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Sample records for inactivating methicillin resistant

  1. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yucheng; Dai, Tianhong; Gu, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Background: With the increasing emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains, there is a pressing need for the development of alternative treatment for infections. Antimicrobial blue light (aBL) has provided a simple and effective approach. Methods: We first investigated the effectiveness of aBL (415 nm) inactivation of USA300 LAClux (a communityacquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain) both in the planktonic and biofilm forms. The survival of the bacteria in suspensions was determined by serial dilution and that of the biofilm-embedded bacteria was determined by bioluminescence quantification. Using a mouse model of thermal burn infected with USA300 LAClux, we further assessed the effectiveness of aBL for treating localized infections. Bioluminescence imaging was performed to monitor in real time bacterial viability in vivo. Results: In vitro study showed that, for the planktonic counterpart of the bacteria or the 24-h-old biofilms, an irradiance of 55 mW/cm2 for 60 min resulted in a 4.61 log10 or 2.56 log10 inactivation, respectively. In vivo study using infected mouse burns demonstrated that a 2.56-log10 inactivation was achieved after 100-mW/cm2 irradiation for 62 min. Conclusions: aBL is a potential alternative approach for treating Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

  2. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, H F

    1988-01-01

    Strains of staphylococci resistant to methicillin were identified immediately after introduction of this drug. Methicillin-resistant strains have unusual properties, the most notable of which is extreme variability in expression of the resistance trait. The conditions associated with this heterogeneous expression of resistance are described. Methicillin resistance is associated with production of a unique penicillin-binding protein (PBP), 2a, which is bound and inactivated only at high concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics. PBP2a appears to be encoded by the mec determinant, which also is unique to methicillin-resistant strains. The relationships between PBP2a and expression of resistance and implications for the mechanism of resistance are discussed. The heterogeneous expression of methicillin resistance by staphylococci poses problems in the detection of resistant strains. Experience with several susceptibility test methods is reviewed and guidelines for performance of these tests are given. Treatment of infections caused by methicillin-resistant staphylococci is discussed. Vancomycin is the treatment of choice. Alternatives have been few because methicillin-resistant strains often are resistant to multiple antibiotics in addition to beta-lactam antibiotics. New agents which are active against methicillin-resistant staphylococci are becoming available, and their potential role in treatment is discussed. Images PMID:3069195

  3. Combined treatments of enterocin AS-48 with biocides to improve the inactivation of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus planktonic and sessile cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero Gómez, Natacha; Abriouel, Hikmate; Grande, M José; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio

    2013-05-15

    Control of staphylococci during cleaning and disinfection is important to the food industry. Broad-spectrum bacteriocins with proved anti-staphylococcal activity, such as enterocin AS-48, could open new possibilities for disinfection in combination with biocides. In the present study, enterocin AS-48 was tested singly or in combination with biocides against a cocktail of six Staphylococcus aureus strains (including three methicillin-resistant strains) in planktonic state as well as in biofilms formed on polystyrene microtiter plates. Cells were challenged with enterocin, biocides or enterocin/biocide combinations. Inactivation of planktonic cells increased significantly (pdidecyldimethylammonium bromide (AB), triclosan (TC), hexachlorophene (CF), polyhexamethylen guanidinium chloride (PHMG), chlorhexidine (CH) or P3-oxonia (OX). In the sessile state (24h biofilms), staphylococci required higher biocide concentrations in most cases, except for OX. Inactivation of sessile staphylococci increased remarkably when biocides were applied in combination with enterocin AS-48, especially when the bacteriocin was added at 50mg/l. During storage, the concentrations of sessile as well as planktonic cells in the treated samples decreased remarkably for BC, TC and PHMG, but OX failed to inhibit proliferation of the treated biofilms as well as growth of planktonic cells. The observed inhibitory effects during storage were potentiated when the biocides were combined with 50 mg/l enterocin AS-48. Results from this study suggest that selected combinations of enterocin AS-48 and biocides offer potential use against planktonic and sessile, methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. CHARACTERISTICS OF METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, R.; Rolinson, G. N.

    1964-01-01

    Sutherland, R. (Beecham Research Laboratories Ltd., Betchworth, Surrey, England), and G. N. Rolinson. Characteristics of methicillin-resistant staphylococci. J. Bacteriol. 87:887–899. 1964.—Cultures of naturally occurring methicillin-resistant staphylococci obtained from a number of hospitals were examined for the nature and degree of resistance to methicillin and other antibiotics. All the cultures tested were similar in that they consisted of mixed populations in which the majority of cells were of normal sensitivity to methicillin with a minority showing methicillin resistance. The resistant members also differed from the rest of the population in that they grew more slowly even in the absence of methicillin. Pure cultures of the resistant minority were obtained readily but, on repeated transfer in the absence of methicillin, resistance was lost and the cultures reverted to mixed populations similar to the original naturally occurring strains. When methicillin-sensitive staphylococci were repeatedly subcultured in the presence of methicillin, a mixed population was obtained in which only a minority of cells were resistant to the antibiotic; in this respect, the cultures of methicillin-resistant staphylococci selected in vitro resembled the naturally occurring strains. The original cultures of methicillin-resistant staphylococci comprised populations of cells with uniform sensitivity or insensitivity to other antibiotics. The resistance of these staphylococci to methicillin was not due to increased ability to inactivate the drug but to intrinsic insensitivity to methicillin. PMID:14137628

  5. Photodynamic inactivation of antibiotic-resistant pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paronyan, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays methicillin-resistant strain Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most widespread multiresistant bacteria. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of microorganisms by photosensitizers (PS) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option against antibiotic resistant bacteria. The effectiveness of new PS cationic porphyrin Zn-TBut4PyP was tested on two strains of S. aureus (MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus). It is shown that Zn-TBut4PyP has high photodynamic activity against both strains

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA); Staph - MRSA; Staphylococcal - MRSA ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). www.cdc.gov/mrsa/index.html . Updated ...

  7. METHICILLIN RESISTANCE IN STAPHYLOCOCCAL ISOLATES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the importance of Staphylococcus aureus as a urinary pathogen and the incidence of multidrug resistant (MDR), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A total of 86 staphylococcal isolates made up of 50 clinical isolates from urine samples submitted to the Medical Microbiology Laboratory ...

  8. Methicillin-resistant septal peptidoglycan synthesis in a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, B J; Nadakavukaren, M J

    1983-01-01

    In a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain, electron micrographs showed that cell wall septa continued to be formed in the presence of methicillin, although they became distorted and enlarged. The results indicated that peripheral cell wall synthesis was inhibited. It is concluded that a methicillin-resistant mode of septal peptidoglycan synthesis is an important determinant of methicillin resistance.

  9. 29 ORIGINAL ARTICLE METHICILLIN RESISTANT S. AUREUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    AKTH) were subjected to methicillin susceptibility testing, while including susceptibility testing to other antibiotics by the disc diffusion methods. Result: Out of 185 S. aureus isolates tested, 53(28.6%) were found to be methicillin resistant.

  10. the current susceptibility pattern of methicillin resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    The most notable example of the phenomenon of antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus was the emergence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) which was reported one year after the launch of methicillin antibiotic 4. MRSA is a bacterium responsible for difficult to treat infection in humans. The.

  11. METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (MRSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The methicillin disc diffusion method for the detection of methicillin resistance and the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion for antibiotic susceptibility tests, were used. The MRSA prevalence rate was 34.7% (51/147) of all Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Forty-five isolates were associated with infections and 6 were colonizing strains.

  12. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococci in companion animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baptiste, Keith Edward; Williams, Kerry; Williams, Nicola J.

    2005-01-01

    We determined the molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant staphylococci from animals and staff at a small animal and equine hospital. Methicillin-restistant Staphylococcus aureus identical to human EMRSA-15 was found in dogs and hospitalstaff. In contrast, 5 distinct MRSA strains were...

  13. Prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading overall cause otf nosocomial infections with increasing resistance to β lactam antibiotics. This study was carried out to study the current resistant/susceptibility pattern of S. aureus to β lactam antibiotics and prevalence of Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in the studied population.

  14. Molecular Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial resistance has become a great public health problem worldwide and multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus has been widely reported. Methods: The presence or absence of methicillin resistance gene (mecA) in 48 clinical wound isolates of S. aureus was examined by the polymerase chain reaction ...

  15. methicillin resistance in staphylococcal isolates from

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the importance of Staphylococcus aureus as a urinary pathogen and the incidence of multidrug resistant (MDR), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A total of 86 staphylococcal isolates made up of 50 clinical isolates from urine samples submitted to the Medical Microbiology Laboratory ...

  16. Molecular genotyping of methicillin resistant and susceptible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) which causes nosocomial infections is among the most important multi-resistant pathogens worldwide. Investigations of MRSA outbreaks in nosocomial settings often require strain-typing data to verify effectively that the isolates belong to the outbreak strain, ...

  17. METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (MRSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nosocomial infections caused by methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus often pose therapeutic dilemma to the clinicians because of the multi resistant nature of these strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Outbreaks of both nosocomial and community acquired infections are also frequent and difficult to control.

  18. Cephalosporin susceptibility of methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R E; Cornere, B M; MacCulloch, D

    1987-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci were tested for susceptibility to methicillin, cephradine, ceftriaxone, cephalothin, and cefamandole by standard broth microdilution. Most of the 26 methicillin-resistant isolates were susceptible to cephalothin and cefamandole, but very few were susceptible to ceftriaxone, and none was susceptible to cephradine. The proportion of bacterial cells that grew in the presence of 128 micrograms of methicillin per ml was calculated for each methicillin-resistant isolate. Those with every cell or 1 in 10 cells resistant to 128 micrograms of methicillin per ml included the isolates that were most resistant to the cephalosporins and highly resistant to methicillin. Those with 1 cell resistant in 10(5) or 10(6) cells were the isolates most susceptible to the cephalosporins, and their methicillin MICs were lower. When cells resistant to 128 micrograms of methicillin per ml were used as inocula for broth microdilution tests, resistance to cephradine remained the same, but resistance to ceftriaxone, cephalothin, and cefamandole increased significantly. Cefamandole was the only cephalosporin which retained antibacterial activity against some methicillin-resistant isolates (12 of 26). Cephradine, ceftriaxone, cephalothin, and cefamandole resistance appeared to be expressed by the same cells that expressed methicillin resistance. In this way, cross resistance was demonstrated between methicillin and the cephalosporins. PMID:3646002

  19. Nasal Carriage of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major causes of community and hospital acquired infections. The emergence of methicillin resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus in the hospitals and the community is a serious health problem. The aim of this study was to determine the nasal carriage and ...

  20. Phenotypic occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To assess the occurrence of MRSA among camels in Kano abattoir, a total of 300 nasal swabs were collected from camels at the lairage in Kano abattoir, Kano state, Nigeria to isolate and biochemically characterize Staphylococcus aureus and confirm methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among isolates using ...

  1. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Leif Percival; Nielsen, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Even though methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of nosocomial infections, it may often be difficult to evaluate the exact route of transmission. METHODS: In this study, we describe four cases of nosocomial transmission of MRSA in a hospital with a low...

  2. Prevalence and Pattern of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This trend is on the increase consequently there is prolong hospital stay, increased hospital bills, and increased morbidity and mortality. The widespread use of antimicrobial agents such as the â- lactam antibiotics has contributed to the emergence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA); which has become ...

  3. The current susceptibility pattern of methicillin resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from in-patients and out-patients at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH) was studied. Fifty, S. aureus organisms were isolated from routine clinical specimens such as high vaginal, wound, urethral and ear ...

  4. Prevalence of clindamycin inducible resistance among methicillin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been recognized world wide as an important causative agent of nosocomial and community acquired infections. Clindamycin has been considered as an alternative drug for the treatment of such strains. However, the possibility of clindamycin inducible ...

  5. Evolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus towards increasing resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strommenger, Birgit; Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Kurt, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the evolutionary history of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex (CC) 8, which encompasses several globally distributed epidemic lineages, including hospital-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the highly prevalent community-associated MRSA clone USA300.......To elucidate the evolutionary history of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex (CC) 8, which encompasses several globally distributed epidemic lineages, including hospital-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the highly prevalent community-associated MRSA clone USA300....

  6. Antimicrobial resistance in methicillin susceptible and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius of canine origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moodley, Arshnee; Damborg, Peter Panduro; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a commensal and a common opportunistic pathogen causing mainly infections of the integumentary system in dogs. The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant S. pseudintermedius isolates, in particular methicillin-resistant strains (MRSP) is a threat to small animal...... health and highlights the need for antimicrobial resistance surveillance to detect trends and potentially perform timeous interventions. We systematically reviewed 202 published articles to investigate temporal changes in antimicrobial resistance in clinical and commensal S. pseudintermedius isolated...... from dogs in 27 countries between 1980 and 2013. Resistance to the most common antimicrobials tested for in published studies and important for the treatment of staphylococcal infections in dogs were assessed separately for methicillin resistant (MRSP) and methicillin susceptible (MSSP) isolates...

  7. Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in apparently healthy ... treatment failures is vital. Keywords: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Nasal swabs, Multidrug resistance, Rational .... defined as resistance to three or more classes of antibiotics other than the ...

  8. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns of methicillin-resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in raw milk and soft cheese (wara) sold in Abeokuta, Nigeria. ... (100%), ampicillin 16 (94.1%), doxycycline 11 (64.7%), tetracycline 17 (100%), oxacillin 15 (88.2%), augmentin 17 (100%), gentamycin 15 (88.2%), colistin 15 (88.2%), ...

  9. Prevalence and risk factors for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and risk factors for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage among emergency department workers and bacterial contamination on touch surfaces in Erciyes University Hospital, Kayseri, Turkey.

  10. A Research of nasal methicillin resistant/sensitive Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Research of nasal methicillin resistant/sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and pharyngeal beta-haemolytic Streptococcus carriage in midwifery students in Kahramanmaras, Eastern Mediterranean Region of Turkey.

  11. Autolysis of methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, J E; Berger-Bächi, B; Strässle, A; Wilkinson, B J

    1992-01-01

    The autolytic activities, including unstimulated, Triton X-100-stimulated, and daptomycin-induced, of various sets of methicillin-resistant and related methicillin-susceptible strains were compared. Faster rates of autolysis were noted in two heterogeneous methicillin-resistant transductants than in their methicillin-susceptible parental recipients, in a heterogeneous resistant strain than in a susceptible derivative created by chemical mutagenesis, and in a homogeneous resistant strain than in a derivative that had decreased methicillin resistance and was created by transposon Tn551 mutagenesis. These results suggest that the presence of the methicillin resistance region, mec, either directly or indirectly through an interaction with other host genes, confers a faster rate of autolysis on strains. Various auxilliary genes are known to affect methicillin resistance expression, and one of these genes, femA, was necessary for the expression of this faster rate of autolysis. These differences in autolytic activities were not observed in isolated crude cell walls retaining autolytic activities, suggesting different modes of regulation of autolysins in intact cells and isolated walls. In contrast, one homogeneous, highly resistant strain, DU4916, had a lower autolytic activity than did derived heterogeneous resistant and susceptible strains created by chemical mutagenesis and a strain that had decreased resistance and was created by transposon mutagenesis. Our observations suggest that methicillin resistance expression is associated with an enhanced rate of autolysis, in heterogeneous resistant strains at least. Images PMID:1320363

  12. Methicillin-Susceptible, Vancomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Panesso , Diana; Planet , Paul J.; Diaz , Lorena; Hugonnet , Jean-Emannuel; Tran , Truc T.; Narechania , Apurva; Munita , José M.; Rincon , Sandra; Carvajal , Lina P.; Reyes , Jinnethe; Londono , Alejandra; Smith , Hannah; Sebra , Robert; Deikus , Gintaras; Weinstock , George M

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We report characterization of a methicillin-susceptible, vancomycin-resistant bloodstream isolate of Staphylococcus aureus recovered from a patient in Brazil. Emergence of vancomycin resistance in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus would indicate that this resistance trait might be poised to disseminate more rapidly among S. aureus and represents a major public health threat.

  13. Subinhibitory concentrations of imipenem induce increased resistance to methicillin and imipenem in vitro in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, B A; McClatchey, K D; Schaberg, D R

    1984-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant (MR) Staphylococcus aureus that was susceptible to less than 0.75 micrograms of imipenem per ml demonstrated inducible resistance. MR S. aureus preincubated with 0.05 microgram of imipenem per ml grew in medium with an imipenem concentration of 32 micrograms/ml, and methicillin MICs increased 20-fold. Non-MR S. aureus exhibited no induction. Preincubation with methicillin produced no effect. Induction appeared to be a unique interaction of imipenem with MR S. aureus.

  14. Evaluation of a protocol to control methicillin-resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major health care problem in intensive care units. Purpose. To evaluate how nurses implement the methicillin-resistant S. aureus protocol (MRSAP) in a surgical cardiac intensive care unit (SCICU), and to evaluate the change in MRSA infection rates after ...

  15. Quality control of direct molecular diagnostics for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); W.G. MacKay (William); W.B. van Leeuwen (Willem)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractTen samples containing various amounts of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), and combinations thereof were distributed to 51 laboratories for molecular diagnostics testing.

  16. Quality control of direct molecular diagnostics for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Belkum, Alex; Niesters, Hubert G M; MacKay, William G; van Leeuwen, Willem B

    Ten samples containing various amounts of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), and combinations thereof were distributed to 51 laboratories for molecular diagnostics testing. Samples containing

  17. Revisiting Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waness, Abdelkarim

    2010-01-01

    Within less than 50 years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) made a tremendous impact worldwide. It is not limited to medical facilities and healthcare institutions anymore. Indeed since two decades, cases of MRSA infections arising from the community among apparently healthy individuals are increasing. In this paper, I will present a case of community-associated MRSA sepsis followed by a comprehensive review about the history, pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, therapeutic options, contributing factors, growing cost and other pertinent elements of this newly evolving epidemic of MRSA infections.

  18. Revisiting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waness Abdelkarim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Within less than 50 years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA made a tremendous impact worldwide. It is not limited to medical facilities and healthcare institutions anymore. Indeed since two decades, cases of MRSA infections arising from the community among apparently healthy individuals are increasing. In this paper, I will present a case of community-associated MRSA sepsis followed by a comprehensive review about the history, pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, therapeutic options, contributing factors, growing cost and other pertinent elements of this newly evolving epidemic of MRSA infections.

  19. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Ethiopia: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshetie, Setegn; Tarekegn, Fentahun; Moges, Feleke; Amsalu, Anteneh; Birhan, Wubet; Huruy, Kahsay

    2016-11-21

    The burden of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a major public health concern worldwide; however the overall epidemiology of multidrug resistant strains is neither coordinated nor harmonized, particularly in developing countries including Ethiopia. Therefore, the aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the burden of methicillin resistant Staphylococcos aureus and its antibiotic resistance pattern in Ethiopia at large. PubMed, Google Scholar, and lancet databases were searched and a total of 20 studies have been selected for meta-analysis. Six authors have independently extracts data on the prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus among clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus. Statistical analysis was achieved by using Open meta-analyst (version 3.13) and Comprehensive meta-analysis (version 3.3) softwares. The overall prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and its antibiotic resistance pattern were pooled by using the forest plot, table and figure with 95% CI. The pooled prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was 32.5% (95% CI, 24.1 to 40.9%). Moreover, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains were found to be highly resistant to penicillin, ampicillin, erythromycin, and amoxicillin, with a pooled resistance ratio of 99.1, 98.1, 97.2 and 97.1%, respectively. On the other hand, comparably low levels of resistance ratio were noted to vancomycin, 5.3%. The overall burden of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus is considerably high, besides these strains showed extreme resistance to penicillin, ampicillin, erythromycin and amoxicillin. In principle, appropriate use of antibiotics, applying safety precautions are the key to reduce the spread of multidrug resistant strains, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in particular.

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: the superbug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Giuseppe; Leone, Sebastiano; Lauria, Francesco N; Nicastri, Emanuele; Wenzel, Richard P

    2010-10-01

    Over the last decade, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains have emerged as serious pathogens in the nosocomial and community setting. Hospitalization costs associated with MRSA infections are substantially greater than those associated with methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) infections, and MRSA has wider economic effects that involve indirect costs to the patient and to society. In addition, there is some evidence suggesting that MRSA infections increase morbidity and the risk of mortality. Glycopeptides are the backbone antibiotics for the treatment of MRSA infections. However, several recent reports have highlighted the limitations of vancomycin, and its role in the management of serious infections is now being reconsidered. Several new antimicrobials demonstrate in vitro activity against MRSA and other Gram-positive bacteria. Data from large surveys indicate that linezolid, daptomycin, and tigecycline are almost universally active against MRSA. This review will briefly discuss the epidemiology, costs, outcome, and therapeutic options for the management of MRSA infections. Copyright © 2010 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nasal carriage of methicillin resistant staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Nuno A; Conceição, Teresa; Miragaia, Maria; Bartels, Mette Damkjær; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Westh, Henrik

    2014-04-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are believed to function as reservoirs, as well as possible sources of staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) to Staphylococcus aureus, but the frequency, preferred partners, and factors promoting SCCmec transfer are not known. Such postulated in vivo genetic transfer events are likely to occur at anatomical sites such as the normal nasal mucosa, which is known to be colonized by both CoNS and coagulase positive staphylococci. In this study, we characterized S. aureus and CoNS strains colonizing the anterior nares of 67 patients in Denmark. A total of 54 patients (80%) were colonized with staphylococci that included nine different species identified by internal transcribed spacer PCR (ITS-PCR) and 16S RNA sequencing. The highest rates of colonization were found for S. epidermidis (58%) and S. aureus (39%). Methicillin resistance was present in S. aureus (53%), S. epidermidis (53%), S. haemolyticus (33%), and S. hominis (62%). Genetic backgrounds were characterized by spa typing for S. aureus and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for CoNS. SCCmec typing showed that SCCmec type IV (2B) was the most common in the entire collection (65%). Carriage of multiple species was detected in 20 patients (30%), 16 of whom were colonized with both S. aureus and S. epidermidis. In two cases, simultaneous carriage of different methicillin resistant species was detected. However, the strains carried different SCCmec types. Additional studies in the same epidemiological settings are warranted to identify interspecific genetic events that involve the acquisition of SCCmec by S. aureus.

  2. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauchaza, Kathrine; Madzimbamuto, Farai D; Waner, Seymour

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Africa is sparsely documented. In Zimbabwe there is no routine patient or specimen screening for MRSA. The aim of this study was to document the presence and epidemiology of MRSA in Zimbabwe. The study was done in one private sector laboratory with a national network that serves both public and private hospitals. The sample population included in-patients and outpatients, all ages, both genders, all races and only one positive specimen per patient was counted. Specimens testing positive for Staphylococcus aureus in this laboratory were further tested for MRSA using cefoxitin, by standard laboratory procedures. Data was collected from 1(st) June 2013 to 31(st) May 2014. MRSA was positive in 30 of 407 [7.0%] cases of Stapylococcus aureus reported from the laboratory. All age groups were affected from neonates to geriatrics. All specimens had similar antibiotic susceptibility pattern. Resistance was high for most widely used drugs in Zimbabwe with high sensitivity to vancomycin, linezolid and teicoplanin. Although there are no recent reports in the literature of the presence of MRSA in Zimbabwe, this study documented a 7.0% prevalence. Resistance to common antibiotics is high and antibiotic oversight is required to control the emergence of resistance to these few expensive drugs. Study was supported by Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care funds.

  3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emerged long before the introduction of methicillin into clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkins, Catriona P; Pichon, Bruno; Doumith, Michel

    2017-01-01

    in the evolution of MRSA as previously thought. Rather it was the widespread use of first generation beta-lactams such as penicillin in the years prior to the introduction of methicillin, which selected for S. aureus strains carrying the mecA determinant. Crucially this highlights how new drugs, introduced......) was first observed in 1960, less than one year after the introduction of this second generation beta-lactam antibiotic into clinical practice. Epidemiological evidence has always suggested that resistance arose around this period, when the mecA gene encoding methicillin resistance carried on an SCCmec......BACKGROUND: The spread of drug-resistant bacterial pathogens poses a major threat to global health. It is widely recognised that the widespread use of antibiotics has generated selective pressures that have driven the emergence of resistant strains. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA...

  4. Resistance of Coagulase-Positive Staphylococci to Methicillin and Oxacillin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravenkemper, Charles F.; Brodie, Jean L.; Kirby, William M. M.

    1965-01-01

    Gravenkemper, Charles F. (University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle), Jean L. Brodie, and William M. M. Kirby. Resistance of coagulase-positive staphylococci to methicillin and oxacillin. J. Bacteriol. 89:1005–1010. 1965.—Two strains resistant to methicillin were discovered among 541 strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated in a clinical laboratory during a 1-yr period, and their properties were compared with those of strains isolated in Europe. The two strains were very active producers of penicillinase, and exhibited cross-resistance with other antistaphylococcal antibiotics. Like the European strains, our resistant cultures showed resistance to methicillin only with large inocula, and consisted of a mixture of cells. The great majority were sensitive and underwent early swelling and lysis, and only a small minority of the bacteria were able to grow in the presence of methicillin. The methicillin-resistant strains caused destruction of methicillin and oxacillin in vitro, but the rate of hydrolysis was slow. Antibiotic destruction was probably due to high concentrations of staphylococcal penicillinase, and not to another specific enzyme. These observations are helpful in explaining why resistance of staphylococci to the synthetic penicillins has not become a significant clinical problem. PMID:14276086

  5. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a neonatal alpaca

    OpenAIRE

    Stull, Jason W.; Kenney, Daniel G.; Slavić, Durda; Weese, J. Scott

    2012-01-01

    A 6-hour-old alpaca was presented for evaluation of respiratory difficulty. As part of routine surveillance, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was identified from a nasal swab taken upon admission to the hospital. No signs of MRSA infection were noted. The MRSA strain recovered was a human epidemic clone that has been associated with horses. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization can occur in camelids, and the potential animal and public health risks require consideration.

  6. Biotechnological Methods for Precise Diagnosis of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aija Zilevica

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most urgent problems in medicine nowadays. The purpose of the study was to investigate the microorganisms resistant to first-line antimicrobials, including gram-positive cocci, particularly the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci, the major agents of nosocomial infections. Owing to the multi-resistance of these agents, precise diagnosis of the methicillin resistance of Staphylococci is of greatest clinical importance. It is not enough to use only conventional microbiological diagnostic methods. Biotechnological methods should be also involved. In our studies, the following methicillin resistance identification methods were used: the disk diffusion method, detection of the mecA gene by PCR, E-test and Slidex MRSA test. For molecular typing, PFGL, RAPD tests and detection of the coa gene were used. All the MRS strains were multiresistant to antibacterials. No vancomycine resistance was registered.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, M A; Liñares, J; Martín, R

    1997-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are among the most common nosocomial pathogens. The most significant mechanism of resistance to methicillin in this-species is the acquisition of a genetic determinant (mecA gene). However, resistance seems to have a more complex molecular basis, since additional chromosomal material is involved in such resistance. Besides, overproduction of penicillinase and/or alterations in the PBPs can contribute to the formation of resistance phenotypes. Genetic and environmental factors leading to MRSA are reviewed.

  8. Nasal carriage of Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus isolates were collected from anterior nares of fifty healthy adults in Zaria and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns determined. 72% of the isolates were methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The isolates were generally resistant to multiple antibiotics including Chloramphenicol (78% resistance), Penicillin ...

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Iranian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Iranian restaurant food samples: Panton-Valentine Leukocidin, SCCmec phenotypes and antimicrobial resistance. ... TetK (80.72 %), linA (67.46 %), aadA1 (62.65 %), and msrA (55.42 %) were the most frequently identified resistance genes. SCCmec V (57.83%) ...

  10. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus fomite survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christa; Davis, Diane L

    2009-01-01

    To assess survival of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on fomites encountered by health students. Three suspensions of MRSA were made to mimic lab splashes: a 0.5 McFarland trypticase soy broth, whole blood with 50 colony forming units/mL and body fluid/serum with 2000 colony forming units/mL. These were seeded onto three environmental surfaces (glass, vinyl floor tile, and countertop) and wet swabbed for 60 days. High touch areas of student stethoscopes were also wet swabbed. MRSA selective CHROMagar was used to identify organism survival. Salisbury University, Salisbury MD PARTICIPANTS: Salisbury University nursing and respiratory therapy students who volunteered to have their stethoscopes swabbed anonymously. Detection of pink colonies on MRSA-selective CHROMagar. MRSA in 0.5 McFarland broth lived for > or =60 days on all surfaces. MRSA in blood was undetectable on any surface, and MRSA in serum survived 41 days on glass, 45 days on tile, and > or =60 days on countertop. Five of thirty-three stethoscopes (15%) tested were positive for MRSA. Previous studies showed fomite survival of MRSA for about two weeks using contact plate sampling and MRSA on 7.4% of stethoscopes. We showed longer MRSA survival times by wet swab sampling and a higher stethoscope contamination rate. As expected, higher organism loads survived longer.

  11. Ward-Specific Rates of Nasal Cocolonization with Methicillin-Susceptible and -Resistant Staphylococcus spp. and Potential Impact on Molecular Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Screening Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Lustig, Sebastien; Lhoste, Yannick; Valour, Florent; Guerin, Claude; Aubrun, Frederic; Tigaud, Sylvestre; Laurent, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    We report that the rates of nasal cocolonization with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci can vary widely between patients admitted to different wards within a single hospital. Such cocolonization can greatly influence the performance of molecular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) screening tests depending on the methods used and targets selected. PMID:23658254

  12. Curcumin Reverse Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Hyun Mun

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic flavonoid extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa L., was shown to possess superior potency to resensitize methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA to antibiotics. Previous studies have shown the synergistic activity of curcumin with β-lactam and quinolone antibiotics. Further, to understand the anti-MRSA mechanism of curcumin, we investigated the potentiated effect of curcumin by its interaction in diverse conditions. The mechanism of anti-MRSA action of curcumin was analyzed by the viability assay in the presence of detergents, ATPase inhibitors and peptidoglycan (PGN from S. aureus, and the PBP2a protein level was analyzed by western blotting. The morphological changes in the curcumin-treated MRSA strains were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. We analyzed increased susceptibility to MRSA isolates in the presence of curcumin. The optical densities at 600 nm (OD600 of the suspensions treated with the combinations of curcumin with triton X-100 and Tris were reduced to 63% and 59%, respectively, compared to curcumin without treatment. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD and sodium azide (NaN3 were reduced to 94% and 55%, respectively. When peptidoglycan (PGN from S. aureus was combined with curcumin, PGN (0–125 μg/mL gradually blocked the antibacterial activity of curcumin (125 μg/mL; however, at a concentration of 125 µg/mL PGN, it did not completely block curcumin. Curcumin has a significant effect on the protein level of PBP2a. The TEM images of MRSA showed damage of the cell wall, disruption of the cytoplasmic contents, broken cell membrane and cell lysis after the treatment of curcumin. These data indicate a remarkable antibacterial effect of curcumin, with membrane permeability enhancers and ATPase inhibitors, and curcumin did not directly bind to PGN on the cell wall. Further, the antimicrobial action of curcumin involved in the PBP2a-mediated resistance mechanism was

  13. Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus replacing methicillin-susceptible S. aureus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Lipsitch, Marc; Regev-Yochay, Gili

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive research on the emergence of and treatments for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), prior studies have not rigorously evaluated the impact of methicillin resistance on the overall incidence of S. aureus infections. Yet, there are direct clinical and research implications of determining whether methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) infection rates remain stable in the face of increasing MRSA prevalence or whether MSSA will be replaced over time. A synthesis of prior studies indicates that the emergence of healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) and community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) has led to an increase in the overall incidence of S. aureus infections, with MRSA principally adding to, rather than replacing, MSSA. However, colonization with CA-MRSA may at least partially replace colonization with MSSA. So far, evidence indicates that MSSA still accounts for many infections. Therefore, eradication of MRSA alone is not sufficient to address the public health burden of S. aureus. PMID:21737459

  14. Modeling of the bacterial mechanism of methicillin-resistance by a systems biology approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Autiero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A microorganism is a complex biological system able to preserve its functional features against external perturbations and the ability of the living systems to oppose to these external perturbations is defined "robustness". The antibiotic resistance, developed by different bacteria strains, is a clear example of robustness and of ability of the bacterial system to acquire a particular functional behaviour in response to environmental changes. In this work we have modeled the whole mechanism essential to the methicillin-resistance through a systems biology approach. The methicillin is a beta-lactamic antibiotic that act by inhibiting the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs. These PBPs are involved in the synthesis of peptidoglycans, essential mesh-like polymers that surround cellular enzymes and are crucial for the bacterium survival. METHODOLOGY: The network of genes, mRNA, proteins and metabolites was created using CellDesigner program and the data of molecular interactions are stored in Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML. To simulate the dynamic behaviour of this biochemical network, the kinetic equations were associated with each reaction. CONCLUSIONS: Our model simulates the mechanism of the inactivation of the PBP by methicillin, as well as the expression of PBP2a isoform, the regulation of the SCCmec elements (SCC: staphylococcal cassette chromosome and the synthesis of peptidoglycan by PBP2a. The obtained results by our integrated approach show that the model describes correctly the whole phenomenon of the methicillin resistance and is able to respond to the external perturbations in the same way of the real cell. Therefore, this model can be useful to develop new therapeutic approaches for the methicillin control and to understand the general mechanism regarding the cellular resistance to some antibiotics.

  15. Role of ArlRS in autolysis in methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmi, Guido; Nair, Dhanalakshmi R; Cheung, Ambrose

    2012-02-01

    Autolysis plays an essential role in bacterial cell division and lysis with β-lactam antibiotics. Accordingly, the expression of autolysins is tightly regulated by several endogenous regulators, including ArlRS, a two component regulatory system that has been shown to negatively regulate autolysis in methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) strains. In this study, we found that inactivation of arlRS does not play a role in autolysis of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains, such as community-acquired (CA)-MRSA strains USA300 and MW2 or the hospital-acquired (HA)-MRSA strain COL. This contrasts with MSSA strains, including Newman, SH1000, RN6390, and 8325-4, where autolysis is affected by ArlRS. We further demonstrated that the striking difference in the roles of arlRS between MSSA and MRSA strains is not due to the methicillin resistance determinant mecA. Among known autolysins and their regulators, we found that arlRS represses lytN, while no effect was seen on atl, lytM, and lytH expression in both CA- and HA-MRSA strains. Transcriptional-fusion assays showed that the agr transcripts, RNAII and RNAIII, were significantly more downregulated in the arlRS mutant of MW2 than the MSSA strain Newman. Importantly, provision of agr RNAIII in trans to the MW2 arlRS mutant via a multicopy plasmid induced autolysis in this MRSA strain. Also, the autolytic phenotype in the arlRS mutant of MSSA strain Newman could be rescued by a mutation in either atl or lytM. Together, these data showed that ArlRS impacts autolysis differently in MSSA and MRSA strains.

  16. Staphylococcal methicillin resistance: fine focus on folds and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallorquí-Fernández, Goretti; Marrero, Aniebrys; García-Piquè, Sonia; García-Castellanos, Raquel; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2004-06-01

    Globalisation has entailed a massive increase in trade and human mobility facilitating the rapid spread of infectious agents, including those that are drug resistant. A particularly serious threat to human health is posed by methicillin-resistant staphylococcal strains which have acquired molecular mechanisms to evade the action of beta-lactam antibiotics (BLAs). Full expression of high-level methicillin resistance involves a complex network of molecules and depends primarily on sufficient expression of a penicillin-binding protein with low sensitivity towards BLAs. Other factors include the fine-tuned regulation of autolytic activity of cell-wall components, as well as an optimal rate of peptidoglycan precursor formation and a highly specific peptidoglycan precursor structure. Three-dimensional structural data are available on several of the pieces involved in the jigsaw puzzle and provide a molecular basis for the understanding of methicillin resistance and for the design of new therapeutic strategies.

  17. Reversal of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus by thioridazine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Janne K; Skov, Marianne N; Kallipolitis, Birgitte H

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Thioridazine has been shown to reverse oxacillin resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate whether thioridazine alone or in combination with oxacillin affects the transcription of the methicillin resistance gene...... that reversal of methicillin resistance by thioridazine in MRSA may be explained by a reduced transcription of mecA and blaZ, resulting in a reduced protein level of PBP2a....... mecA and the protein level of the encoded protein PBP2a. Methods Viability of MRSA was determined in liquid media in the presence of oxacillin or thioridazine alone or in combination. Transcription of mecA was analysed by primer extension, and the protein level of PBP2a was analysed by western...

  18. Carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in small animal veterinarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Narayan Chandra; Moodley, Arshnee; Ghibaudo, G.

    2011-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) is increasingly reported in small animals and cases of human infections have already been described despite its recent emergence in veterinary practice. We investigated the prevalence of MRSP and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aur...

  19. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emerged long before the introduction of methicillin into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkins, Catriona P; Pichon, Bruno; Doumith, Michel; Parkhill, Julian; Westh, Henrik; Tomasz, Alexander; de Lencastre, Herminia; Bentley, Stephen D; Kearns, Angela M; Holden, Matthew T G

    2017-07-20

    The spread of drug-resistant bacterial pathogens poses a major threat to global health. It is widely recognised that the widespread use of antibiotics has generated selective pressures that have driven the emergence of resistant strains. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was first observed in 1960, less than one year after the introduction of this second generation beta-lactam antibiotic into clinical practice. Epidemiological evidence has always suggested that resistance arose around this period, when the mecA gene encoding methicillin resistance carried on an SCCmec element, was horizontally transferred to an intrinsically sensitive strain of S. aureus. Whole genome sequencing a collection of the first MRSA isolates allows us to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the archetypal MRSA. We apply Bayesian phylogenetic reconstruction to infer the time point at which this early MRSA lineage arose and when SCCmec was acquired. MRSA emerged in the mid-1940s, following the acquisition of an ancestral type I SCCmec element, some 14 years before the first therapeutic use of methicillin. Methicillin use was not the original driving factor in the evolution of MRSA as previously thought. Rather it was the widespread use of first generation beta-lactams such as penicillin in the years prior to the introduction of methicillin, which selected for S. aureus strains carrying the mecA determinant. Crucially this highlights how new drugs, introduced to circumvent known resistance mechanisms, can be rendered ineffective by unrecognised adaptations in the bacterial population due to the historic selective landscape created by the widespread use of other antibiotics.

  20. Global trend of Methicillin-resistant Staphlococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Following its first recognition in early 1960s, the increasing incidence of nosocomial and community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections has become a global problem. The emergence of multiple-drug resistant MRSA strains and dissemination of epidemic antibiotic clones ...

  1. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wound colonization by microorganisms is most frequently polymicrobial and incidences of high level resistance among bacterial isolates from wounds have been reported. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extendedspectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Gram-negative bacteria both constitute ...

  2. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci in animals: epidemiology and interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, K.M.H.W.

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in bacteria is a global problem. Important organisms are methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which is widespread among pigs, and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP), which is an important pathogen in dogs and cats. Infections with these organisms can be

  3. Root cause analysis of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Nadia; Mehdi, Naima; Izhar, Mateen

    2015-10-01

    To find the important risk factors and sources of bacteraemia in patients suffering from methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia. The descriptive study was carried out at Shaikh Zayed Hospital, Lahore, from October 2010 to August 2011. Blood cultures were processed to isolate methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus. A questionnaire was completed by the participating patients suffering from bacteraemia. Information about risk factors present at the time and risk factors that served as the source of bacteraemia were noted. Total 4058 blood cultures were processed and 669(16.5%) were positive. Of them, 194(29%) cultures were found to be positive for staphylococci. Out of these 194 blood cultures, coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated from 117(60%), and 77(40%) were positive for S. aureus. Out of these 77 samples, 26(34%) were found to be methicillin-sensitive staphylococcus aureus and 51(66%) were methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus. The overall frequency of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus was 1.25%; 7.62% out of positive blood culture; 26.28% out of total staphylococci; and 66% out of total S. aureus. As for the source of infection, central venous pressure line 11(21.6%), post-influenza pneumonia 9(17.6%), peripheral intravenous line 8(15.7%) and dialysis line 7(13.7%) were major reasons. Taking care of aseptic measures while insertion, frequent change and early removal of the central venous and dialysis lines is of critical significance.

  4. (MRSA) FROM DRUG AND METHICILLIN RESISTANT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    lactam antibiotics,. (methicillin,. , etc.)). The ance does not cause the trinsically virulent than hat have no antibiotic istance does make. Staphylococcus aureus difficult to treat with ibiotics and thus more the emergence of these strains originated from pigs (Habrun. 2011). S. aureus and MRSA isolates have been shown.

  5. Interactions between Methicillin and Vancomycin in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Displaying Different Phenotypes of Vancomycin Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Robin A.; Wootton, Mandy; Bennett, Peter M.; MacGowan, Alasdair P.; Walsh, Timothy R.

    1999-01-01

    Vancomycin-sensitive, -intermediate, and -heterointermediate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates were tested by using E-tests to explore the interaction of methicillin and vancomycin. For the vancomycin-intermediate and -heterointermediate strains both drugs showed antagonism at concentrations below their MICs but synergy at methicillin concentrations near the MIC. This property could be used to screen for heterointermediate S. aureus strains. PMID:10449511

  6. Public transport as a reservoir of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanović, S; Cirković, I; Djukić, S; Vuković, D; Svabić-Vlahović, M

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the occurrence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci in a large urban public transport system. Samples were taken from hand rails, which passengers hold onto when they are standing. In total, 1400 swabs taken from 55 vehicles (trolleybuses, trams and buses) were examined. As many as 30.1% samples were positive for the presence of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS), but none for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRCoNS were isolated from all 55 vehicles. Nearly 50% of MRCoNS isolates displayed resistance not only to beta-lactams, but at least to two or more other classes of antimicrobials as well. This study demonstrated widespread occurrence of MRCoNS on hand rails in public transport vehicles. MRSA was not detected. The recovery of methicillin-resistant staphylococci from public transport system implies a potential risk for transmission of these bacteria in an out-hospital environment.

  7. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pork production shower facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedom Larson, Kerry R; Harper, Abby L; Hanson, Blake M; Male, Michael J; Wardyn, Shylo E; Dressler, Anne E; Wagstrom, Elizabeth A; Tendolkar, Shaliesh; Diekema, Daniel J; Donham, Kelley J; Smith, Tara C

    2011-01-01

    As methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been found in pigs, we sought to determine if MRSA is present in pork production shower facilities. In two production systems tested, 3% and 26% of shower samples were positive for MRSA. spa types identified included t034, t189, t753, and t1746.

  8. Surveillance for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Battambang, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbain, Joel T; Viscount, Helen B

    2002-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and humanitarian missions are increasing worldwide. The prevalence of MRSA in the populations served may be unknown. A BRAVA (Blast Resuscitlation and Victim Assistance) mission was conducted at Battambang, Cambodia that included microbiology support. No MRSA was detected in our patients despite the reported increase in MRSA in Asia. Continued investigation is warranted for future missions.

  9. Nasal carriage of Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nasal carriage of Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus with reduced Vancomycin susceptibility (MRSA-RVS) by healthy adults in Zaria, Nigeria. ... Abstract. Staphylococcus aureus isolates were collected from anterior nares of fifty healthy adults in Zaria and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns determined. 72% of the ...

  10. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage and antibiotic susceptibility patterns in patients admitted to critical care units in a central hospital in Harare Zimbabwe. Design: A cross sectional study of patients admitted to Critical Care Units (CCUs), to determine the ...

  11. Screening for anti-methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin resistant bacterial infections give a tough challenge in the selection of antibiotics. Traditional use of antibiotics is worsening the problem day by day. So, it is essential to sort out other strategies which can replace antibiotic therapy successfully. Bacteriocins are the proteinaceous compounds with a narrower ...

  12. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcucs aureus (MRSA) have become a truly global challenge. Systemic review and meta-analysis was performed to summarize the prevalence of MRSA in different regions of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). A search of the PubMed, Google and Google Scholar databases for ...

  13. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. There is little information regarding the presence and characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an important nosocomial pathogen, in rural African hospitals. Objectives. To determine the prevalence of MRSA colonisation in patients admitted to a rural hospital with tuberculosis (TB) ...

  14. Absence of meca gene in methicillin-resistant staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a serious threat to public health, causing both hospital and community-associated infections. The gold standard for MRSA detection is the amplification of the mecA gene that codes for the production of the altered penicillin-binding protein (PBP2a) responsible for ...

  15. Isolation and identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a nosocomial pathogen of increasing risk on community. This study aims at determining the risk of MRSA transfer from coins as silent and underestimated reservoir in community. One hundred swabs from coins were collected from college students in Malaysia. A series ...

  16. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Dutch soccer team.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijsdens, Xander W; Lier, Ans M C van; Kregten, Eric van; Verhoef, Liesbeth; Santen-Verheuvel, Marga G van; Spalburg, Emile; Wannet, Wim J B

    2006-01-01

    An outbreak of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus occurred among members and close contacts of a soccer team. Typing of the isolates showed the outbreak was caused by the well-known European ST80-IV strain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an outbreak of this

  17. A Research of nasal methicillin resistant/sensitive Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In the hospitals where hygienic conditions are not provided, nasal methicillin resistant/sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA/MSSA) colonization is seen in the hospital personnel and patients. Both the individuals' themselves being MRSA/MSSA carriers and also other people around them are under risk and ...

  18. Rapid detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci by multiplex PCR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rapid and sensitive method for excluding the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in clinical samples was developed. The combination of MRSA detection by mecA coaA PCR with prior enrichment in selective broth was tested for 300 swabs. PCR identified 26 MRSApositive samples, ...

  19. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of each duplicate swab sample was inoculated directly onto chocolate agar, incubated for 24 hours at 37oc while the other swab was used to make a smear for Gram staining. All isolates were identified using standard microbiological methods. Staphylococcus aureus isolates were screened for methicillin resistance ...

  20. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus : a review of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus : a review of the molecular epidemiology, clinical significance and laboratory detection methods. ... Added to this burden is the emergence of more virulent strains of community-associated MRSA (CAMRSA) which at the turn of the century, has been increasingly reported to ...

  1. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Pig Farming

    OpenAIRE

    Voss, Andreas; Loeffen, Frans; Bakker, Judith; Klaassen, Corne; Wulf, Mireille

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a study among a group of 26 regional pig farmers to determine the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevalence rate and found it was >760 times greater than the rate of patients admitted to Dutch hospitals. While spa-type t108 is apparently a more widespread clone among pig farmers and their environment, we did find other spa-types.

  2. Isolation and Identification of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cHyE sHaN

    2012-06-21

    Jun 21, 2012 ... Accepted 23 March, 2012. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a nosocomial pathogen of increasing risk on community. ... become more prevalent as nosocomial pathogens causing severe infections ... prevention of transmission among hospitalized patients. Unrecognized MRSA carriers ...

  3. Transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to household contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.P.N. Mollema (Femke); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); M.D. Behrendt (Myra); N. Vaessen (Norbert); W. Lodder; W. Hendriks; H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); A. Voss (Andreas)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe frequency of and risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission from a MRSA index person to household contacts were assessed in this prospective study. Between January 2005 and December 2007, 62 newly diagnosed MRSA index persons (46 patients and 16

  4. Rapid detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci by multiplex PCR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2010-11-08

    Nov 8, 2010 ... A rapid and sensitive method for excluding the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in clinical samples was developed. The combination of MRSA detection by mecA coaA. PCR with prior enrichment in selective broth was tested for 300 swabs. PCR identified 26 MRSA- positive ...

  5. REVIEW ARTICLE GLOBAL TREND OF METHICILLIN-RESISTANT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    AFR. J. CLN. EXPER. MICROBIOL 11(3): 150-158. GLOBAL TREND OF METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHLOCOCCUS AUREUS AND EMERGING .... MRSA include efflux phenomenon (also a product of structural modification of cellular ... fashion out a coordinated effort at ascertaining the current epidemiologic profile in ...

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in the obstetric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriebs, Jan M

    2008-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an increasingly prevalent pathogen, both in the community and in hospitalized patients. The virulence of MRSA, coupled with its resistance to many frequently prescribed antibiotics, requires increased vigilance in the assessment and diagnosis of skin and soft tissue infections. This article reviews the epidemiology of MRSA and focuses on treatment of MRSA when it is diagnosed during pregnancy.

  7. Activity of cephalosporins against methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci: minimal effect of beta-lactamase.

    OpenAIRE

    John, J F; McNeill, W F

    1980-01-01

    Eight cephalosporins were tested for their activity against methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci and for their resistance to beta-lactamase from methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci. Susceptibility testing by the agar plate method was evaluated for the effect of inoculum size and duration of incubation. Methicillin-susceptible, coagulase-negative staphylococci were highly susceptible to the cephalosporins, with cephapirin and c...

  8. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci: implications for our food supply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, M Ellin; Hartmann, Faye A; Lee Wong, Amy C

    2012-12-01

    Food-borne intoxication, caused by heat-stable enterotoxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus, causes over 240,000 cases of food-borne illness in the United States annually. Other staphylococci commonly associated with animals may also produce these enterotoxins. Foods may be contaminated by infected food handlers during slaughter and processing of livestock or by cross-contamination during food preparation. S. aureus also causes a variety of mild to severe skin and soft tissue infections in humans and other animals. Antibiotic resistance is common in staphylococci. Hospital-associated (HA) S. aureus are resistant to numerous antibiotics, with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) presenting significant challenges in health care facilities for over 40 years. During the mid-1990s new human MRSA strains developed outside of hospitals and were termed community-associated (CA). A few years later, MRSA was isolated from horses and methicillin resistance was detected in Staphylococcus intermedius/pseudintermedius from dogs and cats. In 2003, a livestock-associated (LA) MRSA strain was first detected in swine. These methicillin-resistant staphylococci pose additional food safety and occupational health concerns. MRSA has been detected in a small percentage of retail meat and raw milk samples indicating a potential risk for food-borne transmission of MRSA. Persons working with animals or handling meat products may be at increased risk for antibiotic-resistant infections. This review discusses the scope of the problem of methicillin-resistant staphylococci and some strategies for control of these bacteria and prevention of illness.

  9. [Genotyping and drug resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ming; Guan, Lifeng; Jia, Wei; Wang, Linlin; Li, Gang; Wu, Xuejun; Sun, Tao

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the genotype of staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from burn wards and its current status of drug resistance. One hundred and seventy-nine strains of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from wound excretion, blood, and sputum samples of patients that were admitted to ICU or public wards of our Department of Burns and Plastic Surgery from September 2012 to September 2013. Among them, 68 strains were from ICU and 111 strains from public wards. The MRSA phenotype of Staphylococcus aureus was detected with cefoxitin K-B disk diffusion method, and the isolation rates of MRSA in ICU and public wards were compared. Genotyping of SCCmec was performed by PCR in strains of MRSA. In the meantime, the identification result of MRSA by K-B method was verified through detecting methicillin-resistant determinant mecA. The antimicrobial resistance of MRSA and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) to 23 kinds of commonly used antibiotics in clinic were detected by K-B disk diffusion method. Except for the antibiotics to which the resistant rates of MRSA were 100.0% or 0, the resistant rates of SCCmecIII MRSA and non-SCCmec III MRSA to the rest of antibiotics were compared. Data were processed with Pearson chi-square test or corrected chi-square test. One hundred and forty-eight strains out of the 179 Staphylococcus aureus were identified as MRSA (accounting for 82.7%), among which 62 were originated from ICU and 86 from public wards. The rest 31 strains of Staphylococcus aureus were MSSA, accounting for 17.3%. The percentage of MRSA in the isolated Staphylococcus aureus was 91.2% (62/68) in ICU, which was significantly higher than that in the public wards [77.5% (86/111), χ2 = 5.526, P = 0.019]. PCR detection showed that the 148 strains of MRSA harbored the mecA gene, out of which 106 strains were SCCmec III positive, accounting for 71.6%. The percentages of SCCmec III type MRSA

  10. In vitro phagocytosis of methicillin resistant and methicillin sensitive staphylococcus aureus by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, N.; Tahir, R.; Abbas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a gram positive bacterium that causes a number of diseases such as abscesses, infective endocarditis, septic arthritis, etc. It is acquiring resistance against many antibiotics like methicillin; therefore its control is becoming increasingly difficult. Peripheral blood phagocytes particularly polymorphonuclear leucocytes play an important role in the protective mechanisms against these organisms. Phagocytes interact with bacteria and phagocytose these microorganisms to kill them. Phenotypically different isolates of Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) were collected from various hospitals of Lahore, Pakistan. Fresh polymorphonuclaer leucocytes were obtained from healthy individuals by centrifugation using Ficol-Hypaque gradient combined with dextran sedimentation. Microbiological method was used for the determination of phagocytic index of phenotypic variants of Staphylococcus aureus. A significant difference was observed between the phagocytic index of both bacterial groups. MSSA group showed the Mean+-SD of 79.46%+-3.9 while MRSA group showed 72.35%+-2.5. Significant difference in phagocytic index indicates that it can be one of the mechanisms of MRSA to evade host immune system as compare to MSSA. (author)

  11. Methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: preventing surgical site infections following plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elward, Alexis M; McAndrews, Joanne M; Young, V Leroy

    2009-01-01

    The reader is presumed to have a broad understanding of aesthetic surgical procedures. After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Explain the microbiology of Staphylococcus species and discuss antibiotic resistance development in Staphylococcus species and assess how clinical outcomes are affected. 2. Identify the epidemiology of Staphylococcus carriers and the impact on the clinical practice and regulation. Practice effective measures that prevent surgical site infections. 3. Practice screening for and decolonizing of patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Physicians may earn 2.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit by successfully completing the examination based on material covered in this article. The examination begins on page 245. As a measure of the success of the education we hope you will receive from this article, we encourage you to log on to the Aesthetic Society website and take the preexamination before reading this article. Once you have completed the article, you may then take the examination again for CME credit. The Aesthetic Society will be able to compare your answers and use this data for future reference as we attempt to continually improve the CME articles we offer. ASAPS members can complete this CME examination online by logging on to the ASAPS Members-Only Website (http://www.surgery.org/members) and clicking on "Clinical Education" in the menu bar. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of surgical site infections (SSI), with both methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant strains causing these infections. The incidence of methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) has increased in the US over the past decade, largely due to the emergence of community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). This article reviews the microbiology and epidemiology of methicillin-sensitive S aureus (MSSA) and MRSA, risk factors for surgical site infections among plastic surgery patients, the evidence supporting preoperative

  12. Role of beta-lactamase in expression of resistance by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Boyce, J M; Medeiros, A A

    1987-01-01

    Of 27 unique clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, only 4 were homogeneously resistant, and all 4 produced little or no beta-lactamase. Among heterogeneously resistant strains, those most resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics produced the most beta-lactamase. Similar genes may regulate production of the low-affinity penicillin-binding protein and beta-lactamase.

  13. [Circulation of methicillin-resistant staphylococci in hospitals with different profiles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shub, G M; Khodakova, N G

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of prevalence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci in hospitals with different specializations was performed. 2584 strains were isolated. Methicillin-resistant (MR) strains were present in different profile hospitals and their total prevalence between isolated strains was 12.3% while significantly varied in different hospitals (from 8% to 37%). Along with MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), MRSE (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis) and MRSS (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus saprophyticus) were presented in all studied hospitals. The prevalence of MR strains was highest among strains isolated from flame burn wounds (37%), while in samples from newborns in maternity hospital resistant strains represented 12% of isolates, and in general clinical hospital--not more than 9% of isolates. Relationship between rates of isolation of methicillin-resistant staphylococci and specialization of hospital unit was noted. For example, prevalence of MR staphylococci in isolates from newborns in ICU (47.5%) differed from the same one in maternity hospital (11.6%).

  14. Treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Luna

    Full Text Available The global spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA means it is now a pathogen of worldwide public health concern. Within Latin America, MRSA is highly prevalent, with the proportion of S. aureus isolates that are methicillin-resistant on the rise, yet resources for managing the infection are limited. While several guidelines exist for the treatment of MRSA infections, many are written for the North American or European setting and need adaptation for use in Latin America. In this article, we aim to emphasize the importance of appropriate treatment of MRSA in the healthcare and community settings of Latin America. We present a summary of the available guidelines and antibiotics, and discuss particular considerations for clinicians treating MRSA in Latin America

  15. Cataract surgery during active methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour AM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad M Mansour,1,2 Haytham I Salti11Department of Ophthalmology, American University of Beirut, 2Rafic Hariri University Hospital, Beirut, LebanonAbstract: We present two patients with active, foul-smelling, methicillin-resistant ­Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA wounds of the forehead and sternum following craniotomy or open heart surgery. Both had debilitating cataracts and were told by the infectious diseases team that cataract surgery is very risky. Both underwent sequential bilateral phacoemulsification with no sign of infection. Patients with active MRSA wound infections may safely undergo cataract surgery with additional precautions observed intraoperatively (good wound construction and postoperatively (topical antibiotics and close observation. Banning such surgeries can unnecessarily jeopardize the lifestyles of such patients.Keywords: cataract, infection, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, phacoe­mulsification

  16. Impetigo update: new challenges in the era of methicillin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geria, Aanand N; Schwartz, Robert A

    2010-02-01

    Impetigo is a bacterial infection of the superficial epidermis most commonly seen in infants and children. It is clinically characterized by crusted erosions or ulcers that may arise as a primary infection in which bacterial invasion occurs through minor breaks in the cutaneous surface or a secondary infection of a preexisting dermatosis or infestation. Impetigo occurs in 2 forms: bullous and nonbullous. Staphylococcus aureus currently is the most common overall cause of impetigo, but Streptococcus pyogenes remains an important cause in developing nations. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S aureus (CA-MRSA) poses a challenge because of its enhanced virulence and increasing prevalence in children. For limited uncomplicated impetigo, either topical mupirocin or fusidic acid is as effective if not more effective than systemic antibiotics. For extensive or complicated impetigo, systemic antibiotics may be warranted, but beta-lactam antibiotics should be avoided if methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) is suspected.

  17. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Christian; Colice, Gene

    2014-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become one of the leading etiologies of nosocomial pneumonia as a result of an increase in staphylococcal infections caused by methicillin-resistant strains paired with extended ventilatory support of critically, and often, chronically ill patients. The prevalence of community-acquired MRSA pneumonia, which historically affects younger patients and is often preceded by an influenza-like illness, is also increasing. A high index of suspicion and early initiation of appropriate antibiotics are key factors for the successful treatment of this disease. Even with early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, MRSA pneumonia still carries an unacceptably high mortality rate. This article will review historical differences between hospital-acquired and community-acquired MRSA pneumonia, as well as, clinical features of, diagnosis and treatment of MRSA pneumonia.

  18. Comparative antibacterial activity of topical antiseptic eardrops against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and quinolone-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Cha Kyung; Jang, Sook-Jin; Jo, Eu-Ri; Choi, Ji Ae; Sim, Ju-Hwan; Cho, Sung Il

    2016-06-01

    Aural irrigation using antiseptic solutions can be an effective medical treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) owing to the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant CSOM infections. In the present study, we compared the antimicrobial activities of 100% Burow's solution, 50% Burow's solution, 2% acetic acid, vinegar with water (1:1), and 4% boric acid solution against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), quinolone-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (QRPA), and quinolone-susceptible P. aeruginosa (QSPA) in vitro. We examined the antimicrobial activities of five antiseptic solutions against MRSA, MSSA, QRPA, and QSPA. The antimicrobial activities of the solutions were calculated as a percentage of the surviving microorganisms by dividing the viable count in each antiseptic solution with that in control. The time (D10 value) required for each of the five solutions to inactivate 90% of the microorganism population was also investigated. Burow's solution exhibited the highest antimicrobial activity and the lowest D10 value against MRSA, MSSA, QRPA, and QSPA, followed by 2% acetic acid, vinegar with water (1:1), and 4% boric acid solution. Our results indicate that Burow's solution has the most potent activity against bacteria including antibiotic-resistant strains. Twofold dilution of the solution is recommended to avoid ototoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus survival on hospital fomites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Robert; Mehta, Sanjay; Weed, Diane; Price, Connie Savor

    2006-11-01

    We examined the duration of survival of 2 strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on 3 types of hospital fomites. MRSA survived for 11 days on a plastic patient chart, more than 12 days on a laminated tabletop, and 9 days on a cloth curtain. Irregular surfaces may help harbor organisms in the environment. In addition to contact precautions, MRSA containment during an outbreak should include concurrent environmental decontamination.

  20. Esterase resistant to inactivation by heavy metals

    KAUST Repository

    El, Dorry Hamza

    2014-09-25

    EstATII is an esterase that a halotolerant, thermophilic and resistant to a spectrum of heavy metals including toxic concentration of metals. It was isolated from the lowest convective layer of the Atlantis II Red Sea brine pool. The Atlantis II brine pool is an extreme environment that possesses multiple harsh conditions such as; high temperature, salinity, pH and high concentration of metals, including toxic heavy metals. A fosmid metagenomic library using DNA isolated from the lowest convective layer this pool was used to identify EstATII. Polynucleotides encoding EstATII and similar esterases are disclosed and can be used to make EstATII. EstATII or compositions or apparatuses that contain it may be used in various processes employing lipases/esterases especially when these processes are performed under harsh conditions that inactivate other kinds of lipases or esterases.

  1. Isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from breeding dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Ada; Milani, Chiara; Drigo, Ilenia; Drigo, Michele; Corrò, Michela

    2011-01-01

    The overuse of antimicrobials can select resistant bacteria strains; staphylococci have the ability to become resistant to all beta-lactam antimicrobials and are a significant concern in human medicine and a growing issue for veterinary medicine. Because antimicrobials are sometimes incorrectly used in breeding kennels, the objective of the work was to assess the occurrence of methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococci in breeding dogs. The research was carried out in 13 kennels that were allotted to three categories according to the intensity of antimicrobial use. Vaginal and milk swabs were taken from 87 healthy bitches around parturition and also from multiple organs of 27 of their pups that died within the first 2 weeks. Standard bacteriological examinations were carried out and coagulase-positive staphylococci were identified. All the coagulase-positive staphylococci resulted to be Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. Susceptibility to oxacillin and the presence of the mecA gene were tested. Nine out of 89 strains (six isolated from the bitches' milk and three from dead puppies, all belonging to kennels characterized by an excessive use of antimicrobials) were multidrug-resistant, methicillin-resistant and mecA positive. Our results confirm that excessive use of antimicrobials entails the risk of selecting resistant staphylococci strains. Our data also indicate that the bacterial flora of healthy dogs belonging to specific populations may act as a reservoir of resistance genes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fitness and competitive growth comparison of methicillin resistant and methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durhan, Emine; Korcan, Safiye Elif; Altindis, Mustafa; Konuk, Muhsin

    2017-05-01

    Exponential developments of both Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) 3R ve 36R and methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) 27S were evaluated in the presence and absence of oxacillin. The strains were isolated from the specimens collected in microbiology department. It was also determined the transfer of mecA gene from 3R to 27S strain by using the replica plate technique. It was observed that the presence of antibiotics in the preliminary culture had a positive impact on the growth of the secondary culture of MRSA isolates. Comparison results of Rt bacteria in three different mixed cultures, assessed with Tukey's HSD test, showed a significant statistical difference among the groups. The values were as following; on the first day; Df: 2, F: 60.90, P: 0.0001, second day; Df:2, F:90.56, P: 0.0000, and third day; Df:2, F:4.86, P:0.0557. As a result of the study, we can suggest that the gene expression levels of the transferred antibiotic resistance genes could help us in both controlling hospital originated sickness and developing new strategies to prevent the spread of resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Activity of cephalosporins against methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci: minimal effect of beta-lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, J F; McNeill, W F

    1980-01-01

    Eight cephalosporins were tested for their activity against methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci and for their resistance to beta-lactamase from methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci. Susceptibility testing by the agar plate method was evaluated for the effect of inoculum size and duration of incubation. Methicillin-susceptible, coagulase-negative staphylococci were highly susceptible to the cephalosporins, with cephapirin and cepahlothin showing the greatest activity, followed by cefazolin and cefamandole. Methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci displayed nearly total cross-resistance to the cephalosporins. Resistance increased with increasing inoculum size. Beta-Lactamases produced by methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci had a minimal hydrolytic effect on cepahlothin, cephapirin, cefazolin, and cefamandole and no measurable effect on cefoxitin. There was no correlation between the anti-staphylococcal activity and resistance to beta-lactamases. PMID:6966906

  4. Antimicrobial resistance in methicillin susceptible and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius of canine origin: literature review from 1980 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, Arshnee; Damborg, Peter; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2014-07-16

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a commensal and a common opportunistic pathogen causing mainly infections of the integumentary system in dogs. The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant S. pseudintermedius isolates, in particular methicillin-resistant strains (MRSP) is a threat to small animal health and highlights the need for antimicrobial resistance surveillance to detect trends and potentially perform timeous interventions. We systematically reviewed 202 published articles to investigate temporal changes in antimicrobial resistance in clinical and commensal S. pseudintermedius isolated from dogs in 27 countries between 1980 and 2013. Resistance to the most common antimicrobials tested for in published studies and important for the treatment of staphylococcal infections in dogs were assessed separately for methicillin resistant (MRSP) and methicillin susceptible (MSSP) isolates. Stratified by MSSP and MRSP, no significant increases in antimicrobial resistance were observed over time, except for the penicillinase-labile penicillins (penicillin and ampicillin) among MSSP. However, in recent years, a few studies have reported higher-level of resistance to amikacin, gentamicin and enrofloxacin amongst MSSP. The review highlights inconsistencies between studies as a result of several factors, for example the use of different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods and interpretation criteria. We recommend that data on susceptibility in important companion animal pathogens are collected and presented in a more harmonized way to allow more precise comparison of susceptibility patterns between studies. One way to accomplish this would be through systematic surveillance either at the country-level or at a larger scale across countries e.g. EU level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dissemination of metal resistance genes among animal methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argudín, M Angeles; Butaye, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The use of metals as feed supplement has been recognized as a potential driver for co-selection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pigs. However, the prevalence of these determinants in methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) is largely unknown. In this study, a collection of 130 MRCoNS from pigs and veal calves were investigated for the presence of metal-resistance genes (czrC, copB, cadD, arsA) associated to SCCmec. Near half of the isolates carried metal resistance genes (czrC 5.4%, copB 38.5%, cadD 7.7%, arsA 26.2%) regardless of their SCCmec type. The increased use of metals in livestock animals, especially zinc in pigs in several European countries may co-select for methicillin-resistance in several staphylococcal species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. METHICILLIN - RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS IN PIG PRODUCTION CHAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Conter

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were (i to estimate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus (S.a in pig farm environments; (ii to evaluate the presence of S.a in pork processing environments (iii to detect the presence of methicillin-resistant (MRSA among isolated strains. Samples of pig stool, farm environment and pork processing environment were collected. These samples were submitted to detection of S.a following the international method: UNI EN ISO 6888-2 and the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC tests were performed by using the automated VITEK 2 system. In addition, a PCR for the detection of the mecA gene was applied. Overall, S. aureus were more frequently detected from pig farms than from pork processing environments. Among the n.51 isolated strains, n. 49 (96% were methicillin resistant (MRSA and only n.2 strains were methicillin sensitive (MSSA. The results of the present study highlighted that further studies are needed to elucidate transmission routes of MRSA in pig production chain.

  7. Molecular Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All strains were studied for their susceptibility to traditionally used antibiotics. The results revealed that multi-drug resistance was common among MRSA strains. The drug of choice for the treatment of MRSA and MSSA was vancomycin. Conclusion: The study concluded that multiple antibiotic resistance was common, and ...

  8. Comparison of Biofilm Formation between Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemian, Abdolmajid; Najar Peerayeh, Shahin; Bakhshi, Bita; Mirzaee, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the biofilm formation and the prevalence of biofilm-associated genes between the isolates of methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) Staphylococcus aureus. In total, 209 S. aureus isolates were collected. The antibiotic susceptibility test was conducted using nine antibiotics according to the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Phenotypic biofilm formation was performed with microtiter plate assay. The polymerase chain reaction was employed to detect icaA, icaD, icaB, icaC, clfA, clfB, fnbA, fnbB, fib, cna, eno, ebps, bbp, mecA, and SCCmec types as well as agr group genes with specific primers. Sixty-four (30.62%) isolates were resistant to methicillin, and 54 (83%) MRSA harbored SCCmec III. Furthermore, 122 (58.3%) isolates belonged to agr group I. Twenty-six (36.1%) MRSA and 42 (28.9%) MSSA isolates were strong biofilm producers (no significant difference). The prevalence of icaA, icaD, icaB, and icaC genes in MSSA isolates was 71, 41, 76, and 72%, respectively. The frequency of clfA, clfB, fnbA, fnbB, fib, cna, eno, ebps, and bbp in MSSA was 100, 100, 56, 46, 74, 54, 78, 11, and 1%, respectively. However, in MRSA isolates, the frequency was 97, 97, 64, 51, 76, 56, 79, and 12% with no track of bbp, respectively. Statistical difference between MSSA and MRSA regarding biofilm formation and the frequency of all biofilm-encoding genes was not significant. The majority of the S. aureus isolates harbored clfA, clfB, eno, fib, icaA, and icaD genes.

  9. Serious infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Helen; Miller, Loren G; Razonable, Raymund R

    2010-09-15

    Although first identified just >4 decades ago, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has undergone rapid evolutionary changes and epidemiologic expansion to become a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections worldwide. Increasing resistance to vancomycin among MRSA strains in conjunction with availability of new antibiotics, including daptomycin and linezolid, have increased treatment choices but made clinical treatment decisions more challenging. This article describes the clinical features and management issues of 2 challenging-to-treat manifestations of MRSA infection, bacteremia and/or endocarditis and osteomyelitis. It also presents a brief review of community-associated MRSA infections and preventive strategies directed against MRSA.

  10. The Rate of Inducible MLSB Resistance in the Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci Isolated From Clinical Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toka Özer, Türkan

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococci are one of the most common pathogens in nasocomial and community-acquired infections. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci are known to be resistant against all beta-lactam antibiotics. Therefore, non-beta-lactam antibiotics such as macrolide and lincosamides can be used. Resistance to those antibiotics may lead to therapeutic failure. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB ) resistance by using D-test in staphylococcal isolates from various clinical samples. Seventy-one methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus isolates (six S. aureus, 65 coagulase negative staphylococci) were included in this study. Staphylococci were identified with conventional methods. According to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria, susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. One of six (16.6%) methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates and 19 of 65 (29.2%) methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CNS) were detected as D-test positive. Twenty of 71 (28.1%) staphylococcal isolates detected as D-test positive. Inducible clindamycin resistance was found at a higher rate in MR-CNS. Since the resistant community and hospital acquired staphylococcal infections have become a therapeutic problem, it is very important to detect MLSB resistance routinely in microbiology laboratories. D-test is a cheap and reliable diagnostic method that can be performed in every laboratory. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MRSA) in Africa is sparsely documented. In Zimbabwe there is no routine patient or ... Resistance was high for most widely used drugs in Zimbabwe with high sensitivity to vancomycin, linezolid and teicoplanin. Conclusion: Although there are no ...

  12. Zinc resistance within swine associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates in the USA is associated with MLST lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc resistance in livestock-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) is mediated by the czrC gene co-located with the mecA gene, encoding methicillin resistance, on the type V SCCmec element. Since the czrC gene and the mecA gene are co-located on the SCCmec element, it has ...

  13. Quality Control of Direct Molecular Diagnostics for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Belkum, Alex; Niesters, Hubert G. M.; MacKay, William G.; van Leeuwen, Willem B.

    2007-01-01

    Ten samples containing various amounts of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), and combinations thereof were distributed to 51 laboratories for molecular diagnostics testing. Samples containing 102 to 103 MRSA cells were frequently reported to be negative. MRSE samples were scored as negative by all commercial tests but by only two out of three in-house tests. PMID:17581936

  14. Toxin Mediates Sepsis Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial sepsis is a major killer in hospitalized patients. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS with the leading species Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most frequent causes of nosocomial sepsis, with most infectious isolates being methicillin-resistant. However, which bacterial factors underlie the pathogenesis of CNS sepsis is unknown. While it has been commonly believed that invariant structures on the surface of CNS trigger sepsis by causing an over-reaction of the immune system, we show here that sepsis caused by methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis is to a large extent mediated by the methicillin resistance island-encoded peptide toxin, PSM-mec. PSM-mec contributed to bacterial survival in whole human blood and resistance to neutrophil-mediated killing, and caused significantly increased mortality and cytokine expression in a mouse sepsis model. Furthermore, we show that the PSM-mec peptide itself, rather than the regulatory RNA in which its gene is embedded, is responsible for the observed virulence phenotype. This finding is of particular importance given the contrasting roles of the psm-mec locus that have been reported in S. aureus strains, inasmuch as our findings suggest that the psm-mec locus may exert effects in the background of S. aureus strains that differ from its original role in the CNS environment due to originally "unintended" interferences. Notably, while toxins have never been clearly implied in CNS infections, our tissue culture and mouse infection model data indicate that an important type of infection caused by the predominant CNS species is mediated to a large extent by a toxin. These findings suggest that CNS infections may be amenable to virulence-targeted drug development approaches.

  15. Relative prevalence of methicilline resistant Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resistance rates of MRSA were 88.2% for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 88.2% for erythromycin, 58.8% for gentamycin, 70.6% for ciprofl oxacin, and 88.2% for chloramphenicol. All isolates were found to be sensitive to vancomycin and clindamycin though the D-test was found to be positive in 82.4% of the isolates.

  16. Phenotypic occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2017-03-13

    Mar 13, 2017 ... Because of the ability of the staphylococci to change resistance pattern over time, MRSA may continue to be a problem in the future. In Africa, relatively high prevalence rates of MRSA have been reported especially in Nigeria, Kenya and Cameroon (20-76%) and below 10% in Tunisia and Algeria (Nwanko ...

  17. Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and illicit drug use (AOR 10.18, 95%CI 1.36-76.52) were found to be independently associated with MRSA colonization. Conclusion: a study identified a high prevalence of MRSA colonization among patients admitted in the ICU. MRSA isolates were highly resistant to penicillin and erythromycin. History of illegal drug use ...

  18. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus causing orbital cellulitis in Australian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaska, Vikram L; Grimwood, Keith; Gole, Glen A; Nimmo, Graeme R; Paterson, David L; Nissen, Michael D

    2011-11-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has only emerged recently as a cause of serious ocular infections in several different countries. At a tertiary pediatric hospital in Brisbane, Australia, community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus orbital cellulitis was first noted in 2009. Since then, it has caused 4 of 9 such infections.

  19. The molecular evolution of hospital- and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurenberg, Ruud H; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause a wide variety of infections, ranging from minor skin infections to post-operative wound infections. Its adaptive power to antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in the beginning of the 1960s. Resistance to methicillin and

  20. Patients with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection – 21st Century Lepers

    OpenAIRE

    Mozzillo, Kristin L.; Ortiz, Nancy; Miller, Loren G.

    2010-01-01

    In the recent past, there has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, especially community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) infections. Many media descriptions of MRSA are sensational and focus on its potential for severe disease and contagiousness.

  1. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus": Considerations for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aniltta; Letizia, MariJo

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is a disease-causing organism that has been present in hospital settings since the 1960s. However, a genetically distinct strain of MRSA, called community-acquired methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA), has emerged in recent years in community settings among healthy…

  2. Epidemic Increase in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Henrik; Boye, Kit; Bartels, Mette Damkjær

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We have found an epidemic increase in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Copenhagen. The increase has a complex background and involves hospitals, nursing homes and persons nursed in their own home. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We found 33 MRSA patients in 2003 and 121...... in 2004. All isolates have been spa-typed and epidemiologic information collected. RESULTS: The number of MRSA cases has a doubling time of about six months. The epidemic has been caused by many different MRSA types and 31 staphylococcus protein A genotypes (spa types). MRSA has caused several hospital...

  3. In vitro transfer of methicillin resistance determinants mecA from methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitrus, Asinamai Athliamai; Zunita, Zakaria; Bejo, Siti Khairani; Othman, Sarah; Nadzir, Nur Adilah Ahmad

    2017-04-04

    Staphylococcus aureus more than any other human pathogen is a better model for the study of the adaptive evolution of bacterial resistance to antibiotics, as it has demonstrated a remarkable ability in its response to new antibiotics. This study was designed to investigate the in vitro transfer of mecA gene from methicillin resistant S. aureus to methicillin susceptible S. aureus. The recipient transconjugants were resistant to erythromycin, cefpodoxime and were mecA positive. PCR amplification of mecA after mix culture plating on Luria Bertani agar containing 100 μg/mL showed that 75% of the donor and 58.3% of the recipient transconjugants were mecA positive. Additionally, 61.5% of both the donor cells and recipient transconjugants were mecA positive, while 46.2% and 41.75% of both donor and recipient transconjugants were mecA positive on LB agar containing 50 μg/mL and 30 μg/mL respectively. In this study, the direction of transfer of phenotypic resistance as well as mecA was observed to have occurred from the donor to the recipient strains. This study affirmed the importance of horizontal transfer events in the dissemination of antibiotics resistance among different strains of MRSA.

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in palliative care: A prospective study of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevalence in a hospital-based palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Oliver; Strapatsas, Tobias; Alefelder, Christof; Grebe, Scott Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a common organism in hospitals worldwide and is associated with morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about the prevalence in palliative care patients. Furthermore, there is no standardized screening protocol or treatment for patients for whom therapy concentrates on symptom control. Examining the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in palliative care patients as well as the level of morbidity and mortality. We performed a prospective study where methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus screening was undertaken in 296 consecutive patients within 48 h after admission to our palliative care unit. Medical history was taken, clinical examination was performed, and the Karnofsky Performance Scale and Palliative Prognostic Score were determined. Prevalence of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was compared to data of general hospital patients. In total, 281 patients were included in the study having a mean age of 69.7 years (standard deviation = 12.9 years) and an average Karnofsky Performance Scale between 30% and 40%. The mean length of stay was 9.7 days (standard deviation = 7.6 days). A total of 24 patients were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus positive on the first swab. Median number of swabs was 2. All patients with a negative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus swab upon admission remained Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus negative in all subsequent swabs. Our study suggests that the prevalence of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among patients in an in-hospital palliative care unit is much higher than in other patient populations. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Hawaii, 2000–2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sarah Y.; Ayers, Tracy L.; Miller, F. DeWolfe; MacFadden, Ralph; Nakata, Michele; Lee, Myra Ching; Effler, Paul V.

    2005-01-01

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has generated considerable concern among medical and public health professionals. We used a statewide, population-based antimicrobial resistance surveillance system to examine epidemiologic trends for MRSA from outpatients and inpatients in Hawaii. Pediatric and adult patient populations were compared to assess characteristics of MRSA isolates specific for each group. From 2000 to 2002, 8,206 (26%) of 31,482 total S. aureus isolates were MRSA. During this period, the proportion of MRSA isolates increased in both outpatient and inpatient clinical settings (p0.05). Although MRSA isolates from adults demonstrated high resistance to most non–β-lactams, most MRSA isolates from pediatric outpatients remained susceptible to most non–β-lactams. PMID:16102308

  6. Occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococci in surgically treated dogs and the environment in a Swedish animal hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, A; Gustafsson, C; Leander, M; Fredriksson, M; Grönlund, U; Trowald-Wigh, G

    2012-07-01

    To investigate whether hospitalised dogs treated surgically may become culture positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Surgically treated dogs (n=45) were sampled for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on admission, before and after surgery and at the time of removal of surgical stitches. The hospital environment (n=57), including healthy dogs in the veterinary hospital environment (n=34), were sampled for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Genetic variations among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates were identified through detection of restriction fragment polymorphisms. No dogs developed a wound infection due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. However, there was a significant increase in the number of dogs carrying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius after hospitalisation compared to admission (Pmethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from dogs, but was present in the environment. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates were recovered from environmental surfaces and hospitalised animals, but not from healthy dogs. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates representing nine different restriction endonuclease digestion patterns were found, with two of these occurring in both the environment and on dogs. Dogs may contract methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in association with surgery and hospitalisation. Resistant bacteria may be transmitted between dogs, staff and the environment. Dogs colonised with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius may be a source for hospital- and community-acquired infections.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization to predict methicillin-resistant S aureus soft tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Craig G; Holleck, Jurgen L; Chang, John J; Merchant, Naseema; Lin, Shin; Gupta, Shaili

    2016-10-01

    Nasal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) testing at admission to the hospital was found to have a positive likelihood ratio of 8.5 and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.41 for predicting MRSA soft tissue infections. The clinical utility of this test depends on the prevalence of MRSA infection. In high prevalence populations, nasal MRSA is useful to rule in MRSA infections. In low prevalence populations it may be useful to rule out infections. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacotherapy for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra-Newnham, Marisel; Church, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    To review the evidence for pharmacologic agents available in the treatment of nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia. A search of PubMed (1975-July 2012) was conducted using a combination of the terms methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, pneumonia, nosocomial, vancomycin, linezolid, telavancin, ceftaroline, tigecycline, and quinupristin/dalfopristin. Randomized comparative clinical trials, meta-analyses, and review articles published in English were included. A manual review of the bibliographies of available literature was conducted and all relevant information was included. Observational and in vitro studies were incorporated as indicated. Pharmacotherapy for the treatment of nosocomial MRSA pneumonia is limited. Vancomycin has been the treatment of choice for several years. Linezolid has demonstrated similar efficacy to vancomycin in randomized clinical trials and recent data have suggested that it may be superior in some cases, although there are limitations to this conclusion. Telavancin has also demonstrated similar clinical efficacy to vancomycin; however, the drug is not commercially available in the US. Other agents with MRSA activity include ceftaroline, clindamycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, and tigecycline, although the evidence for their use in nosocomial pneumonia is limited. Based on the currently available evidence and cost-effectiveness, vancomycin should continue to be the drug of choice for most patients with nosocomial MRSA pneumonia. Linezolid is a reasonable alternative for patients with treatment failure while receiving vancomycin, isolates with vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations over 2 μg/mL, allergic reactions, or vancomycin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  9. Pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Ethan; Kollef, Marin H; Nathwani, Dilip

    2008-06-01

    A recent increase in staphylococcal infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), combined with frequent, prolonged ventilatory support of an aging, often chronically ill population, has resulted in a large increase in cases of MRSA pneumonia in the health care setting. In addition, community-acquired MRSA pneumonia has become more prevalent. This type of pneumonia historically affects younger patients, follows infection with influenza virus, and is often severe, requiring hospitalization and causing the death of a significant proportion of those affected. Ultimately, hospital-acquired MRSA and community-acquired MRSA are important causes of pneumonia and present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Rapid institution of appropriate antibiotic therapy, including linezolid as an alternative to vancomycin, is crucial. Respiratory infection-control measures and de-escalation of initial broad-spectrum antibiotic regimens to avoid emergence of resistant organisms are also important. This article reviews the clinical features of, diagnosis of, and therapies for MRSA pneumonia.

  10. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in human milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FR Novak

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We collected and analyzed 500 samples of human milk, from five Brazilian cities (100 from each to detect methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA producing enterotoxins. We found 57 strains of MRSA, and the mecA gene, responsible for resistance, was detected in all of them using a specific molecular probe. We examined 40 strains for the presence of four enterotoxins, after selecting a subset that included all strains from each region, except for the largest sample, from which 10 were randomly selected. Among these two presented enterotoxin B, and growth in human colostrum and trypicase soy broth. After 5 h of incubation at 37°C, population sizes were already higher than 9.4 x 105 UFC/ml and enterotoxin was released into culture medium and colostrum. Our results stress the importance of hygiene, sanitary measures, and appropriate preservation conditions to avoid the proliferation of S. aureus in human milk.

  11. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in India: Prevalence & susceptibility pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indian Network for Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance (INSAR group, India

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is endemic in India and is a dangerous pathogen for hospital acquired infections. This study was conducted in 15 Indian tertiary care centres during a two year period from January 2008 to December 2009 to determine the prevalence of MRSA and susceptibility pattern of S. aureus isolates in India. Methods: All S. aureus isolates obtained during the study period in the participating centres were included in the study. Each centre compiled their data in a predefined template which included data of the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, location of the patient and specimen type. The data in the submitted templates were collated and analysed. Results: A total of 26310 isolates were included in the study. The overall prevalence of methicillin resistance during the study period was 41 per cent. Isolation rates for MRSA from outpatients, ward inpatients and ICU were 28, 42 and 43 per cent, respectively in 2008 and 27, 49 and 47 per cent, respectively in 2009. The majority of S. aureus isolates was obtained from patients with skin and soft tissue infections followed by those suffering from blood stream infections and respiratory infections. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was low in both MSSA (53% and MRSA (21%. MSSA isolates showed a higher susceptibility to gentamicin, co-trimoxazole, erythromycin and clindamycin as compared to MRSA isolates. No isolate was found resistant to vancomycin or linezolid. Interpretation & conclusions: The study showed a high level of MRSA in our country. There is a need to study epidemiology of such infections. Robust antimicrobial stewardship and strengthened infection control measures are required to prevent spread and reduce emergence of resistance.

  12. Detection and analysis of methicillin-resistant human-adapted sequence type 398 allows insight into community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Wang, Yanan; Le, Katherine Y; Liu, Qian; Shang, Jun; Dai, Yingxin; Meng, Hongwei; Wang, Xing; Li, Tianming; Gao, Qianqian; Qin, Juanxiu; Lu, Huiying; Otto, Michael; Li, Min

    2018-01-29

    Severe infections with highly virulent community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) are a global problem. However, the molecular events defining the evolution of CA-MRSA are still poorly understood. MRSA of sequence type (ST) 398 is known to frequently infect livestock, while ST398 isolates infecting humans are commonly methicillin-susceptible or represent MRSA originating from livestock-associated (LA)-MRSA. We used whole genome sequencing of newly detected CA-MRSA ST398 isolates, in comparison to geographically matched LA-MRSA and methicillin-sensitive ST398, to determine their evolutionary history. Furthermore, we used phenotypic analyses including animal infection models to gain insight into the evolution of virulence in these CA-MRSA isolates. Finally, we determined methicillin resistance and expression of the methicillin resistance-conferring gene mecA and its penicillin-binding protein product, PBP2a, in a large series of CA-MRSA strains of divergent STs. We report several cases of severe and fatal infections due to ST398 CA-MRSA. The responsible isolates showed the typical genetic characteristics reported for human-adapted methicillin-sensitive ST398. Whole genome sequencing demonstrated that they evolved from human-adapted, methicillin-susceptible clones on several different occasions. Importantly, the isolates had not undergone consistent genetic alterations or changes in virulence as compared to their methicillin-susceptible predecessors. Finally, we observed dramatically and consistently lower methicillin resistance and expression of the resistance gene mecA, as compared to hospital-associated MRSA strains, in a diverse selection of CA-MRSA strains. Our study presents evidence for the development of highly virulent human-adapted ST398 CA-MRSA isolates from methicillin-susceptible predecessors. Notably, our investigation indicates that, in contrast to widespread notions, the development of CA-MRSA is not necessarily

  13. Methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus sequence type 398 in pigs and humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belkum, A. van; Melles, D.C.; Peeters, J.K.; Leeuwen, W.B. van; Duijkeren, E. van; Huijsdens, X.W.; Spalburg, E.; Neeling, A.J. de; Verbrugh, H.A.

    2008-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus sequence type 398 (ST398 MRSA) was identified in Dutch pigs and pig farmers. ST398 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus circulates among humans at low frequency (0.2%) but was isolated in 3 human cases of bacteremia (2.1%; p = 0.026). Although its natural

  14. Use of a primary isolation medium for recovery of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Enk, R A; Thompson, K D

    1992-01-01

    Clinical specimens frequently contain methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates in low numbers or mixed with methicillin-susceptible staphylococci, which can obscure MRSA on nonselective media. By using an oxacillin-containing mannitol-salt-based selective and differential medium on 936 respiratory specimens, we recovered 45% more MRSA isolates (29 versus 20) than on nonselective media alone.

  15. Characterization of pig-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Jiang, Nansong; Ke, Yuebin; Feßler, Andrea T; Wang, Yang; Schwarz, Stefan; Wu, Congming

    2017-03-01

    Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) have been reported in various countries worldwide. However, although China is one of the biggest pig and pork producers, large-scale studies on pig-associated LA-MRSA from China are scarce. The aims of this study were to analyze 2420 non-duplicate samples collected from pigs at swine farms and slaughterhouses in different regions in China during 2014 for the prevalence of pig-associated MRSA and to determine the antimicrobial resistance pheno- and genotypes of the respective isolates. MRSA isolates were identified in 270 (11.2%) samples. The isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and screening for resistance genes. All MRSA isolates belonged to the clonal complex 9 and spa type t899, but showed variable PFGE patterns. All isolates were non-susceptible to oxacillin, cefoxitin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, florfenicol, ciprofloxacin, and valnemulin. High rates of resistance were also observed for tetracycline (99.6%), erythromycin (97.0%), quinupristin-dalfopristin (97.0%), and gentamicin (80.4%). Three linezolid-non-susceptible isolates containing the multi-resistance gene cfr and nine rifampicin-non-susceptible isolates with mutations in rpoB were detected. Resistance to β-lactams was exclusively associated with mecA, while phenicol resistance was mainly attributable to fexA, except in the three cfr-positive isolates. The pleuromutilin-lincosamide-streptogramin A resistance gene lsa(E) was identified in all MRSA isolates, and no other pleuromutilin resistance genes, except cfr in three isolates, were detected. Pigs are the most important hosts of LA-MRSA in China. Screening for pig-associated MRSA is necessary to monitor changes in epidemiology and characteristics of these important pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The molecular changing mechanism of Ampicillin-Sulbactam resistant Staphylococcus aureus towards Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke Hemiawati Satari

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the molecular changing of S.aureus, which is resistant to Ampicillin-Sulbactam and then become resistant to Methicillin as a result of improper dosage. The study was conducted by isolating Ampicillin-Sulbactam resistant and Methicillin Resistant S.aureus (MRSA, afterwards an amplification process was performed by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction. to isolate the betalactamase enzyme regulator and PBP 2a genes. The result of this research showed that there were a deletion of few amino acids from the regulator gene, and a suspicion that the DNA sequence had been substituted from PBP 2 gene into PBP 2a (gen mec. This process had formed MRSA.

  17. Does Nasal Cocolonization by Methicillin-Resistant Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Strains Occur Frequently Enough To Represent a Risk of False-Positive Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Determinations by Molecular Methods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Karsten; Pagnier, Isabelle; Schuhen, Brigitte; Wenzelburger, Frauke; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Kipp, Frank; Peters, Georg; von Eiff, Christof

    2006-01-01

    By analyzing the colonization of the anterior nares in cardiothoracic surgery patients on admission, nasal cocolonization by methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci was detected in 8/235 (3.4%) specimens. Consequently, in a low-methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) setting, a molecular MRSA screening test targeting the mecA gene and an S. aureus-specific gene in parallel and applied directly to clinical specimens would be associated with an unacceptable positive predictive value of about 40%. PMID:16390977

  18. Modification of the Sceptor system for rapid detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, G A; Sahm, D F

    1986-01-01

    The 24-h Sceptor MIC system (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) was modified to allow rapid (6 h) detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci. For 105 methicillin-resistant staphylococci tested, 90% of the results obtained by the 6-h method agreed with those obtained by disk agar diffusion. In comparison, 88 and 93% of the results obtained by the AutoMicrobic system (Vitek Systems, Inc., Hazelwood, Mo.) and the 24-h conventional Sceptor system, respectively, agreed with disk agar diffusion results. No false-resistant results were observed with 52 methicillin-susceptible staphylococci tested by any of the three methods. PMID:3093529

  19. First isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from pigs’ clinical samples in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenko Zutic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a highly important human pathogen that is also a significant concern in veterinary medicine. Despite the high prevalence of colonization, clinical infections with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus appear to be rare in pigs. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from a sow with endometritis and her five piglets with dermatitis originating from a Serbian farm. Identification of the strains was done by automated system and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction for mecA and nuc genes. Detection of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec type was performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing on erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and vancomycin was done by disc diffusion method. Six isolated strains from the infected sow and her piglets showed resistance only to tetracycline beside resistance to all beta-lactam antibiotics. In the tested methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates, Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec type V was present. To our knowledge, this finding is the first documented detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from pigs’ clinical samples in Serbia. The results of our study indicate the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a pig farm in Serbia highlighting the threat of this antibiotic-resistant microorganism as a pathogen causing both animal and human infections.

  20. Spontaneous methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus epidural abscess in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connealy, Brendan D; Lovgren, Todd R; Tomich, Paul G; Smith, Carl V; Berg, Teresa G

    2010-08-01

    Epidural abscess is a rare complication of regional anesthesia, and spontaneous formation is even more uncommon. Diabetes mellitus, concomitant infection, intravenous drug use, and immune suppression are risk factors for spontaneous epidural abscess. A 29-year-old white woman presented at 28 weeks of estimated gestational age reporting an intermittent headache. She had Horner syndrome and was hospitalized. A cervicothoracic epidural abscess was diagnosed. Surgical decompression and parenteral antibiotics resulted in complete resolution of neurologic symptoms. Cultures were positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureous. Spontaneous epidural abscess is a rare condition and diagnosis is often delayed. The finding of Horner syndrome led to imaging of the cervical spine and diagnosis of epidural abscess. Early intervention resulted in resolution of neurologic symptoms and a successful pregnancy outcome.

  1. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Lip Infection Mimicking Angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucerna, Alan R; Espinosa, James; Darlington, Anne M

    2015-07-01

    It is rare for angioedema to be misidentified by the experienced clinician or for it to mimic another disease process. As an Emergency Physician, it is important to recognize and treat angioedema immediately. Of equal importance is the recognition and initiation of treatment of facial cellulitis. A case report follows that illustrates methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) lip infection mimicking angioedema. Here, we describe a case of a 21-year-old man who presented with a swollen lower lip, initially diagnosed as angioedema. Further investigation revealed the cause of his lip swelling was actually a MRSA abscess and surrounding cellulitis, an unusual presentation for lip infection, which we discuss below. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Misidentifying MRSA lip infection for angioedema, with a delay in proper treatment, could result in serious morbidity or mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Epidemic Increase in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Henrik; Boye, Kit; Bartels, Mette Damkjær

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We have found an epidemic increase in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Copenhagen. The increase has a complex background and involves hospitals, nursing homes and persons nursed in their own home. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We found 33 MRSA patients in 2003 and 121...... in 2004. All isolates have been spa-typed and epidemiologic information collected. RESULTS: The number of MRSA cases has a doubling time of about six months. The epidemic has been caused by many different MRSA types and 31 staphylococcus protein A genotypes (spa types). MRSA has caused several hospital...... outbreaks and is endemic in 10 nursing homes. Five staff members from nursing homes have been infected with MRSA. MRSA commonly causes skin and soft tissue infections (76%), but serious infections such as septicaemia and pneumonia are also found. CONCLUSION: Treatment of MRSA-infected patients is costly due...

  3. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowash, Madeleine G.; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has changed the landscape of S. aureus infections around the globe. Initially recognized for its ability to cause disease in young and healthy individuals without healthcare exposures as well as for its distinct genotype and phenotype, this original description no longer fully encompasses the diversity of CA-MRSA as it continues to expand its niche. Using four case studies, we highlight a wide range of the clinical presentations and challenges of CA-MRSA. Based on these cases we further explore the globally polygenetic background of CA-MRSA with a special emphasis on generally less characterized populations. PMID:24085688

  4. Investigation and Treatment of Fusidic Acid Resistance Among Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcal Isolates from Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelfetouh, Alaa; Kassem, Mervat; Naguib, Marwa; El-Nakeeb, Moustafa

    2017-01-01

    Methicillin resistance among staphylococci isolated from patients in northern Egypt has escalated alarmingly in the past decade. Data about the prevalence of fusidic acid (FA) resistance in Egyptian clinical isolates are limited. This work investigates the prevalence and mechanism of FA resistance among 81 methicillin-resistant staphylococcal isolates from major hospitals of Alexandria, Egypt. Some combinations for treating infections due to resistant isolates were studied. Twenty-six isolates (32.1%) were FA resistant (minimum inhibitory concentrations [MICs] = 2-1,024 μg/ml), and fusB and fusC genes coding for FA resistance were detected in 30.77% and 34.62% of the FA-resistant strains, respectively. One highly resistant isolate, S502 (MIC = 1,024 μg/ml), possessed both genes. Plasmid curing resulted in fusB loss and MIC decrease by 16-64 folds. Conjugation caused acquisition of FA resistance among susceptible isolates. Serial passages in subinhibitory FA concentrations produced mutants with increased MIC by 4-32 folds. The combination of FA with rifampin, gentamicin, or ampicillin/sulbactam, in a subinhibitory concentration, was synergistic against the isolates, including serial passage mutants, decreasing number of survivors by an average of 2-4 logs. A relatively moderate rate of FA resistance was detected in Alexandria hospitals. Combination therapy with gentamicin, rifampin, or ampicillin/sulbactam is crucial to preserve the effectiveness of FA.

  5. Topoisomerase Mutations in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible and -Resistant Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Kaatz, Glenn W.; Seo, Susan M.

    1998-01-01

    The incidence of the various mutations in the genes encoding topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase in fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus is not known. Using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing, we found that in fluoroquinolone- and methicillin-resistant strains, mutations in grlA and gyrA are quite likely to be present together. For fluoroquinolone-resistant but methicillin-susceptible strains, mutations in grlA alone are more common.

  6. Emerging threat of multidrug resistant bugs--Acinetobacter calcoaceticus baumannii complex and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shyam Kumar; Rijal, Basista Prasad; Pokhrel, Bharat Mani

    2013-03-15

    Infections caused by bacteria such as multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter spp. and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) constitute a worldwide pandemic. Without gathering information about these strains, we cannot reduce the morbidity and mortality due to infections caused by these notorious bugs. This study was conducted to identify the status of MDR Acinetobacter spp. and MRSA in a tertiary care centre of Nepal. Sputum, endotracheal aspirate and bronchial washing specimens were collected and processed from patients suspected of lower respiratory tract infection following standard microbiological methods recommended by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). Double disk synergy test method was employed for the detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) in Acinetobacter isolates. Methicillin resistance in S. aureus was confirmed by using cefoxitin and oxacillin disks. Different genomespecies of Acinetobacter were isolated; these consisted of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus baumannii complex and A. lwoffii. Around 95% of Acinetobacter isolates were MDR, while 12.9% were ESBL-producer. Of the total 33 isolates of S. aureus, 26 (78.8%) were MDR and 14 (42.4%) were methicillin resistant. A large number of MDR Acinetobacter spp. and MRSA has been noted in this study. The condition is worsened by the emergence of ESBL producing Acinetobacter spp. Hence, judicious use of antimicrobials is mandatory in clinical settings. Moreover, there should be vigilant surveillance of resistant clones in laboratories.

  7. Emerging threat of multidrug resistant bugs – Acinetobacter calcoaceticus baumannii complex and Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Infections caused by bacteria such as multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter spp. and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) constitute a worldwide pandemic. Without gathering information about these strains, we cannot reduce the morbidity and mortality due to infections caused by these notorious bugs. Methods This study was conducted to identify the status of MDR Acinetobacter spp. and MRSA in a tertiary care centre of Nepal. Sputum, endotracheal aspirate and bronchial washing specimens were collected and processed from patients suspected of lower respiratory tract infection following standard microbiological methods recommended by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). Double disk synergy test method was employed for the detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) in Acinetobacter isolates. Methicillin resistance in S. aureus was confirmed by using cefoxitin and oxacillin disks. Results Different genomespecies of Acinetobacter were isolated; these consisted of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus baumannii complex and A. lwoffii. Around 95% of Acinetobacter isolates were MDR, while 12.9% were ESBL-producer. Of the total 33 isolates of S. aureus, 26 (78.8%) were MDR and 14 (42.4%) were methicillin resistant. Conclusions A large number of MDR Acinetobacter spp. and MRSA has been noted in this study. The condition is worsened by the emergence of ESBL producing Acinetobacter spp. Hence, judicious use of antimicrobials is mandatory in clinical settings. Moreover, there should be vigilant surveillance of resistant clones in laboratories. PMID:23497675

  8. Transmission of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus between Human and Hamster▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Jorge Pinto; Fowler, Vance G.; Correa, Maria T.; Lyman, Roberta; Ruffin, Felicia; Anderson, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    Transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) between humans and animals is increasingly recognized. We newly document that the transmission of MRSA between human and hamster is possible.

  9. Transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus between human and hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jorge Pinto; Fowler, Vance G; Correa, Maria T; Lyman, Roberta; Ruffin, Felicia; Anderson, Kevin L

    2011-04-01

    Transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) between humans and animals is increasingly recognized. We newly document that the transmission of MRSA between human and hamster is possible.

  10. Methicillin and vancomycin resistant S. aureus in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Sood Loomba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available S. aureus is the major bacterial cause of skin, soft tissue and bone infections, and one of the commonest causes of healthcare-associated bacteremia. Hospital-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA carriage is associated with an increased risk of infection, morbidity and mortality. Screening of high-risk patients at the time of hospital admission and decolonization has proved to be an important factor in an effort to reduce nosocomial transmission. The electronic database Pub Med was searched for all the articles on "Establishment of MRSA and the emergence of vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA." The search included case reports, case series and reviews. All the articles were cross-referenced to search for any more available articles. A total of 88 references were obtained. The studies showed a steady increase in the number of vancomycin-intermediate and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus. Extensive use of vancomycin creates a selective pressure that favors the outgrowth of rare, vancomycin-resistant clones leading to heterogenous vancomycin intermediate S. aureus hVISA clones, and eventually, with continued exposure, to a uniform population of vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA clones. However, the criteria for identifying hVISA strains have not been standardized, complicating any determination of their clinical significance and role in treatment failures. The spread of MRSA from the hospital to the community, coupled with the emergence of VISA and VRSA, has become major concern among healthcare providers. Infection-control measures, reliable laboratory screening for resistance, appropriate antibiotic prescribing practices and avoidance of blanket treatment can prevent long-term emergence of resistance.

  11. Response of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to amicoumacin A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Lama

    Full Text Available Amicoumacin A exhibits strong antimicrobial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, hence we sought to uncover its mechanism of action. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of S. aureus COL in response to amicoumacin A showed alteration in transcription of genes specifying several cellular processes including cell envelope turnover, cross-membrane transport, virulence, metabolism, and general stress response. The most highly induced gene was lrgA, encoding an antiholin-like product, which is induced in cells undergoing a collapse of Δψ. Consistent with the notion that LrgA modulates murein hydrolase activity, COL grown in the presence of amicoumacin A showed reduced autolysis, which was primarily caused by lower hydrolase activity. To gain further insight into the mechanism of action of amicoumacin A, a whole genome comparison of wild-type COL and amicoumacin A-resistant mutants isolated by a serial passage method was carried out. Single point mutations generating codon substitutions were uncovered in ksgA (encoding RNA dimethyltransferase, fusA (elongation factor G, dnaG (primase, lacD (tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, and SACOL0611 (a putative glycosyl transferase. The codon substitutions in EF-G that cause amicoumacin A resistance and fusidic acid resistance reside in separate domains and do not bring about cross resistance. Taken together, these results suggest that amicoumacin A might cause perturbation of the cell membrane and lead to energy dissipation. Decreased rates of cellular metabolism including protein synthesis and DNA replication in resistant strains might allow cells to compensate for membrane dysfunction and thus increase cell survivability.

  12. Investigational drugs to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Cuong; Yeh, Anthony J; Cheung, Gordon YC; Otto, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Staphylococcus aureus remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. This is to a large extent due to antibiotic-resistant strains, in particular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). While the toll of invasive MRSA infections appears to decrease in U.S. hospitals, the rate of community-associated MRSA infections remains constant and there is a surge of MRSA in many other countries. This situation calls for continuing if not increased efforts to find novel strategies to combat MRSA infections. Areas covered This review will provide an overview of current investigational antibiotics in clinical development (up to phase II), and of therapeutic antibodies and alternative drugs against S. aureus in preclinical and clinical development, including a short description of the mechanism of action and a presentation of microbiological and clinical data. Expert opinion Increased recent antibiotic development efforts and results from pathogenesis research have led to several new antibiotics and alternative drugs, as well as a more informed selection of targets for vaccination efforts against MRSA. This developing portfolio of novel anti-staphylococcal drugs will hopefully provide us with additional and more efficient ways to combat MRSA infections in the near future and prevent us from running out of treatment options, even if new resistances arise. PMID:26536498

  13. Photodynamic inactivation of multi-resistant bacteria (PIB) - a new approach to treat superficial infections in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Tim; Hackbarth, Steffen; Regensburger, Johannes; Felgenträger, Ariane; Bäumler, Wolfgang; Landthaler, Michael; Röder, Beate

    2011-05-01

    The increasing resistance of bacteria against antibiotics is one of the most important clinical challenges of the 21(st) century. Within the gram-positive bacteria the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecium represent the major obstacle to successful therapy. Apart from the development of new antibiotics it requires additional differently constituted approaches, like photodynamic inactivation in order to have further effective treatment options against bacteria available. Certain dyes, termed photosensitizers, are able to store the absorbed energy in long-lived electronic states upon light activation with appropriate wavelengths and thus make these states available for chemical activation of the immediate surroundings. The interaction with molecular oxygen, which leads to different, very reactive and thus cytotoxic oxygen species, is highlighted. In this review the application of the photodynamic inactivation of bacteria will be discussed regarding the possible indications in dermatology, like localized skin and wound infections or the reduction of nosocomial colonization with multi-resistant bacteria on the skin. The crucial advantage of the local application of photosensitizers followed by irradiation of the area of interest is the fact that independent of the resistance pattern of a bacterium a direct inactivation takes place similarly as with an antiseptic. In this review the physical-chemical and biological basics of photo-dynamic inactivation of bacteria (PIB) will be discussed as well as the possible dermatological indications. © The Authors • Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  14. Origins and Evolution of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Lineages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, AR; Westh, Henrik; Lancastre, H de

    2006-01-01

    Most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates identified among blood isolates collected in Denmark between 1957 and 1970 belonged to either phage group III or the closely related 83A complex and had a PSTM antibiotype (resistance to penicillin [P], streptomycin [S], tetracycline...... [T], and methicillin [M]). Recently, some of these isolates were shown to have the same genetic backgrounds as contemporary epidemic MRSA isolates, and Danish methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates from the 1960s with a PST antibiotype were proposed to have been the recipients of the mec...

  15. Isolation and Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci in Healthy Broilers in Nsukka Southeast, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifeoma Chinyere UGWU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to isolate and detect methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS in healthy broilers in Nsukka Southeast, Nigeria and determine the antibiogram of the isolates. Cloacal and skin swabs were collected from each of 101 randomly sampled broilers meant for slaughter. The samples were processed for isolation and identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus species, following standard methods. Confirmation of methicillin-resistance by the isolates was done using penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP2a kit. Phenotypic resistance of the isolates to antimicrobial agents was determined using disc diffusion method. Out of 202 samples processed, 200 (99.01% yielded positive growth of staphylococci on oxacillin-supplemented oxacillin-resistance staphylococcal agar base (ORSAB. A total of 200 methicillin-resistant staphylococcal isolates were obtained. Of these, 91 (45.5% were identified as methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive Staphylococcus (MRCoPS, while 109 (54.5% were identified as methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species (MRCoNS. Out of the 91 MRCoPS, 53 (58.2% were identified as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Resistance of the isolates was 99.5% to erythromycin and chloramphenicol, 100% to oxacillin, 76.5% to gentamicin, 96.5% to clindamycin, 92.5% to ciprofloxacin, 99% to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim and tetracycline, and 98.5% to streptomycin and cefoxitin. All the isolates were multidrug resistant. This study has shown that healthy broilers reared and slaughtered in Nsukka Southeast, Nigeria harbour multidrug-resistant MRS and thus serve as their reservoirs.

  16. Susceptibility of clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococci isolates to new antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksuz, Lutfiye; Gurler, Nezahat

    2013-11-15

    The treatment of methicillin-resistant staphylococcal infections has been a growing problem both in and out of hospitals for the past 30 years. Therefore, there is a need for other antibiotics as an alternative to glycopeptides in the treatment of methicillin-resistant staphylococcal infections. This study investigated the in vitro susceptibility of 49 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 59 methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (MRCNS) clinical isolates to daptomiycin, telithromycin, tigecyclin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, and linezolid. The identification of the strains was made by conventional methods. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed according to CLSI. Methicillin resistance was determined by cefoxitin disk. Susceptibilities of the strains to daptomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, tigecycline, and vancomycin were performed using the E-test according to the recommendations of CLSI 2011 and the manufacturer. Two strains of MRCNS were resistant, and one was teicoplanin intermediate. It was found that one (2%) strain of MRSA and two (3%) strains of MRCNS were resistant to tigecyclin. Telithromycin resistance was detected in 33% of MRSA strains and 37% of MRCNS strains. Inducible clindamycin resistance was found in nine (18.4%) strains of MRSA and eighteen (30.5%) strains of MRCNS. All strains were susceptible to daptomiycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, and linezolid. Although it has recently been used, telithromycin has a high percentage of resistance; its use for methicillin-resistant staphylococcal strains, therefore, should be limited. Daptomycin and quinupristin/dalfopristin were found to be effective against MRSA and MRCNS strains and were concluded to be a good choice in the treatment of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

  17. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Melissa U.; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent source of infections affecting premature and critically ill infants in neonatal intensive care units. Neonates are particularly vulnerable to colonization and infection with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and many studies have attempted to identify risk factors that predispose certain infants to its acquisition in order to discover potential areas for clinical intervention. In addition, epidemiologic assessment of transmi...

  18. Impact of Colonization Pressure and Strain Type on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Transmission in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Popoola, Victor O.; Carroll, Karen C.; Ross, Tracy; Reich, Nicholas G.; Perl, Trish M.; Milstone, Aaron M.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the transmissibility of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) and healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (HA-MRSA) strains and the association of MRSA colonization pressure and MRSA transmission in critically ill children. Importantly, we found that in hospitalized children MRSA colonization pressure above 10% increases the risk of MRSA transmission 3-fold, and CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains have similar transmission dynamics.

  19. Impact of colonization pressure and strain type on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoola, Victor O; Carroll, Karen C; Ross, Tracy; Reich, Nicholas G; Perl, Trish M; Milstone, Aaron M

    2013-11-01

    We studied the transmissibility of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) and healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (HA-MRSA) strains and the association of MRSA colonization pressure and MRSA transmission in critically ill children. Importantly, we found that in hospitalized children MRSA colonization pressure above 10% increases the risk of MRSA transmission 3-fold, and CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains have similar transmission dynamics.

  20. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian Yik Lim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We investigated the clinical characteristics, treatment patterns and outcomes of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA septic arthritis. Methods: This was a retrospective chart review of CA-MRSA septic arthritis in a tertiary care hospital from 2000-2013. We compared CA-MRSA septic arthritis cases with HA-MRSA septic arthritis cases to identify important differences between the two groups. Results: We identified 11 cases of CA-MRSA septic arthritis and 34 cases of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant SA (HA-MRSA septic arthritis. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus caused 25% of the MRSA septic arthritis cases. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis occurred in younger patients with fewer comorbidities or risk factors. There was no difference in initial presentation between CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus patients were less likely to be treated with appropriate antibiotics initially. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis was associated with increased morbidity with a high percentage of patients developing poor joint outcomes or osteomyelitis complications.  Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis was also associated with increased utilization of health care resources due to long hospital stays, high readmissions rates, and increased requirements for rehabilitation facility placement and home health support. There was no difference in mortality, poor joint outcome, readmissions, and osteomyelitis complications between CA-MRSA septic arthritis and HA-MRSA septic arthritis. Conclusions: Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is associated with increased morbidity and health care resource utilization. Increased awareness into CA-MRSA as a cause of septic

  1. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal periprosthetic joint infections can be effectively controlled by systemic and local daptomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Feng-Chih; Yen, Shih-Hsiang; Peng, Kuo-Ti; Wang, Jun-Wen; Lee, Mel S

    2016-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus remains a serious problem in the treatment of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). Higher failure rates were reported when vancomycin was used in 2-stage exchange arthroplasty. Therefore a better therapeutic drug is needed to treat PJI caused by methicillin-resistant organisms. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of daptomycin when administered in bone cement combined with systemic use for methicillin-resistant Staphylococci PJI. We conducted a retrospective study from January 2010 to December 2012. Twenty-two patients (10 knees and 12 hips) with PJI caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus species underwent 2-stage revision arthroplasty. In the first stage, 10% daptomycin (weight daptomycin per weight bone cement) was incorporated into polymethylmethacrylate bone cement, and systemic daptomycin (6 mg/kg) was administered postoperatively for 14 days. In the second stage, 2.5% w/w daptomycin was used in the bone cement. The minimum follow-up was 2 years or until recurrence of infection. The infecting organisms included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in 10 patients, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis in 8 patients and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci in 4 patients. The mean follow-up duration was 33.7 months (range, 24-51 months). The treatment success rate was 100%. Only one patient developed asymptomatic transient elevation of the creatine phosphokinase level. No patient experienced any adverse effects related to daptomycin such as myositis, rhabdomyolysis, peripheral neuropathy, derangement of liver function, or eosinophilic pneumonia. In this series, no serious adverse events occurred. Our protocol, using daptomycin-impregnated cement combined with short duration of systemic daptomycin, appears to be an effective and safe treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus PJI.

  2. Rapid analysis of microbial systems using vibrational spectroscopy and supervised learning methods: application to the discrimination between methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodacre, Royston; Rooney, Paul J.; Kell, Douglas B.

    1998-04-01

    FTIR spectra were obtained from 15 methicillin-resistant and 22 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus strains using our DRASTIC approach. Cluster analysis showed that the major source of variation between the IR spectra was not due to their resistance or susceptibility to methicillin; indeed early studies suing pyrolysis mass spectrometry had shown that this unsupervised analysis gave information on the phage group of the bacteria. By contrast, artificial neural networks, based on a supervised learning, could be trained to recognize those aspects of the IR spectra which differentiated methicillin-resistant from methicillin- susceptible strains. These results give the first demonstration that the combination of FTIR with neural networks can provide a very rapid and accurate antibiotic susceptibility testing technique.

  3. Methicillin-Resistant Bacteria Inhabiting Surface Waters Monitored by mecA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedmonir, Elnaz; Yilmaz, Fadime; Icgen, Bulent

    2016-08-01

    Part of a 20-60 kb staphylococcal chromosome cassette called mecA encodes low-affinity penicillin-binding protein PBP2a and causes methicillin resistance. Among all methicillin-resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen and main concern worldwide. Although the origin of the mecA is not very well-defined, mecA homologues are also ubiquitous in methicillin-resistant non-staphylococcal bacteria. Due to the dissemination of methicillin resistance through the transmission of mecA gene among staphylococcal and non-staphylococcal bacteria inhabiting surface waters, there is a need to monitor mecA gene in these waters for public health safety. Therefore, this study aimed at monitoring mecA harboring bacteria inhabiting surface waters by using fluorescently labelled mecA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. Under the hybridization conditions of 55 % formamide and 0.020 M NaCl at 46°C, the oligonucleotide probe used in the study showed high hybridization stringency to the mecA gene targeted. The strong linear relationships observed between the signal intensity and the target gene were used to assess the population dynamics of mecA harboring isolates over a 2-year-period. The results indicated that mecA-targeted oligonucleotide probes can be effectively used for in situ monitoring of methicillin resistant isolates inhabiting surface waters.

  4. Zinc resistance of Staphylococcus aureus of animal origin is strongly associated with methicillin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaco, Lina; Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the occurrence of zinc and copper resistances in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from swine and veal calves in a global strain collection.The test population consisted of 476 porcine MRSA isolates from ten European countries, 18 porcine MRSA...... of the pig MRSA from Europe and the seven Chinese isolates belonged to other CCs and 3 isolates were not classified into a CC.All isolates were tested for susceptibility to zinc chloride and copper sulphate using agar dilution and tested by PCR for the czrC gene encoding zinc resistance.Phenotypic zinc...

  5. Gas Plasma Pre-treatment Increases Antibiotic Sensitivity and Persister Eradication in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Xu, Ruobing; Zhao, Yiming; Liu, Dingxin; Liu, Zhijie; Wang, Xiaohua; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G.

    2018-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of serious nosocomial infections, and recurrent MRSA infections primarily result from the survival of persister cells after antibiotic treatment. Gas plasma, a novel source of ROS (reactive oxygen species) and RNS (reactive nitrogen species) generation, not only inactivates pathogenic microbes but also restore the sensitivity of MRSA to antibiotics. This study further found that sublethal treatment of MRSA with both plasma and plasma-activated saline increased the antibiotic sensitivity and promoted the eradication of persister cells by tetracycline, gentamycin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, and vancomycin. The short-lived ROS and RNS generated by plasma played a primary role in the process and induced the increase of many species of ROS and RNS in MRSA cells. Thus, our data indicated that the plasma treatment could promote the effects of many different classes of antibiotics and act as an antibiotic sensitizer for the treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacteria involved in infectious diseases.

  6. Transmission dynamics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence eCrombé

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available From the mid-2000s on, numerous studies have shown that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, renowned as human pathogen, has a reservoir in pigs and other livestock. In Europe and North America, clonal complex (CC 398 appears to be the predominant lineage involved. Especially worrisome is its capacity to contaminate humans in close contact with affected animals. Indeed, the typical multi-resistant phenotype of MRSA CC398 and its observed ability of easily acquiring genetic material suggests that MRSA CC398 strains with an increased virulence potential may emerge, for which few therapeutic options would remain. This questions the need to implement interventions to control the presence and spread of MRSA CC398 among pigs. MRSA CC398 shows a high but not fully understood transmission potential in the pig population and is able to persist within that population. Although direct contact is probably the main route for MRSA transmission between pigs, also environmental contamination, the presence of other livestock, the herd size and farm management are factors that may be involved in the dissemination of MRSA CC398. The current review aims at summarizing the research that has so far been done on the transmission dynamics and risk factors for introduction and persistence of MRSA CC398 in farms.

  7. Emerging drugs on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapikou, Adamantia; Torres, Antoni

    2013-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has proven to be a prominent pathogen in hospitals and in the community, which is capable of causing a variety of severe infections. Until now, there has been a limited antimicrobial armamentarium for use against MRSA, of which glycopeptides and linezolid are the main agents used. This review assesses current treatment and the agents being developed for MRSA infections. A search was conducted in PubMed for English-language references published from 2000 to 2013, using combinations of the following terms: 'MRSA', 'MRSA therapy', 'gram (+) infections therapy', 'new antibiotics', 'vancomycin', 'staphylococcus resistance', 'oritavancin', 'ceftaroline', 'linezolid' and 'tigecycline'. The clinicalTrials website was also searched with keywords regarding the new antibiotic agents against MRSA infections. There are a number of new agents, the place of which in therapeutic regimens is yet to emerge. New glycopeptides, such as dalbavancin and oritavancin, with long half-lives, enabling once-weekly dosing, and oral agents, such as iclaprim, may provide a treatment approach for outpatient therapy. A decision must be made regarding the most suitable agent for an individual patient, the site of infection and the place of therapy.

  8. New treatments for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjewski, Martin E; Corey, G Ralph

    2009-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a dynamic pathogen. Rates of MRSA are increasing worldwide. In some centers, MRSA is becoming less susceptible to vancomycin, and these strains have been associated with worse clinical outcomes. Intermediate or fully resistant vancomycin strains of MRSA have emerged clinically, whereas MRSA acquired in the community has become epidemic. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide clinicians with an evidence-based review on new treatments for MRSA. Linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline have been approved during the last decade to treat infections due to MRSA. Although these agents are extremely valuable in the fight against MRSA, each one has limitations. New lypoglycopeptides (telavancin, dalbavancin and oritavancin) are in advanced phase of clinical development. Similarly, new broad-spectrum cephalosporins active against MRSA (e.g. ceftobiprole and ceftaroline) and a new dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor (iclaprim) are in or have completed phase 3 studies. Here, we review the most relevant information on new drugs to treat MRSA. New studies with available agents and upcoming studies with investigational drugs will help to better understand the role of each compound in the treatment of patients infected with MRSA and assist the clinician in keeping pace with this challenging pathogen.

  9. Transmission Dynamics of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombé, Florence; Argudín, M. Angeles; Vanderhaeghen, Wannes; Hermans, Katleen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Butaye, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    From the mid-2000s on, numerous studies have shown that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), renowned as human pathogen, has a reservoir in pigs and other livestock. In Europe and North America, clonal complex (CC) 398 appears to be the predominant lineage involved. Especially worrisome is its capacity to contaminate humans in close contact with affected animals. Indeed, the typical multi-resistant phenotype of MRSA CC398 and its observed ability of easily acquiring genetic material suggests that MRSA CC398 strains with an increased virulence potential may emerge, for which few therapeutic options would remain. This questions the need to implement interventions to control the presence and spread of MRSA CC398 among pigs. MRSA CC398 shows a high but not fully understood transmission potential in the pig population and is able to persist within that population. Although direct contact is probably the main route for MRSA transmission between pigs, also environmental contamination, the presence of other livestock, the herd size, and farm management are factors that may be involved in the dissemination of MRSA CC398. The current review aims at summarizing the research that has so far been done on the transmission dynamics and risk factors for introduction and persistence of MRSA CC398 in farms. PMID:23518663

  10. Occurrence and characterization of inducible clindamycin resistance in canine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanchaithong, Pattrarat; Prapasarakul, Nuvee

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to detect inducible clindamycin (iCLI) resistance in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from dogs in Thailand using D-zone testing. Strains that were iCLI-resistant were characterized by molecular typing and antibiogram and were detected in 10/200 S. pseudintermedius isolates (5%) from 7/41 dogs (17%). All were methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) and demonstrated multidrug resistance. The iCLI-resistant MRSP contained erm(B) and had identical or closely related DNA fingerprint patterns by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All iCLI-resistant MRSP strains belonged to the same clonal complex 112 (sequence types 111 and 112) by multilocus sequence typing. To avoid misinterpretation of clindamycin susceptibility, D-zone testing is recommended to promote rational antimicrobial selection and limit the clonal expansion of multidrug resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Graphene oxide-silver nanocomposite as a promising biocidal agent against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Moraes ACM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ana Carolina Mazarin de Moraes,1 Bruna Araujo Lima,2 Andreia Fonseca de Faria,1 Marcelo Brocchi,2 Oswaldo Luiz Alves1 1Laboratory of Solid State Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of Genetics, Evolution and Bioagents, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has been responsible for serious hospital infections worldwide. Nanomaterials are an alternative to conventional antibiotic compounds, because bacteria are unlikely to develop microbial resistance against nanomaterials. In the past decade, graphene oxide (GO has emerged as a material that is often used to support and stabilize silver nanoparticles (AgNPs for the preparation of novel antibacterial nanocomposites. In this work, we report the synthesis of the graphene-oxide silver nanocomposite (GO-Ag and its antibacterial activity against relevant microorganisms in medicine. Materials and methods: GO-Ag nanocomposite was synthesized through the reduction of silver ions (Ag+ by sodium citrate in an aqueous GO dispersion, and was extensively characterized using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by microdilution assays and time-kill experiments. The morphology of bacterial cells treated with GO-Ag was investigated via transmission electron microscopy. Results: AgNPs were well distributed throughout GO sheets, with an average size of 9.4±2.8 nm. The GO-Ag nanocomposite exhibited an excellent antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus faecalis, and Escherichia coli. All (100% MRSA cells were inactivated after 4 hours of exposure to GO-Ag sheets. In addition, no toxicity was found for either pristine GO or bare Ag

  12. Inactivation Effect of Antibiotic-Resistant Gene Using Chlorine Disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Furukawa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to elucidate the inactivation effects on the antibiotic-resistance gene (vanA of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE using chlorination, a disinfection method widely used in various water treatment facilities. Suspensions of VRE were prepared by adding VRE to phosphate-buffered saline, or the sterilized secondary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant. The inactivation experiments were carried out at several chlorine concentrations and stirring time. Enterococci concentration and presence of vanA were determined. The enterococci concentration decreased as chlorine concentrations and stirring times increased, with more than 7.0 log reduction occurring under the following conditions: 40 min stirring at 0.5 mg Cl2/L, 20 min stirring at 1.0 mg Cl2/L, and 3 min stirring at 3.0 mg Cl2/L. In the inactivation experiment using VRE suspended in secondary effluent, the culturable enterococci required much higher chlorine concentration and longer treatment time for complete disinfection than the cases of suspension of VRE. However, vanA was detected in all chlorinated suspensions of VRE, even in samples where no enterococcal colonies were present on the medium agar plate. The chlorine disinfection was not able to destroy antibiotic-resistance genes, though it can inactivate and decrease bacterial counts of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB. Therefore, it was suggested that remaining ARB and/or antibiotic-resistance gene in inactivated bacterial cells after chlorine disinfection tank could be discharged into water environments.

  13. Prevention and control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2009-02-01

    Recent efforts to combat infections have focused on pharmaceutical interventions. However, the global spread of antimicrobial resistance calls for the reappraisal of personal and institutional hygiene. Hygiene embodies behavioural and procedural rules that prevent bacterial transmission. Consequently, the chance of spreading bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is significantly reduced. Hygiene is part of the primacy and totality of patient care, ensuring that no harm is done. Any prevention and control strategy must be underpinned by changes in attitude, embraced by all. The major components of preventing and controlling MRSA include hand and environmental hygiene (as part of standard precautions), patient isolation, and patient\\/staff decolonization. Improving hand hygiene practice is especially important where the risk of infection is highest, e.g. in intensive care. Physical isolation has two advantages: the physical barrier interrupts transmission, and this barrier emphasizes that precautions are required. With limited isolation facilities, risk assessment should be conducted to indicate which patients should be isolated. Environmental hygiene, although important, has a lower priority than standard precautions. When a patient is ready for discharge (home) or transfer (to another healthcare facility), the overall interests of the patient should take priority. All patients should be informed of their MRSA-positive status as soon as possible. Because of increased mupirocin resistance, a selective approach to decolonization should be taken. When MRSA-positive staff are identified, restricting their professional activity will depend on the nature of their work. Finally, politicians and others need to commit to providing the necessary resources to maximize MRSA prevention and control.

  14. Methicillin resistant S. aureus in human and bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mark A; Zadoks, Ruth N

    2011-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a ubiquitous organism that causes a variety of diseases including mastitis in cattle and humans. High-level resistance of S. aureus to β-lactams conferred by a mecA gene encoding a modified penicillin binding protein (PBP2a) was first observed in the early 1960's. These methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) have been responsible for both hospital acquired infections (HA-MRSA) and, more recently, community acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). A small number of human MRSA mastitis cases and outbreaks in maternity or neonatal units have been reported which are generally the result of CA-MRSA. The establishment of the sequence type 398 (ST398) in farm animals, primarily pigs, in the early 2000's has provided a reservoir of infection for humans and dairy cattle, particularly in continental Europe, described as livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA). Prior to the emergence of ST398 there were sporadic reports of MRSA in bovine milk and cases of mastitis, often caused by strains from human associated lineages. Subsequently, there have been several reports describing bovine udder infections caused by ST-398 MRSA. Recently, another group of LA-MRSA strains was discovered in humans and dairy cattle in Europe. This group carries a divergent mecA gene and includes a number of S. aureus lineages (CC130, ST425, and CC1943) that were hitherto thought to be bovine-specific but are now also found as carriage or clinical isolates in humans. The emergence of MRSA in dairy cattle may be associated with contact with other host species, as in the case of ST398, or with the exchange of genetic material between S. aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus species, which are the most common species associated with bovine intramammary infections and commonly carry antimicrobial resistance determinants.

  15. DISTRIBUTION OF METHICILLIN - RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCI ISOLATED FROM PATIENT MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branislava Kocic

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigation comprised multivarious patient material like: swabs of wounds, eyes, ears, puncture fluid, aspirate, peritoneal liquid, blood and liquor samples.Distribution of Staphylococcus aureus in nefrologic patients amounted to 21,71% and Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CoNS to 53,14% in 2003, of which methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA was present in 63,27% and MRCoNS in 64,52% of cases. In surgical patients, the distribution of Staphylococcus aureus for the same period amounted to 22,75% and KNS to 18,11%, while MRSA was registered in 63,27% and MRCoNS 66,67% of cases. In 2004, the distribution of Staphylococcus aureus was 11,11% and KNS 24,07%. In nephrology patients, MRSA was present in 52,77% of cases and MRCoNS in 82,05%. In surgical patients, the distribution of Staphylococcus aureus was 43,38% and CoNS 35,29%, of which MRSA was present in 67,79% and MRCoNS in 81,25% of cases. In outpatients, the distribution of Staphylococcus aureus amounted to 26,02% and KNS to 12,07%, of which MRSA was present in 35,31% of cases and MRKNS in 53,65% of cases. The highest degree of resistance to other tested antibiotics was reported in nephrology patients. In these cases, in 2005, the resistance of MRSA to clindamycin was 81,82%, erythromycin 90,91%, ofloxacin 88,82%.

  16. Prevention and control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, H; Grundmann, H; Skov, R; Lucet, J-C; Cauda, R

    2009-02-01

    Recent efforts to combat infections have focused on pharmaceutical interventions. However, the global spread of antimicrobial resistance calls for the reappraisal of personal and institutional hygiene. Hygiene embodies behavioural and procedural rules that prevent bacterial transmission. Consequently, the chance of spreading bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is significantly reduced. Hygiene is part of the primacy and totality of patient care, ensuring that no harm is done. Any prevention and control strategy must be underpinned by changes in attitude, embraced by all. The major components of preventing and controlling MRSA include hand and environmental hygiene (as part of standard precautions), patient isolation, and patient/staff decolonization. Improving hand hygiene practice is especially important where the risk of infection is highest, e.g. in intensive care. Physical isolation has two advantages: the physical barrier interrupts transmission, and this barrier emphasizes that precautions are required. With limited isolation facilities, risk assessment should be conducted to indicate which patients should be isolated. Environmental hygiene, although important, has a lower priority than standard precautions. When a patient is ready for discharge (home) or transfer (to another healthcare facility), the overall interests of the patient should take priority. All patients should be informed of their MRSA-positive status as soon as possible. Because of increased mupirocin resistance, a selective approach to decolonization should be taken. When MRSA-positive staff are identified, restricting their professional activity will depend on the nature of their work. Finally, politicians and others need to commit to providing the necessary resources to maximize MRSA prevention and control.

  17. Presence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in sewage treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boopathy, Raj

    2017-09-01

    The presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in rural sewage treatment plants are not well reported in the literature. The aim of the present study was to study the frequency occurrence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a rural sewage treatment plant. This study was conducted using raw sewage as well as treated sewage from a small town sewage treatment plant in rural southeast Louisiana of USA. Results showed the presence of MRSA consistently in both raw and treated sewage. The presence of mecA gene responsible for methicillin resistance was confirmed in the raw and treated sewage water samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation for a novel methicillin resistance (mecC) homologue in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from injured military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Anuradha; Crawford, Katrina; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley; Ellis, Michael; Tribble, David R; Weintrob, Amy C

    2013-09-01

    A total of 102 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates collected from 50 injured service members (June 2009 to December 2011) at U.S. military treatment facilities were analyzed for the conventional mecA gene and mecC homologue by using standard PCR-based methods. The prevalence of the mecC homologue was zero.

  19. Clinical implications of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Richard H

    2011-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become an increasingly aggressive and prevalent pathogen in medicine. This pattern has also been noted in obstetrics. This review will delineate the epidemiology and clinical implications of MRSA during pregnancy. Investigations have focused on prevalence of MRSA colonization in obstetrics and the associated morbidity. In addition, some attention has been focused on the neonatal implications of maternal colonization. Overall, the rates of maternal MRSA colonization noted in the United States have been low, in the range of 0.5-4%. The clinical impact of MRSA colonization among pregnant women has also been estimated to be modest. Roughly 357 invasive MRSA infections per 100,000 live births in the United States occur on an annual basis. It is however important to note that published estimates likely underestimate the full scope of MRSA in pregnancy given the lack of formal reporting, importance of related neonatal colonization and morbidity, the complicated treatment implications in pregnant women, the recognized high pathogenicity of MRSA infections, and propensity for recurrent infections among community-acquired MRSA strains. MRSA is an increasingly important pathogen in modern healthcare and in the obstetric population. Continued surveillance and research remains a top priority.

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission: unrecognised patient MRSA carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Leif Percival; Nielsen, Xiaohui

    2015-04-01

    Even though methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of nosocomial infections, it may often be difficult to evaluate the exact route of transmission. In this study, we describe four cases of nosocomial transmission of MRSA in a hospital with a low MRSA incidence. In one case, a multi-traumatic patient arrived from a hospital in a foreign country and the primary surveillance swaps were negative for MRSA. The second case was a child with burn wounds who was referred from a Danish hospital. The third case was a multi-traumatic patient from Denmark. The fourth case was a new-born child in the neonate unit. In none of the cases, the index patient was known to have MRSA on admission and no specific precautions were taken to prevent transmission. In all cases there was intensive contact between the patient and the staff which may increase the risk of contaminating hands, arms and the front of the uniform. Hand hygiene is therefore essential, but the use of protection gowns with long sleeves is also important in order to prevent transmission of MRSA. After culture of MRSA and implementation of specific precautions to prevent transmission of MRSA, no further transmissions were observed. not relevant. The data in this study are included in the routine surveillance of MRSA at Rigshospitalet and do not form part of a trial.

  1. New pharmacological treatments for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Stuart L; Rose, Warren E

    2014-03-01

    Despite available treatment options for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the morbidity and mortality attributed to the diverse infection manifestations of this pathogen remain high. More anti-MRSA agents are needed as options for treatment of these infections. Ideally, these new agents would be rapidly bactericidal for bloodstream clearance in septic patients, have few toxicities, be active against MRSA in biofilms, be easy to administer, and have oral bioavailability. This review focuses on MRSA agents in Phase III trials or antibiotics currently in the market, which are being studied for new indications. For each agent, the antimicrobial potency against MRSA, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations and approved and potential new indications are presented. The role of novel combination therapies is also introduced. The new lipoglycopeptides oritavancin, telavancin and dalbavancin have the potential to make a large impact on the treatment of MRSA due to unique pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties and proposed dosing regimens. Other new agents (omadacycline and tedizolid) as well as revisited older agents (fosfomycin and fusidic acid) appear promising but require further study for their potential role. Combination therapy may improve outcomes in patients with high MRSA infection burden or when patient or pathogen factors predict a worse outcome with monotherapy.

  2. Typing of Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A technical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P L Mehndiratta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing prevalence of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA worldwide is a growing public health concern. MRSA typing is an essential component of an effective surveillance system to describe epidemiological trends and infection control strategies. Current challenges for MRSA typing are focused on selecting the most appropriate technique in terms of efficiency, reliability, ease of performance and cost involved. This review summarises the available information on application, potential and problems of various typing techniques in discriminating the strains and understanding the epidemiology of MRSA strains. The phenotypic methods in general are easier to perform, easier to interpret, cost effective and are widely available, however less discriminatory. The genotypic methods are expensive and technically demanding, however more discriminatory. Newer technologies involving sequencing of various genes are coming up as broadly applicable and high throughput typing systems. Still there is no consensus regarding the single best method for typing of MRSA strains. Phage typing is recommended as first line approach in epidemiological investigation of MRSA strains. PFGE remains the gold standard for characterisation of outbreak strains. DNA sequencing methods including MLST, spa typing, SCCmec typing and toxin gene profile typing are more practical methods for detecting evolutionary changes and transmission events. The choice of typing technique further depends on the purpose of the study, the facilities available and the utility of data generated to answer a desirable research question. A need for harmonisation of typing techniques by following standard protocols is emphasised to establish surveillance networks and facilitate global MRSA control.

  3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among animals: current overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires-de-Sousa, M

    2017-06-01

    Currently, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a universal threat. After being well established in the healthcare setting, it has emerged in the community among people with no risk factors for MRSA acquisition, therefore imposing a new threat. The subsequent detection of MRSA colonizing or infecting animals as well as in food of animal origin was of major concern, revealing new reservoirs for MRSA. The major MRSA clonal lineages circulating in the different settings, i.e. in hospitals, in the community and among animals, are described here, differentiating between clones colonizing companion and food-chain animals. Particular attention is given to the widely spread livestock-associated MRSA clonal complex (CC) 398, which is mainly associated with professional exposure but may be of high pathogenicity. The recent detection of a mecA homologue, designated mecC, with a wide geographical distribution in Europe, and including a large diversity of hosts (food-chain, companion and wildlife animals and also detected in water samples) adds to the threat. Domestication as well as globalization of the livestock industry have intensified exchanges between human and animal bacteria. We report here several cases of transmission of MRSA between companion or food-chain animals and humans, as well as some MRSA clones of human origin that have adapted to new animal hosts eventually by losing useless virulence factors or acquiring new mobile genetic elements. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative proteomics of Staphylococcus aureus and the response of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive strains to Triton X-100

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordwell, Stuart J; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Cole, Rebecca T

    2002-01-01

    profiles of S. aureus strains COL (methicillin-resistant) and 8325 (methicillin-sensitive). Reference mapping via this approach identified 377 proteins that corresponded to 266 distinct ORFs. Amongst these identified proteins were 14 potential virulence factors. The production of 41 'hypothetical' proteins....... Comparative maps were used to characterize the S. aureus response to treatment with Triton X-100 (TX-100), a detergent that has been shown to reduce methicillin resistance independently of an interaction with the mecA-encoded penicillin-binding protein 2a. In response to growth of the bacteria in the presence...

  5. Correlation between Genotype and Phenotypic Categorization of Staphylococci Based on Methicillin Susceptibility and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradelski, Elizabeth; Valera, Lourdes; Aleksunes, Lauren; Bonner, Daniel; Fung-Tomc, Joan

    2001-01-01

    Positive correlation between methicillin and oxacillin susceptibility test results and the detection of the mecA gene was observed for Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. haemolyticus as well as among mecA+ strains of other species of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). However, at least 50% of the mecA-negative strains of these other species of CNS were falsely classified as methicillin and oxacillin resistant. PMID:11474022

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus sp. colonizing health care workers of a cancer hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Dayane de Melo; Kipnis, André; Leão-Vasconcelos, Lara Stefânia Netto de Oliveira; Rocha-Vilefort, Larissa Oliveira; Telles, Sheila Araújo; André, Maria Cláudia Dantas Porfírio Borges; Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Lima, Ana Beatriz Mori; Ribeiro, Nádia Ferreira Gonçalves; Pereira, Mayara Regina; Prado-Palos, Marinésia Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze epidemiological and microbiological aspects of oral colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus of health care workers in a cancer hospital. Interview and saliva sampling were performed with 149 health care workers. Antimicrobial resistance was determined by disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration. Polymerase Chain Reaction, Internal Transcribed Spacer-Polymerase Chain Reaction and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis were performed for genotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus. Risk factors were determined by logistic regression. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus colonization prevalence was 19.5%, denture wearing (p = 0.03), habit of nail biting (p = 0.04) and preparation and administration of antimicrobial (p = 0.04) were risk factors identified. All methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus were S. epidermidis, 94.4% of them had mecA gene. Closely related and indistinguishable methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis were detected. These results highlight that HCWs which have contact with patient at high risk for developing infections were identified as colonized by MRSE in the oral cavity, reinforcing this cavity as a reservoir of these bacteria and the risk to themselves and patients safety, because these microorganisms may be spread by coughing and talking.

  7. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from veterinary hospitals in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bo Youn; Youn, Jung-Ho; Shin, Sook; Hwang, Sun Young; Park, Yong Ho

    2012-05-01

    Staphylococci were isolated from veterinary staff, hospitalized animals, and medical equipment from 2 major tertiary veterinary hospitals in South Korea to investigate antimicrobial resistance and genetic relatedness. The detection rate for staphylococci was 55.2% (111/201 samples), and 11 species were identified among the collected staphylococcal strains. The most prevalent species were Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (52/111, 46.8%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (21/111, 18.9%), and Staphylococcus aureus (19/111, 17.1%). The methicillin-resistance rates of staphylococci isolated from veterinary staff and medical equipment were higher than those from hospitalized animals. The genotype of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains in the current study was sequence type (ST)72-SCCmec IVc-t324, which is similar to the genotype of prevalent MRSA strains in human beings and food animals in South Korea. Among the mecA-positive S. pseudintermedius isolates, SCCmec V was most prevalent in strains originating from both veterinary staff and hospitalized animals. SCCmec IVa was detected in methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis, whereas SCCmec IVc was found in other methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci. The SCCmec typing, antimicrobial susceptibility tests, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis results showed that methicillin-resistant staphylococci dissemination between hospitalized animals and veterinary staff is possible in South Korean veterinary hospitals.

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus sp. colonizing health care workers of a cancer hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane de Melo Costa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze epidemiological and microbiological aspects of oral colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus of health care workers in a cancer hospital. Interview and saliva sampling were performed with 149 health care workers. Antimicrobial resistance was determined by disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration. Polymerase Chain Reaction, Internal Transcribed Spacer-Polymerase Chain Reaction and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis were performed for genotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus. Risk factors were determined by logistic regression. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus colonization prevalence was 19.5%, denture wearing (p = 0.03, habit of nail biting (p = 0.04 and preparation and administration of antimicrobial (p = 0.04 were risk factors identified. All methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus were S. epidermidis, 94.4% of them had mecA gene. Closely related and indistinguishable methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis were detected. These results highlight that HCWs which have contact with patient at high risk for developing infections were identified as colonized by MRSE in the oral cavity, reinforcing this cavity as a reservoir of these bacteria and the risk to themselves and patients safety, because these microorganisms may be spread by coughing and talking.

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus sp. colonizing health care workers of a cancer hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Dayane de Melo; Kipnis, André; Leão-Vasconcelos, Lara Stefânia Netto de Oliveira; Rocha-Vilefort, Larissa Oliveira; Telles, Sheila Araújo; André, Maria Cláudia Dantas Porfírio Borges; Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Lima, Ana Beatriz Mori; Ribeiro, Nádia Ferreira Gonçalves; Pereira, Mayara Regina; Prado-Palos, Marinésia Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze epidemiological and microbiological aspects of oral colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus of health care workers in a cancer hospital. Interview and saliva sampling were performed with 149 health care workers. Antimicrobial resistance was determined by disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration. Polymerase Chain Reaction, Internal Transcribed Spacer-Polymerase Chain Reaction and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis were performed for genotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus. Risk factors were determined by logistic regression. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus colonization prevalence was 19.5%, denture wearing (p = 0.03), habit of nail biting (p = 0.04) and preparation and administration of antimicrobial (p = 0.04) were risk factors identified. All methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus were S. epidermidis, 94.4% of them had mecA gene. Closely related and indistinguishable methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis were detected. These results highlight that HCWs which have contact with patient at high risk for developing infections were identified as colonized by MRSE in the oral cavity, reinforcing this cavity as a reservoir of these bacteria and the risk to themselves and patients safety, because these microorganisms may be spread by coughing and talking. PMID:25477910

  10. Nosocomial Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterimia among Nasal Carriers of Methicillin- Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pujol (Miquel); C. Pena; R. Pallares (Roman); J. Ariza (Javier); J. Ayats (Josefina); M.A. Dominguez; F. Gudiol (Francesc)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To determine the relevance of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus, either methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) or methicillinresistant (MRSA), as a risk factor for the development of nosocomial S aureus bacteremia during an MRSA outbreak. patients and methods: In this prospective

  11. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in North-east Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajana Pastuović

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this 5-year study was to determine the frequency and antibiotic susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA-related infections at Osijek Clinical Hospital. Materials and methods. A total of 1987 staphylococci-infected clinical isolates were collected and analysed at the Microbiology Department of the Public Health Institute of Osijek-Baranja County. Results. Between 2008 and 2012, the average rate of MRSA-related infections in staphylococci-infected patients was 27.4%. The proportion of MRSArelated infections on all Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolates from clinical specimens showed a decreasing trend, from 32.6% in 2008 to 25.5% in 2012. MRSA-related infections were mostly detected in wound swabs (50.6% and aspirates (28.8% of patients hospitalized in the surgical (49.8% and intensive care units (27.9%. MRSA-related infection showed an increase compared to S. aureus-infections in samples of wounds and aspirates in 2011 and 2012 (57.9%/34.9% and 35.2%/16.3%, respectively. The majority of strains of MRSA-related infections were resistant to several antibiotics, including erythromycin and clindamycin, where susceptibility were less than 10%. All MRSA isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid. Therefore, antibiotic therapies for MRSA infections include vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid, but microbiological diagnostics need to be performed in order to know when the use of glycopeptides and oxazolidinones is indicated. Conclusion. Our results suggest that appropriate prevention measures, combined with the more rational use of antibiotics are crucial to reduce the spread of MRSA-related infection in healthcare settings. Further monitoring is necessary of the incidence and antibiotic susceptibility of MRSA-related infections in our community.

  12. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in North-east Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuović, Tajana; Perić, Magdalena; Bošnjak, Zinka; Ružman, Nataša; Majić, Patricia Reisz; Talapko, Jasminka; Atalić, Vlasta; Loci-Zvocak, Snježana; Vuković, Dubravka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this 5-year study was to determine the frequency and antibiotic susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-related infections at Osijek Clinical Hospital. A total of 1987 staphylococci-infected clinical isolates were collected and analysed at the Microbiology Department of the Public Health Institute of Osijek-Baranja County. Between 2008 and 2012, the average rate of MRSA-related infections in staphylococci-infected patients was 27.4%. The proportion of MRSA-related infections on all Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolates from clinical specimens showed a decreasing trend, from 32.6% in 2008 to 25.5% in 2012. MRSA-related infections were mostly detected in wound swabs (50.6%) and aspirates (28.8%) of patients hospitalized in the surgical (49.8%) and intensive care units (27.9%). MRSA-related infection showed an increase compared to S. aureus-infections in samples of wounds and aspirates in 2011 and 2012 (57.9%/34.9% and 35.2%/16.3%, respectively). The majority of strains of MRSA-related infections were resistant to several antibiotics, including erythromycin and clindamycin, where susceptibility were less than 10%. All MRSA isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid. Therefore, antibiotic therapies for MRSA infections include vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid, but microbiological diagnostics need to be performed in order to know when the use of glycopeptides and oxazolidinones is indicated. Our results suggest that appropriate prevention measures, combined with the more rational use of antibiotics are crucial to reduce the spread of MRSA-related infection in healthcare settings. Further monitoring is necessary of the incidence and antibiotic susceptibility of MRSA-related infections in our community. Copyright © 2015 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  13. Insights into chitosan antibiofilm activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, E M; Silva, S; Tavaria, F K; Pintado, M M

    2017-06-01

    Chitosan is a natural compound that has been validated as a viable antimicrobial agent against Staphylococcus aureus. With this work we sought to evaluate the planktonic and sessile sensitivity of methicillin-resistant S. aureus to chitosan's activity and evaluate if methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) would be more or less sensitive to chitosan's activity than methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). A group comprised of reference strains and clinical multiresistant isolates of MSSA and MRSA were used. Methicilin resistance effect upon chitosan activity was assessed in planktonic setting and in different phases of sessile colonization, namely adhesion, biofilm formation and mature biofilm through biomass and metabolism inhibition. The results obtained showed that S. aureus methicillin resistance mechanism did not impair chitosan's activity as the highest bacterial susceptibility was registered for MRSA. Chitosan was highly effective in inhibiting MSSA and MRSA strains in both planktonic and sessile settings with biofilm inhibition percentages reaching as high as 90% for MRSA. Staphylococcus aureus methicillin resistance did not impair chitosan's antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities and MRSA and MSSA were inhibited both in planktonic and sessile settings at low concentrations with great efficacy. Considering the obtained results chitosan shows potential as an alternative for the control of biofilm-related recalcitrant MRSA infections. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Comparative Efficacy of Ceftaroline with Linezolid against Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Amira; Munir, Tehmina; Rehman, Sabahat; Najeeb, Sara; Gilani, Mehreen; Latif, Mahwish; Ansari, Maliha; Saad, Nadia

    2015-04-01

    To compare the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of ceftaroline with linezolid against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Quasi-experimental study. Microbiology Department, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from January to December 2013. Clinical samples from respiratory tract, blood, pus and various catheter tips routinely received in the Department of Microbiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi were innoculated on blood and MacConkey agar. Staphylococcus aureus was identified by colony morphology, Gram reaction, catalase test and coagulase test. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus detection was done by modified Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method using cefoxitin disc (30 μg) and the isolates were considered methicillin resistant if the zone of inhibition around cefoxitin disc was ≤ 21 mm. Bacterial suspensions of 56 Staphylococcus aureus isolates and 50 MRSA isolates were prepared, which were standardized equal to 0.5 McFarland's turbidity standard and inoculated on Mueller-Hinton agar plates followed by application of ceftaroline and linezolid disc (Oxoid, UK), according to manufacturer's instructions. The plates were then incubated at 37 °C aerobically for 18 - 24 hours. Diameters of inhibition zone were measured and interpretated as per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Out of 106 isolates all of the 56 Staphylococcus aureus (100%) were sensitive to ceftaroline and linezolid. However, out of 50 methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 48 (96%) were sensitive to ceftaroline whereas, 49 (98%) were sensitive to linezolid. Ceftaroline is equally effective as linezolid against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus methicillin resistance detected by HPLC-MS/MS targeted metabolic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelli, Katie; Rutowski, Joshua; Roubidoux, Julia; Zhu, Jiangjiang

    2017-03-15

    Recently, novel bioanalytical methods, such as NMR and mass spectrometry based metabolomics approaches, have started to show promise in providing rapid, sensitive and reproducible detection of Staphylococcus aureus antibiotic resistance. Here we performed a proof-of-concept study focused on the application of HPLC-MS/MS based targeted metabolic profiling for detecting and monitoring the bacterial metabolic profile changes in response to sub-lethal levels of methicillin exposure. One hundred seventy-seven targeted metabolites from over 20 metabolic pathways were specifically screened and one hundred and thirty metabolites from in vitro bacterial tests were confidently detected from both methicillin susceptible and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA, respectively). The metabolic profiles can be used to distinguish the isogenic pairs of MSSA strains from MRSA strains, without or with sub-lethal levels of methicillin exposure. In addition, better separation between MSSA and MRSA strains can be achieved in the latter case using principal component analysis (PCA). Metabolite data from isogenic pairs of MSSA and MRSA strains were further compared without and with sub-lethal levels of methicillin exposure, with metabolic pathway analyses additionally performed. Both analyses suggested that the metabolic activities of MSSA strains were more susceptible to the perturbation of the sub-lethal levels of methicillin exposure compared to the MRSA strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in community-acquired pyoderma in children in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umashankar Nagaraju

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: MRSA in community-acquired pyoderma in children was 6.5% and nasal colonization with S. aureus was 59.7% in our study. High resistance to commonly used antimicrobials in methicillin-sensitive S. aureus was also observed. Judicious use of antimicrobials is essential to control the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance.

  17. Temperature Effect on the Susceptibility of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus to Four Different Cephalosporins

    OpenAIRE

    Canawati, Hanna N.; Witte, Joyce L.; Sapico, Francisco L.

    1982-01-01

    Forty isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were tested for in vitro susceptibility to cephalothin, cefamandole, cefotaxime, and moxalactam, using the disk diffusion and microbroth dilution methods at incubation temperatures of 30 and 35°C. Resistance to all four antibiotics was more clearly evident at an incubation temperature of 30°C.

  18. Evolutionary dynamics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus within a healthcare system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsu, Li-Yang; Harris, Simon R.; Chlebowicz, Monika A.; Lindsay, Jodi A.; Koh, Tse-Hsien; Krishnan, Prabha; Tan, Thean-Yen; Hon, Pei-Yun; Grubb, Warren B.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J.; Holden, Matthew T. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the past decade, several countries have seen gradual replacement of endemic multi-resistant healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with clones that are more susceptible to antibiotic treatment. One example is Singapore, where MRSA ST239, the dominant

  19. The effectiveness of bacteriophages against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 nasal colonization in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, Koen M.; Tulinski, Pawel; Duim, Birgitta; Fluit, Ad C.; Carney, Jennifer; Nes, Van Arie; Wagenaar, Jaap A.

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important colonizer in animals and an opportunistic pathogen in humans. In humans, MRSA can cause infections that might be difficult to treat because of antimicrobial resistance. The use of bacteriophages has been suggested as a potential

  20. The Effectiveness of Bacteriophages against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 Nasal Colonization in Pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, Koen M; Tulinski, Pawel; Duim, Birgitta; Fluit, Ad C; Carney, Jennifer; van Nes, Arie; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important colonizer in animals and an opportunistic pathogen in humans. In humans, MRSA can cause infections that might be difficult to treat because of antimicrobial resistance. The use of bacteriophages has been suggested as a

  1. Longitudinal study on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in households.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Laarhoven

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP is an emerging pathogen in dogs and has been found in Europe, Asia and North America. To date most studies are one-point prevalence studies and therefore little is known about the dynamics of MRSP in dogs and their surrounding. In this longitudinal study MRSP colonization in dogs and the transmission of MRSP to humans, contact animals and the environment was investigated. Sixteen dogs with a recent clinical MRSP infection were included. The index dogs, contact animals, owners and environments were sampled once a month for six months. Samples taken from the nose, perineum and infection site (if present of the index cases and contact animals, and the nares of the owners were cultured using pre-enrichment. Index cases were found positive for prolonged periods of time, in two cases during all six samplings. In five of the 12 households that were sampled during six months, the index case was intermittently found MRSP-positive. Contact animals and the environment were also found MRSP-positive, most often in combination with a MRSP-positive index dog. In four households positive environmental samples were found while no animals or humans were MRSP-positive, indicating survival of MRSP in the environment for prolonged periods of time. Genotyping revealed that generally similar or indistinguishable MRSP isolates were found in patients, contact animals and environmental samples within the same household. Within two households, however, genetically distinct MRSP isolates were found. These results show that veterinarians should stay alert with (former MRSP patients, even after repeated MRSP-negative cultures or after the disappearance of the clinical infection. There is a considerable risk of transmission of MRSP to animals in close contact with MRSP patients. Humans were rarely MRSP-positive and never tested MRSP-positive more than once suggesting occasional contamination or rapid elimination of

  2. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and methicillin in ophthalmic isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from companion animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Hee; Chae, Min-Joo; Yoon, Jang-Won; Lee, So-Young; Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to fluoroquinolones and methicillin was determined for 49 ophthalmic isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from dogs with and without ophthalmic disease. Resistance was observed for ciprofloxacin (40.8%), ofloxacin (38.8%), enrofloxacin (38.8%), levofloxacin (34.7%), and moxifloxacin (4.1%). Eighteen isolates, 16 of which were resistant to oxacillin, were mecA-positive. Nine of the 16 oxacillin-resistant mecA-positive S. pseudintermedius isolates were resistant to more than one fluoroquinolone and 2 isolates were resistant to 5 fluoroquinolones. The frequency of mecA gene occurrence and fluoroquinolone resistance was twice as high among S. pseudintermedius isolates derived from dogs with ophthalmic disease compared with isolates for dogs without ophthalmic disease. The high prevalence of methicillin and fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pseudintermedius from dogs with ophthalmic disease is a concern. PMID:24982521

  3. Evaluation of Ceftobiprole in a Rabbit Model of Aortic Valve Endocarditis Due to Methicillin-Resistant and Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Chambers, Henry F.

    2005-01-01

    Ceftobiprole is a novel broad-spectrum cephalosporin that binds with high affinity to PBP 2a, the methicillin-resistance determinant of staphylococci, and is active against methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Ceftobiprole was compared to vancomycin in a rabbit model of methicillin-resistant S. aureus aortic valve endocarditis. Ceftobiprole and vancomycin were equally effective against endocarditis caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain 76, whereas ceftobipro...

  4. Classification and characteristics of coagulase-negative, methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, B J; Maxwell, S; Schaus, S M

    1980-01-01

    Sixty-five clinical isolates of coagulase-negative, methicillin-resistant staphylococci have been classified as Staphylococcus epidermidis (63.0%), "phosphatase-negative S. epidermidis" (12.3%), coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus (6.2%), Staphylococcus hemolyticus (6.2%), Staphylococcus hominis (3.1%), and Staphylococcus warneri (1.5%). Five of the organisms (7.7%) could not be classified with certainty as currently recognized species. Novobiocin resistance was encountered in eight of the strains, but these were not classified as the accepted novobiocin-resistant staphylococcal species. Some differences in antibiotic resistance patterns to those typical of methicillin-resistant S. aureus were noted in that, although 29 strains were resistant to methicillin, penicillin, sulfamethizole, streptomycin, and tetracycline, the remainder of the strains were sensitive to streptomycin or tetracycline or both. In a majority of the strains (42 of 65), methicillin susceptibility testing by the disk method at 30 or at 37 degrees C in the presence of NaCl did not appear to enhance resistance expression. Most of the strains produced beta-lactamase (EC 3.5.2.6), but none of the 21 strains tested produced enterotoxin B. PMID:6971871

  5. Detection of Methicillin-Resistance Gene in Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Traditional White Cheese in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Varmazyar-najafi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is considered as a major pathogen in public health concern. The objectives of this study were to firstly determine antibiotic sensitivity among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from traditional Iranian white cheese during 2015 from Hamedan province of Iran; and secondly to estimate the presence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Materials &Methods: This cross-sectional study was done by collecting 120 Iranian white cheeses (traditional and industrial which were available in different markets; and tested for the presence of S. aureus by culture methods. The obtained isolates were subjected to disc diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility tests followed by PCR detection of the mecA gene. Results: Out of 120 examined cheese samples, 19 samples (31.67% were contaminated with S. aureus. The highest rate of antibiotic resistance was observed for penicillin, as all of the 19 isolates (100% were found to be resistant to this antibiotic using disk diffusion method. Three out of 19 S. aureus isolates (15.7% were phenotypically resistant to methicillin (disk diffusion, while 4 (21.05% of them were genotypically confirmed as MRSA strains. Furthermore, none of the isolates were found resistant to vancomycin. Conclusion: The results of the study confirm the presence of methicillin resistant strains of S. aureus in Iranian white cheese. It should be considered to constitute a potential health risk for consumers, suggesting usage of more stringent hygiene measures.

  6. Utility of prior screening for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in predicting resistance of S. aureus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFadden, Derek R; Elligsen, Marion; Robicsek, Ari; Ricciuto, Daniel R; Daneman, Nick

    2013-10-15

    Screening for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is intended to reduce nosocomial spread by identifying patients colonized by MRSA. Given the widespread use of this screening, we evaluated its potential clinical utility in predicting the resistance of clinical isolates of S. aureus. We conducted a 2-year retrospective cohort study that included patients with documented clinical infection with S. aureus and prior screening for MRSA. We determined test characteristics, including sensitivity and specificity, of screening for predicting the resistance of subsequent S. aureus isolates. Of 510 patients included in the study, 53 (10%) had positive results from MRSA screening, and 79 (15%) of infecting isolates were resistant to methicillin. Screening for MRSA predicted methicillin resistance of the infecting isolate with 99% (95% confidence interval [CI] 98%-100%) specificity and 63% (95% CI 52%-74%) sensitivity. When screening swabs were obtained within 48 hours before isolate collection, sensitivity increased to 91% (95% CI 71%-99%) and specificity was 100% (95% CI 97%-100%), yielding a negative likelihood ratio of 0.09 (95% CI 0.01-0.3) and a negative predictive value of 98% (95% CI 95%-100%). The time between swab and isolate collection was a significant predictor of concordance of methicillin resistance in swabs and isolates (odds ratio 6.6, 95% CI 1.6-28.2). A positive result from MRSA screening predicted methicillin resistance in a culture-positive clinical infection with S. aureus. Negative results on MRSA screening were most useful for excluding methicillin resistance of a subsequent infection with S. aureus when the screening swab was obtained within 48 hours before collection of the clinical isolate.

  7. SDS-PAGE and gel IEF – tool for differentiation of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive strains of Staphylococcus aureus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesařová, Marie; Horká, Marie; Moravcová, Dana; Svojanovská, Lenka; Mlynariková, K.; Růžička, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 3 (2016), s. 315-320 ISSN 0343-8651 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20112015021 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus * sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis * gel isoelectric focusing * precipitated proteins Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.322, year: 2016 http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0251069

  8. SDS-PAGE and gel IEF – tool for differentiation of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive strains of Staphylococcus aureus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesařová, Marie; Horká, Marie; Moravcová, Dana; Svojanovská, Lenka; Mlynariková, K.; Růžička, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 3 (2016), s. 315-320 ISSN 0343-8651 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20112015021 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : methicillin- resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus * sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis * gel isoelectric focusing * precipitated proteins Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.322, year: 2016 http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0251069

  9. Correlation of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration Breakpoints and Methicillin Resistance Gene Carriage in Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Eftekhar,

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis is the most important member of coagulase negative staphylococci responsible for community and hospital acquired infections. Most clinical isolates of S. epidermidis are resistant to methicillin making these infections difficult to treat. In this study, correlation of methicillin resistance phenotype was compared with methicillin resistance (mecA gene carriage in 55 clinical isolates of S. epidermidis. Susceptibility was measured by disc diffusion using methicillin discs, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC were measured using broth microdilution. Methicillin resistance gene (MecA gene carriage was detected by specific primers and PCR. Disc susceptibility results showed 90.9% resistance to methicillin. Considering a MIC of 4 µg/ml, 78.1% of the isolates were methicillin resistant, 76.36% of which carried the mecA gene. On the other hand, when a breakpoint of 0.5 µg/ml was used, 89.09% were methicillin resistant, of which 93.75% were mecA positive. There was a better correlation between MIC of 0.5 µg/ml with disc diffusion results and mecA gene carriage. The findings suggest that despite the usefulness of molecular methods for rapid diagnosis of virulence genes, gene carriage does not necessarily account for virulence phenotype. Ultimately, gene expression, which is controlled by the environment, would determine the outcome

  10. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has greater risk of transmission in the operating room than methicillin-sensitive S aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Randy W; Dexter, Franklin; Robinson, Alysha D M

    2018-01-04

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a pathogenic S aureus strain characteristic associated with increased patient morbidity and mortality. The health care system needs to understand MRSA transmissibility in all settings to improve basic preventive measures to generate sustained reductions in invasive MRSA infections. Our primary aim was to compare intraoperative transmissibility of MRSA versus methicillin-sensitive S aureus (MSSA) isolates. S aureus isolates (N = 173) collected from 274 randomly selected operating room environments (first and second case of the day in each operating room, a case pair) at 3 hospitals underwent systematic-phenotypic and genomic processing to identify clonally related transmission events. Confirmed transmission events were defined as at least 2 S aureus isolates obtained from ≥2 distinct intraoperative reservoirs sampled within or between cases in a study unit that were epidemiologically and clonally related. We explored the relationship between clonal transmission and methicillin resistance with Poisson regression analysis. We identified 58 clonal transmission events. MRSA isolates were associated with increased risk of clonal transmission compared with MSSA isolates (adjusted incidence risk ratio [IRR], 1.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-2.49; P = .010; unadjusted IRR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.23-2.77; P = .003, respectively). MRSA isolates are associated with increased risk of intraoperative transmission. Future work should examine the impact of the attenuation of intraoperative MRSA transmission on the incidence of invasive MRSA infections. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Prevalence, incidence, risk factors, and effects on survival of patients in a specialist palliative care unit: A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Aoife; Larkin, Philip; Walsh, Cathal; O'Sullivan, Niamh

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the impact of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in palliative care settings. To date, the clinical impact of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in palliative care is unknown. To determine prevalence and incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonisation in a specialist palliative care setting, to identify risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonisation, to determine the eradication success rate and to determine the impact of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on survival. Prospective cohort study. Data were collected for consecutive admissions to an inpatient palliative care service. Patients were screened for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonisation on admission and 1 week post admission. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus eradication was attempted in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus positive patients. Data were collected from 609 admissions for 466 individual patients. Admission screening data were available in 95.5%. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonisation was 11.59% (54 patients). One week incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonisation was 1.2%. Risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonisation were determined using Chi-Squared test and included high Waterlow score (p resistant Staphylococcus aureus status prior to admission (p resistant Staphylococcus aureus was eradicated in 8.1% of admissions, while 46 patients commenced on the protocol (62.2%) died before completing it. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus did not significantly impact survival but was significantly associated with having infection episodes and longer length of stay. This study identified risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonisation in palliative care patients. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was eradicated in 8.1% of patients. Hence

  12. Next-Generation Sequence Analysis Reveals Transfer of Methicillin Resistance to a Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Strain That Subsequently Caused a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Outbreak: a Descriptive Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterings, Veronica; Bosch, Thijs; Witteveen, Sandra; Landman, Fabian; Schouls, Leo; Kluytmans, Jan

    Resistance to methicillin in Staphylococcus aureus is caused primarily by the mecA gene, which is carried on a mobile genetic element, the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). Horizontal transfer of this element is supposed to be an important factor in the emergence of new clones of

  13. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections: A Comprehensive Review and a Plastic Surgeon's Approach to the Occult Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Cedric; Rosenfield, Lorne; Silverstein, Elena; Petrou-Zeniou, Panayiota

    2016-08-01

    Up to 20 percent of the general population is persistently colonized with Staphylococcus aureus, and 1 to 3 percent of the population is colonized with community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Currently, the knowledge of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage sites other than the nose, and their effect on surgical site infections in cosmetic surgery, is lacking. A comprehensive literature review using the PubMed database to analyze prevalence, anatomical carrier sites, current screening and decontamination protocols and guidelines, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus in cosmetic surgery was performed. The senior author's (L.R.) methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection experience and prevention protocols were also reviewed. Nasal swabs detect only 50.5 percent of methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization, and broad screening has noted the presence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in the ear canal and umbilicus. Decolonization protocols within the orthopedic and cardiothoracic surgery literature have reduced rates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus surgical-site infections. There are no decolonization guidelines for plastic surgeons. Since instituting their decolonization protocol, the authors have had no cases of methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in nearly 1000 cosmetic surgery procedures. There are very limited, if any, Level I or II data regarding methicillin-resistant S. aureus screening and decolonization. As the sequelae of a surgical-site infection can be disastrous, expert opinions recommend that plastic surgeons vigorously address methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization and infection. The authors have developed and recommend a simple decolonization protocol that includes treatment of the umbilicus, ear canal, and nares to limit surgical-site infection and improve surgical outcomes.

  14. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. isolated from dogs in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yunho; Bae, Dong hwa; Cho, Jae-Keun; Bahk, Gyung Jin; Lim, Suk-Kyung; Lee, Young Ju

    2014-11-01

    Staphylococci were isolated from dogs in animal hospitals, animal shelters, and the Daegu PET EXPO to investigate the characteristics of circulating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal (MRS) strains in companion animals in Korea. A total of 36/157 isolates were classified as MRS, and subdivided as follows: 1 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), 4 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis, 2 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and 29 MRS spp. Among the 36 MRS isolates tested, 100% were resistant to oxacillin and penicillin, and at least 50% were resistant to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (69.4%), erythromycin (63.9%), tetracycline (58.3%), cefoxitin (55.6%), clindamycin (50.0%) or pirlimycin (50.0%). Additionally, 34/36 MRS isolates (94.4%) were mecA positive, 15 of which were further classified as SCCmec type V, 6 isolates as type I, 4 isolates as type IIIb, 1 isolate as type IVa, 1 isolate as type IV, with 7 isolates being non-classifiable. The results of multilocus sequence typing and spa typing for the one MRSA strain were ST 72 (1-4-1-8-4-4-3) and spa t148. Our results provide evidence that companion animals like dogs may be MRS carriers, and that continued surveillance of MRS in companion animals is required to prevent increased incidences in humans.

  15. Resistance to Methicillin in Coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Its Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Kolář

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of staphylococci to methicillin is important especially in the case of Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Its impact in veterinary medicine is not exactly specified in coagulase-negative staphylococci; however, these staphylococci may represent an important reservoir of resistance genes. The study aimed at detecting resistance to methicillin in coagulase-negative staphylococci from raw materials and foodstuffs of animal origin and assessing the tests frequently used to determine this resistance. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (198 isolates of 12 species were tested. Resistance to methicillin was determined by the disk diffusion method using oxacillin and cefoxitin disks, microdilution method, detection of PBP2a and the mecA gene. Of the tested isolates, 109 (55.1% were classified as resistant by the diffusion test with oxacillin, 32 isolates (16.2% by the test with cefoxitin and 50 isolates (25.3% on the basis of oxacillin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. No resistant isolates were incorrectly identified as susceptible when using the disk diffusion method with oxacillin (sensitivity of 100%. However, apart from 22 correctly classified resistant isolates, another 87 isolates were incorrectly identified as resistant as well (specificity of 50.6%. The test with cefoxitin showed the lowest (45.5% sensitivity in determination of resistant isolates. By contrast, this test was the most precise in classification of resistant isolates (specificity of 87.5%. When using the microdilution method, resistant strains were identified with the sensitivity and specificity of 68.2% and 80.1%, respectively. The results revealed substantial variability of methicillin-resistant isolates ranging from 16.2% to 55.1%, depending on the phenotyping methods and recommended interpretation criteria used. Therefore, it is advisable to reconsider the current interpretation criteria in the case of coagulasenegative staphylococci of animal origin (with the

  16. Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and their antibiotic sensitivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: One hundred and eighty five (185) S. aureus isolates from various clinical specimens obtained over a 12-month period in the Microbiology Department of Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH) were subjected to methicillin susceptibility testing, while including susceptibility testing to other antibiotics by the disc ...

  17. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus expressing low-level methicillin resistance may not be detected by the VITEK2® system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nakib, Malik; Réglier-Poupet, Hélène; Longo, Magalie; Adam, Jean-Marie; Raymond, Josette; Zambardi, Gilles; Tazi, Asmaa; Poyart, Claire

    2012-02-01

    Low-level methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus may be difficult to detect with the VITEK® 2 system (VK2). Here, we suggest that S. aureus exhibiting VK2-oxacillin MIC of 1 or 2 mg/L and a negative cefoxitin screen should be tested for the presence of mecA or its gene product. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Annual Surveillance Summary: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    1 ). The EDC also monitors other multidrug- resistant organisms (MDROs) of interest in the MHS. 2,3 2 MRSA in the MHS: Annual Summary...MHS. Since the early 2000s, experts have been concerned about ICR, a type of resistance among S. aureus organisms that has been documented in...methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus changing ? JAMA. 1998;279(8):623-624. 7. Gordon RJ, Lowy FD. Pathogenesis of methicillin- resistant

  19. Molecular Characteristics of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis on the Abdominal Skin of Females before Laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pin-Jia; Xie, Cheng-Bin; Sun, Feng-Hui; Guo, Li-Juan; Dai, Min; Cheng, Xi; Ma, Yong-Xin

    2016-06-22

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, especially methicillin-resistant strains, may be the source of surgical site infections and may be a reservoir of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) for S. aureus. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) on the abdominal skin of females before laparotomy and determine the molecular characteristics and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of these isolates. MRSE was found in 54 of 157 isolates based on mecA gene detection, and there was no difference in icaA gene carriage rate between MRSE and methicillin-susceptible S. epidermidis (MSSE) isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were determined by broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing according to the latest CLSI manuals. All MRSE isolates had unfavorable antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Twenty-three MRSE strains (42.6%) were multi-drug resistant. SCCmec typing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing was performed. Thirty-nine (72.2%) had a single SCCmec type, whereas 1.9% had two types. Fourteen strains (25.9%) were non-typeable (NT). The most frequent MRSE genotype was SCCmec type IVa. High diversity with PFGE patterns was obtained for MRSE, and there were no isolates exhibiting identical pulsotype. The results confirm that methicillin-resistant strains are frequently present among S. epidermidis on the abdominal skin of females before laparotomy. Moreover, resistance profiles seem to have no association with the SCCmec types or PFGE types for most common antibiotics.

  20. Molecular Characteristics of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis on the Abdominal Skin of Females before Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin-Jia Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis, especially methicillin-resistant strains, may be the source of surgical site infections and may be a reservoir of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec for S. aureus. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE on the abdominal skin of females before laparotomy and determine the molecular characteristics and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of these isolates. MRSE was found in 54 of 157 isolates based on mecA gene detection, and there was no difference in icaA gene carriage rate between MRSE and methicillin-susceptible S. epidermidis (MSSE isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were determined by broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing according to the latest CLSI manuals. All MRSE isolates had unfavorable antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Twenty-three MRSE strains (42.6% were multi-drug resistant. SCCmec typing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE typing was performed. Thirty-nine (72.2% had a single SCCmec type, whereas 1.9% had two types. Fourteen strains (25.9% were non-typeable (NT. The most frequent MRSE genotype was SCCmec type IVa. High diversity with PFGE patterns was obtained for MRSE, and there were no isolates exhibiting identical pulsotype. The results confirm that methicillin-resistant strains are frequently present among S. epidermidis on the abdominal skin of females before laparotomy. Moreover, resistance profiles seem to have no association with the SCCmec types or PFGE types for most common antibiotics.

  1. [Molecular characterization of resistance mechanisms: methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus, extended spectrum β-lactamases and carbapenemases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteo, Jesús; Belén Aracil, María

    2015-07-01

    Multi-drug resistance in bacterial pathogens increases morbidity and mortality in infected patients and it is a threat to public health concern by their high capacity to spread. For both reasons, the rapid detection of multi-drug resistant bacteria is critical. Standard microbiological procedures require 48-72 h to provide the antimicrobial susceptibility results, thus there is emerging interest in the development of rapid detection techniques. In recent years, the use of selective and differential culture-based methods has widely spread. However, the capacity for detecting antibiotic resistance genes and their low turnaround times has made molecular methods a reference for diagnosis of multidrug resistance. This review focusses on the molecular methods for detecting some mechanisms of antibiotic resistance with a high clinical and epidemiological impact: a) Enzymatic resistance to broad spectrum β-lactam antibiotics in Enterobacteriaceae, mainly extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) and carbapenemases; and b) methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Methicillin resistance reduces the virulence of healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by interfering with the agr quorum sensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkin, Justine K; Edwards, Andrew M; Bowden, Maria G; Brown, Eric L; Pozzi, Clarissa; Waters, Elaine M; Chan, Weng C; Williams, Paul; O'Gara, James P; Massey, Ruth C

    2012-03-01

    The difficulty in successfully treating infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has led to them being referred to as highly virulent or pathogenic. In our study of one of the major healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) clones, we show that expression of the gene responsible for conferring methicillin resistance (mecA) is also directly responsible for reducing the ability of HA-MRSA to secrete cytolytic toxins. We show that resistance to methicillin induces changes in the cell wall, which affects the bacteria's agr quorum sensing system. This leads to reduced toxin expression and, as a consequence, reduced virulence in a murine model of sepsis. This diminished capacity to cause infection may explain the inability of HA-MRSA to move into the community and help us understand the recent emergence of community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). CA-MRSA typically express less penicillin-binding protein 2a (encoded by mecA), allowing them to maintain full virulence and succeed in the community environment.

  3. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant S aureus strains isolated from hospital effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Santi M; Ghosh, Ananta K; Pati, Bikas R

    2015-12-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) and methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) strains were examined in hospital effluents. Most S aureus strains are resistant to methicillin (MRSA), followed by tetracycline. Approximately 15% of MRSA strains are also resistant to vancomycin (VRSA). All VRSA strains developed a VanR/VanS-regulated 2-component system of VanA-type resistance in their genome. Results indicate that there is a possibility of developing resistance to aminoglycosides by VRSA strains in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Experiences of nursing staff caring for patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, H; Andreassen Gleissman, S; Lindholm, C; Fossum, B

    2016-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a resistant variant of S. aureus and can cause pneumonia, septicaemia and, in some cases, death. Caring for patients with antibiotic resistant bacteria is a challenge for healthcare personnel. There is a risk of spreading the bacteria among patients and of healthcare personnel being infected themselves. To describe nursing staffs' experiences of caring for patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus in Sweden. A descriptive qualitative approach was used and 15 nurses from different hospitals and care units, including emergency and geriatric wards and nursing homes in Stockholm, were interviewed. All nurses had been involved in the care of patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus, but not on a regular basis. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Three themes emerged from the data: feeling ignorant, afraid and insecure, feeling competent and secure and feeling stressed and overworked. The more knowledge the nurses acquired about methicillin-resistant S. aureus, the more positive was their attitude to caring for these patients. Caring for patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus without adequate knowledge of how to protect oneself and other patients against transmission may provoke anxiety among personnel. Guidelines, memos and adequate information at the right time are of central importance. Healthcare personnel must feel safe in their role as caregivers. All patients have the right to have the same quality of care regardless of the diagnosis and a lack of knowledge influences the level of care given. This study demonstrates the importance of education when caring for patients with infectious diseases. Hopefully, knowledge gained from our study can provide guidance for future health care when new diseases and infections occur. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  5. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from healthy dogs in Nsukka, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy F. Chah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence, resistance phenotype and molecular mechanisms of resistance of methicillin-resistant staphylococci from groin swabs of 109 clinically healthy dogs in Nsukka, Nigeria were investigated. The groin swab samples were cultured on mannitol salt agar supplemented with 10 µgof cloxacillin. Sixteen methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (MRCoNS, all harbouring the mecA gene were isolated from 14 (12.8% of the 109 dogs studied. The MRCoNS isolated were: S. sciuri subspecies rodentium, S. lentus, S. haemolyticus, and S. simulans with S. sciuri subspecies rodentium (62.5% being the predominant species. Thirteen (81.3% of the MRCoNS were resistant to tetracycline while 12 (75% and 10 (62.5% were resistant to kanamycin and trimthoprim-sulphamethoxazole respectively. None of the isolates was resistant to fusidic acid, linezolid and vancomycin. Thirteen (81.3% of the MRCoNS were multi-drug resistance (MDR. Other antimicrobial genes detected were: blaZ, tet(K, tet(M, tet(L, erm(B, lnu(A, aacA-aphD, aphA3, str, dfr(G, cat pC221,and cat pC223. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci are common colonizers of healthy dogs in Nigeria with a major species detected being S. sciuri subsp. rodentium.

  6. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from healthy dogs in Nsukka, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chah, Kennedy F.; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Nwanta, John A.; Asadu, Brendan; Agbo, Ifeoma C.; Lozano, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam; Torres, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence, resistance phenotype and molecular mechanisms of resistance of methicillin-resistant staphylococci from groin swabs of 109 clinically healthy dogs in Nsukka, Nigeria were investigated. The groin swab samples were cultured on mannitol salt agar supplemented with 10 μg of cloxacillin. Sixteen methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (MRCoNS), all harbouring the mecA gene were isolated from 14 (12.8%) of the 109 dogs studied. The MRCoNS isolated were: S. sciuri subspecies rodentium, S. lentus, S. haemolyticus, and S. simulans with S. sciuri subspecies rodentium (62.5%) being the predominant species. Thirteen (81.3%) of the MRCoNS were resistant to tetracycline while 12 (75%) and 10 (62.5%) were resistant to kanamycin and trimthoprim-sulphamethoxazole respectively. None of the isolates was resistant to fusidic acid, linezolid and vancomycin. Thirteen (81.3%) of the MRCoNS were multi-drug resistance (MDR). Other antimicrobial genes detected were: blaZ, tet(K), tet(M), tet(L), erm(B), lnu(A), aacA-aphD, aphA3, str, dfr(G), catpC221, and catpC223. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci are common colonizers of healthy dogs in Nigeria with a major species detected being S. sciuri subsp. rodentium. PMID:24948934

  7. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from healthy dogs in Nsukka, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chah, Kennedy F; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Nwanta, John A; Asadu, Brendan; Agbo, Ifeoma C; Lozano, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam; Torres, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence, resistance phenotype and molecular mechanisms of resistance of methicillin-resistant staphylococci from groin swabs of 109 clinically healthy dogs in Nsukka, Nigeria were investigated. The groin swab samples were cultured on mannitol salt agar supplemented with 10 μg of cloxacillin. Sixteen methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (MRCoNS), all harbouring the mecA gene were isolated from 14 (12.8%) of the 109 dogs studied. The MRCoNS isolated were: S. sciuri subspecies rodentium, S. lentus, S. haemolyticus, and S. simulans with S. sciuri subspecies rodentium (62.5%) being the predominant species. Thirteen (81.3%) of the MRCoNS were resistant to tetracycline while 12 (75%) and 10 (62.5%) were resistant to kanamycin and trimthoprim-sulphamethoxazole respectively. None of the isolates was resistant to fusidic acid, linezolid and vancomycin. Thirteen (81.3%) of the MRCoNS were multi-drug resistance (MDR). Other antimicrobial genes detected were: blaZ, tet(K), tet(M), tet(L), erm(B), lnu(A), aacA-aphD, aphA3, str, dfr(G), cat pC221 , and cat pC223 . Methicillin-resistant staphylococci are common colonizers of healthy dogs in Nigeria with a major species detected being S. sciuri subsp. rodentium.

  8. Prevalence, species distribution and antimicrobial resistance patterns of methicillin-resistant staphylococci in Lithuanian pet animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzauskas, Modestas; Couto, Natacha; Kerziene, Sigita; Siugzdiniene, Rita; Klimiene, Irena; Virgailis, Marius; Pomba, Constança

    2015-06-02

    The bacterial genus Staphylococcus consists of many species that causes infections in pet animals. Antimicrobial resistant staphylococci cause infections that are difficult to treat and they are important from the point of one health perspective. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRS) species, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in diseased pet animals (Group A) and kennel dogs (Group B) in Lithuania and to characterize the isolates according to their antimicrobial resistance. Twenty-one MRS isolates were obtained from 395 clinical samples (5.3 %; CI 95 % 3.5-8.0) of Group A animals. Sixteen, four and one isolates were from dogs, cats and a pet rabbit, respectively. The mecA gene was present in 20 isolates, whereas one isolate was positive for the mecC gene. Twenty-one MRS isolates (20.0 %; CI 95 % 13.5-28.6) were obtained from the vagina of female dogs (n = 105) (Group B). All isolates carried the mecA gene. Twelve MRS species were isolated of which S. pseudintermedius was the most common (18/42) followed by S. haemolyticus (8/42) and S. lentus (4/42). MRSA was not found. All MRS strains were susceptible to vancomycin, linezolid, daptomycin and quinupristin/dalfopristin. Resistance to tetracycline (16/21), clindamycin (15/21) and erythromycin (14/21) was the most common types of resistance in Group A animals. Three isolates also demonstrated resistance to rifampin. Resistance toward gentamicin (16/21), ciprofloxacin (15/21), macrolides (15/21) and tetracycline (12/21) was the most common in kennel dogs (Group B). The most common genes encoding resistance to antimicrobials (excluding beta-lactams) in isolates from Group A pets were tetK (21/42), aph(3')-IIIa (11/42) and aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia (9/42). A wide range of MRS species were found in pet animals in Lithuania. MRSA was not found.

  9. High frequency of methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in children under 1 year old with skin and soft tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Ospina, Lorena; Jiménez, Judy Natalia

    2017-09-21

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a large number of infections in pediatric population; however, information about the behavior of such infections in this population is limited. The aim of the study was to describe the clinical, epidemiological, and molecular characteristics of infections caused by methicillin-susceptible and resistant S. aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in a pediatric population. A cross-sectional descriptive study in patients from birth to 14 years of age from three high-complexity institutions was conducted (2008-2010). All patients infected with methicillin-resistant S. aureus and a representative sample of patients infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus were included. Clinical and epidemiological information was obtained from medical records and molecular characterization included spa typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). In addition, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and virulence factor genes were detected. A total of 182 patients, 65 with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus infections and 117 with methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections, were included in the study; 41.4% of the patients being under 1 year. The most frequent infections were of the skin and soft tissues. Backgrounds such as having stayed in day care centers and previous use of antibiotics were more common in patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections (p≤0.05). Sixteen clonal complexes were identified and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains were more diverse. The most common cassette was staphylococcal cassette chromosomemec IVc (70.8%), which was linked to Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl). In contrast with other locations, a prevalence of infections in children under 1 year of age in the city could be observed; this emphasizes the importance of epidemiological knowledge at the local level. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights

  10. The Costs and Consequences of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection Treatments in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Rosner

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A multinational randomized controlled trial has shown a trend toward early discharge of patients taking oral linezolid versus intravenous vancomycin (IV in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections. Infection treatments resulting in shorter hospitalization durations are associated with cost savings from the hospital perspective.

  11. Suspected Goat-to-Human Transmission of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type 398

    OpenAIRE

    Loncaric, Igor; Brunthaler, René; Spergser, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) between animals and humans is widely recognized. In this study, we describe the first case of infection of a goat and suspected transmission of MRSA ST398 to a human, which resulted in colonization of animal owners by MRSA sequence type 398.

  12. Transmissibility of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ST398) in Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenberg, M.W.M.; Bootsma, M.C.J.; Troelstra, A.; Kluytmans, J.A.J.W.; Bonten, M.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    We quantified nosocomial transmission rates of sequence type (ST) 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (an emerging livestock-associated MRSA clone) and non-ST398 MRSA isolates in patients hospitalized without infection control measures in 51 Dutch hospitals. Identification of 174

  13. Livestock-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pigs - prevalence, risk factors and transmission dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broens, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2004, an association between human carriage of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and contact with pigs was found. To assess the implications of this finding for veterinary and public health more insight into the prevalence, risk factors and transmission dynamics of this so-called

  14. Evidence for Human Adaptation and Foodborne Transmission of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jesper; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal S; Petersen, Andreas; Larsen, Anders R; Westh, Henrik; Agersø, Yvonne; Fetsch, Alexandra; Kraushaar, Britta; Käsbohrer, Annemarie; Feβler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan; Cuny, Christiane; Witte, Wolfgang; Butaye, Patrick; Denis, Olivier; Haenni, Marisa; Madec, Jean-Yves; Jouy, Eric; Laurent, Frederic; Battisti, Antonio; Franco, Alessia; Alba, Patricia; Mammina, Caterina; Pantosti, Annalisa; Monaco, Monica; Wagenaar, Jaap A; de Boer, Enne; van Duijkeren, Engeline; Heck, Max; Domínguez, Lucas; Torres, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam; Price, Lance B; Skov, Robert L

    2016-11-15

    We investigated the evolution and epidemiology of a novel livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain, which colonizes and infects urban-dwelling Danes even without a Danish animal reservoir. Genetic evidence suggests both poultry and human adaptation, with poultry meat implicated as a probable source. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  15. Transmissibility of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ST398) in Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenberg, M. W. M.; Bootsma, M. C. J.; Troelstra, A.; Kluytmans, J. A. J. W.; Bonten, M. J. M.

    P>We quantified nosocomial transmission rates of sequence type (ST) 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (an emerging livestock-associated MRSA clone) and non-ST398 MRSA isolates in patients hospitalized without infection control measures in 51 Dutch hospitals. Identification of

  16. Long-term carriage, and transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus after discharge from hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. M. Frenay; C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls (Christina); M. J. Molkenboer; J. Verhoef

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study was to determine whether patients who become carriers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) during their stay in hospital, remain colonized after discharge. Thirty-six patients colonized with MRSA during one of three outbreaks at Utrecht

  17. Evidence for Human Adaptation and Foodborne Transmission of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, Jesper; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal S.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the evolution and epidemiology of a novel livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain, which colonizes and infects urban-dwelling Danes even without a Danish animal reservoir. Genetic evidence suggests both poultry and human adaptation, with poultry meat

  18. Diabetes and early postpartum methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in US hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parriott, Andrea M.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in postpartum women is not well characterized. Because diabetes is a risk factor for some infections, we sought to characterize the relationship between diabetes and invasive MRSA infections in women admitted to US

  19. Rapid increase of genetically diverse methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Mette Damkjaer; Boye, Kit; Rhod Larsen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    In Copenhagen, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) accounted for ... by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, Staphylococcus protein A (spa) typing, multilocus sequence typing, staphylococcal chromosome cassette (SCC) mec typing, and detection of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes. Seventy-one percent of cases were community-onset MRSA (CO-MRSA); of these, 36% had...

  20. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Pork Production Shower Facilities ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedom Larson, Kerry R.; Harper, Abby L.; Hanson, Blake M.; Male, Michael J.; Wardyn, Shylo E.; Dressler, Anne E.; Wagstrom, Elizabeth A.; Tendolkar, Shaliesh; Diekema, Daniel J.; Donham, Kelley J.; Smith, Tara C.

    2011-01-01

    As methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been found in pigs, we sought to determine if MRSA is present in pork production shower facilities. In two production systems tested, 3% and 26% of shower samples were positive for MRSA. spa types identified included t034, t189, t753, and t1746. PMID:21097587

  1. Nasal carriage of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among healthy population of Kashmir, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B A Fomda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nasal colonisation with community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA is being increasingly reported, especially in places where people are in close contact and where hygiene is compromised. The aim of this study was to find out prevalence of methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA colonising anterior nares of healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: Nasal swabs of healthy subjects were collected aseptically and cultured using standard microbiological protocols. Antibiotic susceptibility was done by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method according to CLSI guidelines. Methicillin resistance was detected by cefoxitin disc diffusion method and confirmed by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and amplification of mecA gene by PCR. Strain typing of MRSA strains was done by PFGE. Results: Out of 820 samples, S.aureus was isolated from 229 (27.92% subjects. Of the 229 isolates, 15 were methicillin resistant. All S. aureus isolates were susceptible to vancomycin. Nasal carriage of MRSA was found to be 1.83% among healthy population. The isolates were found to be polyclonal by PFGE analysis. Conclusion: High prevalence of MRSA is a cause of concern and strategies to interrupt transmission should be implemented.

  2. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in horses and horse personnel: An investigation of several outbreaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijkeren, van E.; Moleman, M.; Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M.M.S.; Multem, J.; Troelstra, A.; Fluit, A.C.; Wamel, W.J.B.; Houwers, D.J.; Neeling, de A.J.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    At the Veterinary Microbiological Diagnostic Center, the Netherlands, the percentage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates found in equine clinical samples increased from 0% in 2002 to 37% in 2008. MRSA of spa-type t064, belonging to MLST ST8 and spa-types t011 and t2123,

  3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in horses and horse personnel: An investigation of several outbreaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijkeren, E. van; Moleman, M.; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M.M.; Multem, J.D.; Troelstra, A.; Fluit, A.C.; Wamel, W.J.B. van; Houwers, D.J.; Neeling, A.J. de; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    At the Veterinary Microbiological Diagnostic Center, the Netherlands, the percentage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates found in equine clinical samples increased from 0% in 2002 to 37% in 2008. MRSA of spa-type t064, belonging to MLST ST8 and spa-types t011 and t2123,

  4. Mechanisms of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus and methods for laboratory detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, J H

    1991-01-01

    Three distinctly different mechanisms of methicillin resistance have been described in Staphylococcus aureus. The best-documented and probably most important mechanism is production of a unique, low affinity penicillin-binding protein, PBP 2a. Strains possessing PBP 2a are resistant to methicillin, oxacillin, and probably all other currently available beta-lactam antibiotics. Two additional mechanisms of reduced susceptibility to methicillin have been described. Borderline resistance (BORSA) to the semi-synthetic penicillins has been attributed to the hyperproduction of normal staphylococcal beta-lactamase. A third mechanism has recently been advanced that describes an intermediate level of resistance to methicillin due to production of modified, normal PBPs with reduced affinity for beta-lactams (MODSA). Little is known regarding the prevalence or clinical significance of the BORSA and MODSA strains. The most reliable in vitro susceptibility test methods for detecting MRSA (strains possessing PBP 2a) include the microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test (with 2% NaCl supplemented broth), the oxacillin agar screen plate test (incorporating 6 micrograms/ml oxacillin in 4% NaCl supplemented agar), and the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) disk diffusion test with oxacillin. All three methods use direct inoculum preparation and incubation of tests at 35 degrees C for a full 24 hours.

  5. Community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in south Florida hospital and recreational environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strains of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a frequent human pathogen, may also be found in the flora of healthy persons and in the environments that they frequent. Strains of MRSA circulating in the community classified as USA 300 are now found not only in the community but also...

  6. Modified DNA extraction for rapid PCR detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japoni, A.; Alborzi, A.; Rasouli, M.; Pourabbas, B.

    2004-01-01

    Nosocomial infection caused by methicillin-resistant staphylococci poses a serious problem in many countries. The aim of this study was to rapidly and reliably detect methicillin-resistant-staphylococci in order to suggest appropriate therapy. The presence or absence of the methicillin-resistance gene in 115 clinical isolates of staphylococcus aureus and 50 isolates of coagulase negative staphylococci was examined by normal PCR. DNA extraction for PCR performance was then modified by omission of achromopeptadiase and proteinase K digestion, phenol/chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. All isolates with Mic>8 μ g/ml showed positive PCR. No differences in PCR detection have been observed when normal and modified DNA extractions have been performed. Our modified DNA extraction can quickly detect methicillin-resistant staphylococci by PCR. The advantage of rapid DNA extraction extends to both reduction of time and cost of PCR performance. This modified DNA extraction is suitable for different PCR detection, when staphylococci are the subject of DNA analysis

  7. Heterogeneity among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Italian pig finishing holdings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battisti, A.; Franco, A.; Merialdi, G.

    2010-01-01

    A survey for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in finishing pig holdings was carried out in Italy in 2008. MRSA isolates were characterised by spa-. SCCmec- and antimicrobial susceptibility typing. A prevalence of 38% (45/118, 95% CI 29.4-46.9%) positive holdings was observed...

  8. Frequent emergence and limited geographic dispersal of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nubel, U.; Roumagnac, P.; Feldkamp, M.

    2008-01-01

    A small number of clonal lineages dominates the global population structure of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), resulting in the concept that MRSA has emerged on a few occasions after penicillinase-stable beta-lactam antibiotics were introduced to clinical practice, followed...

  9. Emergence of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper; Petersen, Andreas; Larsen, Anders R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 398 (LA-MRSA CC398) is causing an increasing number of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in Denmark and other European countries with industrial pig production. Yet, its impact on MRSA bloodstream...

  10. Transmission of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus among pigs during transportation from farm to abattoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broens, E.M.; Graat, E.A.M.; Wolf, van der P.J.; Giessen, van de A.W.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in pigs at abattoirs is higher than in pigs sampled on farms. This study investigated whether MRSA negative pigs can become MRSA positive during transportation from the farm to the abattoir after exposure to other pigs and

  11. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is widespread in farmed mink (Neovison vison)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Julie Elvekjær; Rhod Larsen, Anders; Skov, Robert Leo

    2017-01-01

    Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) clonal complex (CC) 398 is widespread in the Danish pig production with around 90% of herds being positive. Since 2009, cases of CC398 LA-MRSA infections in Danish mink farmers have been observed. The objective of the study...

  12. Successful Veterans Affairs initiative to prevent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurieva, T.; Bootsma, M.C.J.; Bonten, M.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011 Jain et al reported a 62% reduction of healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections that resulted from an intervention bundle. Here we present a mathematical model and prove, using parameters from the study by Jain et al, that the universal screen and isolate

  13. Pig-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Family transmission and severe pneumonia in a newborn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmeyer, Gitte Nyvang; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente; Skov, Robert L

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Carriage of pig-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is known to occur in pig farmers. Zoonotic lineages of MRSA have been considered of low virulence and with limited capacity for inter-human spread. We present a case of family transmission of pig-associated MRSA...

  14. Carriage frequency, diversity and methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus in Danish small ruminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Jacob; Gongora, Carmen Espinosa; Stamphøj, Inga

    2013-01-01

    The ecology of Staphylococcus aureus in animals has recently gained attention by the research community due to the emergence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). We investigated carriage frequency and clonal diversity of S. aureus in 179 sheep and 17 goats in Denmark using...

  15. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius among dogs in the description of novel SCCmec variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duim, Birgitta; Verstappen, Koen M.H.W.; Kalupahana, Ruwani S.; Ranathunga, Lakmali; Fluit, Ad C.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.

    2018-01-01

    The presence and genetic characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) in Sri Lanka was investigated to add additional insight into global spread, emergence and evolution of MRSP. A total of 234 samples from dogs visiting veterinary clinics were cultured for

  16. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 from Human Patients, Upper Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz-Gercek, Sigrid; Mittermayer, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal type ST398 is usually associated with animals. We examined 1,098 confirmed MRSA samples from human patients and found that 21 were MRSA ST398. Most (16) patients were farmers. Increasing prevalence from 1.3% (2006) to 2.5% (2008) shows emergence of MRSA ST398 in humans in Austria. PMID:19402964

  17. European ST80 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus orbital cellulitis in a neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsironi Evangelia E

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in hospital environment, but also, lately, in the community. This case report is, to our knowledge, the first detailed description of a community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus ST80 orbital cellulitis in a previously healthy neonate. Possible predisposing factors of microbial acquisition and treatment selection are also discussed. Case presentation A 28-day-old Caucasian boy was referred to our hospital with the diagnosis of right orbital cellulitis. His symptoms included right eye proptosis, periocular edema and redness. Empirical therapy of intravenous daptomycin, rifampin and ceftriaxone was initiated. The culture of pus yielded a methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolate and the molecular analysis revealed that it was a Panton-Valentine leukocidine-positive ST80 strain. The combination antimicrobial therapy was continued for 42days and the infection was successfully controlled. Conclusions Clinicians should be aware that young infants, even without any predisposing condition, are susceptible to orbital cellulitis caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Prompt initiation of the appropriate empirical therapy, according to the local epidemiology, should successfully address the infection, preventing ocular and systemic complications.

  18. Nosocomial transmission of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Danish Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetem, David J; Westh, Henrik; Boye, Kit

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has changed the epidemiology of MRSA infections worldwide. In contrast to hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA), CA-MRSA more frequently affects healthy individuals, both with and without recent healthcare...

  19. Emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in different animal species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuny, Christiane; Friedrich, Alexander; Kozytska, Svetlana; Layer, Franziska; Nübel, Ulrich; Ohlsen, Knut; Strommenger, Birgit; Walther, Birgit; Wieler, Lothar; Witte, Wolfgang

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in animals such as horses, pet animals and productive livestock has raised questions of a probable human origin and in more general of host specificity of S. aureus. Particular clonal lineages are obviously specific for humans (e.g.

  20. Cross-border dissemination of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Euregio Meuse-Rhin region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurenberg, Ruud H; Nulens, Eric; Valvatne, Havard; Sebastian, Silvie; Driessen, Christel; Craeghs, Jos; De Brauwer, Els; Heising, Bernhard; Kraat, Yvette J; Riebe, Joachim; Stals, Frans S; Trienekens, Thera A; Scheres, Jacques; Friedrich, Alexander W; van Tiel, Frank H; Beisser, Patrick S; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    Because the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) differs among the 3 countries forming the Euregio Meuse-Rhin (EMR) region (Belgium, Germany, and the Netherlands), cross-border healthcare requires information about the spread of MRSA in the EMR. We investigated the

  1. Risk Factors for Nosocomial Bacterremia Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pujol (Miquel); C. Pena; R. Pallares (Roman); J. Ayats (Josefina); J. Ariza (Javier); F. Gudiol (Francesc)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn a prospective surveillance study (February 1990–December 1991) performed at a 1000-bed teaching hospital to identify risk factors for nosocomial methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia, 309 patients were found to be colonized (n=103; 33 %) or infected (n=206; 67

  2. Comparative molecular analysis substantiates zoonotic potential of equine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walther, Birgit; Monecke, Stefan; Ruscher, Claudia; Friedrich, Alexander W; Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Soba, Alexandra; Wleklinski, Claus-G; Wieler, Lothar H; Lübke-Becker, Antina

    Despite the increasing importance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in veterinary medicine, knowledge about the epidemiology of the pathogen in horses is still poor. The phylogenetic relationship of strains of human and equine origins has been addressed before, usually by

  3. Unraveling the dynamics of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bootsma, M.C.; Bonten, M.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Since the first description of the community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strain USA300 [1] in the 1990s, this pathogen has emerged worldwide [2]. Within a decade, USA300 has become the most prevalent cause of community-acquired S. aureus infections in many

  4. Recommendations for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Prevention in Adult ICUs: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Melanie D; Atherly, Adam J; Curtis, Donna J; Lindrooth, Richard C; Bradley, Cathy J; Campbell, Jonathan D

    2017-08-01

    Patients in the ICU are at the greatest risk of contracting healthcare-associated infections like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This study calculates the cost-effectiveness of methicillin-resistant S aureus prevention strategies and recommends specific strategies based on screening test implementation. A cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov model from the hospital perspective was conducted to determine if the implementation costs of methicillin-resistant S aureus prevention strategies are justified by associated reductions in methicillin-resistant S aureus infections and improvements in quality-adjusted life years. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses determined the influence of input variation on the cost-effectiveness. ICU. Hypothetical cohort of adults admitted to the ICU. Three prevention strategies were evaluated, including universal decolonization, targeted decolonization, and screening and isolation. Because prevention strategies have a screening component, the screening test in the model was varied to reflect commonly used screening test categories, including conventional culture, chromogenic agar, and polymerase chain reaction. Universal and targeted decolonization are less costly and more effective than screening and isolation. This is consistent for all screening tests. When compared with targeted decolonization, universal decolonization is cost-saving to cost-effective, with maximum cost savings occurring when a hospital uses more expensive screening tests like polymerase chain reaction. Results were robust to sensitivity analyses. As compared with screening and isolation, the current standard practice in ICUs, targeted decolonization, and universal decolonization are less costly and more effective. This supports updating the standard practice to a decolonization approach.

  5. Preventing Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" among Student Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many, Patricia S.

    2008-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) was once thought to be a bacterium causing infections in only hospitalized patients. However, a new strain of MRSA has emerged among healthy individuals who have not had any recent exposure to a hospital or to medical procedures. This new strain is known as "community-associated…

  6. Population Dynamics among Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in Germany during a 6-Year Period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaumburg, Frieder; Koeck, Robin; Mellmann, Alexander; Richter, Laura; Hasenberg, Felicitas; Kriegeskorte, Andre; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Gatermann, Soeren; von Eiff, Christof; Becker, Karsten; Peters, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) originated from the health care setting but is now emerging in communities without health care contact (CA-MRSA) or in livestock (LA-MRSA). The impact on the whole MRSA population was assessed in a German prospective multicenter study. Thirty-three

  7. Livestock-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pigs - prevalence, risk factors and transmission dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broens, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2004, an association between human carriage of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and contact with pigs was found. To assess the implications of this finding for veterinary and public health more insight into the prevalence, risk factors and transmission dynamics of

  8. Low methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage rate among Italian dental students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petti, S.; Kakisina, N.; Volgenant, C.M.C.; Messano, G.A.; Barbato, E.; Passariello, C.; de Soet, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage rate among dental students from an Italian university. A total of 157 subjects participated (67 preclinical students and 90 clinical students); samples were collected from the nose, mouth, and skin. Five preclinical students and

  9. Radiological findings of community-acquired methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible staphylococcus aureus pediatric pneumonia in Hawaii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdem, Guliz; Bergert, Lora; Len, Kyra; Melish, Marian; Kon, Kevin; DiMauro, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus (CA-SA) infections are common among pediatric patients in Hawaii. We wanted to characterize the radiological features of methicillin-susceptible (CA-MSSA) and methicillin-resistant (CA-MRSA) staphylococcal pneumonia in Hawaiian children. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and imaging studies of children with SA pneumonia identified from 1996 through 2007. Of 40 children, 26 (65%) had CA-MRSA pneumonia and 14 patients (35%) had CA-MSSA pneumonia. CA-MRSA patients were significantly younger than CA-MSSA patients (65% younger than 1 year vs. 36% older). In a majority (62%) of CA-MRSA patients, the consolidation was unilateral; in most of the CA-MSSA cases (79%), the consolidation was bilateral. Fifty percent of the patients with CA-MRSA and 21% of those with CA-MSSA had pneumatoceles (P = 0.1). CA-MRSA patients more commonly had pleural effusions (85% vs. 64% for CA-MSSA) and pleural thickening (50% vs. 36% for CA-MSSA). This case series describes the radiologic characteristics of CA-MRSA and CA-MSSA pneumonia in children in a highly endemic area. We found that CA-MRSA pneumonias are unilateral in a majority of pediatric pneumonia cases, are more common in children 1 year or younger, and have higher rates of complications in comparison to CA-MSSA patients. (orig.)

  10. Radiological findings of community-acquired methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible staphylococcus aureus pediatric pneumonia in Hawaii

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    Erdem, Guliz; Bergert, Lora; Len, Kyra; Melish, Marian [University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Honolulu, HI (United States); Kon, Kevin; DiMauro, Robert [Kapiolani Medical Center for Women and Children, Department of Radiology, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus (CA-SA) infections are common among pediatric patients in Hawaii. We wanted to characterize the radiological features of methicillin-susceptible (CA-MSSA) and methicillin-resistant (CA-MRSA) staphylococcal pneumonia in Hawaiian children. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and imaging studies of children with SA pneumonia identified from 1996 through 2007. Of 40 children, 26 (65%) had CA-MRSA pneumonia and 14 patients (35%) had CA-MSSA pneumonia. CA-MRSA patients were significantly younger than CA-MSSA patients (65% younger than 1 year vs. 36% older). In a majority (62%) of CA-MRSA patients, the consolidation was unilateral; in most of the CA-MSSA cases (79%), the consolidation was bilateral. Fifty percent of the patients with CA-MRSA and 21% of those with CA-MSSA had pneumatoceles (P = 0.1). CA-MRSA patients more commonly had pleural effusions (85% vs. 64% for CA-MSSA) and pleural thickening (50% vs. 36% for CA-MSSA). This case series describes the radiologic characteristics of CA-MRSA and CA-MSSA pneumonia in children in a highly endemic area. We found that CA-MRSA pneumonias are unilateral in a majority of pediatric pneumonia cases, are more common in children 1 year or younger, and have higher rates of complications in comparison to CA-MSSA patients. (orig.)

  11. Prevalence of Chlorhexidine-Resistant Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus following Prolonged Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Eugene V.; Crawford, Katrina B.; Cui, Tianyuan; Lanier, Jeffrey B.; Tribble, David R.; Ellis, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Chlorhexidine has been increasingly utilized in outpatient settings to control methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreaks and as a component of programs for MRSA decolonization and prevention of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of chlorhexidine resistance in clinical and colonizing MRSA isolates obtained in the context of a community-based cluster-randomized controlled trial for SSTI prevention, during which 10,030 soldiers were issued chlorhexidine for body washing. We obtained epidemiological data on study participants and performed molecular analysis of MRSA isolates, including PCR assays for determinants of chlorhexidine resistance and high-level mupirocin resistance and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). During the study period, May 2010 to January 2012, we identified 720 MRSA isolates, of which 615 (85.4%) were available for molecular analysis, i.e., 341 clinical and 274 colonizing isolates. Overall, only 10 (1.6%) of 615 isolates were chlorhexidine resistant, including three from the chlorhexidine group and seven from nonchlorhexidine groups (P > 0.99). Five (1.5%) of the 341 clinical isolates and five (1.8%) of the 274 colonizing isolates harbored chlorhexidine resistance genes, and four (40%) of the 10 possessed genetic determinants for mupirocin resistance. All chlorhexidine-resistant isolates were USA300. The overall prevalence of chlorhexidine resistance in MRSA isolates obtained from our study participants was low. We found no association between extended chlorhexidine use and the prevalence of chlorhexidine-resistant MRSA isolates; however, continued surveillance is warranted, as this agent continues to be utilized for infection control and prevention efforts. PMID:24841265

  12. Prevalence of chlorhexidine-resistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus following prolonged exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlett, Carey D; Millar, Eugene V; Crawford, Katrina B; Cui, Tianyuan; Lanier, Jeffrey B; Tribble, David R; Ellis, Michael W

    2014-08-01

    Chlorhexidine has been increasingly utilized in outpatient settings to control methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreaks and as a component of programs for MRSA decolonization and prevention of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of chlorhexidine resistance in clinical and colonizing MRSA isolates obtained in the context of a community-based cluster-randomized controlled trial for SSTI prevention, during which 10,030 soldiers were issued chlorhexidine for body washing. We obtained epidemiological data on study participants and performed molecular analysis of MRSA isolates, including PCR assays for determinants of chlorhexidine resistance and high-level mupirocin resistance and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). During the study period, May 2010 to January 2012, we identified 720 MRSA isolates, of which 615 (85.4%) were available for molecular analysis, i.e., 341 clinical and 274 colonizing isolates. Overall, only 10 (1.6%) of 615 isolates were chlorhexidine resistant, including three from the chlorhexidine group and seven from nonchlorhexidine groups (P > 0.99). Five (1.5%) of the 341 clinical isolates and five (1.8%) of the 274 colonizing isolates harbored chlorhexidine resistance genes, and four (40%) of the 10 possessed genetic determinants for mupirocin resistance. All chlorhexidine-resistant isolates were USA300. The overall prevalence of chlorhexidine resistance in MRSA isolates obtained from our study participants was low. We found no association between extended chlorhexidine use and the prevalence of chlorhexidine-resistant MRSA isolates; however, continued surveillance is warranted, as this agent continues to be utilized for infection control and prevention efforts. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevention strategies in the ICU: a clinical decision analysis*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M; Zervou, Fainareti N; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-02-01

    ICUs are a major reservoir of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Our aim was to estimate costs and effectiveness of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevention policies. We evaluated three up-to-date methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevention policies, namely, 1) nasal screening and contact precautions of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-positive patients; 2) nasal screening, contact precautions, and decolonization (targeted decolonization) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers; and 3) universal decolonization without screening. We implemented a decision-analytic model with deterministic and probabilistic analyses. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections averted, quality-adjusted life years gained, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated. Cost-effectiveness planes and acceptability curves were plotted for various willingness-to-pay thresholds to address uncertainty. At base-case scenario, universal decolonization was the dominant strategy; it averted 1.31% and 1.59% of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections over targeted decolonization and screening and contact precautions, respectively, and saved $16,203/quality-adjusted life year over targeted decolonization and 14,562/quality-adjusted life year over screening and contact precautions. Results were robust in sensitivity analysis for a wide range of input variables. In probabilistic analysis, universal decolonization increased quality-adjusted life years by 1.06% (95% CI, 1.02-1.09) over targeted decolonization and by 1.29% (95% CI, 1.24-1.33) over screening and contact precautions; universal decolonization resulted in average savings of $172 (95% CI, $168-$175) and $189 (95% CI, $185-$193) over targeted decolonization and screening and contact precautions, respectively. With willingness-to-pay threshold per quality-adjusted life year gained ranging from $0 to $50,000, universal decolonization was dominant

  14. Oxacillin sensitization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius by antisense peptide nucleic acids in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Shan; Loeffler, Anette; Lloyd, David H; Nair, Sean P; Good, Liam

    2015-11-11

    Antibiotic resistance genes can be targeted by antisense agents, which can reduce their expression and thus restore cellular susceptibility to existing antibiotics. Antisense inhibitors can be gene and pathogen specific, or designed to inhibit a group of bacteria having conserved sequences within resistance genes. Here, we aimed to develop antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) that could be used to effectively restore susceptibility to β-lactams in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP). Antisense PNAs specific for conserved regions of the mobilisable gene mecA, and the growth essential gene, ftsZ, were designed. Clinical MRSA and MRSP strains of high oxacillin resistance were treated with PNAs and assayed for reduction in colony forming units on oxacillin plates, reduction in target gene mRNA levels, and cell size. Anti-mecA PNA at 7.5 and 2.5 μM reduced mecA mRNA in MRSA and MRSP (p resistance in staphylococci. Further studies are warranted as clinical treatment alternatives are needed.

  15. Methicillin Resistant Staphylococci: Prevalence and susceptibility patterns in a burn center in Ahvaz from 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekrami, Alireza; Abbasi Montazeri, Effat; Kaydani, Gholam Abbas; Shokoohizadeh, Leili

    2015-08-01

    Methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and coagulase negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) have recognized as the major cause of nosocomial infections that threat the burn patient's life. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of MRSA and MRCoNS and their antibiotic resistance patterns among burn patients in a burn center in Ahvaz, Iran. A total of 340 clinical specimens: (80%) wound and (20%) blood were obtained from patients in Taleghani burn hospital during February 2013-2014. Staphylococci species identification and antibiogram were performed by standard procedures using disk diffusion method. The Methicillin resistance strains were detected by Etest and PCR using mecA specific primers. Out of 30.2% (103) isolates that were recognized as staphylococci, 82 % (84) and 18% (19) were identified as S. aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) respectively. Resistance to methicillin was detected in 60% and 63% of the S. aureus and CoNS isolates respectively. Seven different antimicrobial resistance patterns observed among methicillin resistant staphylococci. The MRSA and MRCoNS strains showed closed resistance phenotypes. All the methicillin resistant isolates showed a high rate resistance to the other studied antibiotics in comparison to methicilin sensitive isolates. Vancomycin and imipenem showed the greatest effect against methicillin resistant isolates. During 8 years in the studied burn hospital, no significant changes in the methicillin resistance staphylococci frequency were detected. The presence of multi resistant MRSA and MRCoNS strains is cause of concern in burn hospitals. Vancomycin remains as a drug of choice for methicillin resistance staphylococci infections.

  16. Methicillin Resistant Staphylococci: Prevalence and susceptibility patterns in a burn center in Ahvaz from 2013–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekrami, Alireza; Abbasi Montazeri, Effat; Kaydani, Gholam Abbas; Shokoohizadeh, Leili

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and coagulase negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) have recognized as the major cause of nosocomial infections that threat the burn patient's life. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of MRSA and MRCoNS and their antibiotic resistance patterns among burn patients in a burn center in Ahvaz, Iran. Material and Methods: A total of 340 clinical specimens: (80%) wound and (20%) blood were obtained from patients in Taleghani burn hospital during February 2013–2014. Staphylococci species identification and antibiogram were performed by standard procedures using disk diffusion method. The Methicillin resistance strains were detected by Etest and PCR using mecA specific primers. Results: Out of 30.2% (103) isolates that were recognized as staphylococci, 82 % (84) and 18% (19) were identified as S. aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) respectively. Resistance to methicillin was detected in 60% and 63% of the S. aureus and CoNS isolates respectively. Seven different antimicrobial resistance patterns observed among methicillin resistant staphylococci. The MRSA and MRCoNS strains showed closed resistance phenotypes. All the methicillin resistant isolates showed a high rate resistance to the other studied antibiotics in comparison to methicilin sensitive isolates. Vancomycin and imipenem showed the greatest effect against methicillin resistant isolates. During 8 years in the studied burn hospital, no significant changes in the methicillin resistance staphylococci frequency were detected. Conclusion: The presence of multi resistant MRSA and MRCoNS strains is cause of concern in burn hospitals. Vancomycin remains as a drug of choice for methicillin resistance staphylococci infections. PMID:26697160

  17. Molecular detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus harbouring β- lactamase resistance genes isolated from different sources of infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hani Raziq

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The detection and investigation of methicillin resistance staphylococci specifically S. aureus in clinical microbiology setting is very helpful both for informing the appropriate treatment of individual patients and also for the surveillance of these organisms. This study aimed at the rapid molecular detection of methicillin resistant staphylococci harbouring β-lactamase gene and determination of the efficiency of m-PCR through comparison with uniplex PCR. Methods: Standard microbiological techniques were applied for the determination of the presence of methicillin resistant S. aureus in samples recovered from different body sites of patients who attended Al-Kadhumyhia Teaching and Baghdad Teaching Hospitals. The resulting methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA isolates were subjected to uni and multiplex PCR amplifications for detecting the existence of mec A gene and β-lactamase (TEM resistance gene. Results: Half of the cases involved were found to be caused by MRSA. All the tested isolates showed positive amplification bands for the presence of mec A gene and only 48.8% of these harbored TEM gene. The obtained results revealed high sensitivity of universal bacterial and TEM primers expressed as 97.6% and 100% respectively, while the sensitivity of mec A primer was limited to 60%. Conclusion: The phenotypic identification of MRSA revealed a higher incidence rate and that different molecular techniques can yield conflicting results and it can also be concluded that resistant due to beta- lactamase production can be a crucial factor added to the previously settled methicillin resistant due to mec A gene.

  18. Characterization of methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus staphylococci carriage isolates from different bovine populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhaeghen, Wannes; Vandendriessche, Stien; Crombé, Florence; Nemeghaire, Stéphanie; Dispas, Marc; Denis, Olivier; Hermans, Katleen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Butaye, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed at investigating bovine non-Staphylococcus aureus staphylococci for their role as a potential reservoir for methicillin resistance. Nasal swab samples were collected from 150 veal calves on 15 veal farms, 100 dairy cows on 10 dairy farms and 100 beef cows on 10 beef farms. Suspected staphylococcal isolates were investigated by PCR for the presence of the classic mecA and mecA(LGA251). Methicillin-resistant non-S. aureus staphylococci (MRNAS) were genotypically identified and were characterized by broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing. The MRNAS (n = 101) carriage rate was estimated as 30.29% (95% CI 6.14%-74.28%) in veal calves, 13.1% (95% CI 1.28%-63.72%) in dairy cows and 24.8% (95% CI 11.97%-44.42%) in beef cows. Carriage rates were not significantly different between the three populations (P > 0.05). mecA(LGA251) was not detected. Most (n = 80) MRNAS were identified as Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus lentus or Staphylococcus fleurettii. Resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin antimicrobials, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin was frequently detected. Two linezolid-resistant MRNAS from veal calves carried the multidrug-resistance gene cfr. SCCmec cassettes of type III predominated (n = 46); another 40 SCCmec cassettes harboured a class A mec complex without identifiable ccr complex; type IVa, type V and several other non-typeable cassettes were detected in low frequencies, especially in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. The SCCmec types predominating in bovine MRNAS differ from those mostly detected in livestock-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains. Yet, the detection of cfr and the high level of other antimicrobial resistances suggest a potentially important role of bovine MRNAS as a reservoir for resistance determinants other than SCCmec.

  19. In vitro activity of retapamulin against linezolid and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candel, F J; Morales, G; Picazo, J J

    2011-09-01

    To determine the in vitro activity of retapamulin and other topical antibiotics (mupirocin, bacitracin, and fusidic acid) usually employed for nasal decolonization, against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and linezolid and methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined on Mueller-Hinton agar according to the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and of the European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing. Presence of the cfr gene in linezolid and methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates was detected using polymerase chain reaction. Retapamulin inhibited all the isolates of MSSA and MRSA at 0.125 mg/L, but the 18 linezolid-resistant-MRSA strains proved resistant, with MICs over 32 mg/L. Most MSSA isolates (9/10) were susceptible to mupirocin with MICs under 0.19 mg/L, although this value decreased to half against MRSA, and almost all linezolid-resistant MRSA (17/18) strains were resistant to mupirocin with an MIC range of between 8 mg/L and 28 mg/L. The MIC of fusidic acid increased substantially against linezolid-resistant MRSA, whereas that of bacitracin showed no differences. Retapamulin demonstrated excellent in vitro activity against MSSA and MRSA strains, but not against MRSA isolates harbouring the cfr gene. The results of this in vitro study support cut-off values for retapamulin of ≤ 0.5, 1, and ≥ 2 mg/L for susceptible, intermediate, and resistant strains, respectively.

  20. Occurrence and characterization of methicillin-resistant staphylococci from bovine mastitis milk samples in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindonis, Veera; Taponen, Suvi; Myllyniemi, Anna-Liisa; Pyörälä, Satu; Nykäsenoja, Suvi; Salmenlinna, Saara; Lindholm, Laura; Rantala, Merja

    2013-08-28

    Methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) are increasingly being isolated in bovine mastitis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the occurrence of MRS in Finnish mastitis milk samples and characterize the MRS isolates using molecular methods. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was a rare finding in bovine mastitis in Finland. Only two out of 135 (1.5%) S. aureus isolates were positive for mec genes. One of these carried mecA and was of spa type t172, SCCmec type IV and ST375, and the other harboured mecC, being spa type t3256, and ST130. MRSA ST375 is common among human MRSA isolates in Finland, but this is the first report in the country of bovine mecC MRSA. In coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) originating from bovine mastitis, methicillin resistance was more common. In the two CoNS collections studied, 5.2% (17/324) and 1.8% (2/110) of the isolates were mecA positive. Eighteen of these were methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE), which were divided into 6 separate PFGE clusters. One pulsotype was detected in different parts of the country, indicating clonal spread. Most MRSE (13/18) were of SCCmec type IV, one was of type V and four were non-typeable. Comparison with a human staphylococcal database indicated that bovine MRSE strains were not closely related to human MRSE isolates. The occurrence of MRS, especially MRSA, in bovine mastitis in Finland was low. Most methicillin-resistant bovine CoNS are MRSE, and we found evidence of a bovine MRSE strain that may spread clonally. This is the first report of a Finnish bovine isolate of MRSAmecC ST130. The study provides a baseline for further MRS monitoring.

  1. Linezolid limits burden of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in biofilm of tracheal tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Barat, Laia; Ferrer, Miquel; Sierra, Josep Maria; Soy, Dolors; Guerrero, Laura; Vila, Jordi; Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Cortadellas, Núria; Martínez-Olondris, Pilar; Rigol, Montserrat; Esperatti, Mariano; Luque, Néstor; Saucedo, Lina María; Agustí, Carlos; Torres, Antoni

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of systemic treatment with linezolid compared with vancomycin on biofilm formation in mechanically ventilated pigs with severe methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-induced pneumonia. Prospective randomized animal study. Departments of Pneumology, Microbiology, and Pharmacy of the Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, and Scientific and Technological Services of the University of Barcelona. We prospectively analyzed 70 endotracheal tube samples. Endotracheal tubes were obtained from pigs either untreated (controls, n=20), or treated with vancomycin (n=32) or linezolid (n=18). The endotracheal tubes were obtained from a previous randomized study in tracheally intubated pigs with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus severe pneumonia, and mechanically ventilated for 69±16 hrs. Distal and medial hemisections of the endotracheal tube were assessed to quantify methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus burden, antibiotic biofilm concentration by high-performance liquid chromatography or bioassay, and biofilm thickness through scanning electron microscopy. We found a trend toward a significant variation in biofilm methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus burden (log colony-forming unit/mL) among groups (p=.057), and the lowest bacterial burden was found in endotracheal tubes treated with linezolid (1.98±1.68) in comparison with untreated endotracheal tubes (3.72±2.20, p=.045) or those treated with vancomycin (2.97±2.43, p=.286). Biofilm linezolid concentration was 19-fold above the linezolid minimum inhibitory concentration, whereas biofilm vancomycin concentration (1.60±0.91 µg/mL) was consistently below or close to the vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration. Biofilm was thicker in the vancomycin group (p=.077). Systemic treatment with linezolid limits endotracheal tube biofilm development and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus burden. The potential clinical usefulness of linezolid in decreasing the risk of biofilm

  2. Patient age as a factor of antibiotic resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alexander; Delorme, Thierry; Nasr, Payman

    2017-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. A thorough understanding of the epidemiology and distribution of MRSA allows the development of better preventive measures and helps to control or reduce the rate of infection among the general population. A retrospective survey was performed on 511 cases of MRSA infections from inpatient, outpatient and nursing home populations over a 12-month period. To study the relationships between two continuous quantitative variables (patient age vs resistance percentage), a simple linear regression was calculated for each antibiotic to predict the antibiotic resistance percentage with respect to patient age.Results/Key findings. The pattern of antibiotic resistance with respect to the age of patients depended on the antibiotic mode of action. Antibiotics that target DNA synthesis (i.e. fluoroquinolones) display a direct correlation with the age of patients, with higher rates of resistance among the older population, while antibiotics that target ribosomal functions (i.e. aminoglycosides) or cell wall synthesis (i.e. cephalosporin) do not display an age-dependent pattern and have a consistent degree of resistance across all age classes. Antibiotics that target DNA synthesis result in a progressively higher number of resistant isolates among the older population. The results emphasize the importance of patient age on antibiotic selection as a preventive measure to reduce the rate of resistant infections in each susceptible population. This pattern suggests that physicians should take into consideration patient age as another factor in determining the best antibiotic regiment with the aim of curtailing the emergence of newer resistant phenotypes in the future.

  3. Successful use of broth microdilution in susceptibility tests for methicillin-resistant (heteroresistant) staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornsberry, C; McDougal, L K

    1983-01-01

    We studied the broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing procedure to see whether it could be made reliable for determining resistance of staphylococci to methicillin, oxacillin, nafcillin, and cephalothin. With 45 selected strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 12 selected strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis we found that the addition of 2% NaCl to cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth permitted us to discriminate reliably between resistant and susceptible organisms. A screening test in which resistant staphylococci grew on agar containing 4% NaCl and methicillin (10 micrograms/ml), oxacillin (6 micrograms/ml), or nafcillin (6 micrograms/ml) incubated at 35 degrees C for 24 h (additional 24 h if no growth) was also reliable. In vitro cephalothin resistance occurred in heteroresistant S. aureus but usually did not occur in heteroresistant S. epidermidis. PMID:6643661

  4. Occurrence and characteristics of methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from Japanese retail ready-to-eat raw fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Ahmed M; Watanabe, Wataru; Fujii, Tomoko; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2012-06-01

    Staphylococci are not part of the normal fish microflora. The presence of staphylococci on fish is an indication of (a) post-harvest contamination due to poor personnel hygiene, or (b) disease in fish. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, molecular genetic characteristics, antibiotic resistance and virulence factors of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS) isolated from 200 samples of retail ready-to-eat raw fish (sashimi) collected from the Japanese prefecture of Hiroshima. We characterized 180 staphylococcal strains. A majority of the grocery stores surveyed (92%, 23/25) contained fish contaminated with Staphylococcus species. We recovered 175 S. aureus isolates from 174 (87%, 174/200) samples, with 170 isolates of MSSA. For the MRSA and MR-CoNS, 10 isolates were obtained from 10 samples (5%, 10/200) collected from 10 shops (40%, 10/25) belonging to four supermarket chains. SCCmec typing revealed the presence of a type IV.1 SCCmec cassette in S. warneri isolates, a type II.1 SCCmec cassette in S. haemolyticus isolates and a cassette in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates that could not be typed. Molecular typing of two MRSA isolates by spa sequencing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) identified t1767 and ST8, respectively. Antibiotic resistance genes that confer resistance to aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, β-lactams, macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B (MLS(B)) antibiotics were detected. Genes encoding one or more of the following virulence factors: staphylococcal enterotoxins (seb, and sed), toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (tst), exfoliative toxin (etaA) were detected in 14.2% (25/175) of S. aureus isolates. The accessory gene regulator (agr) typing of S. aureus isolates revealed that agr type 1 was most prevalent (96.5%, 169/175) followed by type 2 (2.2%, 4/175) and type 3 (1.1%, 2/175). None of

  5. Hospitalizations and Deaths Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, United States, 1999?2005

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    Klein, Eili; Smith, David L.; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2007-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections with Staphylococcus aureus, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections, are a major cause of illness and death and impose serious economic costs on patients and hospitals. However, the recent magnitude and trend of these infections have not been reported. We used national hospitalization and resistance data to estimate the annual number of hospitalizations and deaths associated with S. aureus and MRSA from 1999 through 2005. During this period, t...

  6. Detection of Macrolide, Lincosamide and Streptogramin Resistance among Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in Mumbai

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    Arunagiri Subramanian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increase in incidence of Methicillin Resistant Staphyloccocus aureus (MRSA and its extraordinary potential to develop antimicrobial resistance has highlighted the need for better agents to treat such infections. This has led to a renewed interest in use of new drugs for treatment with clindamycin and quinuprsitin-dalfopristin being the preferred choice for treatment. Aim & Objectives: This study was undertaken to detect the prevalence of MacrolideLincosamide-Streptogramin (MLS resistance among clinical isolates of MRSA.Material and Methods:Two hundred and thirty clinical isolates of S. aureus were subjected to routine antibiotic susceptibility testing including cefoxitin, erythromycin and quinupristindalfopristin. Inducible resistance to clindamycin was tested by 'D' test as per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Results: Out of all S. aureus isolates, 93.91% were identified as MRSA. In the disc diffusion testing, 81.5% of isolates showed erythromycin resistance. Among these, the prevalence of constitutive (cMLS , inducible (iMLS b b and MS-phenotype were 35.80%, 31.82% and 32.39% respectively by the D-test method. 77.8% of isolates were resistant to quinupristin-dalfopristin and the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC ranged from 4–32 µg/ml. 89.20% of isolates were resistant to both quinupristin-dalfopristin and erythromycin of which 35.03%, 35.67% and 29.30% belonged to iMLS , cMLS and MS phenotype respectively. Conclusion: The emergence of quinupristindalfopristin resistance and MLS phenotypes brings b about the need for the simple and reliable D-test in routine diagnosis and further susceptibility testing for proper antimicrobial therapy.

  7. Phenotypic and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Ekiti State, Nigeria

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    Olowe OA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Olugbenga Adekunle Olowe,1 Olayinka Oluwatoyin Kukoyi,2 Samuel Sunday Taiwo,1 Olusola Ojurongbe,1 Oluyinka Oladele Opaleye,1 Oloyede Samuel Bolaji,1 Abiodun Adebimpe Adegoke,1 Olufunmilola Bamidele Makanjuola,1 David Olusoga Ogbolu,3 Oyebode Terry Alli31Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Health Sciences, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria; 2Department of Microbiology, College of Sciences, Afe Babalola University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria; 3Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Lautech, Osogbo, NigeriaIntroduction: The characteristics and antimicrobial resistance profiles of Staphylococcus aureus differs according to geographical regions and in relation to antibiotic usage. The aim of this study was to determine the biochemical characteristics of the prevalent S. aureus from Ekiti State, Nigeria, and to evaluate three commonly used disk diffusion methods (cefoxitin, oxacillin, and methicillin for the detection of methicillin resistance in comparison with mecA gene detection by polymerase chain reaction.Materials and methods: A total of 208 isolates of S. aureus recovered from clinical specimens were included in this study. Standard microbiological procedures were employed in isolating the strains. Susceptibility of each isolate to methicillin (5 µg, oxacillin (1 µg, and cefoxitin (30 µg was carried out using the modified Kirby–Bauer/Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute disk diffusion technique. They were also tested against panels of antibiotics including vancomycin. The conventional polymerase chain reaction method was used to detect the presence of the mecA gene.Results: Phenotypic resistance to methicillin, oxacillin, and cefoxitin were 32.7%, 40.3%, and 46.5%, respectively. The mecA gene was detected in 40 isolates, giving a methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA prevalence of 19.2%. The S. aureus isolates were resistant to penicillin (82.7% and tetracycline

  8. Molecular characterization of community- & hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant & methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus isolates in Sikkim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Kunsang Ongmoo; Singh, Tsk; Adhikari, Luna; Biswas, Shilpie

    2015-09-01

    The two major genotypic markers that distinguish community acquired (CA) from hospital acquired (HA) methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates are the architecture of mobile genetic element (SCCmec type) and presence of panton valentine leukocidin (PVL) toxin. This study was conducted to determine the molecular characteristics of CA- and HA- MRSA and methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolates in Sikkim. A total of 150 clinical isolates of S. aureus isolated from various clinical specimens were subjected to duplex (mec-A and pvl gene) and multiplex (SCCmec typing) PCR. Of the 150 isolates, 53 (35.33%) and 66 (44%) were positive for mec-A (MRSA) and pvl genes, respectively. Thirty eight (25.33%) met the definition of CA-MRSA and 15 (10%) of HA-MRSA and the remaining 63 (42%) and 34 (22.66%) as CA- and HA-MSSA, respectively. No significant difference was seen in the distribution of PVL toxin in MRSA and MSSA isolates, but it was significantly (P<0.001) high in overall MRSA isolates than in MSSA. The majority of the MRSA isolates showed a double amplification band of SCCmec type III plus V (54.71%), and only a fewer isolates were amplified by single DNA fragments of type I (1.88%), III (3.77%), IVa (1.88%) and V (11.32%). SCCmec types I, III, IVa, were found only in HA-MRSA isolates, whereas type V in both the CA- and HA-MRSA. AST pattern showed that 18.42 per cent (7/38) and 46.66 per cent (7/15) were multidrug resistant (MDR)-CA-MRSA and MDR-HA-MRSA, respectively. The present results show that SCCmec type V MRSA has been on the rise, and genotypic markers such as pvl gene detection used for the differentiation of these clinically distinct isolates of MRSA may not be reliable.

  9. Daptomycin for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis native-valve endocarditis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) have been increasing in importance as a cause of native valve endocarditis (NVE). Most cases of NVE caused by CoNS are attributable to Staphylococcus epidermidis. NVE caused by CoNS acquired in a nosocomial setting may differ from cases acquired in the community in several ways. It may be associated with hemodialysis, the presence of a long-term indwelling central catheter or pacemaker, or a recent invasive procedure; nosocomial cases may have a higher rate of methicillin resistance among CoNS isolates, and so be more likely to be treated with vancomycin. Unfortunately, NVE caused by methicillin-resistant CoNS has been associated with significantly higher rates of persistent bacteremia and in-hospital mortality than methicillin-susceptible isolates. The poor outcomes in these cases point to the need for alternative therapies with potent activity against methicillin-resistant CoNS. In our medical center, a 76-year-old man presented with native-valve endocarditis and positive blood cultures for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE). During each of three 6-week courses of treatment with vancomycin, blood cultures were negative, but they once again became positive for MRSE when vancomycin was discontinued. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the MRSE isolates for vancomycin remained stable at 2 μg/mL. Eventually, treatment with daptomycin was initiated (500 mg [7 mg/kg]) 3 times/week for 6 weeks. Over the following year, no positive cultures for MRSE were detected. PMID:20167084

  10. Daptomycin for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis native-valve endocarditis: a case report

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    Duah Marylene

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS have been increasing in importance as a cause of native valve endocarditis (NVE. Most cases of NVE caused by CoNS are attributable to Staphylococcus epidermidis. NVE caused by CoNS acquired in a nosocomial setting may differ from cases acquired in the community in several ways. It may be associated with hemodialysis, the presence of a long-term indwelling central catheter or pacemaker, or a recent invasive procedure; nosocomial cases may have a higher rate of methicillin resistance among CoNS isolates, and so be more likely to be treated with vancomycin. Unfortunately, NVE caused by methicillin-resistant CoNS has been associated with significantly higher rates of persistent bacteremia and in-hospital mortality than methicillin-susceptible isolates. The poor outcomes in these cases point to the need for alternative therapies with potent activity against methicillin-resistant CoNS. In our medical center, a 76-year-old man presented with native-valve endocarditis and positive blood cultures for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE. During each of three 6-week courses of treatment with vancomycin, blood cultures were negative, but they once again became positive for MRSE when vancomycin was discontinued. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the MRSE isolates for vancomycin remained stable at 2 μg/mL. Eventually, treatment with daptomycin was initiated (500 mg [7 mg/kg] 3 times/week for 6 weeks. Over the following year, no positive cultures for MRSE were detected.

  11. Economic features of antibiotic resistance: the case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonanzas, Fernando; Lozano, Carmen; Torres, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    This paper analyses and updates the economic information regarding methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including information that has been previously reviewed by other authors, and new information, for the purpose of facilitating health management and clinical decisions. The analysed articles reveal great disparity in the economic burden on MRSA patients; this is mainly due to the diversity of the designs of the studies, as well as the variability of the patients and the differences in health care systems. Regarding prophylactic strategies, the studies do not provide conclusive results that could unambiguously orientate health management. The studies addressing treatments noted that linezolid seems to be a cost-effective treatment for MRSA, mostly because it is associated with a shorter length of stay (LOS) in hospital. However, important variables such as antimicrobial susceptibility, infection type and resistance emergence should be included in these analyses before a conclusion is reached regarding which treatment is the best (most efficient). The reviewed studies found that rapid MRSA detection, using molecular techniques, is an efficient technique to control MRSA. As a general conclusion, the management of MRSA infections implicates important economic costs for hospitals, as they result in higher direct costs and longer LOS than those related to methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) patients or MRSA-free patients; there is wide variability in those increased costs, depending on different variables. Moreover, the research reveals a lack of studies on other related topics, such as the economic implications of changes in MRSA epidemiology (community patients and lineages associated with farm animals).

  12. Fitness Cost of VanA-Type Vancomycin Resistance in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, Marie-Laure; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    We have quantified the biological cost of VanA-type glycopeptide resistance due to the acquisition of the resistance operon by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Enterococcus sp. Exponential growths of recipient strain HIP11713, its transconjugant VRSA-1, VRSA-5, and VRSA-6 were compared in the absence or, except for HIP11713, in the presence of vancomycin. Induction of resistance was performed by adding vancomycin in both the preculture and the culture or the culture at only 1/50 the MIC. In the absence of vancomycin, the growth rates of the vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) strains were similar to that of susceptible MRSA strain HIP11713. When resistance was induced, and under both conditions, there was a significant reduction of the growth rate of the VRSA strains relative to that of HIP11713 and to those of their noninduced counterparts, corresponding to a ca. 20% to 38% reduction in fitness. Competition experiments between isogenic VRSA-1 and HIP11713 mixed at a 1:1, 1:100, or 100:1 ratio revealed a competitive disadvantage of 0.4% to 3% per 10 generations of the transconjugant versus the recipient. This slight fitness burden can be attributed to the basal level of expression of the van genes in the absence of induction combined with a gene dosage effect due to the presence of the van operon on multicopy plasmids. These data indicate that VanA-type resistance, when induced, is highly costly for the MRSA host, whereas in the absence of induction, its biological cost is minimal. Thus, the potential for the dissemination of VRSA clinical isolates should not be underestimated. PMID:19332680

  13. Fitness cost of VanA-type vancomycin resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, Marie-Laure; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2009-06-01

    We have quantified the biological cost of VanA-type glycopeptide resistance due to the acquisition of the resistance operon by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Enterococcus sp. Exponential growths of recipient strain HIP11713, its transconjugant VRSA-1, VRSA-5, and VRSA-6 were compared in the absence or, except for HIP11713, in the presence of vancomycin. Induction of resistance was performed by adding vancomycin in both the preculture and the culture or the culture at only 1/50 the MIC. In the absence of vancomycin, the growth rates of the vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) strains were similar to that of susceptible MRSA strain HIP11713. When resistance was induced, and under both conditions, there was a significant reduction of the growth rate of the VRSA strains relative to that of HIP11713 and to those of their noninduced counterparts, corresponding to a ca. 20% to 38% reduction in fitness. Competition experiments between isogenic VRSA-1 and HIP11713 mixed at a 1:1, 1:100, or 100:1 ratio revealed a competitive disadvantage of 0.4% to 3% per 10 generations of the transconjugant versus the recipient. This slight fitness burden can be attributed to the basal level of expression of the van genes in the absence of induction combined with a gene dosage effect due to the presence of the van operon on multicopy plasmids. These data indicate that VanA-type resistance, when induced, is highly costly for the MRSA host, whereas in the absence of induction, its biological cost is minimal. Thus, the potential for the dissemination of VRSA clinical isolates should not be underestimated.

  14. Bovine mastitis Staphylococcus aureus: antibiotic susceptibility profile, resistance genes and molecular typing of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive strains in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dengfeng; Wang, Zhicai; Yan, Zuoting; Wu, Jianyong; Ali, Tariq; Li, Jianjun; Lv, Yanli; Han, Bo

    2015-04-01

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in dairy animals is of great concern for livestock and public health. The aim of present study was to detect new trends of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) towards antibiotic susceptibility, resistance genes and molecular typing by methods of disc diffusion, multiplex PCR assay and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 219 S. aureus strains were isolated from bovine mastitis cases from six provinces of China, including 34 MRSA strains. The results revealed that more than 70% isolated strains showed resistance to various antibiotics, and multiple-drugs resistance to more than five categories of antibiotics was found more common. The ermC was the most prevalent resistance gene, followed by other genes; however, ermA was the least frequently detected gene. Twenty-eight mecA-negative MRSA and six mecA-positive MRSA strains were detected, and in which three strains were ST97-MRSA-IV, others were ST965-MRSA-IV, ST6-MRSA-IV and ST9-MRSA-SCCmec-NT. The mecA-negative MRSA strains were found resistant to most of the antibiotics, and harbored aac(6')/aph(2''), aph(3')-III and tetM genes higher than MSSA strains. The resistance to most of the antibiotics was significantly higher in MRSA than in MSSA strains. The MLST profiles showed that these strains mainly belonged to CC5, CC398, CC121 and CC50 lineage, especially within ST97 and ST398, while some novel sequence types (ST2154, ST2165 and ST2166) were identified and deposited in the MLST database. This indicates that the resistance of S. aureus is becoming more complicated by changes in multi-drug resistance mechanism and appearance of mecA-negative MRSA isolates, and importantly, MRSA-IV strains in different MLST types are emerging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Methicillin resistant staphylococci associated with bovine mastitis and their zoonotic importance

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    S. Vishnupriya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to determine the zoonotic importance of methicillin resistant staphylococci associated with bovine mastitis and their potential role in transmission to animal handlers. Materials and Methods: A total of 158 milk samples from bovine mastitis cases and 126 nasal swabs from the animal handlers were sampled in and around Pondicherry (Southern India. The Presence of Staphylococcal organism was confirmed by PCR amplification using the genus specific primers and among the isolated Staphylococci; methicillin resistance was identified by genetic amplification of mec A methicillin resistant gene. Then the amplified gene from the bacteria expressing the mecA gene (PBP2a (~2kb fragment was further sequenced using four sets of primer pairs and aligned for determining their genetic relatedness between the sequences. Both phenotypic and genotypic analysis was carried out for the six MRS isolates (three bovine and three human in this study. Results: Out of 158 mastitis milk samples; 96 and 19 bovine isolates were found to be positive for Staphylococcal genus specific PCR and methicillin resistant (mecA gene PCR, respectively. Similarly, Out of 126 human nasal swabs, 64 and 13 human isolates were found to be positive for Staphylococcal genus specific PCR and mec A gene PCR, respectively. Among the 160 staphylococcal isolates (Bovine and Human origin; 51 were identified as coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS and remaining as coagulase-negative staphylococci (CONS. The results obtained in this study revealed the presence of many species of Staphylococci but the predominant species were Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis. The Sequence analysis of the mec A gene of human isolates obtained in this study had a maximum identity (99% -100% with the bovine isolates. Conclusion: The phenotypic and genotypic analysis carried out for the six MRS (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococci isolates in this study were indistinguishable

  16. Effects of subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics on alpha-toxin (hla) gene expression of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsen, K; Ziebuhr, W; Koller, K P; Hell, W; Wichelhaus, T A; Hacker, J

    1998-11-01

    Concentrations of antibiotics below the MIC are able to modulate the expression of virulence-associated genes. In this study, the influence of subinhibitory doses of 31 antibiotics on the expression of the gene encoding the staphylococcal alpha-toxin (hla), a major virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus, was investigated with a novel gene fusion protocol. The most striking observation was a strong induction of hla expression by subinhibitory concentrations of beta-lactams and an almost complete inhibition of alpha-toxin expression by clindamycin. Whereas glycopeptide antibiotics had no effect, the macrolide erythromycin and several aminoglycosides reduced and fluoroquinolones slightly stimulated hla expression. Furthermore, Northern blot analysis of hla mRNA and Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of culture supernatants of both methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains revealed that methicillin-induced alpha-toxin expression is a common phenomenon of alpha-toxin-producing strains. Some methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates produced up to 30-fold more alpha-toxin in the presence of 10 microg of methicillin per ml than in its absence. The results indicate that the novel gene fusion technique is a useful tool for studying the modulation of virulence gene expression by antibiotics. Moreover, the results suggest that the effects of certain antibiotics on virulence properties may be relevant for the management of S. aureus infections.

  17. Validation of multiplex PCR strategy for simultaneous detection and identification of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    Rallapalli S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR strategy is described for rapid identification of clinically relevant methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA that targets mecA and coag ulase genes. In this study, 150 staphylococcal clinical isolates were used that included 40 isolates of MRSA, 55 isolates of methicillin susceptible S. aureus (MSSA, 44 isolates of methicillin susceptible coag ulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (MS-CoNS and 11 isolates of methicillin resistant coag ulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (MR-CoNS. Out of 55 S. aureus strains, three strains demonstrated mecA gene, which appeared to be oxacillin sensitive by disc diffusion. When (MS-CoNS were evaluated, 10 isolates classified as oxacillin sensitive phenotypically, yielded positive results in PCR method. The results for mecA detection by PCR were more consistent with disk susceptibility tests in case of MRSA (100% and MSSA (95% isolates. In contrast to above results with MRSA and MSSA, mecA detection by PCR in MS-CoNS showed less correlation with disk susceptibility tests (77%. The results for coag detection by PCR were consistent with phenotypic tests in all isolates.

  18. Ceftaroline-Resistant, Daptomycin-Tolerant, and Heterogeneous Vancomycin-Intermediate Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Causing Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigo, Masayuki; Diaz, Lorena; Carvajal, Lina P; Tran, Truc T; Rios, Rafael; Panesso, Diana; Garavito, Juan D; Miller, William R; Wanger, Audrey; Weinstock, George; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A; Chambers, Henry F

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of infective endocarditis (IE) caused by ceftaroline-resistant, daptomycin-tolerant, and heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Resistance to ceftaroline emerged in the absence of drug exposure, and the E447K substitution in the active site of PBP2a previously associated with ceftaroline resistance was identified. Additionally, we present evidence of patient-to-patient transmission of the strain within the same unit. This case illustrates the difficulties in treating MRSA IE in the setting of a multidrug-resistant phenotype. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Phenotypic methods for determination of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus spp. from health care workers

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    Marcelle Aquino Rabelo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Staphylococcus spp. is an important healthcare-associated pathogen and the identification of methicillin-resistant strains in samples of colonization may provide data to assist in the antimicrobial therapy success. OBJECTIVES: To determine the occurrence of colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. (MRS, through the detection of the mecA gene and to evaluate different phenotypic methods for the presumptive detection of methicillin resistance in samples of the anterior nasal cavity and hands of the health care personnel of a university hospital in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. METHODS: We selected the 28 isolates of Staphylococcus spp., which showed an intermediate or resistant phenotypic profile for oxacillin, detected by the Kirby Bauer technique. The methods used were disk-diffusion tests for cefoxitin, minimal inhibitory concentration by E-test for oxacillin, screening for oxacillin resistance and mecA gene detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. RESULTS: About the phenotypic methods utilized, only the E-test of oxacillin did not show a statistically significant difference in relation to PCR for the mecA gene detection, considered the gold standard. CONCLUSION: The E-test of oxacillin was the best of the phenotypic methods utilized. It is necessary to correctly detect MRS in healthy individuals, because they can act as carriers and can therefore be a potential source of microorganisms involved in hospital infections.

  20. Presence of the optrA Gene in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus sciuri of Porcine Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Run; Li, Dexi; Wang, Yang; He, Tao; Feßler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan; Wu, Congming

    2016-12-01

    A total of 57 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates and 475 methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) collected from pigs in the Guangdong province of China in 2014 were investigated for the presence of the novel oxazolidinone-phenicol resistance gene optrA The optrA gene was detected in 6.9% (n = 33) of the MRCoNS, all of which were Staphylococcus sciuri isolates, but in none of the MRSA isolates. Five optrA-carrying methicillin-resistant (MR) S. sciuri isolates also harbored the multiresistance gene cfr Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and dru typing of the 33 optrA-carrying MR S. sciuri isolates revealed 25 patterns and 5 sequence types, respectively. S1 nuclease PFGE and Southern blotting confirmed that optrA was located in the chromosomal DNAs of 29 isolates, including 1 cfr-positive isolate. The remaining four isolates harbored a ∼35-kb pWo28-3-like plasmid on which optrA and cfr were located together with other resistance genes, as confirmed by sequence analysis. Six different types of genetic environments (types I to VI) of the chromosome-borne optrA genes were identified; these types had the optrA gene and its transcriptional regulator araC in common. Tn558 was found to be associated with araC-optrA in types II to VI. The optrA gene in types II and III was found in close proximity to the ccr gene complex of the respective staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec). Since oxazolidinones are last-resort antimicrobial agents for the control of serious infections caused by methicillin-resistant staphylococci in humans, the location of the optrA gene close to the ccr complex is an alarming observation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Outbreak of Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infections Among a Collegiate Football Team

    OpenAIRE

    Romano, Russ; Lu, Doanh; Holtom, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Context: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was once primarily a hospital-acquired organism, but now community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) is causing outbreaks among otherwise healthy sport participants.

  2. Detection of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus Aureus by Polymerase Chain Reaction and Conventional Methods: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju M Pillai

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: This study recommends advocating PCR for mecA gene on a regular basis for detecting methicillin resistance in S. aureus isolates isolated from sterile body fluids or from special units such as intensive care units.

  3. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Necrotizing Pneumonia without Evidence of Antecedent Viral Upper Respiratory Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Moran Toro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: USA300 community-associated (CA methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains causing necrotizing pneumonia have been reported in association with antecedent viral upper respiratory tract infections (URI.

  4. [Prevalence and predisposing factors of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in long-term care facilities. An international view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Rita

    2016-07-03

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important pathogens of healthcare and long-term care-associated infections over the world, resulting high morbidity, mortality and extra costs in these settings. The authors analyze the prevalence and predisposing factors of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in long-term care facilities. Systematic review using PubMed, ScienceDirect and Cochrane Library CENTRAL databases between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2015 was performed. In the past ten years methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevalence in European long-term care facilities (12.6%) was lower than in North America (33.9%). The most frequent predisposing factor was previous antimicrobial therapy, hospital admission and infection/colonisation, chronic wounds, and high care need. Based on the results, the prevention and control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is an important public health priority in the European and Hungarian long-term care facilities.

  5. Heavy metal and disinfectant resistance genes among livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argudin, Maria Angeles; Lauzat, Birgit; Kraushaar, Britta

    2016-01-01

    substances with antimicrobial activity applied in animal feed, including metal-containing compounds might contribute to their selection. Some of these genes have been found in various novel SCCmec cassettes. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of metal-resistance genes among a LA-S. aureus...... collection [n = 554, including 542 MRSA and 12 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA)] isolated from livestock and food thereof. Most LA-MRSA isolates (76%) carried at least one metal-resistance gene. Among the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates (n = 456), 4.8%, 0.2%, 24.3% and 71.5% were positive for arsA (arsenic......, 72% carried one metal-resistance gene, and the remaining harboured two or more in different combinations. Differences between LA-MRSA CC398 and non-CC398 were statistically significant for arsA and czrC. The czrC gene was almost exclusively found (98%) in the presence of SCCmec V in both CC398...

  6. Colonization by methicillin resistant staphylococci of nares and skin in healthcare workers: a pilot study in spinal surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Lorenzo; Cappelletti, Laura; Lamartina, Claudio; Berjano, Pedro; Mattina, Roberto; De Vecchi, Elena

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) colonization among healthcare workers (HCWs) may have implications in development of infections and in spreading of resistance. This study aimed to determine the rate of methicillin-resistant staphylococci carriage in HCWs of spinal surgeries in an Italian Orthopaedic Institute. Samples from nares, axillae and hands were inoculated onto appropriate media in order to perform colony counts of methicillin-susceptible and resistant S. aureus and CoNS. Prevalence of S. aureus and CNS was 42.3% and 98%, respectively. Methicillin-resistance was rather infrequent in S. aureus (13.5%) while it was detected in most of CoNS (90.4%). Methicillin resistant S. aureus were prevalently isolated from nares while axillae showed the highest methicillin-resistant CoNS colonization rates. A relatively high rate of methicillin resistant staphylococci was found among HCWs in spinal surgeries wards, thus evidencing the need for careful prevention measures and for periodic evaluation of spread among HCWs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Co-colonization and clonal diversity of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetsch, Alexandra; Roesler, Uwe; Kraushaar, Britta; Friese, Anika

    2016-03-15

    Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus (S.) aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are colonizers of skin and mucosa. In humans, MSSA and MRSA compete for colonization space in the anterior nares of pig farmers; however, it was also shown that MSSA/MRSA co-colonization is common and one clone can be found rather than differing types of MSSA and MRSA. We investigated the colonization and clonality of both, MSSA and MRSA in pigs over a longer time. Eighteen sows were nasally sampled three times every ten weeks. Additionally, environmental samples were taken. Samples were investigated for MSSA and MRSA, respectively. The spa type was defined from up to five MRSA and MSSA isolates found per sample and sampling time; selected isolates were further investigated by microarray. Three sows (16.7%) were completely negative for MSSA and MRSA. Twelve pigs (66.7%) were irregularly positive for both, MSSA and MRSA over the time, whereas seven out of them (38.9%) were simultaneously colonized. CC398 (t034, t011) MRSA and CC9 (t337, t1430, and t13816) MSSA associated spa types were exclusively found. In 44.4% (n=8) of sows up to two different types of MSSA were present at the same time and sample. Strains of the same clonal lineage showed a high genetic identity despite their origin. Highly identic clones were present in sows and their environment. As conclusion, MSSA/MRSA may not exclude each other in the anterior nares of pigs. Pigs may also carry different clones at the same time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Low Prevalence of Cfr-Mediated Linezolid Resistance among Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Spanish Hospital: Case Report on Linezolid Resistance Acquired during Linezolid Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sierra, Josep M.; Camoez, Mariana; Tubau, Fe; Gasch, Oriol; Pujol, Miquel; Martin, Rogelio; Dom?nguez, M. Angeles

    2013-01-01

    Linezolid is an effective antimicrobial agent to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Resistance to linezolid due to the cfr gene is described worldwide. The present study aimed to analyze the prevalence of the cfr-mediated linezolid resistance among MRSA clinical isolates in our area. A very low prevalence of cfr mediated linezolid resistance was found: only one bacteremic isolate out of 2 215 screened isolates. The only linezolid resistant isolate arose in a patient, pr...

  9. Staphylococci isolated from carriage sites and infected sites of dogs as a reservoir of multidrug resistance and methicillin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacz, Katarzyna; Żarnowska, Sabina; Piechowicz, Lidia; Haras, Krystyna

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and methicillin-resistant (MR) staphylococci in healthy dogs and in dogs with evident symptoms of infection. The samples from 172 healthy and 197 infected dogs were examined. The staphylococci were identified with conventional methods and by means of the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method (MboI). Susceptibility to 15 antibiotics from 10 different antimicrobial classes was tested. Resistance to methicillin was confirmed by the presence of Staphylococcus aureus mecA and S. sciuri mecA genes. Multidrug resistance was defined as resistance to three or more antimicrobial classes. The oral mucosa to be the most frequent site of staphylococcal colonization (55.8 %), followed by nasal cavity (44.2 %), and anus (32.6 %). The prevalence of MDR staphylococci in infected dogs was significantly higher than in the healthy animals (74/137 vs. 34/95, P = 0.006). The MR strains of S. pseudintermedius (2.9 %) originated solely from infected dogs. In contrast, the MR coagulase-negative strains (7.4 %) were isolated solely from healthy dogs. S. aureus strains originated from nasal swabs, MRSA strains were not isolated. MDR staphylococci and MR S. pseudintermedius are more common among infected dogs, but coagulase-negative staphylococci (mostly S. sciuri) seem to be a reservoir of methicillin resistance in healthy dogs.

  10. Comparative proteomics of Staphylococcus aureus and the response of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive strains to Triton X-100

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordwell, Stuart J; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Cole, Rebecca T

    2002-01-01

    . Comparative maps were used to characterize the S. aureus response to treatment with Triton X-100 (TX-100), a detergent that has been shown to reduce methicillin resistance independently of an interaction with the mecA-encoded penicillin-binding protein 2a. In response to growth of the bacteria in the presence...

  11. Prevalence and molecular characterization of methicillin resistance among Coagulase-negative Staphylococci at a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Puneet; Tandel, Kundan; Singh, Alina; Kumar, M; Grover, Naveen; Sahni, A K

    2016-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Coagulase-negative Staphylococci (MR-CoNS) have emerged as an important cause of nosocomial infections especially in patients with prosthetic devices and implants. This study was conducted with an aim to determine the prevalence of methicillin resistance among CoNS isolates at a tertiary care center by both phenotypic and genotypic methods. This cross sectional study was carried out from September 2011 to February 2014 in which 150 non-repetitive clinical isolates of CoNS were identified at the species level by conventional phenotypic methods. Cefoxitin disk (30 μg) diffusion testing was used to determine methicillin resistance and confirmed by detection of mec A gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Out of 150 CoNS isolates, 51 were methicillin resistant by cefoxitin disk diffusion method. Out of these 51 isolates, mec A gene was detected only in 45 isolates. Moreover, mec A gene was also detected in 4 isolates, which were cefoxitin sensitive. Thus, the prevalence of methicillin resistance among CoNS was found to be 32.7% by PCR. The prevalence of methicillin resistance among Coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS) was 32.7% by PCR detection of mec A gene. The sensitivity and specificity of cefoxitin disk diffusion method against mec A gene detection by PCR were found to be more than 90%. It can be concluded from this study that cefoxitin disk diffusion test can be used as a useful screening method to detect methicillin resistance among CoNS isolates. However, detection of mec A gene by PCR remains a more accurate method of detecting methicillin resistance among CoNS.

  12. Investigation of Antimicrobial Activity of Tigecycline in Methicillin Resistant Staphylococci Isolated from Hospitalized Patients in Intensive Care Units

    OpenAIRE

    Emine Küçükateş; Nazmi Gültekin

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of tigecycline in methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from patients hospitalized in intensive care units. Methods: We investigated methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from blood, wound, urine, catheter tips, endotacheal aspiration fluids (ETA), and sputum specimens of patients hospitalized in the coronary and surgical intensive care units at İstanbul University Cardiology Institute, between Jun...

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Staphylococcus aureus AMRF1 (ST22) and AMRF2 (ST672), Ocular Methicillin-Resistant Isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Velusamy, Nithya

    2014-03-20

    Sequence type 22 (ST22) and ST672 are the two major emerging clones of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in India. ST672 strains were found to cause severe ocular infections. We report the draft genome sequences of two emerging strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus, AMRF1 (ST22) and AMRF2 (ST672), isolated from patients with ocular infections.

  14. Antibacterial activity of mupirocin (pseudomonic Acid A) against, clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, M.; Abbasi, S.A.; Butt, T.; Arain, M.A

    2010-01-01

    Colonized patients and health care workers are the main source of spread of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals. The elimination of nasal colonized MRSA plays a crucial role in infection control protocols. Mupirocin (pseudomonic acid A) is used for eradication of MRSA nasal carriage. Increasing use of pseudomonic acid A (mupirocin) has led to emergence of resistance. Objective To determine low and high level resistance of MRSA isolates from clinical specimens against mupirocin. Place and duration of study: Study was conducted at Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi from July 2006 to June 2007. Material and methods Three hundred methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates were studied. All clinical specimens were processed for culture and sensitivity. Staphylococcus aureus isolates were tested for methicillin resistance using 1 micro g oxacillin disk. The isolates were further tested by PCR for the presence of mecA gene. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of mupirocin against MRSA isolates was determined using agar dilution technique. Results Out of 300 MRSA isolates, 98% were found to have MlC against mupirocin as smaller than 4 micro g/mL. Remaining 2% isolates revealed low level resistance (MIC greater than 8 micro g/mL to 256 micro g/mL), no high level resistance (MIC greater than 512 micro g/mL) against mupirocin was detected. Conclusions: High level mupirocin resistance has not emerged so far in our setup. Due to increasing use of mupirocin, emergence of resistance against mupirocin among MRSA is a strong possibility. Strategy encompassing rational use of antimicrobials, hospital infection control, surveillance for the detection of mupirocin resistance and judicious use of this agent is required. (author)

  15. Activity of linezolid and tedizolid against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant and methicillin and linezolid resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an in vitro comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuelas, M; Candel, F J; Lejarraga, C; López-González, L; Viñuela-Prieto, J M; López de Mendoza, D

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Spain is approximately 20-30%. However, resistance to linezolid is rare, and the main reports are from nosocomial outbreaks. The objective of the present study was to compare the in vitro susceptibility of linezolid with that of tedizolid against MRSA isolates and methicillin-and linezolid-resistant isolates (MLRSA) mediated by the cfr gene. The in vitro susceptibility of linezolid and tedizolid was determined using the E-test with 18 MRSA strains and 18 cfr-mediated MLRSA strains obtained from clinical isolates in the microbiology service of a tertiary university hospital. All MRSA strains were susceptible to both antibiotics. Analysis of the MRSA isolates revealed that the MIC50 and MIC90 of linezolid were 1.5 and 2 mg/L, respectively; those of tedizolid were 0.25 and 0.4 mg/L. The MIC50 and MIC90 of tedizolid remained at 0.75 and 1 mg/L against the MLRSA strains (MIC90 ≥ 8 mg/L). Both for MRSA and for MLRSA, the MICs obtained for tedizolid were at least 2 dilutions lower than those of linezolid, thus demonstrating between 2 and 4 times greater activity in vitro than linezolid.

  16. Prevalence and risk factors for isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus in dogs with keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPinto, Alexander J; Mohammed, Hussni O; Ledbetter, Eric C

    2015-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of, and risk factors for, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRS) isolation in dogs with naturally acquired bacterial keratitis. All Staphylococcus spp. isolated from corneal samples of dogs with keratitis during a 2-year period were evaluated for methicillin resistance by bacteriologic methods. Each MRS isolate was subjected to in vitro susceptibility testing for systemic and ocular antimicrobials. Nasal swabs for culture were collected from all dogs with MRS corneal isolation to evaluate for nasal carrier status. Potential risk factors for MRS isolation were investigated by medical record review and administration of an epidemiological survey to dog owners. Collected information characterizing animal, client, and environmental variables was analyzed for association with MRS isolation. Seventy-one Staphylococcus spp. were isolated from seventy individual dogs with keratitis during the study period. Seventeen of the Staphylococcus isolates (23.9%) were methicillin resistant. The MRS isolates included Staphylococcus epidermidis (n = 10), Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (n = 6), and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 1). The MRS corneal isolates displayed extensive antimicrobial resistance. Four dogs (23.5%) with MRS corneal isolates had positive nasal cultures for MRS. Client occupation was significantly (P = 0.01) associated with MRS isolation, and dogs belonging to owners employed in veterinary or human healthcare fields were four times more likely to have MRS keratitis than dogs owned by clients with different professions. There were no significant associations between the other evaluated animal, client, and environmental factors. Methicillin resistance is relatively common in Staphylococcus isolates from dogs with corneal infections, particularly among dogs belonging to healthcare workers. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  17. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemerovski, Carrie W; Klein, Kristin C

    2008-10-01

    To review the epidemiology and prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), define the differences between community-acquired and hospital-acquired strains, highlight the advantages and disadvantages of antibiotics commonly used to treat infections caused by this pathogen, and identify strategies to limit the spread of this organism and prevent future outbreaks. Literature was accessed through MEDLINE using the search terms community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, CA-MRSA, pediatrics, and children. Articles evaluated were published in the English language and limited to human studies. References of literature identified by initial search techniques were reviewed for additional relevant articles. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has become a prominent pathogen in pediatric patients in the last ten years. Its increasing prevalence has been reported throughout the United States, and it is the cause of over one half of all skin and soft tissue infections seen in many hospitals and emergency departments. The risk factors for infection with this pathogen differ from those associated with hospital-acquired strains. Mild to moderate infections can generally be treated with oral antibiotics, while more serious infections may require parenteral therapy. Sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and clindamycin are the preferred oral agents due to their efficacy, tolerability, well established side effect profiles, and cost. Vancomycin is the standard of care for parenteral therapy, although clindamycin is an acceptable parenteral alternative. More costly agents such as linezolid, daptomycin, and quinupristin/dalfopristin should be reserved for patients with severe infections, multiple allergies, or in strains with unusual resistance patterns. The best way to prevent and control outbreaks is to maintain standard infection

  18. DAYA HAMBAT SARI TANAMAN OBAT TERHADAP PERTUMBUHAN BAKTERI STRAIN Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Hilda Putri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus infection can be treated with Methicilin, β lactam class of antibiotics that have drug targets in the cell wall. Bacteria S. aureus that is resistant to methicillin called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. One alternative that can be used in strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that have this is to use medicinal plants. This study aimed to know the ability of medicinal plant extracts inhibit the growth of bacterial strains of MRSA. This kind of research is experimental research. Medicinal plants tested were Garlic, Turmeric, Aloe Vera, Daun Salam, Curcuma, Ginger, Betel Leaf and Alpinia galanga. As a control, which is used Amphicillin, β lactam antibiotic class. The method used to determine the diameter of inhibition area of medicinal plant extracts is paper diffusion method. The results showed that all medicinal plants can inhibit bacterial growth of MRSA strains characterized by the inhibition zone formed on each treatment. The ability of garlic and turmeric extract better than Amphicillin and other medicinal plants to inhibit bacterial growth of MRSA strains. Kata kunci: inhibit,  growth, bacteria, methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA

  19. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from food and wild animal carcasses in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversa, A; Gariano, G R; Gallina, S; Bianchi, D M; Orusa, R; Domenis, L; Cavallerio, P; Fossati, L; Serra, R; Decastelli, L

    2015-12-01

    Following the detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 in food-producing animals, both livestock and wildlife, and derived products, are considered potential sources of MRSA in humans. There is a paucity of data on MRSA in foods in Italy, and the data regarding wild animals are particularly scarce. A total of 2162 food samples collected during official monitoring activities in 2008 were analyzed for the detection of S. aureus. Also, samples from 1365 wild animals collected by the National Reference Center for Wild Animal Diseases in 2003-2009 were subjected to anatomopathological examination. S. aureus isolates were processed for phenotypic and molecular methicillin resistance determinations. S. aureus was found in 2.0% of wild animal carcasses and in 3.2% of wild boar lymph nodes: none showed methicillin resistance. The prevalence of S. aureus in food was 17.1%. Two MRSA strains, both from bulk tank milk (prevalence 0.77%) were isolated: the strains were resistant to tetracycline, had spa-type t899, and were negative for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene. The low prevalence of MRSA suggests that the risk of transmission to humans via food is limited. However, attention should be paid to the cattle food chain, which may be a potential route of transmission of LA-MRSA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization and lytic activity of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA phages isolated from NICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnar Rahimzadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a well-known pathogen that causes serious diseases in humans. As part of the efforts to control this pathogen, an isolated bacteriophage, Siphoviridae, which specifically targets Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, was characterized. Aims The objective of this study was to characterize of a virulent bacteriophage (Siphoviridae isolated from a NICU bathroom sink. Methods The MRSA strain was isolated from patient blood. The isolated strain was confirmed as MRSA using conventional methods. Phages were isolated from a NICU bathroom sink and activity was lytic as determined by spot test. Titer phage lysate was measured by the Double Layer Agar (DLA technique. The morphology was found with electron microscopy. The single-step growth curve was plotted. Results Electron microscopy showed the phage as a member of the family Siphoviridae, serogroup A and F. The isolated phage was capable of lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strain as shown by spot test. By DLA, the titre of the phages was determined to be 10×108PFU/ml. The single-step growth curve showed that the latent period of the isolated bacteriophage was 30 min and the total number of viable progeny per infected host, burst size, was 2600 PFU/infected host. Conclusion In this study, two phages were isolated and characterized from a NICU bathroom sink, from the Siphoviridae family, which specifically targetsmethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA.

  1. Laboratory evaluation of phenotypic detection methods of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kali, Arunava; Stephen, Selvaraj; Umadevi, Sivaraman

    2014-01-01

    Although conventional antibiotic susceptibility tests are most commonly performed for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the results of these phenotypic tests are dependent on the standardization of the culture conditions. The aim of the study was to evaluate the conventional phenotypic screening tests in comparison to the mecA gene polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One hundred and two clinical isolates of MRSA identified by the oxacillin disk diffusion were subjected to PCR for the mecA gene and by the cefoxitin disk diffusion test and culture on oxacillin screen agar, mannitol salt agar, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Agar (MeReSA) selective medium, for MRSA. Although all 102 isolates were resistant in oxacillin and cefoxitin disk diffusion, 92 (90.1%) isolates were positive for the mecA gene. The sensitivities of the mannitol salt agar, MeReSA agar, and oxacillin screen agar were 89.13, 97.82, and 98.91%, respectively. The oxacillin screen agar may be recommended for confirming methicillin resistance in the disk diffusion test in resource-poor settings, where molecular methods are not available.

  2. Isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. from ready-to-eat fish products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergelidis, D; Abrahim, A; Papadopoulos, T; Soultos, N; Martziou, E; Koulourida, V; Govaris, A; Pexara, A; Zdragas, A; Papa, A

    2014-11-01

    A hundred samples from ready-to-eat (RTE) fish products were examined for the presence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus spp. Staphylococci were isolated from 43% of these samples (n = 100). The identified species in the samples were Staphylococcus aureus (7%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (13%), Staphylococcus xylosus (12%), Staphylococcus sciuri (4%), Staphylococcus warneri (3%), Staphylococcus saprophyticus (2%), Staphylococcus schleiferi (1%) and Staphylococcus auricularis (1%). Two Staph. aureus (MRSA) isolates, three Staph. epidermidis (MRSE), five Staph. xylosus, four Staph. sciuri, one Staph. schleiferi and one Staph. saprophyticus isolates were resistant to oxacillin and all of them carried the mecA gene. The two MRSA isolates belonged to the spa types t316 (ST359) and t548 (ST5) and none of them was able to produce enterotoxins. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis for Staph. aureus and Staph. epidermidis isolates revealed 6 and 11 distinct PFGE types, respectively, reflecting diversity. The presence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci, especially MRSA and MRSE, in RTE fish products may constitute a potential health risk for consumers. This study provides the first data on the occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci in salted and smoked fish products in Greece. These results are important and useful for Staphylococcus spp. risk assessment and management programmes for ready-to-eat fish products. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Genotypic Diversity of Methicillin-Resistant Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci Isolated from Inpatients and Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Malihe; Shafiee, Mohammad; Sadeghi, Javad; Moghadam, Nasrin Asghari; Saifi, Mahnaz; Pourshafie, Mohammad R

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the prevalence of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) isolated from hospitalized patients and outpatients (OP). Out of 350 staphylococcal isolates collected from three hospitals, 190 were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). These isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility tests, detection of mecA, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. Among the 190 isolated CoNS, Staphylococcus epidermidis (47.3%) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (44.2%) were the most prevalent species. Other CoNS species that were isolated were Staphylococcus saprophyticus (2.1%), Staphylococcus warneri (2.1%), Staphylococcus simulans (1.6%), Staphylococcus capitis (1.1%), Staphylococcus schleiferi (1.1%), and Staphylococcus hominis (0.5%). The rate of resistance to methicillin was 60% with 58 (50%) S. epidermidis and 55 (49%) S. haemolyticus. The rate of resistance to 13 antibiotics tested with the lowest and highest to chloramphenicol and penicillin, respectively. High clonal diversity with different PFGE patterns was obtained for methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus by 32 and 31 types, respectively. Our results indicated that the dissemination of MRCoNS is widespread in Tehran. The majority of these isolates showed distinct genotyping patterns. At the same time, the common patterns were found among the MRCoNS obtained from outpatient and inpatient isolates, suggestive of an epidemiological link.

  4. The epidemiology and molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant staphylococci sampled from a healthy Jordanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bakri, A G; Al-Hadithi, H; Kasabri, V; Othman, G; Kriegeskorte, A; Becker, K

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of natural carriage and molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS) isolates in a Jordanian community were investigated. The MRSA nasal carriage rate in 227 healthy volunteers was 7·5% and the majority (81%) of MRSA harboured the resistance element SCCmec type IVe and were of a novel spa type t9519 (76%); other significant spa gene types were t223 (14·7%) and t044 (5·9%). All MRSA isolates were susceptible to other classes of antibiotics, and tested positive for at least three virulence factor encoding genes, but only two harboured the pvl gene. MR-CoNS carriage was 54·2% and these isolates were characterized by single, double and untypable SCCmec elements, with Staphylococcus epidermidis SCCmec type IVa predominating. Of eight subjects with nasal co-colonization of MR-CoNS + MRSA, three shared SCCmec type IV in both groups of organisms. This is the first report of methicillin-resistant staphylococci carriage in a Jordanian community and its findings are important for epidemiological study and infection control measures of these organisms.

  5. Phenotypic evaluation of biofilm producing ability in Methicillin resistant Staphylococ¬cus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Moori-Bakhtiari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Like genomic changes, the ability for biofilm production is considered as one of the antibiotic resistant factors in bacteria which can cause recurrent infections. The infection resulted from Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus is the most common form of such complications manifested as recurrent infections. The aim of this study was to investigate biofilm production ability among isolated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in patients with different types of clinical infection. Material and Methods: Fifty Staphylococcus aureus strains were isolated from different specimens and identified by biochemical and species-specific PCR tests. Methicillin- resistance specificity of isolates was confirmed by disk diffusion method and mecA gene presence; the biofilm- forming ability was evaluated by crystal violet microtiter plate assay and Congo red agar (CRA. Results: Using turbidimetry with no acetic acid, the ability for biofim production was seen at 550 and 492 nm in 34 (68% and 28 isolates (56%, respectively. In both methods, the most of isolates were weak biofilm producers. In CRA, 94% of isolates were biofilm producers which most (72.3% of them were moderate producers. Conclusions: While with the consideration of three studied methods high percentages of isolates were biofilm producers and despite the significant correlation seen between their results, there was a higher correlation coefficient between the results obtained from crystalviolet-treated microtiter plates with two reading methods.

  6. Laboratory evaluation of phenotypic detection methods of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunava Kali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Although conventional antibiotic susceptibility tests are most commonly performed for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, the results of these phenotypic tests are dependent on the standardization of the culture conditions. The aim of the study was to evaluate the conventional phenotypic screening tests in comparison to the mecA gene polymerase chain reaction (PCR. One hundred and two clinical isolates of MRSA identified by the oxacillin disk diffusion were subjected to PCR for the mecA gene and by the cefoxitin disk diffusion test and culture on oxacillin screen agar, mannitol salt agar, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Agar (MeReSA selective medium, for MRSA. Although all 102 isolates were resistant in oxacillin and cefoxitin disk diffusion, 92 (90.1% isolates were positive for the mecA gene. The sensitivities of the mannitol salt agar, MeReSA agar, and oxacillin screen agar were 89.13, 97.82, and 98.91%, respectively. The oxacillin screen agar may be recommended for confirming methicillin resistance in the disk diffusion test in resource-poor settings, where molecular methods are not available.

  7. A laboratory study of susceptibility of methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhari, M.H.; Iqbal, N.; Naeem, S.; Qureshi, G.R.; Naveed, I.A.; Iqbal, A.; Khatoon, N.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the mode of infection, incidence of methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and their susceptibility against glycopeptides and fucidic acid, so that awareness may be created for consultants against such notorious rapidly spreading bacteria and recommendation can be made for their prevention and control. Methods: The specimens from various infections suspected on clinical ground were processed by standard methods and antibiotic susceptibility testing of all the 350 S. aureus and 135 MRSA isolates was done by using modified Kirby Bauer Disc diffusion technique. Results: Of 350 positive S.aureus cultures, 135 were found to be Methicillin resistant (38.5%) which showed susceptibility 96%, 94% and 86% to Vancomycin, Teicoplanin and Fucidic acid respectively. Conclusion: This study showed a high incidence of MRSA at Mayo Hospital Lahore, Glycopeptides and Fucidic acid were found to be valuable antibiotics against MRSA. (author)

  8. Enhanced adherence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius sequence type 71 to canine and human corneocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latronico, Francesca; Moodley, Arshnee; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2014-01-01

    adherence properties between MRSP and methicillin-susceptible (MSSP) strains. Four MRSP, including a human and a canine strain belonging to ST71 and two canine non-ST71 strains, and three genetically unrelated MSSP were tested on corneocytes collected from five dogs and six humans. All strains were fully......The recent worldwide spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) in dogs is a reason for concern due to the typical multidrug resistance patterns displayed by some MRSP lineages such as sequence type (ST) 71. The objective of this study was to compare the in vitro....... pseudintermedius adherence to canine corneocytes was significantly higher compared to human corneocytes (p human origin adhered equally well to canine and human corneocytes, suggesting that MRSP ST71 may be able to adapt to human skin. The genetic basis of the enhanced...

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection risks from companion animals: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petinaki E

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Efthimia Petinaki,1 Iris Spiliopoulou21Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, University of Thessalia, Larissa, 2Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Patras, GreeceAbstract: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA remains one of the most virulent human pathogens and has also recently been recognized as such in the veterinary settings. Companion animals, including dogs, cats, horses, small exotic animals, wildlife animals, and livestock, may constitute a reservoir for MRSA transmission to humans and vice versa. The evolution, emergence, and risk factors for MRSA transmission among colonized or infected animals are reviewed in the present paper, and infection control practices are discussed.Keywords: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, companion animals, close contacts

  10. Identification and Assessment of the Behavior of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci in Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinka, Izabela

    2018-03-22

    This study was carried out with the aim of identifying and assessing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) during lactic acid cheese storage. The study involved 30 assortments of lactic acid cheese and 21 cheeses with S. aureus TWP11616 (MRSA). Results showed low MRSA contamination levels in lactic acid cheese. The majority of cow and goat lactic acid cheese samples (more than 72%) were characterized by a low level of MRSA (≤10 CFU/g). With regard to cow and sheep lactic acid cheese, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. contamination levels of ≥100 CFU/g were found in 88 and 100% of samples, respectively. The microbial dynamics of MRSA changes in lactic acid cheese suggest a significant reduction in contamination levels after 4 days of product storage, and this decrease is likely not dependent on the type of packaging method.

  11. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus lugdunensis carrying SCCmec type V misidentified as MRSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliezer Menezes Pereira

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a rare cause of severe infections and clinical manifestations are similar to those related to S. aureus infection. We describe a hospital-acquired bacteremia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus lugdunensis, misidentified as methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The oxacillin MIC was 16 µg/mL and the mecA gene and SCCmec type V were determined by PCR. Although treatment had been appropriated, the patient died after rapid progressive respiratory failure and another nosocomial sepsis. It is important not only to identify S. lugdunensis in view of its clinical course, but also to determine its susceptibility to oxacillin by detecting the mecA gene or its product.

  12. Reconsidering contact precautions for endemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Daniel J; Murthy, Rekha; Munoz-Price, L Silvia; Barnden, Marsha; Camins, Bernard C; Johnston, B Lynn; Rubin, Zachary; Sullivan, Kaede V; Shane, Andi L; Dellinger, E Patchen; Rupp, Mark E; Bearman, Gonzalo

    2015-10-01

    Whether contact precautions (CP) are required to control the endemic transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) in acute care hospitals is controversial in light of improvements in hand hygiene, MRSA decolonization, environmental cleaning and disinfection, fomite elimination, and chlorhexidine bathing. To provide a framework for decision making around use of CP for endemic MRSA and VRE based on a summary of evidence related to use of CP, including impact on patients and patient care processes, and current practices in use of CP for MRSA and VRE in US hospitals. A literature review, a survey of Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Research Network members on use of CP, and a detailed examination of the experience of a convenience sample of hospitals not using CP for MRSA or VRE. Hospital epidemiologists and infection prevention experts. No high quality data support or reject use of CP for endemic MRSA or VRE. Our survey found more than 90% of responding hospitals currently use CP for MRSA and VRE, but approximately 60% are interested in using CP in a different manner. More than 30 US hospitals do not use CP for control of endemic MRSA or VRE. Higher quality research on the benefits and harms of CP in the control of endemic MRSA and VRE is needed. Until more definitive data are available, the use of CP for endemic MRSA or VRE in acute care hospitals should be guided by local needs and resources.

  13. Inducible clindamycin and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a tertiary care hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, R P; Shrestha, S; Barakoti, A; Amatya, R

    2017-07-11

    Staphylococcus aureus, an important nosocomial pathogen, is frequently associated with infections in human. The management of the infections by it especially methicillin resistant ones is often difficult because methicillin resistant S. aureus is usually resistant to multiple antibiotics. Macrolide-lincosamide streptogramin B family of antibiotics is commonly used to treat such infections as an alternative to vancomycin. This study was conducted over the period of one and half year from November 2013-April 2015 in Microbiology laboratory of Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal to find the incidence of different phenotypes of MLS B resistance among S. aureus from clinical samples and their association with methicillin resistance. Two hundred seventy isolates of S. aureus were included in the study. Methicillin resistance was detected by cefoxitin disc diffusion method and inducible clindamycin resistance by erythromycin and clindamycin disc approximation test (D-test). Of the 270 clinical isolates of S. aureus, 25.1% (68/270) were MRSA. Erythromycin and clindamycin resistance was seen in 54.4% (147/270) and 41.8% (113/270) isolates respectively. Resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin were higher in MRSA as compared to MSSA (erythromycin-resistance: 88.2% Vs 39.1% and clindamycin-resistance: 79.4% Vs 41.8%). The overall prevalence of i MLS B and c MLS B phenotype was 11.48% (31/270) and 29.25% (79/270) respectively. Both i MLS B and c MLS B phenotypes predominated in MRSA strains. Detection rate of MRSA in our study shows the necessity to improve in healthcare practices and to formulate new policy for the control of MRSA infections. Clindamycin resistance in the form of i MLS B and c MLS B especially among MRSA emphasizes the need of D-test to be performed routinely in our set up while using clindamycin as an alternative choice to anti-staphylococcal antibiotics like vancomycin and linezolid in the treatment of staphylococcal infections.

  14. Activity of Tedizolid in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Experimental Foreign Body-Associated Osteomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Kyung-Hwa; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Mandrekar, Jayawant; Patel, Robin

    2016-01-01

    We compared tedizolid alone and tedizolid with rifampin to rifampin and vancomycin plus rifampin in a rat model of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) foreign body-associated osteomyelitis. The study strain was a prosthetic joint infection-associated isolate. Steady-state pharmacokinetics for intraperitoneal administration of tedizolid, vancomycin, and rifampin were determined in uninfected rats. MRSA was inoculated into the proximal tibia, and a wire was implanted. Four weeks ...

  15. Prevalence of Methicillin?Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Equine Nasopharyngeal and Guttural Pouch Wash Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, A.G.; Rankin, S.C.; Duffee, L.A.; Morris, D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Methicillin?resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is recognized as a cause of nosocomial infections in both human and veterinary medicine. Studies that examine the nasopharynx and guttural pouches of the horse as carriage sites for MRSA have not been reported. Hypothesis/Objective MRSA colonizes the nasopharynx and guttural pouch of horses. To determine the prevalence of MRSA in equine nasopharyngeal wash (NPW) and guttural pouch lavage (GPL) samples in a field population of horse...

  16. Ceftaroline Fosamil for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Pulmonary Exacerbation in a Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Molloy, Leah; Snyder, Ashley Hall; Srivastava, Ruma; Rybak, Michael J.; McGrath, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Ceftaroline, an advanced generation cephalosporin with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), may present a new therapeutic alternative for treating lung infections among patients with cystic fibrosis. We report a case of ceftaroline therapy in a pediatric patient with cystic fibrosis, whose dose was increased from 9.7 mg/kg/dose every 12 hours to 10.8 mg/kg/dose every 8 hours by using pharmacokinetic analyses.

  17. Ceftaroline Fosamil for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Pulmonary Exacerbation in a Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Leah; Snyder, Ashley Hall; Srivastava, Ruma; Rybak, Michael J; McGrath, Eric

    2014-04-01

    Ceftaroline, an advanced generation cephalosporin with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), may present a new therapeutic alternative for treating lung infections among patients with cystic fibrosis. We report a case of ceftaroline therapy in a pediatric patient with cystic fibrosis, whose dose was increased from 9.7 mg/kg/dose every 12 hours to 10.8 mg/kg/dose every 8 hours by using pharmacokinetic analyses.

  18. Antibacterial activity of Thai medicinal plants against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomnawang, Mullika Traidej; Surassmo, Suvimol; Wongsariya, Karn; Bunyapraphatsara, Nuntavan

    2009-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major nosocomial pathogen which causes severe morbidity and mortality worldwide. Seventeen Thai medicinal plants were investigated for their activity against MRSA. Garcinia mangostana was identified as the most potent plant, and its activity was traced to the prenylated xanthone, alpha-mangostin (MIC and MBC values of 1.95 and 3.91 microg/ml, respectively).

  19. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection risks from companion animals: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Petinaki E; Spiliopoulou I

    2015-01-01

    Efthimia Petinaki,1 Iris Spiliopoulou21Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, University of Thessalia, Larissa, 2Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Patras, GreeceAbstract: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains one of the most virulent human pathogens and has also recently been recognized as such in the veterinary settings. Companion animals, including dogs, cats, horses, small exotic animals, wildlife animals, and livestock, may...

  20. Rapid Increase of Genetically Diverse Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Boye, Kit; Larsen, Anders Rhod

    2007-01-01

    In Copenhagen, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) accounted for <15 isolates per year during 1980-2002. However, since 2003 an epidemic increase has been observed, with 33 MRSA cases in 2003 and 110 in 2004. We analyzed these 143 cases epidemiologically and characterized isolates ...... and soft tissue infections dominated. CO-MRSA with diverse genetic backgrounds is rapidly emerging in a low MRSA prevalence area. Udgivelsesdato: October...

  1. Methods of detection and typing of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work there was evaluated the method of detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA by using two molecular and three phenotypic tests in investigation procedure of 70 strains of S.aureus isolated from animals. Recent findings of the new mecA homologue, mecALGA251, minimise the significance of mecA gene presence detection as a confirmation method of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus identification. For this reason, along with multiplex PCR set of primers(165rDNK, nuc, mecA for detection mecA gene, there was also used multiplex PCR set of primers (spa, mecA, pvl, mecALGA251 for differentiation mecALGA251 from mecA, with simultaneous detection of luk-PV and spa gene fragments. In all 70 investigated isolates there was detected the presence of specific 16 SrDNK fragment and nuc gene which encodes a thermostable S. aureus nuclease, while in 5 out of 70 S. aureus isolates, there was proven mecA gene presence using two multiplex PCR tests. In the investigated strains there was determined neither mecC (mecALGA251gene presence, nor Panton Valentine Leukocidin encoding gene. By application cefoxitin disk-diffusion, latex-agglutination and two multiplex PCR tests, the identical results in identification 5 methicillin resistant out of 70 investigated S. aureus strains were obtained. In our investigation there was determined a complete correlation between the results of phenotypic and genotypic identification of methicillin resistant S. aureus. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31079

  2. The Costs and Consequences of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection Treatments in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew J Rosner; Debbie L Becker; Angelina H Wong; Elizabeth Miller; John M Conly

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A multinational randomized controlled trial has shown a trend toward early discharge of patients taking oral linezolid versus intravenous vancomycin (IV) in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Infection treatments resulting in shorter hospitalization durations are associated with cost savings from the hospital perspective.OBJECTIVE: To determine whether similar economic advantages are associated with oral linezolid, the costs and consequ...

  3. Interpretation of Epithelial Lining Fluid Concentrations of Antibiotics against Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Kiem, Sungmin; Schentag, Jerome J

    2014-01-01

    Although antibiotics whose epithelial lining fluid (ELF) concentrations are reported high tend to be preferred in treatment of pneumonia, measurement of ELF concentrations of antibiotics could be misled by contamination from lysis of ELF cells and technical errors of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). In this review, ELF concentrations of anti-methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) antibiotics were interpreted considering above confounding factors. An equation used to explain antibioti...

  4. Are toilet seats a vector for transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Mary Anne; Nance, Donna; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2010-01-01

    We studied the bacterial burden on toilet seats in a children's cancer hospital to validate a policy requesting that immunocompromised children use alcohol wipes on the seats prior to use of the toilets. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was recovered from 3.3% of hospital toilets when wipes were not in use. Use of wipes resulted in a 50-fold reduction in mean daily bacterial counts and eliminated MRSA. PMID:19243856

  5. Strategies for Prevention of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infections and Decolonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Ashlesha; Wagner, Cassie; Consoer, Hollie; Chatterjee, Archana

    2016-12-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) invasive infections can be severe in the pediatric population with high morbidity and mortality. MRSA colonization can predispose to recurrent skin and soft tissue infections and invasive MRSA disease and is a frequent challenge faced by clinicians. This article reviews the importance of MRSA as a pathogen, MRSA colonization and various MRSA decolonization strategies. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

  6. Rising Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Ear, Nose, and Throat Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha Thirumazhisi Sachithanandam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections (MRSA in ENT diseases is becoming a big clinical concern. Here two patients are described who developed MRSA infections presented with unusual post-FESS epistaxis and postmastoidectomy perichondrial abscess and failed treatment with broad spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Following treatment with oral linezolid combined with local mupirocin dressing both patients fully recovered.

  7. [The HVR genotypes and their relationship with the resistance of methicillin-resistant staphylococci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, F; Fan, X; Lü, X; Feng, P

    2001-06-01

    To investigate the HVR-PCR genotype of methicillin-resistant Staphylococci in local hospitals and compare it with the antibiograms, with aview to selecting effective antibacterial agents, moreover, to discuss preliminarily its role in molecular epidemiology. The minimal inhibitory concentrations(MICs) of 86 MRSA, 10 MRSE(Mc'S. epidemidis), 5 MSSE(Mc'S. epidemidis), 8 MRSH(Mc'S. haemolyticus) and 5 MSSH(Mc'S. haemolyticus) clinical isolates collected from 4 local hospitals were tested by serial two-fold agar dilution method; their DNA were extracted by moved basic lytic method, whose polymerase chain reaction(PCR) products amplified, based on the size of mec-associated hypervariable region(HVR) were analyzed by PAG vertical and agarose gel electrophoresis. MRSA, MRSE and MRSH were grouped into 4, 3 and 2 HVR genotypes respectively according to the size of the PCR products. The PCR products amplified from 9 of 10 MRSE isolates were the same as the products amplified from MRSA isolates. MRSA strains in this study were mainly HVR genotypes A and D, which accounted for 52.32% and 39.53%; Genotypes B and C were the most multi-drug resistant, but genotype D was multi-sensitive. The I genotype of MRSE was multi-drug resistant, but its genotype III was multi-drug sensitive. The genotype a of MRSH was more resistant than genotype b. These results suggest that HVR-PCR genotype method is an easy and fast method for epidemiological investigation of nosocomial infections caused by MRSA, and it is helpful for clinical selection of antibacterial agents. This method can compare the mec determinants of MRSA and Mc'CNSt isolates and hence to search for the origin of the mec determinant.

  8. Phenotypic Resistance to Disinfectants and Antibiotics in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espigares, E; Moreno Roldan, E; Espigares, M; Abreu, R; Castro, B; Dib, A L; Arias, Á

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this research was to study the phenotypic resistances to disinfectants and antibiotics in strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) obtained from Canary black pigs. Analyses were performed on 54 strains of MRSA, isolated in Canary black pigs from the province of Tenerife (Spain); all of them carried the mecA gene. The strains were isolated by means of nasal swab samples of healthy pigs, collected under veterinarian supervision. Bactericidal activity of antiseptics and disinfectants was tested by means of the dilution-neutralization method. Susceptibility to the disinfectants glutaraldehyde, peracetic acid and silver nitrate was assessed, as well as to the antiseptics chlorhexidine, benzalkonium chloride and povidone iodine. Susceptibility to a wide array of antibiotics representing the main groups was determined by means of the disc diffusion method. All the strains demonstrated susceptibility to the disinfectants tested at the recommended concentration, and even to dilutions equal to or lesser than 1/16. The most effective antiseptic and disinfectant were, respectively, chlorhexidine and silver nitrate. With regard to the antibiotics, the strains proved to be multiresistant. All presented phenotypic resistance to the β-lactam antibiotics ampicillin, penicillin and cefoxitin, as well as to numerous aminoglycosides, tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. It was also observed that 61.1% of the strains were carriers of plasmids. Our results underline that in the strains such as MRSA, which show multiple resistances to antibiotics, the antiseptics and disinfectants show great efficacy. Moreover, as other authors also suggest, for the treatment and prevention of infections caused by MRSA, the use of β-lactam and aminoglycoside antibiotics may be less effective. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. PCR detection of indicator genes in methicillin-resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MRSA) isolated from three Saudi hospitals. ... Resistance towards eight antimicrobial agents revealed that most of the tested strains of Staphylococcus aureus showed resistance to the tested antimicrobials in the following order; Oxacillin 100% ...

  10. Marinopyrrole derivatives as potential antibiotic agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chunwei; Liu, Yan; Song, Hao; Pan, Lili; Li, Jerry; Qin, Yong; Li, Rongshi

    2013-08-15

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a major problem, causing severe and intractable infections worldwide. MRSA is resistant to all beta-lactam antibiotics, and alternative treatments are limited. A very limited number of new antibiotics have been discovered over the last half-century, novel agents for the treatment of MRSA infections are urgently needed. Marinopyrrole A was reported to show antibiotic activity against MRSA in 2008. After we reported the first total synthesis of (±)-marinopyrrole A, we designed and synthesized a series of marinopyrrole derivatives. Our structure activity relationship (SAR) studies of these novel derivatives against a panel of Gram-positive pathogens in antibacterial assays have revealed that a para-trifluoromethyl analog (33) of marinopyrrole A is ≥ 63-, 8-, and 4-fold more potent than vancomycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA, respectively. The results provide valuable information in the search for new-generation antibiotics.

  11. Prevalence and Molecular Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Foods of Animal Origin, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siiriken, Belgin; Yildirim, Tuba; Güney, Akif Koray; Erol, Irfan; Durupinar, Belma

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, 175 coagulase-positive Staphylococcus (CPS) isolates recovered from samples of beef (n = 110), raw milk n = 56), and fish (n = 9) were analyzed for methicillin resistance using MIC and PCR assays. Methicillin-resistant (MR) Staphylococcus aureus (SA) isolates were then characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). According to findings, 62 (35.4%) of the isolates (44 from beef, 9 from milk, and 9 from fish) were identified as S. aureus based on the presence of the nuc gene. MRCPS was detected in 18 (10.3%) of 175 CPS isolates based on the presence of the mecA gene. Among these isolates, 15 (24.2%) were MRSA: 4 (26.7%) from beef, 2 (13.3%) from milk, and 9 (60%) from fish. However, based on the MIC assay, 21 (12.0%) of the CPS isolates (1 from beef, 15 from milk, and 5 from fish) were MRCPS, indicating a discrepancy between the results of these two methods. The PFGE results indicated genetic heterogeneity of the isolates; six PFGE clusters were found. These results confirm that MRSA is present in foods of animal origin, which is a concern to human health, and indicate the importance of method selection for determination of methicillin resistance. The identity of MR isolates should be verified by PCR to obtain more reliable results.

  12. Clinical significance of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci obtained from sterile specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Masato; Izumikawa, Koichi; Ashizawa, Nobuyuki; Narukawa, Munetoshi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Distinguishing true coagulase-negative staphylococci bacteremia from contamination remains a challenge. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 183 patients with methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS)-positive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-positive cultures obtained from sterile sites such as blood, synovial fluid, ascitic fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid. Of the 209 MR-CoNS isolates, 83 (39.7%) were considered infection associated, and 126 (60.3%) were considered contamination. MR-CoNS isolates cultured from synovial fluid were more likely to be infection associated (P = 0.009). The median interval from insertion of a central venous catheter to onset of infection tended to be longer in MR-CoNS infection cases than in methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection cases (41 days versus 14 days, P = 0.055). In conclusion, our results suggest that the proportion of cases of true MR-CoNS infection may be higher than previously reported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative analysis of phenotypic and genotypic detection of methicillin resistance among Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulin Demir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen causing a wide range of infections ranging from mild skin and soft tissue infections to severe, life-threatening infections. Accuracy in the detection of methicillin resistance is important to avoid treatment failures. The aim of this study was to compare the results of phenotypic and genotypic test methods to detect methicillin resistance and also to determine the antimicrobial susceptibilities. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and forty-two S. aureus strains isolated from skin and soft tissue samples were analyzed for methicillin resistance using oxacillin and cefoxitin disk diffusion (DD, oxacillin screen agar test, cefoxitin E-test, and mecA gene polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: 77 of 242 S. aureus isolates were mecA positive. Oxacillin, cefoxitin DD, oxacillin screen agar test and cefoxitin E-test exhibited sensitivities as 98.7%, 98.7%, 100%, 100%, and specificities as 96.9%, 97.5%, 96.9%, 97.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Results of oxacillin screen agar and cefoxitin DD test were in concordance with mecA gene PCR. Thus, it is determined that especially cefoxitin test can be an alternative to PCR in routine.

  14. Marinopyrrole Derivatives as Potential Antibiotic Agents against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongshi Li

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA continues to be a major problem, causing severe and intractable infections worldwide. MRSA is resistant to all beta-lactam antibiotics, and alternative treatments are limited. A very limited number of new antibiotics have been discovered over the last half-century, novel agents for the treatment of MRSA infections are urgently needed. Marinopyrrole A was reported to show antibiotic activity against MRSA in 2008. After we reported the first total synthesis of (±-marinopyrrole A, we designed and synthesized a series of marinopyrrole derivatives. Our structure activity relationship (SAR studies of these novel derivatives against a panel of Gram-positive pathogens in antibacterial assays have revealed that a para-trifluoromethyl analog (33 of marinopyrrole A is ≥63-, 8-, and 4-fold more potent than vancomycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE, methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA, respectively. The results provide valuable information in the search for new-generation antibiotics.

  15. Effect of Allium sativum Extract on Erythromycin and Methicillin Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Hospital Operating Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramezan Ali Ataee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to evaluate antibacterial effect of Allium sativum, garlic extract onerythromycin and methicillin resistant bacteria isolated from an operating room in a teaching hospitalin Tehran, I.R. Iran.Methods: The antibacterial effect of garlic extract was investigated on 70 bacterial strains. Theselected isolates were resistant to erythromycin and or methicillin, which were isolated from anoperating room. Antibiotic sensitivity was done using an agar well diffusion procedure and either amicro dilution method. Each of the bacterial strains were exposed to concentrations of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20and 24 µg/ml of garlic extract, separately. The growth rate of the strains was determined bymeasurement of the inhibition zone diameter, colony count and either by measurement of the opticaldensity.Results: The results showed that 70 (100% of the strains in agar well diffusion method were sensitiveto 4- 12 µg/ml of garlic extract with MIC 8 µg/ml. While, the results of micro dilution method showedthat 40 out of 70 strains were MIC ≥ 12 µg/ml for GE.Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that the MIC and minimum bactericidal concentrationof garlic extract were 8 µg/ml and 16 µg/ml, respectively. These finding indicated that garlic extractinhibit the growth of erythromycin and methicillin resistant bacterial strains.

  16. Effect of Allium sativum Extract on Erythromycin and Methicillin Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Hospital Operating Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramezan Ali Ataee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:   This study aimed to evaluate antibacterial effect of Allium sativum, garlic extract on erythromycin and methicillin resistant bacteria isolated from an operating room in a teaching hospital in Tehran, I.R. Iran.Methods:   The antibacterial effect of garlic extract was investigated on 70 bacterial strains. The selected isolates were resistant to erythromycin and or methicillin, which were isolated from an operating room. Antibiotic sensitivity was done using an agar well diffusion procedure and either a micro dilution method. Each of the bacterial strains were exposed to concentrations of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 µg/ml of garlic extract, separately. The growth rate of the strains was determined by measurement of the inhibition zone diameter, colony count and either by measurement of the optical density.Results:   The results showed that 70 (100% of the strains in agar well diffusion method were sensitive to 4- 12 µg/ml of garlic extract with MIC 8 µg/ml. While, the results of micro dilution method showed that 40 out of 70 strains were MIC ≥ 12 µg/ml for GE.Conclusion:   The results of this study indicated that the MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration of garlic extract were 8 µg/ml and 16 µg/ml, respectively. These finding indicated that garlic extract inhibit the growth of erythromycin and methicillin resistant bacterial strains. 

  17. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All MRSA isolates were resistant to cotrimoxazole, and 74% were resistant to ≥5 classes of antibiotics; all retained susceptibility to vancomycin. Conclusions. A high prevalence of multidrug-resistant MRSA nasal carriage was found. Studies are needed to validate nosocomial acquisition and to evaluate the impact of MRSA ...

  18. Tandem Amplification of the Staphylococcal Cassette ChromosomemecElement Can Drive High-Level Methicillin Resistance in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Laura A; Coughlan, Simone; Black, Nikki S; Lalor, Pierce; Waters, Elaine M; Wee, Bryan; Watson, Mick; Downing, Tim; Fitzgerald, J Ross; Fleming, Gerard T A; O'Gara, James P

    2017-09-01

    Hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains typically express high-level, homogeneous (HoR) β-lactam resistance, whereas community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) more commonly express low-level heterogeneous (HeR) resistance. Expression of the HoR phenotype typically requires both increased expression of the mecA gene, carried on the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCC mec ), and additional mutational event(s) elsewhere on the chromosome. Here the oxacillin concentration in a chemostat culture of the CA-MRSA strain USA300 was increased from 8 μg/ml to 130 μg/ml over 13 days to isolate highly oxacillin-resistant derivatives. A stable, small-colony variant, designated HoR34, which had become established in the chemostat culture was found to have acquired mutations in gdpP , clpX , guaA , and camS Closer inspection of the genome sequence data further revealed that reads covering SCC mec were ∼10 times overrepresented compared to other parts of the chromosome. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) confirmed >10-fold-higher levels of mecA DNA on the HoR34 chromosome, and MinION genome sequencing verified the presence of 10 tandem repeats of the SCC mec element. qPCR further demonstrated that subculture of HoR34 in various concentrations of oxacillin (0 to 100 μg/ml) was accompanied by accordion-like contraction and amplification of the SCC mec element. Although slower growing than strain USA300, HoR34 outcompeted the parent strain in the presence of subinhibitory oxacillin. These data identify tandem amplification of the SCC mec element as a new mechanism of high-level methicillin resistance in MRSA, which may provide a competitive advantage for MRSA under antibiotic selection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Detection of Integrons and Staphylococcal Cassette ChromosomemecTypes in Clinical Methicillin-resistant Coagulase Negative Staphylococci Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiahmadi, Fahimeh; Ghale, Elham Salimi; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Mordadi, Alireza; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza

    2017-02-01

    Integrons are thought to play an important role in the spread of antibiotic resistance. This study investigates class 1 and 2 integron-positive methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci strains isolated in Iran and characterizes their patterns of antimicrobial resistance. Hundred clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci were characterized for integron content and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type. Sixteen isolates carried class 1 ( intI1 ) integrons and four isolates carried class 2 ( intI2 ) integrons. One resistance gene array was identified among the class 1 integrons ( aadA1 cassette). The distribution of SCCmec types in 50 methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci strains showed that SCCmec types III and V dominated among the tested strains. This is the first report of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci strains that carry two mobile genetic elements, including class 1 and 2 integrons and SCCmec, in Iran.

  20. Reversion of antibiotic resistance by inhibiting mecA in clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococci by antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jingru; He, Gonghao; Wang, Hui; Jia, Min; Ma, Xue; Da, Fei; Wang, Ning; Hou, Zheng; Xue, Xiaoyan; Li, Mingkai; Zhou, Ying; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2015-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococci (MRS), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) have become a challenging problem in nosocomial infections and are connected with high morbidity and mortality rates. This is due to the increasing incidence of resistance to virtually all β-lactams and a wide variety of antimicrobials. The spread of MRS severely limits therapeutic options and generates the need for novel antibiotics that are able to combat MRS infections. One method of inhibiting bacterial growth is by blocking the expression of conserved bacterial genes and provides potential new avenues for generating a new generation of antimicrobials. The mecA gene is highly conserved among Staphylococcal species, and this makes it an ideal target for antisense inhibition. We had identified a target sequence (854-871 nt) within the mecA mRNA coding region that is particularly sensitive to antisense inhibition. The anti-mecA PS-ODN04 oligonucleotide was encapsulated into an anionic liposome. MRSA01 and MRSE01 clinical strains treated with this antisense sequence became susceptible to existing β-lactam antibiotics, and their growth was inhibited by oxacillin in vitro and in vivo. PS-ODN04 reduced the bacterial titers in the blood of mice infected with MRSA01 and MRSE01 and significantly improved their survival rate. Our data offer a possible new strategy for treating MRS infections.

  1. Low-level colonization of hospitalized patients with methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci and emergence of the organisms during surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernodle, D S; Barg, N L; Kaiser, A B

    1988-01-01

    By use of techniques that have been developed to detect small numbers of methicillin-resistant staphylococci, we cultured samples from the nares and subclavian and inguinal areas of 29 patients before and after cardiac surgery and 10 patients before and after coronary angioplasty. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci were recovered before the surgical or angioplasty procedure from 74% of patients. The quantitative recovery of methicillin-resistant isolates before cardiac surgery or coronary angioplasty was compared with the number of methicillin-resistant staphylococci detected at the same site 3 days after the procedure. In cardiac surgery patients (who received antibiotic prophylaxis), 17 of the 28 sites (61%) in which low-level colonization with methicillin-resistant strains was detected preoperatively contained high levels of methicillin-resistant staphylococci postoperatively. In contrast, coronary angioplasty patients (who did not receive antibiotic prophylaxis) did not have any of the 14 sites containing low levels of methicillin-resistant strains before angioplasty emerge to harbor high levels of methicillin-resistant staphylococci after angioplasty. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from each site in which high levels of methicillin-resistant staphylococci emerged postoperatively were paired with preoperative isolates from the same site. Identical antibiograms and plasmid profile patterns were demonstrated for seven of the pre- and postoperative isolate pairs, suggesting that the high levels of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci detected on the skin or in the nares after cardiac surgery were derived from methicillin-resistant organisms present at the site preoperatively in much smaller numbers. Images PMID:2966607

  2. Low-level colonization of hospitalized patients with methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci and emergence of the organisms during surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kernodle, D S; Barg, N L; Kaiser, A B

    1988-01-01

    By use of techniques that have been developed to detect small numbers of methicillin-resistant staphylococci, we cultured samples from the nares and subclavian and inguinal areas of 29 patients before and after cardiac surgery and 10 patients before and after coronary angioplasty. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci were recovered before the surgical or angioplasty procedure from 74% of patients. The quantitative recovery of methicillin-resistant isolates before cardiac sur...

  3. Towards the Understanding of Resistance Mechanisms in Clinically Isolated Trimethoprim-resistant, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Dihydrofolate Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, K.; Lombardo, M; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to therapeutics such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has become an increasing problem in strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Clinically isolated trimethoprim-resistant strains reveal a double mutation, H30N/F98Y, in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). In order to develop novel and effective therapeutics against these resistant strains, we evaluated a series of propargyl-linked antifolate lead compounds for inhibition of the mutant enzyme. For the propargyl-linked antifolates, the F98Y mutation generates minimal (between 1.2- and 6-fold) losses of affinity and the H30N mutation generates greater losses (between 2.4- and 48-fold). Conversely, trimethoprim affinity is largely diminished by the F98Y mutation (36-fold) and is not affected by the H30N mutation. In order to elucidate a mechanism of resistance, we determined a crystal structure of a complex of this double mutant with a lead propargyl-linked antifolate. This structure suggests a resistance mechanism consistent both for the propargyl-linked class of antifolates and for trimethoprim that is based on the loss of a conserved water-mediated hydrogen bond.

  4. Characterization of methicillin-resistant and -susceptible staphylococcal isolates from bovine milk in northwestern china.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longping; Zhou, Luoxiong; Wang, Lihong; Xue, Huping; Zhao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS) in bovine milk is a major public health concern. The primary purpose of this research was to determine molecular genetic characteristics and antibiotic resistance of staphylococcal isolates recovered from milk of mastitic cows in the Shaanxi Province in Northwestern China. One hundred and thirteen methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), one mecA-positive and phenotype-positive MRSA, seven mecA- and mecC- negative but phenotype-positive MRSA and two MR-CoNS including one oxacillin-susceptible mecA-positive Staphylococcus haemolyticus (OS-MRSH) and one mecA-positive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) isolates were recovered from 214 quarter milk samples on 4 dairy farms. All above 123 isolates were subjected to antibiotic resistance profiling. S. aureus isolates were also genotyped using the spa typing and the multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Eight MRSA and 2 MR-CoNS isolates were additionally tested for SCCmec types. Resistance was common among isolates against ampicillin or penicillin (80.5%), kanamycin (68.3%), gentamicin (67.5%), tetracycline (43.9%) and chloramphenicol (30.1%). However, no isolate was resistant to vancomycin or teicoplanin. Twenty, 29 and 58 isolates showed resistance to 1, 2 or more than 2 antibiotics, respectively. The predominant multidrug resistance profile was penicillin/ampicillin/kanamycin/gentamicin/tetracycline (46 isolates). Most S. aureus isolates belonged to spa types t524 (n = 63), t11772 (a new type, n = 31) and t4207 (n = 15). At the same time, MLST types ST71 (n = 67) and ST2738 (a new type, n = 45) were identified as dominant sequence types. The mecA-positive and phenotype-positive MRSA isolate had a composite genotype t524-ST71-SCCmecIVa, while 7 mecA-negative but phenotype-positive MRSA isolates were all t524-ST71. The OS-MRSH isolate contained a type V

  5. [Antimicrobial spectrum of ceftaroline. In vitro activity against methicillin-resistant staphylococci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercenado, Emilia; Morosini, María Isabel

    2014-03-01

    Because of the increase in bacterial resistance, there is a need for new antimicrobial agents. In particular, Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent cause of severe infections and has an extraordinary capacity to develop antibiotic multiresistance, including resistance to glycopeptides, linezolid, and daptomycin. Although the incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) seems to have stabilized in the last few years, its wide dissemination in healthcare settings and in the community is a cause of concern. Ceftaroline is a new broad-spectrum cephalosporin with bactericidal activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including MRSA and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. In addition, this drug is active against staphylococci showing resistance to glycopeptides, linezolid, and daptomycin. The ceftaroline MIC90 against MRSA ranges from 0.5-2mg/L and that against methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci is 0.5mg/L. Ceftaroline has also good activity against respiratory pathogens including Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. Although this drug is active against Enterobacteriaceae, it does not retain activity when these isolates produce extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, carbapenemases or hyperproduce AmpC. Ceftaroline is not active against nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli. Ceftaroline is an interesting addition to the therapeutic armamentarium against MRSA and constitutes an important option for the treatment of polymicrobial infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Disk Diffusion Testing for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci: Does Moxalactam Improve upon Cefoxitin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonjean, Marie; Hodille, Elisabeth; Dumitrescu, Oana; Dupieux, Céline; Nkoud Mongo, Christina; Allam, Camille; Beghin, Mathilde; Paris, Mickael; Borrel, Ophelie; Chardon, Hubert; Laurent, Fréderic; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Lina, Gerard

    2016-12-01

    Disk diffusion testing is widely used to detect methicillin resistance in staphylococci, and cefoxitin is currently considered the best marker for mecA-mediated methicillin resistance. In low-inoculum diffusion testing (colony suspension at 10 6 CFU/ml), the addition of moxalactam in combination with cefoxitin has been reported to improve on cefoxitin alone for the detection of methicillin-heteroresistant staphylococci. However, moxalactam is absent from EUCAST and CLSI guidelines, which use high-inoculum diffusion testing (colony suspension at 10 8 CFU/ml), calling into question the potential interest of including moxalactam in their recommendations. The inhibition zone diameters of cefoxitin and moxalactam, alone and in combination, were evaluated for concordance with mecA and mecC positivity in a large collection of clinical Staphylococcus isolates (611 Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolates and 307 coagulase-negative staphylococci other than S. lugdunensis and S. saprophyticus isolates, of which 22% and 53% were mecA-positive, respectively) and in 25 mecC-positive S. aureus isolates using high-inoculum diffusion testing. Receiver operating characteristic, sensitivity, and specificity analyses indicated that the detection of mecA- and mecC-positive and negative isolates did not improve with moxalactam, either alone or in combination with cefoxitin, compared to cefoxitin alone. These findings were similar in both the S. aureus/S. lugdunensis/S. saprophyticus group and in the coagulase-negative staphylococci group. Our results do not support the use of moxalactam as an additional marker of methicillin resistance when testing with high-inoculum disk diffusion. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Detection of Methicillin Resistance and Various Virulence Factors in Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Nasal Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Türk Dağı

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococus aureus can be found as a commensal on skin and nasal flora or it may cause local and invasive infections. S. aureus has a large number of virulence factors. Aims: To investigate the methicillin resistance and frequency of various virulence factors in S. aureus nasal isolates. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: Nasal samples collected from university students were cultured in media. S. aureus was identified by conventional methods and the Staphyloslide latex test (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, USA. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were conducted, and the methicillin resistance was determined. The mecA, nuc, pvl and staphylococcal toxin genes were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: S. aureus was isolated in 104 of 600 (17.3% nasal samples. In total, 101 (97.1% S. aureus isolates were methicillin-sensitive and the remaining 3 (2.9% were methicillin-resistant. Furthermore, all but five isolates carried at least one staphylococcal enterotoxin gene, with seg being predominant. The tst and eta genes were determined in 29 (27.9%, and 3 (2.9% isolates, respectively. None of the S. aureus isolates harbored see, etb, and pvl genes. Conclusion: A moderate rate of S. aureus carriage and low frequency of MRSA were detected in healthy students. S. aureus isolates had a high prevalence of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes and the tst gene. In this study, a large number of virulence factors were examined in S. aureus nasal isolates, and the data obtained from this study can be used for monitoring the prevalence of virulence genes in S. aureus strains isolated from nasal carriers.

  8. Molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus circulating in the Russian Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostev, Vladimir; Kruglov, Alexander; Kalinogorskaya, Olga; Dmitrenko, Olga; Khokhlova, Olga; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Lobzin, Yuri; Ryabchenko, Irina; Sidorenko, Sergey

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the patterns of antimicrobial resistance and molecular features of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates in Russia. Isolates recovered from hospital patients (n=480), healthy medical personnel (n=25), and healthy carriers (n=13) were included in the study. Hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) demonstrated high resistance to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol (76%-92%), moderate - to tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin, and rifampicin (38%-54%), and low - to fusidic acid, co-trimoxazole, mupirocin, and daptomycin (2%-7%). Elevated MIC (2.0μg/ml) of vancomycin was detected in 26% of isolates. All isolates were susceptible to linezolid and tigecycline. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) revealed that CC8 isolates (ST8+ST239) constituted 83.1% of HA-MRSA and that this genetic lineage dominated in all regions from Krasnoyarsk to Saint Petersburg. A local ST239 variant harboring the tst gene (ST239 Kras ) was detected in Krasnoyarsk. The other HA-MRSA isolates belonged to clonal complex 5 (CC5) (21 isolates, 12.2%) and CC22 (2, 1.2%). The majority of CC5 isolates were affiliated with sequence type 228 (ST228) and were characterized with decreased susceptibility to ceftaroline (MIC=2μg/ml). We also detected, for the first time in Russia, livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) from clusters CC398 and CC97 in humans. Among the 2053 healthy persons screened for nasal carriage of S. aureus, the bacteria were isolated from 426 (21%); among them, 13 carried isolates identified as community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Eleven of 13 CA-MRSA isolates belonged to ST22 (spa types t223, t3243, and t3689; SCCmec types IVa and IVc, agr type I, tst-positive) and were similar to the EMRSA-15/Middle Eastern variant (Gaza strain). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream isolates in Taiwan, 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Jung Chen

    Full Text Available The information of molecular characteristics and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is essential for control and treatment of diseases caused by this medically important pathogen. A total of 577 clinical MRSA bloodstream isolates from six major hospitals in Taiwan were determined for molecular types, carriage of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL and sasX genes and susceptibilities to 9 non-beta-lactam antimicrobial agents. A total of 17 genotypes were identified in 577 strains by pulsotyping. Five major pulsotypes, which included type A (26.2%, belonging to sequence type (ST 239, carrying type III staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec, type F (18.9%, ST5-SCCmecII, type C (18.5%, ST59-SCCmecIV, type B (12.0%, ST239-SCCmecIII and type D (10.9%, ST59-SCCmecVT/IV, prevailed in each of the six sampled hospitals. PVL and sasX genes were respectively carried by ST59-type D strains and ST239 strains with high frequencies (93.7% and 99.1%, respectively but rarely detected in strains of other genotypes. Isolates of different genotypes and from different hospitals exhibited distinct antibiograms. Multi-resistance to ≥3 non-beta-lactams was more common in ST239 isolates (100% than in ST5 isolates (97.2%, P = 0.0347 and ST59 isolates (8.2%, P<0.0001. Multivariate analysis further indicated that the genotype, but not the hospital, was an independent factor associated with muti-resistance of the MRSA strains. In conclusion, five common MRSA clones with distinct antibiograms prevailed in the major hospitals in Taiwan in 2010. The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of invasive MRSA was mainly determined by the clonal distribution.

  10. Next-Generation Sequence Analysis Reveals Transfer of Methicillin Resistance to a Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Strain That Subsequently Caused a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Outbreak: a Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, Veronica; Bosch, Thijs; Witteveen, Sandra; Landman, Fabian; Schouls, Leo; Kluytmans, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Resistance to methicillin in Staphylococcus aureus is caused primarily by the mecA gene, which is carried on a mobile genetic element, the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCC mec ). Horizontal transfer of this element is supposed to be an important factor in the emergence of new clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) but has been rarely observed in real time. In 2012, an outbreak occurred involving a health care worker (HCW) and three patients, all carrying a fusidic acid-resistant MRSA strain. The husband of the HCW was screened for MRSA carriage, but only a methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strain, which was also resistant to fusidic acid, was detected. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) typing showed that both the MSSA and MRSA isolates were MT4053-MC0005. This finding led to the hypothesis that the MSSA strain acquired the SCC mec and subsequently caused an outbreak. To support this hypothesis, next-generation sequencing of the MSSA and MRSA isolates was performed. This study showed that the MSSA isolate clustered closely with the outbreak isolates based on whole-genome multilocus sequence typing and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, with a genetic distance of 17 genes and 44 SNPs, respectively. Remarkably, there were relatively large differences in the mobile genetic elements in strains within and between individuals. The limited genetic distance between the MSSA and MRSA isolates in combination with a clear epidemiologic link supports the hypothesis that the MSSA isolate acquired a SCC mec and that the resulting MRSA strain caused an outbreak. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from pig carcasses in Hong Kong

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, J.; O'Donoghue, M.; Guardabassi, Luca

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the isolation and characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from slaughtered pigs sampled from local markets in Hong Kong. The nares of 400 slaughtered pigs were cultured and MRSA isolates characterized for the presence of antibiotic-resistance...... from several regions of China, in contrast to more diversified characteristics reported in European studies. Colonization rates were higher than previously reported. Isolates were resistant to a wide range of antibiotics, but resistance was not detected to linezolid, nitrofurantoin, vancomycin...... was predominant, with only 5/170 isolates displaying closely related types (t4474, t1939, t2922 and t5390). PFGE with sma1 and MLST confirmed the strains as ST9. Most isolates were multidrug resistant. Tetracycline resistance (97%) was mainly attributable to tet(K) with only 3% of isolates additionally harbouring...

  12. Detection of Methicillin-Resistance Gene (mec-A in Staphylococcus aureus Strains by PCR and Determination of Antibiotic Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Zamani

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Methicillin–Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is one of the most important causes of hospital infections worldwide. Treatment of these infections has become more difficult because of resistance to methicillin/oxacillin and other antibiotics. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of MRSA infections in hospitals affiliated to Hamadan University of Medical Sciences.Materials & Methods: Seventy S. aureus clinical strains were isolated from patients from June, 2005 to June, 2006 and examined by conventional microbiological tests and PCR, respectively. Then, the antibiotic susceptibility to methicillin/oxacillin and other antibiotic were performed by Disk Diffusion Agar (DDA.Results: The results of this study showed that Methicillin resistance gene was detected in 35 (50% and 22 (31.4% cases by PCR and DDA, respectively. The results of antibiotic sensitivity assays also showed there was high resistance in MRSA strains to Penicillin (100%, Cloxacillin (91.4%, Tetracycline (74.2%, Cotrimoxazole (68.6% Erythromycin (68.5% and Ceftazidim (51.4%. The strains of Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA showed high sensitivity results to antibiotic used, except penicillin, which all of the isolates were penicillin resistance.Conclusion: As a conclusion, the resistant to methicillin/oxacillin in Hamadan hospitals has reached to 50% and they show multi-drug resistant.

  13. Concomitant genotyping revealed diverse spreading between methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in central Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cheng-Mao; Lin, Chien-Yu; Ho, Mao-Wang; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Peng, Ching-Tien; Lu, Jang-Jih

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile bacterium, which can lead to various infectious diseases. Various molecular typing methods are applied to the evolution and epidemiology surveys of S. aureus, mostly for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). However, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) is still an important pathogen, but their molecular typing is evaluated infrequently. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and detection of five virulent genes for 95 MRSA and 56 MSSA isolates (July-December 2008 and July 2008-December 2009, respectively) during an overlapping period were performed. More diversity was found in MSSA isolates (23 pulsotypes and 25 spa types, excluding 4 new-type and 1 nontypable isolates for spa typing) than in MRSA isolates (19 pulsotypes and 16 spa types, excluding 1 new-type and 1 nontypable isolates for spa typing). By spa typing, t002 (n = 30), t037 (n = 23), t437 (n = 21), t234 (n = 3), t1081 (n = 3), and t1094 (n = 3) were the six major MRSA clones. For MSSA isolates, t189 (n = 13), t437 (n = 4), t084 (n = 3), t213 (n = 3), t701 (n = 3), and t7200 (n = 3) were the six major types. Combining PFGE and spa typing, there were five combinations (pulsotype + spa type) that contained both MRSA and MSSA isolates (pulsotype 9-t437, pulsotype 15-t037, pulsotype 19-t002, pulsotype 21-t002, and pulsotype 28-t1081). For all 151 S. aureus or 95 MRSA isolates, the PFGE typing had more discrimination power, but spa typing had larger discrimination index for 56 MSSA isolates. In conclusion, there were different predominant MRSA and MSSA clones clinically. Continuing longitudinal tracking of molecular typing is necessary for elucidating the evolution of this important clinical pathogen. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Frequency and Treatment of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Obstetric and Gynaecological Sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, I.J.; Khan, S.; Bhutta, S.; Butt, S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To perform culture and sensitivity for pathogens causing puerperal and postoperative wound sepsis and determine the frequency of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in such infections. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Obstetrics and Gynaecology Ward, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from December 2008 to May 2010. Methodology: All patients presenting with puerperal sepsis or postoperative wound infection were enrolled. Pus was collected for culture and sensitivity using standard technique. Two samples were taken from each patient; one before starting the treatment and one at the end of treatment. Ames transport medium was used. Empirical treatment with triple regimen (Ampicillin, Metronidazole and Gentamicin) was started immediately to cover Gram positive as well as negative bacteria in addition to anaerobic infection. After receiving the sensitivity report, antimicrobial agent were changed accordingly. Samples from ward and theater staff and environment were also taken to look for possible mode of transmission. Data was recorded on a proforma. Discrete variables are expressed as percentages. Results: Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent organism isolated in 34.6% cases. Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was seen in 20% cases and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was seen in 14.6%. Out of these 14.6% MRSA, (17) 77% was associated with puerperal sepsis and rest (5) 23% was associated with postoperative wound infection. It showed best sensitivity to vancomycin. Conclusion: Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli were common causative agent of postoperative infections and puerperal sepsis. (author)

  15. Rapid control of a methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in a medical surgical intensive care unit (ICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anjum; Lampitoc, Marianita; Salaripour, Maryam; McKernan, Patricia; Devlin, Roslyn; Muller, Matthew P

    2009-01-01

    Outbreaks of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the intensive care unit setting can be prolonged and difficult to control. This report describes the rapid control of an outbreak of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a 24-bed open-concept medical surgical intensive care unit with a baseline methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus acquisition rate of 1.5 cases per 1000 patient days. This institution's infection control policy mandates an outbreak investigation if two cases of hospital-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization or infection are identified in an intensive care unit within a four-week period. In July 2007, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was identified in the sputum of two patients within a one-week period. Screening of all patients in the intensive care unit identified one additional case and a fourth case was identified from a clinical specimen before control measures were implemented. Initial control measures included healthcare worker education, enhanced surveillance, patient cohorting, and enhanced environmental cleaning. Despite these measures, three more cases occurred. All patients were then placed in contact isolation, healthcare workers were screened, and the nursing staff was cohorted. After two weeks without a case, two additional cases were identified. Decolonization of all positive patients was initiated. No further cases occurred over a five-week period and the outbreak was declared over. The outbreak resulted in nine cases of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization (n = 8) or infection (n = 1) over an 11-week period. Only one of 175 healthcare workers was colonized and it was not the outbreak strain. Early detection and the stepwise addition of infection control measures resulted in the rapid control of an outbreak of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a medical surgical intensive care unit without unit closure. A low threshold of suspicion and

  16. Evaluation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors analysis revealed that history of hospitalization, recent antibiotic intake and frequent contact with animals and livestock workers/veterinarians increase the risk of MRSA nasal carriage. Among MRSA nasal isolates, a high rate of multidrug resistance and particularly an intriguing resistance to gentamycin (20%) ...

  17. A study of the susceptibility of methicillin resistant coagulase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They were further screened against five antiseptic agents namely; benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, chlorhexidine gluconate, gentian violet and acriflavine by the agar dilution method. Oxacillin resistant isolates were confirmed by screening for the mecA gene by the standard PCR method. Results: Oxacillin resistant ...

  18. REVIEW ARTICLE GLOBAL TREND OF METHICILLIN-RESISTANT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    Detection of MRSA strains in domestic animals and protozoan has widened the epidemiologic characters of the organism and may influence infection control policies. Objectives: To review the emergence and epidemiologic spread of resistant strains of MRSA, molecular/genetic basis of resistance in the organism and ...

  19. Abietanes from Plectranthus grandidentatus and P. hereroensis against methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar-Marques, C; Rijo, P; Simões, M F; Duarte, M A; Rodriguez, B

    2006-03-01

    The antimicrobial activity of 10 natural abietanes isolated from Plectranthus grandidentatus and P. hereroensis acetonic extract was evaluated against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE). The results revealed that the most active diterpenes were coleon U (1), 7alpha-acetoxy-6beta-hydroxyroyleanone (2) and horminone (3). Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging 0.98-15.63 microg/ml were obtained for MRSA clinical strains, and MIC values of 15.63 and 31.25 microg/ml were obtained for VRE clinical strains. Some structure-activity relationships are emphasized.

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevalence: Current susceptibility patterns in Trinidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Land Michael

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has become one of the most widespread causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. Recently, reports have emerged that S. aureus strains recovered from community-acquired infections are also methicillin-resistant. This study was undertaken to analyze the prevalence of methicillin resistance among isolates at a regional hospital in Trinidad, and document the current resistance profile of MRSA and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA to the commonly used anti-staphylococcal agents. Methods Over a 6-year period we analyzed 2430 isolates of S. aureus strains recovered from various clinical sources, from hospital and community practices. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done according to guideline recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Results The prevalence of MRSA from surgical/burn wounds, urine and pus/abscess were 60.1%, 15.5% and 6.6%, respectively. The major sources of MSSA were surgical/burn wounds, pus/abscess and upper respiratory tract specimens with rates of 32.9%, 17.1% and 14.3%, respectively. The greatest prevalence of resistance of MRSA was seen for erythromycin (86.7%, and clindamycin (75.3%. Resistance rates among MSSA were highest for ampicillin (70%. Resistance rates for tetracycline were similar among both MRSA (78.7% and MSSA (73.5%. The MRSA recovery rates from nosocomial sources (20.8% was significantly higher than that of previous years (12.5% (p Conclusion The prevalence of MRSA in the hospital increased from 12.5% in 1999 to 20.8% in 2004. Most isolates were associated with infected surgical/burn wounds which may have become infected via the hands of HCPs during dressing exercises. Infection control measures aimed at the proper hand hygiene procedures may interrupt the spread of MRSA. HCPs may also be carriers of MRSA in their anterior nares. Surveillance cultures of both patients and HCPs may help

  1. First report of linezolid dependence in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Hernández, I; Delgado Valverde, M; Batista Díaz, N; Pascual, A

    2015-07-01

    Linezolid is used to treat infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We describe the first report of linezolid dependence in MRSA. The strain was isolated from a respiratory sample of a cystic fibrosis patient, and it showed a thymidine-dependent small-colony variant phenotype. The effect was not related to any known mechanisms implicated in S. aureus resistance to linezolid. The clinical significance of this phenomenon needs further investigation. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Low prevalence of Cfr-mediated linezolid resistance among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Spanish hospital: case report on linezolid resistance acquired during linezolid therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M Sierra

    Full Text Available Linezolid is an effective antimicrobial agent to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Resistance to linezolid due to the cfr gene is described worldwide. The present study aimed to analyze the prevalence of the cfr-mediated linezolid resistance among MRSA clinical isolates in our area. A very low prevalence of cfr mediated linezolid resistance was found: only one bacteremic isolate out of 2 215 screened isolates. The only linezolid resistant isolate arose in a patient, previously colonized by MRSA, following linezolid therapy. Despite the low rate of resistance in our area, ongoing surveillance is advisable to avoid the spread of linezolid resistance.

  3. Low prevalence of Cfr-mediated linezolid resistance among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Spanish hospital: case report on linezolid resistance acquired during linezolid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Josep M; Camoez, Mariana; Tubau, Fe; Gasch, Oriol; Pujol, Miquel; Martin, Rogelio; Domínguez, M Angeles

    2013-01-01

    Linezolid is an effective antimicrobial agent to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Resistance to linezolid due to the cfr gene is described worldwide. The present study aimed to analyze the prevalence of the cfr-mediated linezolid resistance among MRSA clinical isolates in our area. A very low prevalence of cfr mediated linezolid resistance was found: only one bacteremic isolate out of 2 215 screened isolates. The only linezolid resistant isolate arose in a patient, previously colonized by MRSA, following linezolid therapy. Despite the low rate of resistance in our area, ongoing surveillance is advisable to avoid the spread of linezolid resistance.

  4. Rapid Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by the Vitek MS Saramis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Weiguang; Li, Jiaping; Fang, Ying; Wang, Xuan; Gu, Danxia; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and accurate Vitek MS assay was developed to distinguish clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from clinical isolates of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) by developing an in-house knowledgebase of SuperSpectra. Three unique peaks, including peaks at 2305.6 and 3007.3 Da specific to MRSA, and 6816.7 Da specific to MSSA, were selected for differentiating MRSA and MSSA. This assay accurately identified 84 and 91% of clinical MRSA and MSSA strains out of the total 142 clinically acquired S. aureus strains that were tested. This method will greatly improve the efficiency of single clinical sample identification of MRSA, thereby facilitating a reduction in the transmission of MRSA in clinical settings.

  5. Incidence and susceptibility pattern of methicillin resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from a tertiary care hospital of pakistan.

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    Shah, Muhammad Usman; Akram, Muhammad Farhan; Usman, Javaid; Kaleem, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci are resistant organisms causing infections associated with high morbidity and mortality. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), is especially important with respect to admitted patients with indwelling catheters and other installed invasive devices where these organisms are known to be found. As a result, such lifesaving measures may prove fatal from subsequent infection and sepsis by these pathogens. Therefore, to limit such conditions in patients, the spread of MRSE and related organisms in the hospitals have to be effectively controlled. This study was carried out to determine the frequency of methicillin resistant organisms among all isolated coagulase negative Staphylococci (CoNS) and to find effective antibiotics against these microorganisms. All samples sent to the lab were routinely processed according to standard microbiological procedures and the cultures yielding growth of CoNS were selected for the study. All samples containing CoNS collected over a 2 year-period, were included irrespective of patients' age and gender. The antibiogram of the organisms was recorded according to CLSI guidelines and the ratio of methicillin resistant organisms determined. From a total of 299 isolated coagulase negative Staphylococci (CoNS), 40.1% were methicillin resistant. A high proportion of these organisms (more than 50%) were resistant to cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and quinolones while only a small number were found to show resistance to linezolid, minocycline, chloramphenicol and rifampicin. There were no resistant organisms against vancomycin. A considerable amount of methicillin resistant organisms found among CoNS in our region. The above stated antibiotics would prove effective in limiting these infections. Clinicians should keep these facts in mind while treating their patients.

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and other Gram-positives in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calfee, David P

    2012-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterocci (VRE) are the two most common healthcare-associated multidrug-resistant organisms. The purpose of this article is to review recent data regarding the epidemiology, control and treatment of these organisms as well as to discuss the emergence of additional antimicrobial resistance determinants. Although the prevalence of methicillin resistance continues to increase among healthcare-associated S. aureus isolates, the incidence of invasive MRSA infections appears to be decreasing. Reduced susceptibility to vancomycin among MRSA isolates has been associated with glycopeptide treatment failure. Resistance to newer antimicrobial agents, such as daptomycin and linezolid, has been described among isolates of MRSA and VRE, further complicating treatment of infections caused by these organisms. Recent studies that have attempted to assess the efficacy of a variety of strategies for the prevention of MRSA and/or VRE transmission and infection, including active surveillance testing, have been published and additional studies are currently underway. MRSA and VRE remain important causes of morbidity and mortality among patients receiving healthcare. The emergence of resistance to additional antimicrobial agents highlights the importance of effective prevention programs. Further study to determine the optimal approaches to treatment and prevention is needed.

  7. Evaluation of contact precautions for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardossy, Ana Cecilia; Alsafadi, Muhammad Yasser; Starr, Patricia; Chami, Eman; Pietsch, Jennifer; Moreno, Daniela; Johnson, Laura; Alangaden, George; Zervos, Marcus; Reyes, Katherine

    2017-12-01

    There are limited controlled data demonstrating contact precautions (CPs) prevent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) infections in endemic settings. We evaluated changes in hospital-acquired MRSA and VRE infections after discontinuing CPs for these organisms. This is a retrospective study done at an 800-bed teaching hospital in urban Detroit. CPs for MRSA and VRE were discontinued hospital-wide in 2013. Data on MRSA and VRE catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), surgical site infections (SSIs), and hospital-acquired MRSA bacteremia (HA-MRSAB) rates were compared before and after CPs discontinuation. There were 36,907 and 40,439 patients hospitalized during the two 12-month periods: CPs and no CPs. Infection rates in the CPs and no-CPs periods were as follows: (1) MRSA infections: VAP, 0.13 versus 0.11 (P = .84); CLABSI, 0.11 versus 0.19 (P = .45); SSI, 0 versus 0.14 (P = .50); and CAUTI, 0.025 versus 0.033 (P = .84); (2) VRE infections: CAUTI, 0.27 versus 0.13 (P = .19) and CLABSI, 0.29 versus 0.3 (P = .94); and (3) HA-MRSAB rates: 0.14 versus 0.11 (P = .55), respectively. Discontinuation of CPs did not adversely impact endemic MRSA and VRE infection rates. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci by the Vitek 2 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kristen N; Andreacchio, Kathleen; Edelstein, Paul H

    2014-09-01

    The accurate performance of the Vitek 2 GP67 card for detecting methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) is not known. We prospectively determined the ability of the Vitek 2 GP67 card to accurately detect methicillin-resistant CoNS, with mecA PCR results used as the gold standard for a 4-month period in 2012. Included in the study were 240 consecutively collected nonduplicate CoNS isolates. Cefoxitin susceptibility by disk diffusion testing was determined for all isolates. We found that the three tested systems, Vitek 2 oxacillin and cefoxitin testing and cefoxitin disk susceptibility testing, lacked specificity and, in some cases, sensitivity for detecting methicillin resistance. The Vitek 2 oxacillin and cefoxitin tests had very major error rates of 4% and 8%, respectively, and major error rates of 38% and 26%, respectively. Disk cefoxitin testing gave the best performance, with very major and major error rates of 2% and 24%, respectively. The test performances were species dependent, with the greatest errors found for Staphylococcus saprophyticus. While the 2014 CLSI guidelines recommend reporting isolates that test resistant by the oxacillin MIC or cefoxitin disk test as oxacillin resistant, following such guidelines produces erroneous results, depending on the test method and bacterial species tested. Vitek 2 cefoxitin testing is not an adequate substitute for cefoxitin disk testing. For critical-source isolates, mecA PCR, rather than Vitek 2 or cefoxitin disk testing, is required for optimal antimicrobial therapy. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Biofilm synthesis and its relationship with genetic characteristics in clinical methicillin-resistant staphylococci

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    Nikolaos Giormezis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus can cause a broad range of infections, including skin infections, pneumonia and bacteraemia. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS, mainly S. epidermidis, have also emerged as important pathogens, especially in immunocompromised patients or those with prosthetic devices, such as intravascular catheters or biomaterials. Of great importance in the initiation of these infections is the ability of staphylococci to adhere to various surfaces, such as host tissues and prosthetic devices and to form biofilm. The staphylococcal adhesins are encoded by a number of genes such as fnbA (S. aureus fibronectin binding protein A, sasG (S. aureus surface protein G, aap (S. epidermidis accumulation associated protein, bhp (Bap homologue protein and fbe (fibrinogen binding protein epidermidis. In this study, 106 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, 145 methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE and 70 non-epidermidis methicillin-resistant CNS (MR-CNS; 58 S. haemolyticus, 10 S. hominis and two S. lugdunensis were compared in terms of biofilm formation, antimicrobial resistance, clonal distribution and adhesin genes carriage. Isolates were classified into pulsotypes by PFGE and assigned to sequence types by MLST. In total, 121/321 isolates (37.7% produced biofilm and 219 (68.2% carried ica operon. The majority was multidrug resistant (94.7% and carried one or more adhesin genes. MRSE and all other MR-CNS prevailed in biofilm formation (P < 0.001 and antimicrobial resistance (P < 0.05 as compared to MRSA. MRSE also prevailed in ica carriage compared to the other methicillin-resistant staphylococci (P ≤ 0.007 Among MRSE, isolates from bacteraemias prevailed in biofilm formation (P = 0.031, whereas, strains from prosthetic device-associated infections carried more frequently aap (P = 0.003. Even though PFGE showed genetic diversity among MRSE, MLST revealed three major clones (ST2, ST5, ST16. MRSA isolates were less diverse, with five PFGE

  10. Detection of methicillin resistant and toxin-associated genes in Staphylococcus aureus

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    Cajethan Ezeamagu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a problem in both healthcare institutions and community settings. This is due to its multi-drug resistant challenges. Hence, this study assessed the prevalence of methicillin resistant gene (mecA, exfoliative toxin (eta and etb and toxic shock syndrome (tsst-1 genes in S. aureus isolated from clinical samples. A total of 120 clinical samples of patients (urine, high vagina swab (HVS, semen, wound swab, sputum and urethral swab from a hospital laboratory were obtained. S. aureus was isolated and then identified with API-staph kit. Antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates was determined by agar diffusion while PCR was used to detect the presence of mecA and toxin-associated genes. Fifty S. aureus isolates were obtained at frequencies of 26(52%, 12(24%, 4(8%, 3(6%, 3(6% and 2(4% from the HVS, urine, semen, wound, sputum and urethral swab samples respectively. All the isolates of S. aureus were resistant to the antibiotics used in this study. MecA, tsst-1, eta and etb were detected in 19(38%, 7(14%, 3(6% and 2(4% of the isolates respectively. The prevalence of MRSA and its resistance pattern observed in this study was a signal that the health-care workers and the general public are at risk.

  11. Misidentification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in hospitals in Tripoli, Libya

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    Mohamed O. Ahmed

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a nosocomial (hospital-acquired pathogen of exceptional concern. It is responsible for life-threatening infections in both the hospital and the community. Aims: To determine the frequency of MRSA misidentification in hospitals in Tripoli, Libya using current testing methods. Methods: One hundred and seventy S. aureus isolates previously identified as MRSA were obtained from three hospitals in Tripoli. All isolates were reidentified by culturing on mannitol salt agar, API 20 Staph System and retested for resistance to methicillin using the cefoxitin disk diffusion susceptibility test and PBP2a. D-tests and vancomycin E-tests (Van-E-tests were also performed for vancomycin-resistant isolates. Results: Of the 170 isolates examined, 86 (51% were confirmed as MRSA (i.e. 49% were misidentified as MRSA. Fifteen (17% of the confirmed MRSA strains exhibited inducible clindamycin resistance. Of the 86 confirmed MRSA isolates, 13 (15% were resistant to mupirocin, 53 (62% were resistant to ciprofloxacin, 41 (48% were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and none were resistant to linezolid. Although disc-diffusion testing indicated that 23 (27% of the isolates were resistant to vancomycin, none of the isolates were vancomycin-resistant by Van-E-test. Conclusions: Misidentification of nosocomial S. aureus as MRSA is a serious problem in Libyan hospitals. There is an urgent need for the proper training of microbiology laboratory technicians in standard antimicrobial susceptibility procedures and the implementation of quality control programs in microbiology laboratories of Libyan hospitals.

  12. Antibiotic additive and synergistic action of rutin, morin and quercetin against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Muhammad Usman; Khurram, Muhammad; Khattak, Baharullah; Khan, Jafar

    2015-03-12

    To determine the effect of flavonoids in conjunction with antibiotics in methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) a study was designed. The flavonoids included Rutin, Morin, Qurecetin while antibiotics included ampicillin, amoxicillin, cefixime, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, methicillin, cephradine, erythromycin, imipenem, sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim, ciprofloxacin and levolfloxacin. Test antibiotics were mostly found resistant with only Imipenem and Erythromycin found to be sensitive against 100 MRSA clinical isolates and S. aureus (ATCC 43300). The flavonoids were tested alone and also in different combinations with selected antibiotics. Antibiotics and flavonoids sensitivity assays were carried using disk diffusion method. The combinations found to be effective were sifted through MIC assays by broth macro dilution method. Exact MICs were determined using an incremental increase approach. Fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICI) were determined to evaluate relationship between antibiotics and flavonoids is synergistic or additive. Potassium release was measured to determine the effect of antibiotic-flavonoids combinations on the cytoplasmic membrane of test bacteria. Antibiotic and flavonoids screening assays indicated activity of flavanoids against test bacteria. The inhibitory zones increased when test flavonoids were combined with antibiotics facing resistance. MICs of test antibiotics and flavonoids reduced when they were combined. Quercetin was the most effective flavonoid (MIC 260 μg/ml) while morin + rutin + quercetin combination proved most efficient with MIC of 280 + 280 + 140 μg/ml. Quercetin + morin + rutin with amoxicillin, ampicillin, cephradine, ceftriaxone, imipenem, and methicillin showed synergism, while additive relationship was indicated between morin + rutin and amoxicillin, cephradine, ceftriaxone, imipenem, and methicillin. Quercetin alone had an additive effect with ampicillin, cephradine

  13. [Epidemiological study of Arbekacin-resistant, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Saitama Medical School Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Endo, Kazuhiro; Tominaga, Kazunori; Fukuda, Masataka; Maesaki, Shigefumi; Hashikita, Giichi; Itabashi, Akira

    2004-04-01

    Arbekacin-resistant, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was frequently isolated in Saitama Medical School Hospital during 1996 and 1998. The minimum inhibitory concentration for ABK was 8 micrograms/ml in 14 strains, 16 micrograms/ml in 6 strains, and 32 micrograms/ml in 2 strains. The maximum isolation rate of these resistant strains in one month was 8%. Use of ABK in the hospital did not increase during the same period. The infection control team (ICT) of the hospital recognized the increase of resistant strains and started intervention for the hospital staff. The ICT instructed the staff of each ward to follow standard precautions for the prevention of nosocomial infections and the risk of ABK-resistant MRSA was explained repeatedly. Thereafter, the isolation rate decreased to 3%. An epidemiological study was done using 22 strains of ABK-resistant MRSA that were isolated in this period. The strains originated from different patients and from 10 different wards, which were designated as wards A to J. Eight strains were isolated from surgical ward A, followed by the other wards (ward B: 3, C: 2, D: 2, E: 2, F: 1, G: 1, H: 1, I: 1, J: 1). The specimens from which ABK-resistant MRSA were isolated were as follows,: sputum: 4, wound: 4, decubitus ulcer: 4, urine: 2, pus: 2, blood :1, central venous catheter: 1, drainage tube: 1, tracheal aspirate: 1, skin: 1, stool: 1. Several investigations were done using these strains. Sensitivity tests for ABK, VCM, MINO, LVFX, FOM, IPM were performed by the standard method of the Japan Society for Chemotherapy. Coagulase types were determined. Production of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), enterotoxin, and beta-lactamase was assayed. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using Sma I was also done and differences were compared. Seven of the 8 strains from ward A showed the same drug sensitivity profile and biological phenotype. Two of the 3 strains from ward B and 2 strains from ward C were also identical by these

  14. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA: molecular background, virulence, and relevance for public health

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    MF Bonesso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS are frequently found in nosocomial environments as the main pathogen in several infections. In 1961, reports of nosocomial S. aureus resistant to methicillin, the drug of choice against penicillin-resistant strains, required new alternatives and vancomycin started being used to treat infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA was first reported in 1990 affecting patients without risk factors for infection with MRSA of hospital origin. MRSA of community origin harbor the genes responsible for the synthesis of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, a toxin associated with skin and soft tissue infections and that carries the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec type IV. CA-MRSA emergence has caused great impact on the worldwide medical community since the presence of this pathogen in patients without risk factors represents a high risk to public health.

  15. Prevalence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pyogenic community and hospital acquired skin and soft tissues infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M. K.; Asrar, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the percentage and frequency of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in community and hospital-acquired pyogenic skin and soft tissue infections. Methods: The descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at the Dermatology Department of Combined Military Hospital, Abbottabad, from June 2009 to March 2010, and comprised 144 community-acquired and 54 hospital-acquired skin and soft tissue infections. Pus swabs from the infected lesions one from each individual were sent to laboratory for culture and sensitivity tests. Methicillin resistance was detected by 1 (mu) g oxacillin disk. Organisms were labelled methicillin-resistant once the inhibition zone for oxocillin was less than 10 mm. Data analysis was done by using SPSS 20. Results: Of the 198 patients in the study, 98(49.5%) were males and 100(50.5%) were females, with an overall mean age of 33.7+-14.8144 years. There were 144(72.72%) community-acquired infections and 54(27.27%) had hospital-acquired infections. Community-acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus numbered 40(27.8%) and hospital-acquired ones numbered 26(48.1%). Conclusion: Prevalence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in community and hospital-acquired pyogenic skin and soft tissue infections was high. (author)

  16. Methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in health care workers and medical devices

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    Angela Breves

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Cross-contamination by Staphylococcus aureus among patients, professionals and medical supplies in health facilities is a constant concern, leading many researchers to study the prevalence of this pathogen in asymptomatic carriers. Objective: We investigated the colonization and the antimicrobial susceptibility profile of Staphylococcus spp. on surfaces of medical articles and in professionals from two basic health units in the city of Rio de Janeiro. Materials and methods: Seventy-nine samples resulted in 49 isolates which underwent phenotypic and molecular characterization by polymerase chain reaction (PCR of coa, mecA and femA genes. Results: According to the phenotypes, the isolates were identified as S. aureus (n = 35, 71.42% and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS (n = 14, 28.57%. Among these 14 isolates, 42.85% were methicillin-resistant coagulase negative Staphylococcus (MRCoNS. Among the 35 S. aureus, 31.42% were methicillin resistant (MRSA, and 2.8% were vancomycin resistant, characterized as VRSA. Sixty-eight percent were susceptible to methicillin (MSSA. Genes coa, femA and mecA were amplified from 75.51%, 71.42% and 30.61% of the isolates, respectively. After amplification of the mecA gene, 20.41% were characterized as MRSA, and 10.20% as MRCoNS. The vancomycin-resistant strain was characterized as VRSA after detection of the vanB gene. Conclusion: Our results show a higher frequency of MSSA and MRCoNS among S. aureus and CoNS respectively, colonizing devices and health professionals. However, the already described transfer of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SSCmec from MRCoNS to MSSA may alter these results, increasing the frequency of MRSA strains.

  17. Antibacterial susceptibility patterns of methicillin resistant staphylococcus spp. from a tertiary reference hospital

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    Çiğdem Karabıçak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus strainsstill remain as an important reason of hospital acquiredinfections. The aim of this study to see the antimicrobialsensitivity patterns of these strains for effective empiricaltherapyMaterial and methods: Antibiotic susceptibility resultsof staphylococcus strains were investigated retrospectivelyfrom tertiary reference hospital. 276 methicillin resistantstaphylococcus species, which were isolated fromKırıkkale University Faculty of Medicine Department of InfectiousDisease and Clinical Microbiology laboratory betweenNovember 2009-2010 were enrolled in this study.Identification and antibiotic susceptibilities of the strainswere evaluated by using Vitek automated systems (bioMerieux.Results: Most of these strains were isolated from blood(49% and wound (40 % samples. There was no glycopeptideresistance established from 276 strains. Susceptibilitypercents of these strains to linezolid and erythromycinwere 97% and 16% respectively.Conclusions: we believe that, informing physiciansabout antibiotic susceptibility patterns of methicillin resistantstaphylococcus species will be helpful for effectivetreatment and control the spread of these infections. JClin Exp Invest 2012; 3(1: 71-74

  18. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci in the community: high homology of SCCmec IVa between Staphylococcus epidermidis and major clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, François; Ruppé, Etienne; Hernandez, David; Lebeaux, David; Francois, Patrice; Felix, Benjamin; Desprez, Adeline; Maiga, Aminata; Woerther, Paul-Louis; Gaillard, Kevin; Jeanrot, Cécile; Wolff, Michel; Schrenzel, Jacques; Andremont, Antoine; Ruimy, Raymond

    2010-07-15

    Data on community spread of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS) are scarce. We assessed their potential role as a reservoir of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) IVa, the leading SCCmec subtype in community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). Nasal carriage of MR-CoNS was prospectively investigated in 291 adults at hospital admission. MR-CoNS were characterized by SCCmec typing, long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for SCCmec IV, and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) for Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) strains. Three SCCmec IVa elements were fully sequenced. The carriage rate of MR-CoNS was 19.2% (25.9% and 16.5% in patients with and patients without previous exposure to the health care system, respectively; P = .09). MR-CoNS strains (n = 83, including 58 MRSE strains with highly heterogeneous MLVA patterns) carried SCCmec type IVa (n = 9, all MRSE), other SCCmec IV subtypes (n = 9, including 7 MRSE), other SCCmec types (n = 15), and nontypeable SCCmec (n = 50). Long-range PCR indicated structural homology between SCCmec IV in MRSE and that in MRSA. Complete sequences of SCCmec IVa from 3 MRSE strains were highly homologous to those available for CA-MRSA, including major clones USA300 and USA400. MR-CoNS are probably disseminated in the community, notably in subjects without previous exposure to the health care system. MRSE, the most prevalent species, may act as a reservoir of SCCmec IVa for CA-MRSA.

  19. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using the NanoLantern Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohsahl, Christopher M.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Krauss, Todd D.

    2009-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human illness, and has developed the remarkable ability to resist the bactericidal capabilities of many of the world's leading antibiotics (i.e. MRSA). In an effort to enable rapid detection and treatment of MRSA infections, we have developed a DNA detection technology termed the NanoLantern(TM). The NanoLantern(TM) biosensor technology is based on the simple immobilization of a fluorophore-terminated DNA hairpin onto a gold chip. This produces a label-free sensor that allows for a positive response to be obtained without extensive processing of the sample, saving cost and increasing accuracy. We will also discuss a newly developed method of partial gene analysis, used to develop a DNA hairpin probe that is capable of detecting the presence of the mecR gene, a gene necessary for methicillin resistance to be present in S. aureus, with 100% sequence specificity. The successful incorporation of this probe into the NanoLantern(TM) platform, along with the concomitant development of the paired PCR assay has allowed for the successful detection of methicillin-resistance directly from a culture of S. aureus. These results represent an important step forward in terms of developing the ability to rapidly and effectively detect the presence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections.

  20. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from meat raw in Cartagena, Colombia

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    Lersy López Gutierrez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA isolated in establishments that commercialize raw ground beef and pork chops in Cartagena- Colombia. 160 samples were analyzed through microbiological cultures in Baire Parcker agar, and it was determined the presence of mecA gen that codifies the methicillin resistance and the pvl that codifies the Panton- Valentine leukocidin toxin (PVL by the multiplex PCR technique. The antibiotic susceptibility profile for MRSA strains was realized by automatized methods and for MSSA strains it was used Kirby Bauver. 66 samples were confirmed as S. aureus by PCR. The prevalence of MRSA was 7.5% and 33.8% of MSSA. The 66% of the strains were isolated from raw ground beef and the 34% of pork chop meat. The isolations presented about 2 – 12% of multi-resistance to the antibiotics used. The MRSA showed resistance to amoxicillin- clavulanate (57%, ampicillin-sulbactam and cefazolin (85%, erythromycin and clindamycin (7%, tetracycline (35%. The 10% of the isolated strains had the gen of PVL toxin and the 71% of those were identified in samples of raw pork meat and the 28% in raw ground beef. This study reports for the first time, how meat raw products commercialized in the city of Cartagena could build a dissemination source of MRSA carrier of PVL toxin that could generate a public health disease.

  1. In vitro susceptibility of chloramphenicol against methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayyaz, M.; Mirza, I.A.; Hussain, A.; Abbasi, S.A.; Ali, S.; Ahmed, Z.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the in vitro susceptibility of chloramphenicol against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, from January to June 2012. Methodology: One hundred and seventy four isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were included in this study using cefoxitin (30 A g) disc for detection. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of chloramphenicol against MRSA was determined by using E-strip (AB BIO DISK). The susceptibility was determined by swabbing the Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA) plates with the resultant saline suspension of MRSA and applying E-strip of chloramphenicol from AB Biodisk Sweden and determining the MIC of chloramphenicol (in A g/ml). Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) recommendations of A=8 A g/ml being sensitive, 16 A g/ml as intermediate and A 32 A g/ml as resistant were followed in interpreting the results. Results: Out of the 174 MRSA isolates, 132 (75.86%) isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol with MICs of A=8 A g/ml, 38 (21.84%) were resistant A=32 A g/ml while 4 (2.30%) were in intermediate range with MIC of 16 A g/ml. Conclusion: Chloramphenicol has shown good in vitro activity against MRSA and is likely to have a key role in the treatment of MRSA infections providing us a good alternative to newer expensive antimicrobials in resource limited countries. (author)

  2. Characterization of New Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) and Topoisomerase Genes in Fluoroquinolone- and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius▿

    OpenAIRE

    Descloux, Sybill; Rossano, Alexandra; Perreten, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone- and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates harbor two new staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements that belong to class A, allotype 3 (SCCmec II-III), and to the new allotype 5 (SCCmec VII). Analysis of the complete nucleotide sequences of the topoisomerase loci gyrB/gyrA and grlB/grlA revealed mutations involved in fluoroquinolone resistance.

  3. Characterization of new staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and topoisomerase genes in fluoroquinolone- and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descloux, Sybill; Rossano, Alexandra; Perreten, Vincent

    2008-05-01

    Fluoroquinolone- and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates harbor two new staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements that belong to class A, allotype 3 (SCCmec II-III), and to the new allotype 5 (SCCmec VII). Analysis of the complete nucleotide sequences of the topoisomerase loci gyrB/gyrA and grlB/grlA revealed mutations involved in fluoroquinolone resistance.

  4. Characterization of mannitol-fermenting methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from pigs in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford C. Ugwu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the species distribution, antimicrobial resistance pheno- and genotypes and virulence traits of mannitol-positive methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS isolated from pigs in Nsukka agricultural zone, Nigeria. Twenty mannitol-positive methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococcal (MRCoNS strains harboring the mecA gene were detected among the 64 Staphylococcus isolates from 291 pigs. A total of 4 species were identified among the MRCoNS isolates, namely, Staphylococcus sciuri (10 strains, Staphylococcus lentus (6 strains, Staphylococcus cohnii (3 strains and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (one strain. All MRCoNS isolates were multidrug-resistant. In addition to β-lactams, the strains were resistant to fusidic acid (85%, tetracycline (75%, streptomycin (65%, ciprofloxacin (65%, and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (60%. In addition to the mecA and blaZ genes, other antimicrobial resistance genes detected were tet(K, tet(M, tet(L, erm(B, erm(C, aacA-aphD, aphA3, str, dfrK, dfrG, catpC221, and catpC223. Thirteen isolates were found to be ciprofloxacin-resistant, and all harbored a Ser84Leu mutation within the QRDR of the GyrA protein, with 3 isolates showing 2 extra substitutions, Ser98Ile and Arg100Lys (one strain and Glu88Asp and Asp96Thr (2 strains. A phylogenetic tree of the QRDR nucleotide sequences in the gyrA gene revealed a high nucleotide diversity, with several major clusters not associated with the bacterial species. Our study highlights the possibility of transfer of mecA and other antimicrobial resistance genes from MRCoNS to pathogenic bacteria, which is a serious public health and veterinary concern.

  5. Characterization of mannitol-fermenting methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from pigs in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugwu, Clifford C.; Gomez-Sanz, Elena; Agbo, Ifeoma C.; Torres, Carmen; Chah, Kennedy F.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the species distribution, antimicrobial resistance pheno- and genotypes and virulence traits of mannitol-positive methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) isolated from pigs in Nsukka agricultural zone, Nigeria. Twenty mannitol-positive methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococcal (MRCoNS) strains harboring the mecA gene were detected among the 64 Staphylococcus isolates from 291 pigs. A total of 4 species were identified among the MRCoNS isolates, namely, Staphylococcus sciuri (10 strains), Staphylococcus lentus (6 strains), Staphylococcus cohnii (3 strains) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (one strain). All MRCoNS isolates were multidrug-resistant. In addition to β-lactams, the strains were resistant to fusidic acid (85%), tetracycline (75%), streptomycin (65%), ciprofloxacin (65%), and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (60%). In addition to the mecA and blaZ genes, other antimicrobial resistance genes detected were tet(K), tet(M), tet(L), erm(B), erm(C), aacA-aphD, aphA3, str, dfrK, dfrG, cat pC221, and cat pC223. Thirteen isolates were found to be ciprofloxacin-resistant, and all harbored a Ser84Leu mutation within the QRDR of the GyrA protein, with 3 isolates showing 2 extra substitutions, Ser98Ile and Arg100Lys (one strain) and Glu88Asp and Asp96Thr (2 strains). A phylogenetic tree of the QRDR nucleotide sequences in the gyrA gene revealed a high nucleotide diversity, with several major clusters not associated with the bacterial species. Our study highlights the possibility of transfer of mecA and other antimicrobial resistance genes from MRCoNS to pathogenic bacteria, which is a serious public health and veterinary concern. PMID:26413075

  6. Characterization of mannitol-fermenting methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from pigs in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugwu, Clifford C; Gomez-Sanz, Elena; Agbo, Ifeoma C; Torres, Carmen; Chah, Kennedy F

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the species distribution, antimicrobial resistance pheno- and genotypes and virulence traits of mannitol-positive methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) isolated from pigs in Nsukka agricultural zone, Nigeria. Twenty mannitol-positive methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococcal (MRCoNS) strains harboring the mecA gene were detected among the 64 Staphylococcus isolates from 291 pigs. A total of 4 species were identified among the MRCoNS isolates, namely, Staphylococcus sciuri (10 strains), Staphylococcus lentus (6 strains), Staphylococcus cohnii (3 strains) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (one strain). All MRCoNS isolates were multidrug-resistant. In addition to β-lactams, the strains were resistant to fusidic acid (85%), tetracycline (75%), streptomycin (65%), ciprofloxacin (65%), and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (60%). In addition to the mecA and blaZ genes, other antimicrobial resistance genes detected were tet(K), tet(M), tet(L), erm(B), erm(C), aacA-aphD, aphA3, str, dfrK, dfrG, cat pC221, and cat pC223. Thirteen isolates were found to be ciprofloxacin-resistant, and all harbored a Ser84Leu mutation within the QRDR of the GyrA protein, with 3 isolates showing 2 extra substitutions, Ser98Ile and Arg100Lys (one strain) and Glu88Asp and Asp96Thr (2 strains). A phylogenetic tree of the QRDR nucleotide sequences in the gyrA gene revealed a high nucleotide diversity, with several major clusters not associated with the bacterial species. Our study highlights the possibility of transfer of mecA and other antimicrobial resistance genes from MRCoNS to pathogenic bacteria, which is a serious public health and veterinary concern.

  7. Wounds, Functional Disability, and Indwelling Devices Are Associated With Cocolonization by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci in Southeast Michigan

    OpenAIRE

    Flannery, Erika L.; Wang, Linda; Zöllner, Sebastian; Foxman, Betsy; Mobley, Harry L. T.; Mody, Lona

    2011-01-01

    Cocolonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) is a precursor to vancomycin-resistant S. aureus emergence. MRSA/VRE cocolonization incidence is higher among skilled nursing facility residents with functional disability and indwelling devices and occurs more frequently in wounds than other anatomical sites.

  8. Fluoroquinolone Impact on Nasal Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Durations in Neurologic Long-Term-Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couderc, Clotilde; Thiébaut, Anne C M; Lawrence, Christine; Bouchiat, Coralie; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Salomon, Jérôme; Guillemot, Didier

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is a risk factor for subsequent infection. Estimates of colonization duration vary widely among studies, and factors influencing the time to loss of colonization, especially the impact of antibiotics, remain unclear. We conducted a prospective study on patients naive for S. aureus colonization in 4 French long-term-care facilities. Data on nasal colonization status and potential factors for loss of colonization were collected weekly. We estimated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) colonization durations using the Kaplan-Meier method and investigated factors for loss of colonization using shared-frailty Cox proportional hazards models. A total of 285 S. aureus colonization episodes were identified in 149 patients. The median time to loss of MRSA or MSSA colonization was 3 weeks (95% confidence interval, 2 to 8 weeks) or 2 weeks (95% confidence interval, 2 to 3 weeks), respectively. In multivariable analyses, the methicillin resistance phenotype was not associated with S. aureus colonization duration (P = 0.21); the use of fluoroquinolones (hazard ratio, 3.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.31 to 8.71) and having a wound positive for a nonnasal strain (hazard ratio, 2.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.15 to 4.07) were associated with earlier loss of MSSA colonization, while no factor was associated with loss of MRSA colonization. These results suggest that the methicillin resistance phenotype does not influence the S. aureus colonization duration and that fluoroquinolones are associated with loss of MSSA colonization but not with loss of MRSA colonization. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Mechanisms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia-induced intestinal epithelial apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Erin E; Jung, Enjae; Breed, Elise; Dominguez, Jessica A; Liang, Zhe; Clark, Andrew T; Dunne, W Michael; Burd, Eileen M; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2012-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia-induced sepsis is a common cause of morbidity in the intensive care unit. Although pneumonia is initiated in the lungs, extrapulmonary manifestations occur commonly. In light of the key role the intestine plays in the pathophysiology of sepsis, we sought to determine whether MRSA pneumonia induces intestinal injury. FVB/N mice were subjected to MRSA or sham pneumonia and killed 24 h later. Septic animals had a marked increase in intestinal epithelial apoptosis by both hematoxylin-eosin and active caspase 3 staining. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus-induced intestinal apoptosis was associated with an increase in the expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bid and Bax and the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the mitochondrial pathway. In the receptor-mediated pathway, MRSA pneumonia induced an increase in Fas ligand but decreased protein levels of Fas, FADD, pFADD, TNF-R1, and TRADD. To assess the functional significance of these changes, MRSA pneumonia was induced in mice with genetic manipulations in proteins in either the mitochondrial or receptor-mediated pathways. Both Bid-/- mice and animals with intestine-specific overexpression of Bcl-2 had decreased intestinal apoptosis compared with wild-type animals. In contrast, Fas ligand-/- mice had no alterations in apoptosis. To determine if these findings were organism-specific, similar experiments were performed in mice subjected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced gut apoptosis, but unlike MRSA, this was associated with increased Bcl-2 and TNF-R1 and decreased Fas. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus pneumonia thus induces organism-specific changes in intestinal apoptosis via changes in both the mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways, although the former may be more functionally significant.

  10. Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Carriage Methicillin-Resistant Coagulase Negative Staphylococci in School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iravani Mohammad Abadi, Mohammad; Moniri, Rezvan; Khorshidi, Ahmad; Piroozmand, Ahmad; Mousavi, Seyed Gholam Abbas; Dastehgoli, Kamran; Mirzaei Ghazikalayeh, Hamed

    2015-06-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are opportunistic pathogens. Methicillin resistance is common in CoNS and may play an important role as reservoir of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) for Staphylococcus aureus. The aim of this study was to determine molecular characteristics of nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci among students. MR-CoNS from both nares of students were collected. Resistance to methicillin was determined by cefoxitin (30μg) disk diffusion test. SCCmec typing was performed using multiplex PCR by mec complex classes and ccr genes. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were determined on Mueller-Hinton agar according to CLSI. A total of 600 consecutive students were enrolled in this study; 430 of whom (71.7%) had CoNS. Seventy-two MR-CoNS strains, 21 (29.2%) S. lugdunensis, 17 (23.6%) S. haemolyticus, 17 (23.6%) S. saprophyticus, 9 (12.5%) S. epidermidis and 8 (11.1%) S. schleiferi were isolated. MR-CoNS rate in nasal carriage was 16.7%. All strains were susceptible to vancomycin. Forty-eight (66.7%) had a single SCCmec type including types I (n = 5), II (n = 4), III (n = 7), IV (n = 19) and V (n = 13), whereas 5 (6.9%) had two types including III + IV (n = 2), III + V (n = 1) and IV + V (n = 2). Nineteen strains (26.4%) were non-typeable for their SCCmec and ccr. Types IV and V SCCmec were associated with S. lugdunensis and S. haemolyticus, respectively. SCCmec types IV and V were prevalent in MR-CoNS and few isolates could harbor more than one type.

  11. What’s in a Name? Is Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Just Another S aureus When Treated with Vancomycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    of test to detect methicilin - resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureua. J Clin their longer hospitalizations and more severe injuries, had Microbiot...10u f DMRMM STAUXN PLIPoove to lo pu~bi~c releaseB - - 1 C6 01 In SWhat’s in a Name? Is Methicillin- Resistant <Staphylococcus aureus Just Another S... resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, hospital and the community, infections caused by these new principally resistant to penicilllnase

  12. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in horses and horse personnel: An investigation of several outbreaks

    OpenAIRE

    Duijkeren, E. van; Moleman, M.; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M.M.; Multem, J.D.; Troelstra, A.; Fluit, A.C.; Wamel, W.J.B. van; Houwers, D.J.; Neeling, A.J. de; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    At the Veterinary Microbiological Diagnostic Center, the Netherlands, the percentage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates found in equine clinical samples increased from 0% in 2002 to 37% in 2008. MRSA of spa-type t064, belonging to MLST ST8 and spa-types t011 and t2123, both belonging to the livestock-associated MLST ST398, predominated. During an outbreak of post-surgical MRSA infections in horses at a veterinary teaching hospital in2006/2007,MRSAisolates of spa-ty...

  13. Colonization of butchers with livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boost, Maureen; Ho, J.; Guardabassi, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Reports have documented colonization of swine in Europe, North America and more recently in China with livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA). Contamination of pig farmers, veterinarians and abattoir workers with these strains has been observed. However, although......), colonizing two subjects at the same establishment, and single isolates of t008 (CC8), t002 (CC5) and t123 (CC45). The remaining isolates were t359 (CC97), previously reported from buffaloes, and t375 (CC5), reported from bovine milk. None of these butchers reported recent hospitalization or a healthcare...

  14. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Trinidad & Tobago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteil Michele

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has become increasingly prevalent worldwide since it was first reported in a British hospital. The prevalence however, varies markedly in hospitals in the same country, and from one country to another. We therefore sought to document comprehensively the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of MRSA isolates in Trinidad and Tobago. Methods All Staphylococcus aureus isolates encountered in routine clinical specimens received at major hospitals in the country between 2000 and 2001 were identified morphologically and biochemically by standard laboratory procedures including latex agglutination test (Staphaurex Plus; Murex Diagnostics Ltd; Dartford, England; tube coagulase test with rabbit plasma (Becton, Dickinson & Co; Sparks, MD, USA, and DNase test using DNase agar (Oxoid Ltd; Basingstoke, Hampshire, England. MRSA screening was performed using Mueller-Hinton agar containing 6 μg oxacillin and 4% NaCl, latex agglutination test (Denka Seiken Co. Ltd, Tokyo, Japan and E-test system (AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by the modified Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method while methicillin MICs were determined with E-test system. Results Of 1,912 S. aureus isolates received, 12.8% were methicillin (oxacillin resistant. Majority of the isolates were recovered from wound swabs (86.9% and the least in urine (0.4% specimens. Highest number of isolates was encountered in the surgical (62.3% and the least from obstetrics and gynaecology (1.6% facilities respectively. Large proportions of methicillin sensitive isolates are >85% sensitive to commonly used and available antimicrobials in the country. All MRSA isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone, erythromycin, gentamicin and penicillin but were 100% sensitive to vancomycin, rifampin and chloramphenicol. Conclusion There is a progressive increase in MRSA prevalence in the country but

  15. Phylogeographic variation in recombination rates within a global clone of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo-Ramirez, Santiago; Corander, Jukka; Marttinen, Pekka

    2012-01-01

    by employing a recently developed Bayesian approach, BRATNextGen, for detecting recombination on an expanded NGS dataset of the globally disseminated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clone ST239. RESULTS: The data confirm strong geographical clustering at continental, national and city scales...... that the rapid global dissemination of a single pathogenic bacterial clone results in local variation in measured recombination rates. Possible explanatory variables include the size and time since emergence of each defined sub-population (as determined by the sampling frame), variation in transmission dynamics...

  16. Severe invasive methicillin-resistant S. aureus (USA300 clone infection in an Italian adolescent

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    Piero Valentini

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This report describes an uncommon presentation of invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA infection in an immunocompetent adolescent without any other risk factor, characterized by septicaemia, meningitis, necrotising pneumonia and deep venous thrombosis (DVT. Successful treatment was performed with linezolid, rifampicin and low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH. MRSA molecular typing revealed the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL gene, and a genetic background identical to USA300 clone, an emerging aggressive CA-MRSA strain in USA and Europe.

  17. Frequent emergence and limited geographic dispersal of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nubel, U.; Roumagnac, P.; Feldkamp, M.

    2008-01-01

    of mutational steps that define geographically associated clades. These clades are not concordant with previously described groupings based on staphylococcal protein A gene (spa) typing. By mapping the number of independent imports of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome methicillin-resistance island, we also...... show that import has occurred on at least 23 occasions within this single sequence type and that the progeny of such recombinant strains usually are distributed locally rather than globally. These results provide strong evidence that geographical spread of MRSA over long distances and across cultural...

  18. Zeroing in on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: US Department of Veterans Affairs' MRSA Prevention Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralovic, Stephen M; Evans, Martin E; Simbartl, Loretta A; Ambrose, Meredith; Jain, Rajiv; Roselle, Gary A

    2013-05-01

    Implementation of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Prevention Initiative within US Department of Veterans Affairs medical facilities was associated with a significant reduction in MRSA health care-associated infection (HAI) rates nationwide. The first 36 months of data from the Initiative were analyzed to determine how many facilities reported zero MRSA HAIs each month. From October 2007 through September 2010, there was a 37.6% increase nationwide in the number of facilities achieving zero MRSA HAIs each month. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  19. Prevention and Control of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Acute Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andie S; Huttner, Benedikt; Harbarth, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a leading cause of health care-associated infections worldwide. Controversies with regard to the effectiveness of various MRSA control strategies have contributed to varying approaches to the control of this pathogen in different settings. However, new evidence from large-scale studies has emerged, particularly with regards to MRSA screening and decolonization strategies, which will inform future control practices. The implementation as well as outcomes of control measures in the real world is not only influenced by scientific evidence but also depends on economic, administrative, governmental, and political influences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Endemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Nurses' risk perceptions and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Ana Luisa; Sousa-Uva, António; Pina, Elaine

    2014-10-01

    Dissemination of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains one of the most difficult challenges for prevention, control, and treatment of health care-associated infections. A survey and interviews were conducted on nurses from a hospital center. We found that most nurses' perceived risk of acquiring MRSA related to themselves (72%), other nurses (88.5%), and patients (97.8%). This perception influences attitudes, leading to compliance with the existing recommendations. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence and genotypic relatedness of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a tertiary care hospital

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    B A Fomda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is the most common multidrug-resistant pathogen causing nosocomial infections across the world. MRSA is not only associated with significant mortality and morbidity but also places a large economic strain on our health care system. MRSA isolates are also typically resistant to multiple, non-β-lactam antibiotics. We conducted a prospective study in a tertiary care hospital, to determine the prevalence of MRSA and to establish the clonal distribution of MRSA isolates recovered from various clinical specimens. Materials and Methods: Clinical samples were cultured and S. aureus was identified as per standard microbiological procedures. Susceptibility testing was done by agar disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC method as recommended by CLSI. Methicillin resistance was detected by phenotypic methods namely, oxacillin disc diffusion (ODD, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of oxacillin, cefoxitin disk diffusion (CDD, and MIC of cefoxitin. Amplification of mecA gene by PCR was used as gold standard for detection of methicillin resistance. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE typing was performed for MRSA isolates. Results: Out of 390 S. aureus isolates, 154 (39.48% isolates were MRSA and 236 (60.51% isolates were MSSA. Penicillin was the least effective antibacterial drug against the hospital associated S. aureus isolates with 85.64% resistance rate. All the isolates were susceptible to vancomycin. The MRSA showed a high level of resistance to all antimicrobials in general in comparison to the MSSA and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05. Multiplex PCR performed for all strains showed amplification of both the mecA and nucA genes in MRSA strains whereas MSSA strains showed amplification of only nucA gene. PFGE of these isolates showed 10 different patterns. Conclusion: Prevalence of MRSA in our hospital was 39.48%. Most of these isolates were

  2. Antibiotics for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections: the challenge of outpatient therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Amy J; Terribilini, Reno Giovonni; Ghobadi, Farzaneh; Azhir, Alaleh; Barber, Andre; Pearson, Julie Marie; Kalantari, Hossein; Hassen, Getaw W

    2014-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are becoming increasingly prevalent in both community and hospital settings. Certain strains are notorious for causing skin and soft tissue infections in patients with no established risk factors. In this article, we report our findings on the dynamic antibiotic resistance pattern of MRSA and outpatient prescription trend for skin and soft tissue infections within our community. We conducted a retrospective medical record review of 1876 patients evaluated in the emergency department of an urban community hospital from 2003 to 2012. Data regarding culture isolates and associated antimicrobial resistance, antibiotic treatment, site of specimen collection, age, race, and sex were collected and analyzed. Analysis of 1879 culture specimens yielded 2193 isolates. In some cases, a single specimen yielded polymicrobial growth. Staphylococcus aureus represented 996 isolates (45.4%); 463 were methicillin-susceptible (21.1%) and 533 (24.3%) were methicillin-resistant. Most patients were prescribed a single- or poly-drug regimen of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, cephalexin, and clindamycin. Antimicrobial resistance analysis indicated that MRSA became increasingly resistant to the aforementioned antibiotics over time: 10% and 6% in 2012 vs 3.5% and 3.4% in 2007 for clindamycin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, respectively. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a particularly virulent, rapidly adaptive pathogen that is becoming increasingly difficult to combat with existing antibiotics. Care must be taken to ensure appropriate treatment and follow-up of patients with known MRSA infections. © 2013.

  3. The changing face of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is an important cause of infection, both in hospitalised patients with significant healthcare exposure and in patients without healthcare risk factors. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA are known for their rapid community transmission and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia. The distinction between the healthcare-associated (HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA is gradually fading owing to the acquisition of multiple virulence factors and genetic elements. The movement of CA-MRSA strains into the nosocomial setting limits the utility of using clinical risk factors alone to designate community or HA status. Identification of unique genetic characteristics and genotyping are valuable tools for MRSA epidemiological studies. Although the optimum pharmacotherapy for CA-MRSA infections has not been determined, many CA-MRSA strains remain broadly susceptible to several non-β-lactam antibacterial agents. This review aimed at illuminating the characteristic features of CA-MRSA, virulence factors, changing clinical settings and molecular epidemiology, insurgence into the hospital settings and therapy with drug resistance.

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Papua New Guinea: a community nasal colonization prevalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laman, Moses; Greenhill, Andrew; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Robinson, Owen; Pearson, Julie; Davis, Timothy M E; Manning, Laurens

    2017-08-01

    There are few epidemiological data available to inform a national response to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Papua New Guinea (PNG). We performed a cross-sectional survey to determine the pattern of MRSA nasal colonization and the diversity of circulating MRSA clones among adults and adolescents in Madang Province, PNG. S. aureus nasal colonization was confirmed in 44 (17.1%) of 257 participants. Four (9.1%) isolates were methicillin resistant. Resistance to other antimicrobial agents was uncommon. Detailed molecular typing of three MRSA isolates demonstrated multiple MRSA clones in this community, of which two carried the Panton-Valentin leukocidin-associated virulence genes. MRSA is likely to account for a clinically important proportion of staphylococcal disease in PNG. There are multiple MRSA clones in PNG. Ongoing surveillance of community and invasive isolates is a critical component of an effective response to the challenge of community-acquired MRSA in this and many other resource-limited contexts. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The Pleiotropic Antibacterial Mechanisms of Ursolic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Min; Jhan, Yun-Lian; Tsai, Shang-Jie; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2016-07-07

    (1) BACKGROUND: Several triterpenoids were found to act synergistically with classes of antibiotic, indicating that plant-derived chemicals have potential to be used as therapeutics to enhance the activity of antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, the mode of action of triterpenoids against bacterial pathogens remains unclear. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between ursolic acid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); (2) METHODS: The ability of ursolic acid to damage mammalian and bacterial membranes was examined. The proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in ursolic acid treatment was investigated using two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis; (3) RESULTS: Ursolic acid caused the loss of staphylococcal membrane integrity without hemolytic activity. The comparison of the protein pattern of ursolic acid-treated and normal MRSA cells revealed that ursolic acid affected a variety of proteins involved in the translation process with translational accuracy, ribonuclease and chaperon subunits, glycolysis and oxidative responses; (4) CONCLUSION: The mode of action of ursolic acid appears to be the influence on the integrity of the bacterial membrane initially, followed by inhibition of protein synthesis and the metabolic pathway. These findings reflect that the pleiotropic effects of ursolic acid against MRSA make it a promising antibacterial agent in pharmaceutical research.

  6. New recommendations for disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility tests for methicillin-resistant (heteroresistant) staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougal, L K; Thornsberry, C

    1984-01-01

    The agar disk diffusion susceptibility test was reevaluated for its ability to discriminate between susceptible and resistant Staphylococcus aureus (128 strains) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (19 strains) when tested with methicillin, oxacillin, and nafcillin. The results show that the current recommendations for disk potencies and interpretive zone diameters do not fit well with MIC correlates that we now recommend. Based on data from this study, we suggest that these parameters of the test be changed. For methicillin, we recommend a 10-micrograms disk with breakpoints of less than or equal to 11 mm (greater than or equal to 16 micrograms/ml) to indicate resistance and greater than or equal to 15 mm (less than or equal to 4 micrograms/ml) to indicate susceptibility. For oxacillin and nafcillin, we recommend 4-micrograms disks with breakpoints of less than or equal to 12 mm (greater than or equal to 8 micrograms/ml) to indicate resistance and greater than or equal to 16 mm (less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml) to indicate susceptibility. MIC breakpoints were from a broth microdilution system which used a medium containing salt. If one of these three penicillins were to be selected for routine tests, we would recommend oxacillin, based on our data, but we recognize that this may depend upon the population of staphylococci within a particular hospital. Images PMID:6562125

  7. Nasal and hand carriage rate of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among health care workers in Mekelle Hospital, North Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreyesus, Araya; Gebre-Selassie, Solomon; Mihert, Adane

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is significant major pathogen responsible for hospital and community based infections. The aim of this study was to assess the nasal and hand carriage of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in health care workers of Mekelle Hospital The study was carried out during November 2010 to January 2011. Swab samples from both anterior nares and hands were taken. The samples were cultured on mannitol salt agar and incubated aerobically at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. Staphylococcus aureus was identified as nmannitol fermenter and coagulase test positive. Antimicrobial susceptibility test for MRSA was done by disk diffusion method using oxacillin disks. Data were analysed using SPSS version 16 software. Out of the 177 health care workers screened, 36 (20.3%) of them were methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers in their hand and anterior nares. More females, 25(14.1%) were colonized by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus than males 11 (6.2%) (P = 0.044). Nasal carriage of MRSA of 25 (14.1%) was higher than hand carriage 11 (6.2%) (p resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage rates of 26 (13.6%) and 4 (2.3%), respectively. The isolated MRSA were resistant to multiple antibiotics. The highest resistance was observed for ampicillin (88.9%) and tetracycline (86.1%). Two (5.6%) of the nasal isolates were vancomycin resistant. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage among health care workers in this study was high. The carriage rate was higher among nurses and doctors. The MRSA isolates were multi drug resistant to other antibiotics. So, the result of this study emphasizes the need of regular surveillance of health care workers. It also calls a need for an effective infection prevention and control program.

  8. SCC mec typing and antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from pigs of Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkhowa, S; Sarma, D K; Pegu, S R

    2016-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important pathogens of both humans and animal. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important human pathogen that causes serious infections both in hospitals and communities due to its multidrug resistance tendency. This study was undertaken to characterize the MRSA isolates from pigs and to determine the antimicrobial resistance of these isolates. Forty nine MRSA strains (one strain per positive pig) isolated from pigs of Northeast India were characterized by SCCmec typing and antimicrobial resistance. The overall prevalence of MRSA was 7.02 % with the highest prevalence recorded in pigs aged 1-3 months (P = 0.001) and in nasal samples (P = 0.005). Two SCC mec types (type III and V) were found in Indian pigs with predominance of type V. All isolates were resistant to penicillin. Seventeen resistance groups were observed where 87.75 % isolates showed multidrug resistance (showed resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobials). The most predominant resistance pattern observed was Oxytetracycline + Penicillin + Sulfadiazine + Tetracycline accounting 12.24 % of the isolates. The present study contributes to the understanding of characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of porcine MRSA isolates which in turn will help in devising strategy for the control of this pathogen. Findings of the study also throw light on multidrug resistance MRSA and emphasize the need for judicious use of antimicrobials in animal practice.

  9. Molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from a Brazilian university hospital

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    André Martins

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to perform SCCmec typing in Staphylococcus aureus isolates and to characterize the clonal profile of these isolates. Forty-six mecA gene-positive strains isolated between 2002 and 2006 were submitted to antimicrobial resistance testing by the E-test, SCCmec typing by multiplex PCR, and clonal profile analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Forty-one (89.1% isolates were typed as SCCmec III and five (10.9% as SCCmec IV. Four circulating clones were detected, one of them comprising isolates related to the Brazilian epidemic clone. This clone was detected throughout the study period. The SCCmec III isolates were associated with a high rate of multidrug resistance and clonal dissemination of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in the wards of the University Hospital of the Botucatu School of Medicine, Universidade Estadual Paulista.

  10. DQ High genotypic diversity among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from canine infections in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Peter; Moodley, Arshnee; Aalbaek, Bent

    2016-01-01

    -SCCmec IV and its single-and double-locus variants. These were susceptible to 4-7 of the 22 antibiotics tested, whereas CC71 isolates were susceptible to only 2-5 antibiotics. Clone-specific differences were especially pronounced for fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides with most CC71 isolates being......Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) has emerged globally in companion animals in the last decade. In Europe, the multidrug-resistant sequence type (ST) 71 is widespread, but recently other clones have appeared. The objective of this study was to examine...... genotypic diversity and antimicrobial resistance of clinical MRSP isolates obtained from dogs, including dogs sampled on multiple occasions, in Denmark over a six-year period. For that purpose a total of 46 clinical MRSP isolates obtained from 36 dogs between 2009 and 2014 were subjected to antimicrobial...

  11. Effect of Coat Layers in Bacillus Subtilis Spores Resistance to Photo-Catalytic Inactivation

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    Luz del Carmen Huesca-Espitia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Different water treatment processes (physical and chemical exist to obtain safe water for human or food industry supply. The advanced oxidation technologies are rising as a new alternative to eliminate undesirable chemicals and waterborne diseases. In this work, we analyze the power of the photo-assisted Fenton process using Fe(II/H2O2 and UV radiation (365 nm to inactivate Bacillus subtilis spores, considered among the most resistant biological structures known. Different concentrations of Fe(II, H2O2 and UV radiation (365 nm were used to inactivate wt and some coat spore mutants of B. subtilis. Wt spores of B. subtilis were inactivated after 60 min using this process. In general, all defective coat mutants were more sensitive than the wt spores and, particularly, the double mutant was 10 folds more sensitive than others being inactivated during the first 10 minutes using soft reaction conditions. Presence of Fe(II ions was found essential for spore inactivating process and, for those spores inactivated using the Fe(II/H2O2 under UV radiation process, it is suggested that coat structures are important to their resistance to the treatment process. The photo-assisted Fenton process using Fe(II, H2O2 and UV radiation (365 nm can be used to inactivate any water microorganisms with the same or less resistance that B. subtilis spores to produce safe drinking water in relatively short treatment time.

  12. Emergence of multiresistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in two patients with atopic dermatitis requiring linezolid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Jaime S; Ross, Lawrence A; Ong, Peck Y

    2014-01-01

    We report two patients with atopic dermatitis who developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin infections resistant to clindamycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole requiring repeated linezolid treatment. For one patient and family members who received an aggressive regimen of staphylococcal decolonization, including intranasal mupirocin, dilute bleach baths, and bleach cleansing of household items and surfaces, subsequent culture results demonstrated methicillin-susceptible S. aureus colonization and infection. These findings underscore the challenges presented by multiresistant MRSA infections in children with atopic dermatitis. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. In vitro activity of ceftaroline: A novel antibiotic against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    Vaishali Gaikwad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Staphylococcus is one of the most common causes of nosocomial infection, especially pneumonia, surgical site infections, blood stream infections, and continues to be a major cause of community-acquired infections. The emergence of penicillin resistance followed by the development and spread of strains resistant to the semisynthetic penicillins such as methicillin, oxacillin and nafcillin, macrolides, tetracycline, and aminoglycosides has made the treatment of staphylococcal infection a global challenge. To treat this multidrug-resistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, the only option available is glycopeptides such as vancomycin. However, recently, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus strains have emerged with different resistance mechanism. There are newer drugs in the pipeline against MRSA such as ceftaroline, dalbavancin, oritavancin, and tedizolid; however, very little data are available for their use. Recently, ceftaroline has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia due to MRSA. Hence, we tried to evaluate in vitro activity of ceftaroline against MRSA. Aim: The aim of this study was to detect in vitro activity of new cephalosporin, ceftaroline, against MRSA. Materials and Methods: Thirty nonduplicate MRSA strains were collected from various clinical samples, and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was detected using ceftaroline E-test strips. Results: Twenty-eight MRSA isolates (93.33% were found to be susceptible to ceftaroline. Conclusion: Ceftaroline demonstrated promising potency and coverage against MRSA isolates and can be considered an effective alternative treatment keeping vancomycin and linezolid as a reserved option.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from veterinary clinical cases in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluping, R P; Paul, N C; Moodley, A

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a leading aetiologic agent of pyoderma and other body tissue infections in dogs and cats. In recent years, an increased prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) has been reported. Isolation of MRSP in serious infections poses a major therapeutic challenge as strains are often resistant to all forms of systemic antibiotic used to treat S. pseudintermedius -related infections. This study investigates the occurrence of MRSP from a total of 7183 clinical samples submitted to the authors' laboratories over a 15-month period. Identification was based on standard microbiological identification methods, and by S. pseudintermedius-specific nuc polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methicillin resistance was confirmed by PBP2a latex agglutination and mecA PCR. Susceptibility against non-beta-lactam antibiotics was carried out using a disc-diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. In addition, susceptibility to pradofloxacin--a new veterinary fluoroquinolone--was also investigated. SCCmec types were determined by multiplex PCR. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was isolated from 391 (5%) samples and 20 were confirmed as MRSP from cases of pyoderma, otitis, wound infections, urinary tract infection and mastitis in dogs only. All 20 isolates were resistant to clindamycin and sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Nineteen were resistant to chloramphenicol, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, marbofloxacin and pradofloxacin; additionally, seven isolates were resistant to tetracycline. Fifteen isolates carried SCCmec type II-III, four isolates had type V and one harboured type IV. To date, only a few scientific papers on clinical MRSP strains isolated from the UK have been published, thus the results from this study would provide additional baseline data for further investigations.

  15. Transcriptional profiles of the response of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to pentacyclic triterpenoids.

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    Pooi Yin Chung

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen in both hospital and the community that has demonstrated resistance to all currently available antibiotics over the last two decades. Multidrug-resistant isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA exhibiting decreased susceptibilities to glycopeptides has also emerged, representing a crucial challenge for antimicrobial therapy and infection control. The availability of complete whole-genome nucleotide sequence data of various strains of S. aureus presents an opportunity to explore novel compounds and their targets to address the challenges presented by antimicrobial drug resistance in this organism. Study compounds α-amyrin [3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-3-ol (AM], betulinic acid [3β-hydroxy-20(29-lupaene-28-oic acid (BA] and betulinaldehyde [3β-hydroxy-20(29-lupen-28-al (BE] belong to pentacyclic triterpenoids and were reported to exhibit antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi, including S. aureus. The MIC values of these compounds against a reference strain of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA (ATCC 43300 ranged from 64 µg/ml to 512 µg/ml. However, the response mechanisms of S. aureus to these compounds are still poorly understood. The transcription profile of reference strain of MRSA treated with sub-inhibitory concentrations of the three compounds was determined using Affymetrix GeneChips. The findings showed that these compounds regulate multiple desirable targets in cell division, two-component system, ABC transporters, fatty acid biosynthesis, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, ribosome and β-lactam resistance pathways which could be further explored in the development of therapeutic agents for the treatment of S. aureus infections.

  16. Identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from burn patients by multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Effat Abbasi; Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Jolodar, Abbas; Ghaderpanah, Mozhgan; Azarpira, Samireh

    2015-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) as important human pathogens are causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. Burn patients are at a higher risk of local and systemic infections with these microorganisms. A screening method for MRSA by using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), mecA, and nuc genes was developed. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of this PCR assay for the detection of MRSA strains in samples from burn patients. During an 11-month period, 230 isolates (53.11%) of Staphylococcus spp. were collected from burn patients. The isolates were identified as S. aureus by using standard culture and biochemical tests. DNA was extracted from bacterial colonies and multiplex PCR was used to detect MRSA and MRCoNS strains. Of the staphylococci isolates, 149 (64.9%) were identified as S. aureus and 81 (35.21%) were described as CoNS. Among the latter, 51 (62.97%) were reported to be MRCoNS. From the total S. aureus isolates, 132 (88.6%) were detected as MRSA and 17 (11.4%) were methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). The presence of the mecA gene in all isolates was confirmed by using multiplex PCR as a gold standard method. This study presented a high MRSA rate in the region under investigation. The 16S rRNA-mecA-nuc multiplex PCR is a good tool for the rapid characterization of MRSA strains. This paper emphasizes the need for preventive measures and choosing effective antimicrobials against MRSA and MRCoNS infections in the burn units. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. [Activity of vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid in methicillin resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci isolates from paediatric blood cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo Olivares, Miguel; Hidalgo Orozco, Rocío; Rodríguez Garrido, Saray; Gaona Álvarez, Cristina; Sánchez Silos, Rosa María; Hernández Rastrollo, Ramón; Martínez Tallo, Emilia; Cordero Carrasco, Juan Luis

    2012-03-01

    Coagulase-negative-Staphylococci (CNS) are the major cause of bacteraemia and sepsis in newborns. CNS methicillin resistance and its loss of sensitivity to glycopeptide antibiotics, make treatment significantly more difficult in positive cocci infections. To study MIC vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid in different species of CNS methicillin resistant isolates from blood cultures from paediatric patients. Clinically relevant CNS methicillin resistant isolates from paediatric blood cultures from different hospitalization wards were tested. The isolates were identified by biochemical tests by means in the Combo panels 31 of MicroScan (Dade Behring, Siemens). Resistance to oxacillin and susceptibility to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid were tested by microdilution panels as cited above. We also tested teicoplanin and linezolid sensitivity using Etest. 50 methicillin resistant strains were isolated: 37 (74%)S. epidermidis, 7 (14%) S. hominis, 4 (8%) S. haemolyticus and 2 (4%) Staphylococcus spp. 26 strains were observed with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin MIC = 2 mg/L, (22 S. epidermidis, 2 S. haemolyticus and 2 Staphylococcus spp.) and 21 strains with loss of susceptibility to teicoplanin, MIC = 4-16 mg/L (20 S. epidermidis and 1 S. haemolyticus). No CNS linezolid resistant was found. There is a linear correlation between increased vancomycin MIC and teicoplanin MIC. There is a statistically significant difference (p <0.001) in the MIC of teicoplanin in the vancomycin group = 2 mg/L with respect to the vancomycin group ≤ 1 mg/L. We also observed very low levels of linezolid MIC for all strains.

  18. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococci on a farm: staff can harbour MRS when animals do not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, G de V; Maluta, R P; de Ávila, F A

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this work was to establish the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococci (MRS) in the animals and staff of a teaching and research farm. Samples of dairy cattle (36), beef cattle (26), sheep (19), horses (21), pigs (23), goats (23) and humans (13) were collected and screened for the presence of MRS. The detection of mecA gene was performed by PCR to determine the resistance of the samples to methicillin. Antimicrobial-resistance testing to penicillin, meropenem, ceftriaxone, cephalothin, oxacillin, levofloxacin, enrofloxacin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, clindamycin, erytromycin, linezolid, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, tetracycline, doxycycline and vancomycin was performed on the mecA+ isolates. From the 161 samples, four methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci (MRCoNS) were isolated from human beings (31%), whereas none was isolated from animals (0%). No methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were isolated. All of the MRCoNS isolates from this work presented different antimicrobial resistance patterns. MRCoNS may be present in humans associated with animals while not present in the animals. Selective pressure outside of the farm and a lack of MRCoNS transmission between humans and animals may be responsible for this lack of correlation. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Mupirocin resistance in clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from a tertiary care rural hospital

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    Charan Kaur Dardi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Mupirocin is a topical antibiotic that has been used extensively for treating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA associated infections. However, the prevalence of mupirocin-resistant MRSA has increased with the extensive and widespread use of this agent. The aim was to determine the rates of high-level and low-level mupirocin resistance in MRSA to study the antimicrobial resistance pattern and clindamycin resistance in mupirocin-resistant MRSA. Methods: A total of 267 non-duplicate clinical isolates of MRSA from various clinical specimens were tested for mupirocin resistance by the disk diffusion method using 5 and 200 μg mupirocin disks. MRSA isolates were tested for antibiotics by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method as per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Erythromycin-resistant isolates of MRSA were further studied for inducible clindamycin resistance by "D test" as per CLSI guidelines. Results: Of 267 MRSA isolates, high-level mupirocin resistance was observed in 5.99% and low-level resistance in 15.35%. Mupirocin-resistant MRSA isolates showed higher antibiotic resistance to fusidic acid (14.03% vs 7.14%, rifampicin (5.26% vs 2.38%, erythromycin (68.42% vs 58.57%, and clindamycin (52.63% vs 45.71%. No MRSA strains were found to be resistant to vancomycin and linezolid. Mupirocin-resistant MRSA isolates showed higher constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogamin B (cMLS B ; 51.28% vs 42.98% and inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogamin B (iMLS B ; 17.94% vs 13.15% resistance, as compared to mupirocin-sensitive MRSA isolates. Conclusion: The emergence of mupirocin resistance could be limited by regular surveillance and effective infection control initiatives so to inform health care facilities to guide therapeutic and prophylactic use of mupirocin.

  20. Prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Lumbini Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Palpa, Western Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Shristi; Bajracharya, Kishor; Adhikari, Janak; Pant, Sushama Suresh; Adhikari, Bipin

    2017-06-02

    Multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus is common in both tertiary and primary health care settings. Emergence of methicillin resistance in S. aureus (MRSA) along with macrolide, lincosamide, streptogramin B (MLSB) has made treatment of Staphylococcal infection more challenging. The main objective of this study was to detect MRSA, MLSB (inducible; MLSBi and constitutive; MLSBc) resistant S. aureus using phenotypic methods and to determine their antibiogram. Various samples were collected from 1981 patients who attended Lumbini Medical College and Teaching Hospital (LMCTH) during the period of 6 months from September 2015 to February 2016. Out of a total of 1981 samples, 133 S. aureus were isolated. Cefoxitin was used to detect MRSA by the disk diffusion test. Inducible clindamycin resistance (MLSBi) was detected by the D-zone test. The antibiotic profile of all isolates was tested by a modified Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method. Among 133 S. aureus, there were 58 (43.6%) MRSA, 34 (25.6%) MLSBi and 30 (22.6%) MLSBc. Of a total of 64 MLSB, a significant proportion (62.5%) was MRSA (p aureus, MRSA showed significant resistance to 9 (p resistance to multiple antibiotics (p resistance profiles from this study can optimize the treatment of multi-drug resistant S. aureus.

  1. PARTIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A LYTIC METHICILLIN RESISTANT-STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS BACTERIOPHAGE

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    Sulaiman Al-Yousef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A marked increase in the infection incidence caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains has been noted in medical practice in recent years. This study was conducted to study the biological and characterize of MRSA-phage. Methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus was detected and confirmed by determining of the MIC of oxacillin by the standard agar dilution method. Phage was biologically purified using single plaque technique, then phage characterization were studied using host range, adsorption time, particle morphology and its structural protein. MRSA phage showing lytic nature was purified by repeated plating after picking of single isolated plaques. This phage is active against all 11 isolates either of S. aureus or MRSA tested as hosts. Phage produced clear plaques indicating their lytic nature. This phage was concentrated employing polyethylene glycol (PEG-NaCl precipitation method. Morphologically, MRSA Phage has a hexagonal head having a long non-contractile tail, indicating his icosahedral nature. Adsorption studies showed 100% adsorption of MRSA-Phage after 35 minutes of exposure. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE experimentation indicated that the phage particles contain one major structural protein (about 30 Kda.

  2. Daptomycin approved in Japan for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    Mori T

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mao Hagihara1, Takumi Umemura1, Takeshi Mori1,2, Hiroshige Mikamo11Department of Infection Control and Prevention, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan; 2Division of Pharmaceutical Science, Faculty of Pharmacy, Meijo University, Nagoya, Aichi, JapanAbstract: Daptomycin is a lipoglycopeptide antibacterial drug that is rapidly bactericidal for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection and has antibiotic activity against a wide range of Gram-positive organisms. It has been approved by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in Japan for the treatment for bacteremia, right-sided endocarditis, and skin and skin-structure infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, due to MRSA on the basis of a Phase III trial conducted in Japan since July, 2011. In Japanese Phase I and III trials, daptomycin therapy given at 4 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg once per day was well tolerated and effective as standard therapy for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections and bacteremia caused by MRSA, but side effects remain to be evaluated in large-scale trials.Keywords: daptomycin, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Japan

  3. Bactericidal Effects of Charged Silver Nanoparticles in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Urbina, Dulce; Velazquez-Salazar, J. Jesus; Lara, Humberto H.; Arellano-Jimenez, Josefina; Larios, Eduardo; Yuan, Tony T.; Hwang, Yoon; Desilva, Mauris N.; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    The increased number of infections due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a major concern to society. The objective of this work is to determine the effect of positively charged AgNPs on methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) cell wall using advanced electron microscopy techniques. Positively charged AgNPs suspensions were synthesized via a microwave heating technique. The suspensions were then characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) showing AgNPs size range from 5 to 30 nm. MSSA and MRSA were treated with positively charged AgNPs concentrations ranging from 0.06 mM to 31 mM. The MIC50 studies showed that viability of MSSA and MRSA could be reduced by 50% at a positively charged AgNPs concentration of 0.12 mM supported by Scanning-TEM (STEM) images demonstrating bacteria cell wall disruption leading to lysis after treatment with AgNPs. The results provide insights into one mechanism in which positively charged AgNPs are able to reduce the viability of MSSA and MRSA. This research is supported by National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (G12MD007591) from NIH, NSF-PREM Grant No. DMR-0934218, The Welch Foundation and NAMRU-SA work number G1009.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at ambient freshwater beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Spencer, Chelsea

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a threat to human health worldwide, and although detected at marine beaches, they have been largely unstudied at freshwater beaches. Genes indicating S. aureus (SA; femA) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected at 11 and 12 of 13 US Great Lakes beaches and in 18% or 27% of 287 recreational water samples, respectively. Eight beaches had mecA + femA (potential MRSA) detections. During an intensive study, higher bather numbers, staphylococci concentrations, and femA detections were found in samples collected after noon than before noon. Local population density, beach cloud cover, and beach wave height were significantly correlated with SA or MRSA detection frequency. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, associated with community-acquired MRSA, was detected in 12 out of 27 potential MRSA samples. The femA gene was detected less frequently at beaches that met US enterococci criteria or EU enterococci ‘excellent’ recreational water quality, but was not related to Escherichia coli-defined criteria. Escherichia coli is often the only indicator used to determine water quality at US beaches, given the economic and healthcare burden that can be associated with infections caused by SA and MRSA, monitoring of recreational waters for non-fecal bacteria such as staphylococci and/or SA may be warranted.

  5. Short communication: Antimicrobial resistance and virulence characterization of methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolates from bovine mastitis cases in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seixas, R; Santos, J P; Bexiga, R; Vilela, C L; Oliveira, M

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) have already been reported as mastitis agents. Such bacterial species are a public health concern, and the characterization of their antimicrobial resistance and virulence profile is important to better control their dissemination. The present work evaluated the distribution of methicillin-resistance among 204 staphylococci from clinical (n=50) and subclinical (n=154) bovine mastitis. The presence ofthe mecA gene was determined by PCR. Phenotypic expression of coagulase, DNase, lipase, gelatinase, hemolytic enzymes, and biofilm production was evaluated. The presence of biofilm-related genes, icaA, icaD, and bap, was also determined. Antimicrobial resistance patterns for aminoglycosides, lincosamides, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, sulphonamides, tetracyclines, and fusidic acid were determined. Nineteen (9.3%) isolates were identified as MRS, and the presence of mecA in these isolates was confirmed by PCR. Virulence factors evaluation revealed that gelatinase was the most frequently detected (94.7%), followed by hemolysins (73.7%) and lipase (68.4%); 84.2% of the MRS isolates produced biofilm and icaA and icaD were detected in almost half of the MRS isolates (52.6%), but all were bap-negative. Resistance against other antimicrobial agents ranged from 0 (fusidic acid, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, enrofloxacin) to 100% (nalidixic acid). Resistance to nalidixic acid and nalidixic acid-tetracycline were the most common antimicrobial resistance profiles (31.6%). This study confirms that despite the low prevalence of MRS, isolates frequently express other virulence traits, especially biofilm, that may represent a serious challenge to clinicians. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci Isolated from Food Producing Animals: A Public Health Implication

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    Etinosa O. Igbinosa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in food animals is a potential public health concern. Staphylococci are a significant opportunistic pathogen both in humans and dairy cattle. In the present study, the genotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant staphylococcal strains recovered from dairy cattle in a rural community (Okada, Edo State, Nigeria was investigated. A total of 283 samples from cattle (137 milk samples and 146 nasal swabs were assessed between February and April 2015. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was employed for the detection of 16S rRNA, mecA and Panton-Valentine Leucocidinis (PVL genes. The staphylococcal strains were identified through partial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acids (rRNA nucleotide sequencing, and Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST analysis of the gene sequence showed that the staphylococcal strains have 96%–100% similarity to Staphylococcus aureus (30, S. epidermidis (17, S. haemolyticus (15, S. saprophyticus (13, S. chromogenes (8, S. simulans (7, S. pseudintermedius (6 and S. xylosus (4. Resistance of 100% was observed in all Staphylococcus spp. against MET, PEN, CLN, CHL and SXT. Multi-drug resistant (MDR bacteria from nasal cavities and raw milk reveals 13 isolates were MDR against METR, PENR, AMXR, CLNR, CHLR, SXTR CLXR, KANR, ERYR, and VANR. Of all isolates, 100% harboured the mecA gene, while 30% of the isolates possess the PVL gene. All S. aureus harboured the PVL gene while other Staphylococcus spp. were negative for the PVL gene. The presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. isolates in dairy cattle is a potential public health risk and thus findings in this study can be used as a baseline for further surveillance.

  7. High prevalence of methicillin resistant staphylococci strains isolated from surgical site infections in Kinshasa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyamba, Jean-Marie Liesse; Wambale, José Mulwahali; Lukukula, Cyprien Mbundu; za Balega Takaisi-Kikuni, Ntondo

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) after surgery are usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). In low income countries, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CNS) surgical site infections are particularly associated with high treatment cost and remain a source of mortality and morbidity. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and the sensitivity to antibiotics of MRSA and MR-CNS isolated from SSIs. Wound swabs were collected from 130 hospitalized surgical patients in two major hospitals of Kinshasa. S. aureus and CNS strains were identified by standard microbiological methods and latex agglutination test (Pastorex Staph-Plus). The antibiotic susceptibility of all staphylococcal strains was carried out using disk-diffusion method. Eighty nine staphylococcal strains were isolated. Out of 74 S. aureus and 15 CNS isolated, 47 (63.5%) and 9 (60%) were identified as MRSA and MR-CNS respectively. Among the MRSA strains, 47 strains (100%) were sensitive to imipenem, 39 strains (89%) to amoxycillin-clavulanic acid and 38 strains (81%) to vancomycin. All MR-CNS were sensitive to imipenem, amoxycillin-clavulanic acid and vancomycin. The isolated MRSA and MR-CNS strains showed multidrug resistance. They were both resistant to ampicillin, cotrimoxazole, erythromycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime and ceftazidime. The results of the present study showed a high prevalence of MRSA and MR-CNS. Imipenem, amoxycillin-clavulanic acid and vancomycin were the most active antibiotics. This study suggests that antibiotic surveillance policy should become national priority as MRSA and MR-CNS were found to be multidrug resistant.

  8. Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci Isolated from Food Producing Animals: A Public Health Implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbinosa, Etinosa O; Beshiru, Abeni; Akporehe, Lucy U; Ogofure, Abraham G

    2016-07-04

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in food animals is a potential public health concern. Staphylococci are a significant opportunistic pathogen both in humans and dairy cattle. In the present study, the genotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant staphylococcal strains recovered from dairy cattle in a rural community (Okada, Edo State, Nigeria) was investigated. A total of 283 samples from cattle (137 milk samples and 146 nasal swabs) were assessed between February and April 2015. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was employed for the detection of 16S rRNA, mec A and Panton-Valentine Leucocidinis (PVL) genes. The staphylococcal strains were identified through partial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acids (rRNA) nucleotide sequencing, and Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis of the gene sequence showed that the staphylococcal strains have 96%-100% similarity to Staphylococcus aureus (30), S. epidermidis (17), S. haemolyticus (15), S. saprophyticus (13), S. chromogenes (8), S. simulans (7), S. pseudintermedius (6) and S. xylosus (4). Resistance of 100% was observed in all Staphylococcus spp. against MET, PEN, CLN, CHL and SXT. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria from nasal cavities and raw milk reveals 13 isolates were MDR against MET R , PEN R , AMX R , CLN R , CHL R , SXT R CLX R , KAN R , ERY R , and VAN R . Of all isolates, 100% harboured the mec A gene, while 30% of the isolates possess the PVL gene. All S. aureus harboured the PVL gene while other Staphylococcus spp. were negative for the PVL gene. The presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. isolates in dairy cattle is a potential public health risk and thus findings in this study can be used as a baseline for further surveillance.

  9. Characterisation of SCCmec elements in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namvar, Amirmorteza Ebrahimzadeh; Afshar, Mastaneh; Asghari, Babak; Rastegar Lari, Abdolaziz

    2014-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen, especially in burn units all around the world. Because of the emergence of the β-lactam antibiotic-resistant strains since 1961, concern about the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has increased in these units. Resistance to methicillin is mediated by penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) that have enough affinity for binding to the β-lactam ring, but another kind of protein (PBP2α), which is encoded by the mecA gene, has a lower affinity for binding to these antibiotics. The mecA gene is transferred by SCCmec (staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec) as a mobile genetic element, exclusively found in the Staphylococcus genus. Identification of the frequency of the mecA gene, different SCCmec types and also its incidence may have benefit in surveillance prevention and control of MRSA strains in burn units. In this study, 40 S. aureus isolates were collected from patients hospitalised in Motahari burn center of Tehran, during 2012-2013. Conventional microbiological methods were applied and the confirmed isolates were stored at -20°C for molecular polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. The antibiotic resistance pattern was performed by disc diffusion method and finally the different SCCmec types were determined by specific primers. During this research, 40 isolates of S. aureus were collected from burn patients, of which (37.5%) of the specimens belonged to female patients and 62.5% to male patients. The aetiology of the burn was classified as follows: open flame (35%), liquid (32.5%), chemical (5%) and other (27.5%). By a disc diffusion method, no resistance pattern was observed to vancomycin and fosfomycin. Based on a multiplex PCR assay, the five different SCCmec types were detected as: 47.5% type III, 25% type IV, 10% type V, 10% type II and 7.5% type I. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. The Potent of Methanol Extracts of Cashew (Anacardium Occidentale L.) Against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (Mrsa)

    OpenAIRE

    Nursanty, Risa; Yunita, Yunita

    2012-01-01

    Use of antibiotics including misuse and overuse has aided natural bacterial evolution by helping the microbes become resistant such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The MRSA resistant in disease treatment with commonly used antibiotics needs new drug to treat patients. Traditional herb can be alternative treatment such as cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.). Antibacterial activities of methanol extracts of stem cashew with concentration 10%, 20% and 30% showed zone of inh...

  11. Effectiveness of simple control measures on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection status and characteristics with susceptibility patterns in a teaching hospital in Peshawar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Salman; Rafiq, Muhammad Imran; Khan, Taimur; Rafiq, Maria; Khan, Mah Muneer

    2015-09-01

    To determine the effectiveness of simple control measures on the infection status and characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus including susceptibility patterns among health professionals and patients in a teaching hospital. The cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2013 to January 2014, and comprised samples collected from healthcare personnel and patients in the various units of Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar. The specimens were collected before and one month after the implementation of simple control measures for outbreak prevention of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. These were tested for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility. Data about methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection, wound characteristics and susceptibility patterns was collected and effectiveness of simple control measures was determined. SPSS 20 was used for statistical analysis. Of the total 390 isolates, 180(46.2%) were Staphylococcus aureus; 77(19.7%) from healthcare personnel and 103(26.4%) from patients. Of these, 164(42.1%) were methicillin-sensitive and 16(4.1%) were methicillin-resistant. Among the patients, 38(15.1%) methicillin-sensitive and 8(3.2%) methicillin-resistant isolates were recovered from wounds or skin and soft tissues. Pus with 33(13.1%) and 4(1.6%) cases respectively was the second most common source. Among methicillin-resistant isolates, resistance to Linezolid was 0%, all were resistant to Oxacillin, Cefoxitin, Amoxicillin, Cefotaxime and Cephradine, and resistance to both Co-Amoxiclav and Ciprofloxacin was 87.5%. After one month of implementation of simple control measures, the number of methicillin-resistant cases among healthcare professionals and patients dropped from 4(2.9%) and 7(10.8%) to 1(0.7%) and 5(2.7%), respectively. Methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus differed in their anti-microbial susceptibility profiles. Selection of antibiotics

  12. Reflex influence of carotid baroreceptor inactivation on respiratory resistance in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klawe JJ

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Our previous study demonstrated that selective carotid baroreceptors activation decreases airway resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of carotid baroreceptor inactivation on the reflex change of respiratory resistance. Twenty healthy men aged between 20 and 25 were included in the study. Selective inactivation of carotid baroreceptors was induced by generating a positive pressure of 40 mmHg for 5 s in two capsules placed bilaterally on the neck over the bifurcation of the carotid arteries. The oscillatory method (Siregnost FD5, Siemens was used to measure continuously respiratory resistance. Inactivation of carotid baroreceptors produced a short increase in respiratory resistance by 0.39 ± 0.01(SE mbar/l/s, i.e., 21.7% above the resting level. We conclude that in humans, carotid baroreceptors might have a background contribution to bronchodilator tone. This observation seems to be important for clinical situations of impairment of baroreflex function.

  13. Chemical composition, antioxidant activity and in vitro antibacterial activity of Achillea wilhelmsii C. Koch essential oil on methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfatemi, Seyedeh Mahsan Hoseini; Rad, Javad Sharifi; Rad, Majid Sharifi; Mohsenzadeh, Sasan; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigated the chemical composition of the essential oil (EO) from aerial parts (flowering stage) of Achillea wilhelmsii C. Koch by GC-MS. In addition, the antioxidant activity of the EO as well as its antimicrobial activity against methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains was tested. Antioxidant activity was measured by the ability of the EO to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals while the antimicrobial activity was assessed by the disc-diffusion method. In total, 52 compounds were recognized, accounting for 97.33 % of the EO. The main compounds in the EO were carvacrol (22.49 %), dihydrocarvone (13.23 %), linalool (12 %), 1,8-cineol (11.42 %), camphene (8.31 %), thymol (5.28 %), camphor (3.71 %), pulegone (2.82 %) α-terpineol (2.11 %), bornyl acetate (1.14 %), and farganol (1.01 %). The EC 50 value of the EO was 0.01 and 0.08 mg/mL for the antioxidant and DPPH-scavenging ability, respectively. A. wilhelmsii EO affected methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA, but the impact was more effective on MSSA.

  14. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains resistant to multiple antibiotics and carrying the Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes in an Algiers hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdani-Bouguessa, Nadjia; Bes, Michèle; Meugnier, Hélène; Forey, Françoise; Reverdy, Marie-Elisabeth; Lina, Gerard; Vandenesch, François; Tazir, Mohamed; Etienne, Jerome

    2006-03-01

    Forty-five Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains were isolated in Algeria between 2003 and 2004; 18 isolates were isolated in the community and 27 in a hospital. Five PVL-positive hospital isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics, including ofloxacin and gentamicin for three isolates.

  15. ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF DRACONTOMELON DAO EXTRACTS ON METHICILLIN-RESISTANT S. AUREUS (MRSA) AND E. COLI MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANCE (MDR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuniati, Yuniati; Hasanah, Nurul; Ismail, Sjarif; Anitasari, Silvia; Paramita, Swandari

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus , methicillin-resistant and Escherichia coli , multidrug-resistant included in the list of antibiotic-resistant priority pathogens from WHO. As multidrug-resistant bacteria problem is increasing, it is necessary to probe new sources for identifying antimicrobial compounds. Medicinal plants represent a rich source of antimicrobial agents. One of the potential plants for further examined as antibacterial is Dracontomelon dao (Blanco) Merr. & Rolfe. The present study designed to find the antibacterial activity of D. dao stem bark extracts on Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and E. coli Multiple Drug Resistance (MDR), followed by determined secondary metabolites with antibacterial activity and determined the value of MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) and MBC (minimum bactericidal concentration). D. dao stem bark extracted using 60% ethanol. Disc diffusion test methods used to find the antibacterial activity, following by microdilution methods to find the value of MIC and MBC. Secondary metabolites with antibacterial activity determined by bioautography using TLC (thin layer chromatography) methods. D. dao stem bark extracts are sensitive to MSSA, MRSA and E.coli MDR bacteria. The inhibition zone is 16.0 mm in MSSA, 11.7 mm in MRSA and 10.7 mm in E. coli MDR. The entire MBC/MIC ratios for MSSA, MRSA and E.coli MDR is lower than 4. The ratio showed bactericidal effects of D. dao stem bark extracts. In TLC results, colorless bands found to be secondary metabolites with antibacterial activity. D. dao stem bark extracts are potential to develop as antibacterial agent especially against MRSA and E. coli MDR strain.

  16. Classification of Epidemic Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus by Anatomical Site of Isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill C. Roberts

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus contributes significantly to cost, morbidity, and mortality due to infectious disease. We surveyed community-associated MRSA isolates to determine which strains were present within anatomical sites of interest. The most likely sources of MRSA among anatomic sites swabbed were wounds followed by the nasal cavity. The USA 300 MRSA strain was most commonly isolated among wound infections while nasal swabs largely yielded USA 100 MRSA. The frequency of isolation of USA 100 amongst community-associated strains is clinically significant as this strain is often correlated with invasive disease, exhibits broad antibiotic resistance, and has been considered to be hospital associated. The potential of USA 100 to cause serious disease and the frequency of its isolation suggest an important reservoir for opportunistic infection. These data demonstrate that MRSA epidemic clones are widespread among the community.

  17. Current methodologies on genotyping for nosocomial pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jian; Chen, Lequn; Wang, Jingwen; Wang, Wenxin; Chen, Dingqiang; Li, Lin; Li, Bing; Deng, Yang; Xu, Zhenbo

    2017-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common pathogen in hospitals and the community. As the rapid spread and wide distribution of antimicrobial resistance (such as MRSA), treatment for infectious diseases caused by microorganisms has become a vital threat. Thus, early identification and genotyping are essential for further therapeutic treatment and the control of rapid expansion of MRSA. In combination with applications and data feedbacks, this review focused on the currently available molecular-based assays on their utility and performance for rapid typing of MRSA, especially on effective molecular-based methods. Besides, a common mobile element SCCmec and prevalence of HA-MRSA, LA-MRSA and CA-MRSA were introduced in this review in order to provide a more complete profile of MRSA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antibacterial and anti-hemolytic activity of tannins from Pimenta dioica against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reham Al-Harbi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available High rate of resistance among Staphylococcus infection initiates scientists to discover new antibiotics. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of tannins isolated from the Pimenta dioica leaves on Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant S. aureus as well as to evaluate their effect on hemolysin production. The antimicrobial activity of 4,6-(S-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-(α/β-D-glucopyranose and casuarinin, pedunculagin and nilocitin tannins from P. dioica was examined using agar diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentrations were evaluated by microtiter plate assay method. Pedunculagin and nilocitin exhibited antibacterial and anti-hemolytic effect against S. aureus. This will open the era for in vivo assessment of such compounds for clinical applications.

  19. Improved understanding of factors driving methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus epidemic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Som S; Otto, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. Since the global spread of MRSA in the 1960s, MRSA strains have evolved with increased pathogenic potential. Notably, some strains are now capable of causing persistent infections not only in hospitalized patients but also in healthy individuals in the community. Furthermore, MRSA is increasingly associated with infections among livestock-associated workers, primarily because of transmission from animals to humans. Moreover, many MRSA strains have gained resistance to most available antibiotics. In this review, we will present current knowledge on MRSA epidemiology and discuss new endeavors being undertaken to understand better the molecular and epidemiological underpinnings of MRSA outbreaks. PMID:23861600

  20. [Inactivation and reactivation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria during and after UV disinfection in reclaimed water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing-Jing; Tang, Fang; Xi, Jin-Ying; Pang, Yu-Chen; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2014-04-01

    Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in wastewater effluents is concerned as an emerging contaminant. To estimate inactivation and reactivation potentials of antibiotic-resistant bacteria by UV disinfection, inactivation and reactivation of penicillin-, ampicillin-, cephalexin-, chloramphenicol-and rifampicin-resistant bacteria in the secondary effluent were studied under different UV doses. The results showed that the inactivation ratios of penicillin-, ampicillin-, cephalexin-and chloramphenicol-resistant bacteria were higher than 4-log, which was closed to that of total heterotrophic bacteria; however, the inactivation ratio of rifampicin-resistant bacteria was lower (3.7-log) under 20 mJ x cm(-2) UV exposure. After 22 h standing incubation, antibiotic-resistant bacteria widely reactivated. The colony forming ability of antibiotic-resistant bacteria was as high as 3-log when exposed to 20 mJ x cm(-2) UV light. Hence, conventional UV dose can not effectively control reactivation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in reclaimed water by UV disinfection.

  1. Antibacterial Characterization of Novel Synthetic Thiazole Compounds against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Haroon; Reddy, P. V. Narasimha; Monteleone, Dennis; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman S.; Cushman, Mark; Hammac, G. Kenitra; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a commensal organism of companion animals that is a significant source of opportunistic infections in dogs. With the emergence of clinical isolates of S. pseudintermedius (chiefly methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP)) exhibiting increased resistance to nearly all antibiotic classes, new antimicrobials and therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Thiazole compounds have been previously shown to possess potent antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus of human and animal concern. Given the genetic similarity between S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius, this study explores the potential use of thiazole compounds as novel antibacterial agents against methicillin-sensitive S. pseudintermedius (MSSP) and MRSP. A broth microdilution assay confirmed these compounds exhibit potent bactericidal activity (at sub-microgram/mL concentrations) against both MSSA and MRSP clinical isolates while the MTS assay confirmed three compounds (at 10 μg/mL) were not toxic to mammalian cells. A time-kill assay revealed two derivatives rapidly kill MRSP within two hours. However, this rapid bactericidal activity was not due to disruption of the bacterial cell membrane indicating an alternative mechanism of action for these compounds against MRSP. A multi-step resistance selection analysis revealed compounds 4 and 5 exhibited a modest (two-fold) shift in activity over ten passages. Furthermore, all six compounds (at a subinihibitory concentration) demonstrated the ability to re-sensitize MRSP to oxacillin, indicating these compounds have potential use for extending the therapeutic utility of β-lactam antibiotics against MRSP. Metabolic stability analysis with dog liver microsomes revealed compound 3 exhibited an improved physicochemical profile compared to the lead compound. In addition to this, all six thiazole compounds possessed a long post-antibiotic effect (at least 8 hours) against MRSP

  2. [Study of molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Maanshan area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonglu; Li, Fengjuan; Wang, Duochun; Zhang, Ping; Tao, Yong; Wang, Li; Wang, Yan

    2015-03-01

    To identity the distribution of enterotoxin and hemolysin, as well as the clonal complexes and drug resistance of the strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Maanshan region. Automatic enzyme-linked fluorescent assay system and PCR technology were used to identify the distribution of enterotoxin and hemolysin genes. Seven Staphylococcus aureus hourskeeping genes were choosed as the target genes for multilocus sequence typing (MLST) on 34 strains of MRSA and 3 strains of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), comparing the data with the online database and obtaining the sequence typing (ST), conducting affinity analysis on its ST based on eBURST, testing in agar dilution method the drug resistance of MRSA against 12 antibiotics. 50.9% of the 210 Staphylococcus aureus strains were enterotoxin positive, and 97.1% of them carried hemolysin genes as all 51 strains of MRSA carried hemolsin genes. The 34 MRSA strains were divided into 10 STs, ranging in sequence ST239 (47.1%, 16/34), ST5 (17.6%, 6/34). Three MSSA strains belonged to ST188, ST1281 and ST7, respectively. Seventeen strains from the patients were divided into 6 STs, ranging in sequence ST239 (35.3%, 6/17) and ST5 (29.4%, 5/17). Twenty strains from food sources were divided into 9 STs, ranging in sequence ST239 (45.0%, 9/20) and ST7 (15.0%, 3/20). STs of ST585, ST630 and ST239 were close in affinity, while the rest were distant in affinity. Except for vancomycin, all the strains were found with drug resistance to varying extent to the 10 antibiotics tested. Existence of Staphylococcus aureus hemotoxin was universal; ST239 was the main predominant MRSA in Maanshan region, with distant affinity among the STs.

  3. Hospital-community interactions foster coexistence between methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Kouyos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in both hospitals and the community. Traditionally, MRSA was mainly hospital-associated (HA-MRSA, but in the past decade community-associated strains (CA-MRSA have spread widely. CA-MRSA strains seem to have significantly lower biological costs of resistance, and hence it has been speculated that they may replace HA-MRSA strains in the hospital. Such a replacement could potentially have major consequences for public health, as there are differences in the resistance spectra of the two strains as well as possible differences in their clinical effects. Here we assess the impact of competition between HA- and CA-MRSA using epidemiological models which integrate realistic data on drug-usage frequencies, resistance profiles, contact, and age structures. By explicitly accounting for the differing antibiotic usage frequencies in the hospital and the community, we find that coexistence between the strains is a possible outcome, as selection favors CA-MRSA in the community, because of its lower cost of resistance, while it favors HA-MRSA in the hospital, because of its broader resistance spectrum. Incorporating realistic degrees of age- and treatment-structure into the model significantly increases the parameter ranges over which coexistence is possible. Thus, our results indicate that the large heterogeneities existing in human populations make coexistence between hospital- and community-associated strains of MRSA a likely outcome.

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Australian Veterinarians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell D Groves

    Full Text Available This work investigated the molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA isolated from veterinarians in Australia in 2009. The collection (n = 44 was subjected to extensive molecular typing (MLST, spa, SCCmec, dru, PFGE, virulence and antimicrobial resistance genotyping and antimicrobial resistance phenotyping by disk diffusion. MRSA was isolated from Australian veterinarians representing various occupational emphases. The isolate collection was dominated by MRSA strains belonging to clonal complex (CC 8 and multilocus sequence type (ST 22. CC8 MRSA (ST8-IV [2B], spa t064; and ST612-IV [2B], spa variable, were strongly associated with equine practice veterinarians (OR = 17.5, 95% CI = 3.3-92.5, P < 0.001 and were often resistant to gentamicin and rifampicin. ST22-IV [2B], spa variable, were strongly associated with companion animal practice veterinarians (OR = 52.5, 95% CI = 5.2-532.7, P < 0.001 and were resistant to ciprofloxacin. A single pig practice veterinarian carried ST398-V [5C2], spa t1451. Equine practice and companion animal practice veterinarians frequently carried multiresistant-CC8 and ST22 MRSA, respectively, whereas only a single swine specialist carried MRSA ST398. The presence of these strains in veterinarians may be associated with specific antimicrobial administration practices in each animal species.

  5. Bacteriological profiling of diphenylureas as a novel class of antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Haroon; Younis, Waleed; Ezzat, Hany G; Peters, Christine E; AbdelKhalek, Ahmed; Cooper, Bruce; Pogliano, Kit; Pogliano, Joe; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman S; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics remains an imposing global public health challenge. Of the most serious pathogens, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is problematic given strains have emerged that exhibit resistance to several antibiotic classes including β-lactams and agents of last resort such as vancomycin. New antibacterial agents composed of unique chemical scaffolds are needed to counter this public health challenge. The present study examines two synthetic diphenylurea compounds 1 and 2 that inhibit growth of clinically-relevant isolates of MRSA at concentrations as low as 4 µg/mL and are non-toxic to human colorectal cells at concentrations up to 128 μg/mL. Both compounds exhibit rapid bactericidal activity, completely eliminating a high inoculum of MRSA within four hours. MRSA mutants exhibiting resistance to 1 and 2 could not be isolated, indicating a low likelihood of rapid resistance emerging to these compounds. Bacterial cytological profiling revealed the diphenylureas exert their antibacterial activity by targeting bacterial cell wall synthesis. Both compounds demonstrate the ability to resensitize vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to the effect of vancomycin. The present study lays the foundation for further investigation and development of diphenylurea compounds as a new class of antibacterial agents.

  6. Bacteriological profiling of diphenylureas as a novel class of antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon Mohammad

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance to antibiotics remains an imposing global public health challenge. Of the most serious pathogens, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is problematic given strains have emerged that exhibit resistance to several antibiotic classes including β-lactams and agents of last resort such as vancomycin. New antibacterial agents composed of unique chemical scaffolds are needed to counter this public health challenge. The present study examines two synthetic diphenylurea compounds 1 and 2 that inhibit growth of clinically-relevant isolates of MRSA at concentrations as low as 4 µg/mL and are non-toxic to human colorectal cells at concentrations up to 128 μg/mL. Both compounds exhibit rapid bactericidal activity, completely eliminating a high inoculum of MRSA within four hours. MRSA mutants exhibiting resistance to 1 and 2 could not be isolated, indicating a low likelihood of rapid resistance emerging to these compounds. Bacterial cytological profiling revealed the diphenylureas exert their antibacterial activity by targeting bacterial cell wall synthesis. Both compounds demonstrate the ability to resensitize vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to the effect of vancomycin. The present study lays the foundation for further investigation and development of diphenylurea compounds as a new class of antibacterial agents.

  7. Susceptibility profile of methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureusto linezolid in clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariq, Ali; Tanvir, Syed Bilal; Zaman, Atif; Khan, Salman; Anis, Armeena; Khan, Misha Aftab; Ahmed, Sumaira

    2017-01-01

    To determine the resistance and sensitivity pattern of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates to linezolid (LZD) along with its prevalence in a tertiary care hospital of Karachi, Pakistan. A cross-sectional study was carried out. This study lasted for about 1 year. Prevalence and sensitivity of LZD, vancomycin, and oxacillin was tested against isolates of MRSA. Out of total 369 specimens 165 were found to be MRSA making the prevalence in our study 44.7%. All of the isolates which were tested positive for MRSA were susceptible to LZD and no resistance was noted when compared with previous studies performed in Europe and USA. Stringent implementation of infection control measures along with screening for resistance in patients on prolonged LZD therapy or who previously went under LZD therapy should be performed, coupled with judicious usage of the aforementioned antibiotic should be undertaken, as sufficient data is not available at this point for the clinical spectrum of LZD resistant S. aureus, antimicrobial resistance.

  8. Hospital-Community Interactions Foster Coexistence between Methicillin-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouyos, Roger; Klein, Eili; Grenfell, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in both hospitals and the community. Traditionally, MRSA was mainly hospital-associated (HA-MRSA), but in the past decade community-associated strains (CA-MRSA) have spread widely. CA-MRSA strains seem to have significantly lower biological costs of resistance, and hence it has been speculated that they may replace HA-MRSA strains in the hospital. Such a replacement could potentially have major consequences for public health, as there are differences in the resistance spectra of the two strains as well as possible differences in their clinical effects. Here we assess the impact of competition between HA- and CA-MRSA using epidemiological models which integrate realistic data on drug-usage frequencies, resistance profiles, contact, and age structures. By explicitly accounting for the differing antibiotic usage frequencies in the hospital and the community, we find that coexistence between the strains is a possible outcome, as selection favors CA-MRSA in the community, because of its lower cost of resistance, while it favors HA-MRSA in the hospital, because of its broader resistance spectrum. Incorporating realistic degrees of age- and treatment-structure into the model significantly increases the parameter ranges over which coexistence is possible. Thus, our results indicate that the large heterogeneities existing in human populations make coexistence between hospital- and community-associated strains of MRSA a likely outcome. PMID:23468619

  9. Detection of meca gene from methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus isolates of north sumatera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septiani Nasution, Gabriella; Suryanto, Dwi; Lia Kusumawati, R.

    2018-03-01

    Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major pathogen associated with hospital-acquired infections (nosocomial infections). MRSA is a type of S. aureus resistant to the sub-group of beta-lactam antibiotics such as penicillin, cephalosporin, monobactam, and carbapenem. MRSA is resistant because of genetic changes caused by exposure to irrational antibiotic therapy. This study aimed to detect mecA gene in North Sumatra isolates of MRSA and to determine the pattern of antibiotic resistance in S.aureus isolates classified as MRSA by Vitek 2 Compact in the Central Public Hospital Haji Adam Malik, Medan. Samples were 40 isolates of S. aureus classified as MRSA obtained from clinical microbiology specimens. DNA isolation of the isolates was conducted by a method of freeze-thaw cycling. Amplification of mecA gene was done by PCR technique using specific primer for the gene. PCR products were visualized using mini-gel electrophoresis. The results showed that all MRSA isolates showed to have 533 bp band of mecA. Antibiotics test of Vitek 2 Compact showed that despite all isolates were resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics groups; the isolates showed multidrug resistant to other common antibiotics, such as aminoglycosides, macrolides, and fluoroquinolones. However, they were still sensitive to vancomycin (82.5% isolates), linezolid (97.5% isolates), and tigecycline (100% isolates).

  10. Occurrence, species distribution, antimicrobial resistance and clonality of methicillin- and erythromycin-resistant staphylococci in the nasal cavity of domestic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagcigil, Funda A.; Moodley, Arshnee; Baptiste, Keith E.

    2007-01-01

    , horses, pigs, and cattle in Denmark. Nasal swabs were collected from a total of 400 animals, including 100 individuals of each species. Methicillin and erythromycin-resistant staphylococci were isolated on selective media, identified by 16S rDNA sequencing, and typed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis......beta-Lactams and macrolides are important antibiotics for treatment of staphylococcal infections in both humans and animals. The aim of the study was to investigate the occurrence, species distribution and clonality of methicillin and erythromycin-resistant staphylococci in the nasal cavity of dogs...... (PFGE). Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) harbouring mecA were isolated from horses (50%) and dogs (13%), but not from food animals. The species identified were S. haemolyticus (n = 21), S. vitulinus (n = 19), S. sciuri (n = 13), S. epidermidis (n = 8), and S. warneri (n...

  11. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus of lineage ST398 as cause of mastitis in cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, N C C; Guimarães, F F; Manzi, M P; Júnior, A Fernandes; Gómez-Sanz, E; Gómez, P; Langoni, H; Rall, V L M; Torres, C

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse the prevalence and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in milk of cows with mastitis. The California mastitis test (CMT) was used to detect the presence of mastitis in all 100 cows of a farm in Brazil. The CMT was positive in milk of 115 mammary quarters from 36 cows (36%). MRSA isolates were recovered from 4 of these 36 cows with mastitis (11%), and they were further characterized (one MRSA/sample). The four MRSA isolates were typed as t011-ST398-agr1-SCCmecV and presented two different pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis-ApaI patterns. These four MRSA isolates showed resistance to tetracycline, streptomycin and ciprofloxacin, carried the mecA, blaZ, tet(K), and tet(M) resistance genes, and presented the S84L and S80F amino acid substitutions in GyrA and GrlA proteins, respectively. Two ST398 isolates exhibited resistance to gentamicin and tobramycin [with aac(6)-aph(2") and ant(4)-Ia genes] and one isolate resistance to clindamycin [with lnu(B) and lsa(E) genes]; this latter isolate also carried the spectinomycin/streptomycin resistance genes spw and aadE. MRSA of lineage ST398 is worldwide spread, normally multidrug resistant and may be responsible for bovine mastitis. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of MRSA-ST398 in Brazil. Few studies on the epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from bovine isolates have been performed in Brazil. MRSA of lineage ST398 is worldwide spread and associated with farm animals. Multidrug-resistant MRSA-ST398 isolates were recovered in 11% of mastitic cows from a single farm, with one isolate carrying the unusual lsa(E), spw and aadE genes. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of MRSA-ST398 isolates in milk samples of cows with mastitis in Brazil. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Foreign adopted children are a source of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission to countries with low prevalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagleitner, M.M.; Mascini, E.M.; van Berkel, S.; Bosman, J.; Mulder, J.C.; van Setten, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    We report a 13.0% prevalence rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers in foreign adopted children, who are frequently hospitalized within the first year after arrival. Hospitalization in the country of origin and special need status are no significant risk factors for MRSA

  13. Transmission and persistence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among veterinarians and their household members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, T; Verkade, E; van Luit, M; Landman, F; Kluytmans, J; Schouls, L M

    After the first isolation of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) in 2003, this MRSA variant quickly became the predominant MRSA obtained from humans as part of the Dutch national MRSA surveillance. Previous studies have suggested that human-to-human

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain LC33 Isolated from Human Breast Milk

    OpenAIRE

    de Almeida, J?ssica B.; de Carvalho, Suzi P.; de Freitas, Leandro M.; Guimar?es, Ana Marcia S.; do Nascimento, Na?la C.; dos Santos, Andrea P.; Messick, Joanne B.; Timenetsky, Jorge; Marques, Lucas M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus aureus strain LC33, isolated from human breast milk in Brazil. This microorganism has been typed as ST1/t127/sccmecV. To our knowledge, this is the first draft genome sequence of a methicillin-resistant S.?aureus strain isolated from human breast milk.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain LC33 Isolated from Human Breast Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Jéssica B.; de Carvalho, Suzi P.; de Freitas, Leandro M.; Guimarães, Ana Marcia S.; do Nascimento, Naíla C.; dos Santos, Andrea P.; Messick, Joanne B.; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus aureus strain LC33, isolated from human breast milk in Brazil. This microorganism has been typed as ST1/t127/sccmecV. To our knowledge, this is the first draft genome sequence of a methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain isolated from human breast milk. PMID:28408673

  16. Evidence for Human Adaptation and Foodborne Transmission of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the evolution and epidemiology of a novel live-stock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain, which colonizes and infects urban-dwelling Danes even without a Danish animal reservoir. Genetic evidence suggests both poultry and human adaptation, with poultry me...

  17. The value of nasal mupirocin in containing an outbreak of methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an orthopaedic unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.P. Barrett

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAn outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) occurred in two adjacent orthopaedic wards following the admission of a known carrier. The outbreak was not contained by ward closure or by standard infection control measures. Eventually several nasal carriers were

  18. An Outbreak of Community Associated Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Subtype USA300 at an International School in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Dixon; Koh, Tse Hsien; Tan, Yen Ee; Hsu, Li Yang; Kurup, Asok; Donahue, Shelly K; Mann, Janelle; Fisher, Dale

    2013-11-01

    Community associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) subtype USA300 remains relatively well confined within North American shores. Between August and November 2010, a large international school in Singapore recorded 27 skin and soft tissue infections, 8 of which were confirmed USA 300. This study reports the outbreak investigation and the interventions instituted.

  19. Prospective Study of Infection, Colonization and Carriage of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in an Outbreak Affecting 990 Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Coello; J. Jimenez (Jose); M. Garcia (Melissa); P. Arroyo; D. Minguez; C. Fernandez; F. Cruzet; C. Gaspar

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn the three years between November 1989 and October 1992, an outbreak of methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) affected 990 patients at a university hospital. The distribution of patients with carriage, colonization or infection was investigated prospectively. Nosocomial

  20. Introduction of plasmid DNA into an ST398 livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRS926 is a livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain of sequence type (ST) 398. In order to facilitate in vitro and in vivo studies of this strain, we sought to tag it with a fluorescent marker. We cloned a codon-optimized gene for TurboGFP into a shuttle vector...

  1. Complete genome sequence of livestock associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 isolated from swine in USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonizes and causes disease in many animal species. Livestock associated-MRSA isolates are represented by isolates of the sequence type 398. These isolates are considered to be livestock adapted. This report provides the complete genome of one swine assoc...

  2. Review of a major epidemic of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: The costs of screening and consequences of outbreak management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van der Zee (Anneke); W. Hendriks; L.D. Roorda (Lieuwe); J.M. Ossewaarde (Jacobus); J. Buitenwerf (Johannes)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: A major outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) occurred in locations C and Z of our hospital and lasted for several years. It affected 1,230 patients and 153 personnel. Methods: Outbreak management was installed according to the Dutch "search and

  3. A new multiplex PCR for easy screening of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus SCCmec types I-V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boye, Kit; Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Andersen, Ina S

    2007-01-01

    A multiplex PCR with four primer-pairs was designed to identify the five main known SCCmec types. A clear and easily discriminated band pattern was obtained for all five types. The SCCmec type was identified for 98% of 312 clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA...

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in hospitals in Tbilisi, the Republic of Georgia, are variants of the Brazilian clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, M.D.; Nanuashvili, A.; Boye, K.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterise methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from the Republic of Georgia, part of the former Soviet Union. Thirty-two non-duplicate MRSA isolates were collected in the period from May 2006 to February 2007. The patient data were analysed...

  5. Prospective Two-Center Comparison of Three Chromogenic Agars for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Screening in Hospitalized Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dodémont, Magali; Verhulst, Carlo; Nonhoff, Claire; Nagant, Carole; Denis, Olivier; Kluytmans, Jan

    Three chromogenic media, chromID MRSA SMART (SMART), chromID MRSA first generation (chromID), and Brilliance MRSA (OX2), were evaluated for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening using 1,220 samples. The sensitivity at 24 h was significantly better with the SMART agar (66.4%)

  6. Changing epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Iceland from 2000 to 2008: a challenge to current guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzknecht, B.J.; Hardardottir, H.; Haraldsson, Gustav Helgi

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is continuously changing. Iceland has a low incidence of MRSA. A "search and destroy" policy (screening patients with defined risk factors and attempting eradication in carriers) has been implemented since 1991. Clinical...

  7. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci species isolated from computer keyboards located in secondary and postsecondary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boa, Tyler T; Rahube, Teddie O; Fremaux, Bastien; Levett, Paul N; Yost, Christopher K

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a public health threat within the general community, thereby warranting identification of MRSA reservoirs within the community. Computer terminals in schools were sampled for S. aureus and methicillin-resistant staphylococci. The overall prevalence of MRSA on computer keyboards was low: 0.68% for a postsecondary institution and 2% and 0% for two secondary institutes. The MRSA isolate from the postsecondary institution did not correspond to the Canadian epidemic clusters, but is related to the USA 700 cluster, which contains strains implicated in outbreaks within the U.S. The isolate from the secondary institute's keyboard was typed as CMRSA7 (USA 400), a strain that has been implicated in both Canadian and U.S. epidemics. Methicillin-resistant S. haemolyticus and S. epidermidis were also isolated from keyboards, indicating that a mixed community of methicillin-resistant staphylococci can be present on keyboards. Although the prevalence was low, the presence of MRSA combined with the high volume of traffic on these student computer terminals demonstrates the potential for public-access computer terminals and computer rooms at educational institutes to act as reservoirs.

  8. Predischarge postpartum methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection and group B streptococcus carriage at the individual and hospital levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parriott, Andrea M.; Brown, Joelle M.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2014-01-01

    We sought to characterize the relationship between individual group B streptococcus (GBS) colonization and pre-discharge postpartum methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in United States women delivering at term. We also sought to examine the association between hospital GBS

  9. Methicillin resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci on pig farms and as a reservoir of heterogeneous staphylococcal casette chromosome mec elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tulinski, P.; Fluit, A.C.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Mevius, D.J.; Vijver, van de L.P.L.; Duim, B.

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) likely originated by acquisition of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) from coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). However, it is unknown whether the same SCCmec types are present in MRSA and CNS that reside in the same niche. Here

  10. Evaluation of a modular multiplex-PCR methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus detection assay adapted for mecC detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, Karsten; Larsen, Anders R; Skov, Robert L; Paterson, Gavin K; Holmes, Mark A; Sabat, Artur J; Friedrich, Alexander W; Köck, Robin; Peters, Georg; Kriegeskorte, André

    A mecC (mecA(LGA251))-adapted multiplex PCR-based methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) detection assay was evaluated using an international, spa-typed Staphylococcus aureus collection comprising 51 mecC-positive MRSA, 240 mecA-positive MRSA, and 50 mecA-and mecC-negative

  11. Rapid detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolates by the MRSA-screen latex agglutination test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. van Leeuwen (Willem); C. van Pelt (Cindy); A. Luijendijk (Ad); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); W.H.F. Goessens (Wil)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe slide agglutination test MRSA-Screen (Denka Seiken Co., Niigata, Japan) was compared with the mecA PCR ("gold standard") for the detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. The MRSA-Screen test detected the penicillin-binding protein 2a

  12. Nasal Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage among college student athletes in northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Kai Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Of 259 college students in northern Taiwan surveyed, nasal carriage rate of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA was 22.4% and 1.54%, respectively and no significant difference was found between athlete students and non-athlete students. Three of four MRSA isolates belonged to sequence type 59, the endemic community clone.

  13. Microbiological evaluation of a new growth-based approach for rapid detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Eiff, Christof; Maas, Dominik; Sander, Gunnar; Friedrich, Alexander W; Peters, Georg; Becker, Karsten

    OBJECTIVES: Recently, a rapid screening tool for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been introduced that applies a novel detection technology allowing the rapid presence or absence of MRSA to be determined from an enrichment broth after only a few hours of incubation. To evaluate

  14. rRNA Operon Copy Number Can Explain the Distinct Epidemiology of Hospital-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fluit, A.C.; Jansen, M.D.; Bosch, T.; Jansen, W.T.M.; Schouls, L.; Jonker, M.J.; Boel, C.H.E.

    2016-01-01

    The distinct epidemiology of original hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) and early community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) is largely unexplained. S. aureus carries either five or six rRNA operon copies. Evidence is provided for a scenario in which MRSA has adapted

  15. Surveillance of colonization and infection with Staphylococcus aureus susceptible or resistant to methicillin in a community skilled-nursing facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.-L. Lee (Yee-Lean); T. Cesario (Thomas); G.K. Gupta (Geeta); L. Flionis (Leo); C.T. Tran (Chi); M. Decker (Michael); L.D. Thrupp (Lauri)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important nosocomial pathogen in acute care hospitals and long-term care facilities. Few studies have been reported in private skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) not experiencing outbreaks of infections caused by MRSA.

  16. Genetic diversity of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a tertiary hospital in The Netherlands between 2002 and 2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nulens, E; Stobberingh, E E; Smeets, E; van Dessel, H; Welling, M A; Sebastian, S; van Tiel, F H; Beisser, P S; Deurenberg, R H

    The aim of this study was to investigate the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones isolated in a Dutch university hospital, situated near the borders of Belgium and Germany, between 2002 and 2006. MRSA strains (n = 175) were characterized using spa and SCCmec typing. The presence

  17. Evaluation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft-tissue infection prevention strategies at a military training center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Stephanie M; Blaesing, Carl R; Millar, Eugene V; Chukwuma, Uzo; Schlett, Carey D; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Tribble, David R; Ellis, Michael W

    2013-08-01

    Military trainees are at high risk for skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), especially those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A multicomponent hygiene-based SSTI prevention strategy was implemented at a military training center. After implementation, we observed 30% and 64% reductions in overall and MRSA-associated SSTI rates, respectively.

  18. Detection of New Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains That Carry a Novel Genetic Homologue and Important Virulence Determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabat, Artur J.; Koksal, Mahir; Akkerboom-Likhuta, Vika; Monecke, Stefan; Kriegeskorte, Andre; Hendrix, Ron; Ehricht, Ralf; Köck, Robin; Becker, Karsten; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 18 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates harboring staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type XI, recovered in the Dutch-German Euregio, were characterized by DNA microarrays. In contrast to previous data, we found two MRSA strains of different clonal

  19. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Pediatric Emergency Department in Newfoundland and Labrador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Peebles

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: First-generation cephalosporins and antistaphylococcal penicillins are typically the first choice for treating skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI, but are not effective for infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. It is currently unclear what percentage of SSTIs is caused by community-associated MRSA in different regions in Canada.

  20. Role of the Stringent Stress Response in the Antibiotic Resistance Phenotype of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aedo, Sandra; Tomasz, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics in methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus(MRSA) requires the presence of an acquired genetic determinant,mecAormecC, which encode penicillin-binding protein PBP2A or PBP2A', respectively. Although all MRSA strains share a mechanism of resistance, the phenotypic expression of beta-lactam resistance shows considerable strain-to-strain variation. The stringent stress response, a stress response that results from nutrient limitation, was shown to play a key role in determining the resistance level of an MRSA strain. In the present study, we validated the impact of the stringent stress response on transcription and translation ofmecAin the MRSA clinical isolate strain N315, which also carries known regulatory genes (mecI/mecR1/mecR2andblaI/blaR1) formecAtranscription. We showed that the impact of the stringent stress response on the resistance level may be restricted to beta-lactam resistance based on a "foreign" determinant such asmecA, as opposed to resistance based on mutations in the nativeS. aureusdeterminantpbpB(encoding PBP2). Our observations demonstrate that high-level resistance mediated by the stringent stress response follows the current model of beta-lactam resistance in which the native PBP2 protein is also essential for expression of the resistance phenotype. We also show that theStaphylococcus sciuri pbpDgene (also calledmecAI), the putative evolutionary precursor ofmecA, confers oxacillin resistance in anS. aureusstrain, generating a heterogeneous phenotype that can be converted to high and homogenous resistance by induction of the stringent stress response in the bacteria. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.