WorldWideScience

Sample records for inch drive ratchet

  1. Ratcheting Up and Driving Down Global Regulatory Standards

    OpenAIRE

    John Braithwaite; Peter Drahos

    1999-01-01

    Based on a large empirical study of the globalization of business regulation, John Braithwaite and Peter Drahos show that both races to the bottom and races to the top are common in the world system. The focus is on understanding ratcheting up mechanisms. Can health NGOs put these to work to lift public health standards globally?Development (1999) 42, 109–114. doi:10.1057/palgrave.development.1110096

  2. Current Reversal Due to Coupling Between Asymmetrical Driving Force and Ratchet Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai Baoquan; Xie Huizhang; Liu Lianggang

    2006-01-01

    Transport of a Brownian particle moving in a periodic potential is investigated in the presence of an asymmetric unbiased external force. The asymmetry of the external force and the asymmetry of the potential are the two ways of inducing a net current. It is found that the competition of the spatial asymmetry of potential with the temporal asymmetry of the external force leads to the phenomena like current reversal. The competition between the two opposite driving factors is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for current reversals.

  3. Torsional Ratcheting Actuating System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARNES,STEPHEN MATTHEW; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; RODGERS,M. STEVEN; BITSIE,FERNANDO

    2000-01-24

    A new type of surface micromachined ratcheting actuation system has been developed at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories. The actuator uses a torsional electrostatic comb drive that is coupled to an external ring gear through a ratcheting scheme. The actuator can be operated with a single square wave, has minimal rubbing surfaces, maximizes comb finger density, and can be used for open-loop position control. The prototypes function as intended with a minimum demonstrated operating voltage of 18V. The equations of motion are developed for the torsional electrostatic comb drive. The resonant frequency, voltage vs. displacement and force delivery characteristics are predicted and compared with the fabricated device's performance.

  4. Soliton ratchets

    OpenAIRE

    Salerno, Mario; Quintero, Niurka R.

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the soliton ratchet, both in absence and in presence of noise, is investigated. We show the existence of an asymmetric internal mode on the soliton profile that couples, through the damping in the system, to the soliton translational mode. Effective soliton transport is achieved when the internal mode and the external force are phase locked. We use as a working model a generalized double sine-Gordon equation. The phenomenon is expected to be valid for generic soliton ...

  5. Hubble Space Telescope EVA Power Ratchet Tool redesign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Paul W.; Park, Chan; Brown, Lee

    The Power Ratchet Tool (PRT) is a self contained, power-driven, 3/8 inch drive ratchet wrench which will be used by astronauts during Extravehicular Activities (EVA). This battery-powered tool is controlled by a dedicated electonic controller. The PRT was flown during the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Deployment Mission STS-31 to deploy the solar arrays if the automatic mechanisms failed. The PRT is currently intended for use during the first HST Servicing Mission STS-61 as a general purpose power tool. The PRT consists of three major components; the wrench, the controller, and the battery module. Fourteen discrete combinations of torque, turns, and speed may be programmed into the controller before the EVA. The crewmember selects the desired parameter profile by a switch mounted on the controller. The tool may also be used in the manual mode as a non-powered ratchet wrench. The power is provided by a silver-zinc battery module, which fits into the controller and is replaceable during an EVA. The original PRT did not meet the design specification of torque output and hours of operation. To increase efficiency and reliability the PRT underwent a redesign effort. The majority of this effort focused on the wrench. The original PRT drive train consisted of a low torque, high speed brushless DC motor, a face gear set, and a planocentric gear assembly. The total gear reduction was 300:1. The new PRT wrench consists of a low speed, high torque brushless DC motor, two planetary gear sets and a bevel gear set. The total gear reduction is now 75:1. A spline clutch has also been added to disengage the drive train in the manual mode. The design changes to the controller will consist of only those modifications necessary to accomodate the redesigned wrench.

  6. Ratchet effect of the domain wall by asymmetric magnetostatic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Hong-Guang; Choi, Hyeok-Cheol; Shim, Je-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hyun; You, Chun-Yeol

    2011-11-01

    We investigate a ratchet effect of magnetic domain wall motion in a ferromagnetic nanowire under AC magnetic fields using micromagnetic simulation. The ratchet effect for a transverse domain wall is achieved using an asymmetric magnetic potential generated by stray fields from non-contact trapezoidal ferromagnetic stubs near the straight nanowire. The ratchet phenomenon has been examined with various combinations of amplitude and frequency of the driving AC field. Interestingly, we find that the domain wall propagates along a preferential direction by the diode-like ratchet effect under AC field. The propagation of the domain wall strongly depends on the profile of the asymmetrical magnetic potentials and the driving AC field characteristics.

  7. Ratchet Effects in Active Matter Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhardt, C. J. Olson; Reichhardt, C.

    2017-03-01

    Ratchet effects can arise for single or collectively interacting Brownian particles on an asymmetric substrate when a net dc transport is produced by an externally applied ac driving force or by periodically flashing the substrate. Recently, a new class of active ratchet systems that do not require the application of external driving has been realized through the use of active matter; they are self-propelled units that can be biological or nonbiological in nature. When active materials such as swimming bacteria interact with an asymmetric substrate, a net dc directed motion can arise even without external driving, opening a wealth of possibilities such as sorting, cargo transport, or micromachine construction. We review the current status of active matter ratchets for swimming bacteria, cells, active colloids, and swarming models, focusing on the role of particle-substrate interactions. We describe ratchet reversals produced by collective effects and the use of active ratchets to transport passive particles. We discuss future directions including deformable substrates or particles, the role of different swimming modes, varied particle-particle interactions, and nondissipative effects.

  8. Reversible Vector Ratchet Effect in Skyrmion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoyu; Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia

    Magnetic skyrmions are topological non-trivial spin textures found in several magnetic materials. Since their motion can be controlled using ultralow current densities, skyrmions are appealing for potential applications in spintronics as information carriers and processing devices. In this work, we studied the collective transport properties of driven skyrmions based on a particle-like model with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Our results show that ac driven skyrmions interacting with an asymmetric substrate provide a realization of a new class of ratchet system, which we call a vector ratchet, that arises due to the effect of the Magnus term on the skyrmion dynamics. In a vector ratchet, the dc motion induced by the ac drive can be described as a vector that can be rotated up to 360 degrees relative to the substrate asymmetry direction. This could represent a new method for controlling skyrmion motion for spintronic applications.

  9. Ratchet due to broken friction symmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norden, Bengt; Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2002-01-01

    A ratchet mechanism that occurs due to asymmetric dependence of the friction of a moving system on its velocity or a driving force is reported. For this kind of ratchet, instead of a particle moving in a periodic potential, the dynamics of which have broken space-time symmetry, the system must...... be provided with sonic internal structure realizing such a velocity- or force-friction dependence. For demonstration of a ratchet mechanism of this type, an experimental setup (gadget) that converts longitudinal oscillating or fluctuating motion into a unidirectional rotation has been built and experiments...... with it have been carried out. In this device, an asymmetry of friction dependence on an applied force appears, resulting in rectification of rotary motion, In experiments, our setup is observed to rotate only in one direction, which is in accordance with given theoretical arguments, Despite the setup being...

  10. Ratchetting strain prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noban, Mohammad; Jahed, Hamid

    2007-01-01

    A time-efficient method for predicting ratchetting strain is proposed. The ratchetting strain at any cycle is determined by finding the ratchetting rate at only a few cycles. This determination is done by first defining the trajectory of the origin of stress in the deviatoric stress space and then incorporating this moving origin into a cyclic plasticity model. It is shown that at the beginning of the loading, the starting point of this trajectory coincides with the initial stress origin and approaches the mean stress, displaying a power-law relationship with the number of loading cycles. The method of obtaining this trajectory from a standard uniaxial asymmetric cyclic loading is presented. Ratchetting rates are calculated with the help of this trajectory and through the use of a constitutive cyclic plasticity model which incorporates deviatoric stresses and back stresses that are measured with respect to this moving frame. The proposed model is used to predict the ratchetting strain of two types of steels under single- and multi-step loadings. Results obtained agree well with the available experimental measurements

  11. Electrodynamic ratchet motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jiufu; Sader, John E; Mulvaney, Paul

    2009-03-01

    Brownian ratchets produce directed motion through rectification of thermal fluctuations and have been used for separation processes and colloidal transport. We propose a flashing ratchet motor that enables the transduction of electrical energy into rotary micromechanical work. This is achieved through torque generation provided by boundary shaping of equipotential surfaces. The present device contrasts to previous implementations that focus on translational motion. Stochastic simulations elucidate the performance characteristics of this device as a function of its geometry. Miniaturization to nanoscale dimensions yields rotational speeds in excess of 1 kHz, which is comparable to biomolecular motors of similar size.

  12. Magnus-induced ratchet effects for skyrmions interacting with asymmetric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhardt, C.; Ray, D.; Olson Reichhardt, C. J.

    2015-07-01

    We show using numerical simulations that pronounced ratchet effects can occur for ac driven skyrmions moving over asymmetric quasi-one-dimensional substrates. We find a new type of ratchet effect called a Magnus-induced transverse ratchet that arises when the ac driving force is applied perpendicular rather than parallel to the asymmetry direction of the substrate. This transverse ratchet effect only occurs when the Magnus term is finite, and the threshold ac amplitude needed to induce it decreases as the Magnus term becomes more prominent. Ratcheting skyrmions follow ordered orbits in which the net displacement parallel to the substrate asymmetry direction is quantized. Skyrmion ratchets represent a new ac current-based method for controlling skyrmion positions and motion for spintronic applications.

  13. Motional dispersions and ratchet effect in inertial systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For finite frequency field drive the ratchet effect is obtained only numerically. In the ... In the periodic drive case the dispersion behaviour is more complex. ... Department of Physics, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793 022, India; Department of Physics, St. Anthony's College, Shillong 793 001, India; Women's College, ...

  14. Implementing Demons and Ratchets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Orem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results show that ratchets may be implemented in semiconductor and chemical systems, bypassing the second law and opening up huge gains in energy production. This paper summarizes or describes experiments and results on systems that effect demons and ratchets operating in chemical or electrical domains. One creates temperature differences that can be harvested by a heat engine. A second produces light with only heat input. A third produces harvestable electrical potential directly. These systems share creating particles in one location, destroying them in another and moving them between locations by diffusion (Brownian motion. All absorb ambient heat as they produce other energy forms. None requires an external hot and cold side. The economic and social impacts of these conversions of ambient heat to work are, of course, well-understood and huge. The experimental results beg for serious work on the chance that they are valid.

  15. Disordered Markovian Brownian ratchets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicki, R

    1999-09-01

    A model of a Brownian ratchet coupled to a heat bath and driven by a nonequilibrium Poisson white noise is discussed. The formula describing a generated current in terms of the statistical properties of a possible irregular or random potential is derived within the small nonequilibrium noise approximation and illustrated by a few concrete examples. The perturbation technique for Hilbert space operators is used as a mathematical tool.

  16. Ratcheted electrophoresis of Brownian particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalik, Mikołaj; Bishop, Kyle J. M., E-mail: kjmbishop@engr.psu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    The realization of nanoscale machines requires efficient methods by which to rectify unbiased perturbations to perform useful functions in the presence of significant thermal noise. The performance of such Brownian motors often depends sensitively on their operating conditions—in particular, on the relative rates of diffusive and deterministic motions. In this letter, we present a type of Brownian motor that uses contact charge electrophoresis of a colloidal particle within a ratcheted channel to achieve directed transport or perform useful work against an applied load. We analyze the stochastic dynamics of this model ratchet to show that it functions under any operating condition—even in the limit of strong thermal noise and in contrast to existing ratchets. The theoretical results presented here suggest that ratcheted electrophoresis could provide a basis for electrochemically powered, nanoscale machines capable of transport and actuation of nanoscale components.

  17. Length Scale of Leidenfrost Ratchet Switches Droplet Directionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, Rebecca L [ORNL; Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Briggs, Dayrl P [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Arrays of tilted pillars with characteristic heights spanning from hundreds of nanometers to tens of micrometers were created using wafer level processing and used as Leidenfrost ratchets to control droplet directionality. Dynamic Leidenfrost droplets on the ratchets with nanoscale features were found to move in the direction of the pillar tilt while the opposite directionality was observed on the microscale ratchets. This remarkable switch in the droplet directionality can be explained by varying contributions from the two distinct mechanisms controlling droplet motion on Leidenfrost ratchets with nanoscale and microscale features. In particular, asymmetric wettability of dynamic Leidenfrost droplets upon initial impact appears to be the dominant mechanism determining their directionality on tilted nanoscale pillar arrays. By contrast, asymmetric wetting does not provide a strong enough driving force compared to the forces induced by asymmetric vapour flow on arrays of much taller tilted microscale pillars. Furthermore, asymmetric wetting plays a role only in the dynamic Leidenfrost regime, for instance when droplets repeatedly jump after their initial impact. The point of crossover between the two mechanisms coincides with the pillar heights comparable to the values of the thinnest vapor layers still capable of cushioning Leidenfrost droplets upon their initial impact. The proposed model of the length scale dependent interplay between the two mechanisms points to the previously unexplored ability to bias movement of dynamic Leidenfrost droplets and even switch their directionality.

  18. Length scale of Leidenfrost ratchet switches droplet directionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapov, Rebecca L; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Briggs, Dayrl P; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, C Patrick; Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2014-08-07

    Arrays of tilted pillars with characteristic heights spanning from hundreds of nanometers to tens of micrometers were created using wafer level processing and used as Leidenfrost ratchets to control droplet directionality. Dynamic Leidenfrost droplets on the ratchets with nanoscale features were found to move in the direction of the pillar tilt while the opposite directionality was observed on the microscale ratchets. This remarkable switch in the droplet directionality can be explained by varying contributions from the two distinct mechanisms controlling droplet motion on Leidenfrost ratchets with nanoscale and microscale features. In particular, asymmetric wettability of dynamic Leidenfrost droplets upon initial impact appears to be the dominant mechanism determining their directionality on tilted nanoscale pillar arrays. By contrast, asymmetric wetting does not provide a strong enough driving force compared to the forces induced by asymmetric vapour flow on arrays of much taller tilted microscale pillars. Furthermore, asymmetric wetting plays a role only in the dynamic Leidenfrost regime, for instance when droplets repeatedly jump after their initial impact. The point of crossover between the two mechanisms coincides with the pillar heights comparable to the values of the thinnest vapor layers still capable of cushioning Leidenfrost droplets upon their initial impact. The proposed model of the length scale dependent interplay between the two mechanisms points to the previously unexplored ability to bias movement of dynamic Leidenfrost droplets and even switch their directionality.

  19. Rocking ratchets in nanostructured superconducting-magnetic hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez de Lara, D; Gonzalez, E M; Vicent, J L [Departamento Fisica Materiales, Facultad Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Dinis, L; Parrondo, J M R [Departamento Fisica Atomica, Nuclear y Molecular, Facultad Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Anguita, J V [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Tres Cantos, 28760 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-06-24

    Two rectification mechanisms in vortex lattice dynamics in Nb films have been studied. These two effects are based on ratchet effects, that is, an ac driving force induces a net dc vortex flow. In our case, an input ac current applied to the Nb films, grown on top of arrays of Ni nanotriangles, yields an output dc voltage. These two rectification effects occur when the vortex lattice moves in periodic asymmetric potentials. These pinning potentials are induced by the array of Ni triangles. In one configuration (longitudinal effect) the driven force is applied perpendicular to the triangle reflection symmetry axis; in the second one (transverse effect) the input current is injected parallel to the triangle reflection symmetry axis. In the framework of the rocking ratchet mechanism, the appropriate Langevin equation allows us to model the experimental data, taking into account the vortex-vortex interaction.

  20. Directed transport in a ratchet with internal and chemical freedoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, T., E-mail: tdittrich@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota D.C. (Colombia); CeiBA-Complejidad, Bogota D.C. (Colombia); Naranjo, N.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota D.C. (Colombia); CeiBA-Complejidad, Bogota D.C. (Colombia)

    2010-10-05

    Graphical abstract: Directed currents in a ratchet including a chemical freedom that provides energy input and an internal freedom modeled as a functional mode of a motor molecule show a direct relation to the structure of the underlying attaractor, limit cycle or chaotic, as reflected in their dependence on the coupling between external and chemical degrees of freedom. - Abstract: We consider mechanisms of directed current in a ratchet model comprising, besides the external freedom where transport occurs, a chemical freedom that replaces the familiar external driving by an autonomous dynamics providing energy input, and an internal freedom representing a functional mode of a motor molecule. The dependence of the current on various parameters is studied in numerical simulations of our model. In particular, we point out the role of the internal freedom as a buffer between energy input and output of mechanical work that allows a temporary storage of injected energy and can contribute to the efficiency of current generation.

  1. Ratchetting behavior of type 304 stainless steel at room and elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggles, M.; Krempl, E.

    1988-01-01

    The zero-to-tension ratchetting behavior was investigated under uniaxial loading at room temperature and at 550, 600 and 650/degree/ C. In History I the maximum stress level of ratchetting was equal to the stress reached in a tensile test at one percent strain. For History II the maximum stress level was established as the stress reached after a 2100 s relaxation at one percent strain. Significant ratchetting was observed for History I at room temperature but not at the elevated temperatures. The accumulated ratchet strain increases with decreasing stress rate. Independent of the stress rates used insignificant ratchet strain was observed at room temperature for History II. This observation is explained in the context of the viscoplasticity theory based on overstress by the exhaustion of the viscous contribution to the stress during relaxation. The viscous part of the stress is the driving force for the ratchetting in History I. Strain aging is presumably responsible for the lack of short-time inelastic deformation resulting in a nearly rate-independent behavior at the elevated temperatures. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  2. Propulsion on a superhydrophobic ratchet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupeux, Guillaume; Bourrianne, Philippe; Magdelaine, Quentin; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2014-06-13

    Liquids in the Leidenfrost state were shown by Linke to self-propel if placed on ratchets. The vapour flow below the liquid rectified by the asymmetric teeth entrains levitating drops by viscosity. This effect is observed above the Leidenfrost temperature of the substrate, typically 200°C for water. Here we show that coating ratchets with super-hydrophobic microtextures extends quick self-propulsion down to a substrate temperature of 100°C, which exploits the persistence of Leidenfrost state with such coatings. Surprisingly, propulsion is even observed below 100°C, implying that levitation is not necessary to induce the motion. Finally, we model the drop velocity in this novel "cold regime" of self-propulsion.

  3. Thermal ratcheting and creep damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, G.; Cousseran, P.; Roche, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Several proposals have been made to assist adesigners with thermal ratcheting in the creep range, the more known has been made by O'DONNELL and POROWSKY. Unfortunately these methods are not validated by experiments, and they take only inelastic distortion into consideration as creep effects. The aim of the work presented here is to correct these deficiencies - in providing an experimental basis to ratcheting analysis rules in the creep range, - in considering the effect of cyclic straining (like cyclic thermal stresses) on the time to rupture by creep. Experimental tests have been performed on austenitic stainless steel at 650 0 C for the first item. Results of these tests and results available in the open literature have been used to built a practical rule of ratcheting analysis. This rule giving a conservative value of the creep distortion, is based on the concept of effective primary stress which is an amplification of the primary stress really applied. Concerning the second point (time to rupture), it was necessary to obtain real creep rupture and not instability. According to the proposal of Pr LECKIE, tests were performed on specimens made out of copper, and of aluminium alloys at temperatures between 150 0 C and 300 0 C. With such materials creep rupture is obtained without necking. Experimental tests show that cyclic straining reduces the time to creep rupture under load controlled stress. Caution must be given to the designer: cyclic thermal stress can lead to premature creep rupture. (orig./GL)

  4. Capillary droplets on Leidenfrost micro-ratchets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez Marin, Alvaro; Arnaldo del Cerro, D.; Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Pathiraj, B.; Huis in 't Veld, Bert; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Leidenfrost ratchets are structures with the ability of transporting liquid droplets when heated over the critical Leidenfrost temperature. Once this temperature is reached, the droplet levitates over the surface and moves in the direction marked by the slope of the ratchet at terminal velocities

  5. Thermal ratcheting and creep damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, G.; Cousseran, P.; Roche, R.L.

    1983-08-01

    Creep is a cause of deformation; it may also result in rupture in time. Although LMFBR structures are not heavily loaded, they are subjected to large thermal transients. Can structure lifetime be shortened by such transients. Several proposals have been made to assist adesigners with thermal ratcheting in the creep range. Unfortunately these methods are not validated by experiments, and they take only inelastic distorsion into consideration as creep effects. The aim of the work presented here is to correct these deficiencies in providing an experimental basis to ratcheting analysis rules in the creep range, and in considering the effect of cyclic straining (like cyclic thermal stresses) on the time to rupture by creep. Experimental tests have been performed on austenitic stainless steel at 650 0 C for the first item. Results of these tests and results available in the open literature have been used to built a practical rule of ratcheting analysis. This rule giving a conservative value of the creep distortion, is based on the concept of effective primary stress which is an amplification of the primary stress really applied. Concerning the second point (time to rupture), it was necessary to obtain real creep rupture and not instability. According to the proposal of Pr LECKIE, tests were performed on specimen made out of copper, and of aluminium alloys at temperatures between 150 0 C and 300 0 C. With such materials creep rupture is obtained without necking. Experimental tests show that cyclic straining reduces the time to creep rupture under load controlled stress. Caution must be given to the designer: cyclic thermal stress can lead to premature creep rupture

  6. Harmonic ratcheting for fast acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cook

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in the design of rf cavities for the acceleration of medium-energy charged ions is the need to rapidly sweep the radio frequency over a large range. From low-power medical synchrotrons to high-power accelerator driven subcritical reactor systems, and from fixed focus alternating gradient accelerators to rapid cycling synchrotrons, there is a strong need for more efficient, and faster, acceleration of protons and light ions in the semirelativistic range of hundreds of MeV/u. A conventional way to achieve a large, rapid frequency sweep (perhaps over a range of a factor of 6 is to use custom-designed ferrite-loaded cavities. Ferrite rings enable the precise tuning of the resonant frequency of a cavity, through the control of the incremental permeability that is possible by introducing a pseudoconstant azimuthal magnetic field. However, rapid changes over large permeability ranges incur anomalous behavior such as the “Q-loss” and “f-dot” loss phenomena that limit performance while requiring high bias currents. Notwithstanding the incomplete understanding of these phenomena, they can be ameliorated by introducing a “harmonic ratcheting” acceleration scheme in which two or more rf cavities take turns accelerating the beam—one turns on when the other turns off, at different harmonics—so that the radio frequency can be constrained to remain in a smaller range. Harmonic ratcheting also has straightforward performance advantages, depending on the particular parameter set at hand. In some typical cases it is possible to halve the length of the cavities, or to double the effective gap voltage, or to double the repetition rate. This paper discusses and quantifies the advantages of harmonic ratcheting in general. Simulation results for the particular case of a rapid cycling medical synchrotron ratcheting from harmonic number 9 to 2 show that stability and performance criteria are met even when realistic engineering details

  7. Punchets: nonlinear transport in Hamiltonian pump-ratchet hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Thomas; Medina Sánchez, Nicolás

    2018-02-01

    ‘Punchets’ are hybrids between ratchets and pumps, combining a spatially periodic static potential, typically asymmetric under space inversion, with a local driving that breaks time-reversal invariance, and are intended to model metal or semiconductor surfaces irradiated by a collimated laser beam. Their crucial feature is irregular driven scattering between asymptotic regions supporting periodic (as opposed to free) motion. With all binary spatio-temporal symmetries broken, scattering in punchets typically generates directed currents. We here study the underlying nonlinear transport mechanisms, from chaotic scattering to the parameter dependence of the currents, in three types of Hamiltonian models, (i) with spatially periodic potentials where only in the driven scattering region, spatial and temporal symmetries are broken, and (ii), spatially asymmetric (ratchet) potentials with a driving that only breaks time-reversal invariance. As more realistic models of laser-irradiated surfaces, we consider (iii), a driving in the form of a running wave confined to a compact region by a static envelope. In this case, the induced current can even run against the direction of wave propagation, drastically evidencing its nonlinear nature. Quantizing punchets is indicated as a viable research perspective.

  8. Ratcheting up the ratchet: on the evolution of cumulative culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennie, Claudio; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-08-27

    Some researchers have claimed that chimpanzee and human culture rest on homologous cognitive and learning mechanisms. While clearly there are some homologous mechanisms, we argue here that there are some different mechanisms at work as well. Chimpanzee cultural traditions represent behavioural biases of different populations, all within the species' existing cognitive repertoire (what we call the 'zone of latent solutions') that are generated by founder effects, individual learning and mostly product-oriented (rather than process-oriented) copying. Human culture, in contrast, has the distinctive characteristic that it accumulates modifications over time (what we call the 'ratchet effect'). This difference results from the facts that (i) human social learning is more oriented towards process than product and (ii) unique forms of human cooperation lead to active teaching, social motivations for conformity and normative sanctions against non-conformity. Together, these unique processes of social learning and cooperation lead to humans' unique form of cumulative cultural evolution.

  9. Leidenfrost gas ratchets driven by thermal creep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würger, Alois

    2011-10-14

    We show that thermal creep is at the origin of the recently discovered Leidenfrost ratchet, where liquid droplets float on a vapor layer along a heated sawtooth surface and accelerate to velocities of up to 40  cm/s. As the active element, the asymmetric temperature profile at each ratchet summit rectifies the vapor flow in the boundary layer. This mechanism works at low Reynolds number and provides a novel tool for controlling gas flow at nanostructured surfaces.

  10. Ratchet device with broken friction symmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norden, Bengt; Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2002-01-01

    An experimental setup (gadget) has been made for demonstration of a ratchet mechanism induced by broken symmetry of a dependence of dry friction on external forcing. This gadget converts longitudinal oscillating or fluctuating motion into a unidirectional rotation, the direction of which is in ac......An experimental setup (gadget) has been made for demonstration of a ratchet mechanism induced by broken symmetry of a dependence of dry friction on external forcing. This gadget converts longitudinal oscillating or fluctuating motion into a unidirectional rotation, the direction of which...... is in accordance with given theoretical arguments. Despite the setup being three dimensional, the ratchet rotary motion is proved to be described by one simple dynamic equation. This kind of motion is a result of the interplay of friction and inertia....

  11. Light-responsive organic flashing electron ratchet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedem, Ofer; Lau, Bryan; Ratner, Mark A; Weiss, Emily A

    2017-08-15

    Ratchets are nonequilibrium devices that produce directional motion of particles from nondirectional forces without using a bias, and are responsible for many types of biological transport, which occur with high yield despite strongly damped and noisy environments. Ratchets operate by breaking time-reversal and spatial symmetries in the direction of transport through application of a time-dependent potential with repeating, asymmetric features. This work demonstrates the ratcheting of electrons within a highly scattering organic bulk-heterojunction layer, and within a device architecture that enables the application of arbitrarily shaped oscillating electric potentials. Light is used to modulate the carrier density, which modifies the current with a nonmonotonic response predicted by theory. This system is driven with a single unbiased sine wave source, enabling the future use of natural oscillation sources such as electromagnetic radiation.

  12. Granular Segregation by an Oscillating Ratchet Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, A.; Horiuchi, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    We report on a method to segregate granular mixtures which consist of two kinds of particles by an oscillating ''ratchet'' mechanism. The segregation system has an asymmetrical sawtooth-shaped base which is vertically oscillating. Such a ratchet base produces a directional current of particles owing to its transport property. It is a counterintuitive and interesting phenomenon that a vertically vibrated base transports particles horizontally. This system is studied with numerical simulations, and it is found that we can apply such a system to segregation of mixtures of particles with different properties (radius or mass). Furthermore, we find out that an appropriate inclination of the ratchet-base makes the quality of segregation high. (author)

  13. Propulsion mechanisms for Leidenfrost solids on ratchets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Tobias; Dupeux, Guillaume; Herbert, Stefan; Hardt, Steffen; Quéré, David

    2013-02-01

    We propose a model for the propulsion of Leidenfrost solids on ratchets based on viscous drag due to the flow of evaporating vapor. The model assumes pressure-driven flow described by the Navier-Stokes equations and is mainly studied in lubrication approximation. A scaling expression is derived for the dependence of the propulsive force on geometric parameters of the ratchet surface and properties of the sublimating solid. We show that the model results as well as the scaling law compare favorably with experiments and are able to reproduce the experimentally observed scaling with the size of the solid.

  14. Uniaxial ratcheting behavior of Zircaloy-4 tubes at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Mingjian; Li, Hua; Yu, Dunji; Chen, Gang; Chen, Xu

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a series of uniaxial tensile, strain cycling and uniaxial ratcheting tests were conducted at room temperature on Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) tubes used as nuclear fuel cladding in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) for the purpose to investigate the uniaxial ratcheting behavior of Zr-4 and the factors which may influence it. The experimental results show that at room temperature this material features cyclic softening remarkably within the strain range of 1.6%, and former cycling under larger strain amplitude cannot retard cyclic softening of later cycling under lower strain amplitude. Uniaxial ratcheting strain accumulates in the direction of mean stress, and the ratcheting stain level is larger under tensile mean stress than that under compressive mean stress. Uniaxial ratcheting strain level increases with the increase of mean stress and stress amplitude, and decreases with the increase of loading rate. The sequence of loading rate appears to have no effects on the final ratcheting strain accumulation. Loading history has great influence on the uniaxial ratcheting behavior. Lower stress level after loading history with higher stress level leads to the shakedown of ratcheting. Higher loading rate after loading history with lower loading rate brings down the ratcheting strain rate. Uniaxial ratcheting behavior is sensitive to compressive pre-strain, and the decay rate of the ratcheting strain rate is slowed down by pre-compression

  15. Thermal ratcheting in pressure vessels and piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P.

    1975-01-01

    During its lifetime, a nuclear power plant can experience cyclic thermal loading produced during start-ups and shut-downs. Under such conditions, pressure vessels, piping and other components can experience accumulative dimensional changes through thermal ratcheting. Such dimensional changes can occur when cyclic thermal loading is superposed upon steady mechanical loading. Simplified models based on one-dimensional plastic stress-strain relations, as proposed by Miller, Bree and Burgreen, are currently used by designers to estimate the likelihood and the amount of ratcheting during the life of the component. It is shown in this paper that the Miller-Bree-Burgreen one-dimensional model is applicable when the ratio of the steady membrane stresses is larger than one-half (Nsub(y)/Nsub(x)>1/2), which includes such significant applications as cylindrical and spherical vessels under internal pressure. For the stress ratios approaching minus one, the biaxial model predicts much higher ratchet strain. Examples where such states occur are the knuckle region in pressure vessels with torispherical heads and pipe connections under torsion. Designers should be alerted to such a limitation of the presently used ratcheting model. (Auth.)

  16. A design rule about thermal ratcheting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, G.; Lebey, J.; Roche, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an analysis of thermal ratcheting, and to give a practical design rule aimed at avoiding its detrimental effects. A practical method will thus be available to designers for dealing with one of the adverse effects of computed thermal stresses

  17. Engineering Autonomous Chemomechanical Nanomachines Using Brownian Ratchets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavella, Gabriel

    Nanoscale machines which directly convert chemical energy into mechanical work are ubiquitous in nature and are employed to perform a diverse set of tasks such as transporting molecules, maintaining molecular gradients, and providing motion to organisms. Their widespread use in nature suggests that large technological rewards can be obtained by designing synthetic machines that use similar mechanisms. This thesis addresses the technological adaptation of a specific mechanism known as the Brownian ratchet for the design of synthetic autonomous nanomachines. My efforts were focused more specifically on synthetic chemomechanical ratchets which I deem will be broadly applicable in the life sciences. In my work I have theoretically explored the biophysical mechanisms and energy landscapes that give rise to the ratcheting phenomena and devised devices that operate off these principles. I demonstrate two generations of devices that produce mechanical force/deformation in response to a user specified ligand. The first generation devices, fabricatied using a combination nanoscale lithographic processes and bioconjugation techniques, were used to provide evidence that the proposed ratcheting phenomena can be exploited in synthetic architectures. Second generation devices fabricated using self-assembled DNA/hapten motifs were constructed to gain a precise understanding of ratcheting dynamics and design constraints. In addition, the self-assembled devices enabled fabrication en masse, which I feel will alleviate future experimental hurdles in analysis and facilitate its adaptation to technologies. The product of these efforts is an architecture that has the potential to enable numerous technologies in biosensing and drug delivery. For example, the coupling of molecule-specific actuation to the release of drugs or signaling molecules from nanocapsules or porous materials could be transformative. Such architectures could provide possible avenues to pressing issues in biology and

  18. Experiment research on ratcheting of pressurized pipe subjected reversed bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Bingjun; Chen Xu; Chen Gang

    2005-01-01

    With a quasi-three point bending apparatus, ratcheting and ratcheting boundary were studied experimentally for pressurized low carbon 20 steel pipes under reversed bending on servo- electro-hydraulic axial-pressure testing system. It is found that ratcheting initiates firstly in hoop direction and that in axial direction follows with the increase of loading but less in magnitude. The circular cross section turns into ellipse as the ratcheting strain accumulates. Ratcheting strain rate grows with the increase of reversed bending load or internal pressure for both different specimen with different loading and same specimen with multi-step loading. In multi-step loading, ratcheting rate suffers from the ratcheting history, especially for that with ratcheting history at higher level loading. As different positions of the specimen endure different bending moment by the quasi-three point bending apparatus, ratcheting boundary is readily determined experimentally. By comparison with that determined by ASME, RCC-MR, it is shown both code are conservative. (authors)

  19. 8-inch IBM floppy disk

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    The 8-inch floppy disk was a magnetic storage disk for the data introduced commercially by IBM in 1971. It was designed by an IBM team as an inexpensive way to load data into the IBM System / 370. Plus it was a read-only bare disk containing 80 KB of data. The first read-write version was introduced in 1972 by Memorex and could contain 175 KB on 50 tracks (with 8 sectors per track). Other improvements have led to various coatings and increased capacities. Finally, it was surpassed by the mini diskette of 5.25 inches introduced in 1976.

  20. Transport in ratchets with single-file constraint

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    exchange. Similarly, the motion of Brownian particles moving in a ratchet potential has been an active area of research because of its applicability to a wide range of nanoscale systems, including the transport properties of molecular motors. Here, we briefly review these models and discuss particle motion in a ratchet model ...

  1. Experimental adiabatic vortex ratchet effect in Nb films with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Vortices; asymmetric pinning; rectifier; adiabatic ratchet. Abstract. Nb films grown on top of an array of asymmetric pinning centers show a vortex ratchet effect. A net flow of vortices is induced when the vortex lattice is driven by fluctuating forces on an array of pinning centers without reflection symmetry. This effect ...

  2. A Ratchet Lens: Black Queer Youth, Agency, Hip Hop, and the Black Ratchet Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Bettina L.

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the utilization of the theory of a Black ratchet imagination as a methodological perspective to examine the multiple intersections of Black and queer identity constructions within the space of hip hop. In particular, I argue for the need of a methodological lens that recognizes, appreciates, and struggles with the fluidity,…

  3. Ratchet Effects, Negative Mobility, and Phase Locking for Skyrmions on Periodic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhardt, Charles; Ray, Dipanjan; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia

    We examine the dynamics of skyrmions interacting with 1D and 2D periodic substrates in the presence of dc and ac drives. We find that the Magnus term strongly affects the skyrmion dynamics and that new kinds of phenomena can occur which are absent for overdamped ac and dc driven particles interacting with similar substrates. We show that it is possible to realize a Magnus induced ratchet for skyrmions interacting with an asymmetric potential, where the application of an ac drive can produce quantized dc motion of the skyrmions even when the ac force is perpendicular to the substrate asymmetry direction. For symmetric substrates it is also possible to achieve a negative mobility effect where the net skyrmion motion runs counter to an applied dc drive. Here, as a function of increasing dc drive, the velocity-force curves show a series of locking phases that have different features from the classic Shapiro steps found in overdamped systems. In the phase locking and ratcheting states, the skyrmions undergo intricate 2D orbits induced by the Magnus term.

  4. Shakedown and ratchetting below the creep range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponter, A.R.S.

    1983-01-01

    The report reviews current understanding of the behaviour of structure subject to variable mechanical and thermal loading below the creep range through a comparison of theoretical solutions and experimental studies. The particular characteristics of the austenitic stainless steels are emphasized in components subject to moderate primary loads and large thermal loads. The review shows that a clear classification of types of thermal loading is required in design. Two main classes, termed category A and B, exist which arise not from the magnitude of the thermal stresses but their extent through the material volume of the structure. In category A situations, the Bree plate problem being the prime example, the maximum thermal stresses occur over a volume of the structure which does not contain a mechanism of failure. As a result very large thermal stresses may be withstood without ratchetting occurring for sufficiently small mechanical loads. For category B situations, the maximum thermal stress occur within a volume of material which contains a mechanism of deformation. In such cases, the capacity of the structure to withstand thermal loading is limited by a variation of the maximum thermal stress at a material point of 2σsub(γ) where σsub(γ) is a suitably defined yield stress. This situation seems to be the most typical problem of the Liquid Metal Fast Reactor and the ''3Sm'' limit in the ASME III code restriction on secondary stress cannot be exceeded if ratchetting is to be prevented

  5. High temperature viscoplastic ratchetting: Material response or modeling artifact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freed, A.D.

    1991-01-01

    Ratchetting, the net accumulation of strain over a loading cycle, is a deformation mechanism that leads to distortions in shape, often resulting in a loss of function that culminates in structural failure. Viscoplastic ratchetting is prevalent at high homologous temperatures where viscous characteristics are prominent in material response. This deformation mechanism is accentuated by the presence of a mean stress; a consequence of interaction between thermal gradients and structural constraints. Favorable conditions for viscoplastic ratchetting exist in the Stirling engines being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) for space and terrestrial power applications. To assess the potential for ratchetting and its effect on durability of high temperature structures requires a viscoplastic analysis of the design. But ratchetting is a very difficult phenomenon to accurately model. One must therefore ask whether the results from such an analysis are indicative of actual material behavior, or if they are artifacts of the theory being used in the analysis. There are several subtle aspects in a viscoplastic model that must be dealt with in order to accurately model ratchetting behavior, and therefore obtain meaningful predictions from it. In this paper, some of these subtlties and the necessary ratchet experiments needed to obtain an accurate viscoplastic representation of a material are discussed

  6. Submicrometric 2D ratchet effect in magnetic domain wall motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castán-Guerrero, C., E-mail: ccastan@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC – Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Dpto. de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Herrero-Albillos, J. [Fundación ARAID, E-50004 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro Universitario de la Defensa, E-50090 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC – Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Sesé, J. [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Dpto. de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Bartolomé, J.; Bartolomé, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC – Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Dpto. de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Hierro-Rodriguez, A.; Valdés-Bango, F.; Martín, J.I.; Alameda, J.M. [Dpto. Física, Universidad de Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); CINN (CSIC – Universidad de Oviedo – Principado de Asturias), Asturias (Spain); García, L.M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC – Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Dpto. de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Strips containing arrays of submicrometric triangular antidots with a 2D square periodicity have been fabricated by electron beam lithography. A clear ratchet effect of 180° domain wall motion under a varying applied field parallel to the walls has been observed. The direction is determined by the direction of the triangle vertices. In contrast, no ratchet effect is observed when the antidot array is constituted by symmetric rhomb-shaped antidots.

  7. Ten inch Planar Optic Display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiser, L. [Beiser (Leo) Inc., Flushing, NY (United States); Veligdan, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A Planar Optic Display (POD) is being built and tested for suitability as a high brightness replacement for the cathode ray tube, (CRT). The POD display technology utilizes a laminated optical waveguide structure which allows a projection type of display to be constructed in a thin (I to 2 inch) housing. Inherent in the optical waveguide is a black cladding matrix which gives the display a black appearance leading to very high contrast. A Digital Micromirror Device, (DMD) from Texas Instruments is used to create video images in conjunction with a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser. An anamorphic optical system is used to inject light into the POD to form a stigmatic image. In addition to the design of the POD screen, we discuss: image formation, image projection, and optical design constraints.

  8. 10-inch planar optic display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiser, Leo; Veligdan, James T.

    1996-05-01

    A planar optic display (POD) is being built and tested for suitability as a high brightness replacement for the cathode ray tube, (CRT). The POD display technology utilizes a laminated optical waveguide structure which allows a projection type of display to be constructed in a thin (1 to 2 inch) housing. Inherent in the optical waveguide is a black cladding matrix which gives the display a black appearance leading to very high contrast. A digital micromirror device, (DMD) from Texas Instruments is used to create video images in conjunction with a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser. An anamorphic optical system is used to inject light into the POD to form a stigmatic image. In addition to the design of the POD screen, we discuss: image formation, image projection, and optical design constraints.

  9. Investigations into the ratchetting behaviour of austenitic pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, D.; Krolop, S.; Scheffold, A.; Stegmeyer, R.

    1997-01-01

    In technical components subjected to cyclic loading, inelastic deformations cannot be excluded. In such cases, under certain conditions, small amounts of non-reversed plastic strain per cycle can accumulate to large strains, an effect commonly called ratchetting. The proof of ratchetting in complex structures is often possible by numerical methods only, e.g. the finite-element method. Describing cyclic plasticity and predicting ratchetting necessitate a suitable constitutive law. This paper describes the investigation of the ratchetting behaviour of thin-walled tubes under cyclic loading. Tests were performed and accompanied by finite-element computations using a non-linear kinematic hardening rule with superposed isotropic cyclic hardening. The constitutive law applied used a set of 13 material parameters. This paper discusses the requirements for uniaxial tests which meet the determination of a suitable set of parameters for describing ratchetting. To describe different kinds of isotropic hardening, an extension of the isotropic hardening rule is proposed. Under uniaxial conditions, continuous cyclic hardening is well reproduced with this extension. (orig.)

  10. Ratcheting fatigue behavior of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajpurohit, R.S., E-mail: rsrajpurohit.rs.met13@iitbhu.ac.in [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, 221005 (India); Sudhakar Rao, G. [Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, CH-5232 (Switzerland); Chattopadhyay, K.; Santhi Srinivas, N.C.; Singh, Vakil [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, 221005 (India)

    2016-08-15

    Nuclear core components of zirconium alloys experience asymmetric stress or strain cycling during service which leads to plastic strain accumulation and drastic reduction in fatigue life as well as dimensional instability of the component. Variables like loading rate, mean stress, and stress amplitude affect the influence of asymmetric loading. In the present investigation asymmetric stress controlled fatigue tests were conducted with mean stress from 80 to 150 MPa, stress amplitude from 270 to 340 MPa and stress rate from 30 to 750 MPa/s to study the process of plastic strain accumulation and its effect on fatigue life of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature. It was observed that with increase in mean stress and stress amplitude accumulation of ratcheting strain was increased and fatigue life was reduced. However, increase in stress rate led to improvement in fatigue life due to less accumulation of ratcheting strain. - Highlights: • Ratcheting strain accumulation occurred due to asymmetric cyclic loading. • Accumulation of ratcheting strain increased with mean stress and stress amplitude. • Ratcheting strain accumulation decreased with increase in stress rate. • With increase in mean stress and stress amplitude there was reduction in fatigue life. • Fatigue life is improved with increase in stress rate.

  11. Dislocation based controlling of kinematic hardening contribution to simulate primary and secondary stages of uniaxial ratcheting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, S.; Dhar, S.; Acharyya, S. K.

    2017-07-01

    The primary and secondary stages of the uniaxial ratcheting curve for the C-Mn steel SA333 have been investigated. Stress controlled uniaxial ratcheting experiments were conducted with different mean stresses and stress amplitudes to obtain curves showing the evolution of ratcheting strain with number of cycles. In stage-I of the ratcheting curve, a large accumulation of ratcheting strain occurs, but at a decreasing rate. In contrast, in stage-II a smaller accumulation of ratcheting strain is found and the ratcheting rate becomes almost constant. Transmission electron microscope observations reveal that no specific dislocation structures are developed during the early stages of ratcheting. Rather, compared with the case of low cycle fatigue, it is observed that sub-cell formation is delayed in the case of ratcheting. The increase in dislocation density as a result of the ratcheting strain is obtained using the Orowan equation. The ratcheting strain is obtained from the shift of the plastic strain memory surface. The dislocation rearrangement is incorporated in a functional form of dislocation density, which is used to calibrate the parameters of a kinematic hardening law. The observations are formulated in a material model, plugged into the ABAQUS finite element (FE) platform as a user material subroutine. Finally the FE-simulated ratcheting curves are compared with the experimental curves.

  12. Experimental analysis of ratchetting in elbows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acker, D.; Touboul, F.; Brouard, D.

    1991-01-01

    Despite of their apparent simplicity, elbows or curved tubes are one of the most tested and analyzed structures to the last years when a large effort has been done by CEA in the framework of the European Structural Integrity Working Group in order to reassess the RCC-MR (1985) piping design rules for elbows and straight parts (TOUBOUL (1988-1989)). It is impossible to mention all the authors and an extensive bibliography has been done by BENDJEDIDIA (1987). But nobody in our knowledge has taken care in experimental validation of design rules against ratcheting. With such objectives, an experimental test program has been performed at CEA, in order to appraise the design methods based on shakedown model like 3 S m rule used by ASME section III (1989) in USA or RCC-M (1988) in FRANCE, or based on the efficiency Diagram used by the french design code for Fast Breeder reactors RCC-MR (1985). The first results were published by M. BENDJEDIDIA (1987). They have been completed by additional tests and improved by a better material characterisation

  13. Segregation of granular binary mixtures by a ratchet mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Zénó; Szalai, Ferenc; Wolf, Dietrich E; Vicsek, Tamás

    2002-02-01

    We report on a segregation scheme for granular binary mixtures, where the segregation is performed by a ratchet mechanism realized by a vertically shaken asymmetric sawtooth-shaped base in a quasi-two-dimensional box. We have studied this system by computer simulations and found that most binary mixtures can be segregated using an appropriately chosen ratchet, even when the particles in the two components have the same size and differ only in their normal restitution coefficient or friction coefficient. These results suggest that the components of otherwise nonsegregating granular mixtures may be separated using our method.

  14. Reversible self-propelled Leidenfrost droplets on ratchet surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhi-hai; Chen, Meng-yao; Zhu, Hai-tao

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the self-propelled motion of the Leidenfrost droplets on hot surfaces with ratchet like topology. It is found that on hot ratchet surfaces with the certain geometry parameters, the droplets move in the direction towards the steep side of the teeth; as the surface temperature rises, droplets are observed to self propel to the right-angle side direction. Furthermore, there exists a temperature threshold to trigger the motion, at which the droplets do not move in either direction but stay at the stagnation state. A physical model is proposed to analyze the observation in this paper.

  15. Thermo-mechanical ratcheting in jointed rock masses

    KAUST Repository

    Pasten, C.

    2015-09-01

    Thermo-mechanical coupling takes place in jointed rock masses subjected to large thermal oscillations. Examples range from exposed surfaces under daily and seasonal thermal fluctuations to subsurface rock masses affected by engineered systems such as geothermal operations. Experimental, numerical and analytical results show that thermo-mechanical coupling can lead to wedging and ratcheting mechanisms that result in deformation accumulation when the rock mass is subjected to a biased static-force condition. Analytical and numerical models help in identifying the parameter domain where thermo-mechanical ratcheting can take place.

  16. Transverse ratchet effect and superconducting vortices: simulation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinis, L; Parrondo, J M R [Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC) and Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Nuclear y Molecular, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Perez de Lara, D; Gonzalez, E M; Vicent, J L [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Anguita, J V [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, Tres Cantos E-28760 (Spain)], E-mail: ldinis@fis.ucm.es

    2009-07-15

    A transverse ratchet effect has been measured in magnetic/superconducting hybrid films fabricated by electron beam lithography and magnetron sputtering techniques. The samples are Nb films grown on top of an array of Ni nanotriangles. Injecting an ac current parallel to the triangle reflection symmetry axis yields an output dc voltage perpendicular to the current, due to a net motion of flux vortices in the superconductor. The effect is reproduced by numerical simulations of vortices as Langevin particles with realistic parameters. Simulations provide an intuitive picture of the ratchet mechanism, revealing the fundamental role played by the random intrinsic pinning of the superconductor.

  17. Modeling of uniaxial ratchetting behavior of SA333 carbon manganese steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shit, J.; Dhar, S.; Acharyya, S.K.; Goyal, S.

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with uniaxial ratcheting phenomenon of cyclic plasticity behavior of the materials SA333 carbon Manganese steel. A mechanistic model for the ratcheting phenomenon has been proposed. It is observed that von Mises yield criterion together with Chaboche’s kinematic hardening rules are not sufficient to model ratcheting phenomenon. Other associated phenomena like plastic strain memory surface, back stress memory points and over all the extra hardening behavior have to be incorporated to get a complete material model for ratcheting. The proposed model assembled all these ideas together with von Mises yield criterion and Chabache’s kinematic hardening rule. Low cycle fatigue tests and uniaxial ratcheting tests have been conducted for the materials. The material constants are identified and derived from experimental results. The ratcheting coefficients have been properly calibrated with these material constants. The material model, as mentioned above, for the ratcheting phenomenon has been implemented in an elastic plastic finite element code. The ratcheting results for different stress controlled ratcheting loads have been computed. The good feature of this model is that it reduces to symmetric low cycle fatigue model when loop closes. - Highlights: ► A common material model to simulate symmetric LCF and ratcheting. ► Extra hardening to take care the shift of plastic strain centre. ► Material parameters from tensile and LCF tests. ► Saturated loop in LCF and ratcheting strain rate is compared with experiment. ► Consideration of loading path, memory path and their directions.

  18. Motional dispersions and ratchet effect in inertial systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    without the application of any time-averaged external field is termed as ratchet effect [1]. This is necessarily a ... The effect can also be obtained if the system is driven periodically but time asymmetrically in such a way that the ..... Govt. of India for financial assistance (SR/FTP/PS-33/2004). References. [1] P Reimann, Phys.

  19. Mixed motion in deterministic ratchets due to anisotropic permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulrattanarak, T.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Lubbersen, Y.S.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Pham, H.T.M.; Sarro, P.M.; Boom, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays microfluidic devices are becoming popular for cell/DNA sorting and fractionation. One class of these devices, namely deterministic ratchets, seems most promising for continuous fractionation applications of suspensions (Kulrattanarak et al., 2008 [1]). Next to the two main types of particle

  20. Dynamical analysis of an optical rocking ratchet: Theory and experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arzola, Alejandro V.; Volke-Sepúlveda, K.; Mateos, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 6 (2013), 062910:1-9 ISSN 1539-3755 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12018; GA MŠk EE2.4.31.0016 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : deterministic optical rocking ratchet * analysis of the dynamics Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.326, year: 2013

  1. Ratcheting tests on 316L stainless steel at 6500C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, G.; Cousseran, P.; Lebey, J.; Tremblais, A.

    1984-07-01

    Results of ratchet tests performed on 316L steel at 650 0 C are given, the specimens being thin tubes submitted simultaneously to constant tension and cyclic torsion deformation. At the temperature of interest, creep occurs. Results are in good accordance with a practical rule for evaluation of the progressive distorsion based on the use of an effective stress determined from the creep [fr

  2. PBX 9502 ratchet growth experiments on a dilatometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Darla Graff [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Geoff W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Deluca, Racci [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagelberg, Stephanie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    A Netzsch dilatometer has been used to probe the ratchet growth response of TATB-containing PBX 9502. Preliminary data are presented, showing test reproducibility and examining possible effects of density and/or the specific sequencing of different thermal ranges. We have also shown effects of thermal ramp rate on the test data, likely due to thermal equilibrium of the specimen environment.

  3. Experimental adiabatic vortex ratchet effect in Nb films with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nb films grown on top of an array of asymmetric pinning centers show a vortex ratchet effect. A net flow of vortices is induced when the vortex lattice is driven by fluctuating forces on an array of pinning centers without reflection symmetry. This effect occurs in the adiabatic regime and it could be mimiced only by reversible DC ...

  4. Shock initiation experiments on ratchet grown PBX 9502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsen, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Darla G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olinger, Barton W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Deluca, Racci [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pierce, Timothy H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Nathaniel J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    This study compares the shock initiation behavior of PBX 9502 pressed to less than nominal density (nominal density is 1.890 {+-} 0.005 g/cm{sup 3}) with PBX 9502 pressed to nominal density and then ''ratchet grown'' to low density. PBX 9502 is an insensitive plastic bonded explosive consisting of 95 weight % dry-aminated tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) and 5 weight % Kel-F 800 plastic binder. ''Ratchet growth'' - an irreversible increase in specific volume - occurs when an explosive based on TATB is temperature cycled. The design of our study is as follows: PBX 9502, all from the same lot, received the following four treatments. Samples in the first group were pressed to less than nominal density. These were not ratchet grown and used as a baseline. Samples in the second group were pressed to nominal density and then ratchet grown by temperature cycling 30 times between -54 C and +80 C. Samples in the final group were pressed to nominal density and cut into 100 mm by 25.4 mm diameter cylinders. During thermal cycling the cylinders were axially constrained by a 100 psi load. Samples for shock initiation experiments were cut perpendicular (disks) and parallel (slabs) to the axial load. The four sample groups can be summarized with the terms pressed low, ratchet grown/no load, axial load/disks, and axial load/slabs. All samples were shock initiated with nearly identical inputs in plate impact experiments carried out on a gas gun. Wave profiles were measured after propagation through 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm of explosive. Side by side comparison of wave profiles from different samples is used as a measure of relative sensitivity. All reduced density samples were more shock sensitive than nominal density PBX 9502. Differences in shock sensitivity between ratchet grown and pressed to low density PBX 9502 were small, but the low density pressings are slightly more sensitive than the ratchet grown samples.

  5. Current-driven domain wall ratchet in a nanomagnet with functionally graded Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri; Saxena, Avadh

    We develop a concept of functionally graded Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, which provides novel ways of efficient control of the magnetization dynamics. Using this approach we realize the ratchet motion of the domain wall in a magnetic nanowire driven by spin polarized current with potential applications in magnetic devices such as race-track memory and magnetic logical devices. By engineering the spatial profile of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya parameters we provide a unidirectional motion of the domain wall along the wire. We base our study on phenomenological Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations using a collective variable approach. In effective equations of motion the functionally graded Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction appears as a driving force, which can either suppress the action of the pumping by the current or can reinforce it. All analytical predictions are well confirmed by numerical simulations.

  6. Mutational meltdown in primary endosymbionts: selection limits Muller's ratchet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M Allen

    Full Text Available Primary bacterial endosymbionts of insects (p-endosymbionts are thought to be undergoing the process of Muller's ratchet where they accrue slightly deleterious mutations due to genetic drift in small populations with negligible recombination rates. If this process were to go unchecked over time, theory predicts mutational meltdown and eventual extinction. Although genome degradation is common among p-endosymbionts, we do not observe widespread p-endosymbiont extinction, suggesting that Muller's ratchet may be slowed or even stopped over time. For example, selection may act to slow the effects of Muller's ratchet by removing slightly deleterious mutations before they go to fixation thereby causing a decrease in nucleotide substitutions rates in older p-endosymbiont lineages.To determine whether selection is slowing the effects of Muller's ratchet, we determined the age of the Candidatus Riesia/sucking louse assemblage and analyzed the nucleotide substitution rates of several p-endosymbiont lineages that differ in the length of time that they have been associated with their insect hosts. We find that Riesia is the youngest p-endosymbiont known to date, and has been associated with its louse hosts for only 13-25 My. Further, it is the fastest evolving p-endosymbiont with substitution rates of 19-34% per 50 My. When comparing Riesia to other insect p-endosymbionts, we find that nucleotide substitution rates decrease dramatically as the age of endosymbiosis increases.A decrease in nucleotide substitution rates over time suggests that selection may be limiting the effects of Muller's ratchet by removing individuals with the highest mutational loads and decreasing the rate at which new mutations become fixed. This countering effect of selection could slow the overall rate of endosymbiont extinction.

  7. Brownian ratchets from statistical physics to bio and nano-motors

    CERN Document Server

    Cubero, David

    2016-01-01

    Illustrating the development of Brownian ratchets, from their foundations, to their role in the description of life at the molecular scale and in the design of artificial nano-machinery, this text will appeal to both advanced graduates and researchers entering the field. Providing a self-contained introduction to Brownian ratchets, devices which rectify microscopic fluctuations, Part I avoids technicalities and sets out the broad range of physical systems where the concept of ratchets is relevant. Part II supplies a single source for a complete and modern theoretical analysis of ratchets in regimes such as classical vs quantum and stochastic vs deterministic, and in Part III readers are guided through experimental developments in different physical systems, each highlighting a specific unique feature of ratchets. The thorough and systematic approach to the topic ensures that this book provides a complete guide to Brownian ratchets for newcomers and established researchers in physics, biology and biochemistry.

  8. Ratcheting deformation of advanced 316 steel under creep-plasticity condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Fumiko; Ishikawa, Akiyoshi; Asada, Yasuhide

    1998-01-01

    Tension-torsion biaxial ratcheting tests have been conducted with Advanced 316 Steel (316FR Steel) at 650 C under a cyclic strain rate of 10 -3 to 10 -5 s -1 . Accumulation of ratcheting strain has been measured. Accumulated ratchet strain has shown to be much larger than predicted based on a usual method of the linear superposition of strains due to creep and plasticity. The result shows there observed the creep-plasticity interaction in the observation. (orig.)

  9. Ratchetting deformation behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and applicability of existing constitutive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaguchi, Masatsugu; Takahashi, Yukio

    2001-01-01

    A series of ratchetting deformation tests was conducted on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at 550degC under uniaxial and multiaxial stress conditions. Ratchetting behavior depended on various parameters such as mean stress, stress/strain rate and those range, hold time and prior cyclic deformation. Under uniaxial conditions, untraditional ratchetting behavior was observed; the ratchetting deformation rate was the fastest when the stress ratio was equal to -1, while no ratchetting deformation was predicted by conventional constitutive models. In order to discuss the reason for this untraditional ratchetting behavior, a lot of monotonic compression tests were conducted and compared with tension data. The material showed a difference of deformation resistance of about 30 MPa between tension and compression at high strain rates. Furthermore, the authors' previous model and Ohno-Wang model were applied to the test conditions to evaluate their description capability for ratchetting behavior of the material. It was shown that the authors' model has a tendency to overestimate the ratchetting deformation and that the Ohno-Wang model has a tendency to underestimate the uniaxial ratchetting deformation at small stress rates. (author)

  10. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of self-propelled Leidenfrost droplets on ratchet surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Kang, Q. J.; Francois, M. M.; Hu, A. J.

    In this paper, the self-propelled motion of Leidenfrost droplets on ratchet surfaces is numerically investigated with a thermal multiphase lattice Boltzmann model with liquid-vapor phase change. The capability of the model for simulating evaporation is validated via the D2 law. Using the model, we first study the performances of Leidenfrost droplets on horizontal ratchet surfaces. It is numerically shown that the motion of self-propelled Leidenfrost droplets on ratchet surfaces is owing to the asymmetry of the ratchets and the vapor flows beneath the droplets. It is found that the Leidenfrost droplets move in the direction toward the slowly inclined side from the ratchet peaks, which agrees with the direction of droplet motion in experiments [Linke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2006, 96, 154502]. Moreover, the influences of the ratchet aspect ratio are investigated. For the considered ratchet surfaces, a critical value of the ratchet aspect ratio is approximately found, which corresponds to the maximum droplet moving velocity. Furthermore, the processes that the Leidenfrost droplets climb uphill on inclined ratchet surfaces are also studied. Numerical results show that the maximum inclination angle at which a Leidenfrost droplet can still climb uphill successfully is affected by the initial radius of the droplet.

  11. Clarification of strain limits considering the ratcheting fatigue strength of 316FR steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Nobuhiro; Sukekawa, Masayuki; Nakayama, Yasunari; Date, Shingo; Ohtani, Tomomi; Takahashi, Yukio; Kasahara, Naoto; Shibamoto, Hiroshi; Nagashima, Hideaki; Inoue, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    The effect of ratcheting on fatigue strength was investigated in order to rationalize the strain limit as a design criterion of commercialized fast reactor systems. Ratcheting fatigue tests were conducted at 550 deg. Duration of the ratchet straining was set for a certain number of strain cycles taking the loading condition of fast reactors into account, and the number of cycles for strain accumulation was defined as the ratchet-expired cycle. Fatigue lives decrease as the accumulated strain by ratcheting increases. Mean stress increased during the ratcheting cycle and its maximum value depended on the accumulated strain and the ratchet-expired cycle. Fatigue life reduction was negligible when the maximum mean stress was less than 25 MPa, corresponding to an accumulated strain of 2.2%. Accumulated strain is limited to 2% in the present design guidelines and this strain limit is considered effective to avoid reducing fatigue life by ratcheting. Microcrack growth behaviors were also investigated in these tests in order to discuss the life reduction mechanisms in ratcheting conditions

  12. Ratcheting of pressurized piping subjected to seismic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scavuzzo, R.J.; Lam, P.C.; Gau, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    The ABAQUS finite element code was used to model a pressurized pipe and subjected to cyclic bending loads to investigate ratcheting. A 1-in. schedule 40 pipe was loaded with a slow (static) cyclic load. The pipe internal pressure was varied from 0 to 6000 psi. In this paper, two types of materials were considered: an elastic perfectly plastic and a bilinear elastic-plastic material. Two types of finite elements of the ABAQUS program were compared to analytical solutions to evaluate the element accuracy in the plastic regime. Depending upon loading conditions and specified material properties, three different responses were observed from the finite element analyses: cyclic plasticity, ratcheting of the hoop strain, or shakedown. These analytical results are compared to some experimental measurements

  13. Pattern formation in plastic liquid films on elastomers by ratcheting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiangshui; Yang, Jiawei; Jin, Lihua; Clarke, David R; Suo, Zhigang

    2016-04-20

    Plastic liquids, also known as Bingham liquids, retain their shape when loads are small, but flow when loads exceed a threshold. We discovered that plastic liquid films coated on elastomers develop wavy patterns under cyclic loads. As the number of cycles increases, the wavelength of the patterns remains unchanged, but the amplitude of the patterns increases and then saturates. Because the patterns develop progressively under cyclic loads, we call this phenomenon as "patterning by ratcheting". We observe the phenomenon in plastic liquids of several kinds, and studied the effects of thickness, the cyclic frequency of the stretch, and the range of the stretch. Finite element simulations show that the ratcheting phenomenon can occur in materials described by a commonly used model of elastic-plastic deformation.

  14. A ratchet mechanism for low-frequency hearing in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Tobias; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2010-03-01

    The sensitivity and frequency selectivity of hearing result from tuned amplification by an active process in the mechanoreceptive hair cells. The nature of the active process in the mammalian cochlea is intensely debated, for outer hair cells exhibit two forms of mechanical activity, active hair-bundle motility and membrane-based electromotility. Here we show theoretically that active hair-bundle motility and electromotility can together implement an efficient mechanism for amplification that functions like a ratchet: sound-evoked forces acting on the basilar membrane are transmitted to the hair bundles while electromotility decouples the active hair-bundle forces from the basilar membrane. Through a combination of analytical and computational techniques we demonstrate that the ratchet mechanism can naturally account for a variety of unexplained experimental observations from low-frequency hearing.

  15. Evidence of ratchet effect in nanowires of a conducting polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, A.; Sanyal, M. K.; Gangopadhayy, R.; De, A.; Das, I.

    2005-01-01

    Ratchet effect, observed in many systems starting from living organism to artificially designed device, is a manifestation of motion in asymmetric potential. Here we report results of a conductivity study of Polypyrrole nanowires, which have been prepared by a simple method to generate a variation of doping concentration along the length. This variation gives rise to an asymmetric potential profile that hinders the symmetry of the hopping process of charges and hence the value of measured res...

  16. Seismic ratchet-fatigue failure of piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severud, L.K.; Anderson, M.J.; Lindquist, M.R.; Weiner, E.O.

    1986-01-01

    Failures of piping systems during earthquakes have been rare. Those that have failed were either made of brittle material such as cast iron, were rigid systems between major components where component relative seismic motions tore the pipe out of the component, or were high pressure systems where a ratchet-fatigue fracture followed a local bulging of the pipe diameter. Tests to failure of an unpressurized 3-in. and a pressurized 6-in. diameter carbon steel nuclear pipe systems subjected to high level shaking have been accomplished. Failure analyses of these tests are presented and correlated to the test results. It was found that failure of the unpressurized system could be correlated well with standard ASME type fatigue analysis predictions. Moreover, the pressurized system failure occurred in significantly less load cycles than predicted by standard fatigue analysis. However, a ratchet-fatigue and ductility exhaustion analysis of the pressurized system did correlate very well. These findings indicate modifications to design analysis methods and the present ASME Code piping design rules may be appropriate to cover the ratchet-fatigue failure mode

  17. Investigations on the ratchetting behaviour of austenitic pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, D.; Krolop, S.; Scheffold, A.; Stegmeyer, R.

    1994-01-01

    Reversed bending tests at room temperature with pipes with and without internal pressure were carried out. The pipes were manufactured from the austenitic steel X10 CrNiNb 18 9. Under internal pressure ratchetting was observed in circumferential direction. The component tests were accompanied by numerical computations using a nonlinear kinematic hardening rule and superposed isotropic hardening. In total the constitutive model needed 13 parameters to be fitted when isotropic hardening resulted in a cyclic saturation. Uniaxial monotonic and cyclic loading tests served for characterizing the material. A reasonable parameter fitting with respect to describe ratchetting required load controlled nonzero mean-stress tests. On condition, that the loading will lead to cyclic saturation, ratchetting could be well predicted in the pipe with the found set of parameters. An extension of the isotropic hardening rule in the constitutive model was proposed allowing to describe various types of isotropic hardening. In a first step it was shown that under uniaxial conditions the extension reproduces continuous isotropic hardening up to incipient cracking quite well. (orig.)

  18. Uniaxial ratcheting behavior of sintered nanosilver joint for electronic packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Gang; Yu, Lin; Mei, Yunhui; Li, Xin; Chen, Xu; Lu, Guo-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Uniaxial ratcheting behavior and the fatigue life of sintered nanosilver joint were investigated at room temperature. All tests were carried out under stress-controlled mode. Force–displacement data were recorded during the entire fatigue lifespan by a non-contact displacement detecting system. Effects of stress amplitude, mean stress, stress rate, and stress ratio on the uniaxial ratcheting behavior of the sintered nanosilver joint were discussed. Stress-life (S–N) curves of the sintered joints were also obtained. The Smith–Watson–Topper (SWT) model, the Gerber model and the modified Goodman model, all of which took effect of mean stress into consideration, were compared for predicting the fatigue life of the sintered joint. Both the ratcheting strain and its rate increased with increasing stress amplitude or mean stress. The increase in stress amplitude and mean stress both reduced the fatigue life of the sintered joint, while the fatigue life prolonged with the increase in stress rate and stress ratio. The modified Goodman model predicted the fatigue life of the sintered joints well

  19. Particle diode: Rectification of interacting Brownian ratchets

    OpenAIRE

    Ai, Bao-quan; He, Ya-feng; Zhong, Wei-rong

    2012-01-01

    Transport of Brownian particles interacting with each other via the Morse potential is investigated in the presence of an ac driving force applied locally at one end of the chain. By using numerical simulations, we find that the system can behave as a particle diode for both overdamped and underdamped cases. For low frequencies, the transport from the free end to the ac acting end is prohibited, while the transport from the ac acting end to the free end is permitted. However, the polarity of ...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1) The... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305..., or otherwise secured at once. (ii) Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing temperatures shall be supplied...

  1. Ratcheting failure of pressurised straight pipes and elbows under reversed bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnuvardhan, S.; Raghava, G.; Gandhi, P.; Saravanan, M.; Goyal, Sumit; Arora, Punit; Gupta, Suneel K.; Bhasin, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    Ratcheting studies were carried out on Type 304LN stainless steel straight pipes and elbows subjected to steady internal pressure and cyclic bending load. The internal pressure for all the straight pipes was 35 MPa and in the case of elbows the internal pressure was varied for different elbows, ranging from 27.6 MPa to 39.2 MPa. Cyclic bending load was applied on the specimens by subjecting them to different levels of load-line displacement. The specimens have undergone significant ratchet swelling (ballooning), ovalization and consequent thinning of the cross-section during ratcheting. The straight pipes failed either by occurrence of through-wall crack accompanied by simultaneous ballooning, or bursting with simultaneous ballooning. All the elbows failed by occurrence of through-wall crack accompanied by simultaneous ballooning. Ratcheting behaviour of straight pipes and elbows were compared and it was generally inferred that ratcheting was more pronounced in straight pipes than in elbows. -- Graphical abstract: Strain history for the specimen QCE-RAT-6-L1. Highlights: • Studies were carried out under combined internal pressure and cyclic bending. • Ratcheting strains were measured at critical locations of the specimens. • Quantified the percentage of ballooning, ovalization and reduction in thickness. • Modes of ratcheting failure of straight pipes and elbows are studied. • Inferred that ratcheting is more pronounced in straight pipes than in elbows

  2. Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking, Version 2(RATCHET2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdell, James V.; Rishel, Jeremy P.

    2006-07-01

    This manual describes the atmospheric model and computer code for the Atmospheric Transport Module within SAC. The Atmospheric Transport Module, called RATCHET2, calculates the time-integrated air concentration and surface deposition of airborne contaminants to the soil. The RATCHET2 code is an adaptation of the Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emissions Tracking (RATCHET). The original RATCHET code was developed to perform the atmospheric transport for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Fundamentally, the two sets of codes are identical; no capabilities have been deleted from the original version of RATCHET. Most modifications are generally limited to revision of the run-specification file to streamline the simulation process for SAC.

  3. Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Simonen, C.A.; Burk, K.W.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses that individuals may have received from operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. This report deals specifically with the atmospheric transport model, Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). RATCHET is a major rework of the MESOILT2 model used in the first phase of the HEDR Project; only the bookkeeping framework escaped major changes. Changes to the code include (1) significant changes in the representation of atmospheric processes and (2) incorporation of Monte Carlo methods for representing uncertainty in input data, model parameters, and coefficients. To a large extent, the revisions to the model are based on recommendations of a peer working group that met in March 1991. Technical bases for other portions of the atmospheric transport model are addressed in two other documents. This report has three major sections: a description of the model, a user's guide, and a programmer's guide. These sections discuss RATCHET from three different perspectives. The first provides a technical description of the code with emphasis on details such as the representation of the model domain, the data required by the model, and the equations used to make the model calculations. The technical description is followed by a user's guide to the model with emphasis on running the code. The user's guide contains information about the model input and output. The third section is a programmer's guide to the code. It discusses the hardware and software required to run the code. The programmer's guide also discusses program structure and each of the program elements

  4. Ratchet effect for nanoparticle transport in hair follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Matthias; Patzelt, Alexa; Knorr, Fanny; Lademann, Jürgen; Netz, Roland R

    2017-07-01

    The motion of a single rigid nanoparticle inside a hair follicle is investigated by means of Brownian dynamics simulations. The cuticular hair structure is modeled as a periodic asymmetric ratchet-shaped surface. Induced by oscillating radial hair motion we find directed nanoparticle transport into the hair follicle with maximal velocity at a specific optimal frequency and an optimal particle size. We observe flow reversal when switching from radial to axial oscillatory hair motion. We also study the diffusion behavior and find strongly enhanced diffusion for axial motion with a diffusivity significantly larger than for free diffusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Entropic Ratchet transport of interacting active Brownian particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai, Bao-Quan; He, Ya-Feng; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Directed transport of interacting active (self-propelled) Brownian particles is numerically investigated in confined geometries (entropic barriers). The self-propelled velocity can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the interaction between active particles can greatly affect the ratchet transport. For attractive particles, on increasing the interaction strength, the average velocity first decreases to its minima, then increases, and finally decreases to zero. For repulsive particles, when the interaction is very weak, there exists a critical interaction at which the average velocity is minimal, nearly tends to zero, however, for the strong interaction, the average velocity is independent of the interaction

  6. Geometrically controlled ratchet effect with collective vortex motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouco, V; Palau, A; Obradors, X; Puig, T; Monton, C; Del-Valle, N; Navau, C; Sanchez, A

    2015-01-01

    Rectified flux motion arising from the collective effect of many interacting vortices is obtained in a specially designed superconducting device. Ratchet structures with different asymmetric pinning potentials are generated by tuning the size, depth, and distribution of triangular blind-antidots in a high-temperature superconducting film. We experimentally and theoretically demonstrate that the amplitude and sign of the rectified vortex motion can be finely tuned with the pattern geometry. Two different dynamical regimes depending on the nature of vortices initiating the dissipation are identified, which can control the rectified vortex motion. (paper)

  7. Synchronization of linearly coupled networks of deterministic ratchets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Pingli; Yang Ying; Huang Lin

    2008-01-01

    This Letter focuses on the synchronization in a class of dynamical complex networks with each node being a deterministic ratchet. In virtue of the technique derived from pendulum-like nonlinear analytic theory and Kalman-Yakubovich-Popov (KYP) lemma, simple linear matrix inequality (LMI) formulations are established to guarantee the stable synchronization of such networks. An interesting conclusion is reached that the stability of synchronization in the coupled whole N-dimensional networks can be converted into that of the simplest 2-dimensional space

  8. Microfabricated ratchet structures for concentrating and patterning motile bacterial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Yub; Lee, Eun Se; Lee, Ho Jae; Lee, Se Yeon; Lee, Sung Kuk; Kim, Taesung

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel microfabricated concentrator for Escherichia coli that can be a stand-alone and self-contained microfluidic device because it utilizes the motility of cells. First of all, we characterize the motility of E. coli cells and various ratcheting structures that can guide cells to move in a desired direction in straight and circular channels. Then, we combine these ratcheting microstructures with the intrinsic tendency of cells to swim on the right side in microchannels to enhance the concentration rates up to 180 fold until the concentrators are fully filled with cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cells can be positioned and concentrated with a constant spacing distance on a surface, allowing spatial patterning of motile cells. These results can be applied to biosorption or biosensor devices that are powered by motile cells because they can be highly concentrated without any external mechanical and electrical energy sources. Hence, we believe that the concentrator design holds considerable potential to be applied for concentrating and patterning other motile microbes and providing a versatile structure for motility study of bacterial cells.

  9. Effect of Different Fluids on Rectified Motion of Leidenfrost Droplets on Micro/Sub-Micron Ratchets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Jeong Tae; Choi, Junseo; Brown, Emily; Park, Sunggook

    2016-06-01

    Leidenfrost droplets, liquid droplets placed on a hot flat surface above the Leidenfrost temperature of the liquid, are an interesting model system to understand and achieve frictionless motion of droplets on a surface. Controlled unidirectional motion of otherwise random Leidenfrost droplets can be achieved by replacing the flat surface by a surface with topological ratchets. In this study, we show how an increase in the vapor layer thickness below the Leidenfrost droplet influences the droplet motion for underlying ratchets with various periods ranging from 1.5mm down to 800nm. This was exploited by systematically studying the Leidenfrost droplet motion of various liquids with low boiling points including acetone, isopropanol, and R134a on the aforementioned various ratchets. For all liquids with boiling points lower than water, no unidirectional motion was observed for 800 nm. This indicates that the asymmetric vapor flow beneath the Leidenfrost droplet becomes negligible due to the large vapor layer thickness relative to the ratchet depth. However, unidirectional droplet motion was still observed for the micron and millimeter scale ratchets even when the ratchet surface temperature was increased up to 360°C and 230°C for acetone and isopropanol, respectively. This can be attributed to the insulating property of the thick vapor layer which prevent the droplet from producing more vapor with increasing temperature. We also report the effect of the ratchet period on the droplet motion at room temperature using R134a droplets.

  10. Electric generation and ratcheted transport of contact-charged drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Charles A.; Graybill, Jason R.; Bishop, Kyle J. M.

    2017-10-01

    We describe a simple microfluidic system that enables the steady generation and efficient transport of aqueous drops using only a constant voltage input. Drop generation is achieved through an electrohydrodynamic dripping mechanism by which conductive drops grow and detach from a grounded nozzle in response to an electric field. The now-charged drops are transported down a ratcheted channel by contact charge electrophoresis powered by the same voltage input used for drop generation. We investigate how the drop size, generation frequency, and transport velocity depend on system parameters such as the liquid viscosity, interfacial tension, applied voltage, and channel dimensions. The observed trends are well explained by a series of scaling analyses that provide insight into the dominant physical mechanisms underlying drop generation and ratcheted transport. We identify the conditions necessary for achieving reliable operation and discuss the various modes of failure that can arise when these conditions are violated. Our results demonstrate that simple electric inputs can power increasingly complex droplet operations with potential opportunities for inexpensive and portable microfluidic systems.

  11. Studies on the creep ratcheting behaviour of tube specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zottmaier, R.; Over, H.H.; Schubert, F.; Nickel, H.

    1985-09-01

    By superimposing cyclic secondary stresses sigmasub(T) additionally to a constant primary stress sigmasub(p), significant enhanced creep rates of structural components at very high temperatures may be the result. This effect is known as 'Creep Ratcheting' or 'Incremental Growth'. It may occur due to cyclic variations of thermal stresses in the walls of heat exchanger - or chemical reformer-tubes for example. The creep ratcheting effect was evaluated experimentally by comparing the creep behaviour of metallic tube specimens under constant axial load P with and without superimposed cyclic thermal stresses across the tube wall. For theoretical analysis a numerical computer programme has been developed. The tests on lead specimens at temperatures of up to 100 0 C and on the high temperature alloy X10 NiCrAlTi 32 20 H of up to 950 0 C showed no significant enhanced stationary creep rates for the stress relations sigmasub(T)/sigmasub(p) 2) the creep rate increased up to a factor of 15 compared to the creep behavior with the same primary stress as the only effective load. The results of the numerical computer programme developed for this paper and of a Finite Element Analysis showed good consistency with the experimental data only when the temperature dependence of the stationary creep rate and the shape of the time-temperature cycles of the thermal load variations were considered. (orig.) [de

  12. Thermally driven flows between a Leidenfrost solid and a ratchet surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Steffen; Tiwari, Sudarshan; Baier, Tobias

    2013-06-01

    The significance of thermally driven flows for the propulsion of Leidenfrost solids on a ratchet surface is studied based on a numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation. The resulting flow patterns are dominated by vortices developing at the edges of the ratchet teeth. In a previous analysis it had been claimed that thermally driven flows could cause the propulsion of Leidenfrost objects. In contrast to that analysis, it is found that such flows make an insignificant contribution to the thrust of Leidenfrost solids on ratchet surfaces, which is dominated by the pressure-driven flow due to the sublimating solid.

  13. Ratcheting deformation of advanced 316 steel under creep-plasticity condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, Fumiko; Ishikawa, Akiyoshi; Asada, Yasuhide [Tokai Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-11-01

    Tension-torsion biaxial ratcheting tests have been conducted with Advanced 316 Steel (316FR Steel) at 650 C under a cyclic strain rate of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}. Accumulation of ratcheting strain has been measured. Accumulated ratchet strain has shown to be much larger than predicted based on a usual method of the linear superposition of strains due to creep and plasticity. The result shows there observed the creep-plasticity interaction in the observation. (orig.)

  14. Experimental study on uniaxial ratcheting deformation and failure behavior of 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xianjie; Gao Qing; Cai Lixun; Liu Yujie

    2004-01-01

    In the paper, the tests of cyclic strain ratcheting and low cycle fatigue for 304 stainless steel under uniaxial cyclic straining were carried out to systematically explore the deformation and failure behavior of the material. The experimental study shows that the cyclic strain ratcheting deformation behavior of the material is different from either the uniaxial monotonic tensile one or the cyclic deformation one under the symmetrical cyclic straining with the same strain amplitude, and the strain ratcheting deformation and failure behaviors depend on both the plastic strain amplitude and the strain increment at the cyclic maximum strain. Some significant results were observed

  15. Current-driven domain wall motion based memory devices: Application to a ratchet ferromagnetic strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Tejerina, Luis; Martínez, Eduardo; Raposo, Víctor; Alejos, Óscar

    2018-04-01

    Ratchet memories, where perpendicular magnetocristalline anisotropy is tailored so as to precisely control the magnetic transitions, has been recently proven to be a feasible device to store and manipulate data bits. For such devices, it has been shown that the current-driven regime of domain walls can improve their performances with respect to the field-driven one. However, the relaxing time required by the traveling domain walls constitutes a certain drawback if the former regime is considered, since it results in longer device latencies. In order to speed up the bit shifting procedure, it is demonstrated here that the application of a current of inverse polarity during the DW relaxing time may reduce such latencies. The reverse current must be sufficiently high as to drive the DW to the equilibrium position faster than the anisotropy slope itself, but with an amplitude sufficiently low as to avoid DW backward shifting. Alternatively, it is possible to use such a reverse current to increase the proper range of operation for a given relaxing time, i.e., the pair of values of the current amplitude and pulse time that ensures single DW jumps for a certain latency time.

  16. Ratchet analysis of piping systems by dynamic elasto-plastic FEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hisada, Toshiaki; Nakatogawa, Tetsundo; Oketani, Koichiro; Iriki, Nobuyoshi

    1998-01-01

    Ratchet is a phenomenon that local plastic strain accumulates when a highly pressurized piping system repeats yielding and unloading under cyclic loading such as bending and torsion. In this paper an elasto-plastic FE analysis program is developed for the dynamic design of piping systems in which ratchet is anticipated. For this purpose, geometrically nonlinear elasto-plastic solid elements are employed to model the part where ratchet may occur and the rest of the piping system is modeled by pipe elements. These two parts are combined each other by the penalty method. Through a numerical example it is demonstrated that ratchet is successfully simulated during the dynamic analysis of a piping system and it influences the dynamic response of the whole system. (author)

  17. Condition of the ratchet effect of a magnetic domain wall motion under an asymmetric potential energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Hong-Guang; Zhang, Xiaozhong; Choi, Hyeok-Cheol; Kim, Dong-Hyun; You, Chun-Yeol

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated the ratchet effect of magnetic domain wall (DW) motion in a straight ferromagnetic nanowire under ac magnetic field by means of micromagnetic simulation. A structure-stable DW ratchet effect along the ferromagnetic nanowire is observed utilizing an asymmetric potential produced by a nonuniform magnetostatic stray field from an array of a periodic non-contact trapezoidal stubs. A diode-like consecutive operation process for a transverse DW motion is examined with variation of the ac field frequency and amplitude, where the necessary conditions for the DW ratchet effect are systematically examined. We have also obtained the empirical relation between a DW velocity of the ratchet effect and the ac field frequency and amplitude.

  18. Firm Innovation and the Ratchet Effect Among Consumer Packaged Goods Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Moorman; Simone Wies; Natalie Mizik; Fredrika J. Spencer

    2012-01-01

    We consider how public firms influence their stock market valuations by timing the introduction of innovative new products. Our focus is on innovation ratchet strategy --firms timing the introduction of innovations in order to demonstrate an improvement in the number of introductions over time. We document that public firms use an innovation ratchet strategy more often than do private firms and that the stock market rewards public firms for doing so. These rewards from the stock market, howev...

  19. A three-bar model for ratcheting of fusion reactor first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolters, J.; Majumdar, S.

    1994-12-01

    First wall structures of fusion reactors are subjected to cyclic bending stresses caused by inhomogeneous temperature distribution during plasma burn cycles and by electromagnetically induced impact loads during plasma disruptions. Such a combination of loading can potentially lead to ratcheting or incremental accumulation of plastic strain with cycles. An elastic-plastic three-bar model is developed to investigate the ratcheting behavior of the first wall

  20. Can vocal conditioning trigger a semiotic ratchet in marmosets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turesson, Hjalmar K; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of human communication has often been taken as evidence that our language reflects a true evolutionary leap, bearing little resemblance to any other animal communication system. The putative uniqueness of the human language poses serious evolutionary and ethological challenges to a rational explanation of human communication. Here we review ethological, anatomical, molecular, and computational results across several species to set boundaries for these challenges. Results from animal behavior, cognitive psychology, neurobiology, and semiotics indicate that human language shares multiple features with other primate communication systems, such as specialized brain circuits for sensorimotor processing, the capability for indexical (pointing) and symbolic (referential) signaling, the importance of shared intentionality for associative learning, affective conditioning and parental scaffolding of vocal production. The most substantial differences lie in the higher human capacity for symbolic compositionality, fast vertical transmission of new symbols across generations, and irreversible accumulation of novel adaptive behaviors (cultural ratchet). We hypothesize that increasingly-complex vocal conditioning of an appropriate animal model may be sufficient to trigger a semiotic ratchet, evidenced by progressive sign complexification, as spontaneous contact calls become indexes, then symbols and finally arguments (strings of symbols). To test this hypothesis, we outline a series of conditioning experiments in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). The experiments are designed to probe the limits of vocal communication in a prosocial, highly vocal primate 35 million years far from the human lineage, so as to shed light on the mechanisms of semiotic complexification and cultural transmission, and serve as a naturalistic behavioral setting for the investigation of language disorders.

  1. Can vocal conditioning trigger a semiotic ratchet in marmosets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjalmar Kosmos Turesson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of human communication has often been taken as evidence that our language reflects a true evolutionary leap, bearing little resemblance to any other animal communication system. The putative uniqueness of the human language poses serious evolutionary and ethological challenges to a rational explanation of human communication. Here we review ethological, anatomical, molecular and computational results across several species to set boundaries for these challenges. Results from animal behavior, cognitive psychology, neurobiology, and semiotics indicate that human language shares multiple features with other primate communication systems, such as specialized brain circuits for sensorimotor processing, the capability for indexical (pointing and symbolic (referential signaling, the importance of shared intentionality for associative learning, affective conditioning and parental scaffolding of vocal production. The most substantial differences lie in the higher human capacity for symbolic compositionality, fast vertical transmission of new symbols across generations, and irreversible accumulation of novel adaptive behaviors (cultural ratchet. We hypothesize that increasingly-complex vocal conditioning of an appropriate animal model may be sufficient to trigger a semiotic ratchet, evidenced by progressive sign complexification, as spontaneous contact calls become indexes, then symbols and finally arguments (strings of symbols. To test this hypothesis, we outline a series of conditioning experiments in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus. The experiments are designed to probe the limits of vocal communication in a prosocial, highly vocal primate 35 million years far from the human lineage, so as to shed light on the mechanisms of semiotic complexification and cultural transmission, and serve as a naturalistic behavioral setting for the investigation of language disorders.

  2. Can vocal conditioning trigger a semiotic ratchet in marmosets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turesson, Hjalmar K.; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of human communication has often been taken as evidence that our language reflects a true evolutionary leap, bearing little resemblance to any other animal communication system. The putative uniqueness of the human language poses serious evolutionary and ethological challenges to a rational explanation of human communication. Here we review ethological, anatomical, molecular, and computational results across several species to set boundaries for these challenges. Results from animal behavior, cognitive psychology, neurobiology, and semiotics indicate that human language shares multiple features with other primate communication systems, such as specialized brain circuits for sensorimotor processing, the capability for indexical (pointing) and symbolic (referential) signaling, the importance of shared intentionality for associative learning, affective conditioning and parental scaffolding of vocal production. The most substantial differences lie in the higher human capacity for symbolic compositionality, fast vertical transmission of new symbols across generations, and irreversible accumulation of novel adaptive behaviors (cultural ratchet). We hypothesize that increasingly-complex vocal conditioning of an appropriate animal model may be sufficient to trigger a semiotic ratchet, evidenced by progressive sign complexification, as spontaneous contact calls become indexes, then symbols and finally arguments (strings of symbols). To test this hypothesis, we outline a series of conditioning experiments in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). The experiments are designed to probe the limits of vocal communication in a prosocial, highly vocal primate 35 million years far from the human lineage, so as to shed light on the mechanisms of semiotic complexification and cultural transmission, and serve as a naturalistic behavioral setting for the investigation of language disorders. PMID:26500583

  3. Robust unidirectional rotation in three-tooth Brownian rotary ratchet systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutu, Hiroki; Nagata, Soichiro

    2013-02-01

    We apply a simple Brownian ratchet model to an artificial molecular rotary system mounted in a biological membrane, in which the rotor always maintains unidirectional rotation in response to a linearly polarized weak ac field. Because the rotor and stator compose a ratchet system, we describe the motion of the rotor tip with the Langevin equation for a particle in a two-dimensional three-tooth ratchet potential of threefold symmetry. Unidirectional rotation can be induced under the field and optimized by stochastic resonance, wherein the mean angular momentum (MAM) of the rotor exhibits a bell-shaped curve for the noise strength. We obtain analytical expressions for the MAM and power loss from the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation, via a Markov transition model for coarse-grained states (six-state model). The MAM expression reveals a significant effect depending on the chirality of the ratchet potential: in achiral cases, the MAM approximately vanishes with respect to the polarization angle ϕ of the field; in chiral cases, the MAM does not crucially depend on ϕ, but depends on the direction of the ratchet; i.e., the parity of the unidirectional rotation is inherent in the ratchet structure. This feature is useful for artificial rotary systems to maintain robust unidirectional rotation independent of the mounting condition.

  4. Preliminary development of flaw evaluation procedures for delayed hydride cracking initiation under hydride non-ratcheting conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, S.; Cui, J.; Kawa, D.; Shek, G.K.; Scarth, D.A. [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The flaw evaluation procedure for Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) initiation currently provided in the CSA Standard N285.8 was developed for hydride ratcheting conditions, in which flaw-tip hydrides do not completely dissolve at peak temperature. Test results have shown that hydrided regions formed under non-ratcheting conditions, in which flaw-tip hydrides completely dissolve at peak temperature, have significantly higher resistance to cracking than those formed under ratcheting conditions. This paper presents some preliminary work on the development of a procedure for the evaluation of DHC initiation for flaws under hydride non-ratcheting conditions. (author)

  5. Dislocation evolution in 316 L stainless steel during multiaxial ratchetting deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yawei; Kang Guozheng; Liu Yujie; Wang Hong; Cheng Xiaojuan

    2012-01-01

    Dislocation patterns and their evolutions in 316 L stainless steel during the multiaxial ratchetting deformation were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microscopic observations indicate that the dislocation evolution presented during the multiaxial ratchetting with four kinds of multiaxial loading paths is similar to that in the uniaxial case [G. Z. Kang et al., Mater Sci Eng A 527 (2010) 5952]. That is, dislocation networks and dislocation tangles are formed quickly by the multiple-slip and cross-slip of dislocation activated by applied multiaxial stress; and then polarized patterns such as dislocation walls and elongated incipient dislocation cells are formed at the last stage of multiaxial ratchetting. The dislocation patterns evolve more quickly from the modes at low dislocation density to the ones at high density during the multiaxial ratchetting than that in the uniaxial case, and some traces of multiple-slip are observed in the multiaxial ones. The dislocation evolution during the multiaxial ratchetting deformation is summarized by comparing the observed dislocation patterns with those presented in the multiaxial strain-controlled and symmetrical stress-controlled cyclic tests. The multiaxial ratchetting of 316 L stainless steel can be microscopically and qualitatively explained by the observed evolution of dislocation patterns. - Highlights: ► Dislocation patterns change from lines and nets to tangles, walls and cells. ► Dislocation patterns evolve quicker in the multiaxial case. ► Aligned dislocation arrays and some traces of multiple slips are observed. ► Heterogeneous dislocation patterns result in the multiaxial ratchetting.

  6. Ratcheting study in pressurized piping components under cyclic loading at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi Kiran, A.; Agrawal, M.K.; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2006-07-01

    The nuclear power plant piping components and systems are often subjected to reversing cyclic loading conditions due to various process transients, seismic and other events. Earlier the design of piping subjected to seismic excitation was based on the principle of plastic collapse. It is believed that during such events, fatigue-ratcheting is likely mode of failure of piping components. The 1995 ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel code, Section-III, has incorporated the reverse dynamic loading and ratcheting into the code. Experimental and analytical studies are carried out to understand this failure mechanism. The biaxial ratcheting characteristics of SA 333, Gr. 6 steel and SS 304 stainless steel at room temperature are investigated in the present work. Experiments are carried out on straight pipes subjected to internal pressure and cyclic bending load applied in a three point and four point bend test configurations. A shake table test is also carried out on a pressurized elbow by applying sinusoidal base excitation. Analytical simulation of ratcheting in the piping elements is carried out. Chaboche nonlinear kinematic hardening model is used for ratcheting simulation. (author)

  7. Modelling of ratchetting with the Chaboche elastoplastic model modified by Burlet and Cailletaud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyer, P.

    1994-01-01

    A fine modelling of the material's behaviour can be necessary to study the mechanical strength of nuclear power plant's components under cyclic loads. The modelling of cyclic plasticity made great progress during the past 20 years. Ratchetting is one of the last phenomena for which numerical models have to be improved. We give in this document a state of the art report on research in this field. We notably show the basically different character of ratchetting in uniaxial and biaxial loading tests, usually distinguished as 1D and 2D ratchetting. On the basis of this overview, we selected the kinematic hardening formulation proposed by Burlet and Cailletaud, which we coupled with the Chaboche elastoplastic model with two non linear kinematic hardening variables to improve the modelling of 2D ratchetting. We use the experimental results on the austenitic steel 316L at 20 and 300 deg C under uniaxial loadings (low cycle fatigue) and biaxial loadings (traction-torsion) to study the new model capabilities. We get a good modelling of ratchetting in biaxial loadings. The model has been installed in the ASTER code under the name of UBRLET. It now has to be qualified by component analysis calculations. (author). 25 refs., 30 figs., 11 tabs., 3 annexes

  8. Emergent dynamic chirality in a thermally driven artificial spin ratchet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliga, Sebastian; Hrkac, Gino; Donnelly, Claire; Büchi, Jonathan; Kleibert, Armin; Cui, Jizhai; Farhan, Alan; Kirk, Eugenie; Chopdekar, Rajesh V.; Masaki, Yusuke; Bingham, Nicholas S.; Scholl, Andreas; Stamps, Robert L.; Heyderman, Laura J.

    2017-11-01

    Modern nanofabrication techniques have opened the possibility to create novel functional materials, whose properties transcend those of their constituent elements. In particular, tuning the magnetostatic interactions in geometrically frustrated arrangements of nanoelements called artificial spin ice can lead to specific collective behaviour, including emergent magnetic monopoles, charge screening and transport, as well as magnonic response. Here, we demonstrate a spin-ice-based active material in which energy is converted into unidirectional dynamics. Using X-ray photoemission electron microscopy we show that the collective rotation of the average magnetization proceeds in a unique sense during thermal relaxation. Our simulations demonstrate that this emergent chiral behaviour is driven by the topology of the magnetostatic field at the edges of the nanomagnet array, resulting in an asymmetric energy landscape. In addition, a bias field can be used to modify the sense of rotation of the average magnetization. This opens the possibility of implementing a magnetic Brownian ratchet, which may find applications in novel nanoscale devices, such as magnetic nanomotors, actuators, sensors or memory cells.

  9. An epistatic ratchet constrains the direction of glucocorticoid receptor evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridgham, Jamie T.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Thornton, Joseph W.; (Emory-MED); (Oregon)

    2010-10-28

    The extent to which evolution is reversible has long fascinated biologists. Most previous work on the reversibility of morphological and life-history evolution has been indecisive, because of uncertainty and bias in the methods used to infer ancestral states for such characters. Further, despite theoretical work on the factors that could contribute to irreversibility, there is little empirical evidence on its causes, because sufficient understanding of the mechanistic basis for the evolution of new or ancestral phenotypes is seldom available. By studying the reversibility of evolutionary changes in protein structure and function, these limitations can be overcome. Here we show, using the evolution of hormone specificity in the vertebrate glucocorticoid receptor as a case-study, that the evolutionary path by which this protein acquired its new function soon became inaccessible to reverse exploration. Using ancestral gene reconstruction, protein engineering and X-ray crystallography, we demonstrate that five subsequent 'restrictive' mutations, which optimized the new specificity of the glucocorticoid receptor, also destabilized elements of the protein structure that were required to support the ancestral conformation. Unless these ratchet-like epistatic substitutions are restored to their ancestral states, reversing the key function-switching mutations yields a non-functional protein. Reversing the restrictive substitutions first, however, does nothing to enhance the ancestral function. Our findings indicate that even if selection for the ancestral function were imposed, direct reversal would be extremely unlikely, suggesting an important role for historical contingency in protein evolution.

  10. Modified Feynman ratchet with velocity-dependent fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Denur

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The randomness of Brownian motion at thermodynamic equilibrium can be spontaneously broken by velocity-dependence of fluctuations, i.e., by dependence of values or probability distributions of fluctuating properties on Brownian-motional velocity. Such randomness-breaking can spontaneously obtain via interaction between Brownian-motional Doppler effects --- which manifest the required velocity-dependence --- and system geometrical asymmetry. A non random walk is thereby spontaneously superposed on Brownian motion, resulting in a systematic net drift velocity despite thermodynamic equilibrium. The time evolution of this systematic net drift velocity --- and of velocity probability density, force, and power output --- is derived for a velocity-dependent modification of Feynman's ratchet. We show that said spontaneous randomness-breaking, and consequent systematic net drift velocity, imply: bias from the Maxwellian of the system's velocity probability density, the force that tends to accelerate it, and its power output. Maximization, especially of power output, is discussed. Uncompensated decreases in total entropy, challenging the second law of thermodynamics, are thereby implied.

  11. Crossed ratchet effects on magnetic domain walls: geometry and transverse field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alija, A; Hierro-Rodriguez, A; Perez-Junquera, A; Alameda, J M; Martin, J I; Velez, M, E-mail: mvelez@uniovi.es [Dept. Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2011-08-17

    Domain wall propagation across a 2D array of asymmetric holes is strongly dependent on the domain wall configuration: i.e. on whether the wall is flat or kinked. This results in interesting crossed ratchet and asymmetric accommodation effects that have been studied as a function of geometry and transverse field. Micromagnetic simulations have shown that the observation of crossed ratchet effects is easier for arrow than for triangular holes due to a larger field range in which kink propagation is the preferred mode for domain wall motion. Also, it has been found that dc transverse fields can produce a significant enhancement of the easy axis asymmetric accommodation and, also, that ac transverse fields can be rectified by the crossed ratchet potential.

  12. Ratcheting of 316L stainless steel thin wire under tension-torsion loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sichao Fu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of cyclic tension-torsion tests under symmetric shear strain and asymmetric axial stress control in various loading paths are conducted on 100 μm-diameter 316L steel wires applying a micro tensiontorsion fatigue testing apparatus. The ratcheting strain of the thin wire increases with increasing axial mean stress and decreases in a sequence of linear, rhombic and circular paths. The macro-scale based cyclic plastic constitutive models with kinematic hardening rules of the Ohno-Wang (OW and the Chen-Jiao-Kim (C-J-K are evaluated for the thin wire. Comparing with the O-W, the C-J-K predicts more accurately under high axial stress. While the loading path effects on ratcheting for wire specimens are basically simulated, the macro-based models tend to under-estimate the effect of phase difference between axial and torsional loadings and the ratcheting evolution in the initial 50 cycles

  13. Ratcheting fatigue behaviour of Al-7075 T6 alloy: Influence of stress parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarnath, Lala; Bhattacharjee, Antara; Dutta, K.

    2016-02-01

    The use of aluminium and aluminium based alloys are increasing rapidly on account of its high formability, good thermal and electrical conductivity, high strength and lightness. Aluminium alloys are extensively used in aerospace, automobile, marine and space research industries and are also put into structural applications where chances of fatigue damage cannot be ruled out. In the current work, it is intended to study the ratcheting fatigue behavior of 7075-T6 aluminium alloy at room temperature. This Al alloy is potentially used in aviation, marine and automotive components as well as in bicycle parts, rock mounting equipment and parts of ammunition where there is every chance of failure of the parts due to deformation caused by ratcheting. Ratcheting is the process of accruement of plastic stain produced when a component is subjected to asymmetric cyclic loading under the influence of low cycle fatigue. To accomplish the requirements of the projected research, stress-controlled cyclic loading experiments were done using a ±250 kN servo-hydraulic universal testing machine (Instron: 8800R). The effect of stress parameters such as mean stress and stress amplitude were investigated on the ratcheting behavior of the selected aluminium alloy. It was observed that, ratcheting strain increased with increase in the value of stress amplitude at any constant mean stress while a saturation in strain accumulation attained in the investigated material after around 10-20 cycles, under all test conditions. The analyses of hysteresis loop generated during cyclic loading indicate that the material exhibits cyclic hardening in the initial fifty cycles which gets softened in further loading up to about 70-80 cycles and finally attains a steady state. The increase in the ratcheting strain value with stress parameters happens owing to increased deformation domain during cycling. The cyclic hardening accompanied by softening is correlated with characteristic precipitation features of

  14. Ratcheting fatigue behaviour of Al-7075 T6 alloy: Influence of stress parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarnath, Lala; Bhattacharjee, Antara; Dutta, K.

    2016-01-01

    The use of aluminium and aluminium based alloys are increasing rapidly on account of its high formability, good thermal and electrical conductivity, high strength and lightness. Aluminium alloys are extensively used in aerospace, automobile, marine and space research industries and are also put into structural applications where chances of fatigue damage cannot be ruled out. In the current work, it is intended to study the ratcheting fatigue behavior of 7075-T6 aluminium alloy at room temperature. This Al alloy is potentially used in aviation, marine and automotive components as well as in bicycle parts, rock mounting equipment and parts of ammunition where there is every chance of failure of the parts due to deformation caused by ratcheting. Ratcheting is the process of accruement of plastic stain produced when a component is subjected to asymmetric cyclic loading under the influence of low cycle fatigue. To accomplish the requirements of the projected research, stress-controlled cyclic loading experiments were done using a ±250 kN servo-hydraulic universal testing machine (Instron: 8800R). The effect of stress parameters such as mean stress and stress amplitude were investigated on the ratcheting behavior of the selected aluminium alloy. It was observed that, ratcheting strain increased with increase in the value of stress amplitude at any constant mean stress while a saturation in strain accumulation attained in the investigated material after around 10-20 cycles, under all test conditions. The analyses of hysteresis loop generated during cyclic loading indicate that the material exhibits cyclic hardening in the initial fifty cycles which gets softened in further loading up to about 70-80 cycles and finally attains a steady state. The increase in the ratcheting strain value with stress parameters happens owing to increased deformation domain during cycling. The cyclic hardening accompanied by softening is correlated with characteristic precipitation features of

  15. GaAs-Based Nanowire Devices with Multiple Asymmetric Gates for Electrical Brownian Ratchets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Nakano, Yuki; Kasai, Seiya

    2013-06-01

    GaAs-based nanowire devices having multiple asymmetric gates for electrical Brownian ratchets were fabricated and characterized. From three-dimensional potential simulation results and current-voltage characteristics, we confirmed the formation of the asymmetric potential in our device design. Direct current was generated at room temperature by repeatedly switching the potential in a multiple-asymmetric-gate device on and off. Such current was not observed in either a single-asymmetric-gate device or a multiple-symmetric-gate device. The current direction and input frequency dependences of the net current indicated that the observed current was generated by the flashing-ratchet mechanism.

  16. The Six-Inch Lunar Atlas A Pocket Field Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Spain, Don

    2009-01-01

    The Six-Inch Lunar Atlas has been designed specifically for use in the field by lunar observers so it’s perfect for fitting into an observer’s pocket! The author’s own lunar photographs were taken with a 6-inch (150mm) telescope and CCD camera, and closely match the visual appearance of the Moon when viewed through 3-inch to 8-inch telescopes. Each picture is shown oriented "as the Moon really is" when viewed from the northern hemisphere, and is supplemented by exquisite computer sketches that list the main features. Two separate computer sketches are provided to go with each photograph, one oriented to appear as seen through an SCT telescope (e.g. the Meade and Celestron ranges), the other oriented for Newtonian and refracting telescopes. Observers using the various types telescopes will find it extremely helpful to identify lunar features as the human brain is very poor at making "mirror-image" visual translations.

  17. Aerosol Research Branch (ARB) 48 inch Lidar Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ARB_48_IN_LIDAR data set contains data collected from a 48-inch lidar system located at NASA Langley Research Center. Each granule consists of one year of data....

  18. 16 CFR 500.19 - Conversion of SI metric quantities to inch/pound quantities and inch/pound quantities to SI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .../pound quantities and inch/pound quantities to SI metric quantities. 500.19 Section 500.19 Commercial... LABELING ACT § 500.19 Conversion of SI metric quantities to inch/pound quantities and inch/pound quantities to SI metric quantities. (a) For calculating the conversion of SI metric quantities to inch/pound...

  19. Development of 52 inches last stage blade for steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Atsuhide; Hisa, Shoichi; Nagao, Shinichiro; Ogata, Hisao

    1986-01-01

    The last stage blades of steam turbines are the important component controlling the power output and performance of plants. In order to realize a unit of large capacity and high efficiency, the proper exhaust area and the last stage blades having good performance are indispensable. Toshiba Corp. has completed the development of the 52 inch last stage blades for 1500 and 1800 rpm steam turbines. The 52 inch last stage blades are the longest in the world, which have the annular exhaust area nearly 1.5 times as much as that of 41 inch blades used for 1100 MW, 1500 rpm turbines in nuclear power stations. By adopting these 52 inch blades, the large capacity nuclear power plants up to 1800 MW can be economically constructed, the rate of heat consumption of 1350 MW plants is improved by 3 ∼ 4 % as compared with 41 inch blades, and in the plants up to 1100 MW, LP turbines can be reduced from three sets to two. The features of 52 inch blades, the flow pattern and blade form design, the structural strength analysis and the erosion withstanding property, and the verification by the rotation test of the actual blades, the performance test using a test turbine, the vibration analysis of the actually loaded blades and the analysis of wet steam behavior are reported. (Kako, I.)

  20. Self-Rotation-Induced Propulsion of a Leidenfrost Drop on a Ratchet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrinal, Manjarik; Wang, Xiang; Luo, Cheng

    2017-06-27

    A Leidenfrost drop is capable of self-propelling on a ratchet, which consists of asymmetric teeth. In this work, the corresponding movements were first experimentally investigated. Because the detected motion could not be interpreted using existing propulsive mechanisms, a new propulsive mechanism was then developed, followed by force analysis using a scaling law.

  1. Muller's Ratchet and compensatory mutation in Caenorhabditis briggsae mitochondrial genome evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denver Dee R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The theory of Muller' Ratchet predicts that small asexual populations are doomed to accumulate ever-increasing deleterious mutation loads as a consequence of the magnified power of genetic drift and mutation that accompanies small population size. Evidence for Muller's Ratchet and knowledge on its underlying molecular mechanisms, however, are lacking for natural populations. Results We characterized mitochondrial genome evolutionary processes in Caenorhabditis briggsae natural isolates to show that numerous lineages experience a high incidence of nonsynonymous substitutions in protein-coding genes and accumulate unusual deleterious noncoding DNA stretches with associated heteroplasmic function-disrupting genome deletions. Isolate-specific deletion proportions correlated negatively with nematode fecundity, suggesting that these deletions might negatively affect C. briggsae fitness. However, putative compensatory mutations were also observed that are predicted to reduce heteroplasmy levels of deleterious deletions. Paradoxically, compensatory mutations were observed in one major intraspecific C. briggsae clade where population sizes are estimated to be very small (and selection is predicted to be relatively weak, but not in a second major clade where population size estimates are much larger and selection is expected to be more efficient. Conclusion This study provides evidence that the mitochondrial genomes of animals evolving in nature are susceptible to Muller's Ratchet, suggests that context-dependent compensatory mutations can accumulate in small populations, and predicts that Muller's Ratchet can affect fundamental evolutionary forces such as the rate of mutation.

  2. Structural parameter dependence of directed current generation in GaAs nanowire-based electron Brownian ratchet devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yushi; Kuroda, Ryota; Ying, Xiang; Sato, Masaki; Tanaka, Takayuki; Kasai, Seiya

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the structural parameter dependence of the directed current in GaAs-nanowire-based Brownian ratchet devices. The directed current was generated by flashing a ratchet potential array repeatedly using multiple asymmetric gates with a periodic signal. The amount of current in the fabricated device increased as the nanowire width W decreased, which contradicted the theoretical model. The current also depended on the number of the gates N, when N was smaller than 6. We discussed the obtained results in terms of the structural parameter dependence of carrier transfer efficiency and the effect of electron reservoirs on current generation in flashing ratchet operation.

  3. Structural parameter dependence of directed current generation in GaAs nanowire-based electron Brownian ratchet devices

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, Yushi; Kuroda, Ryota; Ying, Xiang; Sato, Masaki; Tanaka, Takayuki; Kasai, Seiya

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the structural parameter dependence of the directed current in GaAs-nanowire-based Brownian ratchet devices. The directed current was generated by flashing a ratchet potential array repeatedly using multiple asymmetric gates with a periodic signal. The amount of current in the fabricated device increased as the nanowire width W decreased, which contradicted the theoretical model. The current also depended on the number of the gates N, when N was smaller than 6. We discussed th...

  4. Extended Parrondo's game and Brownian ratchets: Strong and weak Parrondo effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Degang; Szeto, Kwok Yip

    2014-02-01

    Inspired by the flashing ratchet, Parrondo's game presents an apparently paradoxical situation. Parrondo's game consists of two individual games, game A and game B. Game A is a slightly losing coin-tossing game. Game B has two coins, with an integer parameter M. If the current cumulative capital (in discrete unit) is a multiple of M, an unfavorable coin pb is used, otherwise a favorable pg coin is used. Paradoxically, a combination of game A and game B could lead to a winning game, which is the Parrondo effect. We extend the original Parrondo's game to include the possibility of M being either M1 or M2. Also, we distinguish between strong Parrondo effect, i.e., two losing games combine to form a winning game, and weak Parrondo effect, i.e., two games combine to form a better-performing game. We find that when M2 is not a multiple of M1, the combination of B (M1) and B (M2) has strong and weak Parrondo effect for some subsets in the parameter space (pb,pg), while there is neither strong nor weak effect when M2 is a multiple of M1. Furthermore, when M2 is not a multiple of M1, a stochastic mixture of game A may cancel the strong and weak Parrondo effect. Following a discretization scheme in the literature of Parrondo's game, we establish a link between our extended Parrondo's game with the analysis of discrete Brownian ratchet. We find a relation between the Parrondo effect of our extended model to the macroscopic bias in a discrete ratchet. The slope of a ratchet potential can be mapped to the fair game condition in the extended model, so that under some conditions, the macroscopic bias in a discrete ratchet can provide a good predictor for the game performance of the extended model. On the other hand, our extended model suggests a design of a ratchet in which the potential is a mixture of two periodic potentials.

  5. Ratchet composite thin film for low-temperature self-propelled Leidenfrost droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ruotao; Zhao, Wenjie; Wu, Xuedong; Xue, Qunji

    2012-02-01

    The droplet control, especially for the self-propelled Leidenfrost droplet, has attracted many researchers' attention in applied and fundamental fields. In this paper, the ratchet thin film was fabricated by magnetron sputtering and hybrid ion beams deposition. The micro- and nanoscale structure of the film was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope. This study reports an interesting phenomenon that the self-propelled Leidenfrost water droplet was initiated at low temperature. The Leidenfrost point of droplets was controlled by the surface wettability and parameters of the asymmetric ratchet substrate. This novel self-propelled interfacial material and preparation technology can be expanded to the manufacture process and constructed a temperature-dependent tubule for microfluidic systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Shakedown and ratchetting under tension-torsion loadings: analysis and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitzer, M.; Staat, M.; Reiners, H.; Schubert, F.

    2003-01-01

    Structural design analyses are conducted with the aim of verifying the exclusion of ratchetting. To this end it is important to make a clear distinction between the shakedown range and the ratchetting range. The performed experiment comprised a hollow tension specimen which was subjected to alternating axial forces, superimposed with constant moments. First, a series of uniaxial tests has been carried out in order to calibrate a bounded kinematic hardening rule. The load parameters have been selected on the basis of previous shakedown analyses with the PERMAS code using a kinematic hardening material model. It is shown that this shakedown analysis gives reasonable agreement between the experimental and the numerical results. A linear and a nonlinear kinematic hardening model of two-surface plasticity are compared in material shakedown analysis

  7. Cooperation and competition between two symmetry breakings in a coupled ratchet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen-Pu; Chen, Hong-Bin; Fan, Hong; Xie, Ge-Ying; Zheng, Zhi-Gang

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the collective mechanism of coupled Brownian motors in a flashing ratchet in the presence of coupling symmetry breaking and space symmetry breaking. The dependences of directed current on various parameters are extensively studied in terms of numerical simulations and theoretical analysis. Reversed motion can be achieved by modulating multiple parameters including the spatial asymmetry coefficient, the coupling asymmetry coefficient, the coupling free length and the coupling strength. The dynamical mechanism of these transport properties can be reasonably explained by the effective potential theory and the cooperation or competition between two symmetry breakings. Moreover, adjusting the Gaussian white noise intensity, which can induce weak reversed motion under certain condition, can optimize and manipulate the directed transport of the ratchet system.

  8. Comparing the Ratchet Effects of Cold Atoms in Periodically Symmetric and Asymmetric Optical Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkongho Ayuketang Arreyndip

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a particle in a spatial symmetric/asymmetric potential driven by time periodic bichromatic AC fields of ratchet type. The associated time-dependent Schrödinger equation is conveniently tackled with the Floquet theory. We next proceed to investigate the ratchet effect induced by the driver, comparing the symmetric with the asymmetric cases. It turns out that the current in the asymmetric case is stronger than that of the symmetric one. Besides, we also investigate the case where the driver is a delta kicked acting on our spatial potential with more emphasis on its chaotic behaviour. Here we check that the current emerges as the phase space is mixed and that the system with asymmetric spatial potential becomes more chaotic than the symmetric one at low kicking strength.

  9. Chaotic noisy transport of electron pairs in a superconducting junction device: thermal-inertia ratchets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-hui

    2006-07-01

    Chaotic noisy transport of electron pairs in a superconducting junction device (thermal-inertia ratchets) is investigated. The study shows that when the temperature is low enough, the transport of the electron pairs can be mainly chaotic; when the temperature is high enough, it can be mainly stochastic. By controlling the temperature and the amplitude of the input ac signal, the current of electron pairs can be reversed.

  10. Experimental and numerical evaluations of viscoplastic material behaviour and multiaxial ratchetting for austenitic and ferritic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Components in power plants are subjected under cyclic loading, which can yield in-elastic deformation. When the materials are loaded under uniaxial cyclic loading with mean-stress or under multiaxial combined constant (primary) and cyclic loading (sec-ondary), a progressive plastic deformation can gradually accumulate. This progressive plastic deformation, so-called ratchetting, is related to low cycle fatigue, in which high loading amplitudes are existent, therefore plays an important role i...

  11. Experimental study on uniaxial cyclic ratcheting behavior of 304 stainless steel at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xianjie; Gao Qing; Cai Lixun; Liu Yujie

    2004-01-01

    The cyclic tests for 304 stainless steel with solution heat treatment under uni-axial cyclic straining and stressing were carried out systematically. The effects of the cyclic engineering stress amplitude history with constant mean stress, the mean engineering stress history with constant cyclic stress amplitude and the stress amplitude histories with the specific mean stress increment per cycle on the uni-axial ratcheting deformation behavior were investigated. Some significant results are obtained

  12. GaAs-Based Nanowire Devices with Multiple Asymmetric Gates for Electrical Brownian Ratchets

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Nakano, Yuki; Kasai, Seiya

    2013-01-01

    GaAs-based nanowire devices having multiple asymmetric gates for electrical Brownian ratchets were fabricated and characterized. From three-dimensional potential simulation results and current–voltage characteristics, we confirmed the formation of the asymmetric potential in our device design. Direct current was generated at room temperature by repeatedly switching the potential in a multiple-asymmetric-gate device on and off. Such current was not observed in either a single-asymmetric-gate d...

  13. Numerical convergence in simulations of multiaxial ratcheting with directional distortional hardening

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Welling, CH.A.; Marek, René; Feigenbaum, H. P.; Dafalias, Y.F.; Plešek, Jiří; Hrubý, Zbyněk; Parma, Slavomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 126, November (2017), s. 105-121 ISSN 0020-7683 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EF15_003/0000493; GA MŠk LH14018 Keywords : plasticity * yield * ratcheting * yield surface distortion * directional distortional hardening Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 2.760, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0020768317303499

  14. A three dimensional elastoplastic cyclic constitutive law with a semi discrete variable and a ratchetting stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyer, P.; Proix, J.M.; Jayet-Gendrot, S.; Schoenberger, P.; Taheri, S.

    1995-01-01

    The study of cyclic elastoplastic constitutive law is, at the moment, focused on non proportional loadings, but for uniaxial loadings some problems remain, as for example the ability for a law to describe simultaneously ratcheting (constant increment of strain) in non symmetrical ones. We propose a law with a discrete memory variable, the plastic strain at the last unloading, and a ratchetting stress which, in addition to previous phenomena, describes the other hand the choice of all macroscopic variables is justified by a microscopic analysis. The extension to 3D situations of this law is proposed. The discrete nature of the memory leads to discontinuity problems for some loading paths, a modification is then proposed which uses a differential evolution law. For large enough uniaxial cycles, the uniaxial law is nevertheless recovered. An incremental form of he implicit evolution problem is given, and we describe the implementation of this model in the Code Aster a thermomechanical structural software using the f.e.m. developed at Electricite de France. For a 316 stainless steel we present comparisons between experiments and numerical results in uniaxial and biaxial ratchetting and non proportional strain controlled test (circular, square, stair loading). (authors). 13 refs., 10 figs

  15. Cyclotron resonance of the magnetic ratchet effect and second harmonic generation in bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirabadi, Narjes; McCann, Edward; Fal'ko, Vladimir I.

    2018-02-01

    We model the magnetic ratchet effect in bilayer graphene in which a dc electric current is produced by an ac electric field of frequency ω in the presence of a steady in-plane magnetic field and inversion-symmetry breaking. In bilayer graphene, the ratchet effect is tunable by an external metallic gate which breaks inversion symmetry. For zero in-plane magnetic field, we show that trigonal warping and inversion-symmetry breaking are able to produce a large dc valley current, but not a nonzero total dc charge current. For the magnetic ratchet in a tilted magnetic field, the perpendicular field component induces cyclotron motion with frequency ωc and we find that the dc current displays cyclotron resonance at ωc=ω , although this peak in the current is actually smaller than its value at ωc=0 . Second harmonic generation, however, is greatly enhanced by resonances at ωc=ω and ωc=2 ω for which the current is generally much larger than at ωc=0 .

  16. Evidence of a ratchet effect in nanowires of a conducting polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A.; Sanyal, M. K.; Gangopadhayy, R.; de, A.; Das, I.

    2006-03-01

    Ratchet effect, which has been observed in many systems ranging from a living organism to an artificially designed device, is a manifestation of motion in asymmetric potentials. Here we report results of a conductivity study of Polypyrrole nanowires, which have been prepared by a simple method that generates a variation of doping concentration along the length of the wires. This variation gives rise to a ratchet effect that hinders the symmetry of the hopping process of charges and hence the value of measured resistance of these nanowires becomes sensitive to the direction of current flow. The asymmetry in resistance was found to increase with decreasing nanowire diameter and increasing temperature. The observed phenomena could be explained with the assumption that the spatial extension of the localized state involved in the hopping process is reduced as the doping concentration is reduced along the length of the nanowires. The temperature dependence of the static dielectric constant (γ∝T-δ) gave a value of δ as 1.4 instead of 1.0 perhaps due to dipole rotation being hindered in nanowires, and this would explain the observed reduction of ratchet effect with lowering temperature.

  17. Simulation of ratcheting in straight pipes using ANSYS with an improved cyclic plasticity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, T.; Zhu, Y.; Matzen, V.C.

    1996-01-01

    Ratcheting has been shown to be a contributing cause of failure in several seismic experiments on piping components and systems. Most commercial finite element codes have been unable to simulate the ratcheting in those tests accurately. The reason for this can be traced to inadequate plasticity constitutive models in the analysis codes. The authors have incorporated an improved cyclic plasticity model, based on an Armstrong-Frederick kinematic hardening rule in conjunction with the Drucker-Palgen plastic modulus equation, into an ANSYS user subroutine. This modified analysis code has been able to simulate quite accurately the ratcheting behavior of a tube subjected to a constant internal pressure and axially strain controlled cycling. This paper describes simulations obtained form this modified ANSYS code for two additional tests: (1) a tube subjected to constant axial stress and prescribed torsional cycling, and (2) a straight pipe subjected to constant internal pressure and quasi-static cyclic bending. The analysis results from the modified ANSYS code are compared to the experimental data, as well as results from ABAQUS and the original ANSYS code. The resulting correlation shows a significant improvement over the original ANSYS and the ABAQUS codes

  18. Amnioserosa cell constriction but not epidermal actin cable tension autonomously drives dorsal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasakarnis, Laurynas; Frei, Erich; Caussinus, Emmanuel; Affolter, Markus; Brunner, Damian

    2016-11-01

    Tissue morphogenesis requires coordination of multiple force-producing components. During dorsal closure in fly embryogenesis, an epidermis opening closes. A tensioned epidermal actin/MyosinII cable, which surrounds the opening, produces a force that is thought to combine with another MyosinII force mediating apical constriction of the amnioserosa cells that fill the opening. A model proposing that each force could autonomously drive dorsal closure was recently challenged by a model in which the two forces combine in a ratchet mechanism. Acute force elimination via selective MyosinII depletion in one or the other tissue shows that the amnioserosa tissue autonomously drives dorsal closure while the actin/MyosinII cable cannot. These findings exclude both previous models, although a contribution of the ratchet mechanism at dorsal closure onset remains likely. This shifts the current view of dorsal closure being a combinatorial force-component system to a single tissue-driven closure event.

  19. Movements of molecular motors: Ratchets, random walks and traffic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Stefan; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2005-10-01

    Processive molecular motors which drive the traffic of organelles in cells move in a directed way along cytoskeletal filaments. On large time scales, they perform motor walks, i.e., peculiar random walks which arise from the repeated unbinding from and rebinding to filaments. Unbound motors perform Brownian motion in the surrounding fluid. In addition, the traffic of molecular motors exhibits many cooperative phenomena. In particular, it faces similar problems as the traffic on streets such as the occurrence of traffic jams and the coordination of (two-way) traffic. These issues are studied here theoretically using lattice models.

  20. Stochastic Ratcheting on a Funneled Energy Landscape Is Necessary for Highly Efficient Contractility of Actomyosin Force Dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komianos, James E.; Papoian, Garegin A.

    2018-04-01

    Current understanding of how contractility emerges in disordered actomyosin networks of nonmuscle cells is still largely based on the intuition derived from earlier works on muscle contractility. In addition, in disordered networks, passive cross-linkers have been hypothesized to percolate force chains in the network, hence, establishing large-scale connectivity between local contractile clusters. This view, however, largely overlooks the free energy of cross-linker binding at the microscale, which, even in the absence of active fluctuations, provides a thermodynamic drive towards highly overlapping filamentous states. In this work, we use stochastic simulations and mean-field theory to shed light on the dynamics of a single actomyosin force dipole—a pair of antiparallel actin filaments interacting with active myosin II motors and passive cross-linkers. We first show that while passive cross-linking without motor activity can produce significant contraction between a pair of actin filaments, driven by thermodynamic favorability of cross-linker binding, a sharp onset of kinetic arrest exists at large cross-link binding energies, greatly diminishing the effectiveness of this contractility mechanism. Then, when considering an active force dipole containing nonmuscle myosin II, we find that cross-linkers can also serve as a structural ratchet when the motor dissociates stochastically from the actin filaments, resulting in significant force amplification when both molecules are present. Our results provide predictions of how actomyosin force dipoles behave at the molecular level with respect to filament boundary conditions, passive cross-linking, and motor activity, which can explicitly be tested using an optical trapping experiment.

  1. Stochastic Ratcheting on a Funneled Energy Landscape Is Necessary for Highly Efficient Contractility of Actomyosin Force Dipoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Komianos

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Current understanding of how contractility emerges in disordered actomyosin networks of nonmuscle cells is still largely based on the intuition derived from earlier works on muscle contractility. In addition, in disordered networks, passive cross-linkers have been hypothesized to percolate force chains in the network, hence, establishing large-scale connectivity between local contractile clusters. This view, however, largely overlooks the free energy of cross-linker binding at the microscale, which, even in the absence of active fluctuations, provides a thermodynamic drive towards highly overlapping filamentous states. In this work, we use stochastic simulations and mean-field theory to shed light on the dynamics of a single actomyosin force dipole—a pair of antiparallel actin filaments interacting with active myosin II motors and passive cross-linkers. We first show that while passive cross-linking without motor activity can produce significant contraction between a pair of actin filaments, driven by thermodynamic favorability of cross-linker binding, a sharp onset of kinetic arrest exists at large cross-link binding energies, greatly diminishing the effectiveness of this contractility mechanism. Then, when considering an active force dipole containing nonmuscle myosin II, we find that cross-linkers can also serve as a structural ratchet when the motor dissociates stochastically from the actin filaments, resulting in significant force amplification when both molecules are present. Our results provide predictions of how actomyosin force dipoles behave at the molecular level with respect to filament boundary conditions, passive cross-linking, and motor activity, which can explicitly be tested using an optical trapping experiment.

  2. Dementia & Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find the loss of driving privileges and the inherent loss of independence upsetting. Encourage the individual with ... to modify their driving. This can reduce the risk of an accident if the individual’s driving skills ...

  3. Drive Stands

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electrical Systems Laboratory (ESL)houses numerous electrically driven drive stands. A drive stand consists of an electric motor driving a gearbox and a mounting...

  4. Defying Muller’s Ratchet: Ancient Heritable Endobacteria Escape Extinction through Retention of Recombination and Genome Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizue Naito

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Heritable endobacteria, which are transmitted from one host generation to the next, are subjected to evolutionary forces that are different from those experienced by free-living bacteria. In particular, they suffer consequences of Muller’s ratchet, a mechanism that leads to extinction of small asexual populations due to fixation of slightly deleterious mutations combined with the random loss of the most-fit genotypes, which cannot be recreated without recombination. Mycoplasma-related endobacteria (MRE are heritable symbionts of fungi from two ancient lineages, Glomeromycota (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Mucoromycotina. Previous studies revealed that MRE maintain unusually diverse populations inside their hosts and may have been associated with fungi already in the early Paleozoic. Here we show that MRE are vulnerable to genomic degeneration and propose that they defy Muller’s ratchet thanks to retention of recombination and genome plasticity. We suggest that other endobacteria may be capable of raising similar defenses against Muller’s ratchet.

  5. Ratchetting behavior of primary heat transport (PHT) piping material SA-333 carbon steel subjected to cyclic loads at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, S.; Desai, Y.M.; Kant, T.; Reddy, G.R.; Gupta, C.; Chakravarthy, J.K.

    2004-01-01

    Ratchetting behavior of SA-333 Gr. 6 carbon steel used as primary heat transport (PHT) piping material has been investigated with three constitutive models proposed by Armstrong-Frederick, Chaboche and Ohno-Wang involving different hardening rules. Performance of the above mentioned models have been evaluated for a broad set of uniaxial and biaxial loading histories. The uniaxial ratchetting simulations have been performed for a range of stress ratios (R) by imposing different stress amplitudes and mean stress conditions. Numerical simulations indicated significant ratchetting and opening of hysteresis loop for negative stress ratio with constant mean stress. Application of cyclic stress without mean stress (R = -1.0) has been observed to produce negligible ratchet-strain accumulation in the material. Simulation under the biaxial stress condition was based on modeling of an internally pressurized thin walled pipe subjected to cyclic bending load. Numerical results have been validated with the experiments as per simulation conditions. All three models have been found to predict the observed accumulation of circumferential strain with increasing number of cycles. However, the Armstrong Frederick (A-F) model was found to be inadequate in simulating the ratchetting response for both uniaxial as well as biaxial loading cases. The A-F model actually over-predicted the ratchetting strain in comparison with the experimental strain values. On the other hand, results obtained with the Chaboche and the Ohno-Wang models for both the uniaxial as well as biaxial loading histories have been observed to closely simulate the experimental results. The Ohno-Wang model resulted in better simulation for the presents sets of experimental results in comparison with the Chaboche model. It can be concluded that the Ohno-Wang model suited well compared to the Chaboche model for above sets of uniaxial and biaxial loading histories. (authors)

  6. Compressive cyclic ratcheting and fatigue of synthetic, soft biomedical polymers in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew T; Safranski, David L; Smith, Kathryn E; Guldberg, Robert E; Gall, Ken

    2016-02-01

    The use of soft, synthetic materials for the replacement of soft, load-bearing tissues has been largely unsuccessful due to a lack of materials with sufficient fatigue and wear properties, as well as a lack of fundamental understanding on the relationship between material structure and behavior under cyclic loads. In this study, we investigated the response of several soft, biomedical polymers to cyclic compressive stresses under aqueous conditions and utilized dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry to evaluate the role of thermo-mechanical transitions on such behavior. Studied materials include: polycarbonate urethane, polydimethylsiloxane, four acrylate copolymers with systematically varied thermo-mechanical transitions, as well as bovine meniscal tissue for comparison. Materials showed compressive moduli between 2.3 and 1900MPa, with polycarbonate urethane (27.3MPa) matching closest to meniscal tissue (37.0MPa), and also demonstrated a variety of thermo-mechanical transition behaviors. Cyclic testing resulted in distinct fatigue-life curves, with failure defined as either classic fatigue fracture or a defined increased in maximum strain due to ratcheting. Our study found that polymers with sufficient dissipation mechanisms at the testing temperature, as evidenced by tan delta values, were generally tougher than those with less dissipation and exhibited ratcheting rather than fatigue fracture much like meniscal tissue. Strain recovery tests indicated that, for some toughened polymers, the residual strain following our cyclic loading protocol could be fully recovered. The similarity in ratcheting behavior, and lack of fatigue fracture, between the meniscal tissue and toughened polymers indicates that such polymers may have potential as artificial soft tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Simonen, C.A.; Burk, K.W.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses that individuals may have received from operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. This report deals specifically with the atmospheric transport model, Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). RATCHET is a major rework of the MESOILT2 model used in the first phase of the HEDR Project; only the bookkeeping framework escaped major changes. Changes to the code include (1) significant changes in the representation of atmospheric processes and (2) incorporation of Monte Carlo methods for representing uncertainty in input data, model parameters, and coefficients. To a large extent, the revisions to the model are based on recommendations of a peer working group that met in March 1991. Technical bases for other portions of the atmospheric transport model are addressed in two other documents. This report has three major sections: a description of the model, a user`s guide, and a programmer`s guide. These sections discuss RATCHET from three different perspectives. The first provides a technical description of the code with emphasis on details such as the representation of the model domain, the data required by the model, and the equations used to make the model calculations. The technical description is followed by a user`s guide to the model with emphasis on running the code. The user`s guide contains information about the model input and output. The third section is a programmer`s guide to the code. It discusses the hardware and software required to run the code. The programmer`s guide also discusses program structure and each of the program elements.

  8. Production of medical radioisotopes in ORNL 86-Inch Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skidmore, M.R.

    1975-01-01

    Procedures, targets, and costs are discussed for the production of iodine-123 at the ORNL 86-Inch Cyclotron. The cyclotron is a fixed frequency machine producing 22-MeV proton beams with currents of 3 mA. Flat plate targets are used in the bombardment of readily fabricated metals when highest production rates are necessary, while capsule targets are used when flat plate coatings are difficult or when high production rates are not required. Window targets with metal foils or powders, inorganic compounds, or isotopically enriched materials are also used. (PMA)

  9. Nanoampere charge pump by single-electron ratchet using silicon nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Akira; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Ono, Yukinori

    2008-01-01

    Nanoampere single-electron pumping is presented at 20K using a single-electron ratchet comprising silicon nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. The ratchet features an asymmetric potential with a pocket that captures single electrons from the source and ejects them to the drain. Directional single-electron transfer is achieved by applying one ac signal with the frequency up to 2.3GHz. We find anomalous shapes of current steps which can be ascribed to nonadiabatic electron capture.

  10. Controlling heat transport and flow structures in thermal turbulence using ratchet surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Jiang, Hechuan; Zhu, Xiaojue; Mathai, Varghese; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-11-01

    In this combined experimental and numerical study on thermally driven turbulence in a rectangular cell, the global heat transport and the coherent flow structures are controlled with an asymmetric ratchet-like roughness on the top and bottom plates. We show that, by means of symmetry breaking due to the presence of the ratchet structures on the conducting plates, the orientation of the Large Scale Circulation Roll (LSCR) can be locked to a preferred direction even when the cell is perfectly leveled out. By introducing a small tilt to the system, we show that the LSCR orientation can be tuned and controlled. The two different orientations of LSCR give two quite different heat transport efficiencies, indicating that heat transport is sensitive to the LSCR direction over the asymmetric roughness structure. Through analysis of the dynamics of thermal plume emissions and the orientation of the LSCR over the asymmetric structure, we provide a physical explanation for these findings. This work is financially supported by the Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11672156, the Dutch Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), the Dutch Technology Foundation (STW) and a VIDI Grant.

  11. Service failure of hot-stage turbine blades: The role and mechanisms of oxidation ratcheting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldfield, W.; Oldfield, F.M. (MRCS Corp., St. Augustine, FL (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Surface-connected porosity in current military aircraft hot-stage turbine engine blades is associated with blade failure. Oxidation ratcheting is suggested as the failure mechanism. Statistical comparison of new and used blade populations showed that for blades cast with an equiaxed structure, the porosity in new blades was associated with crack formation on the concave surface of the used blades. The pores did not tend to develop into cracks on the compressed (convex) surface of the blade. Insufficient suitable data on directionally solidified blades prevented similar statistical correlations. However, metallography of the directionally solidified blades showed that the in-service cracks were related to oxidation inside surface-connected pores and that the cracks were oriented in the same direction as the (axial) casting pores. Thus, the proposed failure mechanism through ratcheting is based on the following insights: (1) the blades are thermally cycled as a normal part of service; (2) the hot blades expand and the open pores are filled with oxide; (3) when the blade is cooled, thermal contraction of the metal is greater than the oxide, causing compressive stress and yield-, and (4) thermal expansion of the blades opens the pores again, since yield relaxed compressive stress at low temperature. These insights were supported by metallographic and computer-simulation studies which showed that the pores grow 20 to 50 pct in width per 100 missions (about 90 hours of operation) for a military aircraft on a typical mission profile.

  12. Separation of superparamagnetic particles through ratcheted Brownian motion and periodically switching magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Jiang, Li; Tan, Huei Ming; Yadav, Ashutosh; Biswas, Preetika; van der Maarel, Johan R. C.; Nijhuis, Christian A.; van Kan, Jeroen A.

    2016-01-01

    Brownian ratchet based particle separation systems for application in lab on chip devices have drawn interest and are subject to ongoing theoretical and experimental investigations. We demonstrate a compact microfluidic particle separation chip, which implements an extended on-off Brownian ratchet scheme that actively separates and sorts particles using periodically switching magnetic fields, asymmetric sawtooth channel sidewalls, and Brownian motion. The microfluidic chip was made with Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography of SU-8 molds, which in turn was fabricated using Proton Beam Writing. After bonding of the PDMS chip to a glass substrate through surface activation by oxygen plasma treatment, embedded electromagnets were cofabricated by the injection of InSn metal into electrode channels. This fabrication process enables rapid production of high resolution and high aspect ratio features, which results in parallel electrodes accurately aligned with respect to the separation channel. The PDMS devices were tested with mixtures of 1.51 μm, 2.47 μm, and 2.60 μm superparamagnetic particles suspended in water. Experimental results show that the current device design has potential for separating particles with a size difference around 130 nm. Based on the promising results, we will be working towards extending this design for the separation of cells or biomolecules. PMID:27917252

  13. Thermal ratchetting in pipes subjected to cyclic thermal downshocks and primary traction charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsi, F.; Fabi, A.; Di Giamberardino, P.; Di Ianni, A.; Cesari, F.; Ghia, S.

    1983-01-01

    The paper presents the study about the structural behaviour in ratchetting regime at elevated temperature of an AISI 316 pipe (nominal dimensions are: diameter D=71 mm, thickness s=4.26 mm). The work is part of the research program of collaboration between ENEA and CEA and takes place in the ENEA CRE Casaccia. The experimental-theoretical comparison is showen. The numeric calculations are performed by codes of the finite elements system CASTEM developed at the CEA in Saclay using different constitutive laws for the material. Testing is carried out in a special sodium test facility, built for the purpose. It's given a brief description of the plant and of the used instrumentation on the test section. The specimen is subjected to the combination of cyclic primary and secondary loads. The primary load, a uniform traction stress, is applied by hydraulic jacks whereas the secondary load is a cold radial shock obtained with a sodium flow at lower temperature (300 0 C) in the test section initially at uniform temperature (500 0 C). Ten cycles are excuted. The principal aim of this effort was to analyze in detail the 'Ratchetting' phenomena but on the same time the study allowed to compare different strain measurement technics (the test section was instrumented with capacitive and resistive gages) and to validate the used finite element system in cyclic non-linear field. (orig.)

  14. CERN Library | Roy Calne presents: "The Ratchet of Science - Curiosity killed the cat" | 26 October

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2015-01-01

    Sir Roy Calne will discuss his most recent book: “The Ratchet of Science - Curiosity killed the cat. Can human nature cope with the rapid and accelerated advances of science?”   Monday, 26 October - 4.30 p.m. CERN Filtration plant, Room 222-R-001 There is a limited number of seats. Please register here. The book’s premise is that huge scientific advances throughout history occur in spurts or “ratchets”. It reflects on the good and the evil consequences of discoveries. Due to the worrying nature of human beings, each ratchet in our knowledge is too often accompanied by dangerous applications. Knowledge, once established by a reliable scientific method, cannot be unlearned. The cat is out of the bag and the curiosity may kill the cat – so to speak. Professor Roy Calne illustrates this with the example of the young physicist known to all at CERN: Lise Meitner, who discovered and named nucle...

  15. Remote target removal for the Oak Ridge 86-inch Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walls, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    A remotely operated target remover has been plaed in operation at the 86-Inch Cyclotron located in Oak Ridge. The system provides for the remote removal of a target from inside the cyclotron, loading it into a cask, and the removal of the cask from the 1.5 m (5-ft) shielding walls. The remote system consists of multiple electrical and pneumatically operated equipment which is designed for controlled step-by-step operation, operated with an electrical control panel, and monitored by a television system. The target remover has reduced the radiation exposures to operating personnel at the facility and has increased the effective operating time. The system is fast, requires a minimum of skill to operate, and has demonstrated both reliability and durability

  16. Seismic fragility test of a 6-inch diameter pipe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.P.; Onesto, A.T.; DeVita, V.

    1987-02-01

    This report contains the test results and assessments of seismic fragility tests performed on a 6-inch diameter piping system. The test was funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and conducted by ETEC. The objective of the test was to investigate the ability of a representative nuclear piping system to withstand high level dynamic seismic and other loadings. Levels of loadings achieved during seismic testing were 20 to 30 times larger than normal elastic design evaluations to ASME Level D limits would permit. Based on failure data obtained during seismic and other dynamic testing, it was concluded that nuclear piping systems are inherently able to withstand much larger dynamic seismic loadings than permitted by current design practice criteria or predicted by the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and several proposed nonlinear methods of failure analysis

  17. Electric drives

    CERN Document Server

    Boldea, Ion

    2005-01-01

    ENERGY CONVERSION IN ELECTRIC DRIVESElectric Drives: A DefinitionApplication Range of Electric DrivesEnergy Savings Pay Off RapidlyGlobal Energy Savings Through PEC DrivesMotor/Mechanical Load MatchMotion/Time Profile MatchLoad Dynamics and StabilityMultiquadrant OperationPerformance IndexesProblemsELECTRIC MOTORS FOR DRIVESElectric Drives: A Typical ConfigurationElectric Motors for DrivesDC Brush MotorsConventional AC MotorsPower Electronic Converter Dependent MotorsEnergy Conversion in Electric Motors/GeneratorsPOWER ELECTRONIC CONVERTERS (PECs) FOR DRIVESPower Electronic Switches (PESs)The

  18. Comparisons of ratchetting analysis methods using RCC-M, RCC-MR and ASME codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yu; Cabrillat, M.T.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper compares the simplified ratcheting analysis methods used in RCC-M, RCC-MR and ASME with some examples. Firstly, comparisons of the methods in RCC-M and efficiency diagram in RCC-MR are investigated. A special method is used to describe these two methods with curves in one coordinate, and the different conservation is demonstrated. RCC-M method is also be interpreted by SR (second ratio) and v (efficiency index) which is used in RCC-MR. Hence, we can easily compare the previous two methods by defining SR as abscissa and v as ordinate and plotting two curves of them. Secondly, comparisons of the efficiency curve in RCC-MR and methods in ASME-NH APPENDIX T are investigated, with significant creep. At last, two practical evaluations are performed to show the comparisons of aforementioned methods. (authors)

  19. Generation of Constant Life Diagram under Elevated Temperature Ratcheting of 316LN Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Aritra; Nagesha, A.; Sandhya, R.; Mathew, M. D.

    2016-04-01

    Combined influence of mean stress and stress amplitude on the cyclic life under elevated temperature (823-923 K) ratcheting of 316LN austenitic stainless steel is discussed. Constant life Haigh diagrams have been generated, using different combinations of stress amplitude and mean stress. In the plastic domain, the allowable stress was found to increase or decrease with mean stress depending on the temperature and combination of mean stress - stress amplitude employed. Strong influence of dynamic strain aging (DSA) was found at 823 K which affected the mode of deformation of the material in comparison with 923 K. Failure mode expressed through a fracture mechanism map was found to change from fatigue to necking depending on the test temperature as well as combinations of mean stress and stress amplitude. Occurrence of DSA at 823 K proved to be beneficial by way of extending the safe zone of operation to higher R-ratios in comparison with 923 K.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of Leidenfrost droplets on a vibrating nano ratchet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Lavrik, Nickolay; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    Asymmetrically nanostructured surfaces can function as Brownian ratchets, that is, create a bias in mass or energy flows in response to thermal noise or in a more general case, isotropic excitations. Recently, experimental studies have shown that it is possible to induce directional movement of water droplets deposited on a vertically vibrating hydrophobic substrate made of inclined nanopillars. To investigate this issue, we have performed large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a water droplet on a pillared graphitic substrate. We have found that our results not only reproduce the experimental behavior but also reveal new phenomena. In particular, it was found that at certain critical amplitude and frequency, the motion of the droplet transits from circular to linear-oscillatory along the substrate. The transition ultimately depends on the relative size of droplet and pillars, suggesting new ways of controlling the movement of water droplets on superhydrophobic substrates.

  1. Experimental tests on ratchet of 304 austenitic steel, at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulais, Jacques; Brouard, Daniel; Lebey, Jacques; Roche, Roland.

    1978-09-01

    Most of the studies on ratcheting are theoretical and use very rough constitutive equations for the material behavior (perfect plasticity for instance). Most of the available experimental results concern tests on complex structures, and are difficult to interpret. So there is a need for experimental tests on basic structures easy to use to determine the material characteristics. Tests on thin tubular specimen are very interesting because stress, strain and temperature fields are uniform. The primary stress P is an axial tensile one (dead weight), the secondary stress, with ΔQ range, is due to a cyclic angle controled twist. The incremental elongation is obtained as a function of the number of cycles N for different values of P and ΔQ. Diagrams representing the isocurves of cumulated elongation (for a given number of cycles) as a function of P and ΔQ are shown [fr

  2. Ductility, strength and hardness relation after prior incremental deformation (ratcheting) of austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Diem, H.K.; Wachter, O.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental investigations into the stress/strain behavior of the niobium stabilized austenitic material with the German notation X6 CrNiNb 18 10 proved that a limited incrementally applied prior deformation will reduce the total deformation capability only by the amount of the prior deformation. It could especially be determined on the little changes in the reduction of area that the basically ductile deformation behavior will not be changed by the type of the prior loading. There is a correlation between the amount of deformation and the increase in hardness. It is possible to correlate both the changes in hardness and the material properties. In the case of low cycle fatigue tests with alternating temperature an incremental increase in total strain (ratcheting) was noted to depend on the strain range applied

  3. Terahertz electric field driven electric currents and ratchet effects in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganichev, Sergey D.; Weiss, Dieter; Eroms, Jonathan [Terahertz Center, University of Regensburg (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Terahertz field induced photocurrents in graphene were studied experimentally and by microscopic modeling. Currents were generated by cw and pulsed laser radiation in large area as well as small-size exfoliated graphene samples. We review general symmetry considerations leading to photocurrents depending on linear and circular polarized radiation and then present a number of situations where photocurrents were detected. Starting with the photon drag effect under oblique incidence, we proceed to the photogalvanic effect enhancement in the reststrahlen band of SiC and edge-generated currents in graphene. Ratchet effects were considered for in-plane magnetic fields and a structure inversion asymmetry as well as for graphene with non-symmetric patterned top gates. Lastly, we demonstrate that graphene can be used as a fast, broadband detector of terahertz radiation. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Effect of ratchet strain on fatigue and creep–fatigue strength of Mod.9Cr–1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masanori; Isobe, Nobuhiro; Kikuchi, Koichi; Enuma, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Uniaxial fatigue and creep–fatigue tests with superimposed strain were performed. ► Variety of superimposed strain were applied as ratchet strain in the tests. ► Effect of superimposed strain on fatigue and creep–fatigue life is negligible. ► A cyclic softening character reducing the effect of superimposed strain. - Abstract: The effect of ratcheting deformation on fatigue and creep–fatigue life in Mod.9Cr–1Mo steel was investigated. Uniaxial fatigue and creep–fatigue testing with superimposed strain were performed to evaluate the effect of ratcheting deformation on the failure cycle. In a series of tests, a specific amount of superimposed strain was accumulated in each cycle. The accumulated strain as ratcheting deformation, cycles to reach the accumulated strain, and test temperatures were varied in the tests. In the fatigue tests with superimposed strain at 550 °C, slight reductions of failure lives were observed. All of the numbers of cycles to failure in the fatigue tests with superimposed strain were within a factor of 1.5 of that of the fatigue test without superimposed strain at 550 °C. The apparent relationship between failure cycles and testing parameters was not observed. In fatigue tests with superimposed strain at 550 °C, maximum mean stress was insignificant and generated in early cycles because Mod.9Cr–1Mo steel exhibits cyclic softening characteristics. It was assumed that suppression of mean stress generation by cyclic softening reduces the effect of ratcheting strain. Conversely, failure lives were increased by accumulated strain in the test conducted at 450 °C because of stress–strain hysteresis loop shrinkage caused by cyclic softening induced by the accumulated strain. In the creep–fatigue tests with superimposed strain, test results indicated that the accumulated stain was negligible. It was concluded that the effect of ratcheting deformation on fatigue and creep–fatigue life is negligible as long

  5. Development of 8-inch Key Processes for Insulated-Gate Bipolar Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyou Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the construction of the 8-inch fabrication line, advanced process technology of 8-inch wafer, as well as the fourth-generation high-voltage double-diffused metal-oxide semiconductor (DMOS+ insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT technology and the fifth-generation trench gate IGBT technology, have been developed, realizing a great-leap forward technological development for the manufacturing of high-voltage IGBT from 6-inch to 8-inch. The 1600 A/1.7 kV and 1500 A/3.3 kV IGBT modules have been successfully fabricated, qualified, and applied in rail transportation traction system.

  6. Lowell Observatory's 24-inch Clark Refractor: Its History and Renovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Kevin; Nye, Ralph; Rosenthal, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In 1895, Percival Lowell hired eminent telescope maker Alvan G. Clark to build a 24-inch refractor. Lowell intended the telescope intitally for observing Mars in support of his controversial theories about life on that planet. Clark finished the telescope within a year and at a cost of $20,000. Lowell and his staff of assistants and astronomers began observing through it on July 23, 1896, setting off a long and productive career for the telescope.While Lowell's Mars studies dominated early work with the Clark, V.M. Slipher by the 1910s was using it to observe planetary rotations and atmospheric compositions. He soon revolutionized spectroscopic studies, gathering excruciatingly long spectra - some in excess of 40 hours - of the so-called white nebula and determining startling radial velocities, evidence of an expanding universe. In the 1960s, scientists and artists teamed up on the Clark and created detailed lunar maps in support of the Apollo program.In recent decades, the Clark has played a central role in the education programs at Lowell, with general public audiences, students, and private groups all taking advantage of this unique resource.With this nearly 120 years of contant use, the Clark had been wearing down in recent years. The telescope was becoming more difficult to move, old electrical wiring in the dome was a fire hazard, and many of the telescope's parts needed to be repaired or replaced.In 2013, Lowell Observatory began a fundraising campaign, collecting $291,000 to cover the cost of dome and telescope renovation. Workers removed the entire telescope mount and tube assembly from the dome, examining every part from tube sections to individuals screws. They also stabilized the dome, adding a water vapor barrier and new outer wall while reinforcing the upper dome. The project lasted from January, 2014 through August, 2015. The facility reopened for daytime tours in September, 2015 and evening viewing the following month.

  7. 16 CFR 460.20 - R-value per inch claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false R-value per inch claims. 460.20 Section 460.20 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF HOME INSULATION § 460.20 R-value per inch claims. In labels, fact sheets, ads, or other promotional...

  8. Orthopedic stretcher with average-sized person can pass through 18-inch opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothschuetz, F. X.

    1966-01-01

    Modified Robinson stretcher for vertical lifting and carrying, will pass through an opening 18 inches in diameter, while containing a person of average height and weight. A subject 6 feet tall and weighing 200 pounds was lowered and raised out of an 18 inch diameter opening in a tank to test the stretcher.

  9. Torque expression of 0.018 and 0.022 inch conventional brackets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sifakakis, I.; Pandis, N.; Makou, M.; Eliades, T.; Katsaros, C.; Bourauel, C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the moments generated with low- and high-torque brackets. Four different bracket prescription-slot combinations of the same bracket type (Mini Diamond(R) Twin) were evaluated: high-torque 0.018 and 0.022 inch and low-torque 0.018 and 0.022 inch.

  10. Comparison of silicon strip tracker module size using large sensors from 6 inch wafers

    CERN Multimedia

    Honma, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Two large silicon strip sensor made from 6 inch wafers are placed next to each other to simulate the size of a CMS outer silicon tracker module. On the left is a prototype 2 sensor CMS inner endcap silicon tracker module made from 4 inch wafers.

  11. Analytical investigation of the applicability of simplified ratchetting and creep-fatigue rules to a nozzle-to-sphere geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwaltney, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a nozzle-to-spherical-shell attachment and explores the applicability of simplified ratchetting and creep-fatigue rules to this attachment. A five-cycle inelastic analysis and creep-fatigue damage evaluation was carried out on this component. An elastic analysis also was done to provide input parameters required to apply the various rules and procedures of simplified analysis methods. Ten lines, or critical sections, were chosen for postprocessing to determine the ratchetting strain and creep-fatigue damage at both the inside and outside surfaces. At many of the 20 surface points analyzed, the inelastic analysis results did not develop a constant or decreasing pattern for the incremental strain or damage even after 5 cycles were analyzed. Failure to develop a constant or decreasing pattern was especially prevalent for creep damage. The results of the detailed inelastic analyses at the ten critical sections are compared with the results of elastic evaluations of ratchetting and creep-fatigue damage calculated according to American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Case N-47-13

  12. Analysis of cyclic creep and rupture. Part 2: calculation of cyclic reference stresses and ratcheting interaction diagrams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, P. [Stress Engineering Services, Inc., Mason, OH 45040 (United States)]. E-mail: peter.carter@ses-oh.com

    2005-01-01

    Part 1 gives the basis for the use of cyclic reference stresses for high temperature design and assessment. The methodology relies on elastic-plastic calculations for limit loads, ratcheting and shakedown. In this paper we use a commercial non-linear finite element code for these calculations. Two fairly complex and realistic geometries with cyclic loads are analysed, namely a pipe elbow and a traveling thermal shock in a pressurized pipe. The special case of start-up shut-down cycles is also discussed. Creep and rupture predictions may be made from the results. When reference stresses can be economically calculated, their use for high temperature design has the following advantages: - Accuracy. Limit loads, shakedown and ratcheting limits are based on detailed analysis, and do not rely on rules or judgement. - Efficiency. Use of shakedown and ratcheting reference stresses to predict rupture and creep strain, respectively, allowing details of time and temperature to be dealt with as material data, not affecting the analysis. - Factors of safety. For both low and high temperature problems, factors of safety can be determined or applied, based on the real failure boundaries. - Conservatism. The rupture and strain calculations reflect the limit of rapid cycle behaviour. Cycles with relaxation will be associated with longer lives.

  13. Test procedure for the Master-Lee and the modified Champion four inch hydraulic cutters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    The Master-Lee and the modified Champion 4 Inch hydraulic cutters are being retested to gather and document information related to the following: determine if the Master-Lee cutters will cut the trunnions of an Aluminum fuel canister and a Stainless Steel fuel canister; determine if the Master-Lee cutters will cut 1 1/2 inch diameter fire hose; determine if the modified Champion 4 inch blade will cut sections of piping; and determine the effectiveness of the centering device for the Champion 4 Inch cutters. Determining the limitations of the hydraulic cutter will aid in the process of debris removal in the K-Basin. Based on a previous test, the cutters were returned to the manufacturer for modifications. The modifications to the Champion 4 Inch Cutter and further testing of the Master-Lee Cutter are the subjects of these feature tests

  14. Two inch large area patterning on a vertical light-emitting diode by nano-imprinting technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byeon, Kyeong-Jae; Hong, Eun-Ju; Park, Hyoungwon; Yoon, Kyung-Min; Lee, Heon; Song, Hyun Don; Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Cho, Hyun Kyong; Kwon, Ho Ki

    2010-01-01

    A vertical light-emitting diode (LED) with a chip size of 500 × 500 µm 2 was fabricated by the laser lift-off (LLO) process of an InGaN-based blue LED wafer. After the LLO process, photonic crystal patterns by UV nano-imprint lithography were formed on the n-GaN top layer of the vertical LED over the entire area with a diameter of 2 inches. As the result of n-GaN patterning, light output power of the vertical LED with photonic crystals was increased by up to 44% compared to that of the vertical LED without a photonic crystal at a driving current of 1000 mA

  15. The development of 8 inch roll-to-plate nanoimprint lithography (8-R2P-NIL) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lai Seng; Mohamed, Khairudin; Ooi, Su Guan

    2017-07-01

    Growth in semiconductor and integrated circuit industry was observed in the past decennium of years for industrial technology which followed Moore's law. The line width of nanostructure to be exposed was influenced by the essential technology of photolithography. Thus, it is crucial to have a low cost and high throughput manufacturing process for nanostructures. Nanoimprint Lithography technique invented by Stephen Y. Chou was considered as major nanolithography process to be used in future integrated circuit and integrated optics. The drawbacks of high imprint pressure, high imprint temperature, air bubbles formation, resist sticking to mold and low throughput of thermal nanoimprint lithography on silicon wafer have yet to be solved. Thus, the objectives of this work is to develop a high throughput, low imprint force, room temperature UV assisted 8 inch roll to plate nanoimprint lithography system capable of imprinting nanostructures on 200 mm silicon wafer using roller imprint with flexible mold. A piece of resist spin coated silicon wafer was placed onto vacuum chuck drives forward by a stepper motor. A quartz roller wrapped with a piece of transparent flexible mold was used as imprint roller. The imprinted nanostructures were cured by 10 W, 365 nm UV LED which situated inside the quartz roller. Heat generated by UV LED was dissipated by micro heat pipe. The flexible mold detaches from imprinted nanostructures in a 'line peeling' pattern and imprint pressure was measured by ultra-thin force sensors. This system has imprinting speed capability ranging from 0.19 mm/s to 5.65 mm/s, equivalent to imprinting capability of 3 to 20 pieces of 8 inch wafers per hour. Speed synchronization between imprint roller and vacuum chuck was achieved by controlling pulse rate supplied to stepper motor which drive the vacuum chuck. The speed different ranging from 2 nm/s to 98 nm/s is achievable. Vacuum chuck height was controlled by stepper motor with displacement of 5 nm/step.

  16. Drowsy Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at least 8 hours. 8-9 Develop good sleeping habits such as sticking to a sleep schedule. If ... K, Howard ME. Cognitive components of simulated driving performance: sleep loss effects and predictors. Accid Anal Prev. 2012; ...

  17. Distracted Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Communities Toolkit Best Practices Guide Publications Motorcycle Safety Bicycle Safety Publications Global Road Safety Get Email Updates ... study. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety keeps track of distracted driving laws. 7 As of June ...

  18. Controlling Heat Transport and Flow Structures in Thermal Turbulence Using Ratchet Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hechuan; Zhu, Xiaojue; Mathai, Varghese; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2018-01-01

    In this combined experimental and numerical study on thermally driven turbulence in a rectangular cell, the global heat transport and the coherent flow structures are controlled with an asymmetric ratchetlike roughness on the top and bottom plates. We show that, by means of symmetry breaking due to the presence of the ratchet structures on the conducting plates, the orientation of the large scale circulation roll (LSCR) can be locked to a preferred direction even when the cell is perfectly leveled out. By introducing a small tilt to the system, we show that the LSCR orientation can be tuned and controlled. The two different orientations of LSCR give two quite different heat transport efficiencies, indicating that heat transport is sensitive to the LSCR direction over the asymmetric roughness structure. Through a quantitative analysis of the dynamics of thermal plume emissions and the orientation of the LSCR over the asymmetric structure, we provide a physical explanation for these findings. The current work has important implications for passive and active flow control in engineering, biofluid dynamics, and geophysical flows.

  19. Automated Forward and Reverse Ratcheting of DNA in a Nanopore at Five Angstrom Precision1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherf, Gerald M.; Lieberman, Kate R.; Rashid, Hytham; Lam, Christopher E.; Karplus, Kevin; Akeson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques have been developed for commercial DNA sequencing1,2. One emerging strategy uses a nanopore to analyze DNA molecules as they are driven electrophoretically in single file order past a sensor3-5. However, uncontrolled DNA strand electrophoresis through nanopores is too fast for accurate base reads6. A proposed solution would employ processive enzymes to deliver DNA through the pore at a slower average rate7. Here, we describe forward and reverse ratcheting of DNA templates through the α–hemolysin (α-HL) nanopore controlled by wild-type phi29 DNA polymerase (phi29 DNAP). DNA strands were examined in single file order at one nucleotide spatial precision in real time. The registry error probability (either an insertion or deletion during one pass along a template strand) ranged from 10% to 24.5% absent optimization. This general strategy facilitates multiple reads of individual template strands and is transferrable to other nanopore devices for implementation of DNA sequence analysis. PMID:22334048

  20. Stochastic Stokes' Drift, Homogenized Functional Inequalities, and Large Time Behavior of Brownian Ratchets

    KAUST Repository

    Blanchet, Adrien

    2009-01-01

    A periodic perturbation of a Gaussian measure modifies the sharp constants in Poincarae and logarithmic Sobolev inequalities in the homogeniz ation limit, that is, when the period of a periodic perturbation converges to zero. We use variational techniques to determine the homogenized constants and get optimal convergence rates toward s equilibrium of the solutions of the perturbed diffusion equations. The study of these sharp constants is motivated by the study of the stochastic Stokes\\' drift. It also applies to Brownian ratchets and molecular motors in biology. We first establish a transport phenomenon. Asymptotically, the center of mass of the solution moves with a constant velocity, which is determined by a doubly periodic problem. In the reference frame attached to the center of mass, the behavior of the solution is governed at large scale by a diffusion with a modified diffusion coefficient. Using the homogenized logarithmic Sobolev inequality, we prove that the solution converges in self-similar variables attached to t he center of mass to a stationary solution of a Fokker-Planck equation modulated by a periodic perturbation with fast oscillations, with an explicit rate. We also give an asymptotic expansion of the traveling diffusion front corresponding to the stochastic Stokes\\' drift with given potential flow. © 2009 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  1. Driving things

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard

    2015-01-01

    . pp.155 ((http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/roads/safety/publications/2010/pdf/rsgr_2010001.pdf)) Nevile, M., Haddington, P., Heinemann, T., Rauniomaa, M. (Eds.) Interacting with objects: Language, materiality, and social activity. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Redshaw, S. (2008....... Interaction with objects reflects the car’s role beyond mere transport as a site of personal, social, and work life (Featherstone et al. 2005; Redshaw 2008). Studies of interaction examine this role as it is actually enacted, understood, and accomplished, in situ through participants’ practices (e.g. Laurier...... of in-car distractions, and how they impact driving activities (Nevile & Haddington 2010). Data are video recordings of ordinary journeys, capturing drivers and passengers in real-world real-time driving situations (27 hours, 90 journeys). For driving and road safety, research and experience has...

  2. Community Drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2018-01-01

    opportunity to break boundaries between research institutions and surrounding communities through the involvement of new types of actors, knowledge forms and institutions (OECD, 2011). This paper presents the project Community Drive a three year cross disciplinary community-driven game– and data-based project....... In the paper we present how the project Community Drive initiated in May 2018 is based on results from pilot projects conducted from 2014 – 2017. Overall these studies showed that it is a strong motivational factor for students to be given the task to change their living conditions through redesign...... of living in the area. The paper discusses potentials and pitfalls of designing community-driven science gaming environments and how results from previous studies can form the project Community Drive....

  3. MT. BIGELOW 61-INCH IMAGES OF 9P/TEMPEL 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains 6 images of 9P/Tempel 1 obtained on five nights in 1994 using a visual CCD mounted on the 61-inch Kuiper telescope of the Mt. Bigelow...

  4. Project W320 52-inch diameter equipment container load test: Test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellomy, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    This test report summarizes testing activities and documents the results of the load tests performed on-site and off-site to structural qualify the 52-inch equipment containers designed and fabricated under Project W-320

  5. Cyclic creep, mechanical ratchetting and amplitude history dependence of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and evaluation of unified constitutive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamada, Hiroshi

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to elucidate inelastic behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel as a candidate material for the next-generation fast breeder reactor and to provide the information for the formulation of a unified constitutive model. For this purpose, cyclic creep, mechanical ratchetting and amplitude history dependence of cyclic hardening were first examined at 550degC. As a result, systematic cyclic creep and mechanical ratchetting behavior were observed under various loading conditions, and little amplitude history dependence was found. Then these results were simulated by three unified constitutive models, i.e. the Chaboche, Bodner-Partom and modified Chaboche models. The simulated results show that these models cannot describe the cyclic creep and mechanical ratchetting behavior with high accuracy, but succeed in describing the inelastic behavior of amplitude variation experiments. (author)

  6. Design of a Gear-Shifting Control Mechanism for 8-Speed Bicycle Drive Hub

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-An Chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The multi-speed drive hub stored on the rear wheel of a bicycle is an important speed-changing device to adjust the pedaling force and driving speed. This paper proposes a feasible gear-shifting control mechanism of an 8-speed distributed-flow-type transmission mechanism. A transmission mechanism consisting of two parallel-connected transmission units and one differential unit is introduced first. Then, based on the clutching sequence table, the embodiment design of a gear-shifting control mechanism is presented to selectively control the engagement of pawl-and-ratchet clutches and slot-with-block clutches as well as govern the power-flow path. The power-flow path at each speed-stage of this 8-speed drive hub is analyzed to verify the feasibility of the proposed design.

  7. Risk assessment of K Basin twelve-inch and four-inch drain valve failure from a postulated seismic initiating event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MORGAN, R.G.

    1999-06-23

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project will transfer metallic SNF from the Hanford 105 K-East and 105 K-West Basins to safe interim storage in the Canister Storage Building in the 200 Area. The initial basis for design, fabrication, installation, and operation of the fuel removal systems was that the basin leak rate which could result from a postulated accident condition would not be excessive relative to reasonable recovery operations. However, an additional potential K Basin water leak path is through the K Basin drain valves. Three twelve-inch drain valves are located in the main basin bays along the north wall. Five four-inch drain valves are located in the north and south loadout pits (NLOP and SLOP), the weasel pit, the technical viewing pit, and the discharge chute pit. The sumps containing the valves are filled with concrete which covers the drain valve body. Visual observations indicate that only the valve's bonnet and stem are exposed above the basin concrete floor for the twelve-inch drain valve and that much less of the valve's bonnet and stem are exposed above the basin concrete floor for the five four-inch drain valves. It was recognized, however, that damage of the drain valve bonnet or stem during a seismic initiating event could provide a potential K Basin water leak path. The objectives of this analysis are to: (1) evaluate the likelihood of damaging the three twelve-inch drain valves located along the north wall of the main basin and the five four-inch drain valves located in the pits from a seismic initiating event, and (2) determine the likelihood of exceeding a specific consequence (initial leak rate) from a damaged valve. The analysis process is a risk-based uncertainty analysis where each variable is modeled using available information and engineering judgement. The uncertainty associated with each variable is represented by a probability distribution (probability density function). Uncertainty exists because of the inherent

  8. Development of gamma spectroscopy employing NaI(Tl) detector 3 inch x 3 inch and readout electronic of flash-ADC/FPGA-based technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hai, Vo Hong [HCMC-National Univ., Hochiminh City (Viet Nam). Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Ton Duc Thang Univ., Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam). Div. of Nuclear Physics; Hung, Nguyen Quoc [HCMC-National Univ., Hochiminh City (Viet Nam). Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Khai, Bui Tuan [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2015-05-15

    n this article the development of a gamma spectroscopy system is described using a scintillation detector NaI(Tl) of 3 inch x 3 inch. The readout electronic for the spectroscopy is built from the fast analog-digital conversion of Flash Analog-Digital Converter (Flash-ADC) 250 MHz - 8 bits resolution, and the embedded Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology. The embedded VHSIC Hardware Description Language (VHDL) code for FPGA is built in such a way that it works as a multi channel analyser (MCA) with 4096 Digital Charge Integration (DCI) channels. A pulse generator with frequency varying from Hz up to 12 kHz is used to evaluate the time response of the system. Two standard radioisotope sources of {sup 133}Ba and {sup 152}Eu with multi gamma energies ranging from several tens keV to MeV are used to evaluate the linearity and energy resolution of the system.

  9. Theoretical study of moving magnetic beads on an inclined plane and its application in the ratchet separation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashidi, M.M., E-mail: mm_rashidi@tongji.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Lab of Vehicle Aerodynamics and Vehicle Thermal Management Systems, Tongji University, 4800 Cao An Rd., Jiading, Shanghai, 201804 (China); ENN-Tongji Clean Energy Institute of Advanced Studies, Shanghai (China); ENN-Tongji Clean Energy Institute of Advanced Studies, Shanghai (China); Johnson, S., E-mail: mm_rashidi@sawtc.com [University of Michigan-Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Yang, Z., E-mail: shane.johnson@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Lab of Vehicle Aerodynamics and Vehicle Thermal Management Systems, Tongji University, 4800 Cao An Rd., Jiading, Shanghai, 201804 (China); ENN-Tongji Clean Energy Institute of Advanced Studies, Shanghai (China)

    2016-01-15

    For first time, motion of a magnetic bead ascending an inclined surface is investigated. The translational and rotational velocities of magnetic beads traveling on an inclined plane in the creeping flow regime are studied. The governing equations considering lift force and magnetic torque are obtained. Rolling and slipping cases are studied in detail. It is shown that the lift force effect is critical for large values of sedimentation Reynolds number (Res) and negligible for small values of Res. This method is applicable for neutrally buoyant and heavy magnetic bead motion. Practical application of this study is implemented in the ratchet configuration for separation of magnetic beads with different sizes. This is applicable for novel applications such as drug delivery, magnetic tweezers, and magnetic actuated stiffness testing systems which require accurate magnetic bead sizes for accurate function. - Graphical abstract: Free body diagram for rolling/slipping motion a rough magnetic bead up a smooth plane. - Highlights: • For first time, motion of a magnetic bead ascending an inclined surface is investigated. • The governing equations considering lift force and magnetic torque are obtained. • Practical application of this study is implemented in the ratchet configuration for separation of magnetic beads with different sizes.

  10. Effects of nucleotides and nucleotide analogue inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in a ratchet model of polymerase translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götte, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    A single cycle of nucleotide incorporation by the reverse transcriptase of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 RT) involves the initial binding of an incoming nucleotide, a conformational change that traps the substrate, the formation of a new phosphodiester bond, the release of pyrophosphate (PPi), and ultimately polymerase translocation, which clears the nucleotide binding site. This article reviews different mechanistic models for polymerase translocation with emphasis placed on HIV-1 RT. Structure-function analyses of stalled complexes of HIV-1 RT provide strong evidence to suggest that the enzyme can oscillate between pre- and post-translocational states. Nucleotide hydrolysis is not required for the movement of the polymerase in a stalled configuration; thermal energy is sufficient to allow random bidirectional sliding. The next complementary nucleotide, following the incorporated chain-terminator, acts like a pawl of a ratchet that traps the enzyme in the post-translocation state and prevents the reverse movement. Quantitative footprinting experiments have shown that the concentration of the templated nucleotide required to shift the translocational equilibrium forward depends crucially on the structure of the 3'end of the primer. Changes in the relative population of pre- and post-translocation complexes can influence rates of excision of incorporated NRTIs, which, in turn, affects drug susceptibility. The concept of a ratchet model of HIV-1 RT translocation and its implications for drug action and resistance, and the discovery and development of novel antiviral compounds is discussed.

  11. Am/Cm TTR testing - 3/8-inch glass beads evaluation in CIM5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, D. C.

    2000-01-01

    To facilitate the procurement and handling of the glass former for Am/Cm vitrification in the F-Canyon MPPF, 1/4 inch and 3/8 inch diameter glass beads were purchased from Corning for evaluation in the 5 inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5). Prior to evaluating the beads in the CIM5, tests were conducted in the Drain Tube Test Stand (DTTS) with 1/4 inch beads, 3/8 inch beads, and a 50/50 mixture to identify any process concerns. Results of the DTTS tests are summarized in Attachment 1. A somewhat larger volume expansion was experienced in all three DTTS runs as compared to a standard run using cullet. Further testing of the use of glass beads in the CIM5 was requested by the Design Authority as Task 1.02 of Technical Task Request 99-MNSS/SE-006. Since the Technical Task Plan was not yet approved, the completion of this task was conducted under an authorization request approved by the SRTC Laboratory Director, S. Wood. This request is included as Attachment 2

  12. Comparision of Incidental Reflection From Containerized Maintenance/Housekeeping Solutions and One Inch of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Bryan Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); MacQuigg, Michael Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wysong, Andrew Russell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-15

    This document addresses the incidental reflector reactivity worth of containerized maintenance/housekeeping fluids for use in PF-4 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The intent of the document is to analyze containerized maintenance/housekeeping fluids which will be analyzed as water that may be present under normal conditions of an operation. The reactivity worth is compared to the reactivity worth due to I-inch of close-fitting 4n water reflection and I-inch of close-fitting radial water reflection. Both have been used to bound incidental reflection by 2-liter bottles in criticality safety evaluations. The conclusion is that, when the maintenance/housekeeping fluids are containerized the reactivity increase from a configuration which is bounding of normal conditions (up to eight bottles modeled with 2-liters of solution at varying diameter) is bound by I-inch of close fitting 4n water relection.

  13. Evaluation of 3 Inch SN-219 Failure and S and SX Tank Farm Saltwell Piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELSEN, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluation of direct buried piping currently in use or designated for future Saltwell pumping in S and SX Farms. Documented evaluation of failed S-103 saltwell pumping transfer line 3 inch SN-219. This evaluation is intended to reflect current status of Saltwell piping, when taken in context with referenced documents

  14. Full scale ambient water flow tests of a 10-inch emergency release coupling for LNG transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putte, L.J. van der; Webber, T.; Bokhorst, E. van; Revell, C.

    2016-01-01

    For LNG transfer in ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore configurations emergency release couplings (F.RC) in combination with loading arms and multi-composite hoses are applied In view of a demand for increasing transfer flow rates in offshore LNG applications a 10-inch ERC has been developed intended

  15. Interim results: fines recycle testing using the 4-inch diameter primary graphite burner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, W.B.

    1975-05-01

    The results of twenty-two HTGR primary burner runs in which graphite fines were recycled pneumatically to the 4-inch diameter pilot-plant primary fluidized-bed burner are described. The result of the tests showed that zero fines accumulation can easily be achieved while operating at plant equivalent burn rates. (U.S.)

  16. Theoretical study of moving magnetic beads on an inclined plane and its application in the ratchet separation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, M. M.; Johnson, S.; Yang, Z.

    2016-01-01

    For first time, motion of a magnetic bead ascending an inclined surface is investigated. The translational and rotational velocities of magnetic beads traveling on an inclined plane in the creeping flow regime are studied. The governing equations considering lift force and magnetic torque are obtained. Rolling and slipping cases are studied in detail. It is shown that the lift force effect is critical for large values of sedimentation Reynolds number (Res) and negligible for small values of Res. This method is applicable for neutrally buoyant and heavy magnetic bead motion. Practical application of this study is implemented in the ratchet configuration for separation of magnetic beads with different sizes. This is applicable for novel applications such as drug delivery, magnetic tweezers, and magnetic actuated stiffness testing systems which require accurate magnetic bead sizes for accurate function.

  17. Multiaxial Creep-Fatigue and Creep-Ratcheting Failures of Grade 91 and Haynes 230 Alloys Toward Addressing Design Issues of Gen IV Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Tasnim [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Lissenden, Cliff [Penn State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Carroll, Laura [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The proposed research will develop systematic sets of uniaxial and multiaxial experimental data at a very high temperature (850-950°C) for Alloy 617. The loading histories to be prescribed in the experiments will induce creep-fatigue and creep-ratcheting failure mechanisms. These experimental responses will be scrutinized in order to quantify the influences of temperature and creep on fatigue and ratcheting failures. A unified constitutive model (UCM) will be developed and validated against these experimental responses. The improved UCM will be incorporated into the widely used finite element commercial software packages ANSYS. The modified ANSYS will be validated so that it can be used for evaluating the very high temperature ASME-NH design-by-analysis methodology for Alloy 617 and thereby addressing the ASME-NH design code issues.

  18. Fabrication of 0.5-inch diameter FBR mixed oxide fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Benecke, M.W.; McCord, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    Large diameter (0.535 inch) mixed oxide fuel pellets for Fast Breeder Reactor application were successfully fabricated by the cold-press-and-sinter technique. Enriched UO 2 , PuO 2 -UO 2 , and PuO 2 -ThO 2 compositions were fabricated into nominally 90% theoretical density pellets for the UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 compositions, and 88% and 93% T.D. for the PuO 2 -ThO 2 compositions. Some processing adjustments were required to achieve satisfactory pellet quality and density. Furnace heating rate was reduced from 200 to 50 0 C/h for the organic binder burnout cycle for the large, 0.535-inch diameter pellets to eliminate pellet cracking during sintering. Additional preslugging steps and die wall lubrication during pressing were used to eliminate pressing cracks in the PuO 2 -ThO 2 pellets

  19. Health physics challenges involved with opening a "seventeen-inch" concrete waste vault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Patrick T; Pizzulli, Michelle

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the various activities involved with opening a sealed legacy "Seventeen-inch" concrete vault and the health physics challenges and solutions employed. As part of a legacy waste stream that was removed from the former Hazardous Waste Management Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the "Seventeen-inch" concrete vault labeled 1-95 was moved to the new Waste Management Facility for ultimate disposal. Because the vault contained 239Pu foils with a total activity in excess of the transuranic waste limits, the foils needed to be removed and repackaged for disposal. Conventional diamond wire saws could not be used because of facility constraints, so this project relied mainly on manual techniques. The planning and engineering controls put in place enabled personnel to open the vault and remove the waste while keeping dose as low as reasonably achievable.

  20. Schlesinger's Telescope: A Brief History of the Yale 26-inch Refractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Altena, W. F.; Hoffleit, E. D.

    2003-08-01

    Frank Schlesinger began planning for the establishment of a southern observatory when he arrived at Yale in 1920. After discussing the possibility of a location in Auckland, New Zealand and gathering site survey observations for a four-month period, he decided to select a site in Johannesburg, South Africa. A large photographically corrected 26-inch objective was ground, polished and completed by James McDowell in 1923, while the telescope was built largely in the Yale shops in New Haven. Schlesinger left New Haven in 1924 with the lens, and the telescope followed shortly thereafter. Installation of the 26-inch refractor was completed in early June and dedicated by the Prince of Wales on June 22, 1924. The principal observational program for the 26-inch refractor was the determination of parallaxes of the bright stars and it was continued until 1952, when the telescope was moved to Mt. Stromlo due to the deteriorating sky conditions in Johannesburg. The parallax program continued at Mt. Stromlo until 1963 when the telescope was donated to the Commonwealth Observatory and the Yale-Columbia project moved to Argentina, Columbia having joined with Yale in 1943. Approximately 70,000 plates were taken with the refractor for the parallax programs and about 2,000 stellar parallaxes determined. The Schlesinger 26-inch refractor was destroyed by a firestorm on January 18, 2003, along with the other telescopes on Mount Stromlo, the workshop, library and many of the residences. This event was a sad ending to a telescope that played a major role in defining our knowledge of the distances, motions and masses of the brighter stars during the first half of the 20th century.

  1. Design of a 18F production system at ORNL 86-inch cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaeffer, M.C.; Barreto, F.; Datesh, J.R.; Goldstein, B.R.

    1977-01-01

    A target system for the production of 18 F by proton bombardment of H 2 18 O was designed for the ORNL 86-inch cyclotron facility. The system consists of concentric titanium and aluminum cylinders. Oxygen-18-enriched H 2 O circulates through the inner titanium cylinder and through an external heat exchanger with cooling water flowing in the annulus. Yields of 5.0 curies are expected for a 250-μA proton beam current and 24-min irradiation time

  2. Safe driving for teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driving and teenagers; Teens and safe driving; Automobile safety - teenage drivers ... MAKE A COMMITTMENT TO SAFETY Teens also need to commit to being safe and responsible drivers in order to improve the odds in their favor. Reckless driving ...

  3. Opportunity's View After Drive on Sol 1806

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 60.86 meters (200 feet) on the 1,806th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 21, 2009). North is at the center; south at both ends. Tracks from the drive extend northward across dark-toned sand ripples and light-toned patches of exposed bedrock in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). Engineers designed the Sol 1806 drive to be driven backwards as a strategy to redistribute lubricant in the rovers wheels. The right-front wheel had been showing signs of increased friction. The rover's position after the Sol 1806 drive was about 2 kilometer (1.2 miles) south southwest of Victoria Crater. Cumulative odometry was 14.74 kilometers (9.16 miles) since landing in January 2004, including 2.96 kilometers (1.84 miles) since climbing out of Victoria Crater on the west side of the crater on Sol 1634 (August 28, 2008). This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  4. The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center's 14 X 14-Inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, A.

    1994-01-01

    A history of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) George C. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) 14 x 14-Inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel is presented. Its early and continuing role in the United States space program is shown through highlights of the tunnel's history and the major programs tested in the tunnel over the past 40 years. The 14-Inch Tunnel has its beginning with the Army in the late 1950's under the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA). Such programs as the Redstone, Jupiter, Pershing, and early Saturn were tested in the 14-Inch Tunnel in the late 1950's. America's first launch vehicle, the Jupiter C, was designed and developed using the 14-Inch Wind Tunnel. Under NASA, the 14-Inch Wind Tunnel has made large contributions to the Saturn, Space Transportation System, and future launch vehicle programs such as Shuttle-C and the National Launch System. A technical description of the tunnel is presented for background information on the type and capabilities of the 14-Inch Wind Tunnel. The report concludes in stating: the 14-Inch Wind Tunnel as in speed of sound; transonic, at or near the speed of sound the past, will continue to play a large but unseen role in he development of America's space program.

  5. Monitoring microstructural evolution of alloy 617 with non-linear acoustics for remaining useful life prediction; multiaxial creep-fatigue and creep-ratcheting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lissenden, Cliff [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Hassan, Tasnin [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Rangari, Vijaya [Tuskegee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States)

    2014-10-30

    The research built upon a prior investigation to develop a unified constitutive model for design-­by-­analysis of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design of next generation nuclear plants (NGNPs). Model development requires a set of failure data from complex mechanical experiments to characterize the material behavior. Therefore uniaxial and multiaxial creep-­fatigue and creep-­ratcheting tests were conducted on the nickel-­base Alloy 617 at 850 and 950°C. The time dependence of material behavior, and the interaction of time dependent behavior (e.g., creep) with ratcheting, which is an increase in the cyclic mean strain under load-­controlled cycling, are major concerns for NGNP design. This research project aimed at characterizing the microstructure evolution mechanisms activated in Alloy 617 by mechanical loading and dwell times at elevated temperature. The acoustic harmonic generation method was researched for microstructural characterization. It is a nonlinear acoustics method with excellent potential for nondestructive evaluation, and even online continuous monitoring once high temperature sensors become available. It is unique because it has the ability to quantitatively characterize microstructural features well before macroscale defects (e.g., cracks) form. The nonlinear acoustics beta parameter was shown to correlate with microstructural evolution using a systematic approach to handle the complexity of multiaxial creep-­fatigue and creep-­ratcheting deformation. Mechanical testing was conducted to provide a full spectrum of data for: thermal aging, tensile creep, uniaxial fatigue, uniaxial creep-­fatigue, uniaxial creep-ratcheting, multiaxial creep-fatigue, and multiaxial creep-­ratcheting. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Optical Microscopy were conducted to correlate the beta parameter with individual microstructure mechanisms. We researched

  6. Monitoring microstructural evolution of alloy 617 with non-linear acoustics for remaining useful life prediction; multiaxial creep-fatigue and creep-ratcheting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lissenden, Cliff; Hassan, Tasnin; Rangari, Vijaya

    2014-01-01

    The research built upon a prior investigation to develop a unified constitutive model for design-@by-@analysis of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design of next generation nuclear plants (NGNPs). Model development requires a set of failure data from complex mechanical experiments to characterize the material behavior. Therefore uniaxial and multiaxial creep-@fatigue and creep-@ratcheting tests were conducted on the nickel base Alloy 617 at 850 and 950°C. The time dependence of material behavior, and the interaction of time dependent behavior (e.g., creep) with ratcheting, which is an increase in the cyclic mean strain under load-@controlled cycling, are major concerns for NGNP design. This research project aimed at characterizing the microstructure evolution mechanisms activated in Alloy 617 by mechanical loading and dwell times at elevated temperature. The acoustic harmonic generation method was researched for microstructural characterization. It is a nonlinear acoustics method with excellent potential for nondestructive evaluation, and even online continuous monitoring once high temperature sensors become available. It is unique because it has the ability to quantitatively characterize microstructural features well before macroscale defects (e.g., cracks) form. The nonlinear acoustics beta parameter was shown to correlate with microstructural evolution using a systematic approach to handle the complexity of multiaxial creep-@fatigue and creep-@ratcheting deformation. Mechanical testing was conducted to provide a full spectrum of data for: thermal aging, tensile creep, uniaxial fatigue, uniaxial creep-@fatigue, uniaxial creep-ratcheting, multiaxial creep-fatigue, and multiaxial creep-@ratcheting. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Optical Microscopy were conducted to correlate the beta parameter with individual microstructure mechanisms. We researched application of the

  7. Ion pump as Brownian motor: theory of electroconformational coupling and proof of ratchet mechanism for Na,K-ATPase action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsong, Tian Yow; Chang, Cheng-Hung

    2003-04-01

    This article reviews some concepts of the Brownian Ratchet which are relevant to our discussion of mechanisms of action of Na,K-ATPase, a universal ion pump and an elemental motor protein of the biological cell. Under wide ranges of ionic compositions it can hydrolyze an ATP and use the γ-phosphorous bond energy of ATP to pump 3 Na + out of, and 2 K + into the cell, both being uphill transport. During the ATP-dependent pump cycle, the enzyme oscillates between E1 and E2 states. Our experiment replaces ATP with externally applied electric field of various waveforms, amplitudes, and frequencies. The field enforced-oscillation, or fluctuation of E1 and E2 states enables the enzyme to harvest energy from the applied field and convert it to the chemical gradient energy of cations. A theory of electroconformational coupling (TEC), which embodies all the essential features of the Brownian Ratchet, successfully simulates these experimental results. Our analysis based on a four-state TEC model indicates that the equilibrium and the rate constants of the transport system define the frequency and the amplitude of the field for the optimal activation. Waveform, frequency, and amplitude are three elements of signal. Thus, electric signal of the ion pump is found by TEC analysis of the experimental data. Electric noise (white) superimposed on an electric signal changes the pump efficiency and produces effects similar to the stochastic resonance reported in other biological systems. The TEC concept is compared with the most commonly used Michaelis-Menten enzyme mechanism (MME) for similarities and differences. Both MME and TEC are catalytic wheels, which recycle the catalyst in each turnover. However, a MME can only catalyze reaction of descending free energy while a TEC enzyme can catalyze reaction of ascending free energy by harvesting needed energy from an off-equilibrium electric noise. The TEC mechanism is shown to be applicable to other biological motors and engines, as

  8. Properties of 8-inch photomultiplier tubes for a large volume imaging water Cerenkov detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehler, Ch.

    1996-01-01

    In the Institut fuer Kernphysik I conceptional studies for a possible succession project for the KARMEN-ν-detector are performed. This design studies propose to build a large volume 1300 t imaging water Cerenkov detector. The main goal of this experiment will be the investigation of ν-e - -scattering in the medium energy range up to 50 MeV. The sensitive surface of this detector will be instrumented with about 3000 8-inch photomultiplier tubes (PMT) providing a coverage of 20%. In the framework of this detector design, studies of the properties of hemispherical 8-inch phototubes have been investigated in this work. The topic was to optimise the quality of the important PMT properties like time- and energy-resolution which are crucial to achieve the required spatial and angular resolutions. A second task of this work was to construct a test facility for the PMT, with the possibility to test large quantities. Monte Carlo calculations show that the required detector resolutions of σ E /E(E e ≤50 MeV)=5.2%+47%/√E, σ t (E e ∼30 MeV)=0.6 ns, σ x (E e ∼30 MeV)=13 cm, σ Θ (E e ∼30 MeV)=20 , can be achieved if the phototubes have a transit-time spread less than 1 ns. Up to now, two different 8-inch tubes are available and have been tested, the HAMAMATSU R5912 and the EMI 9353. (orig.)

  9. Photometric Typing Analyses of Three Young Supernovae with the Robotic Palomar 60-Inch Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Rajala, Anne M.; Fox, Derek B.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Leonard, Douglas C.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Moon, Dae-Sik; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2004-01-01

    We present photometric typing analyses of three young supernovae observed with the Robotic 60-inch Telescope at Palomar Observatory (P60). This represents the first time that such photo-typing has been attempted, in a blind fashion, on newly-discovered supernovae. For one of the target supernovae, SN2004cs, our photometry provided the first constraint on the SN type, which we predicted would be type Ia. To the contrary, however, our subsequent Keck spectroscopy shows it to be an unusual type ...

  10. Nanomanipulation of 2 inch wafer fabrication of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays by nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bu, Ian Y. Y.; Eichhorn, Volkmar; Carlson, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays are typically defined by electron beam lithography (EBL), and hence limited to small areas due to the low throughput. To obtain wafer‐scale fabrication we propose large area thermal nanoimprint lithography (NIL). A 2‐inch stamp master is defined using EBL for subsequent......, efficient production of wafer‐scale/larger arrays of CNTs has been achieved. The CNTs have been deposited by wafer‐scale plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) of C2H2/NH3. Substrates containing such nanotubes have been used to automate nanorobotic manipulation sequences of individual CNTs...

  11. First thin AC-coupled silicon strip sensors on 8-inch wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergauer, T., E-mail: thomas.bergauer@oeaw.ac.at [Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Wien (Vienna) (Austria); Dragicevic, M.; König, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Wien (Vienna) (Austria); Hacker, J.; Bartl, U. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Siemensstrasse 2, 9500 Villach (Austria)

    2016-09-11

    The Institute of High Energy Physics (HEPHY) in Vienna and the semiconductor manufacturer Infineon Technologies Austria AG developed a production process for planar AC-coupled silicon strip sensors manufactured on 200 μm thick 8-inch p-type wafers. In late 2015, the first wafers were delivered featuring the world's largest AC-coupled silicon strip sensors. Detailed electrical measurements were carried out at HEPHY, where single strip and global parameters were measured. Mechanical studies were conducted and the long-term behavior was investigated using a climate chamber. Furthermore, the electrical properties of various test structures were investigated to validate the quality of the manufacturing process.

  12. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 2 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA simulations of water landing impacts. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. EWIT Phase 2 featured a 36-inch aluminum tank head. The tank head was outfitted with one accelerometer, twelve pressure transducers, three string potentiometers, and four strain gages. The tank head was dropped from heights of 1 foot and 2 feet. The focus of this report is the correlation of analytical models against test data. As a measure of prediction accuracy, peak responses from the baseline LS-DYNA model were compared to peak responses from the tests.

  13. The 88-Inch Cyclotron: A One-Stop Facility for Electronics Radiation and Detector Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kireeff Covo, M.; Albright, R. A.; Ninemire, B. F.; Johnson, M. B.; Hodgkinson, A.; Loew, T.; Benitez, J. Y.; Todd, D. S.; Xie, D. Z.; Perry, T.; Phair, L.; Bernsteiny, L. A.; Bevins, J.; Brown, J. A.; Goldblum, B. L.; Harasty, M.; Harrig, K. P.; Laplace, T. A.; Matthews, E. F.; Bushmaker, A.; Walker, D.; Oklejas, V.; Hopkins, A. R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Chen, J.; Cronin, S. B.

    2017-10-01

    In outer space down to the altitudes routinely flown by larger aircrafts, radiation can pose serious issues for microelectronics circuits. The 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a sector-focused cyclotron and home of the Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects Facility, where the effects of energetic particles on sensitive microelectronics are studied with the goal of designing electronic systems for the space community. This paper describes the flexibility of the facility and its capabilities for testing the bombardment of electronics by heavy ions, light ions, and neutrons. Experimental capabilities for the generation of neutron beams from deuteron breakups and radiation testing of carbon nanotube field effect transistor will be discussed.

  14. Design rules of mechanical structure of reactors. Damage due to cyclic loading. Progressive distortion. Practical analysis of ratcheting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, Gerard; Cousseran, Pierre; Lebey, Jacques; Moulin, Didier; Roche, Roland; Tremblais, Andre.

    1982-08-01

    At first is given a definition of what is ratcheting. A short discussion shows that computation results do not agree with experimental results. This is attributed to the complexity of the real material behavior. These considerations lead to try to build a design rule mainly based on the results of experimental tests. A large experimental program is in progress at CEN-Saclay. Using these results and the results available in open litterature, it was possible to propose a rule based on the concept of effective primary stress Psub(eff). The effective primary stress is a fictitious primary stress giving the same effects that the real loading (it is to say the same effect that the combination of an applied primary stress P and a cyclic straining). Determination of an upper bound value of Psub(eff) is made with the help of an efficiency diagram. More precisely the efficiency diagram include a curve giving a conservative value of an efficiency index V=P/Psub(eff) as a function of the secondary quotient SQ=ΔQ/P. Finally limitation of Psub(eff) intensity is discussed in regard with the current practice [fr

  15. Double-lock ratchet mechanism revealing the role of  SER-344 in FoF1 ATP synthase

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, T.

    2011-03-07

    In a majority of living organisms, FoF1 ATP synthase performs the fundamental process of ATP synthesis. Despite the simple net reaction formula, ADP+Pi→ATP+H2O, the detailed step-by-step mechanism of the reaction yet remains to be resolved owing to the complexity of this multisubunit enzyme. Based on quantum mechanical computations using recent high resolution X-ray structures, we propose that during ATP synthesis the enzyme first prepares the inorganic phosphate for the γP-OADP bond-forming step via a double-proton transfer. At this step, the highly conserved αS344 side chain plays a catalytic role. The reaction thereafter progresses through another transition state (TS) having a planar ion configuration to finally form ATP. These two TSs are concluded crucial for ATP synthesis. Using stepwise scans and several models of the nucleotide-bound active site, some of the most important conformational changes were traced toward direction of synthesis. Interestingly, as the active site geometry progresses toward the ATP-favoring tight binding site, at both of these TSs, a dramatic increase in barrier heights is observed for the reverse direction, i.e., hydrolysis of ATP. This change could indicate a "ratchet" mechanism for the enzyme to ensure efficacy of ATP synthesis by shifting residue conformation and thus locking access to the crucial TSs.

  16. Ion pump as molecular ratchet and effects of noise: electric activation of cation pumping by Na,K-ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsong, T. Y.; Xie, T. D.

    2002-08-01

    Na,K-ATPase is a universal ion pump of the biological cell. Under physiological conditions, it uses the γ-phosphorus bond energy of ATP during hydrolysis to pump 2 K+ inward and 3 Na+ outward; both being uphill transports. The experiment presented here demonstrates that the protein transporter can also use electric energy to fuel its pump activity. A theory of electroconformational coupling (TEC) is described and an experiment performed to verify several predictions of the model. Analysis based on the TEC model suggests that Na,K-ATPase is a Brownian ratchet. The enzyme harvests energy from the applied field by means of the field-induced conformational oscillation or fluctuation. However, high efficiency of energy transduction can only be achieved with an electric field of certain intensities, frequencies and waveforms. This property of the enzyme allows us to define an electric signal and differentiate it from electric noise on the basis of the analysis by the TEC model. Data show that electric noise alone does not induce pump activity. However, an appropriate power level of noise imposed on a signal can enhance the pump efficiency. The effect of noise on the signal transduction of Na,K-ATPase is reminiscent of the stochastic resonance phenomenon reported in other biological systems [3, 35]. The TEC model embodies many common features of enzymes and biological motors. It is potentially energy-efficient, much more so than models based on the ion-rectification mechanism.

  17. High-Volume Production of Lightweight, Multi-Junction Solar Cells Using 6-inch GaAs, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the proposed Phase II program, we will transition MicroLink's 6-inch epitaxial lift-off (ELO) solar cell fabrication process into a manufacturing platform capable...

  18. Stand Development 25 Years after a 9.0-inch Diameter-Limit First Cutting In Appalachian Hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Clay Smith; N. I. Lamson

    1977-01-01

    This report is a case history of stand development 25 years after a 9.0-inch diameter-limit cutting in a primarily second growth 40- to 45-year-old Appalachian hardwood stand. Some old residual trees from the early 1900 logging era were scattered throughout the stand. In 1950, a 9.0-inch diameter-limit cutting removed 8,650 board feet per acre and reduced the basal...

  19. Recommendations for protecting against failure by brittle fracture: Category II and III ferritic steel shipping containers with wall thickness greater than four inches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.W.; Fischer, L.E.

    1996-08-01

    This report provides criteria for selecting ferritic steels that would prevent brittle fracture in Category II and III shipping containers with wall thickness greater than 4 inches. These methods are extensions of those previously used for Category II and III containers less than 4 inches thick and Category I containers more than 4 inches thick

  20. A new alignment procedure for the South African Astronomical Observatory's 74-inch telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crause, Lisa A.; Booth, John A.; Doss, David; Loubser, Egan; O'Connor, James E.; Sass, Craig; Sickafoose, Amanda A.; Worters, Hannah L.

    2016-07-01

    Considerable effort has gone into improving the performance and reliability of the SAAO's 74-inch telescope. This included replacing the telescope encoders, refining the pointing model and increasing the telescope throughput. The latter involved re-aluminising the primary and formulating a procedure to ensure optimal alignment of the telescope mirrors. To this end, we developed the necessary hardware and techniques to ensure that such alignment is achieved and maintained, particularly following re-aluminising of the mirrors. In essence, the procedure involves: placing a Taylor Hobson Alignment Telescope on the mechanical rotation axis of the 74-inch (which we define to be the optical axis, since the Cassegrain instruments attach to the associated turntable), then adjusting the tip/tilt of the secondary mirror to get it onto that axis and, lastly, adjusting the tip/tilt of the primary mirror to eliminate coma. An eyepiece (or wavefront camera) is installed at the Cassegrain port for this final step since comatic star images indicate the need to tip/tilt the primary mirror to align it to the secondary. Tuning out any brightness gradients seen in an out-of-focus image of a bright star may also be used for feedback when adjusting the tip/tilt of the primary mirror to null coma.

  1. A PROTOTYPE FOUR INCH SHORT HYDRIDE (FISH) BED AS A REPLACEMENT TRITIUM STORAGE BED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.; Estochen, E.; Shanahan, K.; Heung, L.

    2011-02-23

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities have used 1st generation (Gen1) metal hydride storage bed assemblies with process vessels (PVs) fabricated from 3 inch nominal pipe size (NPS) pipe to hold up to 12.6 kg of LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} metal hydride for tritium gas absorption, storage, and desorption for over 15 years. The 2nd generation (Gen2) of the bed design used the same NPS for the PV, but the added internal components produced a bed nominally 1.2 m long, and presented a significant challenge for heater cartridge replacement in a footprint limited glove-box. A prototype 3rd generation (Gen3) metal hydride storage bed has been designed and fabricated as a replacement candidate for the Gen2 storage bed. The prototype Gen3 bed uses a PV pipe diameter of 4 inch NPS so the bed length can be reduced below 0.7 m to facilitate heater cartridge replacement. For the Gen3 prototype bed, modeling results show increased absorption rates when using hydrides with lower absorption pressures. To improve absorption performance compared to the Gen2 beds, a LaNi{sub 4.15}Al{sub 0.85} material was procured and processed to obtain the desired pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) properties. Other bed design improvements are also presented.

  2. Artist autonomy in a digital era: The case of Nine Inch Nails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven C. Brown

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A 2009 presentation by Michael Masnick (CEO and founder of insight company Floor64 entitled ‘How Trent Reznor and Nine Inch Nails represent the Future of the Music Business’ brought the success of the business models employed by Reznor in distributing Nine Inch Nails’ music into the spotlight. The present review provides a comprehensive timeline of the band circa 2005-2010, evaluating the success of the distribution methods employed in accordance with Masnick’s (2009 proposed business model of connecting with fans and providing them with a reason to buy. The model is conceptualised in the wider context in which Reznor’s distribution methods take place (including a brief consideration of Radiohead’s much cited pay-what-you- want model, addressing the perceived gaps in the model by exploring the involvement of musical preferences; age and consumer purchasing behavior and fan worship. Implications are discussed concerning the applicability of the model for new and emerging bands.

  3. Separation Efficiency of Nagar Parker China Clay Using Two Inch Hydrocyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Ghani Pathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance efficiency of two inch hydrocyclone has been investigated, using the Nagar Parker china clay. Raw china clay was initially washed with tap water and -75 ?m size fraction was separated through wet sieving. Washed china clay of -75 ?m was used as feed sample in hydrocyclone tests. Solids concentration in slurry was kept as 2.5%. 45 tests were conducted with different combinations of pressure, vortex finder and spigot. Three sizes of spigot viz. 3.2, 2.2 and 1.5mm and three sizes of vortex finder viz. 7.00, 5.5 and 3.00mm were used. Hydrocyclone rig was operated at five different pressures viz. 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 psi in conjunction with various combinations of vortex finder and spigot. Laser light scattering technique was used for particle size analysis of O/F (Overflow and U/F (Underflow products. Separation efficiency of the hydrocyclone, for various combinations of Vortex Finder, Spigot and operating pressure, was determined for two size fractions, i.e. less than ten micron and less than twenty micron, present in O/F and U/F products. From the results it was concluded that the best separation efficiency of 2 inch hydrocyclone is achieved by using the vortex finder of 7.0mm size and spigot of 1.5mm size. It was also concluded that the separation efficiency of the hydrocyclone decreases by increasing the pressure.

  4. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Polar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009). This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top. The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

  5. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends. The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock. This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  6. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Vertical)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009). This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top. The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

  7. Dementia and driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000028.htm Dementia and driving To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. If your loved one has dementia , deciding when they can no longer drive may ...

  8. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimano, Kunio; Nakamura, Akira; Mizuguchi, Koji; Sakai, Kazuhito; Mitsui, Hisayasu.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns upper-built-in type control rod drives of a BWR type reactor. Namely, high temperature linear motor driving type control rod drives are disposed in an upper space of the reactor pressure vessel, which generates electromagnetic power. In usual driving of control rods, driving shafts connected with control rods by a high temperature linear motor driving system comprising a driving shaft having an iron core inserted therein and electromagnetic coils is vertically moved to insert/withdraw the control rods to and from the reactor core. Upon occurrence of reactor scram, electric power source is interrupted, and the control rods are rapidly inserted to the reactor core. According to the present invention, since the control rod drives are disposed in the space above the reactor pressure vessel, pipelines or equipments passing through the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel can be saved. As a result, operation for maintenance and inspection is facilitated. (I.S.)

  9. Gear bearing drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  10. FDG gamma camera PET equipped with one inch crystal and XCT. Assessment of myocardial viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beheshti, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ., General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, PET CT Centre, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Linz (Austria); Khorsand, A.; Graf, S. [Dept. of Cardiology, Medical Univ., General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Dobrozemsky, G. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ. of Innsbruck (Austria); Oezer, S.; Kletter, K.; Dudczak, R. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ., General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Pirich, C. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine und Endocrinology, Paracelsus Private Medical Univ., SALK, Salzburg (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    Metabolic imaging with 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is actually considered as the best method to detect and quantitatively assess myocordial tissue viability. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of FDG gamma camera positron emission tomography (GCPET) imaging equipped with one inch NaI crystals in comparison to FDG dedicated PET (dPET) imaging as a ''gold standard'' in phantom and clinical studies. Patients, methods: nineteen patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent both imaging modalities. Phantom and clinical GCPET imaging were performed with a dual-headed, coincidence based gamma camera equipped with 1 inch thick NaI crystals and an X-ray tube (XCT) for attenuation correction (AC), as well as with a dedicated PET scanner with AC. {sup 99m}Tc tetrofosmin single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies were performed for assessment of myocardial perfusion, with AC. Results: phantom studies showed a significant relation in segmental activity between FDG imaging with AC using GCPET and dPET (r = 0.91, p < 0.001). In clinical studies with AC correlation coefficients of mean segmental FDG uptake and regional defect size were r = 0.87 (p < 0.0001) and r = 0.83 (p < 0.0001), respectively. In regional analysis close agreement was even found in the most attenuated regions of the heart if AC was used in GCPET imaging. The overall agreement for detection of viable myocardium was 81% between FDG-dPET (AC) and FDG-GCPET (AC) and 74% between FDG-dPET (AC) and FDG-GCPET (NC). Conclusions: suggests that the assessment of myocardial metabolism by means of FDG is feasible with a coincidence based gamma camera equipped with 1 inch thick NaI crystal if AC is performed. The results reveal a close concordance and agreement between FDG-dPET (AC) and FDG-GCPET (AC) as compared to FDG-GCPET (NC). (orig.)

  11. Simple Driving Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Mads

    2002-01-01

    -like language. Our aim is to extract a simple notion of driving and show that even in this tamed form it has much of the power of more general notions of driving. Our driving technique may be used to simplify functional programs which use function composition and will often be able to remove intermediate data...

  12. Testing of one-inch UF{sub 6} cylinder valves under simulated fire conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, P.G. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Accurate computational models which predict the behavior of UF{sub 6} cylinders exposed to fires are required to validate existing firefighting and emergency response procedures. Since the cylinder valve is a factor in the containment provided by the UF{sub 6} cylinder, its behavior under fire conditions has been a necessary assumption in the development of such models. Consequently, test data is needed to substantiate these assumptions. Several studies cited in this document provide data related to the behavior of a 1-inch UF{sub 6} cylinder valve in fire situations. To acquire additional data, a series of tests were conducted at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) under a unique set of test conditions. This document describes this testing and the resulting data.

  13. Recent developments in high charge state heavy ion beams at the LBL 88-inch Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, R.A.; Clark, D.J.; Glasgow, L.R.

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in design and operation of the internal PIG sources at the LBL 88-Inch Cyclotron have led to the development of high charge state (0.4 16 O 8+ . Total external intensities of these beams range from 10 12 particles/s for 6 Li 3+ to 0.1 particles/s for 16 O 8+ . Techniques have been developed for routine tune-out of the low intensity beams. These include use of model beams and reliance on the large systematic data base of cyclotron parameters which has been developed over many years of operation. Techniques for delivery of these weak beams to the experimental target areas are presented. Source design and operation, including special problems associated with Li, Be, and B beams are discussed

  14. LOFT transient thermal analysis for 10 inch primary coolant blowdown piping weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, S.K.

    1978-01-01

    A flaw in a weld in the 10 inch primary coolant blowdown piping was discovered by LOFT personnel. As a result of this, a thermal analysis and fracture mechanics analysis was requested by LOFT personnel. The weld and pipe section were analyzed for a complete thermal cycle, heatup and Loss of Coolant Experiment (LOCE), using COUPLE/MOD2, a two-dimensional finite element heat conduction code. The finite element representation used in this analysis was generated by the Applied Mechanics Branch. The record of nodal temperatures for the entire transient was written on tape VSN=T9N054, and has been forwarded to the Applied Mechanics Branch for use in their mechanical analysis. Specific details and assumptions used in this analysis are found in appropriate sections of this report

  15. Development and characterization of a CCD camera system for use on six-inch manipulator systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logory, L.M.; Bell, P.M.; Conder, A.D.; Lee, F.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has designed, constructed, and fielded a compact CCD camera system for use on the Six Inch Manipulator (SIM) at the Nova laser facility. The camera system has been designed to directly replace the 35 mm film packages on all active SIM-based diagnostics. The unit's electronic package is constructed for small size and high thermal conductivity using proprietary printed circuit board technology, thus reducing the size of the overall camera and improving its performance when operated within the vacuum environment of the Nova laser target chamber. The camera has been calibrated and found to yield a linear response, with superior dynamic range and signal-to-noise levels as compared to T-Max 3200 optic film, while providing real-time access to the data. Limiting factors related to fielding such devices on Nova will be discussed, in addition to planned improvements of the current design

  16. High performance AC drives

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Mukhtar

    2010-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive view of high performance ac drives. It may be considered as both a text book for graduate students and as an up-to-date monograph. It may also be used by R & D professionals involved in the improvement of performance of drives in the industries. The book will also be beneficial to the researchers pursuing work on multiphase drives as well as sensorless and direct torque control of electric drives since up-to date references in these topics are provided. It will also provide few examples of modeling, analysis and control of electric drives using MATLAB/SIMULIN

  17. Magnetic quantum ratchet effect in (Cd,Mn)Te- and CdTe-based quantum well structures with a lateral asymmetric superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltermeier, P.; Budkin, G. V.; Unverzagt, J.; Hubmann, S.; Pfaller, A.; Bel'kov, V. V.; Golub, L. E.; Ivchenko, E. L.; Adamus, Z.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.; Popov, V. V.; Fateev, D. V.; Kozlov, D. A.; Weiss, D.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2017-04-01

    We report on the observation of magnetic quantum ratchet effect in (Cd,Mn)Te- and CdTe-based quantum well structures with an asymmetric lateral dual grating gate superlattice subjected to an external magnetic field applied normal to the quantum well plane. A dc electric current excited by cw terahertz laser radiation shows 1 /B oscillations with an amplitude much larger as compared to the photocurrent at zero magnetic field. We show that the photocurrent is caused by the combined action of a spatially periodic in-plane potential and the spatially modulated radiation due to the near-field effects of light diffraction. Magnitude and direction of the photocurrent are determined by the degree of the lateral asymmetry controlled by the variation of voltages applied to the individual gates. The observed magneto-oscillations with enhanced photocurrent amplitude result from Landau quantization and, for (Cd,Mn)Te at low temperatures, from the exchange enhanced Zeeman splitting in diluted magnetic heterostructures. Theoretical analysis, considering the magnetic quantum ratchet effect in the framework of semiclassical approach, describes quite well the experimental results.

  18. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  19. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Koichi.

    1994-01-01

    In control rod drives, differential pressure sensors are disposed at the inlet and the exit of a driving water pressure control valve disposed in a driving water supply device and, when deviation of fluctuation of the differential pressure from a set value is detected, a pressure control valve for driving water is controlled so as to make the differential pressure constant. The differential pressure sensors detect the differential pressure between the pressure of the control rod drives at the inlet and the exit of the driving water pressure control valve and a pressure in a reactor dome. A judging circuit judges whether the differential pressure between both sides of the driving water pressure control valve is deviated from a set value or not and, if it deviates from the set value, outputs of judging signal to the control device. In the control device, the opening degree of the driving water pressure control valve is controlled, so that the differential pressure between both sides of the driving water pressure control value is constant and does not deviate from the set value. There are provided advantageous effects of preventing abnormal control rod withdrawing phenomenon to improve safety and reliability for the control of the reactor operation. (N.H.)

  20. Medications and impaired driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetland, Amanda; Carr, David B

    2014-04-01

    To describe the association of specific medication classes with driving outcomes and provide clinical recommendations. The MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for articles published from January 1973 to June 2013 on classes of medications associated with driving impairment. The search included outcome terms such as automobile driving, motor vehicle crash, driving simulator, and road tests. Only English-language articles that contained findings from observational or interventional designs with ≥ 10 participants were included in this review. Cross-sectional studies, case series, and case reports were excluded. Driving is an important task and activity for the majority of adults. Some commonly prescribed medications have been associated with driving impairment measured by road performance, driving simulation, and/or motor vehicle crashes. This review of 30 studies identified findings with barbiturates, benzodiazepines, hypnotics, antidepressants, opioid and nonsteroidal analgesics, anticonvulsants, antipsychotics, antiparkinsonian agents, skeletal muscle relaxants, antihistamines, anticholinergic medications, and hypoglycemic agents. Additional studies of medication impact on sedation, sleep latency, and psychomotor function, as well as the role of alcohol, are also discussed. Psychotropic agents and those with central nervous system side effects were associated with measures of impaired driving performance. It is difficult to determine if such associations are actually a result of medication use or the medical diagnosis itself. Regardless, clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of impaired driving with specific classes of medications, educate their patients, and/or consider safer alternatives.

  1. The Berkeley accelerator space effects facility (BASE) - A newmission for the 88-inch cyclotron at LBNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, M.A.

    2005-09-06

    In FY04, the 88-Inch Cyclotron began a new operating mode that supports a local research program in nuclear science, R&D in accelerator technology and a test facility for the National Security Space (NSS) community (the U.S. Air Force and NRO). The NSS community (and others on a cost recovery basis) can take advantage of both the light- and heavy-ion capabilities of the Cyclotron to simulate the space radiation environment. A significant portion of this work involves the testing of microcircuits for single event effects. The experimental areas within the building that are used for the radiation effects testing are now called the Berkeley Accelerator and Space Effects (BASE) facility. Improvements to the facility to provide increased reliability, quality assurance and new capabilities are underway and will be discussed. These include a 16 AMeV ''cocktail'' of beams for heavy ion testing, a neutron beam, more robust dosimetry, and other upgrades.

  2. Design evaluation of the 20-cm (8-inch) secondary burner system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rode, J.S.

    1977-08-01

    This report describes an evaluation of the design of the existing 20-cm (8-inch) engineering-scale secondary burner system in the HTGR reprocessing cold pilot plant at General Atomic Co. The purpose of this evaluation is to assess the suitability of the existing design as a prototype of the HTGR Recycle Demonstration Facility (HRDF) secondary burner system and to recommend alternatives where the existing design is thought to be unsuitable as a prototype. This evaluation has led to recommendations for the parallel development of two integrated design concepts for a prototype secondary burner system. One concept utilizes the existing burner heating and cooling subsystems in order to minimize development risk, but simplifies a number of other features associated with remote maintenance and burner operation. The other concept, which offers maximum cost reduction, utilizes internal gas cooling of the burner, retains the existing heating subsystem for design compatibility, but requires considerable development to reduce the risk to acceptable limits. These concepts, as well as other design alternatives, are described and evaluated.

  3. Performance and Flowfield Measurements on a 10-inch Ducted Rotor VTOL UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Preston; Tung, Chee

    2004-01-01

    A ducted fan VTOL UAV with a 10-inch diameter rotor was tested in the US Army 7-by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel. The test conditions covered a range of angle of attack from 0 to 110 degrees to the freestream. The tunnel velocity was varied from 0 (simulating a hover condition) to 128 ft/sec in propeller mode. A six-component internal balance measured the aerodynamic loads for a range of model configurations. including the isolated rotor, the isolated duct, and the full configuration of the duct and rotor. For some conditions, hotwire velocity surveys were conducted along the inner and outer surface of the duct and across the downstream wake. In addition, fluorescent oil flow visualization allowed the flow separation patterns inside and outside of the duct to be mapped for a few test conditions. Two different duct shapes were tested to determine the performance effects of leading edge radius. For each duct, a range of rotor tip gap from 1%R to 4.5%R was tested to determine the performance penalty in hover and axial flight. Measured results are presented in terms of hover performance, hover performance in a crosswind, and high angle of attack performance in propeller mode. In each case, the effects of both tip gap and duct leading edge radius are illustrated using measurements. Some of the hover performance issues were also studied using a simple analytical method, and the results agreed with the measurements.

  4. Experimental performance of an internal resistance heater for Langley 6-inch expansion tube driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the heating characteristics of an internal resistance heating element was conducted in the driver of the Langley 6-inch expansion tube to obtain actual operating conditions, to compare these results to theory, and to determine whether any modification need be made to the heater element. The heater was operated in pressurized helium from 138. MN/sq m to 62.1 MN/sq m. This investigation revealed large temperature variations within the heater element caused primarily by area reductions at insulator locations. These large temperature variations were reduced by welding small tabs over all grooves. Previous predictions of heater element and driver gas temperature were unacceptable so new equations were derived. These equations predict element and gas temperature within 10 percent of the test data when either the constant power cycle or the interrupted power cycle is used. Visual observation of the heater element, when exposed to the atmosphere with power on, resulted in a decision to limit the heater element to 815 K. Experimental shock Mach numbers are in good agreement with theory.

  5. Summary of LaRC 2-inch Erectable Joint Hardware Heritage Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, John T.; Watson, Judith J.

    2016-01-01

    As the National Space Transportation System (STS, also known as the Space Shuttle) went into service during the early 1980's, NASA envisioned many missions of exploration and discovery that could take advantage of the STS capabilities. These missions included: large orbiting space stations, large space science telescopes and large spacecraft for manned missions to the Moon and Mars. The missions required structures that were significantly larger than the payload volume available on the STS. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) conducted studies to design and develop the technology needed to assemble the large space structures in orbit. LaRC focused on technology for erectable truss structures, in particular, the joint that connects the truss struts at the truss nodes. When the NASA research in large erectable space structures ended in the early 1990's, a significant amount of structural testing had been performed on the LaRC 2-inch erectable joint that was never published. An extensive set of historical information and data has been reviewed and the joint structural testing results from this historical data are compiled and summarized in this report.

  6. Design evaluation of the 20-cm (8-inch) secondary burner system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, J.S.

    1977-08-01

    This report describes an evaluation of the design of the existing 20-cm (8-inch) engineering-scale secondary burner system in the HTGR reprocessing cold pilot plant at General Atomic Co. The purpose of this evaluation is to assess the suitability of the existing design as a prototype of the HTGR Recycle Demonstration Facility (HRDF) secondary burner system and to recommend alternatives where the existing design is thought to be unsuitable as a prototype. This evaluation has led to recommendations for the parallel development of two integrated design concepts for a prototype secondary burner system. One concept utilizes the existing burner heating and cooling subsystems in order to minimize development risk, but simplifies a number of other features associated with remote maintenance and burner operation. The other concept, which offers maximum cost reduction, utilizes internal gas cooling of the burner, retains the existing heating subsystem for design compatibility, but requires considerable development to reduce the risk to acceptable limits. These concepts, as well as other design alternatives, are described and evaluated

  7. Development of the Software for 30 inch Telescope Control System at KHAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, B.-S.; Kim, S.-J.; Jang, M.; Min, S.-W.; Seol, K.-H.; Moon, K.-S.

    2006-12-01

    Even though 30inch optical telescope at Kyung Hee Astronomy Observatory has been used to produce a series of scientific achievements since its first light in 1992, numerous difficulties in the operation of the telescope have hindered the precise observations needed for further researches. Since the currently used PC-TCS (Personal Computer based Telescope Control system) software based on ISA-bus type is outdated, it doesn't have a user friendly interface and make it impossible to scale. Also accumulated errors which are generated by discordance from input and output signals into a motion controller required new control system. Thus we have improved the telescope control system by updating software and modifying mechanical parts. We applied a new BLDC (brushless DC) servo motor system to the mechanical parts of the telescope and developed a control software using Visual Basic 6.0. As a result, we could achieve a high accuracy in controlling of the telescope and use the userfriendly GUI (Graphic User Interface).

  8. Electric Vehicle - Economical driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, VCE, Steen V.; Schøn, Henriette

    1999-01-01

    How do you reduce the energy-wast when driving and loading EV's - or rather: How do I get more km/l out of an EV......How do you reduce the energy-wast when driving and loading EV's - or rather: How do I get more km/l out of an EV...

  9. Fundamentals of electrical drives

    CERN Document Server

    Veltman, André; De Doncker, Rik W

    2007-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive introduction to various aspects of electrical drive systems. This volume provides a presentation of dynamic generic models that cover all major electrical machine types and modulation/control components of a drive as well as dynamic and steady state analysis of transformers and electrical machines.

  10. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treu, C.A. Jr.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes. 7 figs.

  11. Switched reluctance motor drives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Davis RM, Ray WF, Blake RJ 1981 Inverter drive for switched reluctance: circuits and component ratings. Inst. Elec. Eng. Proc. B128: 126-136. Ehsani M. 1991 Position Sensor elimination technique for the switched reluctance motor drive. US Patent No. 5,072,166. Ehsani M, Ramani K R 1993 Direct control strategies based ...

  12. Self-driving carsickness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diels, C.; Bos, J.E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and

  13. Self-driving carsickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diels, C.; Bos, J.E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and

  14. Wind-Sculpted Vicinity After Opportunity's Sol 1797 Drive (Vertical)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 111 meters (364 feet) on the 1,797th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 12, 2009). North is at the center; south at both ends. Tracks from the drive recede northward across dark-toned sand ripples in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. Patches of lighter-toned bedrock are visible on the left and right sides of the image. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  15. Wind-Sculpted Vicinity After Opportunity's Sol 1797 Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 111 meters (364 feet) on the 1,797th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 12, 2009). North is at the center; south at both ends. Tracks from the drive recede northward across dark-toned sand ripples in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. Patches of lighter-toned bedrock are visible on the left and right sides of the image. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  16. Wind-Sculpted Vicinity After Opportunity's Sol 1797 Drive (Polar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 111 meters (364 feet) on the 1,797th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 12, 2009). North is at the center; south at both ends. Tracks from the drive recede northward across dark-toned sand ripples in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. Patches of lighter-toned bedrock are visible on the left and right sides of the image. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

  17. Linear micromechanical stepping drive for pinhole array positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endrödy, Csaba; Mehner, Hannes; Hoffmann, Martin; Grewe, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    A compact linear micromechanical stepping drive for positioning a 7 × 5.5 mm 2 optical pinhole array is presented. The system features a step size of 13.2 µm and a full displacement range of 200 µm. The electrostatic inch-worm stepping mechanism shows a compact design capable of positioning a payload 50% of its own weight. The stepping drive movement, step sizes and position accuracy are characterized. The actuated pinhole array is integrated in a confocal chromatic hyperspectral imaging system, where coverage of the object plane, and therefore the useful picture data, can be multiplied by 14 in contrast to a non-actuated array. (paper)

  18. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akira.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to monitor the coupling state between a control rod and a control rod drive. Constitution: After the completion of a control rod withdrawal, a coolant pressure is applied to a control rod drive being adjusted so as to raise only the control rod drive and, in a case where the coupling between the control rod drive and the control rod is detached, the former is elevated till it contacts the control rod and then stopped. The actual stopping position is detected by an actual position detection circuit and compared with a predetermined position stored in a predetermined position detection circuit. If both of the positions are not aligned with each other, it is judged by a judging circuit that the control rod and the control rod drives are not combined. (Sekiya, K.)

  19. Bright Soil Churned by Spirit's Sol 1861 Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit drove 22.7 meters (74 feet) toward the southwest on the 1,861st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (March 28, 2009). After the drive, the rover took this image with its front hazard-avoidance camera, looking back at the tracks from the drive. As usual since losing the use of its right-front wheel in 2006, Spirit drove backwards. The immobile right-front wheel churned up a long stripe of bright soil during this drive. Where Spirit has found such bright soil in the past, subsequent analysis of the composition found concentrations of sulfur or silica that testified to past action of water at the site. When members of the rover team saw the large quantity of bright soil exposed by the Sol 1861 drive, they quickly laid plans to investigate the composition with Spirit's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. The Sol 1861 drive took the rover past the northwest corner of the low plateau called 'Home Plate,' making progress on a route around the western side of Home Plate. The edge of Home Plate forms the horizon on the right side of this image. Husband Hill is on the horizon on the left side. For scale, the parallel rover wheel tracks are about 1 meter (40 inches) apart. The rover's hazard-avoidance cameras take 'fisheye' wide-angle images.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of space shuttle main propulsion feed line 17-inch disconnect valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max; Pearce, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    A steady incompressible three-dimensional (3-D) viscous flow analysis was conducted for the Space Shuttle Main Propulsion External Tank (ET)/Orbiter (ORB) propellant feed line quick separable 17-inch disconnect flapper valves for liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2). The main objectives of the analysis were to predict and correlate the hydrodynamic stability of the flappers and pressure drop with available water test data. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer codes were procured at no cost from the public domain, and were modified and extended to carry out the disconnect flow analysis. The grid generator codes SVTGD3D and INGRID were obtained. NASA Ames Research Center supplied the flow solution code INS3D, and the color graphics code PLOT3D. A driver routine was developed to automate the grid generation process. Components such as pipes, elbows, and flappers can be generated with simple commands, and flapper angles can be varied easily. The flow solver INS3D code was modified to treat interior flappers, and other interfacing routines were developed, which include a turbulence model, a force/moment routine, a time-step routine, and initial and boundary conditions. In particular, an under-relaxation scheme was implemented to enhance the solution stability. Major physical assumptions and simplifications made in the analysis include the neglect of linkages, slightly reduced flapper diameter, and smooth solid surfaces. A grid size of 54 x 21 x 25 was employed for both the LO2 and LH2 units. Mixing length theory applied to turbulent shear flow in pipes formed the basis for the simple turbulence model. Results of the analysis are presented for LO2 and LH2 disconnects.

  1. Turbulent current drive mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Christopher J.; Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2017-08-01

    Mechanisms through which plasma microturbulence can drive a mean electron plasma current are derived. The efficiency through which these turbulent contributions can drive deviations from neoclassical predictions of the electron current profile is computed by employing a linearized Coulomb collision operator. It is found that a non-diffusive contribution to the electron momentum flux as well as an anomalous electron-ion momentum exchange term provide the most efficient means through which turbulence can modify the mean electron current for the cases considered. Such turbulent contributions appear as an effective EMF within Ohm's law and hence provide an ideal means for driving deviations from neoclassical predictions.

  2. Identifying Method of Drunk Driving Based on Driving Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Zhao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Drunk driving is one of the leading causes contributing to traffic crashes. There are numerous issues that need to be resolved with the current method of identifying drunk driving. Driving behavior, with the characteristic of real-time, was extensively researched to identify impaired driving behaviors. In this paper, the drives with BACs above 0.05% were defined as drunk driving state. A detailed comparison was made between normal driving and drunk driving. The experiment in driving simulator was designed to collect the driving performance data of the groups. According to the characteristics analysis for the effect of alcohol on driving performance, seven significant indicators were extracted and the drunk driving was identified by the Fisher Discriminant Method. The discriminant function demonstrated a high accuracy of classification. The optimal critical score to differentiate normal from drinking state was found to be 0. The evaluation result verifies the accuracy of classification method.

  3. Experimental observations on uniaxial whole-life transformation ratchetting and low-cycle stress fatigue of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy micro-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Di; Kang, Guozheng; Kan, Qianhua; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the low-cycle fatigue failure of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy micro-tubes with a wall thickness of 150 μm is investigated by uniaxial stress-controlled cyclic tests at human body temperature 310 K. The effects of mean stress, peak stress, and stress amplitude on the uniaxial whole-life transformation ratchetting and fatigue failure of the NiTi alloy are observed. It is concluded that the fatigue life depends significantly on the stress levels, and the extent of martensite transformation and its reverse play an important role in determining the fatigue life. High peak stress or complete martensite transformation shortens the fatigue life. (paper)

  4. Linear step drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haniger, L.; Elger, R.; Kocandrle, L.; Zdebor, J.

    1986-01-01

    A linear step drive is described developed in Czechoslovak-Soviet cooperation and intended for driving WWER-1000 control rods. The functional principle is explained of the motor and the mechanical and electrical parts of the drive, power control, and the indicator of position are described. The motor has latches situated in the reactor at a distance of 3 m from magnetic armatures, it has a low structural height above the reactor cover, which suggests its suitability for seismic localities. Its magnetic circuits use counterpoles; the mechanical shocks at the completion of each step are damped using special design features. The position indicator is of a special design and evaluates motor position within ±1% of total travel. A drive diagram and the flow chart of both the control electronics and the position indicator are presented. (author) 4 figs

  5. Drugs and driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walsh, J. Michael; De Gier, Johan J.; Christopherson, Asbjørg S.; Verstraete, Alain G.

    The authors present a global overview on the issue of drugs and driving covering four major areas: (1) Epidemiology and Prevalence-which reviews epidemiological research, summarizes available information, discusses the methodological shortcomings of extant studies, and makes recommendations for

  6. Science of driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The Science of Driving project focused on developing a collaborative relationship to develop curriculum units for middle school and high school students to engage them in exciting real-world scenarios. This effort involved faculty, staff, and student...

  7. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapellier, R.A.

    1960-05-24

    BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

  8. Instant Google Drive starter

    CERN Document Server

    Procopio, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This book is a Starter which teaches you how to use Google Drive practically. This book is perfect for people of all skill levels who want to enjoy the benefits of using Google Drive to safely store their files online and in the cloud. It's also great for anyone looking to learn more about cloud computing in general. Readers are expected to have an Internet connection and basic knowledge of using the internet.

  9. Belt drive construction improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Yu. Khomenko

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of the traction capacity increase of the belt drive TRK is examined. This was done for the purpose of air conditioning system of passenger car with double-generator system energy supplying. Belts XPC (made by the German firm «Continental ContiTech» testing were conducted. The results confirmed the possibility of their usage in order to improve belt drive TRK characteristics.

  10. Epilepsy and driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moetamedi M

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a disease with high prevalence, which interferes driving and may lead to car accident; This case-control study has been done on 100 epileptic patients and 100 persons as control group, who had history of driving. We gathered our patients with face to face interview and registering their information in special forms which were prepared for this study. There were three times more accidents among epileptic cases comparing with control group and this difference was more considerable in men and in patients under 35 years old. The cause of accident were not seizure attack in more than 60% of the patients and these ordinary accidents were also more in case group. Epileptic patients with history of car accidents during driving had poor drug compliance comparing with the epileptics without history of an accident so drug compliance may be valuable in predicting accident in these patients. We have also found poor drug compliance in whom seizure attacks caused accident for them. 58% of the epileptics had not consulted their physician about driving. 43.3% of seizures during driving were of generalized type and none of the patients had inform police about their disease during getting driving license.

  11. Dementia and driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, D; Neubauer, K; Boyle, M; Gerrard, J; Surmon, D; Wilcock, G K

    1992-04-01

    Many European countries test cars, but not their drivers, as they age. There is evidence to suggest that human factors are more important than vehicular factors as causes of motor crashes. The elderly also are involved in more accidents per distance travelled than middle-aged drivers. As the UK relies on self-certification of health by drivers over the age of 70 years, we examined the driving practices of patients with dementia attending a Memory Clinic. Nearly one-fifth of 329 patients with documented dementia continued to drive after the onset of dementia, and impaired driving ability was noted in two-thirds of these. Their families experienced great difficulty in persuading patients to stop driving, and had to invoke outside help in many cases. Neuropsychological tests did not help to identify those who drove badly while activity of daily living scores were related to driving ability. These findings suggest that many patients with dementia drive in an unsafe fashion after the onset of the illness. The present system of self-certification of health by the elderly for driver-licensing purposes needs to be reassessed.

  12. Self-driving carsickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diels, Cyriel; Bos, Jelte E

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and productivity. However, we here show that the envisaged scenarios all lead to an increased risk of motion sickness. As such, the benefits this technology is assumed to bring may not be capitalised on, in particular by those already susceptible to motion sickness. This can negatively affect user acceptance and uptake and, in turn, limit the potential socioeconomic benefits that this emerging technology may provide. Following a discussion on the causes of motion sickness in the context of self-driving cars, we present guidelines to steer the design and development of automated vehicle technologies. The aim is to limit or avoid the impact of motion sickness and ultimately promote the uptake of self-driving cars. Attention is also given to less well known consequences of motion sickness, in particular negative aftereffects such as postural instability, and detrimental effects on task performance and how this may impact the use and design of self-driving cars. We conclude that basic perceptual mechanisms need to be considered in the design process whereby self-driving cars cannot simply be thought of as living rooms, offices, or entertainment venues on wheels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  13. MLEP-Fail calibration for 1/8 inch thick cast plate of 17-4 steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, Edmundo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of the work presented in this memo was to calibrate the Sierra material model Multilinear Elastic-Plastic Hardening Model with Failure (MLEP-Fail) for 1/8 inch thick cast plate of 17-4 steel. The calibration approach is essentially the same as that recently used in a previous memo using data from smooth and notched tensile specimens. The notched specimens were manufactured with three notch radii R = 1=8, 1/32 and 1/64 inches. The dimensions of the smooth and notched specimens are given in the prints in Appendix A. Two cast plates, Plate 3 and Plate 4, with nominally identical properties were considered.

  14. Optimizing Facility Configurations and Operating Conditions for Improved Performance in the NASA Ames 24 Inch Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Cruden, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) is a shock tube wherein the driver gas can be heated by an electric arc discharge. The electrical energy is stored in a 1.2 MJ capacitor bank. Four inch and 24 inch diameter driven tubes are available. The facility is described and the need for testing in the 24 inch tube to better simulate low density NASA mission profiles is discussed. Three test entries, 53, 53B and 59, are discussed. Tests are done with air or Mars gas (95.7% CO2/2.7% N2/1.6% Ar) at pressures of 0.01 to 0.14 Torr. Velocities spanned 6.3-9.2 km/s, with a nominal center of 7 km/s. Many facility configurations are studied in an effort to improve data quality. Various driver and driven tube configurations and the use of a buffer section between the driver and the driven tube are studied. Diagnostics include test times, time histories of the shock light pulses and tilts of the shock wave off the plane normal to the tube axis. The report will detail the results of the various trials, give the best configuration/operating conditions found to date and provide recommendations for further improvements. Finally, diaphragm performance is discussed.

  15. Opportunity's View After Long Drive on Sol 1770

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 104 meters (341 feet) on the 1,770th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (January 15, 2009). Tracks from the drive extend northward across dark-toned sand ripples and light-toned patches of exposed bedrock in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). Prior to the Sol 1770 drive, Opportunity had driven less than a meter since Sol 1713 (November 17, 2008), while it used the tools on its robotic arm first to examine a meteorite called 'Santorini' during weeks of restricted communication while the sun was nearly in line between Mars and Earth, then to examine bedrock and soil targets near Santorini. The rover's position after the Sol 1770 drive was about 1.1 kilometer (two-thirds of a mile) south southwest of Victoria Crater. Cumulative odometry was 13.72 kilometers (8.53 miles) since landing in January 2004, including 1.94 kilometers (1.21 miles) since climbing out of Victoria Crater on the west side of the crater on Sol 1634 (August 28, 2008). This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  16. Opportunity's View After Long Drive on Sol 1770 (Vertical)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 104 meters (341 feet) on the 1,770th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (January 15, 2009). This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top. Tracks from the drive extend northward across dark-toned sand ripples and light-toned patches of exposed bedrock in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). Prior to the Sol 1770 drive, Opportunity had driven less than a meter since Sol 1713 (November 17, 2008), while it used the tools on its robotic arm first to examine a meteorite called 'Santorini' during weeks of restricted communication while the sun was nearly in line between Mars and Earth, then to examine bedrock and soil targets near Santorini. The rover's position after the Sol 1770 drive was about 1.1 kilometer (two-thirds of a mile) south southwest of Victoria Crater. Cumulative odometry was 13.72 kilometers (8.53 miles) since landing in January 2004, including 1.94 kilometers (1.21 miles) since climbing out of Victoria Crater on the west side of the crater on Sol 1634 (August 28, 2008).

  17. Opportunity's View After Drive on Sol 1806 (Polar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 60.86 meters (200 feet) on the 1,806th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 21, 2009). North is at the center; south at both ends. Tracks from the drive extend northward across dark-toned sand ripples and light-toned patches of exposed bedrock in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). Engineers designed the Sol 1806 drive to be driven backwards as a strategy to redistribute lubricant in the rovers wheels. The right-front wheel had been showing signs of increased friction. The rover's position after the Sol 1806 drive was about 2 kilometer (1.2 miles) south southwest of Victoria Crater. Cumulative odometry was 14.74 kilometers (9.16 miles) since landing in January 2004, including 2.96 kilometers (1.84 miles) since climbing out of Victoria Crater on the west side of the crater on Sol 1634 (August 28, 2008). This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

  18. Opportunity's View After Long Drive on Sol 1770 (Polar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 104 meters (341 feet) on the 1,770th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (January 15, 2009). This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top. Tracks from the drive extend northward across dark-toned sand ripples and light-toned patches of exposed bedrock in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). Prior to the Sol 1770 drive, Opportunity had driven less than a meter since Sol 1713 (November 17, 2008), while it used the tools on its robotic arm first to examine a meteorite called 'Santorini' during weeks of restricted communication while the sun was nearly in line between Mars and Earth, then to examine bedrock and soil targets near Santorini. The rover's position after the Sol 1770 drive was about 1.1 kilometer (two-thirds of a mile) south southwest of Victoria Crater. Cumulative odometry was 13.72 kilometers (8.53 miles) since landing in January 2004, including 1.94 kilometers (1.21 miles) since climbing out of Victoria Crater on the west side of the crater on Sol 1634 (August 28, 2008).

  19. Opportunity's View After Drive on Sol 1806 (Vertical)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 60.86 meters (200 feet) on the 1,806th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 21, 2009). North is at the center; south at both ends. Tracks from the drive extend northward across dark-toned sand ripples and light-toned patches of exposed bedrock in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). Engineers designed the Sol 1806 drive to be driven backwards as a strategy to redistribute lubricant in the rovers wheels. The right-front wheel had been showing signs of increased friction. The rover's position after the Sol 1806 drive was about 2 kilometer (1.2 miles) south southwest of Victoria Crater. Cumulative odometry was 14.74 kilometers (9.16 miles) since landing in January 2004, including 2.96 kilometers (1.84 miles) since climbing out of Victoria Crater on the west side of the crater on Sol 1634 (August 28, 2008). This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  20. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Hiroyasu.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable rapid control in a simple circuit by providing a motor control device having an electric capacity capable of simultaneously driving all of the control rods rapidly only in the inserting direction as well as a motor controlling device capable of fine control for the insertion and extraction at usual operation. Constitution: The control rod drives comprise a first motor control device capable of finely controlling the control rods both in inserting and extracting directions, a second motor control device capable of rapidly driving the control rods only in the inserting direction, and a first motor switching circuit and a second motor switching circuit switched by switches. Upon issue of a rapid insertion instruction for the control rods, the second motor switching circuit is closed by the switch and the second motor control circuit and driving motors are connected. Thus, each of the control rod driving motors is driven at a high speed in the inserting direction to rapidly insert all of the control rods. (Yoshino, Y.)

  1. China's modern day Great Wall : the 40 inch West to East Gas Pipeline Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.A.B.

    2004-01-01

    In order to fuel China's economic growth, PetroChina began construction of the West to East Natural Gas Pipeline Project (WEPP) in 2001 to transport large quantities of natural gas reserves from the Tarim Basin in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region in far western China to markets in eastern China. The WEPP is the first large diameter, cross-country pipeline project ever constructed in China, and was the first to use automatic welding and automatic ultrasonic inspection on pipelines in China. This paper addressed the management, engineering, procurement and construction challenges of the WEPP. Upon completion of the 3,800 km, 1.016 mm mainline pipeline, construction will begin on other major facilities, such 294 km of lateral line, dual fiber optic conduits with the mainline, 1,100 km of access roads, 23 metering stations, 18 pigging stations, 10 compressor stations, 16 mountain tunnels, 16 aerial crossings, 1 crossing of the Yangtze River, 3 crossings of the Yellow River, a gas control center, and SCADA system. Houston-based Universal Ensco Inc. was awarded a contract to perform a feasibility study as well as a construction supervision contract by PetroChina for the WEPP. Universal also designed a gas turbine drive compressor station at Lunnan and an electric drive compressor station at Zhengzhou. This paper demonstrated that business in China for foreign companies in the pipeline industry is evolving and several changes can be expected as the state planned economy is reformed to a free market economy. 4 refs., 5 tabs., 17 figs.

  2. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Stereo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11841 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11841 NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009). This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left. The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock. This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

  3. Gears and gear drives

    CERN Document Server

    Jelaska, Damir T

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how gears are formed and how they interact or 'mesh' with each other is essential when designing equipment that uses gears or gear trains. The way in which gear teeth are formed and how they mesh is determined by their geometry and kinematics, which is the topic of this book.  Gears and Gear Drives provides the reader with comprehensive coverage of gears and gear drives. Spur, helical, bevel, worm and planetary gears are all covered, with consideration given to their classification, geometry, kinematics, accuracy control, load capacity and manufacturing. Cylindric

  4. Comparing Expert and Novice Driving Behavior in a Driving Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiran B. Ekanayake

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study focused on comparing driving behavior of expert and novice drivers in a mid-range driving simulator with the intention of evaluating the validity of driving simulators for driver training. For the investigation, measurements of performance, psychophysiological measurements, and self-reported user experience under different conditions of driving tracks and driving sessions were analyzed. We calculated correlations between quantitative and qualitative measures to enhance the reliability of the findings. The experiment was conducted involving 14 experienced drivers and 17 novice drivers. The results indicate that driving behaviors of expert and novice drivers differ from each other in several ways but it heavily depends on the characteristics of the task. Moreover, our belief is that the analytical framework proposed in this paper can be used as a tool for selecting appropriate driving tasks as well as for evaluating driving performance in driving simulators.

  5. Gaze-controlled Driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tall, Martin; Alapetite, Alexandre; San Agustin, Javier

    2009-01-01

    We investigate if the gaze (point of regard) can control a remote vehicle driving on a racing track. Five different input devices (on-screen buttons, mouse-pointing low-cost webcam eye tracker and two commercial eye tracking systems) provide heading and speed control on the scene view transmitted...

  6. Drive-Through Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Margie

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how the early childhood field's approach to staff training reflects the drive-through, fast-food culture. Year after year directors send their teachers to workshops to get some quick refresher techniques. The author suggests that rather than focusing professional development on topics, focus on observing…

  7. Driving While Intoxicated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brick, John

    Alcohol intoxication increases the risk of highway accidents, the relative risk of crash probability increasing as a function of blood alcohol content (BAC). Because alcohol use is more prevalent than use of other drugs, more is known about the relationship between alcohol use and driving. Most states presume a BAC of .10% to be evidence of drunk…

  8. Electric-Drive Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-09-01

    Electric-drive vehicles use electricity as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. These vehicles can be divided into three categories: Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), All-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, PHEVs and EVs can also be referred to as plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs).

  9. Electric-Drive Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Septon, Kendall K [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-11

    Electric-drive vehicles use electricity as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. These vehicles can be divided into three categories: Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), All-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, PHEVs and EVs can also be referred to as plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs).

  10. Rod drive and latching mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronesi, L.; Sherwood, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Hydraulic drive and latching mechanisms for driving reactivity control mechanisms in nuclear reactors are described. Preferably, the pressurized reactor coolant is utilized to raise the drive rod into contact with and to pivot the latching mechanism so as to allow the drive rod to pass the latching mechanism. The pressure in the housing may then be equalized which allows the drive rod to move downwardly into contact with the latching mechanism but to hold the shaft in a raised position with respect to the reactor core. Once again, the reactor coolant pressure may be utilized to raise the drive rod and thus pivot the latching mechanism so that the drive rod passes above the latching mechanism. Again, the mechanism pressure can be equalized which allows the drive rod to fall and pass by the latching mechanism so that the drive rod approaches the reactor core. (author)

  11. Low-Cost, Manufacturable, 6-Inch Wafer Bonding Process for Next-Generation 5-Junction IMM+Ge Photovoltaic Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the development of a 6-inch wafer bonding process to allow bonding of a multi-junction inverted metamorphic (IMM) tandem solar cell structure to an...

  12. MRIR/Nimbus-2 Images of Daytime Brightness Temperature on 4 x 5 inch Film Sheets V001 (MRIRN2IM) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MRIRN2IM is the Nimbus-2 Medium Resolution Infrared Radiometer (MRIR) data product consisting of 4 x 5 inch photographic film sheets. Each film sheet contains an...

  13. MRIR/Nimbus-3 Images of Daytime Brightness Temperature on 4 x 5 inch Film Sheets V001 (MRIRN3IM) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MRIRN3IM is the Nimbus-3 Medium Resolution Infrared Radiometer (MRIR) data product consisting of 4 x 5 inch photographic film sheets. Each film sheet contains an...

  14. Two members of the CERN HPD team present their babies. André Braem (left) holds in his hands a 5-inch glass HPD, while a ceramic HPD for medical applications is shown by Christian Joram. The large detector in the middle is a 10-inch HPD developed for an astrophysics experiment.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Two members of the CERN HPD team present their babies. André Braem (left) holds in his hands a 5-inch glass HPD, while a ceramic HPD for medical applications is shown by Christian Joram. The large detector in the middle is a 10-inch HPD developed for an astrophysics experiment.

  15. A rotary drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causer, R.

    1983-01-01

    A rotary drive for a manipulator or teleoperator comprises a ring member freely rotatable about an eccentric boss extending from an input driver shaft. The ring member has a tapered rim portion wedged between two resiliently biassed friction rings of larger diameter than the ring member and coaxial with the driver shaft, and the ring member is rotatably connected to an output driven shaft. The rotary drive provides a considerable velocity ratio, and also provides a safety feature in that friction between the rim portion and the friction rings only causes rotation of the driven shaft if the load on the driven shaft is less than a certain limiting value. This limiting value may be varied by adjusting the resilient bias on the friction rings. (author)

  16. Driving and engine cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Giakoumis, Evangelos G

    2017-01-01

    This book presents in detail the most important driving and engine cycles used for the certification and testing of new vehicles and engines around the world. It covers chassis and engine-dynamometer cycles for passenger cars, light-duty vans, heavy-duty engines, non-road engines and motorcycles, offering detailed historical information and critical review. The book also provides detailed examples from SI and diesel engines and vehicles operating during various cycles, with a focus on how the engine behaves during transients and how this is reflected in emitted pollutants, CO2 and after-treatment systems operation. It describes the measurement methods for the testing of new vehicles and essential information on the procedure for creating a driving cycle. Lastly, it presents detailed technical specifications on the most important chassis-dynamometer cycles around the world, together with a direct comparison of those cycles.

  17. Drive-by-Downloads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narvaez, Julia; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara E.; Seifert, Christian; Aval, Chiraag U.; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2010-02-01

    Abstract: Drive-by-downloads are malware that push, and then execute, malicious code on a client system without the user's consent. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a discussion of the usefulness of antivirus software for detecting the installation of such malware, providing groundwork for future studies. Client honeypots collected drive-by malware which was then evaluated using common antivirus products. Initial analysis showed that most of such antivirus products identified less than 70% of these highly polymorphic malware programs. Also, it was observed that the antivirus products tested, even when successfully detecting this malware, often failed to classify it, leading to the conclusion that further work could involve not only developing new behavioral detection technologies, but also empirical studies that improve general understanding of these threats. Toward that end, one example of malicious code was analyzed behaviorally to provide insight into next steps for the future direction of this research.

  18. Sex Chromosome Drive

    OpenAIRE

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R.; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in t...

  19. Driving electrostatic transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Electrostatic transducers represent a very interesting alternative to the traditional inefficient electrodynamic transducers. In order to establish the full potential of these transducers, power amplifiers which fulfill the strict requirements imposed by such loads (high impedance, frequency...... depended, nonlinear and high bias voltage for linearization) must be developed. This paper analyzes power stages and bias configurations suitable for driving an electrostatic transducer. Measurement results of a 300 V prototype amplifier are shown. Measuring THD across a high impedance source is discussed...

  20. Design Drives: materials innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, Raymond; Toomey, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Design Drives Materials Innovation‘ outlines the potential of a D:STEM (Design, Science, Technology, Engineering amd Mathematics) approach to combining traditionally different fields through design-led, needs driven and technology anchored future products using electro/photo/bio-active polymers in physical formats defined in ‚dots, lines, surfaces and structures‘.It also identifies Ambient Assisted Living as a key driver for future applications.

  1. [Automobile driving capacity in dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Dementia influences at an early stage the driving aptitude of motor vehicle steering persons. Every year in Switzerland, around 16'000 driving permit holders suffer newly from dementia; therefore the driving aptitude is questioned, especially because of possibly limited executive functions. Individuals with early-stage dementia often may show a dangerous driving stile. However, a mild dementia does not a priori exclude the driving aptitude, and less than half of these drivers can continue driving for another 1 - 3 years. In contrast, there is no further driving aptitude in presence of moderate dementia. In the assessment of driving aptitude, the underlying cause of dementia is always taken into account. Cognitive short tests such as the Mini-Mental Status Exam, Clock Drawing Test and Trail-Making Test are not suitable to make reliable statements about the aptitude to drive, but these tests are very important for the initial diagnosis of dementia in primary care practice and can lead the way for further examination concerning driving aptitude. The legally prescribed regular check-up for motorists aged over 70 years in Switzerland provides an ideal opportunity for early detection of incipient dementia. The practical procedure for the assessment of aptitude to drive in the primary care practice is presented. The physician-guided on-road driving test represents a meaningful, practical and relatively cost-effective tool for the evaluation of driving aptitude in cases of doubt.

  2. Parkinson's disease and driving ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajiv; Pentland, Brian; Hunter, John; Provan, Frances

    2007-04-01

    To explore the driving problems associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) and to ascertain whether any clinical features or tests predict driver safety. The driving ability of 154 individuals with PD referred to a driving assessment centre was determined by a combination of clinical tests, reaction times on a test rig and an in-car driving test. The majority of cases (104, 66%) were able to continue driving although 46 individuals required an automatic transmission and 10 others needed car modifications. Ability to drive was predicted by the severity of physical disease, age, presence of other associated medical conditions, particularly dementia, duration of disease, brake reaction, time on a test rig and score on a driving test (all pfeatures in distinguishing safety to drive were severe physical disease (Hoehn and Yahr stage 3), reaction time, moderate disease associated with another medical condition and high score on car testing. Most individuals with PD are safe to drive, although many benefit from car modifications or from using an automatic transmission. A combination of clinical tests and in-car driving assessment will establish safety to drive, and a number of clinical correlates can be shown to predict the likely outcome and may assist in the decision process. This is the largest series of consecutive patients seen at a driving assessment centre reported to date, and the first to devise a scoring system for on-road driving assessment.

  3. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takao; Arita, Setsuo; Mizuno, Katsuhiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable fine positioning by using an induction motor of a simple structure as a driving source and thereby improve the reliability of control rod drives. Constitution: A step actuator is directly coupled with an induction motor, in which the induction motor is connected by way of a pulse driving control circuit to an AC power source, while the step actuator is connected to a DC power source. When a thyristor is turned ON, the motor outputs a positive torque and rotates and starts to rotate in the forward direction. When the other thyristor is turned ON, the motor is applied with braking by a reverse excitation in a manner equivalent to the change for the exciting phase sequence. When the speed is lowered to a predetermined value, braking is actuated by the torque of the step actuator and the motor stops at a zero position or balanced position. In this way, braking is actuated from the decelerating step to the stopping with no abrasion and a highly accurate positioning is possible due to the characteristics of the step actuator. (Horiuchi, T.)

  4. Control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watando, Kosaku; Tanaka, Yuzo; Mizumura, Yasuhiro; Hosono, Kazuya.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide a simple and compact construction of an apparatus for driving a drive shaft inside with a magnetic force from the outside of the primary system water side. Structure: The weight of a plunger provided with an attraction plate is supported by a plunger lift spring means so as to provide a buffer action at the time of momentary movement while also permitting the load on lift coil to be constituted solely by the load on the drive shaft. In addition, by arranging the attraction plate and lift coil so that they face each other with a small gap there-between, it is made possible to reduce the size and permit efficient utilization of the attracting force. Because of the small size, cooling can be simply carried out. Further, since there is no mechanical penetration portion, there is no possibility of leakage of the primary system water. Furthermore, concentration of load on a latch pin is prevented by arranging so that with a structure the load of the control rod to be directly beared through the scrum latch. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. The effects of Earth's magnetic field on 3-inch diameter photomultipliers used in KM3NeT neutrino telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, V.; Aiello, S.; Leonora, E.; Randazzo, N.

    2016-04-01

    The KM3NeT neutrino telescope will be the largest underwater neutrino telescope and will be located in the abyss of the Mediterranean Sea. In neutrino telescopes the key element of the detector is the optical module and for KM3NeT it consists of 31 PMTs stored inside a transparent pressure-resistant glass sphere of 17-inch that serves as mechanical protection while ensuring good light transmission. Since the PMTs installed into an underwater neutrino telescope can change their orientation because of movements of the detector structure due to sea currents, the influence of Earth's magnetic field has been investigated. Magnetic shielding by means of a mu-metal cage is used to reduce magnetic effects and to make the response of the PMT sufficiently orientation independent. In order to quantify the effect on magnetic field, we compared measurements on variation of gain, transit time spread and detection efficiency for a 3-inch PMT in shielded and unshielded condition at 3 PMT inclinations. Data shows that variations are sufficiently low especially for timing properties.

  6. Application of Derrick Corporation's stack sizer technology for slimes reduction in 6 inch clean coal hydrocyclone circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodzik, P.

    2009-04-15

    The article discusses the successful introduction of Derrick Corporation's Stack Sizer technology for removing minus 200 mesh slimes from 6-inch coal hydrocyclone underflow prior to froth flotation or dewatering by screen bowl centrifuges. In 2006, the James River Coal Company selected the Stack Sizer fitted with Derrick 150 micron and 100 micron urethane screen panels for removal of the minus 100 mesh high ash clay fraction from the clean coal spiral product circuits. After this application proved successful, Derrick Corporation introduced new 75 micron urethane screen panels for use on the Stack Sizer. Evaluation of feed slurry to flotation cells and screen bowl centrifuges showed significant amounts of minus 75 micron that could potentially be removed by efficient screening technology. Removal of the minus 75 micron fraction was sought to reduce ash and moisture content of the final clean coal product. Full-scale lab tests confirmed that the Stack Sizer fitted with Derrick 75 micron urethane screen panels consistently reduced the minus 75 micron percentage in coal slurry from 6-inch clean coal hydrocyclone underflow that is approximately 15 to 20% solid by-weight and 30 to 60% minus 75 micron to a clean coal fraction that is approximately 13 to 16% minus 75 micron. As a result total ash is reduced from approximately 36 to 38% in the hydrocyclone underflow to 14 to 16% in the oversize product fraction form the Stack Sizers. 1 fig., 2 tabs., 5 photos.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Project Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Aeroheating: LaRC 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel Test 6931

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    An investigation of the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion Crew Entry Vehicle has been performed in the Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. Data were measured on a approx.3.5% scale model (0.1778-m/7-inch diameter) of the vehicle using coaxial thermocouples at free stream Reynolds numbers of 2.0 10(exp 6)/ft to 7.30 10(exp 6)/ft and computational predictions were generated for all test conditions. The primary goals of this test were to obtain convective heating data for use in assessing the accuracy of the computational technique and to validate test methodology and heating data from a test of the same wind tunnel model in the Arnold Engineering Development Center Tunnel 9. Secondary goals were to determine the extent of transitional/turbulent data which could be produced on a CEV model in this facility, either with or without boundary-layer trips, and to demonstrate continuous pitch-sweep operation in this tunnel for heat transfer testing.

  8. Effects of trait anger, driving anger, and driving experience on dangerous driving behavior: A moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yan; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Wenguo; Zhang, Kan; Qu, Weina

    2017-11-01

    To explore the effect of anger behind the wheel on driving behavior and accident involvement has been the subject of many studies. However, few studies have explored the interaction between anger and driving experience on dangerous driving behavior. This study is a moderated mediation analysis of the effect of trait anger, driving anger, and driving experience on driving behavior. A sample of 303 drivers was tested using the Trait Anger Scale (TAS), the Driving Anger Scale (DAS), and the Dula Dangerous Driving Index (DDDI). The results showed that trait anger and driving anger were positively correlated with dangerous driving behavior. Driving anger partially mediated the effect of trait anger on dangerous driving behavior. Driving experience moderated the relationship between trait anger and driving anger. It also moderated the effect of driving anger on dangerous driving behavior. These results suggest that drivers with more driving experience may be safer as they are not easily irritated during driving. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Scenario analysis of energy saving and CO2 emissions reduction potentials to ratchet up Japanese mitigation target in 2030 in the residential sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakiyama, Takako; Kuramochi, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    This paper assesses to what extent CO 2 emissions from electricity in the residential sector can be further reduced in Japan beyond its post-2020 mitigation target (known as “Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC)”). The paper examines the reduction potential of electricity demand and CO 2 emissions in the residential sector by conducting a scenario analysis. Electricity consumption scenarios are set up using a time-series regression model, and used to forecast the electricity consumption patterns to 2030. The scenario analysis also includes scenarios that reduce electricity consumption through enhanced energy efficiency and energy saving measures. The obtained results show that Japan can reduce electricity consumption and CO 2 emissions in the residential sector in 2030 more than the Japanese post-2020 mitigation target indicates. At the maximum, the electricity consumption could be reduced by 35 TWh, which contributes to 55.4 MtCO 2 of emissions reduction in 2030 compared to 2013 if the voluntarily targeted CO 2 intensity of electricity is achieved. The result implies that Japan has the potential to ratchet up post-2020 mitigation targets discussed under the Paris Agreement of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). - Highlights: • Further reduction of electricity consumption is possible beyond Japan's post-2020 mitigation target. • Energy saving efforts by households and incentives to reduce electricity demands are required. • Improvement of CO 2 intensity from electricity is a key factor in the reduction of CO 2 emissions.

  10. Low Sex Drive in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low sex drive in women Overview Women's sexual desires naturally fluctuate over the years. Highs and lows commonly coincide ... used for mood disorders also can cause low sex drive in women. If your lack of interest ...

  11. Marijuana and actual driving performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This report concerns the effects of marijuana smoking on actual driving performance. It presents the results of one pilot and three actual driving studies. The pilot study's major purpose was to establish the THC dose current marijuana users smoke to...

  12. Determination on Damage Mechanism of the Planet Gear of Heavy Vehicle Final Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdan, RD; Setiawan, R.; Sasmita, F.; Suratman, R.; Taufiqulloh

    2018-02-01

    The works focus on the investigation of damage mechanism of fractured in the form of spalling of the planet gears from the final drive assembly of 160-ton heavy vehicles. The objective of this work is to clearly understand the mechanism of damage. The work is the first stage of the on-going research on the remaining life estimation of such gears. The understanding of the damage mechanism is critical in order to provide accurate estimate of the gear’s remaining life with observed initial damage. The analysis was performed based on the metallurgy laboratory works, including visual observation, macro-micro fractography by optical stereo and optical microscope and micro-vickers hardness test. From visual observation it was observed pitting that form lining defect at common position, which is at gear flank position. From spalling sample it was observed ratchet mark at the boundary between macro pitting and the edge of fractured parts. Further observation on the cross-section of the samples by optical microscope confirm that initial micro pitting occur without spalling of the case hardened surface. Spalling occur when pitting achieve certain critical size, and occur at multiple initiation site of crack propagation. From the present research it was concluded that pitting was resulted due to repeated contact fatigue. In addition, development of micro to macro pitting as well as spalling occur at certain direction towards the top of the gear teeth.

  13. Nuclear refueling platform drive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, F.R.; Faulstich, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a drive system. It comprises: a gantry including a bridge having longitudinal and transverse axes and supported by spaced first and second end frames joined to fist and second end frames joined to first and second drive trucks for moving the bridge along the transverse axis; first means for driving the first drive truck; second means for driving the second drive truck being independent from the first driving means; and means for controlling the first and second driving means for reducing differential transverse travel between the first and second drive trucks, due to a skewing torque acting on the bridge, to less than a predetermined maximum, the controlling means being in the form of an electrical central processing unit and including: a closed-loop first velocity control means for controlling velocity of the first drive truck by providing a first command signal to the first driver means; a close loop second velocity control means for controlling velocity of the second drive truck by providing a second command signal to the second driving means; and an auxiliary closed-loop travel control means

  14. Offset Compound Gear Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Mark A.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The Offset Compound Gear Drive is an in-line, discrete, two-speed device utilizing a special offset compound gear that has both an internal tooth configuration on the input end and external tooth configuration on the output end, thus allowing it to mesh in series, simultaneously, with both a smaller external tooth input gear and a larger internal tooth output gear. This unique geometry and offset axis permits the compound gear to mesh with the smaller diameter input gear and the larger diameter output gear, both of which are on the same central, or primary, centerline. This configuration results in a compact in-line reduction gear set consisting of fewer gears and bearings than a conventional planetary gear train. Switching between the two output ratios is accomplished through a main control clutch and sprag. Power flow to the above is transmitted through concentric power paths. Low-speed operation is accomplished in two meshes. For the purpose of illustrating the low-speed output operation, the following example pitch diameters are given. A 5.0 pitch diameter (PD) input gear to 7.50 PD (internal tooth) intermediate gear (0.667 reduction mesh), and a 7.50 PD (external tooth) intermediate gear to a 10.00 PD output gear (0.750 reduction mesh). Note that it is not required that the intermediate gears on the offset axis be of the same diameter. For this example, the resultant low-speed ratio is 2:1 (output speed = 0.500; product of stage one 0.667 reduction and stage two 0.750 stage reduction). The design is not restricted to the example pitch diameters, or output ratio. From the output gear, power is transmitted through a hollow drive shaft, which, in turn, drives a sprag during which time the main clutch is disengaged.

  15. Measurement of Driving Terms

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, F; Faus-Golfe, A

    2001-01-01

    In 2000 a series of MDs has been performed at the SPS to measure resonance driving terms. Theory predicts that these terms can be determined by harmonic analysis of BPM data recorded after applying single kicks at various amplitudes. Strong sextupoles were introduced to create a sizeable amount of nonlinearities. Experiments at injection energy (26 GeV) with single bunch as well as one experiment at 120 GeV with 84 bunches were carried out. The expected nonlinear content is compared to the experimenteal observation.

  16. Electric drive design methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Jufer, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    An electric drive that is designed or adapted to a specific application must take into account all the elements of the chain of constituent elements in its use and deployment. In addition to the motor, the transmission, power electronics, control, sensors, and electrical protection systems must be taken into account. The motor and the transmission can be optimized and designed to obtain the best energy efficiency assessment, in particular for dynamic nodes. An inventory and a characterization of these various components is proposed as part of this book's examination and explanation

  17. Electrical machines and drives

    CERN Document Server

    Hindmarsh, John

    2002-01-01

    Recent years have brought substantial developments in electrical drive technology, with the appearance of highly rated, very-high-speed power-electronic switches, combined with microcomputer control systems.This popular textbook has been thoroughly revised and updated in the light of these changes. It retains its successful formula of teaching through worked examples, which are put in context with concise explanations of theory, revision of equations and discussion of the engineering implications. Numerous problems are also provided, with answers supplied.The third edition in

  18. Electrical machines & drives

    CERN Document Server

    Hammond, P

    1985-01-01

    Containing approximately 200 problems (100 worked), the text covers a wide range of topics concerning electrical machines, placing particular emphasis upon electrical-machine drive applications. The theory is concisely reviewed and focuses on features common to all machine types. The problems are arranged in order of increasing levels of complexity and discussions of the solutions are included where appropriate to illustrate the engineering implications. This second edition includes an important new chapter on mathematical and computer simulation of machine systems and revised discussions o

  19. Driving electrostatic transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Electrostatic transducers represent a very interesting alternative to the traditional inefficient electrodynamic transducers. In order to establish the full potential of these transducers, power amplifiers which fulfill the strict requirements imposed by such loads (high impedance, frequency...... depended, nonlinear and high bias voltage for linearization) must be developed. This paper analyzes power stages and bias configurations suitable for driving an electrostatic transducer. Measurement results of a 300 V prototype amplifier are shown. Measuring THD across a high impedance source is discussed......, and a high voltage attenuation interface for an audio analyzer is presented. THD below 0:1% is reported....

  20. Glaucoma and Driving: On-Road Driving Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Joanne M; Black, Alex A; Mallon, Kerry; Thomas, Ravi; Owsley, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    To comprehensively investigate the types of driving errors and locations that are most problematic for older drivers with glaucoma compared to those without glaucoma using a standardized on-road assessment. Participants included 75 drivers with glaucoma (mean = 73.2±6.0 years) with mild to moderate field loss (better-eye MD = -1.21 dB; worse-eye MD = -7.75 dB) and 70 age-matched controls without glaucoma (mean = 72.6 ± 5.0 years). On-road driving performance was assessed in a dual-brake vehicle by an occupational therapist using a standardized scoring system which assessed the types of driving errors and the locations where they were made and the number of critical errors that required an instructor intervention. Driving safety was rated on a 10-point scale. Self-reported driving ability and difficulties were recorded using the Driving Habits Questionnaire. Drivers with glaucoma were rated as significantly less safe, made more driving errors, and had almost double the rate of critical errors than those without glaucoma. Driving errors involved lane positioning and planning/approach, and were significantly more likely to occur at traffic lights and yield/give-way intersections. There were few between group differences in self-reported driving ability. Older drivers with glaucoma with even mild to moderate field loss exhibit impairments in driving ability, particularly during complex driving situations that involve tactical problems with lane-position, planning ahead and observation. These results, together with the fact that these drivers self-report their driving to be relatively good, reinforce the need for evidence-based on-road assessments for evaluating driving fitness.

  1. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oonuki, Koji.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the driving speed of control rods at rapid insertion with an elongate control rod and an extension pipe while ensuring sufficient buffering performance in a short buffering distance, by providing a plurality of buffers to an extension pipe between a control rod drive source and a control rod in LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: First, second and third buffers are respectively provided to an acceleration piston, an extension pipe and a control rod respectively and the insertion positions for each of the buffers are displaced orderly from above to below. Upon disconnection of energizing current for an electromagnet, the acceleration piston, the extension pipe and the control rod are rapidly inserted in one body. The first, second and third buffers are respectively actuated at each of their falling strokes upon rapid insertion respectively, and the acceleration piston, the extension pipe and the control rod receive the deceleration effect in the order correspondingly. Although the compression force is applied to the control rod only near the stroke end, it does not cause deformation. (Kawakami, Y.)

  2. Polar drive on OMEGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha P.B.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available High-convergence polar-drive experiments are being conducted on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commum. 133, 495 (1997] using triple-picket laser pulses. The goal of OMEGA experiments is to validate modeling of oblique laser deposition, heat conduction in the presence of nonradial thermal gradients in the corona, and implosion energetics in the presence of laser–plasma interactions such as crossed-beam energy transfer. Simulated shock velocities near the equator, where the beams are obliquely incident, are within 5% of experimentally inferred values in warm plastic shells, well within the required accuracy for ignition. High, near-one-dimensional areal density is obtained in warm-plastic-shell implosions. Simulated backlit images of the compressing core are in good agreement with measured images. Outstanding questions that will be addressed in the future relate to the role of cross-beam transfer in polar drive irradiation and increasing the energy coupled into the target by decreasing beam obliquity.

  3. Characterization of the first double-sided 3D radiation sensors fabricated at FBK on 6-inch silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultan, D.M.S.; Mendicino, R.; Betta, G.-F. Dalla; Boscardin, M.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.

    2015-01-01

    Following 3D pixel sensor production for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer, Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) fabrication facility has recently been upgraded to process 6-inch wafers. In 2014, a test batch was fabricated to check for possible issues relevant to this upgrade. While maintaining a double-sided fabrication technology, some process modifications have been investigated. We report here on the technology and the design of this batch, and present selected results from the electrical characterization of sensors and test structures. Notably, the breakdown voltage is shown to exceed 200 V before irradiation, much higher than in earlier productions, demonstrating robustness in terms of radiation hardness for forthcoming productions aimed at High Luminosity LHC upgrades

  4. Optimum Design of Oil Lubricated Thrust Bearing for Hard Disk Drive with High Speed Spindle Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Sunami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of optimization method developed by Hashimoto to design oil lubricated thrust bearings for 2.5 inch form factor hard disk drives (HDD. The designing involves optimization of groove geometry and dimensions. Calculations are carried out to maximize the dynamic stiffness of the thrust bearing spindle motor. Static and dynamic characteristics of the modeled thrust bearing are calculated using the divergence formulation method. Results show that, by using the proposed optimization method, dynamic stiffness values can be well improved with the bearing geometries not being fixed to conventional grooves.

  5. Opportunity's View After Drive on Sol 1806 (Stereo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11816 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11816 NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 60.86 meters (200 feet) on the 1,806th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 21, 2009). North is at the center; south at both ends. This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left. Tracks from the drive extend northward across dark-toned sand ripples and light-toned patches of exposed bedrock in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). Engineers designed the Sol 1806 drive to be driven backwards as a strategy to redistribute lubricant in the rovers wheels. The right-front wheel had been showing signs of increased friction. The rover's position after the Sol 1806 drive was about 2 kilometer (1.2 miles) south southwest of Victoria Crater. Cumulative odometry was 14.74 kilometers (9.16 miles) since landing in January 2004, including 2.96 kilometers (1.84 miles) since climbing out of Victoria Crater on the west side of the crater on Sol 1634 (August 28, 2008). This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

  6. Opportunity's View After Long Drive on Sol 1770 (Stereo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11791 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11791 NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 104 meters (341 feet) on the 1,770th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (January 15, 2009). This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left. Tracks from the drive extend northward across dark-toned sand ripples and light-toned patches of exposed bedrock in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). Prior to the Sol 1770 drive, Opportunity had driven less than a meter since Sol 1713 (November 17, 2008), while it used the tools on its robotic arm first to examine a meteorite called 'Santorini' during weeks of restricted communication while the sun was nearly in line between Mars and Earth, then to examine bedrock and soil targets near Santorini. The rover's position after the Sol 1770 drive was about 1.1 kilometer (two-thirds of a mile) south southwest of Victoria Crater. Cumulative odometry was 13.72 kilometers (8.53 miles) since landing in January 2004, including 1.94 kilometers (1.21 miles) since climbing out of Victoria Crater on the west side of the crater on Sol 1634 (August 28, 2008). This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

  7. Driving citations and aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Leung, Justin S; Wiederman, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Anger and driving have been examined in a number of studies of aggressive drivers and in drivers with road rage using various psychological and environmental study variables. However, we are not aware of any study that has examined the number of driving citations (an indication of problematic driving) and various forms of anger not related to driving. Using a cross-sectional approach in a consecutive sample of 331 respondents (68% female), we surveyed participants about the number of past driving citations, not necessarily convictions, and 21 aggressive behaviors using the Aggressive Behavior Questionnaire. The number of driving citations demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with the number of aggressive behaviors in the 21-item Aggressive Behavior Questionnaire. There were no differences between men and women. As for specific aggressive behaviors, the number of driving citations was statistically significantly related to punching a wall when angry, causing and getting into a bar fight, getting into fistfights (not in a bar), causing someone to have an accident, and intentionally running someone off the road. The number of driving citations, an indication of problematic driving, appears to be related to generally aggressive behavior. Findings indicate that if aggression plays a role in problematic driving, it is likely not limited to the road.

  8. Driving without a GPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    in the best way possible; and that the differences in their knowledge systems is acknowledged and used as an asset in these international programmes. With these factors in place, on the other hand, programmes with international faculty and diverse student audiences in which this diversity is exploited...... as students as well as the lecturers themselves represent a diverse range of first languages, cultures and knowledge systems; at the same time, the teaching and learning must reach at least the same high quality standards as in more traditional mono-lingual and mono-cultural settings. For a lecturer...... in an appropriate way, may have a considerable added value that positively impacts on the knowledge, skills and competences developed by their graduates. However, lecturers often feel at a loss because they are not sure how to do this and teaching becomes like driving in unknown territory without a GPS. Based...

  9. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Nobuaki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To remove movable portion and improve the reliability by the direct control to coil. Constitution: Coils are disposed vertically at a predetermined interval to the outside of a control rod drive guide tube and each of the coils is adapted to be directly controlled. The coils are arranged at such an interval that a plunger laps over the vertically adjacent coils. In the case of moving the plunger upwardly, a coil just above the coil that attract the plunger is energized while the coil attracting the plunger so far is denergized. Then, the plunger is pulled up to an aimed position by repeating the procedures. In the case of moving the plunger downwardly, the procedures are conducted in the manner opposite to the above. (Kawakami, Y.)

  10. Do emotions drive psychosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João G. Ribeiro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: How important is the emotional life of persons who manifest psychotic symptoms? Aims: The aim of this paper is to review evidence on a causal role for emotions in psychotic processes. Methods: Selective review of literature on affective symptoms in psychoses, on emotions in the production of psychotic symptoms and on dopaminergic models of psychosis. Results: Affective symptoms are relevant across psychoses. Persons with schizophrenia have high levels of emotional reactivity and the intensification of negative affects not only is associated with but also precedes the intensification of psychotic symptoms, which is evidence that negative emotions drive the course of psychotic symptoms. Negative self‑representations are central in psychotic processes and can be the link between negative emotions and psychosis. Evidence favours the notion that persecutory delusions are consistent with negative affects and self‑representations, while grandiose delusions are consistent with a defensive amplification of positive affects and self‑representations. Shame has been proposed as the core emotional experience of psychosis, one in which the self becomes vulnerable to the external world, which is consistent with persecutory experiences. Assaults on the self, under the form of hostility in the family environment and society, are strong predictors of relapse and development of schizophrenia. Assaults on the self which induce social defeat are also strong stimulants of mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways, whose hyperactivity is associated with acute psychotic episodes and the experience of “aberrant salience”, put forward as a dopaminergic model of psychosis. Conclusions: The “defeat of the self” emerges as a central link that binds the experience of negative emotions to the expression of psychotic symptoms and its psychological and neurobiological correlates. The hypothesis gains support that the emotions related to that defeat control

  11. CLIC Drive Beam Phase Stabilisation

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Schulte, Daniel

    The thesis presents phase stability studies for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and focuses in particular on CLIC Drive Beam longitudinal phase stabilisation. This topic constitutes one of the main feasibility challenges for CLIC construction and is an essential component of the current CLIC stabilisation campaign. The studies are divided into two large interrelated sections: the simulation studies for the CLIC Drive Beam stability, and measurements, data analysis and simulations of the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) Drive Beam phase errors. A dedicated software tool has been developed for a step-by-step analysis of the error propagation through the CLIC Drive Beam. It uses realistic RF potential and beam loading amplitude functions for the Drive and Main Beam accelerating structures, complete models of the recombination scheme and compressor chicane as well as of further CLIC Drive Beam modules. The tool has been tested extensively and its functionality has been verified. The phase error propagation at CLIC h...

  12. The Drive-Wise Project: Driving Simulator Training increases real driving performance in healthy older drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianclaudio eCasutt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age-related cognitive decline is often associated with unsafe driving behavior. We hypothesized that 10 active training sessions in a driving simulator increase cognitive and on-road driving performance. In addition, driving simulator training should outperform cognitive training.Methods: Ninety-one healthy active drivers (62 – 87 years were randomly assigned to either (1 a driving simulator training group, (2 an attention training group (vigilance and selective attention, or (3 a control group. The main outcome variables were on-road driving and cognitive performance. Seventy-seven participants (85% completed the training and were included in the analyses. Training gains were analyzed using a multiple regression analysis with planned comparisons.Results: The driving simulator training group showed an improvement in on-road driving performance compared to the attention training group. In addition, both training groups increased cognitive performance compared to the control group. Conclusion: Driving simulator training offers the potential to enhance driving skills in older drivers. Compared to the attention training, the simulator training seems to be a more powerful program for increasing older drivers’ safety on the road.

  13. Motor Integrated Variable Speed Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Yash Veer

    A new trend in the variable speed drives (VSDs) is to develop fully integrated systems, which lead to low-cost products with shorter design cycles. Motor Integrated design of VSDs will reduce cable length to connect drive with machine windings and installation time for end user. The electric drives...... so it can fit inside the motor housing. Weight and volume of a filter inductor has to come down drastically to make it a suitable power converter for motor integrated variable speed drives. Introduction of active power electronic switches can ensure very high performance and small size...

  14. Noninductive current drive in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    Various current drive mechanisms may be grouped into four classes: (1) injection of energetic particle beams; (2) launching of rf waves; (3) hybrid schemes, which are combinations of various rf schemes (rf plus beams, rf and/or beam plus ohmic heating, etc.); and (4) other schemes, some of which are specific to reactor plasma conditions requiring the presence of alpha particle or intense synchrotron radiation. Particle injection schemes include current drive by neutral beams and relativistic electron beams. The rf schemes include current drive by the lower hybrid (LH) waves, the electron waves, the waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies, etc. Only a few of these approaches, however, have been tested experimentally, with the broadest data base available for LH waves. Included in this report are (1) efficiency criteria for current drive, (2) current drive by neutral beam injection, (3) LH current drive, (4) electron cyclotron current drive, (5) current drive by ion cyclotron waves - minority species heating, and (6) current drive by other schemes (such as hybrids and low frequency waves)

  15. Wind-Sculpted Vicinity After Opportunity's Sol 1797 Drive (Stereo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11820 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11820 NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 111 meters (364 feet) on the 1,797th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 12, 2009). North is at the center; south at both ends. This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. Tracks from the drive recede northward across dark-toned sand ripples in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. Patches of lighter-toned bedrock are visible on the left and right sides of the image. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

  16. 2TB hard disk drive

    CERN Multimedia

    This particular object was used up until 2012 in the Data Centre. It slots into one of the Disk Server trays. Hard disks were invented in the 1950s. They started as large disks up to 20 inches in diameter holding just a few megabytes (link is external). They were originally called "fixed disks" or "Winchesters" (a code name used for a popular IBM product). They later became known as "hard disks" to distinguish them from "floppy disks (link is external)." Hard disks have a hard platter that holds the magnetic medium, as opposed to the flexible plastic film found in tapes and floppies.

  17. Control rod driving mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maejima, Yoshinori.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct reactor scram by an external signal and, also by a signal for the abnormal temperature from a temperature detector in the nuclear reactor. Constitution: Control rod driving mechanisms magnetically coupling the extension pipe with the elevating mechanism above the reactor core and the holding magnet, and retains a control rod to the lower portion of the extension pipe by way of a latch mechanism. The temperature detector is immersed in reactor coolants. If the temperature of the coolants rises abnormally, bimetal contacts of the temperature detector are opened to interrupt the current supply to the holding electromagnet. Then, the extension pipe released from the magnetic coupling is lowered and the control rod free from latch is rapidly dropped and inserted into the reactor core. Since this procedure is carried out for all of the control rods, the reactor scram can be attained. The feature of this invention resides in that the reactor scram can be attained also by the signal of the reactor core itself even if the signal system for the external signals should be failed. (Horiuchi, T.)

  18. Driving for shorter outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritch, S.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear plant outages are necessary to complete activities that cannot be completed during the operating cycle, such as steam generator inspection and testing, refueling, installing modifications, and performing maintenance tests. The time devoted to performing outages is normally the largest contributor to plant unavailability. Similarly, outage costs are a sizable portion of the total plant budget. The scope and quality of work done during outages directly affects operating reliability and the number of unplanned outages. Improved management and planning of outages enhances the margin of safety during the outage and results in increased plant reliability. The detailed planning and in-depth preparation that has become a necessity for driving shorter outage durations has also produced safer outages and improved post-outage reliability. Short outages require both plant and vendor management to focus on all aspects of the outage. Short outage durations, such as 26 days at South Texas or 29 days at North Anna, require power plant inter-department and intra-department teamwork and communication and vendor participation. In this paper shorter and safer outage at the 3-loop plants in the United States are explained. (J.P.N.)

  19. First mile, first inch

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Morris, C

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Access to Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) remains one of the biggest challenges to Africa in leapfrogging the development chasm. The African digital divide can be in part attributed to a restrictive regulatory policy...

  20. Assessment of RELAP/MOD3 using BETHSY 6.2TC 6-inch cold leg side break comparative test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Young-Jong; Jeong, Jae-Jun; Chang, Won-Pyo; Kim, Dong-Su [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yusung, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the results of the RELAP5/MOD3 Version 7j assessment on BETHSY 6.2TC. BETHSY 6.2TC test corresponding to a six inch cold leg break LOCA of the Pressurizer Water Reactor(PWR). The primary objective of the test was to provide reference data of two facilities of different scales (BETHSY and LSTF facility). On the other hand, the present calculation aims at analysis of RELAP5/N4OD3 capability on the small break LOCA simulation, The results of calculation have shown that the RELAP5/MOD3 reasonably predicts occurrences as well as trends of the major phenomena such as primary pressure, timing of loop seal clearing, liquid hold up, etc. However, some disagreements also have been found in the predictions of loop seal clearing, collapsed core water level after loop seal clearing, and accumulator injection behaviors. For better understanding of discrepancies in same predictions, several sensitivity calculations have been performed as well. These include the changes of two-phase discharge coefficient at the break junction and some corrections of the interphase drag term. As result, change of a single parameter has not improved the overall predictions and it has been found that the interphase drag model has still large uncertainties.

  1. Assessment of RELAP/MOD3 using BETHSY 6.2TC 6-inch cold leg side break comparative test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Young-Jong; Jeong, Jae-Jun; Chang, Won-Pyo; Kim, Dong-Su

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the results of the RELAP5/MOD3 Version 7j assessment on BETHSY 6.2TC. BETHSY 6.2TC test corresponding to a six inch cold leg break LOCA of the Pressurizer Water Reactor(PWR). The primary objective of the test was to provide reference data of two facilities of different scales (BETHSY and LSTF facility). On the other hand, the present calculation aims at analysis of RELAP5/N4OD3 capability on the small break LOCA simulation, The results of calculation have shown that the RELAP5/MOD3 reasonably predicts occurrences as well as trends of the major phenomena such as primary pressure, timing of loop seal clearing, liquid hold up, etc. However, some disagreements also have been found in the predictions of loop seal clearing, collapsed core water level after loop seal clearing, and accumulator injection behaviors. For better understanding of discrepancies in same predictions, several sensitivity calculations have been performed as well. These include the changes of two-phase discharge coefficient at the break junction and some corrections of the interphase drag term. As result, change of a single parameter has not improved the overall predictions and it has been found that the interphase drag model has still large uncertainties

  2. Development of a 55 μm pitch 8 inch CMOS image sensor for the high resolution NDT application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. S.; Kim, G.; Cho, G.; Kim, D.

    2016-11-01

    A CMOS image sensor (CIS) with a large area for the high resolution X-ray imaging was designed. The sensor has an active area of 125 × 125 mm2 comprised with 2304 × 2304 pixels and a pixel size of 55 × 55 μm2. First batch samples were fabricated by using an 8 inch silicon CMOS image sensor process with a stitching method. In order to evaluate the performance of the first batch samples, the electro-optical test and the X-ray test after coupling with an image intensifier screen were performed. The primary results showed that the performance of the manufactured sensors was limited by a large stray capacitance from the long path length between the analog multiplexer on the chip and the bank ADC on the data acquisition board. The measured speed and dynamic range were limited up to 12 frame per sec and 55 dB respectively, but other parameters such as the MTF, NNPS and DQE showed a good result as designed. Based on this study, the new X-ray CIS with ~ 50 μm pitch and ~ 150 cm2 active area are going to be designed for the high resolution X-ray NDT equipment for semiconductor and PCB inspections etc.

  3. Refurbishment and modification of existing protective shipping packages (for 30-inch UF{sub 6} cylinders) per USDOT specification No. USA-DOT-21PF-1A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Housholder, W.R. [Nuclear Containers, Incorporated, Elizabethton, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    This paper addresses the refurbishment procedures for existing shipping containers for 30-inch diameter UF{sub 6} cylinders in accordance with DOT Specification 21PF-1 and the criteria used to determine rejection when such packages are unsuitable for refurbishment.

  4. Specification for modular plug-in unit and standard 19-inch rack mounting unit based on NIM standard (for electronic nuclear instruments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The object is to define standard dimensions of a modular system based on NIM standard and comprising the plug-in unit Type N specified in IEC Publication 482, Dimensions of Electronic Instrument Modules (for Nuclear Electronic Instruments), the corresponding 19-inch rack mounting unit Type NC (conforming to IEC Publication 297, Dimensions of Panels and Racks) and the associated connectors. (author)

  5. Electric vehicle drive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleyard, M.

    1992-01-01

    New legislation in the State of California requires that 2% of vehicles sold there from 1998 will be 'zero-emitting'. This provides a unique market opportunity for developers of electric vehicles but substantial improvements in the technology are probably required if it is to be successfully exploited. There are around a dozen types of battery that are potentially relevant to road vehicles but, at the present, lead/acid and sodium—sulphur come closest to combining acceptable performance, life and cost. To develop an efficient, lightweight electric motor system requires up-to-date techniques of magnetics design, and the latest power-electronic and microprocessor control methods. Brushless machines, coupled with solid-state inverters, offer the most economical solution for mass production, even though their development costs are higher than for direct-current commutator machines. Fitted to a small car, even the highest energy-density batteries will only provide around 200 km average range before recharging. Therefore, some form of supplementary on-board power generation will probably be needed to secure widespread acceptance by the driving public. Engine-driven generators of quite low power can achieve useful increases in urban range but will fail to qualify as 'zero-emitting'. On the other hand, if the same function could be economically performed by a small fuel-cell using hydrogen derived from a methanol reformer, then most of the flexibility provided by conventional vehicles would be retained. The market prospects for electric cars would then be greatly enhanced and their dependence on very advanced battery technology would be reduced.

  6. Linear Back-Drive Differentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Linear back-drive differentials have been proposed as alternatives to conventional gear differentials for applications in which there is only limited rotational motion (e.g., oscillation). The finite nature of the rotation makes it possible to optimize a linear back-drive differential in ways that would not be possible for gear differentials or other differentials that are required to be capable of unlimited rotation. As a result, relative to gear differentials, linear back-drive differentials could be more compact and less massive, could contain fewer complex parts, and could be less sensitive to variations in the viscosities of lubricants. Linear back-drive differentials would operate according to established principles of power ball screws and linear-motion drives, but would utilize these principles in an innovative way. One major characteristic of such mechanisms that would be exploited in linear back-drive differentials is the possibility of designing them to drive or back-drive with similar efficiency and energy input: in other words, such a mechanism can be designed so that a rotating screw can drive a nut linearly or the linear motion of the nut can cause the screw to rotate. A linear back-drive differential (see figure) would include two collinear shafts connected to two parts that are intended to engage in limited opposing rotations. The linear back-drive differential would also include a nut that would be free to translate along its axis but not to rotate. The inner surface of the nut would be right-hand threaded at one end and left-hand threaded at the opposite end to engage corresponding right- and left-handed threads on the shafts. A rotation and torque introduced into the system via one shaft would drive the nut in linear motion. The nut, in turn, would back-drive the other shaft, creating a reaction torque. Balls would reduce friction, making it possible for the shaft/nut coupling on each side to operate with 90 percent efficiency.

  7. Contribution to the validation of thermal ratchetting prevision methods in metallic structures; Contribution a la validation des methodes de prevision du rochet thermique dans les structures metalliques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakotovelo, A.M

    1998-03-01

    This work concerns the steady state assessment in the metallic structures subjected to thermomechanical cyclic loadings in biaxial stress state. The effect of the short time mechanical overloads is also investigated. The first chapter is devoted to a bibliographic research concerning the behaviour of the materials and the structures in the cyclic plasticity. Some works relate to the experimental aspect as well as the numerical one for the steady state assessment of such structures are presented. The experimental part of the study is presented in the second chapter. The experimental device was carried out in order to prescribe tension and torsion forces combined with cyclic thermal loading. Some tests was then carried out, among these tests certain include some overloads in tension or torsion. The last chapter describes the numerical calculations using different models (linear isotropic hardening, linear kinematic hardening and elasto-viscoplastic Chaboche's model) and the application of some simplified methods for the ratchetting assessment in the structures. We have considered two categories of methods. The first one is based on an elastic analysis (Bree's diagram, 3 Sm rule, efficiency rule) and the second one combines elastic analysis and elastoplastic analysis of the first cycle (Gatt's and Taleb's methods). The results of this study have enabled: to validate in the biaxial stress state an expression which takes into account the effect of mechanical short time overloads; to test the performances of considered models to describe the evolution of the structure during the first cycle and to take into account the effect of short time overloads. Among the considered models, the elastoplastic Chaboche's model seems to be the most accurate to describe the structure's behaviour during the first cycles; to validate some simplified methods. Certain methods based only on elastic analysis (Bee's diagram and efficiency rule) seem not

  8. Automated driving safer and more efficient future driving

    CERN Document Server

    Horn, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The main topics of this book include advanced control, cognitive data processing, high performance computing, functional safety, and comprehensive validation. These topics are seen as technological bricks to drive forward automated driving. The current state of the art of automated vehicle research, development and innovation is given. The book also addresses industry-driven roadmaps for major new technology advances as well as collaborative European initiatives supporting the evolvement of automated driving. Various examples highlight the state of development of automated driving as well as the way forward. The book will be of interest to academics and researchers within engineering, graduate students, automotive engineers at OEMs and suppliers, ICT and software engineers, managers, and other decision-makers.

  9. Driving Performance Under Alcohol in Simulated Representative Driving Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenntner-Mabiala, Ramona; Kaussner, Yvonne; Jagiellowicz-Kaufmann, Monika; Hoffmann, Sonja; Krüger, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Comparing drug-induced driving impairments with the effects of benchmark blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) is an approved approach to determine the clinical relevance of findings for traffic safety. The present study aimed to collect alcohol calibration data to validate findings of clinical trials that were derived from a representative test course in a dynamic driving simulator. The driving performance of 24 healthy volunteers under placebo and with 0.05% and 0.08% BACs was measured in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Trained investigators assessed the subjects’ driving performance and registered their driving errors. Various driving parameters that were recorded during the simulation were also analyzed. Generally, the participants performed worse on the test course (P the investigators’ assessment) under the influence of alcohol. Consistent with the relevant literature, lane-keeping performance parameters were sensitive to the investigated BACs. There were significant differences between the alcohol and placebo conditions in most of the parameters analyzed. However, the total number of errors was the only parameter discriminating significantly between all three BAC conditions. In conclusion, data show that the present experimental setup is suitable for future psychopharmacological research. Thereby, for each drug to be investigated, we recommend to assess a profile of various parameters that address different levels of driving. On the basis of this performance profile, the total number of driving errors is recommended as the primary endpoint. However, this overall endpoint should be completed by a specifically sensitive parameter that is chosen depending on the effect known to be induced by the tested drug. PMID:25689289

  10. Phoning while driving II: a review of driving conditions influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, C; Guillot, A; Petit, C

    2010-05-01

    The first paper examined how the variables related to driving performance were impacted by the management of holding a phone conversation. However, the conditions under which this dual task is carried out are dependent upon a set of factors that may particularly influence the risk of crash. These conditions are defined by several independent variables, classified into five main categories: i) legislation; ii) phone type (hands-free or hand-held); iii) drivers' features regarding age, gender, personal individual profile and driving experience; iv) conversation content (casual or professional) and its context (held with passengers or with a cell (mobile) phone); v) driving conditions (actual or simulated driving, road type, traffic density and weather). These independent variables determine the general conditions. The way in which these factors are combined and interact one with another thus determines the risk that drivers undergo when a cell phone is used while driving. Finally, this review defined the general conditions of driving for which managing a phone conversation is likely to elicit a high risk of car crash or, conversely, may provide a situation of lower risk, with sufficient acceptance to ensure safety.

  11. Quantum effects in warp drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finazzi Stefano

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Warp drives are interesting configurations that, at least theoretically, provide a way to travel at superluminal speed. Unfortunately, several issues seem to forbid their realization. First, a huge amount of exotic matter is required to build them. Second, the presence of quantum fields propagating in superluminal warp-drive geometries makes them semiclassically unstable. Indeed, a Hawking-like high-temperature flux of particles is generated inside the warp-drive bubble, which causes an exponential growth of the energy density measured at the front wall of the bubble by freely falling observers. Moreover, superluminal warp drives remain unstable even if the Lorentz symmetry is broken by the introduction of regulating higher order terms in the Lagrangian of the quantum field. If the dispersion relation of the quantum field is subluminal, a black-hole laser phenomenon yields an exponential amplification of the emitted flux. If it is superluminal, infrared effects cause a linear growth of this flux.

  12. Drowsy driving and automobile crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Drowsy driving is a serious problem that leads to : thousands of automobile crashes each year. This : report, sponsored by the National Center on : Sleep Disorders Research (NCSDR) of the National : Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the : National ...

  13. Matrix Converter in Hybrid Drives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lettl, Jiří; Flígl, S.

    -, č. 3 (2004), s. 77-80 ISSN 0204-3599 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2057903 Keywords : matrix converter * hybrid drive * electric power splitting Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  14. Lunar Core Drive Tubes Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Contains a brief summary and high resolution imagery from various lunar rock and core drive tubes collected from the Apollo and Luna missions to the moon.

  15. [Fitness to drive after stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Peter

    2018-01-01

    In Germany, patient information and expert testimony on driving ability requires knowledge of the corresponding legislation and the Guideline for expertises on driver aptitude. The testimony should clearly identify handicaps with regard to driving, give estimates on the future risks of a sudden loss of control, and also consider personal attitudes such as inadequate behavior, lack of insight etc. Physical handicaps often can be compensated for by restrains or restrictions such as vehicle modifications, daylight driving only etc.Both, information and testimony must give estimates on the risks of a sudden loss of control while driving by stroke recurrence or epileptic seizures. In accordance with the Risk-of-Harm-Formula of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society methods are being discussed, by which an estimate of harmful traffic accidents due to stroke recurrence can be calculated. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Clinical Action against Drunk Driving.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald A Redelmeier

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In advance of a safety campaign on 17 March 2017, Donald Redelmeier and Allan Detsky call on physicians and clinical colleagues to reduce the chances that patients will drive drunk.

  17. Mulholland Drive: An Intertextual Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Barzegar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article examines David Lynch’s Mulholland Drive from Kristeva’s concept of intertextuality. To achieve this aim, this study provides a close reading of the selected film so as to trace and illustrate the polyphonic network of references, citations, quotations and intertexts of Mulholland Drive to the significant already-made films such as Sunset Boulevard, The Wizard of Oz, and Persona.

  18. Driving experiences of disabled drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, R S; Hunter, J; Hanley, J

    2006-05-01

    To study the influence of non-standard controls on return to driving after disability, including prevalence of accidents/retraining difficulties. Postal questionnaires sent within two years of assessment to 972 disabled drivers seen over a three-year period. Scottish Driving Assessment Service. All patients considered capable of driving after assessment during the study period. Five hundred and eighty-nine people (61 %) replied who were representative of the total population (mean age 55 years, range 19-87); 73% were male and 70% were disabled for up to two years. Overall 79% respondents had returned to driving (highest reported success with standard manual car (86%) and lowest using left foot to accelerate and brake (66%) (chi2 = 16.6, P = 0.005)). A significantly higher proportion of the 30 patients (6.5%) admitting to accidents and 25 (5.4%) to problems with retraining were using non-standard driving techniques, especially the use of hand controls. Disabled drivers returning to drive using non-familiar controls had lower success and a higher proportion of accidents and/or problems with retraining than people using conventional controls. If confirmed in larger studies this may have implications for policy-makers as well as specialist practitioners.

  19. High-power converters and AC drives

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    This new edition reflects the recent technological advancements in the MV drive industry, such as advanced multilevel converters and drive configurations. It includes three new chapters, Control of Synchronous Motor Drives, Transformerless MV Drives, and Matrix Converter Fed Drives. In addition, there are extensively revised chapters on Multilevel Voltage Source Inverters and Voltage Source Inverter-Fed Drives. This book includes a systematic analysis on a variety of high-power multilevel converters, illustrates important concepts with simulations and experiments, introduces various megawatt drives produced by world leading drive manufacturers, and addresses practical problems and their mitigations methods.

  20. Efficient Driving of Piezoelectric Transducers Using a Biaxial Driving Technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Pichardo

    Full Text Available Efficient driving of piezoelectric materials is desirable when operating transducers for biomedical applications such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU or ultrasound imaging. More efficient operation reduces the electric power required to produce the desired bioeffect or contrast. Our preliminary work [Cole et al. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. 2014;26(13:135901.] suggested that driving transducers by applying orthogonal electric fields can significantly reduce the coercivity that opposes ferroelectric switching. We present here the experimental validation of this biaxial driving technique using piezoelectric ceramics typically used in HIFU. A set of narrow-band transducers was fabricated with two sets of electrodes placed in an orthogonal configuration (following the propagation and the lateral mode. The geometry of the ceramic was chosen to have a resonance frequency similar for the propagation and the lateral mode. The average (± s.d. resonance frequency of the samples was 465.1 (± 1.5 kHz. Experiments were conducted in which each pair of electrodes was driven independently and measurements of effective acoustic power were obtained using the radiation force method. The efficiency (acoustic/electric power of the biaxial driving method was compared to the results obtained when driving the ceramic using electrodes placed only in the pole direction. Our results indicate that the biaxial method increases efficiency from 50% to 125% relative to the using a single electric field.

  1. Driving and Dementia: Workshop Module on Communicating Cessation to Drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byszewski, Anna; Power, Barbara; Lee, Linda; Rhee, Glara Gaeun; Parson, Bob; Molnar, Frank

    2017-12-01

    For persons with dementia (PWD), driving becomes very dangerous. Physicians in Canada are legally responsible to report unfit drivers and then must disclose that decision to their patients. That difficult discussion is fraught with challenges: physicians want to maintain a healthy relationship; patients often lack insight into their cognitive loss and have very strong emotional reactions to the loss of their driving privileges. All of which may stifle the exchange of accurate information. The goal of this project was to develop a multimedia module that would provide strategies and support for health professionals having these difficult conversations. Literature search was conducted of Embase and OVID MedLine on available driving and dementia tools, and on websites of online tools for communication strategies on driving cessation. A workshop module was developed with background material, communication strategies, links to resources and two videos demonstrating the "bad" then the "good" ways of managing this emotionally charged discussion. When the module was tested with internal medicine trainees, results demonstrated that confidence increased significantly ( p communicate driving cessation to PWD.

  2. Exploring Forensic Implications of the Fusion Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Gupta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the forensic implications of Apple's Fusion Drive. The Fusion Drive is an example of auto-tiered storage. It uses a combination of a flash drive and a magnetic drive. Data is moved between the drives automatically to maximize system performance. This is different from traditional caches because data is moved and not simply copied. The research included understanding the drive structure, populating the drive, and then accessing data in a controlled setting to observe data migration strategies. It was observed that all the data is first written to the flash drive with 4 GB of free space always maintained. If data on the magnetic drive is frequently accessed, it is promoted to the flash drive while demoting other information. Data is moved at a block-level and not a file-level. The Fusion Drive didn't alter the timestamps of files with data migration.

  3. Driving performance at lateral system limits during partially automated driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naujoks, Frederik; Purucker, Christian; Wiedemann, Katharina; Neukum, Alexandra; Wolter, Stefan; Steiger, Reid

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated driver performance during system limits of partially automated driving. Using a motion-based driving simulator, drivers encountered different situations in which a partially automated vehicle could no longer safely keep the lateral guidance. Drivers were distracted by a non-driving related task on a touch display or driving without an additional secondary task. While driving in partially automated mode drivers could either take their hands off the steering wheel for only a short period of time (10s, so-called 'Hands-on' variant) or for an extended period of time (120s, so-called 'Hands-off' variant). When the system limit was reached (e.g., when entering a work zone with temporary lines), the lateral vehicle control by the automation was suddenly discontinued and a take-over request was issued to the drivers. Regardless of the hands-off interval and the availability of a secondary task, all drivers managed the transition to manual driving safely. No lane exceedances were observed and the situations were rated as 'harmless' by the drivers. The lack of difference between the hands-off intervals can be partly attributed to the fact that most of the drivers kept contact to the steering wheel, even in the hands-off condition. Although all drivers were able to control the system limits, most of them could not explain why exactly the take-over request was issued. The average helpfulness of the take-over request was rated on an intermediate level. Consequently, providing drivers with information about the reason for a system limit can be recommended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vertical Force-deflection Characteristics of a Pair of 56-inch-diameter Aircraft Tires from Static and Drop Tests with and Without Prerotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, Robert F; Horne, Walter B

    1957-01-01

    The vertical force-deflection characteristics were experimentally determined for a pair of 56-inch-diameter tires under static and drop-test conditions with and without prerotation. For increasing force, the tires were found to be least stiff for static tests, almost the same as for the static case for prerotation drop tests as long as the tires remain rotating, and appreciably stiffer for drop tests without prerotation.

  5. 49 CFR 231.24 - Box and other house cars with roofs, 16 feet 10 inches or more above top of rail. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Box and other house cars with roofs, 16 feet 10... APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.24 Box and other house cars with roofs, 16 feet 10 inches or more above top of.... Same as specified for “Box and Other House Cars.” (2) Dimensions. Same as specified for “Box and Other...

  6. Driving After Hallux Valgus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Elizabeth; Shakked, Rachel; Daniel, Joseph; Pedowitz, David I; Winters, Brian S; Reb, Christopher; Lynch, Mary-Katherine; Raikin, Steven M

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine when patients can safely return to driving after first metatarsal osteotomy for hallux valgus correction. After institutional review board approval, 60 patients undergoing right first metatarsal osteotomy for hallux valgus correction surgery were recruited prospectively. Patients' brake reaction time (BRT) was tested at 6 weeks and repeated until patients achieved a passing BRT. A control group of twenty healthy patients was used to establish as passing BRT. Patients were given a novel driver readiness survey to complete. At 6 weeks, 51 of the 60 patients (85%) had BRT less than 0.85 seconds and were considered safe to drive. At 6 weeks, the passing group average was 0.64 seconds. At the 8 weeks, 59 patients (100%) of those who completed the study achieved a passing BRT. Patients that failed at 6 weeks had statistically greater visual analog scale (VAS) pain score and diminished first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) range of motion (ROM). On the novel driver readiness survey, 8 of the 9 patients (89%) who did not pass disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement, "Based on what I think my braking reaction time is, I think that I am ready to drive." Most patients may be informed that they can safely return to driving 8 weeks after right metatarsal osteotomy for hallux valgus correction. Some patients may be eligible to return to driving sooner depending on their VAS, first MTP ROM, and driver readiness survey results. Level II, comparative study.

  7. Deterministic ratchets for suspension fractionation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulrattanarak, T.

    2010-01-01

    Driven by the current insights in sustainability and technological development in biorefining natural renewable resources, the food industry has taken an interest in fractionation of agrofood materials, like milk and cereal crops. The purpose of fractionation is to split the raw material in

  8. Ratchet models of molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaster, Nicole

    2003-09-01

    Transport processes in and of cells are of major importance for the survival of the organism. Muscles have to be able to contract, chromosomes have to be moved to opposing ends of the cell during mitosis, and organelles, which are compartments enclosed by membranes, have to be transported along molecular tracks. Molecular motors are proteins whose main task is moving other molecules.For that purpose they transform the chemical energy released in the hydrolysis of ATP into mechanical work. The motors of the cytoskeleton belong to the three super families myosin, kinesin and dynein. Their tracks are filaments of the cytoskeleton, namely actin and the microtubuli. Here, we examine stochastic models which are used for describing the movements of these linear molecular motors. The scale of the movements comprises the regime of single steps of a motor protein up to the directed walk along a filament. A single step bridges around 10 nm, depending on the protein, and takes about 10 ms, if there is enough ATP available. Our models comprise M states or conformations the motor can attain during its movement along a one-dimensional track. At K locations along the track transitions between the states are possible. The velocity of the protein depending on the transition rates between the single states can be determined analytically. We calculate this velocity for systems of up to four states and locations and are able to derive a number of rules which are helpful in estimating the behaviour of an arbitrary given system. Beyond that we have a look at decoupled subsystems, i.e., one or a couple of states which have no connection to the remaining system. With a certain probability a motor undergoes a cycle of conformational changes, with another probability an independent other cycle. Active elements in real transport processes by molecular motors will not be limited to the transitions between the states. In distorted networks or starting from the discrete Master equation of the system, it is possible to specify horizontal rates, too, which furthermore no longer have to fulfill the conditions of detailed balance. Doing so, we obtain unique, complete paths through the respective network and rules for the dependence of the total current on all the rates of the system. Besides, we view the time evolutions for given initial distributions. In enzymatic reactions there is the idea of a main pathway these reactions follow preferably. We determine optimal paths and the maximal flow for given networks. In order to specify the dependence of the motor's velocity on its fuel ATP, we have a look at possible reaction kinetics determining the connection between unbalanced transitions rates and ATP-concentration. Depending on the type of reaction kinetics and the number of unbalanced rates, we obtain qualitatively different curves connecting the velocity to the ATP-concentration. The molecular interaction potentials the motor experiences on its way along its track are unknown. We compare different simple potentials and the effects the localization of the vertical rates in the network model has on the transport coefficients in comparison to other models. Transportvorgänge in und von Zellen sind von herausragender Bedeutung für das Überleben des Organismus. Muskeln müssen sich kontrahieren können, Chromosomen während der Mitose an entgegengesetzte Enden der Zelle bewegt und Organellen, das sind von Membranen umschlossene Kompartimente, entlang molekularer Schienen transportiert werden. Molekulare Motoren sind Proteine, deren Hauptaufgabe es ist, andere Moleküle zu bewegen. Dazu wandeln sie die bei der ATP-Hydrolyse freiwerdende chemische Energie in mechanische Arbeit um. Die Motoren des Zellskeletts gehören zu den drei Superfamilien Myosin, Kinesin und Dynein. Ihre Schienen sind Filamente des Zellskeletts, Actin und die Microtubuli. In dieser Arbeit werden stochastische Modelle untersucht, welche dazu dienen, die Fortbewegung dieser linearen molekularen Motoren zu beschreiben. Die Skala, auf der wir die Bewegung betrachten, reicht von einzelnen Schritten eines Motorproteins bis in den Bereich der gerichteten Bewegung entlang eines Filaments. Ein Einzelschritt überbrückt je nach Protein etwa 10 nm und wird in ungefähr 10 ms zurückgelegt. Unsere Modelle umfassen M Zustände oder Konformationen, die der Motor annehmen kann, während er sich entlang einer eindimensionalen Schiene bewegt. An K Orten dieser Schiene sind Übergänge zwischen den Zuständen möglich. Die Geschwindigkeit des Proteins lässt sich in Abhängigkeit von den vertikalen Übergangsraten zwischen den einzelnen Zuständen analytisch bestimmen. Wir berechnen diese Geschwindigkeit für Systeme mit bis zu vier Zuständen und Orten und können weiterhin eine Reihe von Regeln ableiten, die uns einschätzen helfen, wie sich ein beliebiges vorgegebenes System verhalten wird. Darüber hinaus betrachten wir entkoppelte Subsysteme, also einen oder mehrere Zustände, die keine Verbindung zum übrigen System haben. Mit einer bestimmten Wahrscheinlichkeit kann ein Motor einen Zyklus von Konformationen durchlaufen, mit einer anderen Wahrscheinlichkeit einen davon unabhängigen anderen. Aktive Elemente werden in realen Transportvorgängen durch Motorproteine nicht auf die Übergänge zwischen den Zuständen beschränkt sein. In verzerrten Netzwerken oder ausgehend von der diskreten Mastergleichung des Systems können auch horizontale Raten spezifiziert werden und müssen weiterhin nicht mehr die Bedingungen der detaillierten Balance erfüllen. Damit ergeben sich eindeutige, komplette Pfade durch das jeweilige Netzwerk und Regeln für die Abhängigkeit des Gesamtstroms von allen Raten des Systems. Außerdem betrachten wir die zeitliche Entwicklung für vorgegebene Anfangsverteilungen. Bei Enzymreaktionen gibt es die Idee des Hauptpfades, dem diese bevorzugt folgen. Wir bestimmen optimale Pfade und den maximalen Fluss durch vorgegebene Netzwerke. Um darüber hinaus die Geschwindigkeit des Motors in Abhängigkeit von seinem Treibstoff ATP angeben zu können, betrachten wir mögliche Reaktionskinetiken, die den Zusammenhang zwischen den unbalancierten Übergangsraten und der ATP-Konzentration bestimmen. Je nach Typ der Reaktionskinetik und Anzahl unbalancierter Raten ergeben sich qualitativ unterschiedliche Verläufe der Geschwindigkeitskurven in Abhängigkeit von der ATP-Konzentration. Die molekularen Wechselwirkungspotentiale, die der Motor entlang seiner Schiene erfährt, sind unbekannt.Wir vergleichen unterschiedliche einfache Potentiale und die Auswirkungen auf die Transportkoeffizienten, die sich durch die Lokalisation der vertikalen Übergänge im Netzwerkmodell im Vergleich zu anderen Ansätzen ergeben.

  9. Drive: Theory and Construct Validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex B Siegling

    Full Text Available This article explicates the theory of drive and describes the development and validation of two measures. A representative set of drive facets was derived from an extensive corpus of human attributes (Study 1. Operationalised using an International Personality Item Pool version (the Drive:IPIP, a three-factor model was extracted from the facets in two samples and confirmed on a third sample (Study 2. The multi-item IPIP measure showed congruence with a short form, based on single-item ratings of the facets, and both demonstrated cross-informant reliability. Evidence also supported the measures' convergent, discriminant, concurrent, and incremental validity (Study 3. Based on very promising findings, the authors hope to initiate a stream of research in what is argued to be a rather neglected niche of individual differences and non-cognitive assessment.

  10. Drive: Theory and Construct Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegling, Alex B; Petrides, K V

    2016-01-01

    This article explicates the theory of drive and describes the development and validation of two measures. A representative set of drive facets was derived from an extensive corpus of human attributes (Study 1). Operationalised using an International Personality Item Pool version (the Drive:IPIP), a three-factor model was extracted from the facets in two samples and confirmed on a third sample (Study 2). The multi-item IPIP measure showed congruence with a short form, based on single-item ratings of the facets, and both demonstrated cross-informant reliability. Evidence also supported the measures' convergent, discriminant, concurrent, and incremental validity (Study 3). Based on very promising findings, the authors hope to initiate a stream of research in what is argued to be a rather neglected niche of individual differences and non-cognitive assessment.

  11. 32 CFR 634.43 - Driving records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Records and the Traffic Point System § 634.43 Driving... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Driving records. 634.43 Section 634.43 National... suspension or revocation actions. Table 5-1 of Part 634 Suspension/Revocation of Driving Privileges (See...

  12. Influence of roadside infrastructure on driving behavior: driving simulator study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, A.R.A. van der; Ridder, S. de

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a driving simulator study that focused on the influence of roadside infrastructure on speed choice and lateral placement of car drivers. A review of the RISER detailed accident database revealed that lateral positioning and speed of the vehicle were two of the

  13. Digital control of electric drives

    CERN Document Server

    Koziol, R; Szklarski, L

    1992-01-01

    The electromechanical systems employed in different branches of industry are utilized most often as drives of working machines which must be fed with electric energy in a continuous, periodic or even discrete way. Some of these machines operate at constant speed, others require wide and varying energy control. In many designs the synchronous cooperation of several electric drives is required in addition to the desired dynamic properties. For these reasons the control of the cooperation and dynamics of electromechanical systems requires the use of computers.This book adopts an unusual approach

  14. Error signals driving locomotor adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    anaesthesia (n = 5) instead of repetitive nerve stimulation. Foot anaesthesia reduced ankle adaptation to external force perturbations during walking. Our results suggest that cutaneous input plays a role in force perception, and may contribute to the 'error' signal involved in driving walking adaptation when...

  15. CLIC Drive Beam Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Wegner, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Travelling structures for accelerating the high-current (4.2 A) CLIC Drive Beam to an energy of 2.37 GeV are presented. The structures are optimised for efficiency (full beam loading operation) and a desired filling time. Higher order modes are studied and are reduced by detuning along the structure and by damping with silicon carbide loads.

  16. Promising Electric Aircraft Drive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    An overview of electric aircraft propulsion technology performance thresholds for key power system components is presented. A weight comparison of electric drive systems with equivalent total delivered energy is made to help identify component performance requirements, and promising research and development opportunities.

  17. Safe Driving After Propofol Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerlin-Grady, Lee; Austin, Paul N; Gabaldon, Dion A

    2017-10-01

    Propofol is a short-acting medication with fast cognitive and psychomotor recovery. However, patients are usually instructed not to drive a motor vehicle for 24 hours after receiving propofol. The purpose of this article was to review the evidence examining when it is safe to drive after receiving propofol for sedation for diagnostic and surgical procedures. This is a systematic review of the literature. A search of the literature was conducted using Google Scholar, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library for the time period 1990 to 2015. Two randomized controlled trials and two observational studies met the inclusion criteria. Using a simulator, investigators examined driving ability of subjects who received modest doses (about 100 mg) of propofol for endoscopic procedures and surveyed subjects who drove immediately after discharge. There were methodological concerns with the studies such as small sample sizes, modest doses of propofol, and three of the four studies were done in Japan by the same group of investigators limiting generalizability. This limited research suggests that it may be safe for patients to drive sooner than 24 hours after receiving propofol. However, large multicenter trials using heterogenous samples using a range of propofol doses are needed to support an evidence-based revision to the current discharge guidelines for patients receiving propofol. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Synergy in RF Current Drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, R.J.; Giruzzi, G.

    2005-01-01

    Auxiliary methods for efficient non-inductive current drive in tokamaks generally involve the interaction of externally driven waves with superthermal electrons. Among the possible schemes, Lower Hybrid (LH) and Electron Cyclotron (EC) current drive have been so far the most successful. An interesting aspect of their combined use is the fact that since they involve possibly overlapping domains in velocity and configuration spaces, a synergy between them is expected for appropriate parameters. The signature of this effect, significant improvement of the EC current drive efficiency, results from a favorable interplay of the quasilinear diffusions induced by both waves. Recently, improvements of the EC current drive efficiency in the range of 2-4 have been measured in fully non-inductive discharges in the Tore Supra tokamak, providing the first clear evidence of this effect in steady-state conditions. We present here the experimental aspects of these discharges. The associated kinetic modeling and current state of understanding of the LH-EC synergy phenomenon are also discussed. (authors)

  19. Synergy in RF Current Drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, R.J.; Giruzzi, G.

    2005-01-01

    Auxiliary methods for efficient non-inductive current drive in tokamaks generally involve the interaction of externally driven waves with superthermal electrons. Among the possible schemes, Lower Hybrid (LH) and Electron Cyclotron (EC) current drive have been so far the most successful. An interesting aspect of their combined use is the fact that since they involve possibly overlapping domains in velocity and configuration spaces, a synergy between them is expected for appropriate parameters. The signature of this effect, significant improvement of the EC current drive efficiency, results from a favorable interplay of the quasilinear diffusions induced by both waves. Recently, improvements of the EC current drive efficiency in the range of 2-4 have been measured in fully non-inductive discharges in the Tore Supra tokamak, providing the first clear evidence of this effect in steady-state conditions. We present here the experimental aspects of these discharges. The associated kinetic modeling and current state of understanding of the LH-EC synergy phenomenon are also discussed

  20. Factors driving aquaculture technology adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology adoption has played a key role in the global development and increase in agricultural productivity. However, the decision to adopt a new technology on farms is complex. While the factors that drive the adoption of new technologies have been well studied in agriculture, less attention has ...

  1. Foreign driving licences in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    1. Persons residing in Switzerland 1.1 Holders of a B, C, D, E or P-type "carte de légitimation" For holders of a B, C, D, E or P-type "carte de légitimation" issued by the Swiss Federal Department for Foreign Affairs (DFAE), current non-Swiss national driving licences are valid in Switzerland. If they so wish, holders of such driving licences may apply to the relevant road licensing authority in the canton where they live (Service des Automobiles et de la Navigation; for Geneva call + 41 22 388 30 30, website http://www.geneve.ch/san; for Vaud call + 41 21 316 82 10, website http://www.san.vd.ch/index.html) to exchange their driving licence for an equivalent Swiss licence (they must pass a test if they are not citizens of countries with which Switzerland has concluded an agreement on this matter, e.g. Member States of the European Union, the United States and Japan). However, such an exchange is not possible if the driving licence was issued in a foreign country during a...

  2. FOREIGN DRIVING LICENCES IN SWITZERLAND

    CERN Multimedia

    Relatiopns with the Host States Service

    2001-01-01

    1. PERSONS RESIDING IN SWITZERLAND 1.1 Holders of a B, C, D or E-type carte de légitimation For holders of B, C, D or E-type cartes de légitimation issued by the Swiss Federal Department for Foreign Affairs (Département fédéral suisse des Affaires étrangères, hereinafter called DFAE), current non-Swiss national driving licences are valid in Switzerland. Should they so wish, holders of such driving licences may apply to the relevant roads authority in the canton where they live (Service des Automobiles et de la Navigation ; for Geneva call 022/343 02 00, website: http://www.geneve.ch/san/welcome.html, for Vaud call 021/316 82 10, website: http://www.dse.vd.ch/auto/index.html) in order to exchange their driving licence for an equivalent Swiss licence. However, exchanges are not permitted if the driving licence was issued in a foreign country during a stay there of less than six months' duration while the person concerned was officially...

  3. Distracted Driving Raises Crash Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... phone, or texting—raises the risk of a crash. NIH-funded researchers analyzed the driving habits of both novice teen and experienced drivers. Vehicles were equipped with 4 cameras that recorded video whenever the cars were moving. A suite of sensors recorded acceleration, ...

  4. Current drive for rotamak plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Experiments which have been undertaken over a number of years have shown that a rotating magnetic field can drive a significant non-linear Hall current in a plasma. Successful experiments of this concept have been made with a device called rotamak. In its original configuration this device was a field reversed ...

  5. Low Sex Drive in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Low self-esteem History of physical or sexual abuse Previous negative sexual experiences Relationship issues For many women, emotional closeness is an essential prelude to sexual intimacy. So problems in your relationship can be a major factor in low sex drive. Decreased interest in sex is often a ...

  6. Older drivers with cognitive impairment: Perceived changes in driving skills, driving-related discomfort and self-regulation of driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, A.; Siren, A.; Teasdale, Thomas William

    2013-01-01

    drivers may recognise cognitive problems, they tend not to recognise changes to their driving, which may reflect reluctance to acknowledge the impact of cognitive impairment on their driving. Furthermore, the results suggest that driving-related discomfort plays an important role in the self-regulation......The results of a previous study indicate that in general, older drivers who recognise cognitive problems show realistic self-assessment of changes in their driving skills and that driving-related discomfort may function as an indirect monitoring of driving ability, contributing to their safe...... of driving among cognitively impaired older drivers. However, it is less clear what triggers driving-related discomfort among cognitively impaired older drivers indicating that it may be a less reliable aspect of their self-monitoring of driving ability....

  7. Current challenges in autonomous driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabás, I.; Todoruţ, A.; Cordoş, N.; Molea, A.

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays the automotive industry makes a quantum shift to a future, where the driver will have smaller and smaller role in driving his or her vehicle ending up being totally excluded. In this paper, we have investigated the different levels of driving automatization, the prospective effects of these new technologies on the environment and traffic safety, the importance of regulations and their current state, the moral aspects of introducing these technologies and the possible scenarios of deploying the autonomous vehicles. We have found that the self-driving technologies are facing many challenges: a) They must make decisions faster in very diverse conditions which can include many moral dilemmas as well; b) They have an important potential in reducing the environmental pollution by optimizing their routes, driving styles by communicating with other vehicles, infrastructures and their environment; c) There is a considerable gap between the self-drive technology level and the current regulations; fortunately, this gap shows a continuously decreasing trend; d) In case of many types of imminent accidents management there are many concerns about the ability of making the right decision. Considering that this field has an extraordinary speed of development, our study is up to date at the submission deadline. Self-driving technologies become increasingly sophisticated and technically accessible, and in some cases, they can be deployed for commercial vehicles as well. According to the current stage of research and development, it is still unclear how the self-driving technologies will be able to handle extreme and unexpected events including their moral aspects. Since most of the traffic accidents are caused by human error or omission, it is expected that the emergence of the autonomous technologies will reduce these accidents in their number and gravity, but the very few currently available test results have not been able to scientifically underpin this issue yet. The

  8. Driver headway choice: a comparison between driving simulator and real-road driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risto, Malte; Martens, Marieke Hendrikje

    2014-01-01

    Driving simulators have become an established tool in driver behaviour research by offering a controllable, safe and cost-effective alternative to real world driving. A challenge for using driving simulators as a research tool has been to elicit driving behaviour that equals real world driving. With

  9. Driver headway choice : A comparison between driving simulator and real-road driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risto, M.; Martens, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Driving simulators have become an established tool in driver behaviour research by offering a controllable, safe and cost-effective alternative to real world driving. A challenge for using driving simulators as a research tool has been to elicit driving behaviour that equals real world driving. With

  10. Among High School Seniors, Driving After Marijuana Use Surpasses Drunk Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drunk Driving Among High School Seniors, Driving After Marijuana Use Surpasses Drunk Driving Email Facebook Twitter July ... in a vehicle whose driver had been using marijuana or another illicit drug, or had drunk 5 ...

  11. Experimental and numerical approach on fracture behaviour of four inches diameter carbon-manganese cracked welded pipes in four point bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semete, P.; Faidy, C.; Lautier, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    EDF has conducted a research programme to demonstrate the fracture resistance of carbon-manganese welded pipes. The main task of this programme consisted of testing three four inches diameter (114.3 mm O.D.) thin welded pipes (8.56 mm thick) which are representative of those of the sites. The three pipes were loaded under four point bending at a quasi-static rate at -20 C till their maximum bending moment was reached. This paper presents the experimental results, finite element calculations and their comparison with the simplified fracture assessment method of the RSE-M Code. (author)

  12. Analysis of risk and dose when using thermal protection on non-fissile and fissile-excepted UF6 48-inch cylinder packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, D.B.; Lowe, L.M.; Elizabeth Darrough, M.; Jones, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    An industry consortium of owners of large (i.e., the 48-inch or 48X and 48Y) cylinders commissioned an independent study to evaluate the safety of using thermal protective covers on the cylinders and the likelihood that the cylinders would experience the regulations' hypothetical thermal accident. The study examined the demonstrable risks of the protective covers, i.e., increased dose to workers and the potential for accidents associated with the extra handling, vs. the theoretical risk of the UF 6 cylinders' encountering the hypothetical fire, to evaluate the appropriateness of using the thermal protective covers

  13. Granular gases under extreme driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, W.; Machta, J.; Ben-Naim, E.

    2010-08-01

    We study inelastic gases in two dimensions using event-driven molecular-dynamics simulations. Our focus is the nature of the stationary state attained by rare injection of large amounts of energy to balance the dissipation due to collisions. We find that under such extreme driving, with the injection rate much smaller than the collision rate, the velocity distribution has a power-law high-energy tail. The numerically measured exponent characterizing this tail is in excellent agreement with predictions of kinetic theory over a wide range of system parameters. We conclude that driving by rare but powerful energy injection leads to a well-mixed gas and constitutes an alternative mechanism for agitating granular matter. In this distinct nonequilibrium steady state, energy cascades from large to small scales. Our simulations also show that when the injection rate is comparable with the collision rate, the velocity distribution has a stretched exponential tail.

  14. Inside Solid State Drives (SSDs)

    CERN Document Server

    Micheloni, Rino; Eshghi, Kam

    2013-01-01

    Solid State Drives (SSDs) are gaining momentum in enterprise and client applications, replacing Hard Disk Drives (HDDs) by offering higher performance and lower power. In the enterprise, developers of data center server and storage systems have seen CPU performance growing exponentially for the past two decades, while HDD performance has improved linearly for the same period. Additionally, multi-core CPU designs and virtualization have increased randomness of storage I/Os. These trends have shifted performance bottlenecks to enterprise storage systems. Business critical applications such as online transaction processing, financial data processing and database mining are increasingly limited by storage performance. In client applications, small mobile platforms are leaving little room for batteries while demanding long life out of them. Therefore, reducing both idle and active power consumption has become critical. Additionally, client storage systems are in need of significant performance improvement as well ...

  15. Auto warranty and driving patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastasiadis, Simon; Anderson, Boyd; Chukova, Stefanka

    2013-01-01

    Automobile warranty coverage is typically limited by age as well as mileage. However, the age is known for all sold vehicles at all times, but mileage is only observed for a vehicle with a claim and only at the time of the claim. We study the relationship between the expected number/cost of warranty claims and the driving patterns. Within a nonparametric framework, we account for the rate of mileage accumulation and propose a measure for the variability of this rate over a vehicle's observable life. We illustrate the ideas with real warranty data and comment on the relationship between the expected number/cost of warranty claims and the driving patterns using results adjusted/unadjusted for withdrawals from the warranty coverage due to mileage accumulation

  16. Concurrent Driving Method with Fast Scan Rate for Large Mutual Capacitance Touch Screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gamal Ahmed Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel touch screen control technique is introduced, which scans each frame in two steps of concurrent multichannel driving and differential sensing. The proposed technique substantially increases the scan rate and reduces the ambient noise effectively. It is also extended to a multichip architecture to support excessively large touch screens with great scan rate improvement. The proposed method has been implemented using 0.18 μm CMOS TowerJazz process and tested with FPGA and AFE board connecting a 23-inch touch screen. Experimental results show a scan rate improvement of up to 23.8 times and an SNR improvement of 24.6 dB over the conventional method.

  17. Unitary deformations of counterdiabatic driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2015-04-01

    We study a deformation of the counterdiabatic-driving Hamiltonian as a systematic strategy for an adiabatic control of quantum states. Using a unitary transformation, we design a convenient form of the driver Hamiltonian. We apply the method to a particle in a confining potential and discrete systems to find explicit forms of the Hamiltonian and discuss the general properties. The method is derived by using the quantum brachistochrone equation, which shows the existence of a nontrivial dynamical invariant in the deformed system.

  18. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, 4 inch aerial photography (color, infrared, and color oblique) in urban areas, 1 foot in national forest, Published in 2006, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Los Angeles County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2006. 4 inch aerial photography (color, infrared, and color oblique) in urban areas, 1 foot in...

  19. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, Spring 2006 - natural color - countywide 12 inch pixel orthophotography - County of Polk, Wisconsin, Published in 2006, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Polk County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2006. Spring 2006 - natural color - countywide 12 inch pixel orthophotography - County of Polk,...

  20. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, Six-inch orthoimagery of Washburn County, Wisconsin. The imagery was collected May 5, 2004 by ImageAmerica, Published in 2004, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Washburn County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2004. Six-inch orthoimagery of Washburn County, Wisconsin. The imagery was collected May 5,...

  1. FOREIGN DRIVING LICENCES IN FRANCE

    CERN Multimedia

    Service des relations avec les Pays Hôtes

    2000-01-01

    1. PERSONS RESIDING IN FRANCE1.1 National driving licences from countries belonging to the EEAa) ValidityCurrent national driving licences issued by a country belonging to the European Economic Area (here inafter called EEA) are, in principle, valid in France. N.B. : The countries belonging to the EEA are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.b)\tRegistrationTo ensure that all the conditions of validity in France have been met, holders of driving licences issued by a country belonging to the EEA, who reside in France (i.e. hold a residence permit issued by a Préfecture, or a carte spéciale issued by the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which is equivalent to a residence permit), can have their licences registered with the Préfecture of the department where they live (for Ain, call 04 74 32 30 00, for Haute Savoie call 04 50 33 ...

  2. FOREIGN DRIVING LICENCES IN FRANCE

    CERN Multimedia

    DSU Unit

    2008-01-01

    The following information is provided subject to possible amendments decided by the competent French authorities. Those wishing to undertake the necessary steps with the prefectural services of the Departments of Ain and Haute-Savoie may obtain information by calling the following numbers: + 33 474 32 30 65 for Ain and + 33 450 33 60 00 for Haute-Savoie. 1. PEOPLE RESIDING IN FRANCE 1.1 Driving licences issued by a state belonging to the EU or the EEA a) Recognition on French territory All currently valid driving licences issued by States belonging to the European Union (EU) or to the European Economic Area (EEA) are generally valid for driving on French territory. However, if the licence was originally obtained in exchange for a licence issued by a State not belonging to the EU or to the EEA with which France has not concluded a reciprocity agreement, it is recognised only up to one year following the date of establishment of normal residence in France (date of the first special residence permit issu...

  3. Foreign driving licences in France

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The following information is subject to possible amendments decided by the competent French authorities. Those wishing to undertake the necessary steps with the prefectural services of the Departments of the Ain and Haute-Savoie may obtain information by calling the following numbers: + 33 4 74 32 30 65 for the Ain and + 33 4 50 33 60 00 for Haute-Savoie. 1. PERSONS RESIDING IN FRANCE 1.1 Driving licences issued by a State belonging to the EU or the EEA a) Recognition on French territory All currently valid driving licences issued by States belonging to the European Union (EU) or to the European Economic Area (EEA) are generally valid for driving on French territory. However, if the licence was originally obtained in exchange for a licence issued by a State not belonging to the EU or to the EEA and with which France has not concluded a reciprocity agreement, it will be recognised for a maximum of one year following the date of establishment of normal residence in France ...

  4. Factors That Drive Youth Specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padaki, Ajay S; Popkin, Charles A; Hodgins, Justin L; Kovacevic, David; Lynch, Thomas Sean; Ahmad, Christopher S

    Specialization in young athletes has been linked to overuse injuries, burnout, and decreased satisfaction. Despite continued opposition from the medical community, epidemiological studies suggest the frequency is increasing. Extrinsic pressures in addition to individual aspirations drive this national trend in sports specialization. Descriptive epidemiology study. Level 3. A novel instrument assessing the driving factors behind youth specialization was generated by an interdisciplinary team of medical professionals. Surveys were administered to patients and athletes in the department's sports medicine clinic. The survey was completed by 235 athletes between 7 and 18 years of age, with a mean age of 13.8 ± 3.0 years. Athletes specialized at a mean age of 8.1 years, and 31% of athletes played a single sport while 58% played multiple sports but had a preferred sport. More than 70% of athletes had collegiate or professional ambitions, and 60% played their primary sport for 9 or more months per year, with players who had an injury history more likely to play year-round ( P sports, with specialized athletes reporting this significantly more often ( P = 0.04). Half of the athletes reported that sports interfered with their academic performance, with older players stating this more frequently ( P sport before starting high school. While intrinsic drive may identify healthy aspirations, extrinsic influences are prevalent in specialized athletes. Extrinsic factors contributing to youth specialization were identified and compounded the deleterious sequelae of youth athlete specialization.

  5. Foreign driving licences in Switzerland

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    1. Persons residing in Switzerland 1.1 Holders of a B, C, D, E or P-type "carte de légitimation" For holders of a B, C, D, E or P-type "carte de légitimation" issued by the Swiss Federal Department for Foreign Affairs (DFAE), current non-Swiss national driving licences are valid in Switzerland. (see the official news about the new "Carte de légitimation P") If they so wish, holders of such driving licences may apply to the relevant road licensing authority in the canton where they live (Service des Automobiles et de la Navigation; for Geneva call + 41 22 388 30 30, website http://www.geneve.ch/san; for Vaud call + 41 21 316 82 10, website http://www.san.vd.ch/index.html) to exchange their driving licence for an equivalent Swiss licence (they must pass a test if they are not citizens of countries with which Switzerland has concluded an agreement on this matter, e.g. Member States of the European Union, the United States and Japan). However, such an exchange is not possible...

  6. Advisory and autonomous cooperative driving systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, T.H.A. van den; Ploeg, J.; Netten, B.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the traffic efficiency of an advisory cooperative driving system, Advisory Acceleration Control is examined and compared to the efficiency of an autonomous cooperative driving system, Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control. The algorithms and implementation thereof are explained. The

  7. Synthesizing Naturalistic Driving Data: a further review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Venter, Karien

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Naturalistic Driving Study (NDS) methodology has in the past decade proven extremely valuable in providing rich contextual information about the driver, the vehicle and driving environment. Internationally the uptake of the methodology...

  8. Speciation through sensory drive in cichlid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seehausen, Ole; Terai, Yohey; Magalhaes, Isabel S.; Carleton, Karen L.; Mrosso, Hillary D. J.; Miyagi, Ryutaro; van der Sluijs, Inke; Schneider, Maria V.; Maan, Martine E.; Tachida, Hidenori; Imai, Hiroo; Okada, Norihiro

    2008-01-01

    Theoretically, divergent selection on sensory systems can cause speciation through sensory drive. However, empirical evidence is rare and incomplete. Here we demonstrate sensory drive speciation within island populations of cichlid fish. We identify the ecological and molecular basis of divergent

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Drinking and Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resulting in nearly 11,000 deaths in 2009. Driving drunk is never OK. Choose not to drink and ... interlocks prevent drivers who were convicted of alcohol-impaired driving from operating their vehicles if they have been ...

  10. Deceleration buffer for hydraulic linear motion drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamrus, K.J.

    1982-01-01

    Braking of the motion of a fluid-actuated drive is provided by a buffer arrangement which is normally sealed to prevent vaporization of the fluid in a buffer cylinder and which isolates the drive piston rings from braking pressures

  11. Modeling human learning involved in car driving

    OpenAIRE

    Wewerinke, P.H.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, car driving is considered at the level of human tracking and maneuvering in the context of other traffic. A model analysis revealed the most salient features determining driving performance and safety. Learning car driving is modelled based on a system theoretical approach and based on a neural network approach. The aim of this research is to assess the relative merit of both approaches to describe human learning behavior in car driving specifically and in operating dynamic sys...

  12. Modeling human learning involved in car driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wewerinke, P.H.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, car driving is considered at the level of human tracking and maneuvering in the context of other traffic. A model analysis revealed the most salient features determining driving performance and safety. Learning car driving is modelled based on a system theoretical approach and based

  13. CAAD: Computer Architecture for Autonomous Driving

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shaoshan; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Zhe; Gaudiot, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    We describe the computing tasks involved in autonomous driving, examine existing autonomous driving computing platform implementations. To enable autonomous driving, the computing stack needs to simultaneously provide high performance, low power consumption, and low thermal dissipation, at low cost. We discuss possible approaches to design computing platforms that will meet these needs.

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Teen Drinking and Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... every trip, no matter how short. Obey speed limits. Never use a cell phone or text while driving. Parents can Understand that most teens ... teen passengers Never use a cell phone or text while driving Obey speed limits Get your copy of CDC's parent-teen driving ...

  15. Driving When You Have Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driving When You Have Parkinson’s Disease DRIVEWELL You have been a safe driver for years. For you, driving means freedom and control. As you get older, ... mental health can affect how safely you drive. Parkinson’s disease is a disorder of the central nervous system ...

  16. Assessment of driving outcomes after epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Ross L; Omar, Nidal B; Agee, Bonita S; Walters, Beverly C; Riley, Kristen O

    2015-11-01

    Driving is an important factor contributing to good quality of life in patients with epilepsy. Little work has been undertaken to explore the details of driving experience alone in this patient population. We assessed the driving status of our patients prior to and following surgery for epilepsy. We also sought to determine what associations exist between patient characteristics and postoperative driving status. The participants were selected from those adult patients with epilepsy who have required surgical treatment at our home institution between 2006 and 2010. Each participant received a questionnaire asking about driving and seizure status before and after surgery. The surveys were distributed using a modified Dillman approach. Perioperative patient data were obtained from the electronic medical record system in addition to a previously assembled epilepsy database from the Neurology Department at our institution. Independent variables were analyzed to look for significant associations with driving outcomes. One hundred forty eligible patients were included in the survey population; 78 patients returned a questionnaire for a response rate of 55.7%. Eighty percent of patients experienced driving as a regular part of life at some point prior to surgery. At the time of the questionnaire distribution, 68% of patients had returned to regular driving. Demographic characteristics did not play a significant role in whether or not the patient had a favorable driving outcome after surgery. However, patients who had a history of driving on a regular basis prior to surgery and those who had an Engel Class I outcome after surgery had significantly higher rates of good driving outcomes. Also, patients with an unfavorable preoperative driving status were more likely to have a favorable driving outcome after surgery if they had an Engel Class I outcome. Patients in whom intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) was utilized prior to resection had worse driving outcomes. A

  17. Changes in glance behaviour when using a visual eco-driving system - A field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, Christer; Kircher, Katja

    2017-01-01

    While in-vehicle eco-driving support systems have the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and save fuel, they may also distract drivers, especially if the system makes use of a visual interface. The objective of this study is to investigate the visual behaviour of drivers interacting with such a system, implemented on a five-inch screen mounted above the middle console. Ten drivers participated in a real-world, on-road driving study where they drove a route nine times (2 pre-baseline drives, 5 treatment drives, 2 post-baseline drives). The route was 96 km long and consisted of rural roads, urban roads and a dual-lane motorway. The results show that drivers look at the system for 5-8% of the time, depending on road type, with a glance duration of about 0.6 s, and with 0.05% long glances (>2s) per kilometre. These figures are comparable to what was found for glances to the speedometer in this study. Glance behaviour away from the windscreen is slightly increased in treatment as compared to pre- and post-baseline, mirror glances decreased in treatment and post-baseline compared to pre-baseline, and speedometer glances increased compared to pre-baseline. The eco-driving support system provided continuous information interspersed with additional advice pop-ups (announced by a beep) and feedback pop-ups (no auditory cue). About 20% of sound initiated advice pop-ups were disregarded, and the remaining cases were usually looked at within the first two seconds. About 40% of the feedback pop-ups were disregarded. The amount of glances to the system immediately before the onset of a pop-up was clearly higher for feedback than for advice. All in all, the eco-driving support system under investigation is not likely to have a strong negative impact on glance behaviour. However, there is room for improvements. We recommend that eco-driving information is integrated with the speedometer, that optional activation of sound alerts for intermittent information is made

  18. What Drives Politicians’ Online Popularity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis; Vaccari, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    The number of website visits, Facebook friends, or Twitter followers that politicians attract varies greatly, but little is known about what drives politicians' online popularity. In this article, we use data from a systematic tracking of congressional candidates' popularity on four web platforms......-seat races tend to attract larger audiences online, as do candidates who are more visible on political blogs. Surprisingly, how intensely candidates are covered in news media, how popular they are in opinion polls, and how much money they spend during the campaign show no significant effect. These findings...... help us understand the dynamics of internet politics, and have wider implications for candidate competition and party politics....

  19. Efficient alternatives for electric drives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comnes, G.A.; Barnes, R.W.

    1987-11-01

    This analysis of industrial electric motors describes the current motor stock, its energy use and operating characteristics, and innovations that could change current use patterns. It provides calculations characterizing the economic attractiveness of several existing and potential options. One attractive option given particular attention is the adjustable-speed drive which can replace throttles or valves for many pumping operations. A major conclusion is that, throughout industry, options that are both energy-saving and economically attractive appear to penetrate markets more slowly than would be socially optimal. The final section examines characteristics of industry that may contribute to slow market penetration. 29 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs.

  20. Perceptual and Cognitive Impairments and Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korner-Bitensky, Nicol; Coopersmith, Henry; Mayo, Nancy; Leblanc, Ginette; Kaizer, Franceen

    1990-01-01

    Perceptual and cognitive disorders that frequently accompany stroke and head injury influence an individual's ability to drive a motor vehicle. Canadian physicians are legally responsible for identifying patients who are potentially unsafe to drive and, if they fail to do so, may be held liable in a civil action suit. The authors review the guidelines for physicians evaluating a patient's fitness to drive after brain injury. They also examine the actions a physician should take when a patient with perceptual and cognitive problems wants to drive. Ultimately, by taking these actions, physicians will help to prevent driving accidents. PMID:21234047

  1. Smartphone Based Approach For Monitoring Inefficient And Unsafe Driving Behavior And Recognizing Drink And Drive Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Mane

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Many automobile drivers having knowledge of the driving behaviours and habits that can lead to inefficient and unsafe driving. However it is often the case that these same drivers unknowingly manifest these inefficient and unsafe driving behaviours in their everyday driving activity. The proposed system proposes a practical and economical way to capture measure and alert drives of inefficient and unsafe driving as well as highly efficient system aimed at early detection and alert of dangerous vehicle maneuvers typically related to drunk driving. The upcoming solution consists of a mobile application running on a modern smartphone device paired with a compatible OBDII On-board diagnostics II reader.

  2. Computer Security: drive-bye

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefan Lueders, Computer Security Team

    2016-01-01

    Like a lion waiting to ambush gazelles at a waterhole, malware can catch you by surprise.    As some of you might have noticed, the Computer Security Team had to block the news site “20min.ch” a while ago, as it was found to be distributing malware. This block comes after similar incidents at other Swiss organizations. Our blocking is protective in order to safeguard your computers, laptops, tablets and smartphones. Unfortunately, this is not the first time we have seen these so-called drive-by/waterhole attacks: once you have visited an affected website, embedded third-party malicious code is downloaded to your computer and subsequently infects it (if running Windows or Android as well as, less likely, Mac operating systems). Hence the name “drive-by”. As “20min.ch” is a very frequented website among CERN staff members and users, it makes it a perfect source for attacks against CERN (or other Geneva-based organisations): inste...

  3. Learning headway estimation in driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb-Maimon, Meirav

    2007-08-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to examine to what extent the ability to attain a required headway of 1 or 2 s can be improved through practical driving instruction under real traffic conditions and whether the learning is sustained after a period during which there has been no controlled training. The failure of drivers to estimate headways correctly has been demonstrated in previous studies. Two methods of training were used: time based (in seconds) and distance based (in a combination of meters and car lengths). For each method, learning curves were examined for 18 participants at speeds of 50, 80, and 100 km/hr. The results indicated that drivers were weak in estimating headway prior to training using both methods. The learning process was rapid for both methods and similar for all speeds; thus, after one trial with feedback, there was already a significant improvement. The learning was retained over time, for at least the 1 month examined in this study. Both the time and distance training of headway improved drivers' ability to attain required headways, with the learning being maintained over a retention interval. The learning process was based on perceptual cues from the driving scene and feedback from the experimenter, regardless of the formal training method. The implications of these results are that all drivers should be trained in headway estimation using an objective distance measuring device, which can be installed on driver instruction vehicles.

  4. A study on the effects of fatigue driving and drunk driving on drivers' physical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingjian; Zhao, Xiaohua; Du, Hongji; Rong, Jian

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of fatigue driving and drunk driving on drivers' physical characteristics; to analyze the differences in drivers' physical characteristics affected by different kinds of fatigue; and to compare the differences in the effects of the 2 driving states, fatigue driving and drunk driving. Twenty-five participants' physical characteristics were collected under 5 controlled situations: normal, tired driving, drowsy driving, drowsiness + tired driving, and drunk driving. In this article, fatigue driving refers to tiredness and drowsiness and includes 3 situations: tired driving, drowsy driving, and drowsiness + tired driving. The drivers' physical characteristics were measured in terms of 9 parameters: systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR), eyesight, dynamic visual acuity (DVA), time for dark adaption (TDA), reaction time to sound (RTS), reaction time to light (RTL), deviation of depth perception (DDP), and time deviation of speed anticipation (TDSA). They were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures. Binary logistical regression analysis was used to explain the relationship between drivers' physical characteristics and the two driving states. Most of the drivers' physical characteristic parameters were found to be significantly different under the influence of different situations. Four indicators are significantly affected by fatigue driving during deep fatigue (in decreasing order of influence): HR, RTL, SBP and RTS. HR and RTL are significant in the logistical regression model of the drowsiness + tired driving situation and normal situations. Six indicators of the drivers' physical characteristics are significantly affected by drunk driving (in decreasing order of influence): SBP, RTL, DDP, eyesight, RTS, and TDSA. SBP and DDP have a significant effect in the logistical regression model of the drunk driving situation and the normal situation. Both fatigue driving and drunk driving

  5. [Useful assessment for identifying unsafe driving].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Régis; Fabrigoule, Colette; Domont, Alain

    2005-03-01

    Ability to drive safely is the resultant of interactions between the individual (the driver), the vector (the car) and the environment (the state of the road). For some aged drivers, an important decline of visual, musculosquelettic and cognitive performances, may affect the ability to drive and increase the rate of crashes per vehicle-kilometer-driven, and the morbidity and mortality related to crash. Therefore, each holder of a driving licence should be medically suited to control his driving ability. In case of transitory or lasting driving incapacity, drivers must, of their own initiative, stop driving according to the Highway code and the contractual obligations appearing in their vehicle insurance contract. A medical examination for aptitude to driving requires a standardized, reliable, reproducible procedure based on consensual assessment tools to avoid arbitrary decisions for driving cessation. We propose a multidisciplinary approach to detect important decline of visuospatial and motor skills, paroxystic drops of attention and vigilance, and decreased cognitive capacity to anticipate and adapt driving at every moment. This assessment is based on a semi-directed interview and simple diagnostic tests. According to the present French law, only twelve medical conditions or functional deficits are inconsistent with the retain of the driving licence for a light vehicle.

  6. Radiation Characterization Summary: ACRR Central Cavity Free-Field Environment with the 32-Inch Pedestal at the Core Centerline (ACRR-FF-CC-32-cl).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Richard Manuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parma, Edward J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Naranjo, Gerald E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lippert, Lance L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vehar, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Griffin, Patrick J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This document presents the facilit y - recommended characteri zation o f the neutron, prompt gamma - ray, and delayed gamma - ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor ( ACRR ) for the cen tral cavity free - field environment with the 32 - inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environmen t is ACRR - FF - CC - 32 - cl. The neutron, prompt gamma - ray , and delayed gamma - ray energy spectra , uncertainties, and covariance matrices are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma - ray fluence profiles within the experiment area of the cavity . Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse operations are presented with conversion examples . Acknowledgements The authors wish to th ank the Annular Core Research Reactor staff and the Radiation Metrology Laboratory staff for their support of this work . Also thanks to David Ames for his assistance in running MCNP on the Sandia parallel machines.

  7. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR 44 Inch Lead-Boron (LB44) Bucket Environment (ACRR-LB44-CC-32-CL).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Richard Manuel [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parma, Edward J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Griffin, Patrick J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vehar, David W. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity with the 44 inch Lead-Boron (LB44) bucket, reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  8. Shock shapes on blunt bodies in hypersonic-hypervelocity helium, air, and CO2 flows, and calibration results in Langley 6-inch expansion tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1975-01-01

    Shock shape results for flat-faced cylinders, spheres, and spherically blunted cones in various test gases, along with preliminary results from a calibration study performed in the Langley 6-inch expansion tube are presented. Free-stream velocities from 5 to 7 km/sec are generated at hypersonic conditions with helium, air, and CO2, resulting in normal shock density ratios from 4 to 19. Ideal-gas shock shape predictions, in which an effective ratio of specific heats is used as input, are compared with the measured results. The effect of model diameter is examined to provide insight to the thermochemical state of the flow in the shock layer. The regime for which equilibrium exists in the shock layer for the present air and CO2 test conditions is defined. Test core flow quality, test repeatability, and comparison of measured and predicted expansion-tube flow quantities are discussed.

  9. Description and operating performance of a parallel-rail electric-arc system with helium driver gas for the Langley 6-inch expansion tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A parallel-rail arc-discharge system to heat and pressurize the initial helium driver gas of the Langley 6-inch expansion tube is described. This system was designed for a 2.44-m-long driver vessel rated at 138 MPa, with a distance between rails of 20.3 cm. Electric energy was obtained from a capacitor storage system rated at 12,000 V with a maximum energy of 5 MJ. Tests were performed over a range of energy from 1.74 MJ to the maximum value. The operating experience and system performance are discussed, along with results from a limited number of expansion-tube tests with air and carbon dioxide as test gases.

  10. Design and Simulation of an Electrothermal Actuator Based Rotational Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeson, Sterling; Dallas, Tim

    2008-10-01

    As a participant in the Micro and Nano Device Engineering (MANDE) Research Experience for Undergraduates program at Texas Tech University, I learned how MEMS devices operate and the limits of their operation. Using specialized AutoCAD-based design software and the ANSYS simulation program, I learned the MEMS fabrication process used at Sandia National Labs, the design limitations of this process, the abilities and drawbacks of micro devices, and finally, I redesigned a MEMS device called the Chevron Torsional Ratcheting Actuator (CTRA). Motion is achieved through electrothermal actuation. The chevron (bent-beam) actuators cause a ratcheting motion on top of a hub-less gear so that as voltage is applied the CTRA spins. The voltage applied needs to be pulsed and the frequency of the pulses determine the angular frequency of the device. The main objective was to design electromechanical structures capable of transforming the electrical signals into mechanical motion without overheating. The design was optimized using finite element analysis in ANSYS allowing multi-physics simulations of our model system.

  11. Factors Driving Business Intelligence Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimvydas Skyrius

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The field of business intelligence (BI, despite rapid technology advances, continues to feature inadequate levels of adoption. The attention of researchers is shifting towards hu-man factors of BI adoption. The wide set of human factors influencing BI adoption con-tains elements of what we call BI culture – an overarching concept covering key managerial issues that come up in BI implementation. Research sources provide different sets of features pertaining to BI culture or related concepts – decision-making culture, analytical culture and others. The goal of this paper is to perform the review of research and practical sources to examine driving forces of BI – data-driven approaches, BI agility, maturity and acceptance – to point out culture-related issues that support BI adoption and to suggest an emerging set of factors influencing BI culture.

  12. Technology as a driving force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torvund, T. [Norsk Hydro A/S (Norway)

    1994-12-31

    The competitiveness of the Norwegian Continental shelf has been put firmly on the agenda in Norway since the report from a working group set up by the Ministry of Industry and Energy was released in February this year. If there is to be secured a long future for oil and gas activities, a reduction in the time and costs used in the projects of the order of 40-50%, without jeopardizing the high safety and environmental standards achieved in Norway. The paper addresses how technology can be a driving force in achieving these aims. But technology alone cannot do the job. Progress and changes in several other areas are also necessary, and the new scenario also calls for improved relations between all actors in the North Sea, authorities, oil companies, contractors and labour unions. 15 figs.

  13. Technology as a driving force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torvund, T.

    1994-01-01

    The competitiveness of the Norwegian Continental shelf has been put firmly on the agenda in Norway since the report from a working group set up by the Ministry of Industry and Energy was released in February this year. If there is to be secured a long future for oil and gas activities, a reduction in the time and costs used in the projects of the order of 40-50%, without jeopardizing the high safety and environmental standards achieved in Norway. The paper addresses how technology can be a driving force in achieving these aims. But technology alone cannot do the job. Progress and changes in several other areas are also necessary, and the new scenario also calls for improved relations between all actors in the North Sea, authorities, oil companies, contractors and labour unions. 15 figs

  14. Drivers’ Age, Gender, Driving Experience, and Aggressiveness as Predictors of Aggressive Driving Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perepjolkina Viktorija

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen a growing interest in the problem of aggressive driving. In the presentstudy two demographic variables (gender and age, two non-psychological driving-experiencerelated variables (annual mileage and legal driving experience in years and aggressiveness asa personality trait (including behavioural and affective components as psychological variableof individual differences were examined as potential predictors of aggressive driving. The aimof the study was to find out the best predictors of aggressive driving behaviour. The study wasbased on an online survey, and 228 vehicle drivers in Latvia participated in it. The questionnaireincluded eight-item Aggressive Driving Scale (Bone & Mowen, 2006, short Latvian versionof the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (AQ; Buss & Perry, 1992, and questions gainingdemographic and driving experience information. Gender, age and annual mileage predictedaggressive driving: being male, young and with higher annual driving exposure were associatedwith higher scores on aggressive driving. Dispositional aggressiveness due to anger componentwas a significant predictor of aggressive diving score. Physical aggression and hostility wereunrelated to aggressive driving. Altogether, the predictors explained a total of 28% of thevariance in aggressive driving behaviour. Findings show that dispositional aggressiveness,especially the anger component, as well as male gender, young age and higher annual mileagehas a predictive validity in relation to aggressive driving. There is a need to extend the scope ofpotential dispositional predictors pertinent to driving aggression.

  15. Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Charles E.; Benson, Ralph A.

    1994-01-01

    A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the traction battery and the power drive circuit, a voltage detector across contacts of the main contactor, and a controller for controlling the main contactor to prevent movement of its contacts to the closed position when the voltage across the contacts exceeds a predetermined threshold, to thereby protect the contacts of the contactor. The power drive circuit includes an electric traction motor and a DC-to-AC inverter with a capacitive input filter. The controller also inhibits the power drive circuit from driving the motor and thereby discharging the input capacitor if the contacts are inadvertently opened during motoring. A precharging contactor is controlled to charge the input filter capacitor prior to closing the main contactor to further protect the contacts of the main contactor.

  16. Simulation and Analysis of Chain Drive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sine Leergaard

    The subject of this thesis is simulation and analysis of large roller chain drive systems, such as e.g. used in marine diesel engines. The aim of developing a chain drive simulation program is to analyse dynamic phenomena of chain drive systems and investigate different design changes...... to the systems, in order to remove unwanted phenomena. Such a computer program can, when properly validated, be used as an alternative to or in combination with physical experiments. Prior investigations in this area have been done with a focus on smaller chains in high speed chain drives. For large low speed...... systems other phenomena occur and therefore, a specific model of the marine engine chain drive is of interest. The research objective of the work presented in this thesis is to contribute with a novel theoretical basis for the analysis of chain drive systems, by posing and validating different...

  17. Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, C.E.; Benson, R.A.

    1994-11-29

    A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the traction battery and the power drive circuit, a voltage detector across contacts of the main contactor, and a controller for controlling the main contactor to prevent movement of its contacts to the closed position when the voltage across the contacts exceeds a predetermined threshold, to thereby protect the contacts of the contactor. The power drive circuit includes an electric traction motor and a DC-to-AC inverter with a capacitive input filter. The controller also inhibits the power drive circuit from driving the motor and thereby discharging the input capacitor if the contacts are inadvertently opened during motoring. A precharging contactor is controlled to charge the input filter capacitor prior to closing the main contactor to further protect the contacts of the main contactor. 3 figures.

  18. Switched reluctance drives for electric vehicle applications

    OpenAIRE

    Andrada Gascón, Pedro; Torrent Burgués, Marcel; Blanqué Molina, Balduino; Perat Benavides, Josep Ignasi

    2003-01-01

    Electric vehicles are the only alternative for a clean, efficient and environmentally friendly urban transport system. With the increasing interest in electric drives for electric vehicle propulsion. This paper first tries to explain why the switched reluctance drive is a strong candidate for electric vehicle applications. It then gives switched reluctance drive design guidelines for battery or fuel cell operated electric vehicles. Finally, it presents the design and simulation of a switched ...

  19. Optimal Sector Sampling for Drive Triage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    known files, which we call target data, that could help identify a drive holding evidence such as child pornography or malware. Triage is needed to sift...we call target data, that could help identify a drive holding evidence such as child pornography or malware. Triage is needed to sift through drives...situations where the user is looking for known data.1 One example is a law enforcement officer searching for evidence of child pornography from a large num

  20. Instruction or distraction in the driving school?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mike Kirk; Caglio, Agnese

    In this paper we report an ongoing study of driving school practice. We recorded several hours of driving lessons in different environments, which we analyze with the Interaction Analysis method. Our initial analysis suggests that looking at how teachers make use of different communicative resour...... resources to instruct students in driving, can provide insights for the development of technologies that support drivers in managing distractions....

  1. Risky driving behaviors in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Mohsen; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2009-03-01

    Iran has one of the highest fatality rates due to road traffic crashes (RTC) in the world. The disability adjusted life years (DALYs) for RTC in Iran is more than 1,300,000 years, which is more than that for any other disease such as cardiovascular or cancer. We evaluated risky driving behaviors in Tehran, the capital of Iran. A retrospective analysis was conducted based on the data obtained from the Tehran Police Safety Driving Department. Offenses and crashes were studied in different municipal districts in Tehran from March 2006 to March 2007. The inclusion criteria were risky driving behaviors fined by the police. Nonbehavioral offences were excluded. There were 3,821,798 offenses in Tehran. Not wearing a seat belt was the most common (59%) example of risky driving behavior, followed by tailgating, not wearing motorcycle helmets, talking on the cell phone while driving, overtaking from the wrong side, speeding, not driving between the lanes, weaving in and out of traffic, left deviation, and changing lanes without signals. The most common causes of RTC in Tehran are speeding, overtaking from the wrong side, and the rapid changing of driving lanes. The study factors effective in preventing risky driving behaviors in Tehran is recommended. The consideration of specific characteristics of the municipal districts is necessary to reduce risky driving behaviors.

  2. Configuring NIF for direct drive experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eimerl, D.; Rothenberg, J.; Key, M.

    1995-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a proposed 1.8 MJ laser facility for carrying out experiments in inertial confinement fusion, currently designed for indirect drive experiments. The direct drive approach is being pursued at the 30 kJ Omega facility at the University of Rochester. In this paper we discuss the modifications to the NIF laser that would be required for both indirect and direct drive experiments. A primary concern is the additional cost of adding direct drive capability to the facility

  3. Warp Drive - From Imagination to Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, J.

    The realisation of warp drive is far beyond current science and technology; nevertheless, setting out a timetable for the realisation of warp drive is instructive as this will set expectations for the progress of future research. It is proposed that a time scale for the realisation of warp drive can be estimated by historical analogy with the development of manned space travel to the Moon, using conventional project estimation techniques. A timeline for space travel to the Moon begins with Cyrano de Bergerac's Voyage dans la Lune in 1657 and culminates with the Apollo 11 Moon landing in 1969, a little over 300 years later. A similar timeline for warp drive begins with John W. Campbell's novel Islands of Space in 1930. Fictional conjecture on the warp drive has given way to serious scientific speculation following publication of Alcubierre's seminal warp drive paper in 1994. It is concluded that the realisation of warp drive might be achieved around the year 2180. A projected timetable for the realisation of warp drive through phases of conjecture , speculation , science , technology and application suggests that the warp drive proposal should enter the science phase around the year 2030.

  4. Energy Optimal Control of Induction Motor Drives

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsen, Flemming

    2000-01-01

    This thesis deals with energy optimal control of small and medium-size variable speed induction motor drives for especially Heating, Ventilation and Air-Condition (HVAC) applications. Optimized efficiency is achieved by adapting the magnetization level in the motor to the load, and the basic purpose is demonstrate how this can be done for low-cost PWM-VSI drives without bringing the robustness of the drive below an acceptable level.Four drives are investigated with respect to energy optimal c...

  5. Risky driving and lifestyles in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bina, Manuela; Graziano, Federica; Bonino, Silvia

    2006-05-01

    Several studies have shown that risky driving is especially prevalent among young drivers and recent research has pointed out that driving in adolescence should be investigated in the more general context of adolescent development. The first aim of this contribution was to analyze involvement in risky driving in a normative sample of 645 Italian adolescents, boys and girls, aged 14-17, through a self-report questionnaire. A second aim was to evaluate the association between risky driving and lifestyle, defined as involvement in other health risk behaviors and leisure activities. The main results showed that many adolescents drove cars and motorcycles without the required driving license and the most frequent offences were speeding and failure to maintain a safe braking distance. Gender and age differences were also investigated. Results concerning the association between risky driving and lifestyle showed that risky driving was not an isolated behavior. Boys who displayed risky driving practices were more likely to adopt a lifestyle characterized by high involvement in antisocial behaviors, tobacco smoking, comfort eating and time spent in non-organized activities with friends. Girls involved in risky driving were more likely to be involved in other risk-taking behaviors, antisocial behaviors and drug use.

  6. Effects of driving time on microsaccadic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stasi, Leandro L; McCamy, Michael B; Pannasch, Sebastian; Renner, Rebekka; Catena, Andrés; Cañas, José J; Velichkovsky, Boris M; Martinez-Conde, Susana

    2015-02-01

    Driver fatigue is a common cause of car accidents. Thus, the objective detection of driver fatigue is a first step toward the effective management of fatigue-related traffic accidents. Here, we investigated the effects of driving time, a common inducer of driver fatigue, on the dynamics of fixational eye movements. Participants drove for 2 h in a virtual driving environment while we recorded their eye movements. Microsaccade velocities decreased with driving time, suggesting a potential effect of fatigue on microsaccades during driving.

  7. Teens' distracted driving behavior: Prevalence and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Pnina; Zhu, Chunming; Klauer, Sheila G; Dingus, Tom; Simons-Morton, Bruce

    2017-12-01

    Teen drivers' over-involvement in crashes has been attributed to a variety of factors, including distracted driving. With the rapid development of in-vehicle systems and portable electronic devices, the burden associated with distracted driving is expected to increase. The current study identifies predictors of secondary task engagement among teenage drivers and provides basis for interventions to reduce distracted driving behavior. We described the prevalence of secondary tasks by type and driving conditions and evaluated the associations between the prevalence of secondary task engagement, driving conditions, and selected psychosocial factors. The private vehicles of 83 newly-licensed teenage drivers were equipped with Data Acquisition Systems (DAS), which documented driving performance measures, including secondary task engagement and driving environment characteristics. Surveys administered at licensure provided psychosocial measures. Overall, teens engaged in a potentially distracting secondary task in 58% of sampled road clips. The most prevalent types of secondary tasks were interaction with a passenger, talking/singing (no passenger), external distraction, and texting/dialing the cell phone. Secondary task engagement was more prevalent among those with primary vehicle access and when driving alone. Social norms, friends' risky driving behaviors, and parental limitations were significantly associated with secondary task prevalence. In contrast, environmental attributes, including lighting and road surface conditions, were not associated with teens' engagement in secondary tasks. Our findings indicated that teens engaged in secondary tasks frequently and poorly regulate their driving behavior relative to environmental conditions. Practical applications: Peer and parent influences on secondary task engagement provide valuable objectives for countermeasures to reduce distracted driving among teenage drivers. Copyright © 2017 National Safety Council and

  8. Driving automation forward : human factors for limited-ability autonomous driving systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 100 years, there has been a : steady progression of innovations that : enhance the driving experience, in particular : the continuing trend toward automating more : driving tasks. Human Factors for Limited-Ability : Autonomous Drivin...

  9. The Virtual Driving Instructor: A Multi-agent Based System for Driving Instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weevers, I.; Kuipers, J.; Brugman, A.; Zwiers, Jakob; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Nijholt, Antinus

    Driving simulators need an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS). Simulators provide ways to conduct objective measurements on students' driving behavior and opportunities for creating the best possible learning environment. The generated traffic situations can be influenced directly according to the

  10. Hurried driving: Relationship to distress tolerance, driver anger, aggressive and risky driving in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kenneth H; Daughters, Stacey B; Ali, Bina

    2013-03-01

    Being a hurried driver is associated with a variety of risky driving behaviors, yet the mechanisms underlying this behavior remain unknown. Distress tolerance, defined as an individual's capability to experience and endure negative emotional states, was examined as a predictor of hurried driving among 769 college students. Results indicate that after controlling for age, gender, race, ethnicity, the student's year in school, their grade point average, driving frequency, angry driving, aggressive driving as well as other forms of self-reported risky driving; hurried driving was significantly associated with lower levels of distress tolerance. Hurried drivers also reported greater levels of frustration and impatience with other drivers, suggesting that they have difficulty in withstanding or coping with negative psychological states when driving. Traditional traffic safety campaigns that emphasize enforcement may be less successful with these drivers. The need to develop campaigns that address the affective coping abilities that contribute to this behavioral pattern is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Redundant arrays of IDE drives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A. Sanders et al.

    2002-01-02

    The authors report tests of redundant arrays of IDE disk drives for use in offline high energy physics data analysis. Parts costs of total systems using commodity EIDE disks are now at the $4000 per Terabyte level. Disk storage prices have now decreased to the point where they equal the cost per Terabyte of Storage Technology tape silos. The disks, however, offer far better granularity; even small institutions can afford to deploy systems. The tests include reports on software RAID-5 systems running under Linux 2.4 using Promise Ultra 100{trademark} disk controllers. RAID-5 protects data in case of a single disk failure by providing parity bits. Tape backup is not required. Journaling file systems are used to allow rapid recovery from crashes. The data analysis strategy is to encapsulate data and CPU processing power. Analysis for a particular part of a data set takes place on the PC where the data resides. The network is only used to put results together. They explore three methods of moving data between sites; internet transfers, not pluggable IDE disks in FireWire cases, and DVD-R disks.

  12. The Queerness of the Drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lauretis, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    The view of sexuality Freud first proposed in the Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality contains a discrepancy between the sexuality perverse and polymorphous described in the first two essays and the biologically directed, reproductive sexuality of the third essay. According to Jean Laplanche, the theorist of psychoanalysis who is Freud's closest reader and translator, the discrepancy is due to two contradictory opinions Freud apparently held at different moments of his writing: one, that sexuality is exogenous, an effect of seduction by adults; two, that sexuality is endogenous, innate in the human biological organism. This article focuses on Laplanche's elucidation of two aspects of sexuality present in each adult: an instinctual, hormonally based, and ultimately reproductive sexual impulse, which begins at puberty, and the drive-based sexual impulses first theorized by Freud as polymorphous-perverse infantile sexuality, which begin in infancy and continue to be active throughout the individual's life. Laplanche's rereading of Freud leads to a more complex understanding of sexuality as always deviant, in one way or another and to a greater or lesser degree, from the established social norms. So-called sexual deviance, therefore, is not a problem within the sexual but an issue within the social field.

  13. Control rod drive hydraulic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takekawa, Toru.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention can reliably prevent a possible erroneous withdrawal of control rod driving mechanism when the pressure of a coolant line is increased by isolation operation of hydraulic control units upon periodical inspection for a BWR type reactor. That is, a coolant line is connected to the downstream of a hydraulic supply device. The coolant line is connected to a hydraulic control unit. A coolant hydraulic detection device and a pressure setting device are disposed to the coolant line. A closing signal line and a returning signal line are disposed, which connect the hydraulic supply device and a flow rate control valve for the hydraulic setting device. In the device of the present invention, even if pressure of supplied coolants is elevated due to isolation of hydraulic control units, the elevation of the hydraulic pressure can be prevented. Accordingly, reliability upon periodical reactor inspection can be improved. Further, the facility is simplified and the installation to an existent facility is easy. (I.S.)

  14. Empathic concern drives costly altruism

    Science.gov (United States)

    FeldmanHall, Oriel; Dalgleish, Tim; Evans, Davy; Mobbs, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Why do we self-sacrifice to help others in distress? Two competing theories have emerged, one suggesting that prosocial behavior is primarily motivated by feelings of empathic other-oriented concern, the other that we help mainly because we are egoistically focused on reducing our own discomfort. Here we explore the relationship between costly altruism and these two sub-processes of empathy, specifically drawing on the caregiving model to test the theory that trait empathic concern (e.g. general tendency to have sympathy for another) and trait personal distress (e.g. predisposition to experiencing aversive arousal states) may differentially drive altruistic behavior. We find that trait empathic concern – and not trait personal distress – motivates costly altruism, and this relationship is supported by activity in the ventral tegmental area, caudate and subgenual anterior cingulate, key regions for promoting social attachment and caregiving. Together, this data helps identify the behavioral and neural mechanisms motivating costly altruism, while demonstrating that individual differences in empathic concern-related brain responses can predict real prosocial choice. PMID:25462694

  15. Drive Electric Vermont Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Fred [Energetics Incorporated, Columbia, MD (United States); Roberts, Dave [Vermont Energy Investment Corporation (VEIC), Burlington, VT (United States); Francfort, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); White, Sera [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Currently in the United States, the heavy majority of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) sales have been in highly conducive, selected, metropolitan areas; opposed to more broad distribution across the country. The U.S. Department of Energy’s EV Everywhere Grand Challenge is looking carefully at the barriers and opportunities that exist to enable small and midsize communities to partake in the PEV market and benefit from the economic and environmental advantages of PEVs. In order to gain insight into these challenges and barriers, DOE selected a success story (i.e., Drive Electric Vermont) as the subject of this case study, as the state of Vermont is tied with Detroit, Michigan in having the highest percentage of 2014 (most recent complete data) PEV registrations for cold weather U.S. cities and has seen more than a sixfold increase in charging stations over the last three years. The overall objective of this case study was to use the lessons learned from Drive Electric Vermont to determine what activities are most effective at encouraging acquisitions of PEVs and deployment of charging infrastructure in small to midsize communities, prioritizing and sequencing their implementation, identifying robust means for extrapolation, and applying this understanding to other small to midsize communities across the nation. The Drive Electric Vermont Program was formed in 2012 with a goal of increasing the use of electrified transportation in Vermont through policy development, education and outreach, and infrastructure development. The Drive Electric Vermont Program can be broadly broken into four components: (1) strategic planning/leadership, (2) stakeholder/partnership development, (3) education and outreach, and (4) incentives. The early phases of the program focused heavily on strategic planning, and stakeholder and partnership development, followed by a transition to education and outreach activities, charging infrastructure development, and grant and incentive programs

  16. The Thermodynamics of Drunk Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert Q.

    1997-05-01

    Chemical and instrumental tests for driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI) measure the concentration of ethanol in the breath (BrAC), while state DUI laws are described in terms of blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Consequently, accurate and fair conversion from BrAC to BAC is crucial to the judicial process. Theoretical treatment of the water-air-ethanol equilibrium system and the related blood-breath-ethanol system, based on principles from general chemistry and biology, yields an equation relating the ratio of BAC to BrAC to the absolute temperature of the breath, the fraction of water in the blood, and the enthalpy and entropy of vaporization of ethanol from aqueous solution. The model equation predicts an average value for the ratio of 2350+100, not significantly different from reported experimental values. An exponential temperature dependence is predicted and has been confirmed experimentally as well. Biological, chemical, and instrumental variables are described along with their contributions to the overall uncertainty in the value of BrAC/BAC. While the forensic science community uses, and debates, a fixed ratio of 2100, the theoretical model suggests that a value of 1880 should be used to reduce the fraction of false positives to <1%.

  17. ELDERLY DRIVING BEHAVIOR AND COGNITIVE FUNCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etsuo HORIKAWA

    2009-01-01

    Discussions: Of the 30 items monitored in the study, significant differences were evident in only a few. Because the evidence did not suggest a particular link to accident experience, it will be necessary to obtain objective data from other cognitive function tests and driving behavior for reassessment. various problems related to elderly driving in Japan were discussed.

  18. Dynamics and control of instrumented harmonic drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazerooni, H.; Ellis, S. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Since torque in harmonic drives is transmitted by a pure couple, harmonic drives do not generate radial forces and therefore can be instrumented with torque sensors without interference from radial forces. The installation of torque sensors on the stationary component of harmonic drives (the Flexipline cup in this research work) produce backdrivability needed for robotic and telerobotic compliant maneuvers. Backdrivability of a harmonic drive, when used as torque increaser, means that the output shaft can be rotated via finite amount of torque. A high ratio harmonic drive is non-backdrivable because its output shaft cannot be turned by applying a torque on it. This article first develops the dynamic behavior of a harmonic drive, in particular the non-backdrivability, in terms of a sensitivity transfer function. The instrumentation of the harmonic drive with torque sensor is then described. This leads to a description of the control architecture which allows modulation of the sensitivity transfer function within the limits established by the closed-loop stability. A set of experiments on an active hand controller, powered by a DC motor coupled to an instrumented harmonic drive, is given to exhibit this method's limitations.

  19. Use of the mobile phone while driving.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Using a mobile phone while driving has negative effects on driving behaviour. This is the case for conducting a conversation, dialling a number, and sending text messages as well as for using the extra functions that smartphones offer, like accessing internet or social networking sites. An elaborate

  20. Testing device for control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Toshifumi.

    1992-01-01

    A testing device for control rod drives comprises a logic measuring means for measuring an output signal from a control rod drive logic generation circuit, a control means for judging the operation state of a control rod and a man machine interface means for outputting the result of the judgement. A driving instruction outputted from the control rod operation device is always monitored by the control means, and if the operation instruction is stopped, a testing signal is outputted to the control rod control device to simulate a control rod operation. In this case, the output signal of the control rod drive logic generation circuit is held in a control rod drive memory means and intaken into a logic analysis means for measurement and an abnormality is judged by the control means. The stopping of the control rod drive instruction is monitored and the operation abnormality of the control rod is judged, to mitigate the burden of an operator. Further, the operation of the control rod drive logic generation circuit can be confirmed even during a nuclear plant operation by holding the control rod drive instruction thereby enabling to improve maintenance efficiency. (N.H.)

  1. Driving with head-slaved camera system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oving, A.B.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2001-01-01

    In a field experiment, we tested the effectiveness of a head-slaved camera system for driving an armoured vehicle under armour. This system consists of a helmet-mounted display (HMD), a headtracker, and a motion platform with two cameras. Subjects performed several driving tasks on paved and in

  2. Chemical driving force for rafting in superalloys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nabarro, FRN

    1997-08-15

    Full Text Available The author provides a brief overview of the chemical driving forces for rafting in superalloys. Until recently, all theories of the driving force for rafting have considered the compositions of the two phases to be fixed, although accepting...

  3. Adjustable Speed Drives and Power Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davari, Pooya; Yang, Yongheng; Zare, Firuz

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview and proposes cost-effective and efficient opportunities in improving power quality in Adjustable Speed Drive (ASD) systems. In particular, an Electronic Inductor (EI) technique has been used in single drives to overcome the existing challenges in conventional...

  4. Fitness to drive after traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, WH; Withaar, FK

    This paper deals with the issue of fitness to drive in patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI). Guidelines for assessment are proposed and three types of studies are reviewed: studies about impairments of attention and information processing, studies of driving competence, and driver

  5. Strategic advertising plans to deter drunk driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Primary objective for this study was to identify and profile subpopulations at highest risk for drinking and driving, and persons who may be in a position to intervene in their drinking and driving behavior. A related objective was to explore media m...

  6. Motion feedback in advanced driving manoeuvres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correia Grácio, B.; Wentink, M.; Feenstra, P.J; Mulder, M.; Paassen M.M. van; Bles, W.

    2009-01-01

    During advanced driving manoeuvres, drivers can be hypothesized to use all the available cues to optimize their performance. Fixed-base simulators are commonly used for training of these advanced driving manoeuvres, despite the fact that motion cues are not present. In this experiment we hypothesize

  7. Signed reward prediction errors drive declarative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Loof, E.; Ergo, K.; Naert, L.; Janssens, C.; Talsma, D.; van Opstal, F.; Verguts, T.

    2018-01-01

    Reward prediction errors (RPEs) are thought to drive learning. This has been established in procedural learning (e.g., classical and operant conditioning). However, empirical evidence on whether RPEs drive declarative learning–a quintessentially human form of learning–remains surprisingly absent. We

  8. Simulation of linear Switched Reluctance Motor drives

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Amoros, Jordi; Blanqué Molina, Balduino; Andrada Gascón, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation model of linear switched reluctance motor drives. A Matlab-Simulink environment coupled with finite element analysis is used to perform the simulations. Experimental and simulation results for a double sided linear switched motor drive prototype are reported and compared to verify the simulation model.

  9. Educational Biofeedback Driving Simulator as a Drink-Driving Prevention Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howat, Peter; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Used experimental driving simulator as basis for strategy to encourage a reduction in drunk driving prevalence using adult male subjects (n=36) who participated in a study group and controls (n=36). Results indicated study group subjects significantly decreased their drunk driving compared to the control group. (ABL)

  10. Deep brain stimulation to reduce sexual drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Johannes; Auer, Matthias K; Biedermann, Sarah V; Briken, Peer; Hacke, Werner

    2015-11-01

    To date there are few treatment options to reduce high sexual drive or sexual urges in paraphilic patients with a risk for sexual offending. Pharmacological therapy aims to reduce sexual drive by lowering testosterone at the cost of severe side effects. We hypothesize that high sexual drive could also be reduced with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of circuits that generate sexual drive. This approach would help to avoid systemic side effects of antiandrogenic drug therapies. So far the best investigated target to reduce sexual drive is the ventromedial hypothalamus, which was lesioned unilaterally and bilaterally by stereotaxic interventions in paraphilic patients in the 1970s. Here, we discuss DBS as a treatment strategy in patients with severe paraphilic disorders with a serious risk of sexual offending. There are profound ethical and practical issues associated with DBS treatment of paraphilic patients that must be solved before considering such a treatment approach.

  11. Lower hybrid current drive in shaped tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesner, J.

    1993-01-01

    A time dependent lower hybrid current drive tokamak simulation code has been developed. This code combines the BALDUR tokamak simulation code and the Bonoli/Englade lower hybrid current drive code and permits the study of the interaction of lower hybrid current drive with neutral beam heating in shaped cross-section plasmas. The code is time dependent and includes the beam driven and bootstrap currents in addition to the current driven by the lower hybrid system. Examples of simulations are shown for the PBX-M experiment which include the effect of cross section shaping on current drive, ballooning mode stabilization by current profile control and sawtooth stabilization. A critical question in current drive calculations is the radial transport of the energetic electrons. The authors have developed a response function technique to calculate radial transport in the presence of an electric field. The consequences of the combined influences of radial diffusion and electric field acceleration are discussed

  12. Special Considerations in Distracted Driving with Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Dennis R; McGehee, Daniel V; Fisher, Donald; McCartt, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Novice teen drivers have long been known to have an increased risk of crashing, as well as increased tendencies toward unsafe and risky driving behaviors. Teens are unique as drivers for several reasons, many of which have implications specifically in the area of distracted driving. This paper reviews several of these features, including the widespread prevalence of mobile device use by teens, their lack of driving experience, the influence of peer passengers as a source of distraction, the role of parents in influencing teens’ attitudes and behaviors relevant to distracted driving and the impact of laws designed to prevent mobile device use by teen drivers. Recommendations for future research include understanding how engagement in a variety of secondary tasks by teen drivers affects their driving performance or crash risk; understanding the respective roles of parents, peers and technology in influencing teen driver behavior; and evaluating the impact of public policy on mitigating teen crash risk related to driver distraction. PMID:24776228

  13. Driving pleasure and perceptions of the transition from no automation to full self-driving automation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    In this article, I offer a sociological user perspective on increased self-driving automation, which has evolved from a long history associated with automobility. This study explores complex, perceived a priori driving pleasures in different scenarios involving self-driving cars. The methods used...... consisted of 32 in-depth interviews with participants who were given eight video examples (two video examples within four different scenarios) to watch. A numerical rating scales formed parts of the interviews. The findings revealed that driving pleasure when using increasingly automated driving...

  14. Fracture toughness of 6.4 mm (0.25 inch) Arc-Cast molybdenum and molybdenum-TZM plate at room temperature and 300 oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, J.A. jr.; Lipetzky, P.; Mueller, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    The fracture toughness of 6.4 mm (0.25 inch) low carbon arc-cast (LCAC) molybdenum and arc-cast molybdenum-TZM alloy plate were measured at room temperature and 300 o C using compact tension specimens. The effect of crack plane orientation (longitudinal vs. transverse) and annealing practice (stress-relieved vs. recrystallized) were evaluated. Depending upon the test temperature either a standard K IC or a J-integral analysis was used to obtain the toughness value. At room temperature, regardless of alloy, orientation, or microstructure, fracture toughness values between 15 and 22 MPa m 1/2 (14 and 20 ksi in 1/2 ) were measured. These K IC values were consistent with measurements by other authors. Increasing temperature improves the toughness, due to the fact that one takes advantage of the ductile-brittle transition behavior of molybdenum. At 300 o C, the fracture toughness of recrystallized LCAC and arc-cast TZM molybdenum were also similar at approximately 64 MPa m 1/2 (58 ksi in 1/2 ). In the stress-relieved condition, however, the toughness of arc-cast TZM (91 MPa m 1/2 / 83 ksi in 1/2 ) was higher than that of the LCAC molybdenum (74 MPa m 1/2 / 67 ksi in 1/2 ). (author)

  15. Ductile fracture behavior of 6-inch diameter type 304 stainless steel and STS 42 carbon steel piping containing a through-wall or part-through crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Katsuyuki; Ohba, Toshihiro; Kawamura, Takaichi; Miyazono, Shohachiro; Kaneko, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Norio.

    1986-05-01

    The double ended guillotine break philosophy in the design base accident of the nuclear power plant is considered to be overly conservative from the view point of piping design. Through the past experiences and developments of the fabrication, inspection, and operation of nuclear power plants, it has been recognized that the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) concept can be justified in the LWR pressure boundary pipings. In order to verify the LBB concept, extensive experimental and theoretical works are being conducted in many countries. Furthermore, a revised piping design standard, in which LBB concept is introduced, is under preparation in Japan, U.S.A., and European countries. At JAERI, a research program to investigate the unstable ductile fracture behavior of LWR piping under bending load has been carried out as a part of the LBB verification researches since 1983. This report summarizes the result of the ductile fracture tests conducted at room temperature in 1983 and 84. The 6-inch diameter pipes of type 304 stainless steel and STS 42 carbon steel pipe with a through-wall or part-through crack were tested under bending load with low or high compliance condition at room temperature. Pipe fracture data were obtained from the test as regards to load- displacement curve, crack extension, net section stress, J-resistance curve, and so on. Besides, the influence of the compliance on the fracture behavior was examined. Discussions are performed on the ductile pipe fracture criterion, flaw evaluation criterion, and LBB evaluation method. (author)

  16. MOVPE growth of GaN on 6-inch SOI-substrates: effect of substrate parameters on layer quality and strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemettinen, J.; Kauppinen, C.; Rudzinski, M.; Haapalinna, A.; Tuomi, T. O.; Suihkonen, S.

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate that higher crystalline quality, lower strain and improved electrical characteristics can be achieved in gallium nitride (GaN) epitaxy by using a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate compared to a bulk silicon (Si) substrate. GaN layers were grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on 6-inch bulk Si and SOI wafers using the standard step graded AlGaN and AlN approach. The GaN layers grown on SOI exhibited lower strain according to x-ray diffraction analysis. Defect selective etching measurements suggested that the use of SOI substrate for GaN epitaxy reduces the dislocation density approximately by a factor of two. Furthermore, growth on SOI substrate allows one to use a significantly thinner AlGaN buffer compared to bulk Si. Synchrotron radiation x-ray topography analysis confirmed that the stress relief mechanism in GaN on SOI epitaxy is the formation of a dislocation network to the SOI device Si layer. In addition, the buried oxide layer significantly improves the vertical leakage characteristics as the onset of the breakdown is delayed by approximately 400 V. These results show that the GaN on the SOI platform is promising for power electronics applications.

  17. Effect of DS Concentration on the PRO Performance Using a 5-Inch Scale Cellulose Triacetate-Based Hollow Fiber Membrane Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Yasukawa

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO performance of a 5-inch scale cellulose triacetate (CTA-based hollow fiber (HF membrane module was evaluated under a wide range of operating conditions (0.0–6.0 MPa of applied pressure, 0.5–2.0 L/min feed solution (FS inlet flow rate, 1.0–6.0 L/min DS inlet flow rate and 0.1–0.9 M draw solution (DS concentration by using a PRO/reverse osmosis (RO hybrid system. The subsequent RO system for DS regeneration enabled the evaluation of the steady-stated module performance. In the case of pilot-scale module operation, since the DS dilution and the feed solution (FS up-concentration had occurred and was not negligible, unlike the lab-scale experiment, PRO performance strongly depended on operating conditions such as inlet flow rates of both the DS and FS concentration. To compare the module performance with different configurations, we proposed a converted parameter in which a difference of the packing density between the spiral wound (SW and the HF module was fairly considered. In the case of HF configuration, because of high packing density, volumetric-based performance was higher than that of SW module, that is, the required number of the module would be less than that of SW module in a full-scale PRO plant.

  18. Radiation Characterization Summary: ACRR Cadmium-Polyethylene (CdPoly) Bucket Located in the Central Cavity on the 32-Inch Pedestal at the Core Centerline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parma, Edward J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Naranjo, Gerald E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kaiser, Krista Irene [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Arnold, James F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lippert, Lance L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clovis, Ralph D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Lonnie E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Quirk, Thomas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vehar, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This document presents the facility-recommended characterization of the neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the cadmium-polyethylene (CdPoly) bucket in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environment is ACRR-CdPoly-CC-32-cl. The neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray energy spectra, uncertainties, and covariance matrices are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma-ray fluence profiles within the experiment area of the bucket. Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse operations are presented with conversion examples. Acknowledgements The authors wish to thank the Annular Core Research Reactor staff and the Radiation Metrology Laboratory staff for their support of this work. Also thanks to Drew Tonigan for helping field the activation experiments in ACRR, David Samuel for helping to finalize the drawings and get the parts fabricated, and Elliot Pelfrey for preparing the active dosimetry plots.

  19. Some Measurements of Noise Transmission and Stress Response of a 0.020-Inch Duralumin Panel in the Presence of Air Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarges, George T.

    1960-01-01

    Noise transmission measurements were made for a 0.020-inch panel with and without air flow on its surface. Tests were conducted with both an absorbent and reverberant chamber behind the panel. Panel stresses for some of these tests were also determined. Noise spectra obtained inside the absorbent chamber with flow attached and flow not attached to the panel appeared to contain several peaks corresponding in frequency to panel vibration modes. These peaks were notably absent when the chamber was reverberant. The noise reduction through the test panel measured with the aid of an absorbent chamber for the flow-not-attached case is in general agreement with values predicted by the theoretical weight law, which assumes negligible panel stiffness. Corresponding data for the flow-attached case do not follow the weight law but rather indicate less noise reduction at the high frequencies. The main stress responses of the panel without air flow occurred at its fundamental vibration mode. In the presence of air flow the main response occurs in a vibration mode having a node line perpendicular to the direction of air flow.

  20. The identification of Malaysian driving styles using the multidimensional driving style inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karjanto Juffrizal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to investigate the driving styles within the geographical region of Malaysia. The first part of the study determined Malaysian drivers’ driving styles using the Multidimensional Driving Style Inventory approach. Respondents had various backgrounds in terms of age, gender and experience of driving. A statistical factor analysis was done for 338 respondents revealing four driving styles; careful, risky, anxious-dissociative and angry. In addition, a comparison with previous findings from Netherlands and Israel was also done in this study. The next part of the study focused on the associations of these driving styles with two personality traits (sensation seeking and desire for control, sociodemographic factors and experience of driving. The last part of the paper discusses the relevance of the study against the background of future automotive development.

  1. Using music to change mood while driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwaag, Marjolein D; Janssen, Joris H; Nass, Clifford; Westerink, Joyce H D M; Chowdhury, Shrestha; de Waard, Dick

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether gradual or abrupt music change towards more calming music is most effective in calming drivers during high-demand driving situations. Twenty-eight participants were subjected to two types of music change (gradual, abrupt) in a within-subject design. First, a relatively happy mood was induced with personally selected music during an eight-minute simulated high-demand drive. The drive then continued and the mood was changed either gradually or abruptly. Subjective results showed successful music mood induction irrespective of gradual or abrupt changes. The results further showed lower skin conductance (less arousal) and more facial corrugator muscle tension (more sadness) during the abrupt music change. Fewer accidents occurred during the abrupt music mood change. To conclude, the results support the abrupt way of changing music type to down-regulate one's mood: during high-demand driving, abrupt changes in music led to more physiological calmness and improved driving performance, and were thus safer and more effective. The current study shows that during high-demand drives, drivers are calmed more effectively using abrupt music changes compared to gradual music changes. This is illustrated by reductions in physiological arousal and improved driving behaviour. Hence, in-car music presentation can be used as a tool to improve driver's mood and behaviour.

  2. Robust Adaptive Speed Control of Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidstrup, N.

    This thesis concerns speed control of current vector controlled induction motor drives (CVC drives). The CVC drive is an existing prototype drive developed by Danfoss A/S, Transmission Division. Practical tests have revealed that the open loop dynamical properties of the CVC drive are highly...

  3. Recommendations on future driving instructor standards in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Robertsen, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The recommendations on future driving instructor standards in Portugal are mainly based on experiences from the Norwegian model for driving instructor education; its organisational structure, topics and objectives, taking into consideration our knowledge and information on the existing Portuguese system for driving instructor education and training. Therefore introductorily a brief overview of the Norwegian Driving Instructor Education and driving licence system.

  4. Omni rotational driving and steering wheel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    and steering wheel part (108), where the omni rotational part (106) is provided for infinite rotation relative to the flange part (104) by both a drive motor (110) and a steering motor (114) being positionable on the flange part (104), and the driving and steering wheel part (108) is suspended from the upper...... omni rotational part (105) with a suspension (116) such that wheel part (108) can move relatively to the upper omni rotational part (105) in a suspension direction (118), and a reduction gear (120) for gearing the drive torque is provided in the wheel part (108) in order e.g. to assure traction...

  5. Adjustable Speed Drives - Future Challenges and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Thoegersen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    are specified. Further on power architectures and motor types are discussed in a short term and long-term view. Possible drivers of the future development are identified, and the concept of an ?Electronic Motor? is discussed. A number of applications are presented where variable speed is attractive.......The main trends within Adjustable Drives in industrial and appliance applications for the next decade are discussed based on the newest developments seen on the market and a few historical trends. Different drive configurations are presented and the general demands to adjustable speed drives...

  6. Drive mechanism nuclear reactor control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.G. Jr.; Maure, D.R.; Meijer, C.H.

    1978-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus for operating magnetic stepping-type mechanisms. The current flowing in the coils of magnetic stepping-type mechanisms of the kind, for instance, that are used in control-element drive mechanisms is sensed and used to monitor operation of the mechanism. Current waveforms that characterize the motion of the mechanism are used to trigger changes in drive voltage and to verify that the drive mechanism is operating properly. In addition, incipient failures are detected through the observation of differences between the observed waveform and waveforms that characterize proper operation

  7. Wind turbine ring/shroud drive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakemore, Ralph W.

    2005-10-04

    A wind turbine capable of driving multiple electric generators having a ring or shroud structure for reducing blade root bending moments, hub loads, blade fastener loads and pitch bearing loads. The shroud may further incorporate a ring gear for driving an electric generator. In one embodiment, the electric generator may be cantilevered from the nacelle such that the gear on the generator drive shaft is contacted by the ring gear of the shroud. The shroud also provides protection for the gearing and aids in preventing gear lubricant contamination.

  8. The driving force for magnetospheric convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, F. S.

    1978-01-01

    Viscously driven magnetospheric models, as well as a model involving interconnection between the geomagnetic field and the magnetic field in the solar wind, have been proposed to describe the driving force for magnetospheric convection. Lack of a satisfactory theory for the interconnection in the latter model and, in the case of the viscous interaction models, inadequacies in predicting the quantity of the driving force, make these two classes of models less than successful. Accordingly, a mechanically driven magnetospheric model is proposed: solar wind plasma enters the magnetosphere around the neutral points, covers the inner surface of the magnetopause and subsequently expands, driving convection as it escapes from the open tail.

  9. Snubber assembly for a control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    A snubber cartridge assembly is mounted to the nozzle of a control rod drive mechanism to insure that the snubber assembly will be located within the liquid filled section of a nuclear reactor vessel whenever the control rod drive is assembled thereto. The snubber assembly includes a piston mounted proximate to the control rod connecting end of the control rod drive leadscrew to allow the piston to travel within the liquid filled snubber cartridge and controllably exhaust liquid therefrom during a ''scram'' condition. The snubber cartridge provides three separate areas of increasing resistance to piston travel to insure a speedy but safe ''scram'' of the control rod into the reactor

  10. Assessment of driving-related performance in chronic whiplash using an advanced driving simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaki, Hiroshi; Treleaven, Julia; Johnston, Venerina; Rakotonirainy, Andry; Haines, Andrew; Jull, Gwendolen

    2013-11-01

    Driving is often nominated as problematic by individuals with chronic whiplash associated disorders (WAD), yet driving-related performance has not been evaluated objectively. The purpose of this study was to test driving-related performance in persons with chronic WAD against healthy controls of similar age, gender and driving experience to determine if driving-related performance in the WAD group was sufficiently impaired to recommend fitness to drive assessment. Driving-related performance was assessed using an advanced driving simulator during three driving scenarios; freeway, residential and a central business district (CBD). Total driving duration was approximately 15min. Five driving tasks which could cause a collision (critical events) were included in the scenarios. In addition, the effect of divided attention (identify red dots projected onto side or rear view mirrors) was assessed three times in each scenario. Driving performance was measured using the simulator performance index (SPI) which is calculated from 12 measures. z-Scores for all SPI measures were calculated for each WAD subject based on mean values of the control subjects. The z-scores were then averaged for the WAD group. A z-score of ≤-2 indicated a driving failing grade in the simulator. The number of collisions over the five critical events was compared between the WAD and control groups as was reaction time and missed response ratio in identifying the red dots. Seventeen WAD and 26 control subjects commenced the driving assessment. Demographic data were comparable between the groups. All subjects completed the freeway scenario but four withdrew during the residential and eight during the CBD scenario because of motion sickness. All scenarios were completed by 14 WAD and 17 control subjects. Mean z-scores for the SPI over the three scenarios was statistically lower in the WAD group (-0.3±0.3; P0.05). Assessment of driving in an advanced driving simulator for approximately 15min revealed

  11. Effects of decades of physical driving on body movement and motion sickness during virtual driving.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Stoffregen

    Full Text Available We investigated relations between experience driving physical automobiles and motion sickness during the driving of virtual automobiles. Middle-aged individuals drove a virtual automobile in a driving video game. Drivers were individuals who had possessed a driver's license for approximately 30 years, and who drove regularly, while non-drivers were individuals who had never held a driver's license, or who had not driven for more than 15 years. During virtual driving, we monitored movement of the head and torso. During virtual driving, drivers became motion sick more rapidly than non-drivers, but the incidence and severity of motion sickness did not differ as a function of driving experience. Patterns of movement during virtual driving differed as a function of driving experience. Separately, movement differed between participants who later became motion sick and those who did not. Most importantly, physical driving experience influenced patterns of postural activity that preceded motion sickness during virtual driving. The results are consistent with the postural instability theory of motion sickness, and help to illuminate relations between the control of physical and virtual vehicles.

  12. DrivingSense: Dangerous Driving Behavior Identification Based on Smartphone Autocalibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since pervasive smartphones own advanced computing capability and are equipped with various sensors, they have been used for dangerous driving behaviors detection, such as drunk driving. However, sensory data gathered by smartphones are noisy, which results in inaccurate driving behaviors estimations. Some existing works try to filter noise from sensor readings, but usually only the outlier data are filtered. The noises caused by hardware of the smartphone cannot be removed from the sensor reading. In this paper, we propose DrivingSense, a reliable dangerous driving behavior identification scheme based on smartphone autocalibration. We first theoretically analyze the impact of the sensor error on the vehicle driving behavior estimation. Then, we propose a smartphone autocalibration algorithm based on sensor noise distribution determination when a vehicle is being driven. DrivingSense leverages the corrected sensor parameters to identify three kinds of dangerous behaviors: speeding, irregular driving direction change, and abnormal speed control. We evaluate the effectiveness of our scheme under realistic environments. The results show that DrivingSense, on average, is able to detect the driving direction change event and abnormal speed control event with 93.95% precision and 90.54% recall, respectively. In addition, the speed estimation error is less than 2.1 m/s, which is an acceptable range.

  13. High Torque, Direct Drive Electric Motor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Bear Engineering proposes to advance the development of an innovative high torque, low speed, direct drive motor in order to meet NASA's requirements for such...

  14. Developing Castable Metal Harmonic Drives Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This effort utilizes the high elastic strain limit and net-shaped processing of metallic glasses to fabricate low-cost harmonic drives that outperform steel. ...

  15. Kinematics and Dynamics of Roller Chain Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglede, Niels

    There are two main subjects of this work: Kinematic and dynamic modeling and analysis of roller chain drives. In the kinematic analysis we contribute first with a complete treatment of the roller chain drive modeled as a four-bar mechanism. This includes a general, exact and approximate analysis...... which is useful for predicting the characteristic loading of the roller chain drive. As a completely novel contribution, a kinematic model and analysis is presented which includes both spans and sprockets in a simple chain drive system. A general procedure for determination of the total wrapping length...... is presented, which also allows for exact sprocket center positions for a chain with a given number of links. Results show that the total chain wrapping length varies periodically with the tooth frequency. These results are of practical importance to both the design, installation and operation of roller chain...

  16. Energy Optimal Control of Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Flemming

    This thesis deals with energy optimal control of small and medium-size variable speed induction motor drives for especially Heating, Ventilation and Air-Condition (HVAC) applications. Optimized efficiency is achieved by adapting the magnetization level in the motor to the load, and the basic...... improvement by energy optimal control for any standard induction motor drive between 2.2 kW and 90 kW. A simple method to evaluate the robustness against load disturbances was developed and used to compare the robustness of different motor types and sizes. Calculation of the oscillatory behavior of a motor...... demonstrated that energy optimal control will sometimes improve and sometimes deteriorate the stability. Comparison of small and medium-size induction motor drives with permanent magnet motor drives indicated why, and in which applications, PM motors are especially good. Calculations of economical aspects...

  17. State Alcohol-Impaired-Driving Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2012 Data DOT HS 812 017 May 2014 State Alcohol-Impaired-Driving Estimates This fact sheet contains ... alcohol involvement in fatal crashes for the United States and individually for the 50 States, the District ...

  18. Drowsy Driving: Asleep at the Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need at least 8 hours. 9 Develop good sleeping habits such as sticking to a sleep schedule. If ... K, Howard ME. Cognitive components of simulated driving performance: sleep loss effects and predictors. Accid Anal Prev. 2012; ...

  19. Some Sleep Drugs Can Impair Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Some Sleep Drugs Can Impair Driving Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. Most Widely Used Sleep Drug Zolpidem—which has been on the market ...

  20. Universal power transistor base drive control unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Allan R.; Gritter, David J.

    1988-01-01

    A saturation condition regulator system for a power transistor which achieves the regulation objectives of a Baker clamp but without dumping excess base drive current into the transistor output circuit. The base drive current of the transistor is sensed and used through an active feedback circuit to produce an error signal which modulates the base drive current through a linearly operating FET. The collector base voltage of the power transistor is independently monitored to develop a second error signal which is also used to regulate base drive current. The current-sensitive circuit operates as a limiter. In addition, a fail-safe timing circuit is disclosed which automatically resets to a turn OFF condition in the event the transistor does not turn ON within a predetermined time after the input signal transition.