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Sample records for inadequate antimicrobial treatment

  1. The Effect of Inadequate Initial Empiric Antimicrobial Treatment on Mortality in Critically Ill Patients with Bloodstream Infections: A Multi-Centre Retrospective Cohort Study.

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    Rachel D Savage

    Full Text Available Hospital mortality rates are elevated in critically ill patients with bloodstream infections. Given that mortality may be even higher if appropriate treatment is delayed, we sought to determine the effect of inadequate initial empiric treatment on mortality in these patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted across 13 intensive care units in Canada. We defined inadequate initial empiric treatment as not receiving at least one dose of an antimicrobial to which the causative pathogen(s was susceptible within one day of initial blood culture. We evaluated the association between inadequate initial treatment and hospital mortality using a random effects multivariable logistic regression model. Among 1,190 patients (1,097 had bacteremia and 93 had candidemia, 476 (40% died and 266 (22% received inadequate initial treatment. Candidemic patients more often had inadequate initial empiric therapy (64.5% versus 18.8%, as well as longer delays to final culture results (4 vs 3 days and appropriate therapy (2 vs 0 days. After adjustment, there was no detectable association between inadequate initial treatment and mortality among bacteremic patients (Odds Ratio (OR: 1.02, 95% Confidence Interval (CI 0.70-1.48; however, candidemic patients receiving inadequate treatment had nearly three times the odds of death (OR: 2.89, 95% CI: 1.05-7.99. Inadequate initial empiric antimicrobial treatment was not associated with increased mortality in bacteremic patients, but was an important risk factor in the subgroup of candidemic patients. Further research is warranted to improve early diagnostic and risk prediction methods in candidemic patients.

  2. [Inadequate treatment of affective disorders].

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    Bergsholm, P; Martinsen, E W; Holsten, F; Neckelmann, D; Aarre, T F

    1992-08-30

    Inadequate treatment of mood (affective) disorders is related to the mind/body dualism, desinformation about methods of treatment, the stigma of psychiatry, low funding of psychiatric research, low educational priority, and slow acquisition of new knowledge of psychiatry. The "respectable minority rule" has often been accepted without regard to the international expertise, and the consequences of undertreatment have not been weighed against the benefits of optimal treatment. The risk of chronicity increases with delayed treatment, and inadequately treated affective disorders are a leading cause of suicide. During the past 20 years the increase in suicide mortality in Norway has been the second largest in the world. Severe mood disorders are often misclassified as schizophrenia or other non-affective psychoses. Atypical mood disorders, notably rapid cycling and bipolar mixed states, are often diagnosed as personality, adjustment, conduct, attention deficit, or anxiety disorders, and even mental retardation. Neuroleptic drugs may suppress the most disturbing features of mood disorders, a fact often misinterpreted as supporting the diagnosis of a schizophrenia-like disorder. Treatment with neuroleptics is not sufficient, however, and serious side effects may often occur. The consequences are too often social break-down and post-depression syndrome.

  3. The impact of inadequate wastewater treatment on the receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of inadequate wastewater treatment on the receiving water bodies – Case study: Buffalo City and Nkokonbe Municipalities of the Eastern Cape ... into their respective receiving water bodies (Tembisa Dam, the Nahoon and Eastern Beach which are part of the Indian Ocean; the Tyume River and the Kat River).

  4. The impact of inadequate wastewater treatment on the receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    7950 = Water SA (on-line). 687. The impact of inadequate wastewater treatment on the receiving water bodies – Case study: Buffalo City and. Nkokonbe Municipalities of the Eastern Cape Province. MNB Momba1*, AN Osode2 and M Sibewu1.

  5. Inadequate treatment of ventilator-associated and hospital-acquired pneumonia: Risk factors and impact on outcomes

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    Piskin Nihal

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Initial antimicrobial therapy (AB is an important determinant of clinical outcome in patients with severe infections as pneumonia, however well-conducted studies regarding prognostic impact of inadequate initial AB in patients who are not undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV are lacking. In this study we aimed to identify the risk factors for inadequate initial AB and to determine its subsequent impact on outcomes in both ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP and hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP. Methods We retrospectively studied the accuracy of initial AB in patients with pneumonia in a university hospital in Turkey. A total of 218 patients with HAP and 130 patients with VAP were included. For each patient clinical, radiological and microbiological data were collected. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was used for risk factor analysis. Survival analysis was performed by using Kaplan-Meier method with Log-rank test. Results Sixty six percent of patients in VAP group and 41.3% of patients in HAP group received inadequate initial AB. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk factors for inadequate initial AB in HAP patients were; late-onset HAP (OR = 2.35 (95% CI, 1.05-5.22; p = 0.037 and APACHE II score at onset of HAP (OR = 1.06 (95% CI, 1.01-1.12; p = 0.018. In VAP patients; antibiotic usage in the previous three months (OR = 3.16 (95% CI, 1.27-7.81; p = 0.013 and admission to a surgical unit (OR = 2.9 (95% CI, 1.17-7.19; p = 0.022 were found to be independent risk factors for inadequate initial AB. No statistically significant difference in crude hospital mortality and 28-day mortality was observed between the treatment groups in both VAP and HAP. However we showed a significant increase in length of hospital stay, duration of mechanical ventilation and a prolonged clinical resolution in the inadequate AB group in both VAP and HAP. Conclusion Our data

  6. Inadequate treatment of ventilator-associated and hospital-acquired pneumonia: risk factors and impact on outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskin, Nihal; Aydemir, Hande; Oztoprak, Nefise; Akduman, Deniz; Comert, Fusun; Kokturk, Furuzan; Celebi, Guven

    2012-10-24

    Initial antimicrobial therapy (AB) is an important determinant of clinical outcome in patients with severe infections as pneumonia, however well-conducted studies regarding prognostic impact of inadequate initial AB in patients who are not undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV) are lacking. In this study we aimed to identify the risk factors for inadequate initial AB and to determine its subsequent impact on outcomes in both ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) and hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP). We retrospectively studied the accuracy of initial AB in patients with pneumonia in a university hospital in Turkey. A total of 218 patients with HAP and 130 patients with VAP were included. For each patient clinical, radiological and microbiological data were collected. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was used for risk factor analysis. Survival analysis was performed by using Kaplan-Meier method with Log-rank test. Sixty six percent of patients in VAP group and 41.3% of patients in HAP group received inadequate initial AB. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk factors for inadequate initial AB in HAP patients were; late-onset HAP (OR = 2.35 (95% CI, 1.05-5.22; p = 0.037) and APACHE II score at onset of HAP (OR = 1.06 (95% CI, 1.01-1.12); p = 0.018). In VAP patients; antibiotic usage in the previous three months (OR = 3.16 (95% CI, 1.27-7.81); p = 0.013) and admission to a surgical unit (OR = 2.9 (95% CI, 1.17-7.19); p = 0.022) were found to be independent risk factors for inadequate initial AB. No statistically significant difference in crude hospital mortality and 28-day mortality was observed between the treatment groups in both VAP and HAP. However we showed a significant increase in length of hospital stay, duration of mechanical ventilation and a prolonged clinical resolution in the inadequate AB group in both VAP and HAP. Our data suggests that the risk factors for inadequate initial AB

  7. Managing inadequate responses to frontline treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia: a case-based review.

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    Bixby, Dale L

    2013-05-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib are the standard of care for treating patients with newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Compared with interferon-based treatment, the previous standard of care, imatinib is associated with significantly higher cytogenetic response rates and prolonged overall survival. Nilotinib and dasatinib, both newer and more potent TKIs, significantly improve cytogenetic and molecular response rates compared with imatinib. Despite significant advances in CML treatment enabled by the TKIs, a fraction of patients who receive frontline treatment with a TKI demonstrate inadequate response. The reasons for this vary, but in many cases, inadequate response can be attributed to non-adherence to the treatment regimen, intolerance to the drug, intrinsic or acquired resistance to the drug, or a combination of reasons. More often than not, strategies to improve response necessitate a change in treatment plan, either a dose adjustment or a switch to an alternate drug, particularly in the case of drug intolerance or drug resistance. Improved physician-patient communication and patient education are effective strategies to address issues relating to adherence and intolerance. Because inadequate response to TKI treatment correlates with poor long-term outcomes, it is imperative that patients who experience intolerance or who fail to achieve appropriate responses are carefully evaluated so that appropriate treatment modifications can be made to maximize the likelihood of positive long-term outcome. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Defining localities of inadequate treatment for childhood asthma: A GIS approach

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    Pliskin Joseph S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS has great potential for the management of chronic disease and the analysis of clinical and administrative health care data. Asthma is a chronic disease associated with substantial morbidity, mortality, and health care use. Epidemiologic data from all over the world show an increasing prevalence of asthma morbidity and mortality despite the availability of effective treatment. These facts led to the emergence of strategies developed to improve the quality of asthma care. The objective To develop an efficient tool for quality assurance and chronic disease management using a Geographic Information System (GIS. Geographic location The southern region of Israel. January 1998 – October 2000. Databases Administrative claims data of the largest HMO in Israel: drug dispensing registry, demographic data, Emergency Room visits, and hospitalization data bases. Methods We created a list of six markers for inadequate pharmaceutical treatment of childhood asthma from the Israeli clinical guidelines. We used this list to search the drug dispensing registry to identify asthmatic children who received inadequate treatment and to assess their health care utilization and bad outcomes: emergency room visits and hospitalizations. Using GIS we created thematic maps on which we located the clinics with a high percentage of children for whom the treatment provided was not in adherence with the clinical guidelines. Results 81% of the children were found to have at least one marker for inadequate treatment; 17.5% were found to have more than one marker. Children with markers were found to have statistically significant higher rates of Emergency Room visits, hospitalizations and longer length of stay in hospital compared with children without markers. The maps show in a robust way which clinics provided treatment not in accord with the clinical guidelines. Those clinics have high rates of Emergency Room

  9. Initial treatment of severe malaria in children is inadequate – a study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -medicated at home. Initial consultations are at primary local health facilities where less effective drugs are prescribed at inadequate dosages. Recommended ACTs were also often prescribed at inadequate dosages. Education in the use of ...

  10. Naegleria fowleri: Diagnosis, Pathophysiology of Brain Inflammation, and Antimicrobial Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, J Jeffrey; Levy, Rebecca A

    2016-09-21

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a very rare disease with a high mortality rate. PAM is caused by Naegleria fowleri, an amoeba which resides in freshwater lakes and ponds and can survive in inadequately chlorinated pools ( Lopez, C.; Budge, P.; Chen, J., et al. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis: a case report and literature review . Pediatr. Emerg. Care 2012 , 28 , 272 - 276 ). In the past 50 years, there have been over 130 cases of Naegleria induced PAM in the United States with only three known survivors; one survivor was diagnosed and treated at Arkansas Children's Hospital. Successful treatment of PAM started with a rapid diagnosis, extensive antimicrobial therapy including an investigational medication miltefosine, supportive care, an intraventricular shunt, and hypothermia. These treatments address different aspects of the disease process. Increased understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of PAM is important especially for patients who present with meningitis-like findings during the summer months.

  11. An implant-supported removable partial denture on milled bars to compromise the inadequate treatment plan: a clinical report

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    Kim, Jee-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Presurgical prosthetic treatment planning is critical for the success of the implant prosthesis. Inadequate treatment plan, due to insufficient discussion between prosthodontist, and surgeon, may result in poor prognosis. A 26-year-old male patient was referred for prosthodontic treatment after implant was placed in the area of teeth #17, 16, 22, 25 and 27, without adequate discussion nor the treatment planning between oral surgeon and prosthodontist. It was found that the patient had two hop...

  12. Pregabalin for the treatment of patients with generalized anxiety disorder with inadequate treatment response to antidepressants and severe depressive symptoms.

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    Olivares, José M; Álvarez, Enrique; Carrasco, José L; Pérez Páramo, María; López-Gómez, Vanessa

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of pregabalin in patients with resistant generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and severe depressive symptoms, we carried out a post-hoc analysis of a multicenter, prospective, and observational 6-month study. We included patients who were at least 18 years old, fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) criteria for GAD, showed inadequate responses to previous courses of antidepressant treatment, had Montgomery-Asberg Rating Scale scores of at least 35, had not received pregabalin previously, and were prescribed pregabalin upon entry into this study. We included 1815 patients fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria for GAD, and 133 (7.3%) fulfilled the selection criteria for these analyses. Ninety-seven percent of the patients received pregabalin (mean dose: 222 mg/day) in combination with other psychotropics. The Hamilton Anxiety Scale total score was reduced by a mean of 20.3 points (95% confidence interval, 22.1-18.4) (57.2% reduction) at month 6. Pregabalin also ameliorated comorbid depressive symptoms, with a reduction in the mean score of the Montgomery-Asberg Rating Scale of 22.3 points (95% confidence interval, 24.2-20.4) (56.6% reduction). Our results suggest that pregabalin, as part of a combination regimen with antidepressants and/or benzodiazepines, might be effective for the treatment of patients with GAD who have shown inadequate response to previous antidepressants and have severe depressive symptoms.

  13. Antimicrobial selection and dosing in the treatment of wounds in the United Kingdom.

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    Ross, S E; Duz, M; Rendle, D I

    2016-11-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship within the veterinary profession is recognised by governing and professional bodies as being important; the attitudes and behaviour of veterinary surgeons merit investigation. To investigate levels of protected antimicrobial use and accuracy of antimicrobial dosing in a common clinical scenario in equine practice. Retrospective cohort study. Antimicrobial use was evaluated retrospectively in 113 cases subsequently referred to a single referral hospital for the treatment of limb wounds over a 20-month period. Antimicrobial classification (first-line, alternative or protected) was made according to guidelines produced by the British Equine Veterinary Association. These guidelines also served as the reference for recommended dose rates. Systemic antimicrobials were administered prior to referral in 94/113 (83.2%) horses, of which 8 (8.5%) received the protected third or fourth generation cephalosporins or fluoroquinolones. Forty-eight of 87 (55.2%) horses for which complete dosing data were available received antimicrobials at ≤90% of the recommended dose. Practitioners who held a postgraduate clinical qualification or worked in purely equine practice were no more or less likely to use protected antimicrobials (P = 0.06 and P = 0.64, respectively) or administer inadequate doses (P = 0.75 and P = 0.85, respectively). Veterinary surgeons with more experience were less likely to use protected antimicrobials (P<0.001); however, with the small case numbers, this finding should be interpreted with caution. Heavier horses were more likely to be under-dosed (P<0.002). This study highlights the administration of certain classes of antimicrobials in situations where their use is unlikely to be justified. If these findings reflect more general attitudes and behaviour then greater awareness of, and compliance with, recommendations for responsible antimicrobial use are required among equine practitioners. Bodyweight ought to be measured or estimated

  14. Nonoclusive thrombosis of mechanical mitral valve prosthesis caused by inadequate treatment of anticoagulant therapy resistance

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    Ivanović Branislava

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oral anticoagulants have been used in the prevention of thromboembolic complications for over six decades. A rare, but possible problem in the application of these medications could be resistance to them. Case report. We presented a patient with nonocclusive thrombosis of the mechanical mitral prosthesis due to inadequately treated resistance to peroral anticoagulant therapy. Resistance to oral anticoagulant medications was proven by an increased dosage of warfarin up to 20 mg and, after that, acenokumarol to 15 mg over ten days which did not lead to an increase in the international normalized ratio (INR value over 1.2. On the basis of information that she did not take food rich in vitamin K or medications which could reduce effects of oral anticoagulants, and that she did not have additional illnesses and conditions that could cause an inadequate response to anticoagulant therapy, it was circumstantially concluded that this was a hereditary form of resistance. Because of the existing mechanical prosthetics on the mitral position, low molecular heparin has been introduced into the therapy. The patient reduced it on her own initiative, leading to nonocclusive valvular thrombosis. Conclusion. When associated complications like absolute arrhithmia does not exist, the finding of resistance to oral anticoagulant agents is an indication for the replacement of a mechanical prosthetic with a biological one which has been done in this patients.

  15. Effect of adjunct metformin treatment in patients with type-1 diabetes and persistent inadequate glycaemic control. A randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, S.S.; Tarnow, L.; Astrup, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite intensive insulin treatment, many patients with type-1 diabetes (T1DM) have longstanding inadequate glycaemic control. Metformin is an oral hypoglycaemic agent that improves insulin action in patients with type-2 diabetes. We investigated the effect of a one-year treatment...... with metformin versus placebo in patients with T1DM and persistent poor glycaemic control. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One hundred patients with T1DM, preserved hypoglycaemic awareness and HaemoglobinA(1c) (HbA(1c)) > or = 8.5% during the year before enrolment entered a one-month run-in on placebo treatment....... Thereafter, patients were randomized (baseline) to treatment with either metformin (1 g twice daily) or placebo for 12 months (double-masked). Patients continued ongoing insulin therapy and their usual outpatient clinical care. The primary outcome measure was change in HbA(1c) after one year of treatment...

  16. ANTIMICROBIAL TREATMENT OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGIC INFECTIONS

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    Srdjan Pesic

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Treatment regimens for pelvic inflammatory diseases (PID, as a common cause of morbidity in women under the age of 45, should provide broad-spectrum coverage of likely etiologic pathogens and take into account the polymicrobial nature of PID. Antibiotic regimens that do provide coverage of these pathogens showed unacceptably high failure rates. The most recent edition of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Disease Treatment guidelines provides an evidence-based and reliable set of recommendations for treating patients with PID and other sexually transmitted diseases.Outpatient regimens for the treatment of mildly and moderately severe acute PID include ofloxacin or levofloxacin with or without metronidazole for anaerobic coverage for 14 days. Alternatively, a single dose ceftriaxone or cefoxitin plus probenecid, followed by doxycycline with or with metronidazole for 14 days. In more severe cases, inpatient antibiotic treatment should be based on intravenous therapy with cefotetan or cefoxitin plus doxycycline which should be continued until 24 hours after clinical improvement and followed by oral therapy with doxycycline and metronidazole. Clindamycin plus gentamicin can be used alternatively in penicillin-allergic and pregnant women.Many antimicrobial regimens effectively treat uncomplicated gonorrhea, like single-dose ceftriaxone or cefoxitin or other pareneral third-generation cephalosporin. Treatment options for uncomplicated genitourinary chlamydial infection include a single dose azithromycin orally or doxycycline for seven days. A first-line drug for chlamydial infection in pregnant women is erythromycin base or amoxicillin.

  17. Antimicrobial commodities. 3. Antimicrobial treatment for plastics; Kokin seikatsu yohin. 3. Kokin plastic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomioka, T. [Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes antimicrobial plastics. Antimicrobial agents may sometimes be used to maintain cleanliness on surface of plastics. The antimicrobial agents can be divided into organic agents including natural substance systems and inorganic materials. The organic agents are volatile, can retain their effects even if dust is deposited on the surface, and are utilized as anti-fungus agents. The inorganic systems, which are heat resistant, can withstand plastics molding temperatures, and are used kneaded with plastic materials. The inorganic systems use silver or silver complex, copper and zinc carried or displaced in inorganic oxides. Properties of the carriers produce different features. The action mechanism of a silver antimicrobial agent uses active oxidization of plastic surface by means of catalytic action of silver, and enzymatic inhibition of silver ions. Antimicrobial treatment methods include mixing and kneading with resins, and surface coating. Antimicrobial agents can include those having high reactivity against resins, whereas the antimicrobial treatment and the mold processing must be conceived independently and cooperatively. What is important is not simply the initial antimicrobial characteristics, but their sustainability. Their using environment and required antimicrobial performance require adequate evaluation and verification. 4 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Inadequate treatment for elderly patients: professional norms and tight budgets could cause "ageism" in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirbekk, Helge; Nortvedt, Per

    2014-06-01

    We have studied ethical considerations of care among health professionals when treating and setting priorities for elderly patients in Norway. The views of medical doctors and nurses were analysed using qualitative methods. We conducted 21 in depth interviews and 3 focus group interviews in hospitals and general practices. Both doctors and nurses said they treated elderly patients different from younger patients, and often they were given lower priorities. Too little or too much treatment, in the sense of too many interventions and too much drugs, combined with too little care and comfort, was admitted as a relatively frequent yet unwanted consequence of the way clinical priorities were set for elderly patients. This was explained in terms of elderly patients not tolerating the same treatment as younger patients, and questions were raised about the quality of life of many elderly patients after treatment. These explanations were frequently referred to as medically sound decision making. Other explanations had little to do with medically sound decisions. These often included deep frustration with executive guidelines and budget constraints.

  19. What causes treatment failure - the patient, primary care, secondary care or inadequate interaction in the health services?

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    Lange Ove

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal treatment gives complete relief of symptoms of many disorders. But even if such treatment is available, some patients have persisting complaints. One disorder, from which the patients should achieve complete relief of symptoms with medical or surgical treatment, is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Despite the fact that such treatment is cheap, safe and easily available; some patients have persistent complaints after contact with the health services. This study evaluates the causes of treatment failure. Methods Twelve patients with GERD and persistent complaints had a semi-structured interview which focused on the patients' evaluation of treatment failure. The interviews were taped, transcribed and evaluated by 18 physicians, (six general practitioners, six gastroenterologists and six gastrointestinal surgeons who completed a questionnaire for each patient. The questionnaires were scored, and the relative responsibility for the failure was attributed to the patient, primary care, secondary care and interaction in the health services. Results Failing interaction in the health services was the most important cause of treatment failure, followed by failure in primary care, secondary care and the patient himself; the relative responsibilities were 35%, 28%, 27% and 10% respectively. There was satisfactory agreement about the causes between doctors with different specialities, but significant inter-individual differences between the doctors. The causes of the failures differed between the patients. Conclusions Treatment failure is a complex problem. Inadequate interaction in the health services seems to be important. Improved communication between parts of the health services and with the patients are areas of improvement.

  20. Predictors of treatment response for depression and inadequate social support--the ENRICHD randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Marie J; Freedland, Kenneth E; Burg, Matthew M; Saab, Patrice G; Youngblood, Marston E; Cornell, Carol E; Powell, Lynda H; Czajkowski, Susan M

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether the 'dose' of treatment exposure, delivery of specific components of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), patient adherence and/or use of antidepressants predict favorable depression and social support outcomes after 6 months of cognitive behavioral treatment. Secondary analyses of the intervention arm of the Enhancing Recovery in Coronary Heart Disease (ENRICHD) clinical trial involving persons with acute myocardial infarction (MI): n = 641 for the depression outcomes and n = 523 for the social support outcomes. The outcome measures were, for depression: the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D); for social support: the ENRICHD Social Support Instrument (ESSI) and Perceived Social Support Scale (PSSS). Better depression outcomes (measured by the BDI) were receiving a high number of depression-specific intervention components, p depression outcomes (measured by the HAM-D) were receiving a high number of the social communication and assertiveness components of the intervention, p social support outcomes (measured by the ESSI and PSSS) were predicted by membership in a racial or ethnic minority group, p social communication and assertiveness components of the intervention was an independent predictor of a worse social support outcome, p depression are useful in treating comorbid depression in post-MI patients. Working on communication skills may help to improve depression but not necessarily social support outcomes in this patient population, while adherence to cognitive-behavioral homework assignments is important for both outcomes. Other components of the ENRICHD intervention that were designed to improve social support had no discernible effects on outcomes. Intervention refinements may be needed in order to achieve better results in future post-MI clinical trials. A greater emphasis on CBT homework adherence could improve both depression and social support outcomes. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  1. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Antimicrobial Treatment of Acute Bacterial Meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Tunkel, Allan R.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has changed as a result of the widespread use of conjugate vaccines and preventive antimicrobial treatment of pregnant women. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with bacterial meningitis, accurate information is necessary regarding the

  2. Chemical analysis of plasma-assisted antimicrobial treatment on cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, C. W.; Lam, Y. L.; Yuen, C. W. M.; Luximon, A.; Lau, K. W.; Chen, K. S.

    2013-06-01

    This paper explores the use of plasma treatment as a pretreatment process to assist the application of antimicrobial process on cotton fabric with good functional effect. In this paper, antimicrobial finishing agent, Microfresh Liquid Formulation 9200-200 (MF), and a binder (polyurethane dispersion, Microban Liquid Formulation R10800-0, MB) will be used for treating the cotton fabric for improving the antimicrobial property and pre-treatment of cotton fabric by plasma under atmospheric pressure will be employed to improve loading of chemical agents. The chemical analysis of the treated cotton fabric will be conducted by Fourier transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

  3. Occurrence of antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes in beef cattle storage ponds and swine treatment lagoons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yuping; Zhang, Chiqian; Parker, David B.; Snow, Daniel D.; Zhou, Zhi; Li, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Livestock manure treatment and storage structures are potential environmental sources of antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, the occurrence of antimicrobials and ARGs was investigated in the water and the sludge compartments of beef cattle storage ponds and swine lagoons. Analysis was focused on two families of antimicrobials (sulfonamide and tetracycline) and the corresponding ARGs (sul1, sul2, tetO, tetQ and tetX). Results showed that the pseudo-partitioning coefficients of tetracyclines were higher than those of sulfonamides, suggesting different distributions of these two classes of antimicrobials between water and sludge. The ARGs tested were detected in nearly all ponds and lagoons, with the highest relative abundance in sul2 at 6.3 × 10 −1 copies per 16S rRNA gene. A positive correlation was observed between total sul genes and total sulfonamides in water while the correlation was negative in sludge. No significant correlation was found between total tet genes and total tetracyclines in either water or sludge, but significant correlations were observed for certain individual tet genes. Ammonia concentrations strongly correlated with all ARGs except tetX. This study provided quantitative information on the occurrence of antimicrobials and ARGs in the liquid and solid compartments of typical manure treatment and storage structures. - Highlights: • Partitioning of antimicrobials between water and sludge is compound specific. • Antimicrobial resistance genes occurred in both water and sludge. • The ARG abundance varied more substantially in swine lagoons than in cattle ponds. • Correlations between ARGs and antimicrobials are system dependent

  4. [Antimicrobial treatment in complicated intraabdominal infections--current situation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnánek, F

    2009-04-01

    Compared to other infections, intraabdominal infections include wide spectrum of infections of various severity, have different ethiology, which is frequently polymicrobial, show different microbiological results, which are difficult to interpret. The role of surgical intervention is essential. Intraabdominal infections are common causes of morbidity and mortality. Their prognosis is significantly improved with early and exact diagnosis, appropriate surgical or radiological intervention and timely effective antimicrobial therapy. Practitioners may choose between older or more modern antibiotics, between monotherapy or combination therapy, however, they should also consider clinical condition of the patient, the antibiotic's spectrum of activity, the treatment timing and its duration, the dose and dosing scheme of the particular antimicrobials. Furthermore, antimicrobial therapy should be used with caution, with the aim to prevent development of antimicrobial resistence. Inappropriate choice of antimicrobials in initial empiric therapy results in relapsing infections, surgical intervention and prolongation of hospitalization, and even death rates reflect adequate and timely empiric therapy.

  5. Effect of adjunct metformin treatment in patients with type-1 diabetes and persistent inadequate glycaemic control. A randomized study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Søgaard Lund

    Full Text Available Despite intensive insulin treatment, many patients with type-1 diabetes (T1DM have longstanding inadequate glycaemic control. Metformin is an oral hypoglycaemic agent that improves insulin action in patients with type-2 diabetes. We investigated the effect of a one-year treatment with metformin versus placebo in patients with T1DM and persistent poor glycaemic control.One hundred patients with T1DM, preserved hypoglycaemic awareness and HaemoglobinA(1c (HbA(1c > or = 8.5% during the year before enrolment entered a one-month run-in on placebo treatment. Thereafter, patients were randomized (baseline to treatment with either metformin (1 g twice daily or placebo for 12 months (double-masked. Patients continued ongoing insulin therapy and their usual outpatient clinical care. The primary outcome measure was change in HbA(1c after one year of treatment. At enrolment, mean (standard deviation HbA(1c was 9.48% (0.99 for the metformin group (n = 49 and 9.60% (0.86 for the placebo group (n = 51. Mean (95% confidence interval baseline-adjusted differences after 12 months with metformin (n = 48 versus placebo (n = 50 were: HbA(1c, 0.13% (-0.19; 0.44, p = 0.422; Total daily insulin dose, -5.7 U/day (-8.6; -2.9, p<0.001; body weight, -1.74 kg (-3.32; -0.17, p = 0.030. Minor and overall major hypoglycaemia was not significantly different between treatments. Treatments were well tolerated.In patients with poorly controlled T1DM, adjunct metformin therapy did not provide any improvement of glycaemic control after one year. Nevertheless, adjunct metformin treatment was associated with sustained reductions of insulin dose and body weight. Further investigations into the potential cardiovascular-protective effects of metformin therapy in patients with T1DM are warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00118937.

  6. Modeling antimicrobial tolerance and treatment of heterogeneous biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jia; Seeluangsawat, Paisa; Wang, Qi

    2016-12-01

    A multiphasic, hydrodynamic model for spatially heterogeneous biofilms based on the phase field formulation is developed and applied to analyze antimicrobial tolerance of biofilms by acknowledging the existence of persistent and susceptible cells in the total population of bacteria. The model implements a new conversion rate between persistent and susceptible cells and its homogeneous dynamics is bench-marked against a known experiment quantitatively. It is then discretized and solved on graphic processing units (GPUs) in 3-D space and time. With the model, biofilm development and antimicrobial treatment of biofilms in a flow cell are investigated numerically. Model predictions agree qualitatively well with available experimental observations. Specifically, numerical results demonstrate that: (i) in a flow cell, nutrient, diffused in solvent and transported by hydrodynamics, has an apparent impact on persister formation, thereby antimicrobial persistence of biofilms; (ii) dosing antimicrobial agents inside biofilms is more effective than dosing through diffusion in solvent; (iii) periodic dosing is less effective in antimicrobial treatment of biofilms in a nutrient deficient environment than in a nutrient sufficient environment. This model provides us with a simulation tool to analyze mechanisms of biofilm tolerance to antimicrobial agents and to derive potentially optimal dosing strategies for biofilm control and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Multistrain models predict sequential multidrug treatment strategies to result in less antimicrobial resistance than combination treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Amais; Zachariasen, Camilla; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo

    2016-01-01

    frequency did not play a role in suppressing the growth of resistant strains, but the specific order of the two antimicrobials did. Predictions made from the study could be used to redesign multidrug treatment strategies not only for intramuscular treatment in pigs, but also for other dosing routes.......Background: Combination treatment is increasingly used to fight infections caused by bacteria resistant to two or more antimicrobials. While multiple studies have evaluated treatment strategies to minimize the emergence of resistant strains for single antimicrobial treatment, fewer studies have...... considered combination treatments. The current study modeled bacterial growth in the intestine of pigs after intramuscular combination treatment (i.e. using two antibiotics simultaneously) and sequential treatments (i.e. alternating between two antibiotics) in order to identify the factors that favor...

  8. Antimicrobial treatments to control Listeria monocytogenes in queso fresco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, António; Kamnetz, Mary B; Gadotti, Camila; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2017-06-01

    Queso fresco, is a Hispanic non-fermented cheese highly susceptible to contamination with L. monocytogenes. This research was aimed to determine the effect of GRAS antimicrobial ingredients to control L. monocytogenes. Antimicrobials included caprylic acid (CA), Nisaplin ® (N, 2.5% nisin), a mixture of sodium lactate and sodium diacetate (SL/SD), Lactococcus lactis sbp. lactis DPC 3147, monolaurin, and lactic acid (LA). Batches of queso fresco curds were inoculated with 10 4  CFU/g and stored at 4 °C for three weeks. During storage the count of L. monocytogenes reached 7 to 8 Log CFU/g in control samples. Most individual antimicrobial treatments resulted in less than 1 Log CFU/g reductions in final counts, with the exception of N (0.5 g/kg) and CA (2.9 g/kg) that caused more than 3 and 5 Log CFU/g differences with controls, respectively. Mixtures of ingredients were more effective in inhibiting L. monocytogenes growth, and treatments with N and CA consistently delivered 6 Log CFU/g less counts than controls. Supplementation of 12 g/kg LA to treatments with SL/SD (3%/0.22%) caused differences of more than 4 Log CFU/g in final Listeria populations. Samples treated with the binary mixtures of N and CA (0.5 and 0.7 g/kg, respectively) were evaluated in a consumer panel (n = 67). Panelists slightly preferred control and commercial over treated samples, but all samples were in average rated between "slightly liking" and "moderately liking." These experiments indicated that combined use of antimicrobial ingredients may be an effective way to control the population of Listeria monocytogenes in queso fresco. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A systematic review and mixed-treatment comparison of dapagliflozin with existing anti-diabetes treatments for those with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled by sulfonylurea monotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background To compare the first-in-class sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, dapagliflozin, with existing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treatment options available within the European Union (EU) for add-on therapy to sulfonylureas (SUs). Methods A systematic review was conducted to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in T2DM patients inadequately controlled by SU monotherapy. Direct meta-analysis, Bucher indirect comparisons and Bayesian network meta-analysis (NMA) were conducted on studies meeting predefined inclusion criteria. Sufficient data were available to assess three clinical endpoints at 24 (+/- 6) weeks follow-up: mean change in HbA1c from baseline, mean change in weight from baseline, and the proportion of patients experiencing at least one episode of hypoglycaemia. The effect of confounding baseline factors was explored through covariate analyses. Results The search identified 1,901 unique citations, with 1,870 excluded based on title/abstract. From reviewing full-texts of the remaining 31 articles, 5 studies were considered eligible for analysis. All studies were comparable in terms of baseline characteristics, including: HbA1c, age and body mass index (BMI). In addition to dapagliflozin, sufficient data for meta-analysis was available for three dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and one glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue. Based on fixed-effect NMA, all treatment classes resulted in statistically significant decreases in HbA1c at follow-up compared to placebo. Dapagliflozin treatment resulted in significantly decreased weight at follow-up compared to placebo (-1.54 kg; 95% CrI -2.16, -0.92), in contrast to treatment with GLP-1 analogues (-0.65 kg; 95% CrI -1.37, 0.07) and DPP-4 inhibitors (0.57 kg; 95% CrI 0.09, 1.06). The odds of hypoglycaemia were similar to placebo for dapagliflozin and DPP-4 inhibitor add-on treatment, but significantly greater than placebo for GLP-1 analogue add-on treatment (10.89; 95% Cr

  10. Acinetobacter baumannii: Evolution of Antimicrobial Resistance—Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Yohei; Murray, Gerald L.; Peleg, Anton Y.

    2015-01-01

    The first decade of the 20th century witnessed a surge in the incidence of infections due to several highly antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in hospitals worldwide. Acinetobacter baumannii is one such organism that turned from an occasional respiratory pathogen into a major nosocomial pathogen. An increasing number of A. baumannii genome sequences have broadened our understanding of the genetic makeup of these bacteria and highlighted the extent of horizontal transfer of DNA. Animal models of disease combined with bacterial mutagenesis have provided some valuable insights into mechanisms of A. baumannii pathogenesis. Bacterial factors known to be important for disease include outer membrane porins, surface structures including capsule and lipopolysaccharide, enzymes such as phospholipase D, iron acquisition systems, and regulatory proteins. A. baumannii has a propensity to accumulate resistance to various groups of antimicrobial agents. In particular, carbapenem resistance has become commonplace, accounting for the majority of A. baumannii strains in many hospitals today. Carbapenem-resistant strains are often resistant to all other routinely tested agents. Treatment of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii infection therefore involves the use of combinations of last resort agents such as colistin and tigecycline, but the efficacy and safety of these approaches are yet to be defined. Antimicrobial-resistant A. baumannii has high potential to spread among ill patients in intensive care units. Early recognition and timely implementation of appropriate infection control measures is crucial in preventing outbreaks. PMID:25643273

  11. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children. Antimicrobial Resistance and Treatment Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Milagrosa; Villalon, Flor N; Eizaguirre, Francisco J; Delgado, Maider; Muñoz-Seca, Ignacio M; Fernández-Reyes, María; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the appropriateness of the recent recommendations for managing Helicobacter pylori infection in children in a university hospital in Southern Europe. Antimicrobial resistance and response to eradication therapy were also determined. The presence of H. pylori was studied in 143 children: by gastric biopsy culture (GBC), (13)C-urea breath test (UBT) and stool antigen immunochromatography test (SAIT) in 56 children; by GBC and UBT in 20, by GBC and SAIT in 18, and by GBC alone in 49. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by E-test. Infection was defined as a positive culture or positivity in both UBT and SAIT. Disease progression was studied in 118 patients. First evaluation of symptoms was carried out at 3-6 months after diagnosis and/or after treatment of the infection. H. pylori was detected in 74 from the 143 children analyzed (100% GBC positive, 98.1% UBT positive, and 58.1% SAIT positive). The main symptom was chronic abdominal pain (n = 121). Macroscopic antral nodularity was observed in 29.7% of infected patients and in 5.8% of uninfected patients, respectively. Resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole was found in 34.7 and 16.7%, respectively. Eradication when susceptible antimicrobials were used occurred in 78.7% (48/61) versus 37.5% (3/8) when the treatment included a drug with resistance (p = .024). In patients with recurrent abdominal pain, symptoms resolved in 92.9% (39/42) patients with HP eradication versus 42.9% (6/14) without HP eradication (p pylori diagnostic screening and treatment because most of them had only recurrent abdominal pain, but remission of their symptoms was associated with H. pylori eradication. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effect of adjunct metformin treatment in patients with type-1 diabetes and persistent inadequate glycaemic control. A randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, S.S.; Tarnow, L.; Astrup, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    . Thereafter, patients were randomized (baseline) to treatment with either metformin (1 g twice daily) or placebo for 12 months (double-masked). Patients continued ongoing insulin therapy and their usual outpatient clinical care. The primary outcome measure was change in HbA(1c) after one year of treatment...... = 0.422; Total daily insulin dose, -5.7 U/day (-8.6; -2.9), pbody weight, -1.74 kg (-3.32; -0.17), p = 0.030. Minor and overall major hypoglycaemia was not significantly different between treatments. Treatments were well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In patients with poorly controlled T......1DM, adjunct metformin therapy did not provide any improvement of glycaemic control after one year. Nevertheless, adjunct metformin treatment was associated with sustained reductions of insulin dose and body weight. Further investigations into the potential cardiovascular-protective effects...

  13. The antimicrobial treatment of subacute endometritis: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, L O; Thwin, S S; Hillier, S L; Kiviat, N B; Eschenbach, D A

    2004-02-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the antimicrobial therapy effect on clinical and laboratory findings among women at risk for endometritis. A prospective antimicrobial treatment trial of 153 women was performed to characterize subacute endometritis and to determine the treatment effect on endometritis resolution. After antimicrobial treatment, significant reductions occurred in abnormal bleeding (60% vs 29%), mucopurulent cervicitis (20% vs 6%), uterine tenderness (20% vs 6%), and histologic endometritis (38% vs 4%), all Pcervical infection as a risk for endometritis.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of different filling pastes for deciduous tooth treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Feltrin ANTONIAZZI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Guedes-Pinto paste is the filling material most employed in Brazil for endodontic treatment of deciduous teeth; however, the Rifocort® ointment has been removed. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial potential of filling pastes, by proposing three new pharmacological associations to replace Rifocort® ointment with drugs of already established antimicrobial power: Nebacetin® ointment, 2% Chlorhexidine Gluconate gel, and Maxitrol® ointment. A paste composed of Iodoform, Rifocort® ointment and Camphorated Paramonochlorophenol (CPC was employed as the gold standard (G1. The other associations were: Iodoform, Nebacetin® ointment and CPC (G2; Iodoform, 2% Chlorhexidine Digluconate gel and CPC (G3; Iodoform, Maxitrol® ointment and CPC (G4. The associations were tested for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans, Streptococcus oralis (S. oralis, Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis, Escherichia coli (E. coli, and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis, using the methods of dilution on solid medium – orifice agar – and broth dilution. The results were tested using statistical analysis ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis. They showed that all the pastes had a bacteriostatic effect on all the microorganisms, without any statistically significant difference, compared with G1. S. aureus was statistically significant (multiple comparison test of Tukey, insofar as G2 and G3 presented the worst and the best performance, respectively. All associations were bactericidal for E. coli, S. aureus, S. mutans and S. oralis. Only G3 and G4 were bactericidal for E. faecalis, whereas no product was bactericidal for B. subtilis. Thus, the tested pastes have antimicrobial potential and have proved acceptable for endodontic treatment of primary teeth.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of different filling pastes for deciduous tooth treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniazzi, Bruna Feltrin; Pires, Carine Weber; Bresolin, Carmela Rampazzo; Weiss, Rita Niederauer; Praetzel, Juliana Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Guedes-Pinto paste is the filling material most employed in Brazil for endodontic treatment of deciduous teeth; however, the Rifocort® ointment has been removed. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial potential of filling pastes, by proposing three new pharmacological associations to replace Rifocort® ointment with drugs of already established antimicrobial power: Nebacetin® ointment, 2% Chlorhexidine Gluconate gel, and Maxitrol® ointment. A paste composed of Iodoform, Rifocort® ointment and Camphorated Paramonochlorophenol (CPC) was employed as the gold standard (G1). The other associations were: Iodoform, Nebacetin® ointment and CPC (G2); Iodoform, 2% Chlorhexidine Digluconate gel and CPC (G3); Iodoform, Maxitrol® ointment and CPC (G4). The associations were tested for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), Streptococcus oralis (S. oralis), Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), using the methods of dilution on solid medium - orifice agar - and broth dilution. The results were tested using statistical analysis ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis. They showed that all the pastes had a bacteriostatic effect on all the microorganisms, without any statistically significant difference, compared with G1. S. aureus was statistically significant (multiple comparison test of Tukey), insofar as G2 and G3 presented the worst and the best performance, respectively. All associations were bactericidal for E. coli, S. aureus, S. mutans and S. oralis. Only G3 and G4 were bactericidal for E. faecalis, whereas no product was bactericidal for B. subtilis. Thus, the tested pastes have antimicrobial potential and have proved acceptable for endodontic treatment of primary teeth.

  16. Surgical and prosthodontic consequences of inadequate treatment planning for fixed implant-supported prosthesis in the edentulous mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidra, Avinash S

    2010-10-01

    Treatment planning for mandibular fixed implant-supported prostheses requires close communication between surgeons and restorative dentists. Improper implant positioning can result in significant difficulty for patient comfort and fabrication of a functional prosthesis. This case report describes the consequences of placing implants with no preoperative planning with regard to the implant position based on the final restorative plan. A 46-year-old male had all of his remaining maxillary and mandibular teeth extracted, and had 5 implants placed immediately in the interforaminal region of the mandible with the intent of providing a fixed prosthesis. Six weeks later, the patient was referred for prosthodontic care. The patient had no prostheses at that time and was in severe pain due to impingement of the lower lip by one of the implants. The implants were deemed to be in unfavorable positions and angulations. Thereafter, the case was treatment-planned systematically, requiring 2 additional surgical procedures---removal of one of the implants and alveoloplasty of posterior mandible for creation of space for prosthetic components. The remaining 4 implants with unfavorable angulations posed a prosthodontic challenge for fabrication of a prosthesis. The situation was eventually managed by fabrication of a screw-retained metal-resin fixed prosthesis over the remaining 4 implants. Although the situation was managed successfully, it resulted in increased time and treatment expenses, additional appointments, and elaborative steps for correction. Prosthodontics-driven treatment planning concepts and guidelines for prevention of such situations are described in this article. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Inadequate management of pregnancy-associated listeriosis: lessons from four case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, C; Goffinet, F; Azria, E; Leclercq, A; Lecuit, M

    2014-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection during pregnancy can lead to dramatic fetal or neonatal outcomes. No clinical trial has evaluated treatment options, and retrospective studies of cases are therefore important to define optimal regimens. We report four cases of materno-neonatal listeriosis illustrating inadequate antimicrobial therapy management and discuss recommended treatment options. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  18. Inadequate housing in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Obeng-Odoom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Two themes are evident in housing research in Ghana. One involves the study of how to increase the number of dwellings to correct the overall housing deficit, and the other focuses on how to improve housing for slum dwellers. Between these two extremes, there is relatively little research on why the existing buildings are poorly maintained. This paper is based on a review of existing studies on inadequate housing. It synthesises the evidence on the possible reasons for this neglect, makes a case for better maintenance and analyses possible ways of reversing the problem of inadequate housing.

  19. 75 FR 45646 - Design of Clinical Trials of Aerosolized Antimicrobials for the Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ...] Design of Clinical Trials of Aerosolized Antimicrobials for the Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis; Public... development of aerosolized antimicrobials for the management and/or treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis... respiratory symptoms in patients with cystic fibrosis. This public workshop is intended to provide information...

  20. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Treatment of Chronic Recurrent Sinusitis Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biel, Merrill A.; Sievert, Chet; Usacheva, Marina; Teichert, Matthew; Balcom, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic recurrent sinusitis (CRS) is an inflammatory disease of the facial sinuses and nasal passages that is defined as lasting longer than 12 weeks or occurring more than 4 times per year with symptoms usually lasting more than 20 days. The National Institute for Health Statistics estimates that CRS is one of the most common chronic conditions in the United States affecting an estimated 37 million Americans. The potential etiologies of CRS include bacteria, viruses, allergies, fungi, superantigens and microbial biofilms. In clinical practice there is a significant subpopulation of patients with CRS who remain resistant to cure despite rigorous treatment regimens including surgery, allergy therapy and prolonged antibiotic therapy. The reason for treatment failure is thought to be related to the destruction of the sinus mucociliary defense by the chronic sinus infection resulting in the development of secondary antibiotic resistant microbial colonization of the sinuses and biofilm formation. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is a non-antibiotic broad spectrum antimicrobial treatment that has been demonstrated to eradicate antibiotic resistant bacteria and biofilms. Objective The objective of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of a non-invasive aPDT treatment method of eradicating antibiotic resistant biofilms/microorganisms known to cause CRS in an in vitro model. Methods Antibiotic resistant planktonic bacteria and fungi and polymicrobial biofilms of Pseudomonas aerugenosa and MRSA were grown on silastic sheets and treated with a methylene blue photosensitizer and 670nm non-thermal activating light. Cultures of the planktonic micoroorganisms and biofilms were obtained before and after light treatment to determine efficacy of planktonic baciteria and biofilm reduction. Results The in vitro CRS planktonic microorganism and biofilm study demonstrated that aPDT reduced the CRS polymicrobial biofilm by >99.9% after a single treatment

  1. Comparison of antemortem antimicrobial treatment regimens to antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of postmortem lung isolates from feedlot cattle with bronchopneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Catherine G; Love, Brenda C; Krehbiel, Clint R; Johnson, Nicholas J; Step, Douglas L

    2012-03-01

    A retrospective study was performed to compare the treatment regimens in feedlot cattle that died with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) to the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the microorganisms isolated from lungs. Forty-three cattle submitted by the Willard Sparks Beef Research Center (WSBRC) to the Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory for postmortem examination during 2007 had bronchopneumonia (acute = 16, subacute = 5, or chronic = 22). Lungs from cattle were cultured aerobically (40 cattle) and for Mycoplasma spp. (34 cattle). Susceptibility panels were performed. At least 1 BRD pathogen (Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni, Mycoplasma bovis, or Arcanobacterium pyogenes) was isolated from 39 cattle, and 77% (30/39) had multiple organisms recovered. Mycoplasmal infections were common (25/34) and a major component of mixed infections (24/25). The majority (60%) of the M. haemolytica, P. multocida, and H. somni isolates were resistant to tetracycline. Most of the H. somni isolates (67%) were susceptible to tilmicosin (Ti), enrofloxacin (En), ceftiofur (Ce), and florfenicol, despite extensive treatment with Ti, En, and Ce (75% of isolates were from cattle that received each antimicrobial once). Most of the M. haemolytica (65%) and P. multocida (79%) isolates were susceptible to En and Ce, despite antemortem treatment of cattle with these antimicrobials. Hence, the current study reports a discrepancy between the antemortem treatment of clinical BRD and the susceptibility patterns of the bacteria isolated from lungs postmortem. Based on these findings, factors other than antimicrobial resistance are playing a role in the death of feedlot cattle with BRD.

  2. Antimicrobial and Biophysical Properties of Surfactant Supplemented with an Antimicrobial Peptide for Treatment of Bacterial Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banaschewski, Brandon J H; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Keating, Eleonora; Haagsman, Henk P; Zuo, Yi Y; Yamashita, Cory M; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibiotic resistant bacterial infections represent an emerging health concern in clinical settings, and a lack of novel developments in the pharmaceutical pipeline is creating a "perfect storm" for multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been

  3. Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy in the treatment of denture stomatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senna, Andre Machado de

    2012-01-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS), also called chronic atrophic candidiasis, is the most common oral fungal infection in denture wearers. It has a multifactorial etiology, but the presence of Candida spp. biofilm on the denture is considered the most important factor for the establishment of the DS. This study aimed to evaluate the treatment of DS through the use of photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PAT), mediated by methylene blue. For this purpose, preclinical studies and clinical trials were performed. Simulators prototypes dentures were made of methyl methacrylate polymer to serve as a basis for biofilm growth of the following species of Candida: C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. dubliniensis, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. guilliermondii. Methylene blue solution at a concentration of 450 μg/mL was used as a photosensitizer. The prototypes and biofilms were irradiated with a laser of wavelength of 660 nm, potency of 100 mW, for 80 seconds. For the clinical study, subjects were divided into two groups. The first group received conventional treatment based on the use of antifungal Miconazole. The second group received the treatment by PAT. The preclinical results showed that all species of the genus Candida were susceptible to PAT, with a reduction in colonies that ranged from 2.48 to 3.93 log 10 . Clinical outcomes were evaluated for the reduction of colonies of Candida spp. located in the mucosa and in the prosthesis and relative to the improvement of the clinical aspect of the affected mucosa. Both the conventional therapy and PAT were effective in treating DS. There was no significant statistical difference between PAT and conventional treatment for any of the factors evaluated. Thus, it was concluded that PAT is effective in the treatment of denture stomatitis. (author)

  4. In-Vitro efficacy of antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Failure to cure eye infections, and reduced potency in topical antimicrobials had been observed in South Western Nigeria, this study sought to evaluate in vitro, the efficacy of antimicrobial agents in the treatment of ocular infections. A total of 46 ocular bacterial isolates were recovered from the diagnostic laboratory of the ...

  5. Inhibitory effects of the macrolide antimicrobial tylosin on anaerobic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Toshio; Zilles, Julie L; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2008-09-01

    A laboratory-scale anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) was operated using a glucose-based synthetic wastewater to study the effects of tylosin, a macrolide antimicrobial commonly used in swine production, on treatment performance. The experimental period was divided into three consecutive phases with different influent tylosin concentrations (0, 1.67, and 167 mg/L). The addition of 1.67 mg/L tylosin to the reactor had negligible effects on the overall treatment performance, that is, total methane production and effluent chemical oxygen demand did not change significantly (P tylosin was added. The addition of 167 mg/L tylosin to the reactor resulted in a gradual decrease in methane production and the accumulation of propionate and acetate. Subsequent inhibition of methanogenesis was attributed to a decrease in the pH of the reactor. After the addition of 167 mg/L tylosin to the reactor, an initial decrease in the rate of glucose uptake during the ASBR cycle followed by a gradual recovery was observed. In batch tests, the specific biogas production with the substrate butyrate was completely inhibited in the presence of tylosin. This study indicated that tylosin inhibited propionate- and butyrate-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria and fermenting bacteria resulting in unfavorable effects on methanogenesis.

  6. Risk Factors for Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli in Pigs Receiving Oral Antimicrobial Treatment: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, Elke; Käsbohrer, Annemarie

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this literature review was to identify risk factors in addition to antimicrobial treatment for antimicrobial resistance (AMR) occurrence in commensal Escherichia coli in pigs. A variety of studies were searched in 2014 and 2015. Studies identified as potentially relevant were assessed against eligibility criteria such as observation or experiment (no review), presentation of risk factors in addition to (single dosage) antimicrobial use, risk factors for but not resulting from AMR, and the same antimicrobial used and tested. Thirteen articles (nine on observational, four on experimental studies) were finally selected as relevant. It was reported that space allowance, production size/stage, cleanliness, entry of animals and humans into herds, dosage/frequency/route of administration, time span between treatment and sampling date, herd size, distance to another farm, coldness, and season had an impact on AMR occurrence. Associations were shown by one to four studies per factor and differed in magnitude, direction, and level of significance. The risk of bias was unclear in nearly half of the information of observational studies and in most of the information from experimental studies. Further research on the effects of specific management practices is needed to develop well-founded management advice.

  7. Current concepts in travelers' diarrhea: epidemiology, antimicrobial resistance and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhuysen, Pablo C

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this article is to review recent advances in travelers' diarrhea, which remains one of the most common health problems afflicting individuals from developed countries visiting less affluent regions of the world. A large epidemiologic study done at the point of departure provided insights into regional risk factors for travelers' diarrhea and demonstrated that visitors rarely exercised dietary precautions aimed at disease prevention. A preventive program implemented with the close interaction between public health agencies, hotel industry and academia can result in effective reduction of cases. A polymorphism in the IL-8 gene promoter is associated with susceptibility to diarrhea due to enteroaggregative Escherichia coli. New diagnostic tools assist in better understanding the role of norovirus and emerging bacterial enteric pathogens such as enteroaggregative E. coli. Rifaximin, a non-absorbable antibiotic, is a safe and effective alternative for the prevention and treatment of travelers' diarrhea due to non-invasive organisms. Traditional public health and new antimicrobial agents can decrease the risk of travel related diarrhea.

  8. Treatment Compliance with Fixed-Dose Combination of Vildagliptin/Metformin in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Inadequately Controlled with Metformin Monotherapy: A 24-Week Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorios Rombopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the differences in treatment compliance with vildagliptin/metformin fixed-dose versus free-dose combination therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in Greece. Design. Adult patients with T2DM, inadequately controlled with metformin monotherapy, (850 mg bid, participated in this 24-week, multicenter, observational study. Patients were enrolled in two cohorts: vildagliptin/metformin fixed-dose combination (group A and vildagliptin metformin free-dose combination (group B. Results. 659 patients were enrolled, 360 were male, with mean BMI 30.1, mean T2DM duration 59.6 months, and mean HbA1c at baseline 8%; 366 patients were assigned to group A and 293 to group B; data for 3 patients was missing. In group A, 98.9% of patients were compliant with their treatment compared to 84.6% of group B. The odds ratio for compliance in group A versus B was (OR 18.9 (95% CI: 6.2, 57.7; P<0.001. In group A mean HbA1c decreased from 8.1% at baseline to 6.9% (P<0.001 at the study end and from 7.9% to 6.8% (P<0.001 in group B. Conclusions. Patients in group A were more compliant than patients in group B. These results are in accordance with international literature suggesting that fixed-dose combination therapies lead to increased compliance to treatment.

  9. Antimicrobial treatment improves mycobacterial survival in nonpermissive growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turapov, Obolbek; Waddell, Simon J; Burke, Bernard; Glenn, Sarah; Sarybaeva, Asel A; Tudo, Griselda; Labesse, Gilles; Young, Danielle I; Young, Michael; Andrew, Peter W; Butcher, Philip D; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin; Mukamolova, Galina V

    2014-05-01

    Antimicrobials targeting cell wall biosynthesis are generally considered inactive against nonreplicating bacteria. Paradoxically, we found that under nonpermissive growth conditions, exposure of Mycobacterium bovis BCG bacilli to such antimicrobials enhanced their survival. We identified a transcriptional regulator, RaaS (for regulator of antimicrobial-assisted survival), encoded by bcg1279 (rv1219c) as being responsible for the observed phenomenon. Induction of this transcriptional regulator resulted in reduced expression of specific ATP-dependent efflux pumps and promoted long-term survival of mycobacteria, while its deletion accelerated bacterial death under nonpermissive growth conditions in vitro and during macrophage or mouse infection. These findings have implications for the design of antimicrobial drug combination therapies for persistent infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis.

  10. Multistrain models predict sequential multidrug treatment strategies to result in less antimicrobial resistance than combination treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Amais; Zachariasen, Camilla; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo

    2016-01-01

    generated by a mathematical model of the competitive growth of multiple strains of Escherichia coli.Results: Simulation studies showed that sequential use of tetracycline and ampicillin reduced the level of double resistance, when compared to the combination treatment. The effect of the cycling frequency...... (how frequently antibiotics are alternated in a sequential treatment) of the two drugs was dependent upon the order in which the two drugs were used.Conclusion: Sequential treatment was more effective in preventing the growth of resistant strains when compared to the combination treatment. The cycling...... frequency did not play a role in suppressing the growth of resistant strains, but the specific order of the two antimicrobials did. Predictions made from the study could be used to redesign multidrug treatment strategies not only for intramuscular treatment in pigs, but also for other dosing routes....

  11. Paradoxical Responses After Start of Antimicrobial Treatment in Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, Willemien A.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Abass, K. Mohammed; Tuah, Wilson; Thompson, William A.; Awuah, Peter C.; Awuah-Boateng, Nana Yaa; Adjei, Ohene; Bretzel, Gisela; Schouten, Jan P.; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Antimicrobial killing in mycobacterial infections may be accompanied by (transient) clinical deterioration, known as paradoxical reaction. To search for patterns reflecting such reactions in the treatment of Buruli ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans infection), the evolution of lesions of

  12. Antimicrobial use Guidelines for Treatment of Respiratory Tract Disease in Dogs and Cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappin, M. R.; Blondeau, J.; Boothe, D.

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory tract disease can be associated with primary or secondary bacterial infections in dogs and cats and is a common reason for use and potential misuse, improper use, and overuse of antimicrobials. There is a lack of comprehensive treatment guidelines such as those that are available...... veterinarians in making antimicrobial treatment choices for use in the management of bacterial respiratory diseases in dogs and cats....

  13. Longterm safety and efficacy of abatacept through 5 years of treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and an inadequate response to tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Mark C; Schiff, Michael; Luggen, Michael; Le Bars, Manuela; Aranda, Richard; Elegbe, Ayanbola; Dougados, Maxime

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate abatacept safety and efficacy over 5 years in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who had inadequate response to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy in the ATTAIN trial. Patients completing the 6-month, double-blind (DB) placebo-controlled period were eligible to enter the longterm extension (LTE), where all patients received abatacept every 4 weeks (∼10 mg/kg, according to weight range). Safety, efficacy, physical function, and health-related quality of life were monitored throughout. In total, 317 patients (218 DB abatacept, 99 DB placebo) entered the LTE; 150 (47.3%) completed it. Overall incidences of serious adverse events, infections, serious infections, malignant neoplasms, and autoimmune events did not increase during the LTE versus the DB period. American College of Rheumatology responses with abatacept at Month 6 were maintained over 5 years. At Year 5, among patients who received abatacept for 5 years and had available data, 38/103 (36.9%) achieved low disease activity as defined by the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28)/C-reactive protein (CRP); 23/103 (22.3%) achieved DAS28/CRP-defined remission. Health Assessment Questionnaire response was achieved by 62.5% of patients remaining on treatment at Year 5; mean improvements from baseline in physical component summary and mental component summary scores were 7.34 and 6.42, respectively. High proportions of patients maintained efficacy and physical function benefits or improved their disease state at each timepoint throughout the LTE, if remaining on abatacept treatment. Safety remained consistent, and abatacept efficacy was maintained from 6 months to 5 years, demonstrating the benefits of switching to abatacept in this difficult-to-treat population of patients with RA previously failing anti-TNF therapy.

  14. Antimicrobial and biophysical properties of surfactant supplemented with an antimicrobial peptide for treatment of bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaschewski, Brandon J H; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Keating, Eleonora; Haagsman, Henk P; Zuo, Yi Y; Yamashita, Cory M; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections represent an emerging health concern in clinical settings, and a lack of novel developments in the pharmaceutical pipeline is creating a "perfect storm" for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been suggested as future therapeutics for these drug-resistant bacteria, since they have potent broad-spectrum activity, with little development of resistance. Due to the unique structure of the lung, bacterial pneumonia has the additional problem of delivering antimicrobials to the site of infection. One potential solution is coadministration of AMPs with exogenous surfactant, allowing for distribution of the peptides to distal airways and opening of collapsed lung regions. The objective of this study was to test various surfactant-AMP mixtures with regard to maintaining pulmonary surfactant biophysical properties and bactericidal functions. We compared the properties of four AMPs (CATH-1, CATH-2, CRAMP, and LL-37) suspended in bovine lipid-extract surfactant (BLES) by assessing surfactant-AMP mixture biophysical and antimicrobial functions. Antimicrobial activity was tested against methillicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All AMP/surfactant mixtures exhibited an increase of spreading compared to a BLES control. BLES+CATH-2 mixtures had no significantly different minimum surface tension versus the BLES control. Compared to the other cathelicidins, CATH-2 retained the most bactericidal activity in the presence of BLES. The BLES+CATH-2 mixture appears to be an optimal surfactant-AMP mixture based on in vitro assays. Future directions involve investigating the potential of this mixture in animal models of bacterial pneumonia. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Antimicrobial and Biophysical Properties of Surfactant Supplemented with an Antimicrobial Peptide for Treatment of Bacterial Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Keating, Eleonora; Haagsman, Henk P.; Zuo, Yi Y.; Yamashita, Cory M.; Veldhuizen, Ruud A. W.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections represent an emerging health concern in clinical settings, and a lack of novel developments in the pharmaceutical pipeline is creating a “perfect storm” for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been suggested as future therapeutics for these drug-resistant bacteria, since they have potent broad-spectrum activity, with little development of resistance. Due to the unique structure of the lung, bacterial pneumonia has the additional problem of delivering antimicrobials to the site of infection. One potential solution is coadministration of AMPs with exogenous surfactant, allowing for distribution of the peptides to distal airways and opening of collapsed lung regions. The objective of this study was to test various surfactant-AMP mixtures with regard to maintaining pulmonary surfactant biophysical properties and bactericidal functions. We compared the properties of four AMPs (CATH-1, CATH-2, CRAMP, and LL-37) suspended in bovine lipid-extract surfactant (BLES) by assessing surfactant-AMP mixture biophysical and antimicrobial functions. Antimicrobial activity was tested against methillicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All AMP/surfactant mixtures exhibited an increase of spreading compared to a BLES control. BLES+CATH-2 mixtures had no significantly different minimum surface tension versus the BLES control. Compared to the other cathelicidins, CATH-2 retained the most bactericidal activity in the presence of BLES. The BLES+CATH-2 mixture appears to be an optimal surfactant-AMP mixture based on in vitro assays. Future directions involve investigating the potential of this mixture in animal models of bacterial pneumonia. PMID:25753641

  16. Suggested guidelines for using systemic antimicrobials in bacterial skin infections: part?2? antimicrobial choice, treatment regimens and compliance

    OpenAIRE

    Beco, L.; Guagu?re, E.; M?ndez, C. Lorente; Noli, C.; Nuttall, T.; Vroom, M.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic antimicrobials are critically important in veterinary healthcare, and resistance is a major concern. Antimicrobial stewardship will be important in maintaining clinical efficacy by reducing the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance. Bacterial skin infections are one of the most common reasons for using systemic antimicrobials in dogs and cats. Appropriate management of these infections is, therefore, crucial in any policy for responsible antimicrobial use. The goals of t...

  17. Assessment of Antimicrobial Treatment Strategies in Pig Production Using Mathematical Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Amais

    The phenomenon of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is well established, but its persistent increase and alarming proportions threaten the ability of antimicrobials to treat infections. AMR has become a major issue in veterinary antimicrobial use, specifically in food production animals, due...... to the potential consequences for human health. Danish pig production accounted for 76% of the total veterinary use of antimicrobials in 2012 with 79% of pig production used in weaning pigs. Escherichia coli (E. coli) are the predominant bacteria in the gastrointestinal flora of humans and animals, and can serve...... as a reservoir of AMR. Furthermore, around 40% of E. coli isolates from healthy pigs throughout the Denmark over the past five years were found to be resistant to tetracycline and ampicillin. There is, therefore, a need to reduce the levels of resistance in the pig production system using improved treatment...

  18. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Model To Evaluate Intramuscular Tetracycline Treatment Protocols To Prevent Antimicrobial Resistance in Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Amais; Græsbøll, Kaare; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo

    2015-01-01

    to which resistant strains outcompete susceptible strains under antimicrobial pressure may depend not only on the antimicrobial treatment strategies but also on the epidemiological parameters, such as the composition of the bacterial strains in a pig. This study evaluated how variation in the dosing......High instances of antimicrobial resistance are linked to both routine and excessive antimicrobial use, but excessive or inappropriate use represents an unnecessary risk. The competitive growth advantages of resistant bacteria may be amplified by the strain dynamics; in particular, the extent...... protocol for intramuscular administration of tetracycline and the composition of bacterial strains in a pig affect the level of resistance in the intestine of a pig. Predictions were generated by a mathematical model of competitive growth of Escherichia coli strains in pigs under specified plasma...

  19. Effect of fertilizer treatment on the antimicrobial activity of the leaves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Streptococcus faecalis, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. The result obtained showed that the antimicrobial activity of the leaves of O. gratissimum and G. latifolium was significantly (P < 0.05) increased by fertilizer treatment. The inhibition zone increased with increase in the level of fertilizer treatment. The ethanolic ...

  20. Effect of fertilizer treatment on the antimicrobial activity of the leaves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-12-21

    Dec 21, 2010 ... The effect of fertilizer treatment on the antimicrobial activity of the leaves of Ocimum gratissimum (L.) and Gongronema latifolium (Benth) was investigated. Cultivated O. gratissimum (L) and G. latifolium were applied with NPK (15:15:15) fertilizer at 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 kg/ha treatment levels in.

  1. "Salvage microbiology": detection of bacteria directly from clinical specimens following initiation of antimicrobial treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Farrell

    Full Text Available PCR coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS is a diagnostic approach that has demonstrated the capacity to detect pathogenic organisms from culture negative clinical samples after antibiotic treatment has been initiated. [1] We describe the application of PCR/ESI-MS for detection of bacteria in original patient specimens that were obtained after administration of antibiotic treatment in an open investigation analysis.We prospectively identified cases of suspected bacterial infection in which cultures were not obtained until after the initiation of antimicrobial treatment. PCR/ESI-MS was performed on 76 clinical specimens that were submitted for conventional microbiology testing from 47 patients receiving antimicrobial treatment.In our series, 72% (55/76 of cultures obtained following initiation of antimicrobial treatment were non-diagnostic (45 negative cultures; and 10 respiratory specimens with normal flora (5, yeast (4, or coagulase-negative staphylococcus (1. PCR/ESR-MS detected organisms in 83% (39/47 of cases and 76% (58/76 of the specimens. Bacterial pathogens were detected by PCR/ESI-MS in 60% (27/45 of the specimens in which cultures were negative. Notably, in two cases of relapse of prosthetic knee infections in patients on chronic suppressive antibiotics, the previous organism was not recovered in tissue cultures taken during extraction of the infected knee prostheses, but was detected by PCR/ESI-MS.Molecular methods that rely on nucleic acid amplification may offer a unique advantage in the detection of pathogens collected after initiation of antimicrobial treatment and may provide an opportunity to target antimicrobial therapy and "salvage" both individual treatment regimens as well as, in select cases, institutional antimicrobial stewardship efforts.

  2. Quality of antimicrobial products used in white leg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) aquaculture in Northern Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Kim Chi; Tran, Minh Phu; Phan, Thi Van

    2018-01-01

    Antimicrobials are important to treat diseases in aquaculture and the objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of antimicrobial products commonly used in white leg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) aquaculture in Northern Vietnam. A total of 25 antimicrobial products were obtained from 20....... The documented poor quality of antimicrobial products and inadequate labelling has negative impacts on effective disease treatment; contribute to development of antimicrobial resistance, and the use of such products is associated with food safety and occupational health hazards. There is an urgent need...

  3. The effects of tertiary wastewater treatment on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, L.; Wong, Danilo Lo Fo; Dalsgaard, A.

    2002-01-01

    with a genus-specific DNA probe. Independent of the different antibiotics and media used, the total numbers of resistant bacteria in treated sewage were 10-1000 times lower than in raw sewage. Based on linear regression analysis of data on bacteriological counts, the prevalences of antimicrobial-resistant...... by antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Acinetobacter isolates. Based on logistic regression analysis, isolates from treated sewage and digested sludge were generally not significantly more resistant compared with isolates from raw sewage. Based on these evidences, it was concluded that tertiary wastewater......The effects of tertiary wastewater treatment on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistant bacteria were investigated in two large-scale municipal treatment plants during a period of six months. Total and relative numbers of resistant bacteria were determined in raw sewage, treated sewage...

  4. Randomised positive control trial of NSAID and antimicrobial treatment for calf fever caused by pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendran, S A; Booth, R; Bell, N J; Burge, M

    2017-07-07

    One hundred and fifty-four preweaning calves were followed between May and October 2015. Calves were fitted with continuous monitoring temperature probes (TempVerified FeverTag), programmed so a flashing light emitting diode (LED) light was triggered following six hours of a sustained ear canal temperature of ≥39.7°C. A total of 83 calves (61.9 per cent) developed undifferentiated fever, with a presumptive diagnosis of pneumonia through exclusion of other calf diseases. Once fever was detected, calves were randomly allocated to treatment groups. Calves in group 1 (NSAID) received 2 mg/kg flunixin meglumine (Allevinix, Merial) for three consecutive days and group 2 (antimicrobial) received 6 mg/kg gamithromycin (Zactran, Merial). If fever persisted for 72 hours after the initial treatment, calves were given further treatment (group 1 received antimicrobial and group 2 received NSAID). Calves in group 1 (NSAID) were five times more likely (P=0.002) to require a second treatment (the antimicrobial) after 72 hours to resolve the fever compared with the need to give group 2 (antimicrobial) calves a second treatment (NSAID). This demonstrates the importance of ongoing monitoring and follow-up of calves with respiratory disease. However, of calves with fever in group 1 (NSAID), 25.7 per cent showed resolution following NSAID-only treatment with no detrimental effect on the development of repeated fever or daily live weight gain. This suggests that NSAID alone may be a useful first-line treatment, provided adequate attention is given to ongoing monitoring to identify those cases that require additional antimicrobial treatment.

  5. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model to evaluate intramuscular tetracycline treatment protocols to prevent antimicrobial resistance in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Amais; Græsbøll, Kaare; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Toft, Nils; Matthews, Louise; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2015-03-01

    High instances of antimicrobial resistance are linked to both routine and excessive antimicrobial use, but excessive or inappropriate use represents an unnecessary risk. The competitive growth advantages of resistant bacteria may be amplified by the strain dynamics; in particular, the extent to which resistant strains outcompete susceptible strains under antimicrobial pressure may depend not only on the antimicrobial treatment strategies but also on the epidemiological parameters, such as the composition of the bacterial strains in a pig. This study evaluated how variation in the dosing protocol for intramuscular administration of tetracycline and the composition of bacterial strains in a pig affect the level of resistance in the intestine of a pig. Predictions were generated by a mathematical model of competitive growth of Escherichia coli strains in pigs under specified plasma concentration profiles of tetracycline. All dosing regimens result in a clear growth advantage for resistant strains. Short treatment duration was found to be preferable, since it allowed less time for resistant strains to outcompete the susceptible ones. Dosing frequency appeared to be ineffective at reducing the resistance levels. The number of competing strains had no apparent effect on the resistance level during treatment, but possession of fewer strains reduced the time to reach equilibrium after the end of treatment. To sum up, epidemiological parameters may have more profound influence on growth dynamics than dosing regimens and should be considered when designing improved treatment protocols. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Heat treatment effects on the antimicrobial activity of macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorraquino, M A; Althaus, R L; Roca, M; Molina, M P

    2011-02-01

    Antibiotic residues in milk can cause serious problems for consumers and the dairy industry. Heat treatment of milk may diminish the antimicrobial activity of these antibiotic residues. This study analyzed the effect of milk processing (60 °C for 30 min, 120 °C for 20 min, and 140 °C for 10 s) on the antimicrobial activity of milk samples fortified with three concentrations of three macrolides (erythromycin: 20, 40 and 80 μg/liter; spiramycin: 100, 200, and 400 μg/liter; and tylosin: 500, 1,000, and 2,000 μg/liter) and one lincosamide (lincomycin: 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 μg/liter). To measure the loss of antimicrobial activity, a bioassay based on the growth inhibition of Micrococcus luteus was done. The data were analyzed using a multiple linear regression model. The results indicate that treatment at 120 °C for 20 min produces inactivation percentages of 93% (erythromycin), 64% (spiramycin), 51% (tylosin), and 5% (lincomycin), while treatment at 140 °C for 10 s results in generally lower percentages (30% erythromycin, 35% spiramycin, 12% tylosin, and 5% lincomycin). The lowest loss or lowest reduction of antimicrobial activity (21% erythromycin and 13% spiramycin) was obtained by treatment at 60 °C for 30 min. Copyright ©, International Association for Food Protection

  7. Antimicrobial and cold plasma treatments for inactivation of listeria monocytogenes on whole apple surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Produce and bacterial cell surface structure play an important role as to where and how bacteria attach to produce surfaces. The efficacy of a novel antimicrobial solution developed in our laboratory was investigated in combination with cold plasma treatments for inactivation of Liste...

  8. Occurrence and fate of dissolved and particulate antimicrobials in municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senta, Ivan; Terzic, Senka; Ahel, Marijan

    2013-02-01

    Comprehensive study on the occurrence and fate of several classes of antimicrobials, including sulfonamides, trimethoprim, fluoroquinolones and macrolides, in Croatian municipal wastewaters was performed using an integrated approach, which comprised analysis of both dissolved and particulate fractions. A nation-wide screening showed ubiquitous occurrence of human-use antimicrobials in raw wastewater samples with the total concentrations ranging from 2 to 20 μg/L, while veterinary antimicrobials were typically present in much lower concentrations (removal mechanisms of investigated compounds during the conventional activated sludge treatment. The overall removal efficiencies of antimicrobials from the water phase were rather variable, ranging from 0% for trimethoprim to 85% for norfloxacin. A significant percentage of fluoroquinolones (norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin) and macrolides (azithromycin and clarithromycin) was associated with the primary and excess secondary sludge, explaining 14-77% of the total removal. The removal, which could be attributed to biological transformation, was relatively poor for all antimicrobials, exceeding 30% only for SMX (32%) and clarithromycin (55%). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Implementing Precision Antimicrobial Therapy for the Treatment of Bovine Respiratory Disease: Current Limitations and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Lhermie

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic efficacy of an early treatment protocol with an infection-stage adjusted fluoroquinolone regimen was evaluated in a field study on young bulls (YBs presenting signs of bovine respiratory disease (BRD. A total of 195 YB (Charolais, Limousin, and Rouge-des-Prés breeds from 6 farms implementing or not prophylactic antimicrobial treatments (PROPHY or absence were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 experiment groups based on time of detection of BRD and first-line marbofloxacin regimen, early adjusted dose [Early 2 (E2] or late standard dose [Late 10 (L10]. Each YB was administered orally a reticulo-rumen bolus, allowing continuous monitoring of ruminal temperature. In the E2 group, YB presenting early signs of BRD, i.e., an increase in ruminal temperature over 40.2°C and persisting more than 12 h, confirmed by a clinical examination showing no or mild signs of BRD, were given 2 mg/kg of marbofloxacin. In the L10 group, YBs presenting moderate or severe signs of BRD at visual inspection, confirmed at clinical examination, were given 10 mg/kg of marbofloxacin. If needed, YBs were given a relapse treatment. The YBs were followed for 30 days. The proportions of first and relapse treatments were calculated, as well as the therapeutic efficacy at day 10. In the E2 group, the first-line treatments’ proportion was significantly higher (P < 0.05, while the relapse treatments’ proportion tended to be higher (P = 0.08, than in the L10 group. Evolution of clinical scores (CSs of diseased YB was followed for 10 days. In both groups, CS and rectal temperature decreased significantly 24 h after treatment (P < 0.05. Treatment incidences (TI representing antimicrobial consumption assessed on used daily doses (UDD were calculated. Antimicrobial consumption of marbofloxacin and relapse treatments were not significantly different between the groups. These values were strongly influenced by the recourse to a prophylactic

  10. Antimicrobial Nanoparticle for the Treatment of Bacterial Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornpattananangkul, Dissaya

    Liposomes are spherical lipid vesicles with bilayered membrane structure, which have been recognized as one of the most widely used carriers for delivering a myriad of pharmaceuticals. Liposomes can carry both hydrophilic and hydrophobic agents with high efficiency and protect them from undesired effects of external conditions. However, the applications of liposomes are usually limited by their instability during storage. They are inclined to fuse with one another immediately after preparation, resulting in undesired mixing, increase in size, and payload loss. To overcome this limitation, this dissertation will focus on the technology to stabilize liposomes during storage and destabilize at specific conditions in order to allow controllable therapeutic release, as well as demonstrate their application to treat one of the bacterial infection diseases, acne vulgaris. The first area of this research is stimuli-responsive liposomes development, where the liposomes are stabilized by introducing gold nanoparticles to adsorb to their surface. As a result, the liposomes are prevented from fusing with one another and undesirable payload release during storage or physiological environments. Moreover, therapeutic is controllably released depending on environment conditions, such as acidic pH and bacterial virulence factor. In case of acid-responsive liposomes, the bound gold nanoparticles can effectively prevent liposomes from fusing with one another at neutral pH value, while at acidic environment (e.g. pHhuman skin are typically acidic. Demonstrated by fluorescent and antimicrobial experiments, the bound gold nanoparticles effectively prevent LipoLA from fusing with one another at neutral pH value. However, at acidic condition, the gold particles detatch from LipoLA surface, allowing the fusion with P.acnes membrane and lauric acid delivery, resulting in a complete killing effect. The stimuli-responsive liposomes presented here provide a new, safe, and effective approach to

  11. Diversity of fecal coliforms and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in wastewater treatment model plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczkiewicz, A; Fudala-Ksiazek, S; Jankowska, K; Quant, B; Olańczuk-Neyman, K

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of resistance patterns among wastewater fecal coliforms was determined in the study. Susceptibility of the isolates was tested against 19 antimicrobial agents: aminoglycosides, aztreonam, carbapenems, cephalosporines, beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitors, penicillines, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and fluoroquinolones. Additionally the removal of resistant isolates was evaluated in the laboratory-scale wastewater treatment model plant (M-WWTP), continuously supplied with the wastewater obtained from the full-scale WWTP. Number of fecal coliforms in raw (after mechanical treatment) and treated wastewater, as well as in aerobic chamber effluent was determined using selective medium. The selected strains were identified and examined for antibiotic resistance using Phoenix Automated Microbiology System (BD Biosciences, USA). The strains were identified as Escherichia coli (n=222), Klebsiella pneumoniae ssp. ozaenae (n=9), and Pantoea agglomerans (n=1). The isolate of P. agglomerans as well as 48% of E. coli isolates were sensitive to all antimicrobials tested. The most frequent resistance patterns were found for ampicillin: 100% of K. pneumoniae ssp. ozaenae and 41% of E. coli isolates. Among E. coli isolates 12% was regarded as multiple antimicrobial resistant (MAR). In the studied M-WWTP, the applied activated sludge processes reduced considerably the number of fecal coliforms, but increased the ratio of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli isolates to sensitive ones, especially among strains with MAR patterns.

  12. Consequences of Inadequate Physical Activity

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-03-27

    Listen as CDC Epidemiologist Susan Carlson, PhD, talks about her research, which estimates the percentage of US deaths attributed to inadequate levels of physical activity.  Created: 3/27/2018 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/27/2018.

  13. Radiologists' responses to inadequate referrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysdahl, Kristin Bakke; Hofmann, Bjoern Morten; Espeland, Ansgar

    2010-01-01

    To investigate radiologists' responses to inadequate imaging referrals. A survey was mailed to Norwegian radiologists; 69% responded. They graded the frequencies of actions related to referrals with ambiguous indications or inappropriate examination choices and the contribution of factors preventing and not preventing an examination of doubtful usefulness from being performed as requested. Ninety-five percent (344/361) reported daily or weekly actions related to inadequate referrals. Actions differed among subspecialties. The most frequent were contacting the referrer to clarify the clinical problem and checking test results/information in the medical records. Both actions were more frequent among registrars than specialists and among hospital radiologists than institute radiologists. Institute radiologists were more likely to ask the patient for additional information and to examine the patient clinically. Factors rated as contributing most to prevent doubtful examinations were high risk of serious complications/side effects, high radiation dose and low patient age. Factors facilitating doubtful examinations included respect for the referrer's judgment, patient/next-of-kin wants the examination, patient has arrived, unreachable referrer, and time pressure. In summary, radiologists facing inadequate referrals considered patient safety and sought more information. Vetting referrals on arrival, easier access to referring clinicians, and time for radiologists to handle inadequate referrals may contribute to improved use of imaging. (orig.)

  14. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes. PMID:27078624

  15. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes.

  16. Enhancement of food safety – antimicrobial effectiveness of cold plasma treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina SMEU

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cold plasma treatment proved to be a flexible, efficient, chemical-free antimicrobial process and it can represent an easy to use sanitizing method for the food industry that does not require special temperature, humidity or pressure conditions. This paper reviews the classification of plasma and the main cold plasma generating devices used in the recent years to enhance food safety. A research of available literature was also conducted to identify the antimicrobial mode of action of cold plasma treatment as well as advantages and key limitations of this technique when applied to different food products such as fruits, vegetables, meat and milk. The study revealed that further development of this method will have to be carried out, allowing better understanding of the complex interactions during applications and its restrictions, as well as practice outlook.

  17. Inhalable Antimicrobials for Treatment of Bacterial Biofilm-Associated Sinusitis in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klodzinska, Sylvia Natalie; Priemel, Petra Alexandra; Rades, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm-associated chronic sinusitis in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections and the lack of available treatments for such infections constitute a critical aspect of CF disease management. Currently, inhalation therapies to combat P. aeruginosa...... infections in CF patients are focused mainly on the delivery of antimicrobials to the lower respiratory tract, disregarding the sinuses. However, the sinuses constitute a reservoir for P. aeruginosa growth, leading to re-infection of the lungs, even after clearing an initial lung infection. Eradication of P....... aeruginosa from the respiratory tract after a first infection has been shown to delay chronic pulmonary infection with the bacteria for up to two years. The challenges with providing a suitable treatment for bacterial sinusitis include: (i) identifying a suitable antimicrobial compound; (ii) selecting...

  18. Clay mineral particles as efficient carriers of methylene blue Used for antimicrobial treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bujdák, J.; Jurečenková, J.; Bujdáková, H.; Lang, Kamil; Šeršeň, F.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 16 (2009), s. 6202-6207 ISSN 0013-936X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN100500651 Grant - others:SRDA(SK) APVV-51-027405; GASK(SK) VEGA2/0089/09 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : clay mineral * disinfection material * antimicrobial treatment Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.630, year: 2009

  19. Estimates of Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Biochemical Oxygen Demand, and Fecal Coliforms Entering the Environment Due to Inadequate Sanitation Treatment Technologies in 108 Low and Middle Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmeister, Erica R; Schwab, Kellogg J; Julian, Timothy R

    2015-10-06

    Understanding the excretion and treatment of human waste (feces and urine) in low and middle income countries (LMICs) is necessary to design appropriate waste management strategies. However, excretion and treatment are often difficult to quantify due to decentralization of excreta management. We address this gap by developing a mechanistic, stochastic model to characterize phosphorus, nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and fecal coliform pollution from human excreta for 108 LMICs. The model estimates excretion and treatment given three scenarios: (1) use of existing sanitation systems, (2) use of World Health Organization-defined "improved sanitation", and (3) use of best available technologies. Our model estimates that more than 10(9) kg/yr each of phosphorus, nitrogen and BOD are produced. Of this, 22(19-27)%, 11(7-15)%, 17(10-23)%, and 35 (23-47)% (mean and 95% range) BOD, nitrogen, phosphorus, and fecal coliforms, respectively, are removed by existing sanitation systems. Our model estimates that upgrading to "improved sanitation" increases mean removal slightly to between 17 and 53%. Under the best available technology scenario, only approximately 60-80% of pollutants are treated. To reduce impact of nutrient and microbial pollution on human and environmental health, improvements in both access to adequate sanitation and sanitation treatment efficiency are needed.

  20. Can ECDC PPS HAI&AU data on antimicrobial use can be used to evaluate adherence to national guidelines for antimicrobial treatment of community acquired pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deptuła, Aleksander; Trejnowska, Ewa; Dubiel, Grzegorz; Deptuła, Maria; Zienkiewicz, Marleta; Żukowska, Agnieszka; Misiewska-Kaczur, Agnieszka; Ozorowski, Tomasz; Księżniakiewicz, Piotr; Kubiak, Joanna; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2018-02-15

    INTRODUCTION    Point-prevalence surveys are widely described as a useful tool for evaluation of antimicrobial policy, as well as adherence to the guidelines.  OBJECTIVES    To evaluate if ECDC Point Prevalence Survey and Antimicrobial Use (PPS HAI&AU) data can be used for evaluation of adherence to the national guidelines (NG) for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and analysis of the quality of treatment regimens. PATIENTS AND METHODS    Data for 72 698 patients were collected in Poland between 2012-2015 according to the ECDC Protocol v.4.2. CAP was the indication for antimicrobial treatment in 3,608 patients. Patients hospitalized longer than 48 hours were excluded. 667 patients met inclusion criteria and 79 regimens were recorded. The first author evaluated them as concordant or discordant with the NG. Afterwards, seven experts scored those regimens from 1 to 5. Averages were calculated, results PPS HAI&AU data can be efficiently used for guidelines adherence evaluation. Despite low adherence to the guidelines (22.8%) almost 75% of patients received optimal antimicrobials. Some actions promoting guidelines and time-series studies analysing improvement of adherence should be considered.

  1. Antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter coli selected by tylosin treatment at a pig farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntunen, P; Heiska, H; Olkkola, S; Myllyniemi, A-L; Hänninen, M-L

    2010-11-20

    Limited knowledge is available regarding the dynamics of macrolide resistance under farm conditions with natural Campylobacter populations. We examined the dynamics of antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter coli at a large pig farm. Faeces were sampled from untreated sows and piglets (n=57), weaned pigs treated with tylosin (n=68) and pigs of the same group 3-5 weeks after withdrawal of tylosin (n=15). Additionally, 48 weaned pigs were sampled after tylosin had not been administered for 7 months at the farm. MICs for seven antimicrobials were determined, isolates were genotyped by PFGE and mutations conferring macrolide resistance were identified. Resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent was higher (Ptylosin had not been administered for 7 months. Resistance to erythromycin and streptomycin also decreased (Ptylosin treatment. In conclusion, tylosin treatment of pigs selected for a high-level of resistance to erythromycin and resistance to ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid and streptomycin also increased in C. coli isolates within a few days. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship between biosecurity and production/antimicrobial treatment characteristics in pig herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laanen, M; Persoons, D; Ribbens, S; de Jong, E; Callens, B; Strubbe, M; Maes, D; Dewulf, J

    2013-11-01

    The biosecurity status of 95 breeder-finisher pig herds was quantified using a risk-based weighted scoring system. Data relating to herd-, farmer- and production-characteristics and to the prophylactic use of antimicrobials were also collected. The average external biosecurity score (measures to prevent pathogens from entering a herd) was 65 (range, 45-89) and the average internal score (measures to reduce the within-herd spread of pathogens) was 52 (range, 18-87). External scores were positively associated with herd size, while internal scores were negatively associated with both 'age of buildings' and 'years of experience of the farmer', indicating that biosecurity is generally better implemented in larger herds, in more modern facilities and by younger farmers. External and internal biosecurity scores were positively associated with daily weight gain and negatively associated with feed conversion ratio of fattening pigs. Internal scores were negatively associated with disease treatment incidence, suggesting that improved biosecurity might help in reducing the amount of antimicrobials used prophylactically. This study demonstrates and quantifies a clear link between biosecurity and both production- and antimicrobial treatment-related criteria in pig herds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy: a promise candidate for caries lesions treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Ivana Márcia Alves; Horta, Ivay Diniz; Azevedo, Cynthia Soares; Elmadjian, Thaís Regina; Matos, Adriana Bona; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzetti; Marques, Márcia Martins

    2015-09-01

    Antibacterial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is a promising adjunctive therapy to the treatment of caries lesions, mainly in the minimally invasive approach to preserve dental tissue and favor its repair. Here we analyzed both the efficacy of aPDT in reducing the bacterial load in cariogenic biofilms and the indirect effect of noxious components produced by aPDT on the viability of dental pulp cells. The aPDT protocol was established using 0.025g/mL methylene blue (MB) and 5min pre-irradiation time. A continuous-wave diode laser (660nm, 0.04cm(2) spot size, 40mW, 60s, 60J/cm(2) and 2.4J) was used in punctual and distance modes to excite the MB. The protocol was first tested against Streptococcus mutans (U159) biofilms produced in 96-well microplates, and then evaluated on caries-like affected human dentin discs of three thicknesses. The number of colony forming units (CFU) was compared between groups. Discs were then assembled in metallic inserts to produce an artificial pulp chamber and allow investigation of the indirect effects of aPDT on dental pulp cells by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Data were analyzed using Student's t test or one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Tukey's test at a significance level of 5%. Bacterial load reduction was observed in biofilms produced both in the microplates (pcaries-like affected dentin discs (81.01% or mean reduction of log21.010±0.1548; p=0.0029). The cell viability of aPDT and control group was similar (p>0.05). aPDT may be considered a promise adjunctive therapy for deep carious lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Underlying mechanism of antimicrobial activity of chitosan microparticles and implications for the treatment of infectious diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Jin Jeon

    Full Text Available The emergence of antibiotic resistant microorganisms is a great public health concern and has triggered an urgent need to develop alternative antibiotics. Chitosan microparticles (CM, derived from chitosan, have been shown to reduce E. coli O157:H7 shedding in a cattle model, indicating potential use as an alternative antimicrobial agent. However, the underlying mechanism of CM on reducing the shedding of this pathogen remains unclear. To understand the mode of action, we studied molecular mechanisms of antimicrobial activity of CM using in vitro and in vivo methods. We report that CM are an effective bactericidal agent with capability to disrupt cell membranes. Binding assays and genetic studies with an ompA mutant strain demonstrated that outer membrane protein OmpA of E. coli O157:H7 is critical for CM binding, and this binding activity is coupled with a bactericidal effect of CM. This activity was also demonstrated in an animal model using cows with uterine diseases. CM treatment effectively reduced shedding of intrauterine pathogenic E. coli (IUPEC in the uterus compared to antibiotic treatment. Since Shiga-toxins encoded in the genome of bacteriophage is often overexpressed during antibiotic treatment, antibiotic therapy is generally not recommended because of high risk of hemolytic uremic syndrome. However, CM treatment did not induce bacteriophage or Shiga-toxins in E. coli O157:H7; suggesting that CM can be a potential candidate to treat infections caused by this pathogen. This work establishes an underlying mechanism whereby CM exert antimicrobial activity in vitro and in vivo, providing significant insight for the treatment of diseases caused by a broad spectrum of pathogens including antibiotic resistant microorganisms.

  5. Insulin Initiation in Insulin-Naïve Korean Type 2 Diabetic Patients Inadequately Controlled on Oral Antidiabetic Drugs in Real-World Practice: The Modality of Insulin Treatment Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, In Joo; Kim, Yong Ki; Yoon, Kun Ho; Son, Ho Young; Park, Sung Woo; Sung, Yeon Ah; Baek, Hong Sun

    2015-12-01

    The Modality of Insulin Treatment Evaluation (MOTIV) study was performed to provide real-world data concerning insulin initiation in Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with inadequate glycemic control with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs). This multicenter, non-interventional, prospective, observational study enrolled T2DM patients with inadequate glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] ≥7.0%) who had been on OHAs for ≥3 months and were already decided to introduce basal insulin by their physician prior to the start of the study. All treatment decisions were at the physician's discretion to reflect real-world practice. A total of 9,196 patients were enrolled, and 8,636 patients were included in the analysis (mean duration of diabetes, 8.9 years; mean HbA1c, 9.2%). Basal insulin plus one OHA was the most frequently (51.0%) used regimen. After 6 months of basal insulin treatment, HbA1c decreased to 7.4% and 44.5% of patients reached HbA1c <7%. Body weight increased from 65.2 kg to 65.5 kg, which was not significant. Meanwhile, there was significant increase in the mean daily insulin dose from 16.9 IU at baseline to 24.5 IU at month 6 (P<0.001). Overall, 17.6% of patients experienced at least one hypoglycemic event. In a real-world setting, the initiation of basal insulin is an effective and well-tolerated treatment option in Korean patients with T2DM who are failing to meet targets with OHA therapy.

  6. Insulin Initiation in Insulin-Naïve Korean Type 2 Diabetic Patients Inadequately Controlled on Oral Antidiabetic Drugs in Real-World Practice: The Modality of Insulin Treatment Evaluation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe Modality of Insulin Treatment Evaluation (MOTIV study was performed to provide real-world data concerning insulin initiation in Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients with inadequate glycemic control with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs.MethodsThis multicenter, non-interventional, prospective, observational study enrolled T2DM patients with inadequate glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] ≥7.0% who had been on OHAs for ≥3 months and were already decided to introduce basal insulin by their physician prior to the start of the study. All treatment decisions were at the physician's discretion to reflect real-world practice.ResultsA total of 9,196 patients were enrolled, and 8,636 patients were included in the analysis (mean duration of diabetes, 8.9 years; mean HbA1c, 9.2%. Basal insulin plus one OHA was the most frequently (51.0% used regimen. After 6 months of basal insulin treatment, HbA1c decreased to 7.4% and 44.5% of patients reached HbA1c <7%. Body weight increased from 65.2 kg to 65.5 kg, which was not significant. Meanwhile, there was significant increase in the mean daily insulin dose from 16.9 IU at baseline to 24.5 IU at month 6 (P<0.001. Overall, 17.6% of patients experienced at least one hypoglycemic event.ConclusionIn a real-world setting, the initiation of basal insulin is an effective and well-tolerated treatment option in Korean patients with T2DM who are failing to meet targets with OHA therapy.

  7. Reduction of Sulfonylurea with the Initiation of Basal Insulin in Patients with Inadequately Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Undergoing Long-Term Sulfonylurea-Based Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeoree Yang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThere were a limited number of studies about β-cell function after insulin initiation in patients exposed to long durations of sulfonylurea treatment. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the recovery of β-cell function and the efficacy of concurrent sulfonylurea use after the start of long-acting insulin.MethodsIn this randomized controlled study, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, receiving sulfonylurea for at least 2 years with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c >7%, were randomly assigned to two groups: sulfonylurea maintenance (SM and sulfonylurea reduction (SR. Following a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, we administered long-acting basal insulin to the two groups. After a 6-month follow-up, we repeated the OGTT.ResultsAmong 69 enrolled patients, 57 completed the study and were analyzed: 31 in the SM and 26 in the SR group. At baseline, there was no significant difference except for the longer duration of diabetes and lower triglycerides in the SR group. After 6 months, the HbA1c was similarly reduced in both groups, but there was little difference in the insulin dose. In addition, insulin secretion during OGTT was significantly increased by 20% to 30% in both groups. A significant weight gain was observed in the SM group only. The insulinogenic index was more significantly improved in the SR group.ConclusionLong-acting basal insulin replacement could improve the glycemic status and restore β-cell function in the T2DM patients undergoing sulfonylurea-based treatment, irrespective of the sulfonylurea dose reduction. The dose reduction of the concurrent sulfonylurea might be beneficial with regard to weight grain.

  8. The standard treatment protocol for paracetamol poisoning may be inadequate following overdose with modified release formulation: a pharmacokinetic and clinical analysis of 53 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonson, Heléne; Sjöberg, Gunilla; Brogren, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    The use of the standard procedure for managing overdoses with immediate release (IR) paracetamol is questionable when applied to overdoses with modified release (MR) formulations. This study describes the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol and the clinical outcomes following overdoses with a MR formulation. Medical records including laboratory analyses concerning overdoses of MR paracetamol from 2009 to 2015 were collected retrospectively. Inclusion criteria were ingestion of a toxic dose, known time of intake and documented measurements of serum paracetamol and liver function tests. Graphical analysis, descriptive statistics and population pharmacokinetic modelling were used to describe data. Fifty-three cases were identified. Median age was 26 years (range 13-68), median dose was 20 g (range 10-166) and 74% were females. The pharmacokinetic analysis showed a complex, dose dependent serum versus time profile with prolonged absorption and delayed serum peak concentrations with increasing dose. Ten patients had persistently high serum levels for 24 h or more, six of them had a second peak 8-19 h after ingestion. Seven of 34 patients receiving N-acetylcysteine (NAC) within 8 h had alanine aminotransferase (ALT) above reference range. Three of them developed hepatotoxicity (ALT >1000 IU/l). The pharmacokinetic and clinical analysis showed that the standard treatment protocol, including risk assessment and NAC regimen, used for IR paracetamol poisoning not appear suitable for MR formulation. Individual and tailored treatment may be valuable but further studies are warranted to determine optimal regimen of overdoses with MR formulation.

  9. A randomised, double-blind study in adults with major depressive disorder with an inadequate response to a single course of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor or serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor treatment switched to vortioxetine or agomelatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Stuart A; Nielsen, Rebecca Z; Poulsen, Lis H; Häggström, Lars

    2014-09-01

    This randomised, double-blind, 12-week study compared efficacy and tolerability of flexible-dose treatment with vortioxetine(10-20 mg/day) versus agomelatine (25-50 mg/day) in major depressive disorder patients with inadequate response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)/serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) monotherapy. Patients were switched directly from SSRI/SNRI to vortioxetine or agomelatine. Primary endpoint was change from baseline to week 8 in the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score analysed by mixed model for repeated measurements, using a noninferiority test followed by a superiority test. Secondary endpoints included response and remission rates, anxiety symptoms(Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), Clinical Global Impression, overall functioning (Sheehan Disability Scale), health-related quality of life(EuroQol 5 Dimensions), productivity (work limitation questionnaire) and family functioning (Depression and Family Functioning Scale). Primary endpoint noninferiority was established and vortioxetine (n = 252) was superior to agomelatine (n = 241) by 2.2 MADRS points (pDepression and Family Functioning Scale at weeks 8 and 12. Fewer patients withdrew because of adverse events with vortioxetine (5.9% vs 9.5%). Adverse events (incidence ≥5%) were nausea, headache, dizziness and somnolence. Vortioxetine was noninferior and significantly superior to agomelatine in major depressive disorder patients with previous inadequate response to a single course of SSRI/SNRI monotherapy. Vortioxetine was safe and well tolerated.

  10. Antimicrobial treatment of infective endocarditis caused by viridans streptococci highly susceptible to penicillin: historic overview and future considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, D. W. M.; Vedder, A. C.; Speelman, P.; van der Meer, J. T. M.

    2006-01-01

    In this article we present the path that led to current concepts regarding antimicrobial treatment of endocarditis caused by viridans streptococci highly susceptible to penicillin. Early treatment trials indicate that some patients with subacute endocarditis can be cured with shorter treatment

  11. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Combined With Conventional Endodontic Treatment to Eliminate Root Canal Biofilm Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcez, Aguinaldo S.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; Tegos, George P.; Núñez, Silvia C.; Jorge, Antonio O.C.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective To compare the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT), standard endodontic treatment and the combined treatment to eliminate bacterial biofilms present in infected root canals. Study Design/Materials and Methods Ten single-rooted freshly extracted human teeth were inoculated with stable bioluminescent Gram-negative bacteria, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form 3-day biofilms in prepared root canals. Bioluminescence imaging was used to serially quantify bacterial burdens. PDT employed a conjugate between polyethylenimine and chlorin(e6) as the photosensitizer (PS) and 660-nm diode laser light delivered into the root canal via a 200-µ fiber, and this was compared and combined with standard endodontic treatment using mechanical debridement and antiseptic irrigation. Results Endodontic therapy alone reduced bacterial bioluminescence by 90% while PDT alone reduced bioluminescence by 95%. The combination reduced bioluminescence by >98%, and importantly the bacterial regrowth observed 24 hours after treatment was much less for the combination (Pendodontic therapy. Antimicrobial PDT may have a role to play in optimized endodontic therapy. PMID:17066481

  12. The Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy in the Treatment of Peri-Implantitis

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    Umberto Romeo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of addition of the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy to the conventional approach in the treatment of peri-implantitis. Materials and Methods. Forty patients were randomly assigned to test or control groups. Patients were assessed at baseline and at six (T1, twelve (T2, and twenty-four (T3 weeks recording plaque index (PlI, probing pocket depth (PPD, and bleeding on probing (BOP; control group received conventional periodontal therapy, while test group received photodynamic therapy in addition to it. Result. Test group showed a 70% reduction in the plaque index values and a 60% reduction in PD values compared to the baseline. BOP and suppuration were not detectable. Control group showed a significative reduction in plaque index and PD. Discussion. Laser therapy has some advantages in comparison to traditional therapy, with faster and greater healing of the wound. Conclusion. Test group showed after 24 weeks a better value in terms of PPD, BOP, and PlI, with an average pocket depth value of 2 mm, if compared with control group (3 mm. Our results suggest that antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with diode laser and phenothiazine chloride represents a reliable adjunctive treatment to conventional therapy. Photodynamic therapy should, however, be considered a coadjuvant in the treatment of peri-implantitis associated with mechanical (scaling and surgical (grafts treatments.

  13. Addition of antimicrobial/antimold feature and antistatic treatment by electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Shinobu [Iwasaki Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    A plastic which has a high insulation resistance and is apt to build up static causes an electrostatic problem during the process or other problem like an attraction of dust or small particle. Bacteria and fungus are suspended in the air by sticking to the dust/small particle/waterdrop or in the form of spore, and are apt to stick to the substance bearing the static electricity, which may lead to a microbial problem. In order to avoid these problems, an antistatic agent is mixed in a plastic so that the insulation resistance is decreased to prevent the static electricity. Also for the addition of antimicrobial/antimold feature to a plastic, a mixing-in of antimicrobial/antimold agent is adopted. However, problems still remain in the antistatic treatment, such as that an antistatic effect finally becomes invalid due to the loss of the antistatic agent after some time or the surface of the substance becomes viscous and consequently can not maintain the hardness. As to the antimicrobial/antimold treatment, a difficulty remains in selecting a suitable antimicrobial/antimold agent which must be resistant to high temperature during a mixing-in of the agent. In our test, an electron beam-induced technology (EB) by which a non-solvent resin can be hardened at room temperature and provided with a surface hardening is evaluated. An antimicrobial effect was tested by using Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. No live bacteria was observed in a bacteria solution which had been kept overnight in contact with the test film, and the result was proved to successful. As to the antimold effect, a drop of a suspension of 5 different spores including Aspergillus niger was applied to a culture medium, and it was kept in contact with the test film for culturing. On the untreated sample, a growth of the mold was observed approx. 2 weeks later, but on the test film, a growth of the mold was not observed, and the result was proved to be successful. (J.P.N.)

  14. Addition of antimicrobial/antimold feature and antistatic treatment by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Shinobu

    1996-01-01

    A plastic which has a high insulation resistance and is apt to build up static causes an electrostatic problem during the process or other problem like an attraction of dust or small particle. Bacteria and fungus are suspended in the air by sticking to the dust/small particle/waterdrop or in the form of spore, and are apt to stick to the substance bearing the static electricity, which may lead to a microbial problem. In order to avoid these problems, an antistatic agent is mixed in a plastic so that the insulation resistance is decreased to prevent the static electricity. Also for the addition of antimicrobial/antimold feature to a plastic, a mixing-in of antimicrobial/antimold agent is adopted. However, problems still remain in the antistatic treatment, such as that an antistatic effect finally becomes invalid due to the loss of the antistatic agent after some time or the surface of the substance becomes viscous and consequently can not maintain the hardness. As to the antimicrobial/antimold treatment, a difficulty remains in selecting a suitable antimicrobial/antimold agent which must be resistant to high temperature during a mixing-in of the agent. In our test, an electron beam-induced technology (EB) by which a non-solvent resin can be hardened at room temperature and provided with a surface hardening is evaluated. An antimicrobial effect was tested by using Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. No live bacteria was observed in a bacteria solution which had been kept overnight in contact with the test film, and the result was proved to successful. As to the antimold effect, a drop of a suspension of 5 different spores including Aspergillus niger was applied to a culture medium, and it was kept in contact with the test film for culturing. On the untreated sample, a growth of the mold was observed approx. 2 weeks later, but on the test film, a growth of the mold was not observed, and the result was proved to be successful. (J.P.N.)

  15. The effect of antimicrobial treatment and preventive strategies on bovine respiratory disease and genetic relatedness and antimicrobial resistance of Mycoplasma bovis isolates in a western Canadian feedlot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, Steven H.; Bateman, Ken G.; Rosengren, Leigh B.

    2013-01-01

    Feedlot calves (n = 3784) were systematically randomized and allocated in a 2 × 2 factorial study to receive metaphylactic oxytetracycline (OTC) on arrival or no antimicrobial, as well as florfenicol once subcutaneously or twice intramuscularly (48 h apart) if diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Calves of different treatment groups were comingled and followed from placement to re-implantation (~100 days). Animals receiving OTC had a reduced risk of BRD, an increased risk of arthritis, and no significant differences in average daily gain, BRD relapse, overall mortality, or BRD mortality. There were no significant differences between treatment protocols. Deep nasal swabs (n = 233) taken at arrival (n = 122), treatment (n = 77), and swabs from lungs and joints at postmortem (n = 34) were cultured for Mycoplasma bovis from 61 animals ill or dying of chronic pneumonia and arthritis and from 61 healthy calves. There was significant variation in diversity among isolates (n = 51) between study years and different cattle. Metaphylaxis or antimicrobial treatment did not affect the diversity of isolates. Except for tilmicosin, isolates were largely susceptible to tested antimicrobials. PMID:24293675

  16. The effect of antimicrobial treatment and preventive strategies on bovine respiratory disease and genetic relatedness and antimicrobial resistance of Mycoplasma bovis isolates in a western Canadian feedlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, Steven H; Bateman, Ken G; Rosengren, Leigh B

    2013-12-01

    Feedlot calves (n = 3784) were systematically randomized and allocated in a 2 × 2 factorial study to receive metaphylactic oxytetracycline (OTC) on arrival or no antimicrobial, as well as florfenicol once subcutaneously or twice intramuscularly (48 h apart) if diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Calves of different treatment groups were comingled and followed from placement to re-implantation (~100 days). Animals receiving OTC had a reduced risk of BRD, an increased risk of arthritis, and no significant differences in average daily gain, BRD relapse, overall mortality, or BRD mortality. There were no significant differences between treatment protocols. Deep nasal swabs (n = 233) taken at arrival (n = 122), treatment (n = 77), and swabs from lungs and joints at postmortem (n = 34) were cultured for Mycoplasma bovis from 61 animals ill or dying of chronic pneumonia and arthritis and from 61 healthy calves. There was significant variation in diversity among isolates (n = 51) between study years and different cattle. Metaphylaxis or antimicrobial treatment did not affect the diversity of isolates. Except for tilmicosin, isolates were largely susceptible to tested antimicrobials.

  17. Clinical and microbial efficacy of antimicrobial treatments of experimental avian colibacillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheilly, Alexandra; Bouder, Axelle; Le Devendec, Laëtitia; Hellard, Gwenaëlle; Kempf, Isabelle

    2011-05-05

    The clinical and microbial efficacy of antimicrobial treatments of avian colibacillosis was studied, using an experimental model on chickens previously inoculated with multiresistant commensal Escherichia coli strains. One E. coli with pMG252 plasmid containing bla(FOX5) and qnrA1 genes and another E. coli with pMG298 plasmid containing bla(CTX-M15) and qnrB1 genes were first orally inoculated to chickens Both isolates were also resistant to chloramphenicol, sulphamethoxazole, trimethoprim, streptomycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, and tetracycline. The birds were then experimentally infected with an avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC), via the air sac. Treatments (oxytetracycline (OTC), trimethoprim-sulfadimethoxin (SXT), amoxicillin (AMX) or enrofloxacin (ENR) were then offered at the therapeutic doses. Symptoms, lesions in dead or sacrificed birds, and isolation and characterization of APEC from internal organs were studied. Results showed that OTC, SXT or ENR treatments could control the pathology. AMX worsened the disease, possibly due to endotoxin shock. All APEC re-isolated from internal organs showed the same antimicrobial susceptibility as the APEC inoculated strain, except for one APEC isolate from an infected OTC-treated bird, which acquired tetracycline resistance only, and one APEC isolate recovered from the air sacs of a chicken in the infected SXT-treated group, which acquired the pMG252 plasmid and became multi-resistant. Thus three antimicrobials could control the disease but the experimental model enabled, to our knowledge, the first observation of plasmid transfer from a bacterium of the intestinal tract to a pathogenic isolate from the respiratory tract. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Antimicrobial therapy for the treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS patients: a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seddon J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Jo Seddon1, Sanjay Bhagani21Department of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK; 2Department of Infection and Immunity, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London, UKAbstract: The widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART has entirely changed the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and dramatically reduced the rates of opportunistic infections (OI. However, OI continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in both developed countries, where presentation with advanced HIV infection is common, and also in developing countries where ART is less widely available. Evidence to direct OI guidelines is partly limited by the fact that many large-scale studies date from the pre-ART era and more recent studies are sometimes poorly powered due to the falling rates of OI. Treatment of OI is now known to be as much about antimicrobials as about immune reconstitution with ART, and recent studies help guide the timing of initiation of ART in different infections. OI have also become complicated by the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome phenomenon which may occur once successful immune recovery begins. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has long been one of the most important antibiotics in the treatment and prevention of OI and remains paramount. It has a broad spectrum of activity against Pneumocystis jiroveci, toxoplasmosis, and bacterial infections and has an important role to play in preventing life-threatening OI. New advances in treating OI are coming from a variety of quarters: in cytomegalovirus eye disease, the use of oral rather than intravenous drugs is changing the face of therapy; in cryptococcal meningitis, improved drug formulations and combination therapy is improving clearance rates and reducing drug toxicities; and in gut disease, the possibility of rapid immune restitution with ART is replacing the need for antimicrobials against cryptosporidia and microsporidia.Keywords: HIV

  19. Can Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (aPDT) Enhance the Endodontic Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiniforush, Nasim; Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Shahabi, Sima; Kosarieh, Emad; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve a long-lasting effect, one of the main goals in root canal treatment is to eliminate the endodontic bacteria. Conventional chemomechanical debridement is considered as the basic treatment in root canal therapy, but adjunctive techniques such as antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) can also be helpful. The aim of this study was to evaluate reports in the scientific literature that used different photosensitizers (PSs) for bacterial reduction. The literature search was conducted using databases including PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar with the keywords "photodynamic therapy," "antimicrobial photodynamic therapy," or "photoactivated disinfection" and "endodontic," "Enterococcus faecalis," or "root canal treatment," from 2000 to 2015. By evaluating different studies, it was concluded that aPDT should be applied in combination with conventional mechanical debridement and irrigants. However, it is also important to note that the success rate is critically dependent on the type of the PS, output power of the laser used, irradiation time, pre-irradiation time, and type of tips used.

  20. Shedding of cephalosporin resistant Escherichia coli in pigs from conventional farms after early treatment with antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron-Veas, Karla; Moreno, Miguel A; Fraile, Lorenzo; Migura-Garcia, Lourdes

    2016-05-01

    This study assessed the dynamics of cephalosporin resistant (CR) E. coli populations during the life cycle of pigs treated early in life with ceftiofur or tulathromycin. The study was conducted at eight conventional pig farms; four for each treatment with ceftiofur or tulathromycin. At each farm, 70 7-day-old piglets were divided into two groups: a control group (n = 30) and a treatment group (n = 40). Faecal samples were collected on day 0 and on days 2, 7 and 180 post-treatment. Sows were also sampled on day 0. CR E. coli were selected on MacConkey agar with ceftriaxone. On five farms, 7-day-old piglets excreted CR E. coli before treatment associated with the presence of CR E. coli in sows. The occurrence of CR E. coli positive animals decreased with increasing piglet age. The remaining three farms tested negative for CR E. coli during the study period. Results demonstrated great variability in the frequency of CR E. coli positive animals between farms, independent of treatment. Treatment with ceftiofur resulted in a transitory increase in the counts of CR E. coli after 48 h. However, other risk factors including the presence of CR E. coli in sows and animal age were more important than antimicrobial treatment. Accordingly, intervention strategies targeting sows would likely have a beneficial effect in reducing the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in primary pig production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hyperosmotic nanoemulsions: Development and application of a new antimicrobial treatment for wound care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Sean

    Wound healing is the intricate process that restores function to damaged skin. The process consists of the inflammatory, proliferative and remodeling phases that orchestrate dynamic cellular responses to regenerate the cutaneous barrier. However, microbial contamination of the wound site stimulates a deleterious inflammatory response with the production of endotoxins, exotoxins and proteases that result in secondary injury. The end result is delayed healing, protracted debilitation and increased health care costs. Controlling contamination is critical for proper wound management and reduced burden on the healthcare system. Based on this concern, we developed and applied a new antimicrobial therapeutic that relies on hyperosmotic nanoemulsions (HNE). The biomechanical process consists of a high-energy nanoemulsion component that permeates the protective microbial membrane and a (ii) nonionic hyperosmoticum that facilitates intracellular water extraction to critically dehydrate the pathogen. HNE was shown to be effective against a multitude of pathogens including bacteria, antibiotic-resistant variants, fungi and viruses. Reported non-clinical studies demonstrate that the membrane disrupting nanoemulsion and hyperosmotic component act synergistically to enhance microbicidal activity. Further, results illustrate that pathogen inactivation was rapid as determined by ion and macromolecule leakage assays. Application of HNE in a pre-clinical animal model of wound healing demonstrated the treatment actively promoted healing to reduce treatment times. HNE mitigated wound infection to reduce the inflammatory response and mechanically debrided the wound to facilitate wound closure. Recent work further enhanced the stability of the nanoemulsion component with the addition of surfactant stabilizers using a low-energy spontaneous emulsification process. The refined nanoemulsion composition was stable against physical stressors and long-term storage without disrupting the

  2. Clinical and Histological Evaluation of the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy used in addition to Antibiotic Therapy in Pericoronitis Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Cennet Neslihan; Tunc, Serap Keskin; Erten, Remzi; Usumez, Aslıhan

    2018-02-24

    Although antimicrobial efficacy of photodynamic therapy has been studied several times, there is no study investigating its efficacy on pericoronitis. This study aimed to determine whether antimicrobial photodynamic therapy combined with antibiotic therapy is clinically and histologically superior to antibiotic therapy alone in pericoronitis treatment. Patients (n = 40) with pericoronitis were divided into two groups (20 patients for each) to receive either antibiotic + indocyanine green + 810 nm wavelength diode laser (antimicrobial photodynamic therapy group) or antibiotic alone. Initial biopsy samples were obtained from the affected tissue of the patients at their first presentation to the clinic before any intervention. The second biopsy samples were obtained on the 3rd day of treatment in both groups from the tissue part not biopsied before; tooth extraction was then performed. All tissue samples were histologically examined to assess inflammatory cell response. Patients' pain (using Visual Analogue Scale) and lymphadenopathy (presence or absence) were clinically evaluated in the first 3 days and on the 7th day of treatment. In the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy group, 100% improvement was achieved regarding pain and lymphadenopathy at the end of the 7th day. Comparison of the inflammatory cell scores of the 2nd biopsy samples between the antibiotic alone and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy groups revealed a significant difference in favor of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy group. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy combined with antibiotic therapy for pericoronitis treatment was found to be more successful as compared with the antibiotic therapy alone regarding clinical and histological outcomes. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Quantification of symbiotic contributions to lower termite lignocellulose digestion using antimicrobial treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Brittany F; Stewart, Hannah L; Scharf, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Animal-microbe co-evolution and symbiosis are broadly distributed across the animal kingdom. Insects form a myriad of associations with microbes ranging from vectoring of pathogens to intracellular, mutualistic relationships. Lower termites are key models for insect-microbe symbiosis because of the diversity, complexity and functionality of their unique tripartite symbiosis. This collaboration allows termites to live on a diet of nitrogen-poor lignocellulose. Recent functional investigations of lignocellulose digestion in lower termites have primarily focused on the contributions of the eukaryotic members of the termite holobiont (termite and protist). Here, using multiple antimicrobial treatments, we induced differing degrees of dysbiosis in the termite gut, leading to variably altered symbiont abundance and diversity, and lignocellulolytic capacity. Although protists are clearly affected by antimicrobial treatments, our findings provide novel evidence that the removal of distinct groups of bacteria partially reduces, but does not abolish, the saccharolytic potential of the termite gut holobiont. This is specifically manifested by reductions of 23-47% and 30-52% in glucose and xylose yields respectively from complex lignocellulose. Thus, all members of the lower termite holobiont (termite, protist and prokaryotes) are involved in the process of efficient, sustained lignocellulase activity. This unprecedented quantification of the relative importance of prokaryotes in this system emphasizes the collaborative nature of the termite holobiont, and the relevance of lower termites as models for inter-domain symbioses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial Effects of Three Different Treatment Modalities on Dental Implant Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Olav I; Enersen, Morten; Kristoffersen, Anne Karin; Wennerberg, Ann; Bunæs, Dagmar F; Lie, Stein Atle; Leknes, Knut N

    2017-12-01

    Resolution of peri-implant inflammation and re-osseointegration of peri-implantitis affected dental implants seem to be dependent on bacterial decontamination. The aims of the study were to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of 3 different instrumentations on a micro-textured dental implant surface contaminated with an avirulent or a virulent Porphyromonas gingivalis strain and to determine alterations to the implant surface following instrumentation. Forty-five dental implants (Straumann SLA) were allocated to 3 treatment groups: Er:YAG laser, chitosan brush, and titanium curette (10 implants each) and a positive (10 implants) and a negative (5 implants) control. Each treatment group and the positive control were split into subgroups of 5 implants subsequently contaminated with either the avirulent or virulent P. gingivalis strain. The antimicrobial effect of instrumentation was evaluated using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Implant surface alterations were determined using a light interferometer. Instrumentation significantly reduced the number of attached P. gingivalis ( P implant surface micro-texture. Neither the Er:YAG laser nor the chitosan brush significantly altered the implant surface. The 3 instrumentations appear to have a similar potential to remove P. gingivalis. The titanium curette significantly altered the microstructure of the implant surface.

  5. [Analysis of the efficiency of antimicrobial treatment for community-acquired pneumonia in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, O V; Ruina, O V; Kononova, S V; Konyshkina, T M

    To analyze actual drug consumption based on the defined daily dose (DDD analysis) and to analyze the utilization of drugs based on their proportion of the total defined daily doses (DU90% analysis) for the antimicrobial therapy of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in clinical practice at a hospital in Russia. The investigation materials were the data of 117 case histories of male (51.3%) and female (48.7%) patients hospitalized with CAP at Nizhny Novgorod City Clinical Hospital Five in 2015. The investigation enrolled all the patients admitted to the hospital over the analyzed period. DDD analysis and DU90% analysis were used as study methods. DDD analysis and DU90% analysis of antimicrobial therapy for CAP were carried out at the hospital in clinical practice during a year. The annual number of defined daily doses (NDDD) for antimicrobial drugs, the number of defined daily doses per 100 bed-days (NDDD/100 bed-days), and a drug load (g) per 1000 CAP patients per day and per CAP patient per year were determined. The largest NDDD/year for CAP treatment with ceftriaxone was 376 g, or 43.43 NDDD/100 bed-days, which is much higher than that with other antimicrobial agents. The daily drug load of ceftriaxone per 1,000 CAP patients was 8.8 g, which exceeds that of moxifloxacin by 18.7 times, azithromycin and levofloxacin by 5 times, and ampicillin/sulbactam by 2.3 times. The daily drug load of ceftriaxone per CAP patient was 3.2 g, which exceeds that of of ampicillin/sulbactam by 2.3 times, levofloxacin and azithromycin by 5 times, and moxifloxacin by 19 times. It may be recommended that the proportion of cephalosporins as drugs that promote the rise of resistance in microbes and their production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases should be further limited, the proportion of penicillins be extended, and the administered ampicillin/sulbactam be added, for example, by amoxicillin/clavulanate. Penicillins contribute to the rise of resistance to a lesser degree, and the use

  6. Role of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Fahim; Akram, Zohaib; Safii, Syarida Hasnur; Vaithilingam, Rathna Devi; Ghanem, Alexis; Sergis, Konstantinos; Javed, Fawad

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to assess the efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis (AgP). The addressed focused question was "Is aPDT effective in the treatment of AgP?" MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, ISI Web of knowledge and Google-Scholar databases were searched from 1977 till May 2015 using combinations of the following keywords: antimicrobial; photochemotherapy; photodynamic therapy; photosensitizing agents; AgP; scaling and root-planing (SRP). Reviews, case reports, commentaries, and articles published in languages other than English were excluded. Seven studies were included. In 5 studies, aPDT was performed as an adjunct to SRP. Laserwavelengths and duration of irradiation ranged between 660-690 nm and 60-120 s, respectively. Laser power output as reported in 2 studies was 75 mW. One study showed significant improvement in periodontal parameters for subjects receiving aPDT as an adjunct to SRP as compared to treatment with SRP alone at follow up. However, comparable periodontal parameters were reported when aPDT as an adjunct to SRP was compared to SRP alone in the treatment of AgP in one study. One study showed comparable outcomes when aPDT was compared to SRP in the treatment of AgP. In two studies, adjunctive antibiotic administration to SRP showed significantly better outcomes when compared to application of adjunctive use of aPDT to SRP. aPDT is effective as an adjunct to SRP for the management of AgP, however, further randomized clinical trials with well defined control groups are needed in this regard. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Neisseria gonorrhoeae: testing, typing and treatment in an era of increased antimicrobial resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, C.M.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis discusses the management of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections while under threat of emerging antimicrobial resistance. It focuses on improved diagnostics, and antimicrobial resistance to current and future therapies. We describe a new method of targeted deferred culture, using nucleic

  8. Adherence barriers to antimicrobial treatment guidelines in teaching hospital, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, PGM; Rutten, WJMJ; Gans, ROB; Degener, JE; Haaijer-Ruskamp, FM

    To optimize appropriate antimicrobial use in a university hospital and identify barriers hampering implementation strategies, physicians were interviewed regarding their opinions on antimicrobial policies. Results indicated that effective strategies should include regular updates of guidelines that

  9. The effects of tertiary wastewater treatment on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, L.; Wong, Danilo Lo Fo; Dalsgaard, A.

    2002-01-01

    and anaerobically digested sludge by bacteriological counts on media selective for coliforms (MacConkey agar) and Acinetobacter spp. (Baumann agar). In addition, the level of antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disc-diffusion method in 442 Acinetobacter isolates identified by colony hybridisation......-resistant presumptive coliforms and Acinetobacter spp. in treated sewage and digested sludge were not significantly higher compared with raw sewage. On the contrary at one plant, statistically significant decreases were observed in the prevalence of ampicillin-resistant presumptive Acinetobacter spp. (p = 0.......0188) following sewage treatment, and in the prevalence of either ampicillin-resistant presumptive Acinetobacter spp. (p = 0.0013) or ampicillin- and gentamicin-resistant presumptive coliforms (p = 0.0273 and p = 0.0186) following sludge treatment. The results obtained by bacteriological counts were confirmed...

  10. Synergistic antimicrobial therapy using nanoparticles and antibiotics for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akash; Saleh, Neveen M.; Das, Riddha; Landis, Ryan F.; Bigdeli, Arafeh; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Rosa Campos, Alexandre; Pomeroy, Kenneth; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2017-06-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria pose a serious global burden of mortality, causing thousands of deaths each year. Antibiotic treatment of resistant infections further contributes to the rapidly increasing number of antibiotic-resistant species and strains. Synthetic macromolecules such as nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit broad-spectrum activity against MDR species, however lack of specificity towards bacteria relative to their mammalian hosts limits their widespread therapeutic application. Here, we demonstrate synergistic antimicrobial therapy using hydrophobically functionalized NPs and fluoroquinolone antibiotics for treatment of MDR bacterial strains. An 8-16-fold decrease in antibiotic dosage is achieved in presence of engineered NPs to combat MDR strains. This strategy demonstrates the potential of using NPs to ‘revive’ antibiotics that have been rendered ineffective due to the development of resistance by pathogenic bacteria.

  11. Kampo medicines improved blood test and QOL in two vasculitis cases of Churg–Strauss syndrome and Henoch–Shönlein purpura after inadequate treatment with conventional therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyo Hijikata

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Yasuyo Hijikata1, Yumiko Ikemoto2, Urara Kohdera31Toyodo Hijikata Clinic, Osaka, Japan; 2St Mary’s Hospital, Himeji, Japan; 3Nakano Children’s Hospital, Osaka, JapanObjective: Based on the tenets of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM theory, Kampo medicines were selected and applied to two cases of Churg–Strauss syndrome and Henoch–Shönlein purpura. Two vasculitis syndrome patients exhibited persistent symptoms and abnormal blood tests after treatment with conventional therapies.Methods: As the two cases had “blood stagnation” and “damps and heat” and one had a “yang deficiency” in terms of TCM theory, we applied certain selected Kampo medicines.Results: In case 1, the patient presented with hypereosinophilia, venous thrombosis, pulmonary infarction, decreased platelet count, ulner nerve palsy and Raynaud’s phenomena, which led to a diminished quality of life. After starting the Kampo medicines, the patient improved quickly and recovered within 11 months. In case 2, persistent purpura, abdominal pain, and bloody feces quickly improved and disappeared after Kampo treatment. After starting the Kampo medicines, prednisolone was stopped at 21 days without any sign of relapse to date.Conclusion: Kampo medicines helped clear the persistent abnormal symptoms and laboratory findings of vasculitis syndromes, Churg–Strauss syndrome and Henoch–Shönlein purpura, which had responded inadequately to the conventional therapies administered.Keywords: Kampo medicine, vasculitis, Churg–Strauss syndrome, Henoch–Shönlein purpura

  12. Antimicrobial Treatments to Preserve Packaged Ready-to-Eat Table Grapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ready-to-eat table grapes are a product with severe shelf life problems. Mass loss, colour changes, accelerated softening and mould proliferation can greatly influence quality decay of berries. Hence, the effects of different dipping treatments on the quality of packaged ready-to-eat table grapes have been successfully assessed. Various antimicrobial compounds (trans-2-hexenal, potassium sorbate, eugenol, cinnamon bark oil and ethanol were used at different concentrations for dipping grape berries prior to packaging. All the samples were packaged in biaxially oriented polypropylene and stored at (4±1 °C. During the storage period, headspace gas composition, spoilage microorganisms, appearance of visible moulds and sensory quality were monitored. The composition of the headspace gas was typical of a non-climacteric fruit, thus demonstrating that the antimicrobial compounds did not affect product respiration rate. For the entire storage period, the bacterial counts did not grow significantly. On the contrary, mould proliferation on the product surface affected sensory properties until provoking product unacceptability. Relevant differences were found between the dipped and undipped samples. In particular, 50 % ethanol or 20 % ethanol combined with potassium sorbate (3 % seemed to be very effective in preventing mould proliferation, thus promoting an increase in shelf life by about 100 %.

  13. Antimicrobial peptides for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, allies or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Torres-Juarez, Flor

    2018-03-27

    Tuberculosis is an ancient disease that has become a serious public health issue in recent years, although increasing incidence has been controlled, deaths caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been accentuated due to the emerging of multi-drug resistant strains and the comorbidity with diabetes mellitus and HIV. This situation is threatening the goals of world health organization (WHO) to eradicate tuberculosis in 2035. WHO has called for the creation of new drugs as an alternative for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, among the plausible molecules that can be used are the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). These peptides have demonstrated remarkable efficacy to kill mycobacteria in vitro and in vivo in experimental models, nevertheless, these peptides not only have antimicrobial activity but also have a wide variety of functions such as angiogenesis, wound healing, immunomodulation and other well-described roles into the human physiology. Therapeutic strategies for tuberculosis using AMPs must be well thought prior to their clinical use; evaluating comorbidities, family history and risk factors to other diseases, since the wide function of AMPs, they could lead to collateral undesirable effects. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Antimicrobial consumption on Austrian dairy farms: an observational study of udder disease treatments based on veterinary medication records

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    Clair L. Firth

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Antimicrobial use in livestock production is an important contemporary issue, which is of public interest worldwide. Antimicrobials are not freely available to Austrian farmers and can only be administered to livestock by veterinarians, or by farmers who are trained members of the Animal Health Service. Since 2015, veterinarians have been required by law to report antimicrobials dispensed to farmers for use in food-producing animals. The study presented here went further than the statutory framework, and collected data on antimicrobials dispensed to farmers and those administered by veterinarians. Methods Seventeen veterinary practices were enrolled in the study via convenience sampling. These veterinarians were asked to contact interested dairy farmers regarding participation in the study (respondent-driven sampling. Data were collected from veterinary practice software between 1st October 2015 and 30th September 2016. Electronic data (89.4% were transferred via an online interface and paper records (10.6% were entered by the authors. Antimicrobial treatments with respect to udder disease were analysed by number of defined daily doses per cow and year (nDDDvet/cow/year, based on the European Medicines Agency technical unit, Defined Daily Dose for animals (DDDvet. Descriptive statistics and the Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to analyse the results. Results Antimicrobial use data from a total of 248 dairy farms were collected during the study, 232 of these farms treated cows with antibiotics; dry cow therapy was excluded from the current analysis. The mean number of DDDvet/cow/year for the antimicrobial treatment of all udder disease was 1.33 DDDvet/cow/year. Of these treatments, 0.73 DDDvet/cow/year were classed as highest priority critically important antimicrobials (HPCIAs, according to the World Health Organization (WHO definition. The Wilcoxon rank sum test determined a statistically significant difference between the median

  15. Efficacy and safety of the selective co-stimulation modulator abatacept following 2 years of treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and an inadequate response to anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, M C; Schiff, M; Luggen, M; Becker, J-C; Aranda, R; Teng, J; Li, T; Schmidely, N; Le Bars, M; Dougados, M

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of abatacept during 2 years of the ATTAIN (Abatacept Trial in Treatment of Anti-TNF INadequate responders) trial in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients completing the 6-month, double-blind period were eligible to enter the long-term extension; patients received abatacept approximately 10 mg/kg, plus disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Safety and efficacy (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria responses, DAS28 (C-reactive protein), HAQ-DI, SF-36, Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Problems Index, fatigue VAS) were assessed through 2 years. 317 patients (218 from the abatacept and 99 from the placebo group) entered and 222 (70%) completed 18 months of long-term extension treatment. The incidence and type of adverse events were consistent between the double-blind and cumulative (double-blind plus long-term extension) periods. Rates of serious adverse events were 25.6 and 23.4 per 100 patient-years in the double-blind versus cumulative period. At 6 months and 2 years, using non-responder analyses, ACR responses in abatacept-treated patients were: ACR 20, 59.4% and 56.2%; ACR 50, 23.5% and 33.2%; ACR 70, 11.5% and 16.1%; HAQ-DI responses were 54.4% and 47.9%. At 6 months and 2 years, using post-hoc as-observed analyses, the percentage of patients (95% confidence interval) achieving DAS28 (C-reactive protein) low disease activity score (problems were also maintained throughout the 2 years of abatacept treatment. No unique safety observations were reported during open-label exposure. Improvements in the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, physical function and health-related quality of life observed after 6 months, were maintained throughout the 2 years in this population with difficult-to-treat disease. NCT00124982.

  16. Antimicrobial Use Guidelines for Treatment of Urinary Tract Disease in Dogs and Cats: Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Scott Weese

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract disease is a common reason for use (and likely misuse, improper use, and overuse of antimicrobials in dogs and cats. There is a lack of comprehensive treatment guidelines such as those that are available for human medicine. Accordingly, guidelines for diagnosis and management of urinary tract infections were created by a Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases. While objective data are currently limited, these guidelines provide information to assist in the diagnosis and management of upper and lower urinary tract infections in dogs and cats.

  17. Effect of different oral oxytetracycline treatment regimes on selection of antimicrobial resistant coliforms in nursery pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Zachariasen, Camilla; Nørholm, Nanna; Holm, Anders; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2017-09-01

    A major concern derived from using antimicrobials in pig production is the development of resistance. This study aimed to assess the impact of selected combinations of oral dose and duration of treatment with oxytetracycline (OTC) on selection of tetracycline resistant (TET-R) coliforms recovered from swine feces. The work encompassed two studies: 1) OTC 5mg/kg and 20mg/kg were administered to nursery pigs for 3 and 10days, respectively, under controlled experimental conditions, and 2) 10mg/kg, 20mg/kg and 30mg/kg OTC were given to a higher number of pigs for 6, 3 and 2days, respectively, under field conditions. Statistical modeling was applied to analyze trends in the proportion of TET-R coliforms. In the experimental study, no statistical difference in proportion of TET-R coliforms was observed between treatments at the end of the trial (day 18) and compared to day 0. In the field study, treatment had a significant effect on the proportion of TET-R bacteria two days after the end of treatment (2dAT) with the regimes "low dose-six days" and "medium dose-three days" yielding the highest and lowest proportions of TET-R strains, respectively. No indication of co-selection for ampicillin- and sulphonamide -R bacteria was observed for any treatment at 2dAT. By the end of the nursery period, the proportion of TET-R bacteria was not significantly different between treatments and compared to day 0. Our results suggest that similar resistance levels might be obtained by using different treatment regimes regardless of the combinations of oral dose-duration of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of treatment records and inventory of empty drug containers to quantify antimicrobial usage in dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobrega, Diego B; De Buck, Jeroen; Naqvi, S Ali; Liu, Gang; Naushad, Sohail; Saini, Vineet; Barkema, Herman W

    2017-12-01

    Assessment of antimicrobial use (AMU) is vital for interpreting the origin of changes in antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The objectives of the present study were to estimate the association between AMU determined using on-farm treatment records (TR) and inventory of empty drug containers (INV). Herds were selected to represent Canadian dairy farms. Producers were asked to record animal health events and treatments on a standard General Health Event form. For inventory data, 40-L receptacles were placed at various locations considered convenient to deposit all empty drug containers. Antimicrobial defined-daily dosages (ADD) were calculated for 51 Canadian herds using the 2 methods. Estimation of AMU was 31,840 ADD using the INV and 14,487 ADD using the TR, indicating that for every TR entry, 2.20 times more treatments were observed using the INV. Mastitis, reproductive conditions, and dry cow therapy were the most frequent reasons for antimicrobial therapy when assessing TR. For all antimicrobials evaluated, mean ADD was higher using the INV versus TR. Regardless, a strong positive correlation (0.80) was observed between the 2 methods, indicating that herds with increased number of ADD recorded using the INV also had increased number of ADD recorded using TR. Furthermore, a positive association was observed for the 6 most commonly used antimicrobials. In comparison to methods used in surveillance programs on AMU in livestock that assume a constant use in all herds (i.e., sales data), INV provided a herd-level specific quantity of AMU positively correlated with AMU recorded at the animal level in general. The INV was easy to implement and provided a measure of total AMU in the herd. Availability of such information would be valuable for interpreting changes in AMR at the herd level and enabling evaluation of interventions for decreasing AMR. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Adjunctive Application of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy in Nonsurgical Periodontal Treatment: A Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kikuchi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is caused by dental plaque biofilms, and the removal of these biofilms from the root surface of teeth plays a central part in its treatment. The conventional treatment for periodontal disease fails to remove periodontal infection in a subset of cases, such as those with complicated root morphology. Adjunctive antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT has been proposed as an additional treatment for this infectious disease. Many periodontal pathogenic bacteria are susceptible to low-power lasers in the presence of dyes, such as methylene blue, toluidine blue O, malachite green, and indocyanine green. aPDT uses these light-activated photosensitizer that is incorporated selectively by bacteria and absorbs a low-power laser/light with an appropriate wavelength to induce singlet oxygen and free radicals, which are toxic to bacteria. While this technique has been evaluated by many clinical studies, some systematic reviews and meta-analyses have reported controversial results about the benefits of aPDT for periodontal treatment. In the light of these previous reports, the aim of this review is to provide comprehensive information about aPDT and help extend knowledge of advanced laser therapy.

  20. Medication Use Patterns, Treatment Satisfaction, and Inadequate Control of Osteoporosis Study in the Asia-Pacific Region (MUSIC OS-AP): Design of a multinational, prospective, observational study examining the impact of gastrointestinal events on osteoporosis management in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Ankita; Ebeling, Peter R; Lee, Mel S; Min, Yong-Ki; Mithal, Ambrish; Yang, Xiaoqin; Sajjan, Shiva

    2015-12-01

    The burden of osteoporosis in the Asia-Pacific region is not well characterized. The Medication Use Patterns, Treatment Satisfaction, and Inadequate Control of Osteoporosis Study in the Asia-Pacific Region (MUSIC OS-AP) was designed to better understand the association of gastrointestinal events with patient-reported outcomes in postmenopausal women of this region. MUSIC OS-AP is a prospective, multinational, observational cohort study of postmenopausal women ≥ 50 years of age diagnosed with osteoporosis. The study was conducted in five Asia-Pacific countries: Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan, Korea, and India. MUSIC OS-AP has three components: a physician questionnaire, a retrospective chart review, and a prospective cohort study. The physician questionnaire investigated the role of gastrointestinal events in physicians' pharmacologic management of osteoporosis. The retrospective chart review, also completed by physicians, recorded rate of osteoporosis treatment and the types of osteoporosis medications prescribed to osteoporosis patients. The prospective cohort study investigated the associations between gastrointestinal events and patient-reported outcomes among patients taking oral medications for osteoporosis as well as reasons for non-treatment in patients who remained untreated. The prospective cohort study enrolled two groups of patients: untreated, and treated with oral osteoporosis medications. Untreated patients completed only the baseline surveys, providing information on gastrointestinal event rates, quality of life, health care resource use, and reasons for non-treatment. Treated patients, who were either new to osteoporosis medication or continuing an ongoing medication course, completed surveys at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months post-baseline. The evaluations recorded patient characteristics, gastrointestinal events, health-related and osteoporosis-specific quality of life, health care resource use, medication adherence, and satisfaction with

  1. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy: Study of Bacterial Recovery Viability and Potential Development of Resistance after Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Alves

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT has emerged in the clinical field as a potential alternative to antibiotics to treat microbial infections. No cases of microbial viability recovery or any resistance mechanisms against it are yet known. 5,10,15-tris(1-Methylpyridinium-4-yl-20-(pentafluorophenyl-porphyrin triiodide (Tri-Py+-Me-PF was used as photosensitizer. Vibrio fischeri and recombinant Escherichia coli were the studied bacteria. To determine the bacterial recovery after treatment, Tri-Py+-Me-PF (5.0 µM was added to bacterial suspensions and the samples were irradiated with white light (40 W m-2 for 270 minutes. Then, the samples were protected from light, aliquots collected at different intervals and the bioluminescence measured. To assess the development of resistance after treatment, bacterial suspensions were exposed to white light (25 minutes, in presence of 5.0 μM of Tri-Py+-Me-PF (99.99% of inactivation and plated. After the first irradiation period, surviving colonies were collected from the plate and resuspended in PBS. Then, an identical protocol was used and repeated ten times for each bacterium. The results suggest that aPDT using Tri-Py+-Me-PF represents a promising approach to efficiently destroy bacteria since after a single treatment these microorganisms do not recover their viability and after ten generations of partially photosensitized cells neither of the bacteria develop resistance to the photodynamic process.

  2. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy as a Co-adjuvant in Endodontic Treatment of Deciduous Teeth: Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Camila Basilio; Motta, Lara Jasinski; Prates, Renato Araujo; da Mota, Ana Carolina Costa; Gonçalves, Marcela Leticia Leal; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini; Mesquita Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2018-02-08

    To assure the success of endodontic treatment, the root canal must be completely decontaminated. Thus, some methods have been researched in an attempt to effectively eliminate microorganisms from the interior of the root canal system. Among them, is conventional endodontic therapy in conjunction with photodynamic therapy (PDT). Five anterior deciduous teeth were treated endodontically with the conventional technique and PDT. For PDT, 0.005% methylene blue was used as a photosensitizer and a 660nm laser. After the conventional endodontic therapy, the photosensitizer was applied inside the root canal, 3 minutes of pre-irradiation time and then the laser was applied for 40s with an energy of 4J. Afterwards, the canal was irrigated with saline solution and the sealing material of the root canal was placed. The microbiological analysis of the samples were collected before and after the treatments were performed. Observing the results obtained in this case series,which showed a bacterial reduction from 37.57% to 100%, and the clear difficulty in the success of endodontic treatment of deciduous teeth, antimicrobial photodynamic therapy can be considered an alternative of easy application, and that does not generate microbial resistance, to act as a support in the decontamination of the root canals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Antimicrobial peptides, nanotechnology, and natural metabolites as novel approaches for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Michel L; da Cunha, Nicolau B; Costa, Fabricio F

    2018-03-01

    Despite the advances in tumor identification and treatment, cancer remains the primary driver of death around the world. Also, regular treatments for the disease are incapable of targeting particular cancer types at different stages since they are not specifically focused on harmful cells since they influence both solid and tumor cells, causing side effects and undesirable symptoms. Therefore, novel strategies should be developed to treat this disease. Several efforts have been made in this direction to find more effective alternatives to cancer treatment, such as the use of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with antitumoral activity, nanocarriers and natural compounds from a variety of sources. AMPs are more specific to their targets because of electrostatic interaction between AMPs and the cancer cells' plasma membrane. Nanocarriers may be used for the delivery of non-soluble drugs, which are poorly stable or require a controlled release. In addition, natural compounds have been a rich source of anti-cancer agents for decades. In this review, these three approaches will be discussed, showing recent advances and advantages of using these strategies to treat cancer as well as the combination of these approaches increasing anticancer activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of different oral oxytetracycline treatment regimes on selection of antimicrobial resistant coliforms in nursery pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fresno, Ana Herrero; Zachariasen, Camilla; Norholm, Nanna

    2017-01-01

    A major concern derived from using antimicrobials in pig production is the development of resistance. This study aimed to assess the impact of selected combinations of oral dose and duration of treatment with oxytetracycline (OTC) on selection of tetracycline resistant (TET-R) coliforms recovered...... from swine feces. The work encompassed two studies: 1) OTC 5 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg were administered to nursery pigs for 3 and 10 days, respectively, under controlled experimental conditions, and 2) 10 mg/kg, 20 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg OTC were given to a higher number of pigs for 6, 3 and 2 days, respectively......-selection for ampicillin- and sulphonamide-R bacteria was observed for any treatment at 2dAT. By the end of the nursery period, the proportion of TET-R bacteria was not significantly different between treatments and compared to day 0. Our results suggest that similar resistance levels might be obtained by using different...

  5. Effectiveness of a combined antimicrobial treatment by means of the draughtboard. In vitro and in vivo assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espino Hernandez, Maria; Martinez Motas, Isabel; Couto Ramos, Maria Julia; Zuazo Silva, Jorge L.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of present paper was to evaluate clinical effectiveness of combined antimicrobial treatment by means of in vitro synergism tests and to determine effectiveness of used procedure to direct applications of these treatment strategies in patient presenting with sepsis from varied resistance bacteria. Treatment applied was assessed in 163 newborn patients presenting with sepsis from positive hemoculture in 'America Arias' University Gynecology-Obstetrics Hospital from January 1993 to December 2000, by checkerboard method in microtritate plates. In vitro synergic drug combinations showed a high probability of clinical effectiveness, independently of susceptibility pattern of microorganism event versus resistant strains to both antimicrobials used in treatment. All in vitro antagonistic results correspond both with a therapeutic clinical failure. Procedure used may be a valuable tool to direct therapeutics in patients presenting with sepsis from resistant microorganisms. (Author)

  6. Effect of Antimicrobial and Physical Treatments on Growth of Multispecies Staphylococcal Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Elizabeth J; Payne, David E; Ma, Tianhui Maria; VanEpps, J Scott; Boles, Blaise R; Younger, John G; Solomon, Michael J

    2017-06-15

    The prevalence and structure of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis within multispecies biofilms were found to depend sensitively on physical environment and antibiotic dosage. Although these species commonly infect similar sites, such as orthopedic implants, little is known about their behavior in multispecies communities, particularly in response to treatment. This research establishes that S. aureus is much more prevalent than S. epidermidis when simultaneously seeded and grown under unstressed conditions (pH 7, 37°C) in both laboratory and clinical strains. In multispecies communities, S. epidermidis is capable of growing a more confluent biofilm when the addition of S. aureus is delayed 4 to 6 h during 18 h of growth. Different vancomycin dosages generate various behaviors: S. epidermidis is more prevalent at a dose of 1.0 μg/ml vancomycin, but reduced growth of both species occurs at 1.9 μg/ml vancomycin. This variability is consistent with the different MICs of S. aureus and S. epidermidis Growth at higher temperature (45°C) results in an environment where S. aureus forms porous biofilms. This porosity allows S. epidermidis to colonize more of the surface, resulting in detectable S. epidermidis biomass. Variations in pH result in increased prevalence of S. epidermidis at low pH (pH 5 and 6), while S. aureus remains dominant at high pH (pH 8 and 9). This work establishes the structural variability of multispecies staphylococcal biofilms as they undergo physical and antimicrobial treatments. It provides a basis for understanding the structure of these communities at infection sites and how treatments disrupt their multispecies behaviors. IMPORTANCE Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are two species of bacteria that are commonly responsible for biofilm infections on medical devices. Biofilms are structured communities of bacteria surrounded by polysaccharides, proteins, and DNA; bacteria are more resistant to

  7. Synthesis and characterization of antimicrobial nanosilver/diatomite nanocomposites and its water treatment application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Yijie [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), Agency of Science, Technology, and Research - A*STAR, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Jiang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jing [AGplus Technologies Pte Ltd, 10 Jalan Besar #10-06 Sim Lim Tower, 208787 (Singapore); Lin, Ming [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), Agency of Science, Technology, and Research - A*STAR, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Tang, Xiaosheng [AGplus Technologies Pte Ltd, 10 Jalan Besar #10-06 Sim Lim Tower, 208787 (Singapore); Zhang, Jie, E-mail: zhangj@imre.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), Agency of Science, Technology, and Research - A*STAR, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Liu, Hongjun, E-mail: hjliu@henu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Natural Medicine and Immuno-Engineering of Henan Province, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan 475004 (China); AGplus Technologies Pte Ltd, 10 Jalan Besar #10-06 Sim Lim Tower, 208787 (Singapore)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Nanosilver diatomite has been developed with a facile, easy and effective in–situ reduction method. • The nanosilver diatomite demonstrated great antibacterial properties to gram positive and gram–negative bacterial. • A small amount of the nanosilver diatomite could kill >99.999% of E. Coli within half an hour time. • Low cost nano–composite antimicrobial material for water purification industry. - Abstract: Nanotechnology for water disinfection application gains increasing attention. Diatomite is one kind of safe natural material, which has been widely used as absorbent, filtration agents, mineral fillers, especially in water treatment industry. Nanosilver/diatomite nanocomposites were developed in this publication with a facile, effective in-situ reduction method. The as-prepared nanosilver/diatomite nanocomposites demonstrated amazing antibacterial properties to gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The corresponding property has been characterized by UV–vis absorbance, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Moreover, the detailed bacteria killing experiments further displayed that 0.5 g of the nanosilver diatomite could kill >99.999% of E. Coli within half an hour time. And the silver leaching test demonstrated that the concentrations of silver in the filtered water under varies pH environment were below the limit for silver level of WHO standard. Considering the low price of natural diatomite, it is believed that the nanosilver/diatomite nanocomposites have potential application in water purification industry due to its excellent antimicrobial property.

  8. Efficacy and Tolerability of Travoprost 0.004%/Timolol 0.5% Fixed-Dose Combination for the Treatment of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension Inadequately Controlled with Beta-Blocker Monotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki Ho; Hubatsch, Douglas A.; Erichev, Valeriy; Paczka, Jose A.; Roberts, Timothy V.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of travoprost 0.004%/timolol 0.5% fixed-dose combination (TTFC) in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) or ocular hypertension (OHT) inadequately controlled on beta-blocker monotherapy. Methods. In this phase IV, open-label study, 156 patients on beta-blocker monotherapy with mean intraocular pressure (IOP) between 18 and 32 mmHg were randomized (no washout period) to receive TTFC for 8 weeks (TTFC group) or to continue beta-blocker monotherapy for 4 weeks followed by TTFC for the remaining 4 weeks (beta-blocker group). Results. The mean IOP (±standard deviation) at baseline in the TTFC and beta-blocker groups was 22.5 ± 2.5 mmHg and 22.2 ± 2.3 mmHg, respectively, and at weeks 4 and 8, was 16.7 ± 3.1 mmHg and 16.1 ± 3.1 mmHg, respectively, in TTFC group and 21.1 ± 3.1 mmHg and 16.1 ± 2.8 mmHg, respectively, in the beta-blocker group. There was a significant least squares mean difference between TTFC and beta-blocker in 8 a.m. IOP at week 4 (−4.6 mmHg; one-sided 95% confidence interval [−inf, −3.9]; p < 0.0001 [primary endpoint]); the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval was within the prespecified limit (<0). Both treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion. Superior IOP control was achieved with TTFC in patients with OAG or OHT previously uncontrolled with beta-blockers. No new safety findings were identified. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02003391. PMID:28239491

  9. Efficacy of Local and Systemic Antimicrobials in the Non-Surgical Treatment of Smokers With Chronic Periodontitis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambrone, Leandro; Vargas, Miguel; Arboleda, Silie; Serna, Maritza; Guerrero, Marcela; de Sousa, Jose; Lafaurie, Gloria Inés

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate whether use of local or systemic antimicrobials would improve clinical results of non-surgical periodontal therapy for smokers with chronic periodontitis (CP). Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, Excerpta Medica Database, and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched up to and including March 2016. Randomized clinical trials of duration of at least 6 months were included if they reported on treatment of smokers (≥10 cigarettes per day for minimum 12 months) with CP with non-surgical periodontal therapy either alone or associated with local or systemic antimicrobials. Random-effects meta-analyses were undertaken to evaluate mean differences in probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL). Of 108 potentially eligible articles, seven were included. Most individual studies (75%) testing locally delivered antibiotics reported that smokers benefited from this treatment approach. Pooled estimates found additional PD reduction of 0.81 mm (P = 0.01) and CAL gain of 0.91 mm (P = 0.01) at sites with baseline PD ≥5 mm. Conversely, meta-analysis on systemic use of antimicrobials failed to detect significant differences in mean changes from baseline, and only one trial supported their use. In smokers with CP, adjunctive use of local antimicrobials improved efficacy of non-surgical periodontal therapy in reducing PD and improving CAL at sites presenting PD ≥5 mm before treatment. Current evidence does not demonstrate similar gains when scaling and root planing plus systemic antimicrobial/antibiotics were associated with therapy.

  10. Effects of Ultrasound Treatment on Physiochemical Properties and Antimicrobial Activities of Whey Protein-Totarol Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuang; Shi, Ce; Wang, Cuina; Guo, Mingruo

    2017-10-01

    Totarol is a natural antimicrobial compound extracted from the heartwood of Podocarpus totara, a conifer native to New Zealand. The effects of whey protein-totarol nanoparticles treated with ultrasound on the physiochemical properties and the growth of Staphylococcus aureus were investigated. The particle size of whey protein-totarol nanoparticles was reduced by ultrasound treatment from 31.24 ± 5.31 to 24.20 ± 4.02 nm, and the size distribution was also narrowed by the treatment. Viscosity and modulus data indicated that the flow behaviors of whey protein-totarol nanoparticles seemed to be Newtonian and exerted a typical viscoelastic fluid at protein content of 15% (w/v). Rheological properties were more insensitive to ultrasonic time. Time-killing assays, agar diffusion tests, the cell membrane damage analysis, and microstructure were exploited to study the antibacterial properties of whey protein-totarol nanoparticles. The MIC of whey protein-totarol nanoparticles after ultrasound treatment decreased from 4 to 2 μg/mL compared with that without ultrasound treatment. Whey protein-totarol nanoparticles treated with ultrasound resulted in a significant (P whey protein-totarol nanoparticles were 12 and 36 mm for untreated and treated with ultrasound, respectively. The cell membrane damages and the microstructure changes also proved that whey protein-totarol nanoparticles treated with ultrasound had strong antibacterial activities against S. aureus and that the antibacterial effectiveness enhanced with the increasing of ultrasonic time. These findings suggested that whey protein-totarol nanoparticles treated with ultrasound were more effective against S. aureus than untreated nanoparticles.

  11. Inadequate Empirical Antibiotic Therapy in Hospital Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, S; Rijal, B P; Yogi, K N; Sherchand, J B; Parajuli, K; Parajuli, N; Pokhrel, B M

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy for HAP is a common phenomena and one of the indicators of the poor stewardship. This study intended to analyze the efficacy of empirical antibiotics in the light of microbiological data in HAP cases. Suspected cases of HAP were followed for clinico-bacterial evidence, antimicrobial resistance and pre and post culture antibiotic use. The study was taken from February,2014 to July 2014 in department of Microbiology and department of Respiratory medicine prospectively. Data was analyzed by Microsoft Office Excel 2007. Out of 758 cases investigated, 77(10 %) cases were HAP, 65(84%) of them were culture positive and 48(74 %) were late in onset. In early onset cases, isolates were Acinetobacter 10(42%), Escherichia coli 5(21%), S.aureus 4(17%), Klebsiella 1(4%) and Pseudomonas 1(4%). From the late onset cases Acinetobacter 15(28%), Klebsiella 17(32%) and Pseudomonas 13(24%) were isolated. All Acinetobacter, 78% Klebsiella and 36% Pseudomonas isolates were multi drug resistant. Empirical therapies were inadequate in 12(70%) of early onset cases and 44(92%) of late onset type. Cephalosporins were used in 7(41%) of early onset infections but found to be adequate only in 2(12%) cases. Polymyxins were avoided empirically but after cultures were used in 9(19%) cases. Empirical antibiotics were vastly inadequate, more frequently so in late onset infections. Use of cephalosporins empirically in early onset infections and avoiding empirical use of polymyxin antibiotics in late onset infections contributed largely to the findings. Inadequate empirical regimen is a real time feedback for a practitioner to update his knowledge on the local microbiological trends.

  12. Effects of combined treatments of irradiation and antimicrobial coatings on reduction of food pathogens in broccoli florets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takala, P.N.; Salmieri, S.; Vu, K.D.; Lacroix, M.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of combined treatment of antimicrobial coatings and γ-radiation on reduction of food pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella Typhimurium was evaluated in broccoli florets. Broccoli florets were inoculated with pathogenic bacteria at 10 6 CFU/g. Inoculated florets were then coated with methylcellulose-based coating containing various mixtures of antimicrobial agents: organic acids (OAs) plus lactic acid bacteria metabolites (LABs), OA plus citrus extract (CE), OA plus CE plus spice mixture (SM), and OA plus rosemary extract (RE). Coated florets were irradiated with various doses (0-3.3 kGy), and microbial analyses were used to calculate the D 10 value and radiosensitive relative. The coating containing OA plus CE was the most effective formulation for increasing the sensitization of Escherichia coli by 2.4 times as compared to the control without the antimicrobial coating. For Salmonella Typhimurium, coating containing OA plus LAB was the most effective formulation, increasing radiosensitivity by 2.4 times as well. All antimicrobial coatings had almost the same effect of increasing the sensitivity of Listeria monocytogenes (from 1.31 to 1.45 times) to γ-irradiation. - Highlights: → Demonstrate scientifically the synergistic effect of the combined treatment of gamma-irradiation and natural antimicrobial coating in reduction of food pathogens in broccoli. → The coating containing organic acids plus citrus extract was the most efficient formulation for increasing the sensitization of E. coli by 2.40 times as compared to the control. → The coating containing organic acids plus lactic acid bacteria metabolites was the most effective formulation causing the sensitization of S. Typhimurium to γ-irradiation by 2.4 times. → Potential in application of developed formulations to protect food products against food pathogens.

  13. Effects of combined treatments of irradiation and antimicrobial coatings on reduction of food pathogens in broccoli florets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takala, P.N.; Salmieri, S.; Vu, K.D. [INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Research Laboratories in Sciences Applied to Food, Canadian Irradiation Centre, 531, Blvd des Prairies, Laval, QC, H7V 1B7 (Canada); Lacroix, M., E-mail: Monique.Lacroix@iaf.inrs.ca [INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Research Laboratories in Sciences Applied to Food, Canadian Irradiation Centre, 531, Blvd des Prairies, Laval, QC, H7V 1B7 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    The effect of combined treatment of antimicrobial coatings and {gamma}-radiation on reduction of food pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella Typhimurium was evaluated in broccoli florets. Broccoli florets were inoculated with pathogenic bacteria at 10{sup 6} CFU/g. Inoculated florets were then coated with methylcellulose-based coating containing various mixtures of antimicrobial agents: organic acids (OAs) plus lactic acid bacteria metabolites (LABs), OA plus citrus extract (CE), OA plus CE plus spice mixture (SM), and OA plus rosemary extract (RE). Coated florets were irradiated with various doses (0-3.3 kGy), and microbial analyses were used to calculate the D{sub 10} value and radiosensitive relative. The coating containing OA plus CE was the most effective formulation for increasing the sensitization of Escherichia coli by 2.4 times as compared to the control without the antimicrobial coating. For Salmonella Typhimurium, coating containing OA plus LAB was the most effective formulation, increasing radiosensitivity by 2.4 times as well. All antimicrobial coatings had almost the same effect of increasing the sensitivity of Listeria monocytogenes (from 1.31 to 1.45 times) to {gamma}-irradiation. - Highlights: > Demonstrate scientifically the synergistic effect of the combined treatment of gamma-irradiation and natural antimicrobial coating in reduction of food pathogens in broccoli. > The coating containing organic acids plus citrus extract was the most efficient formulation for increasing the sensitization of E. coli by 2.40 times as compared to the control. > The coating containing organic acids plus lactic acid bacteria metabolites was the most effective formulation causing the sensitization of S. Typhimurium to {gamma}-irradiation by 2.4 times. > Potential in application of developed formulations to protect food products against food pathogens.

  14. Obesity and skin and soft tissue infections: how to optimize antimicrobial usage for prevention and treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupper, Mordechai; Nicolau, David P

    2017-04-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are prevalent in the obese population, with rising trend expected. Although numerous antibiotics are available for the prevention and treatment of SSTIs, their characterization in obese patients is not a regulatory mandate. Consequently, information that carries importance for optimizing the dosing regimen in the obese population may not be readily available. This review focuses on the most recent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data on this topic with attention to cefazolin for surgical prophylaxis as well as antibiotics that are active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Moreover, the implications for optimizing SSTIs prevention and treatment in the obese population will also be discussed. On the basis of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic considerations, most studies found a perioperative prophylactic cefazolin regimen of 2 g to be reasonable in the case of obese patients undergoing cesarean delivery or bariatric surgery. There is general paucity of data regarding the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics of antimicrobials active against MRSA in obese patients, especially for the target tissue. Therapeutic drug monitoring has been correlated with pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic optimization for vancomycin and teicoplanin, and should be used in these cases. There is more supportive evidence for the use of oxazolidinones (linezolid and tedizolid), daptomycin and lipoglycopeptides (telavancin, dalbavancin and oritavancin) in the management of SSTIs in this population. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic approach, which can be used as a basis or supplement to clinical trials, provides valuable data and decision-making tools for optimizing regimens used for both prevention and treatment of SSTIs in the obese population. Important pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics of antibiotics, such as the penetration into the subcutaneous tissue and the probability of reaching the

  15. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy as an adjunct for treatment of deep carious lesions-A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplik, Fabian; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Hellwig, Elmar; Al-Ahmad, Ali; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Maisch, Tim; Karygianni, Lamprini

    2017-06-01

    For deep carious lesions, a more conservative treatment modality ("selective caries removal") has been proposed, where only the heavily contaminated dentine is removed. In this regard, effective adjuncts for cavity disinfection such as the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) can be valuable clinically prior to definitive restoration. Therefore, the aim of this study was to systematically assess clinical studies on the effectiveness of aPDT as a supplementary tool in the treatment of deep caries lesions. Searches were performed in four databases (PubMed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov) from 1st January, 2011 until 21st June, 2016 for search terms relevant to the observed parameters, pathological condition, intervention and anatomic entity. The pooled information was evaluated according to PRISMA guidelines. At first, 1651 articles were recovered, of which 1249 full-text articles were evaluated, 270 articles thereof were reviewed for eligibility and finally 6 articles met all inclusion criteria. The aPDT protocols involved Methylene Blue, Toluidine Blue and aluminium-chloride-phthalocyanine as photosensitizers and diode lasers, light-emitting diodes and halogen light-sources. The data from five reports, utilizing both culture-dependent and -independent methods, disclosed significant reduction of cariogenic bacterial load after mechanical caries removal with adjunct aPDT. As these studies exhibit some methodological limitations, e.g. lack of positive controls, this systematic review can support the application of aPDT to a limited extent only in terms of reducing the microbial load in deep carious lesions before restorative treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of combined treatments of irradiation and antimicrobial coatings on reduction of food pathogens in broccoli florets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takala, P. N.; Salmieri, S.; Vu, K. D.; Lacroix, M.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of combined treatment of antimicrobial coatings and γ-radiation on reduction of food pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella Typhimurium was evaluated in broccoli florets. Broccoli florets were inoculated with pathogenic bacteria at 10 6 CFU/g. Inoculated florets were then coated with methylcellulose-based coating containing various mixtures of antimicrobial agents: organic acids (OAs) plus lactic acid bacteria metabolites (LABs), OA plus citrus extract (CE), OA plus CE plus spice mixture (SM), and OA plus rosemary extract (RE). Coated florets were irradiated with various doses (0-3.3 kGy), and microbial analyses were used to calculate the D10 value and radiosensitive relative. The coating containing OA plus CE was the most effective formulation for increasing the sensitization of Escherichia coli by 2.4 times as compared to the control without the antimicrobial coating. For Salmonella Typhimurium, coating containing OA plus LAB was the most effective formulation, increasing radiosensitivity by 2.4 times as well. All antimicrobial coatings had almost the same effect of increasing the sensitivity of Listeria monocytogenes (from 1.31 to 1.45 times) to γ-irradiation.

  17. Clinical use of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy for the treatment of deep carious lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmi, Camila De Almeida B.; Simionato, Maria Regina L.; Ramalho, Karen Müller; Imparato, José Carlos P.; Pinheiro, Sérgio Luiz; Luz, Maria A. A. C.

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) via irradiation, using a low power laser associated with a photosensitization dye, as an alternative to remove cariogenic microorganisms by drilling. Remaining dentinal samples in deep carious lesions on permanent molars (n = 26) were treated with 0.01% methylene blue dye and irradiated with a low power laser (InGaAIP - indium gallium aluminum phosphide; λ = 660 nm; 100 mW; 320 Jcm-2 90 s; 9J). Samples of dentin from the pulpal wall region were collected with a micropunch before and immediately after PACT and kept in a transport medium for microbiological analysis. Samples were cultured in plates of Brucella blood agar, Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar and Rogosa SL agar to determine the total viable bacteria, mutans streptococci and Lactobacillus spp. counts, respectively. After incubation, colony-forming units were counted and microbial reduction was calculated for each group of bacteria. PACT led to statistically significant reductions in mutans streptococci (1.38 log), Lactobacillus spp. (0.93 log), and total viable bacteria (0.91 log). This therapy may be an appropriate approach for the treatment of deep carious lesions using minimally invasive procedures.

  18. Clinical use of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy for the treatment of deep carious lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmi, Camila de Almeida B; Simionato, Maria Regina L; Ramalho, Karen Müller; Imparato, José Carlos P; Pinheiro, Sérgio Luiz; Luz, Maria A A C

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) via irradiation, using a low power laser associated with a photosensitization dye, as an alternative to remove cariogenic microorganisms by drilling. Remaining dentinal samples in deep carious lesions on permanent molars (n = 26) were treated with 0.01% methylene blue dye and irradiated with a low power laser (InGaAIP - indium gallium aluminum phosphide; λ = 660 nm; 100 mW; 320 Jcm(-2); 90 s; 9J). Samples of dentin from the pulpal wall region were collected with a micropunch before and immediately after PACT and kept in a transport medium for microbiological analysis. Samples were cultured in plates of Brucella blood agar, Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar and Rogosa SL agar to determine the total viable bacteria, mutans streptococci and Lactobacillus spp. counts, respectively. After incubation, colony-forming units were counted and microbial reduction was calculated for each group of bacteria. PACT led to statistically significant reductions in mutans streptococci (1.38 log), Lactobacillus spp. (0.93 log), and total viable bacteria (0.91 log). This therapy may be an appropriate approach for the treatment of deep carious lesions using minimally invasive procedures.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of antimicrobial nanosilver/diatomite nanocomposites and its water treatment application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yijie; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Ming; Tang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Hongjun

    2017-02-01

    Nanotechnology for water disinfection application gains increasing attention. Diatomite is one kind of safe natural material, which has been widely used as absorbent, filtration agents, mineral fillers, especially in water treatment industry. Nanosilver/diatomite nanocomposites were developed in this publication with a facile, effective in-situ reduction method. The as-prepared nanosilver/diatomite nanocomposites demonstrated amazing antibacterial properties to gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The corresponding property has been characterized by UV-vis absorbance, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Moreover, the detailed bacteria killing experiments further displayed that 0.5 g of the nanosilver diatomite could kill >99.999% of E. Coli within half an hour time. And the silver leaching test demonstrated that the concentrations of silver in the filtered water under varies pH environment were below the limit for silver level of WHO standard. Considering the low price of natural diatomite, it is believed that the nanosilver/diatomite nanocomposites have potential application in water purification industry due to its excellent antimicrobial property.

  20. [Antimicrobial efficacy of systemic antibiotics of different groups in the complex treatment of patients with chronic periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorina, O A; Berkutova, I S; Basova, A A

    2014-01-01

    Among microorganisms found in the oral cavity there are several kinds of periodontopathogenic bacteria having higher adhesive, invasive and toxic properties. Eighty patients with moderate and severe chronic generalized periodontitis were included in the study. The choice of treatment regimen depended on real-time PCR values of pathogenic microorganisms in periodontal pockets. Data on composition of periodontal pockets microflora by moderate and severe periodontal disease allow prompt target antimicrobial therapy.

  1. Stepwise impact of urban wastewater treatment on the bacterial community structure, antibiotic contents, and prevalence of antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingyu; Shen, Weitao; Yan, Lei; Wang, Xin-Hua; Xu, Hai

    2017-12-01

    Bacteria, antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance determinants are key biological pollutants in aquatic systems, which may lead to bacterial infections or prevent the cure of bacterial infections. In this study, we investigated how the wastewater treatment processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) affect these pollutants. We found that the addition of oxygen, polyaluminum chloride (PAC), and polyacrylamide (PAM), as well as ultraviolet (UV) disinfection could significantly alter the bacterial communities in the water samples. An overall shift from Gram-negative bacteria to Gram-positive bacteria was observed throughout the wastewater treatment steps, but the overall bacterial biomass was not reduced in the WWTP samples. The antibiotic contents were reduced by the WWTP, but the size of the reduction and the step when antibiotic degradation occurred differed among antibiotics. Ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole and erythromycin could be removed completely by the WWTP, whereas cephalexin could not. The removal of ciprofloxacin, cephalexin, and erythromycin occurred in the anaerobic digester, whereas the removal of sulfamethoxazole occurred after the addition of PAC and PAM, and UV disinfection. Antimicrobial resistance determinants were highly prevalent in all of the samples analyzed, except for those targeting vancomycin and colistin. However, wastewater treatment was ineffective at removing antimicrobial resistance determinants from wastewater. There were strong correlations between intI1, floR, sul1, and ermB, thereby suggesting the importance of integrons for the spread of these antimicrobial resistance genes. In general, this study comprised a stepwise analysis of the impact of WWTPs on three biological pollutants: bacteria, antibiotics, and antimicrobial resistance determinants, where our results suggest that the design of WWTPs needs to be improved to address the threats due to these pollutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Occurrence and fate of dissolved and particulate antimicrobials in municipal wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Senta, Ivan; Terzić, Senka; Ahel, Marijan

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive study on the occurrence and fate of several classes of antimicrobials, including sulfonamides, trimethoprim, fluoroquinolones and macrolides, in Croatian municipal wastewaters was performed using an integrated approach, which comprised analysis of both dissolved and particulate fractions. A nation-wide screening showed ubiquitous occurrence of human-use antimicrobials in raw wastewater samples with the total concentrations ranging from 2 to 20 μg/L, while veterinary antimicrobia...

  3. Effects of treatment with antimicrobial agents on the human colonic microflora

    OpenAIRE

    Rafii, Fatemeh

    2008-01-01

    Fatemeh Rafii, John B Sutherland, Carl E CernigliaDivision of Microbiology, National Center for Toxicological Research, FDA, Jefferson, AR, USAAbstract: Antimicrobial agents are the most valuable means available for treating bacterial infections. However, the administration of therapeutic doses of antimicrobial agents to patients is a leading cause of disturbance of the normal gastrointestinal microflora. This disturbance results in diminishing the natural defense mechanisms provided by the c...

  4. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Emmanuel; Medeiros, Ana Cláudia; Gurgel, Bruno César; Sarmento, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to investigate whether the use of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) as an adjuvant to scaling and root planning (SRP) yields better results than SRP alone or associated with systemic antibiotics in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis (AgP). A meta-analysis was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) statements and Cochrane Collaboration recommendations. The search for relevant studies (earliest record to January 2015) was carried out in seven databases, followed by a manual search. Methodological quality assessment of the studies selected was based on an analysis of the risk of bias. At each time point of follow-up, the existence of significant differences (p < 0.05) in clinical attachment level (CAL) gain and probing depth (PD) reduction (primary outcomes) between groups was assessed with RevMan software 5.0. Heterogeneity between studies was assessed by the Higgin test (I (2)). Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) satisfied the eligibility criteria of this review. Only one study was found to have a low risk of bias. There were no significant differences in PD reduction (mean difference 0.33, 95 % confidence interval -0.32 to 0.98, p = 0.32) and CAL gain (mean difference 0.20, 95 % confidence interval -0.41 to 0.81, p = 0.53) between the test and control interventions. At present, therefore, when compared to SRP alone or associated with systemic antibiotics, the evidence suggests that the association of aPDT + SRP is of no additional benefit in the nonsurgical treatment of AgP.

  5. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy for the treatment of teeth with apical periodontitis: a histopathological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra; Novaes, Arthur B; de Oliveira, Rafael R; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Santamaria, Milton; Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo response of apical and periapical tissues of dogs' teeth with apical periodontitis after one-session endodontic treatment with and without antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT). Sixty root canals with experimentally induced apical periodontitis were instrumented and assigned to 4 groups receiving aPDT and root canal filling (RCF) or not: group aPDT+/RCF+ (n = 20): aPDT (photosensitizer phenothiazine chloride at 10 mg/mL for 3 minutes and diode laser [λ = 660 nm, 60 mW/cm(2)] for 1 minute) and RCF in the same session; group aPDT+/RCF- (n = 10); group aPDT-/RCF+ (n = 20), and group aPDT-/RCF- (n = 10). Teeth were restored, and the animals were killed after 90 days. Sections from the maxillas and mandibles were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Mallory trichrome and examined under light microscopy. Descriptive (ie, newly formed apical mineralized tissue, periapical inflammatory infiltrate, apical periodontal ligament thickness, and mineralized tissue resorption) and quantitative (ie, periapical lesion size and number of inflammatory cells) microscopic analysis was performed. Quantitative data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (α = .05). In the aPDT-treated groups, the periapical region was moderately/severely enlarged with no inflammatory cells, moderate neoangiogenesis and fibrogenesis, and the smallest periapical lesions. Although apical closure by mineralized tissue deposition was not achieved, the absence of inflammatory cells, moderate neoangiogenesis, and fibrogenesis in the periapical region in the groups treated with aPDT indicate that this can be a promising adjunct therapy to cleaning and shaping procedures in teeth with apical periodontitis undergoing one-session endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antimicrobial Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Therapeutic Potential for Cystic Fibrosis Infection, and Treatment

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    Morgan T. Sutton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a genetic disease in which the battle between pulmonary infection and inflammation becomes the major cause of morbidity and mortality. We have previously shown that human MSCs (hMSCs decrease inflammation and infection in the in vivo murine model of CF. The studies in this paper focus on the specificity of the hMSC antimicrobial effectiveness using Pseudomonas aeruginosa (gram negative bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus (gram positive bacteria. Our studies show that hMSCs secrete bioactive molecules which are antimicrobial in vitro against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia, impacting the rate of bacterial growth and transition into colony forming units regardless of the pathogen. Further, we show that the hMSCs have the capacity to enhance antibiotic sensitivity, improving the capacity to kill bacteria. We present data which suggests that the antimicrobial effectiveness is associated with the capacity to slow bacterial growth and the ability of the hMSCs to secrete the antimicrobial peptide LL-37. Lastly, our studies demonstrate that the tissue origin of the hMSCs (bone marrow or adipose tissue derived, the presence of functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR: human, Cftr: mouse activity, and response to effector cytokines can impact both hMSC phenotype and antimicrobial potency and efficacy. These studies demonstrate, the unique capacity of the hMSCs to manage different pathogens and the significance of their phenotype in both the antimicrobial and antibiotic enhancing activities.

  7. Preliminary antimicrobial susceptibility: possibility of early and effective therapy during treatment of septic patients

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    Maria Antonietta Distasi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood cultures have the drawback of requiring long time to be carried out. Our study was designed with the aim of early reports on both causing agents and preliminary antimicrobial susceptibility. We carried out a direct antimicrobial susceptibility on 79 positive blood cultures (42 for Gram-negative bacteria of which 21 MDRO; 22 for staphylococci of which 15 S. aureus; and 15 Enterococci/Streptococci employing E-test strips deposited on Müller-Hinton Agar for staphylococci and Gram-negative bacteria, and Müller-Hinton Agar + 5% of blood for enterococci/streptococci. MICs were compared to the antimicrobial susceptibility tests carried out using Vitek2. On the basis of the interpretative criteria (SIR, the comparison between the direct antimicrobial susceptibility and the routine antimicrobial susceptibility, showed a concordance from 92.6% up to 100% for Gram-negative bacteria; from 90.0% up to 100% for staphylococci; from 86.7% up to 100% for streptococci/enterococci, respectively. With regard to MICs comparison, good concordance was detected on the basis of ± 1 doubling dilution. Moreover, this work allowed, in the case of Gram-negative bacteria, either the early identification of multidrug-resistant organisms or providing the MIC evaluation in a broader interval than it would be possible by the reference antimicrobial susceptibility.

  8. Association of gastrointestinal events with quality of life and treatment satisfaction in osteoporosis patients: results from the Medication Use Patterns, Treatment Satisfaction, and Inadequate Control of Osteoporosis Study (MUSIC OS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, A; Sen, S; Adachi, J D; Adami, S; Cortet, B; Cooper, A L; Geusens, P; Mellström, D; Weaver, J P; van den Bergh, J P; Keown, P A; Sajjan, S

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the association of GI events with HRQoL and treatment satisfaction. The effect of baseline GI events persisted through 1 year of follow-up, as indicated by lower EQ-5D, OPAQ-SV, and treatment satisfaction scores among patients with vs without baseline GI events. The presence of GI events is an independent predictor of decreased HRQoL and treatment satisfaction in patients being treated for osteoporosis. The goal of this study was to assess the association of gastrointestinal (GI) events with health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and treatment satisfaction in patients being treated for osteoporosis. MUSIC OS was a multinational, prospective, observational study examining the impact of GI events on osteoporosis management in postmenopausal women. In this analysis, HRQoL and treatment satisfaction were assessed at baseline, 6, and 12 months and compared between patients with and without GI events. Covariate-adjusted scores were calculated using multivariate least-squares regression analysis, and differences between the mean scores of patients with and without baseline and post-baseline GI events were determined. Among the 2959 patients in the analysis, unadjusted scores at each time point were lower (i.e., worse) for patients with GI events than patients without GI events. In adjusted analyses, the effect of baseline GI events persisted through 1 year of follow-up, as indicated by lower EQ-5D and OPAQ-SV scores at 12 months among patients with vs without baseline GI events (-0.04 for the EQ-5D utility score, -5.07 for the EQ-5D visual analog scale, -3.35 for OPAQ physical function, -4.60 for OPAQ emotional status, and -8.50 for OPAQ back pain; P ≤ 0.001 for all values). Decrements in month 12 treatment satisfaction scores were -6.46 for patients with baseline GI events and -7.88 for patients with post-baseline GI events. The presence of GI events is an independent predictor of decreased HRQoL and treatment satisfaction

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing before first-line treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with dual or triple antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Angel; Montes, Milagrosa; Ibarra, Begoña; Tamayo, Esther; Alonso, Horacio; Mendarte, Usua; Lizasoan, Jacobo; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis

    2017-05-14

    To evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial susceptibility-guided therapy before first-line treatment for infection in patients with dual or triple antibiotic resistance. A total of 1034 patients infected by Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) during 2013-2014 were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. 157 of 1034 (15%) patients showed resistance to two (127/1034; 12%) and to three (30/1034; 3%) antibiotics. Sixty-eight patients with dual H. pylori -resistance (clarithromycin, metronidazole or levofloxacin) were treated for 10 d with triple therapies: OAL (omeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and levofloxacin 500 mg b.i.d.) 43 cases, OAM (omeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and metronidazole 500 mg b.i.d.) 12 cases and OAC (omeprazole 20 mg b.id., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d.) 13 cases based on the antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Twelve patients showed triple H. pylori -resistance (clarithromycin, metronidazole and levofloxacin) and received for 10 d triple therapy with OAR (omeprazole 20 mg b.id., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and rifabutin 150 mg b.i.d.). Eradication was confirmed by 13C-urea breath test. Adverse effects and compliance were assessed by a questionnaire. Intention-to-treat eradication rates were: OAL (97.6%), OAM (91.6%), OAC (92.3%) and OAR (58.3%). Cure rate was significantly higher in naïve patients treated with OAR-10 compared to patients who had two or three previous treatment failures (83% vs 33%). Adverse events rates for OAL, OAM, OAC and OAR were 22%, 25%, 23% and 17%, respectively, all of them mild-moderate. Antimicrobial susceptibility-guided triple therapies during 10 d for first-line treatment leads to an eradication rate superior to 90% in patients with dual antibiotic H. pylori resistance.

  10. Impact of prenatal antimicrobial treatment on fetal brain damage due to autogenous fecal peritonitis in Wistar rats: A Histomorphometric Study

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    Neylane Gadelha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate brain neuronal density in newborn rats whose mothers were subjected to fecal peritonitis and compare findings between rats born to mothers treated and not treated with antimicrobials. Methods: Peritonitis was induced with a 10% fecal suspension (4mL/kg in 2 pregnant rats. Of these, 1 received antimicrobial treatment 24 hours after peritonitis induction: moxifloxacin and dexamethasone plus 2 mL of the inner bark of the Schinus terebinthifolius raddi extract. One pregnant rat underwent no intervention and served as a control. Results: The newborn brains of rats born to mothers with fecal peritonitis were significantly smaller and of less firm consistency. Brain neuronal density was lower in the untreated group than in the control and treated groups (P<0.01. Conclusions: Untreated peritonitis caused brain damage in the offspring, which was averted by effective early antimicrobial treatment. This approach may provide an early avenue for translation of such therapy in humans. Keywords: peritonitis, brain injuries, rats

  11. Short Synthetic β-Sheet Antimicrobial Peptides for the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Burn Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guansheng; Cheng, Junchi; Liang, Zhen Chang; Xu, Liang; Lou, Weiyang; Bao, Chang; Ong, Zhan Yuin; Dong, Huihui; Yang, Yi Yan; Fan, Weimin

    2017-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is often implicated in burn wound infections; its inherent drug resistance often renders these infections extremely challenging to treat. This is further compounded by the problem of emerging drug resistance and the dearth of novel antimicrobial drug discovery in recent years. In the perennial search for effective antimicrobial compounds, the authors identify short synthetic β-sheet folding peptides, IRIKIRIK (IK8L), IRIkIrIK (IK8-2D), and irikirik (IK8D) as prime candidates owing to their high potency against Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, the peptides are first assayed against 20 clinically isolated multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains in comparison with the conventional antibiotics imipenem and ceftazidime, and IK8L is demonstrated to be the most effective. IK8L also exhibits superior antibacterial killing kinetics compared to imipenem and ceftazidime. From transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and protein release analyses, IK8L shows membrane-lytic antimicrobial mechanism. Repeated use of IK8L does not induce drug resistance, while the bacteria develop resistance against the antibiotics after several times of treatment at sublethal doses. Analysis of mouse blood serum chemistry reveals that peptide does not induce systemic toxicity. The potential utility of IK8L in the in vivo treatment of P. aeruginosa-infected burn wounds is further demonstrated in a mouse model. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Exploring Post-Treatment Reversion of Antimicrobial Resistance in Enteric Bacteria of Food Animals as a Resistance Mitigation Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Victoriya V; KuKanich, Butch; Riviere, Jim E

    2016-11-01

    Antimicrobial drug use in food animals is associated with an elevation in relative abundance of bacteria resistant to the drug among the animal enteric bacteria. Some of these bacteria are potential foodborne pathogens. Evidence suggests that at least in the enteric nontype-specific Escherichia coli, after treatment the resistance abundance reverts to the background pre-treatment levels, without further interventions. We hypothesize that it is possible to define the distribution of the time period after treatment within which resistance to the administered drug, and possibly other drugs in case of coselection, in fecal bacteria of the treated animals returns to the background pre-treatment levels. Furthermore, it is possible that a novel resistance mitigation strategy for microbiological food safety could be developed based on this resistance reversion phenomenon. The strategy would be conceptually similar to existing antimicrobial drug withdrawal periods, which is a well-established and accepted mitigation strategy for avoiding violative drug residues in the edible products from the treated animals. For developing resistance-relevant withdrawals, a mathematical framework can be used to join the necessary pharmacological, microbiological, and animal production components to project the distributions of the post-treatment resistance reversion periods in the production animal populations for major antimicrobial drug classes in use. The framework can also help guide design of empirical studies into the resistance-relevant withdrawal periods and development of mitigation approaches to reduce the treatment-associated elevation of resistance in animal enteric bacteria. We outline this framework, schematically and through exemplar equations, and how its components could be formulated.

  13. Antimicrobial agents of plant origin for the treatment of phlogistic-infectious diseases of the lower female genital tract

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    Francesco Gon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The phlogistic-infectious diseases of the lower female genital tract are one of the most widespread obstetricgynecologic issues, due to treatment failures that cause frequent relapses and to the adverse effects of some commonly used drugs.The most common vaginal syndromes are due to uncontrolled growth of bacteria or fungi which replace the normal vaginal flora, causing phlogistic and infectious based diseases. These infections are treated with anti-inflammatory and antibiotic therapy; however, the emergence of resistant strains and the ability of many microorganisms to grow inside biofilms severely reduce the repertoire of useful agents.Thus, in the last years increasing interest has been focused toward compounds of plant origin with anti-microbial properties. In the present work, we studied the antimicrobial activity of fractions obtained from endemic plants of Sardinia towards microorganisms that frequently are involved in vaginal infectious diseases: Streptococcus agalactiae, Gardnerella vaginalis and Candida albicans.

  14. Effect of the presence of the antimicrobial tylosin in swine waste on anaerobic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angenent, Largus T; Mau, Margit; George, Usha; Zahn, James A; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2008-05-01

    An anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), seeded with a biomass inoculum that previously had not been exposed to the macrolide antimicrobial tylosin (mixture of Tylosin A, B, C, and D), was operated for 3 months with swine waste without Tylosin A and for 9 months with swine waste containing Tylosin A at an average concentration of 1.6 mg/L. When swine waste with tylosin was fed to the ASBR, methane production and volatile solids removal did not appear to be inhibited and a methane yield of 0.47 L methane per gram volatile solids fed to the ASBR was observed. Throughout the operating period, Tylosin A levels in ASBR biomass and effluent were below the detection limit of 0.01 mg/L. However, during the first 3 months of operation, the levels of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB)-resistant bacteria in the ASBR biomass increased substantially as determined by hybridizations with oligonucleotide probes designed to target MLSB-resistant bacteria. Since no Tylosin A was present in the swine waste during the initial 3 months, the presence of MLSB-resistant bacteria in the swine waste was likely the reason for the increase in resistance. Subsequently, the levels of MLSB-resistant bacteria in ASBR biomass stabilized with an average of 44.9% for the 9 months of operation with swine waste containing Tylosin A. The level of MLSB-resistant bacteria in the swine waste fed to the ASBR during this period averaged 18.0%. The results indicate that anaerobic treatment of a waste stream containing tylosin was effective (based on reactor performance) and that the level of resistant bacteria in the ASBR was substantially higher than in the waste stream fed to this system.

  15. Common errors in the treatment of intra-abdominal infections: the irrational use of antimicrobial agents

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    Belinda De Simone

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance (AR is a global, emergent problem because an increasing numbers of serious community acquired and nosocomial infections are caused by resistant bacterial pathogens. It is a direct consequence of the excessive and irrational use of antibiotics. The use of antimicrobial agents – aimed to decrease morbidity and mortality rate related to intra-abdominal infections – is very high, often improper, in the Departments of General and Emergency Surgery and Intensive Cure Units. Source control and empiric antibiotic therapy have to be administrated as early as possible to decrease high mortality rates in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock and, in this, the general surgeon has a crucial role. Proper antimicrobial stewardship in selecting an appropriate antibiotic and optimizing its dose and duration to cure intraabdominal infections may prevent the emergence of AR and decrease costs for antibiotics.

  16. STUDY OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTION OF COMBINED DOSAGE FORM FOR THE TREATMENT OF INTESTINAL INFECTIONS

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    Bobritskaya LA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal infection (II of various etiologies is among to the most widespread diseases in the world. The treatment regimen bacterial etiology involves the suppression of pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic with the restoration of the normal intestinal microflora. For effective antibiotic pharmacotherapy of intestinal infections are widely used drug combinations with the additionof nifuroxazide, as well as enzymatic and normalizing bowel motility broad-spectrum drugs. Intestinal antiseptics nifuroxazide characterized by broad spectrum of antibacterial action against Staphylococcus spp, Clostridium spp, E. coli, Salmonella spp, Shigellaspp, Proteus spp, Klebsiellaspp, Enterobacter spp, V. cholerae, H. pylori, Yersinia spp, and also the lack of effect on the normal intestinal flora, high safety profile. Recently, for the treatment of intestinal infections nifuroxazide often combined with pre- and probiotics for complex correction of the intestinal microflora disorders. For complex therapy of intestinal infections, we have developed an original combined medicine "Diaplant", in the form of capsules, comprising as active ingredients nifuroxazide (200 mg in combination with plant substance plantaglucide (200 mg. Plantaglucide drug obtained from Plantago major has spasmolytic, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity, normalizes bowel peristalsis, while reducing the tone of smooth muscles of the stomach and intestines, reduces swelling folds of the gastric mucosa, and contained therein polysaccharides in the form of pectins have properties of prebiotic and have immunostimulatory effects. Aim of the work – study of antibacterial action of combined drug "Diaplant" containing nifuroxazide and plantaglucide in regard to test strains and clinical strains of microorganisms allocated from patients with bacterial diarrhea. Materials and methods. Estimation of antimicrobial activity was performed under conditions in vitro by method of serial dilutions

  17. The effect of heat treatment on the antimicrobial properties of honey

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    Cuilan eChen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the antimicrobial properties of honey. In most honey samples, antimicrobial activity is due to the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 by the bee-derived enzyme glucose oxidase, however the amount of H2O2 produced can vary greatly among samples. In addition, honey is a complex product, and other components may contribute to or modulate this activity, which may be further affected by processing procedures used in large-scale commercial production. In this study we examined honey derived from three native Australian floral sources that had previously been associated with H2O2-dependent activity: spotted gum (Eucalyptus maculata, red stringybark (Eucalyptus macrorrhyncha and yellowbox (Eucalyptus melliodora. Antimicrobial activity was measured using standardized assays against the bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Antibacterial activity was only seen in four of the six red stringybark samples and ranged from 12-21.1% phenol equivalence. No antibacterial activity was detected in the spotted gum or yellowbox samples. Antifungal activity ranged from MIC values of 19-38.3 % (w/v, and although all samples were significantly more active than an osmotically equivalent sugar solution, most had relatively low activity. All honey samples were provided unprocessed and underwent standard heating and filtration procedures (45˚C for 8 hours followed by filtration with a 100 µm filter, allowing the effects of commercial heating and filtration methods on antimicrobial activity and H2O2 levels to be assessed. Average antibacterial and antifungal activities decreased, but while processing was usually detrimental, occasionally the reverse was seen and antimicrobial activity increased. Significant activity was eliminated from all samples by the addition of catalase, indicating that H2O2 was chiefly responsible for their antimicrobial action, and H2O2 production was measured in the

  18. Increased use of antimicrobial medication in bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder prior to the eating disorder treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raevuori, Anu; Lukkariniemi, Laura; Suokas, Jaana T; Gissler, Mika; Suvisaari, Jaana M; Haukka, Jari

    2016-06-01

    We examined the use of antimicrobial medication as a proxy for infections in large patient cohort treated for binge-eating disorder (BED), bulimia nervosa (BN), and anorexia nervosa (AN) over the five-year period preceding eating disorder treatment. Patients (N = 1592) at the Eating Disorder Unit of Helsinki University Central Hospital between 2000 and 2010 were compared with matched general population controls (N = 6368). The study population was linked to the prescription data of antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral medication from the Register on Reimbursed Prescription Medicine. Data were analyzed using regression models. Individuals with BN and BED had received more often antimicrobial medication prescriptions compared to their controls (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.3-2.1; OR: 2.6, 95% CI: 1.4-4.6, respectively), while no significant difference emerged in AN (OR: 0.9, 95% CI: 0.7-1.0, p = 0.10). Of the main drug categories, the respective pattern was seen in antibacterial and antifungal medication, while increased use for antivirals appeared only in BN (OR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1-2.3). Measured with the mean number of prescriptions or mean Defined Daily Doses per individual, patients with BN, BED and males with AN had also higher total antimicrobial medication use. Indicating increased infections, we found elevated use of antimicrobial medication in BN, BED and in males with AN. Infections may be consequence of hyperglycemia, weight gain, or dysregulation of intestinal microbiota associated with core eating disorder behaviors. Or the other way round; changes in intestinal microbiota due to infections, inflammation, or antibacterial medications might contribute to eating disorders in multiple ways. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:542-552). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Early appropriate parenteral antimicrobial treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Lena M

    2008-01-01

    Complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs) are a major clinical problem, in part because of the increasing resistance of infecting bacteria to our current antibiotic therapies. Prompt appropriate treatment of infections in hospitalized patients reduces the mortality rate. Furthermore, appropriate and timely antibiotic therapy improves outcomes for cSSTIs caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). This review delineates factors to consider in the choice of initial antibiotic treatment for cSSTIs and describes the antimicrobial agents available or under clinical development for the treatment of cSSTIs caused by MRSA. Review of the pertinent literature and recommendations. The choice of antimicrobial agent for empiric treatment of cSSTIs should be guided by the site and type of infection, the presence of an immunocompromised state or neutropenia, and risk factors for hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) or community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) infection. Most CA-MRSA strains remain susceptible to ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, gentamicin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, although resistance to clindamycin can emerge during treatment. Of the agents available for the treatment of HA-MRSA cSSTIs, vancomycin has been the reference standard, but clinical failures have been reported increasingly. Alternative agents for HA-MRSA include linezolid, which has been well-studied for treatment of cSSTIs, as well as daptomycin and tigecycline. A number of antibiotic agents are undergoing clinical trials or are under development for the treatment of cSSTIs caused by MRSA. Severe and progressive cSSTIs should be treated promptly with appropriate antibiotic agents. The choice of agent should be guided by a number of factors, including suspected CA-MRSA or HA-MRSA infection. Available agents should be evaluated carefully for efficacy in the treatment of MRSA cSSTIs.

  20. Antimicrobial peptides for topical treatment of osteomyelitis and prevention of implant related infections in orthopedics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čeřovský, Václav; Nešuta, Ondřej; Dudková, Vlasta; Melicherčík, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, Suppl S2 (2016), S157-S158 ISSN 1075-2617. [European Peptide Symposium /34./ and International Peptide Symposium /8./. 04.09.2016-09.09.2016, Leipzig] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : antimicrobial peptides * osteomyelitis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  1. Antimicrobial treatment of polymeric medical devices by silver nanomaterials and related technology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívková, A.; Hubáček, Tomáš; Staszek, M.; Švorčík, V.; Siegel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 419. E-ISSN 1422-0067 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : antimicrobials * medical devices * nanostructures * polymers * modification Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2016

  2. Triple-acting antimicrobial treatment for drug-resistant and intracellular Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over-used conventional antibiotics. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a notorious pathogen for both animal and human health with multi-d...

  3. Antimicrobials and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein-DeVore, L

    1991-10-01

    Effective control of plaque and gingivitis are among our most important treatment goals. Several antimicrobial products have demonstrated safety and various degrees of effectiveness as adjuncts to mechanical plaque control. Our clinical decisions relating to antimicrobial products should be based on the expanding body of research that documents product safety and effectiveness in reducing both plaque and gingivitis. Antimicrobials present exciting prospects for in-office and home use, but they do not replace thorough root debridement and traditional plaque control. However, when selected based on individual patient needs and used in recommended regimens, antimicrobials can be important additions to both professional treatment and oral hygiene practices.

  4. Italian retail gasoline activities: inadequate distribution network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verde, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    It is common belief that competition in the Italian retail gasoline activities is hindered by oil companies' collusive behaviour. However, when developing a broader analysis of the sector, low efficiency and scarce competition could results as the consequences coming from an inadequate distribution network and from the recognition of international markets and focal point [it

  5. Barriers to Mammography among Inadequately Screened Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Carolyn R. T.; Roberts, Summer; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Crayton, Eloise V.; Jackson, Sherrill; Politi, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Mammography use has increased over the past 20 years, yet more than 30% of women remain inadequately screened. Structural barriers can deter individuals from screening, however, cognitive, emotional, and communication barriers may also prevent mammography use. This study sought to identify the impact of number and type of barriers on mammography…

  6. Radiologists' responses to inadequate referrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lysdahl, Kristin Bakke [Oslo University College, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Section for Medical Ethics, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 1130, Blindern, Oslo (Norway); Hofmann, Bjoern Morten [University of Oslo, Section for Medical Ethics, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 1130, Blindern, Oslo (Norway); Gjoevik University College, Faculty of Health Care and Nursing, Gjoevik (Norway); Espeland, Ansgar [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Section for Radiology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway)

    2010-05-15

    To investigate radiologists' responses to inadequate imaging referrals. A survey was mailed to Norwegian radiologists; 69% responded. They graded the frequencies of actions related to referrals with ambiguous indications or inappropriate examination choices and the contribution of factors preventing and not preventing an examination of doubtful usefulness from being performed as requested. Ninety-five percent (344/361) reported daily or weekly actions related to inadequate referrals. Actions differed among subspecialties. The most frequent were contacting the referrer to clarify the clinical problem and checking test results/information in the medical records. Both actions were more frequent among registrars than specialists and among hospital radiologists than institute radiologists. Institute radiologists were more likely to ask the patient for additional information and to examine the patient clinically. Factors rated as contributing most to prevent doubtful examinations were high risk of serious complications/side effects, high radiation dose and low patient age. Factors facilitating doubtful examinations included respect for the referrer's judgment, patient/next-of-kin wants the examination, patient has arrived, unreachable referrer, and time pressure. In summary, radiologists facing inadequate referrals considered patient safety and sought more information. Vetting referrals on arrival, easier access to referring clinicians, and time for radiologists to handle inadequate referrals may contribute to improved use of imaging. (orig.)

  7. Financial incentives are inadequate for most companies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Financial incentives are inadequate for most companies. market far less lucrative than for other diseases, which results in chronic underinvestment; reduced investment in TB drug R&D,. Pfizer withdrawal from TB R&D; AstraZeneca abandon TB R&D & close site; Novartis pull out; 4/22 Big Pharma producing antibacterials ...

  8. Antimicrobial stewardship: Limits for implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, Bhanu

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic stewardship programme (ASP) is a multifaceted approach to improve patients' clinical outcomes, prevent the emergence of antimicrobial resistance, and reduce hospital costs by prudent and focused antimicrobial use. Development of local treatment guidelines according to local ecology, rapid

  9. Microencapsulated antimicrobial compounds as a means to enhance electron beam irradiation treatment for inactivation of pathogens on fresh spinach leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Carmen; Moreira, Rosana G; Castell-Perez, Elena

    2011-08-01

    eliminate internalized pathogens. Ionizing radiation is a viable alternative for eliminating pathogens; however, the dose required to inactivate these pathogens is often too high to be tolerated by the fresh produce without undesirable quality changes. This study uses natural antimicrobial ingredients as radiosensitizers. These ingredients were encapsulated and applied to fresh produce that was subsequently irradiated. The process results in high level of microorganism inactivation using lower doses than the conventional irradiation treatments. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Antimicrobial Textile Treatments - A Literature Review of Risks, Benefits and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    dose dependent  none  possible  none      3    compounds are classified as disinfectants (e.g., iodine, alcohols) that are highly active; by  definition ...environmental conditions, a  definitive  conclusion is difficult to construct [6].    Antimicrobial agents used to treat textiles may result in resistant...textiles, skin‐borne  flora  and odour”. Current Problems in  Dermatology, 33:67‐77.  13. Hoefer, D and Hammer TR. (2011) “Antimicrobial active clothes

  11. Evidence Report: Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.; Heer, Martina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of nutrition in exploration has been documented repeatedly throughout history, where, for example, in the period between Columbus' voyage in 1492 and the invention of the steam engine, scurvy resulted in more sailor deaths than all other causes of death combined. Because nutrients are required for the structure and function of every cell and every system in the body, defining the nutrient requirements for spaceflight and ensuring provision and intake of those nutrients are primary issues for crew health and mission success. Unique aspects of nutrition during space travel include the overarching physiological adaptation to weightlessness, psychological adaptation to extreme and remote environments, and the ability of nutrition and nutrients to serve as countermeasures to ameliorate the negative effects of spaceflight on the human body. Key areas of clinical concern for long-duration spaceflight include loss of body mass (general inadequate food intake), bone and muscle loss, cardiovascular and immune system decrements, increased radiation exposure and oxidative stress, vision and ophthalmic changes, behavior and performance, nutrient supply during extravehicular activity, and general depletion of body nutrient stores because of inadequate food supply, inadequate food intake, increased metabolism, and/or irreversible loss of nutrients. These topics are reviewed herein, based on the current gap structure.

  12. Electrofabrication of Functional Materials: Chloramine-based Antimicrobial Film for Infectious Wound Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xue; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Chuchu; Lei, Yu; Lei, Miao; Xu, Miao; Jin, Dawei; Li, Peng; Yin, Meng; Payne, Gregory F; Liu, Changsheng

    2018-03-02

    Electrical signals can be imposed with exquisite spatiotemporal control and provide exciting opportunities to create structure and confer function. Here, we report the use of electrical signals to program the fabrication of a chloramine wound dressing with high antimicrobial activity. This method involves two electrofabrication steps: (i) a cathodic electrodeposition of an aminopolysaccharide chitosan triggered by a localized region of high pH; and (ii) an anodic chlorination of the deposited film in the presence of chloride. This electrofabrication process is completed within several minutes and the chlorinated chitosan can be peeled from the electrode to yield a free-standing film. The presence of active N-Cl species in this electrofabricated film was confirmed with chlorination occurring first on the amine groups and then on the amide groups when large anodic charges were used. Electrofabrication is quantitatively controllable as the cathodic input controls film growth during deposition and the anodic input controls film chlorination. In vitro studies demonstrate that the chlorinated chitosan film has antimicrobial activities that depend on the chlorination degree. In vivostudies with a MRSA infected wound healing model indicate that the chlorinated chitosan film inhibited bacterial growth, induced less inflammation, developed reorganized epithelial and dermis structures, and thus promoted wound healing compared to a bare wound or wound treated with unmodified chitosan. These results demonstrate the fabrication of advanced functional materials (i.e., antimicrobial wound dressings) using controllable electrical signals to both organize structure through non-covalent interactions (i.e., induce chitosan's reversible self-assembly) and to initiate function-conferring covalent modifications (i.e., generate chloramine bonds). Potentially, electrofabrication may provide a simple, low cost and sustainable alternative for materials fabrication. We believe this work is

  13. Classification of wounds at risk and their antimicrobial treatment with polihexanide: a practice-oriented expert recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemond, J; Assadian, O; Gerber, V; Kingsley, A; Kramer, A; Leaper, D J; Mosti, G; Piatkowski de Grzymala, A; Riepe, G; Risse, A; Romanelli, M; Strohal, R; Traber, J; Vasel-Biergans, A; Wild, T; Eberlein, T

    2011-01-01

    Currently, there are no generally accepted definitions for wounds at risk of infection. In clinical practice, too many chronic wounds are regarded as being at risk of infection, and therefore many topical antimicrobials - in terms of frequency and duration of use - are applied to wounds. Based on expert discussion and current knowledge, a clinical assessment score was developed. The objective of this wounds at risk (W.A.R.) score is to allow decision-making on the indication for the use of antiseptics on the basis of polihexanide. The proposed clinical classification of W.A.R. shall facilitate the decision for wound antisepsis and allow an appropriate general treatment regimen with the focus on the prevention of wound infection. The W.A.R. score is based on a clinically oriented risk assessment using concrete patient circumstances. The indication for the use of antiseptics results from the addition of differently weighted risk causes, for which points are assigned. Antimicrobial treatment is justified in the case of 3 or more points. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Porous CS based membranes with improved antimicrobial properties for the treatment of infected wound in veterinary applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonda-Turo, C., E-mail: chiara.tondaturo@polito.it [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy); Ruini, F. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy); Argentati, M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy); Clinic for Exotic Animals, CVS, Via Sandro Giovannini 53, 00137 Rome (Italy); Di Girolamo, N. [Clinic for Exotic Animals, CVS, Via Sandro Giovannini 53, 00137 Rome (Italy); Robino, P.; Nebbia, P. [Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Largo Braccini 2, 10095 Grugliasco, Turin (Italy); Ciardelli, G. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy)

    2016-03-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to the use of innovative solution for the treatment of infected wounds in animals. Current applied treatments are often un-effective leading to infection propagation and animal death. Novel engineered membranes based on chitosan (CS) can be prepared to combine local antimicrobial effect, high flexibility and easy manipulation. In this work, CS crosslinked porous membranes with improved antimicrobial properties were prepared via freeze-drying technique to promote wound healing and to reduce the bacterial proliferation in infected injuries. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gentamicin sulfate (GS) were incorporated into the CS matrices to impart antibacterial properties on a wild range of strains. CS based porous membranes were tested for their physicochemical, thermal, mechanical as well as swelling and degradation behavior at physiological condition. Additionally, GS release profile was investigated, showing a moderate burst effect in the first days followed by a decreasing release rate which it was maintained for at least 56 days. Moreover, porous membranes loaded with GS or AgNPs showed good bactericidal activity against both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The bacterial strains used in this work were collected in chelonians after carapace injuries to better mimic the environment after trauma. - Highlights: • Innovative scaffolds for wound healing in veterinary applications • Novel engineered membranes based on chitosan with improved antibacterial properties • Highly flexible and versatile membranes for infected wounds.

  15. Antimicrobial commodities. 7. Biocide for water treatment; Kokin seikatsu yohin. 7. Suraimu control zai no kokin bo kabi sayo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugi, T. [Kurita Water Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    Outlined in this report are microbe-caused troubles that happen in manufacturing processes particularly in water treatment systems, measures for dealing with such troubles, and the antimicrobial and fungicidal functions presented by slime inhibiting agents. In heat exchangers in production lines in chemical and iron-making industries, and in paper making processes in paper and pulp industry, deposits, called slime and composed mainly of microbes, occur to cause various troubles such as reduction in production efficiency. In general, vermicides and multiplication depressants are used for the prevention and removal of slime deposition. They include chlorine gas, sodium hypochlorite, chlorinated isocyanuric acid, and dibromohydantoin, which are used for slime control mainly in cooling water systems. Slime inhibitors are needed for paper pulp, antiseptic agents with its effect lasting long are required for industrial production, and, in small cooling towers where chlorine management is demanding, antimicrobial agents of the organic nature are used. In case water treatment is inappropriately performed, troubles may be caused by Legionella microbes, for whose destruction chemical-aided washing is necessary. (NEDO)

  16. Porous CS based membranes with improved antimicrobial properties for the treatment of infected wound in veterinary applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonda-Turo, C.; Ruini, F.; Argentati, M.; Di Girolamo, N.; Robino, P.; Nebbia, P.; Ciardelli, G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to the use of innovative solution for the treatment of infected wounds in animals. Current applied treatments are often un-effective leading to infection propagation and animal death. Novel engineered membranes based on chitosan (CS) can be prepared to combine local antimicrobial effect, high flexibility and easy manipulation. In this work, CS crosslinked porous membranes with improved antimicrobial properties were prepared via freeze-drying technique to promote wound healing and to reduce the bacterial proliferation in infected injuries. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gentamicin sulfate (GS) were incorporated into the CS matrices to impart antibacterial properties on a wild range of strains. CS based porous membranes were tested for their physicochemical, thermal, mechanical as well as swelling and degradation behavior at physiological condition. Additionally, GS release profile was investigated, showing a moderate burst effect in the first days followed by a decreasing release rate which it was maintained for at least 56 days. Moreover, porous membranes loaded with GS or AgNPs showed good bactericidal activity against both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The bacterial strains used in this work were collected in chelonians after carapace injuries to better mimic the environment after trauma. - Highlights: • Innovative scaffolds for wound healing in veterinary applications • Novel engineered membranes based on chitosan with improved antibacterial properties • Highly flexible and versatile membranes for infected wounds

  17. Rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in urinary tract infections during pregnancy: Necessity for exploring newer treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meher Rizvi

    2011-01-01

    antimicrobial susceptibility with safe drugs in pregnant women so that these can be used for the treatment. For empirical treatment cefoperazone-sulbactum can be recommended, which is a safe drug, covering both gram positive and gram negative organisms and with a good sensitivity.

  18. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts to select the appropriate antimicrobial for treatment. Accordingly, efforts are underway in both veterinary and human medicine to preserve the effectiveness of these drugs. ...

  19. Shelf-life extension of gilthead seabream fillets by osmotic treatment and antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsironi, T N; Taoukis, P S

    2012-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effect of selected antimicrobial agents on the shelf life of osmotically pretreated gilthead seabream and to establish reliable kinetic equations for shelf-life determination validated in dynamic conditions. Fresh gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) fillets were osmotically treated with 50% high dextrose equivalent maltodextrin (HDM, DE 47) plus 5% NaCl and 0·5% carvacrol, 0·5% glucono-δ-lactone or 1% Citrox (commercial antimicrobial mix). Untreated and treated slices were aerobically packed and stored isothermally (0-15°C). Microbial growth and quality-related chemical indices were modelled as functions of temperature. Models were validated at dynamic storage conditions. Osmotic pretreatment with the use of antimicrobials led to significant shelf-life extension of fillets, in terms of microbial growth and organoleptic deterioration. The shelf life was 7 days for control samples at 5°C. The osmotic pretreatment with carvacrol, glucono-δ-lactone and Citrox allowed for shelf-life extension by 8, 10 and 5 days at 5°C, respectively. The results of the study show the potential of adding carvacrol, glucono-δ-lactone or Citrox in the osmotic solution to extend the shelf life and improve commercial value of chilled osmotically pretreated fish products. The developed models can be a reliable tool for predicting the shelf life of fresh or minimally processed gilthead seabream fillets in the real chill chain. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy using zinc phthalocyanine derivatives in treatment of bacterial skin infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Yaxin; Wang, Dong; Li, Linsen; Zhou, Shanyong; Huang, Joy H.; Chen, Jincan; Hu, Ping; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is an effective method for killing bacterial cells in view of the increasing problem of multiantibiotic resistance. We herein reported the PACT effect on bacteria involved in skin infections using a zinc phthalocyanine derivative, pentalysine β-carbonylphthalocyanine zinc (ZnPc-Lys). Compared with its anionic ZnPc counterpart, ZnPc-Lys showed an enhanced antibacterial efficacy in vitro and in an animal model of localized infection. Meanwhile, ZnPc-Lys was observed to significantly reduce the wound skin blood flow during wound healing, indicating an anti-inflammation activity. This study provides new insight on the mechanisms of PACT in bacterial skin infection.

  1. Treatment Modalities and Antimicrobial Stewardship Initiatives in the Management of Intra-Abdominal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Hoffmann

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs focus on improving the utilization of broad spectrum antibiotics to decrease the incidence of multidrug-resistant Gram positive and Gram negative pathogens. Hospital admission for both medical and surgical intra-abdominal infections (IAIs commonly results in the empiric use of broad spectrum antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones, beta-lactam beta-lactamase inhibitors, and carbapenems that can select for resistant organisms. This review will discuss the management of uncomplicated and complicated IAIs as well as highlight stewardship initiatives focusing on the proper use of broad spectrum antibiotics.

  2. Honey as an effective antimicrobial treatment for chronic wounds: is there a place for it in modern medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper R

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rose Cooper Centre for Biomedical Sciences, Cardiff School of Health Sciences, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff, Wales, UK Abstract: Honey has a long history in the treatment of wounds, where claims of its therapeutic properties include the inhibition of a wide range of infectious agents as well as an ability to promote rapid wound healing. However, honey is not a uniform product, and its chemical composition can be influenced by multiple factors. The availability of modern, licensed dressings containing medical grade honey has garnered renewed interest in its clinical potential for conventional wound care. Laboratory investigations are beginning to explain at a cellular and molecular level the effects of specific honeys on certain microorganisms, but the clinical evidence of its antimicrobial effects is limited at present. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the chemical complexity of honey, to describe the mechanisms of antibacterial action reported to date, and to collate the evidence that provides insight into antimicrobial claims for honey. Keywords: medical grade honey, wound infection, antibacterial activity, antibiofilm activity, wound healing

  3. The antimicrobial effectiveness of photodynamic therapy used as an addition to the conventional endodontic re-treatment: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurič, Ivona Bago; Plečko, Vanda; Pandurić, Dragana Gabrić; Anić, Ivica

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) used as an adjunct to the endodontic re-treatment in the eradication of microorganisms from previously filled root canals. The study sample consisted of 21 randomly selected patients with root filled and infected root canal system with chronic apical periodontitis on incisors or canines, who have had previously endodontic treatment. Microbiological samples from the root canals were collected after accessing the canal, following the endodontic re-treatment and after the aPDT procedure. During instrumentation, the root canals were irrigated with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and the final irrigation protocol included 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid followed by NaOCl. Root canals were filled with a phenothiazinium chloride and irradiated with a diode laser (λ=660 nm, 100 mW) for 1 min. Microbiological samples from the root canals were cultivated on selective plates, and the identification was done by micromorphology, macromorphology and different API strips as well as bacterial counts (colony forming units). Fourteen bacteria species were isolated from the root canals initially, with a mean value of 4.57 species per canal. Although endodontic re-treatment alone produced a significant reduction in the number of bacteria species (pendodontic treatment and aPDT was statistically more effective (pendodontic therapy achieved a significant further reduction of intracanal microbial load. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial drug use and risk factors associated with treatment incidence and mortality in Swiss veal calves reared under improved welfare conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lava, M; Schüpbach-Regula, G; Steiner, A; Meylan, M

    2016-04-01

    Ninety-one Swiss veal farms producing under a label with improved welfare standards were visited between August and December 2014 to investigate risk factors related to antimicrobial drug use and mortality. All herds consisted of own and purchased calves, with a median of 77.4% of purchased calves. The calves' mean age was 29±15days at purchasing and the fattening period lasted at average 120±28 days. The mean carcass weight was 125±12kg. A mean of 58±33 calves were fattened per farm and year, and purchased calves were bought from a mean of 20±17 farms of origin. Antimicrobial drug treatment incidence was calculated with the defined daily dose methodology. The mean treatment incidence (TIADD) was 21±15 daily doses per calf and year. The mean mortality risk was 4.1%, calves died at a mean age of 94±50 days, and the main causes of death were bovine respiratory disease (BRD, 50%) and gastro-intestinal disease (33%). Two multivariable models were constructed, for antimicrobial drug treatment incidence (53 farms) and mortality (91 farms). No quarantine, shared air space for several groups of calves, and no clinical examination upon arrival at the farm were associated with increased antimicrobial treatment incidence. Maximum group size and weight differences >100kg within a group were associated with increased mortality risk, while vaccination and beef breed were associated with decreased mortality risk. The majority of antimicrobial treatments (84.6%) were given as group treatments with oral powder fed through an automatic milk feeding system. Combination products containing chlortetracycline with tylosin and sulfadimidine or with spiramycin were used for 54.9%, and amoxicillin for 43.7% of the oral group treatments. The main indication for individual treatment was BRD (73%). The mean age at the time of treatment was 51 days, corresponding to an estimated weight of 80-100kg. Individual treatments were mainly applied through injections (88.5%), and included

  5. Use of cryopoor plasma for albumin replacement and continuous antimicrobial infusion for treatment of septic peritonitis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropski, Meaghan K; Guillaumin, Julien; Monnig, Andrea A; Townsend, Katy; McLoughlin, Mary A

    2017-05-01

    To report the successful management of a dog with septic peritonitis and septic shock secondary to enterectomy dehiscence using novel techniques for identification of intestinal dehiscence and for septic shock treatment. A 5-year-old castrated male Bernese Mountain Dog presented for lethargy 6 days following enterotomy for foreign body obstruction. Septic peritonitis was identified due to dehiscence of the enterotomy site, and resection and anastomosis were performed using a gastrointestinal anastomosis and thoracoabdominal stapling device. Postoperatively the patient experienced severe hypotension, which responded to norepinephrine constant rate infusion (CRI) after failing to improve with fluid therapy or dopamine CRI. Further treatment included antimicrobial CRI and supportive care including careful fluid therapy. Due to low effective circulating volume paired with intersititial fluid overload and large volume abdominal effusion, fluid therapy consisted of a combination of human serum albumin, canine albumin, synthetic colloids, and isotonic crystalloids. Cryopoor plasma (CPP) was used as a source of canine albumin and intravascular volume. On Day 4, food dye was given through a nasogastric tube due to suspicion of dehiscence of the anastomosis site. Dehiscence was confirmed during abdominal exploratory, and a second resection and anastomosis was performed. Abdominal partial closure with vacuum-assisted closure device was performed. Supportive care was continued with CPP CRI and imipenem CRI. Planned relaparotomy to change the vacuum-assisted closure device was performed 48 hours later, with abdominal closure 96 hours after anastomosis. The patient was discharged on Day 15. Recheck 12 months later was normal. This case includes novel techniques such food dye via nasogastric tube to identify anastomosis dehiscence, use of CPP as a source of canine albumin, and antimicrobial CRI in a dog with septic peritonitis. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society

  6. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M.E. van; Paget, W.J.; Heijer, C.D.J. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. Methods:

  7. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bijnen, E.M.E.; Paget, W.J.; den Heijer, C.D.J.; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. Methods:

  8. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolated in newly-hatched chickens and effect of amoxicillin treatment during their growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Belenguer, Ana; Doménech, Eva; Villagrá, Arantxa; Fenollar, Alejandro; Ferrús, Maria Antonia

    2016-08-01

    The use of antimicrobials in food animals is the major determinant for the propagation of resistant bacteria in the animal reservoir. However, other factors may also play a part, and in particular vertical spread between the generations has been suggested to be an important transmission pathway. The objective of this paper was to determine the resistance patterns of Escherichia coli isolated from newly-hatched chickens as well as to study the antibiotic pressure effect when amoxicillin was administered during their growing period. With this aim, meconium from 22 one-day-old Ross chickens was analysed. In addition, during their growth period, amoxicillin treatments at days 7, 21 and 35 were carried out. Results showed a high number of E. coli-resistant strains were isolated from the treated one-day-old chickens, and were the highest for β-lactams group, followed by quinolone and tetracyclines. After treatment with amoxicillin, the highest percentage of resistances were detected for this antibiotic compared to the others analysed, with significant differences in resistance percentages between control and treated broilers detected in relation to ampicillin, cephalothin, streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline. Differences in resistances to ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid between control and treated animals were not observed and there was lack of resistance for amikacin and ceftriaxone. These results suggest the possibility of vertical transmission of resistant strains to newly-hatched chicks from parent flocks, and seem to indicate that the treatment with amoxicillin increased the resistance of E. coli to other antibiotics.

  9. Potential antimicrobial agents for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsaad, Noor; Wilffert, Bob; van Altena, Richard; de Lange, Wiel C. M.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) is challenging because of the high toxicity of second-line drugs and the longer treatment duration than for drug-susceptible TB patients. In order to speed up novel treatment for MDR-TB, we suggest considering expanding the indications of

  10. Applications of nano-structured metal oxides for treatment of arsenic in water and for antimicrobial coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadu, Rakesh Babu

    Dependency of technology has been increasing radically through cellular phones for communication, data storage devices for education, drinking water purifiers for healthiness, antimicrobial-coated textiles for cleanliness, nanomedicines for deadliest diseases, solar cells for natural power, nanorobots for engineering and many more. Nanotechnology develops many unprecedented products and methodologies with its adroitness in this modern scientific world. Syntheses of nanomaterials play a significant role in the development of technology. Solution combustion and hydrothermal syntheses produce many nanomaterials with different structures and pioneering applications. Nanometal oxides, like titania, silver oxide, manganese oxide and iron oxide have their unique applications in engineering, chemistry and biochemistry. Likewise, this study talks about the syntheses and applications of nanomaterials such as magnetic graphene nanoplatelets (M-Gras) decorated with uniformly dispersed NPs, manganese doped titania nanotubes (Mn-TNTs), and silver doped titania nanopartcles (nAg-TNPs) and their polyurethane based polymer nanocomposite coating (nAg-TiO2 /PU). Basically, M-Gras, and Mn-TNTs were applied for the treatment of arsenic contaminated water, and nAg- TiO2/PU applied for antimicrobial coatings on textiles. Adsorption of arsenic over Mn- TNTs, and M-Gras was discussed while considering all the regulations of arsenic contamination in drinking water and oxidation of arsenic over Mn-TNTs also discussed with the possible surface reactions. Silver doped titania and its polyurethane nanocomposite was coated on polyester fabric and examined the coated fabric for bactericidal activity for gram-negative (E. coli) and gram-positive ( S. epidermidis) bacteria. This study elucidates the development of suitable nanomaterials and their applications to treat or rectify the environmental hazards while following the scientific standards and regulations.

  11. Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, fluoride release, and antimicrobial properties of glass ionomer cements indicated for atraumatic restorative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Sudhanshu; Tiwari, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare constituents of glass powder, fluoride release, and antimicrobial properties of new atraumatic restorative treatment material with zirconia fillers and conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) type IX. Thisin vitro study comparing Zirconomer and Fuji IX was executed in three parts: (1) energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of glass powders (2) analysis of fluoride release at 1(st), 3(rd), 7(th), 15(th), and 30(th) day, and (3) antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Candida albicans at 48 hours. Data was analyzed using unpaired t-test and two way analysis of variance followed by least significant difference post hoc test. A P value of glass powders, mean atomic percentage of oxygen was more than 50%. According to the weight percentage, zirconium in Zirconomer and silica in Fuji IX were the second main elements. Calcium, zinc, and zirconium were observed only in Zirconomer. At all the time intervals, statistically significant higher amount of fluoride release was observed with Zirconomer than Fuji IX. At 48 hours, mean ± standard deviation (SD) of zone of inhibition against Streptococcus mutans was 11.14 ± 0.77 mm and 8.51 ± 0.43 mm for Zirconomer and Fuji IX, respectively. Against Lactobacillus casei, it was 14.06 ± 0.71 mm for Zirconomer and 11.70 ± 0.39 mm for Fuji IX. No antifungal activity was observed against Candida albicans by Zirconomer and Fuji IX. Zirconomer had higher antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei, which may be attributed to its composition and higher fluoride release. However, it failed to show antifungal effect againstCandida albicans.

  12. Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... least 10 countries (Australia, Austria, Canada, France, Japan, Norway, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden and the United Kingdom ... plan Global report on surveillance Country situation analysis Policy to combat antimicrobial resistance More on antimicrobial resistance ...

  13. Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy in the treatment of denture stomatitis; Terapia fotodinamica antimicrobiana no tratamento da estomatite protetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senna, Andre Machado de

    2012-07-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS), also called chronic atrophic candidiasis, is the most common oral fungal infection in denture wearers. It has a multifactorial etiology, but the presence of Candida spp. biofilm on the denture is considered the most important factor for the establishment of the DS. This study aimed to evaluate the treatment of DS through the use of photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PAT), mediated by methylene blue. For this purpose, preclinical studies and clinical trials were performed. Simulators prototypes dentures were made of methyl methacrylate polymer to serve as a basis for biofilm growth of the following species of Candida: C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. dubliniensis, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. guilliermondii. Methylene blue solution at a concentration of 450 {mu}g/mL was used as a photosensitizer. The prototypes and biofilms were irradiated with a laser of wavelength of 660 nm, potency of 100 mW, for 80 seconds. For the clinical study, subjects were divided into two groups. The first group received conventional treatment based on the use of antifungal Miconazole. The second group received the treatment by PAT. The preclinical results showed that all species of the genus Candida were susceptible to PAT, with a reduction in colonies that ranged from 2.48 to 3.93 log{sub 10}. Clinical outcomes were evaluated for the reduction of colonies of Candida spp. located in the mucosa and in the prosthesis and relative to the improvement of the clinical aspect of the affected mucosa. Both the conventional therapy and PAT were effective in treating DS. There was no significant statistical difference between PAT and conventional treatment for any of the factors evaluated. Thus, it was concluded that PAT is effective in the treatment of denture stomatitis. (author)

  14. One-session root canal treatment with antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT): an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsatto, M C; Correa-Afonso, A M; Lucisano, M P; Bezerra da Silva, R A; Paula-Silva, F W G; Nelson-Filho, P; Bezerra da Silva, L A

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the response of the apical and periapical tissues of dog teeth with apical periodontitis after one-session root canal treatment with and without antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) compared with the use of an intracanal dressing. Sixty root canals with an induced periapical lesion were instrumented and assigned to three groups: I, two-session root canal treatment using antibacterial dressing with calcium hydroxide-based paste; II, one-session root canal treatment using aPDT; and III, one-session root canal treatment in which the root canals were filled immediately after biomechanical preparation. The animals were euthanized after a 90-day experimental period. The maxillas and mandibles with teeth were submitted to histotechnical processing and haematoxylin-eosin staining. Descriptive microscopic analysis of the apical and periapical region characteristics was performed, as well as morphometric assessment of the periapical lesion areas in fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative data were analysed statistically by the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn's post-test (α = 0.05). Group I was characterized by progressive repair, with the presence of fibres, cells and blood vessels. Group II had periodontal ligaments with the presence of collagen fibres and residual inflammatory cells. Group III had a dense inflammatory infiltrate with extensive oedematous areas and fibrillar dissociation, suggesting a persistent inflammatory and resorptive condition. Regarding periapical lesion size, group I had significantly smaller lesions (P session root canal treatment using a calcium hydroxide-based dressing was associated with significantly smaller periapical lesions at 90 days and characterized by progressive repair. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. 9 CFR 417.6 - Inadequate HACCP Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inadequate HACCP Systems. 417.6... ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT (HACCP) SYSTEMS § 417.6 Inadequate HACCP Systems. A HACCP system may be found to be inadequate if: (a) The HACCP plan in operation does not meet the requirements set forth in...

  16. What Happens When "Germs Don't Get Killed and They Attack Again and Again": Perceptions of Antimicrobial Resistance in the Context of Diarrheal Disease Treatment Among Laypersons and Health-Care Providers in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Heather A; Agboatwalla, Mubina; Hurd, Jacqueline; Jacobs-Slifka, Kara; Pitz, Adam; Bowen, Anna

    2016-07-06

    In south Asia, where diarrhea is common and antibiotics are accessible without prescription, antimicrobial resistance is an emerging and serious problem. However, beliefs and behaviors related to antimicrobial resistance are poorly understood. We explored laypersons' and health-care providers' (HCP) awareness and perceptions of antimicrobial resistance in the context of treatment of adult diarrheal disease in Karachi, Pakistan. In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted with 40 laypersons and 45 HCPs in a lower-middle-class urban neighborhood. Interviews conducted in Urdu were audiotaped, transcribed, translated, and coded using applied thematic analysis. Slightly over half of laypersons and two-thirds of HCPs were aware that antimicrobial medication could lose effectiveness, but misperceptions were common. Laypersons and HCPs often believed that "the body becomes immune" or "bacteria attack more strongly" if medications are taken "improperly." Another prevalent theme was that causes and effects of antimicrobial resistance are limited to the individual taking the antimicrobial medication and to the specific diarrheal episode. Participants often attributed antimicrobial resistance to patient behaviors; HCP behavior was rarely discussed. Less than half of the HCPs were aware of treatment guidelines. To combat antimicrobial resistance in urban Pakistan, a health systems strategy and community-supported outreach campaigns on appropriate antimicrobial use are needed. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  17. Identification of treatment strategies for Mycoplasma genitalium-related urethritis in male patients by culturing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasuna, Ryoichi

    2013-02-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium was first isolated from urethral swab specimens of male patients with non-gonococcal urethritis. However, the isolation of M. genitalium strains from clinical specimens has been difficult. Co-cultivation with Vero cells is one available technique for the isolation of M. genitalium. The strains that can be used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing by broth dilution or agar dilution methods are limited. Macrolides, such as azithromycin (AZM), have the strongest activity against M. genitalium. However, AZM-resistant strains have emerged and spread. Mutations in the 23S rRNA gene contribute to the organism's macrolide resistance, which is similar to the effects of the mutations in macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Of the fluoroquinolones, moxifloxacin (MFLX) and sitafloxacin have the strongest activities against M. genitalium, while levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin are not as effective. Some clinical trials on the treatment of M. genitalium-related urethritis are available in the literature. A doxycycline regimen was microbiologically inferior to an AZM regimen. For cases of treatment failure with AZM regimens, MFLX regimens were effective.

  18. Tofacitinib versus Biologic Treatments in Moderate-to-Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Who Have Had an Inadequate Response to Nonbiologic DMARDs: Systematic Literature Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien Bergrath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the efficacy and tolerability of tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, as monotherapy and combined with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs versus biological DMARDs (bDMARDs and other novel DMARDs for second-line moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients by means of a systematic literature review (SLR and network meta-analysis (NMA. Methods. MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched to identify randomized clinical trials (RCTs published between 1990 and March 2015. Efficacy data based on American College of Rheumatology (ACR response criteria, improvements in the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI at 6 months, and discontinuation rates due to adverse events were analyzed by means of Bayesian NMAs. Results. 45 RCTs were identified, the majority of which demonstrated a low risk of bias. Tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily (BID and 10 mg BID monotherapy exhibited comparable efficacy and discontinuation rates due to adverse events versus other monotherapies. Tofacitinib 5 mg BID and 10 mg BID + DMARDs or methotrexate (MTX were mostly comparable to other combination therapies in terms of efficacy and discontinuation due to adverse events. Conclusion. In most cases, tofacitinib had similar efficacy and discontinuation rates due to adverse events compared to biologic DMARDs.

  19. Inadequate Nutritional Status of Hospitalized Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alkan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In oncology practice, nutrition and also metabolic activity are essential to support the nutritional status and prevent malignant cachexia. It is important to evaluate the patients and plan the maneuvers at the start of the therapy. The primary objective of the study is to define the nutritional status of hospitalized patients and the factors affecting it in order to define the most susceptible patients and maneuvers for better nutritional support. Methods: Patients hospitalized in oncology clinic for therapy were evaluated for food intake and nutritional status through structured interviews. The clinical properties, medical therapies, elements of nutritional support were noted and predictors of inadequate nutritional status (INS were analyzed. Results: Four hundred twenty three patients, between 16-82 years old (median: 52 were evaluated. Nearly half of the patients (185, 43% reported a better appetite at home than in hospital and declared that hospitalization is an important cause of loss of appetite (140/185, 75.6%. Presence of nausea/vomiting (N/V, depression, age less than 65 and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs were associated with increased risk of INS in hospitalized cancer patients. On the contrary, steroid medication showed a positive impact on nutritional status of cancer patients. Conclusion: N/V, younger age, presence of depression and NSAIDs medication were associated with INS in hospitalized cancer patients. Clinicians should pay more attention to this group of patients. In addition, unnecessary hospitalizations and medications that may disturb oral intake must be avoided. Corticosteroids are important tools for managing anorexia and INS.

  20. Helicobacter cinaedi bacteremia resulting from antimicrobial resistance acquired during treatment for X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyofuku, Meiwa; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Miyata, Ippei; Yuza, Yuki; Horikoshi, Yuho

    2016-10-01

    This is the first report of penicillin/cephalosporin-resistant Helicobacter cinaedi arising from prolonged treatment. H. cinaedi, common among immunocompromised patients, caused recurrent bacteremia and cellulitis in a 19-year-old Japanese man with X-linked agammaglobulinemia. The minimal inhibitory concentration of these drugs was raised, which subsequently resulted in clinical failure. Prolonged suboptimal treatment may cause bacterial resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in H. cinaedi. It is possible that this resistance may have contributed to the treatment failure. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bioeconomic modeling of lactational antimicrobial treatment of new bovine subclinical intramammary infections caused by contagious pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borne, van den B.H.P.; Halasa, T.; Schaik, van G.; Hogeveen, H.; Nielen, M.

    2010-01-01

    This study determined the direct and indirect epidemiologic and economic effects of lactational treatment of new bovine subclinical intramammary infections (IMI) caused by contagious pathogens using an existing bioeconomic model. The dynamic and stochastic model simulated the dynamics of

  2. The importance of tissue penetration in achieving successful antimicrobial treatment of nosocomial pneumonia and complicated skin and soft-tissue infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: vancomycin and linezolid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Gary E; Wells, Elizabeth M

    2010-03-01

    The rising prevalence of nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the recent emergence of community-associated MRSA are major clinical, public health, and economic challenges. MRSA is a leading cause of nosocomial pneumonia and complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (cSSTI). Vancomycin and linezolid are two commonly used antimicrobial agents with activity against Gram-positive pathogens, particularly MRSA, that are used to treat both nosocomial pneumonia and cSSTI. Recently, the therapeutic efficacy of vancomycin in the treatment of hospitalized patients with MRSA infections has been questioned due to the emergence of MRSA strains with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin together with concerns related to inadequate dosing and poor tissue penetration of the drug. A literature review was conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics and pulmonary and tissue penetration of vancomycin and linezolid. Using MEDLINE and EMBASE, the most relevant articles in English published over the past 25 years (up to October 2008) were identified and summarized. Studies in human volunteers and adult patients that measured concentrations of antibiotic in serum, epithelial lining fluid (ELF), and tissue were selected for further review. For both drugs, pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in diverse patient populations and employed varying techniques to measure tissue concentrations. Vancomycin concentrations in ELF ranged from 5 to 25% of simultaneous plasma levels, while concentrations in whole homogenized lung tissue were slightly higher (24-41%). Distribution of vancomycin into soft tissue was variable. For linezolid, overall mean concentrations in ELF and in soft tissue were generally similar or higher than simultaneous plasma levels, although variability in tissue penetration across studies in healthy volunteers and patients was seen. The studies included in this review vary greatly in their designs and patient populations; this, together with

  3. Etiología bacteriana de la neumonía nosocomial y resistencia a los antimicrobianos en pacientes con y sin tratamiento antimicrobiano previo Bacterial etiology of nosocomial pneumonia and antimicrobial resistance in patients with and without antimicrobial treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Weyland

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available La neumonía nosocomial (NN se asocia a una elevada morbimortalidad y es la segunda causa de infección intrahospitalaria después de la infección urinaria. El objetivo de este trabajo fue conocer la etiología de la NN en adultos y evaluar el perfil de resistencia a los antimicrobianos de los microorganismos aislados teniendo en cuenta si los pacientes recibieron o no tratamiento antimicrobiano previo. Desde el año 2000 hasta el 2005 se analizaron 430 lavados broncoalveolares provenientes de 430 pacientes adultos con diagnóstico de neumonía internados en la unidad de cuidados intensivos del Hospital de Clínicas "José de San Martín". El 74% (199/ 269 de los pacientes con tratamiento previo tuvieron cultivos positivos, mientras que en el grupo sin tratamiento previo esta proporción fue del 83% (134/161 (p = 0,03. Los microorganismos prevalentes fueron Acinetobacter spp., Staphylococcus aureus y Pseudomonas aeruginosa (37,9% ; 21,3% y 20,9% vs. 36,1%; 26,6% y 17,7% en los pacientes con tratamiento previo o sin él, respectivamente; p > 0,05. La resistencia a los antimicrobianos de los citados microorganismos cuando los aislamientos provinieron de pacientes que recibieron antes tratamiento antibiótico fue superior a la encontrada en el grupo de pacientes que no recibió tratamiento previo (p Nosocomial pneumonia (NP is associated with high morbimortality, representing the second cause of nosocomial infection after urinary tract infection. The objective of this work was to become acquainted with the etiology of NP and to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance profile of the isolated microorganisms from adult patients with and without previous antimicrobial treatment admitted in the intensive care unit (ICU. From 2000 to 2005, 430 bronchoalveolar lavages from 430 adult patients diagnosed with pneumonia admitted in the ICU were analyzed. Seventy-four percent (199/ 269 of the patients with previous treatment had positive cultures, whereas in

  4. Antibiotic-specific differences in the response of Staphylococcus aureus to treatment with antimicrobials combined with manuka honey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eLiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin infections caused by antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus are a significant health problem worldwide; often associated with high treatment cost and mortality rate. Complex natural products like New Zealand (NZ manuka honey have been revisited and studied extensively as an alternative to antibiotics due to their potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, and the inability to isolate honey-resistant S. aureus. Previous studies showing synergistic effects between manuka-type honeys and antibiotics have been demonstrated against the growth of one methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA strain. We have previously demonstrated strong synergistic activity between NZ manuka-type honey and rifampicin against growth and biofilm formation of multiple S. arueus strains. Here, we have expanded our investigation using multiple S. aureus strains and four different antibiotics commonly used to treat S. aureus-related skin infections: rifampicin, oxacillin, gentamicin and clindamycin. Using checkerboard microdilution and agar diffusion assays with S. aureus strains including clinical isolates and MRSA we demonstrate that manuka-type honey combined with these four antibiotics frequently produces a synergistic effect. In some cases when synergism was not observed, there was a significant enhancement in antibiotic susceptibility. Some strains that were highly resistant to an antibiotic when present alone become sensitive to clinically-achievable concentrations when combined with honey. However, not all of the S. aureus strains tested responded in the same way to these combinational treatments. Our findings support the use of NZ manuka-type honeys in clinical treatment against S. aureus-related infections and extend their potential use as an antibiotic adjuvant in combinational therapy. Our data also suggest that manuka-type honeys may not work as antibiotic adjuvants for all strains of S. aureus, and this may help determine the mechanistic processes

  5. Bovine respiratory disease: efficacy of different prophylactic treatments in veal calves and antimicrobial resistance of isolated Pasteurellaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rérat, M; Albini, S; Jaquier, V; Hüssy, D

    2012-03-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of two prophylactic antibiotic treatments against bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in veal calves. In addition, the antibiotic susceptibilities of isolated Pasteurellaceae were tested. The calves were treated either on the day of arrival by a single administration of tulathromycin (group A, n=20), by a peroral administration of chlortetracycline, sulphadimidine, and tylosin (group B, n=20) for seven consecutive days, or were not prophylactically treated (group C, n=19). On the first day of clinically diagnosed BRD, transtracheal lavage samples were obtained prior to therapeutic treatment and were subsequently cultured. Pasteurellaceae isolates were tested for their susceptibility to 12 antimicrobial agents by the determination of the minimal inhibitory concentrations. During the first 56 d after arrival, different calves in group A and B suffered from one episode of clinically diagnosed BRD while calves of group C experienced two episodes. The average daily weight gain during the same period was significantly lower in group C (0.89 ± 0.04kg/d) than in the two prophylactically treated groups (1.14 ± 0.05 and 1.15 ± 0.04 kg/d for group A and B, respectively). The improved performance of groups A and B in comparison to group C could be related to a lower incidence of respiratory disorders during the first days after arrival in the prophylactically treated animals. No differences in the clinical efficacy were seen between the two tested prophylactic treatments. The most prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated (n=79) were Pasteurella multocida (23% of isolated pathogens), Mycoplasma bovis (18%), and Mannheimia varigena (16%). For the isolated Pasteurellaceae, a high resistance pattern was observed to tylosin (83% of the tested P. multocida and 88% of the Mannheimia spp. isolates resistant) and tilmicosin (56% of the tested P. multocida isolates non-sensitive). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Determinants of antimicrobial treatment for udder health in Danish dairy cattle herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gussmann, Maya Katrin; Græsbøll, Kaare; Toft, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Societal pressure to limit the use of antibiotics in livestock production systems, including dairy cattle systems, is consistently increasing. To motivate farmers to reduce antibiotic usage, it is important to understand the factors that determine whether a cow will be treated with antibiotics...... on these factors. The resulting regression coefficients of 422 herds were further analyzed by principal component analysis and clustering to determine the driving predictors for treatment in different groups of farms. The results showed that determinants that were most important for predicting antibiotic...... treatments vary from one farm to another. Health indicators such as PCR or somatic cell count were most indicative for treatment on some farms, whereas other groups seemed to depend more on production factors (milk yield) or later culling of the cows. This shows that farmers behave differently...

  7. New treatment options for infections caused by increasingly antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyukmin; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of high-level resistance to ceftriaxone is giving rise to serious concern about absence of effective treatment options to cure gonococcal infections. Increasing the dosage regimen can be applied to ceftriaxone and azithromycin, but the emergence of high-level resistance has already been reported. Spectinomycin is another active drug but has low efficacy in the treatment of pharyngeal gonorrhoea. Conventional antibiotics could be introduced for gonococcal treatment, but they have some limitations, such as the absence of clinical trials and breakpoint. Combining antibiotics is another promising method to cure patients and to prevent the emergence of resistance. The most important strategy to maintain the efficacy of antibiotics is rapid detection and dissemination control of novel resistant isolate.

  8. Microbiological surveillance and antimicrobial stewardship minimise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbiological surveillance and antimicrobial stewardship minimise the need for ultrabroad-spectrum combination therapy for treatment of nosocomial infections in a trauma intensive care unit: An audit of an evidence-based empiric antimicrobial policy.

  9. Leading Antimicrobial Drug-Resistant Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supporting research on several organisms that have developed resistance to antimicrobial drug treatment. The institute manages a research portfolio of grants aimed at the problem of antimicrobial resistance and hospital-acquired infections. Here is a list ...

  10. [Evidence and recommendation of empirical antimicrobial treatment in pyogenic spondylodiscitis: systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Delgado, David Agustín; Moheno-Gallardo, Alfredo Javier; Torres-González, Rubén; Mata-Hernández, Argenis; Elizalde-Martínez, Eulalio; Pérez-Atanasio, José Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Pyogenic spondylodiscitis is the infectious process that affects the vertebral body and the intervertebral disc. It has an incidence between 2 and 7%. To prescribe antibiotic treatment, it is required to identify the causative organism on the basis of the epidemiology of the etiologic agent, as well as the ability of the antibiotic to penetrate the bone tissue and the intervertebral disc. The objective was to identify the level of evidence and the grade of recommendation for the empiric initial treatment. A systematic review was conducted based on the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) criteria. PubMed articles were evaluated to assess their level of evidence and the grade of recommendation according to the Jadad scale and the classification of Sackett. On the basis of those two scales, it was analyzed the agreement by two observers and a Kappa value of 0.750 (p = 0.0001) was considered statistically significant. 642 studies were analyzed, out of which only 19 met the inclusion criteria. In these it was identified a level of evidence 4 and a degree of recommendation C for the use of fluoroquinolones in association with rifampicin in the empirical treatment of pyogenic spondylodiscitis and the use of vancomycin for the treatment of methicillin-resistant strains. There is not enough information concerning the use of empiric antibiotics in pyogenic spondylodiscitis; however, the existing information is favorable, even though it is not conclusive.

  11. Novel use of antimicrobial hand sanitizer in treatment of nosocomial acinetobacter infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Meghan; Watson, Luke R; Torress-Cook, Alfonso; Watson, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    Colonization of wounds with multidrug-resistant organisms is a difficult orthopedic problem. Acinetobacter infections are especially difficult because they are resistant to all currently available antibiotics. We present the use of a novel skin sanitizer, Stay Byotrol Clean (Byotrol Inc, Spartanburg, South Carolina), to treat a multidrug-resistant wound infection. A 31-year-old T10 paraplegic man presented with chronic bilateral stage IV decubitus trochanteric ulcers. Cultures grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. The ulcers were initially treated with irrigation and debridement and vancomycin, levaquin, and cefepime. After 4 months of aggressive treatment, the cultures continued to be positive for Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii. The patient was started on amikacin and tigecycline. Despite 1 additional month of aggressive wound care, debridements, and intravenous antibiotics, the cultures continued to grow A baumannii and Pseudomonas aerug. The A baumannii was resistant to all available antibiotics tested. The ulcers were then treated with daily application of Stay Byotrol Clean hand and skin sanitizer. Four days later, cultures were negative for any bacterial growth, with no A baumannii. After 1 week, the ulcers showed new granulation tissue with no visible necrotic tissue. After 3 months of treatment, the ulcers had healed. Stay Byotrol Clean is nonirritating and contains no iodine or alcohol. It is currently being used for decolonization of patients on admission to the hospital, however, there is great potential for its use in wound treatment, preoperative surgical sterilization, and orthopedic devices.

  12. A novel point-of-use water treatment method by antimicrobial nanosilver textile material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongjun; Tang, Xiaosheng; Liu, Qishan

    2014-12-01

    Pathogenic bacteria are one of the main reasons for worldwide water-borne disease causing a big threat to public health, hence there is an urgent need to develop cost-effective water treatment technologies. Nano-materials in point-of-use systems have recently attracted considerable research and commercial interests as they can overcome the drawbacks of traditional water treatment techniques. We have developed a new point-of-use water disinfection kit with nanosilver textile material. The silver nanoparticles were in-situ generated and immobilized onto cotton textile, followed by fixing to a plastic tube to make a water disinfection kit. By soaking and stirring the kit in water, pathogenic bacteria have been killed within minutes. The silver leaching from the kit was insignificant, with values silver level in drinking water. Herein, the nanosilver textile water disinfection kit could be a new, efficient and cost-effective point-of-use water treatment method for rural areas and emergency preparedness.

  13. Inadequate control of world's radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The radioactive materials needed to build a 'dirty bomb' can be found in almost any country in the world, and more than 100 countries may have inadequate control and monitoring programs necessary to prevent or even detect the theft of these materials. The IAEA points out that while radioactive sources number in the millions, only a small percentage have enough strength to cause serious radiological harm. It is these powerful sources that need to be focused on as a priority. In a significant recent development, the IAEA, working in collaboration with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Russian Federation's Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM), have established a tripartite working group on 'Securing and Managing Radioactive Sources'. Through its program to help countries improve their national infrastructures for radiation safety and security, the IAEA has found that more than 100 countries may have no minimum infrastructure in place to properly control radiation sources. However, many IAEA Member States - in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Europe - are making progress through an IAEA project to strengthen their capabilities to control and regulate radioactive sources. The IAEA is also concerned about the over 50 countries that are not IAEA Member States (there are 134), as they do not benefit from IAEA assistance and are likely to have no regulatory infrastructure. The IAEA has been active in lending its expertise to search out and secure orphaned sources in several countries. More than 70 States have joined with the IAEA to collect and share information on trafficking incidents and other unauthorized movements of radioactive sources and other radioactive materials. The IAEA and its Member States are working hard to raise levels of radiation safety and security, especially focusing on countries known to have urgent needs. The IAEA has taken the leading role in the United Nations system in establishing standards of safety, the most significant of

  14. Estimating the Transfer Range of Plasmids Encoding Antimicrobial Resistance in a Wastewater Treatment Plant Microbial Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Liguan; Dechesne, Arnaud; He, Zhiming

    2018-01-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have been suggested as reservoirs and sources of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment. In a WWTP ecosystem, human enteric and environmental bacteria are mixed and exposed to pharmaceutical residues, potentially favoring genetic exchange and thus...... sludge microbial community was challenged in standardized filter matings with one of three multidrug resistance plasmids (pKJK5, pB10, and RP4) harbored by Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas putida. Different donor–plasmid combinations had distinct transfer frequencies, ranging from 3 to 50 conjugation...

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections: factors relating to mortality with emphasis on resistance pattern and antimicrobial treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millena R.S. Pinheiro

    Full Text Available A retrospective case-control study was conducted to investigate the risk factors for death among intensive care unit patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Out of 131 patients investigated, 67 (51.1% died within 30 days of being diagnosed with this infection. The mean duration of hospital stay before this diagnosis was 28.5 ± 26.5 days. No association was found between bacterial resistance and death in this study (multiresistant p= 0.26; panresistant p= 0.42, but the adequacy of the initial treatment was inversely proportional to the degree of resistance. There was a tendency towards greater mortality among patients who received combination therapy (empirical p= 0.09; definitive p= 0.08, despite the greater frequency of appropriate treatment in these patients and the similar degree of severity in the two groups. This finding may be explained by pharmacodynamic parameters that were not studied or by the extensive use of aminoglycosides in the combination therapy, which play a controversial role in combination therapy due to their potential for renal toxicity. The multivariate analysis in our study demonstrated that age [odds ratio (OR 1.04], septic shock (OR 15.4 and hypoalbuminemia (OR 0.32 were independent risk factors for death.

  16. Bioeconomic modeling of lactational antimicrobial treatment of new bovine subclinical intramammary infections caused by contagious pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Borne, B. H. P.; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Van Schaik, G.

    2010-01-01

    of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Escherichia coli during lactation and the dry period in a 100-cow dairy herd during 1 quota year. Input parameters on cure were obtained from recent Dutch field data. The costs of clinical IMI, subclinical IMI, and intervention were...... not limit the spread of Staph. aureus at high transmission rates, although the associated costs were lower compared with no intervention. To improve udder health in a dairy herd, lactational treatment of contagious subclinical IMI must therefore be preceded by management measures that lower the transmission...... of uncured cows after 2 mo of infection. Model behavior was observed for variation in parameter input values. Compared with no lactational intervention, lactational intervention of new subclinical IMI resulted in fewer clinical flare ups, less transmission within the herd, and much lower combined total...

  17. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance More in Antimicrobial ... Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated ...

  18. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance More in Antimicrobial ... Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated ...

  19. Photodynamic topical antimicrobial therapy for infected foot ulcers in patients with diabetes: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study--the D.A.N.T.E (Diabetic ulcer Antimicrobial New Topical treatment Evaluation) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, Edoardo; Genovese, Stefano; Monami, Matteo; Navalesi, Giovanni; Dotta, Francesco; Anichini, Roberto; Romagnoli, Fabio; Gensini, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the antimicrobial effect and tolerability of a single dose of a photo-activated gel containing RLP068 in the treatment for infected foot ulcers in subjects with diabetes. A randomized, double-blind, parallel series, placebo-controlled phase IIa trial was performed with three concentrations of RLP068 (0.10, 0.30, and 0.50 %), measuring total and pathogen microbial load on Day 1 (before and 1 h after topical gel application and photoactivation with 689 nm red light), on Days 3, 8, and 15, as add-on to systemic treatment with amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. Blood samples were also drawn 1, 2, and 48 h after administration for the assessment of systemic drug absorption. The trial was performed on 62 patients aged ≥18 years, with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and infected foot ulcer, with an area of 2-15 cm(2) and a maximum diameter ≤4.6 cm. A dose-dependent reduction in total microbial load was observed (-1.92 ± 1.21, -2.94 ± 1.60, and -3.00 ± 1.82 LogCFU/ml for 0.10, 0.30, and 0.50 % RPL068 vs. -1.00 ± 1.02 LogCFU/ml with placebo) immediately after illumination, with a progressive fading of the effect during follow-up. No safety issues emerged from the analysis of adverse events. Systemic absorption of RLP068 was negligible. Photodynamic antimicrobial treatment with RLP068 of infected diabetic foot ulcers is well tolerated and produces a significant reduction in germ load. Further clinical trials are needed to verify the efficacy of this approach as add-on to systemic antibiotic treatment.

  20. Absorbent silver (I) antimicrobial fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, silver in form of silver ions, has been gaining importance in the wound management as an effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent. Silver has a long history as an antimicrobial agent, especially in the treatment of wounds. Alginates and carboxymethyl (CM) cotton contain carboxyl...

  1. Mycobacterial r32-kDa antigen-specific T-cell responses correlate with successful treatment and a heightened anti-microbial response in human leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neela, Venkata Sanjeev Kumar; Devalraju, Kamakshi Prudhula; Pydi, Satya Sudheer; Sunder, Sharada Ramaseri; Adiraju, Kameswara Rao; Singh, Surya Satyanarayana; Anandaraj, M P J S; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi

    2016-09-01

    Immunological characterization of mycobacterial peptides may help not only in the preparation of a vaccine for leprosy but also in developing in vitro T-cell assays that could perhaps be used as an in vitro correlate for treatment outcome. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the use of Mycobacterium bovis recombinant 32-kDa protein (r32-kDa) antigen-stimulated T-cell assay as a surrogate marker for treatment outcome and monitor vitamin D receptor (VDR)-mediated anti-microbial responses during multidrug therapy (MDT) in leprosy. Newly diagnosed tuberculoid and lepromatous leprosy patients were enrolled and followed up during their course of MDT at 6 and 12 months. IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-17 and IL-23 levels in culture supernatants and expression of VDR, TLR2, LL37 and DEFB in r32-kDa-stimulated PBMCs were measured. Controls comprised household contacts (HHCs) and healthy endemic subjects (HCs). Significant differences were observed in the levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-23, VDR and anti-microbial peptides LL37 and DEFB after treatment and when compared with that of HHCs and HCs, respectively. These findings suggest that responses to r32-kDa antigen reflect an improved immunological and anti-microbial response in leprosy patients during therapy, thereby indicating its potential use as an immune correlate in the treatment of leprosy patients. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Treatment Response in Enteric Fever in an Era of Increasing Antimicrobial Resistance: An Individual Patient Data Analysis of 2092 Participants Enrolled into 4 Randomized, Controlled Trials in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Corinne N; Karkey, Abhilasha; Dongol, Sabina; Arjyal, Amit; Wolbers, Marcel; Darton, Thomas; Farrar, Jeremy J; Thwaites, Guy E; Dolecek, Christiane; Basnyat, Buddha; Baker, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    Enteric fever, caused by Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A, is the leading cause of bacterial febrile disease in South Asia. Individual data from 2092 patients with enteric fever randomized into 4 trials in Kathmandu, Nepal, were pooled. All trials compared gatifloxacin with 1 of the following comparator drugs: cefixime, chloramphenicol, ofloxacin, or ceftriaxone. Treatment outcomes were evaluated according to antimicrobial if S. Typhi/Paratyphi were isolated from blood. We additionally investigated the impact of changing bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility on outcome. Overall, 855 (41%) patients had either S. Typhi (n = 581, 28%) or S. Paratyphi A (n = 274, 13%) cultured from blood. There were 139 (6.6%) treatment failures with 1 death. Except for the last trial with ceftriaxone, the fluoroquinolone gatifloxacin was associated with equivalent or better fever clearance times and lower treatment failure rates in comparison to all other antimicrobials. However, we additionally found that the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against fluoroquinolones have risen significantly since 2005 and were associated with increasing fever clearance times. Notably, all organisms were susceptible to ceftriaxone throughout the study period (2005-2014), and the MICs against azithromycin declined, confirming the utility of these alternative drugs for enteric fever treatment. The World Health Organization and local government health ministries in South Asia still recommend fluoroquinolones for enteric fever. This policy should change based on the evidence provided here. Rapid diagnostics are urgently required given the large numbers of suspected enteric fever patients with a negative culture. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  3. Randomized Trial of Once-Daily Fluticasone Furoate in Children with Inadequately Controlled Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliver, Amanda J.; Covar, Ronina A.; Goldfrad, Caroline H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the dose-response, efficacy, and safety of fluticasone furoate (FF; 25 µg, 50 µg, and 100 µg), administered once daily in the evening during a 12-week treatment period to children with inadequately controlled asthma. Study design This was a Phase IIb, multicenter, stratified...

  4. The effect of discontinued use of antimicrobial growth promoters on the risk of therapeutic antibiotic treatment in Danish farrow-to-finish pig farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigre, Håkan; Larsen, P.B.; Andreasen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    This study estimated the effect of discontinued use of antimicrobial growth promoters (duAGPs) oil the risk of antibiotic treatment for diarrhoea, arthritis. pneumonia, unthriving and miscellaneous disorders in Danish pig farms. The estimation was done in a case-crossover study comparing: (1......) the proportion of days per farm where treatment was performed (PDT) and (2) the proportion of pigs treated per day per farm at days where treatment was performed (PPT) before and after duAGPs at 68 farrow-to-finish farms. The farms were selected using, a two-stage (veterinarian/farm) convenience sampling....... On average, during the first year after duAGPs there was a significant increase in the risk of antibiotic treatment for diarrhoea (PDT: OR 2.5. 95% CI 1.7-3.8; PPT: OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.2). However, the effect varied among farms - some farms experienced substantial problems, while others experienced few...

  5. Skull-base Osteomyelitis: a Dreaded Complication after Trivial Fall and Inadequate Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundan Mittal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Skull-based osteomyelitis is bony infection which generally originates from inadequately treated chronic infection, adjoining tissue infection or after trauma.Case: 11 month female child had a trivial fall while standing near a bucket. The child developed fracture of right clavicle and left orbital swelling which was inadequately treated. This resulted in in spread of infection to adjoining tissues, skull bones, sinuses and brain.Conclusion: Cranial base osteomyelitis is rare but dreaded condition which requires early diagnosis and prompt treatment to avoid mortality and morbidity in form of neurological deficits and permanent disability

  6. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... video) Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (text version) Arabic Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Chinese Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance French Translation of ...

  7. Short communication: use of the BetaStar Plus assay for detection of ceftiofur antimicrobial residues in milk from individual cows following intramammary treatment for mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grooms, D L; Norby, B; Grooms, K E; Jagodzinski, E N; Erskine, R J; Halbert, L W; Coetzee, J F; Wulf, L; Rice, J A

    2015-09-01

    Development and use of on-farm assays to detect antimicrobial residues in milk is important to reduce the risk of violative residues in marketed milk. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a lateral-flow immunodiagnostic assay (BetaStar Plus, Neogen Corp., Lansing, MI) in detecting ceftiofur residues in milk from individual cows treated for mastitis. This assay is currently approved by the US Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for detecting β-lactam residues in commingled milk. Forty-five dairy cows with clinical mastitis from 4 dairy farms were enrolled and treated intramammary with 125 mg of ceftiofur hydrochloride (Spectramast LC, Zoetis, Madison, NJ) according to the manufacturer's label recommendation. Composite milk samples were collected (A) before first intramammary antimicrobial treatment, (B) before the last intramammary antimicrobial treatment, (C) the last milking of the product-labeled milk withhold, (D) the first milking after the product-labeled milk withhold had been met, and (E) 72 h after the product-labeled milk withhold had been met. Samples were tested using the BetaStar Plus assay within 48 h of collection. Parallel samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and for somatic cell count and milk components. The BetaStar Plus assay identified 6.7, 60.0, 46.7, 22.2, and 6.7% positive samples at each of the respective time points. The assay had sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 84.7%, respectively, compared with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis using FDA published residue tolerance levels for ceftiofur (or ceftiofur metabolites) as a threshold. The BetaStar Plus assay could be useful for detecting ceftiofur residues in milk from individual cows following intramammary treatment for mastitis before the milk is shipped for processing. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Antimicrobial textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, J Vaun; Tuckfield, R C; Baker-Austin, C

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved unique mechanisms that allow them survive in the presence of strong selection pressures. Included in these mechanisms is the ability to share genetic determinants among and between species of bacteria thus spreading metal or antibiotic resistance traits quickly. The textile industry in response to demand has developed antimicrobial fabrics by the addition of bactericidal compounds during production. Some of these antimicrobials include metal nanoparticles, quaternary ammonia compounds, and broad spectrum compounds like triclosan. Bacteria have already expressed resistance to each of these bactericides. Here we discuss the evolutionary and ecological consequences of antimicrobial textiles in terms of co-selection. We predict that continued use of such materials could result in increased and widespread resistance to specific antimicrobials, especially metals, with an increased resistance to antibiotics. Such increases have the potential to find their way into other bacterial populations of human pathogens leading to serious and unintended public health consequences.

  9. Antimicrobial Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be harboring disease organisms. Determining human and ecological risks from exposure to antimicrobial pesticides requires different ... Open Government Regulations.gov Subscribe USA.gov White House Ask. Contact Us Hotlines FOIA Requests Frequent Questions ...

  10. Bioactive Antimicrobial Peptides as Therapeutics for Corneal Wounds and Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Gina L; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Pereira, H Anne

    2017-06-01

    Significance: More than 2 million eye injuries and infections occur each year in the United States that leave civilians and military members with reduced or complete vision loss due to the lack of effective therapeutics. Severe ocular injuries and infections occur in varied settings including the home, workplace, and battlefields. In this review, we discuss the potential of developing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as therapeutics for the treatment of corneal wounds and infections for which the current treatment options are inadequate. Recent Advances: Standard-of-care employs the use of fluorescein dye for the diagnosis of ocular defects and is followed by the use of antibiotics and/or steroids to treat the infection and reduce inflammation. Recent advances for treating corneal wounds include the development of amniotic membrane therapies, wound chambers, and drug-loaded hydrogels. In this review, we will discuss an innovative approach using AMPs with the dual effect of promoting corneal wound healing and clearing infections. Critical Issues: An important aspect of treating ocular injuries is that treatments need to be effective and administered expeditiously. This is especially important for injuries that occur during combat and in individuals who demonstrate delayed wound healing. To overcome gaps in current treatment modalities, bioactive peptides based on naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial proteins are being investigated as new therapeutics. Future Directions: The development of new therapeutics that can treat ocular infections and promote corneal wound healing, including the healing of persistent corneal epithelial defects, would be of great clinical benefit.

  11. The Link Between Inadequate Sleep and Obesity in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Perla A

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically over the past decade. Although an imbalance between caloric intake and physical activity is considered a key factor responsible for the increase, there is emerging evidence suggesting that other factors may be important contributors to weight gain, including inadequate sleep. Overall research evidence suggests that inadequate sleep is associated with obesity. Importantly, the strength and trajectory of the association seem to be influenced by multiple factors including age. Although limited, the emerging evidence suggests young adults might be at the center of a "perfect health storm," exposing them to the highest risk for obesity and inadequate sleep. Unfortunately, the methods necessary for elucidating the complex relationship between sleep and obesity are lacking. Uncovering the underlying factors and trajectories between inadequate sleep and weight gain in different populations may help to identify the windows of susceptibility and to design targeted interventions to prevent the negative impact of obesity and related diseases.

  12. Inadequate pain relief among patients with primary knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laires, Pedro A; Laíns, Jorge; Miranda, Luís C; Cernadas, Rui; Rajagopalan, Srini; Taylor, Stephanie D; Silva, José C

    Despite the widespread treatments for osteoarthritis (OA), data on treatment patterns, adequacy of pain relief, and quality of life are limited. The prospective multinational Survey of Osteoarthritis Real World Therapies (SORT) was designed to investigate these aspects. To analyze the characteristics and the patient reported outcomes of the Portuguese dataset of SORT at the start of observation. Patients ≥50 years with primary knee OA who were receiving oral or topical analgesics were eligible. Patients were enrolled from seven healthcare centers in Portugal between January and December 2011. Pain and function were evaluated using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and WOMAC. Quality of life was assessed using the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12). Inadequate pain relief (IPR) was defined as a score >4/10 on item 5 of the BPI. Overall, 197 patients were analyzed. The median age was 67.0 years and 78.2% were female. Mean duration of knee OA was 6.2 years. IPR was reported by 51.3% of patients. Female gender (adjusted odds ratio - OR 2.15 [95%CI 1.1, 4.5]), diabetes (OR 3.1 [95%CI 1.3, 7.7]) and depression (OR 2.24 [95%CI 1.2, 4.3]) were associated with higher risk of IPR. Patients with IPR reported worst outcomes in all dimensions of WOMAC (p<0.001) and in all eight domains and summary components of SF-12 (p<0.001). Our findings indicate that improvements are needed in the management of pain in knee OA in order to achieve better outcomes in terms of pain relief, function and quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Accelerating resistance, inadequate antibacterial drug pipelines and international responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuretzbacher, Ursula

    2012-04-01

    The pandemic of multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens and their continuing spread is beyond dispute. In contrast to the past, today's antibacterial research and development (R&D) pipelines are nearly dry, failing to provide the flow of novel antibiotics required to match the clinical challenges of the multidrug resistance (MDR) crisis. Concerned over the rapidly worsening potential global healthcare crisis caused by MDR bacteria and the lack of robust drug pipelines, several multinational campaigns have issued policy recommendations and have initiated broad discussion with a goal of stimulating the development of novel antibacterial drugs and technologies. These activities have resulted in intensified co-operation between the USA and the EU. The recently announced extensive 'Action plan against the rising threats from antimicrobial resistance' substantially ramps up action within the EU. In recognising the potential crisis caused by MDR and the limited treatment options, the European Commission decided on an unprecedented approach to drive the search for novel antibiotics by integrating the pharmaceutical industry, the research capacities of universities and small companies supported by public funding along with pricing/reimbursement and regulatory bodies. The European Commission has shown leadership and put action plans in place. Only the future will tell whether these initiatives will help curb the impact of the MDR pandemic. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of the decision support system for antimicrobial treatment, TREAT, in an acute medical ward of a university hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arboe, Bente; Laub, Rasmus Rude; Kronborg, Gitte

    2014-01-01

    .247). The coverage of TREAT advice for the bacteraemia patients was non-inferior to the physicians (p=1.00). CONCLUSIONS: TREAT can potentially improve the ecological costs of empirical antimicrobial therapy for patients in acute medical wards, but provided lower coverage than local guidelines.......OBJECTIVES: TREAT, a decision support system for antimicrobial therapy, was implemented in an acute medical ward. METHODS: Patients admitted on suspicion of infection were included in the study. The evaluation of TREAT was done both retrospectively and prospectively. Coverage of empirical...... of hospital stay, or hospital or 30-day mortality. Direct costs were significantly higher for TREAT advice than for local guidelines or the physician prescriptions (padvice than for both local guidelines (p

  15. Rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in urinary tract infections during pregnancy: Necessity for exploring newer treatment options

    OpenAIRE

    Meher Rizvi; Fatima Khan; Indu Shukla; Abida Malik; Shaheen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTI) are one of the most common medical complications of pregnancy. The emergence of drug resistance and particularly the Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production by Escherichia coli and methicillin resistance in Staphylococci, limits the choice of antimicrobials. Materials and Methods: Patients in different stages of pregnancy with or without symptoms of urinary tract infection attending the antenatal clinic of obstetrics and gynaecology were scr...

  16. Antimicrobial treatment reduces intestinal microflora and improves protein digestive capacity without changes in villous structure in weanling pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thymann, Thomas; Sørensen, Kristina U.; Hedemann, Mette S.

    2007-01-01

    for being able to devise better alternatives. Hence, for 7 d we treated pigs, weaned at 24 d of age, with a combination of amoxicillin (25 mg/kg feed and injection of 8.75 mg/kg body weight per 12 h) and ZnO (2.5 g/kg feed). The pigs treated with antimicrobials (n 11) showed no signs of gut malfunction...

  17. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (video) Animation of Antimicrobial ...

  18. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Antimicrobial Resistance More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated Report Data Meetings and Publications Resources Judicious Use of Antimicrobials Page Last Updated: ...

  19. Analysis of inadequate cervical smears using Shewhart control charts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Michael K

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate cervical smears cannot be analysed, can cause distress to women, are a financial burden to the NHS and may lead to further unnecessary procedures being undertaken. Furthermore, the proportion of inadequate smears is known to vary widely amongst providers. This study investigates this variation using Shewhart's theory of variation and control charts, and suggests strategies for addressing this. Methods Cervical cytology data, from six laboratories, serving 100 general practices in a former UK Health Authority area were obtained for the years 2000 and 2001. Control charts of the proportion of inadequate smears were plotted for all general practices, for the six laboratories and for the practices stratified by laboratory. The relationship between proportion of inadequate smears and the proportion of negative, borderline, mild, moderate or severe dyskaryosis as well as the positive predictive value of a smear in each laboratory was also investigated. Results There was wide variation in the proportion of inadequate smears with 23% of practices showing evidence of special cause variation and four of the six laboratories showing evidence of special cause variation. There was no evidence of a clinically important association between high rates of inadequate smears and better detection of dyskaryosis (R2 = 0.082. Conclusions The proportion of inadequate smears is influenced by two distinct sources of variation – general practices and cytology laboratories, which are classified by the control chart methodology as either being consistent with common or special cause variation. This guidance from the control chart methodology appears to be useful in delivering the aim of continual improvement.

  20. Topical antimicrobial agents in ophthalmology. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Dovgan’

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The data on different antimicrobial agents (fluoroquinolones, minoglycosides, macrolides, fusidic acid, chloramphenicol and their activity against various microorganisms are reviewed. The findings from different researchers are analyzed. Considerable attention is devoted to the problem of antimicrobial resistance in ophthalmology. Pharmacokinetics of topical antimicrobial agents applied in ophthalmology, their safety and tolerability are described. The indications for topical antimicrobial agents use in ophthalmology approved in Russian Federation are presented. With regard for pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, safety profile and good tolerability, it is concluded that fluoroquinolones are medication of choice for empirical antimicrobial treatment in ophthalmology.

  1. Antimicrobial resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global public health challenge, which has accelerated by the overuse of antibiotics worldwide. Increased antimicrobial resistance is the cause of severe infections, complications, longer hospital stays and increased mortality. Overprescribing of antibiotics......-the-counter sale of antibiotics, the use of antimicrobial stewardship programmes, the active participation of clinicians in audits, the utilization of valid rapid point-of-care tests, the promotion of delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies, the enhancement of communication skills with patients with the aid...... is associated with an increased risk of adverse effects, more frequent re-attendance and increased medicalization of self-limiting conditions. Antibiotic overprescribing is a particular problem in primary care, where viruses cause most infections. About 90% of all antibiotic prescriptions are issued by general...

  2. Relation between antimicrobial use and resistance in Belgian pig herds

    OpenAIRE

    Callens, Benedicte; Boyen, Filip; Maes, Dominiek; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Butaye, Patrick; Dewulf, Jeroen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the link between the characteristics of antimicrobial therapy and occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli of clinically healthy pigs exposed to antimicrobial treatments. A total of 918 Escherichia coli isolates were obtained from faecal samples, collected from 50 pig herds at the end of the fattening period and susceptibility was tested towards 15 different antimicrobial agents, using the disk diffusion method. The Antimicrobial Resist...

  3. Antibiofilm agents: A new perspective for antimicrobial strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi-Hui; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2017-10-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial architectures that attach to surfaces and encase microorganisms in a matrix composed of self-produced hydrated extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). In biofilms, microorganisms become much more resistant to antimicrobial treatments, harsh environmental conditions, and host immunity. Biofilm formation by microbial pathogens greatly enhances survival in hosts and causes chronic infections that result in persistent inflammation and tissue damages. Currently, it is believed over 80% of chronic infectious diseases are mediated by biofilms, and it is known that conventional antibiotic medications are inadequate at eradicating these biofilm-mediated infections. This situation demands new strategies for biofilm-associated infections, and currently, researchers focus on the development of antibiofilm agents that are specific to biofilms, but are nontoxic, because it is believed that this prevents the development of drug resistance. Here, we review the most promising antibiofilm agents undergoing intensive research and development.

  4. Distribution and Relationships of Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants among Extended-Spectrum-Cephalosporin-Resistant or Carbapenem-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolates from Rivers and Sewage Treatment Plants in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Masato; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Akifumi; Kuroda, Makoto; Fujii, Yuki; Murata, Misato; Lee, Ken-Ichi; Joshua, Derrick Ian; Balakrishna, Keshava; Bairy, Indira; Subramanian, Kaushik; Krishnan, Padma; Munuswamy, Natesan; Sinha, Ravindra K; Iwata, Taketoshi; Kusumoto, Masahiro; Guruge, Keerthi S

    2016-05-01

    To determine the distribution and relationship of antimicrobial resistance determinants among extended-spectrum-cephalosporin (ESC)-resistant or carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from the aquatic environment in India, water samples were collected from rivers or sewage treatment plants in five Indian states. A total of 446 E. coli isolates were randomly obtained. Resistance to ESC and/or carbapenem was observed in 169 (37.9%) E. coli isolates, which were further analyzed. These isolates showed resistance to numerous antimicrobials; more than half of the isolates exhibited resistance to eight or more antimicrobials. The blaNDM gene was detected in 14/21 carbapenem-resistant E. coli isolates: blaNDM-1 in 2 isolates, blaNDM-5 in 7 isolates, and blaNDM-7 in 5 isolates. The blaCTX-M gene was detected in 112 isolates (66.3%): blaCTX-M-15 in 108 isolates and blaCTX-M-55 in 4 isolates. We extracted 49 plasmids from selected isolates, and their whole-genome sequences were determined. Fifty resistance genes were detected, and 11 different combinations of replicon types were observed among the 49 plasmids. The network analysis results suggested that the plasmids sharing replicon types tended to form a community, which is based on the predicted gene similarity among the plasmids. Four communities each containing from 4 to 17 plasmids were observed. Three of the four communities contained plasmids detected in different Indian states, suggesting that the interstate dissemination of ancestor plasmids has already occurred. Comparison of the DNA sequences of the blaNDM-positive plasmids detected in this study with known sequences of related plasmids suggested that various mutation events facilitated the evolution of the plasmids and that plasmids with similar genetic backgrounds have widely disseminated in India. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Alternative treatment of vaginal infections – in vitro antimicrobial and toxic effects of Coriandrum sativum L. and Thymus vulgaris L. essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogavac, M; Karaman, M; Janjušević, Lj; Sudji, J; Radovanović, B; Novaković, Z; Simeunović, J; Božin, B

    2015-09-01

    The aims of study were to examine the antibacterial potential of two commercial essential oils (EOs) from coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) and thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) against vaginal clinical strains of bacteria and yeast and their chemical composition. Antimicrobial activities of commercial essential oils were determined using macro-diffusion (disc, well) and micro-dilution method in 96-well micro plates against twelve clinical strains of bacteria: Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus sp., Staph. aureus ATCC 25923, ATCC 6538 and E. coli 25922 and two clinical Candida albicans strains, including ATTC 10231. Spectrophotometric method was used for determination on C. albicans growth. An antimicrobial effect of EOs was strain specific. Bactericidal activity was higher for coriander EO (minimal inhibitory concentration (MICs) 0·4-45·4 μl ml(-1)) against almost all tested bacteria, except multiple resistant strains of Eneterococcus sp. and Proteus sp. Thyme EO showed slightly better fungicidal activity reaching MIC at 0·11 mg ml(-1) for all C. albicans strains. The effect of EOs on biofilm-forming ability was tested for two strains of Staph. aureus and E. coli, as well as on C. albicans filamentation ability. Brine shrimp lethality bioassay revealed thymus oil total toxicity and coriander oil intoxicity (LC50 = 2·25 mg ml(-1)). The chemical composition of oils was analysed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry showing oxygenated monoterepenes as dominant constituents. The results provide in-vitro scientific support for the safety possible use of Coriander EO against E. coli, Staph. aureus and C. albicans vaginal infections in alternative gynaecological treatment. To examine EOs as possible constituent of naturally based antimicrobial agents in vaginaletes for safety gynaecological application. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Characterisation and antimicrobial activity of biosurfactant extracts produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndlovu, Thando; Rautenbach, Marina; Vosloo, Johann Arnold; Khan, Sehaam; Khan, Wesaal

    2017-12-01

    Biosurfactants are unique secondary metabolites, synthesised non-ribosomally by certain bacteria, fungi and yeast, with their most promising applications as antimicrobial agents and surfactants in the medical and food industries. Naturally produced glycolipids and lipopeptides are found as a mixture of congeners, which increases their antimicrobial potency. Sensitive analysis techniques, such as liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, enable the fingerprinting of different biosurfactant congeners within a naturally produced crude extract. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ST34 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ST5, isolated from wastewater, were screened for biosurfactant production. Biosurfactant compounds were solvent extracted and characterised using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results indicated that B. amyloliquefaciens ST34 produced C 13-16 surfactin analogues and their identity were confirmed by high resolution ESI-MS and UPLC-MS. In the crude extract obtained from P. aeruginosa ST5, high resolution ESI-MS linked to UPLC-MS confirmed the presence of di- and monorhamnolipid congeners, specifically Rha-Rha-C 10 -C 10 and Rha-C 10 -C 10 , Rha-Rha-C 8 -C 10 /Rha-Rha-C 10 -C 8 and Rha-C 8 -C 10 /Rha-C 10 -C 8 , as well as Rha-Rha-C 12 -C 10 /Rha-Rha-C 10 -C 12 and Rha-C 12 -C 10 /Rha-C 10 -C 12 . The crude surfactin and rhamnolipid extracts also retained pronounced antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of opportunistic and pathogenic microorganisms, including antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli strains and the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. In addition, the rapid solvent extraction combined with UPLC-MS of the crude samples is a simple and powerful technique to provide fast, sensitive and highly specific data on the characterisation of biosurfactant compounds.

  7. Performance and clinical significance of direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing on urine from hospitalized patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breteler, K.B.; Rentenaar, R.J.; Verkaart, G.; Sturm, P.D.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common infections in the community and the hospital. With increasing antimicrobial resistance, specifically in the Gram-negative uropathogens, reliable, rapid antimicrobial susceptibility data would be useful to guide antimicrobial treatment. Direct

  8. Identification of biotransformation products of macrolide and fluoroquinolone antimicrobials in membrane bioreactor treatment by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzic, Senka; Senta, Ivan; Matosic, Marin; Ahel, Marijan

    2011-07-01

    Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was applied for the identification of transformation products (TPs) of fluoroquinolone (norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin) and macrolide (azithromycin, erythromycin, and roxitromycin) antimicrobials in wastewater effluents from a Zenon hollow-fiber membrane bioreactor (MBR). The detected TPs were thoroughly characterized using the accurate mass feature for the determination of the tentative molecular formulae and MS-MS experiments for the structural elucidation of unknowns. Several novel TPs, which have not been previously reported in the literature, were identified. The TPs of azithromycin and roxithromycin, identified in MBR effluent, were conjugate compounds, which were formed by phosphorylation of desosamine moiety. Transformation of fluoroquinolones yielded two types of products: conjugates, formed by succinylation of the piperazine ring, and smaller metabolites, formed by an oxidative break-up of piperazine moiety to form the 7-[(2-carboxymethyl)amino] group. A semi-quantitative assessment of these TPs suggested that they might have contributed significantly to the overall balance of antimicrobial residues in MBR effluents and thus to the overall removal efficiency. Determination of TPs during a period of 2 months indicated a conspicuous dynamics, which warrants further research to identify microorganisms involved and treatment conditions leading to their formation.

  9. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT TB DRUGS AND ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS ON THE EFFICIENCY OF TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vasilyeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study: to study the effect of specific TB drugs and antimicrobial agents constituting chemotherapy regimens on the efficiency of treatment of tuberculosis patients with various patterns of multiple drug resistance.Subjects and Methods. 412 pulmonary tuberculosis patients with bacillary excretion and various patterns of multiple drug resistance were enrolled into the study (117 patients with MDR TB (non pre-XDR and non-XDR; 120 patients with pre-XDR TB and 175 with XDR TB. Patients in the subgroups were compatible regarding sex and age. The patients were prescribed regimens including 5-6 drugs in accordance with their drug resistance pattern. The time of sputum conversion (by culture versus the year of treatment was selected as a surrogate endpoint. The effect of specific TB drugs and antimicrobial agents on treatment efficiency was assessed through calculation of odds ratio (OR of achieving a surrogate endpoint in the patients receiving and not receiving a certain drug.Results. In the subgroup of pre-XDR TB, the following drugs demonstrated the valid increase of odds of sputum conversion: ethambutol (OR 11.8, pyrazinamide (OR 10.2, moxifloxacin (OR 7.8, capreomicin (OR 4.41. Sputum conversion was achieved in all 11 patients treated with bedaquiline.In the subgroup of XDR TB, the following drugs provided a positive effect on the achievement of sputum conversion: bedaquiline (OR 9.62, linezolid (OR 8.15, cycloserine (OR 7.88, pyrazinamide (OR 7.29, moxifloxacin (OR 7.08, and ethambutol (OR 6.69. Ofloxacin demonstrated a confident negative effect on achieving sputum conversion (95% CI 0.06-0.32. 

  10. Inadequate cerebral oxygen delivery and central fatigue during strenuous exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Rasmussen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Under resting conditions, the brain is protected against hypoxia because cerebral blood flow increases when the arterial oxygen tension becomes low. However, during strenuous exercise, hyperventilation lowers the arterial carbon dioxide tension and blunts the increase in cerebral blood flow, which...... can lead to an inadequate oxygen delivery to the brain and contribute to the development of fatigue....

  11. Inadequate Information in Laboratory Test Requisition in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: Laboratory investigations are important aspect of patient management and inadequate information or errors arising from the process of filling out laboratory Request Forms can impact significantly on the quality of laboratory result and ultimately on patient care. Objectives: This study examined the pattern of deficiencies ...

  12. Longitudinal on-farm study of the development of antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter coli from pigs before and after danofloxacin and tylosin treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntunen, Pekka; Olkkola, Satu; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2011-06-02

    Effects of danofloxacin or consecutive fluoroquinolone and macrolide treatments on resistance development in Campylobacter have remained uncharacterised. Therefore we analysed the development of resistance in porcine Campylobacter coli before and after danofloxacin and tylosin treatments at a farrowing farm. Danofloxacin-treated (n=12, group A) and control pigs (n=15, group B) were subsequently treated with tylosin and sampled longitudinally. C. coli were isolated and susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin were assessed, isolates were genotyped with PFGE and resistance-related mutations were identified. Isolates from the danofloxacin-treated pigs had more frequently non-wild type MICs (above the epidemiological cut-off value (ECOFF)) for ciprofloxacin (Ptylosin treatment increased proportion of isolates with non-wild type MICs for erythromycin in both groups A and B (Ptylosin treatment isolates had even higher MICs for ciprofloxacin and erythromycin than before the treatment. Therefore, controlled use of antimicrobials in food animal production is essential. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Inadequate sleep and muscle strength: Implications for resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Olivia E; Drinkwater, Eric J; Urwin, Charles S; Lamon, Séverine; Aisbett, Brad

    2018-02-02

    Inadequate sleep (e.g., an insufficient duration of sleep per night) can reduce physical performance and has been linked to adverse metabolic health outcomes. Resistance exercise is an effective means to maintain and improve physical capacity and metabolic health, however, the outcomes for populations who may perform resistance exercise during periods of inadequate sleep are unknown. The primary aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effect of sleep deprivation (i.e. no sleep) and sleep restriction (i.e. a reduced sleep duration) on resistance exercise performance. A secondary aim was to explore the effects on hormonal indicators or markers of muscle protein metabolism. A systematic search of five electronic databases was conducted with terms related to three combined concepts: inadequate sleep; resistance exercise; performance and physiological outcomes. Study quality and biases were assessed using the Effective Public Health Practice Project quality assessment tool. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria and were rated as 'moderate' or 'weak' for global quality. Sleep deprivation had little effect on muscle strength during resistance exercise. In contrast, consecutive nights of sleep restriction could reduce the force output of multi-joint, but not single-joint movements. Results were conflicting regarding hormonal responses to resistance training. Inadequate sleep impairs maximal muscle strength in compound movements when performed without specific interventions designed to increase motivation. Strategies to assist groups facing inadequate sleep to effectively perform resistance training may include supplementing their motivation by training in groups or ingesting caffeine; or training prior to prolonged periods of wakefulness. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Microbial shifts in the swine distal gut in response to the treatment with antimicrobial growth promoter, tylosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeun Bum; Borewicz, Klaudyna; White, Bryan A; Singer, Randall S; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Tu, Zheng Jin; Isaacson, Richard E

    2012-09-18

    Antimicrobials have been used extensively as growth promoters (AGPs) in agricultural animal production. However, the specific mechanism of action for AGPs has not yet been determined. The work presented here was to determine and characterize the microbiome of pigs receiving one AGP, tylosin, compared with untreated pigs. We hypothesized that AGPs exerted their growth promoting effect by altering gut microbial population composition. We determined the fecal microbiome of pigs receiving tylosin compared with untreated pigs using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries. The data showed microbial population shifts representing both microbial succession and changes in response to the use of tylosin. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of sequences showed that tylosin caused microbial population shifts in both abundant and less abundant species. Our results established a baseline upon which mechanisms of AGPs in regulation of health and growth of animals can be investigated. Furthermore, the data will aid in the identification of alternative strategies to improve animal health and consequently production.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile, treatment outcome and serotype distribution of clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica: a 2-year study from Kerala, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harichandran D

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Harichandran, Kavitha Radhakrishnan Dinesh Department of Microbiology, Amrita School of Medicine, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham University, Kochi, Kerala, India Background/purpose: Typhoid and paratyphoid fever continue to be important causes of illness and death in parts of Asia, being associated with poor sanitation and consumption of unsafe food and water. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged to traditional first-line drugs, namely, the fluoroquinolones, as well as to third-generation cephalosporins, posing challenges to treatment. Azithromycin has proven to be an effective alternative for treatment of uncomplicated typhoid fever. The purpose of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility, clinical outcome and serotype distribution pattern of clinical isolates belonging to Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica. Methodology: All clinical isolates of S. enterica obtained from blood, sterile body fluids, as well as stool and urine samples at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Kerala, India, between August 2011 and July 2013 were included in the study and processed based on standard microbiology protocols. Results: A total of 118 isolates of Salmonella were obtained during the study period. Out of these, 79 were of S. Typhi (66.95%, followed by isolates of S. Paratyphi A (22; 18.64% and S. Typhimurium 12 (10.17%. Five isolates could not be identified further. There was 100% susceptibility to ceftriaxone in all S. enterica subspecies. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility was 32.91% for S. Typhi and 40.90% for S. Paratyphi A as determined by the disk diffusion method. The susceptibility profile of S. Typhi isolates to different antimicrobials was as follows: chloramphenicol (94.93%, ampicillin (77.21%, cotrimoxazole (75.94% and azithromycin (78.48%. For S. Typhi, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of ciprofloxacin required to inhibit the growth

  16. Antimicrobial Stewardship and Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian M. Abbo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections are the most common bacterial infections encountered in ambulatory and long-term care settings in the United States. Urine samples are the largest single category of specimens received by most microbiology laboratories and many such cultures are collected from patients who have no or questionable urinary symptoms. Unfortunately, antimicrobials are often prescribed inappropriately in such patients. Antimicrobial use, whether appropriate or inappropriate, is associated with the selection for antimicrobial-resistant organisms colonizing or infecting the urinary tract. Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant organisms are associated with higher rates of treatment failures, prolonged hospitalizations, increased costs and mortality. Antimicrobial stewardship consists of avoidance of antimicrobials when appropriate and, when antimicrobials are indicated, use of strategies to optimize the selection, dosing, route of administration, duration and timing of antimicrobial therapy to maximize clinical cure while limiting the unintended consequences of antimicrobial use, including toxicity and selection of resistant microorganisms. This article reviews successful antimicrobial stewardship strategies in the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections.

  17. Effects of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy and surgical endodontic treatment on the bacterial load reduction and periapical lesion healing. Three years follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcez, Aguinaldo S; Arantes-Neto, Julio G; Sellera, Debora P; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Besides the advances in endodontics, there are situations in which surgery is necessary to retain a tooth that otherwise would be extracted. This study analyzes the microbial reduction after conventional periapical surgery followed by antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) in 3 years follows up. Twenty-eight teeth needing periapical surgery were enrolled in this study. Microbiological samples were taken after: (1) accessing the lesion, (2) surgical procedure, and (3) aPDT. The teeth received a full mucoperiosteal flap, osteotomy with a high-speed bur, manual curettage of lesion and of the root, root-end resection and retrograde cavities prepared using ultrasonic retro-tips. After the conventional procedure the cavities received an aqueous solution of methylene blue (60 μM, 3 min) and were irradiated with a diode laser λ=660 nm (6 min, 15 J). After aPDT, a retrograde filling with mineral trioxide aggregate, flap re-positioning, and sutures conventionally ended the procedure. In all the cases, a periapical X-ray exam was taken before and after the surgical procedure. The microbiological samples showed an overall significant reduction, surgical procedure achieved a mean reduction of about 3.5 log while aPDT achieved a 5 log reduction. After 36 months of follow up the patients had, in average a reduction of 78% of the periapical lesion area. It appears that surgical endodontic treatment associated with antimicrobial photodynamic therapy highly improves the microbial reduction compared to the traditional technique and this could directly affect the treatment prognosis and periapical lesion healing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Adem Bahar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics.

  19. Comparison of the efficacy of four antimicrobial treatment schemes against experimental Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale infection in turkey poults pre-infected with avian pneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marien, Maja; Nauwynck, Hans; Duchateau, Luc; Martel, An; Chiers, Koen; Devriese, Luc; Froyman, Robrecht; Decostere, Annemie

    2006-06-01

    The clinical efficacy of drinking-water administration of enrofloxacin for 3 and 5 days, amoxicillin for 5 days and florfenicol for 5 days for the treatment of respiratory disease induced by an experimental Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale infection in turkeys pre-infected with avian pneumovirus (APV) was assessed based on clinical, bacteriological and histopathological examinations. Experimental groups of 15 susceptible 3-week-old turkeys were each inoculated oculonasally with APV subtype A and 3 days later with susceptible O. rhinotracheale bacteria. Antimicrobial treatment started 1 day after O. rhinotracheale inoculation. After infection, the birds were examined and scored for clinical signs, swabbed daily and weighed at different times. Five birds were euthanized and examined for macroscopic lesions at necropsy at 5 days post bacterial inoculation, and the remainder at 15 days post bacterial inoculation. Samples of the turbinates, trachea, lungs, air sacs, heart and pericardium were collected for bacteriological and/or histological examination. Recovery from respiratory disease caused by an APV/O. rhinotracheale dual infection was most successful after enrofloxacin treatment, irrespective of treatment duration, followed by florfenicol. Amoxicillin treatment was not efficacious. Clinical signs and the number of O. rhinotracheale organisms re-isolated from the trachea and the different respiratory organs were significantly reduced by enrofloxacin treatment for 3 and 5 days. O. rhinotracheale bacteria were not re-isolated from the tracheas of the birds treated with enrofloxacin except for one bird in the 5-day group, as early as 1 day after medication onset. In the group treated with enrofloxacin for 5 days, O. rhinotracheale organisms with a higher minimal inhibitory concentration value (x8) were isolated starting 2 days following treatment onset, initially from a single turkey and subsequently from the other animals.

  20. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, ...

  1. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts to select the appropriate antimicrobial ...

  2. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, ...

  3. Antimicrobial resistance mechanisms among Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Kinga; Osek, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed.

  4. Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanisms among Campylobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed. PMID:23865047

  5. Heightened circulating levels of antimicrobial peptides in tuberculosis-Diabetes co-morbidity and reversal upon treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathella Pavan Kumar

    Full Text Available The association of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs with tuberculosis-diabetes comorbidity (PTB-DM is not well understood.To study the association of AMPs with PTB-DM, we examined the systemic levels of cathelicidin (LL37, human beta defensin- 2 (HBD2, human neutrophil peptides 1-3, (HNP1-3 and granulysin in individuals with either PTB-DM, PTB, latent TB (LTB or no TB infection (NTB.Circulating levels of cathelicidin and HBD2 were significantly higher and granulysin levels were significantly lower in PTB-DM compared to PTB, LTB or NTB, while the levels of HNP1-3 were significantly higher in PTB-DM compared to LTB or NTB individuals. Moreover, the levels of cathelicidin and/or HBD2 were significantly higher in PTB-DM or PTB individuals with bilateral and cavitary disease and also exhibited a significant positive relationship with bacterial burden. Cathelidin, HBD2 and HNP1-3 levels exhibited a positive relationship with HbA1c and/or fasting blood glucose levels. Finally, anti-tuberculosis therapy resulted in significantly diminished levels of cathelicidin, HBD2, granulysin and significantly enhanced levels of HNP1-3 and granulysin in PTB-DM and/or PTB individuals.Therefore, our data demonstrate that PTB-DM is associated with markedly enhanced levels of AMPs and diminished levels of granulysin.

  6. Impact of azithromycin on the clinical and antimicrobial effectiveness of tobramycin in the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Dave P; Happoldt, Carrie L; Bratcher, Preston E; Caceres, Silvia M; Chmiel, James F; Malcolm, Kenneth C; Saavedra, Milene T; Saiman, Lisa; Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L; Nick, Jerry A

    2017-05-01

    Concomitant use of oral azithromycin and inhaled tobramycin occurs in approximately half of US cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Recent data suggest that this combination may be antagonistic. Test the hypothesis that azithromycin reduces the clinical benefits of tobramycin by analyses of clinical trial data, in vitro modeling of P. aeruginosa antibiotic killing, and regulation of the MexXY efflux pump. Ongoing administration of azithromycin associates with reduced ability of inhaled tobramycin, as compared with aztreonam, to improve lung function and quality of life in a completed clinical trial. In users of azithromycin FEV 1 (L) increased 0.8% during a 4-week period of inhaled tobramycin and an additional 6.4% during a subsequent 4-week period of inhaled aztreonam (Pazithromycin had similar improvement in lung function and quality of life scores during inhaled tobramycin and inhaled aztreonam. In vitro, azithromycin selectively reduced the bactericidal effects tobramycin in cultures of clinical strains of P. aeruginosa, while up regulating antibiotic resistance through MexXY efflux. Azithromycin appears capable of reducing the antimicrobial benefits of tobramycin by inducing adaptive bacterial stress responses in P. aeruginosa, suggesting that these medications together may not be optimal chronic therapy for at least some patients. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy of plant-derived compounds combined with hydrogen peroxide as antimicrobial wash and coating treatment for reducing Listeria monocytogenes on cantaloupes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Abhinav; Upadhyaya, Indu; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy of four plant-derived antimicrobials (PDAs), namely carvacrol, thymol, β-resorcylic acid, and caprylic acid, with or without hydrogen peroxide (HP), as antimicrobial wash and chitosan based coating for reducing Listeria monocytogenes (LM) on cantaloupes was investigated. Cantaloupe rind plugs inoculated with LM (10(7) CFU/cm(2)) were washed for 3, 6, 10 min at 25 °C or 1, 3, 5 min at 55 or 65 °C in water, or water containing 2% PDAs with or without 2% HP. Additionally, inoculated cantaloupes (10(8) CFU/fruit) washed with 2% PDA-HP combinations at 55 or 65 °C (5 min) were cut into rindless cubical pieces, stored at 4 °C for 7 days and sampled for LM. Furthermore, inoculated plugs coated with 2% PDAs were stored for 7 days and sampled for surviving LM. Individual PDA washes reduced LM on rinds by ≥2.5 log CFU/cm(2) by 3 min (P < 0.05). PDA-HP combinations decreased LM to undetectable levels by 5 min at 55, 65 °C, and 10 min at 25 °C (P < 0.05) and reduced LM transfer from cantaloupe surface to interior (P < 0.0001). All PDA coating treatments reduced LM on cantaloupe to undetectable levels by 5 days (P < 0.05). Results indicate that PDAs alone, or with HP could be used to reduce LM on cantaloupes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated Report Data Meetings and Publications Resources Judicious Use of ...

  9. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System ... If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  10. phytochemical and antimicrobial properties of commiphora

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... ABSTRACT. The extracts from the stem bark of Commiphora pedunculata, a plant used in Northern Nigeria for the treatment of infectious diseases, were subjected to phytochemical as well as antimicrobial screening using standard procedures. The antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, B. cereus, S. typhii ...

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibilty of potentially pathogenic halophilic Vibrio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance is indispensable for empirical treatment of infections and in preventing the spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms. This study is aimed at determining the antibiotic susceptibility of potentially pathogenic halophylic Vibrio species isolated in Lagos, Nigeria. Susceptibility ...

  12. antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Salmonella species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ABSTRACT. Treatment of enteric fever is increasingly becoming very challenging due to the increasing wave of antibiotic resistance. This study is a review of the contemporary antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of. Salmonella species. The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Salmonella species to a wide range of.

  13. Predictors of inadequate initial echocardiography in suspected Kawasaki disease: Criteria for sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni, Raymond P; Choi, Jaeun; Choueiter, Nadine F; Munjal, Iona M; Katyal, Chhavi; Stern, Kenan W D

    2018-03-09

    Kawasaki disease is the primary cause of acquired pediatric heart disease in developed nations. Timely diagnosis of Kawasaki disease incorporates transthoracic echocardiography for visualization of the coronary arteries. Sedation improves this visualization, but not without risks and resource utilization. To identify potential sedation criteria for suspected Kawasaki disease, we analyzed factors associated with diagnostically inadequate initial transthoracic echocardiography performed without sedation. This retrospective review of patients Kawasaki disease from 2009 to 2015 occurred at a medium-sized urban children's hospital. The primary outcome was diagnostically inadequate transthoracic echocardiography without sedation due to poor visualization of the coronary arteries, determined by review of clinical records. The associations of the primary outcome with demographics, Kawasaki disease type, laboratory data, fever, and antipyretic or intravenous immunoglobulin treatment prior to transthoracic echocardiography were analyzed. In total, 112 patients (44% female, median age 2.1 years, median BSA 0.54 m 2 ) underwent initial transthoracic echocardiography for suspected Kawasaki disease, and 99 were not sedated. Transthoracic echocardiography was diagnostically inadequate in 19 out of these 99 patients (19.2%) and was associated with age ≤ 2.0 years, weight ≤ 10.0 kg, and antipyretic use ≤ 6 hours before transthoracic echocardiography (all P Kawasaki disease. These factors should be considered when deciding which patients to sedate for initial Kawasaki disease transthoracic echocardiography. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Aerosol-based efficient delivery of telithromycin, a ketolide antimicrobial agent, to lung epithelial lining fluid and alveolar macrophages for treatment of respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2010-07-01

    The efficacy of aerosol-based delivery of telithromycin (TEL), as a model antimicrobial agent, for the treatment of respiratory infections was evaluated by comparison with oral administration. The aerosol formulation (0.2 mg/kg) was administered to rat lungs using a Liquid MicroSprayer. The time courses of the concentration of TEL in lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and alveolar macrophages (AMs) following administration of an aerosol formulation to rat lungs were markedly higher than that following the administration of an oral formulation (50 mg/kg). The time course of the concentrations of TEL in plasma following administration of the aerosol formulation was markedly lower than that in ELF and AMs. These results indicate that the aerosol formulation is more effective in delivering TEL to ELF and AMs, compared to the oral formulation, despite a low dose and it avoids distribution of TEL to the blood. In addition, the antibacterial effects of TEL in ELF and AMs following administration of the aerosol formulation were estimated by pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics analysis. The concentrations of TEL in ELF and the AMs time curve/minimum inhibitory concentration of TEL ratio were markedly higher than the effective values. This study indicates that an antibiotic aerosol formulation may be an effective pulmonary drug delivery system for the treatment of respiratory infections.

  15. Antimicrobial use in swine production and its effect on the swine gut microbiota and antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Devin B; Chénier, Martin R

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobials have been used in swine production at subtherapeutic levels since the early 1950s to increase feed efficiency and promote growth. In North America, a number of antimicrobials are available for use in swine. However, the continuous administration of subtherapeutic, low concentrations of antimicrobials to pigs also provides selective pressure for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and resistance determinants. For this reason, subtherapeutic antimicrobial use in livestock remains a source of controversy and concern. The swine gut microbiota demonstrates a number of changes in response to antimicrobial administration depending on the dosage, duration of treatment, age of the pigs, and gut location that is sampled. Both culture-independent and -dependent studies have also shown that the swine gut microbiota contains a large number of antimicrobial resistance determinants even in the absence of antimicrobial exposure. Heavy metals, such as zinc and copper, which are often added at relatively high doses to swine feed, may also play a role in maintaining antimicrobial resistance and in the stability of the swine gut microbiota. This review focuses on the use of antimicrobials in swine production, with an emphasis on the North American regulatory context, and their effect on the swine gut microbiota and on antimicrobial resistance determinants in the gut microbiota.

  16. The Antimicrobial Activity of Aliquidambar orientalis mill. Against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Medicinal plants are an important source of substances which are claimed to induce antimicrobial, antimutagenic and antioxidant effects. Many plants have been used due to their antimicrobial treatments. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of L. orientalis have not been reported to the present day. The aim ...

  17. Antimicrobial Resistance Trend of Bacteria from Clinical Isolates: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For decades, antimicrobials have proven useful for the treatment of bacterial infections. However, the immergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a major challenge to public health in many countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates from clinical sources.

  18. Aerosol-based efficient delivery of clarithromycin, a macrolide antimicrobial agent, to lung epithelial lining fluid and alveolar macrophages for treatment of respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2012-04-01

    Macrolide antimicrobial agents are generally given by the oral route for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by pathogenic microorganisms infected in lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and alveolar macrophages (AMs). However, because macrolides distribute to many different tissues via the blood after oral administration, systemic side effects are frequently induced. In contrast with oral administration, aerosolization may be an efficient method for delivering macrolides directly to ELF and AMs. In this study, the efficacy of aerosol-based delivery of clarithromycin (CAM), as a model macrolide, for the treatment of respiratory infections was evaluated by comparison with oral administration. The aerosol formulation of CAM (0.2 mg/kg) was administered to rat lungs using a Liquid MicroSprayer(®). The oral formulation of CAM (50 mg/kg) was used for comparison. Time courses of concentrations of CAM in ELF and AMs following administration were obtained, and then the bioavailability (BA) was calculated. In addition, the area under the concentrations of CAM in ELF and AMs-time curve/minimum inhibitory concentration at which 90% of isolates ratio [area under the curve (AUC/MIC(90))] were calculated to estimate the antibacterial effects in ELF and AMs. The BA of CAM in ELF and AMs following administration of aerosol formulation were markedly greater than that following administration of oral formulation. This indicates that the aerosol formulation is more effective in delivering CAM to ELF and AMs, compared with the oral formulation, despite a low dose. The AUC/MIC(90) of CAM in ELF and AMs were markedly higher than the effective values. This indicates that the aerosol formulation could be useful for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by pathogenic microorganisms infected in ELF and AMs. This study suggests that aerosol formulation of macrolides is an effective pulmonary drug delivery system for the treatment of respiratory infections.

  19. Deferasirox pharmacokinetics in patients with adequate versus inadequate response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirnomas, Deborah; Smith, Amber Lynn; Braunstein, Jennifer; Finkelstein, Yaron; Pereira, Luis; Bergmann, Anke K.; Grant, Frederick D.; Paley, Carole; Shannon, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Tens of thousands of transfusion-dependent (eg, thalassemia) patients worldwide suffer from chronic iron overload and its potentially fatal complications. The oral iron chelator deferasirox has become commercially available in many countries since 2006. Although this alternative to parenteral deferoxamine has been a major advance for patients with transfusional hemosiderosis, a proportion of patients have suboptimal response to the maximum approved doses (30 mg/kg per day), and do not achieve negative iron balance. We performed a prospective study of oral deferasirox pharmacokinetics (PK), comparing 10 transfused patients with inadequate deferasirox response (rising ferritin trend or rising liver iron on deferasirox doses > 30 mg/kg per day) with control transfusion-dependent patients (n = 5) with adequate response. Subjects were admitted for 4 assessments: deferoxamine infusion and urinary iron measurement to assess readily chelatable iron; quantitative hepatobiliary scintigraphy to assess hepatic uptake and excretion of chelate; a 24-hour deferasirox PK study following a single 35-mg/kg dose of oral deferasirox; and pharmacogenomic analysis. Patients with inadequate response to deferasirox had significantly lower systemic drug exposure compared with control patients (P deferasirox must be determined. This trial has been registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov under identifier NCT00749515. PMID:19724055

  20. Antimicrobial resistant bacteria in the food chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2003-01-01

    Antimicrobials are used for treatment and prevention of disease in food animals and as feed additives for growth promotion. All uses lead to the development of resistant bacteria, some of which are pathogenic to humans. Current main concerns are with resistance in Salmonella and Campylobacter...... to fluoroquinolones, which are used for empirical treatment of diarrhea in humans. Resistance to vancomycin and Synercid((R)) in enterococci is associated with use of similar drugs as growth promoters in food animals. Danish food animal producers have terminated the use of antimicrobial growth promoters. This has...... reduced the total use of antimicrobials by more than 50% and markedly reduced levels of resistance. There is an urgent need to implement globally, WHO principles for prudent use of antimicrobials in food animals. Use of antimicrobials as growth promoters could and should be terminated completely....

  1. Method development for the analysis of ionophore antimicrobials in dairy manure to assess removal within a membrane-based treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Jerod J; Wallace, Josh S; Aga, Diana S

    2018-04-01

    Ionophore antimicrobials are heavily used in the livestock industries, both for preventing animal infection by coccidia protozoa and for increasing feed efficiency. Ionophores are excreted mostly unmetabolized and are released into the environment when manure is land-applied to fertilize croplands. Here, an analytical method was optimized to study the occurrences of five ionophore residues (monensin, lasalocid, maduramycin, salinomycin, and narasin) in dairy manure after solid-liquid separation and further treatment of the liquid manure by a membrane-based treatment system. Ionophore residues from the separated solid manure (dewatered manure) and suspended solids of manure slurry samples were extracted using ultrasonication with methanol, followed by sample clean-up using solid phase extraction (SPE) and subsequent analysis via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The use of an ethyl acetate and methanol (1:1 v:v) mixture as an SPE eluent resulted in higher recoveries and lower method quantitation limits (MQL), when compared to using methanol. Overall recoveries from separated solid manure ranged from 73 to 134%. Liquid manure fractions were diluted with Nanopure™ water and cleaned up using SPE, where recoveries ranged from 51 to 100%. The developed extraction and LC-MS/MS methods were applied to analyze dairy manure samples subjected to an advanced manure treatment process involving a membrane-based filtration step (reverse osmosis). Monensin and lasalocid were detected at higher concentrations in the suspended solid fractions (4.40-420 ng/g for lasalocid and 85-1950 ng/g for monensin) compared to the liquid fractions (

  2. Histopathological, Microbiological, and Radiographic Analysis of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy for the Treatment of Teeth with Apical Periodontitis: A Study in Rats' Molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Alessandra Cesar; de Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli; de Oliveira, Sílvia Dias; Barth Junior, Valdir Cristóvão; Gallo, Stephanie Wagner; Follmann, Carina; Wolle, Carlos Frederico Brilhante; Steier, Liviu; Morgental, Renata Dornelles; Weber, João Batista Blessmann

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo, by histological and radiographic analysis, the response of apical tissues of rats' teeth with experimentally induced apical periodontitis, after one- and two-session endodontic treatment with and without photodynamic therapy (PDT). A microbiological analysis was also performed to verify bacterial reduction after each treatment. Studies carried out in recent years highlighted the antibacterial potential of PDT when associated with conventional endodontic therapy in vitro. Although the antimicrobial effect of PDT is well-established, tissue response to PDT in teeth with apical periodontitis lacks studies. Thirty-two rats' root canals were assigned to four groups: one session/PDT-[chemomechanical preparation (CMP)+root canal filling (RCF)]; two sessions/PDT- [CMP+calcium hydroxide (CH) for 14 days+RCF]; one session/PDT+ [CMP+PDT+RCF], and two sessions/PDT+ [CMP+PDT+CH for 14 days+RCF]. For microbiological evaluation, samples were collected before and after proposed treatments. For radiographic and histological analysis, the animals were euthanized after 28 days and the mandibles surgically removed. PDT associated with conventional endodontic therapy was able to promote significant bacterial reduction in root canals with induced apical periodontitis, but this reduction was not significantly different to conventional endodontic therapy alone. Although radiographic evaluation showed no significant differences, histological analysis showed lower scores for neutrophils/eosinophils in PDT-treated groups and macrophages/giant cells in CH groups. The use of low-level laser as light source did not promote major improvement on radiographic and histological repair, but since the number of inflammatory cells slightly decreased, it may optimize repair by modulating inflammatory process. PDT may be indicated as an adjunct to conventional endodontic therapy for teeth with apical periodontitis, in association with an interappointment

  3. Risk factors for and consequences of inadequate surgical margins in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawaetz, Mads; Homøe, Preben

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine which factors are associated with inadequate surgical margins and to assess the postoperative consequences. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective cohort of 110 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma treated with surgery during a 2-year period...... was examined. Clinical, histopathologic, and operative variables were related to the surgical margin status. Furthermore postoperative treatment data were compared with margin status. RESULTS: Univariate statistically significant associations were found between the tumor site in the floor of mouth, more...

  4. The role of abutment-attachment selection in resolving inadequate interarch distance: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsiyabi, Abdullah S; Felton, David A; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2005-09-01

    A critical factor that needs to be evaluated during the diagnosis and treatment planning phase for patients seeking an implant-tissue-supported overdenture or metal-resin implant fixed denture is the presence of adequate interarch distance. The amount of interarch distance is critical to the selection of appropriate implant abutments and attachments for both implant-tissue-supported overdentures and metal-resin implant fixed complete dentures. This clinical report describes a patient with complications related to the failure to diagnose inadequate interarch distance, and the methods used to resolve the patient's chief complaint. A guide for abutment-attachment selection using one commercially available implant system is given.

  5. Implant-related infections : application of PCR-based diagnostics and new antimicrobial strategies in prevention and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moojen, D.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focused on different aspects of the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of implant-related infections. Using in vitro laboratory experiments, animal infection studies and retro- and prospective clinical studies, different aims were addressed: Aim: To determine the value of the combined

  6. Drifting towards ceftriaxone treatment failure in gonorrhoea: risk factor analysis of data from the Gonococcal Resistance to Antimicrobials Surveillance Programme in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, K; Obi, C; Quaye, N; Chisholm, S; Hughes, G

    2017-02-01

    Treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is threatened by the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. We analysed data from the Gonococcal Resistance to Antimicrobials Surveillance Programme (GRASP) in England and Wales to identify groups most at risk of reduced susceptibility to the currently recommended first-line therapy, ceftriaxone. Data from GRASP between 2007 and 2013 on ceftriaxone susceptibility and strain types were analysed. Risk factors associated with isolates exhibiting a ceftriaxone minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥0.015 mg/L (CTR ≥0.015 mg/L) were identified using logistic regression. One third of isolates from men who have sex with men (MSM) (1279/4203) and 9.9% from heterosexuals (458/4626) exhibited CTR ≥0.015 mg/L. Between 2007 and 2013, the modal MIC for isolates remained at 0.004 mg/L for MSM but increased from 0.002 to 0.004 mg/L for heterosexuals. Among MSM, CTR ≥0.015 mg/L was associated with Asian ethnicity (crude OR: 1.42; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.88) and previous gonorrhoea (1.34; 1.16 to 1.54). Among heterosexuals, CTR ≥0.015 mg/L was associated with older age (35+ years: 4.31; 3.34 to 5.55), ≥6 sexual partners (1.58; 1.01 to 2.44) and sex abroad (2.23; 1.71 to 2.91). CTR ≥0.015 mg/L was less likely in isolates from heterosexuals of black Caribbean or African ethnicity (0.29; 0.20 to 0.41, 0.66; 0.43 to 0.99), with a concurrent chlamydial infection (0.25; 0.19 to 0.34) or women (0.57; 0.46 to 0.71). Over 600 isolates (CTR ≥0.015 mg/L) were typed; the majority were in Genogroup 1407, containing sequence type 1407. The emergence and spread of gonorrhoea with reduced susceptibility to ceftriaxone seems a realistic prospect, most likely in those involved in 'rapid-transmission' or bridging sexual networks. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. In Vitro Activity of the New Fluoroketolide Solithromycin (CEM-101) against a Large Collection of Clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates and International Reference Strains, Including Those with High-Level Antimicrobial Resistance: Potential Treatment Option for Gonorrhea?

    OpenAIRE

    Golparian, Daniel; Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Ohnishi, Makoto; Jensen, Jörgen S.; Unemo, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Gonorrhea may become untreatable, and new treatment options are essential. We investigated the in vitro activity of the first fluoroketolide, solithromycin. Clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates and reference strains (n = 246), including the two extensively drug-resistant strains H041 and F89 and additional isolates with clinical cephalosporin resistance and multidrug resistance, were examined. The activity of solithromycin was mainly superior to that of other antimicrobials (n = 10) curren...

  8. Internet addiction: reappraisal of an increasingly inadequate concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcevic, Vladan; Aboujaoude, Elias

    2017-02-01

    This article re-examines the popular concept of Internet addiction, discusses the key problems associated with it, and proposes possible alternatives. The concept of Internet addiction is inadequate for several reasons. Addiction may be a correct designation only for the minority of individuals who meet the general criteria for addiction, and it needs to be better demarcated from various patterns of excessive or abnormal use. Addiction to the Internet as a medium does not exist, although the Internet as a medium may play an important role in making some behaviors addictive. The Internet can no longer be separated from other potentially overused media, such as text messaging and gaming platforms. Internet addiction is conceptually too heterogeneous because it pertains to a variety of very different behaviors. Internet addiction should be replaced by terms that refer to the specific behaviors (eg, gaming, gambling, or sexual activity), regardless of whether these are performed online or offline.

  9. In Vitro Activity of the New Fluoroketolide Solithromycin (CEM-101) against a Large Collection of Clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates and International Reference Strains, Including Those with High-Level Antimicrobial Resistance: Potential Treatment Option for Gonorrhea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golparian, Daniel; Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Ohnishi, Makoto; Jensen, Jörgen S.

    2012-01-01

    Gonorrhea may become untreatable, and new treatment options are essential. We investigated the in vitro activity of the first fluoroketolide, solithromycin. Clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates and reference strains (n = 246), including the two extensively drug-resistant strains H041 and F89 and additional isolates with clinical cephalosporin resistance and multidrug resistance, were examined. The activity of solithromycin was mainly superior to that of other antimicrobials (n = 10) currently or previously recommended for gonorrhea treatment. Solithromycin might be an effective treatment option for gonorrhea. PMID:22354296

  10. In vitro activity of the new fluoroketolide solithromycin (CEM-101) against a large collection of clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates and international reference strains, including those with high-level antimicrobial resistance: potential treatment option for gonorrhea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golparian, Daniel; Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Ohnishi, Makoto; Jensen, Jörgen S; Unemo, Magnus

    2012-05-01

    Gonorrhea may become untreatable, and new treatment options are essential. We investigated the in vitro activity of the first fluoroketolide, solithromycin. Clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates and reference strains (n = 246), including the two extensively drug-resistant strains H041 and F89 and additional isolates with clinical cephalosporin resistance and multidrug resistance, were examined. The activity of solithromycin was mainly superior to that of other antimicrobials (n = 10) currently or previously recommended for gonorrhea treatment. Solithromycin might be an effective treatment option for gonorrhea.

  11. Biosynthesis, characterization and antimicrobial study of silver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both the characterization and antimicrobial activity test were very successful and could lead to significant economic viability, as well as being environmentally friendly for treatment of some infectious diseases. Keywords: Syzygium guineenses, Green Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Optoelectronics, Biomedical Sensors ...

  12. antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Salmonella species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Empirical treatment for enteric fevers should, therefore, be discouraged while quinolones, cefepime, carbapenem, azithromycin and third generation cephalosporins be given preference. KEY WORDS: Susceptibility, Antimicrobial, Salmonella species, Enteric fever. INTRODUCTION. In the 21st century, enteric fever in the.

  13. Cosmeceutical values, antimicrobial activities and antioxidant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... Key words: Antimicrobial, antioxidant, ethanol extract, water extract, cashew leaves, cosmeceutical. INTRODUCTION ... Anacardium occidentale (Cashew) leaves extract could ..... Antioxidant activity at different contact time for treatment of different concentration CLE in water with different amount of GAC.

  14. Inadequate doses of hemodialysis. Predisposing factors, causes and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pehuén Fernández

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving sub-optimal dose of hemodialysis have increased morbidity and mortality. The objectives of this study were to identify predisposing factors and causes of inadequate dialysis, and to design a practical algorithm for the management of these patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Ninety patients in chronic hemodialysis at Hospital Privado Universitario de Córdoba were included, during September 2015. Twenty two received sub-optimal dose of hemodialysis. Those with urea distribution volume (V greater than 40 l (72 kg body weight approximately are 11 times more likely (OR = 11.6; CI 95% = 3.2 to 51.7, p < 0.0001 to receive an inadequate dose of hemodialysis, than those with a smaller V. This situation is more frequent in men (OR = 3.5; 95% CI 1.01-15.8; p = 0.0292. V greater than 40 l was the only independent predictor of sub-dialysis in the multivariate analysis (OR = 10.3; 95% CI 2.8-37; p < 0.0004. The main cause of suboptimal dialysis was receiving a lower blood flow (Qb than the prescribed (336.4 ± 45.8 ml/min vs. 402.3 ± 28.8 ml/min respectively, p < 0.0001 (n = 18. Other causes were identified: shorter duration of the session (n = 2, vascular access recirculation (n = 1, and error in the samples (n = 1. In conclusion, the only independent predisposing factor found in this study for sub-optimal dialysis is V greater than 40 l. The main cause was receiving a slower Qb than prescribed. From these findings, an algorithm for the management of these patients was developed

  15. Evidence Report: Risk of Inadequate Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Kritina; Ezer, Neta; Vos, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Human-computer interaction (HCI) encompasses all the methods by which humans and computer-based systems communicate, share information, and accomplish tasks. When HCI is poorly designed, crews have difficulty entering, navigating, accessing, and understanding information. HCI has rarely been studied in an operational spaceflight context, and detailed performance data that would support evaluation of HCI have not been collected; thus, we draw much of our evidence from post-spaceflight crew comments, and from other safety-critical domains like ground-based power plants, and aviation. Additionally, there is a concern that any potential or real issues to date may have been masked by the fact that crews have near constant access to ground controllers, who monitor for errors, correct mistakes, and provide additional information needed to complete tasks. We do not know what types of HCI issues might arise without this "safety net". Exploration missions will test this concern, as crews may be operating autonomously due to communication delays and blackouts. Crew survival will be heavily dependent on available electronic information for just-in-time training, procedure execution, and vehicle or system maintenance; hence, the criticality of the Risk of Inadequate HCI. Future work must focus on identifying the most important contributing risk factors, evaluating their contribution to the overall risk, and developing appropriate mitigations. The Risk of Inadequate HCI includes eight core contributing factors based on the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS): (1) Requirements, policies, and design processes, (2) Information resources and support, (3) Allocation of attention, (4) Cognitive overload, (5) Environmentally induced perceptual changes, (6) Misperception and misinterpretation of displayed information, (7) Spatial disorientation, and (8) Displays and controls.

  16. Implant-related infections : application of PCR-based diagnostics and new antimicrobial strategies in prevention and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Moojen, D.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focused on different aspects of the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of implant-related infections. Using in vitro laboratory experiments, animal infection studies and retro- and prospective clinical studies, different aims were addressed: Aim: To determine the value of the combined use of broad range 16S rRNA PCR and reverse line blot hybridization (PCR-RLB) in the detection of orthopaedic implant-related infections. This technique was first optimized and validated using clini...

  17. Investigations of efficacy of intramammary applied antimicrobials and glucocorticosteroides in the treatment of subclinical and clinical mastitis in cows

    OpenAIRE

    Vakanjac, Slobodanka; Pavlović, Vojislav; Magaš, Vladimir; Pavlović, Miloš; Đurić, Miloje; Maletić, Milan; Nedić, Svetlana; Sočo, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of the mammary gland, mastitis in cows, presents one of the most acute problems in intensive dairy production, inflicting huge economic losses. In the course of one year, 80 samples were taken at investigated farms from udder quarters of cows with clinical mastitis and 160 samples from udder quarters of cows with subclinical mastitis. The efficacy of three preparations, A, B, and C, was examined in the treatment of clinical and subclinical mast...

  18. Antimicrobial resistance of thermophilic Campylobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Engberg, J.

    2001-01-01

    Campylobacter has become the leading cause of zoonotic enteric infections in developed and developing countries world-wide. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged among Campylobacter mainly as a consequence of the use of antimicrobial agents in food animal production. Resistance to drugs of choice...... for the treatment of infections, macrolides and fluoroquinolones has emerged as a clinical problem and interventions to reduce this are recommended. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and macrolides is mediated by chromosomal mutations. Resistance to other relevant antimicrobial agents, mediated by acquired resistance...... genes, has not become widespread so far. However, resistance genes originating from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species have been found, showing the potential for acquired resistance to emerge in Campylobacter....

  19. Antimicrobial effect and shelf-life extension by combined thermal and pulsed electric field treatment of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkling-Ribeiro, M; Noci, F; Cronin, D A; Lyng, J G; Morgan, D J

    2009-01-01

    The impact of a combined hurdle treatment of heat and pulsed electric fields (PEF) was studied on native microbiota used for the inoculation of low-fat ultra-high temperature (UHT) milk and whole raw milk. Microbiological shelf-life of the latter following hurdle treatment or thermal pasteurization was also investigated. UHT milk was preheated to 30 degrees C, 40 degrees C or 50 degrees C over a 60-s period, pulsed for 50 micros or 60 micros at a field strength of 40 kV cm(-1) or for 33 micros at 50 kV cm(-1). Heat and PEF reduced the microbial count by a maximum of 6.4 log in UHT milk (50 degrees C; 50 kV cm(-1), 33 micros) compared to 6.0 log (P > or = 0.05) obtained by thermal pasteurization (26 s, 72 degrees C). When raw milk was treated with a combination of hurdles (50 degrees C; 40 kV cm(-1), 60 micros) a 6.0 log inactivation of microbiota was achieved and microbiological milk shelf-life was extended to 21 days under refrigeration (4 degrees C) vs 14 days in thermally pasteurized milk. Native microbiota was decreased by 6.7 log following conventional pasteurization. The findings suggest that heat and PEF achieved similar inactivation of native microbiota in milk and longer stabilization of microbiological shelf-life than thermal pasteurization. A hurdle approach of heat and PEF could represent a valid milk processing alternative to conventional pasteurization. Hurdle treatment might also preserve native milk quality better due to less thermal exposure.

  20. Health Alliance for Prudent Prescribing, Yield and Use of Antimicrobial Drugs in the Treatment of Respiratory Tract Infections (HAPPY AUDIT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Munck, Anders; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics is considered to be the most important reason for development of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. As antibiotic resistance may spread across borders, high prevalence countries may serve as a source of bacterial resistance for countries...... of the project period. DISCUSSION: HAPPY AUDIT is an EU-financed project with the aim of contributing to the battle against antibiotic resistance through quality improvement of GPs' diagnosis and treatment of RTIs through development of intervention programmes targeting GPs, parents of young children and healthy...

  1. Extended antimicrobial treatment of bacterial vaginosis combined with human lactobacilli to find the best treatment and minimize the risk of relapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammarström Lennart

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary objective of this study was to investigate if extended antibiotic treatment against bacterial vaginosis (BV together with adjuvant lactobacilli treatment could cure BV and, furthermore, to investigate factors that could cause relapse. Methods In all, 63 consecutive women with bacterial vaginosis diagnosed by Amsel criteria were offered a much more aggressive treatment of BV than used in normal clinical practice with repeated antibiotic treatment with clindamycin and metronidazole together with vaginal gelatine capsules containing different strains of lactobacilli both newly characterised and a commercial one (109 freeze-dried bacteria per capsule. Oral clindamycin treatment was also given to the patient's sexual partner. Results The cure rate was 74.6% after 6 months. The patients were then followed as long as possible or until a relapse. The cure rate was 65.1% at 12 months and 55.6% after 24 months. There was no significant difference in cure rate depending on which Lactobacillus strains were given to the women or if the women were colonised by lactobacilli. The most striking factor was a new sex partner during the follow up period where the Odds Ratio of having a relapse was 9.3 (2.8-31.2 if the patients had a new sex partner during the observation period. Conclusions The study shows that aggressive treatment of the patient with antibiotics combined with specific Lactobacillus strain administration and partner treatment can provide long lasting cure. A striking result of our study is that change of partner is strongly associated with relapse of BV. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01245322

  2. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitrat V

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Virginie Vitrat,1 Serge Hautefeuille,2 Cécile Janssen,1 David Bougon,2 Michel Sirodot,2 Leonardo Pagani1,3 1Antimicrobial Stewardship Program, Infectious Diseases Unit, 2Intensive Care Unit, Annecy-Genevois Hospital Center (CHANGE, Annecy, France; 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Bolzano Central Hospital, Bolzano, Italy Abstract: Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobial treatment. Diagnostic techniques have clearly improved in the last years and allow earlier identification of bacterial strains in some cases, but these techniques are still quite expensive and not readily available in all institutions. Moreover, the ever increasing rates of resistance to antimicrobials, especially in Gram-negative pathogens, are threatening the outcome for such patients because of the lack of effective medical treatment; ICU physicians are therefore resorting to combination therapies to overcome resistance, with the direct consequence of promoting further resistance. A more appropriate use of available antimicrobials in the ICU should be pursued, and adjustments in doses and dosing through pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have recently shown promising results in improving outcomes and reducing antimicrobial resistance. The aim of multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programs is to improve antimicrobial prescription, and in this review we analyze the available experiences of such programs carried out in ICUs, with emphasis on results, challenges, and pitfalls. Any effective intervention aimed at improving antibiotic usage in ICUs must be brought about at the present time; otherwise, we will face the challenge of intractable infections in critically ill patients in the near future. Keywords: ICU, antimicrobial therapies, antimicrobial stewardship, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, antimicrobial resistance, early diagnosis

  3. Health Alliance for Prudent Prescribing, Yield and Use of Antimicrobial Drugs in the Treatment of Respiratory Tract Infections (HAPPY AUDIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reutskiy Anatoliy

    2010-04-01

    treatment, posters for the waiting room, brochures to patients and implementation of point of care tests (Strep A and CRP to be used in the GPs'surgeries. To ensure public awareness of the risk of resistant bacteria, media campaigns targeting both professionals and the public will be developed and the results will be published and widely disseminated at a Working Conference hosted by the World Association of Family Doctors (WONCA-Europe at the end of the project period. Discussion HAPPY AUDIT is an EU-financed project with the aim of contributing to the battle against antibiotic resistance through quality improvement of GPs' diagnosis and treatment of RTIs through development of intervention programmes targeting GPs, parents of young children and healthy adults. It is hypothesized that the use of multifaceted strategies combining active intervention by GPs will be effective in reducing prescribing of unnecessary antibiotics for RTIs and improving the use of appropriate antibiotics in suspected bacterial infections.

  4. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infected mice with Bryophyllum pinnatum, a medicinal plant with antioxidant and antimicrobial properties, reduces bacterial load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouitcheu Mabeku, Laure Brigitte; Eyoum Bille, Bertrand; Tchouangueu, Thibau Flaurant; Nguepi, Eveline; Leundji, Hubert

    2017-12-01

    Bryophyllum pinnatum (Lam.) Kurz (Crassulaceae) is a plant known for its antiulcer properties. This study evaluates the anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of Bryophyllum pinnutum methanol extract with a mouse model and its antioxidant properties. Dried leaves of Bryophyllum pinnutum were extracted with methanol and ethyl acetate. Broth microdilution method was used to evaluate the anti-Helicobacter activity of extract samples in vitro. Swiss mice were inoculated with a suspension of Helicobacter pylori and divided into control group and four others that received 125, 250, 500 mg/kg of methanol extract or ciprofloxacin (500 mg/kg), respectively, for 7 days. Helicobacter pylori colonization and bacterial load of mouse stomach was assessed on day 1 and 7 post-treatment. The antioxidant activity of Bryophyllum pinnutum was evaluated through DPPH radical, hydroxyl radical and reducing power assay. Methanol extract showed a significant anti-Helicobacter activity with MIC and MBC values of 32 and 256 μg/mL, respectively. Bryophyllum pinnatum and ciprofloxacin reduced H. pylori colonization of gastric tissue from 100% to 17%. Bryophyllum pinnatum extract (85.91 ± 52.91 CFU) and standard (25.74 ± 16.15 CFU) also reduced significantly (p Helicobacter pylori growth, and may also acts as an antioxidant to protect gastric mucosa against reactive oxygen species.

  5. A single capsule formulation of RHB-104 demonstrates higher anti-microbial growth potency for effective treatment of Crohn's disease associated withMycobacterium aviumsubspeciesparatuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasem, Ahmad; Safavikhasraghi, Mitra; Naser, Saleh A

    2016-01-01

    Most recently we reported that RHB‑104 triple antibiotics combination in culture is bactericidal and should be effective for treatment of Crohn's disease (CD)-associated with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) (Alcedo et al. in Gut Pathog 14:32, 2016). The combination exhibited unique synergistic antimicrobial growth activity. The proprietary RHB-104 capsule formulation contains active ingredients (63.3 % Clarithromycin (CLA), 6.7 % Clofazimine (CLO) and 30 % Rifabutin (RIF)). In our earlier study, we could not dissolve the proprietary RHB-104 capsule formulation in one compatible solvent. Consequently, we re-created RHB-104 analog by adding appropriate concentrations of each of the three antibiotics into the cultures. The Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for RHB-104 analog, CLA, CLO, RIF, CLA-CLO, CLA-RIF, CLO-RIF and their individual solvents were reported earlier (Alcedo et al. in Gut Pathog 14:32, 2016). In this study, we succeeded in dissolving the proprietary RHB-104 capsule formulation in a single proprietary solvent. This study is designed to compare of the MIC the proprietary RHB-104 capsule formulation to RHB-104 analog against MAP and other microorganisms. BD Bactec™ MGIT™ Para-TB medium (Sparks, MD) system was used to determine the MIC of the proprietary RHB-104 capsule formulation and RHB-104 analog and their solvents against MAP and several other microorganisms. The final concentration of solvents used to dissolve all the drugs were ≤0.5 % (v/v). The MIC for the RHB-104 proprietary solvent against MAP was consistent against all microorganisms tested in the study at 12.5 % (v/v). The MIC for the proprietary RHB-104 capsule formulation was similar to RHB-104 analog against several MAP clinical strains with MIC ≤ 0.2 μg/mL. The MIC for the proprietary RHB-104 capsule formulation was at 2.0 μg/mL against MAP strain MS 137 and M. avium strain JF7 compared to 4.0 ug/mL for RHB-104 analog. Similarly, the MIC of

  6. Oral administration of antimicrobials increase antimicrobial resistance in E. coli from chicken--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneit, C; Burow, E; Tenhagen, B-A; Käsbohrer, A

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobials play an important role in animal and human health care. It was the aim of this systematic review to assess the effects of oral administration of antimicrobials on the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Escherichia coli (E. coli) from chickens. Moreover, the effects of the administration of more than one antimicrobial and of different dosages were studied. Literature was searched in November 2012 from the electronic databases ISI Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus and a national literature database (DIMDI) as well as the database ProQuest LLC. The search was updated in March 2014. Original studies describing a treatment (A) and a control group of either non-treatment (C) or initial value (0) and determining AMR in E. coli at different sample points (SP) were included. The literature search resulted in 35 full text articles on the topic, seven (20%) of which contained sufficient information on the administered antimicrobial and the impact of treatment on AMR. Most papers described the use of more than one antimicrobial, several dosages, controls (non-treatment or pre-treatment) and measured AMR at different SPs leading to a total of 227 SPs on the impact of the use of antimicrobials on AMR in chickens. 74% of the SPs (168/227) described a higher AMR-rate in E. coli from treated animals than from controls. After the administration of a single antimicrobial, AMR increased at 72% of the SPs. Administration of more than one antimicrobial increased AMR at 82% of the SPs. Higher dosages were associated with similar or higher AMR rates. The limited number of studies for each antimicrobial agent and the high variability in the resistance effect call for more well designed studies on the impact of oral administration on AMR development and spread. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... version) Arabic Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Chinese Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance French Translation ... FEAR Act Site Map Nondiscrimination Website Policies U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver ...

  8. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. ... concept more understandable to non-scientists by showing how bacterial antimicrobial resistance can develop and spread. All ...

  9. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share ...

  10. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy combined with periodontal treatment for metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Erika Elisabeth; França, Cristiane Miranda; Veni, Priscila; de Oliveira Silva, Tamires; Gonçalves, Rafael Moredo; de Carvalho, Verônica Franco; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Fernandes, Kristianne P S; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel A; Camacho, Cleber P; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Alvarenga, Letícia Heineck; Prates, Renato Araujo

    2015-05-27

    The relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and periodontal disease is bidirectional. DM is a predisposing and modifying factor of periodontitis, which, in turn, worsens glycemic control and increases proteins found in the acute phase of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein. The gold standard for the treatment of periodontal disease is oral hygiene orientation, scaling and planing. Moreover, systemic antibiotic therapy may be employed in some cases. In an effort to minimize the prescription of antibiotics, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been studied as an antimicrobial technique and has demonstrated promising results. The aim of the proposed study is to determine whether PDT as a complement to periodontal therapy (PT) is helpful in the metabolic control of individuals with type 2 diabetes and the reduction of acute-phase inflammatory markers. The patients will be randomized using a proper software program into two groups: 1) PT + placebo PDT or 2) PT + active PDT. All patients will first be examined by a specialist, followed by PT performed by two other healthcare professionals. At the end of each session, PDT (active or placebo) will be administered by a fourth healthcare professional. The following will be the PDT parameters: diode laser (660 nm); power output = 110 mW; exposure time = 90 s per point (9 J/point); and energy density = 22 J/cm(2). The photosensitizer will be methylene blue (50 μg/mL). The patients will be re-evaluated 15, 30, 90 and 180 days after treatment. Serological examinations with complete blood count, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin and salivary examinations to screen for tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1, interleukin 6, ostelocalcin, and osteoprotegerin/RANKL will be performed at each evaluation. The data will be statistically evaluated using the most appropriate tests. The results of this study will determine the efficacy of photodynamic therapy as an adjuvant to periodontal treatment in diabetic patients. The

  11. Newcastle disease virus outbreaks: vaccine mismatch or inadequate application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dortmans, Jos C F M; Peeters, Ben P H; Koch, Guus

    2012-11-09

    Newcastle disease (ND) is one of the most important diseases of poultry, and may cause devastating losses in the poultry industry worldwide. Its causative agent is Newcastle disease virus (NDV), also known as avian paramyxovirus type 1. Many countries maintain a stringent vaccination policy against ND, but there are indications that ND outbreaks can still occur despite intensive vaccination. It has been argued that this may be due to antigenic divergence between the vaccine strains and circulating field strains. Here we present the complete genome sequence of a highly virulent genotype VII virus (NL/93) obtained from vaccinated poultry during an outbreak of ND in the Netherlands in 1992-1993. Using this strain, we investigated whether the identified genetic evolution of NDV is accompanied by antigenic evolution. In this study we show that a live vaccine that is antigenically adapted to match the genotype VII NL/93 outbreak strain does not provide increased protection compared to a classic genotype II live vaccine. When challenged with the NL/93 strain, chickens vaccinated with a classic vaccine were completely protected against clinical disease and mortality and virus shedding was significantly reduced, even with a supposedly suboptimal vaccine dose. These results suggest that it is not antigenic variation but rather poor flock immunity due to inadequate vaccination practices that may be responsible for outbreaks and spreading of virulent NDV field strains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison between two antimicrobial protocols with or without guided bone regeneration in the treatment of peri-implantitis. A histomorphometric study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Umberto Demoner; Suaid, Flavia Adelino; Wikesjö, Ulf M E; Susin, Cristiano; Taba, Mario; Novaes, Arthur Belém

    2017-11-01

    This study used a dog model to evaluate two antimicrobial protocols with or without guided bone regeneration (GBR) in the surgical reconstruction of peri-implantitis defects. Eight beagle dogs subject to ligature-induced peri-implantitis were used. The animals either received antimicrobial photodynamic therapy or topical tetracycline hydrochloride combined with GBR or as stand-alone surgical interventions. Block biopsies of the defect sites for histological analysis were obtained at euthanasia, 12 weeks postsurgery. The primary outcome of the study was re-osseointegration; secondary outcomes included alveolar bone gain and remaining defect characteristics. The effects of the implant site, early exposure, and type of antimicrobial protocol on bone regeneration were also evaluated. No significant differences were observed between the two antimicrobial protocols, and the adjunctive use of GBR failed to significantly improve re-osseointegration or bone gain using either protocol. Buccal sites and implant early exposure negatively affected bone regeneration. Both antimicrobial therapies stand-alone or combined with GBR allowed similar and limited bone gain. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. ANTIMICROBIAL HERBAL DRUGS

    OpenAIRE

    K. Nishteswar

    2011-01-01

    An anti-microbial is a substance that kills or inhibits the growth of microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, or protozoans. Antimicrobial drugs either kill microbes (microbiocidal) or prevent the growth of microbes (microbiostatic). Sulphonamide drugs were the first antimicrobial drugs, and paved the way for the antibiotic revolution in medicine. The first sulfonamide, trade named Prontosil, was actually a prodrug. However, with the development of antimicrobials, microorganisms have adapted ...

  14. Approach to the patients with inadequate response to colchicine in familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common form of monogenic autoinflammatory conditions, and response to colchicine has been considered as one of its distinctive features among other hereditary periodic fever disorders. Prophylactic colchicine has been shown to be effective in the prevention of inflammatory attacks and development of amyloidosis. However, the highest tolerable doses of colchicine may not be adequate enough to manage these goals in approximately 5% of FMF patients. Inadequate response to colchicine in fully compliant FMF patients may be associated with genetic and/or environmental factors affecting disease severity and colchicine bioavailability. Clarification of the molecular pathogenic mechanisms of FMF has revealed that interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) cytokine is the most likely target to attack, and several case reports and case series have already documented the efficacy and safety of available anti-IL-1 agents, such as anakinra, rilonacept, and canakinumab in those patients inadequately responding to colchicine. Characterization and early identification of those FMF patients with uncontrolled inflammatory activity have become more important after the availability of new treatment options for the prevention of disease-associated complications and permanent damages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Oral antimicrobials increase antimicrobial resistance in porcine E. coli--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, E; Simoneit, C; Tenhagen, B-A; Käsbohrer, A

    2014-03-01

    Administration of antimicrobials to livestock increases the risk of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in commensal bacteria. Antimicrobials in pig production are usually administered per pen via feed which implies treatment of sick alongside with healthy animals. The objective of this systematic literature review was to investigate the effect of orally administered antimicrobials on AMR in Escherichia coli of swine. Studies published in peer reviewed journals were retrieved from the international online databases ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed, Scopus and the national electronic literature data base of Deutsches Institut für Medizinische Dokumentation und Information. The studies were assessed using the eligibility criteria English or German language, access to full paper version, defined treatment and control group (initial value or non-treatment) as well as administration and resistance testing of the same antimicrobial class. In the qualitative synthesis, only studies were included presenting the summary measures odds ratio or prevalence of resistance, the category of the applied antimicrobial and the dosage. An effect of the antimicrobial on AMR in E. coli was evaluated as an "increase", "no effect" or "decrease" if the odds or alternatively the prevalence ratio were >1.0, 1.0 or antimicrobial substance and dosage was missing in 4 and 5 of the 11 finally selected studies. The 36 identified trials were inhomogenous in usage and provision of information on sample size. Oral administration of antimicrobials increases the risk of AMR in E. coli from swine. There is however a lack of studies on the impact of dosage and longitudinal effects of treatment. The published studies have a number of issues concerning their scientific quality. More high quality research is needed to better address and quantifiy the effect of orally administered antimicrobials on AMR in swine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Quality of Antimicrobial Products Used in Striped Catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus Aquaculture in Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Minh Phu

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial usage is common in Asian aquaculture. This study aimed to determine the quality of antimicrobial products used by Vietnamese striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus farmers. Twenty one antimicrobial products (11 products contained a single antimicrobial and 10 products contained a mixture of two different antimicrobials commonly used by catfish farmers were obtained from so-called chemical shops located in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry was used to analyze concentration of sulfonamides, trimethoprim, amoxicillin, cefalexin and ciprofloxacin whereas concentrations of florfenicol and doxycycline were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography with UV detection. Results revealed that only 4/11 products with a single antimicrobial and 2/10 products with a mixture of antimicrobials contained active substances within ±10% of the concentration declared on the product label. Two products with antimicrobial mixtures did not contain any of the declared antimicrobials. Comparing two batches, analysis of 11 products revealed that only one product contained a concentration of active compound that varied with less than 10% in both batches. Several product labels provided inadequate information on how to calculate therapeutic dosage and further stated withdrawal time despite lack of pharmacokinetic data on the antimicrobials in catfish. There is an urgent need to strengthen approval procedures and in particular regularly to monitor the quality of antimicrobials used in Vietnamese aquaculture.

  17. Quality of Antimicrobial Products Used in Striped Catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) Aquaculture in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phu, Tran Minh; Phuong, Nguyen Thanh; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial usage is common in Asian aquaculture. This study aimed to determine the quality of antimicrobial products used by Vietnamese striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) farmers. Twenty one antimicrobial products (11 products contained a single antimicrobial and 10 products contained a mixture of two different antimicrobials) commonly used by catfish farmers were obtained from so-called chemical shops located in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry was used to analyze concentration of sulfonamides, trimethoprim, amoxicillin, cefalexin and ciprofloxacin whereas concentrations of florfenicol and doxycycline were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography with UV detection. Results revealed that only 4/11 products with a single antimicrobial and 2/10 products with a mixture of antimicrobials contained active substances within ±10% of the concentration declared on the product label. Two products with antimicrobial mixtures did not contain any of the declared antimicrobials. Comparing two batches, analysis of 11 products revealed that only one product contained a concentration of active compound that varied with less than 10% in both batches. Several product labels provided inadequate information on how to calculate therapeutic dosage and further stated withdrawal time despite lack of pharmacokinetic data on the antimicrobials in catfish. There is an urgent need to strengthen approval procedures and in particular regularly to monitor the quality of antimicrobials used in Vietnamese aquaculture.

  18. Quality of Antimicrobial Products Used in Striped Catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) Aquaculture in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phu, Tran Minh; Phuong, Nguyen Thanh; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial usage is common in Asian aquaculture. This study aimed to determine the quality of antimicrobial products used by Vietnamese striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) farmers. Twenty one antimicrobial products (11 products contained a single antimicrobial and 10 products contained a mixture of two different antimicrobials) commonly used by catfish farmers were obtained from so-called chemical shops located in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry was used to analyze concentration of sulfonamides, trimethoprim, amoxicillin, cefalexin and ciprofloxacin whereas concentrations of florfenicol and doxycycline were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography with UV detection. Results revealed that only 4/11 products with a single antimicrobial and 2/10 products with a mixture of antimicrobials contained active substances within ±10% of the concentration declared on the product label. Two products with antimicrobial mixtures did not contain any of the declared antimicrobials. Comparing two batches, analysis of 11 products revealed that only one product contained a concentration of active compound that varied with less than 10% in both batches. Several product labels provided inadequate information on how to calculate therapeutic dosage and further stated withdrawal time despite lack of pharmacokinetic data on the antimicrobials in catfish. There is an urgent need to strengthen approval procedures and in particular regularly to monitor the quality of antimicrobials used in Vietnamese aquaculture. PMID:25897517

  19. Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life-threatening infections – to a last resort treatment (carbapenem antibiotics) has spread to all regions of the ... unit patients. In some countries, because of resistance, carbapenem antibiotics do not work in more than half ...

  20. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobials for textile applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, Lena; Height, Murray; Nowack, Bernd

    2013-03-01

    Many antimicrobial technologies are available for textiles. They may be used in many different textile applications to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Due to the biological activity of the antimicrobial compounds, the assessment of the safety of these substances is an ongoing subject of research and regulatory scrutiny. This review aims to give an overview on the main compounds used today for antimicrobial textile functionalization. Based on an evaluation of scientific publications, market data as well as regulatory documents, the potential effects of antimicrobials on the environment and on human health were considered and also life cycle perspectives were taken into account. The characteristics of each compound were summarized according to technical, environmental and human health criteria. Triclosan, silane quaternary ammonium compounds, zinc pyrithione and silver-based compounds are the main antimicrobials used in textiles. The synthetic organic compounds dominate the antimicrobials market on a weight basis. On the technical side the application rates of the antimicrobials used to functionalize a textile product are an important parameter with treatments requiring lower dosage rates offering clear benefits in terms of less active substance required to achieve the functionality. The durability of the antimicrobial treatment has a strong influence on the potential for release and subsequent environmental effects. In terms of environmental criteria, all compounds were rated similarly in effective removal in wastewater treatment processes. The extent of published information about environmental behavior for each compound varies, limiting the possibility for an in-depth comparison of all textile-relevant parameters across the antimicrobials. Nevertheless the comparative evaluation showed that each antimicrobial technology has specific risks and benefits that should be taken into account in evaluating the suitability of different antimicrobial products. The

  1. Metabolic regulation during sport events: factual interpretations and inadequate allegations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Remy Poortmans

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Different fuels are available to generate ATP for muscle activities during sport events. Glycogen from striated muscles and liver stores may be converted to lactic acid or almost completely oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2, triacylglycerol within the muscle itself and fatty acids from adipose tissue could be converted to CO2 in acting muscles, some free amino acids can be released within the muscle itself and from intestinal stores to sustain the amount of ATP generation indispensable for muscle contraction. All single biochemical reactions, but one, need one or several enzymes to activate the conversion of a substrate into a product. The energy transformation in biochemical reactions is led by application of so-called free energy. Reversible and non-reversible reactions within a metabolic pathway are dependent on specific enzymes near or far from equilibrium. Allosteric enzymes are regulatory enzymes that provide the direction in the pathway. A regulatory enzyme is either activated or inhibited by small regulators (ligands. A reversible substrate cycle between A and B is catalyzed by two enzymes with different fluxes. The need of ATP production for muscle contraction is under the leadership of regulatory enzymes and available substrate stores. The improvement of adapted metabolic reactions under sport training depends on the appropriate increase of regulatory enzymes within the glycolytic and oxidative pathways. The amount of some specific enzymes is increased by training in order to improve the maximum activity of the metabolic pathway. Unfortunately, several publications do not precisely implicate the appropriate enzyme(s to explain or reject the adaptation induced by the training schedule. A few examples will illustrate the factual interpretation and the inadequate allegation.

  2. The association of xerostomia and inadequate intake in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodus, N L; Brown, J

    1990-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that nearly one in five older adults has xerostomia (dry mouth). Salivary gland dysfunction and/or inadequate saliva increases the difficulty of these older adults in obtaining proper nutrition. Problems in lubricating, masticating, tolerating, tasting, and swallowing food contribute notably to the complex physiological and psychological manifestations of aging. To our knowledge, the literature has not demonstrated an association between xerostomia and malnutrition in the elderly. We randomly selected 67 older adults from institutionalized and free-living geriatric populations. Nutritional intake analysis was performed on both groups of study subjects, who were found to have xerostomia by use of sialometry, and on control subjects matched for age, sex, and physical status. Intake of total energy, protein, dietary fiber, total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium, potassium, vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B-6, calcium, iron, and zinc was compared with the 1989 Recommended Dietary Allowances. Subjects' intakes were also compared with that of a control group. Medical systemic information and number and types of medications were compared among the groups. Statistical analysis of the data indicated significant (p less than .001) inadequacies in the nutritional intake patterns of institutionalized and free-living older adults with xerostomia. Subjects with xerostomia (more than 75% of the free-living and institutionalized seniors) had significant deficiencies of fiber, potassium, vitamin B-6, iron, calcium, and zinc. Taste and food perception were significantly reduced in the elders with xerostomia. Our study indicates the potential contribution of xerostomia to the high prevalence of geriatric malnutrition in the United States.

  3. Characterization of CTX-M enzymes, quinolone resistance determinants, and antimicrobial residues from hospital sewage, wastewater treatment plant, and river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Danieli; Palmeiro, Jussara Kasuko; da Silva Nogueira, Keite; de Lima, Thiago Marenda Rosa; Cardoso, Marco André; Pontarolo, Roberto; Degaut Pontes, Flávia Lada; Dalla-Costa, Libera Maria

    2017-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria are widespread in hospitals and have been increasingly isolated from aquatic environments. The aim of the present study was to characterize extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and quinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae from a hospital effluent, sanitary effluent, inflow sewage, aeration tank, and outflow sewage within a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), as well as river water upstream and downstream (URW and DRW, respectively), of the point where the WWTP treated effluent was discharged. β-lactamase (bla) genes, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR), and quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) were assessed by amplification and sequencing in 55 ESBL-positive and/or quinolone-resistant isolates. Ciprofloxacin residue was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography. ESBL-producing isolates were identified in both raw (n=29) and treated (n=26) water; they included Escherichia coli (32), Klebsiella pneumoniae (22) and Klebsiella oxytoca (1). Resistance to both cephalosporins and quinolone was observed in 34.4% of E. coli and 27.3% of K. pneumoniae. Resistance to carbapenems was found in 5.4% of K. pneumoniae and in K. oxytoca. Results indicate the presence of bla CTX-M (51/55, 92.7%) and bla SHV (8/55, 14.5%) ESBLs, and bla GES (2/55, 3.6%) carbapenemase-encoding resistance determinants. Genes conferring quinolone resistance were detected at all sites, except in the inflow sewage and aeration tanks. Quinolone resistance was primarily attributed to amino acid substitutions in the QRDR of GyrA (47%) or to the presence of PMQR (aac-(6')-Ib-cr, oqxAB, qnrS, and/or qnrB; 52.9%) determinants. Ciprofloxacin residue was absent only from URW. Our results have shown strains carrying ESBL genes, PMQR determinants, and mutations in the gyrA QRDR genes mainly in hospital effluent, URW, and DRW samples. Antimicrobial use, and the inefficient removal of MDR bacteria and antibiotic residue during sewage treatment, may

  4. The Anticancer Peptide TAT-RasGAP317−326 Exerts Broad Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Heulot

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance has become a major health issue. Nosocomial infections and the prevalence of resistant pathogenic bacterial strains are rising steadily. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new classes of antibiotics effective on multi-resistant nosocomial pathogenic bacteria. We have previously shown that a cell-permeable peptide derived from the p120 Ras GTPase-activating protein (RasGAP, called TAT-RasGAP317−326, induces cancer cell death, inhibits metastatic progression, and sensitizes tumor cells to various anti-cancer treatments in vitro and in vivo. We here report that TAT-RasGAP317−326 also possesses antimicrobial activity. In vitro, TAT-RasGAP317−326, but not mutated or truncated forms of the peptide, efficiently killed a series of bacteria including Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In vivo experiments revealed that TAT-RasGAP317−326 protects mice from lethal E. coli-induced peritonitis if administrated locally at the onset of infection. However, the protective effect was lost when treatment was delayed, likely due to rapid clearance and inadequate biodistribution of the peptide. Peptide modifications might overcome these shortcomings to increase the in vivo efficacy of the compound in the context of the currently limited antimicrobial options.

  5. Microbiologic characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium tetani isolated from wounds of patients with clinically diagnosed tetanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James I; Lam, Thi Minh Yen; Huynh, Thi Loan; To, So Diep; Tran, Thi Thu Nga; Nguyen, Van Minh Hoang; Le, Thanh Son; Nguyen, van Vinh Chau; Parry, Christopher; Farrar, Jeremy J; Tran, Tinh Hien; Baker, Stephen

    2009-05-01

    Clostridium tetani is the etiologic agent of the muscle-spasming disease tetanus. Despite an effective vaccine, tetanus is an ongoing problem in some developing countries. Diagnosis by bacterial culture is not done because it is generally unnecessary and the entry of route of the bacteria can be inapparent. We attempted to isolate and evaluate C. tetani from the wounds of 84 patients with tetanus. We effectively isolated C. tetani from 45 patients. All strains tested positive by polymerase chain reaction for the gene encoding tetanus neurotoxin. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined by disc diffusion and E-test. All C. tetani isolates were susceptible to penicillin and metronidazole but resistant to co-trimoxazole. Despite treatment with high doses of penicillin, C. tetani was isolated after 16 days of intravenous penicillin in two cases. These data show that the intravenous route for penicillin may be inadequate for clearing the infection and emphasizes wound debridement in the treatment of tetanus.

  6. Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bacteria, viruses, and fungi— is among modern medicine's great achievements. The German physician Paul Ehrlich developed a narrow-spectrum antibiotic called Salvarsan in 1909 for treatment of syphilis. Discovery of penicillin by Alexander Fleming followed in 1928. By the mid 1940s, ...

  7. Antimicrobial outcomes in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Stalder, Kenneth R.; Woloszko, Jean

    2015-03-01

    Plasma is referred to as the fourth state of matter and is frequently generated in the environment of a strong electric field. The result consists of highly reactive species--ions, electrons, reactive atoms and molecules, and UV radiation. Plasma Medicine unites a number of fields, including Physics, Plasma Chemistry, Cell Biology, Biochemistry, and Medicine. The treatment modality utilizes Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP), which is able to sterilize and treat microbes in a nonthermal manner. These gas-based plasma systems operate at close to room temperature and atmospheric pressure, making them very practical for a range of potential treatments and are highly portable for clinical use throughout the health care system. The hypothesis is that gas based plasma kills bacteria, fungus, and viruses but spares mammalian cells. This paper will review systematic work which shows examples of systems and performance in regards to antimicrobial effects and the sparing of mammalian cells. The mechanism of action will be discussed, as well as dosing for the treatment of microbial targets, including sterilization processes, another important healthcare need. In addition, commercial systems will be overviewed and compared, along with evidence-based, patient results. The range of treatments cover wound treatment and biofilms, as well as antimicrobial treatment, with little chance for resistance and tolerance, as in drug regimens. Current clinical studies include applications in dentistry, food treatment, cancer treatment, wound treatment for bacteria and biofilms, and systems to combat health care related infections.

  8. Antimicrobial resistance of mastitis pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stephen P; Murinda, Shelton E

    2012-07-01

    Antibiotics are used extensively in the dairy industry to combat disease and to improve animal performance. Antibiotics such as penicillin, cephalosporin, streptomycin, and tetracycline are used for the treatment and prevention of diseases affecting dairy cows caused by a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Antibiotics are often administrated routinely to entire herds to prevent mastitis during the dry period. An increase in the incidence of disease in a herd generally results in increased use of antimicrobials, which in turn increases the potential for antibiotic residues in milk and the potential for increased bacterial resistance to antimicrobials. Continued use of antibiotics in the treatment and prevention of diseases of dairy cows will continue to be scrutinized. It is clear that strategies employing the prudent use of antimicrobials are needed. This clearly illustrates the importance of effective herd disease prevention and control programs. Based on studies published to date, scientific evidence does not support widespread, emerging resistance among mastitis pathogens to antibacterial drugs even though many of these antibiotics have been used in the dairy industry for treatment and prevention of disease for several decades. However, it is clear that use of antibiotics in dairy cows can contribute to increased antimicrobial resistance. While antimicrobial resistance does occur, we are of the opinion that the advantages of using antibiotics for the treatment of mastitis far outweigh the disadvantages. The clinical consequences of antimicrobial resistance of dairy pathogens affecting humans appear small. Antimicrobial resistance among dairy pathogens, particularly those found in milk, is likely not a human health concern as long as the milk is pasteurized. However, there are an increasing number of people who choose to consume raw milk. Transmission of an antimicrobial-resistant mastitis pathogen and/or foodborne pathogen to humans could occur

  9. Nocturia is often inadequately assessed, diagnosed and treated by physicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oelke, Matthias; Anderson, Peter; Wood, Robert

    2016-01-01

    strategies. Regardless the type of LUTS and physician, 59% of men received α-blockers and 76% of women antimuscarinics. CONCLUSIONS: Data show that patients with nocturia and LUTS accept their symptoms for a considerable period before they seek help or ultimately receive treatment. They may therefore......AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the quality and timing of the diagnosis and treatment of nocturia in real-life practice in European and US-American patients to obtain better insights into the management of nocturia in different Western healthcare systems. METHODS: Data were drawn...

  10. Synthetic biology platform technologies for antimicrobial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braff, Dana; Shis, David; Collins, James J

    2016-10-01

    The growing prevalence of antibiotic resistance calls for new approaches in the development of antimicrobial therapeutics. Likewise, improved diagnostic measures are essential in guiding the application of targeted therapies and preventing the evolution of therapeutic resistance. Discovery platforms are also needed to form new treatment strategies and identify novel antimicrobial agents. By applying engineering principles to molecular biology, synthetic biologists have developed platforms that improve upon, supplement, and will perhaps supplant traditional broad-spectrum antibiotics. Efforts in engineering bacteriophages and synthetic probiotics demonstrate targeted antimicrobial approaches that can be fine-tuned using synthetic biology-derived principles. Further, the development of paper-based, cell-free expression systems holds promise in promoting the clinical translation of molecular biology tools for diagnostic purposes. In this review, we highlight emerging synthetic biology platform technologies that are geared toward the generation of new antimicrobial therapies, diagnostics, and discovery channels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cell (GMSC) Delivery System Based on RGD-Coupled Alginate Hydrogel with Antimicrobial Properties: A Novel Treatment Modality for Peri-Implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Ivana M A; Chen, Chider; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Chee, Daniel; Marques, Márcia M; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2016-02-01

    Peri-implantitis is one of the most common inflammatory complications in dental implantology. Similar to periodontitis, in peri-implantitis, destructive inflammatory changes take place in the tissues surrounding a dental implant. Bacterial flora at the failing implant sites resemble the pathogens in periodontal disease and consist of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of a silver lactate (SL)-containing RGD-coupled alginate hydrogel scaffold as a promising stem cell delivery vehicle with antimicrobial properties. Gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) or human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) were encapsulated in SL-loaded alginate hydrogel microspheres. Stem cell viability, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation capacity were analyzed. Our results showed that SL exhibited antimicrobial properties against Aa in a dose-dependent manner, with 0.50 mg/ml showing the greatest antimicrobial properties while still maintaining cell viability. At this concentration, SL-containing alginate hydrogel was able to inhibit Aa growth on the surface of Ti discs and significantly reduce the bacterial load in Aa suspensions. Silver ions were effectively released from the SL-loaded alginate microspheres for up to 2 weeks. Osteogenic differentiation of GMSCs and hBMMSCs encapsulated in the SL-loaded alginate microspheres were confirmed by the intense mineral matrix deposition and high expression of osteogenesis-related genes. Taken together, our findings confirm that GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate hydrogel containing SL show promise for bone tissue engineering with antimicrobial properties against Aa bacteria in vitro. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Development of shampoo, soap and ointment formulated by green synthesised silver nanoparticles functionalised with antimicrobial plants oils in veterinary dermatology: treatment and prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansod, Sunita Dashrath; Bawaskar, Manisha Subrashrao; Gade, Aniket Krishnarao; Rai, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Many scientists have focused their research on the role of nanotechnology for the control of human pathogens, but there are also many topical pathogens present in animals, which infect animals and transfer to humans. Topical therapy is extremely important for the management of dermatological condition in animals. Therefore, the present study aims to evaluate the efficacy of biogenic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in combination with herbal oils against animal skin infections which may be responsible for causing infections in human beings. Here, the authors synthesised and characterised the AgNPs from Azadirachta indica. The oils were extracted from medicinal plants including Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon martini, Eucalyptus globules, A. indica and Ocimum sanctum and the antifungal and antibacterial activity of plant oils along with AgNPs were evaluated. An excision wound model was used for the study of wound healing activity in rabbits. AgNPs functionalised oil has demonstrated remarkable antimicrobial activity against pathogens present on the skin of animals. The nano-functionalised antimicrobial oils were used in the formulation of shampoo, soap and ointment for veterinary dermatology. Antimicrobial products of plant origin with AgNPs are valuable, safe and have a specific role in controlling diseases. The authors believe that this approach will be a good alternative therapy to solve the continuous antibiotic resistance developed by many bacterial pathogens and will be utilised in various animal contacting areas in medicine.

  13. Use and Misuse of Antimicrobial Drugs in Poultry and Livestock: Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Poole* and Cynthia Sheffield

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Food safety begins on the farm with management practices that contribute to an abundant, safe, and affordable food supply. To attain this goal antimicrobials have been used in all stages of food animal production in the United States and elsewhere around the world at one time or another. Among food–production animals antimicrobials are used for growth promotion, disease prophylaxis or disease treatment, and are generally administered to the entire flock or herd. Over many decades bacteria have become resistant to multiple antimicrobial classes in a cumulative manner. Bacteria exhibit a number of well characterized mechanisms of resistance to antimicrobials that include: 1 modification of the antimicrobial; 2 alteration of the drug target; 3 decreased access of drug to target; and 4 implementation of an alternative metabolic pathway not affected by the drug. The mechanisms of resistance are complex and depend on the type of bacterium involved (e.g. Gram–positive or Gram–negative and the class of drug. Some bacterial species have accumulated resistance to nearly all antimicrobial classes due to a combination of intrinsic and acquired processes. This has and will continue to lead to clinical failures of antimicrobial treatment in both human and animal medicine.

  14. Microbiological changes after periodontal therapy in diabetic patients with inadequate metabolic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Maciel Silva-Boghossian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment (SRP on the composition of the subgingival microbiota of chronic periodontitis (CP in individuals with type 2 diabetes (DM2 with inadequate metabolic control and in systemically healthy (SH individuals. Forty individuals (20 DM2 and 20 SH with CP underwent full-mouth periodontal examination. Subgingival plaque was sampled from 4 deep sites of each individual and tested for mean prevalence and counts of 45 bacterial taxa by the checkerboard method. Clinical and microbiological assessments were performed before and 3 months after SRP. At baseline, those in the DM2 group presented a significantly higher percentage of sites with visible plaque and bleeding on probing compared with those in the SH group (p < 0.01. Those in the DM2 group presented significantly higher levels of C. rectus and P. gingivalis, and lower prevalence of P. micra and S. anginosus, compared with those in the SH group (p ≤ 0.001. At the 3-month visit, both groups showed a significant improvement in all clinical parameters (p < 0.01. Those in the DM2 group showed significantly higher prevalence and/or levels of A. gerencseriae, A. naeslundii I, A. oris, A. odontolyticus, C. sputigena, F. periodonticum, and G. morbillorum compared with those in the SH group (p ≤ 0.001. However, those in the DM2 group showed a significant reduction in the levels of P. intermedia, P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and T. denticola (p ≤ 0.001 over time. Those in the SRP group showed improved periodontal status and reduced levels of putative periodontal pathogens at 3 months’ evaluation compared with those in the DM2 group with inadequate metabolic control.

  15. Biofilm disruption with rotating microrods enhances antimicrobial efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Lamar O.; Nacev, Aleksandar; Hilaman, Ryan; Stepanov, Pavel Y.; Chowdhury, Sagar; Jafari, Sahar; Hausfeld, Jeffrey; Karlsson, Amy J.; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Shapiro, Benjamin; Weinberg, Irving N.

    2017-04-01

    Biofilms are a common and persistent cause of numerous illnesses. Compared to planktonic microbes, biofilm residing cells often demonstrate significant resistance to antimicrobial agents. Thus, methods for dislodging cells from the biofilm may increase the antimicrobial susceptibility of such cells, and serve as a mechanical means of increasing antimicrobial efficacy. Using Aspergillus fumigatus as a model microbe, we magnetically rotate microrods in and around biofilm. We show that such rods can improve the efficacy of antimicrobial Amphotericin B treatments in vitro. This work represents a first step in using kinetic magnetic particle therapy for disrupting fungal biofilms.

  16. Antimicrobial drugs for treating cholera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibovici-Weissman, Ya'ara; Neuberger, Ami; Bitterman, Roni; Sinclair, David; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Paul, Mical

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholera is an acute watery diarrhoea caused by infection with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, which if severe can cause rapid dehydration and death. Effective management requires early diagnosis and rehydration using oral rehydration salts or intravenous fluids. In this review, we evaluate the additional benefits of treating cholera with antimicrobial drugs. Objectives To quantify the benefit of antimicrobial treatment for patients with cholera, and determine whether there are differences between classes of antimicrobials or dosing schedules. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; African Index Medicus; LILACS; Science Citation Index; metaRegister of Controlled Trials; WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform; conference proceedings; and reference lists to March 2014. Selection criteria Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials in adults and children with cholera that compared: 1) any antimicrobial treatment with placebo or no treatment; 2) different antimicrobials head-to-head; or 3) different dosing schedules or different durations of treatment with the same antimicrobial. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently applied inclusion and exclusion criteria, and extracted data from included trials. Diarrhoea duration and stool volume were defined as primary outcomes. We calculated mean difference (MD) or ratio of means (ROM) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and pooled data using a random-effects meta-analysis. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Main results Thirty-nine trials were included in this review with 4623 participants. Antimicrobials versus placebo or no treatment Overall, antimicrobial therapy shortened the mean duration of diarrhoea by about a day and a half compared to placebo or no treatment (MD -36.77 hours, 95% CI -43

  17. Effects of ceftiofur and chlortetracycline treatment strategies on antimicrobial susceptibility and on tet(A, tet(B, and bla CMY-2 resistance genes among E. coli isolated from the feces of feedlot cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena Kanwar

    Full Text Available A randomized controlled field trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of two sets of treatment strategies on ceftiofur and tetracycline resistance in feedlot cattle. The strategies consisted of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid (CCFA administered to either one or all of the steers within a pen, followed by feeding or not feeding a therapeutic dose of chlortetracycline (CTC. Eighty-eight steers were randomly allocated to eight pens of 11 steers each. Both treatment regimens were randomly assigned to the pens in a two-way full factorial design. Non-type-specific (NTS E. coli (n = 1,050 were isolated from fecal samples gathered on Days 0, 4, 12, and 26. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were determined using a microbroth dilution technique. PCR was used to detect tet(A, tet(B, and bla CMY-2 genes within each isolate. Chlortetracycline administration greatly exacerbated the already increased levels of both phenotypic and genotypic ceftiofur resistance conferred by prior CCFA treatment (P<0.05. The four treatment regimens also influenced the phenotypic multidrug resistance count of NTS E. coli populations. Chlortetracycline treatment alone was associated with an increased probability of selecting isolates that harbored tet(B versus tet(A (P<0.05; meanwhile, there was an inverse association between finding tet(A versus tet(B genes for any given regimen (P<0.05. The presence of a tet(A gene was associated with an isolate exhibiting reduced phenotypic susceptibility to a higher median number of antimicrobials (n = 289, median = 6; 95% CI = 4-8 compared with the tet(B gene (n = 208, median = 3; 95% CI = 3-4. Results indicate that CTC can exacerbate ceftiofur resistance following CCFA therapy and therefore should be avoided, especially when considering their use in sequence. Further studies are required to establish the animal-level effects of co-housing antimicrobial-treated and non-treated animals together.

  18. Inadequate humidification of respiratory gases during mechanical ventilation of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnow-Mordi, W O; Sutton, P; Wilkinson, A R

    1986-01-01

    Proximal airway humidity was measured during mechanical ventilation in 14 infants using an electronic hygrometer. Values below recommended minimum humidity of adult inspired gas were recorded on 251 of 396 occasions. Inadequate humidification, largely due to inadequate proximal airway temperature, is commoner than recognised in infants receiving mechanical ventilation. PMID:3740912

  19. Inadequate humidification of respiratory gases during mechanical ventilation of the newborn.

    OpenAIRE

    Tarnow-Mordi, W O; Sutton, P; Wilkinson, A R

    1986-01-01

    Proximal airway humidity was measured during mechanical ventilation in 14 infants using an electronic hygrometer. Values below recommended minimum humidity of adult inspired gas were recorded on 251 of 396 occasions. Inadequate humidification, largely due to inadequate proximal airway temperature, is commoner than recognised in infants receiving mechanical ventilation.

  20. Biofilm disruption with rotating microrods enhances antimicrobial efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mair, Lamar O., E-mail: Lamar.Mair@gmail.com [Weinberg Medical Physics, Inc., North Bethesda, MD (United States); Nacev, Aleksandar; Hilaman, Ryan; Stepanov, Pavel Y.; Chowdhury, Sagar; Jafari, Sahar [Weinberg Medical Physics, Inc., North Bethesda, MD (United States); Hausfeld, Jeffrey [School of Medicine and Health Sciences, George Washington University, WA (United States); Karlsson, Amy J. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Shirtliff, Mark E. [School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Shapiro, Benjamin [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Weinberg, Irving N. [Weinberg Medical Physics, Inc., North Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Biofilms are a common and persistent cause of numerous illnesses. Compared to planktonic microbes, biofilm residing cells often demonstrate significant resistance to antimicrobial agents. Thus, methods for dislodging cells from the biofilm may increase the antimicrobial susceptibility of such cells, and serve as a mechanical means of increasing antimicrobial efficacy. Using Aspergillus fumigatus as a model microbe, we magnetically rotate microrods in and around biofilm. We show that such rods can improve the efficacy of antimicrobial Amphotericin B treatments in vitro. This work represents a first step in using kinetic magnetic particle therapy for disrupting fungal biofilms. - Highlights: • Fungal biofilms have been implicated in a variety of medical ailments. • Magnetic microrods, grown via electroplating, were rotated in and around fungal biofilms. • Rotating microrods potentiate the effectiveness of antimicrobial drug. • Antimicrobial efficacy may be enhanced due to increased mixing.

  1. Biofilm disruption with rotating microrods enhances antimicrobial efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, Lamar O.; Nacev, Aleksandar; Hilaman, Ryan; Stepanov, Pavel Y.; Chowdhury, Sagar; Jafari, Sahar; Hausfeld, Jeffrey; Karlsson, Amy J.; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Shapiro, Benjamin; Weinberg, Irving N.

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms are a common and persistent cause of numerous illnesses. Compared to planktonic microbes, biofilm residing cells often demonstrate significant resistance to antimicrobial agents. Thus, methods for dislodging cells from the biofilm may increase the antimicrobial susceptibility of such cells, and serve as a mechanical means of increasing antimicrobial efficacy. Using Aspergillus fumigatus as a model microbe, we magnetically rotate microrods in and around biofilm. We show that such rods can improve the efficacy of antimicrobial Amphotericin B treatments in vitro. This work represents a first step in using kinetic magnetic particle therapy for disrupting fungal biofilms. - Highlights: • Fungal biofilms have been implicated in a variety of medical ailments. • Magnetic microrods, grown via electroplating, were rotated in and around fungal biofilms. • Rotating microrods potentiate the effectiveness of antimicrobial drug. • Antimicrobial efficacy may be enhanced due to increased mixing.

  2. Comparison of Vildagliptin and Pioglitazone in Korean Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Inadequately Controlled with Metformin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Ho Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe compared the efficacies of vildagliptin (50 mg twice daily relative to pioglitazone (15 mg once daily as an add-on treatment to metformin for reducing glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes.MethodsThe present study was a multicenter, randomized, active-controlled investigation comparing the effects of vildagliptin and pioglitazone in Korean patients receiving a stable dose of metformin but exhibiting inadequate glycemic control. Each patient underwent a 16-week treatment period with either vildagliptin or pioglitazone as an add-on treatment to metformin.ResultsThe mean changes in HbA1c levels from baseline were –0.94% in the vildagliptin group and –0.6% in the pioglitazone group and the difference between the treatments was below the non-inferiority margin of 0.3%. The mean changes in postprandial plasma glucose (PPG levels were –60.2 mg/dL in the vildagliptin group and –38.2 mg/dL in the pioglitazone group and these values significantly differed (P=0.040. There were significant decreases in the levels of total, low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein (HDL, and non-HDL cholesterol in the vildagliptin group but increases in the pioglitazone group. The mean change in body weight was –0.07 kg in the vildagliptin group and 0.69 kg in the pioglitazone group, which were also significantly different (P=0.002.ConclusionAs an add-on to metformin, the efficacy of vildagliptin for the improvement of glycemic control is not inferior to that of pioglitazone in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes. In addition, add-on treatment with vildagliptin had beneficial effects on PPG levels, lipid profiles, and body weight compared to pioglitazone.

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  4. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ol Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share ...

  5. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet ...

  6. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... topics menu Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System ... If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  7. Public health effects of inadequately managed stormwater runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffield, Stephen J; Goo, Robert L; Richards, Lynn A; Jackson, Richard J

    2003-09-01

    This study investigated the scale of the public health risk from stormwater runoff caused by urbanization. We compiled turbidity data for municipal treated drinking water as an indication of potential risk in selected US cities and compared estimated costs of waterborne disease and preventive measures. Turbidity levels in other US cities were similar to those linked to illnesses in Milwaukee, Wis, and Philadelphia, Pa. The estimated annual cost of waterborne illness is comparable to the long-term capital investment needed for improved drinking water treatment and stormwater management. Although additional data on cost and effectiveness are needed, stormwater management to minimize runoff and associated pollution appears to make sense for protecting public health at the least cost.

  8. Antimicrobial drug use in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Paul S; Apley, Michael D; Besser, Thomas E; Burney, Derek P; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Papich, Mark G; Traub-Dargatz, Josie L; Weese, J Scott

    2005-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of antimicrobial resistance and the need for veterinarians to aid in efforts for maintaining the usefulness of antimicrobial drugs in animals and humans, the Board of Regents of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine charged a special committee with responsibility for drafting this position statement regarding antimicrobial drug use in veterinary medicine. The Committee believes that veterinarians are obligated to balance the well-being of animals under their care with the protection of other animals and public health. Therefore, if an animal's medical condition can be reasonably expected to improve as a result of treatment with antimicrobial drugs, and the animal is under a veterinarian's care with an appropriate veterinarian-client-patient relationship, veterinarians have an obligation to offer antimicrobial treatment as a therapeutic option. Veterinarians also have an obligation to actively promote disease prevention efforts, to treat as conservatively as possible, and to explain the potential consequences associated with antimicrobial treatment to animal owners and managers, including the possibility of promoting selection of resistant bacteria. However, the consequences of losing usefulness of an antimicrobial drug that is used as a last resort in humans or animals with resistant bacterial infections might be unacceptable from a public or population health perspective. Veterinarians could therefore face the difficult choice of treating animals with a drug that is less likely to be successful, possibly resulting in prolonged or exacerbated morbidity, to protect the good of society. The Committee recommends that voluntary actions be taken by the veterinary profession to promote conservative use of antimicrobial drugs to minimize the potential adverse effects on animal or human health. The veterinary profession must work to educate all veterinarians about issues related to conservative antimicrobial drug use and

  9. Alternative Antimicrobial Approach: Nano-Antimicrobial Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit Beyth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous existing potent antibiotics and other antimicrobial means, bacterial infections are still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the need to develop additional bactericidal means has significantly increased due to the growing concern regarding multidrug-resistant bacterial strains and biofilm associated infections. Consequently, attention has been especially devoted to new and emerging nanoparticle-based materials in the field of antimicrobial chemotherapy. The present review discusses the activities of nanoparticles as an antimicrobial means, their mode of action, nanoparticle effect on drug-resistant bacteria, and the risks attendant on their use as antibacterial agents. Factors contributing to nanoparticle performance in the clinical setting, their unique properties, and mechanism of action as antibacterial agents are discussed in detail.

  10. Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of the Stem Bark of Cussonia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of this study justifies to some extent the use of C. bancoensis in the treatment of microbial infections and supports the ethnomedical evidence that the plant could be a potential source of natural antimicrobial and antioxidant agents. Keywords: Antimicrobial, antioxidant, phytochemical constituents, Cussonia ...

  11. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of the stem bark of Cylicodiscus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The greater and remarkable antimicrobial activity of the (EA) extract of CG was recorded with Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris and Bacillus cereus T. These results provide a rationalization for the traditional use of this plant for the treatment of infections diseases. Keywords: Antimicrobial activity; Cylicodiscus ...

  12. Antimicrobial activity of tempeh gembus hydrolyzate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noviana, A.; Dieny, F. F.; Rustanti, N.; Anjani, G.; Afifah, D. N.

    2018-02-01

    Tropical disease can be prevented by consumming fermented foods that have antimicrobial activity. One of them is tempeh gembus that has short shelf life. It can be overcome by processing it into hydrolyzate. This study aimed to determine antimicrobial activity of tempeh gembus hydrolyzate. Tempeh gembus was made of local soybean from Grobogan. They were added 5,000 ppm, 8,000 ppm, and 10,000 ppm of bromelain enzyme (TGH BE). Antimicrobial effects of TGH BE were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Steptococcus mutans. Antimicrobial test was carried out using Kirby-Bauer Disc Diffussion method. Soluble protein test used Bradford method. The largest inhibition zone against S. aureus and S. mutans were shown by TGH BE 8,000 ppm, 0.89±0.53 mm and 2.40±0.72 mm. The largest inhibition zone of B. subtilis, 7.33±2,25 mm, was shown by TGH BE 5,000 ppm. There wasn’t antimicrobial effect of TGH BE against E. coli. There weren’t significant differences of soluble protein (P=0.293) and the inhibition zones againt S. aureus (P = 0.967), E. coli (P = 1.000), B. subtilis (P = 0.645), S. mutans (P=0.817) of all treatments. There were antimicrobial activities of TGH BE against S. aureus, B. subtilis, and S. mutans.

  13. Strategies for targeted antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sarika; Sallum, Ulysses; Zheng, Xiang; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2009-06-01

    The photophysics and mechanisms of cell killing by photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been extensively studied in recent years, and PDT has received regulatory approval for the treatment of a number of diseases worldwide. As the application of this treatment modality expands with regard to both anatomical sites and diseases, it is important to develop strategies for enhancing PDT outcomes. Our group has focused on developing targeting strategies to enhance PDT for both cancerous as well as anti-microbial applications. In this article, we will discuss photosensitizer modification and conjugation strategies for targeted antimicrobial photodynamic therapy.

  14. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in caesarean section delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ronghua; Lin, Lin; Wang, Dujuan

    2016-08-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is used routinely for pre-, intra- and post-operative caesarean section. One of the most important risk factors for postpartum infection is caesarean delivery. Caesarean section shows a higher incidence of infection than vaginal delivery. It is complicated by surgical site infections, endometritis or urinary tract infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the usage of antimicrobials in women undergoing caesarean section at a Tertiary Care Hospital. A prospective study was conducted in 100 women during the period of February 2013 to August 2013 in the inpatient Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. Data collected included the age of the patient, gravidity, and type of caesarean section, which was analyzed for the nature and number of antimicrobials prescribed, duration of treatment, polypharmacy, fixed-dose combinations, generic/brand names used and failure of prophylaxis. Antimicrobial prophylaxis was administered to the patients. The most commonly prescribed antimicrobial was a combination of ceftriaxone and sulbactam. Of 100 patients, 87% were aged 20-35 years. The highest proportion of patients were primigravida 72%. Elective procedure was carried out in 38%, the remaining were emergency C-section in whom intra- and post-operative antimicrobial prophylaxis was given for a duration of 7 days. In total, 27% of patients were reported with infection even after the antimicrobial prophylaxis. In conclusion, pre-operative prophylaxis was given in the early rupture of membranes. Fixed-dose combinations were preferred. Incidence of infection even after antimicrobial prophylaxis was reported due to pre-existing infection, debilitating disease or prolonged rupture of membranes. Patients with recurrent infection were shifted to amoxicillin and clavulinic acid combination. Drugs were prescribed only by brand names which is of concern.

  15. Inadequate description of educational interventions in ongoing randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pino Cécile

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The registration of clinical trials has been promoted to prevent publication bias and increase research transparency. Despite general agreement about the minimum amount of information needed for trial registration, we lack clear guidance on descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions in trial registries. We aimed to evaluate the quality of registry descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions assessed in ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs of patient education. Methods On 6 May 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the 10 trial registries accessible through the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We included trials evaluating an educational intervention (that is, designed to teach or train patients about their own health and dedicated to participants, their family members or home caregivers. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data related to the description of the experimental intervention, the centers, and the caregivers. Results We selected 268 of 642 potentially eligible studies and appraised a random sample of 150 records. All selected trials were registered in 4 registers, mainly ClinicalTrials.gov (61%. The median [interquartile range] target sample size was 205 [100 to 400] patients. The comparator was mainly usual care (47% or active treatment (47%. A minority of records (17%, 95% CI 11 to 23% reported an overall adequate description of the intervention (that is, description that reported the content, mode of delivery, number, frequency, duration of sessions and overall duration of the intervention. Further, for most reports (59%, important information about the content of the intervention was missing. The description of the mode of delivery of the intervention was reported for 52% of studies, the number of sessions for 74%, the frequency of sessions for 58%, the duration of each session for 45% and the overall duration for 63

  16. Screening for antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants used in Colombian folkloric medicine: A possible alternative in the treatment of non-nosocomial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocampo Saul A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The antimicrobial activity and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of the extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Bixa orellana L., Cecropia peltata L., Cinchona officinalis L., Gliricidia sepium H.B. & K, Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, Justicia secunda Vahl., Piper pulchrum C.DC, P. paniculata L. and Spilanthes americana Hieron were evaluated against five bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus β hemolític, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli, and one yeast (Candida albicans. These plants are used in Colombian folk medicine to treat infections of microbial origin. Methods Plants were collected by farmers and traditional healers. The ethanol, hexane and water extracts were obtained by standard methods. The antimicrobial activity was found by using a modified agar well diffusion method. All microorganisms were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC. MIC was determined in the plant extracts that showed some efficacy against the tested microorganisms. Gentamycin sulfate (1.0 μg/ml, clindamycin (0.3 μg/ml and nystatin (1.0 μg/ml were used as positive controls. Results The water extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, and Piper pulchrum C.DC showed a higher activity against Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli than gentamycin sulfate. Similarly, the ethanol extracts of all species were active against Staphylococcus aureus except for Justicia secunda. Furthermore, Bixa orellana L, Justicia secunda Vahl. and Piper pulchrum C.DC presented the lowest MICs against Escherichia coli (0.8, 0.6 and 0.6 μg/ml, respectively compared to gentamycin sulfate (0.9 8g/ml. Likewise, Justicia secunda and Piper pulchrum C.DC showed an analogous MIC against Candida albicans (0.5 and 0.6 μg/ml, respectively compared to nystatin (0.6 μg/ml. Bixa orellana L, exhibited a better MIC against Bacillus cereus (0.2 μg/ml than gentamycin sulfate (0.5 μg/ml. Conclusion This in vitro study

  17. Surface-Adaptive, Antimicrobially Loaded, Micellar Nanocarriers with Enhanced Penetration and Killing Efficiency in Staphylococcal Biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yong; Busscher, Henk J; Zhao, Bingran; Li, Yuanfeng; Zhang, Zhenkun; van der Mei, Henny C; Ren, Yijin; Shi, Linqi

    Biofilms cause persistent bacterial infections and are extremely recalcitrant to antimicrobials, due in part to reduced penetration of antimicrobials into biofilms that allows bacteria residing in the depth of a biofilm to survive antimicrobial treatment. Here, we describe the preparation of

  18. Inadequate Brain Glycogen or Sleep Increases Spreading Depression Susceptibility

    KAUST Repository

    Kilic, Kivilcim

    2017-12-16

    Glycogen in astrocyte endfeet contributes to maintenance of low extracellular glutamate and K+ concentrations around synapses. Sleep deprivation (SD), a common migraine trigger induces transcriptional changes in astrocytes reducing glycogen breakdown. We hypothesize that when glycogen utilization cannot match synaptic energy demand, extracellular K+ can rise to levels that activate neuronal pannexin-1 channels and downstream inflammatory pathway, which might be one of the mechanisms initiating migraine headaches.We suppressed glycogen breakdown by inhibiting glycogen phosphorylation with 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol (DAB) and by SD.DAB caused neuronal pannexin-1 large-pore opening and activation of the downstream inflammatory pathway as shown by procaspase-1 cleavage and HMGB1 release from neurons. Six-hour SD induced pannexin-1 mRNA. DAB and SD also lowered the cortical spreading depression (CSD) induction threshold, which was reversed by glucose or lactate supplement, suggesting that glycogen-derived energy substrates are needed to prevent CSD generation. Supporting this, knocking-down neuronal lactate transporter, MCT2 with an anti-sense oligonucleotide or inhibiting glucose transport from vessels to astrocytes with intracerebroventricularly given phloretin reduced the CSD threshold. In vivo recordings with a K+ -sensitive/selective fluoroprobe, APG-4 disclosed that DAB treatment or SD caused significant rise in extracellular K+ during whisker-stimulation, illustrating the critical role of glycogen in extracellular K+ clearance.Synaptic metabolic stress caused by insufficient glycogen-derived energy substrate supply can activate neuronal pannexin-1 channels as well as lowering the CSD threshold. Therefore, conditions that limit energy supply to synapse (e.g. SD) may predispose to migraine attacks as suggested by genetic studies associating glucose or lactate transporter deficiency with migraine. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Antimicrobial stewardship programme in critical care medicine: A prospective interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J; Ramirez, P; Gordon, M; Villarreal, E; Frasquet, J; Poveda-Andres, J L; Salavert-Lletí, M; Catellanos, A

    2017-09-04

    Hospital antimicrobial stewardship programmes have achieved savings and a more rational use of antimicrobial treatments in general wards. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the experience of an antimicrobial stewardship programme in an intensive care unit (ICU). Prospective interventional, before-and-after study. 24-bed medical ICU in a tertiary hospital. Prospective audit and feedback antimicrobial stewardship programme. Antimicrobial consumption, antimicrobial related costs, multi-drug resistant microorganisms (MDRM) prevalence, nosocomial infections incidence, ICU length of stay, and ICU mortality rates were compared before and after one-year intervention. A total of 218 antimicrobial episodes of 182 patients were evaluated in 61 team meetings. Antimicrobial stewardship suggestions were accepted in 91.5% of the cases. Total antimicrobial DDD/100 patient-days consumption was reduced from 380.6 to 295.2 (-22.4%; p=0.037). Antimicrobial stewardship programme was associated with a significant decrease in the prescription of penicillins plus b-lactamase inhibitors, linezolid, cephalosporins, and aminoglycosides. Overall antimicrobial spending was reduced by €119,636. MDRM isolation and nosocomial infections per 100 patient-days did not change after the intervention period. No changes in length of stay or mortality rate were observed. An ICU antimicrobial stewardship programme significantly reduced antimicrobial use without affecting inpatient mortality and length of stay. Our results further support the implementation of an antimicrobial stewardship programme in critical care units. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  20. Synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Abhigyan; Vemparala, Satyavani; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Tew, Gregory N

    2008-01-01

    Infectious diseases and antibiotic resistance are now considered the most imperative global healthcare problem. In the search for new treatments, host defense, or antimicrobial, peptides have attracted considerable attention due to their various unique properties; however, attempts to develop in vivo therapies have been severely limited. Efforts to develop synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides (SMAMPs) have increased significantly in the last decade, and this review will focus primarily on the structural evolution of SMAMPs and their membrane activity. This review will attempt to make a bridge between the design of SMAMPs and the fundamentals of SMAMP-membrane interactions. In discussions regarding the membrane interaction of SMAMPs, close attention will be paid to the lipid composition of the bilayer. Despite many years of study, the exact conformational aspects responsible for the high selectivity of these AMPs and SMAMPs toward bacterial cells over mammalian cells are still not fully understood. The ability to design SMAMPs that are potently antimicrobial, yet nontoxic to mammalian cells has been demonstrated with a variety of molecular scaffolds. Initial animal studies show very good tissue distribution along with more than a 4-log reduction in bacterial counts. The results on SMAMPs are not only extremely promising for novel antibiotics, but also provide an optimistic picture for the greater challenge of general proteomimetics.

  1. Plant Products as Antimicrobial Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Marjorie Murphy

    1999-01-01

    The use of and search for drugs and dietary supplements derived from plants have accelerated in recent years. Ethnopharmacologists, botanists, microbiologists, and natural-products chemists are combing the Earth for phytochemicals and “leads” which could be developed for treatment of infectious diseases. While 25 to 50% of current pharmaceuticals are derived from plants, none are used as antimicrobials. Traditional healers have long used plants to prevent or cure infectious conditions; Western medicine is trying to duplicate their successes. Plants are rich in a wide variety of secondary metabolites, such as tannins, terpenoids, alkaloids, and flavonoids, which have been found in vitro to have antimicrobial properties. This review attempts to summarize the current status of botanical screening efforts, as well as in vivo studies of their effectiveness and toxicity. The structure and antimicrobial properties of phytochemicals are also addressed. Since many of these compounds are currently available as unregulated botanical preparations and their use by the public is increasing rapidly, clinicians need to consider the consequences of patients self-medicating with these preparations. PMID:10515903

  2. Antimicrobial peptides in the airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, D M; Yim, S; Ryan, L K; Kisich, K O; Diamond, G

    2006-01-01

    The airway provides numerous defense mechanisms to prevent microbial colonization by the large numbers of bacteria and viruses present in ambient air. An important component of this defense is the antimicrobial peptides and proteins present in the airway surface fluid (ASF), the mucin-rich fluid covering the respiratory epithelium. These include larger proteins such as lysozyme and lactoferrin, as well as the cationic defensin and cathelicidin peptides. While some of these peptides, such as human beta-defensin (hBD)-1, are present constitutively, others, including hBD2 and -3 are inducible in response to bacterial recognition by Toll-like receptor-mediated pathways. These peptides can act as microbicides in the ASF, but also exhibit other activities, including potent chemotactic activity for cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, suggesting they play a complex role in the host defense of the airway. Inhibition of antimicrobial peptide activity or gene expression can result in increased susceptibility to infections. This has been observed with cystic fibrosis (CF), where the CF phenotype leads to reduced antimicrobial capacity of peptides in the airway. Pathogenic virulence factors can inhibit defensin gene expression, as can environmental factors such as air pollution. Such an interference can result in infections by airway-specific pathogens including Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and influenza virus. Research into the modulation of peptide gene expression in animal models, as well as the optimization of peptide-based therapeutics shows promise for the treatment and prevention of airway infectious diseases.

  3. The significance of inadequate transcranial Doppler studies in children with sickle cell disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Greenwood

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is a common cause of cerebrovascular disease in childhood. Primary stroke prevention is effective using transcranial Doppler (TCD scans to measure intracranial blood velocities, and regular blood transfusions or hydroxycarbamide when these are abnormal. Inadequate TCD scans occur when it is not possible to measure velocities in all the main arteries. We have investigated the prevalence and significance of this in a retrospective audit of 3915 TCD scans in 1191 children, performed between 2008 and 2015. 79% scans were normal, 6.4% conditional, 2.8% abnormal and 12% inadequate. 21.6% of 1191 patients had an inadequate scan at least once. The median age of first inadequate scan was 3.3 years (0.7-19.4, with a U-shaped frequency distribution with age: 28% aged 2-3 years, 3.5% age 10 years, 25% age 16 years. In young children reduced compliance was the main reason for inadequate TCDs, whereas in older children it was due to a poor temporal ultrasound window. The prevalence of inadequate TCD was 8% in the main Vascular Laboratory at King's College Hospital and significantly higher at 16% in the outreach clinics (P<0.0001, probably due to the use of a portable ultrasound machine. Inadequate TCD scans were not associated with underlying cerebrovascular disease.

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  5. Circulating sclerostin and estradiol levels are associated with inadequate response to bisphosphonates in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Santana, Sonia; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo; Olmos, José M; Nogués, Xavier; Sosa, Manuel; Díaz-Curiel, Manuel; Pérez-Castrillón, José L; Pérez-Cano, Ramón; Torrijos, Antonio; Jodar, Esteban; Rio, Luis Del; Caeiro-Rey, José R; Reyes-García, Rebeca; García-Fontana, Beatriz; González-Macías, Jesús; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    The biological mechanisms associated with an inadequate response to treatment with bisphosphonates are not well known. This study investigates the association between circulating levels of sclerostin and estradiol with an inadequate clinical outcome to bisphosphonate therapy in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. This case-control study is based on 120 Spanish women with postmenopausal osteoporosis being treated with oral bisphosphonates. Patients were classified as adequate responders (ARs, n=66, mean age 68.2±8 years) without incident fractures during 5 years of treatment, or inadequate responders (IRs, n=54, mean age 67±9 years), with incident fractures between 1 and 5 years of treatment. Bone mineral density (DXA), structural analysis of the proximal femur and structural/fractal analysis of the distal radius were assessed. Sclerostin concentrations were measured by ELISA and 17β-estradiol levels by radioimmunoassay based on ultrasensitive methods. In the ARs group, sclerostin serum levels were significantly lower (p=0.02) and estradiol concentrations significantly higher (p=0.023) than in the IRs group. A logistic regression analysis was performed, including as independent variables in the original model femoral fracture load, 25 hydroxyvitamin D, previus history of fragility fracture, sclerostin and estradiol. Only previous history of fragility fracture (OR 14.04, 95% CI 2.38-82.79, p=0.004) and sclerostin levels (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.02-1.20, p=0.011), both adjusted by estradiol levels remained associated with IRs. Also, sclerostin concentrations were associated with the index of resistance to compression (IRC) in the fractal analysis of the distal radius, a parameter on bone microstructure. Sclerostin and estradiol levels are associated with the response to bisphosphonate therapy in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Predictors of Inadequate Inpatient Colonoscopy Preparation and Its Association with Hospital Length of Stay and Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadlapati, Rena; Johnston, Elyse R; Gregory, Dyanna L; Ciolino, Jody D; Cooper, Andrew; Keswani, Rajesh N

    2015-11-01

    Adequate bowel preparation is essential to safe and effective inpatient colonoscopy. Predictors of poor inpatient colonoscopy preparation and the economic impacts of inadequate inpatient preparations are not defined. The aims of this study were to (1) determine risk factors for inadequate inpatient bowel preparations, and (2) examine the association between inadequate inpatient bowel preparation and hospital length of stay (LOS) and costs. We performed a retrospective cohort study of adult patients undergoing inpatient colonoscopy preparation over 12 months (1/1/2013-12/31/2013). Of 524 identified patients, 22.3% had an inadequate preparation. A multiple logistic regression model identified the following potential predictors of inadequate bowel preparation: lower income (OR 1.11; 95% CI 1.04, 1.22), opiate or tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) use (OR 1.55; 0.98, 2.46), and afternoon colonoscopy (OR 1.66; 1.07, 2.59); as well as American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class ≥3 (OR 1.15; 1.05, 1.25) and symptoms of nausea/vomiting (OR 1.14; 1.04, 1.25) when a fair preparation was considered inadequate. Inadequate bowel preparation was associated with significantly increased hospital LOS (model relative mean estimate 1.25; 95% CI 1.03, 1.51) and hospital costs (estimate 1.31; 1.03, 1.67) when compared to adequate preparations. The rate of inadequate inpatient bowel preparations is high and associated with a significant increase in hospital LOS and costs. We identified five potential predictors of inadequate inpatient preparation: lower socioeconomic class, opiate/TCA use, afternoon colonoscopies, ASA class ≥3, and pre-preparation nausea/vomiting; these data should guide future initiatives to improve the quality of inpatient bowel preparations.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of oral Treponema species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto-Shibayama, Kazuko; Sekino, Jin; Yoshikawa, Kouki; Saito, Atsushi; Ishihara, Kazuyuki

    2017-12-01

    Treponemes occur in the microflora of the dental plaque. Certain Treponema species that are frequently isolated from chronic periodontitis lesions are involved in its initiation and progression. In addition to mechanical instrumentation, antimicrobial agents are used as an adjunctive treatment modality for periodontitis. Despite its importance for successful antimicrobial treatment, information about susceptibility is limited for Treponema species. The aim of this study was to assess the susceptibility of Treponema denticola strains, Treponema socranskii, and Treponema vincentii to eleven antimicrobial agents. The minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentrations of these antimicrobial agents revealed strain-specific variation. Doxycycline, minocycline, azithromycin, and erythromycin were effective against all Treponema species tested in this study, whereas fluoroquinolones only exhibited an equivalent effectiveness on T. socranskii. The susceptibility of one T. denticola strain, T. socranskii, and T. vincentii to kanamycin was influenced by prior exposure to aerobic conditions. The susceptibility to quinolone drugs varied among strains of T. denticola, although they share an amino acid sequence identity of greater than 99% for DNA gyrase (type II topoisomerase) subunit A. In addition, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter inhibitor assay for T. denticola indicated that the transport of quinolone drugs is partially related to this transporter, although there may be parallel transport mechanisms. Our results provide important insights into antimicrobial agent-Treponema dynamics and establish a basis for developing an appropriate adjunctive therapy for periodontal disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cystic fibrosis microbiology: Advances in antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Valerie; Smyth, Alan

    2015-09-01

    Much of the improvement in the survival of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) is due to advancements in antimicrobial treatments. New aerosolized antibiotic formulations have recently been introduced (such as inhaled aztreonam), and others are in development (inhaled levofloxacin and liposomal amikacin). Licensed dry powder formulations include tobramycin inhalation powder and dry powder colistimethate (available in Europe). Although inhaled antibiotics have the advantage of being able to deliver high intrapulmonary concentrations of drug, antimicrobial resistance can still develop and is a concern in CF. Antimicrobial resistance might be mitigated by using non-antibiotic treatments, antibiotic adjuvants, which have activity against bacteria. Examples include agents such as gallium, antimicrobial peptides and anti-biofilm compounds such as alginate oligosaccharides (OligoG) and garlic. Vaccination strategies and antibody therapy (IgY) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa have also been attempted to prevent initial infection with this organism in CF. Although aggressive and long-term use of antibiotics has been crucial in slowing lung function decline and improving survival in people with CF, it has added a significant burden of care and associated toxicities in these individuals. Careful surveillance and the use of preventative strategies for antibiotic related toxicity (such as nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity) are essential. Continued development of effective antimicrobial agents that can function in the conditions encountered in the CF lung, such as against bacterial biofilm growth and under anaerobic conditions, is needed. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Antimicrobials in beekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reybroeck, Wim; Daeseleire, Els; De Brabander, Hubert F; Herman, Lieve

    2012-07-06

    The bee diseases American and European foulbrood and nosemosis can be treated with anti-infectious agents. However, in the EU and the USA the use of these agents in beekeeping is strictly regulated due to the lack of tolerance (e.g. Maximum Residue Limit) for residues of antibiotics and chemotherapeutics in honey. This article reviews the literature dealing with antimicrobials of interest in apiculture, stability of these antimicrobials in honey, and disposition of the antimicrobials in honeybee hives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class...... of antimicrobial drugs, and computational methods utilizing molecular descriptors can significantly accelerate the development of new peptide drug candidates. Areas covered: This paper gives a broad overview of peptide and amino-acid scale descriptors available for AMP modeling and highlights which...

  11. Usage of antimicrobials and occurrence of antimicrobial resistance among bacteria from mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Hammer, Anne Sofie; Sørensen, Charlotte Mark

    2009-01-01

    The usage of antimicrobials for treatment of mink and the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens in mink was investigated. The aim of the study was to provide data, which may serve as a basis for the formulation of recommendations for prudent Use...... of antimicrobial's for mink. A total of 164 haemolytic staphylococci. 49 haemolytic streptococci. 39 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 13 Pasteurella multocida. and 1093 Escherichia coli isolates front Danish mink were included in the Study. A high frequency of resistance among S. intermedius was found for tetracyclines (54.......7%). followed by penicillin (21.7%), lincosamides (20.4%), macrolides (19.1%), and spectinomycin (18.5%). Very low frequencies of resistance were recorded for other antimicrobials. The highest frequency among the E. coli isolates was recorded for ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides, and tetracyclines...

  12. Antimicrobial Resistance in the Food Chain: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verraes, Claire; Van Boxstael, Sigrid; Van Meervenne, Eva; Van Coillie, Els; Butaye, Patrick; Catry, Boudewijn; de Schaetzen, Marie-Athénaïs; Van Huffel, Xavier; Imberechts, Hein; Dierick, Katelijne; Daube, George; Saegerman, Claude; De Block, Jan; Dewulf, Jeroen; Herman, Lieve

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistant zoonotic pathogens present on food constitute a direct risk to public health. Antimicrobial resistance genes in commensal or pathogenic strains form an indirect risk to public health, as they increase the gene pool from which pathogenic bacteria can pick up resistance traits. Food can be contaminated with antimicrobial resistant bacteria and/or antimicrobial resistance genes in several ways. A first way is the presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria on food selected by the use of antibiotics during agricultural production. A second route is the possible presence of resistance genes in bacteria that are intentionally added during the processing of food (starter cultures, probiotics, bioconserving microorganisms and bacteriophages). A last way is through cross-contamination with antimicrobial resistant bacteria during food processing. Raw food products can be consumed without having undergone prior processing or preservation and therefore hold a substantial risk for transfer of antimicrobial resistance to humans, as the eventually present resistant bacteria are not killed. As a consequence, transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes between bacteria after ingestion by humans may occur. Under minimal processing or preservation treatment conditions, sublethally damaged or stressed cells can be maintained in the food, inducing antimicrobial resistance build-up and enhancing the risk of resistance transfer. Food processes that kill bacteria in food products, decrease the risk of transmission of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23812024

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center for Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (video) Animation ... Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials ...

  14. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  15. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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    Full Text Available ... to make the concept of antimicrobial resistance more real and understandable to veterinarians, livestock producers, lawmakers, consumer ... FEAR Act Site Map Nondiscrimination Website Policies U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver ...

  16. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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    Full Text Available ... Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated Report Data Meetings and Publications Resources Judicious Use of Antimicrobials ... Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health Professionals Science & Research Industry Scroll back to top Popular Content Home ...

  17. What are Antimicrobial Pesticides?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial pesticides are substances or mixtures of substances used to destroy or suppress the growth of harmful microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, or fungi on inanimate objects and surfaces.

  18. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... complex. This video was designed to make the concept of antimicrobial resistance more real and understandable to ... audiences. We hope this animation will make the concept more understandable to non-scientists by showing how ...

  19. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  20. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Veterinary ... both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the ...

  1. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... issue of antimicrobial resistance is that the subject material appears abstract and is complex. This video was ... can develop and spread. All FDA CVM produced material may be copied, reproduced, and distributed as long ...

  2. SYNTHESIS, STEREOCHEMISTRY AND ANTIMICROBIAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    KEY WORDS: 4-Phenylsemicarbazone, Metal complexes, Stereochemistry, Antimicrobial activity. INTRODUCTION ... stereochemistry of semicarbazone metal complexes [8-13], this group of ligands deserve further investigations. ..... The cytotoxicity of tested compounds generally increased with increase concentration and ...

  3. Multiplex PCR point of care testing versus routine, laboratory-based testing in the treatment of adults with respiratory tract infections: a quasi-randomised study assessing impact on length of stay and antimicrobial use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Denise; Chetty, Yumela; Cooper, Ben S; Virk, Manjinder; Glass, Stephen K; Letters, Andrew; Kelly, Philip A; Sudhanva, Malur; Jeyaratnam, Dakshika

    2017-10-10

    Laboratory-based respiratory pathogen (RP) results are often available too late to influence clinical decisions such as hospitalisation or antibiotic treatment due to time delay in transport of specimens and testing schedules. Ward-based i.e. point of care (POC) testing providing rapid results may alter the clinical management pathway. FilmArray® RP polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems were placed in three in-patient and out-patient medical areas. Patients presenting with influenza-like illness /upper respiratory tract infection +/- lower RTI were recruited between January-July 2015. FilmArray® POC testing occurred on even days of the month (intervention) or routine, laboratory-based RP PCR testing +/- atypical serology on odd days (control). The primary outcome was length of hospital stay. The secondary outcomes were impact on the use of antimicrobials, readmissions, all-cause mortality, length of ward stay and turn-around time (TAT) (time to result from admission). Of 606 eligible patients, 545 (89.9%) were included; 211 in the control arm and 334 in the intervention arm. 20% of control arm patients and 24% of intervention arm patients had an RP detected. POC testing was not associated with the primary outcome measure, length of stay, but reduced the TAT from 39.5 h to 19.0 h, p testing and length of stay or most of the secondary outcomes except the antimicrobial prescribing decision. This was probably due to a delay in initiating FilmArray® testing. Despite this, POC testing allowed time-critical antivirals to be given significantly faster, appropriate mycoplasma treatment and results were available considerably faster than routine, laboratory-based testing. Ward-staff of all grades performed POC testing without difficulty suggesting potential use across many divergent healthcare settings. Further studies evaluating the implementation of rapid respiratory PCR POC testing and the effect on length of stay and antimicrobial use are required. ISRCTN10470967

  4. Current resistance issues in antimicrobial therapy | Senekal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The human gut contains 1013 - 1014 bacteria that are exposed to selection pressure whenever antibiotics are administered.1 The same selection pressure applies to respiratory flora, which is one of the reasons why antimicrobial therapy prescribed for the treatment of respiratory tract infection should aim to eradicate ...

  5. Antimicrobial resistant bacteria in the food chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2003-01-01

    to fluoroquinolones, which are used for empirical treatment of diarrhea in humans. Resistance to vancomycin and Synercid((R)) in enterococci is associated with use of similar drugs as growth promoters in food animals. Danish food animal producers have terminated the use of antimicrobial growth promoters. This has...

  6. Novel antimicrobial textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Unchin

    2003-10-01

    Many microorganisms can survive, and perhaps proliferate on textiles, generating adverse effects such as: disease transmission, odor generation, pH changes, staining, discoloration and loss of performance. These adverse effects may threaten users' health, deteriorate textile properties and degrade service quality. It may, therefore, be desirable to incorporate antimicrobials on textiles for controlling the growth of microorganisms. This dissertation focuses on the development of antimicrobial fibers and fabrics by integration of antimicrobials with these textiles. The applications of hydantoin-based halamines were mainly investigated in the research. The typical process is that hydantoin containing compounds are grafted onto textiles and transformed to halamine by chlorination. Hydantoin-based halamines are usually chloramines that release chlorine (Cl+) via cleavage of the -NCl functional group which attacks and kills microbes. The antimicrobial behavior is rechargeable many times by rinsing the fiber or fabric with chlorine-containing solution. Some quaternary ammonium type antimicrobials were also investigated in this research. The choice of integrating techniques is dependant on both the textile and antimicrobial compounds. In this dissertation, the nine approaches were studied for incorporating antimicrobial with various textiles: (1) co-extrusion of fibers with halamine precursor additive; (2) grafting of the quaternary ammonium compounds onto ethylene-co-acrylic acid fiber for creating quaternary ammonium type antimicrobial fiber; (3) entrapment of the additives in thermally bonded bicomponent nonwoven fabrics; (4) attaching antimicrobial additives to surfaces with latex adhesive coating; (5) grafting of antimicrobial compounds onto rubber latex via UV exposure; (6) reaction of halamine with needle-punched melamine formaldehyde nonwoven fabric and laminates; (7) coating melamine resin onto tent fabrics and laminates; (8) synthesis of super absorbent polymer

  7. AMDD: Antimicrobial Drug Database

    OpenAIRE

    Danishuddin, Mohd; Kaushal, Lalima; Hassan Baig, Mohd; Khan, Asad U.

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the major concerns for antimicrobial chemotherapy against any particular target. Knowledge of the primary structure of antimicrobial agents and their activities is essential for rational drug design. Thus, we developed a comprehensive database, anti microbial drug database (AMDD), of known synthetic antibacterial and antifungal compounds that were extracted from the available literature and other chemical databases, e.g., PubChem, PubChem BioAssay and ZINC, etc. The ...

  8. Novel Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Nordahl, Emma

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides serve as a first line of defence against invading microorganisms and are an essential part of our fast innate immune system. They are ancient molecules found in all classes of life. Antimicrobial peptides rapidly kill a broad spectrum of microbes and are immunomodulatory, i.e. having additional actions influencing inflammation and other innate immune responses. Results presented in this thesis demonstrate that proteases of common human pathogens degrade and inactivate t...

  9. Behaviorally inadequate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, Tyler Joshua

    2014-01-01

    According to situationism in psychology, behavior is primarily influenced by external situational factors rather than internal traits or motivations such as virtues. Environmental ethicists wish to promote pro-environmental behaviors capable of providing adequate protection for the environment......, but situationist critiques suggest that character traits, and environmental virtues, are not as behaviorally robust as is typically supposed. Their views present a dilemma. Because ethicists cannot rely on virtues to produce pro-environmental behaviors, the only real way of salvaging environmental virtue theory...... positive results. However, because endorsing behaviorally ineffective virtues, for whatever reason, entails that environmental ethicists are abandoning the goal of helping and protecting the environment, environmental ethicists should consider looking elsewhere than virtues and focus instead on the role...

  10. The inadequate treatment of pain: collateral damage from the war on drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Jason W; Attaran, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Jason Nickerson and Amir Attaran examine the vast inequities in medical pain relief around the world and argue that the global control of licit narcotics be shifted from the International Narcotic Control Board to WHO.

  11. The inadequate treatment of pain: collateral damage from the war on drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W Nickerson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Jason Nickerson and Amir Attaran examine the vast inequities in medical pain relief around the world and argue that the global control of licit narcotics be shifted from the International Narcotic Control Board to WHO.

  12. Pioglitazone for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in patients inadequately controlled on insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz S

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Stanley S SchwartzDiabetes Disease Management at the University of Pennsylvania, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia Heart Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: Insulin resistance and impaired beta-cell function are primary defects that occur early in the course of development of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance leads to hyperinsulinemia in order to maintain normal glucose tolerance. In most cases of type 2 diabetes, beta-cell dysfunction develops subsequent to the development of insulin resistance, and it is not until such beta-cell dysfunction develops that any abnormality in glucose tolerance is seen. Insulin resistance is a primary defect in type 2 diabetes. The risk of coronary heart disease is significantly increased in patients with type 2 diabetes. Cardiovascular disease causes 80% of all diabetic mortality, and in 75% of those cases, it is a result of coronary atherosclerosis. These points provide a rationale for early and aggressive management of cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetes. Thiazolidinediones represent an effective tool for targeting some features of this increased risk as they decrease insulin resistance and can prevent and/or delay diabetes progression.Keywords: pioglitazone, type 2 diabetes, insulin

  13. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Fecal Contamination and Inadequate Treatment of Packaged Water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley R Williams

    Full Text Available Packaged water products provide an increasingly important source of water for consumption. However, recent studies raise concerns over their safety.To assess the microbial safety of packaged water, examine differences between regions, country incomes, packaged water types, and compare packaged water with other water sources.We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis. Articles published in English, French, Portuguese, Spanish and Turkish, with no date restrictions were identified from online databases and two previous reviews. Studies published before April 2014 that assessed packaged water for the presence of Escherichia coli, thermotolerant or total coliforms were included provided they tested at least ten samples or brands.A total of 170 studies were included in the review. The majority of studies did not detect fecal indicator bacteria in packaged water (78/141. Compared to packaged water from upper-middle and high-income countries, packaged water from low and lower-middle-income countries was 4.6 (95% CI: 2.6-8.1 and 13.6 (95% CI: 6.9-26.7 times more likely to contain fecal indicator bacteria and total coliforms, respectively. Compared to all other packaged water types, water from small bottles was less likely to be contaminated with fecal indicator bacteria (OR = 0.32, 95%CI: 0.17-0.58 and total coliforms (OR = 0.10, 95%CI: 0.05, 0.22. Packaged water was less likely to contain fecal indicator bacteria (OR = 0.35, 95%CI: 0.20, 0.62 compared to other water sources used for consumption.Policymakers and regulators should recognize the potential benefits of packaged water in providing safer water for consumption at and away from home, especially for those who are otherwise unlikely to gain access to a reliable, safe water supply in the near future. To improve the quality of packaged water products they should be integrated into regulatory and monitoring frameworks.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of crude extracts of three medicinal plants used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . wilkesiana traditionally used in South-West Nigerian communities for the treatment of gastroenteritis were investigated for antibacterial activity against strains of three food borne pathogens that resisted conventional orthodox antimicrobials.

  15. Comparing antimicrobial exposure based on sales data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondt, Nico; Jensen, Vibeke Frøkjær; Puister-Jansen, Linda F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the possibilities of making meaningful comparisons of the veterinary use of antimicrobial agents among countries, based on national total sales data. Veterinary antimicrobial sales data on country level and animal census data in both Denmark and the Netherlands were combined...... is a severe overestimation of the true use in poultry (i.e. 3 days), and the overall model estimate of 13 treatment days per year for the Netherlands is a severe underestimation of the true use in veal calves (i.e. 66 days).The conclusion is that simple country comparisons, based on total sales figures...

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacteria that cause gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Romney M; Schuetz, Audrey N

    2015-06-01

    Gastroenteritis due to enteric pathogens is generally a self-limiting disease for which antimicrobial treatment is not required. However, treatment should be considered for cases of severe or prolonged diarrhea, extraintestinal isolation of bacteria, or diarrhea in immunocompromised hosts, the elderly, and infants. Various resistance trends and current issues concerning antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enteric pathogens are reviewed in this article, including Campylobacter, Salmonella, Shigella, Vibrio, Aeromonas, Plesiomonas, and Clostridium difficile. Updated interpretive criteria from breakpoint-setting organizations are reviewed, along with explanations for recent changes in antimicrobial breakpoints. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Machine learning: novel bioinformatics approaches for combating antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macesic, Nenad; Polubriaginof, Fernanda; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2017-12-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a threat to global health and new approaches to combating AMR are needed. Use of machine learning in addressing AMR is in its infancy but has made promising steps. We reviewed the current literature on the use of machine learning for studying bacterial AMR. The advent of large-scale data sets provided by next-generation sequencing and electronic health records make applying machine learning to the study and treatment of AMR possible. To date, it has been used for antimicrobial susceptibility genotype/phenotype prediction, development of AMR clinical decision rules, novel antimicrobial agent discovery and antimicrobial therapy optimization. Application of machine learning to studying AMR is feasible but remains limited. Implementation of machine learning in clinical settings faces barriers to uptake with concerns regarding model interpretability and data quality.Future applications of machine learning to AMR are likely to be laboratory-based, such as antimicrobial susceptibility phenotype prediction.

  18. Archetypal tryptophan-rich antimicrobial peptides: properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Palombo, Enzo A; Clayton, Andrew H A; Bhave, Mrinal

    2016-02-01

    Drug-resistant microorganisms ('superbugs') present a serious challenge to the success of antimicrobial treatments. Subsequently, there is a crucial need for novel bio-control agents. Many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) show a broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, fungi or viruses and are strong candidates to complement or substitute current antimicrobial agents. Some AMPs are also effective against protozoa or cancer cells. The tryptophan (Trp)-rich peptides (TRPs) are a subset of AMPs that display potent antimicrobial activity, credited to the unique biochemical properties of tryptophan that allow it to insert into biological membranes. Further, many Trp-rich AMPs cross bacterial membranes without compromising their integrity and act intracellularly, suggesting interactions with nucleic acids and enzymes. In this work, we overview some archetypal TRPs derived from natural sources, i.e., indolicidin, tritrpticin and lactoferricin, summarising their biochemical properties, structures, antimicrobial activities, mechanistic studies and potential applications.

  19. Spectrum of antimicrobial activity associated with ionic colloidal silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Kira; May, Kathleen; Leek, Daniel; Langland, Nicole; Jeane, La Deana; Ventura, Jose; Skubisz, Corey; Scherer, Sean; Lopez, Eric; Crocker, Ephraim; Peters, Rachel; Oertle, John; Nguyen, Krystine; Just, Scott; Orian, Michael; Humphrey, Meaghan; Payne, David; Jacobs, Bertram; Waters, Robert; Langland, Jeffrey

    2013-03-01

    Silver has historically and extensively been used as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent. However, the Food and Drug Administration currently does not recognize colloidal silver as a safe and effective antimicrobial agent. The goal of this study was to further evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of colloidal silver. Several strains of bacteria, fungi, and viruses were grown under multicycle growth conditions in the presence or absence of ionic colloidal silver in order to assess the antimicrobial activity. For bacteria grown under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, significant growth inhibition was observed, although multiple treatments were typically required. For fungal cultures, the effects of ionic colloidal silver varied significantly between different genera. No viral growth inhibition was observed with any strains tested. The study data support ionic colloidal silver as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent against aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, while having a more limited and specific spectrum of activity against fungi.

  20. Patient compliance with antimicrobial drugs: A Chinese survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shuangmei; Pan, Jiaqian; Lu, Shan; Tang, Jing

    2018-04-01

    Antimicrobial therapy is among the mainstream treatment modalities employed in clinical settings. Antimicrobial sensitivity of the pathogen and patient compliance are key determinants of the efficacy of antimicrobial therapy. In this study, we sought to investigate the factors that affect patient compliance to antimicrobial therapy in a Chinese teaching hospital to enhance patient compliance and to prevent abuse and misuse of antibiotics by patients. A questionnaire survey was conducted among patients willing to answer all the questions who were prescribed antimicrobial drugs orally, and for whom at least half of the duration of therapy was not under the supervision of a doctor or nurse. Data analyses were performed using Kruskal-Wallis test and multivariate logistic regression. A total of 720 patients participated in the survey; of these, 714 patients provided complete data and were included in the analysis. Up to 86.97% of patients showed noncompliance to antimicrobial therapy (total compliance score compliance (total compliance score = 8). On multivariate analyses, understanding of the treatment was an important factor associated with compliance. A range of factors were associated with compliance to antimicrobial therapy, including understanding of the treatment, gender, age, home address, education level, and family income. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Low occurrence of 'non-haemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus' misidentified as Haemophilus influenzae in cystic fibrosis respiratory specimens, and frequent recurrence of persistent H. influenzae clones despite antimicrobial treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenger, Mette G; Ridderberg, Winnie; Olesen, Hanne V; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2012-12-01

    Non-influenzae commensal Haemophilus species of low pathogenicity may be difficult to discriminate from Haemophilus influenzae. We investigated the level of misidentifications in respiratory specimens from cystic fibrosis patients and evaluated the colonisation dynamics of genuine H. influenzae isolates. One hundred and ninety-two presumptive H. influenzae isolates were re-examined by assessment of marker genes sodC and fucK, and isolates with aberrant genotypes were subjected to multilocus sequence typing. Misidentifications (3%) were mainly caused by failure to identify porphyrin-synthesising strains, and only a single strain (0.5%) could be classified as 'non-haemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus'. Sequential isolates of confirmed H. influenzae isolates from individual patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Despite the routine prescription of antimicrobial therapy, the majority of H. influenzae isolates were identical with at least one of the strains cultured from the two preceding positive samples from the same patient. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy as an adjunct to non-surgical treatment of aggressive periodontitis: a split-mouth randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, André L; Novaes, Arthur B; Grisi, Márcio F; Taba, Mario; Souza, Sérgio L; Palioto, Daniela B; de Oliveira, Paula G; Casati, Marcio Z; Casarin, Renato C; Messora, Michel R

    2015-03-01

    The management of aggressive periodontitis (AgP) represents a challenge for clinicians because there are no standardized protocols for an efficient control of the disease. This randomized controlled clinical trial evaluated the effects of repeated applications of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) adjunctive to scaling and root planing (SRP) in patients with AgP. Using a split-mouth design, 20 patients with generalized AgP were treated with aPDT + SRP (test group) or SRP only (control group). aPDT was applied at four periods. All patients were monitored for 90 days. Clinical, microbiologic, and immunologic parameters were statistically analyzed. In deep periodontal pocket analysis (probing depth [PD] ≥ 7 mm at baseline), the test group presented a decrease in PD and a clinical attachment gain significantly higher than the control group at 90 days (P periodontal pathogens of red and orange complexes and a lower interleukin-1β/interleukin-10 ratio than the control group (P periodontal pockets in single-rooted teeth in patients with AgP.

  3. Inadequate prescription of chronic consumption of proton pump inhibitors in a hospital in Mexico: Cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Alberto Sánchez-Cuén

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: PPIs have been an enormous therapeutic advance in acid-related diseases. However, it has been detected an abuse in its consumption. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of inadequate prescription of chronic use of PPIs in outpatients in a speciality hospital. Material and methods: we performed a cross-sectional descriptive study review. The study population were patients, chronic users of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, attending outpatient consult in a hospital of government workers. We defined as chronic user of PPIs that patient that takes medication daily for over a year and inappropriate prescription, that one that has not been approved by the clinical guidelines. A simple random sampling was utilized. The following parameters were investigated: diagnosis and prescription of PPIs, time of use, at which level of care PPIs were prescribed (primary care or specialist, self-medication, with or without endoscopy. For the statistical analysis, we used Student's t-test and Chi-square, 95% confidence intervals and significance 0.05 %. Results: we reviewed 153 patients, 40 (26.1 % men and 113 (73.9 % women, mean age 58 ± 11.4 years. The prescription of chronic treatment with PPIs was adequate in 64.7 % of patients and inadequate in 35.3 %. The most common appropriate prescription (31.3 % of chronic use of PPIs was due to gastroesophageal reflux disease. The most common inadequate prescription was absence of diagnosis (22.2 %, polypharmacy without nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (16.6 % and chronic gastritis (16.6 %. History of endoscopy were not statistically significant. Conclusions: the frequency of inappropriate prescriptions of chronic use of PPIs was high, around 35.3 %, similar to those reported in hospitals in developed countries.

  4. Antimicrobials, stress and mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides are ancient and ubiquitous immune effectors that multicellular organisms use to kill and police microbes whereas antibiotics are mostly employed by microorganisms. As antimicrobial peptides (AMPs mostly target the cell wall, a microbial 'Achilles heel', it has been proposed that bacterial resistance evolution is very unlikely and hence AMPs are ancient 'weapons' of multicellular organisms. Here we provide a new hypothesis to explain the widespread distribution of AMPs amongst multicellular organism. Studying five antimicrobial peptides from vertebrates and insects, we show, using a classic Luria-Delbrück fluctuation assay, that cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs do not increase bacterial mutation rates. Moreover, using rtPCR and disc diffusion assays we find that AMPs do not elicit SOS or rpoS bacterial stress pathways. This is in contrast to the main classes of antibiotics that elevate mutagenesis via eliciting the SOS and rpoS pathways. The notion of the 'Achilles heel' has been challenged by experimental selection for AMP-resistance, but our findings offer a new perspective on the evolutionary success of AMPs. Employing AMPs seems advantageous for multicellular organisms, as it does not fuel the adaptation of bacteria to their immune defenses. This has important consequences for our understanding of host-microbe interactions, the evolution of innate immune defenses, and also sheds new light on antimicrobial resistance evolution and the use of AMPs as drugs.

  5. Antimicrobial ceramics. Kokinsei ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinari, T.; Uchida, M. (Shinagawa Fuel Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    In recent years, the occurrence of infection by methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), for which almost all antibiotics do not affect, in facilities such as hospitals is causing trouble. The antimicrobial property of silver has been known empirically since the ancient times. However, since 1985, so called silver zeolite in which zeolite carries silver ions has become utilized as an inorganic antimicrobial agent with silver as its constituent. In this article, the effect of inhibiting MRSA propagation of antimicrobial fibers containing silver zeolite is explained centering around the physical properties of silver zeolite. MRSA has resistance against antibiotics, methicillin which is mainly used at present. When the antimicrobial power of silver zeolite is compared with those of copper zeolite and zinc zeolite, the antimicrobial power of silver zeolite is the strongest and further increases as the silver ion concentration in the zeolite increases. Silver zeolite is safe to use and used for tools and clothes to be used in the fields of food and medical care. 12 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Antimicrobial Stewardship in Daily Practice: Managing an Important Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Le Saux

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial stewardship is a recent concept that embodies the practical, judicious use of antimicrobials to decrease adverse outcomes from antimicrobials while optimizing the treatment of bacterial infections to reduce the emergence of resistant pathogens. The objectives of the present statement are to illustrate the principles of antimicrobial stewardship and to offer practical examples of how to make antimicrobial stewardship part of everyday hospital and outpatient practice. Vital components of antimicrobial stewardship include appropriate testing to diagnose whether infections are viral or bacterial, and using clinical follow-up rather than antibiotics in cases in which the child is not very ill and uncertainty exists. Other specific, important actions include questioning whether positive urine cultures are contaminated when there is no evidence of pyuria or inflammatory changes, and obtaining a chest radiograph to support a diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia. Optimizing the choice and dosage of antimicrobials also reduces the probability of clinical failures and subsequent courses of antimicrobials. A list of common clinical scenarios to promote stewardship is included.

  7. Antimicrobial properties and isotope investigations of South African honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, F; Hill, J; Kaehler, S; Allsopp, M; van Vuuren, S

    2014-08-01

    The therapeutic potential of honey for the treatment of wound infections is well documented. However, South African (SA) honey has been poorly explored as an antimicrobial agent and given the well-established antimicrobial properties of the indigenous plant species from SA, there is the potential that honey from this geographical region may exhibit noteworthy anti-infective properties. In this study, the antimicrobial properties of 42 SA honey samples were determined. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) agar dilution method was used to determine antimicrobial activity. The MICs of the honeys ranged from 6·25 to 50·00%. Samples 4-(CITYMIX/WC), 12-(BUSHVELD/KZN), 15-(ONION/WC), 16-(FYNBOS/WC), 17-(AKMS/FS), 19-(CITYMIX/FS), 41-(INDIGENOUS/WC) and 52-(SURBURBANGARDEN/WC) displayed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. The physicochemical properties including pH, water content and stable isotope analysis (SIA) was analysed. The pH of the honeys ranged between 3·89 and 5·09. The SIA revealed strong overall trends between protein concentration and MIC suggesting close links with antimicrobial activity. A number of SA honey samples tested have potential as an effective antimicrobial agent in wound healing. The future of South Africa's market for medical grade and therapeutic honeys looks promising as the antimicrobial properties of the honeys have some superior activity. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. The association between inadequate prenatal care and future healthcare use among offspring in the Bedouin population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estis-Deaton, Asia; Sheiner, Eyal; Wainstock, Tamar; Landau, Daniella; Walfisch, Asnat

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of inadequate prenatal care on long-term morbidity among the offspring of an ethnic minority population. A retrospective population-based cohort analysis was performed among all Bedouin women with singleton pregnancies who delivered in a tertiary medical center in Israel between January 1, 1991, and January 1, 2014. Morbidity was defined as pediatric hospitalization across six distinct disease categories before 18 years of age. The cumulative morbidity rates were compared for offspring born following pregnancies with either inadequate (prenatal care facility) or adequate prenatal care. Overall, 127 396 neonates were included; 19 173 (15.0%) were born following inadequate prenatal care. Pediatric hospitalizations for all morbidities other than cardiovascular ones were less frequent among the inadequate prenatal care group than the adequate prenatal care group (Pprenatal care group, with the exception of cardiovascular disease. Inadequate prenatal care correlated with reduced pediatric hospitalization rates among offspring, possibly owing to a lack of child healthcare service utilization within the Bedouin population. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  9. Consequences of Inadequate Staffing Include Missed Care, Potential Failure to Rescue, and Job Stress and Dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice; Lyndon, Audrey; Ruhl, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate responses of registered nurse members of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) to a survey that sought their recommendations for staffing guidelines and their perceptions of the consequences of inadequate nurse staffing. The goal was to use these member data to inform the work of the AWHONN nurse staffing research team. Secondary analysis of responses to the 2010 AWHONN nurse staffing survey. Online. AWHONN members (N = 884). Review of data from an online survey of AWHONN members through the use of thematic analysis for descriptions of the consequences of inadequate nurse staffing during the childbirth process. Three main themes emerged as consequences of inadequate staffing or being short-staffed: Missed Care, Potential for Failure to Rescue, and Job-Related Stress and Dissatisfaction. These themes are consistent with those previously identified in the literature related to inadequate nurse staffing. Based on the responses from participants in the 2010 AWHONN nurse staffing survey, consequences of inadequate staffing can be quite serious and may put patients at risk for preventable harm. Copyright © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inadequate dietary intake of children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Michelle C; Ortiz, Thaís T; Terreri, Maria Teresa S R L A; Sarni, Roseli O S; Silva, Simone G L; Souza, Fabíola I S; Hilário, Maria Odete E

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the dietary intake of children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) using a 24-hour diet recall and relating it to the patients' clinical and anthropometric characteristics and to the drugs used in their treatment. By means of a cross-sectional study, we assessed the 24-hour diet recalls of outpatients. Their nutritional status was classified according to the CDC (2000). The computer program NutWin UNIFESP-EPM was used for food intake calculation. The Recommended Dietary Allowances and the Brazilian food pyramid were used for quantitative and qualitative analysis. Median age was 12 years for JIA patients and 16.5 years for JSLE patients. Among the JIA patients, 37.5% had active disease, and among the JSLE patients, 68.2% showed Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) > 4. Malnutrition was found in 8.3 and 4.5% of the JIA and JSLE patients, respectively, and obesity was present in 16.7 and 18.2%. For JIA patients, the excessive intake of energy, protein, and lipids was 12.5, 75, and 31.3%, respectively. For JSLE patients, the excessive intake of energy, protein, and lipids was 13.6, 86.4, and 36.4%, respectively. Low intake of iron, zinc, and vitamin A was found in 29.2 and 50, 87.5 and 86.4, and 87.5 and 95.2% of the JIA and JSLE patients, respectively. There was not a significant association between intake, disease activity, and nutritional status. Patients with rheumatic diseases have inadequate dietary intake. There is excessive intake of lipids and proteins and low intake of micronutrients.

  11. General principles of antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leekha, Surbhi; Terrell, Christine L; Edson, Randall S

    2011-02-01

    Antimicrobial agents are some of the most widely, and often injudiciously, used therapeutic drugs worldwide. Important considerations when prescribing antimicrobial therapy include obtaining an accurate diagnosis of infection; understanding the difference between empiric and definitive therapy; identifying opportunities to switch to narrow-spectrum, cost-effective oral agents for the shortest duration necessary; understanding drug characteristics that are peculiar to antimicrobial agents (such as pharmacodynamics and efficacy at the site of infection); accounting for host characteristics that influence antimicrobial activity; and in turn, recognizing the adverse effects of antimicrobial agents on the host. It is also important to understand the importance of antimicrobial stewardship, to know when to consult infectious disease specialists for guidance, and to be able to identify situations when antimicrobial therapy is not needed. By following these general principles, all practicing physicians should be able to use antimicrobial agents in a responsible manner that benefits both the individual patient and the community.

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae colonization associated with fecal microbiota treatment failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Fecal microbiota therapy (FMT) has emerged as the gold standard for treatment of persistent, symptomatic Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) that does not respond to conventional antimicrobial treatment. Probiotics are commonly recommended in addition to antimicrobial treatment for CD...

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  14. Insights on antimicrobial resistance, biofilms and the use of phytochemicals as new antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Anabela; Saavedra, Maria J; Simões, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most serious public health problems. This is of particular concern when bacteria become resistant to various antimicrobial agents simultaneously and when they form biofilms. Consequently, therapeutic options for the treatment of infections have become limited, leading frequently to recurrent infections, treatment failure and increase of morbidity and mortality. Both, persistence and spread of antibiotic resistance, in combination with decreased effectiveness and increased toxicity of current antibiotics have emphasized the urgent need to search alternative sources of antimicrobial substances. Plants are recognized as a source of unexplored chemical structures with high therapeutic potential, including antimicrobial activity against clinically important microorganisms. Additionally, phytochemicals (plant secondary metabolites) present several advantages over synthetic molecules, including green status and different mechanisms of action from antibiotics which could help to overcome the resistance problem. In this study, an overview of the main classes of phytochemicals with antimicrobial properties and their mode of action is presented. A revision about the application of phytochemicals for biofilm prevention and control is also done. Moreover, the use of phytochemicals as scaffolds of new functional molecules to expand the antibiotics pipeline is reviewed.

  15. Antimicrobial blue light therapy for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection in a mouse burn model: implications for prophylaxis and treatment of combat-related wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunsong; Zhu, Yingbo; Gupta, Asheesh; Huang, Yingying; Murray, Clinton K; Vrahas, Mark S; Sherwood, Margaret E; Baer, David G; Hamblin, Michael R; Dai, Tianhong

    2014-06-15

    In this study, we investigated the utility of antimicrobial blue light therapy for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection in a mouse burn model. A bioluminescent clinical isolate of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii was obtained. The susceptibility of A. baumannii to blue light (415 nm)-inactivation was compared in vitro to that of human keratinocytes. Repeated cycles of sublethal inactivation of bacterial by blue light were performed to investigate the potential resistance development of A. baumannii to blue light. A mouse model of third degree burn infected with A. baumannii was developed. A single exposure of blue light was initiated 30 minutes after bacterial inoculation to inactivate A. baumannii in mouse burns. It was found that the multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strain was significantly more susceptible than keratinocytes to blue light inactivation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed blue light-induced ultrastructural damage in A. baumannii cells. Fluorescence spectroscopy suggested that endogenous porphyrins exist in A. baumannii cells. Blue light at an exposure of 55.8 J/cm(2) significantly reduced the bacterial burden in mouse burns. No resistance development to blue light inactivation was observed in A. baumannii after 10 cycles of sublethal inactivation of bacteria. No significant DNA damage was detected in mouse skin by means of a skin TUNEL assay after a blue light exposure of 195 J/cm(2). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. PCR-based detection of bacterial DNA after antimicrobial treatment is indicative of persistent, viable bacteria in the chinchilla model of otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, J C; Aul, J J; White, G J; Wadowsky, R M; Zavoral, T; Tabari, R; Kerber, B; Doyle, W J; Ehrlich, G D

    1996-01-01

    Bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has been previously detected by polymerase chain reactions (PCR) in a significant percentage of culturally-sterile pediatric middle-ear effusions. The current study was designed to determine whether this represents the existence of viable bacteria or the persistence of residual DNA in the middle-ear cleft. The middle-ear cavities of two sets of chinchillas were inoculated with either: 1) 100 colony-forming units (CFU) of live Haemophilus influenzae, 2.2 x 10(6) CFU of pasteurized Moraxella catarrhalis, and 1000 ng of DNA (>10(8) genomic equivalents) from Streptococcus pneumoniae; or 2) 100 CFU of live S pneumoniae, 2.2 x 10(6) CFU of pasteurized M catarrhalis and 1000 ng of purified DNA from H influenzae. Animals were treated with ampicillin for 5 days beginning on day 3. A single-point longitudinal study design was used for sampling to eliminate the possibility of contamination. No DNA was detectable from the heat-killed bacteria or the purified DNA after day 3. However, DNA from the live bacteria persisted through day 21, even though all specimens were culture-negative following the initiation of antimicrobial therapy. These findings indicate that purified DNA and DNA from intact but nonviable bacteria do not persist in the middle-ear cleft in the presence of an effusion, even following high copy inoculation. In contrast, antibiotic-treated bacteria persist in some viable state for weeks as evidenced by the differential ability of the PCR-based assay systems to detect the live bacteria, but not detect the heat-killed organisms.

  17. Antimicrobial resistance challenged with metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Aziz, Alaa S; Agatemor, Christian; Etkin, Nola

    2017-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance threatens the achievements of science and medicine, as it deactivates conventional antimicrobial therapeutics. Scientists respond to the threat by developing new antimicrobial platforms to prevent and treat infections from these resistant strains. Metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules are emerging as an alternative to conventional platforms because they combine multiple mechanisms of action into one platform due to the distinctive properties of metals. For example, metals interact with intracellular proteins and enzymes, and catalyse various intracellular processes. The macromolecular architecture offers a means to enhance antimicrobial activity since several antimicrobial moieties can be conjugated to the scaffold. Further, these macromolecules can be fabricated into antimicrobial materials for contact-killing medical implants, fabrics, and devices. As volatilization or leaching out of the antimicrobial moieties from the macromolecular scaffold is reduced, these medical implants, fabrics, and devices can retain their antimicrobial activity over an extended period. Recent advances demonstrate the potential of metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules as effective platforms that prevent and treat infections from resistant strains. In this review these advances are thoroughly discussed within the context of examples of metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules, their mechanisms of action and biocompatibility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance-a threat to the world's sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasovský, Dušan; Littmann, Jasper; Zorzet, Anna; Cars, Otto

    2016-08-01

    This commentary examines how specific sustainable development goals (SDGs) are affected by antimicrobial resistance and suggests how the issue can be better integrated into international policy processes. Moving beyond the importance of effective antibiotics for the treatment of acute infections and health care generally, we discuss how antimicrobial resistance also impacts on environmental, social, and economic targets in the SDG framework. The paper stresses the need for greater international collaboration and accountability distribution, and suggests steps towards a broader engagement of countries and United Nations agencies to foster global intersectoral action on antimicrobial resistance.

  19. Anti-Microbial and Self-Cleaning Properties of Photocatalytic Surface Treatments and their Potential Use for Space-Based Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this project was to implement a method to assess self-cleaning properties of commercially available photocatalytic surface treatments for their...

  20. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Integrated Report Data Meetings and Publications Resources Judicious Use of Antimicrobials Page Last Updated: 02/23/2018 Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading Viewers and Players . Language Assistance Available: Español | 繁體ä¸æ–‡ | ...

  1. Antimicrobial Prophylaxis in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Enzler, Mark J.; Berbari, Elie; Osmon, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is commonly used by clinicians for the prevention of numerous infectious diseases, including herpes simplex infection, rheumatic fever, recurrent cellulitis, meningococcal disease, recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with cirrhosis, influenza, infective endocarditis, pertussis, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis, as well as infections associated with open fractures, recent prosthetic joint placement...

  2. Fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfson, J S; Hooper, D C

    1989-01-01

    The fluoroquinolones, a new class of potent orally absorbed antimicrobial agents, are reviewed, considering structure, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum, variables affecting activity in vitro, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, emergence of resistance, and tolerability. The primary bacterial target is the enzyme deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase. Bacterial resistance occurs by chromosomal mutations altering deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase and decreasing drug permeation. The dr...

  3. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... U.S. Food and Drug Administration A to Z Index Follow FDA En Español Search FDA Submit ... non-scientists by showing how bacterial antimicrobial resistance can develop and spread. All FDA CVM produced material ...

  4. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, ... Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of ...

  5. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts ... 語 | فارسی | English FDA Accessibility Careers FDA Basics FOIA No FEAR Act Site Map ...

  6. Multifactorial antimicrobial wood protectants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert D. Coleman; Carol A. Clausen

    2008-01-01

    It is unlikely that a single antimicrobial compound, whether synthetic or natural, will provide the ‘magic bullet’ for eliminating multiple biological agents affecting wood products. Development of synergistic combinations of selected compounds, especially those derived from natural sources, is recognized as a promising approach to improved wood protection. Recent...

  7. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated Report Data Meetings and Publications Resources Judicious Use of Antimicrobials Page Last Updated: ... Deutsch | 日本語 | فارسی | English FDA Accessibility Careers FDA Basics FOIA No FEAR ...

  8. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains ... human medicine to preserve the effectiveness of these drugs. One of the major obstacles to understanding the ... Page Last Updated: 02/23/2018 ...

  9. Analysis of the antimicrobial activities of a chemokine-derived peptide (CDAP-4) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Becerra, Francisco; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Dominguez-Ramirez, Lenin; Mendoza-Hernandez, Guillermo; Lopez-Vidal, Yolanda; Soldevila, Gloria; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A.

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines are key molecules involved in the control of leukocyte trafficking. Recently, a novel function as antimicrobial proteins has been described. CCL13 is the only member of the MCP chemokine subfamily displaying antimicrobial activity. To determine Key residues involved in its antimicrobial activity, CCL13 derived peptides were synthesized and tested against several bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One of these peptides, corresponding to the C-terminal region of CCL13 (CDAP-4) displayed good antimicrobial activity. Electron microscopy studies revealed remarkable morphological changes after CDAP-4 treatment. By computer modeling, CDAP-4 in α helical configuration generated a positive electrostatic potential that extended beyond the surface of the molecule. This feature is similar to other antimicrobial peptides. Altogether, these findings indicate that the antimicrobial activity was displayed by CCL13 resides to some extent at the C-terminal region. Furthermore, CDAP-4 could be considered a good antimicrobial candidate with a potential use against pathogens including P. aeruginosa

  10. Self-esteem, social support, and satisfaction differences in women with adequate and inadequate prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, P; Murray, M L; Williams, E M

    1994-03-01

    This descriptive, retrospective study examined levels of self-esteem, social support, and satisfaction with prenatal care in 193 low-risk postpartal women who obtained adequate and inadequate care. The participants were drawn from a regional medical center and university teaching hospital in New Mexico. A demographic questionnaire, the Coopersmith self-esteem inventory, the personal resource questionnaire part 2, and the prenatal care satisfaction inventory were used for data collection. Significant differences were found in the level of education, income, insurance, and ethnicity between women who received adequate prenatal care and those who received inadequate care. Women who were likely to seek either adequate or inadequate prenatal care were those whose total family income was $10,000 to $19,999 per year and high school graduates. Statistically significant differences were found in self-esteem, social support, and satisfaction between the two groups of women. Strategies to enhance self-esteem and social support have to be developed to reach women at risk for receiving inadequate prenatal care.

  11. Wearable Devices for Classification of Inadequate Posture at Work Using Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkallah, Eya; Freulard, Johan; Otis, Martin J-D; Ngomo, Suzy; Ayena, Johannes C; Desrosiers, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Inadequate postures adopted by an operator at work are among the most important risk factors in Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders (WMSDs). Although several studies have focused on inadequate posture, there is limited information on its identification in a work context. The aim of this study is to automatically differentiate between adequate and inadequate postures using two wearable devices (helmet and instrumented insole) with an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and force sensors. From the force sensors located inside the insole, the center of pressure (COP) is computed since it is considered an important parameter in the analysis of posture. In a first step, a set of 60 features is computed with a direct approach, and later reduced to eight via a hybrid feature selection. A neural network is then employed to classify the current posture of a worker, yielding a recognition rate of 90%. In a second step, an innovative graphic approach is proposed to extract three additional features for the classification. This approach represents the main contribution of this study. Combining both approaches improves the recognition rate to 95%. Our results suggest that neural network could be applied successfully for the classification of adequate and inadequate posture.

  12. The Inadequacy of Academic Environment Contributes to Inadequate Teaching and Learning Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quasim, Shahla; Arif, Muhammad Shahbaz

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at the inadequacy of academic environment as an indicator contributing to the inadequate teaching and learning situation in Pakistan. The main focus is to look into the low proficiency of students in the subject of English at secondary school level. A comprehensive questionnaire was designed from the literature concerned and The…

  13. 25 CFR 170.811 - What happens if lack of funds results in inadequate maintenance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What happens if lack of funds results in inadequate maintenance? 170.811 Section 170.811 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.811 What happens if lack of funds...

  14. Do infants with cow's milk protein allergy have inadequate levels of vitamin D?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cristiane M; Silva, Silvia A da; Antunes, Margarida M de C; Silva, Gisélia Alves Pontes da; Sarinho, Emanuel Sávio Cavalcanti; Brandt, Katia G

    To verify whether infants with cow's milk protein allergy have inadequate vitamin D levels. This cross-sectional study included 120 children aged 2 years or younger, one group with cow's milk protein allergy and a control group. The children were recruited at the pediatric gastroenterology, allergology, and pediatric outpatient clinics of a university hospital in the Northeast of Brazil. A questionnaire was administered to the caregiver and blood samples were collected for vitamin D quantification. Vitamin D levels <30ng/mL were considered inadequate. Vitamin D level was expressed as mean and standard deviation, and the frequency of the degrees of sufficiency and other variables, as proportions. Infants with cow's milk protein allergy had lower mean vitamin D levels (30.93 vs.35.29ng/mL; p=0.041) and higher deficiency frequency (20.3% vs.8.2; p=0.049) than the healthy controls. Exclusively or predominantly breastfed infants with cow's milk protein allergy had higher frequency of inadequate vitamin D levels (p=0.002). Regardless of sun exposure time, the groups had similar frequencies of inadequate vitamin D levels (p=0.972). Lower vitamin D levels were found in infants with CMPA, especially those who were exclusively or predominantly breastfed, making these infants a possible risk group for vitamin D deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Sleep deprivation in the last trimester of pregnancy and inadequate vitamin D: Is there a relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Gunduz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Inadequate vitamin D and poor sleep quality are prevalent in pregnant women, but low levels of vitamin D are not associated with poor sleep quality. Further studies with larger sample sizes and studies that include preterm deliveries and special sleep disorders should be performed to understand this issue better.

  16. Inadequate Evidence for Multiple Intelligences, Mozart Effect, and Emotional Intelligence Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    I (Waterhouse, 2006) argued that, because multiple intelligences, the Mozart effect, and emotional intelligence theories have inadequate empirical support and are not consistent with cognitive neuroscience findings, these theories should not be applied in education. Proponents countered that their theories had sufficient empirical support, were…

  17. Resveratrol Antagonizes Antimicrobial Lethality and Stimulates Recovery of Bacterial Mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanli Liu

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS; superoxide, peroxide, and hydroxyl radical are thought to contribute to the rapid bactericidal activity of diverse antimicrobial agents. The possibility has been raised that consumption of antioxidants in food may interfere with the lethal action of antimicrobials. Whether nutritional supplements containing antioxidant activity are also likely to interfere with antimicrobial lethality is unknown. To examine this possibility, resveratrol, a popular antioxidant dietary supplement, was added to cultures of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus that were then treated with antimicrobial and assayed for bacterial survival and the recovery of mutants resistant to an unrelated antimicrobial, rifampicin. Resveratrol, at concentrations likely to be present during human consumption, caused a 2- to 3-fold reduction in killing during a 2-hr treatment with moxifloxacin or kanamycin. At higher, but still subinhibitory concentrations, resveratrol reduced antimicrobial lethality by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Resveratrol also reduced the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS characteristic of treatment with quinolone (oxolinic acid. These data support the general idea that the lethal activity of some antimicrobials involves ROS. Surprisingly, subinhibitory concentrations of resveratrol promoted (2- to 6-fold the recovery of rifampicin-resistant mutants arising from the action of ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, or daptomycin. This result is consistent with resveratrol reducing ROS to sublethal levels that are still mutagenic, while the absence of resveratrol allows ROS levels to high enough to kill mutagenized cells. Suppression of antimicrobial lethality and promotion of mutant recovery by resveratrol suggests that the antioxidant may contribute to the emergence of resistance to several antimicrobials, especially if new derivatives and/or formulations of resveratrol markedly increase bioavailability.

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Bee Venom and Melittin against Borrelia burgdorferi

    OpenAIRE

    Kayla M. Socarras; Priyanka A. S. Theophilus; Jason P. Torres; Khusali Gupta; Eva Sapi

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne, multi-systemic disease, caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. Though antibiotics are used as a primary treatment, relapse often occurs after the discontinuation of antimicrobial agents. The reason for relapse remains unknown, however previous studies suggest the possible presence of antibiotic resistant Borrelia round bodies, persisters and attached biofilm forms. Thus, there is an urgent need to find antimicrobial agents suitable to eliminate all known f...

  19. Genotoxic and antimicrobial studies of the leaves of Psidium guajava

    OpenAIRE

    Nwannemka Lauretta Ofodile; Ndubuisi Moses Chikere Nwakanma; Michael Mordi; Oluwakemi Ademolu; Isabella Ezimoke; Jokotade Owoso

    2013-01-01

    Background: The guava, Psidium guajava is one of the most gregarious of fruit trees, of the Myrtaceae family. The leaf of P. guajava is a common herb used in the treatment of diarrhea in Nigeria and this has generated special interest in the probable antimicrobial and genotoxic effects of the leaf. However the mode of action of the leaf extracts has not been reported, hence the genotoxicity study. Materials and Methods: Antimicrobial activity of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of the le...

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Calcium Hydroxide in Endodontics: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Z; Shalavi, S; Yazdizadeh, M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of endodontic therapy is to preserve the patient's natural teeth without compromising the patient's local or systemic health. Calcium hydroxide has been included in several materials and antimicrobial formulations that are used in several treatment modalities in endodontics, such as inter-appointment intracanal medicaments. The purpose of this article was to review the antimicrobial properties of calcium hydroxide in endodontics. Calcium hydroxide has a high pH (approximately 12.5...

  1. Responsible use of antimicrobials in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, M G; Slots, J

    2000-03-01

    New products and treatment modalities for the management of periodontal disease continue to offer the clinician a large number of choices, many of which involve antimicrobials. Specific pathogenic bacteria play a central role in the etiology and pathogenesis of destructive periodontal disease. Under suitable conditions, periodontal pathogens colonize the subgingival environment and are incorporated into a tenacious biofilm. Successful prevention and treatment of periodontitis is contingent upon effective control of the periodontopathic bacteria. This is accomplished by professional treatment of diseased periodontal sites and patient-performed plaque control. Attention to community factors, such as water contamination and bacterial transmission among family members, facilitates preventive measures and early treatment for the entire family. Subgingival mechanical debridement, with or without surgery, constitutes the basic means of disrupting the subgingival biofilm and controlling pathogens. Appropriate antimicrobial agents that can be administered systemically (antibiotics) or via local delivery (povidone-iodine) may enhance eradication or marked suppression of subgingival pathogens. Microbiological testing may aid the clinician in the selection of the most effective antimicrobial agent or combination of agents. Understanding the benefits and limitations of antibiotics and antiseptics will optimize their usefulness in combating periodontal infections.

  2. Antimicrobial use and antimicrobial susceptibility in Escherichia coli on small- and medium-scale pig farms in north-eastern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ström

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensification of livestock production seen in many low- and middle-income countries is often believed to be associated with increased use of antimicrobials, and may hence contribute to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The aim of this study was to map antimicrobial use on small- (n = 25 and medium-scale (n = 27 pig farms in north-eastern Thailand, and to compare antimicrobial susceptibility of commensal Escherichia coli isolated from sows on these farms. Methods Information regarding pig husbandry and antimicrobial treatment regimens was obtained by the use of semi-structured questionnaires. Faecal samples were collected from three healthy sows at each farm, and Escherichia coli was cultured and analysed for antimicrobial susceptibility using the broth microdilution method. Multilevel regression models were used to compare antimicrobial susceptibility between isolates from small- and medium-scale farms. Results All farms included in the study administered antimicrobials to their sows. Small-scale farmers most commonly (64% decided themselves when to give antimicrobials and the majority (60% bought the medicines at the local store or pharmacy, whereas farmers on medium-scale farms always discussed antimicrobial treatment with a veterinarian. Medium-scale farms used a greater diversity of antimicrobials than small-scale farms and did also administer antimicrobials in feed to a higher extent. High levels of antimicrobial resistance to several critically important antimicrobials for human medicine (including ciprofloxacin, streptomycin and ampicillin were found in isolates from both small- and medium-scale farms. Resistance levels were significantly (P < 0.05 higher in isolates from medium-scale farms for several of the antimicrobials tested, as well as the level of multidrug-resistance (P = 0.026. Conclusion The routines regarding access and administration of antimicrobials differed between the small- and

  3. Macromolecular agents with antimicrobial potentialities: A drive to combat antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Rasheed, Tahir; Iqbal, Hafiz M N; Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xuehong

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) or multidrug resistance (MDR) has become a serious health concern and major challenging issue, worldwide. After decades of negligence, the AMR has now captured global attention. The increasing number of antibiotic-resistant strains has threatened the achievements of science and medicine since it inactivates conventional antimicrobial therapeutics. Scientists are trying to respond to AMR/MDR threat by exploring innovative platforms and new therapeutic strategies to tackle infections from these resistant strains and bypass treatment limitations related to these pathologies. The present review focuses on the utilization of bio-inspired novel constructs and their potential applications as novel antimicrobial agents. The first part of the review describes plant-based biological macromolecules containing an immense variety of secondary metabolites, which could be potentially used as alternative strategies to combat antimicrobial resistance. The second part discusses the potential of metal-based macromolecules as effective antimicrobial platforms for preventing infections from resistant strains. The third part comprehensively elucidates how nanoparticles, in particular, metal-integrated nanoparticles can overcome this AMR or MDR issue. Towards the end, information is given with critical concluding remarks, gaps, and finally envisioned with future considerations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of modern topical antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Vorontsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To measure minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC values for modern topical antimicrobials against common ocular pathogens.Methods.Antimicrobials most commonly used in ophthalmology (fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides are dose-dependent drugs, i.e., the rate of microbial death increases in direct proportion to their concentrations. To determine MICs, we applied Hi Comb MIC Test (E-test. 105 patients aged 2 months through 7 years which were diagnosed with various inflammatory disorders of anterior segment were  xamined. MIC values for most commonly used antimicrobials, i.e., ciprofloxacin / Cipromed (Sentiss Pharma, Gurgaon, India, ofloxacin / Floxal (Baush & Lomb, Rochester, New-York, levofloxacin / Signicef (Sentiss Pharma, Gurgaon, India, moxifloxacin / Vigamox (Alcon, Fort Worth, Texas, gatifloxacin / Zymar (Allergan, Irvine, California, and tobramycin / Tobrex (Alcon, Fort Worth, Texas, were measured.Results. The analysis revealed that the most effective antibacterial drug against microbial isolates in children (i.e., Staphylococci spp. was levofloxacin. MIC for this agent against Streptococci spp. and Gram-negative microbes was low as well. Moxifloxacin is preferred for the treatment of ocular inflammation provoked by Streptococci spp. as MIC of this antimicrobial against Streptococci spp. was the lowest. MIC of ciprofloxacin against Gram-negative flora was the lowest. These data demonstrate generally recognized high efficacy of this drug. MIC value for tobramycin against all bacterial isolates was the highest.

  5. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of modern topical antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Vorontsova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To measure minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC values for modern topical antimicrobials against common ocular pathogens.Methods.Antimicrobials most commonly used in ophthalmology (fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides are dose-dependent drugs, i.e., the rate of microbial death increases in direct proportion to their concentrations. To determine MICs, we applied Hi Comb MIC Test (E-test. 105 patients aged 2 months through 7 years which were diagnosed with various inflammatory disorders of anterior segment were  xamined. MIC values for most commonly used antimicrobials, i.e., ciprofloxacin / Cipromed (Sentiss Pharma, Gurgaon, India, ofloxacin / Floxal (Baush & Lomb, Rochester, New-York, levofloxacin / Signicef (Sentiss Pharma, Gurgaon, India, moxifloxacin / Vigamox (Alcon, Fort Worth, Texas, gatifloxacin / Zymar (Allergan, Irvine, California, and tobramycin / Tobrex (Alcon, Fort Worth, Texas, were measured.Results. The analysis revealed that the most effective antibacterial drug against microbial isolates in children (i.e., Staphylococci spp. was levofloxacin. MIC for this agent against Streptococci spp. and Gram-negative microbes was low as well. Moxifloxacin is preferred for the treatment of ocular inflammation provoked by Streptococci spp. as MIC of this antimicrobial against Streptococci spp. was the lowest. MIC of ciprofloxacin against Gram-negative flora was the lowest. These data demonstrate generally recognized high efficacy of this drug. MIC value for tobramycin against all bacterial isolates was the highest.

  6. Integrating tuberculosis and antimicrobial resistance control programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Rumina; Shakoor, Sadia; Hanefeld, Johanna; Khan, Mishal

    2018-03-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries facing high levels of antimicrobial resistance, and the associated morbidity from ineffective treatment, also have a high burden of tuberculosis. Over recent decades many countries have developed effective laboratory and information systems for tuberculosis control. In this paper we describe how existing tuberculosis laboratory systems can be expanded to accommodate antimicrobial resistance functions. We show how such expansion in services may benefit tuberculosis case-finding and laboratory capacity through integration of laboratory services. We further summarize the synergies between high-level strategies on tuberculosis and antimicrobial resistance control. These provide a potential platform for the integration of programmes and illustrate how integration at the health-service delivery level for diagnostic services could occur in practice in a low- and middle-income setting. Many potential mutual benefits of integration exist, in terms of accelerated scale-up of diagnostic testing towards rational use of antimicrobial drugs as well as optimal use of resources and sharing of experience. Integration of vertical disease programmes with separate funding streams is not without challenges, however, and we also discuss barriers to integration and identify opportunities and incentives to overcome these.

  7. Burden of disease from inadequate water, sanitation and hygiene in low- and middle-income settings: a retrospective analysis of data from 145 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüss-Ustün, Annette; Bartram, Jamie; Clasen, Thomas; Colford, John M; Cumming, Oliver; Curtis, Valerie; Bonjour, Sophie; Dangour, Alan D; De France, Jennifer; Fewtrell, Lorna; Freeman, Matthew C; Gordon, Bruce; Hunter, Paul R; Johnston, Richard B; Mathers, Colin; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Medlicott, Kate; Neira, Maria; Stocks, Meredith; Wolf, Jennyfer; Cairncross, Sandy

    2014-08-01

    To estimate the burden of diarrhoeal diseases from exposure to inadequate water, sanitation and hand hygiene in low- and middle-income settings and provide an overview of the impact on other diseases. For estimating the impact of water, sanitation and hygiene on diarrhoea, we selected exposure levels with both sufficient global exposure data and a matching exposure-risk relationship. Global exposure data were estimated for the year 2012, and risk estimates were taken from the most recent systematic analyses. We estimated attributable deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) by country, age and sex for inadequate water, sanitation and hand hygiene separately, and as a cluster of risk factors. Uncertainty estimates were computed on the basis of uncertainty surrounding exposure estimates and relative risks. In 2012, 502,000 diarrhoea deaths were estimated to be caused by inadequate drinking water and 280,000 deaths by inadequate sanitation. The most likely estimate of disease burden from inadequate hand hygiene amounts to 297,000 deaths. In total, 842,000 diarrhoea deaths are estimated to be caused by this cluster of risk factors, which amounts to 1.5% of the total disease burden and 58% of diarrhoeal diseases. In children under 5 years old, 361,000 deaths could be prevented, representing 5.5% of deaths in that age group. This estimate confirms the importance of improving water and sanitation in low- and middle-income settings for the prevention of diarrhoeal disease burden. It also underscores the need for better data on exposure and risk reductions that can be achieved with provision of reliable piped water, community sewage with treatment and hand hygiene. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine and International Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Advances in pharmacovigilance initiatives surrounding antimicrobial resistance-Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairy, Laxminarayana Kurady; Nayak, Veena; A, Avinash; Kunder, Sushil Kiran

    2016-08-01

    In recent years the development of antimicrobial resistance has been accelerating, the discovery of new antimicrobial agents has slowed substantially in past decades. This review mainly focuses on the problem of antimicrobial resistance(AMR); the various contributor mechanisms, consequences and future of AMR. The review also highlights the irrational use of antimicrobials, improving their usage and problems associated with pharmacovigilance of antimicrobial resistance. Pharmacovigilance in the form of surveillance of antibiotic use is being done in 90% of the countries worldwide through the WHONET program developed by WHO. However, the data comes from a limited area of the globe. Data from every part of the world is required, so that there is geographical representation of every region. A major hurdle in quantifying the extent of antimicrobial resistance is the fact that there are several known microbes, that may turn out to be resistant to one or more of the several known antimicrobial agents. The global action plan initiated by WHO, if implemented successfully will definitely reduce AMR and will help in evaluating treatment interventions.

  9. Therapeutic drug monitoring of antimicrobials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jason A; Norris, Ross; Paterson, David L; Martin, Jennifer H

    2012-01-01

    Optimizing the prescription of antimicrobials is required to improve clinical outcome from infections and to reduce the development of antimicrobial resistance. One such method to improve antimicrobial dosing in individual patients is through application of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). The aim of this manuscript is to review the place of TDM in the dosing of antimicrobial agents, specifically the importance of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) to define the antimicrobial exposures necessary for maximizing killing or inhibition of bacterial growth. In this context, there are robust data for some antimicrobials, including the ratio of a PK parameter (e.g. peak concentration) to the minimal inhibitory concentration of the bacteria associated with maximal antimicrobial effect. Blood sampling of an individual patient can then further define the relevant PK parameter value in that patient and, if necessary, antimicrobial dosing can be adjusted to enable achievement of the target PK/PD ratio. To date, the clinical outcome benefits of a systematic TDM programme for antimicrobials have only been demonstrated for aminoglycosides, although the decreasing susceptibility of bacteria to available antimicrobials and the increasing costs of pharmaceuticals, as well as emerging data on pharmacokinetic variability, suggest that benefits are likely. PMID:21831196

  10. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy combined with periodontal treatment for metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelista, Erika Elisabeth; Fran?a, Cristiane Miranda; Veni, Priscila; de Oliveira Silva, Tamires; Gon?alves, Rafael Moredo; de Carvalho, Ver?nica Franco; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Fernandes, Kristianne P S; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel A; Camacho, Cleber P; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Alvarenga, Let?cia Heineck; Prates, Renato Araujo

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and periodontal disease is bidirectional. DM is a predisposing and modifying factor of periodontitis, which, in turn, worsens glycemic control and increases proteins found in the acute phase of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein. The gold standard for the treatment of periodontal disease is oral hygiene orientation, scaling and planing. Moreover, systemic antibiotic therapy may be employed in some cases. In an effort to minimize...

  11. Natural antimicrobials in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Stock, Sarah J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Natural antimicrobials are peptides that are essential components of the innate immune system, providing broad-spectrum protection against bacteria, yeasts and some viruses. In addition to their innate immune activity, they exhibit properties suggesting they interact with the adaptive immune system. These functions imply they may be of particular importance in pregnancy. Intrauterine infection is responsible for approximately one third of cases of preterm labour, and normal ...

  12. Antimicrobial Modifications of Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Sedlarik, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is focused on antimicrobial modifications of polymer materials intended for medical devices production. Firstly, a brief introduction into the field of medical application of polymers is presented. Considering the fact that polymer medical devices are often connected with occurrence of nosocomial infections, the next part refers to this phenomenon and its causes. One of the possibilities of reducing of the infection occurrence is aimed at polymer modification. It is a key topic o...

  13. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substrat...

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolated in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papanin Putsathit

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to antimicrobials is the major risk factor associated with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI. Paradoxically, treatment of CDI with antimicrobials remains the preferred option. To date, only three studies have investigated the antimicrobial susceptibility of C. difficile from Thailand, two of which were published in the 1990s. This study aimed to investigate the contemporary antibiotic susceptibility of C. difficile isolated from patients in Thailand. Methods A collection of 105 C. difficile isolated from inpatients admitted at Siriraj Hospital in Bangkok in 2015 was tested for their susceptibility to nine antimicrobials via an agar incorporation method. Results All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, metronidazole, amoxicillin/clavulanate and meropenem. Resistance to clindamycin, erythromycin and moxifloxacin was observed in 73.3%, 35.2% and 21.0% of the isolates, respectively. The in vitro activity of fidaxomicin (MIC50/MIC90 0.06/0.25 mg/L was superior to first-line therapies vancomycin (MIC50/MIC90 1/2 mg/L and metronidazole (MIC50/MIC90 0.25/0.25 mg/L. Rifaximin exhibited potent activity against 85.7% of the isolates (MIC ≤0.03 mg/L, and its MIC50 (0.015 mg/L was the lowest among all antimicrobials tested. The prevalence of multi-drug resistant C. difficile, defined by resistance to ≥3 antimicrobials, was 21.9% (23/105. Conclusions A high level of resistance against multiple classes of antimicrobial was observed, emphasising the need for enhanced antimicrobial stewardship and educational programmes to effectively disseminate information regarding C. difficile awareness and appropriate use of antimicrobials to healthcare workers and the general public.

  15. The antimicrobial resistance crisis: causes, consequences and management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Anne Michael

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR crisis is the increasing global incidence of infectious diseases affecting the human population, which are untreatable with any known antimicrobial agent. This crisis will have a devastating cost on human society as both debilitating and lethal diseases increase in frequency and scope. Three major factors determine this crisis: 1/ The increasing frequency of AMR phenotypes amongst microbes is an evolutionary response to the widespread use of antimicrobials. 2/ The large and globally connected human population allows pathogens in any environment access to all of humanity. 3/ The extensive and often unnecessary use of antimicrobials by humanity provides the strong selective pressure that is driving the evolutionary response in the microbial world. Of these factors, the size of the human population is least amenable to rapid change. In contrast the remaining two factors may be affected, so offering a means of managing the crisis: The rate at which AMR, as well as virulence factors evolve in microbial world may be slowed by reducing the applied selective pressure. This may be accomplished by radically reducing the global use of current and prospective antimicrobials. Current management measures to legislate the use of antimicrobials and to educate the healthcare world in the issues, while useful, have not comprehensively addressed the problem of achieving an overall reduction in the human use of antimicrobials. We propose that in addition to current measures and increased research into new antimicrobials and diagnostics, a comprehensive education programme will be required to change the public paradigm of antimicrobial usage from that of a first line treatment to that of a last resort when all other therapeutic options have failed.

  16. The antimicrobial resistance crisis: causes, consequences, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Carolyn Anne; Dominey-Howes, Dale; Labbate, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial resistance (AMR) crisis is the increasing global incidence of infectious diseases affecting the human population, which are untreatable with any known antimicrobial agent. This crisis will have a devastating cost on human society as both debilitating and lethal diseases increase in frequency and scope. Three major factors determine this crisis: (1) the increasing frequency of AMR phenotypes among microbes is an evolutionary response to the widespread use of antimicrobials; (2) the large and globally connected human population allows pathogens in any environment access to all of humanity; and (3) the extensive and often unnecessary use of antimicrobials by humanity provides the strong selective pressure that is driving the evolutionary response in the microbial world. Of these factors, the size of the human population is least amenable to rapid change. In contrast, the remaining two factors may be affected, so offering a means of managing the crisis: the rate at which AMR, as well as virulence factors evolve in microbial world may be slowed by reducing the applied selective pressure. This may be accomplished by radically reducing the global use of current and prospective antimicrobials. Current management measures to legislate the use of antimicrobials and to educate the healthcare world in the issues, while useful, have not comprehensively addressed the problem of achieving an overall reduction in the human use of antimicrobials. We propose that in addition to current measures and increased research into new antimicrobials and diagnostics, a comprehensive education program will be required to change the public paradigm of antimicrobial usage from that of a first line treatment to that of a last resort when all other therapeutic options have failed.

  17. Antimicrobials and QT prolongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jay W

    2017-05-01

    Solithromycin, a ketolide/macrolide antibiotic, has recently been reported to be free of the expected QT-prolonging effect of macrolides. It appears that its keto substitution provides a structural basis for this observation, as the other two tested ketolides also have minimal QT effect.Among non-cardiovascular therapies, antimicrobials probably carry the greatest potential to cause cardiac arrhythmias. This is a result of their propensity to bind to the delayed rectifier potassium channel, IKr, inducing QT prolongation and risk of torsades de pointes ventricular tachycardia, their frequent interference with the metabolism of other QT prolongers and their susceptibility to metabolic inhibition by numerous commonly used drugs.Unfortunately, there is evidence that medical practitioners do not take account of the QT/arrhythmia risk of antimicrobials in their prescribing practices. Education on this topic is sorely needed. When a macrolide is indicated, a ketolide should be considered in patients with a QT risk. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Plated coating with antimicrobial agent and application; Kokinsei mekki to sono oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramatsu, Minoru; Fukuzaki, Satoshi

    1999-11-01

    Needs of society for the plating technology which gives the function of antifouling property and antimicrobial, etc. on the material surface is big. However, the superfluous antimicrobial treatment has been killed to necessary mycorrhizal fungus, when the human lives. In the development of future antimicrobe plating, not only safety to antimicrobial activity and organism but also consideration to the environmental problem are also the important development element. Here, it introduces production technique and antimicrobe product of the antimicrobe plating. (NEDO)

  19. Serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance, and molecular characterization of invasive group B Streptococcus isolates recovered from Chinese neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Serotype distribution, antimicrobial susceptibility, and sequence type characterization in Asia and in other global regions may contribute to improve the prevention and treatment of neonatal GBS infections.

  20. Substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Falagas, Matthew E

    2015-04-01

    Substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs are a growing global problem. The most common substandard/counterfeit antimicrobials include beta-lactams (among antibiotics) and chloroquine and artemisin derivatives (among antimalarials). The most common type of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs have a reduced amount of the active drug, and the majority of them are manufactured in Southeast Asia and Africa. Counterfeit antimicrobial drugs may cause increased mortality and morbidity and pose a danger to patients. Here we review the literature with regard to the issue of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobials and describe the prevalence of this problem, the different types of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs, and the consequences for the individuals and global public health. Local, national, and international initiatives are required to combat this very important public health issue. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Mycoplasma bovis: mechanisms of resistance and trends in antimicrobial susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna eLysnyansky

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma bovis is a cell-wall-less bacterium and belongs to the class Mollicutes. It is the most important etiological agent of bovine mycoplasmoses in North America and Europe, causing respiratory disease, mastitis, otitis media, arthritis, and reproductive disease. Clinical disease associated with M. bovis is often chronic, debilitating, and poorly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, resulting in significant economic loss, the full extent of which is difficult to estimate. Until M. bovis vaccines are universally available, sanitary control measures and antimicrobial treatment are the only approaches that can be used in attempts to control M. bovis infections. However, in vitro studies show that many of the current M. bovis isolates circulating in Europe have high minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC for many of the commercially available antimicrobials. In this review we summarize the current MIC trends indicating the development of antimicrobial resistance in M. bovis as well as the known molecular mechanisms by which resistance is acquired.

  2. Screening of some Malay medicated oils for antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Khalisanni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oils from six Malay medicated oils, used traditionally in the treatment of infectious and septic diseases in humans, were tested for their antimicrobial property. The aim was to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of six Malay medicated oils against certain microbial isolates. Locally available Malay medicated oils were checked for their antimicrobial activities using six species of bacteria: E. coli, Salmonella spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus, Bacillus subtilis and 2 fungi with 1 yeast (Aspergillus niger, Penicillum spp. and Candida albicans. Clove oil showed the highest antibacterial activity followed, respectively, by 'bunga merah', cajaput, nutmeg, lemon grass and 'gamat' oil. Clove oil and lemon grass showed anticandidal activity. The Malay medicated oil studies did not show any antifungal activity. The study shows that Malay medicated oils, like antibiotics, have antimicrobial activities against some microorganisms.

  3. Anti-microbial activities of sulfonamides using disc diffusion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saba; Farrukh, Muhammad Akhyar

    2012-10-01

    Sulfonamides, being the member of the oldest anti-microbial group of compounds possess wide anti-microbial activities and are effective against pathogenic strains of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. They are widely used in the treatment of various infectious diseases e.g. malaria, urinary tract infections, respiratory tract infections etc. Based on their effectiveness against most of the bacteria, two novel sulfonamides (N-(2-methoxy phenyl)-4-methylbenzenesulfonamide and N-ethyl-4-methyl-N-(3-methyl phenyl)benzenesulfonamide) were synthesized. The compounds were characterized by FT-IR and elemental analyzer. Their anti-microbial activity was assessed and observed against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria using disc diffusion method. They showed good anti-microbial activities.

  4. Mycoplasma bovis: Mechanisms of Resistance and Trends in Antimicrobial Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysnyansky, Inna; Ayling, Roger D

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is a cell-wall-less bacterium and belongs to the class Mollicutes. It is the most important etiological agent of bovine mycoplasmoses in North America and Europe, causing respiratory disease, mastitis, otitis media, arthritis, and reproductive disease. Clinical disease associated with M. bovis is often chronic, debilitating, and poorly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, resulting in significant economic loss, the full extent of which is difficult to estimate. Until M. bovis vaccines are universally available, sanitary control measures and antimicrobial treatment are the only approaches that can be used in attempts to control M. bovis infections. However, in vitro studies show that many of the current M. bovis isolates circulating in Europe have high minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for many of the commercially available antimicrobials. In this review we summarize the current MIC trends indicating the development of antimicrobial resistance in M. bovis as well as the known molecular mechanisms by which resistance is acquired.

  5. Donepezil: A cause of inadequate muscle relaxation and delayed neuromuscular recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Bhardwaj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 74-year-old female with diabetes mellitus type II and Alzheimer′s disease, taking donepezil for 4 months was operated for right modified radical mastectomy under general anesthesia. During the procedure a higher dose of non-depolarizing muscle relaxant was required than those recommended for her age yet the muscle relaxation was inadequate intra-operatively. Residual neuromuscular blockade persisted postoperatively, due to the cumulative effect of large doses of non-depolarizing muscle relaxant, needing post-operative ventilatory assistance. After ruling out other causes of resistance to non-depolarizing muscle relaxants, we concluded that acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil was primarily responsible for inadequate muscle relaxation and delayed post-operative neuromuscular recovery.

  6. Role of Sex and the Environment in Moderating Weight Gain Due to Inadequate Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coborn, Jamie E; Houser, Monica M; Perez-Leighton, Claudio E; Teske, Jennifer A

    2017-12-01

    The growing prevalence of obesity, inadequate sleep and sleep disorders together with the negative impact of lack of sleep on overall health highlights the need for therapies targeted towards weight gain due to sleep loss. Sex disparities in obesity and sleep disorders are present; yet, the role of sex is inadequately addressed and thus it is unclear whether sensitivity to sleep disruption differs between men and women. Like sex, environmental factors contribute to the development of obesity and poor sleep. The obesogenic environment is characterized by easy access to palatable foods and a low demand for energy expenditure in daily activities. These and other environmental factors are discussed, as they drive altered sleep or their interaction with food choice and intake can promote obesity. We discuss data that suggest differences in sleep patterns and responses to sleep disruption influence sex disparities in weight gain, and that enviromental disturbances alter sleep and interact with features of the obesogenic environment that together promote obesity.

  7. Antimicrobial Approaches for Textiles: From Research to Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Diana Santos; Guedes, Rui Miranda; Lopes, Maria Ascensão

    2016-01-01

    The large surface area and ability to retain moisture of textile structures enable microorganisms’ growth, which causes a range of undesirable effects, not only on the textile itself, but also on the user. Due to the public health awareness of the pathogenic effects on personal hygiene and associated health risks, over the last few years, intensive research has been promoted in order to minimize microbes’ growth on textiles. Therefore, to impart an antimicrobial ability to textiles, different approaches have been studied, being mainly divided into the inclusion of antimicrobial agents in the textile polymeric fibers or their grafting onto the polymer surface. Regarding the antimicrobial agents, different types have been used, such as quaternary ammonium compounds, triclosan, metal salts, polybiguanides or even natural polymers. Any antimicrobial treatment performed on a textile, besides being efficient against microorganisms, must be non-toxic to the consumer and to the environment. This review mainly intends to provide an overview of antimicrobial agents and treatments that can be performed to produce antimicrobial textiles, using chemical or physical approaches, which are under development or already commercially available in the form of isolated agents or textile fibers or fabrics. PMID:28773619

  8. Antimicrobial Approaches for Textiles: From Research to Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Santos Morais

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The large surface area and ability to retain moisture of textile structures enable microorganisms’ growth, which causes a range of undesirable effects, not only on the textile itself, but also on the user. Due to the public health awareness of the pathogenic effects on personal hygiene and associated health risks, over the last few years, intensive research has been promoted in order to minimize microbes’ growth on textiles. Therefore, to impart an antimicrobial ability to textiles, different approaches have been studied, being mainly divided into the inclusion of antimicrobial agents in the textile polymeric fibers or their grafting onto the polymer surface. Regarding the antimicrobial agents, different types have been used, such as quaternary ammonium compounds, triclosan, metal salts, polybiguanides or even natural polymers. Any antimicrobial treatment performed on a textile, besides being efficient against microorganisms, must be non-toxic to the consumer and to the environment. This review mainly intends to provide an overview of antimicrobial agents and treatments that can be performed to produce antimicrobial textiles, using chemical or physical approaches, which are under development or already commercially available in the form of isolated agents or textile fibers or fabrics.

  9. OCCUPATIONAL ACCIDENTS AS INDICATORS OF INADEQUATE WORK CONDITIONS AND WORK ENVIRONMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Petar Babović

    2009-01-01

    Occupational accidents due to inadequate working conditions and work environment present a major problem in highly industrialised countries, as well as in developing ones. Occupational accidents are a regular and accompanying phenomenon in all human activities and one of the main health related and economic problems in modern societies.The aim of this study is the analysis of the connections of unfavourable working conditions and working environment on occupational accidents. Occurrence of oc...

  10. Global trends in dietary micronutrient supplies and estimated prevalence of inadequate intakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ty Beal

    Full Text Available Understanding dietary patterns is vital to reducing the number of people experiencing hunger (about 795 million, micronutrient deficiencies (2 billion, and overweight or obesity (2.1 billion. We characterize global trends in dietary quality by estimating micronutrient density of the food supply, prevalence of inadequate intake of 14 micronutrients, and average prevalence of inadequate intake of these micronutrients for all countries between 1961 and 2011. Over this 50-year period, the estimated prevalence of inadequate intakes of micronutrients has declined in all regions due to increased total production of food and/or micronutrient density. This decline has been particularly strong in East and Southeast Asia and weaker in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Sub-Saharan Africa is the only region where dietary micronutrient density has declined over this 50-year period. At the global level, micronutrients with the lowest levels of adequate estimated intake are calcium, iron, vitamin A, and zinc, but there are strong differences between countries and regions. Fortification has reduced the estimated prevalence of inadequate micronutrient intakes in all low-income regions, except South Asia. The food supply in many countries is still far below energy requirements, which suggests a need to increase the availability and accessibility of nutritious foods. Countries where the food energy supply is adequate show a very large variation in dietary quality, and in many of these countries people would benefit from more diverse diets with a greater proportion of micronutrient-dense foods. Dietary quality can be improved through fortification, biofortification, and agricultural diversification, as well as efforts to improve access to and use of micronutrient-dense foods and nutritional knowledge. Reducing poverty and increasing education, especially of women, are integral to sustainably addressing malnutrition.

  11. Global trends in dietary micronutrient supplies and estimated prevalence of inadequate intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Ty; Massiot, Eric; Arsenault, Joanne E; Smith, Matthew R; Hijmans, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Understanding dietary patterns is vital to reducing the number of people experiencing hunger (about 795 million), micronutrient deficiencies (2 billion), and overweight or obesity (2.1 billion). We characterize global trends in dietary quality by estimating micronutrient density of the food supply, prevalence of inadequate intake of 14 micronutrients, and average prevalence of inadequate intake of these micronutrients for all countries between 1961 and 2011. Over this 50-year period, the estimated prevalence of inadequate intakes of micronutrients has declined in all regions due to increased total production of food and/or micronutrient density. This decline has been particularly strong in East and Southeast Asia and weaker in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Sub-Saharan Africa is the only region where dietary micronutrient density has declined over this 50-year period. At the global level, micronutrients with the lowest levels of adequate estimated intake are calcium, iron, vitamin A, and zinc, but there are strong differences between countries and regions. Fortification has reduced the estimated prevalence of inadequate micronutrient intakes in all low-income regions, except South Asia. The food supply in many countries is still far below energy requirements, which suggests a need to increase the availability and accessibility of nutritious foods. Countries where the food energy supply is adequate show a very large variation in dietary quality, and in many of these countries people would benefit from more diverse diets with a greater proportion of micronutrient-dense foods. Dietary quality can be improved through fortification, biofortification, and agricultural diversification, as well as efforts to improve access to and use of micronutrient-dense foods and nutritional knowledge. Reducing poverty and increasing education, especially of women, are integral to sustainably addressing malnutrition.

  12. Cognitive Dissonance, Confirmatory Bias and Inadequate Information Processing: Evidence from Experimental Auctions

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Ying; Just, David R.; Wansink, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Using psychological terms such as cognitive dissonance and confirmation bias, this study reveals how individual consumers inadequately process (food safety) information, pay limited attention to signals, and make purchase decisions that are bias towards their initial choices. While it is expected that reading extra information about potential risk associated with the food decreases consumers' willingness to pay (WTP), the magnitude of the impact varies across individuals. In general, consumer...

  13. Growth inhibition in rats fed inadequate and incomplete proteins: repercussion on mandibular biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Bozzini, Clarisa; Champin, Graciela Monica; Bozzini, Carlos Eduardo Jose; Alippi, Rosa Maria

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the effects of feeding growing rats with a diet containing inadequate and incomplete proteins on both the morphological and the biomechanical properties of the mandible. Female rats aged 30 d were fed freely with one of two diets, control (CD, 301 Cal/100g) and experimental (ED, 359 Cal/100g). CD was a standard laboratory diet, while ED was a synthetic diet containing cornflower supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Both diets had the same physical characteristics. Con...

  14. Antimicrobial Drugs in the Home

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-10-19

    Survey participants in the United Kingdom admitted keeping leftover antimicrobial drugs for future use and taking them without medical advice. Dr. J. Todd Weber, director of CDC's Office of Antimicrobial Resistance, advises against the practice, which can be dangerous and can promote antimicrobial drug resistance.  Created: 10/19/2006 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 10/26/2006.

  15. Inadequate vocal hygiene habits associated with the presence of self-reported voice symptoms in telemarketers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-López, Eduardo; Fuente, Adrian; Contreras, Karem V

    2017-12-18

    The aim of this study is to determine possible associations between vocal hygiene habits and self-reported vocal symptoms in telemarketers. A cross-sectional study that included 79 operators from call centres in Chile was carried out. Their vocal hygiene habits and self-reported symptoms were investigated using a validated and reliable questionnaire created for the purposes of this study. Forty-five percent of telemarketers reported having one or more vocal symptoms. Among them, 16.46% reported that their voices tense up when talking and 10.13% needed to clear their throat to make their voices clearer. Five percent mentioned that they always talk without taking a break and 40.51% reported using their voices in noisy environments. The number of working hours per day and inadequate vocal hygiene habits were associated with the presence of self-reported symptoms. Additionally, an interaction between the use of the voice in noisy environments and not taking breaks during the day was observed. Finally, the frequency of inadequate vocal hygiene habits was associated with the number of symptoms reported. Using the voice in noisy environments and talking without taking breaks were both associated with the presence of specific vocal symptoms. This study provides some evidence about the interaction between these two inadequate vocal hygiene habits that potentiates vocal symptoms.

  16. Factors associated with inadequate work ability among women in the clothing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Viviane Gontijo; Sampaio, Rosana Ferreira; Ferreira, Fabiane Ribeiro; Kirkwood, Renata Noce; César, Cibele Comini

    2015-01-01

    Work ability depends on a balance between individual resources and work demands. This study evaluated factors that are associated with inadequate work ability among workers in the clothing industry. We conducted a cross-sectional observational study of 306 workers in 40 small and medium-sized enterprises. We assessed work ability, individual resources, physical and psychosocial demands, and aspects of life outside work using a binary logistic regression model with hierarchical data entry. The mean work ability was 42.5 (SD=3.5); when adjusted for age, only 11% of the workers showed inadequate work ability. The final model revealed that smoking, high isometric physical load, and poor physical environmental conditions were the most significant predictors of inadequate work ability. Good working conditions and worker education must be implemented to eliminate factors that can be changed and that have a negative impact on work ability. These initiatives include anti-smoking measures, improved postures at work, and better physical environmental conditions.

  17. Antimicrobial resistance in the environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keen, Patricia L; Montforts, M. H. M. M

    2012-01-01

    .... Recognizing the connectivity between overlapping complex systems, the book discusses the subject from the perspective of an ecosystem approach"-- "This book explores the role that antimicrobial...

  18. Strategies to combat antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchil, Rajesh R; Kohli, Gurdeep Singh; Katekhaye, Vijay M; Swami, Onkar C

    2014-07-01

    The global burden of antimicrobial resistance is rising and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in clinical and community setting. Spread of antibiotic resistance to different environmental niches and development of superbugs have further complicated the effective control strategies. International, national and local approaches have been advised for control and prevention of antimicrobial resistance. Rational use of antimicrobials, regulation on over-the-counter availability of antibiotics, improving hand hygiene and improving infection prevention and control are the major recommended approaches. Thorough understanding of resistance mechanism and innovation in new drugs and vaccines is the need. A multidisciplinary, collaborative, regulatory approach is demanded for combating antimicrobial resistance.

  19. Delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Randi; Malmsten, Martin

    2017-01-01

    on the identification such peptides, as well as on their optimization to reach potent antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects at simultaneously low toxicity against human cells. In comparison, delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides have attracted considerably less interest. However, such delivery systems......, or through achieving co-localization with intracellular pathogens. Here, an overview is provided of the current understanding of delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides, with special focus on AMP-carrier interactions, as well as consequences of these interactions for antimicrobial and related biological...

  20. Antimicrobial resistant coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Isolates of coagulase positive S. aureus resistance to 10 antimicrobials was determined by disc diffusion method. Staphylococcus .... Table 1: Antimicrobial resistance of coagulase positive Staphylococcus. aureus isolates from chickens in Maiduguri,. Nigeria. Antimicrobials .... on Danish poultry and pig farms. Preventive.

  1. Antidepressants, antimicrobials or both? Gut microbiota dysbiosis in depression and possible implications of the antimicrobial effects of antidepressant drugs for antidepressant effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Danielle; Filho, Adriano José Maia Chaves; Soares de Sousa, Caren Nádia; Quevedo, João; Barichello, Tatiana; Júnior, Hélio Vitoriano Nobre; Freitas de Lucena, David

    2017-01-15

    The first drug repurposed for the treatment of depression was the tuberculostatic iproniazid. At present, drugs belonging to new classes of antidepressants still have antimicrobial effects. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota was implicated in the development or exacerbation of mental disorders, such as major depressive disorder (MDD). Based on the current interest in the gut-brain axis, the focus of this narrative review is to compile the available studies regarding the influences of gut microbiota in behavior and depression and to show the antimicrobial effect of antidepressant drugs. A discussion regarding the possible contribution of the antimicrobial effect of antidepressant drugs to its effectiveness/resistance is included. The search included relevant articles from PubMed, SciELO, LILACS, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Knowledge. MDD is associated with changes in gut permeability and microbiota composition. In this respect, antidepressant drugs present antimicrobial effects that could also be related to the effectiveness of these drugs for MDD treatment. Conversely, some antimicrobials present antidepressant effects. Both antidepressants and antimicrobials present neuroprotective/antidepressant and antimicrobial effects. Further studies are needed to evaluate the participation of antimicrobial mechanisms of antidepressants in MDD treatment as well as to determine the contribution of this effect to antidepressant resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies of polystyrene films under ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies of polystyrene films under air plasma and He-Ne laser treatment ... The parameters such as (1) surface area by contact angle measurements, (2) quality of material before and after treatment by SEM and FTIR spectra and (3) material characterization by UV-vis spectra were studied.

  3. Valproic Acid Induces Antimicrobial Compound Production in Doratomyces microspores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutz, Christoph; Bacher, Markus; Parich, Alexandra; Kluger, Bernhard; Gacek-Matthews, Agnieszka; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin; Strauss, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in public health is the rising number of antibiotic resistant pathogens and the lack of novel antibiotics. In recent years there is a rising focus on fungi as sources of antimicrobial compounds due to their ability to produce a large variety of bioactive compounds and the observation that virtually every fungus may still contain yet unknown so called "cryptic," often silenced, compounds. These putative metabolites could include novel bioactive compounds. Considerable effort is spent on methods to induce production of these "cryptic" metabolites. One approach is the use of small molecule effectors, potentially influencing chromatin landscape in fungi. We observed that the supernatant of the fungus Doratomyces (D.) microsporus treated with valproic acid (VPA) displayed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and two methicillin resistant clinical S. aureus isolates. VPA treatment resulted in enhanced production of seven antimicrobial compounds: cyclo-(L-proline-L-methionine) (cPM), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, cyclo-(phenylalanine-proline) (cFP), indole-3-carboxylic acid, phenylacetic acid (PAA) and indole-3-acetic acid. The production of the antimicrobial compound phenyllactic acid was exclusively detectable after VPA treatment. Furthermore three compounds, cPM, cFP, and PAA, were able to boost the antimicrobial activity of other antimicrobial compounds. cPM, for the first time isolated from fungi, and to a lesser extent PAA, are even able to decrease the minimal inhibitory concentration of ampicillin in MRSA strains. In conclusion we could show in this study that VPA treatment is a potent tool for induction of "cryptic" antimicrobial compound production in fungi, and that the induced compounds are not exclusively linked to the secondary metabolism. Furthermore this is the first discovery of the rare diketopiperazine cPM in fungi. Additionally we could demonstrate that cPM and PAA boost antibiotic activity against antibiotic

  4. The Effect of NIR Light and the Light-Activated Antimicrobial Agent on Wound Pathogenic Biofilms; Implication for Nonpharmacologic Chronic Wound Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omar, Ghada Said Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    biofilms. Metoder / Methods Biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in a 96-well microtiter plate for 18-22 h. The study included 4 arms: (a) control; (b) 200 µg/mL Indocyanin green (ICG) kept in the dark, (c) NIR laser alone; (d) NIR laser combined with 200 µg/mL. ICG...... cells encased in biofilms, while a combination of both light and dye resulted in a 99.3% kill. Exposure of Staph. aureus biofilms to ICG in combination with NIR laser light or to the NIR light alone resulted in 99.9% and 99.7% reductions in the number of viable bacteria, respectively. Konklusioner...... / Conclusions NIR laser alone was superior to the combination of ICG and NIR light in killing P. aeruginosa biofilms. However the combination of NIR with ICG was more effective in disrupting Staph. aureus biofilms. Thus NIR light laser may be a promising nonpharmacologic treatment method for disrupting biofilms...

  5. Antimicrobial activity of some Indian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabur, Rajesh; Gupta, Amita; Mandal, T K; Singh, Desh Deepak; Bajpai, Vivek; Gurav, A M; Lavekar, G S

    2007-02-16

    The antimicrobial potential of seventy-seven extracts from twenty-four plants was screened against eight bacteria and four pathogenic fungi, using microbroth dilution assay. Lowest concentration of the extract, which inhibits any visual microbial growth after treatment with p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet, was considered to be minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Water extracts of Acacia nilotica, Justicia zelanica, Lantana camara and Saraca asoca exhibited good activity against all the bacteria tested and the MIC was recorded in range of 9.375-37.5 microg/ml and 75.0-300.0 microg/ml against the bacterial and fungal pathogens, respectively. The other extracts of Phyllanthus urinaria, Thevetia nerifolia, Jatropha gossypifolia Saraca asoca, Tamarindus indica, Aegle marmelos, Acacia nilotica, Chlorophytum borivilianum, Mangifera indica, Woodfordia fruticosa and Phyllanthus emblica showed antimicrobial activity in a range of 75-1200 microg/ml.

  6. A situational analysis of current antimicrobial governance, regulation, and utilization in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Schellack

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Global Action Plan on antimicrobial resistance calls for the use of antimicrobial medicines in human and animal health to be optimized, in tandem with a strengthening of the knowledge and evidence base through surveillance and research. However, there is a paucity of consumption data for African countries such as South Africa. Determining antimicrobial consumption data in low-resource settings remains a challenge. This article describes alternative mechanisms of assessing antimicrobial consumption data, such as the use of Intercontinental Marketing Services (IMS data and contract data arising from tenders (an open Request for Proposal, RFP, as opposed to the international norms of daily defined doses per 100 patient-days or per 1000 population. Despite their limitations, these serve as indicators of antimicrobial exposure at the population level and represent an alternative method for ascertaining antimicrobial consumption in human health. Furthermore, South Africa has the largest antiretroviral treatment programme globally and carries a high burden of tuberculosis. This prompted the inclusion of antiretroviral and anti-tuberculosis antibiotic consumption data. Knowledge of antimicrobial utilization is imperative for meaningful future interventions. Baseline antimicrobial utilization data could guide future research initiatives that could provide a better understanding of the different measures of antibiotic use and the level of antibiotic resistance. Keywords: Antimicrobial governance, DOTS, Antibiotic consumption, Developing country, Antimicrobial exposure

  7. Antimicrobial activity and mechanism of action of a thionin-like peptide from Capsicum annuum fruits and combinatorial treatment with fluconazole against Fusarium solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveira, Gabriel B; Mello, Érica O; Carvalho, André O; Regente, Mariana; Pinedo, Marcela; de La Canal, Laura; Rodrigues, Rosana; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2017-05-01

    Many Fusarium species are able to cause severe infections in plants as well as in animals and humans. Therefore, the discovery of new antifungal agents is of paramount importance. CaThi belongs to the thionins, which are cationic peptides with low molecular weights (∼5 kDa) that have toxic effects against various microorganisms. Herein, we study the mechanism of action of CaThi and its combinatory effect with fluconazole (FLC) against Fusarium solani. The mechanism of action of CaThi was studied by growth inhibition, viability, plasma membrane permeabilization, ROS induction, caspase activation, localization, and DNA binding capability, as assessed with Sytox green, DAB, FITC-VAD-FMK, CaThi-FITC, and gel shift assays. The combinatory effect of CaThi and FLC was assessed using a growth inhibition assay. Our results demonstrated that CaThi present a dose dependent activity and at the higher used concentration (50 µg mL -1 ) inhibits 83% of F. solani growth, prevents the formation of hyphae, permeabilizes membranes, induces endogenous H 2 O 2 , activates caspases, and localizes intracellularly. CaThi combined with FLC, at concentrations that alone do not inhibit F. solani, result in 100% death of F. solani when combined. The data presented in this study demonstrate that CaThi causes death of F. solani via apoptosis; an intracellular target may also be involved. Combined treatment using CaThi and FLC is a strong candidate for studies aimed at improved targeting of F. solani. This strategy is of particular interest because it minimizes selection of resistant microorganisms. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Monitoring of Para-Hydroxy Benzoic Acid Esters (Antimicrobial and Preservative in Tehran Wastewater Treatment Plants and Performance Evaluation of Various Wastewater Treatment Method in the Removal of These Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Yegane Badi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Parabens are a group of Para-hydroxy Benzoic acid alkyl esters which extensively used as preservative in personal care products. Parabens have been recently found in wastewater, rivers, soil and dust. Therefore, the purpose of this study aimed to Monitor the occurrence of parabens from selected wastewater treatment plants (Shahrak Ghods and south of Tehran and evaluate the performance of different treatment methods for removing these compounds. Methods: In this study, the samples from influent and effluent were collected from Shahrak Ghods and South of Tehran wastewater treatment plant as Seasonal and Three samples per season. Concentration of Para-hydroxy Benzoic acid esters was determined by HPLC, CECIL, 4100 at 242 nm. Result: After sampling in the different seasons from the west and south treatment plants, two selective paraben concentrations (Methyl paraben and Ethyl paraben were measured. The results showed that average concentration of Methyl paraben (MeP and Ethyl paraben EtP( respectively were 740.7 and 277.7 ng/L in the Influent and 179.3 and 45.8 ng/L in the effluent of Shahrak Ghods treatment plant. Also, the average concentration of MeP and EtP respectively were 835.3 and 295.3 ng/L in Influent and 132.8 and 29.7 ng/L in the effluent of South of Tehran treatment plant. In the next step, Risk assessment of effluent treatment plants discharging to environment with comparing the studies was done. According to the paraben concentration in the effluent of both treatment plants, discharge of effluent treatment plants whit selective contaminants, have little biological effects on ecosystems. Conclusions: The removal efficiency of Shahrak Ghods treatment plant in removing parabens, was lower than the South of Tehran. But the effluent quality of both treatment plant was less than the Effluent discharge standard. So both of treatment plant have appropriate performance to removal contaminants.

  9. Human Health Hazards from Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli of Animal Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, A. M.; Heuer, Ole Eske

    2009-01-01

    Because of the intensive use of antimicrobial agents in food animal production, meat is frequently contaminated with antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli. Humans can be colonized with E. coli of animal origin, and because of resistance to commonly used antimicrobial agents, these bacteria may...... cause infections for which limited therapeutic options are available. This may lead to treatment failure and can have serious consequences for the patient. Furthermore, E. coli of animal origin may act as a donor of antimicrobial resistance genes for other pathogenic E. coli. Thus, the intensive use...

  10. The Role of Antimicrobial Peptides in Preventing Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Infections and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Soo Hahm

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, decreasing effectiveness of conventional antimicrobial-drugs has caused serious problems due to the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Furthermore, biofilms, which are microbial communities that cause serious chronic infections and dental plaque, form environments that enhance antimicrobial resistance. As a result, there is a continuous search to overcome or control such problems, which has resulted in antimicrobial peptides being considered as an alternative to conventional drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient host defense effector molecules in living organisms. These peptides have been identified in diverse organisms and synthetically developed by using peptidomimic techniques. This review was conducted to demonstrate the mode of action by which antimicrobial peptides combat multidrug-resistant bacteria and prevent biofilm formation and to introduce clinical uses of these compounds for chronic disease, medical devices, and oral health. In addition, combinations of antimicrobial peptides and conventional drugs were considered due to their synergetic effects and low cost for therapeutic treatment.

  11. Antimicrobial Food Packaging: Potential & Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BHANU eMALHOTRA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays food preservation, quality maintenance, and safety are major growing concerns of the food industry. It is evident that over time consumers’ demand for natural and safe food products with stringent regulations to prevent food-borne infectious diseases. Antimicrobial packaging which is thought to be a subset of active packaging and controlled release packaging is one such promising technology which effectively impregnates the antimicrobial into the food packaging film material and subsequently delivers it over the stipulated period of time to kill the pathogenic microorganisms affecting food products thereby increasing the shelf life to severe folds. This paper presents a picture of the recent research on antimicrobial agents that are aimed at enhancing and improving food quality and safety by reduction of pathogen growth and extension of shelf life, in a form of a comprehensive review. Examination of the available antimicrobial packaging technologies is also presented along with their significant impact on food safety. This article entails various antimicrobial agents for commercial applications, as well as the difference between the use of antimicrobials under laboratory scale and real time applications. Development of resistance amongst microorganisms is considered as a future implication of antimicrobials with an aim to come up with actual efficacies in extension of shelf life as well as reduction in bacterial growth through the upcoming and promising use of antimicrobials in food packaging for the forthcoming research down the line.

  12. for antimicrobial and antioxidant activities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-31

    Jan 31, 2012 ... An acetone extract of Loxostylis alata was separated into six fractions based on polarity by a solvent- solvent fractionation procedure and the different fractions were screened for antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. The number of antimicrobial compounds in the carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), chloroform ...

  13. Antimicrobial activity of Agave sisalana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... This study was carried out to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of extracts of the leaves and leaf waste discarded in the process of obtaining the hard fibers of Agave sisalana. The antimicrobial activity was determined by the paper disk diffusion method using Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (non-.

  14. Therapeutic drug monitoring of antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Indran; Shorten, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    As pathology services become more centralized and automated, the measurement of therapeutic antimicrobial drugs concentrations is increasingly performed in clinical biochemistry or 'blood science' laboratories. This review outlines key groups of antimicrobial agents: aminoglycosides, glycopeptides, antifungal agents and antituberculosis agents, their role in managing infectious diseases, and the reasons why serum concentration measurement is important. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopic and antimicrobial properties of Co(II), Ni (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study is to investigate the antimicrobial activity of novel Schiff base metal complexes. The resistance of micro-organisms to classical antimicrobial compounds poses a challenge to effective management and treatment of some diseases. In line with this, copper (II), nickel (II) and cobalt (II) complexes of ...

  16. Antimicrobial activity of the ethanol extract of the aerial parts of sida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The antimicrobial activity of the 90 % ethanol extract of the aerial parts of Sida acuta Burm. F. (Malvaceae) was investigated in other to verify its claimed ethno medicinal use in the treatment of microbial infections. Method: The antimicrobial activity of the extract was tested against standard strains and clinical ...

  17. In Vitro Evaluation of Biofilm Dispersal as a Therapeutic Strategy To Restore Antimicrobial Efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roizman, Dan; Vidaillac, Celine; Givskov, Michael

    2017-01-01

    engineered strain PAO1/pBAD-yhjH resulted in increased antimicrobial efficacy and synergy of the imipenem-tobramycin combination. These results support the use of biofilm dispersal to enhance antimicrobial efficacy in the treatment of biofilm-associated infections, representing a promising therapeutic...

  18. Synthesis, Spectroscopic and Antimicrobial properties of Co(II), Ni (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study is to investigate the antimicrobial activity of novel. Schiff base metal complexes. The resistance of micro-organisms to classical antimicrobial compounds poses a challenge to effective management and treatment of some diseases. In line with this, copper (II), nickel (II) and cobalt (II) ...

  19. Prospects of Nanostructure Materials and Their Composites as Antimicrobial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupriya Baranwal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured materials (NSMs have increasingly been used as a substitute for antibiotics and additives in various products to impart microbicidal effect. In particular, use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs has garnered huge researchers' attention as potent bactericidal agent due to the inherent antimicrobial property of the silver metal. Moreover, other nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, graphene, chitosan, etc. have also been studied for their antimicrobial effects in order ensure their application in widespread domains. The present review exclusively emphasizes on materials that possess antimicrobial activity in nanoscale range and describes their various modes of antimicrobial action. It also entails broad classification of NSMs along with their application in various fields. For instance, use of AgNPs in consumer products, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs in drug delivery. Likewise, use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs as additives in consumer merchandises and nanoscale chitosan (NCH in medical products and wastewater treatment. Furthermore, this review briefly discusses the current scenario of antimicrobial nanostructured materials (aNSMs, limitations of current research and their future prospects. To put various perceptive insights on the recent advancements of such antimicrobials, an extended table is incorporated, which describes effect of NSMs of different dimensions on test microorganisms along with their potential widespread applications.

  20. Characterization of shallot, an antimicrobial extract of allium ascalonicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, M.; Montazeri, E.A.; Mashhadizadeh, M.A.; Sheikh, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was characterization of antimicrobial extract of shallot in terms of its stability at different pH, Heat, enzymes and detergents and also determination of its MIC and shelf life. Methodology: Active fraction was determined by column chromatography and agar diffusion test. The amount of carbohydrate and protein in different forms of shallot extract were estimated. Stability of antimicrobial activity of shallot extract at different pH and temperature, solubility in different solvent, determination of shelf life and susceptibility to enzymes and detergents were evaluated. Results: Shallot extract was active against microbes at pH 4-8. Relative activities of shallot extract at temperature -7 to 121 deg. C were 88 to 100 %. Extract of shallot only was soluble in dimethyl sulphoxide, dimethyl formamide and water. The enzymes and detergents used in this study had no effect on antimicrobial activity on water extract of shallot. Relative antimicrobial activity at incubation times of one hour to 6 mounts were 94 to 100 %. Conclusion: In this study antimicrobial properties of shallot were investigated for discovery of a new antibiotic. Based on this the antimicrobial compound can be an effective medicine for treatment of dermatomycosis and other infectious diseases. (author)