skills and asthma medication management practices in Year 1 (preimplementation) and Year 5. There was an estimated response rate of 94% for Year 1 and 82% for Year 5. Compared to staff in Year 1, Year 5 staff were significantly more likely to report they had very good knowledge and skills related to asthma [odds ratio (OR) 1.63; p staff reported higher self-assessed knowledge and skills, self-reports of asthma medication management practices, and self-reports of asthma activities compared to Year 1 staff. HS serves high-risk children with asthma, and a multicomponent program can adequately prepare staff to manage asthma in the child care setting. Our results indicate the feasibility of providing efficacious health skill education into child care provider training to reduce asthma knowledge gaps.

  16. Symposium on Obesity and Asthma –November 2, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe Boulet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma and obesity are frequently associated, and obesity has been considered a factor contributing to both an increase in severity of asthma and to its development. The present document summarizes the proceedings of a symposium held in Montreal, Quebec, on November 2, 2006, under the auspices of the Réseau en santé respiratoire du Fonds de la recherche en santé du Québec in collaboration with the McGill University – Strauss Severe Asthma Program, Université Laval (Quebec City and Université de Montréal. It includes an overview of the various aspects of the relationships between asthma and obesity with regard to animal models; genetic, hormonal and physiological determinants; influence of comorbidities (eg, sleep apnea syndrome; epidemiology; clinical and psychological features; and management of asthma in the obese population.

  17. Risk of Asthma from Cesarean Delivery Depends on Membrane Rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevelsted, Astrid; Stokholm, Jakob; Bisgaard, Hans

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess our prospective mother-child cohort and the national registry data to analyze the risk of asthma by delivery mode and whether cesarean delivery before or after membrane rupture affects this risk differently. STUDY DESIGN: The Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma...... in Childhood2000 is a high-risk birth cohort of 411 Danish children. Asthma was diagnosed prospectively by physicians at the research site, and associations with cesarean delivery were investigated using Cox proportional hazard models. From the Danish national prospective registry we included data from 1997......-2010. Childhood asthma was defined from recurrent use of inhaled corticosteroids filled at pharmacies. Cesarean delivery was classified as either before or after rupture of membranes, and the risk of asthma was compared with vaginal delivery. Results were adjusted stepwise for age and calendar year, sex, birth...

  18. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  19. Rhinitis: a complication to asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J W; Thomsen, S F; Nolte, H

    2010-01-01

    Asthma and rhinitis often co-occur, and this potentially increases the disease severity and impacts negatively on the quality of life. We studied disease severity, airway responsiveness, atopy, quality of life and treatment in subjects with both asthma and rhinitis compared to patients with asthma...

  20. Leukotriene modifiers in pediatric asthma management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (Cys-LTs) are mediators released in asthma and virus-induced wheezing. Corticosteroids appear to have little or no effect on this release in vivo. Cys-LTs are both direct bronchoconstrictors and proinflammatory substances that mediate several steps in the pathophysiology...... of chronic asthma, including inflammatory cell recruitment, vascular leakage, and possibly airway remodeling. Blocking studies show that Cys-LTs are pivotal mediators in the pathophysiology of asthma. Cys-LTs are key components in the early and late allergic airway response and also contribute to bronchial......-LTRA) are generally well-tolerated. Phase III randomized, controlled clinical trials (RCT) show that LT modifiers are moderately effective, apparently with a particular between-patient variability in their clinical response. The clinical effects of LT modifiers are additive to those of beta...

  1. Evaluating Emergency Department Asthma Management Practices in Florida Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Alexandra C H; Carretta, Henry J; Dudley, Julie K; Forrest, Jamie R; Folsom, Abbey N

    2016-01-01

    To assess gaps in emergency department (ED) asthma management at Florida hospitals. Survey instrument with open- and closed-ended questions. Topics included availability of specific asthma management modalities, compliance with national guidelines, employment of specialized asthma care personnel, and efforts toward performance improvement. Emergency departments at 10 large hospitals in the state of Florida. Clinical care providers and health administrators from participating hospitals. Compliance with national asthma care guideline standards, provision of specific recommended treatment modalities and resources, employment of specialized asthma care personnel, and engagement in performance improvement efforts. Our results suggest inconsistency among sampled Florida hospitals' adherence to national standards for treatment of asthma in EDs. Several hospitals were refining their emergency care protocols to incorporate guideline recommendations. Despite a lack of formal ED protocols in some hospitals, adherence to national guidelines for emergency care nonetheless remained robust for patient education and medication prescribing, but it was weaker for formal care planning and medical follow-up. Identified deficiencies in emergency asthma care present a number of opportunities for strategic mitigation of identified gaps. We conclude with suggestions to help Florida hospitals achieve success with ED asthma care reform. Team-based learning activities may offer an optimal strategy for sharing and implementing best practices.

  2. Mechanisms Mediating Pediatric Severe Asthma and Potential Novel Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldara Martin Alonso

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although a rare disease, severe therapy-resistant asthma in children is a cause of significant morbidity and results in utilization of approximately 50% of health-care resources for asthma. Improving control for children with severe asthma is, therefore, an urgent unmet clinical need. As a group, children with severe asthma have severe and multiple allergies, steroid resistant airway eosinophilia, and significant structural changes of the airway wall (airway remodeling. Omalizumab is currently the only add-on therapy that is licensed for use in children with severe asthma. However, limitations of its use include ineligibility for approximately one-third of patients because of serum IgE levels outside the recommended range and lack of clinical efficacy in a further one-third. Pediatric severe asthma is thus markedly heterogeneous, but our current understanding of the different mechanisms underpinning various phenotypes is very limited. We know that there are distinctions between the factors that drive pediatric and adult disease since pediatric disease develops in the context of a maturing immune system and during lung growth and development. This review summarizes the current data that give insight into the pathophysiology of pediatric severe asthma and will highlight potential targets for novel therapies. It is apparent that in order to identify novel treatments for pediatric severe asthma, the challenge of undertaking mechanistic studies using age appropriate experimental models and airway samples from children needs to be accepted to allow a targeted approach of personalized medicine to be achieved.

  3. Glucocorticoid-resistant asthma: more than meets the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Divya; Little, Frederic F

    2013-12-01

    For decades glucocorticoids have been considered as the gold standard for the treatment of asthma. We present a case report of typical glucocorticoid-resistant asthma and current consensus in definitions of "severe refractory", "difficult" and "glucocorticoid-resistant" asthma. Full-text papers and abstracts were identified on the basis of a comprehensive literature search primarily in MEDLINE (1966 to June 2012) but also in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials database. Glucocorticoid-resistant asthmatics are a small subset of patients who pose noteworthy diagnostic challenges while contributing disproportionately to health care costs. Recognition of various asthma phenotypes has aided in characterizing groups with severe asthma and given a better understanding of its pathophysiological process. The molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid action is complicated and several pathways have been identified to explain drug resistance, which in turn is crucial for drug development. Tobacco smoking appears to be the single most important contributor of glucocorticoid resistance. We present the emerging and promising concepts in the management of glucocorticoid-resistant asthma, which mainly include drugs targeting specific molecules, receptors, inflammatory cells or immune processes. The challenges in making a diagnosis of glucocorticoid-resistant asthma may contribute to underestimating its prevalence and impact on patient care. Considerable progress has been made in identifying distinct phenotypes and mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance; therefore the future of new drug development in management of asthma is promising.

  4. Adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is associated with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halmøy Anne

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is increasingly recognized as a common disorder not only in children, but also in the adult population. Similarly, asthma also has a substantial prevalence among adults. Previous studies concerning a potential relationship between ADHD and asthma have not presented consistent results. Methods A cross-sectional study of 594 adult patients diagnosed with ADHD, compared with 719 persons from the general population. Information was collected between 1997 and 2005 using auto-questionnaires rating past and present symptoms of ADHD, co-morbid conditions, including asthma, and work status. Results The prevalence of asthma was significantly higher in the ADHD patient group compared to the controls, 24.4% vs. 11.3% respectively (OR = 2.54, 95% CI 1.89-3.44, and controls with asthma scored higher on ratings of both past and present symptoms of ADHD. Female ADHD patients had a significantly higher prevalence of asthma compared to male ADHD patients (30.9% vs. 18.2%, OR = 2.01, CI 1.36-2.95, but in controls a slight female preponderance was not statistically significant. In both ADHD patients and controls, having asthma was associated with an increased prevalence of symptoms of mood- and anxiety disorders. Conclusions The present findings point to a co-morbidity of ADHD and asthma, and these patients may represent a clinical and biological subgroup of adult patients with ADHD.

  5. The Danish National Database for Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Vibeke; Lykkegaard, Jesper; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    of 6 years, with a specific focus on 6-44 years, are included. The DNDA links three existing nationwide registries of administrative records in the Danish health care system: the National Patient Register, the National Health Insurance Services Register, and the National Prescription Registry. For each...... year, the inclusion criteria are a second purchase of asthma prescription medicine within a 2-year period (National Prescription Registry) or a diagnosis of asthma (National Patient Register). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are excluded, but smokers are not excluded. DESCRIPTIVE...

  6. Reflexology and bronchial asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, T; Heinig, J H; Collins, P

    2001-01-01

    Many asthma patients seek alternative or adjunctive therapies. One such modality is reflexology, whereby finger pressure is applied to certain parts of the body. The aim of the study was to examine the popular claim that reflexology treatment benefits bronchial asthma. Ten weeks of active...... or simulated (placebo) reflexology given by an experienced reflexologist, were compared in an otherwise blind, controlled trial of 20+20 outpatients with asthma. Objective lung function tests (peak flow morning and evening, and weekly spirometry at the clinic) did not change. Subjective scores (describing...... symptoms, beta2-inhalations and quality of life) and also bronchial sensitivity to histamine improved on both regimens, but no differences were found between groups receiving active or placebo reflexology. However, a trend in favour of reflexology became significant when a supplementary analysis of symptom...

  7. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes......, be noted that daily use of β-agonists could expose elite athletes to the risk of developing tolerance towards these drugs. Use of β2-agonist should be replaced with daily inhaled corticosteroid treatment, the most important treatment of exercise-induced asthma. All physicians treating asthma should...... have been shown to have a different distribution of airway inflammation and unequal response to bronchial provocative test. Elite athletes display signs of exercise-induced symptoms, for example, nonasthmatic inspiratory wheeze, vocal cord dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmias, which could limit...

  8. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes......, be noted that daily use of ß-agonists could expose elite athletes to the risk of developing tolerance towards these drugs. Use of ß2-agonist should be replaced with daily inhaled corticosteroid treatment, the most important treatment of exercise-induced asthma. All physicians treating asthma should...... have been shown to have a different distribution of airway inflammation and unequal response to bronchial provocative test. Elite athletes display signs of exercise-induced symptoms, for example, nonasthmatic inspiratory wheeze, vocal cord dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmias, which could limit...

  9. Prevalence of childhood asthma in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Shigemi; Munkhbayarlakh, Sonomjants; Makino, Sohei; Ito, Clyde; Logii, Narantsetseg; Dashdemberel, Sarangerel; Sagara, Hironori; Fukuda, Takeshi; Arisaka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a common but important chronic disease in children in all over the world. To take measures against prevalence of childhood asthma, many researchers have surveyed the actual statuses of childhood asthma in developed countries, but in most Asia-Pacific developing countries including Mongolia such surveys have never been sufficiently conducted until now. We have thought that this survey, though performed in 2009, will give important and meaningful information even now in taking measures to prevent prevailing bronchial asthma in children in Mongolia or the countries under similar statuses. The asthma prevalence and patient background information in Mongolian children aged 6-7 living in Ulaanbaatar were examined using a written questionnaire modified for their parents from that prepared by the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC). The estimated prevalence of asthma in Mongolian children was 20.9%. The following 3 risk factors were found to be related to asthma: (1) having allergic rhinitis symptoms, (2) mothers' smoking, and (3) history of severe respiratory infection before 1-year-old. The asthma prevalence in Mongolian children was higher than that in the world and Asia-Pacific countries reported by ISAAC. The higher prevalence was probably attributable to households' (especially mothers) smoking in draft-free houses designed for the cold area and severe air-pollution due to rapid industrialization and urbanization in Mongolia. Smoking prohibition in the mother (including family members) and a reduction of exposure to air pollutants are urgently needed to prevent developing childhood asthma. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Can Twitter Be a Source of Information on Allergy? Correlation of Pollen Counts with Tweets Reporting Symptoms of Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis and Names of Antihistamine Drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gesualdo

    Full Text Available Pollen forecasts are in use everywhere to inform therapeutic decisions for patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC. We exploited data derived from Twitter in order to identify tweets reporting a combination of symptoms consistent with a case definition of ARC and those reporting the name of an antihistamine drug. In order to increase the sensitivity of the system, we applied an algorithm aimed at automatically identifying jargon expressions related to medical terms. We compared weekly Twitter trends with National Allergy Bureau weekly pollen counts derived from US stations, and found a high correlation of the sum of the total pollen counts from each stations with tweets reporting ARC symptoms (Pearson's correlation coefficient: 0.95 and with tweets reporting antihistamine drug names (Pearson's correlation coefficient: 0.93. Longitude and latitude of the pollen stations affected the strength of the correlation. Twitter and other social networks may play a role in allergic disease surveillance and in signaling drug consumptions trends.

  11. Obesity and asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Pranab Baruwa; Kripesh Ranjan Sarmah

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. The prevalence of asthma is around 300 million and is expected to increase another 100 million by 2025. Obesity, on the other hand, also affects a large number of individuals. Overweight in adults is defined when body mass index (BMI) is between 25 to 30 kg/m 2 and obesity when the BMI >30 kg/m 2 . It has been a matter of interest for researchers to find a relation between these two conditions. This knowledge will provide a ...

  12. The frequency of asthma exacerbations and healthcare utilization in patients with asthma from the UK and USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suruki, Robert Y; Daugherty, Jonas B; Boudiaf, Nada; Albers, Frank C

    2017-04-27

    Asthma exacerbations are frequent in patients with severe disease. This report describes results from two retrospective cohort studies describing exacerbation frequency and risk, emergency department (ED)/hospital re-admissions, and asthma-related costs by asthma severity in the US and UK. Patients with asthma in the US-based Clinformatics™ DataMart Multiplan IMPACT (2010-2011; WEUSKOP7048) and the UK-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink (2009-2011; WEUSKOP7092) databases were categorized by disease severity (Global Initiative for Asthma [GINA]; Step and exacerbation history) during the 12 months pre-asthma medical code (index date). Outcomes included: frequency of exacerbations (asthma-related ED visit, hospitalization, or oral corticosteroid use with an asthma medical code recorded within ±2 weeks) 12 months post-index, asthma-related ED visits/hospitalization, and asthma-related costs 30 days post-index. Risk of a subsequent exacerbation was determined by proportional hazard model. Of the 222,817 and 211,807 patients with asthma included from the US and UK databases, respectively, 12.5 and 8.4% experienced ≥1 exacerbation during the follow-up period. Exacerbation frequency increased with disease severity. Among the 5,167 and 2,904 patients with an asthma-related ED visit/hospitalization in the US and UK databases, respectively, 9.2 and 4.7% had asthma-related re-admissions within 30 days. Asthma-related re-admission rates and costs increased with disease severity, approximately doubling between GINA Step 1 and 5 and in patients with ≥2 versus <2 exacerbations in the previous year. Risk of a subsequent exacerbation increased 32-35% for an exacerbation requiring ED visit/hospitalization versus oral corticosteroids. Increased disease severity was associated with higher exacerbation frequency, ED/hospitalization re-admission, costs and risk of subsequent exacerbation, indicating that these patients require high-intensity post-exacerbation management.

  13. Asthma as a disruption in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over several decades, asthma has evolved from being recognized as a single disease to include a diverse group of phenotypes with dissimilar natural histories, pathophysiologies, responses to treatment, and distinctive molecular pathways. With the application of Occam’s razor to ...

  14. Influenza vaccination in children with asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Bueving (Herman)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractEvery year, outbreaks of in.uenza appear across the world and cause substantial morbidity and mortality in the general population, particularly in persons with underlying conditions including asthma. Because the in.uenza virus changes constantly, man’s acquired immunity is usually only

  15. Traditional Therapies for Severe Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Eileen; Hoyte, Flavia C L

    2016-08-01

    Severe asthma is a complex and heterogeneous disease. The European Respiratory Society and American Thoracic Society guidelines define severe asthma for patients 6 years or older as "asthma which requires treatment with high-dose inhaled corticosteroids…plus a second controller or systemic corticosteroids to prevent it from becoming 'uncontrolled' or which remains 'uncontrolled' despite this therapy." This article reviews available traditional therapies, data behind their uses in severe asthma, and varying recommendations. As various asthma endotypes and phenotypes are better understood and characterized, targeted therapies should help improve disease outcomes, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The evolving role of tiotropium in asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIvor ER

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Emma R McIvor,1 R Andrew McIvor2 1Queen’s University, Belfast, UK; 2Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Abstract: Tiotropium is a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA that exerts its bronchodilatory effect by blocking endogenous acetylcholine receptors in the airways. Its safety and efficacy are well established for the treatment of COPD, and it is now being recognized for its role in improving lung function and control in asthma. This review discusses the evolving role of tiotropium delivered by the Respimat® in patients across the range of asthma severities and ages, and provides an overview of safety and efficacy data. Tiotropium is the only LAMA currently approved for the treatment of asthma, and evidence from a large-scale clinical trial program, including several Phase III studies in adults, has demonstrated that tiotropium improves lung function and asthma control, with a safety profile comparable with that of placebo. Clinical trials in adolescent patients (aged 12–17 years have also shown improvements in lung function and trends toward improved asthma control. Of note, the efficacy and safety profiles are consistent regardless of baseline characteristics and phenotype. Given the large and growing body of evidence, it is likely that as clinical experience with tiotropium increases, this treatment may possibly emerge as the key choice for add-on therapy to inhaled corticosteroids/long-acting β2-agonists, and in patients who do not tolerate long-acting bronchodilators or other medications, in the future. Keywords: tiotropium, anticholinergics, asthma, efficacy

  17. Animal models of asthma: utility and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aun MV

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Marcelo Vivolo Aun,1,2 Rafael Bonamichi-Santos,1,2 Fernanda Magalhães Arantes-Costa,2 Jorge Kalil,1 Pedro Giavina-Bianchi1 1Clinical Immunology and Allergy Division, Department of Internal Medicine, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil, 2Laboratory of Experimental Therapeutics (LIM20, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Clinical studies in asthma are not able to clear up all aspects of disease pathophysiology. Animal models have been developed to better understand these mechanisms and to evaluate both safety and efficacy of therapies before starting clinical trials. Several species of animals have been used in experimental models of asthma, such as Drosophila, rats, guinea pigs, cats, dogs, pigs, primates and equines. However, the most common species studied in the last two decades is mice, particularly BALB/c. Animal models of asthma try to mimic the pathophysiology of human disease. They classically include two phases: sensitization and challenge. Sensitization is traditionally performed by intraperitoneal and subcutaneous routes, but intranasal instillation of allergens has been increasingly used because human asthma is induced by inhalation of allergens. Challenges with allergens are performed through aerosol, intranasal or intratracheal instillation. However, few studies have compared different routes of sensitization and challenge. The causative allergen is another important issue in developing a good animal model. Despite being more traditional and leading to intense inflammation, ovalbumin has been replaced by aeroallergens, such as house dust mites, to use the allergens that cause human disease. Finally, researchers should define outcomes to be evaluated, such as serum-specific antibodies, airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation and remodeling. The present review analyzes the animal models of asthma, assessing differences between species, allergens and routes

  18. A program for children with severe asthma: impact analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubergia, Verónica; Fridman, Nora; González Pena, Hebe

    2012-10-01

    Asthma is a major economic burden to families and public healthcare since it leads to a large number of emergency room (ER) visits and hospital admissions. Whereas healthcare programs for children with asthma have proved to be very effective to improve the course of the disease, there is less information about programs for children with severe asthma. To comparatively analyze the impact of the Healthcare Program for Children with Severe Asthma (Programa de Atención de Niños con Asma Grave, PANAG). This was a longitudinal, pre- and postintervention study. Two approaches were used to compare the frequency of asthma exacerbations and hospital admissions due to severe asthma in a group of patients: regular follow-up in a public hospital (pre-intervention period, 18 months) and follow-up while participating in PANAG (post-intervention period, 18 months). During the Program, patients received preventive treatment free of charge; educational activities were also organized. Twenty children were included, 16 (80%) out of the 20 were females, and the mean age was 13.3 years (SD 3.8). During the pre-intervention period 59 asthma attacks were recorded; after PANAG was implemented, they decreased to 26. This accounts for a significant reduction of 55% of asthma attacks (p= 0.0002). During the period previous to PANAG implementation, there were 4 asthma-related hospital admissions. In the period after the program implementation, there was only one hospital admission. The Healthcare Program for Patients with Severe Asthma is an effective strategy to manage this disease. This healthcare program is affordable to be used in a public hospital.

  19. Bronchial thermoplasty in severe asthma: food for thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzi, M; Solidoro, P; Patella, V; Contoli, M; Scichilone, N

    2014-06-01

    Asthma is a complex inflammatory disorder of the airways characterized by airway hyper-responsiveness and variable, reversible, airflow obstruction. Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a new modality for treating asthma. It targets airway smooth muscles (ASM) by delivering a controlled specific amount of thermal energy (radiofrequency ablation) to the airway wall through a dedicated catheter. The use of bronchial thermoplasty has been widely discussed for its potential in the treatment of asthma, since it seems to be able to reduce the symptoms of asthma. The definitive study for BT (AIR2 trial) employed a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled design and enrolled 288 subjects with severe persistent asthma from 30 US and international centers. The results of the AIR2 trial demonstrated clinically significant benefits of BT compared with the sham group at one year post-treatment, including an improvement in asthma-related quality of life, 32% reduction in severe exacerbations, 84% reduction in emergency department visits for asthma symptoms, and a 66% reduction in time lost from work/school/other daily activities because of asthma symptoms. Preclinical work showed that ASM is reduced after BT by at least 3 years after treatment. The recent article from the ARI2 trial study group analyses the long-term safety and effectiveness of BT in patients with severe persistent asthma and demonstrates the 5-year durability of the benefits of BT in the control of symptoms and safety. It supports the evidence that reduction in asthma attacks, ER visits, and hospitalizations for respiratory symptoms are maintained for at least 5 years. There is a pressing need to understand the underlying mechanism(s) of BT and how the delivered heat is translated into clinical benefit. This necessitates additional investigation to identify disease and patient characteristics that would enable accurate phenotyping of positive responders to avoid unnecessary procedures and risks.

  20. Diagnosis and Management of Asthma - The Swiss Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Thomas; Spagnolo, Paolo; Bridevaux, Pierre-Olivier; Clarenbach, Christian; Eich-Wanger, Christine; Meyer, Franca; Miedinger, David; Möller, Alexander; Nicod, Laurent P; Nicolet-Chatelain, Geneviève; Sauty, Alain; Steurer-Stey, Claudia; Leuppi, Joerg D

    2018-04-03

    The Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) is a network of individuals, organizations, and public health officials that was established to disseminate information about the care of patients with asthma and to improve asthma care. The GINA ("Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention") report has been updated annually since 2002. Due to new knowledge and therapeutic development in the field, the Swiss Respiratory Society felt the need to provide a new document that is based on both the available literature and the recommendations of the 2016 GINA report. Key new features of the 2016 GINA report include a "new" definition of asthma, underscoring its heterogeneous nature, and the core elements of variable symptoms and variable expiratory airflow limitation; the importance of confirming the diagnosis of asthma in order to minimize both under- and overtreatment; practical tools for the assessment of symptom control and risk factors for adverse outcomes; a comprehensive approach to asthma management that acknowledges the foundational role of inhaled corticosteroid therapy, but also provides a framework for individualizing patient care; an emphasis on maximizing the benefit of available medications by addressing common problems such as incorrect inhaler technique and poor adherence; a continuum of care for worsening asthma, starting with early self-management and progressing to primary care or acute care management; and diagnosis of the asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. This document is meant to advice the key stakeholders on the diagnosis and management of asthma and highlights the need to individualize the care of each and every asthmatic patient. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. [Clinical pathway for management of patients with acute asthma attack].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Naoto; Katada, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Kojima, Makiko; Nakajima, Yumi; Shibano, Miyo; Tomita, Hitomi; Yamanaka, Takao; Harada, Yoshinori; Ishii, Taeko; Saeki, Yukihiko

    2008-11-01

    There have been few reports of clinical pathway (CP) for treatment of asthma attack, because patients with asthma always admit emergently and the severity varies. We introduced CP so that standard asthma treatment can be widely used, and investigated its clinical usefulness. We designed a new CP for treating asthma attack according to the guideline (Japanese guideline (JGL) and Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA)). 136 patients who admitted to our hospital due to asthma attack from January 1999 to November 2006, were enrolled our study. Excluding cases complicated with pneumonia, COPD or cardiac failure, we evaluated 46 cases treated with the CP comparing with 19 cases treated without the CP. The clinical evaluations include systemic and inhaled steroid use, FEV1.0%, history of asthma, and the duration of asthma attack. Furthermore, we investigated difference between cases with and without prolonged admission. While the rates of systemic and inhaled steroid use in cases without the CP were 57.9% and 52.6% respectively, those in cases with the CP were approximately 100%. Employing the CP, FEV 1.0% at discharge time was elevated from 71.7% to 76.3% and the duration of hospitalization was shortened from 14.2 days to 11.5 days. Mean age of the cases with prolonged admission was higher than the rest. The asthma CP is an effective way for the standard treatment according to the guideline to be used widely even by doctors who are not familiar with asthma treatment. It improves the efficacy of in-hospital treatment.

  2. Exercise training in children with asthma: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanrooij, Vera H M; Willeboordse, Maartje; Dompeling, Edward; van de Kant, Kim D G

    2014-07-01

    Exercise can provoke asthma symptoms, such as dyspnoea, in children with asthma. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is prevalent in 40-90% of children with asthma. Conversely, exercise can improve physical fitness. The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the literature regarding the effects of exercise training in children with asthma, particularly in relation to: EIB, asthma control, pulmonary function, cardiorespiratory parameters and parameters of underlying pathophysiology. A systematic search in several databases was performed. Controlled trials that undertook a physical training programme in children with asthma (aged 6-18 years) were selected. Twenty-nine studies were included. Training had positive effects on several cardiorespiratory fitness parameters. A few studies demonstrated that training could improve EIB, especially in cases where there was sufficient room for improvement. Peak expiratory flow was the only lung function parameter that could be improved substantially by training. The effects of training on asthma control, airway inflammation and bronchial hyper-responsiveness were barely studied. Owing to the overall beneficial effects of training and the lack of negative effects, it can be concluded that physical exercise is safe and can be recommended in children with asthma. A training programme should have a minimum duration of 3 months, with at least two 60 min training sessions per week, and a training intensity set at the (personalised) ventilatory threshold. Further research is recommended regarding the effects of exercise on underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and asthma control in children with asthma. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Direct health care costs associated with asthma in British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadatsafavi, Mohsen; Lynd, Larry; Marra, Carlo; Carleton, Bruce; Tan, Wan C; Sullivan, Sean; FitzGerald, J Mark

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A better understanding of health care costs associated with asthma would enable the estimation of the economic burden of this increasingly common disease. OBJECTIVE: To determine the direct medical costs of asthma-related health care in British Columbia (BC). METHODS: Administrative health care data from the BC Linked Health Database and PharmaNet database from 1996 to 2000 were analyzed for BC residents five to 55 years of age, including the billing information for physician visits, drug dispensations and hospital discharge records. A unit cost was assigned to physician/emergency department visits, and government reimbursement fees for prescribed medications were applied. The case mix method was used to calculate hospitalization costs. All costs were reported in inflation-adjusted 2006 Canadian dollars. RESULTS: Asthma resulted in $41,858,610 in annual health care-related costs during the study period ($331 per patient-year). The major cost component was medications, which accounted for 63.9% of total costs, followed by physician visits (18.3%) and hospitalization (17.8%). When broader definitions of asthma-related hospitalizations and physician visits were used, total costs increased to $56,114,574 annually ($444 per patient-year). There was a statistically significant decrease in the annual per patient cost of hospitalizations (P<0.01) over the study period. Asthma was poorly controlled in 63.5% of patients, with this group being responsible for 94% of asthma-related resource use. CONCLUSION: The economic burden of asthma is significant in BC, with the majority of the cost attributed to poor asthma control. Policy makers should investigate the reason for lack of proper asthma control and adjust their policies accordingly to improve asthma management. PMID:20422063

  4. Accommodating interruptions: A grounded theory of young people with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Mary; Savage, Eileen; Andrews, Tom

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an explanatory theory on the lives of young people with asthma, issues affecting them and the impact of asthma on their day-to-day lives. Accommodating Interruptions is a theory that explains young people's concerns about living with asthma. Although national and international asthma management guidelines exist, it is accepted that the symptom control of asthma among the young people population is poor. This study was undertaken using Classic Grounded Theory. Data were collected through in-depth interviews and clinic consultations with young people aged 11-16 years who had asthma for over 1 year. Data were also collected from participant diaries. Constant comparative analysis, theoretical coding and memo writing were used to develop the substantive theory. The theory explains how young people resolve their main concern of being restricted by Accommodating Interruptions in their lives. They do this by assimilating behaviours in balance finding, moderating influence, fitting in and assuming control minimising the effects of asthma on their everyday lives. The theory of Accommodating Interruptions explains young people's asthma management behaviours in a new way. It allows us to understand how and why young people behave the way they do because they want to participate and be included in everyday activities, events and relationships. The theory adds to the body of knowledge on how young people with asthma live their day-to-day lives and it challenges some existing viewpoints in the literature regarding their behaviours. The findings have implications for developing services to support young people in a more meaningful way as they accommodate the interruptions associated with asthma in their lives. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Prevalence of asthma in Saudi adults: findings from a national household survey, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; El Bcheraoui, Charbel; Daoud, Farah; Tuffaha, Marwa; Kravitz, Hannah; Al Saeedi, Mohammad; Basulaiman, Mohammed; Memish, Ziad A; AlMazroa, Mohammad A; Al Rabeeah, Abdullah A; Mokdad, Ali H

    2015-07-28

    There are not enough data on the epidemiology of asthma in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). We analyzed data from a national household survey conducted in KSA in 2013 to estimate prevalence, associated risk factors and control measurements of asthma. The Saudi Health Interview Survey was a cross-sectional national multistage survey of 10,735 individuals aged 15 years or older. The survey included a detailed household questionnaire and a physical exam. We used self-reported clinical diagnosis of asthma to assess prevalence of asthma. The prevalence of asthma in KSA was 4.05 % (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 3.54-4.62 %). Asthma was less frequent in individuals with higher education but higher in former smokers and obese individuals. Around 76.7 % of asthma patients (95 % CI: 70.6-82.0 %) experienced an asthmatic attack, and 61.6 % (95 % CI: 54.4-68.4 %) visited a hospital/emergency room because of asthma during the past year. Asthma attack was less frequent in older patients (odds ratio [OR] = 0.78, 95 %CI: 0.59-0.96 for each decade of life). Current use of medication for asthma was highly associated with asthma attacks (OR = 9.14, 95 % CI: 3.29-25.38). Asthma attack was also more frequent in individuals who were exposed to secondhand smoking (OR = 2.17, 95 %CI: 1.05-4.45) and those who were obese (OR = 3.01, 95 %CI: 1.34-6.78). Saudi Arabia has a relatively low prevalence of diagnosed asthma; however, many of the patients with known asthma do not have it under good control. Our study calls for programs to inform patients about the importance and proper means of controlling their condition. Implementing and monitoring of clinical guidelines can also help to improve asthma control among patients as well as identify undiagnosed cases.

  6. Sociodemographic Factors Mediate Race and Ethnicity-associated Childhood Asthma Health Disparities: a Longitudinal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, David M; Curtis, Laura M; Waite, Katherine; Wolf, Michael S; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2017-11-29

    Race and ethnicity-based disparities in childhood asthma are well established. We characterized the longitudinal effects associated with being African-American/Black or Hispanic/Latino on a range of asthma outcomes, and the extent to which sociodemographic factors, caregiver health literacy, education level, and asthma knowledge mediate these associations. Children ages 8-15 and their caregivers (n = 544) in the Chicago Initiative to Raise Asthma Health Equity (CHIRAH) cohort completed interviews every 3 months for 1.5 years. Health literacy was measured with the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM). Other covariates include sex, age, education level, income, smoke exposure, asthma duration, employment status, and insurance status. We conducted a series of models to evaluate these factors as mediators of the relationship between race/ethnicity and (1) asthma knowledge, (2) asthma-related quality of life, (3) asthma severity, and (4) asthma control based on NAEPP/EPR-3 2007 guidelines. African-American race and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity were significantly associated with all outcomes when compared to Whites. Adjusting for sociodemographic factors resulted in the most significant mediation of racial/ethnic disparities in all outcomes. Health literacy was a partial mediator of race/ethnic disparities in asthma knowledge and asthma-related quality of life. Asthma knowledge remained significantly associated with race and ethnicity, and race remained associated with asthma-related quality of life. African-American race and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity are significantly associated with worse asthma compared to Whites in longitudinal analyses. Sociodemographic factors are potent mediators of these disparities, and should be considered when designing interventions to reduce asthma disparities. Health literacy and education level are partial mediators.

  7. Children with bronchial asthma assessed for psychosocial problems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    .5,8 Social problems that may oc- cur in asthma are also many, these include: educational problems, family dysfunction, stigma, parental distress, sibling resentment and jealousy, maternal over protec- tiveness and altered relationships with ...

  8. Do Newborns Have More Complications When Mom Has Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... earlier. Maternal asthma also increased the risk for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission; jaundice; and breathing complications including respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea of the newborn, and asphyxia. These findings were present even if babies were ...

  9. Effects of β2-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms on asthma severity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    -ray, pulmonary function testing and ADRB2 ... asthma severity and response to salbutamol in Egyptian asthmatic children. Further studies are needed to ..... A meta-analysis including a total of 28 studies performed by Contopoulos-Ioannidis et ...

  10. The mechanisms of intractable asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T Holgate

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Overwhelming evidence now points to asthma as a chronic inflammatory disease involving the airways. The T lymphocyte takes primacy in driving the inflammatory response through upregulation of cytokines, specifically those encoded in the IL-4 gene cluster: IL-4 and IL-13 (IgE isotype switching; IL-3, IL-5 and GM-CSF (eosinophil and basophil recruitment; and IL-9 (mast cell maturation. Additional cytokines of importance include TNFa and a range of related C-x-C and C-C cytokines. Although allergens are involved in initiating the Th-2 T-cell response, other factors are likely to operate that expand and maintain the inflammatory reaction. These include a potential role for superantigens and autoimmune mechanisms as well as the recruitment of accessory cytokine producing cells, especially mast cells and eosinophils. Leucocytes recruited from the microvasculature through interactions with specific adhesion molecules release an array of mediators, which in addition to causing bronchoconstriction also lead to damage to the epithelium and underlying structures. Neutral proteases from mast cells, metalloproteases from eosinophils and an array of mediators from the formed elements of the airway all contribute to the tissue destruction remodelling process. It was concluded that asthma is a dynamic disease process involving an interplay between inflammation and repair processes and that the differing proportions of these could account for the various disease phenotypes associated with severity and progression.

  11. Elastin in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddel, Caroline J; Weiss, Anthony S; Burgess, Janette K

    Extracellular matrix is generally increased in asthma, causing thickening of the airways which may either increase or decrease airway responsiveness, depending on the mechanical requirements of the deposited matrix. However, in vitro studies have shown that the altered extracellular matrix produced

  12. Work-related asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    asthma. MOHAMED F JEEBHAY, MB ChB, DOH, MPhil (Epi), MPH (Occ Med), PhD. Professor, Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health Research, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape. Town. Mohamed Jeebhay is a Professor of Occupational Medicine at the University of Cape Town.

  13. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and box springs. House dust may also contain tiny particles of pollen, mold, fibers from clothing and fabrics, and detergents. All of these can also trigger allergies and asthma. Choose the Right Home Furnishings You can do many things to limit ...

  14. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decrease mucus production. They are the most effective long-term control medicine now available. They improve asthma symptoms and lung function, and they have been shown to decrease the need for oral steroids and hospitalization. Inhaled steroids are taken on a regular basis ...

  15. Bronchial Thermoplasty in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Mitzner

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review we discuss the potential of a new procedure, termed Bronchial Thermoplasty to prevent serious consequences resulting from excessive airway narrowing. The most important factor in minimizing an asthmatic attack is limiting the degree of smooth muscle shortening. The premise that airway smooth muscle can be either inactivated or obliterated without any long-term alteration of other lung tissues, and that airway function will remain normal, albeit with reduced bronchoconstriction, has now been demonstrated in dogs, a subset of normal subjects, and mild asthmatics. Bronchial Thermoplasty may thus develop into a useful clinical procedure to effectively impair the ability for airway smooth muscle to reach the levels of pathologic narrowing that characterizes an asthma attack. It may also enable more successful treatment of asthma patients who are unresponsive to more conventional therapies. Whether this will remain stable for the lifetime of the patient still remains to be determined, but at the present time, there are no indications that the smooth muscle contractility will return. This successful preliminary experience showing that Bronchial Thermoplasty could be safely performed in patients with asthma has led to an ongoing clinical trial at a number of sites in Europe and North America designed to examine the effectiveness of this procedure in subjects with moderately severe asthma.

  16. Stress and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Nagata

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Three factors in recent medical research and treatment (advances in the field of psychoneuroimmunology, epidemiological evidence regarding important interaction between psychosocial factors and development of disease, and the recognition of the importance of patient education for self-management of asthma have led clinicians and researchers to reconsider the role of psychosocial stress in asthma. There are many reports suggesting that stressful life events, family problems and a behavior pattern that increases psychological conflict may influence the development or relapse of asthma and influence its clinical course. Depression is known as one of the risk factors of fatal asthmatic attack. In laboratory studies, about 20% of asthmatics were considered reactors who showed an airway change after exposure to emotional stress. Studies regarding the pathway of stress effect on allergy and asthma are reviewed and discussed from the standpoint of psychoneuroimmunology; for example, the enhancement of IgE production and increased susceptibility to respiratory infection by stress, conditioned anaphylaxis and nerve/mast cell interaction, the effect of stress on various bronchial responses and the inhibition of the immediate and late asthmatic response by anterior hypothalamic lesioning.

  17. Decreasing asthma morbidity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-12-12

    Dec 12, 1994 ... Apart from the optimal use of drugs, various supplementary methods have been tested to decrease asthma morbidity, usually in patients from reiatively affluent socio-economic backgrounds. A study of additional measures taken in a group of moderate to severe adult asthmatics from very poor socio- ...

  18. ASTHMA AND EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan BOZDOĞAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. There are two terms about asthma in athletes, often used interchangeably: exercise-induced asthma (EIA and exercise-induce bronchoconstriction (EIB. An increasing prevalence of EIA or EIB in athletes and particularly in elite endurance athletes is widely recorded. If adequately managed, EBA/EBB, do not negatively affect elite athletic performance and success. Pathologic mechanisms of EIA/EIB classically involve both osmolar and vascular changes in the airways, in addition to parasympathetic stimulation by cooling of the airways. Airway inflammation plays a fundamental role in EIA/EIB. Most patients with asthma, with the exception of athletes tend to avoid physical activity due to EBA/EBB. However, exercise has beneficial effects on airways in asthmatic patients. In fact, preliminary data of recent studies reveal that intermediate-level exercise would be one of the treatment options for asthmatic patients. Etiologic, diagnostic and treatment aspects of the pathology are reviewed with special emphasis on exercise.

  19. Allergy, asthma and the environment; Allergie, Asthma und Umwelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ring, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Dermatologie und Allergologie am Biederstein, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Gfesser, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Dermatologie und Allergologie am Biederstein, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    1996-10-11

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. Asthma and other allergic diseases have increased in prevalence during the last decades in many industrialized countries. Among other hypotheses, the possible role of environmental pollutants has received much public and scientific attention. Some pollutants may modulate the different phases of allergic reactions. Inflammation is a critical feature in the pathogenesis of asthma and therefore, beside allergen avoidance, anti-inflammatory treatment is the first line therapy of asthma. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes are lipid mediators which appear to play a major role in the pathophysiology of asthma. Based on current data, it appears that leukotrience receptor antagonists have bronchodilative and anti-inflammatory effects and may therefore enrich the pharmacotherapeutic spectrum within the therapeutic concept of patient management in asthma. (orig.) [Deutsch] Asthma bronchiale ist eine entzuendliche Erkrankung der Atemwege. Epidemiologische Studien konnten eine deutliche Zunahme der Erkrankung in den letzten zwei Jahrzehnten aufzeigen. In der Entstehung von Allergien und Asthma bronchiale spielen Umwelteinfluesse eine grosse Rolle. Luftschadstoffe scheinen mit verschiedenen Allergie-Parametern bei der Sensibilisierung, Symptombildung und Chronifizierung zu interferieren. Da beim Asthma bronchiale neben der Bronchokonstriktion die Entzuendung der Bronchialschleimhaut eine besondere Rolle spielt, wird heute neben Allergenkarenz und prophylaktischen Massnahmen eine fruehzeitige antientzuendliche Asthmatherapie angestrebt. Cysteinyl-Leukotriene gehoeren zu den wirksamsten Entzuendungsmediatoren beim Asthma bronchiale. Leukotrien-Rezeptorantagonisten scheinen sowohl bronchodilatatorische als auch antientzuendliche Wirkungen zu haben und koennten so innerhalb eines Gesamtkonzeptes von antiallergischer und antiasthmatischer Therapie das pharmakotherapeutische Spektrum bereichern. (orig.)

  20. Review of guidelines and the literature in the treatment of acute bronchospasm in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Kathryn

    2006-09-01

    Asthma is a common chronic condition that disproportionately affects persons younger than 45 years. Asthma exacerbations can be sudden and severe, requiring treatment in the emergency department or hospitalization. Children younger than 15 years are 2-4 times more likely to have asthma as the first-listed hospital discharge diagnosis compared with those in other age groups. An estimated 12.8 million missed school days and 24.5 million lost work days due to asthma occurred in 2003. Drugs used in the treatment of acute asthma include inhaled beta(2)-agonists, oral corticosteroids, and inhaled anticholinergics. Levalbuterol was evaluated in several recent trials for treatment of asthma in the emergency department, for its effect in improving pulmonary function and on hospitalization rate. Theophylline, intravenous beta(2)-agonists, intravenous magnesium sulfate, and inhaled anesthetics have not been proven useful in the emergency management of asthma. The effectiveness of inhalation devices is dependent on age, cooperation of the patient, and technique.

  1. Effect of long-acting beta2 agonists on exacerbation rates of asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to examine the effect of long-acting beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists (LABAs) on the asthma exacerbation rate in pediatric patients. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) that included the use of LABAs to treat symptoms of pediatric asthma in children on inhaled...... corticosteroids, that reported asthma exacerbation rates, and that were published as full papers in peer-reviewed journals were retrieved from a search of the medical literature. Eight studies were identified that fulfilled these criteria. An exacerbation was defined as deterioration in a patient's asthma...... requiring a change in prescribed medication or not defined but reported as an asthma exacerbation or an asthma-related hospitalization. Analysis of data from the eight studies revealed no apparent protection from an asthma exacerbation among children on a LABA compared to patients on comparator treatment...

  2. Management of asthma in adults: do the patients get what they need--and want?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, V; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Harving, H

    2007-01-01

    of uncontrolled disease with night asthma (16%), daily symptoms (18%), or exercise-induced asthma (11%) were found. Of 285 participants with persistent asthma, 70% used inhaled corticosteroids. Lung function was measured within the preceding 6 months in 24% of patients, whereas 7% had never had their lung......Suboptimal asthma control may be caused by a combination of factors, such as nonadherence to guidelines, lack of compliance, and poor asthma education. The aim was to assess patients' knowledge of asthma and different management strategies, including patients' attitudes toward involvement...... in treatment decisions. The participants (n=509) were recruited from all parts of Denmark through a web-based panel (Zapera Danmarkspanel). A questionnaire concerning asthma knowledge, compliance, and treatment was fulfilled through the Internet. Among the participating adult asthmatic patients, signs...

  3. Asthma-like symptoms, diagnostic tests, and asthma medication use in children and adolescents: a population-based nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Magalhães, Manuel; Sá-Sousa, Ana; Morais-Almeida, Mário; Pité, Helena; Azevedo, Luis Filipe; Azevedo, Maria Inês; Bugalho-Almeida, António; Fonseca, João Almeida

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of asthma-like symptoms, current asthma (CA), asthma diagnostic tests, and inhaled medication use in a nationwide pediatric population (Pediatric-specific data from a cross-sectional, population-based telephone survey (INAsma study) in Portugal were analyzed. CA was defined as lifetime asthma and (1) wheezing, (2) waking with breathlessness, or (3) asthma attack in the previous 12 months, and/or (4) taking asthma medication at the time of the interview. In total, 716 children were included. The prevalence of asthma-like symptoms was 39.4% [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 35.7-43.3]. The most common symptoms were waking with cough (30.9%) and wheezing (19.1%). The prevalence of CA was 8.4% (95% CI: 6.6-10.7). Among children with CA, 79.9% and 52.9% reported prior allergy testing and pulmonary function testing (PFT), respectively. Inhaled medication use in the previous 12 months was reported by 67.6% (reliever inhalers, 40.1%; controller inhalers, 41.5%). Those who only used inhaled reliever medications experienced more asthma attacks [odds ratio (OR): 2.69]. Significantly fewer children with CA living in rural areas than those living in urban areas had undergone PFT or used inhaled medication (OR: 0.06 for PFT, 0.20 for medication]. The prevalence of CA in the Portuguese pediatric population was 8.4%. Only half of children with CA had ever undergone PFT; more than half did not use controller inhalers, and those who only used reliever inhalers reported more asthma attacks. These findings suggest that asthma management has been substandard, mainly in rural areas.

  4. Serum total and free carnitine levels in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asilsoy, Suna; Bekem, Ozlem; Karaman, Ozkan; Uzuner, Nevin; Kavukçu, Salih

    2009-02-01

    Serum carnitine is decreased in recurrent pulmonary infections. We aimed to evaluate serum carnitine levels in asthmatic children. Study group consisted of children with stable asthma and those with acute asthma attacks, while control group included healthy children. Attack severity was determined by the pulmonary score system. Total and free carnitine levels were studied in one blood sample from the control group and stable asthmatics and in two samples from children with acute asthma exacerbation during and after the attack. All the 40 patients in the study group had moderate asthma including 30 with acute attack (13 mild and 17 moderate) and 10 with stable asthma. Carnitine levels were significantly lower in acute attack asthmatics than in the stable asthmatics and controls, while there was no significant difference between the latter two groups. Carnitine levels were not different between asthmatics with mild and moderate attack, and were similar during and after an acute attack. Serum carnitine levels decrease in children with moderate asthma during exacerbation of asthma and shortly thereafter. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of carnitine treatment on serum carnitine level.

  5. Outdoor air pollution and asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzivian, Lilian

    2011-06-01

    Asthma, a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, is associated with reversible airway obstruction and hyperresponsiveness to triggers; clinical symptoms include wheezing, episodic cough, shortness of breath, and increased mucous production. Ambient or outdoor environmental exposure to ozone, particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides has been well documented to exacerbate asthma. Children appear to be most vulnerable to the harmful effects of ambient air pollutants. As their lungs are not completely developed, children may experience greater exposure to environmental pollutants than adults and the higher doses of varied composition may remain in their lungs for a greater duration. Altogether, the negative effects of air pollutants on pulmonary function place children at a greater risk of air pollutant-induced exacerbation of asthma for the duration of their lives. The aim of this review was to assess recently published literature regarding the influence of air pollution on asthma in children. For this work, we reviewed articles found in PubMed using the key words "outdoor air pollution, asthma, and children" which were published between 2006 and 2009. Only those articles that had a full version available in PubMed were analyzed. We reviewed studies published between 2006 and 2009 examining the effect of outdoor air pollution on asthma in children. In total, we evaluated 25 articles; of these, 9 were published in 2006, 3 in 2007, 8 in 2008, and 5 in 2009. Of these 25 studies, 1 was a clinical trial, 6 were cross-sectional, 4 were case-control (2 with a case-crossover design), 12 were cohort prospective, and 2 were cohort retrospective studies with varied follow-up times ranging from 10 days to 7 years. The ages of children also differed, ranging from birth to 18 years of age. All studies reviewed in this work indicate that outdoor air pollution affects the appearance and exacerbation of asthma in children. Although these findings are of great

  6. Reduced breath condensate pH in asymptomatic children with prior wheezing as a risk factor for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Jagwitz, Marie; Pessler, Frank; Akmatov, Manas; Li, Jialiang; Range, Ursula; Vogelberg, Christian

    2011-07-01

    Early noninvasive detection of increased risk of asthma with exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH measurement has not been applied to preschool children. We sought to evaluate the ability of EBC pH measurement to identify young asymptomatic children at risk of asthma using the combination of recurrent wheezing and atopic sensitization as a proxy for a high risk of asthma. pH values were measured in deaerated EBC from 191 children (median age, 4.4 years [interquartile range, 2.2 years]). Children were divided into one of 5 groups: asymptomatic children with recurrent wheezy bronchitis with (group 1, n = 34) or without (group 2, n = 64) allergic sensitization, acute wheezy bronchitis (group 3, n = 18), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis without recurrent wheezy bronchitis (group 4, n = 15), and healthy control subjects (group 5, n = 60). The Asthma Predictive Index score was calculated for groups 1 and 2. Statistical significance was evaluated with the appropriate nonparametric tests, and the discriminatory accuracy was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic analysis. Deaerated EBC pH values were significantly lower in groups 1 and 3 than in groups 2, 4, and 5 (median, 7.49 [interquartile range, 0.94] and 7.44 [interquartile range, 0.70] vs 7.93 [interquartile range, 0.23], 8.02 [interquartile range, 0.17], and 7.96 [interquartile range, 0.25], respectively; P < .001 and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve ≥0.80 in all comparisons). The area under the curve for the differentiation between groups 1 and 2 improved from 0.80 to 0.94 (sensitivity, 0.94; specificity, 0.84; positive predictive value, 0.76) when breath condensate pH values and Asthma Predictive Index scores were combined. A reduced deaerated EBC pH value might help identify young asymptomatic children at high risk of asthma. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting as Uncontrolled Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic A. Rawlins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is an uncommon disorder affecting primarily young adult smokers. It is characterized by abnormal proliferation of Langerhans cells, specialized monocyte-macrophage lineage antigen-presenting cells. LCH can affect the lungs in isolation or as part of a systemic disease. Most commonly, the disease presents in the third or fourth decade without gender predominance. Symptoms typically include dyspnea and cough. Commonly, physical examination is unremarkable but cor pulmonale may be observed in advanced disease. The chest radiograph is typically abnormal with nodular or interstitial infiltrates and cystic changes. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest with these findings in the middle and upper lobes of an adult smoker is virtually diagnostic of LCH. Pulmonary function assessment is variable. Asthma has rarely been reported in association with this disorder. There are only three reported cases of the diagnosis of concomitant asthma which have been made in association with the diagnosis of LCH. We present a case in which our patient presented with signs and symptoms of asthma to include confirmatory findings of airway hyperresponsiveness. The diagnosis of LCH was established after the patient failed to respond to conventional treatment for asthma, and further evaluation was completed.

  8. Smartphone and tablet self management apps for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcano Belisario, José S; Huckvale, Kit; Greenfield, Geva; Car, Josip; Gunn, Laura H

    2013-11-27

    Asthma is one of the most common long-term conditions worldwide, which places considerable pressure on patients, communities and health systems. The major international clinical guidelines now recommend the inclusion of self management programmes in the routine management of patients with asthma. These programmes have been associated with improved outcomes in patients with asthma. However, the implementation of self management programmes in clinical practice, and their uptake by patients, is still poor. Recent developments in mobile technology, such as smartphone and tablet computer apps, could help develop a platform for the delivery of self management interventions that are highly customisable, low-cost and easily accessible. To assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and feasibility of using smartphone and tablet apps to facilitate the self management of individuals with asthma. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Register (CAGR), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Global Health Library, Compendex/Inspec/Referex, IEEEXplore, ACM Digital Library, CiteSeer(x) and CAB abstracts via Web of Knowledge. We also searched registers of current and ongoing trials and the grey literature. We checked the reference lists of all primary studies and review articles for additional references. We searched for studies published from 2000 onwards. The latest search was run in June 2013. We included parallel randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared self management interventions for patients with clinician-diagnosed asthma delivered via smartphone apps to self management interventions delivered via traditional methods (e.g. paper-based asthma diaries). We used standard methods expected by the Cochrane Collaboration. Our primary outcomes were symptom scores; frequency of healthcare visits due to asthma exacerbations or complications and health-related quality of life. We included two RCTs with a total of

  9. Back for more: a qualitative study of emergency department reattendance for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeman, Dianne P; Aroni, Rosalie A; Sawyer, Susan M; Stewart, Kay; Thien, Francis C K; Abramson, Michael J; Douglass, Jo A

    2004-02-02

    To explore the reasons why individuals recurrently present with asthma to hospital emergency departments. A predominantly qualitative study in which participants were interviewed in-depth about their asthma. Data on medication use, respiratory health and asthma knowledge were also collected, and asthma severity was determined from medical records. A tertiary teaching hospital and a suburban hospital emergency department (ED) from 1 March to 30 April 2000, and a rural hospital ED from 1 July to 31 August 2000. The participation rate was 32% of an initial 195 ED attendees (183 of whom were eligible) aged 18-70 years: 32 had presented to an ED for asthma care on more than one occasion over the preceding 12 months (reattendees), and 29 were non-reattendees. Two-thirds (22/32) of reattendees had chronic severe asthma and presentation to ED was deemed appropriate for 18 of these, indicated by recurrent severe asthma attacks despite seeking prior medical intervention. Reasons for re-presentation identified in a third of all reattendees included poor asthma knowledge, and financial and other barriers to medication use. We identified potentially preventable issues in about a third of patients (most of whom had mild to moderate asthma) who recurrently presented to EDs for treatment. The remainder of the participants sought emergency asthma treatment appropriately after failing to respond to medical care, and this was frequently in accordance with their asthma management plans.

  10. Asthma knowledge, attitude, and self-efficacy in Iranian asthmatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Laleh; Pourpak, Zahra; Heidarnazhad, Hassan; Bokaie, Saied; Moin, Mostafa

    2011-09-01

    Worldwide, numerous people of all ages and ethnicities experience asthma. The achievements of current medical regimens for patients frequently depend on three factors: 1) knowledge of patients regarding this disease, 2) patient's attitude about asthma, including willingness to collaborate with the therapeutic group for disease control and 3) patient's self-efficacy for controlling asthma. Therefore, this study examined the relationship between knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy with socio-economic factors in Iranian asthmatic patients during 2006-2008. Participants consisted of 120 adults referred to Milad Hospital, Tehran, Iran during 2006 to 2008 whose physicians diagnosed their asthma. Socio-demographic factors such as sex, age, education level, occupation, marital status, family history of asthma, disease costs, and period of sickness were reviewed. Assessments of knowledge, attitudes and self-efficacy were performed by the Persian version of an international standard questionnaire (KASE-AQ). Data were analyzed by SPSS version 14. Among respondents, only 9 (7.5%) patients had good knowledge about asthma, 108 (90%) patients had a suitable attitude about their asthma and 103 (85.3%) patients had proper self-efficacy. We found a significant association between self-efficacy and attitude in asthmatic patients (Pknowledge about asthma is low, however, favorable attitudes toward asthma create opportunities to intervene and improve asthma management among patients. However, the use of educational tools depends on patients' educational levels. Therefore, we recommend elevating asthma knowledge.

  11. Improving Asthma-Related Outcomes Among Children Participating in the Head-Off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana (HEAL), Phase II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Kristi Isaac; Jack, Leonard; Wilson, Candice; Hayes, Sandra Carr; Post, Robert; McKnight, Ellen; Malveaux, Floyd

    2018-03-01

    Pediatric asthma disproportionately affects low-income and minority children. The HEAL (Head-Off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana), Phase II Project was a collaborative effort with a primary focus to improve pediatric asthma management in New Orleans, Louisiana. The purpose of this article is to report clinical outcomes captured at baseline and 12-month follow-up. HEAL (Head-off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana), Phase II was a pre-post intervention study that enrolled children ages 2 to 18 years of age with a diagnosis of asthma to receive asthma education within the clinic setting. Enrollees received an asthma education intervention, an environmental evaluation, and a 12-month follow-up session. Endpoints included symptom days, level of asthma control, asthma exacerbations, emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and missed school days. The majority of participants were aged 5 years and older, male, Black, and persistent asthmatics. Emergency room visits decreased from 41% to 20% ( p < .001). Improvements in coughing (83% to 62%, p < .001), wheezing (50% to 26%, p < .001), and chest tightness (29% to 18%, p < .001) were also seen. The novel intervention was associated with improved asthma outcomes among pediatric patients receiving care at the clinical sites in the Greater New Orleans area.

  12. Relationship between maternal asthma, its severity and control and abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Lucie; Kettani, Fatima-Zohra; Forget, Amélie

    2013-04-01

    Are women with asthma, and more specifically those with severe or uncontrolled asthma, at higher risk of spontaneous and induced abortions? Pregnant women with asthma, notably when uncontrolled, are at higher risk of spontaneous abortion. Only one study has examined the association between asthma and spontaneous and induced abortions and revealed a modest increase in the risk of spontaneous abortions, particularly in women with more severe asthma and those with previous exacerbations, and a marginal decrease in the risk of induced abortions. A cohort of pregnancies from asthmatic (n = 15,107) and non-asthmatic (n = 34,331) women was reconstructed by linking three administrative databases from Quebec (Canada), between 1992 and 2002. The cohort included 7870 spontaneous abortions, 14,596 induced abortions and 26,972 live births. Pregnant women with and without asthma were analyzed. Asthma was defined by at least one asthma diagnosis and one dispensed prescription for an asthma medication in the 2 years prior to or during pregnancy. Asthma severity and control were assessed using validated indexes in the year before the 20th week of pregnancy or the termination of the pregnancy. Logistic polytomous regression models were used to estimate the relationship between asthma and asthma severity and control on the risk of abortion, while adjusting for potential confounders. The prevalence of spontaneous and induced abortions was 15.9 and 29.5%, respectively. Maternal asthma was associated with an increased risk of a spontaneous abortion [odds ratio (OR) = 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.33-1.49] and a decreased risk of induced abortions (OR = 0.92; 0.88-0.97). No association was observed between asthma severity and abortion, while uncontrolled asthma increased the risk of a spontaneous abortion by 26% (95% CI: 14-41%) and the risk of induced abortions by 11% (95% CI: 1-21%). It is possible that the study results were confounded by imbalances between groups in variables

  13. Associated factors to repeated consultations to the urgencies service for asthma in pediatric patient: Implications for an educational program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Martinez, Carlos; Sossa, Monica Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is one of the most frequent respiratory diseases in childhood. Recurrent emergency department visits for asthma produce anxiety and high costs for the system of health and for the family. It is important to know the factors related to these recurrent emergency department visits to assist the targeting of appropriate future interventions aimed at reducing this avoidable presentation. The objective of the present study was to identify factors associated with recurrent emergency department visits for asthma in children liable to be modified by means of an education program. Data obtained from a survey of parents of 146 pediatric patients with asthma attending an asthma clinic and educational program were examined. Parents completed an asthma knowledge and attitudes questionnaire that also included other socio demographic and illness-related variables, including the number of consultations to emergency department by their children asthma in the previous 6 months. Of the 146 asthmatic patients enrolled, 41 (28.1%) consulted repeatedly to the emergency department for asthma. After controlling for age of the patient, educational level of the parents, and functional severity of the disease, we found that parents who reported that they attended to emergency room because asthma attacks of their children were severe enough to go elsewhere (OR, 4.57; CL95%, 1.76- 11.85; P = 0.002), parents who reported that asthma medications should be administered only in symptomatic moments (OR 278, CL 95%, 1.05 - 7.33, P = 0.038 and parents that did not recognize the fact that asthma attacks can be avoided if medications are administered when there are no symptoms (between asthma attacks) (OR 2.61; CL95%; 1.03 - 7.02; p = 0,045), had a greater probability to attend rapidly the emergency room because of asthma of their children. The fact that parents of asthmatic patients have thought that asthma medications should be administered only in symptomatic patients, that they hadn

  14. Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Correlation in Palm Tree Workers of Jahrom City in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand Fard, Mohammad Amin; Khanjani, Narges; Arabi Mianroodi, Aliasghar; Ashrafi Asgarabad, Ahad

    2017-05-01

    Allergic rhinitis and asthma can be related to occupation. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between asthma or allergic rhinitis and employment in the palm tree gardens of Jahrom, Iran. This was a cross-sectional study including 50 palm tree garden workers and a control group of 50 office employees. Data collection included demographics, as well as standard International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) and A New Symptom-Based Questionnaire for Predicting the Presence of Asthma (ASQ) questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS22. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test, t-test, and logistics regression were used to analyze data. The correlation between asthma and occupation was significant ( P=0.046); and asthma prevalence was higher in palm tree garden workers. However, no relationship was observed between age, duration of employment, smoking cigarettes, hookah, or opium addiction with asthma. Furthermore, in this study, no significant relation was observed between the prevalence of asthma and contact with dust, contact with pets' skin and hair, family history of asthma, or the use of perfume and air freshener. The symptoms of allergic rhinitis (including sneezing, runny nose, and blocked nose) were significantly greater in palm tree garden workers (P=0.038). These symptoms in both workers and office employees were higher in spring. In our study, allergic rhinitis and asthma were more common in palm tree garden workers than in the general population. According to our study, people working in this occupation should take necessary precautions.

  15. Parents' childhood socioeconomic circumstances are associated with their children's asthma outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Edith; Shalowitz, Madeleine U; Story, Rachel E; Ehrlich, Katherine B; Manczak, Erika M; Ham, Paula J; Le, Van; Miller, Gregory E

    2017-09-01

    Previous literature documents associations between low socioeconomic status (SES) and poor health outcomes, including asthma. However, this literature has largely focused on the effects of current family circumstances. We sought to test an intergenerational hypothesis, that the childhood SES that parents experience will be associated with asthma outcomes in their children, independent of effects of current family SES. Second, we aimed to test whether this association is in part due to difficulties in current parent-child relationships. This was an observational study, whereby 150 parents were interviewed about their childhood SES and their children (physician-diagnosed asthma, ages 9-17 years) were interviewed about current family stress. Asthma control was assessed by parent report and child report (primary outcome), and blood was collected from children to measure cytokine production relevant to asthma (secondary outcomes). To the degree that parents had lower childhood SES, their offspring showed worse asthma outcomes across multiple indicators. This included lower asthma control scores (parent and child report, Ps asthma control and greater cytokine production in children. These results suggest the potential "long reach" of low SES across generations, and the importance of expanding theories of how the social environment can affect childhood asthma to include characteristics of earlier generations. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-reported asthma in Chaldeans, Arabs, and African Americans: factors associated with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Hikmet; Raymond, Delbert; Fakhouri, Monty; Templin, Thomas; Khoury, Radwan; Fakhouri, Haifa; Arnetz, Bengt B

    2011-06-01

    Although the prevalence of asthma is increasing worldwide, there are striking, and largely unexplained differences across various racial and ethnic groups. The current study looks at the prevalence of asthma and risk factors between Chaldeans, Arabs, and African Americans. We used Health Assessment Survey data representing 3,136 respondents. Prevalence across the three ethnic groups were compared using unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios, accounting for multiple risk factors. There were significant socio-demographic differences across all ethnic groups. Asthma prevalence was significantly lower in Arabs (9.4%) and Chaldeans (5.4%) than in Non-Middle Eastern Whites (14.4%). African American prevalence was 14.4%. The significantly lower prevalence of asthma among Chaldean and Arabs, as compared to African Americans, were not explained by traditional risk factors included in our models. We therefore, suggest that future studies should explore the possible role of ethnic-specific differences in gene × environmental interactions in the precipitation and/or exacerbation of asthma.

  17. The association of vitamin D, cathelicidin, and vitamin D binding protein with acute asthma attacks in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikoglu, Tugba; Kuyucu, Semanur; Karaismailoglu, Eda; Batmaz, Sehra Birgul; Balci, Senay

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence about the various effects of vitamin D (vit D) on innate and adaptive immunity has led to a search for the role of vit D in asthma. It is postulated that a decrease in cathelicidin, a multifunctional host defense molecule, production due to low vit D status may predispose to infectious complications in children with asthma. The aim of this study was to determine the association of vit D, vit D-binding protein (VDBP) and cathelicidin with acute asthma attacks among children with allergic asthma. This prospective study included 35 patients with acute asthma attack and 32 children with controlled asthma, and all were matched by sampling season, sensitization to mites, and previous severity of asthma. A comprehensive questionnaire about risk factors, blood sampling for 25-hydroxyvitamin D vit D, VDBP, and cathelicidin levels; spirometric indices were used. Factors that influence serum vit D and cathelicidin levels and the development of asthma attacks were evaluated with multivariate analysis. The mean serum vit D levels of the attack group was significantly lower than that of the controlled asthma group (p asthma group than with the controlled subjects with asthma (p = 0.002). There was no difference between the acute and controlled asthma groups in terms of markers of allergy and serum VDBP levels. Risk factors that may influence vit D levels revealed that body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.038), duration of sun exposure (p asthma showed that low serum levels of vit D were significantly related to the risk of asthma attacks (p asthma attacks and BMI. Vit D deficiency showed a significant relationship to the development of asthma attacks independent of cathelicidin deficiency and other factors associated with the severity of chronic asthma.

  18. Contemporaneous International Asthma Guidelines Present Differing Recommendations: An Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Several international groups develop asthma guidelines. Conflicting recommendations across guidelines have been described in several disease areas and may contribute to practice variability. Accordingly, we compared the latest Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS asthma guideline with contemporaneous international asthma guidelines to evaluate conflicting recommendations and their causes. Methods. We identified the latest CTS asthma guideline update (2012 and the following societies which also updated their guidelines in 2012: the British Thoracic Society and Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network and the Global Initiative for Asthma. We compared these three guidelines on (1 key methodological factors and (2 adult pharmacotherapy recommendations. Results. Methods used and documentation provided for literature search strategy and dates, evidence synthesis, outcomes considered, evidence appraisal, and recommendation formulation varied between guidelines. Criteria used to define suboptimal asthma control varied widely between guidelines. Inhaled corticosteroid dosing recommendations diverged, as did recommendations surrounding use of budesonide/formoterol as a reliever and controller and recommendations in the subsequent step. Conclusions. There are important differences between recommendations provided in contemporaneous asthma guidelines. Causes include differences in methods used for interpreting evidence and formulating recommendations. Adopting a common set of valid and explicit methods across international societies could harmonize recommendations and facilitate guideline implementation.

  19. Asthma in intellectual disability: are we managing our patients appropriately?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    People with intellectual disability are a vulnerable group of people with asthma that has, to date, largely been ignored in the medical literature. Although guidelines for medication management for people with intellectual disability suggest asthma is treated as for other populations, there are special considerations that should be taken into account when managing asthma in this group. Due to their cognitive impairment as well as comorbidities, they are likely to require support with asthma self-management, including inhaler use. Their varying degrees of autonomy mean that there is often a need to provide education and information to both the person and their caregivers. Educational aims To understand general principles of health of people with intellectual disability and how this affects the healthcare professional’s approach to asthma management. To understand how intellectual disability affects cognition, autonomy and communication, and therefore the ability of a person to self-manage asthma. To recognise ways of mitigating respiratory disease risk in people with intellectual disability. To describe ways for healthcare professionals to support people with intellectual disability and their caregivers in asthma management. PMID:28210318

  20. Assesment of Quality of Life in Children with Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhat Gümüş

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Bronchial asthma is among the most common chronic pediatric diseases that can result in variable restriction in the physical, emotional and social aspects of the patient%u2019s life. The aim of this study was to assess impairment on quality of life (QOL in asthmatic children. Material and Method: Ninety seven patients aged between 7 and 15 years which followed up at Pediatric Pulmonology Department of Dicle University Hospital were included into the study, during October 2009 %u2013 January 2010. To assess the quality of life Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life questionnaire%u2019s (PAQLQ self-applied Turkish version was used. In addition, the severity of asthma was measured using by Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT. Results: The male to female ratio of asthmatic children was 2/1 and the mean age was 10.0 %uF0B1 2.5 years. Severity of asthma, history of steroid use and low family income were found as having negative effect on the PAQLQ scores (p < 0.001. Mother%u2019s education level also had statistically significant effect on the PAQLQ scores (P = 0.02. Father%u2019s education level; patient%u2019s age, gender, passive smoking exposure, family history of asthma or eczema and duration of disease did not have statistically significant effect on PAQLQ scores (p>0.05. Asthma control test score had a significant correlation with PAQLQ score (p

  1. DNA methylation levels associated with race and childhood asthma severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Marcia A; Ciaccio, Christina E; Gigliotti, Nicole M; Rezaiekhaligh, Mo; Siedlik, Jacob A; Kennedy, Kevin; Barnes, Charles S

    2017-10-01

    Asthma is a common chronic childhood disease worldwide. Socioeconomic status, genetic predisposition and environmental factors contribute to its incidence and severity. A disproportionate number of children with asthma are economically disadvantaged and live in substandard housing with potential indoor environmental exposures such as cockroaches, dust mites, rodents and molds. These exposures may manifest through epigenetic mechanisms that can lead to changes in relevant gene expression. We examined the association of global DNA methylation levels with socioeconomic status, asthma severity and race/ethnicity. We measured global DNA methylation in peripheral blood of children with asthma enrolled in the Kansas City Safe and Healthy Homes Program. Inclusion criteria included residing in the same home for a minimum of 4 days per week and total family income of less than 80% of the Kansas City median family income. DNA methylation levels were quantified by an immunoassay that assessed the percentage of 5-methylcytosine. Our results indicate that overall, African American children had higher levels of global DNA methylation than children of other races/ethnicities (p = 0.029). This difference was more pronounced when socioeconomic status and asthma severity were coupled with race/ethnicity (p = 0.042) where low-income, African American children with persistent asthma had significantly elevated methylation levels relative to other races/ethnicities in the same context (p = 0.006, Hedges g = 1.14). Our study demonstrates a significant interaction effect among global DNA methylation levels, asthma severity, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.

  2. General practitioners' knowledge of childhood asthma in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, V P; Shah, A; Malhotra, A; Dewanwala, A; Taneja, D K; Gupta, V K; Ingle, G K

    2008-06-01

    To assess knowledge of childhood asthma among general practitioners (GPs) in Delhi, India. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 157 GPs were interviewed using a validated questionnaire, including six questions of local and social relevance. A response rate of 78.5% was obtained. Although the GPs who participated in the study had adequate knowledge of the importance of appropriate treatment, the safety of inhalers/oral steroids and the role of medicines in the prevention of frequent asthma attacks, the majority lacked knowledge of symptomatology, exercise-induced asthma and inhaled corticosteroids. GPs with >5 years of practice were more likely to have significantly less knowledge about preventive drugs, certain aspects of treatment of acute asthma and misconceptions, such as 'drinking milk increases mucus production' or 'children with asthma should not consume dairy products, chilled drinks, sour or chilled food'. On the other hand, GPs with < or =5 of practice had misconceptions such as 'children with asthma have abnormally sensitive airways' and 'asthmatic children develop dependence on inhalers'. The gaps in knowledge about asthma and its management highlight the need to design well-structured educational strategies for health professionals.

  3. Environmental triggers and avoidance in the management of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautier C

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Clarisse Gautier,1 Denis Charpin1,2 1Department of Pulmonology and Allergy, North Hospital, 2Faculty of Medicine, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France Abstract: Identifying asthma triggers forms the basis of environmental secondary prevention. These triggers may be allergenic or nonallergenic. Allergenic triggers include indoor allergens, such as house dust mites (HDMs, molds, pets, cockroaches, and rodents, and outdoor allergens, such as pollens and molds. Clinical observations provide support for the role of HDM exposure as a trigger, although avoidance studies provide conflicting results. Molds and their metabolic products are now considered to be triggers of asthma attacks. Pets, dogs, and especially cats can undoubtedly trigger asthmatic symptoms in sensitized subjects. Avoidance is difficult and rarely adhered to by families. Cockroach allergens contribute to asthma morbidity, and avoidance strategies can lead to clinical benefit. Mouse allergens are mostly found in inner-city dwellings, but their implication in asthma morbidity is debated. In the outdoors, pollens can induce seasonal asthma in sensitized individuals. Avoidance relies on preventing pollens from getting into the house and on minimizing seasonal outdoor exposure. Outdoor molds may lead to severe asthma exacerbations. Nonallergenic triggers include viral infections, active and passive smoking, meteorological changes, occupational exposures, and other triggers that are less commonly involved. Viral infection is the main asthma trigger in children. Active smoking is associated with higher asthma morbidity, and smoking cessation interventions should be personalized. Passive smoking is also a risk factor for asthma exacerbation. The implementation of public smoking bans has led to a reduction in the hospitalization of asthmatic children. Air pollution levels have been linked with asthmatic symptoms, a decrease in lung function, and increased emergency room visits and

  4. Vaccines for preventing influenza in people with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, C J; Jefferson, T O; Rowe, B H

    2008-04-16

    Influenza vaccination is recommended for asthmatic patients in many countries as observational studies have shown that influenza infection can be associated with asthma exacerbations, but influenza vaccination itself has the potential to adversely affect pulmonary function. A recent overview concluded that there was no clear benefit of influenza vaccination in patients with asthma but this conclusion was not based on a systematic search of the literature. Whilst influenza may cause asthma exacerbations, there is controversy about the use of influenza vaccinations, since they may precipitate an asthma attack in some people. The objective of this review was to assess the efficacy of influenza vaccination in children and adults with asthma. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and checked reference lists of articles. The last search was carried out in September 2007. Randomised trials of influenza vaccination in children (over two years of age) and adults with asthma. Studies involving people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were excluded. Inclusion criteria and assessment of trial quality were applied by two reviewers independently. Data extraction was done by two reviewers independently. Study authors were contacted for missing information. Nine trials were initially included. Four of these trials were of high quality. Six further articles have been included in three updates (Bueving 2003; Castro 2001; Fleming 2006; Redding 2002; Reid 1998). The included studies covered a wide diversity of people, settings and types of influenza vaccination, but data from the more recent studies that used similar vaccines have been pooled. Bueving 2003 studied 696 children with asthma and did not demonstrate a significant reduction in influenza related asthma exacerbations (Risk Difference 0.01; 95% confidence interval -0.02 to 0.04). The pooled results of two trials involving 2306 people with asthma did not demonstrate a significant increase in asthma

  5. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... among Adults with Current Asthma Flu Vaccination among Children with Current Asthma Asthma and Fair or Poor Health Usual Place for Medical Care among Children Number of Visits to a Health Care Provider(s) ...

  6. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Joint Congress Mark your calendars and head to Orlando for the premier event in allergy/immunology. You ... Of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Life Spectrum of Asthma Meeting School-based Asthma Management Program – (SAMPRO TM ) This ...

  7. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Publications on Asthma National Asthma Control Program America Breathing Easier Guide for State Programs Interventions Community Guide— ... Puff Inner City Asthma YES WE CAN Bibliography Breathing Easier Success Stories State Contacts and Programs Evaluation ...

  8. Influenza vaccination for children with asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Bat-Chen; Goldman, Ran D.

    2010-01-01

    QUESTION Parents of children with asthma are encouraged by many health organizations to vaccinate their children against seasonal influenza viruses. Is the influenza vaccine efficient in preventing asthma exacerbation? Are current vaccinations safe to administer to children with asthma?

  9. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, and Surveillance Most Recent Asthma Data Most Recent Asthma State ... 1 Table 4-2 Reports and Publications Asthma Surveillance Summaries MMWR Publications NCHS Reports and Publications Related ...

  10. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, and Surveillance Most Recent ... Archive 2014 State or Territory Data Archive AsthmaStats Flu Vaccination among Adults with Current Asthma Flu Vaccination ...

  11. Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feel symptoms all the time. But when an asthma attack happens, it becomes hard for air to pass ... Make peak flow a habit! Signs of an asthma attack Stay away from asthma triggers Review Date 12/ ...

  12. Managing Asthma: Learning to Breathe Easier

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lungs. When symptoms flare up, it’s called an asthma attack. The airways of people with asthma are prone ... every day to help control symptoms and prevent asthma attacks. “Inhaled corticosteroids are recommended as the preferred long- ...

  13. Asthma - what to ask the doctor - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feel symptoms all the time. But when an asthma attack happens, it becomes hard for air to pass ... Make peak flow a habit! Signs of an asthma attack Stay away from asthma triggers Review Date 11/ ...

  14. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Brochures Facts Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, ... Current Asthma Overuse of quick-relief medication among persons with active asthma Use of long-term control ...

  15. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Controlling Tools for Control Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers ... Case Studies Open Airways for Schools Asthma Care Training Wee Wheezers Adventures of Puff Inner City Asthma ...

  16. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Missed School Days among Children aged 5–17 Years Asthma Severity among Adults with Current Asthma Asthma ... different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft ...

  17. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Asthma & Community Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma and avoid an attack by taking your medicine ...

  18. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Messages Agencies Working on Asthma Follow @CDCasthma on Twitter to learn more about helping people with asthma ... de boca) [PDF – 276 KB] Follow @CDCasthma on Twitter to learn more about helping people with asthma ...

  19. Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Correlation in Palm Tree Workers of Jahrom City in 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Farahmand Fard, Mohammad Amin; Khanjani, Narges; Arabi Mianroodi, Aliasghar; Ashrafi Asgarabad, Ahad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Allergic rhinitis and asthma can be related to occupation. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between asthma or allergic rhinitis and employment in the palm tree gardens of Jahrom, Iran.   Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including 50 palm tree garden workers and a control group of 50 office employees. Data collection included demographics, as well as standard International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) and A New Sy...

  20. Asthma symptoms in obese adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2016-01-01

    . Obese patients, who present with symptoms suggesting a diagnosis of asthma, may have a distinct phenotype or a disease mimicking asthma, likely to have a potentially higher remission rate. And by that, our approach to this group of patients should combine pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies......The association between asthma and obesity is well-described, but not straightforward, and according to current guidelines asthma control is more difficult to achieve in obese patients. The currently available studies evaluating response to pharmacological asthma therapy in obese patients show...... that these patients have an altered, in general less favorable, response to both reliever and controller medication compared to normal weight patients. However, at present, the limited available evidence precludes evidence-based recommendations. The 'obesity-related asthma' phenotype has different characteristics...

  1. Childhood asthma and physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochte, Lene; Nielsen, Kim G; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma is a global problem affecting the respiratory health of children. Physical activity (PA) plays a role in the relationship between asthma and respiratory health. We hypothesized that a low level of PA would be associated with asthma in children and adolescents....... The objectives of our study were to (1) summarize the evidence available on associations between PA and asthma prevalence in children and adolescents and (2) assess the role of PA in new-onset or incident asthma among children and adolescents. METHODS: We searched Medline, the Cochrane Library, and Embase......: We retrieved 1,571 titles and selected 11 articles describing three cohort and eight cross-sectional studies for inclusion. A meta-analysis of the cohort studies revealed a risk of new-onset asthma in children with low PA (OR [95 % CI] 1.32 [0.95; 1.84] [random effects] and 1.35 [1.13; 1.62] [fixed...

  2. The sensitization pattern differs according to rhinitis and asthma multimorbidity in adults: the EGEA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burte, E; Bousquet, J; Siroux, V; Just, J; Jacquemin, B; Nadif, R

    2017-04-01

    Mono- and polysensitization are different IgE-mediated allergic phenotypes in children. Allergic sensitization is associated with both allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis, however, associations between the sensitization pattern and particularly polysensitization with asthma and rhinitis remains poorly studied in adults. The aim of this study was to assess how the allergic sensitization pattern associates with asthma, rhinitis and their multimorbidity. 1199 adults from the EGEA study, with extensive phenotypic characterization and all data available on skin prick tests to 10 allergens, total IgE and blood eosinophils were included. Using questionnaires only, participants were classified into 6 groups: asymptomatic (no asthma, no rhinitis), non-allergic rhinitis alone, allergic rhinitis alone, asthma alone, asthma+non-allergic rhinitis and asthma+allergic rhinitis. Mono- and polysensitization were defined by a positive skin prick test to one or more than one allergen respectively. Asymptomatic participants and those with non-allergic rhinitis alone were mostly non-sensitized (around 72%) while around 12% were polysensitized. Between 32% and 43% of participants with allergic rhinitis alone, asthma alone and asthma+non-allergic rhinitis were non-sensitized and between 37% and 46% of them were polysensitized. 65% of the participants with asthma+allergic rhinitis were polysensitized. The level of total IgE followed a similar trend to that of allergic sensitization. Eosinophils were increased in asthma, especially when associated with rhinitis. Nasal symptoms were more severe and eczema more common in participants with both asthma and allergic rhinitis than in the other groups. Allergic sensitization and particularly polysensitization rates widely differ according to asthma and rhinitis status. This study emphasized the importance of taking into account multimorbidity between asthma and rhinitis and showed that allergic sensitization is not a dichotomic variable.

  3. Military service-aggravated asthma improves at two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Irmeli; Koponen, Pekka; Luukkonen, Ritva; Pallasaho, Paula; Kauppi, Paula; Latvala, Jari; Karjalainen, Antti; Lauerma, Antti

    2009-12-01

    During military service young men (age 19-21 years) are exposed to many predisposing factors for asthma. We aimed to study the short-term prognosis of asthma after the military service. All 216 men with verified asthma in 2004-2005 from the register of the Central Military Hospital were included in the study. A questionnaire was mailed to them in autumn 2007 and the 146 responders (68%) formed the final study population. Asthma severity was evaluated during military service according to the medical records of the subjects and two years later based on the questionnaire using modified GINA guidelines. The results on lung function and allergy tests during military service and asthma history were used as predictors of asthma severity at two-year follow-up. Two groups of asthmatics were identified: those who already had asthma when entering the military service (n=71, 48.6%) and those, who had a new onset of asthma during the service (n=75, 51.4%). Overall asthma was less severe at two-year follow-up than during military service (p=0.036). Both during military service and at two-year follow-up, asthma was milder among the men, who had a new onset of asthma during military service. Atopy (p=0.002), number of positive skin-prick tests (p=0.005) and higher total serum IgE (p=0.001) were significant predictors for persistent asthma at follow-up. Asthma, which had aggravated or started during military service, was significantly less severe two years later. The degree of atopy was a major determinant of the two-year prognosis of asthma after military service.

  4. Tobacco Control Laws and Pediatric Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatoun, Jonathan; Davis-Plourde, Kendra; Penti, Brian; Cabral, Howard; Kazis, Lewis

    2018-01-01

    Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke increases pediatric asthma severity. Strict, state-level tobacco control reduces smoking. The Child Asthma Call-Back Survey (Child ACBS) is a nationally representative survey of the guardians of children with asthma. The American Lung Association's annual State of Tobacco Control report grades tobacco control laws in each state including a tax grade (cigarette excise tax relative to the national mean), and a smoke-free air grade (number of locations where smoking is prohibited). We joined Child ACBS data from 2006 to 2010 with corresponding state and year tobacco grades. In the primary analysis, we investigated the effect of state tax grades on a child's asthma severity by using a logistic regression model adjusting for year. A secondary analysis assessed the impact of smoke-free air grades on in-home smoking. Our analysis included 12 860 Child ACBS interviews from 35 states over 5 years, representing over 24 million individuals. We merged 112 unique State of Tobacco Control grades with patient data by state and year. A higher tax grade was associated with reduced severity (adjusted odds ratio = 1.40; P = .007, 95% confidence interval: 1.10-1.80). A better smoke-free air grade was not associated with decreased in-home smoking after adjusting for confounding by income and type of residence. A stronger tobacco tax is associated with reduced asthma severity. Further study is needed to determine the effect of smoke-free air laws on in-home environmental. This work supports ongoing efforts to strengthen tobacco control through federal and state regulations. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. [Digital action plan for asthma exacerbations (PANAME)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydon, N; Delclaux, C

    2017-11-01

    A written action plan (WAP) reduces emergency visits for asthma exacerbations. However, a WAP is underused and often focused on asthma control. The innovation is an AppWeb that includes an expert software aimed at diagnosing the level of severity of asthma exacerbations and delivering a personalized digital action plan (DAP) when patients are in urgent need of medical advice. Symptoms describing the level of severity of asthma exacerbations and the consequent treatments have been established by working groups of the French Respiratory Societies (SPLF and SP2A for adults and children, respectively). The main objective of the study is to evaluate the effect of the DAP on the frequency of urgent medical attendance. Secondary objectives are to evaluate adherence to the DAP compared to a WAP and the qualitative satisfaction of patients using the DAP. A randomized, prospective, comparative, multicenter study on two parallel groups, conducted in private practice and in hospitals. In both arms, asthmatic patients (240 children aged 6 to 12 years and 270 adults aged 18 to 50 years) with severe asthma exacerbation(s) during the previous year and an Internet connection via a smartphone or a tablet computer, will have at their disposal a WAP and one arm will have, in addition, the DAP. Included patients will be followed up every three months for one year. A decrease in the number of urgent medical attendances and better adherence in the WAP+DAP group compared to the WAP group. Copyright © 2017 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Studies on provoked asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munkner, L.; Bundgaard, A.

    1982-01-01

    A group of adult patients with perennial bronchial asthma has been studied as to lung perfusion and alveolar ventilation (81m-Kr) at rest and after provocation of an acute attack. Asthma was provoked by exercise and by histamine inhalation. After provocation the peak expiratory flow values were reduced to less than 80% of the base line values. Perfusion was often deranged. Regional ventilation changed rapidly after provocation and not always in the same fashion after exercise and histamine. During attacks lung volume increased. The expansion decreased (in parallel with increased peak expiratory flow) after inhalator of a #betta#-2 agonist (terbutaline). 81m-Kr offers unique opportunities for studying acute regional changes in alveolar ventilation. (Author)

  7. Prevalence and risk factors of asthma in mainland China: The CARE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiangtao; Wang, Wenya; Chen, Ping; Zhou, Xin; Wan, Huanying; Yin, Kaisheng; Ma, Lijun; Wu, Changgui; Li, Jing; Liu, Chuntao; Su, Nan; Liu, Guoliang; Xie, Hua; Tang, Wei; Huang, Mao; Chen, Yan; Liu, Yuanhua; Song, Liqiang; Chen, Xianliang; Zhang, Yongming; Li, Wen; Sun, Lichao

    2018-04-01

    There are limited population based data on the prevalence of asthma in China. The China Asthma and Risk factors Epidemiologic (CARE) survey was designed to understand the prevalence and risk factors for asthma in mainland China. The CARE survey aims to demonstrate the prevalence and risk factors of asthma in mainland China among adolescents (age >14 years) and adults. The survey was performed between February 2010 and August 2012 in eight provinces/cities of seven areas in mainland China. The inhabitants (age, >14 years) recruited in this survey were through multi-stage cluster random sampling. Asthma diagnosis was based on medical history and lung function tests. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyzed the risk factors for asthma. The study included 164 215 subjects (men, 79 692 [48.53%]; women, 84 523 [51.47%]). 2034 (1.24%) were asthmatic patients. Among all asthmatic patients, 521 (25.61%) were newly diagnosed. Univariable regression analysis showed that risk factors for asthma included smoking, first-degree relatives with asthma, allergic rhinitis, chronic bronchitis, COPD, pollinosis, allergic pneumonia, concomitant allergic diseases, BMI and raising pets. Multivariable logistic regression indicated that asthma risk factors included women, age stratification, smoking, first-degree relatives suffering from asthma or pollinosis, combined with allergic rhinitis, eczema or GERD. We speculated that the prevalence of asthma is increasing in mainland China among individuals aged >14 years in the past 10 years. A number of risk factors were identified. The risk factors of asthma would be further elucidated in our future work. Our CARE study highlights that asthma epidemic in mainland China should be paid more attention. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Sensitization predicts asthma development among wheezing toddlers in secondary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Nienke A; Meijneke, Ruud W H; Kelder, Johannes C; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Balemans, Walter A F

    2017-06-01

    Some wheezing toddlers develop asthma later in childhood. Sensitization is known to predict asthma in birth cohorts. However, its predictive value in secondary healthcare is uncertain. This study examines the predictive value of sensitization to inhalant allergens among wheezing toddlers in secondary healthcare for the development of asthma at school age (≥6 years). Preschool children (1-3 years) who presented with wheezing in secondary healthcare were screened on asthma at school age with the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire. The positive and negative predictive value (PPV and NPV) of specific IgE to inhalant allergens (cut-off concentration 0.35 kU/L) and several non-invasive variables from a child's history (such as hospitalization, eczema, and parental atopy) were calculated. The additional predictive value of sensitization when combined with non-invasive predictors was examined in multivariate analysis and by ROC curves. Of 116 included children, 63% developed asthma at school age. Sensitization to inhalant allergens was a strong asthma predictor. The odds ratio (OR), PPV and NPV were 7.4%, 86%, and 55%, respectively. Eczema (OR 3.4) and hospital admission (OR 2.6) were significant non-invasive determinants. Adding sensitization to these non-invasive predictors in multivariate analysis resulted in a significantly better asthma prediction. The area under the ROC curve increased from 0.70 with only non-invasive predictors to 0.79 after adding sensitization. Sensitization to inhalant allergens is a strong predictor of school age asthma in secondary healthcare and has added predictive value when combined with non-invasive determinants. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2017;52:729-736. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Asthma deaths during sports: report of a 7-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jack M; Rogers, James; Rossini, Gregory; Mirchandani, Haresh; D'Alonzo, Gilbert E

    2004-02-01

    Asthma mortality and the mortality of athletes during sports have been described separately in detail in the medical literature. However, asthma has not been reported as a cause of death in competitive athletes. The object of this study was to raise the awareness of physicians, coaches, trainers, and parents that children and adults can have fatal asthma exacerbations during and immediately after participating in sports. The Temple Sports Asthma Research Center identified athletes from 1993 until 2000 who died during or after sporting activity by using the nationwide Burrell's Information Service. Once a possible asthma-related sports death was identified, the autopsy report was requested from the coroner or medical examiner, and an attempt was made to contact the family. Contact with the family was limited to information about the death, medical history, sports involvement, and any medication usage by the person who had died. Secondary sources, including news reports, were used to confirm whether the subject died of asthma during or immediately after a sporting activity. Two hundred sixty-three possible cases were identified. Sixty-one deaths met the criteria for study inclusion. White deaths outnumbered black deaths by 2 to 1. Deaths among male subjects predominated. Most subjects were younger than the age of 20 years, with the most prevalent age group being between 10 to 14 years old. Fifty-one percent (18 of 35) of the competitive athletes had their fatal event while participating in organized sport, 14 in a practice situation and 4 deaths during a game or meet setting. Basketball and track were the 2 most frequent activities performed at the time of the fatal event. The subjects who had fatal asthma exacerbations were usually white male subjects between the ages of 10 and 20 years. Mild intermittent or persistent asthma by history was commonly identified. Sudden fatal asthma exacerbations occur in both competitive and recreational athletes and can be

  10. Holy Saturday asthma

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, Terence M; Cusack, Ruth; Landers, Sarah; Bredin, Charles Patrick

    2014-01-01

    A 61-year-old man complained of cough and dyspnoea after exposure to colophony-containing solder fumes at work. A histamine challenge test confirmed airway hyper-responsiveness, and colophony-challenge demonstrated a 16.7% drop in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), supporting a diagnosis of colophony-induced occupational asthma. At review, the patient presented with cough, dyspnoea and wheeze that occurred acutely when exposed to the fumes from burning incense during Easter Saturday services, ...

  11. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Providers CDC Publications on Asthma National Asthma Control Program America Breathing Easier Guide for State Programs Interventions Community Guide—Evidence-based Potentially Effective Interventions ...

  12. Prevalence of childhood asthma in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigemi Yoshihara

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The asthma prevalence in Mongolian children was higher than that in the world and Asia–Pacific countries reported by ISAAC. The higher prevalence was probably attributable to households' (especially mothers smoking in draft-free houses designed for the cold area and severe air-pollution due to rapid industrialization and urbanization in Mongolia. Smoking prohibition in the mother (including family members and a reduction of exposure to air pollutants are urgently needed to prevent developing childhood asthma.

  13. Clinical relevance of IgE-mediated sensitization against the mould Alternaria alternata in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Sylvia; Sprünken, Anja; Wagner, Norbert; Tenbrock, Klaus; Ott, Hagen

    2017-01-01

    Asthma in childhood has a prevalence of 5-10% in Germany and severe asthma accounts for about 5% in this patient group. Positive predictive values for severe asthma are atopy, a positive family history and sensitizations against inhalative allergens. Alternaria is an important inhalative allergen and sensitization is suspected to correlate with severe and lethal asthma. We investigated the prevalence and impact of Alternaria sensitization in paediatric asthma. We reviewed paediatric patients with a diagnosis of low-grade, moderate and severe asthma. Data collection included concomitant atopic diseases, sensitization profiles, family history and prior hospitalization for asthma exacerbation. A total of 207 paediatric patients (aged 1-17 years) were included in the study. Overall, 25% had low-grade asthma, 31% moderate and 44% severe asthma and 26% were formerly hospitalized. Alternaria sensitization was the most common in moulds, although without significant correlation with hospitalization and severe asthma. Alternaria sensitization increased with age and was significantly associated with co-sensitization against other moulds, grass pollen and cat epithelia. Allergic rhinitis was significantly correlated with hospitalization, independent of Alternaria sensitization. Alternaria sensitization was common and increased with age. No significant correlation was found between asthma degree, hospitalization rates and sensitization profiles. Alternaria sensitization demonstrated no isolated risk factor for severe asthma and hospitalization.

  14. ANTHROPOMETRIC INDICATORS OF GENERAL AND CENTRAL OBESITY IN THE PREDICTION OF ASTHMA IN ADOLESCENTS; CENTRAL OBESITY IN ASTHMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobim Benedetti, Franceliane; Lúcia Bosa, Vera; Mariante Giesta, Juliana; Bueno Fischer, Gilberto

    2015-12-01

    to determine the prevalence of asthma risk associated with anthropometric indicators of excess weight and body fat distribution. cross-sectional study including adolescents between 10 and 19 years of age. The anthropometric indicator used to classify excess weight was the body mass index (BMI-Z); those used for abdominal adiposity were waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and the conicity index (CI). Asthma characteristics were evaluated using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire. The significance level was 5%, and the analyses were performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) Version 18.0. adolescent students (n = 1362; 788 [57.9%] female) with a mean age of 15.65 ± 1.24 years were evaluated. A high prevalence of asthma, excess weight (BMI-Z) and excess abdominal adiposity (WC and WHtR) was observed in the females. Only CI values for excess abdominal adiposity were higher for males than for females. Adolescents with excess abdominal adiposity, as shown by the WHtR, had a 1.24 times higher risk of having asthma compared with non-obese adolescents. Boys with excess abdominal adiposity, as classified by CI, presented a 1.8 times greater risk of asthma. The risk of severe asthma was 3 times higher among adolescents who were classified as severely obese via the BMI-Z. this study showed that excess body weight and abdominal obesity are associated with an increased risk of asthma and asthma severity in adolescents. Thus, additional BMI measurements are suggested for asthmatics. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  15. Mepolizumab and exacerbations of refractory eosinophilic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Pranabashis; Brightling, Christopher E; Hargadon, Beverley; Gupta, Sumit; Monteiro, William; Sousa, Ana; Marshall, Richard P; Bradding, Peter; Green, Ruth H; Wardlaw, Andrew J; Pavord, Ian D

    2009-03-05

    Exacerbations of asthma are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality and with considerable use of health care resources. Preventing exacerbations remains an important goal of therapy. There is evidence that eosinophilic inflammation of the airway is associated with the risk of exacerbations. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of 61 subjects who had refractory eosinophilic asthma and a history of recurrent severe exacerbations. Subjects received infusions of either mepolizumab, an anti-interleukin-5 monoclonal antibody (29 subjects), or placebo (32) at monthly intervals for 1 year. The primary outcome measure was the number of severe exacerbations per subject during the 50-week treatment phase. Secondary outcomes included a change in asthma symptoms, scores on the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ, in which scores range from 1 to 7, with lower values indicating more severe impairment and a change of 0.5 unit considered to be clinically important), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) after use of a bronchodilator, airway hyperresponsiveness, and eosinophil counts in the blood and sputum. Mepolizumab was associated with significantly fewer severe exacerbations than placebo over the course of 50 weeks (2.0 vs. 3.4 mean exacerbations per subject; relative risk, 0.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.32 to 0.92; P=0.02) and with a significant improvement in the score on the AQLQ (mean increase from baseline, 0.55 vs. 0.19; mean difference between groups, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.62; P=0.02). Mepolizumab significantly lowered eosinophil counts in the blood (P<0.001) and sputum (P=0.002). There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to symptoms, FEV(1) after bronchodilator use, or airway hyperresponsiveness. The only serious adverse events reported were hospitalizations for acute severe asthma. Mepolizumab therapy reduces exacerbations and improves AQLQ scores in patients

  16. Asthma Bronchiale and Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Harshani; Kopsaftis, Zoe; Carson, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Exercising regularly has a wide range of beneficial health effects; in particular, it has been well documented to help in the management of chronic illnesses including asthma. However, in some individuals, exertion can also trigger an exacerbation of asthmatic episodes and subsequent acute attacks of breathlessness, coughing, tightness of the chest and wheezing. This physiological process is called exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) whereby post-exercise forced expiratory volume in 1 s is reduced by 10-15% from baseline. While EIB is highly prevalent in asthmatics and presents with similar respiratory symptoms, asthma and EIB are not mutually exclusive. The aim of this review is to present a broad overview of both conditions in order to enhance the understanding of the similarities and differences distinguishing them as two separate entities. The pathophysiology and mechanisms underlying asthma are well described with research now focussing on defining phenotypes for targeted management strategies. Conversely, the mechanistic understanding of EIB remains largely under-described. Diagnostic pathways for both are established and similar, as are pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments and management approaches, which have enhanced success with early detection. Given the potential for exacerbation of asthma, exercise avoidance is common but counterproductive as current evidence indicates that it is well tolerated and improves quality of life. Literature supporting the benefit of exercise for EIB sufferers is at present favourable, yet extremely limited; therefore, future research should be directed in this area as well as towards further developing the understanding of the pathophysiology and mechanisms underpinning both EIB and asthma. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Carmine (E-120)-induced occupational asthma revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabar-Purroy, Ana I; Alvarez-Puebla, María J; Acero-Sainz, Sara; García-Figueroa, Blanca E; Echechipía-Madoz, Susana; Olaguibel-Rivera, Jose M; Quirce-Gancedo, Santiago

    2003-02-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) caused by carmine (E-120) has been reported. We sought to evaluate the prevalence of sensitization and OA at a natural dye processing factory in which 2 workers had been given a diagnosis of carmine-induced OA 6 years previously. The 24 current employees and one worker who had recently left work because of asthma completed a questionnaire and underwent skin testing (carmine, cochineal, carminic acid, curcuma, annato, and chlorophyll), carmine IgE dot-blot analysis, and methacholine inhalation testing. Workers exhibiting positive occupational skin test responses, work-related asthma, or bronchial hyperresponsiveness underwent specific inhalation challenge and serial peak expiratory flow rate recording. Positive skin test responses to carmine (41.7%), cochineal (29.2%), and carminic acid (4.2%) were observed. Carmine IgE dot-blot results were positive in 4 subjects. No difference in atopy or smoking was observed between occupationally sensitized and nonsensitized subjects. Among the 5 employees reporting work-related asthma, 2 had positive skin test responses, and 4 had bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Five subjects underwent specific inhalation challenges: 2 workers had early asthma responses to carmine and cochineal challenges, and the remaining subjects did not have suggestive peak expiratory flow recordings. The subject who had left his job was given a diagnosis of carmine-induced OA. The prevalence of sensitization and OA caused by carmine was 41.6% and 8.3%, respectively. When the 3 workers who had left their jobs were included, the cumulative incidence of sensitization and OA was 48.1% and 18.5%, resembling the healthy worker effect. Prevention programs to establish the permissible levels of airborne allergen should be implemented.

  18. Health Service Utilization and Poor Health Reporting in Asthma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Joshua G; Diaz, Rafael; Akpinar-Elci, Muge

    2016-06-30

    The management and treatment of adult asthma has been associated with utilization of health services. First, to investigate the likelihood of health service utilization, including primary care, emergency department, and hospital stays, among persons diagnosed with an asthma condition relative to those that do not have an asthma condition. Second, to examine the likelihood of poor physical health among asthma respondents relative to those that do not have an asthma condition. Third, to demonstrate that these relationships vary with frequency of utilization. Fourth, to discuss the magnitude of differences in frequent utilization between asthma and non-asthma respondents. Data is derived from a random, stratified sampling of Hampton Roads adults, 18 years and older (n = 1678). Study participants are interviewed to identify asthma diagnosis, access to primary care, frequency of emergency department utilization, hospital admissions, and days of poor physical health. Odds-ratios establish relationships with the covariates on the outcome variable. Those with asthma are found more likely (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.05-2.15) to report poor physical health relative to non-asthma study participants. Further, asthma respondents are found more likely (OR 4.23, 95% CI 1.56-11.69) to frequently utilize primary care that may be associated with the management of the condition and are also more likely to utilize treatment services, such as the emergency department (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.32-2.65) and hospitalization (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.39-3.50), associated with acute and episodic care. Further, it is a novel finding that these likelihoods increase with frequency of utilization for emergency department visits and hospital stays. Continuity in care and better management of the diseases may result in less demand for emergency department services and hospitalization. Health care systems need to recognize that asthma patients are increasingly more likely to be characterized as frequent utilizers of

  19. The proportion of asthma and patterns of asthma medications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The proportion of asthma and patterns of asthma medications prescriptions among adult patients in the chest, accident and emergency units of a tertiary health care ... Methods: A retrospective chart review at Mulago Hospital chest clinic and A&E department from January 1st 2009 to December 31st 2009 was performed.

  20. Assessment of asthma control using asthma control test in chest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean duration of asthma was 8 years with an interquartile range of 4 and 18 years. Forty-three participants (17.7%) were not under any controller medication while the mean ACT score was 19.3 ± 4.6. Independent associations were found between inadequately controlled asthma and female gender (OR 1.91; 95% CI ...

  1. The poorly explored impact of uncontrolled asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Byrne, Paul M; Pedersen, Søren; Schatz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The goal of asthma management is to achieve disease control; however, despite the availability of effective and safe medications, for many patients asthma remains uncontrolled. One reason for this is the fear of long-term side effects from the regular use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs). Advers...... in the pregnancies of women with asthma. The maintenance of asthma control has significant advantages to patients and greatly outweighs the potential risks of treatment side effects....... effects of poorly controlled asthma (for example, obesity, pneumonia, and risks to the fetus) can be perceived as side effects of ICSs. Poorly controlled asthma adversely affects children's cardiovascular fitness, while children with well-controlled asthma perform at the same level as their peers....... Children with uncontrolled asthma also have a higher frequency of obesity than children with controlled asthma. Stress can affect asthma control, and children with poorly controlled asthma are more likely to have learning disabilities compared with those with good control. In adults, focused attention...

  2. Bilateral internal laryngoceles mimicking asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif A Aksoy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngocele is an air-filled, abnormal dilation of the laryngeal saccule that extends upward within the false vocal fold, in communication with the laryngeal lumen. A case of 43-year-old male with bilateral internal laryngoceles, who has been treated as asthma for 4 years, is presented. The patient had dyspnea, cough, and excessive phlegm for a month and a late onset stridor. Flexible nasopharyngolaryngoscopy showed bilateral cystic enlargements of the false vocal folds and true vocal folds could not be visualized. Laryngeal CT without contrast enhancement showed bilateral internal laryngoceles. Submucosal total excision of bilateral cystic masses including parts of false vocal folds was performed. The symptoms resolved immediately after surgery. Although the incidence of internal laryngocele is rare, it should be remembered in the differential diagnosis of upper airway problems and diagnostic flexible nasopharnygolaryngoscopy is routinely indicated for airway evaluation in at-risk patients.

  3. Early menarche is associated with increased risk of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lieberoth, Sofie; Gade, Elisabeth; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To examine the association between early menarche and risk of post-menarcheal asthma. METHODS: Using data from two multidisciplinary questionnaire surveys, conducted eight years apart, we prospectively studied 10,648 female twins, 12-41 years of age, from the nationwide Danish Twin Registry....... Early menarche was defined as menarche before 12 years of age. We performed a cohort analysis and a co-twin control analysis including twin pairs discordant for incident asthma. RESULTS: Early menarche was observed in 9.3% of the individuals. The eight-year cumulative incidence of asthma was higher...... in girls with early menarche compared to girls without early menarche (7.4 vs. 4.5%), OR = 1.71 (1.31-2.22), p asthma was increased by 8% (1-15%), p = 0...

  4. Prematurity and prescription asthma medication from childhood to young adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Anne Louise; Hansen, Bo Moelholm; Mathiasen, Rene

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preterm birth is associated with increased risk of asthma-like symptoms and purchase of prescription asthma medication in childhood. We investigated whether this association persists into adulthood and whether it is affected by accounting for neonatal respiratory morbidity (acute...... respiratory disease and bronchopulmonary dysplasia). METHODS: A national cohort of all infants born in Denmark in the period 1980-2009 was included in this register study. Data on purchase of asthma medication (combination of inhaled β-2 agonists and other drugs for obstructive airway disease) in 2010......-2011 were obtained from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Associations between gestational age (GA), neonatal respiratory morbidity and a cross-sectional evaluation of asthma medication purchase were explored by multivariate logistic regressions. RESULTS: A full dataset was obtained on 1...

  5. Evidence for a pleiotropic QTL on chromosome 5q13 influencing both time to asthma onset and asthma score in French EGEA families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Ulgen, Ayse; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Siroux, Valérie; Lathrop, Mark; Kauffmann, Francine; Pin, Isabelle; Demenais, Florence

    2007-07-01

    Although many genome screens have been conducted for asthma as a binary trait, there is limited information regarding the genetic factors underlying variation of asthma expression. Phenotypes related to variable disease expression include time to asthma onset and variation in clinical expression as measured by an asthma score built from EGEA data. A recent genome scan conducted for this score led to detection of a new region (18p11) not revealed by analysis of dichotomous asthma. Our goal was to characterize chromosomal regions harboring genes underlying time to asthma onset and to search for pleiotropic QTL influencing both time to asthma onset and the asthma score. We conducted a genome-wide linkage screen for time to asthma onset, modeled by martingale residuals from Cox survival model, in EGEA families with at least two asthmatic sibs. This was followed by a bivariate linkage scan of these residuals and asthma score. Univariate linkage analysis was performed using the Maximum Likelihood Binomial method that we extended to bivariate analysis. This screen revealed two regions potentially linked to time to asthma onset, 1p31 (LOD = 1.70, P = 0.003) and 5q13 (LOD = 1.87, P = 0.002). Bivariate linkage analysis led to a substantial improvement of the linkage signal on 5q13 (P = 0.00007), providing evidence for a pleiotropic QTL influencing both variation of time to asthma onset and of clinical expression. Use of quantitative phenotypes of variable disease expression and suitable statistical methodology can improve the power to detect new regions harboring genes which may play an important role in onset and course of disease.

  6. Current issues on sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy in children with asthma and allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Zorica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1993 the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology was the first official organization to recognize that sublingual administration could be “promising route” for allergic desensitization. A few years later, the World Health Organization recommended this therapy as “a viable alternative to the injection route in adults.” The first meta-analysis showed sublingual allergen specific immunotherapy (SLIT effectiveness for allergic rhinitis and another study showed SLIT can actually help prevent the development of asthma both in adults and in children. The main goal of this review article is to present insight into the most up-to-date understanding of the clinical efficacy and safety of immunotherapy in the treatment of pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma. A literature review was performed on PubMed from 1990 to 2015 using the terms “asthma,” “allergic rhinitis,” “children,” “allergen specific immune therapy.” Evaluating data from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials (DB-PC-RCTs, the clinical efficacy (assessed as the reduction of symptom score and the need of rescue medicament of SLIT for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma, has been confirmed in various meta-analysis Outcomes such as rhinoconjunctivitis score and medication scores, combined scores, quality of life, days with severe symptoms, immunological endpoints, and safety parameters were all improved in the SLIT-tablet compared with placebo group. SLIT safety has been already proven in many DB-PC-RCTs and real-life settings. In accordance with all of the above mentioned, the goals for future trials and studies are the development of comprehensive guidelines for clinical practice on immunotherapy, embracing all the different potential participants. The importance of allergen immunotherapy is of special relevance in the pediatric age, when the plasticity and modulability of the immune system are maximal, and when

  7. The effects of acculturation on asthma burden in a community sample of Mexican American schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Molly A; Shalowitz, Madeleine U; Mijanovich, Tod; Clark-Kauffman, Elizabeth; Perez, Elizabeth; Berry, Carolyn A

    2007-07-01

    We sought to determine whether low acculturation among Mexican American caregivers protects their children against asthma. Data were obtained from an observational study of urban pediatric asthma. Dependent variables were children's diagnosed asthma and total (diagnosed plus possible) asthma. Regression models were controlled for caregivers' level of acculturation, education, marital status, depression, life stress, and social support and children's insurance. Caregivers' level of acculturation was associated with children's diagnosed asthma (P = .025) and total asthma (P = .078) in bivariate analyses. In multivariate models, protective effects of caregivers' level of acculturation were mediated by the other covariates. Independent predictors of increased diagnosed asthma included caregivers' life stress (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12, P= .005) and children's insurance, both public (OR = 4.71, P= .009) and private (OR = 2.87, P= .071). Only caregiver's life stress predicted increased total asthma (OR = 1.21, P= .001). The protective effect of caregivers' level of acculturation on diagnosed and total asthma for Mexican American children was mediated by social factors, especially caregivers' life stress. Among acculturation measures, foreign birth was more predictive of disease status than was language use or years in country. Increased acculturation among immigrant groups does not appear to lead to greater asthma risk.

  8. What is new since the last (1999) Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, L P; Bai, T R; Becker, A; Bérubé, D; Beveridge, R; Bowie, D M; Chapman, K R; Côté, J; Cockcroft, D; Ducharme, F M; Ernst, P; FitzGerald, J M; Kovesi, T; Hodder, R V; O'Byrne, P; Rowe, B; Sears, M R; Simons, F E; Spier, S

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present document is to review the impact of new information on the recommendations made in the last (1999) Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines. It includes relevant published studies and observations or comments regarding what are considered to be the main issues in asthma management in children and adults in office, emergency department, hospital and clinical settings. Asthma is still insufficiently controlled in a large number of patients, and practice guidelines need to be integrated better with current care. This report re-emphasises the need for the following: objective measures of airflow obstruction to confirm the diagnosis of asthma suggested by the clinical evaluation; identification of contributing factors; and the establishment of a treatment plan to rapidly obtain and maintain optimal asthma control according to specific criteria. Recent publications support the essential role of asthma education and environmental control in asthma management. They further support the role of inhaled corticosteroids as the mainstay of anti-inflammatory therapy of asthma, and of both long acting beta2-agonists and leukotriene antagonists as effective means to improve asthma control when inhaled corticosteroids are insufficient. New developments, such as combination therapy, and recent major trials, such as the Children's Asthma Management Project (CAMP) study, are discussed.

  9. What Is New Since the Last (1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe Boulet

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present document is to review the impact of new information on the recommendations made in the last (1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines. It includes relevant published studies and observations or comments regarding what are considered to be the main issues in asthma management in children and adults in office, emergency department, hospital and clinical settings. Asthma is still insufficiently controlled in a large number of patients, and practice guidelines need to be integrated better with current care. This report re-emphasises the need for the following: objective measures of airflow obstruction to confirm the diagnosis of asthma suggested by the clinical evaluation; identification of contributing factors; and the establishment of a treatment plan to rapidly obtain and maintain optimal asthma control according to specific criteria. Recent publications support the essential role of asthma education and environmental control in asthma management. They further support the role of inhaled corticosteroids as the mainstay of anti-inflammatory therapy of asthma, and of both long acting beta2-agonists and leukotriene antagonists as effective means to improve asthma control when inhaled corticosteroids are insufficient. New developments, such as combination therapy, and recent major trials, such as the Children’s Asthma Management Project (CAMP study, are discussed.

  10. [Psychological stress and quality of life in patients with persistent asthma in Manzanillo, Cuba].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Rodríguez, María; Rodríguez Sánchez, Pedro Manuel; Brocard Arencibia, Ileana; Menéndez Porto, Lourdes

    2014-07-30

    Psychological stress is part of people's lives and can sometimes contribute to exacerbation of allergic diseases such as asthma. Asthma is prevalent in all age groups. Acute asthma attacks can be triggered by stress, thus impacting control of the disease and overall quality of life in these patients. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the presence of psychological stress as a trigger in poorly controlled asthma patients and its implications in their quality of life. A descriptive study was conducted in the city of Manzanillo, Cuba, in the course of one year, from January to December, 2010, which included 33 patients with persistent asthma. They were grouped according to severity as suffering from moderate or severe asthma, and all of them met the criteria for poorly controlled disease. They were surveyed to gather data about family and personal history of atopy, age of first asthma crisis, and environmental as well as other factors. Two surveys were used: a list of indicators of vulnerability to stress and the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). Most patients with poorly controlled asthma were in their forties. Female patients were more frequently affected than men were (28 females or 84.8%, and 5 males or 15.1%), and most patients had a family history of atopic disease. Almost all patients had high vulnerability to stress as well as low overall quality of life in all the areas surveyed. Psychological counseling is advised for asthma patients in order to reduce their stress levels.

  11. Asthma Disparity Photovoice: The Discourses of Black Adolescent and Public Health Policymakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Agnew, Robin Andrew

    2018-03-01

    Policies in U.S. public schools that address asthma management for Black adolescents may not sufficiently transform sociocultural determinants of disparities. A critical analysis of public health policy maker and adolescent discourses on asthma management using an ecological framework could inform policy development. This study describes the discourses of asthma management disparities of school and other public health policymakers and Black adolescents with asthma during a statewide asthma planning activity. I conducted a qualitative critical discourse analysis on transcripts and phototexts from a photovoice project with Black adolescents with asthma (n = 19), an asthma-planning meeting with school and public health policymakers (n = 12), and an observation of a photovoice dissemination event that included the same adolescents and policymakers. Policymakers did not discuss sociocultural discourses concerning asthma management disparities such as racism and discrimination, but the adolescents did. The only shared discourses between adolescents and policymakers were on the management of indoor environments, health care quality, inadequate housing, and outdoor air pollution. Including Black adolescents in policymaking activities concerning asthma management disparities furthers the identification of differing and shared discourses. School policies should include multilevel strategies that address structural inequities. Photovoice presents an opportunity for including the voice of marginalized youth in policy-planning processes.

  12. Overweight/obesity and risk of seasonal asthma exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Michael; Zeiger, Robert S; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Wansu; Yang, Su-Jau; Camargo, Carlos A

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for asthma exacerbations, but whether this risk is related to the season of exacerbation is not known. To determine the relationship of increased body mass index (BMI) to the season of asthma exacerbation. Study subjects were adult (aged 18-65 years) and children (aged 5-17 years) health plan members with persistent asthma in 2008 for whom a BMI measurement was available. BMI categories were normal (fall, or winter of 2009. The cohort included 17,316 adults and 10,700 children. There was a significant (P children with exacerbations during fall and winter. Relationships of overweight or obesity (vs normal weight) to fall and winter exacerbations remained significant in both adults and children after adjustment for sex and education. In a generalized estimating equation model, both BMI status and season (spring, fall, and winter) were related to exacerbations. Moreover, we noted a significant interaction in adults (P = .03) but not children (P = .97) of the BMI-exacerbation association by season (fall-winter vs spring-summer). Higher BMI values increased the risk for asthma exacerbations in adults and children with persistent asthma, particularly for fall-winter exacerbations in adults. Potential mechanisms for these findings, including vitamin D status, viral infections, and corticosteroid responsiveness, merit further study. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Does rhinitis lead to asthma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cauwenberge, Paul; Watelet, Jean-Baptiste; van Zele, Thibaut; Wang, De-Yun; Toskala, Elina; Durham, Stephen; Fokkens, Wytske; Lau, Susanne; Leynaert, Benedicte; Wickman, Magnus; Salapatas, Marianella; Burney, Peter; Mullol, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    Rhinitis and asthma are commonly linked even if the precise pathological mechanisms explaining the relationship are not fully understood. Although there is increasing evidence that rhinitis may influence the development of asthma, there remain many gaps in our understanding of the processes

  14. Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, it has been recognized that asthma is not a single disease, but comprises several clinical syndromes, which all share respiratory symptoms and lung function abnormalities, associated with different types of airway inflammation. These syndromes are now known as different asthma

  15. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  16. The Saudi Initiative for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Moamary Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA provides up-to-date guidelines for healthcare workers managing patients with asthma. SINA was developed by a panel of Saudi experts with respectable academic backgrounds and long-standing experience in the field. SINA is founded on the latest available evidence, local literature, and knowledge of the current setting in Saudi Arabia. Emphasis is placed on understanding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, medications, and clinical presentation. SINA elaborates on the development of patient-doctor partnership, self-management, and control of precipitating factors. Approaches to asthma treatment in SINA are based on disease control by the utilization of Asthma Control Test for the initiation and adjustment of asthma treatment. This guideline is established for the treatment of asthma in both children and adults, with special attention to children 5 years and younger. It is expected that the implementation of these guidelines for treating asthma will lead to better asthma control and decrease patient utilization of the health care system.

  17. Arginine homeostasis in allergic asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarsingh, Harm; Zaagsma, Johan; Meurs, Herman

    2008-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic disease characterized by early and late asthmatic reactions, airway hyperresponsiveness, airway inflammation and airway remodelling. Changes in L-arginine homeostasis may contribute to all these features of asthma by decreased nitric oxide (NO) production and increased

  18. Asthma in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønnberg, A S; Skov, L; Skytthe, A

    2015-01-01

    We read with interest the report by Fang and colleagues of the relationship between psoriasis and asthma in a large retrospective case-control study from Taiwan [1]. The study found a 1.38-fold increased risk of asthma among patients with psoriasis, and with an increasing risk according to higher...

  19. [Oral testing for sulfite asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, H; Kirsten, D; Jörres, R A; Magnussen, H

    1996-06-01

    Patients with asthma may develop bronchoconstriction after ingestion of sulfites. We studied the sensitivity and specificity of an oral provocation challenge with metabisulfite to detect a sulfite-sensitive asthma. We performed an oral dose-response metabisulfite challenge in 44 patients with a history of sulfite-sensitive asthma, 27 patients with asthma but without a history of sulfite sensitivity, and 8 control subjects without asthma. Metabisulfite was administered in capsules in a single-blind manner. Airway response was assessed by FEV decline, measured 30' after each dose. Thirty-nine percent of patients with a history of sulfite-sensitive asthma demonstrated a significant bronchoconstriction after ingestion of metabisulfite, whereas patients without an appropriate history and control subjects did not respond to the challenge. The oral metabisulfite challenge exhibits a high specificity (100%) but low sensitivity of about 40%. Nonetheless, taking into account the uncertainties in the patients' history of sulfite-sensitive asthma, the oral metabisulfite challenge as performed by us is a useful method for the diagnosis of sulfite sensitive asthma.

  20. Asthma in elite athletes: how do we manage asthma-like symptoms and asthma in elite athletes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Thomas Kromann

    2009-01-01

    . Elite athletes with physician-diagnosed asthma seem to have less airway reactivity and fewer sputum eosinophils than non-athletes with physician-diagnosed asthma, but more studies are needed to further investigate if and how the asthma phenotype of elite athletes differs from that of classical asthma....

  1. A community study of factors related to poorly controlled asthma among Brazilian urban children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia de Magalhães Simões

    Full Text Available Asthma constitutes a serious public health problem in many regions of the world, including the city of Salvador, State of Bahia-Brazil. The purpose of this study was to analyse the factors associated with poor asthma control.Two definitions were used for asthma: 1 wheezing in the last 12 months; 2 wheezing in the last 12 months plus other asthma symptoms or asthma diagnosis ever. The definition of poorly controlled asthma was: at least one reported hospitalisation due to asthma and/or high frequency of symptoms, in the last year. Children with poorly controlled asthma (N = 187/374 were compared with wheezing children with controlled asthma regarding age, gender, atopy, parental asthma, rhinitis, eczema, exposure to second hand tobacco smoke, presence of moulds, pets and pests in the house, helminth infections and body mass index. Crude and logistic regression adjusted odds ratios were used as measures of association. There was a higher proportion of poorly controlled asthma among children with eczema (OR = 1.55; 95% CI 1.02; 2.37. The strength of the association was greater among children with eczema and rhinitis (42.6%, 53.4% and 57.7%, respectively, in children who had no rhinitis nor eczema, had only one of those, and had both (p = 0.02 for trend test. The presence of mould in the houses was inversely associated with poorly controlled asthma (OR = 0.54; 95% CI 0.34; 0.87.Our results indicate an association between eczema and poor asthma control in this environment, but emphasize the role of various other individual and environmental factors as determinants of poor control.

  2. A new measure to assess asthma's effect on quality of life from the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sandra R; Mulligan, Michael J; Ayala, Estela; Chausow, Alan; Huang, Qiwen; Knowles, Sarah B; Gummidipundi, Santosh; Castro, Mario; Wise, Robert A

    2018-03-01

    The Asthma Impact on Quality of Life Scale (A-IQOLS) assesses the negative effect of asthma on quality of life (QoL) from the patient's perspective by using dimensions of Flanagan's Quality of Life Scale (QOLS), a measure of current QoL. We sought to determine and compare the psychometric properties of the A-IQOLS and QOLS, including their sensitivities to differences and change in asthma status. In a test-retest design (3- to 5-week interval) adults with persistent asthma underwent spirometry and were administered the A-IQOLS, other asthma outcome measures (Asthma Control Test, Asthma Symptom Utility Index, and the Marks and Juniper Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaires), and the QOLS. Participants' (n = 147) mean age was 49 years, 76% were white, 12% were Hispanic, and 65% were female. A-IQOLS and QOLS scores were significantly correlated with other asthma outcomes scores, except FEV 1 , but shared relatively low common variance with these measures. A-IQOLS but not QOLS score changes were significantly correlated with changes in asthma outcomes. An A-IQOLS standard error of measurement of 0.27 implies that a within-person score change of ±0.73 or greater constitutes a true change. The QOLS standard error of measurement was 0.43. A-IQOLS provides a reliable, valid, and unique assessment of the patient-perceived negative effect of asthma on QoL that is suitable for use in asthma clinical research and potentially in clinical care. Further studies are needed in diverse patient populations. QOLS, a measure of current QoL, is less sensitive to disease status changes but might be useful in characterizing study populations, in treatment adherence research, and as a clinical and research tool in patients with multiple, severe, and/or life-limiting chronic conditions. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Z; Hansen, A V; Ulrik, C S

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is common among pregnant women, and the incidence of asthma exacerbations during pregnancy is high. This literature review provides an overview of the impact of exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy on pregnancy-related complications. The majority of published retrospective studies reveal...... that asthma exacerbations during pregnancy increase the risk of pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, placental abruption and placenta praevia. Furthermore, these women also have higher risk for breech presentation, haemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, caesarean delivery, maternal admission to the intensive care...... to these outcomes. In conclusion, asthma exacerbations during pregnancy are associated with complications of pregnancy, labour and delivery. Prevention of exacerbations is essential to reduce the risk of complications and poor outcome....

  4. Influence of asthma definition on the asthma-obesity relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetlin Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies suggest an association between obesity and asthma in adults and children. Asthma diagnosis criteria are different among studies. The aim of this study was to test the influence of asthma definition on the asthma-obesity relationship. Methods In a cross-sectional analysis of 1922 men and women, subjects completed a translated questionnaire from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey and underwent spirometry and a bronchial challenge test. Weight, height and waist circumference were measured. Multiple logistic regression analysis was carried out to assess the association of variables related to obesity and asthma. Asthma was defined either by the presence of symptoms with bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR or by a self-report of a physician-made diagnosis. The following variables were separately tested for associations with asthma: socioeconomic characteristics, schooling, physical activity, smoking status, anthropometry and spirometry. Results No association was detected between asthma confirmed by BHR and obesity indicators, odds ratio (OR = 1.08 (95% confidence interval: 0.69 - 1.68 for obesity assessed by body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2; OR = 1.02 (0.74 - 1.40 for obesity assessed by abnormal waist-to-height ratio; and, OR = 0.96 (0.69 - 1.33 for abnormal waist circumference. On the contrary, a previous diagnosis of asthma was associated with obesity, OR = 1.48 (1.01 - 2.16 for body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2; OR = 1.48 (1.13 - 1.93 for abnormal waist-to-height ratio; and, OR = 1.32 (1.00 – 1.75 for abnormal waist circumference. Female gender, schooling ≥ 12 years and smoking were associated with BHR-confirmed asthma. Physically inactive subjects were associated with a previous diagnosis of asthma. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the relationship between asthma and obesity in epidemiological studies depends on the definition adopted. Certain components of asthma, for instance, symptoms

  5. Psychosocial factors and incident asthma hospital admissions in the EPIC-Norfolk cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, N W J; Surtees, P G; Wareham, N J; Harrison, B D W

    2007-05-01

    Case series and case-control studies have shown high rates of psychosocial and behavioural risk factors amongst patients admitted to hospital with severe asthma. General population studies have shown associations between psychosocial factors and prevalent asthma but few have investigated incident asthma outcomes. Data on psychosocial factors and asthma hospital admissions were available for 20 854 participants, aged 41-80 years, in the Norfolk cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer study. Postal assessments included details of physical functioning, mood disorder history, social adversity and social support. A total of 686 asthma hospital admissions were recorded. Psychosocial factors present at baseline, including current mood disorders, adverse circumstances in childhood, the impact of life events experienced during adulthood and negative perceived support from a close confidant, were associated with increased rates of hospital admission independent of age, sex, indicators of socio-economic status, physical functional health, and obesity. Restricted to those participants who reported lifetime doctor-diagnosed asthma at baseline, the reported impact of adverse life events experienced in adulthood, and both confiding and negative aspects of support quality, were associated with asthma hospital admission. The magnitude of these associations was comparable to those involving indicators of socio-economic status and physical health. These results show that psychosocial factors are associated with incident asthma hospital admissions and highlight the potential importance of taking account of psychosocial factors, including availability and quality of support networks, in guiding long-term asthma management.

  6. Rural and urban children with asthma: are school health services meeting their needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillemeier, Marianne M; Gusic, Maryellen E; Bai, Yu

    2006-09-01

    Children with asthma spend a large portion of their day in school, and the extent to which public schools are prepared to meet their health needs is an important issue. The objective of this study was to identify asthma policies and practices in rural and urban school settings and to compare them with current National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute recommendations. A stratified random sample of school nurses who represented each of the 500 active Pennsylvania school districts were surveyed in 2004 concerning nurse staffing patterns, availability of asthma monitoring and treatment-related equipment, emergency preparedness, availability of asthma-related support and case management services, school-specific procedures including identification of children with asthma and accessibility of inhaler medication during school hours, presence and content of written asthma management plans, and perceived obstacles to asthma management in the school setting. Sampling weights were incorporated into the analyses to take the survey design into account. The overall response rate was 76%, with a total of 757 surveys analyzed. In more than half of secondary schools and three quarters of elementary schools, nurses were present asthma attack were not always available. In 72% of rural schools, children were allowed to self-carry rescue inhalers, as compared with 47% of urban schools. Asthma management plans were on file for only 1 quarter of children with asthma, and important information often was omitted. Approximately half of the schools were equipped with peak flow meters and nebulizers, and spacers were available in 1 third of schools. Improvements are needed to bring schools into compliance with current recommendations, including more consistent availability of knowledgeable staff, improved access to asthma monitoring and treatment-related equipment, more universal use of asthma management plans, and greater access to inhalers while at school, including increasing the

  7. Exclusive breastfeeding reduces asthma in a group of children from the Caguas municipality of Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Jessica; Fernández, Mariola; García Fragoso, Lourdes

    2010-01-01

    Breast-feeding is the preferred method of infant nutrition. Its role in preventing childhood asthma is controversial. Determine whether breastfeeding protects against the development of bronchial asthma in children. A survey was answered by parents of children less than 18 years of age attending a Pediatric clinic at Cidra, Puerto Rico from July to December 2008. A group of 175 mothers were included in the study. The mean age was 28 years (range 14-50). The mean age of the children was 5 years. There was family history of asthma in 64% of the families. The prevalence of asthma in these children was 50%. Sixty-six percent of the mother's breastfed but only 27% did it exclusively. Children who were exclusively breastfed had a lower prevalence of asthma and milk protein allergy. This study correlates with literature reports linking exclusive breastfeeding to a reduction in asthma and other allergic diseases.

  8. Fungal Exposure and Asthma: IgE and Non-IgE-Mediated Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Reponen, Tiina; Hershey, Gurjit K Khurana

    2016-11-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous in indoor and outdoor environments and have been associated with respiratory disease including childhood and adult asthma. A growing body of evidence from human and animal studies has revealed a link between fungal exposure, especially indoor fungal exposure, with asthma initiation, persistence, and exacerbation. Despite the overwhelming evidence linking mold exposure and asthma, the mechanistic basis for the association has remained elusive. It is now clear that fungi need not be intact to impart negative health effects. Fungal components and fungal fragments are biologically active and contribute to asthma development and severity. Recent mechanistic studies have demonstrated that fungi are potent immunomodulators and have powerful effects on asthma independent of their potential to act as antigens. This paper will review the connection between fungal exposure and asthma with a focus on the immunological mechanisms underlying this relationship.

  9. Asthma in Urban Children: Epidemiology, Environmental Risk Factors, and the Public Health Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Ki Lee; Matsui, Elizabeth; Sharma, Hemant

    2016-04-01

    Asthma is the most commonly reported chronic condition of childhood in developed countries, with 6.5 million children affected in the USA. A disparate burden of childhood asthma is seen among socioeconomically disadvantaged youth, often concentrated in urban areas with high poverty rates. Host factors that predispose a child to asthma include atopy, male gender, parental history of asthma, and also race, ethnicity, and genetic and epigenetic susceptibilities. Environmental factors, such as improved hygiene, ambient air pollution, and early life exposures to microbes and aeroallergens, also influence the development of asthma. With greater than 90% of time spent indoors, home exposures (such as cockroach, rodent, and indoor air pollution) are highly relevant for urban asthma. Morbidity reduction may require focused public health initiatives for environmental intervention in high priority risk groups and the addition of immune modulatory agents in children with poorly controlled disease.

  10. Use of Antibiotics during pregnancy increases the risk of Asthma in early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Simonsen, Jacob; Jensen, Signe Marie

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the hypothesis that mother's use of antibiotics in pregnancy could influence asthma and eczema in early life. STUDY DESIGN: Subjects were included from the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood cohort of children born of mothers with asthma (N = 411). Severe...... verified eczema. All children were followed to age 5 years in a cohort study design. RESULTS: The Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood data showed increased risk of asthma exacerbation (hazard ratio 1.98 [95% CI 1.08-3.63]) if mothers had used antibiotics during third trimester. The Danish...... National Birth Cohort confirmed increased risk of asthma hospitalization (hazard ratio 1.17 [1.00-1.36]), and inhaled corticosteroids (1.18 [1.10-1.27]) in the children if mothers used antibiotics any time during pregnancy. In the subgroup of mothers using antibiotics for nonrespiratory infection...

  11. Leveraging gene-environment interactions and endotypes for asthma gene discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Ober, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome that includes subtypes of disease with different underlying causes and disease mechanisms. Asthma is caused by a complex interaction between genes and environmental exposures; early-life exposures in particular play an important role. Asthma is also...... heritable, and a number of susceptibility variants have been discovered in genome-wide association studies, although the known risk alleles explain only a small proportion of the heritability. In this review, we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that focusing on more specific asthma phenotypes......, such as childhood asthma with severe exacerbations, and on relevant exposures that are involved in gene-environment interactions (GEIs), such as rhinovirus infections, will improve detection of asthma genes and our understanding of the underlying mechanisms. We will discuss the challenges of considering GEIs...

  12. [Physical exercise and bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endre, László

    2016-06-26

    An article was published in the Lancet in 1935 about the therapy of asthmatic patients, using a special breathing exercise (the authors used a control group, too). Swimming, as a complementary therapy for asthmatic children, was first recommended in 1968, by authors from the United States. In Hungary, regular swimming training for asthmatic children is in use since August, 1981. As the result of this exercise, the physical fitness of asthmatic children (using this method regularly for years) increased dramatically, and it is much better compared to that found in the non asthmatic, non swimming children of the same age group. The requirement for asthma medication decreased, and the severity of their disease significantly decreased, also. On the other hand, asthma is not a rarity even among elite athletes. It is most frequent in the endurance sports (for example in Northern Europe among cross-country skiers its prevalence is between 14-54%, among long distance runners 15-24%, and among swimmers 13-44%). The possible reason is related to the fact that elite athletes inspire 200 liter air/minute (mostly through the mouth). Air pollution and allergens can penetrate in the lower respiratory tract. The air causes cooling and drying of the mucosa of the airways and, as a consequence, mediators are liberated which produce oedema of the mucosa, and bronchoconstriction. Beta-2-receptor agonists inhalation can prevent (or decrease significantly) this phenomenon. These agents are used regularly by elite athletes, too. The non-medical possibilities for prevention include wearing a special mask, frequent ventilation of the swimming pool's air, consumption of omega-3-fatty acid, and inhalation of dry salt (very small, and very clear sodiumchloride particles).

  13. Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search English Español Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma? KidsHealth / For Parents / Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma? Print Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma? Yes. Weather conditions can bring on asthma symptoms. ...

  14. Handling an Asthma Flare-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español Handling an Asthma Flare-Up KidsHealth / For Kids / Handling an Asthma Flare-Up ... controlar las crisis asmáticas What's an Asthma Flare-Up? If you have asthma , you probably know about ...

  15. Childhood asthma | Levin | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... seasonal variation in symptoms. Asthma is on the increase in both developed and developing countries, in both rural and urban communities. The first part of this series aims to give a brief overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology and diagnosis of childhood asthma. Keywords: childhood asthma, asthma, paediatric, ...

  16. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to care for people with asthma NACP Grantee Profile Tables and Graphs Asthma Call-back Survey Technical ... Impact on the Nation Fact Sheet State Data Profiles (2011) Work-related Asthma NCHS Asthma FastStats Survey ...

  17. Allergy to house dust mites and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milián, Evelyn; Díaz, Ana María

    2004-03-01

    House dust mites have been shown to be important sources of indoor allergens associated with asthma and other allergic conditions. Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that affects millions of people worldwide, and numerous scientific studies have shown that the prevalence of asthma is increasing. The most common dust mite species around the world include Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp), Dermatophagoides farinae (Df), Euroglyphus maynei (Em) and Blomia tropicalis (Bt). Over the past three decades, many important allergens from these species have been identified and characterized at the molecular level. The biological function of several house dust mite allergens has been elucidated, with many of them showing enzymatic activity. However, Bt allergens remain the least studied, even though this mite is very common in tropical and subtropical regions of the world, including Puerto Rico. Therefore, it is very important to include Bt in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for house dust mite induced allergy and asthma, particularly in areas where Bt exposure and sensitization is high. Recombinant DNA technology, as well as other molecular biology and immunological techniques, have played a fundamental role in advances towards a better understanding of the biology of house dust mites and their role in allergic diseases. This kind of study also contributes to the understanding of the complex immunologic mechanisms involved in allergic reactions. The development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches depends on the continuity of research of house dust mite allergens. The objectives of this review are to describe the most important aspects of house dust mite allergy and to acquaint the scientific community with the latest findings pertaining to house dust mite allergens, particularly those derived from Bt.

  18. Exploring youth and caregiver preferences for asthma education video content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geryk, Lorie L; Arrindell, Courtney C; Sage, Adam J; Blalock, Susan J; Reuland, Daniel S; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Lee, Charles; Sleath, Betsy L; Carpenter, Delesha M

    2016-01-01

    This study examines (1) whether youth and their caregivers have different preferences for asthma education video topics and (2) if education topic preferences vary by youth and caregiver sociodemographic characteristics. Youth (n = 83) ages 7-17 years with persistent asthma and their caregivers were recruited at two pediatric practices in North Carolina. Sociodemographic information and youth and caregiver preferences for nine asthma video education topics were collected during in-person interviews. Bonferroni-corrected Chi-square or McNemar tests (α = 0.0056) were used to compare youth and caregivers differences in topic preferences and topic preferences by youth and caregiver sociodemographic characteristics, including gender, race, ethnicity, and age. Youth were primarily male (52%) and from low-income families (74%; caregiver annual income less than $30,000) and many were Hispanic (45%). Youth and parents expressed the most interest in the following two topics: "how to deal with triggers" (90% and 95%, respectively) and "how to keep asthma under control" (87% and 96%, respectively). Caregivers and children were discordant for two topics: "the difference between a rescue and controller medicine" and "how to [help your child] talk to your [his/her] friends about asthma." No differences were found between youth and caregiver sociodemographic characteristics and video topic preferences. Youth with persistent asthma and their caregivers differed in their asthma education topic preferences, but preferences did not vary by caregiver or youth sociodemographic characteristics. Studies examining the effectiveness of interventions tailored to differences in educational preferences of youth with asthma and their caregivers are needed.

  19. Seasonal Risk Factors for Asthma Exacerbations among Inner City Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teach, Stephen J.; Gergen, Peter J.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Mitchell, Herman E.; Calatroni, Agustin; Wildfire, Jeremy; Bloomberg, Gordon; Kercsmar, Carolyn; Liu, Andrew H.; Makhija, Melanie; Matsui, Elizabeth; Morgan, Wayne; O'Connor, George; Busse, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exacerbations of asthma remain common even in children and adolescents despite optimal medical management. Identification of host risk factors for exacerbations is incomplete, particularly for seasonal episodes. Objective Define host risk factors for asthma exacerbations unique to their season of occurrence. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of patients aged 6-20 years who comprised the control groups of the Asthma Control Evaluation trial and the Inner City Anti-IgE Therapy for Asthma trial. Univariate and multivariate models were constructed to determine if patient demographic and historical factors, allergic sensitization, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, spirometric measurements, asthma control, and treatment requirements were associated with seasonal exacerbations. Results The analysis included 400 patients (54.5% male; 59.0% African American; median age 13 years). Exacerbations occurred in 37.5% of participants over the periods of observation and were most common in the fall (28.8% of participants). In univariate analysis, impaired pulmonary function was significantly associated with greater odds of exacerbations for all seasons, as was an exacerbation in the previous season for all seasons except spring. In multivariate analysis, exacerbation in the previous season was the strongest predictor in fall and winter while a higher requirement for inhaled corticosteroids was the strongest predictor in spring and summer. The multivariate models had the best predictive power for fall exacerbations (30.5% variance attributed). Conclusions Among a large cohort of inner city children with asthma, patient risk factors for exacerbations vary by season. Thus, individual patient information may be beneficial in strategies to prevent these seasonal events. Clinical Implications Inner city children remain at risk for asthma exacerbations despite appropriate therapy. Because their risk factors vary by season, strategies to prevent them may need to differ as

  20. Control of occupational asthma and allergy in the detergent industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlo, Katherine

    2003-05-01

    To provide an overview of how a comprehensive preclinical, clinical, and industrial hygiene program has been successfully used to control allergy and asthma to enzymes used in the detergent industry. The author performed a PubMed and ToxLine search of English-language articles with the keywords enzymes, occupational allergy, occupational asthma, detergent, and detergent industry from January 1, 1995, to January 1, 2002. Scientific meeting abstracts, books, and industry association papers on allergy and asthma in the detergent industry were also reviewed. In addition, the practical experience of one major detergent company was included in the review. All published work on this topic was reviewed, and the work that discussed the key highlights of control of occupational allergy and asthma to enzymes used in the detergent industry was selected for this review. The detergent industry has developed guidelines for the safety assessment of enzymes, control of exposure to enzymes, and medical surveillance of enzyme-exposed workers. Because of these guidelines, occupational allergy and asthma to enzymes used in the detergent industry have become uncommon events. Cases of disease have been documented in some manufacturing sites that have had poor adherence to the guidelines. Those manufacturing sites that have adhered to the guidelines have had few cases of allergy and asthma to enzymes among exposed workers. A review of medical data from these sites has shown that workers who have developed IgE antibody to enzymes can continue to work with enzymes and remain symptom free. Occupational allergy and asthma to enzymes used in the detergent industry have been successfully controlled via the use of preclinical, clinical, and industrial hygiene safety programs designed to minimize sensitization to enzymes and development of disease. The basic principles of these programs can be applied to other industries where occupational allergy and asthma to proteins are common.

  1. Asthma Controller Medication Adherence, Risk of Exacerbation, and Use of Rescue Agents Among Texas Medicaid Patients with Persistent Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhinova, Tatiana; Barner, Jamie C; Richards, Kristin M; Rascati, Karen L

    2015-12-01

    Adherence to asthma long-term controller medications is one of the key drivers to improve asthma management among patients with persistent asthma. While suboptimal use of controller medications has been found to be associated with more frequent use of oral corticosteroids (OCS), few studies exist regarding the relationship between adherence to controller therapy and the use of short-acting beta2-agonists (SABAs). A better understanding of the association between adherence to asthma controller agents and use of reliever medications will help health care providers and decision makers enhance asthma management. To determine if there is a relationship between asthma controller adherence, risk of exacerbation requiring OCS, and use of asthma rescue agents. Texas Medicaid claims data from January 1, 2008, to August 31, 2011, were retrospectively analyzed. Continuously enrolled patients aged 5-63 years with a primary diagnosis of asthma (ICD-9-CM code 493) and with 4 or more prescription claims for any asthma medication in 1 year (persistent asthma) were included. The index date was the date of the first asthma controller prescription, and patients were followed for 1 year. The primary outcome variables were SABA (dichotomous: less than  6 vs. ≥ 6) and OCS (continuous) use. The primary independent variable was adherence (proportion of days covered [PDC]) to asthma long-term controller medications. Covariates included demographics and nonstudy medication utilization. Multivariate logistic and linear regression analyses were employed to address the study objective. The study sample (n = 32,172) was aged 15.0 ± 14.5 years, and adherence to controller therapy was 32.2% ± 19.7%. The mean number of SABA claims was 3.7 ± 3.1, with most patients having 1-5 claims (73.2%), whereas 19.4% had ≥ 6 SABA claims. The mean number of OCS claims was 1.0 ± 1.4. Adherent (PDC ≥ 50%) patients were 96.7% (OR = 1.967; 95% CI = 1.826-2.120) more

  2. Role of a Th2 cytokine inhibitor in asthma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Tamaoki

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The airway wall of asthmatic patients is infiltrated with inflammatory cells, consisting chiefly of eosinophils and T lymphocytes. Among these T lymphocytes, Th2 cells are involved in the regulation of the IgE immune response and local allergic inflammation, which underlie allergic diseases. Various cytokines produced and released by Th2 cells play important roles in the development of many allergic diseases, including asthma, and the exacerbations of their disease states. Therefore, targeting of Th2 cell-derived cytokines is a rational therapeutic strategy for the treatment of asthma. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents can potently inhibit Th2 cytokine-mediated responses, but have no selectivity for Th2 cells: they also exert pharmacological activity against cells other than inflammatory cells, thereby potentially causing adverse side-effects. However, suplatast tosilate is the only specific Th2 cytokine inhibitor that can be used clinically and it has been used widely in Japan as a maintenance drug in the treatment of asthma, atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis. There is considerable evidence of the effectiveness of suplatast tosilate in patients with mild asthma or moderate persistent asthma. Furthermore, an effect on cough variant asthma and a steroid-sparing effect have also been reported for suplatast tosilate.

  3. A systematic review of serious games in asthma education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, David; Monnier, Delphine; Tesnière, Antoine; Hadchouel, Alice

    2017-05-01

    Serious games may be useful tools for asthma education. The objectives of this systematic review were to identify the available articles on serious games designed to educate patients and the general public about asthma and to assess their impact on patient's knowledge, behavior, and clinical outcomes related to asthma. PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, PsychInfo, and Web of Science were systematically searched from January 1980 to December 2015 for studies investigating serious games in asthma education. Two investigators independently assessed studies against inclusion criteria and rated those included on indicators of quality. Investigators extracted data on serious games' content and learning objectives, and on outcomes following Kirkpatrick classification. A total of 12 articles were found to be relevant, describing a total of 10 serious games. All serious games were directed toward children, with eight games for children with asthma and two for school-based intervention. The average Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument score was 13.9 of 18, which is high. Most of the serious games were associated with high rates of satisfaction and improvement in children's knowledge. Seven studies evaluated the impact of serious games on clinical outcomes and found no significant difference relative to control groups. Although serious games designed for asthma education have evolved with advances in technology, results of their evaluation remained similar across studies, with clear improvements in knowledge but little or no change in behaviors and clinical outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Indications for the use of bronchial thermoplasty in severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheda, Keertan; Koegelenberg, Coenraad F N; Esmail, Aliasgar; Irusen, Elvis; Wechsler, Michael E; Niven, Rob M; Chung, Kian Fan; Bateman, Eric D

    2015-09-18

    Approximately 5% of the ~3 million asthmatics in South Africa have severe asthma that is associated with substantial morbidity, cost, absenteeism, preventable mortality, and the requirement for costly chronic medication that may be associated with significant adverse events. There is an unmet need for alternative safer and more effective interventions for severe asthma. A recently introduced option, bronchial thermoplasty (BT), imparts radiofrequency-generated heat energy to the airways to cause regression of airway smooth muscle. The effectiveness of this technique has been confirmed in randomised control trials and is now endorsed by several international guidelines, including the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guideline, the British Asthma Guideline, and the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guideline. We recommend BT as a potential therapeutic intervention for severe uncontrolled asthma, provided that it is performed by an experienced pulmonologist at an accredited centre and done within the broader context of appropriate management of the disease by doctors experienced in treating difficult-to-control asthma.

  5. Diagnosis and management of asthma in older adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chotirmall, Sanjay Haresh

    2009-05-01

    Despite comprehensive guidelines established by the European Global Initiative for Asthma and the U.S. National Asthma Education and Prevention Program on the diagnosis and management of asthma, its mortality in older adults continues to rise. Diagnostic and therapeutic problems contribute to older patients being inadequately treated. The diagnosis of asthma rests on the history and characteristic pulmonary function testing (PFT) with the demonstration of reversible airway obstruction, but there are unique problems in performing this test in older patients and in its interpretation. This review aims to address the difficulties in performing and interpreting PFT in older patients because of the effects of age-related changes in lung function on respiratory physiology. The concept of "airway remodeling" resulting in "fixed obstructive" PFT and the relevance of atopy in older people with asthma are assessed. There are certain therapeutic issues unique to older patients with asthma, including the increased probability of adverse effects in the setting of multiple comorbidities and issues surrounding effective drug delivery. The use of beta 2-agonist, anticholinergic, corticosteroid, and anti-immunoglobulin E treatments are discussed in the context of these therapeutic issues.

  6. Tachykinin receptors antagonism for asthma: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couto Nuno

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tachykinins substance P, neurokinin A and neurokinin B seem to account for asthma pathophysiology by mediating neurogenic inflammation and several aspects of lung mechanics. These neuropeptides act mainly by their receptors NK1, NK2 and NK3, respectively which may be targets for new asthma therapy. Methods This review systematically examines randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of tachykinins receptors antagonism on asthma. Symptoms, airway inflammation, lung function and airway inflammation were considered as outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialized Register of Asthma Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE. The search is as current as June 2010. Quality rating of included studies followed the Cochrane Collaboration and GRADE Profiler approaches. However, data were not pooled together due to different measures among the studies. Results Our systematic review showed the potential of NK receptor antagonist to decrease airway responsiveness and to improve lung function. However, effects on airway inflammation and asthma symptoms were poorly or not described. Conclusion The limited available evidence suggests that tachykinin receptors antagonists may decrease airway responsiveness and improve lung function in patients with asthma. Further large randomized trials are still required.

  7. Medication use in Indian children with asthma: the user's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Charu; Goel, Nitin; Chugh, Krishan; Gaur, Shailendra Nath; Armour, Carol; van Asperen, Peter Paul; Moles, Rebekah Jane; Saini, Bandana

    2013-07-01

    Despite the high prevalence of asthma in children, there has been limited research into patient perception of medication use, particularly in the developing world. This study therefore aimed to carry out an in-depth exploration of the views of carers and children with asthma on asthma medication use. Grounded theory approach was used to conduct semistructured qualitative interviews in a purposive convenience sample of parents and children with asthma. The participants were recruited from two specialty hospitals in New Delhi, India. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Twenty children (7-12 years old) with asthma and their parent or carer were interviewed in July 2011. Major reported issues included poor parent and child understanding of disease and medications. Fears, misinformed beliefs and lack of self-management skills were apparent. Child self-image, resistance to medication use and lack of responsibility in medication taking were themes that emerged from child interviews. This is one of the first research studies exploring the viewpoint of children with asthma about their medications. Resource constraints dictate a pragmatic paternalistic approach by physicians which, in contrast to patients in westernized nations, seems to be acceptable and satisfactory to Indian patients (carers). © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  8. Incident asthma and Mycoplasma pneumoniae: A nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jun-Jun; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies investigating the relationship between Mycoplasma pneumoniae and incident asthma in the general population have been inconclusive. We conducted a nationwide cohort study to clarify this relationship. Using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, we identified 1591 patients with M pneumoniae infection (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code 4830) given diagnoses between 2000 and 2008. We then frequency matched 6364 patients without M pneumoniae infection from the general population according to age, sex, and index year. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to determine the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of the occurrence of asthma in the M pneumoniae cohort compared with that in the non-M pneumoniae cohort. Regardless of comorbidities and the use of antibiotic or steroid therapies, patients with M pneumonia infection had a higher risk of incident asthma than those without it. The aHR of asthma was 3.35 (95% CI, 2.71-4.15) for the M pneumoniae cohort, with a significantly higher risk when patients were stratified by age, sex, follow-up time, and comorbidities, including allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, or allergic conjunctivitis. Patients with M pneumoniae infection had a higher risk of having early-onset (age, incident cases of early-onset and late-onset asthma are closely related to M pneumoniae infection, even in nonatopic patients. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Food Intolerance and childhood asthma: what is the link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausoleil, Janet L; Fiedler, Joel; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2007-01-01

    Food allergies and asthma are increasing worldwide. It is estimated that approximately 8% of children aged children are egg, milk, peanut, soy, fish, shellfish, and tree nuts. Asthma alone as a manifestation of a food allergy is rare and atypical. Less than 5% of patients experience wheezing without cutaneous or gastrointestinal symptoms during a food challenge. In addition to acute respiratory symptoms, a food allergy may also induce airway hyper-responsiveness beyond the initial reaction. This process can occur in patients who do not demonstrate a decrease in lung function during the reaction. Inhalation of aerosolized food particles can cause respiratory symptoms in selected food-allergic individuals, particularly with fish and shellfish during cooking and aerosolization. However, this has not been demonstrated with the smelling of, or casual contact with, peanut butter. Rarely, food additives such as sulfating agents can cause respiratory reactions. This reaction occurs primarily in patients with underlying asthma, particularly in patients with more severe asthma. In contrast, there is no convincing evidence that tartrazine or monosodium glutamate can induce asthma responses. Although food-induced asthma is rare, it is common for patients and clinicians to perceive that food can trigger asthma. Avoidance of specific foods or additives has not been shown to improve asthma, even in patients who may perceive that a particular food worsens their asthma.However, patients with underlying asthma are more likely to experience a fatal or near-fatal food reaction. Food reactions tend to be more severe or life threatening when they involve the respiratory tract. The presence of a food allergy is a risk factor for the future development of asthma, particularly for children with sensitization to egg protein. The diagnosis of a food allergy includes skin or in vitro testing as an initial study when the history suggests food allergy. While negative testing generally rules out

  10. Occupational rhinitis affects occupational asthma severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscato, Gianna; Pala, Gianni; Folletti, Ilenia; Siracusa, Andrea; Quirce, Santiago

    2016-06-16

    The strong interactions between asthma and rhinitis, and the influence of rhinitis in the severity and/or control of asthma, have clearly been demonstrated. Nevertheless, no specific study has been conducted in the occupational setting. The aim of the study was to assess the severity of occupational asthma and rhinitis and evaluate whether rhinitis is a predictor for increased asthma severity. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical charts of 72 patients who received a diagnosis of allergic occupational asthma, with or without associated occupational rhinitis. Our findings suggested that persistent asthma tended to be more common in subjects with associated occupational asthma and rhinitis, and occupational asthma severity was associated with occupational rhinitis severity. Moderate-severe persistent occupational rhinitis is a risk factor for persistent occupational asthma. We demonstrated, for the first time in the occupational setting, a significant association between occupational rhinitis and asthma severity.

  11. Understanding mild persistent asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Szefler, Stanley J

    2005-01-01

    Limitations in asthma prevalence studies and difficulties in diagnosing pediatric asthma lead to uncertainty over the full extent of mild persistent asthma in children and adolescents. Although recent surveys have reported that the majority of pediatric patients with asthma in the United States...... and Europe have symptoms consistent with mild disease, these surveys have limitations in design. Thus, the true prevalence of mild asthma remains unknown. It is unclear whether children with mild persistent asthma progress to more severe asthma, but the risk of severe asthma exacerbations seems...... to be unrelated to the symptom severity. Clinical studies restricted to pediatric patients with mild asthma are limited, but available data do suggest substantial morbidity of mild persistent asthma in this population and support inhaled corticosteroid intervention. There is a need for further investigation...

  12. Phenotypes Determined by Cluster Analysis in Moderate to Severe Bronchial Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youroukova, Vania M; Dimitrova, Denitsa G; Valerieva, Anna D; Lesichkova, Spaska S; Velikova, Tsvetelina V; Ivanova-Todorova, Ekaterina I; Tumangelova-Yuzeir, Kalina D

    2017-06-01

    Bronchial asthma is a heterogeneous disease that includes various subtypes. They may share similar clinical characteristics, but probably have different pathological mechanisms. To identify phenotypes using cluster analysis in moderate to severe bronchial asthma and to compare differences in clinical, physiological, immunological and inflammatory data between the clusters. Forty adult patients with moderate to severe bronchial asthma out of exacerbation were included. All underwent clinical assessment, anthropometric measurements, skin prick testing, standard spirometry and measurement fraction of exhaled nitric oxide. Blood eosinophilic count, serum total IgE and periostin levels were determined. Two-step cluster approach, hierarchical clustering method and k-mean analysis were used for identification of the clusters. We have identified four clusters. Cluster 1 (n=14) - late-onset, non-atopic asthma with impaired lung function, Cluster 2 (n=13) - late-onset, atopic asthma, Cluster 3 (n=6) - late-onset, aspirin sensitivity, eosinophilic asthma, and Cluster 4 (n=7) - early-onset, atopic asthma. Our study is the first in Bulgaria in which cluster analysis is applied to asthmatic patients. We identified four clusters. The variables with greatest force for differentiation in our study were: age of asthma onset, duration of diseases, atopy, smoking, blood eosinophils, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs hypersensitivity, baseline FEV1/FVC and symptoms severity. Our results support the concept of heterogeneity of bronchial asthma and demonstrate that cluster analysis can be an useful tool for phenotyping of disease and personalized approach to the treatment of patients.

  13. Rural Asthma: Current Understanding of Prevalence, Patterns, and Interventions for Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Robin Dawson; Ownby, Dennis R

    2017-06-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic illness of children and adolescents in the USA. While asthma has been understood to disproportionately affect urban dwellers, recent investigations have revealed rural pediatric asthma prevalence to be very similar to urban and to be more closely correlated with socioeconomic and environmental factors than geographic location or population density. Rural children experience factors unique to location that impact asthma development and outcomes, including housing quality, cigarette smoke exposure, and small/large-scale farming. Additionally, there are challenging barriers to appropriate asthma care that frequently are more severe for those living in rural areas, including insurance status, lack of primary care providers and pulmonary specialists, knowledge deficits (both patient and provider), and a lack of culturally tailored asthma interventions. Interventions designed to address rural pediatric asthma disparities are more likely to be successful when targeted to specific challenges, such as the use of school-based services or telemedicine to mitigate asthma care access issues. Continued research on understanding the complex interaction of specific rural environmental factors with host factors can inform future interventions designed to mitigate asthma disparities.

  14. Holy Saturday asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Terence M; Cusack, Ruth; Landers, Sarah; Bredin, Charles Patrick

    2014-03-13

    A 61-year-old man complained of cough and dyspnoea after exposure to colophony-containing solder fumes at work. A histamine challenge test confirmed airway hyper-responsiveness, and colophony-challenge demonstrated a 16.7% drop in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), supporting a diagnosis of colophony-induced occupational asthma. At review, the patient presented with cough, dyspnoea and wheeze that occurred acutely when exposed to the fumes from burning incense during Easter Saturday services, necessitating his departure from the church. Inhalation challenge tests using two blends of incense used at his church (Greek and Vatican) led to identical symptoms and a significant reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s 15 min after exposure and PEFRs up to 48 h after exposure, indicating an early and late phase asthmatic reaction. This is the first report of coexistent colophony and incense-induced asthma. The similarities in chemical structures between abietic acid in colophony and boswellic acid in incense suggest a common mechanism.

  15. Eicosanoids in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Kong-Sang; Wu, Wei-Fong

    2007-01-01

    Eicosanoids belong to a diverse family of bioactive fatty acids that play important roles in regulating airway inflammation and reactivity. They are the key mediators of the pathobiology of asthma. Among the eicosanoids, lipoxins (LXs) were the first agents to be identified and recognized as potential anti-inflammatory endogenous lipid mediators. Lipoxins are biosynthesized in vivo at inflammation sites. They result mainly from the interaction between 5 and 15-lipoxygenases (LOs), which are distinct from leukotrienes (LTs) and prostaglandins (PGs) in structure and function. Leukotrienes are potent proinflammatory mediators and directly and indirectly stimulate fibroblast chemotaxis, proliferation, and collagen synthesis. Prostaglandins have both bronchoconstrictive and bronchoprotective effects and the bronchoconstriction mediated by PGD2 and PGF2alpha is only occurred in asthmatic patients but not in healthy subjects. Lipoxins counter-regulate the proinflammatory actions of LTs and activate resolution of the inflammatory response. At least two classes of receptors, CysLT1 receptors and Asprin-triggered lipoxin A4 (ALX) receptors, can interact with lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and LXA4 analogs to mediate their biologic actions. Allergen challenge initiates airway biosynthesis of LXA4 and increases expression of its receptor. In addition, LXA4 affects the release of interleukin-8 by blood mononuclear cells, and ALX affects calcium influx into epithelial cells. Therefore, the pivotal role of LXs is mediating airway homeostasis, and LXs may be part of a novel, multipronged approach for treating human asthma.

  16. Holy Saturday asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Terence M; Cusack, Ruth; Landers, Sarah; Bredin, Charles Patrick

    2014-01-01

    A 61-year-old man complained of cough and dyspnoea after exposure to colophony-containing solder fumes at work. A histamine challenge test confirmed airway hyper-responsiveness, and colophony-challenge demonstrated a 16.7% drop in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), supporting a diagnosis of colophony-induced occupational asthma. At review, the patient presented with cough, dyspnoea and wheeze that occurred acutely when exposed to the fumes from burning incense during Easter Saturday services, necessitating his departure from the church. Inhalation challenge tests using two blends of incense used at his church (Greek and Vatican) led to identical symptoms and a significant reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s 15 min after exposure and PEFRs up to 48 h after exposure, indicating an early and late phase asthmatic reaction. This is the first report of coexistent colophony and incense-induced asthma. The similarities in chemical structures between abietic acid in colophony and boswellic acid in incense suggest a common mechanism. PMID:24626388

  17. Can geodata be used to determine the distribution of fast food outlets in relation to the prevalence and severity of asthma? A novel methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, A; Asher, M I; Ellwood, P; Ellwood, E

    2016-01-01

    Can the distribution of fast food outlets be obtained and effectively used to identify if there is a relationship between the placement of these and the prevalence and severity of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema (ARE) in children and adolescents? Fast food restaurant location data was obtained for seven countries. Data from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) was used from 53 centres in the same seven countries. Each ISAAC centre provided a detailed map of the study area. The location of restaurants and ISAAC centres were overlaid using the ArcMap software, and the number of restaurants within each ISAAC centre counted. Bivariate regression analysis was used to compare outlet density with ARE prevalence and severity. The results from the analyses showed a positive (non-significant) trend on a regression plot between outlet density and ARE severity. This project has shown that it is practical to systematically obtain and map fast food outlets and compare their distribution worldwide with the prevalence and severity of diseases, in this case ARE. The devised methodology has proven to be an efficient way to obtain restaurant distribution data in a form that is manageable and suitable to compare with area based disease prevalences. This project has shown that a larger scale investigation is both feasible and warranted. Copyright © 2015 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Parent-reported outcomes of a shared decision-making portal in asthma: a practice-based RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiks, Alexander G; Mayne, Stephanie L; Karavite, Dean J; Suh, Andrew; O'Hara, Ryan; Localio, A Russell; Ross, Michelle; Grundmeier, Robert W

    2015-04-01

    Electronic health record (EHR)-linked patient portals are a promising approach to facilitate shared decision-making between families of children with chronic conditions and pediatricians. This study evaluated the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of MyAsthma, an EHR-linked patient portal supporting shared decision-making for pediatric asthma. We conducted a 6-month randomized controlled trial of MyAsthma at 3 primary care practices. Families were randomized to MyAsthma, which tracks families' asthma treatment concerns and goals, children's asthma symptoms, medication side effects and adherence, and provides decision support, or to standard care. Outcomes included the feasibility and acceptability of MyAsthma for families, child health care utilization and asthma control, and the number of days of missed school (child) and work (parent). Descriptive statistics and longitudinal regression models assessed differences in outcomes between study arms. We enrolled 60 families, 30 in each study arm (mean age 8.3 years); 57% of parents in the intervention group used MyAsthma during at least 5 of the 6 study months. Parents of children with moderate to severe persistent asthma used the portal more than others; 92% were satisfied with MyAsthma. Parents reported that use improved their communication with the office, ability to manage asthma, and awareness of the importance of ongoing attention to treatment. Parents in the intervention group reported that children had a lower frequency of asthma flares and intervention parents missed fewer days of work due to asthma. Use of an EHR-linked asthma portal was feasible and acceptable to families and improved clinically meaningful outcomes. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Different oral corticosteroid regimens for acute asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Normansell, R; Kew, KM; Mansour, G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma is a common long-term breathing condition that affects approximately 300 million people worldwide. People with asthma may experience short-term worsening of their asthma symptoms; these episodes are often known as 'exacerbations', 'flare-ups', 'attacks' or 'acute asthma'. Oral steroids, which have a potent anti-inflammatory effect, are recommended for all but the most mild asthma exacerbations; they should be initiated promptly. The most often prescribed oral steroids are p...

  20. Epidemiology of bronchial asthma in school children (10–16 years in Srinagar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uruj Altaf Qureshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the epidemiological profile of asthma in school going children in Srinagar, Kashmir. Study design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Thirty-one schools with proportionate representation from both government and private schools as well as from primary, middle, and high schools. Participants: School children aged 10–16 years with equal representation of sex and all ages. Main Outcome Measure: Prevalence of current and past asthma. Methods and Results: After administering a modified pretested questionnaire, peak expiratory flow measurement was carried. Children who had asthma-like symptoms or positive family history of asthma or physician-labeled asthma were subjected to spirometry and bronchodilator reversibility. Out of 806 children, bronchial asthma was seen in 60 (prevalence of 7.4% which included 34 boys and 26 girls. Majority of asthmatic children (78.3% [n = 47] had probable asthma; 6.7% (n = 4 had definite asthma; and 15% (n = 9 had physician-diagnosed asthma. Majority of children had intermittent asthma (78.3% [n = 47]. Mild persistent asthma was seen in 12.7% (n = 7 and 10% (n = 6 had moderate persistent asthma. None of the children had severe persistent asthma. The prevalence of current asthma was 3.2% (n = 26. On univariate analysis, the factors found to be statistically significant were family history of asthma (odds ratio [OR] =8.174; confidence interval [CI] =4.403–15.178, seasonal cough (OR = 4.266; CI = 2.336–7.791, allergic rhinitis (OR = 2.877; CI = 1.414–5.852, atopic dermatitis (OR = 6.597; CI = 2.72–16.004, and obesity (OR = 6.074; CI = 2.308–18.034. On multivariate analysis, family history, seasonal cough, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and obesity were found to be significant independent risk factors. Conclusions: Srinagar qualifies as a low prevalence area for bronchial asthma in the age group of 10–16 years. Majority of children had mild intermittent asthma resulting in under