WorldWideScience

Sample records for in-class game designed

  1. Design Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin Wetterstrand

    2007-01-01

    In this paper design games are discussed as an approach to managing design sessions. The focus is on the collaborative design session and more particular on how to set up the collaboration and reinsure progress. Design games have the advantage of framing the collaborative assignment at hand....... Experiments can be set up to explore possible futures and design games has the qualities of elegantly focus the work at the same time as it lessens the burden for the process facilitator. The present paper goes into detail about how design games can be set up to facilitate collaboration and how the design...

  2. Game mechanics : advanced game design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Ernest; Dormans, Joris

    2012-01-01

    Game Mechanics is aimed at game design students and industry professionals who want to improve their understanding of how to design, build, and test the mechanics of a game. Game Mechanics will show you how to design, test, and tune the core mechanics of a game—any game, from a huge role-playing

  3. Video Design Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Christensen, Kasper Skov; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    We introduce Video Design Games to train educators in teaching design. The Video Design Game is a workshop format consisting of three rounds in which participants observe, reflect and generalize based on video snippets from their own practice. The paper reports on a Video Design Game workshop...

  4. Design of Game Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Playing games of any kind, from tennis to board games, it is easy to notice that games are configured in space, often using stripes or a kind of map on a board. Some games are clearly performed within this marked border, while it may be difficult to pinpoint such a visual border in a game like hide....... This makes sense, but also demands that play and non-play can be easily separated. I will examine how games make use of space, and show that the magic circle not only is a viable, though criticized, concept but should be understood as a spatial concept. In order to do this several games are examined, leading...... to introduce a spatial model of the game performance comprising a primary and secondary game space. I will show how new game genres can profit from using this model when designing new games....

  5. Clockwork game design

    CERN Document Server

    Burgun, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Only by finding and focusing on a core mechanism can you further your pursuit of elegance in strategy game design.Clockwork Game Design is the most functional and directly applicable theory for game design. It details the clockwork game design pattern, which focuses on building around fundamental functionality. You can then use this understanding to prescribe a system for building and refining your rulesets. A game can achieve clarity of purpose by starting with a strong core, then removing elements that conflict with that core while adding elements that support it.Filled with examples and exe

  6. Design Games to Learn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchetti, Emanuela; Valente, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we argue that there is a need for digital games that could be easy to alter by young learners. Unfortunately it was found that digital games do not enable children to express their creativity at full, in contrast with low-fidelity prototypes and non-digital toys (such as card or table...... top games). Therefore, we propose here a middle ground between digital and traditional table top games, so to grant children more freedom to express themselves, articulate their understanding and difficulties individually or socially; this approach is an alternative to the current trend of associating...... programming with digital creativity. In our preliminary study we transposed a digital game into a card game and observed students while shifting between playing and design thinking. Results from this study suggest that the notion of altering a digital game through a card-based transposition of the same game...

  7. Designing an Educational Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Thomas; Hansen, Charina Benedikte Søgaard

    2010-01-01

    When designing games with learning purposes used in a classroom, there often occur problems about the lack of learning content or the lack of game contents. Other disadvantages of existing educational games are the difficulty to provide a continual balance between the challenge and the pupils...... engage both pupils and teachers, and the interplay between game play, pupils and teachers creates some dynamic learning opportunities.......’ skill to control and solve the given task. In this paper we suggest three different perspectives that need to be communicated across in order to design a useful educational game: teachers, pupils and game designers. It is our intention with this paper to suggest some design principles for educational...

  8. The Magnetic Sentences Industry Game: A Competitive In-Class Experience of Business-Level Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casile, Maureen; Wheeler, Jane V.

    2005-01-01

    The Magnetic Sentences Industry Game is a high-energy in-class exercise designed to help students gain hands-on experience with setting, implementing, evaluating, and revising business-level strategy. Students compete in teams to create and market sentences using Magnetic Poetry (a product of Magnetic Poetry, Inc.). Revenues earned are highly…

  9. Expanding the Game Design Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel; Majgaard, Gunver

    2016-01-01

    This article considers game design research in educational settings. Its focus is on how undergraduate students – particularly engineering students – learn computer game design. From observations conducted during our game design courses we have developed a model of expanded game design space....... It encapsulates the entire development process from the first ideas to the final game with emphasis on game design thinking. Our model of expanded game design space consists of four separate – yet interconnected – layers in the process of game development. The first layer addresses the importance of framing......, providing a clear game design assignment that involves the formulation of intended player experience and a description of game mechanics. The second layer focuses on game design thinking from six different aspects of game design chosen in relation to the framing of the game design assignment. The third...

  10. Taking Design Games Seriously

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette Agger; Brandt, Eva; Mattelmäki, Tuuli

    2014-01-01

    Using design games at Participatory Design (PD) events is well acknowledged as a fruitful way of staging participation. As PD researchers, we have many such experiences, and we have argued that design games connect participants and promote equalizing power relations. However, in this paper, we...... will (self) critically re-connect and reflect on how people (humans) and materials (non-humans) continually participate and intertwine in various power relations in design game situations. The analysis is of detailed situated actions with one of our recent games, UrbanTransition. Core concepts mainly from...... Bruno Latour’s work on Actor-Network-Theory are applied. The aim is to take design games seriously by e.g. exploring how assemblages of humans and non-humans are intertwined in tacitly-but-tactically staging participation, and opening up for or hindering negotiations and decision-making, thus starting...

  11. Learning via Game Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchetti, Emanuela; Valente, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of making design of digital games accessible to primary school children and their teachers, and we argue for the need of digital games that are easy to alter by young learners. We know from previous research projects that digital games do not enable children...... to express their creativity at full, in contrast with low-fidelity prototypes and non-digital toys (such as card or table top games). Therefore, we propose here a novel approach that serves as a middle ground between digital and traditional table top games, and grants children more freedom to express...... themselves, articulate their understanding and difficulties both individually and socially. This approach, called card-based model for digital game design, is an alternative to the current trend of associating programming with digital creativity. A preliminary study was conducted by transposing a digital...

  12. Problem Based Game Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reng, Lars; Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    At Aalborg University’s department of Medialogy, we are utilizing the Problem Based Learning method to encourage students to solve game design problems by pushing the boundaries and designing innovative games. This paper is concerned with describing this method, how students employ it in various...... projects and how they learn to analyse, design, and develop for innovation by using it. We will present various cases to exemplify the approach and focus on how the method engages students and aspires for innovation in digital entertainment and games....

  13. Designing the Object Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filip, Diane; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    The Object Game is an exploratory design game and an experiment of developing a tangible object that can spark dialogue and retrospection between collaborative partners and act as a boundary object. The objective of this article is to show and elaborate on the development of the Object Game......, and to provide case examples of the game in action. The Object Game has two parts – Story-building and Co-rating of objects – with the aim of stimulating a collaborative reflection on knowledge sharing with different objects. In Story-building, the participants visualize their knowledge sharing process...... these facilitated knowledge transfer, knowledge exchange, knowledge generation, and knowledge integration. The participants collaborative reflected on their use of different objects for knowledge sharing and learn which objects have been effective (and which have not been effective) in their collaborative...

  14. Introduction to (participatory) design games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This article gives an introduction to (participatory) design games in three rounds. Firstly it argues that designing design games is a particular and very productive genre for formatting participation and design dialogues during ongoing design projects. Secondly it presents some of the main contr...... contributions to the development of design games in a historical perspective, and thirdly it introduces three recent PhD dissertations that all but in very different ways have investigated design games in more detail....

  15. Video game designer

    CERN Document Server

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    "Readers will learn what it takes to succeed as a video game designer. The book also explains the necessary educational steps, useful character traits, potential hazards, and daily job tasks related to this career. Sidebars include thought-provoking trivia. Questions in the backmatter ask for text-dependent analysis. Photos, a glossary, and additional resources are included."-- Provided by publisher.

  16. Game Design as STS Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Dumit

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Game design offers a powerful pedagogical paradigm for engaging students in thinking and researching sociotechnical systems. Using the example of designing a game around fracking, this paper describes how game design grapples with emergent dynamic processes, and how students are drawn into becoming STS researchers.

  17. Design Games for In-Situ Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The mobile culture has spawned a host of context-based products, like location-based and tag-based applications. This presents a new challenge for the designer. There is a need of design methods that acknowledge the context and allows it to influence the design ideas. This article focuses...... on a design problem where an in-situ design practice may further the early design process: the case of designing a pervasive game. Pervasive games are computer games, played using the city as a game board and often using mobile phones with GPS. Some contextual design methods exist, but we propose an approach...... that calls for the designer to conceptualise and perform ideas in-situ, that is on the site, where the game is supposed to be played. The problem was to design a creativity method that incorporated in-situ design work and which generated game concepts for pervasive games. The proposed design method, called...

  18. Games on Games. Game Design as Critical Reflexive Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Caruso

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Can video game design be compared to more formalized practices of scientific research or speculation within game studies? And, by virtue of an intellectual leap that in itself calls for discussion, can video games be considered as an efficient vehicle for the presentation of certain kinds of knowledge, in the same way in which papers, conference presentations, and books are? What Ratto defines as critical making (2011, the practice of producing artifacts of different sorts in order to supplement and extend critical reflection, may apply to video games as well. Forms of research through design (Zimmerman, Forlizzi and Evenson, 2007, of carpentry (Bogost, 2012, and speculative design (Dunne and Raby, 2013 have been analyzed, discussed, and maybe most importantly, put into practice in different fields of cultural and scientific production. To address this gap and to map the current (and future state of self-reflexive games, we asked both researchers and designers to imagine an application of these concepts to video games. Paraphrasing Zimmerman, Forlizzi and Evenson, what does research through game design might mean? What epistemological insights can we derive from the act of designing, making and playing video games?

  19. Game Design to Introduce Pets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Febriyanto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of animals from an early age can make children to love animals, especially pets. Children are the easiest group to receive stimulation, such as for example the stimulation of introducing children to the pet. Various media are used by parents to introduce pet. For examplle, by the media of books, multimedia, etc. One of the interesting media to introduce pet is with game. Of these problems then need to know how to make concept and design game to introduced pets for children age 3-6 years. In this paper, author formulate how to make pet game design include game genre, user interface design, image model selection, game characters, and game engine. The expected design of this game can be formulation of learning through proper game as a learning tool children. Game design derived from this writing by using model 2-dimensional images are funny and interesting coloring. And combines several game genres into one, or use the mini games that children do not get bored quickly. Design of GUI (Graphical User Interface is made as simple as possible so that children easily understand in playing this game, but also must use an interesting image

  20. How Student Game Designers Design Learning into Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2017-01-01

    This investigation examined how to support students in creating learning designs for specific learning goals in analogue and digital games as a means of learning. The study also explored the learning trajectories that emerged in the digital games created by the student learning-game designers...... learning games for specific learning goals in cross-disciplinary subject matters. The findings were that the students succeeded in developing and implementing specific learning goals in their games. The students also developed learning trajectories through the games by designing various learning....... The DBR study was developed through three iterations over two years, involving teachers and students in co-design processes. Together with the teachers, an overall learning design supported the learning process for students by inviting them to be their own learning designers as they designed digital...

  1. Facilitating Collaboration through Design Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva; Messeter, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    in collaboration with industrial partners and potential users, and use of the games in three educational settings.The overall aim of the design games is to help facilitate a user-centered design process for cross-disciplinary design groups early in the design process. Framing collaborative design activities...... understanding of the development task. This paper presents a set of four design games, which offers solutions to the challenges mentioned. The design games have been developed in the Space Studio during several projects and years. Here experiences are discussed on the basis of two research projects carried out...... in a game format, arguably improves idea generation and communication between stakeholders. By shifting focus to the game, power relations and other factors that might hamper idea generation, are downplayed....

  2. Participation through Exploratory Design Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Exploratory Design Games (EDG) belong to a field of participatory design, where the direct involvement of users (the people who are supposed to use the design) is essential. Exploratory design games are a particular genre for formatting design dialogues that are engaging for all parties involved....... They are a serious but playful way to work that opens up the design process for stakeholders outside the traditional design team. EDG set an agenda for collaborative inquiry and assist the players in creating for instance new services, material products or common visions for possible futures. The scope...... of this chapter is to describe four board game formats in order to identify issues that one should be aware of when using EDG for various purposes: A) The User Game creates stories about people as prospective users. B) In the Landscape Game the focus shifts from developing stories about a person to his or her...

  3. Healthy Gaming – Video Game Design to promote Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brox, E.; Fernandez-Luque, L.; Tøllefsen, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background There is an increasing interest in health games including simulation tools, games for specific conditions, persuasive games to promote a healthy life style or exergames where physical exercise is used to control the game. Objective The objective of the article is to review current literature about available health games and the impact related to game design principles as well as some educational theory aspects. Methods Literature from the big databases and known sites with games for health has been searched to find articles about games for health purposes. The focus has been on educational games, persuasive games and exergames as well as articles describing game design principles. Results The medical objectives can either be a part of the game theme (intrinsic) or be totally dispatched (extrinsic), and particularly persuasive games seem to use extrinsic game design. Peer support is important, but there is only limited research on multiplayer health games. Evaluation of health games can be both medical and technical, and the focus will depend on the game purpose. Conclusion There is still not enough evidence to conclude which design principles work for what purposes since most of the literature in health serious games does not specify design methodologies, but it seems that extrinsic methods work in persuasion. However, when designing health care games it is important to define both the target group and main objective, and then design a game accordingly using sound game design principles, but also utilizing design elements to enhance learning and persuasion. A collaboration with health professionals from an early design stage is necessary both to ensure that the content is valid and to have the game validated from a clinical viewpoint. Patients need to be involved, especially to improve usability. More research should be done on social aspects in health games, both related to learning and persuasion. PMID:23616865

  4. Healthy Gaming - Video Game Design to promote Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brox, E; Fernandez-Luque, L; Tøllefsen, T

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in health games including simulation tools, games for specific conditions, persuasive games to promote a healthy life style or exergames where physical exercise is used to control the game. The objective of the article is to review current literature about available health games and the impact related to game design principles as well as some educational theory aspects. Literature from the big databases and known sites with games for health has been searched to find articles about games for health purposes. The focus has been on educational games, persuasive games and exergames as well as articles describing game design principles. The medical objectives can either be a part of the game theme (intrinsic) or be totally dispatched (extrinsic), and particularly persuasive games seem to use extrinsic game design. Peer support is important, but there is only limited research on multiplayer health games. Evaluation of health games can be both medical and technical, and the focus will depend on the game purpose. There is still not enough evidence to conclude which design principles work for what purposes since most of the literature in health serious games does not specify design methodologies, but it seems that extrinsic methods work in persuasion. However, when designing health care games it is important to define both the target group and main objective, and then design a game accordingly using sound game design principles, but also utilizing design elements to enhance learning and persuasion. A collaboration with health professionals from an early design stage is necessary both to ensure that the content is valid and to have the game validated from a clinical viewpoint. Patients need to be involved, especially to improve usability. More research should be done on social aspects in health games, both related to learning and persuasion.

  5. Design education with simulation games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juuti, Tero; Lehtonen, Timo; Hansen, Poul H. Kyvsgård

    2008-01-01

    " This paper is a report on the use of simulation games in design education. Our objective was to find solution to the question: "How to do design education effectively and efficiently for hundreds of people with minimum resources?" In the paper the learning theories are described in short. Our...... data was gathered from exams and the results were analysed. Especially the learning of low grade exam students was impressive when using simulation game. The data from industry is based on observations while using simulation game. The results were that each of the workshop, game, and simulation...... elements can support the effort if configured and synchronized properly. The simulation games are valuable method for design education with skillful design, scoping and facilitation."...

  6. Seriously Considering Design in Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaydos, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that well-designed games can be good for learning under the right conditions. How such games are designed remains poorly understood, as studies have focused more on "whether" games can produce learning than on how such games work or how they can be reliably developed. That is, though the design of a game is considered…

  7. Digital Games, Design, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Douglas B.; Tanner-Smith, Emily E.; Killingsworth, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    In this meta-analysis, we systematically reviewed research on digital games and learning for K–16 students. We synthesized comparisons of game versus nongame conditions (i.e., media comparisons) and comparisons of augmented games versus standard game designs (i.e., value-added comparisons). We used random-effects meta-regression models with robust variance estimates to summarize overall effects and explore potential moderator effects. Results from media comparisons indicated that digital games significantly enhanced student learning relative to nongame conditions (g¯ = 0.33, 95% confidence interval [0.19, 0.48], k = 57, n = 209). Results from value-added comparisons indicated significant learning benefits associated with augmented game designs (g¯ = 0.34, 95% confidence interval [0.17, 0.51], k = 20, n = 40). Moderator analyses demonstrated that effects varied across various game mechanics characteristics, visual and narrative characteristics, and research quality characteristics. Taken together, the results highlight the affordances of games for learning as well as the key role of design beyond medium. PMID:26937054

  8. Design education with simulation games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juuti, Tero; Lehtonen, Timo; Hansen, Poul H. Kyvsgård

    2008-01-01

    " This paper is a report on the use of simulation games in design education. Our objective was to find solution to the question: "How to do design education effectively and efficiently for hundreds of people with minimum resources?" In the paper the learning theories are described in short. Our...... focus is to describe observations and recommendations for people who have similar challenge. In the end we have discussion about the drawbacks of the learning method. Two different simulation games were used; one with university students and another with industrial people. At university quantitative...... data was gathered from exams and the results were analysed. Especially the learning of low grade exam students was impressive when using simulation game. The data from industry is based on observations while using simulation game. The results were that each of the workshop, game, and simulation...

  9. Stereoscopic game design and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivett, Joe; Holliman, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    We report on a new game design where the goal is to make the stereoscopic depth cue sufficiently critical to success that game play should become impossible without using a stereoscopic 3D (S3D) display and, at the same time, we investigate whether S3D game play is affected by screen size. Before we detail our new game design we review previously unreported results from our stereoscopic game research over the last ten years at the Durham Visualisation Laboratory. This demonstrates that game players can achieve significantly higher scores using S3D displays when depth judgements are an integral part of the game. Method: We design a game where almost all depth cues, apart from the binocular cue, are removed. The aim of the game is to steer a spaceship through a series of oncoming hoops where the viewpoint of the game player is from above, with the hoops moving right to left across the screen towards the spaceship, to play the game it is essential to make decisive depth judgments to steer the spaceship through each oncoming hoop. To confound these judgements we design altered depth cues, for example perspective is reduced as a cue by varying the hoop's depth, radius and cross-sectional size. Results: Players were screened for stereoscopic vision, given a short practice session, and then played the game in both 2D and S3D modes on a seventeen inch desktop display, on average participants achieved a more than three times higher score in S3D than they achieved in 2D. The same experiment was repeated using a four metre S3D projection screen and similar results were found. Conclusions: Our conclusion is that games that use the binocular depth cue in decisive game judgements can benefit significantly from using an S3D display. Based on both our current and previous results we additionally conclude that display size, from cell-phone, to desktop, to projection display does not adversely affect player performance.

  10. Participation through Exploratory Design Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Exploratory Design Games (EDG) belong to a field of participatory design, where the direct involvement of users (the people who are supposed to use the design) is essential. Exploratory design games are a particular genre for formatting design dialogues that are engaging for all parties involved....... also been applied in architectural and urban planning approaches in order to gain new insights and develop a common strategy for the future. EDG are powerful, bacause they help to create an informal and playful atmosphere, which can be very productive in creative work.......Exploratory Design Games (EDG) belong to a field of participatory design, where the direct involvement of users (the people who are supposed to use the design) is essential. Exploratory design games are a particular genre for formatting design dialogues that are engaging for all parties involved....... They are a serious but playful way to work that opens up the design process for stakeholders outside the traditional design team. EDG set an agenda for collaborative inquiry and assist the players in creating for instance new services, material products or common visions for possible futures. The scope...

  11. Video Game Packaging Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterer, Irv

    2012-01-01

    High-school students are a dominant force in the gaming industry, accounting for annual sales in the millions. Retailers devote large areas of commercial space to keep pace with this lucrative part of the entertainment business. Recognizing the popularity of this phenomenon with the younger generation, it proved an ideal vehicle to explore…

  12. An Examination of In-Class Physical Activity across Games Classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Dana J.; Forrest, Greg

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the in-class physical activity opportunities across game classifications. A total of 221 (male, 100; female, 121) Year 9/10 physical education students were used within this study. Each student was engaged in four sport-based units (target, net/wall, striking/fielding, and invasion). Physical activity data…

  13. Reflections on the Design of Exertion Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Florian Floyd; Altimira, David; Khot, Rohit Ashot

    2015-02-01

    The design of exertion games (i.e., digital games that require physical effort from players) is a difficult intertwined challenge of combining digital games and physical effort. To aid designers in facing this challenge, we describe our experiences of designing exertion games. We outline personal reflections on our design processes and articulate analyses of players' experiences. These reflections and analyses serve to highlight the unique opportunities of combining digital games and physical effort. The insights we seek aim to enhance the understanding of exertion game design, contributing to the advancement of the field, and ultimately resulting in better games and associated player experiences.

  14. The playful and reflective game designer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Gunver

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: A group of first-semester engineering students participated in a game design course. The aim of the course was to learn how to design computer games and programming skills by creating their own games, thereby applying their game-playing experiences to gain knowledge about game design...... they are constructed. The students used the GameMaker programming tool, which can be used without any prior programming knowledge. The tool allows for the easy development of 2D game prototypes.The didactic approach was based on play as a lever for the design process, and on constructionistic and reflective learning...... philosophies. Playing games constituted an integral element of the design process; new code added to the program was tested by playing the game. The students were constantly alternating between playing and adding and revising code. The learning environment where games were played and developed could...

  15. From Game Design Elements to Gamefulness: Defining “Gamification”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Dixon, Dan; Khaled, Rilla

    2011-01-01

    games, pervasive games, alternate reality games, or playful design. However, it is not clear how “gamification” relates to these, whether it denotes a novel phenomenon, and how to define it. Thus, in this paper we investigate “gamification” and the historical origins of the term in relation...... to precursors and similar concepts. It is suggested that “gamified” applications provide insight into novel, gameful phenomena complementary to playful phenomena. Based on our research, we propose a definition of “gamification” as the use of game design elements in non-game contexts.......Recent years have seen a rapid proliferation of mass-market consumer software that takes inspiration from video games. Usually summarized as “gamification”, this trend connects to a sizeable body of existing concepts and research in human- computer interaction and game studies, such as serious...

  16. A cookbook method for Persuasive Game Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panote Siriaraya

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growing interest in persuasive game design, there have been few methods which cover the complete process of game design that designers could draw upon in their practice. In this paper, the Persuasive Game Design method(PGD is presented as a non-directive approach for designing persuasive games including a practical hand-out. To better fit with the practical constraints encountered in game design, this method adopts a “cookbook” approach. A set of essential PGD components and tools are provided from which game designers can choose from, given their specific context and resources. Designers first consider the game design steps(“dishes” to use in creating their game and in each step, select which components(“ingredients” to take into account and tools(“utensils” to use. The proposed method, based on our experience as persuasive game researchers and design practitioners, is further refined using feedback from professional game designers. The paper concludes with a case study illustrating how to put the meal into practice. Overall, the method provides a useful contribution to the existing research domain by combining knowledge from game theory, game design and design methodology to create a structured yet flexible approach which covers the complete persuasive game design process for researchers, students and practitioners. 

  17. Educational game design: game elements for promoting engagement

    OpenAIRE

    He, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Engagement in educational games, a recently popular academic topic, has been shown to increase learning performance, as well as a number of attitudinal factors, such as intrinsic interest and motivation. However, there is a lack of research on how games can be designed to promote engagement. This mixed methods case study aimed to discover effective game elements for promoting 17-18 year old high school students' engagement with an educational game. Using within-case and cross-case analyses an...

  18. Inclusive Game Design Facilitating Shared Gaming Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsson, UIf; Engström, Henrik; Brusk, Jenny; Östblad, Per Anders

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the result from a study comparing the perception and understanding of a game story between sighted and visually impaired players playing the same game. In particular, whether sighted and visually impaired players could experience and recount the same story construed from the plot elements that are either manifested by audio…

  19. The design game in Participatory Design and design education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törpel, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    In this contribution, the design game as a method in Participatory Design is discussed. The focus lies on the organizational design game. For using the design game relations of power, socio-technical textures and forms of work and organization are treated as concerns that need to be addressed...... carefully. Cases from student projects are used as illustrating examples; work environments were redesigned and design games played. It turns out that degrees of freedom are present for the choice of (gaming) method as well as the ways of using the selected method. These degrees of freedom should be used...... in a way that will be labeled as »interested«, rather than in a way labeled as »taking for granted«. It is not possible to guarantee an interested and beneficial approach; yet the paper argues on the grounds that reflective gaming practice can be supportive in this direction....

  20. Serious games: design and development

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, André Filipe Santos

    2011-01-01

    With the growth of the video game industry, interest in video game research has increased, leading to the study of Serious Games. Serious Games are generally perceived as games that use the video games’ capabilities to emerge players, for other purposes besides entertainment. These purposes include education and training, among others. By using Serious Games for education, teachers could capture the students’ attention in the same way that video games often do, thus the learning proc...

  1. Tabletop Games: Platforms, Experimental Games and Design Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Michael; Forlines, Clifton; Koeffel, Christina; Leitner, Jakob; Shen, Chia

    While the last decade has seen massive improvements in not only the rendering quality, but also the overall performance of console and desktop video games, these improvements have not necessarily led to a greater population of video game players. In addition to continuing these improvements, the video game industry is also constantly searching for new ways to convert non-players into dedicated gamers. Despite the growing popularity of computer-based video games, people still love to play traditional board games, such as Risk, Monopoly, and Trivial Pursuit. Both video and board games have their strengths and weaknesses, and an intriguing conclusion is to merge both worlds. We believe that a tabletop form-factor provides an ideal interface for digital board games. The design and implementation of tabletop games will be influenced by the hardware platforms, form factors, sensing technologies, as well as input techniques and devices that are available and chosen. This chapter is divided into three major sections. In the first section, we describe the most recent tabletop hardware technologies that have been used by tabletop researchers and practitioners. In the second section, we discuss a set of experimental tabletop games. The third section presents ten evaluation heuristics for tabletop game design.

  2. Challenges to Designing Game-Based Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2014-01-01

    The four categories labelled game-design, didactic design, organisational design and business design each constitute a set of challenges, each requiring a particular set of competencies. The key conclusion of the paper is that even though the learning game design constitutes the core of establish......The four categories labelled game-design, didactic design, organisational design and business design each constitute a set of challenges, each requiring a particular set of competencies. The key conclusion of the paper is that even though the learning game design constitutes the core...... of establishing game based business (GBB), the subsequent stages of development call for other kinds of competencies in order to become a viable GBB....

  3. Designing Narrative Games for a Serious Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutz, Eva; Markussen, Thomas; Desmet, Pieter

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach to designing games for serious contexts. In contrast to Serious Games we argue that learning is a too narrow focus for serious contexts and that simulation of real world problems ought to be supplemented with other design strategies that place greater...... emphasis on fiction and narratives. The approach is exemplified through three game prototypes designed to be played by an inmate and his child in a prison during visiting hours. By analyzing these game prototypes we demonstrate how a game can be structured around a narrative plot in three different ways....... Moreover, we discuss how narrative plots in a game may open up for developing player’s emotional experiences over time and grow social relationships between inmate and child. On the basis of our case analysis we discuss, in more detail, how our approach differs from Serious Games and we single out some key...

  4. Game Design and Development as Mathematical Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Ottar; Hanghøj, Thorkild; Misfeldt, Morten

    2016-01-01

    education which have mostly been tied to students making learning games involving specific mathematical content. Game design activities are reported to have a motivational pull for students. A challenge seems to be that the students are mostly motivated by the game design or the programming activities...... between user and goal through the computational artifacts being used. The framework serves as a lens for making sense of computer game design as a context for learning mathematics.......In this paper a framework for describing some of the mathematical activities inherent in computer game design is proposed in order to develop a framework for use in a recently conducted pilot study. The paper presents an introduction of previous work on the subject of game design and mathematics...

  5. Dimensions in Educational Game-Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments within learning games have shown that games hold a great potential for meeting current educational needs. These developments have also pointed out a number of challenges to address if games are to play a role in the educational setting. One key issue is the design of learning...... games, another is to implement them into the educational setting. Each of these issues provide a set of challenges, which is to be negotiated in order to create successful game-based learning. In order to meet these issues, eight key dimensions in educational game-design are presented, as well...... as a structure for implementing learning games into the educational setting in a beneficial manner....

  6. Designing Narrative Games for a Serious Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutz, Eva; Markussen, Thomas; Desmet, Pieter

    2012-01-01

    emphasis on fiction and narratives. The approach is exemplified through three game prototypes designed to be played by an inmate and his child in a prison during visiting hours. By analyzing these game prototypes we demonstrate how a game can be structured around a narrative plot in three different ways....... Moreover, we discuss how narrative plots in a game may open up for developing player’s emotional experiences over time and grow social relationships between inmate and child. On the basis of our case analysis we discuss, in more detail, how our approach differs from Serious Games and we single out some key...

  7. Practical game design with Unity and Playmaker

    CERN Document Server

    Mohov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    A practical guide packed with examples that helps you to build a full-fledged game with the help of Unity and Playmaker. A few exercises and useful external resources are also provided to improve both the game and your skills.This book is for animation artists and 3D artists, designers, and engineers who want to create interactive content with little or no programming. This book is also for game programmers who want to create a game from scratch in Unity and Playmaker. You are expected to have basic knowledge of game programming and Unity 3D.

  8. Designing intervention in educational game research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2010-01-01

    The international focus on the learning potential of games in recent years has led to a boost in both academic research interest and the development of game formats. Numerous educational computer games are available for today's teachers, but the implementation of games in everyday teaching is often...... problematic. In this paper, we argue that the focus on designing and implementing game-based learning environments in educational settings implies a need to rethink methodological questions on how to apply and study educational designs. We review the methodological approaches of design-based research...... and action research and discuss some of the implications of applying these methods to game research. Both methods involve combining empirical educational research with the theory-driven design of learning environments. However, whereas action research aims at changing attitudes or behavior by involving...

  9. Designing intervention in educational game research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Magnussen, Rikke

    2010-01-01

    The international focus on the learning potential of games in recent years has led to a boost in both academic research interest and the development of game formats. Numerous educational computer games are available for today’s teachers, but the implementation of games in everyday teaching is often...... problematic. In this paper, we argue that the focus on designing and implementing game-based learning environments in educational settings implies a need to rethink methodological questions on how to apply and study educational designs. We review the methodological approaches of design-based research...... and action research and discuss some of the implications of applying these methods to game research. Both methods involve combining empirical educational research with the theory-driven design of learning environments. However, whereas action research aims at changing attitudes or behavior by involving...

  10. Designing Intervention in Educational Game Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2010-01-01

    and action research and discuss some of the implications of applying these methods to game research. Both methods involve combining empirical educational research with the theory-driven design of learning environments. However, whereas action research aims at changing attitudes or behavior by involving......The international focus on the learning potential of games in recent years has led to a boost in both academic research interest and the development of game formats. Numerous educational computer games are available for today’s teachers, but the implementation of games in everyday teaching is often...... problematic. In this paper, we argue that the focus on designing and implementing game-based learning environments in educational settings implies a need to rethink methodological questions on how to apply and study educational designs. We review the methodological approaches of design-based research...

  11. Theoretical Framework for Interaction Game Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    behavior. We investigated a method for estimating the degree of concentration based on the physiological indices during VR exercise games . Also, in order...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0069 Theoretical Framework for Interaction Game Design Toyoaki Nishida KYOTO UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL Final Report 05/19/2016...DATES COVERED (From - To) 14 May 2014 to 13 May 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Theoretical Framework for Interaction Game Design 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  12. Student Learning-Game Designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2016-01-01

    trajectories for specific learning goals into the digital games. The article examines how specific features in the two digital game tools, Scratch and RGBMaker, afford creation of learning trajectories in various ways, enabling deep learning and gameplay processes for the players of the games. According...

  13. Steps to Design a Household Energy Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dirk Fijnheer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Research where gamification is used to influence household energy consumption is an emerging field. This paper reviews the design and effectiveness of ten games that aim to influence household energy consumption and presents a novel gamification approach in which real world activities are implemented in a game design. From the review suggestions for the design of a new game have been identified, such as including real life missions in order to optimize the transfer between the game world and the real world, feedback from monitoring the electricity meter, the presence of a strong storyline, personalized game characters, social interaction, etc. Based on this comparative analysis, the new game 'Powersaver Game' focused on reducing energy consumption has been designed and its prototype is described. In the next stage of iterative design, end-users evaluated the match between in-game scenes and household energy saving activities. This considerate user-centered design process should allow us to build a serious game that is potentially effective in reducing household energy consumption. 

  14. Cognitive behavioral game design: a unified model for designing serious games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starks, Katryna

    2014-01-01

    Video games have a unique ability to engage, challenge, and motivate, which has led teachers, psychology specialists, political activists and health educators to find ways of using them to help people learn, grow and change. Serious games, as they are called, are defined as games that have a primary purpose other than entertainment. However, it is challenging to create games that both educate and entertain. While game designers have embraced some psychological concepts such as flow and mastery, understanding how these concepts work together within established psychological theory would assist them in creating effective serious games. Similarly, game design professionals have understood the propensity of video games to teach while lamenting that educators do not understand how to incorporate educational principles into game play in a way that preserves the entertainment. Bandura (2006) social cognitive theory (SCT) has been used successfully to create video games that create positive behavior outcomes, and teachers have successfully used Gardner’s (1983) theory of multiple intelligences (MIs) to create engaging, immersive learning experiences. Cognitive behavioral game design is a new framework that incorporates SCT and MI with game design principles to create a game design blueprint for serious games. PMID:24550858

  15. Cognitive behavioral game design: a unified model for designing serious games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starks, Katryna

    2014-01-01

    Video games have a unique ability to engage, challenge, and motivate, which has led teachers, psychology specialists, political activists and health educators to find ways of using them to help people learn, grow and change. Serious games, as they are called, are defined as games that have a primary purpose other than entertainment. However, it is challenging to create games that both educate and entertain. While game designers have embraced some psychological concepts such as flow and mastery, understanding how these concepts work together within established psychological theory would assist them in creating effective serious games. Similarly, game design professionals have understood the propensity of video games to teach while lamenting that educators do not understand how to incorporate educational principles into game play in a way that preserves the entertainment. Bandura (2006) social cognitive theory (SCT) has been used successfully to create video games that create positive behavior outcomes, and teachers have successfully used Gardner's (1983) theory of multiple intelligences (MIs) to create engaging, immersive learning experiences. Cognitive behavioral game design is a new framework that incorporates SCT and MI with game design principles to create a game design blueprint for serious games.

  16. Cognitive behavioral game design: a unified model for designing serious games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katryna eStarks

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Video games have a unique ability to engage, challenge, and motivate, which has led teachers, psychology specialists, political activists and health educators to find ways of using them to help people learn, grow and change. Serious games, as they are called, are defined as games that have a primary purpose other than entertainment. However, it is challenging to create games that both educate and entertain. While game designers have embraced some psychological concepts such as flow and mastery, understanding how these concepts work together within established psychological theory would assist them in creating effective serious games. Similarly, game design professionals have understood the propensity of video games to teach while lamenting that educators do not understand how to incorporate educational principles into game play in a way that preserves the entertainment. Albert Bandura’s (1998 social cognitive theory (SCT has been used successfully to create video games that create positive behavior outcomes, and teachers have successfully used Howard Gardner’s (1983 theory of multiple intelligences (MI to create engaging, immersive learning experiences. Cognitive behavioral game design is a new framework that incorporates Social Cognitive Theory (SCT and Multiple Intelligences (MI with game design principles to create a game design blueprint for serious games.

  17. Digital Gaming and Sustainable Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Vassigh

    2012-10-01

    of a simulation softwarepackage in an interactive game format. The project teaches the concepts of “integrated design ”through immersing students in a virtual world that imitates the complexity of the real world of decision-making and material choices in design. The project accomplishes this by harnessingthe capabilities of simulation and dynamic modeling programs as well as powerful game engineswhile creating compelling and rewarding reasons for student’s engagement in the learning process. The project is funded by the US Department of Education for the period of 2007-2010.

  18. Design, engineering and utility of biotic games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H; Chung, Alice M; Dura, Burak; Hamilton, Andrea L; Lee, Byung C

    2011-01-07

    Games are a significant and defining part of human culture, and their utility beyond pure entertainment has been demonstrated with so-called 'serious games'. Biotechnology--despite its recent advancements--has had no impact on gaming yet. Here we propose the concept of 'biotic games', i.e., games that operate on biological processes. Utilizing a variety of biological processes we designed and tested a collection of games: 'Enlightenment', 'Ciliaball', 'PAC-mecium', 'Microbash', 'Biotic Pinball', 'POND PONG', 'PolymerRace', and 'The Prisoner's Smellemma'. We found that biotic games exhibit unique features compared to existing game modalities, such as utilizing biological noise, providing a real-life experience rather than virtual reality, and integrating the chemical senses into play. Analogous to video games, biotic games could have significant conceptual and cost-reducing effects on biotechnology and eventually healthcare; enable volunteers to participate in crowd-sourcing to support medical research; and educate society at large to support personal medical decisions and the public discourse on bio-related issues.

  19. Design Strategies for Balancing Exertion Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2016-01-01

    In sports, if players' physical and technical abilities are mismatched, the competition is often uninteresting for them. With the emergence of exertion games, this could be changing. Player balancing, known from video games, allows players with different skill levels to compete, however......, it is unclear how balancing mechanisms should be applied in exertion games, where physical and digital elements are fused. In this paper, we present an exertion game and three approaches for balancing it; a physical, an explicit-digital and an implicit-digital balancing approach. A user study that compares...... these three approaches is used to investigate the qualities and challenges within each approach and explore how the player experience is affected by them. Based on these findings, we suggest four design strategies for balancing exertion games, so that players will stay engaged in the game and contain...

  20. Design for game based learning platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Meyer, Bente

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the challenges related to the design of game based learning platforms for formal learning contexts that are inspired by the pupil's leisure time related use of web 2.0. The paper is based on the project Serious Games on a Global Market Place (2007-2011) founded by the Danish...... Council for Strategic Research, in which an online game-based platform for English as a foreign language in primary school is studied. The paper presents a model for designing for game based learning platforms. This design is based on cultural and ethnographic based research on children's leisure time use...... of web 2.0 and integrates theories of learning, didactics, games, play, communication, multimodality and different pedagogical approaches. In relation to the introduced model the teacher role is discussed....

  1. Player Experiences and Behaviors in a Multiplayer Game : Designing game rules to change interdependent behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegt, N.J.H.; Visch, V.T.; Vermeeren, A.P.O.S.; de Ridder, H.

    2016-01-01

    Serious gaming is used as a means for improving organizational teamwork, yet little is known about the effect of individual game elements constituting serious games. This paper presents a game design experiment aimed at generating knowledge on designing game elements for teamwork. In previous work,

  2. Designing meaningful intergenerational digital games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loos, Eugène

    2014-01-01

    This paper will focus on intergenerational digital games between grandparents and their grandchildren, which could enhance not only their physical and social well-being but also social bonding between them. This is a topic which has been neglected in digital game research. Therefore, after having

  3. Didactic design for business games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus Henriksen, Thomas; Lainema, Timo

    2010-01-01

    on to the practical experience, for then to return to the theoretical approach to the game subject, the game-based learning process can be seen as an attempt to facilitate an explorative process. The IKEA deployment followed the TiA model, resulting in a much more blended approach, which explicitly sought...

  4. An Architecture for Designing Content Agnostic Game Mechanics for Educational Burst Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    Currently, educational games are designed with the educational content as the primary factor driving the design of the game. While this may seem to be the optimal approach, this design paradigm causes multiple issues. For one, the games themselves are often not engaging as game design principles were put aside in favor of increasing the…

  5. Examining Student-Designed Games through Suits' Theory of Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Ashley; Hastie, Peter; Jump, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This paper documents how a unit of student-designed games can create a more meaningful version of physical education (PE) for disengaged students, a version that enhances the educational legitimacy of the subject matter by affording it worth in and of itself rather than being justified for other, extrinsic or instrumental reasons. Furthermore, it…

  6. Learning from Game Design : Understanding Participatory processes through Game Mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ampatzidou, Christina; Gugerell, Katharina; Diephuis, Jeremiah

    With the increasing interest of local governments in civic participation, it becomes important to explore the available methods for orchestrating participatory processes and evaluate how different tools address some of the common issues associated with participatory processes. Game design is an

  7. Swipe this! the guide to great touchscreen game design

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Learn to design games for tablets from a renowned game designer! Eager to start designing games for tablets but not sure where to start? Look no further! Gaming guru Scott Rogers has his finger on the pulse of tablet game design and is willing to impart his wisdom and secrets for designing exciting and successful games. As the creator of such venerable games as God of War, the SpongeBob Squarepants series, and Pac-Man World, to name a few, Rogers writes from personal experience and in this unique book, he hands you the tools to create your own tablet games for the iPad, Android tablets, Ninten

  8. Interactivity, Game Creation, Design, Learning, and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the proceedings of two conferences: The 5th International Conference on ArtsIT, Interactivity and Game Creation (ArtsIT 2016) and the First International Conference on Design, Learning and Innovation (DLI 2016). ArtsIT is reflecting trends in the expanding field of digital art......, interactive art, and how game creation is considered an art form. The decision was made to augment the title of ArtsIT to be in future known as “The International Conference on Interactivity, Game Creation, Design, Learning, and Innovation”. The event was hosted in Esbjerg, Denmark in May 2016 and attracted...

  9. Preparing Instructional Designers for Game-Based Learning: Part III. Game Design as a Collaborative Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Appelman, Bob; Rieber, Lloyd; Van Eck, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this three part series, four professors who teach graduate level courses on the design of instructional video games discuss their perspectives on preparing instructional designers to optimize game-based learning. Part I set the context for the series and one of four panelists discussed what he believes instructional designers should know about…

  10. Measuring and Communicating Emotions Through Game Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutz, Eva; Markussen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    digital narrative and game play as means for self-report. In so doing it integrate play, communication and measurement in one and the same device. First it gives 4-6 year old hospitalized children an opportunity to learn how to cope with their own emotional reactions to medical treatment through game play......This paper explores how emotion research may inform the design of a playful interactive tool for emotion measurement and communication, called Child Patient Game (CPgame) that has been developed for paediatric patients at a Danish hospital. The CPgame differs from other instruments in that it uses...

  11. Gaming the System: Video Games as a Theoretical Framework for Instructional Design

    OpenAIRE

    Beatty, Ian D.

    2014-01-01

    In order to facilitate analyzing video games as learning systems and instructional designs as games, we present a theoretical framework that integrates ideas from a broad range of literature. The framework describes games in terms of four layers, all sharing similar structural elements and dynamics: a micro-level game focused on immediate problem-solving and skill development, a macro-level game focused on the experience of the game world and story and identity development, and two meta-level...

  12. Measuring and Communicating Emotions Through Game Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutz, Eva; Markussen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores how emotion research may inform the design of a playful interactive tool for emotion measurement and communication, called Child Patient Game (CPgame) that has been developed for paediatric patients at a Danish hospital. The CPgame differs from other instruments in that it uses....... Second, healthcare personal and design researchers can use the CPgame to gain knowledge of this patient group as it measures the children’s subjective feelings about their emotions. In the paper we discuss how key theoretical concepts of emotion may help the designer to identify the basic building blocks...... digital narrative and game play as means for self-report. In so doing it integrate play, communication and measurement in one and the same device. First it gives 4-6 year old hospitalized children an opportunity to learn how to cope with their own emotional reactions to medical treatment through game play...

  13. Didaktisk design af et pervasive learning game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oldenskov, Joakim; Westergren, Jens; Frank, Anders Bredahl

    2010-01-01

    Projektet er et studie i det teoretiske grundlag for, og en empirisk undersøgelse, af en prototype for et didaktisk design af et pervasive learning game. Der arbejdes overordnet med udviklingen af et didaktisk design af et læringsspil som kombinerer mobile teknologier, det fysiske rum og eleverne...... game med en analyse af legen og motivationen iboende spillet. I det læringsteoretiske felt inddrages og diskuteres forskellige tilgange til læring og pervasive games, som alle repræsenterer et socialkonstruktivistisk syn på læring. Det didaktiske design danner grundlag for et prototypedesign af et...... spilkoncept, hvor remediering og it-kompetencer inddrages som vigtige teoretiske faktorer. Undersøgelsesdesignet er rettet mod elever i Folkeskolen igennem brugen af fokusgruppeinterviews, og dataindsamlingen er foretaget med video. Eleverne udtrykker sig i undersøgelsen klart omkring konceptets...

  14. Serious game design principles: The impact of game design on learning outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael W.

    This dissertation examines the research question "How do video game design principles affect learning outcomes in serious games?" This research first develops a theoretical foundation concerning the meaning of the terms "game" and "serious game". This conceptual clarification is broken down into analytic propositions, which state that games have participants, rules, goals and challenges, and synthetic propositions, which state that the games should be intrinsically compelling, provide meaningful choices, and be self encapsulated. Based on these synthetic propositions, three hypotheses were developed. The hypotheses are that games with an enhanced aesthetic presentation, more meaningful choices, or provide player competition will elicit higher learning outcomes than identical games without these factors. These hypotheses were tested via a quantitative experiment involving 172 undergraduate students in the Old Dominion University Chemistry Department. The students were asked to play a chemistry-oriented serious game entitled Element Solitaire©, which was created by the research author. The students were randomly given different treatments of the Element Solitaire© game to play, and the difference between their learning outcomes were compared. The experimental results demonstrated that the aesthetic presentation of a game can have a significant impact upon the learning outcome. The experiment was not able to discern significant effects from the choice or competition conditions, but further examination of the experimental data did reveal some insight into these aspects of serious game design. Choices need to provide the player with options that have a sufficient value that they will be considered and the application of competition within games needs to be judiciously implemented to promote a positive affect for all players. The results of the theoretical foundations and empirical evidence were then combined with additional theoretical research to develop a set of

  15. Designing Educational Software with Students through Collaborative Design Games: The We!Design&Play Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllakos, George; Palaigeorgiou, George; Tsoukalas, Ioannis A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for the development of collaborative design games that can be employed in participatory design sessions with students for the design of educational applications. The framework is inspired by idea generation theory and the design games literature, and guides the development of board games which, through the use…

  16. Designing Serious Games for People with Disabilities: Game, Set and Match to the Wii™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evett, Lindsay; Ridley, Allan; Keating, Liz; Merritt, Liz; Merritt, Patrick; Shopland, Nick; Brown, David

    2011-01-01

    Serious games are effective and engaging learning resources for people with disabilities, and guidelines exist to make games accessible to people with disabilities. During research into designing accessible interfaces and games, it was noted that people who are blind often report enjoying playing Wii Sports. These games are pick-upand- play games…

  17. Taking Educational Games Seriously: Using the RETAIN Model to Design Endogenous Fantasy into Standalone Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Glenda A.; Kenny, Robert F.; Vick, Erik H.

    2008-01-01

    We are witnessing a mad rush to pour educational content into games in an ad hoc manner in hopes that player/learners are motivated simply because the content is housed inside a game. A failure to base educational game design on well-established learning and instructional theories increases the risk of the game failing to meet its intended…

  18. Creating Evaluation Profiles for Games Designed to be Fun: An Interpretive Framework for Serious Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Frank; Helms, Niels Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Background. Games can be great pedagogical tools for educators and students. COTS games (commercialoff-the-shelf) are designed for the pure purpose of leisure but can also contain educational value. Aim. In this paper, we address the potential of COTS games as serious games. We develop...... an interpretive evaluation framework that can identify the educational value in COTS games. Application. The presented framework can create evaluative profiles of the learning, social, game, and immersive mechanics of COTS games as educational tools. Moreover, the framework can position COTS games between four...... enables critical reflection on the game mechanics; thereby capturing the complexity of the game mechanics that makes COTS game both educational and fun to play....

  19. User experience interaction design for digital educational games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiugen; Zhang, Wenting; Xing, Ruonan

    2014-04-01

    Leading the elements of games into education is the newest teaching concepts in the field of educational technology, which is by using healthy games to impel and preserve the learner's motivation, improve the learning efficiency and bring one experience in learning something by playing games. First of all, this article has introduced the concept of Digital Game and User Experience and brought the essence of Digital Game to light to construct the frame of user experience interaction design for digital educational games and offer one design idea for the development of related products and hoping that Digital Game will bring us continuous innovation experience.

  20. Making Gameplay Matter: Designing Modern Educational Tabletop Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Scott

    2011-01-01

    One of the great failings in educational game design is a focus on the question-and-answer model of gameplay. This type of educational game has players engage in some sort of time-wasting activity like rolling a die and moving, and then the focus of the game, the activity of answering a question, is triggered. Thousands of educational games use…

  1. Designing an Electronic Educational Game to Facilitate Immersion and Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuxin; Williams, Doug; Prejean, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Advocates of electronic educational games often cite the work on motivation to support the use of games in education. However, motivation alone is inadequate to facilitate learning. Many of the educational games that focused their game design solely on the motivational effect failed to be either educational or entertaining. Theory and research is…

  2. Steps to design a household energy game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijnheer, J.D.L.; van Oostendorp, H.

    2016-01-01

    Research where gamification is used to influence household energy consumption is an emerging field. This paper reviews the design and effectiveness of ten games that aim to influence household energy consumption and presents a novel gamification approach in which real world activities are

  3. Designing an International Joint Venture Negotiation Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenkel, Phil; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates a simulation game that models management problems encountered in negotiating and managing international joint ventures. Designed to instruct executives of state-owned agribusinesses in Indonesia in abstract concepts such as partner rapport, transfer price conflicts, and marketing disagreements, its success suggests that simulation games…

  4. Persuasive Game Design : A model and its definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visch, V.T.; Vegt, N.J.H.; Anderiesen, H.; Van der Kooij, K.

    2013-01-01

    The following position paper proposes a general theoretical model for persuasive game design. This model combines existing theories on persuasive technology, serious gaming, and gamification. The model is based on user experience, gamification design, and transfer effects.

  5. A Technique for Mapping Mathematics Content to Game Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vani Kalloo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that games can be valuable tools for learning mathematics. In this paper, we explain how we tackled the challenge of mapping mathematics content to games in the design of mathematics learning games. We present a unique technique for mapping mathematics content to game design. The technique can be used to improve the game design process by guiding the designer through one of the more challenging stages of the design process, namely, that of incorporating mathematics content into a game. The technique is based on several factors such as mathematics learning pedagogy, game type categorization, the mathematics curriculum, and past research experience. The technique is unique since it focuses on guiding the game designer through the process of mapping the mathematics content to the game idea. Additionally, the technique incorporates several important game design principles. A preliminary evaluation of the technique was conducted with several amateur game designers. Although there are several limitations of the technique, the evaluation shows that it was useful in helping the game designers to design suitable mathematics learning games

  6. Formatting Design Dialogues – Games and Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva; Messeter, Jörn; Binder, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    . Next we look more closely at what constitutes game and play, we discuss other authors’ use of games in collaborative settings and finally we examine the board game as a particularly interesting game format. In the second part of the article we present and discuss two board games: the User Game...

  7. Helping Hands: Designing Video Games with Interpersonal Touch Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Watts , Cody; Sharlin , Ehud; Woytiuk , Peter

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Increasingly, the movements of players' physical bodies are being used as a method of controlling and playing video games. This trend is evidenced by the recent development of interpersonal touch-based games; multiplayer games which players control by physically touching their partners. Although a small number of interpersonal touch-based games have recently been designed, the best practices for creating video games based on this unconventional interaction technique re...

  8. Using Formal Game Design Methods to Embed Learning Outcomes into Game Mechanics and Avoid Emergent Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Simon; Grey, David; Gordon, Neil; Purdy, Jon

    2017-01-01

    This paper offers an approach to designing game-based learning experiences inspired by the Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics (MDA) model (Hunicke et al., 2004) and the elemental tetrad model (Schell, 2008) for game design. A case for game based learning as an active and social learning experience is presented including arguments from both teachers and…

  9. It's All Part of the Game: Video Game Interaction Design and Business Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirinian, Ara

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the importance of positive video game experiences and designs that can create them, including immediacy of feedback, allowing graceful recovery from mistakes, high-quality feedback, and input device mappings. Examines interface complexity. Concludes game designers must treat the interaction between human and video game as a formal…

  10. Games as Actors - Interaction, Play, Design, and Actor Network Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Jari Due; Jessen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    When interacting with computer games, users are forced to follow the rules of the game in return for the excitement, joy, fun, or other pursued experiences. In this paper, we investigate how games a chieve these experiences in the perspective of Actor Network Theory (ANT). Based on a qualitative...... data from a study of board games , computer games, and exergames, we conclude that games are actors that produce experiences by exercising power over the user’ s abilities, for example their cognitive functions. Games are designed to take advantage of the characteristics of the human players...

  11. Designing and remotely testing mobile diabetes video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeShazo, Jonathan; Harris, Lynne; Turner, Anne; Pratt, Wanda

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated game design and usability for three mobile phone video games designed to deliver diabetes education. The games were refined using focus groups. Six people with diabetes participated in the first focus group and five in the second. Following the focus groups, we incorporated the new findings into the game design, and then conducted a field test to evaluate the games in the context in which they would actually be used. Data were collected remotely about game usage by eight people with diabetes. The testers averaged 45 seconds per question and answered an average of 50 total nutrition questions each. They self-reported playing the game for 10-30 min, which coincided with the measured metrics of the game. Mobile games may represent a promising new way to engage the user and deliver relevant educational content.

  12. Designing for social play in co-located mobile games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, William; Garner, Jayden; Jensen, Mads Møller

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we explore how mobile devices and co-location in mobile contexts contribute social play in game design, addressing the limited understanding of social interactivity in mobile games. Using the Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics (MDA) framework, we code four games illustrating effective use...... play from the perspectives of co-located mobile contexts in game design by identifying how mobility: (1) affords co-locating with other players in public spaces, (2) supports physical interactions using spatial context and players bodies, extending games beyond their formal system, (3) supports...... of mobile, social, and colocated elements. Subsequently, we analyse and discuss this data to identify generalisability in these games. In our discussion we identify how these findings address game design problems of designing collaborative games. Furthermore, we contribute to theory of designing for social...

  13. A Model-driven Framework for Educational Game Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Roungas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Educational games are a class of serious games whose main purpose is to teach some subject to their players. Despite the many existing design frameworks, these games are too often created in an ad-hoc manner, and typically without the use of a game design document (GDD. We argue that a reason for this phenomenon is that current ways to structure, create and update GDDs do not increase the value of the artifact in the design and development process. As a solution, we propose a model-driven, web-based knowledge management environment that supports game designers in the creation of a GDD that accounts for and relates educational and entertainment game elements. The foundation of our approach is our devised conceptual model for educational games, which also defines the structure of the design environment. We present promising results from an evaluation of our environment with eight experts in serious games.

  14. Preparing Instructional Designers for Game-Based Learning: Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Appelman, Bob; Rieber, Lloyd; Van Eck, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Like many rapidly growing industries, advances in video game technology are far outpacing research on its design and effectiveness. Relatively little is understood about how to apply what we know about teaching and learning to optimize game-based learning. For the most part, instructional designers know little about game development and video game…

  15. Designing Hypercontextualized Games: A Case Study with LieksaMyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedano, Carolina Islas; Sutinen, Erkki; Vinni, Mikko; Laine, Teemu H.

    2012-01-01

    Digital technology empowers one to access vast amounts of on-line data. From a learning perspective, however, it is difficult to access meaningful on-site information within a given context. The Hypercontextualized Game (HCG) design model interweaves on-site resources, translated as content, and the digital game. As a local game design process,…

  16. Preparing Instructional Designers for Game-Based Learning: Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Appelman, Bob; Rieber, Lloyd; Van Eck, Richard

    2010-01-01

    As noted in part I of this article (published in "TechTrends 54"(3)), advances in technology continue to outpace research on the design and effectiveness of instructional (digital video) games. In general, instructional designers know little about game development, commercial video game developers know little about training, education and…

  17. Designing Serious Game Interventions for Individuals with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Elisabeth M.; Smyth, Joshua M.; Scherf, K. Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    The design of "Serious games" that use game components (e.g., storyline, long-term goals, rewards) to create engaging learning experiences has increased in recent years. We examine of the core principles of serious game design and examine the current use of these principles in computer-based interventions for individuals with autism.…

  18. Facilitating Collaboration through Design Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva; Messeter, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    In recent years both companies and research communities call for collaborative work practices and user-centered approaches in various design fields. There are several challenges and issues to take into consideration. For instance there is a need to find ways of collaborating across various compet...

  19. Designing for Motivation: Design-Considerations for Spaced-Repetition-Based Learning Games on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimanke, Florian; Mertens, Robert; Vornberger, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Learning games are an ideal vessel for many kinds of learning content. Playful interaction with the subject matter makes the human mind more receptive and thus learning itself more effective. Well designed games also come with an addictive game-play that makes users want to play the game over and over. This is intended in fun games but it can be…

  20. Designing and evaluating sociability in online video games

    OpenAIRE

    Christou, Georgios; Law, Effie; Geerts, David; Nacke, Lennart; Zaphiris, Panayiotis

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of Online Video Games has led to new ways of socializing with friends. Nowadays a good online game is also associated with the pleasure of socializing and interaction with other players. One cannot play such a game solitarily in a meaningful sense without interacting with the other players. However, there are still no integrated ways of designing and evaluating the inherent sociability of online video games, nor are there methods or guidelines for designing and evaluating social...

  1. Gaming the System: Culture, Process, and Perspectives Supporting a Game and App Design Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herro, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Games and digital media experiences permeate the lives of youth. Researchers have argued the participatory attributes and cognitive benefits of gaming and media production for more than a decade, relying on socio-cultural theory to bolster their claims. Only recently have large-scale efforts ensued towards moving game play and design into formal…

  2. Learning via Game Design: From Digital to Card Games and Back Again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Emanuela; Valente, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of making design of digital games accessible to primary school children and their teachers, and we argue for the need of digital games that are easy to alter by young learners. We know from previous research projects that digital games do not enable children to express their creativity at full, in contrast…

  3. Creating Evaluation Profiles for Games Designed to be Fun: An Interpretive Framework for Serious Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Frank; Helms, Niels Henrik

    2017-01-01

    an interpretive evaluation framework that can identify the educational value in COTS games. Application. The presented framework can create evaluative profiles of the learning, social, game, and immersive mechanics of COTS games as educational tools. Moreover, the framework can position COTS games between four...... intertwined dimensions, namely pedagogical, design, knowledge, and sociotechnical considerations. Demonstration. To validate the practical application of the interpretive framework, we apply it to a real-world example. Our demonstration reveals the usefulness of the framework. Conclusions. The framework...

  4. Game Design Narrative for Learning: Appropriating Adventure Game Design Narrative Devices and Techniques for the Design of Interactive Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual analysis is to investigate how contemporary video and computer games might inform instructional design by looking at how narrative devices and techniques support problem solving within complex, multimodal environments. Specifically, this analysis presents a brief overview of game genres and the role of narrative in…

  5. A Case Study of the In-Class Use of a Video Game for Teaching High School History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, William R.; Mong, Christopher J.; Harris, Constance A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the case of a sophomore high school history class where "Making History", a video game designed with educational purposes in mind, is used in the classroom to teach about World War II. Data was gathered using observation, focus group and individual interviews, and document analysis. The high school was a rural school…

  6. From Game Design Elements to Gamefulness: Defining “Gamification”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Dixon, Dan; Khaled, Rilla

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid proliferation of mass-market consumer software that takes inspiration from video games. Usually summarized as “gamification”, this trend connects to a sizeable body of existing concepts and research in human- computer interaction and game studies, such as serious...

  7. Investigating the Effect of Scaffolding in Modern Game Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kasper Halkjær; Kraus, Martin

    2017-01-01

    of not knowing what to do. This paper investigates the effects that scaffolding in games has on players’ experience of a game. To this end, a custom game was designed and implemented that contained a number of different scenarios with different types of scaffolding. This was used to conduct an experiment on 18...

  8. Pre-Service Teachers Designing and Constructing "Good Digital Games"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artym, Corbett; Carbonaro, Mike; Boechler, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the application of digital games to enhance learning across many educational levels. This paper investigates pre-service teachers' ability to operationalize the learning principles that are considered part of a good digital game (Gee, 2007) by designing digital games in Scratch. Forty pre-service teachers, enrolled…

  9. The Effects of Game Design on Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael W.; Shen, Yuzhong

    2014-01-01

    This article details the administration and results of an experiment conducted to assess the impact of three video game design concepts upon learning outcomes. The principles tested include game aesthetics, player choice, and player competition. The experiment participants were asked to play a serious game over the course of a week, and the…

  10. Supporting Teachers to Design and Use Mobile Collaborative Learning Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfisi-Schottman, Iza; George, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Mobile Collaborative Learning Games combine all the ingredients necessary to attract students' attention and engage them in learning activities. However, designing a coherent scenario that combines mobility, game mechanics and collaborative learning is quite a challenge. In this article, we take the first step by proposing several game patterns…

  11. Reimagining Game Design: Exploring the Design of Constructible Authentic Representations for Science Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbert, Nathan Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Video games have recently become a popular space for educational design due to their interactive and engaging nature and the ubiquity of the gaming experience among youth. Though many researchers argue video games can provide opportunities for learning, educational game design has focused on the classroom rather than the informal settings where…

  12. Learning about the game: designing science games for a generation of gamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Marjee

    2012-12-01

    This paper is a response to "Challenges and Opportunities: Using a science-based video game in secondary school settings" by Rachel Muehrer, Jennifer Jenson, Jeremy Friedberg, and Nicole Husain. The article highlights two critical areas that I argue require more research in the studies of video games in education. The first area focuses on the need to better understand how children interact with non-educational games, outside of the school setting. This includes issues such as "gamer culture" and game play styles. The better we understand these issues, the better educational game designers and implementers can imagine the kinds of behaviors that might be elicited from students when we bring educational games into their classroom. In this focus, the student is the unit of analysis, but it is the student in and out of the classroom: the way the student understands video games when she is at home, playing with friends, and at school. The second area focuses on the study of the classroom as a unit of analysis. As the authors of this study reveal, classroom cultures affect the reception and success of an educational game. This is to ask, how does a game play when students have to play it in pairs or groups for a lack of resources? What is the role of the teacher in the success of video game implementation? How does a game react to multiple server requests in a short period of time? These are issues that are still largely unexplored in the educational game design literature.

  13. Game Programming Course - Creative Design and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaak Henno

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid developments of the Electronic Entertainment - computer and video games, virtual environments, the "Games 3.0" revolution - influences also courses about Games and Virtual Environments. In the following is discussed the course “Games and Virtual Environments” presented in the fall 2007 term in Tallinn University of Technology; the main emphasis of the course was not on programming technology, but on understanding games as a special form of communication and exploring specific features of this form.

  14. Achieving teachers' competences in the serious game design process

    OpenAIRE

    Zapušek, Matej; Rugelj, Jože

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to present ‘SADDIE’, the methodology for designing educational games that was developed at the Faculty of Education, University of Ljubljana and defines indikative phases for serious game design project that is implemented as a two‐semester project in the course "Application of ICT in education". The methodology is carefully designed and its application has various positive outcomes. Serious game as a final product is just a side effect of the more i...

  15. Design of an Interactive Game for Teaching War Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, Nikolaos; Drigas, Athanasios; Bardis, Nikolaos G.

    This work focuses on the use of computer simulations and computer games for the training of prospective and serving Armed Forces officers. A study of the use of computer simulations and games for teaching and training in the context of both the Armed Forces and civilian applications is presented. The study leads to high level specifications for the design of the proposed training game. The functional design of the proposed game is then explained and its rules are listed. The design is shown to offer the flexibility required for the teaching courses it is meant to serve. Further research necessary for the development of optimization algorithms necessary for the design is described.

  16. Game design as marketing: How game mechanics create demand for virtual goods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehdonvirta, V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Selling virtual goods for real money is an increasingly popular revenue model for massively-multiplayer online games (MMOs, social networking sites (SNSs and other online hangouts. In this paper, we argue that the marketing of virtual goods currently falls short of what it could be. Game developers have long created compelling game designs, but having to market virtual goods to players is a relatively new situation to them. Professional marketers, on the other hand, tend to overlook the internal design of games and hangouts and focus on marketing the services as a whole. To begin bridging the gap, we propose that the design patterns and game mechanics commonly used in games and online hangouts should be viewed as a set of marketing techniques designed to sell virtual goods. Based on a review of a number of MMOs, we describe some of the most common patterns and game mechanics and show how their effects can be explained in terms of analogous techniques from marketing science. The results provide a new perspective to game design with interesting implications to developers. Moreover, they also suggest a radically new perspective to marketers of ordinary goods and services: viewing marketing as a form of game design.

  17. Fostering 21st Century Skills through Game Design and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    This reflection paper argues that the design and development of digital games teach essential 21st century skills. Intrinsic to application and game development is design thinking. Design thinking requires iterative development, which demands creativity, critical thinking and problem solving. Students are engaged through learning by doing in both…

  18. A Pattern-Based Game Mechanics Design Assistant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Rozen (Riemer)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractVideo game designers iteratively improve player experience by play testing game software and adjusting its design. Deciding how to improve gameplay is difficult and time-consuming because designers lack an effective means for exploring decision alternatives and modifying a game’s

  19. Designing Serious Games for getting transferable skills in training settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Buendía-García

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, serious games are present in almost every educational context. The current work deals with the design of serious games oriented towards getting transferable skills in different kinds of training settings. These games can be a valuable way of engaging citizens and workers in the learning process by means of metaphors or similar mechanisms close to their user experience. They also contain an encouragement factor to uptake generic job competencies. An approach is proposed to develop this type of game by mixing traditional design steps with an instructional strategy to provide structured learning bites in training settings. Several game prototypes have been developed to test this approach in the context of courses for public employees. The obtained outcomes reveal the wider possibilities of serious games as educational resources, as well as the use of game achievements to evaluate the acquisition of transferable skills.

  20. Advanced game design with HTML5 and JavaScript

    CERN Document Server

    van der Spuy, Rex

    2015-01-01

    How do you make a video game? Advanced Game Design with HTML5 and JavaScript is a down to earth education in how to make video games from scratch, using the powerful HTML5 and JavaScript technologies. This book is a point-by-point round up of all the essential techniques that every game designer needs to know. You'll discover how to create and render game graphics, add interactivity, sound, and animation. You'll learn how to build your own custom game engine with reusable components so that you can quickly develop games with maximum impact and minimum code. You'll also learn the secrets o

  1. Toward Visualization for Games: Theory, Design Space, and Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Brian; Elmqvist, Niklas; Jankun-Kelly, T J

    2012-11-01

    Electronic games are starting to incorporate in-game telemetry that collects data about player, team, and community performance on a massive scale, and as data begins to accumulate, so does the demand for effectively analyzing this data. In this paper, we use examples from both old and new games of different genres to explore the theory and design space of visualization for games. Drawing on these examples, we define a design space for this novel research topic and use it to formulate design patterns for how to best apply visualization technology to games. We then discuss the implications that this new framework will potentially have on the design and development of game and visualization technology in the future.

  2. Design-Based Research and Video Game Based Learning: Developing the Educational Video Game "Citizen Science"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaydos, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a series of studies detailing the research and development of the educational science video game "Citizen Science." It documents the design process, beginning with the initial grant and ending with a case study of two teachers who used the game in their classrooms. Following a design-based research approach, this…

  3. Designing learning scenarios for serious games with ARGILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour El Mawas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The design of Serious Games for training in complex areas of expertise presents many difficulties related to trainers’ participation in the design phase, the formalization of scenarios describing highly complex situations, the limited number of scenarios in Serious Games due to their high costs, and the low re-use level of real-life scenarios. This study proposes functional and technical infrastructure with ARGILE (Architecture for Representations, Games, Interactions, and Learning among Experts for design of Serious Games. We illustrate our solution applied to a project in the sustainable development field.

  4. Designing learning scenarios for serious games with ARGILE

    OpenAIRE

    Nour El Mawas

    2014-01-01

    The design of Serious Games for training in complex areas of expertise presents many difficulties related to trainers’ participation in the design phase, the formalization of scenarios describing highly complex situations, the limited number of scenarios in Serious Games due to their high costs, and the low re-use level of real-life scenarios. This study proposes functional and technical infrastructure with ARGILE (Architecture for Representations, Games, Interactions, and Learning among Expe...

  5. Stochastic Game Approach to Guidance Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-09

    maneuverable aircraft, which can employ also electronic counter measures, is formulated as an imper- fect information zero-sum pursuit-evasion game played...on Differential Game Applications [36]. However, some other examples which included " electronic jinking", indicated that in an ECM environment a mixed...radius, b) missile/target maneuver ratio, c) nonlinear maneuver similarity parameter (aE T2 max d) normalized end- game duration, e ) ini’tial end- game

  6. Design Pattern Canvas: An Introduction to Unified Serious Game Design Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Zavcer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to start a dialogue and search for a unified game design tool within the game design and research community. As a possible direction, presented paper outlines the practice and importance of design pattern use in serious game development and argues that design patterns can make serious game development more efficient by enabling knowledge exchange and better communication between different stakeholders. Furthermore, the use of design patterns provides a foundation for structured research and analysis of games. In order to help advance the state of game design the paper proposes a new method – the Serious Games Design Pattern Canvas or shorter Design Pattern Canvas (DPC. DPC is a design template for developing new or documenting existing (serious game design patterns. It is a visual chart with elements describing a pattern's purpose, mechanic, audience, consequences, collected data, related research and ethical considerations. It assists game designer in aligning their activities by illustrating patterns characteristics and potential trade-offs. One of the goals of the DPC is to either help break larger game design problems into smaller pieces or assist in a bottom up approach of designing serious games. It is important to note, that the paper proposes the first step for co-creation of a game design tool and further research and validation of the DPC is needed.

  7. A New Design Approach to game or play based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel

    Abstract: The present paper proposes a new design perspective for game based learning. The general idea is to abandon the long and sought after dream of designing a closed learning system, where students from elementary school to high school without teachers’ interference could learn whatever...... subject they wanted sitting in front of a computer. This dream is a caricature I know, but it still lurks in the background whenever we speak, read or write about learning with computer games. The entire field of learning with games is called serious games since they profoundly find themselves...... on collision course with of-the-shelf-commercial entertainment games. This paper wants to promote two different yet interconnected ideas. The first aims at describing a different design perspective for game based learning which in many ways will provoke not only the above mentioned latent dream of a closed...

  8. Diabetic Mario: Designing and Evaluating Mobile Games for Diabetes Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei, Nilufar; Nandigam, David; Casey, John; Direito, Artur; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally, diabetes education has relied on written materials, with limited resources available for children with diabetes. Mobile games can be effective and motivating tools for the promotion of children's health. In our earlier work, we proposed a novel approach for designing computer games aimed at educating children with diabetes. In this article, we apply our game design to a mobile Android game (Mario Brothers). We also introduce four heuristics that are specifically designed for evaluating the mobile game, by adapting traditional usability heuristics. Results of a pilot study (n = 12) to evaluate gameplay over 1-week showed that the children found the game engaging and improved their knowledge of healthy diet and lifestyle.

  9. An Agent Based approach to design Serious Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Gentile

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Serious games are designed to train and educate learners, opening up new learning approaches like exploratory learning and situated cognition.  Despite growing interest in these games, their design is still an artisan process.On the basis of experiences in designing computer simulation, this paper proposes an agent-based approach to guide the design process of a serious game. The proposed methodology allows the designer to strike the right equilibrium between educational effectiveness and entertainment, realism and complexity.The design of the PNPVillage game is used as a case study. The PNPVillage game aims to introduce and foster an entrepreneurial mindset among young students. It was implemented within the framework of the European project “I  can… I cannot… I go!” Rev.2

  10. Constructible Authentic Representations: Designing Video Games That Enable Players to Utilize Knowledge Developed In-Game to Reason about Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbert, Nathan R.; Wilensky, Uri

    2014-01-01

    While video games have become a source of excitement for educational designers, creating informal game experiences that players can draw on when thinking and reasoning in non-game contexts has proved challenging. In this paper we present a design principle for creating educational video games that enables players to draw on knowledge resources…

  11. High User Control in Game Design Elements Increases Compliance and In-game Performance in a Memory Training Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Aniket; Riener, Robert; Wolf, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Computer games are increasingly being used for training cognitive functions like working memory and attention among the growing population of older adults. While cognitive training games often include elements like difficulty adaptation, rewards, and visual themes to make the games more enjoyable and effective, the effect of different degrees of afforded user control in manipulating these elements has not been systematically studied. To address this issue, two distinct implementations of the three aforementioned game elements were tested among healthy older adults (N = 21, 69.9 ± 6.4 years old) playing a game-like version of the n-back task on a tablet at home for 3 weeks. Two modes were considered, differentiated by the afforded degree of user control of the three elements: user control of difficulty vs. automatic difficulty adaptation, difficulty-dependent rewards vs. automatic feedback messages, and user choice of visual theme vs. no choice. The two modes ("USER-CONTROL" and "AUTO") were compared for frequency of play, duration of play, and in-game performance. Participants were free to play the game whenever and for however long they wished. Participants in USER-CONTROL exhibited significantly higher frequency of playing, total play duration, and in-game performance than participants in AUTO. The results of the present study demonstrate the efficacy of providing user control in the three game elements, while validating a home-based study design in which participants were not bound by any training regimen, and could play the game whenever they wished. The results have implications for designing cognitive training games that elicit higher compliance and better in-game performance, with an emphasis on home-based training.

  12. Designer Modeling for Personalized Game Content Creation Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liapis, Antonios; Yannakakis, Georgios N.; Togelius, Julian

    2013-01-01

    With the growing use of automated content creation and computer-aided design tools in game development, there is potential for enhancing the design process through personalized interactions between the software and the game developer. This paper proposes designer modeling for capturing the designer......’s preferences, goals and processes from their interaction with a computer-aided design tool, and suggests methods and domains within game development where such a model can be applied. We describe how designer modeling could be integrated with current work on automated and mixed-initiative content creation...

  13. Serious Games: Video Game Design Techniques for Academic and Commercial Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Bull-Hansen, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Serious Games: Video game design techniques for academic and commercial communication, by Christian Bull-Hansen, Department of Informatics, University of Oslo, Norway. Traditional academic and commercial communication sources, like schools and television, are losing ground to video games. People of all ages spend increasingly more time engaged in virtual worlds and on the Internet, and are becoming used to actively pursuing the information they want to know more about, while rejecting the...

  14. Authentic Design in Gaming: Changing the Rules of Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manusos, Dominick O.; Busby, Joe R.; Clark, Aaron C.

    2013-01-01

    The article provides information on the changing rules in the authentic designs in gaming. It states that board games have been used to teach before a traditional classroom setting was ever put in place. It mentions that technology, engineering, and design education teachers would do well to develop their assignments to lead students into…

  15. Reference task-based design of crisis management games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Link, Daniel; Meesters, Kenny; Hellingrath, Bernd; van de Walle, B.A.; Hiltz, S.R.; Pfaff, M.S.; Plotnick, L.; Shih, P.C.

    Serious games are an effective tool for giving players a hands-on, immersive experience of crisis situations. To simplify the design of such games while ensuring their relevance, we propose a design method that is based on reference tasks. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by the

  16. A New Design Approach to Game-Based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel

    2012-01-01

    they wanted while sitting in front of a computer. This describes a caricature, I know, but it still lurks in the background whenever we speak of, read or write about learning with computer games. The entire field of learning with games is called ‘serious games’, since they find themselves on a direct...... collision course with off-the-shelf, commercial entertainment games. This paper promotes two different yet interconnected ideas. The first aims to describe a new design perspective for game-based learning, which in many ways not only will provoke the abovementioned latent dream of a closed game...... to ground the student’s reason to learn. This paper proposes a different approach: using visualisation in immersive 3D worlds as both documentation of learning progress and as a reward system which motivates further learning. The overall design idea is to build a game based learning system from three...

  17. Foundation game design with HTML5 and JavaScript

    CERN Document Server

    van der Spuy, Rex

    2012-01-01

    Foundation Game Design with HTML5 and JavaScript teaches you everything you need to know about how to make video games. If you've never done any programming before and don't know where to start, this book will show you how to make games from start to finish. You'll learn all the latest programming technologies (HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript) to create your games. All written in a fun and friendly style with open-ended projects that encourage you to build your own original games. Foundation Game Design with HTML5 and JavaScript starts by showing you how you can use basic programing to create logic

  18. Player Experiences and Behaviors in a Multiplayer Game: designing game rules to change interdependent behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko Vegt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Serious gaming is used as a means for improving organizational teamwork, yet little is known about the effect of individual game elements constituting serious games. This paper presents a game design experiment aimed at generating knowledge on designing game elements for teamwork. In previous work, we suggested that interaction- and goal-driven rules could guide interdependence and teamwork strategies. Based on this finding, for the present experiment we developed two versions of multiplayer Breakout, varying in rule-sets, designed to elicit player strategies of either dependent competition or dependent cooperation. Results showed that the two rule-sets could generate distinct reported player experiences and observable distinct player behaviors that could be further discriminated into four patterns: expected patterns of helping and ignoring, and unexpected patterns of agreeing and obstructing. Classic game theory was applied to understand the four behavior patterns and made us conclude that goal-driven rules steered players towards competition and cooperation. Interaction rules, in contrast, mainly stimulated dependent competitive behavior, e.g. obstructing each other. Since different types of rules thus led to different player behavior, discriminating in game design between interaction- and goal-driven rules seems relevant. Moreover, our research showed that game theory proved to be useful for understanding goal-driven rules.

  19. Essential Features of Serious Games Design in Higher Education: Linking Learning Attributes to Game Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameras, Petros; Arnab, Sylvester; Dunwell, Ian; Stewart, Craig; Clarke, Samantha; Petridis, Panagiotis

    2017-01-01

    This paper consolidates evidence and material from a range of specialist and disciplinary fields to provide an evidence-based review and synthesis on the design and use of serious games in higher education. Search terms identified 165 papers reporting conceptual and empirical evidence on how learning attributes and game mechanics may be planned,…

  20. Design sensitivities for interactive sport-training games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegård; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2014-01-01

    and reflected upon. Based on the experiences gained from the design and development process, as well as examples from the existing field and skill acquisition theory, we present three areas of interest to consider for interactive sport-training game designers: Context Characteristics, Movement Patterns...... and Perceptual Reaction. From a discussion of these areas, we derive eight design sensitivities that emphasize issues, challenges and opportunities, important for the design, development and analysis of interactive sport-training games in general....

  1. The Effects of Game Design Experience on Teachers' Attitudes and Perceptions Regarding the Use of Digital Games in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yun-Jo; Cao, Li

    2017-01-01

    Researchers have investigated how gameplay and other related activities influence teachers' attitudes toward and perceptions of games or game-based learning. Taking one step further, this study was conducted to investigate how game design experience influences teachers' attitudes toward and perceptions of the use of digital games in the classroom…

  2. Google SketchUp for Game Design Beginner's Guide

    CERN Document Server

    de Jongh, Robin

    2011-01-01

    The book takes a clear, step-by-step approach to building a complete game level using SketchUp with many props and textures. This book is designed for anyone who wants to create entire 3D worlds in freely available game engines such as Unity 3D, CryEngine, Ogre, Panda3D, Unreal Engine, and Blender Game Engine. It also targets all those who wish to create new levels and assets to sell in game asset stores or use in visualization or animation.

  3. Serious simulation game development for energy transition education using integrated framework game design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destyanto, A. R.; Putri, O. A.; Hidayatno, A.

    2017-11-01

    Due to the advantages that serious simulation game offered, many areas of studies, including energy, have used serious simulation games as their instruments. However, serious simulation games in the field of energy transition still have few attentions. In this study, serious simulation game is developed and tested as the activity of public education about energy transition which is a conversion from oil to natural gas program. The aim of the game development is to create understanding and awareness about the importance of energy transition for society in accelerating the process of energy transition in Indonesia since 1987 the energy transition program has not achieved the conversion target yet due to the lack of education about energy transition for society. Developed as a digital serious simulation game following the framework of integrated game design, the Transergy game has been tested to 15 users and then analysed. The result of verification and validation of the game shows that Transergy gives significance to the users for understanding and triggering the needs of oil to natural gas conversion.

  4. Using Video Game Design to Motivate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael A.; Jones, Brett D.; Akalin, Sehmuz

    2017-01-01

    Because video games are so popular with young people, researchers have explored ways to use game play to engage students in school subjects (Peppler & Kafai, 2007; Rockwell & Kee, 2011; Small, 2011). Motivating students in science is especially important because of declines both in the number of young people who choose science careers and…

  5. Ethical Considerations in Designing Adaptive Persuasive Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christoffer Holmgård; Khaled, Rilla; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    In this poster, we describe an ongoing project concerning the development of an Adaptive Treatment Game (ATG) for treating Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The ATG uses biofeedback and computer game technology to enable multiple treatment techniques and goals. We examine how a multidisciplinary ap...

  6. A New Methodology of Design and Development of Serious Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André F. S. Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a serious game requires perfect knowledge of the learning domain to obtain the desired results. But it is also true that this may not be enough to develop a successful serious game. First of all, the player has to feel that he is playing a game where the learning is only a consequence of the playing actions. Otherwise, the game is viewed as boring and not as a fun activity and engaging. For example, the player can catch some items in the scenario and then separate them according to its type (i.e., recycle them. Thus, the main action for player is catching the items in the scenario where the recycle action is a second action, which is viewed as a consequence of the first action. Sometimes, the game design relies on a detailed approach based on the ideas of the developers because some educational content are difficult to integrate in the games, while maintaining the fun factor in the first place. In this paper we propose a new methodology of design and development of serious games that facilitates the integration of educational contents in the games. Furthermore, we present a serious game, called “Clean World”, created using this new methodology.

  7. Interlopers 3D: experiences designing a stereoscopic game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, James; Holliman, Nicolas S.

    2014-03-01

    Background In recent years 3D-enabled televisions, VR headsets and computer displays have become more readily available in the home. This presents an opportunity for game designers to explore new stereoscopic game mechanics and techniques that have previously been unavailable in monocular gaming. Aims To investigate the visual cues that are present in binocular and monocular vision, identifying which are relevant when gaming using a stereoscopic display. To implement a game whose mechanics are so reliant on binocular cues that the game becomes impossible or at least very difficult to play in non-stereoscopic mode. Method A stereoscopic 3D game was developed whose objective was to shoot down advancing enemies (the Interlopers) before they reached their destination. Scoring highly required players to make accurate depth judgments and target the closest enemies first. A group of twenty participants played both a basic and advanced version of the game in both monoscopic 2D and stereoscopic 3D. Results The results show that in both the basic and advanced game participants achieved higher scores when playing in stereoscopic 3D. The advanced game showed that by disrupting the depth from motion cue the game became more difficult in monoscopic 2D. Results also show a certain amount of learning taking place over the course of the experiment, meaning that players were able to score higher and finish the game faster over the course of the experiment. Conclusions Although the game was not impossible to play in monoscopic 2D, participants results show that it put them at a significant disadvantage when compared to playing in stereoscopic 3D.

  8. Students Designing Video Games about Immunology: Insights for Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Neda; Sheridan, Kimberly; Williams, Asia; Clark, Kevin; Stegman, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Exposing American K-12 students to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) content is a national initiative. Game Design Through Mentoring and Collaboration targets students from underserved communities and uses their interest in video games as a way to introduce science, technology, engineering, and math topics. This article describes a…

  9. Using Semantics to Improve the Design of Game Worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tutenel, T.; Smelik, R.M.; Bidarra, R.; Kraker, J.K. de

    2009-01-01

    Design of game worlds is becoming more and more laborintensive because of the increasing demand and complexity of content. This is being partially addressed by developing semi-automated procedural techniques that help generate (parts of) game worlds (e.g terrains, cities and buildings). However,

  10. Mobile Learning with a Mobile Game: Design and Motivational Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Gerhard; Goth, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Mobile technologies offer the opportunity to embed learning in a natural environment. This paper describes the design of the MobileGame prototype, exploring the opportunities to support learning through an orientation game in a university setting. The paper first introduces the scenario and then describes the general architecture of the prototype.…

  11. Mobile Game Based Learning: Designing a Mobile Location Based Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadenbauer, Sandra

    Today’s students grow up with rapidly changing technology. They spend much of their spare time using computer games, mobile phones and other toys and tools of the digital age. These things are part of their lives. Now it’s time to redesign the educational system and to adjust it to today’s technological opportunities. The current system is out of date. It isn’t able to arouse interest in students. With new technology, schools are able to rebuild their educational system and to spark the student’s interest in learning and further education. Passive and disinterested children will be a thing of the past.

  12. Level up! the guide to great video game design

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Want to design your own video games? Let expert Scott Rogers show you how! If you want to design and build cutting-edge video games but aren't sure where to start, then the SECOND EDITION of the acclaimed Level Up! is for you! Written by leading video game expert Scott Rogers, who has designed the hits Pac Man World, Maximo and SpongeBob Squarepants, this updated edition provides clear and well-thought out examples that forgo theoretical gobbledygook with charmingly illustrated concepts and solutions based on years of professional experience. Level Up! 2nd Edition has been NEWLY EXPANDED to

  13. Integrating Health Behavior Theory and Design Elements in Serious Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Colleen; Fleming, Theresa; Lucassen, Mathijs Fg; Bridgman, Heather; Stasiak, Karolina; Shepherd, Matthew; Orpin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Internet interventions for improving health and well-being have the potential to reach many people and fill gaps in service provision. Serious gaming interfaces provide opportunities to optimize user adherence and impact. Health interventions based in theory and evidence and tailored to psychological constructs have been found to be more effective to promote behavior change. Defining the design elements which engage users and help them to meet their goals can contribute to better informed serious games. To elucidate design elements important in SPARX, a serious game for adolescents with depression, from a user-centered perspective. We proposed a model based on an established theory of health behavior change and practical features of serious game design to organize ideas and rationale. We analyzed data from 5 studies comprising a total of 22 focus groups and 66 semistructured interviews conducted with youth and families in New Zealand and Australia who had viewed or used SPARX. User perceptions of the game were applied to this framework. A coherent framework was established using the three constructs of self-determination theory (SDT), autonomy, competence, and relatedness, to organize user perceptions and design elements within four areas important in design: computer game, accessibility, working alliance, and learning in immersion. User perceptions mapped well to the framework, which may assist developers in understanding the context of user needs. By mapping these elements against the constructs of SDT, we were able to propose a sound theoretical base for the model. This study's method allowed for the articulation of design elements in a serious game from a user-centered perspective within a coherent overarching framework. The framework can be used to deliberately incorporate serious game design elements that support a user's sense of autonomy, competence, and relatedness, key constructs which have been found to mediate motivation at all stages of the change

  14. Searching for Sentient Design Tools for Game Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liapis, Antonios

    Over the last twenty years, computer games have grown from a niche market targeting young adults to an important player in the global economy, engaging millions of people from different cultural backgrounds. As both the number and the size of computer games continue to rise, game companies handle...... their generative algorithms) and to their human users (who must take all design decisions), respectively. This thesis argues that computers can be creative partners to human designers rather than mere slaves; game design tools can be aware of designer intentions, preferences and routines, and can accommodate them...... to the user's current design in order to speed up the creation process and inspire the user to think outside the box. Several AI techniques are implemented, and others invented, for the purposes of creating meaningful suggestions for Sentient Sketchbook as well as for adapting these suggestions to the user...

  15. Design sensitivities for interactive sport-training games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegård; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2014-01-01

    and reflected upon. Based on the experiences gained from the design and development process, as well as examples from the existing field and skill acquisition theory, we present three areas of interest to consider for interactive sport-training game designers: Context Characteristics, Movement Patterns......This paper presents the design and development process of an interactive football-training game that aims to improve players' ball-handling skills, and their ability to simultaneously survey the playing field. A small-scale experiment was conducted to test the game, and the results are presented...... and Perceptual Reaction. From a discussion of these areas, we derive eight design sensitivities that emphasize issues, challenges and opportunities, important for the design, development and analysis of interactive sport-training games in general....

  16. Diabetes City: How Urban Game Design Strategies Can Help Diabetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöll, Martin

    Computer Games are about to leave their “electronic shells” and enter the city. So-called Serious Pervasive Games (SPGs) [1] allow for hybrid - simultaneously physical and virtual - experiences, applying technologies of ubiquitous computing, communication and “intelligent” interfaces. They begin to focus on non-entertaining purposes. The following article a) presents game design strategies as a missing link between pervasive computing, Ambient Intelligence and user’s everyday life. Therefore it spurs a discussion how Pervasive Healthcare focusing on the therapy and prevention of chronic diseases can benefit from urban game design strategies. b) Moreover the article presents the development and work in progress of “DiabetesCity“ - an educational game prototype for young diabetics.

  17. Searching for Sentient Design Tools for Game Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liapis, Antonios

    a large volume of game content or to reduce designer effort by automating the mechanizable aspects of content creation, such as feasibility checking. However elaborate the type of content such tools can create, they remain subservient to their human developers/creators (who have tightly designed all......Over the last twenty years, computer games have grown from a niche market targeting young adults to an important player in the global economy, engaging millions of people from different cultural backgrounds. As both the number and the size of computer games continue to rise, game companies handle...... increasing demand by expanding their cadre, compressing development cycles and reusing code or assets. To limit development time and reduce the cost of content creation, commercial game engines and procedural content generation are popular shortcuts. Content creation tools are means to either generate...

  18. When Playing Meets Learning: Methodological Framework for Designing Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linek, Stephanie B.; Schwarz, Daniel; Bopp, Matthias; Albert, Dietrich

    Game-based learning builds upon the idea of using the motivational potential of video games in the educational context. Thus, the design of educational games has to address optimizing enjoyment as well as optimizing learning. Within the EC-project ELEKTRA a methodological framework for the conceptual design of educational games was developed. Thereby state-of-the-art psycho-pedagogical approaches were combined with insights of media-psychology as well as with best-practice game design. This science-based interdisciplinary approach was enriched by enclosed empirical research to answer open questions on educational game-design. Additionally, several evaluation-cycles were implemented to achieve further improvements. The psycho-pedagogical core of the methodology can be summarized by the ELEKTRA's 4Ms: Macroadaptivity, Microadaptivity, Metacognition, and Motivation. The conceptual framework is structured in eight phases which have several interconnections and feedback-cycles that enable a close interdisciplinary collaboration between game design, pedagogy, cognitive science and media psychology.

  19. Video Games: A Human Factors Guide to Visual Display Design and Instructional System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    Abstract K Electronic video games have many of the same technological and psychological characteristics that are found in military computer-based...employed as learning vehicles, the especially compelling characteristics of electronic video games have not been fully explored for possible exploitation...new electronic video games . !? Accordingly, the following experiment was designed to determine those m dimensions along which electronic

  20. Designing wheelchair-based movement games

    OpenAIRE

    Gerling, Kathrin; Mandryk, Regan; Miller, Matthew; Kalyn, Mike; Birk, Max; Smeddinck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    People using wheelchairs have access to fewer sports and other physically stimulating leisure activities than nondisabled persons, and often lead sedentary lifestyles that negatively influence their health. While motion- based video games have demonstrated great potential of encouraging physical activity among nondisabled players, the accessibility of motion-based games is limited for persons with mobility disabilities, thus also limiting access to the potential health benefits of playing the...

  1. DESIGN EVALUATION OF A FORKLIFT SERIOUS GAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Theunis de Villiers

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Forklift training is one of many training programmes which involve heavymachinery or industrial equipment. During such sessions, it is not only theequipment, but also the trainer, trainees and others who may be at risk.Theoretical aspects can be presented without any risk, but practical aspects aredangerous, especially where novices are involved. Novice trainees not familiarwith forklift controls, could easily erras theydo not always contemplate theoutcomes of their driving. It would beideal if they could undergo training in a riskfree virtual environment where theycouldhave the opportunity to learn from theirmistakes. Due to advanced technologies in the world we live in, the youngergeneration find the use of technology interestingwhile they perceive learning asboring. Serious games provide Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL which isalso fun when learning and gaming are combined. The authors previouslyinvestigated how a digital forklift training in a virtual environment would benefittrainees. They consequently embarked on developing a digital-based forklifttraining game,OcuLift™, which could be usedin existing forklift training. Thispaper discusses the multimodalmethodology used during this phase of the project for the development of a prototype pertaining to the selection of input/outputdevices, game construction, as well as the rationale for the use of certain gamingelements. The authors tested the game with a local safety training company withsixteenforklift operatorswho played the game and shared their perceptions.

  2. Designing Meaningful Game Experiences for Rehabilitation and Sustainable Mobility Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Gabrielli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the approach followed in two ongoing research projects aimed to designing meaningful game-based experiences to support home rehabilitation, eco-sustainable mobility goals and more in general better daily lifestyles. We first introduce the need for designing meaningful game-based experiences that are well-connected to the relevant non-game settings and can be customized by/for users, then, we show examples of how this approach can be realized in the rehabilitation and sustainable mobility contexts.

  3. Gamification: The Intersection between Behavior Analysis and Game Design Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Morford, Zachary H.; Witts, Benjamin N.; Killingsworth, Kenneth J.; Alavosius, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Deterding et al. (Proceedings of the 15th International Academic MindTrek Conference: Envisioning Future Media Environments, USA 15: 9–15, 2011) report a recent rise in popularity of video game inspired software designed to address issues in a variety of areas, including health, energy conservation, education, and business. These applications have been based on the concept of gamification, which involves a process by which nongame activities are designed to be more like a game. We provide exa...

  4. Teaching Co-Design Games in Five Weeks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva; Kjærgård, Sarasiff; Risak Schou, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    . It is important in order to prepare students for a career as designers. The paper reports from an intense five weeks course about developing and using design games as a frame for design-oriented collaborations with people outside the core design team. Co-design is about making room for people with diverse...... interests, roles and responsibilities in rehearsing the future. Using the game metaphor to stage and engage everyone is a valuable format for collaborative inquiry and co-creating future visions – in other words exploring diversity and creating unity about values and goals. The professional designer...

  5. Excessive and addictive gaming control using counselling agent in online game design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ididi, Italumeh O.; Hassan, Sa'adah; Ghani, Abdul Azim Abd; Ali, Norhayati Mohd

    2017-10-01

    In recent times, online game play has become a food for thought to concerned individuals, researchers and authorities of various countries due to its excessive and addictive usage. Although, various government have taken certain measures such as shutting down internet cafe at certain hours of the day, censoring the most brutal, offensive and aggressive sections of certain games before they are released. Researchers have advised developers on ways of limiting harm on players by suggesting design changes on time limit. Furthermore, researchers have also suggested that online game distributors ought to make available appropriate referral services. The impart of the above are yet to make any remarkable impact on players. In this paper, we have proposed a Counseling Agent model integrating informative and self-appraisal messages in online game design as a control measure. Informative and self-appraisal messaging in games have proven optimistic through making positive impact on player's thoughts and behavior towards gaming. These messages are expected to remind players about the negative impact of excessive and addictive gaming habits, as well as suggesting possible reductive solutions through message streaming.

  6. Usability Testing Analysis on The Bana Game as Education Game Design References on Junior High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Adnan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning media is one of the important elements in the learning process. Technological development support makes learning media more varied. The approach of using digital technology as a learning media has a better and more effective impact than other approaches. In order to increase the students’ learning interest, it requires the support of an interesting learning media. The use of gaming applications as learning media can improve learning outcomes. The benefits of using the maximum application cannot be separated from the determination of application design. The Bana game aims to increase the ability of critical thinking of the junior high school students. The usability-testing analysis on the Bana game application is used in order to get the design reference as an educational game development. The game is used as an object of the analysis because it has the same characteristics and goals with the game application to be developed. Usability Testing is a method used to measure the ease of use of an application by users. The Usability Testing consists of learnability, efficiency, memorability, errors, and satisfaction. The results of the analysis obtained will be used as a reference for educational game applications that will be developed.

  7. Improving the Design of a Learning Game through Intrinsic Integration and Playtesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, André R.

    2016-01-01

    Designing and developing games for learning is a difficult endeavor. Educational game designers must not only make an engaging and motivating game, but must also ensure that learning takes place as a result of gameplay. Educational researchers have sought to define design principles in order to lessen the difficulty involved with game design. In…

  8. A Course on Serious Game Design and Development Using an Online Problem-Based Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapralos, Bill; Fisher, Stephanie; Clarkson, Jessica; van Oostveen, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a novel undergraduate course on serious game design and development that integrates both game and instructional design, thus providing an effective approach to teaching serious game design and development. Very little effort has been dedicated to the teaching of proper serious game design and…

  9. Murder on Grimm Isle: The Impact of Game Narrative Design in an Educational Game-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of narrative design in a game-based learning environment. Specifically, this investigation focuses the narrative design in an adventure-styled, game-based learning environment for fostering argumentation writing by looking at how the game narrative impacted player/learner (1) intrinsic…

  10. Computer Game Theories for Designing Motivating Educational Software: A Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Chee Siang; Rao, G. S. V. Radha Krishna

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate computer game theories for educational software. We propose a framework for designing engaging educational games based on contemporary game studies which includes ludology and narratology. Ludology focuses on the study of computer games as play and game activities, while narratology revolves around the…

  11. Analog Design for Digital Deployment of a Serious Leadership Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Nicholas; Lang, Tristan; Herman, Jeffrey L.; Phares, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design, development, and user testing of a leadership development simulation. The authors share lessons learned from using a design process for a board game to allow for quick and inexpensive revision cycles during the development of a serious leadership development game. The goal of this leadership simulation is to accelerate the development of leadership capacity in high-potential mid-level managers (GS-15 level) in a federal government agency. Simulation design included a mixed-method needs analysis, using both quantitative and qualitative approaches to determine organizational leadership needs. Eight design iterations were conducted, including three user testing phases. Three re-design iterations followed initial development, enabling game testing as part of comprehensive instructional events. Subsequent design, development and testing processes targeted digital application to a computer- and tablet-based environment. Recommendations include pros and cons of development and learner testing of an initial analog simulation prior to full digital simulation development.

  12. Reimagining Game Design: Exploring the Design of Constructible Authentic Representations for Science Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbert, Nathan Ryan

    Video games have recently become a popular space for educational design due to their interactive and engaging nature and the ubiquity of the gaming experience among youth. Though many researchers argue video games can provide opportunities for learning, educational game design has focused on the classroom rather than the informal settings where games are typically played. Educational games have been moderately successful at achieving learning gains on standardized items, but have failed to show improvements on related but distal problems. In this dissertation I develop and assess a new design principle, called constructible authentic representations for creating informal gaming experiences that players will actively draw on when reasoning in formal and real world contexts. These games provide players with opportunities to engage in meaningful construction with components that integrate relevant concepts to create in-game representations that visually and epistemologically align with related tools and representations utilized in the target domain. In the first phase of the dissertation, I observed children playing popular video games to better understand what in-game representations children attend to and how interactions with these representations contribute to intuitive ideas of encountered STEM content. Results from this study fed into the iterative design of two prototype video games, FormulaT Racing and Particles!, intending to give players useful knowledge resources for reasoning about kinematics and the particulate nature of matter respectively. Designed games encourage players to utilize and refine intuitive ideas about target content through the construction of domain relevant representations. To assess the effectiveness of these designs I conducted two studies of children ages 7-14 playing prototype games in informal settings. An analysis of pre- and post-game clinical interviews, domain specific tasks, and video and logging data of gameplay suggests

  13. Game Design Jomblo Keren As a Startup Marketing Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celvin Laviano

    2018-01-01

    ability to be able to take advantage of opportunities with the best. Bill Gates once quoted a word from Don Corleone that we must keep our friend close but our enemies even closer. Because of these competitors we will see various types of opportunities and opportunities that exist. The creation of "Jomblo Keren" game design will look at different types of aspects that can be used to get the right predictions to make the games acceptable by the market. These aspects include themes, games platform, visuals, gameplay, and stories.

  14. Examining the Characteristics of Digital Learning Games Designed by In-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yun-Jo; Cao, Li

    2017-01-01

    In order to better understand teachers' perspectives on the design and development of digital game-based learning environments, this study examined the characteristics of digital learning games designed by teachers. In addition, this study explored how game design and peer critique activities influenced their perceptions of digital game-based…

  15. Making Games after School: Participatory Game Design in Non-Formal Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kevin; Brandt, Jami; Hopkins, Rhonda; Wilhelm, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Participatory design principles were used with primarily African-American and Latino children in the Washington, DC area in the development of sports-themed digital game prototypes in an after-school program. The three stages in participatory design are the discovery stage, the evaluative stage, and prototyping. Within the participatory design…

  16. Using the Monopoly[R] Board Game as an In-Class Economic Simulation in the Introductory Financial Accounting Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanklin, Stephen B.; Ehlen, Craig R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses using the Monopoly[R] board game as an economic simulation exercise to reinforce an understanding of how the accounting cycle impacts financial statements used to evaluate management performance. This approach uses the rules and strategies of a familiar board game to create a simulation of business and economic realities,…

  17. Teaching Co-Design Games in Five Weeks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva; Kjærgård, Sarasiff; Risak Schou, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    This paper is about educating designers as codesigners and reflective practitioners. It is argued that an important goal in design pedagogy is learning the students’ strategies and tools for how to involve various stakeholders in designing, and how to deal with uncertainty and open design agendas....... It is important in order to prepare students for a career as designers. The paper reports from an intense five weeks course about developing and using design games as a frame for design-oriented collaborations with people outside the core design team. Co-design is about making room for people with diverse...... interests, roles and responsibilities in rehearsing the future. Using the game metaphor to stage and engage everyone is a valuable format for collaborative inquiry and co-creating future visions – in other words exploring diversity and creating unity about values and goals. The professional designer...

  18. Game Design Concept Report : Application of the WeShareIt Game Elements in Nzoia River Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onencan, A.M.; Enserink, B.; van de Walle, B.A.

    2018-01-01

    In early 2016, we designed Nzoia WeShareIt game to support joint decision-making, in a complex river basin, through policy practice in the form of water allocation trade-offs between food, energy, and nature. Nzoia WeShareIt game is a multi-player hybrid cooperation game.

    This concept

  19. Disruptive game design: a commercial design and development methodology for supporting player cognitive engagement in digital games

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    First-person games often support the player’s gradual accretion of knowledge of the game’s rules during gameplay. They thus focus on challenging and developing performative skills, which in turn supports the player in attaining feelings of achievement and skills mastery. However, an alternative disruptive game design approach is proposed as an approach that encourages players to engage in higher-order thinking, in addition to performative challenges. This requires players to cognitively engag...

  20. Designing the user experience of game development tools

    CERN Document Server

    Lightbown, David

    2015-01-01

    The Big Green Button My Story Who Should Read this Book? Companion Website and Twitter Account Before we BeginWelcome to Designing the User Experience of Game Development ToolsWhat Will We Learn in This Chapter?What Is This Book About?Defining User ExperienceThe Value of Improving the User Experience of Our ToolsParallels Between User Experience and Game DesignHow Do People Benefit From an Improved User Experience?Finding the Right BalanceWrapping UpThe User-Centered Design ProcessWhat Will We

  1. Searching for Concurrent Design Patterns in Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Micah J.; Fedorova, Alexandra; Dickie, Ryan; Tagliasacchi, Andrea; Couture-Beil, Alex; Mustard, Craig; Mottishaw, Shane; Brown, Aron; Huang, Zhi Feng; Xu, Xiaoyuan; Ghazali, Nasser; Brownsword, Andrew

    The transition to multicore architectures has dramatically underscored the necessity for parallelism in software. In particular, while new gaming consoles are by and large multicore, most existing video game engines are essentially sequential and thus cannot easily take advantage of this hardware. In this paper we describe techniques derived from our experience parallelizing an open-source video game Cube 2. We analyze the structure and unique requirements of this complex application domain, drawing conclusions about parallelization tools and techniques applicable therein. Our experience and analysis convinced us that while existing tools and techniques can be used to solve parts of this problem, none of them constitutes a comprehensive solution. As a result we were inspired to design a new parallel programming environment (PPE) targeted specifically at video game engines and other complex soft real-time systems. The initial implementation of this PPE, Cascade, and its performance analysis are also presented.

  2. Prime Example Ingress Reframing the Pervasive Game Design Framework (PGDF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Söbke

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The growing availability of mobile communication infrastructure over the last decade has contributed significantly to the maturity of Pervasive Gaming. The massive success of games such as Ingress and Pokémon Go made pervasive gaming a viable option for transforming learning. By its adaptability to location and context, pervasive technology is a valuable support for the design of engaging learning experiences. Despite profound examples of pervasive gaming as learning tool, there is still a lack of reliable methodologies to construct purposeful pervasive learning experiences. The Pervasive Game Design Framework (PGDF is intended to fill this gap. In this article, we present the PGDF using the example of Ingress. Ingress is a prominent pervasive game, as it has received huge attention since its appearance in 2012. A large community of players and third-party-tool suppliers has created a rich set of experiences since then. In this research, we examine Ingress according to PGDF’s categories based on a survey among long-term Ingress players (N=133. Founded on this analysis we identify three main benefits for Ingress players. Furthermore, we discuss the consequences of these findings on the PGDF. Summarizing, this work strengthens the applicability of the PGDF, in order to enable the construction of enriched pervasive learning experiences.

  3. Designing for Game-Based Learning: The Effective Integration of Technology to Support Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaswad, Zina; Nadolny, Larysa

    2015-01-01

    The use of games and game structures in educational contexts is growing in popularity. An increasing number of technologies have been developed to meet the needs of designing a course as a game. This article discussed the design process in game-based learning and reviewed the research on structuring a course with a focus on feedback, goals, and…

  4. Explicit design for real estate education : The management game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, P.; Van Dooren, E.J.G.C.; Den Heijer, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    In positioning the design school versus the business school, the management game as an educational module in the last semester of the architectural bachelor in Delft is illustrative for the possible synthesis between real estate and architecture. The explicit approach of design, as applied in Delft

  5. Design and Development of Educational Games for Children on Mobile Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Galun, Mojca

    2016-01-01

    An overview of existing educational games for children on Android mobile platform and categorisation was made. The best games in each category are presented and used as examples for preparing recommendations on implementation of such games. The largest deficiency of games in Slovenian is noticed in the category Alphabet. Because of this, we have designed and developed a game called Žirafko's adventure (slov. Žirafkovo potovanje). In this game, users must find the first letters of depicted obj...

  6. Gamification: The Intersection between Behavior Analysis and Game Design Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morford, Zachary H; Witts, Benjamin N; Killingsworth, Kenneth J; Alavosius, Mark P

    2014-05-01

    Deterding et al. (Proceedings of the 15th International Academic MindTrek Conference: Envisioning Future Media Environments, USA 15: 9-15, 2011) report a recent rise in popularity of video game inspired software designed to address issues in a variety of areas, including health, energy conservation, education, and business. These applications have been based on the concept of gamification, which involves a process by which nongame activities are designed to be more like a game. We provide examples of how gamification has been used to increase health-related behavior, energy consumption, academic performance, and other socially-significant behavior. We argue that behavior analytic research and practice stands to benefit from incorporating successful elements of game design. Lastly, we provide suggestions for behavior analysts regarding applied and basic research related to gamification.

  7. Examining key design decisions involved in developing a serious game for child sexual abuse prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen Joy Stieler-Hunt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study of the key decisions made in the design of Orbit, a child sexual abuse prevention computer game targeted at school students between 8 and 10 years of age. Key decisions include providing supported delivery for the target age group, featuring adults in the program, not over-sanitising game content, having a focus on building healthy self-concept of players, making the game engaging and relatable for all players and evaluating the program. This case study has implications for the design of Serious Games more generally, including that research should underpin game design decisions, game designers should consider ways of bridging the game to real life, the learning that arises from the game should go beyond rote-learning, designers should consider how the player can make the game-world their own and comprehensive evaluations of Serious Games should be undertaken.

  8. Accurate Complex Systems Design: Integrating Serious Games with Petri Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Sinclair

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Difficulty understanding the large number of interactions involved in complex systems makes their successful engineering a problem. Petri Nets are one graphical modelling technique used to describe and check proposed designs of complex systems thoroughly. While automatic analysis capabilities of Petri Nets are useful, their visual form is less so, particularly for communicating the design they represent. In engineering projects, this can lead to a gap in communications between people with different areas of expertise, negatively impacting achieving accurate designs.In contrast, although capable of representing a variety of real and imaginary objects effectively, behaviour of serious games can only be analysed manually through interactive simulation. This paper examines combining the complementary strengths of Petri Nets and serious games. The novel contribution of this work is a serious game prototype of a complex system design that has been checked thoroughly. Underpinned by Petri Net analysis, the serious game can be used as a high-level interface to communicate and refine the design.Improvement of a complex system design is demonstrated by applying the integration to a proof-of-concept case study.   

  9. Designing and Evaluating Conative Game-Based Learning Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønau-Fog, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    It is an essential prerequisite to design for motivation in game-based learning applications, tools and activities. However, how is it possible to design and evaluate motivational game-based learning scenarios in a systematic process-oriented manner based on conation and player engagement? While...... conation is related to the perseverance, determination and tenacity players exhibit when playing an interesting game, player engagement describes in detail what it is that causes a player to keep playing - Not only through fun and gamification drivers such as points and levels, but by utilizing triggers...... of ‘continuation desire’ such as interfacing with the scenario, exploration and socialising. This paper aims to combine the concepts of Player Engagement, Conation and Continuation Desire by focusing on the conative aspects which are the essential drivers for the desire to continue any learning activity...

  10. An Analytic Creativity Assessment Scale for Digital Game Story Design: Construct Validity, Internal Consistency and Interrater Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tsung-Yen; Huang, Yun-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technology has rapidly made digital games a popular entertainment to this digital generation, and thus digital game design received considerable attention in both the game industry and design education. Digital game design involves diverse dimensions in which digital game story design (DGSD) particularly attracts our interest, as the…

  11. Designing an Augmented Reality Board Games with children: The BattleBoard 3D experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Kristensen, Sune; Andersen, Troels L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of Battleboard 3D (BB3D) which is an ARToolkit based game prototype, featuring the use of LEGO bricks for the physical and digital pieces. BB3D is a novel type of an AR game augmenting traditional board games with features from computer games. The initial experiments...

  12. Digital Games, Design, and Learning: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Douglas B.; Tanner-Smith, Emily E.; Killingsworth, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    In this meta-analysis, we systematically reviewed research on digital games and learning for K-16 students. We synthesized comparisons of game versus nongame conditions (i.e., media comparisons) and comparisons of augmented games versus standard game designs (i.e., value-added comparisons). We used random-effects meta-regression models with robust…

  13. Leveraging Insights from Mainstream Gameplay to Inform STEM Game Design: Great Idea, but What Comes Next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biles, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    This response to Leah A. Bricker and Phillip Bell's paper, "GodMode is his video game name", examines their assertion that the social nexus of gaming practices is an important factor to consider for those looking to design STEM video games. I propose that we need to go beyond the investigation into which aspects of games play a role in learning,…

  14. Design and Production of Trophies for Selected Sports and Games ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design and production of trophies for games and sports particularly in a form of metal art has been in existence for so many years. Presently they are practiced with much improvement and modern technology as compared to the ancient times where leaves, horns and other objects were used as trophies to award warriors ...

  15. Ambient Displays and Game Design Patterns for Social Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelle, Sebastian; Börner, Dirk; Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus; Glahn, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Kelle, S., Börner, D., Kalz, M., Specht, M., & Glahn, C. (2010). Ambient Displays and Game Design Patterns for Social Learning. In B. Chang, T. Hirashima, & H. Ogata (Eds.), Joint Proceedings of the Work-in-Progress Poster and Invited Young Researcher Symposium for the 18th International Conference

  16. Balancing Fun and Learning in a Serious Game Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzwa, Christopher; Tang, Ying; Johnson, Aaron; Bielefeldt, Talbot

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the underlying philosophy of Sustain City, an educational serious game system that engages students, particularly prospective and beginning science and engineering students, in a series of engineering design challenges. Various strategies implemented in Sustain City for achieving a balance of fun and learning are discussed,…

  17. How Games are Designed to Increase Students’ Motivation in Learning Physics? A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinedi, V.; Yohandri, Y.; Djamas, D.

    2018-04-01

    Game is a promising tool to help students in understanding physics concept. It can motivate and provide the opportunities for students to become independent in learning. In order to fulfil these functions, games should be carefully designed. Thus, the objective of this paper is to present how games are designed to increase students’ motivation in learning physics based on several literature reviews. The results showed that there are several ways to increase students’ motivation in learning physics and to achieve that, game dimensions are needed to be considered when designing a game. This literature review may have useful to assist teachers and contribute in improving the design of games.

  18. Design Principles for Serious Video Games in Mathematics Education: From Theory to Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Chorianopoulos; Michail Giannakos

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in the employment of serious video games in science education, but there are no clear design principles. After surveying previous work in serious video game design, we highlighted the following design principles: 1) engage the students with narrative (hero, story), 2) employ familiar gameplay mechanics from popular video games, 3) engage students into constructive trial and error game-play and 4) situate collaborative learning. As illustrated examples we designed two...

  19. Design principles for simulation games for learning clinical reasoning: A design-based research approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, J-M; Haavisto, E; Niemi, H; Haho, P; Nylund, S; Multisilta, J

    2018-01-01

    Nurses sometimes lack the competence needed for recognising deterioration in patient conditions and this is often due to poor clinical reasoning. There is a need to develop new possibilities for learning this crucial competence area. In addition, educators need to be future oriented; they need to be able to design and adopt new pedagogical innovations. The purpose of the study is to describe the development process and to generate principles for the design of nursing simulation games. A design-based research methodology is applied in this study. Iterative cycles of analysis, design, development, testing and refinement were conducted via collaboration among researchers, educators, students, and game designers. The study facilitated the generation of reusable design principles for simulation games to guide future designers when designing and developing simulation games for learning clinical reasoning. This study makes a major contribution to research on simulation game development in the field of nursing education. The results of this study provide important insights into the significance of involving nurse educators in the design and development process of educational simulation games for the purpose of nursing education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Extending the Use and Effectiveness of the Monopoly® Board Game as an In-Class Economic Simulation in the Introductory Financial Accounting Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanklin, Stephen B.; Ehlen, Craig R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper extends the use of the Monopoly® board game as an economic simulation exercise designed to reinforce an understanding of how the accounting cycle impacts the financial statements used to evaluate management performance. This extension adds elements of debt not previously utilized to allow for an introduction of the fundamentals of ratio…

  1. Gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Camilleri, Cassi

    2014-01-01

    In ancient times games played an integral role in society. Whilst in today’s hyperlinked world, games have evolved into complex, sophisticated mechanisms that enthral millions. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/the-school-of-games/

  2. Students as Game Designers vs. "Just" Players: Comparison of Two Different Approaches to Location-Based Games Implementation into School Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slussareff, Michaela; Bohácková, Petra

    2016-01-01

    This paper compares two kinds of educational treatment within location-based game approach; learning by playing a location-based game and learning by designing a location-based game. Two parallel elementary school classes were included in our study (N = 27; age 14-15). The "designers" class took part in the whole process of game design…

  3. The design of Eco Board Games as an umbrella approach to sustainable product design education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boks, Casper; McAloone, Tim C.

    2009-01-01

    The multidisciplinarity and quickly broadening scope of sustainable product design education provide incentives for experimentation with different pedagogical techniques. One of these, involving the development of eco board games, has been used at both the Technical University Denmark...

  4. Algorithm Design on Network Game of Chinese Chess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianmei, Fang

    This paper describes the current situation of domestic network game. Contact the present condition of the local network game currently, we inquired to face to a multithread tcp client and server, such as Chinese chess, according to the information, and study the contents and meanings. Combining the Java of basic knowledge, the article study the compiling procedure facing to the object according to the information in Java Swing usage, and the method of the network procedure. The article researched the method and processes of the network procedure carry on the use of Sprocket under the Java Swing. Understood the basic process of compiling procedure using Java and how to compile a network procedure. The most importance is how a pair of machines correspondence-C/S the service system-is carried out. From here, we put forward the data structure,the basic calculate way of the network game- Chinese chess, and how to design and realize the server and client of that procedure. The online games -- chess design can be divided into several modules as follows: server module, client module and the control module.

  5. Towards a culturally independent participatory design method: Fusing game elements into the design process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mika Yasuoka; Nakatani, Momoko; Ohno, Takehiko

    2013-01-01

    Historically, Participatory Design (PD) was introduced and applied in the Scandinavian and American context as a practical design method for collective creativity and stakeholder involvement. In this paper, by fusing game elements into PD, we suggest a first step towards a culturally independent PD...... and the created Persona characteristics, probably due to cultural differences. Of more interestingly, despite these process differences, the game elements of our PD variant were found to promote the key values of PD in culturally diverse settings by stimulating idea creation and participation. Our experiments...... imply that the introduction of game elements allows PD to be effectively utilized in culturally diverse settings....

  6. Experimenting on how to create a sustainable gamified learning design that supports adult students when learning through designing learning games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2014-01-01

    digital learning games (small games) in cross‐disciplinary subject matters. The experiment has focused on creating a game‐based learning design that enables the students to implement the learning goals into their games, and on making the game design process motivating and engaging. Another focus...... of the study has been to create a sustainable learning design that supports the learning game design process and gives teachers the ability to evaluate whether the students have been successful in learning their subject matter through this learning game design process. The findings are that this initial......This paper presents and discusses the first iteration of a design‐based research experiment focusing on how to create an overall gamified learning design (big Game) facilitating the learning process for adult students by letting them be their own learning designers through designing their own...

  7. Game Design Document Format For Video Games With Passive Dynamic Difficulty Adjustment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratama Wirya Atmaja

    2016-07-01

    satisfaction of its players is the primary mean to measure its quality. One important element of player’s satisfaction is a proper difficulty level, which is neither too easy nor too hard. The current state-of-the-art way to implement it is with Dynamic Difficulty Adjustment (DDA, which allows the difficulty level of a video game to be adjusted at run-time. Currently, the most popular type of DDA is the passive one. Meanwhile, Game Design Document (GDD is an important artefact in the development process of a video game software, and there is still no GDD format that supports the design of passive DDA mechanism. The aim of this research was to find a new GDD format that supports the mechanism. We modified a general purpose GDD format by adding new parts for designing passive DDA mechanism. We tested the usefulness of the modified format in a testing process involving developers and players. The developers developed video games using the modified GDD format and the general purpose one. Their development processes were observed and evaluated to know if there were any difficulties. The resulting video games were played by the players to find which are better in terms of passive DDA mechanism. The result of developer testing showed that the modified format is better than the general purpose one. The result of player testing showed that the video games made with the modified format are better than their counterparts, albeit by an insignificant margin. Based on the results, we declare that the modified GDD format is successful.Keywords: Video game, requirement engineering, game design document, dynamic difficulty adjustment, software development.

  8. Roteiro e design da narrativa (de Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Winck

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A tecnologia narrativa audiovisual inaugura um modo de produção coletivo no qual a figura do autor se mescla e se anula na equipe de realizadores, os prossumidores. O projeto lógico estrutural ou design de relações da narrativa é o que emoldura toda a complexidade dos múltiplos projetos narrativos numa organização teleológica, uma espécie de “estrutura ausente”, um esqueleto fluido, invisível e inaudível. O design do audiovisual, é uma geometria plástica, matemática e política capaz de levar à compreensão das “mensagens” do audiovisual pela “maneira” de desenhar e organizar a trama no corpo da tecnologia narrativa; e  isso inaugura um novo design: o Design de Relações.

  9. Digging deeper into platform game level design: session size and sequential features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Noor; Yannakakis, Georgios N.; Togelius, Julian

    2012-01-01

    A recent trend within computational intelligence and games research is to investigate how to affect video game players’ in-game experience by designing and/or modifying aspects of game content. Analysing the relationship between game content, player behaviour and self-reported affective states...... constitutes an important step towards understanding game experience and constructing effective game adaptation mechanisms. This papers reports on further refinement of a method to understand this relationship by analysing data collected from players, building models that predict player experience...... and analysing what features of game and player data predict player affect best. We analyse data from players playing 780 pairs of short game sessions of the platform game Super Mario Bros, investigate the impact of the session size and what part of the level that has the major affect on player experience...

  10. Game Theory and Risk-Based Levee System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, R.; Lund, J. R.; Madani, K.

    2014-12-01

    Risk-based analysis has been developed for optimal levee design for economic efficiency. Along many rivers, two levees on opposite riverbanks act as a simple levee system. Being rational and self-interested, land owners on each river bank would tend to independently optimize their levees with risk-based analysis, resulting in a Pareto-inefficient levee system design from the social planner's perspective. Game theory is applied in this study to analyze decision making process in a simple levee system in which the land owners on each river bank develop their design strategies using risk-based economic optimization. For each land owner, the annual expected total cost includes expected annual damage cost and annualized construction cost. The non-cooperative Nash equilibrium is identified and compared to the social planner's optimal distribution of flood risk and damage cost throughout the system which results in the minimum total flood cost for the system. The social planner's optimal solution is not feasible without appropriate level of compensation for the transferred flood risk to guarantee and improve conditions for all parties. Therefore, cooperative game theory is then employed to develop an economically optimal design that can be implemented in practice. By examining the game in the reversible and irreversible decision making modes, the cost of decision making myopia is calculated to underline the significance of considering the externalities and evolution path of dynamic water resource problems for optimal decision making.

  11. An Evaluation of the Added Value of Co-Design in the Development of an Educational Game for Road Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    All, Anissa; Van Looy, Jan; Castellar, Elena Patricia Nuñez

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the added value of co-design in addition to other innovation research methods in the process of developing a serious game design document for a road safety game. The sessions aimed at exploring 4 aspects of a location-based game experience: themes, game mechanics, mobile phone applications and locations for mini-games. In…

  12. Designing a serious game for historical heritage: a case study of Heerlen Roman bathhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The advances of computer games have shown their potentials for developing edutainment content and services. Current cultural heritages often make use of games in order to complement existing presentations and to create a memorable exhibition. It offers opportunities to reorganize and conceptualize historical, cultural and technological information about the exhibits. To demonstrate the benefits of serious games in terms of facilitating the learning activities in a constructive and meaningful way, we designed a video game about the Heerlen bathhouse heritage. This paper explains the design considerations of this Roman bathhouse game, with a particular focus on the link between game play and learning.

  13. The Uses of Teaching Games in Game Theory Classes and Some Experimental Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubik, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the use of lightly controlled games, primarily in classes in game theory. Considers the value of such games from the viewpoint of both teaching and experimentation and discusses context; control; pros and cons of games in teaching; experimental games; and games in class, including cooperative game theory. (Author/LRW)

  14. Optimal preview game theory approach to vehicle stability controller design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddoni, Seyed Hossein; Taheri, Saied; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic game theory brings together different features that are keys to many situations in control design: optimisation behaviour, the presence of multiple agents/players, enduring consequences of decisions and robustness with respect to variability in the environment, etc. In the presented methodology, vehicle stability is represented by a cooperative dynamic/difference game such that its two agents (players), namely the driver and the direct yaw controller (DYC), are working together to provide more stability to the vehicle system. While the driver provides the steering wheel control, the DYC control algorithm is obtained by the Nash game theory to ensure optimal performance as well as robustness to disturbances. The common two-degrees-of-freedom vehicle-handling performance model is put into discrete form to develop the game equations of motion. To evaluate the developed control algorithm, CarSim with its built-in nonlinear vehicle model along with the Pacejka tire model is used. The control algorithm is evaluated for a lane change manoeuvre, and the optimal set of steering angle and corrective yaw moment is calculated and fed to the test vehicle. Simulation results show that the optimal preview control algorithm can significantly reduce lateral velocity, yaw rate, and roll angle, which all contribute to enhancing vehicle stability.

  15. The "Learning Games Design Model": Immersion, Collaboration, and Outcomes-Driven Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Barbara; Trespalacios, Jesús; Gallagher, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Instructional designers in the Learning Games Lab at New Mexico State University have developed a specific approach for the creation of educational games, one that has been used successfully in over 20 instructional design projects and is extensible to other developers. Using this approach, game developers and content experts (a) work…

  16. Designing and Integrating Purposeful Learning in Game Play: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Fengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Via a systematic review of the literature on learning games, this article presents a systematic discussion on the design of intrinsic integration of domain-specific learning in game mechanics and game world design. A total of 69 articles ultimately met the inclusion criteria and were coded for the literature synthesis. Exemplary learning games…

  17. Educational Game Design as Gateway for Operationalizing Computational Thinking Skills among Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min Lun

    2018-01-01

    This qualitative case study reports descriptive findings of digital game-based learning involving 15 Taiwanese middle school students' use of computational thinking skills elicited through programmed activities in a game design workshop. Situated learning theory is utilized as framework to evaluate novice game designers' individual advancement in…

  18. Effects of Game Design Patterns on Basic Life Support Training Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelle, Sebastian; Klemke, Roland; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Based on a previous analysis of game design patterns and related effects in an educational scenario, the following paper presents an experimental study. In the study a course for Basic Life Support training has been evaluated and two game design patterns have been applied to the course. The hypotheses evaluated in this paper relate to game design…

  19. Serious Games for Higher Education: A Framework for Reducing Design Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westera, W.; Nadolski, R. J.; Hummel, H. G. K.; Wopereis, I. G. J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Serious games open up many new opportunities for complex skills learning in higher education. The inherent complexity of such games, though, requires large efforts for their development. This paper presents a framework for serious game design, which aims to reduce the design complexity at conceptual, technical and practical levels. The approach…

  20. A Description Grid to Support the Design of Learning Role-Play Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariais, Christelle; Michau, Florence; Pernin, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    To strengthen the motivation of learners, the professional training sector is focusing more and more on game-based learning. In this context, the authors have become interested in the design of Learning Role-Play Game (LRPG) scenarios. The aim of this article is to improve the designers' confidence in the validity of the game-based learning…

  1. Cross-cultures impact on video game industry. : Case study: Dota 2’s game design and customer experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, An

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the culture’s impact on online game designs, how the game could attract players internationally with culturally adaptive design and last but not least create its own digital culture among its players. The main finding of the thesis was the importance of culture in the current online game industry. Since the players were from all around the world, their cultural impacts on the game’s design could be greater than ever. Companies who are aiming fo...

  2. Concept Model For Designing Engaging And Motivating Games For Learning - The Smiley-Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke; Ørngreen, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    learning in a learning game, 2) study of motivational theories, 3) analysis of theory of play and existing experiences on dissemination of learning in games in fun ways 4) analysis of motivating and engaging game elements, and 5) analysis of similar music learning games. During an iterative design process......, the design manual was used for development of various prototypes of the learning game concept. This happened through action research in collaboration with the users, in participatory design workshops, combined with observation, qualitative interviews, and peer reviews. Through empirical studies and design...... that is believed to be an advantage when using learning games in education. In this paper the Smiley-model is presented (figure 1). The model describes which parameters and elements are important when designing a learning game. The present research is a result of a case-based action research study for designing...

  3. A "Knowledge Trading Game" for Collaborative Design Learning in an Architectural Design Studio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wan-Ling; Shih, Shen-Guan; Chien, Sheng-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge-sharing and resource exchange are the key to the success of collaborative design learning. In an architectural design studio, design knowledge entails learning efforts that need to accumulate and recombine dispersed and complementary pieces of knowledge. In this research, firstly, "Knowledge Trading Game" is proposed to be a way for…

  4. Games as Actors - Interaction, Play, Design, and Actor Network Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Jessen, Jari Due; Jessen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    When interacting with computer games, users are forced to follow the rules of the game in return for the excitement, joy, fun, or other pursued experiences. In this paper, we investigate how games a chieve these experiences in the perspective of Actor Network Theory (ANT). Based on a qualitative data from a study of board games , computer games, and exergames, we conclude that games are actors that produce experiences by exercising power over the user’ s abilities, for example their cognitive...

  5. Design Principles for Serious Video Games in Mathematics Education: From Theory to Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Chorianopoulos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the employment of serious video games in science education, but there are no clear design principles. After surveying previous work in serious video game design, we highlighted the following design principles: 1 engage the students with narrative (hero, story, 2 employ familiar gameplay mechanics from popular video games, 3 engage students into constructive trial and error game-play and 4 situate collaborative learning. As illustrated examples we designed two math video games targeted to primary education students. The gameplay of the math video games embeds addition operations in a seamless way, which has been inspired by that of classic platform games. In this way, the students are adding numbers as part of popular gameplay mechanics and as a means to reach the video game objective, rather than as an end in itself. The employment of well-defined principles in the design of math video games should facilitate the evaluation of learning effectiveness by researchers. Moreover, educators can deploy alternative versions of the games in order to engage students with diverse learning styles. For example, some students might be motived and benefited by narrative, while others by collaboration, because it is unlikely that one type of serious video game might fit all learning styles. The proposed principles are not meant to be an exhaustive list, but a starting point for extending the list and applying them in other cases of serious video games beyond mathematics and learning.

  6. Mobile & social game design monetization methods and mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Fields, Tim

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionThe Changing TideWhat This Book Is NotWhat Is a Social Game? Are Mobile Games Social? Meet Your CompetitionBBS Games and MUDsMMOsJust Being Multiplayer Doesn't Make You SocialGreat Mobile Games ARE SocialInterview with Words with Friends Creators, The BettnersHistory of Game MonetizationWhat Do We Mean By MonetizationA Brief History of Game MonetizationInterview with Richard Garriott, ""The Three Grand Eras of Gaming""Why Create a Social or Mobile Game?Social and Mobile Games Put a Lot of Power in the Hands of the DevelopersSocial Games Make the Developer ResponsibleSocial Games Gi

  7. Jointly Optimal Design for MIMO Radar Frequency-Hopping Waveforms Using Game Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Jointly Optimal Design for MIMO Radar Frequency-Hopping Waveforms Using Game Theory KEYONG HAN, Student Member, IEEE ARYE NEHORAI, Fellow, IEEE...matrices that result in improved performance over that of separate designs. We propose a game theory framework for the joint design. First, we present...badly when the function evaluation is expensive. In recent years, game theory has been used to solve multiobjective design problems, especially for

  8. Creative Design of Digital Cognitive Games: Application of Cognitive Toys and Isomorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedig, Kamran; Haworth, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Digital cognitive games (DCGs) are games whose primary purpose is to mediate (i.e., support, develop, and enhance) cognitive activities such as problem solving, decision making, planning, and critical reasoning. As these games increase in popularity and usage, more attention should be paid to their design. Currently, there is a lack of design…

  9. A Survey of Educational Games as Interaction Design Tools for Affective Learning: Thematic Analysis Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Zarwina; Kamsin, Amirrudin; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    2018-01-01

    A Computer game is the new platform in generating learning experiences for educational purposes. There are many educational games that have been used as an interaction design tool in a learning environment to enhance students learning outcomes. However, research also claims that playing video games can have a negative impact on student behavior,…

  10. Digital Games for Young Children Ages Three to Six: From Research to Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Debra A.; Fisk, Maria Chesley; Biely, Erica

    2009-01-01

    Young children ages 3 to 6 play a wide range of digital games, which are now available on large screens, handheld screens, electronic learning systems, and electronic toys, and their time spent with games is growing. This article examines effects of digital games and how they could be designed to best serve children's needs. A small body of…

  11. The Design of Scaffolding in Game-Based Learning: A Formative Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weppel, Sheri; Bishop, Mj; Munoz-Avila, Hector

    2012-01-01

    Instructional games fluctuate between "restricted play" and "free play." Highly structured games with lots of corrective feedback can be less engaging, whereas unstructured games with minimal feedback can lead to frustration. This mixed methods, formative evaluation study investigated how designers might find the balance between too much and too…

  12. Students as Designers and Creators of Educational Computer Games: Who Else?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensky, Marc

    2008-01-01

    In the companion article, "Spirit of the Game: Empowering Students as Designers in Schools?", author Cher Ping Lim puts forth strong arguments supporting the creation and use of curricular, educational games in our schools and education. His essay ends with the question "Can students build such games?" This paper responds to this question and…

  13. Adopting the alternate reality game approach in the design of the Singa environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlodlo, N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Playing games, especially electronic games, is a popular free-time activity among children and adolescents and these games seem to have a prominent role in the culture of young people. It is with this in mind that the SINGA environment was designed...

  14. Educational Design for Learning Games with a focus on the teacher’s roles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Meyer, Bente Tobiesen

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the challenges related to the development of an educational design for learning games. The focus will be on how instructional and introductory texts that are integrated in specific game-based platforms address teachers, and how and why these texts can be developed as part...... of the educational design of game-based learning. In the paper we shall conceptualize these texts as paratexts, following Genette’s terminology. In the paper we shall present an on-going development of an educational design concept for learning games with a focus on how teachers are and can be included in the design...... of game-based learning platforms. The teacher’s role is important in a game based school practice, as the teacher develops new functions as a teacher and new positions in relation to the students. A number of studies show that teachers often fail to take an active role when games are used in the classroom...

  15. An educational video game for nutrition of young people: Theory and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Tracey; Griffith, Melissa; Thompson, Debbe; Nguyen, Nga; Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Janice; Buday, Richard; Abdelsamad, Dina; Baranowski, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background Playing Escape from DIAB (DIAB) and Nanoswarm (NANO), epic video game adventures, increased fruit and vegetable consumption among a multi-ethnic sample of 10–12 year old children during pilot testing. Key elements of both games were educational mini-games embedded in the overall game that promoted knowledge acquisition regarding diet, physical activity and energy balance. 95–100% of participants demonstrated mastery of these mini-games suggesting knowledge acquisition. Aim This article describes the process of designing and developing the educational mini-games. A secondary purpose was to explore the experience of children while playing the games. Method The educational games were based on Social Cognitive and Mastery Learning Theories. A multidisciplinary team of behavioral nutrition, PA, and video game experts designed, developed, and tested the mini-games. Results Alpha testing revealed children generally liked the mini-games and found them to be reasonably challenging. Process evaluation data from pilot testing revealed almost all participants completed nearly all educational mini-games in a reasonable amount of time suggesting feasibility of this approach. Conclusions Future research should continue to explore the use of video games in educating children to achieve healthy behavior changes. PMID:27547019

  16. An educational video game for nutrition of young people: Theory and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Tracey; Griffith, Melissa; Thompson, Debbe; Nguyen, Nga; Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Janice; Buday, Richard; Abdelsamad, Dina; Baranowski, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Playing Escape from DIAB (DIAB) and Nanoswarm (NANO) , epic video game adventures, increased fruit and vegetable consumption among a multi-ethnic sample of 10-12 year old children during pilot testing. Key elements of both games were educational mini-games embedded in the overall game that promoted knowledge acquisition regarding diet, physical activity and energy balance. 95-100% of participants demonstrated mastery of these mini-games suggesting knowledge acquisition. This article describes the process of designing and developing the educational mini-games. A secondary purpose was to explore the experience of children while playing the games. The educational games were based on Social Cognitive and Mastery Learning Theories. A multidisciplinary team of behavioral nutrition, PA, and video game experts designed, developed, and tested the mini-games. Alpha testing revealed children generally liked the mini-games and found them to be reasonably challenging. Process evaluation data from pilot testing revealed almost all participants completed nearly all educational mini-games in a reasonable amount of time suggesting feasibility of this approach. Future research should continue to explore the use of video games in educating children to achieve healthy behavior changes.

  17. Balancing Expression and Structure in Game Design: Developing Computational Participation Using Studio-Based Design Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVane, Ben; Steward, Cody; Tran, Kelly M.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a project that used a game-creation tool to introduce middle-school students ages 10 to 13 to problem-solving strategies similar to those in computer science through the lens of studio-based design arts. Drawing on historic paradigms in design pedagogy and contemporary educational approaches in the digital arts to teach…

  18. Design Heuristics for Authentic Simulation-Based Learning Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, Muriel; Gonçalves, Celso; Balacheff, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Simulation games are games for learning based on a reference in the real world. We propose a model for authenticity in this context as a result of a compromise among learning, playing and realism. In the health game used to apply this model, students interact with characters in the game through phone messages, mail messages, SMS and video.…

  19. Designing Science Learning with Game-Based Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Rosenblum, Jason A.; Horton, Lucas; Kang, Jina

    2014-01-01

    Given the growing popularity of digital games as a form of entertainment, educators are interested in exploring using digital games as a tool to facilitate learning. In this study, we examine game-based learning by describing a learning environment that combines game elements, play, and authenticity in the real world for the purpose of engaging…

  20. Designing and Deploying 3D Collaborative Games in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavridis, Apostolos; Tsiatsos, Thrasyvoulos; Terzidou, Theodouli

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on methodologies of serious games deployment and evaluation. Particularly, this study will present a specific category of serious games that are based on Collaborative Virtual Environments and they aim to support Collaborative Learning. We call these serious games Collaborative Virtual Educational Games (CVEG). The paper aims to…

  1. Designing Mixed Reality Mobile Games for Crisis Management Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Loreto, Ines; Mora, Simone; Divitini, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Games for crisis management offer an interesting complement to traditional training. Experiments on their usage show that games can be promising tools able to address some of the limitations of traditional training. Also our first assessment with a board game for panic management shows that this particular kind of game could be useful for soft…

  2. Recommendations for the Design of Serious Games in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Sadoun, Grégory; Manera, Valeria; Alvarez, Julian; Sacco, Guillaume; Robert, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    The use of Serious Games (SG) in the health domain is expanding. In the field of Neurodegenerative Diseases (ND) such as Alzheimer’s Disease, SG are currently employed to provide alternative solutions for patients’ treatment, stimulation, and rehabilitation. The design of SG for people with ND implies collaborations between professionals in ND and professionals in SG design. As the field is quite young, professionals specialized in both ND and SG are still rare, and recommendations for the design of SG for people with ND are still missing. This perspective paper aims to provide recommendations in terms of ergonomic choices for the design of SG aiming at stimulating people with ND, starting from the existing SG already tested in this population: “MINWii”, “Kitchen and Cooking”, and “X-Torp”. We propose to rely on nine ergonomic criteria: eight ergonomic criteria inspired by works in the domain of office automation: Compatibility, Guidance, Workload, Adaptability, Consistency, Significance of codes, Explicit control and Error management; and one ergonomic criterion related to videogame: the game rules. Perspectives derived from this proposal are also discussed. PMID:29456501

  3. Recommendations for the Design of Serious Games in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Sadoun, Grégory; Manera, Valeria; Alvarez, Julian; Sacco, Guillaume; Robert, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    The use of Serious Games (SG) in the health domain is expanding. In the field of Neurodegenerative Diseases (ND) such as Alzheimer's Disease, SG are currently employed to provide alternative solutions for patients' treatment, stimulation, and rehabilitation. The design of SG for people with ND implies collaborations between professionals in ND and professionals in SG design. As the field is quite young, professionals specialized in both ND and SG are still rare, and recommendations for the design of SG for people with ND are still missing. This perspective paper aims to provide recommendations in terms of ergonomic choices for the design of SG aiming at stimulating people with ND, starting from the existing SG already tested in this population: "MINWii", "Kitchen and Cooking", and "X-Torp". We propose to rely on nine ergonomic criteria: eight ergonomic criteria inspired by works in the domain of office automation: Compatibility, Guidance, Workload, Adaptability, Consistency, Significance of codes, Explicit control and Error management; and one ergonomic criterion related to videogame: the game rules. Perspectives derived from this proposal are also discussed.

  4. Recommendations for the Design of Serious Games in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Ben-Sadoun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of Serious Games (SG in the health domain is expanding. In the field of Neurodegenerative Diseases (ND such as Alzheimer’s Disease, SG are currently employed to provide alternative solutions for patients’ treatment, stimulation, and rehabilitation. The design of SG for people with ND implies collaborations between professionals in ND and professionals in SG design. As the field is quite young, professionals specialized in both ND and SG are still rare, and recommendations for the design of SG for people with ND are still missing. This perspective paper aims to provide recommendations in terms of ergonomic choices for the design of SG aiming at stimulating people with ND, starting from the existing SG already tested in this population: “MINWii”, “Kitchen and Cooking”, and “X-Torp”. We propose to rely on nine ergonomic criteria: eight ergonomic criteria inspired by works in the domain of office automation: Compatibility, Guidance, Workload, Adaptability, Consistency, Significance of codes, Explicit control and Error management; and one ergonomic criterion related to videogame: the game rules. Perspectives derived from this proposal are also discussed.

  5. Four categories of design challenges to building game-based business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus; Harpelund, Christian

    2014-01-01

    a four-category approach to understanding such challenges. The four categories include 1) the learning game design, 2) didactic design on how the game is to be used, 3) organisational design for establishing both supply and demand, and finally 4) business design, which concerns the establishment...

  6. Design games : A conceptual framework for dynamic evolutionary design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sönmez, N.O.; Erdem, A.

    2014-01-01

    Most evolutionary computation (EC) applications in design fields either assume simplified, static, performance-oriented procedures for design or focus on well-defined sub-problems, to be able to impose problem-solving and optimization schemes on design tasks, which render known EC techniques

  7. On the way to fun an emotion-based approach to successful game design

    CERN Document Server

    Dillon, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    On the Way to Fun outlines a fine framework linking human emotions and instincts to successful game design, blending a theoretical framework with keys to analyzing game play. The framework is then applied to both successful and unsuccessful games to make for a fine survey for any who want to properly design and develop ideas to maximum benefit.-Midwest Book Review, January 2011I love the '6-11 Framework'. It's a brilliant analysis. Wish I'd thought of it. Emotion is essential to establishing a deep connection with games. So many games lack it, and this book shows the way. The analyses of retro

  8. Model based design introduction: modeling game controllers to microprocessor architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungwirth, Patrick; Badawy, Abdel-Hameed

    2017-04-01

    We present an introduction to model based design. Model based design is a visual representation, generally a block diagram, to model and incrementally develop a complex system. Model based design is a commonly used design methodology for digital signal processing, control systems, and embedded systems. Model based design's philosophy is: to solve a problem - a step at a time. The approach can be compared to a series of steps to converge to a solution. A block diagram simulation tool allows a design to be simulated with real world measurement data. For example, if an analog control system is being upgraded to a digital control system, the analog sensor input signals can be recorded. The digital control algorithm can be simulated with the real world sensor data. The output from the simulated digital control system can then be compared to the old analog based control system. Model based design can compared to Agile software develop. The Agile software development goal is to develop working software in incremental steps. Progress is measured in completed and tested code units. Progress is measured in model based design by completed and tested blocks. We present a concept for a video game controller and then use model based design to iterate the design towards a working system. We will also describe a model based design effort to develop an OS Friendly Microprocessor Architecture based on the RISC-V.

  9. The design and development of a computer game on insulin injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimpour, Fatemeh; Najafi, Mostafa; Sadeghi, Narges

    2014-01-01

    Insulin therapy is of high importance in glycemic control and prevention of complications in type 1 diabetes in children. However, this treatment is unpleasant and stressful for many children, and it is difficult for them to accept. The purpose of the study was to design and develop an educational computer game for diabetic children to familiarize them with insulin injections. After a review of the literature and the collection of basic information, we discussed the purpose of this research with some diabetic children, their parents, and nurses. The findings that we acquired from the discussion were considered in designing and developing the game. Then, following the principles associated with the development of computer games, we developed seven different games that related to insulin injections, and the games were evaluated in a pilot study. The games developed through the design and programming environment of Adobe Flash Player and stored on a computer disk (CD). The seven games were a pairs game, a puzzle game, a question and answer game, an insulin kit game, a drawing room game, a story game, and an insulin injection-room game). The idea was that diabetic children could become acquainted with insulin injections and the injection toolkit by playing a variety of entertaining and fun games. They also learned about some of the issues associated with insulin and experienced insulin injection in a simulated environment. It seems that the use of new technologies, such as computer games, can influence diabetic children's acquaintance with the correct method of insulin injection, psychological readiness to initiate insulin therapy, reduction in stress, anxiety, and fear of insulin injection.

  10. Enhancing the Therapy Experience Using Principles of Video Game Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkins, John Wm; Brackenbury, Tim; Krause, Miriam; Haviland, Allison

    2016-02-01

    This article considers the potential benefits that applying design principles from contemporary video games may have on enhancing therapy experiences. Six principles of video game design are presented, and their relevance for enriching clinical experiences is discussed. The motivational and learning benefits of each design principle have been discussed in the education literature as having positive impacts on student motivation and learning and are related here to aspects of clinical practice. The essential experience principle suggests connecting all aspects of the experience around a central emotion or cognitive connection. The discovery principle promotes indirect learning in focused environments. The risk-taking principle addresses the uncertainties clients face when attempting newly learned skills in novel situations. The generalization principle encourages multiple opportunities for skill transfer. The reward system principle directly relates to the scaffolding of frequent and varied feedback in treatment. Last, the identity principle can assist clients in using their newly learned communication skills to redefine self-perceptions. These principles highlight areas for research and interventions that may be used to reinforce or advance current practice.

  11. Achievement Emotions and Peer Acceptance Get Together in Game Design at School

    OpenAIRE

    Margherita BRONDINO; Gabriella DODERO; Rosella GENNARI; Alessandra MELONIO; Daniela RACCANELLO; Santina TORELLO

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a game design experience in primary schools, with children creating game design ideas and prototypes. Children were organized in cooperative groups. Game design tasks were organized following gamification principles, with ad-hoc gamified material. Cooperative learning and gamification served to elicit emotions and social inclusion. This paper measures them as follows. It operationalizes social inclusion with peer acceptance in three different social contexts, measured befo...

  12. Negotiation and Design for the Self-Organizing City. Gaming as a method for Urban Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekim Tan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of cities as open systems whose agents act on them simultaneously from below and above, influencing urban processes by their interaction with them and with each other, is replacing the simplistic debate on urban participation which asks whether cities should be organized bottom-up or top-down. This conceptualization of cities as complex systems calls for new collaborative city-making methods: a combination of collaborative planning (which already embraces various agencies and derives decision-making from negotiations between them and collaborative design (existing methods rely on rule-based iterative processes which control spatial outcomes. While current collaborative planning methods are open and interactive, they fail to simulate realistic power negotiations in the evolution of the physical environments they plan; collaborative design methods fall short in modelling the decision-making mechanisms of the physical environments they control. This research is dedicated to building an open negotiation and design method for cities as self-organizing systems that bridges this gap. Gaming as a tool for knowledge creation and negotiation serves as an interface between the more abstract decision-making and material city-making. Rarely involved in the creation of our environment, it has the unexplored potential of combining the socio-spatial dimensions of self-organizing urban processes. Diverse agents, the collaborations and conflicts within and between interest groups, and the parameters provided by topological data can all be combined in an operational form in gaming: potentially a great unifier of multiple stakeholder negotiations and individual design aspirations through which to generate popularly informed policies or design. The simple language and rules of games will allow jargon-free communication between stakeholders, experts and non-experts alike. The interactive and iterative nature of city gaming encourages the development

  13. Developing a 3D Game Design Authoring Package to Assist Students' Visualization Process in Design Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ming-Shiou; Chuang, Tsung-Yen

    2013-01-01

    The teaching of 3D digital game design requires the development of students' meta-skills, from story creativity to 3D model construction, and even the visualization process in design thinking. The characteristics a good game designer should possess have been identified as including redesign things, creativity thinking and the ability to…

  14. Productive Gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Brandstätter , Ulrich; Sommerer , Christa

    2016-01-01

    Part 4: Short Papers; International audience; Video games can be appropriated for productive purposes. Commercial games and game engines are often used for video productions, and game development companies provide development kits and modding environments to gaming communities and independent developers. With gamification, game principles are deployed in non-game contexts for benefits beyond pure entertainment. Most approaches are more focused on using games and their design elements rather t...

  15. Child development and genre preference: research for educational game design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, John L; Lucas, Kristen; Greenberg, Bradley S; Holmstrom, Amanda

    2013-05-01

    As the movement to capitalize on unique affordances of video games for learning continues to grow, relatively little research in that area has examined how formal features, such as genre and game mechanics, draw and hold children's attention. This study examines which genres children prefer and the reasons why children prefer those genres by reporting on a video game uses and gratifications survey of children of various ages (n=685). Results show distinct patterns of game use and preference tied to typical child developmental ecology at each age, indicating that genre preference varies by age and developmental context. Implications for game research and educational gaming are provided.

  16. Developing a Big Game for Financial Education Using Service Design Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myunghee; Yoon, Seonghye; Kang, Minjeng; Jang, JeeEun; Lee, Yujung

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and develop an educational game which facilitates building adolescents' knowledge and attitudes in financial principles of a daily life. To achieve this purpose, the authors designed a learner-centered big game for financial education by applying an experience-based triple-diamond instructional design model…

  17. Design and development of the mobile game based on the J2ME technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, JunHua

    2012-01-01

    With the continuous improvement of mobile performance, mobile entertainment applications market trend has been increasingly clear, mobile entertainment applications will be after the PC entertainment applications is another important business growth. Through the full analysis of the current mobile entertainment applications market demand and trends, the author has accumulated a lot of theoretical knowledge and practical experience. Rational, using of some new technology for a mobile entertainment games design, and described the development of key technologies required for mobile game an analysis and design of the game, and to achieve a complete game development. Light of the specific mobile game project - "Battle City", detailed the development of a mobile game based on the J2ME platform, the basic steps and the various key elements, focusing on how to use object-oriented thinking on the role of mobile phones in the abstract and Game Animation package, the source code with specific instructions.

  18. The Use of User-Centered Participatory Design in Serious Games for Anxiety and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Maria R; Williams, Alishia D

    2017-12-01

    There is increasing interest in using serious games to deliver or complement healthcare interventions for mental health, particularly for the most common mental health conditions such as anxiety and depression. Initial results seem promising, yet variations exist in the effectiveness of serious games, highlighting the importance of understanding optimal design features. It has been suggested that the involvement of end-users in the design and decision-making process could influence game effectiveness. In user-centered design (UCD) or participatory design (PD), users are involved in stages of the process, including planning, designing, implementing, and testing the serious game. To the authors' knowledge, no literature review to date has assessed the use of UCD/PD in games that are designed for mental health, specifically for anxiety or depression. The aim of this review is, therefore, to document the extent to which published studies of serious games that are designed to prevent or treat anxiety and depression have adopted a PD framework. A search of keywords in PubMed and PsychINFO databases through to December 2016 was conducted. We identified 20 serious games developed to prevent, treat or complement existing therapies for anxiety and/or depression. Half (N = 10; 50%) of these games were developed with input from the intended end-users, in either informant (N = 7; 70%) or full participatory co-design roles (N = 3; 30%). Less than half of games (45%) included users only in the testing phase.

  19. Combining video games and constructionist design to support deep learning in play

    OpenAIRE

    Holbert, Nathan; Weintrop, David; Wilensky, Uri; Sengupta, Pratim; Killingsworth, Stephen; Krinks, Kyra; Clark, Doug; Brady, Corey; Shapiro, R. Benjamin; Russ, Rosemary S.; Klopfer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    This effort has produced many interesting games though it is unclear if “educational video games” have achieved their promise. Similarly, for many years constructionists have engaged children in learning across a variety of contexts, including game design. While these programs have been successful, their exploratory nature leads to concerns about content coverage. In this symposium we discuss the potential of blending these two design traditions. Constructionist video games infuse tradi...

  20. Searching for Sentient Design Tools for Game Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liapis, Antonios

    Over the last twenty years, computer games have grown from a niche market targeting young adults to an important player in the global economy, engaging millions of people from different cultural backgrounds. As both the number and the size of computer games continue to rise, game companies handle...

  1. Using Data Mining Results to Improve Educational Video Game Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    This study uses information about in-game strategy use, identified through cluster analysis of actions in an educational video game, to make data-driven modifications to the game in order to reduce construct-irrelevant behavior. The examination of student strategies identified through cluster analysis indicated that (a) it was common for students…

  2. Augmented Learning: Research and Design of Mobile Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfer, Eric

    2008-01-01

    New technology has brought with it new tools for learning, and research has shown that the educational potential of video games resonates with scholars, teachers, and students alike. In "Augmented Learning", Eric Klopfer describes the largely untapped potential of mobile learning games--games played on such handheld devices as cell phones, Game…

  3. Toward Understanding the Potential of Games for Learning: Learning Theory, Game Design Characteristics, and Situating Video Games in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkay, Selen; Hoffman, Daniel; Kinzer, Charles K.; Chantes, Pantiphar; Vicari, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have argued that an effort should be made to raise teachers' and parents' awareness of the potentially positive educational benefits of playing video games (e.g., see Baek, 2008). One part of this effort should be to increase understanding of how video games can be situated within teachers' existing goals and knowledge…

  4. Design Smart Games with requirements, generate them with a Click, and revise them with a GUIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza COFINI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available TERENCE is an FP7 ICT European project that is developing an adaptive learning system for supporting poor comprehenders and their educators. Its learning material are books of stories and games. The games are specialised into smart games, which stimulate inference-making for story comprehension, and relaxing games, which stimulate visual perception and not story comprehension. The paper focuses on smart games. It first describes the TERENCE system architecture, thus delves into the design of smart games starting from the requirements and their automated generation, by highlighting the role of the reasoning module therein. Finally, it outlines the manual revision of the generated smart games, and ends with short conclusions about the planned improvements on the automated generation process.

  5. Design Smart Games with requirements, generate them with a Click, and revise them with a GUIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosella GENNARI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available TERENCE is an FP7 ICT European project that is developing an adaptive learning system for supporting poor comprehenders and their educators. Its learning material are books of stories and games. The games are specialised into smart games, which stimulate inference-making for story comprehension, and relaxing games, which stimulate visual perception and not story comprehension. The paper focuses on smart games. It first describes the TERENCE system architecture, thus delves into the design of smart games starting from the requirements and their automated generation, by highlighting the role of the reasoning module therein. Finally, it outlines the manual revision of the generated smart games, and ends with short conclusions about the planned improvements on the automated generation process.

  6. Gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Chircop, David

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades a relatively new sort of board gaming has emerged which you might not have heard about. ‘Hobby’ or ‘modern’ board gaming is sweeping across the world. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/rise-of-the-ancients/

  7. Video games for diabetes self-management: examples and design strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Debra A

    2012-07-01

    The July 2012 issue of the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology includes a special symposium called "Serious Games for Diabetes, Obesity, and Healthy Lifestyle." As part of the symposium, this article focuses on health behavior change video games that are designed to improve and support players' diabetes self-management. Other symposium articles include one that recommends theory-based approaches to the design of health games and identifies areas in which additional research is needed, followed by five research articles presenting studies of the design and effectiveness of games and game technologies that require physical activity in order to play. This article briefly describes 14 diabetes self-management video games, and, when available, cites research findings on their effectiveness. The games were found by searching the Health Games Research online searchable database, three bibliographic databases (ACM Digital Library, PubMed, and Social Sciences Databases of CSA Illumina), and the Google search engine, using the search terms "diabetes" and "game." Games were selected if they addressed diabetes self-management skills. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  8. Video Games for Diabetes Self-Management: Examples and Design Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    The July 2012 issue of the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology includes a special symposium called “Serious Games for Diabetes, Obesity, and Healthy Lifestyle.” As part of the symposium, this article focuses on health behavior change video games that are designed to improve and support players’ diabetes self-management. Other symposium articles include one that recommends theory-based approaches to the design of health games and identifies areas in which additional research is needed, followed by five research articles presenting studies of the design and effectiveness of games and game technologies that require physical activity in order to play. This article briefly describes 14 diabetes self-management video games, and, when available, cites research findings on their effectiveness. The games were found by searching the Health Games Research online searchable database, three bibliographic databases (ACM Digital Library, PubMed, and Social Sciences Databases of CSA Illumina), and the Google search engine, using the search terms “diabetes” and “game.” Games were selected if they addressed diabetes self-management skills. PMID:22920805

  9. Introduction to Chemical Engineering Reactor Analysis: A Web-Based Reactor Design Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbey, Nese; Clay, Molly; Russell, T.W. Fraser

    2014-01-01

    An approach to explain chemical engineering through a Web-based interactive game design was developed and used with college freshman and junior/senior high school students. The goal of this approach was to demonstrate how to model a lab-scale experiment, and use the results to design and operate a chemical reactor. The game incorporates both…

  10. A Ten-Step Design Method for Simulation Games in Logistics Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fumarola, M.; Van Staalduinen, J.P.; Verbraeck, A.

    2011-01-01

    Simulation games have often been found useful as a method of inquiry to gain insight in complex system behavior and as aids for design, engineering simulation and visualization, and education. Designing simulation games are the result of creative thinking and planning, but often not the result of a

  11. Formulating a Serious-Games Design Project for Adult Offenders with the Probation Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Matthew Ian; Brown, David; Cranton, Wayne; Lewis, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper documents an investigation evaluating if adult offenders can benefit from a facilitated serious-games design project as part of their probation program. Research has observed a participatory design group of adult offenders working with their probation managers and a PhD researcher to create a new serious-game for use by the probation…

  12. "Jiselle and the Royal Jelly": Power, Conflict and Culture in an Interdisciplinary Game Design Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2010-01-01

    With the rising popularity of digital games, a growing number of universities are developing programmes in various areas of digital design and interactive media to meet the needs for game-related courses. Faculty of this emerging field are grappling with the complexity of developing curricula which integrate art, design and technology and of…

  13. Designing Science Games and Science Toys from the Perspective of Scientific Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir Kaçan, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted with the participation of 21 pre-service science teachers attending the faculty of education of a university in Turkey. The study aims to evaluate pre-service science teachers' science games and science toy designs in terms of scientific creativity. Participants were given a four-week period to design science games or…

  14. Extending the Activity Theory Based Model for Serious Games Design in Engineering to Integrate Analytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Callaghan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Serious Games (SG have been shown to have instructional potential and a number of formal models, frameworks and methodologies have emerged to support their design and analysis. The Activity Theory-based Model of Serious Games (ATMSG facilitates a systematic and detailed representation of educational SG describing how game elements are connected together to contribute to pedagogical goals. This paper proposes and presents an extension to the ATMSG framework to facilitate the identification, selection and integration of analytics into serious games. A practical example of the approach in use in the analysis and design phase of a SG for engineering is demonstrated.

  15. Video Games and Software Engineers : Designing a study based on the benefits from Video Games and how they can improve Software Engineers

    OpenAIRE

    Cosic Prica, Srdjan

    2017-01-01

    Context: This is a study about investigating if playing video games can improve any skills and characteristics in a software engineer. Due to lack of resources and time, this study will focus on designing a study that others may use to measure the results and if video games actually can improve software engineers. Objectives: The main objectives are finding the benefits of playing video games and how those benefits are discovered. Meaning what types of games and for how long someone needs to ...

  16. Relationship between Designing Computer-based Educational Games, and Learning Motivation among Elementary Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jamebozorg

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Motivation is an important factor in learning. Educational games increase the learning motivation and understanding of students by creating a sense of joy, satisfaction and involvement. However, it is necessary to incorporate learning elements into the games, differently. In this study, the researcher tried to provide a model for designing educational games and determining its relationship with learning motivation. Materials and Methods:  Components of the model for designing educational games were first determined qualitatively. Then, the relationship between the educational games designed and students' learning motivation was determined. A self-made questionnaire, with elements of educational game designing along with another questionnaire was used to determine the learning motivation. The obtained data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and independent t-test. Results: The model, with 4 main components and 26 sub-components, was designed. That set of various elements, including: the rules, objectives, tools, results and feedbacks, accidents, challenges and interactions displayed in the context of the game, along with instructional design component such as analysis, design, development, utilization and evaluation were used. After implementation of the pattern and designing the "States of Matter" lesson in the science book for the third graders, the results showed that there is a significant correlation between the use of designed educational game and components of the students’ learning motivation (r= 0.85 and P=0.01. Conclusion: According to this study given the relationship between the use of educational games and motivation to learn, it can be concluded that the educational games designed according to scientific principles could lead to the improved students’ motivation and learning.

  17. Strategies of Collaborative Work in the Classroom Through the Design of Video Games

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz, Juan; Rubio García, Sebastián; Cruz Pichardo, Ivanovna

    2015-01-01

    At the present time, the use of video games goes beyond mere amusement or entertainment due to its potential for developing capacities, dexterity and skills. Thus, video games have extended to environments like that of education, serving as didactic resources within dynamics that respond to the interests and necessities of the 21st century student. In this study, we approach the design of video games in initial teacher training. In this respect, we aim to collect the student’s views reg...

  18. Designing Serious Video Games for Health Behavior Change: Current Status and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Debbe

    2012-01-01

    Serious video games for health are designed to entertain while changing a specific health behavior. This article identifies behavioral principles that can guide the development of serious video games focused on changing a variety of health behaviors, including those attempting to decrease risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Guidelines discussed include how to develop video games that provide a solid foundation for behavior change by enhancing a player’s knowledge and skill, ways in which per...

  19. Learning about the Game: Designing Science Games for a Generation of Gamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Marjee

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a response to "Challenges and Opportunities: Using a science-based video game in secondary school settings" by Rachel Muehrer, Jennifer Jenson, Jeremy Friedberg, and Nicole Husain. The article highlights two critical areas that I argue require more research in the studies of video games in education. The first area focuses on the…

  20. Guidelines for an effective design of serious games

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Eva Catalano; Angelo Marco Luccini; Michela Mortara

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness about the potential of serious games for education and training in many disciplines. However, research still witnesses a lack of methodologies, guidelines and best practices on how to develop effective serious games and how to integrate them in the actual learning and training processes. The process of integration heavily depends on providing and spreading evidence of the effectiveness of serious games. In this paper we present an overview on the factors that ...

  1. The Role of Transfer in Designing Games and Simulations for Health: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Derek A; Terlouw, Gijs; Wartena, Bard O; van 't Veer, Job Tb; Prins, Jelle T; Pierie, Jean Pierre En

    2017-11-24

    The usefulness and importance of serious games and simulations in learning and behavior change for health and health-related issues are widely recognized. Studies have addressed games and simulations as interventions, mostly in comparison with their analog counterparts. Numerous complex design choices have to be made with serious games and simulations for health, including choices that directly contribute to the effects of the intervention. One of these decisions is the way an intervention is expected to lead to desirable transfer effects. Most designs adopt a first-class transfer rationale, whereas the second class of transfer types seems a rarity in serious games and simulations for health. This study sought to review the literature specifically on the second class of transfer types in the design of serious games and simulations. Focusing on game-like interventions for health and health care, this study aimed to (1) determine whether the second class of transfer is recognized as a road for transfer in game-like interventions, (2) review the application of the second class of transfer type in designing game-like interventions, and (3) assess studies that include second-class transfer types reporting transfer outcomes. A total of 6 Web-based databases were systematically searched by titles, abstracts, and keywords using the search strategy (video games OR game OR games OR gaming OR computer simulation*) AND (software design OR design) AND (fidelity OR fidelities OR transfer* OR behaviour OR behavior). The databases searched were identified as relevant to health, education, and social science. A total of 15 relevant studies were included, covering a range of game-like interventions, all more or less mentioning design parameters aimed at transfer. We found 9 studies where first-class transfer was part of the design of the intervention. In total, 8 studies dealt with transfer concepts and fidelity types in game-like intervention design in general; 3 studies dealt with

  2. A Learner-Centred Game-Design Approach: Impacts on teachers' creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédérique Frossard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an innovative pedagogical approach where teachers become game designers and engage in creative teaching practices. Within co-design training workshops, 21 Spanish primary and secondary school teachers have developed their own Game-Based Learning (GBL scenarios, especially tailored to their teaching contexts and students profiles. In total, teachers developed 13 GBL scenarios and put them into practice in teaching contexts. The present paper analyses the impacts of this learner-centred game design approach on teachers’ creativity from three different points of view: the GBL design process, the GBL scenario, and the teaching processes at stake.

  3. The design of serious games: a pedagogical experience inthe field of BA design studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Morales Moras

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic programs in Design have always faced the challenge of providing the best education in a sphere so changing as Design discipline itself. This is especially true within the current renewal of curricula derived from the implementation of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA and, to a much more general level, the adaptation of the discipline of Design to the new challenges posed by the Knowledge Society. In this context, we present the educational experience of a serious games design workshop, which has been conducted at the Universitat de Barcelona’s Design BA. This pedagogical activity emphasises on three aspects which we believe are fundamental to the current pedagogy of design: to give a more transverse view of this discipline, to value the role of Design as a means of innovation in today's Knowledge Society, and to rethink the social function of Design.

  4. Learning and Motivational Processes When Students Design Curriculum-Based Digital Learning Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2015-01-01

    This design-based research (DBR) project has developed an overall gamified learning design (big Game) to facilitate the learning process for adult students by inviting them to be their own learning designers through designing digital learning games (small games) in cross-disciplinary subject...... matters. The DBR project has investigated and experimented with which elements, methods, and processes are important when aiming at creating a cognitive complex (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001) and motivating learning process within a reusable game-based learning design. This project took place in a co......-design process with teachers and students. The learning approach was founded in problem-based learning (PBL) and constructionist pedagogical methodology, building on the thesis that there is a strong connection between designing and learning. The belief is that activities that involve making, building...

  5. Serious Game Co-Design for Children with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomutare, Taridzo; Johansen, Svein-Gunnar; Hartvigsen, Gunnar; Årsand, Eirik

    2016-01-01

    Co-design or participatory design has emerged as a useful concept where stakeholders and end-users have a greater stake in designing the end product. To date, few accounts exist of the use of the concept in serious game design, especially for children with chronic diseases. We report initial steps in serious game co-design for children with type 1 diabetes. Participants included 14 children (mean age 8.6 years, range of 4-13) who were invited to sketch a diabetes game. The most prevalent themes that emerged from the sketches (N=17) include blood glucose monitoring (n=12), nutrition (n=8) and insulin (n=8); all of which are consistent with diabetes education guidelines. Co-design is a promising concept for understanding children's world-view when designing healthcare games.

  6. Design and evaluation of an intergenerational gaming platform for cognitive stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia García

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive stimulation therapies based on games are commonly used nowadays in care centers for people suffering from Alzheimer's or other cognitive diseases. Although users usually like the proposed games, they are not motivated enough to play willingly on a regular basis. This work presents a novel game platform for cognitive stimulation that introduces the factor of intergenerational interaction in order to increase user’s motivation towards playing. This work tries to involve patient’s relatives in the gaming experience by including the use of social networks. The presented gaming platform has been designed, implemented and evaluated with real patients, proving its technical feasibility and usability. Evaluation results and practitioners’ experience show that the gaming platform will be more suitable for patients suffering from a mild level of cognitive disease.

  7. Achievement Emotions and Peer Acceptance Get Together in Game Design at School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita BRONDINO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a game design experience in primary schools, with children creating game design ideas and prototypes. Children were organized in cooperative groups. Game design tasks were organized following gamification principles, with ad-hoc gamified material. Cooperative learning and gamification served to elicit emotions and social inclusion. This paper measures them as follows. It operationalizes social inclusion with peer acceptance in three different social contexts, measured before and after the game design activity. It tracks achievement emotions experienced during game design at school. Then the paper examines the relationships between achievement emotions and peer acceptance. In this manner, it tackles an open problem in the literature concerning the links between emotions and social well-being in a game design experience. Path analyses indicate that, respectively for received choices and mutual friendships, positive emotions played a significant role in improving children’s social relations, and negative emotions were associated with a significant deterioration of social relations, but only for the extra-school leisure context. The paper concludes assessing the study limits and results in relation to game design with and for children.

  8. Designing Stories for Educational Video Games: Analysis and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Arcos, J. R.; Padilla-Zea, N.; Paderewski, P.; Gutiérrez, F. L.

    2017-01-01

    The use of video games as an educational tool initially causes a higher degree of motivation in students. However, the inclusion of educational activities throughout the game can cause this initial interest to be lost. A good way to maintain motivation is to use a good story that is used as guiding thread with which to contextualize the other…

  9. Examining Game Design Features for Identity Exploration and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Aroutis; Shah, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    This study used the Dynamic Systems Model of Role Identity (DSMRI) to examine the extent to which a game, Land Science, afforded identity change opportunities as exploration of science identities, science content knowledge, science confidence, action possibilities, and interest/valuing in an intentional manner. Analysis of the game and existing…

  10. Designing a Virtual Reality Game for the CAVE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2006-01-01

    Virtual Reality has for many years been a technology which has stagnated in application and software development for games. What was possible and created ten years ago for games in VR environments is still being developed. The applications available for VR environments have increased but they mos...

  11. Using Educational Design Research Methods to Examine the Affordances of Online Games for Teacher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrasidas, Charalambos; Solomou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the affordances and opportunities from using online games in teacher professional development. Following an educational design research approach, we developed an environment to provide opportunities for in-service teachers to engage in-game-based activities. Our work presented in this manuscript was of…

  12. Linking Serious Game Narratives with Pedagogical Theories and Pedagogical Design Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Troyer, Olga; Van Broeckhoven, Frederik; Vlieghe, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Narrative-based serious games present pedagogical content and interventions through an interactive narrative. To ensure effective learning in such kind of serious games, designers are not only faced with the challenge of creating a compelling narrative, but also with the additional challenge of incorporating suitable pedagogical strategies.…

  13. From Playing to Designing: Enhancing Educational Experiences with Location-Based Mobile Learning Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Roger; Smith, Simon

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents research into the benefits and implementation strategies of integrating location-based mobile learning games in higher education courses to enhance educational experiences. Two approaches were studied: learning by playing, and learning by designing. In the first, games were developed for undergraduate courses in four discipline…

  14. Design and Implementation of a Bingo Game for Teaching the Periodic Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Mariscal, Antonio Joaquín; Cano-Iglesias, María José

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a game designed to help Spanish high school students (grade 10, age 15-16) understand the periodic table. It combines some features of bingo and a puzzle in the same pedagogical game, making it an engaging approach for learning about this important teaching tool. Students are given a verbal clue -- the name of a chemical…

  15. Design Of An Educational Game For Training Learners In The Use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, research focused on educational effectiveness of games has been limited. The purpose of this study was to examine the design of an educational game for training learners in the use of 3D visualization skills. A qualitative research approach was used to ascertain from university of Natal lecturers (n=13) what ...

  16. Designing serious video games for health behavior change: Current status and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serious video games for health are designed to entertain while changing a specific health behavior. This article identifies behavioral principles that can guide the development of serious video games focused on changing a variety of health behaviors, including those attempting to decrease risk of o...

  17. Design of video games for children's diet and physical activity behavior change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serious video games (VG) offer new opportunities for promoting health related diet, and physical activity change among children. Games can be designed to use storylines, characters, and behavior change procedures, including modeling (e.g., engaging characters make changes themselves, and face and ov...

  18. Design of graphic and animation in game interface based on cultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design of graphic and animation in game interface based on cultural value: verification. R.Z. Ramli, N.A.M. Zin, N Sahari Ashaari, M.N. Ismail, S Osman. Abstract. No Abstract. Keywords: game interface; cultural value; hofstede; prototype; eye tracker. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  19. Rough Set Theory Based Fuzzy TOPSIS on Serious Game Design Evaluation Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Ho Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a hybrid methodology for solving the serious game design evaluation in which evaluation criteria are based on meaningful learning, ARCS motivation, cognitive load, and flow theory (MACF by rough set theory (RST and experts’ selection. The purpose of this study tends to develop an evaluation model with RST based fuzzy Delphi-AHP-TOPSIS for MACF characteristics. Fuzzy Delphi method is utilized for selecting the evaluation criteria, Fuzzy AHP is used for analyzing the criteria structure and determining the evaluation weight of criteria, and Fuzzy TOPSIS is applied to determine the sequence of the evaluations. A real case is also used for evaluating the selection of MACF criteria design for four serious games, and both the practice and evaluation of the case could be explained. The results show that the playfulness (C24, skills (C22, attention (C11, and personalized (C35 are determined as the four most important criteria in the MACF selection process. And evaluation results of case study point out that Game 1 has the best score overall (Game 1 > Game 3 > Game 2 > Game 4. Finally, proposed evaluation framework tends to evaluate the effectiveness and the feasibility of the evaluation model and provide design criteria for relevant multimedia game design educators.

  20. Design and evaluation of a data-driven scenario generation framework for game-based training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, L.; Yin, H.; Cai, W.; Zhong, J.; Lees, M.

    Generating suitable game scenarios that can cater for individual players has become an emerging challenge in procedural content generation. In this paper, we propose a data-driven scenario generation framework for game-based training. An evolutionary scenario generation process is designed with a

  1. Design and evaluation of a gesture driven wavefield synthesis auditory game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grani, Francesco; Paisa, Razvan; Banas, Jan Stian

    2016-01-01

    An auditory game has been developed as a part of research in Wavefield Synthesis. In order to design and implement this game, a number of technologies have been incorporated in the development process. By pairing motion capture with a WiiMote new dimension of movement input was achieved. We present...

  2. Attributing design decisions in the evaluation of game-based health interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Jonker; J. Folkerts; drs E.P. Braad

    2014-01-01

    The use of games as interventions in the domain of health care is of-ten paired with evaluating the effects in randomized clinical trials. The iterative design and development process of games usually also involves an evaluation phase, aimed at identifying improvements for subsequent iterations.

  3. Negotiating Intra-Asian Games Networks: On Cultural Proximity, East Asian Games Design, and Chinese Farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Chan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A key feature of networked games in East Asia is the relationship between the adaptation of regional Asian aesthetic and narrative forms in game content, and the parallel growth in more regionally-focused marketing and distribution initiatives. This essay offers a contextual analysis of intra-Asian games networks, with reference to the production, marketing and circulation of Asian MMORPGs. My discussion locates these networks as part of broader discourses on regionalism, East Asian cultural production and Asian modernity. At the same time, I consider how these networks highlight structural asymmetry and uneven power relations within the region; and I examine the emergent use of gamer-workers known as Chinese farmers in the digital game-items trade.

  4. Designing for movement quality in exergames: lessons learned from observing senior citizens playing stepping games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjæret, Nina; Nawaz, Ather; Ystmark, Kristine; Dahl, Yngve; Helbostad, Jorunn L; Svanæs, Dag; Vereijken, Beatrix

    2015-01-01

    Exergames are increasingly used as an exercise intervention to reduce fall risk in elderly. However, few exergames have been designed specifically for elderly, and we lack knowledge about the characteristics of the movements elicited by exergames and thereby about their potential to train functions important for fall risk reduction. This study investigates game elements and older players' movement characteristics during stepping exergames in order to inform exergame design for movement quality in the context of fall preventive exercise. Fourteen senior citizens (mean age 73 years ± 5.7, range 65 - 85) played 3 stepping exergames in a laboratory. Each of the exergames was described with respect to 7 game elements (physical space, sensing hardware technology, game graphics and sound, model of user, avatar/mapping of movements, game mechanism and game narrative). Five movement characteristics (weight shift; variation in step length, speed, and movement direction; visual independency) were scored on a 5-point Likert scale based on video observations of each player and each game. Disagreement between raters was resolved by agreement. Differences in scores for the 3 exergames were analyzed with a multivariate one-way ANOVA. The Mole received the highest sum score and the best score on each of the 5 movement characteristics (all p values movement direction (both p values movement quality positively as indexed by multiple weight shifts and variation in stepping size, direction, and speed. Furthermore, players' movements improved when playing speed-affected game progression and when the game narrative was related to a natural context. Comparing differences in game elements with associated differences in game movement requirements provides valuable insights about how to design for movement quality in exergames. This provided important lessons for the design of exergames for fall-preventive exercise in senior citizens and illustrates the value of including analyses of

  5. Design Features in Games for Health: Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Expert Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Christina; Wilcox, Lauren; Ng, Wendy; Schiffer, Jade; Hammer, Jessica

    2017-06-01

    Games for health (G4H) aim to improve health outcomes and encourage behavior change. While existing theoretical frameworks describe features of both games and health interventions, there has been limited systematic investigation into how disciplinary and interdisciplinary stakeholders understand design features in G4H. We recruited 18 experts from the fields of game design, behavioral health, and games for health, and prompted them with 16 sample games. Applying methods including open card sorting and triading, we elicited themes and features (e.g., real-world interaction, game mechanics) around G4H. We found evidence of conceptual differences suggesting that a G4H perspective is not simply the sum of game and health perspectives. At the same time, we found evidence of convergence in stakeholder views, including areas where game experts provided insights about health and vice versa. We discuss how this work can be applied to provide conceptual tools, improve the G4H design process, and guide approaches to encoding G4H-related data for large-scale empirical analysis.

  6. Gaming

    CERN Document Server

    Duke, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Als Richard Duke sein Buch ""Gaming: The Future's Language"" 1974 veröffentlichte, war er ein Pionier für die Entwicklung und Anwendung von Planspielen in Politik, Strategieentwicklung und Management. Das Buch wurde zu einem viel zitierten Standardwerk. 2014 feiert die von Richard D. Duke gegründete International Simulation and Gaming Association (ISAGA) ihr 45-jähriges Bestehen. Gleichzeitig legt Richard D. Duke eine überarbeitete Auflage seines Klassikers vor.   Inhaltsverzeichnis TABLE OF CONTENTSAcknowledgments Preface SECTION I1. The ProblemSECTION II2. Modes of Human Communication3. Mode

  7. An Experiment on How Adult Students Can Learn by Designing Engaging Learning Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2014-01-01

    worth investigating as a motivational learning strategy. As meaning can be constructed through the manipulation of materials, which facilitates reflection and new ways of thinking, the use of learning games in education is taken one step further into the building of learning games in collaborative......This article presents and discusses the first iteration of a design-based research experiment focusing on how to create a motivating gamified learning design, one that facilitates a deep learning process for adult students making their own learning games. Using games for learning has attracted...... attention from many teachers as well as researchers because of their promise to motivate students and provide them with deep learning experiences. Part of the young adult target group in our current case has motivational issues in the formal learning environment, and the use of learning games is therefore...

  8. Game Mechanics and Bodily Interactions: Designing Interactive Technologies for Sports Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller

    Advancements in wearable and ubiquitous computing technologies have radically increased the possibilities for designing full-body human-computer interactions. Among this multitude of new bodily interaction possibilities are sports training technologies and bodily games. In terms of sports training...... activity as a control mechanism or the core game mechanic. While sports training technologies and bodily games build upon similar technologies and emanate from sports, they do not share focus. One focuses on measuring, monitoring and skill acquisition, while the other focuses on motivation, engagement...... and enjoyment. Thus, despite being two coexisting research areas, they do not extend or contribute to one another per se. However, bridging this gap by combining skill acquisition knowledge from sports training technologies with motivational game mechanics from bodily games holds great potential for designing...

  9. Development and Evaluation of a Cognitive Training Game for Older People: A Design-based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsin Lu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the research field of cognitive aging, games have gained attention as training interventions to remediate age-related deficits. Cognitive training games on computer, video and mobile platforms have shown ample and positive support. However, the generalized effects are not agreed upon unanimously, and the game tasks are usually simple and decontextualized due to the limitations of measurements. This study adopted a qualitative approach of design-based research (DBR to systematically review and pragmatically examine the regime, presentation and feedback design of a cognitive training game for older adults. An overview of the literature of cognitive aging and training games was conducted to form the theoretical conjectures of the design, and an iterative cycle and process were employed to develop a mobile game for older adults who are homebound or receiving care in a nursing home. Stakeholders, i.e., elderly users and institutional administrators, were invited to participate in the design process. Using two cycles of design and evaluation, a working prototype of an iPad-based app that accounted for the needs of elderly adults in terms of form, appearance and working function was developed and tested in the actual contexts of the participants' homes and an assisted living facility. The results showed that the cognitive training game developed in this study was accepted by the participants, and a high degree of satisfaction was noted. Moreover, the elements of the interface, including its size, layout and control flow, were tested and found to be suitable for use. This study contributes to the literature by providing design suggestions for such games, including the designs of the cognitive training structure, interface, interaction, instructions and feedback, based on empirical evidence collected in natural settings. This study further suggests that the effectiveness of cognitive training in mobile games be evaluated through field and physical

  10. Development and Evaluation of a Cognitive Training Game for Older People: A Design-based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Hsin; Lin, Weijane; Yueh, Hsiu-Ping

    2017-01-01

    In the research field of cognitive aging, games have gained attention as training interventions to remediate age-related deficits. Cognitive training games on computer, video and mobile platforms have shown ample and positive support. However, the generalized effects are not agreed upon unanimously, and the game tasks are usually simple and decontextualized due to the limitations of measurements. This study adopted a qualitative approach of design-based research (DBR) to systematically review and pragmatically examine the regime, presentation and feedback design of a cognitive training game for older adults. An overview of the literature of cognitive aging and training games was conducted to form the theoretical conjectures of the design, and an iterative cycle and process were employed to develop a mobile game for older adults who are homebound or receiving care in a nursing home. Stakeholders, i.e., elderly users and institutional administrators, were invited to participate in the design process. Using two cycles of design and evaluation, a working prototype of an iPad-based app that accounted for the needs of elderly adults in terms of form, appearance and working function was developed and tested in the actual contexts of the participants' homes and an assisted living facility. The results showed that the cognitive training game developed in this study was accepted by the participants, and a high degree of satisfaction was noted. Moreover, the elements of the interface, including its size, layout and control flow, were tested and found to be suitable for use. This study contributes to the literature by providing design suggestions for such games, including the designs of the cognitive training structure, interface, interaction, instructions and feedback, based on empirical evidence collected in natural settings. This study further suggests that the effectiveness of cognitive training in mobile games be evaluated through field and physical testing on a larger

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Cognitive Training Game for Older People: A Design-based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Hsin; Lin, Weijane; Yueh, Hsiu-Ping

    2017-01-01

    In the research field of cognitive aging, games have gained attention as training interventions to remediate age-related deficits. Cognitive training games on computer, video and mobile platforms have shown ample and positive support. However, the generalized effects are not agreed upon unanimously, and the game tasks are usually simple and decontextualized due to the limitations of measurements. This study adopted a qualitative approach of design-based research (DBR) to systematically review and pragmatically examine the regime, presentation and feedback design of a cognitive training game for older adults. An overview of the literature of cognitive aging and training games was conducted to form the theoretical conjectures of the design, and an iterative cycle and process were employed to develop a mobile game for older adults who are homebound or receiving care in a nursing home. Stakeholders, i.e., elderly users and institutional administrators, were invited to participate in the design process. Using two cycles of design and evaluation, a working prototype of an iPad-based app that accounted for the needs of elderly adults in terms of form, appearance and working function was developed and tested in the actual contexts of the participants' homes and an assisted living facility. The results showed that the cognitive training game developed in this study was accepted by the participants, and a high degree of satisfaction was noted. Moreover, the elements of the interface, including its size, layout and control flow, were tested and found to be suitable for use. This study contributes to the literature by providing design suggestions for such games, including the designs of the cognitive training structure, interface, interaction, instructions and feedback, based on empirical evidence collected in natural settings. This study further suggests that the effectiveness of cognitive training in mobile games be evaluated through field and physical testing on a larger

  12. Educational Gaming for Pharmacy Students - Design and Evaluation of a Diabetes-themed Escape Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eukel, Heidi N; Frenzel, Jeanne E; Cernusca, Dan

    2017-09-01

    Objective. To design an educational game that will increase third-year professional pharmacy students' knowledge of diabetes mellitus disease management and to evaluate their perceived value of the game. Methods. Faculty members created an innovative educational game, the diabetes escape room. An authentic escape room gaming environment was established through the use of a locked room, an escape time limit, and game rules within which student teams completed complex puzzles focused on diabetes disease management. To evaluate the impact, students completed a pre-test and post-test to measure the knowledge they've gained and a perception survey to identify moderating factors that could help instructors improve the game's effectiveness and utility. Results. Students showed statistically significant increases in knowledge after completion of the game. A one-sample t -test indicated that students' mean perception was statistically significantly higher than the mean value of the evaluation scale. This statically significant result proved that this gaming act offers a potential instructional benefit beyond its novelty. Conclusion. The diabetes escape room proved to be a valuable educational game that increased students' knowledge of diabetes mellitus disease management and showed a positive perceived overall value by student participants.

  13. Is participatory design associated with the effectiveness of serious digital games for healthy lifestyle promotion? A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serious digital games can be effective at changing healthy lifestyles, but large differences in their effectiveness exist. The extent of user involvement in game design may contribute to game effectiveness by creating a better fit with user preferences. Participatory design (PD), which represents ac...

  14. Using Robotics and Game Design to Enhance Children's Self-Efficacy, STEM Attitudes, and Computational Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Jacqueline; Buss, Alan; Gamboa, Ruben; Mitchell, Monica; Fashola, Olatokunbo S.; Hubert, Tarcia; Almughyirah, Sultan

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the findings of a pilot study that used robotics and game design to develop middle school students' computational thinking strategies. One hundred and twenty-four students engaged in LEGO® EV3 robotics and created games using Scalable Game Design software. The results of the study revealed students' pre-post self-efficacy…

  15. Social Construction Kits for Kids: New Models for Game Design in the Era of MySpace and Disney Mobile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brynskov, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Mobile and networked technologies coupled with children’s popular culture are spawning new genres and blends of play and games that challenge the way we understand games and game design. This article presents our efforts toward understanding how children’s play is changing, and how we can design ...

  16. The Investigation on Using Unity3D Game Engine in Urban Design Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aswin Indraprastha

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Developing a virtual 3D environment by using game engine is a strategy to incorporate various multimedia data into one platform. The characteristic of game engine that is preinstalled with interactive and navigation tools allows users to explore and engage with the game objects. However, most CAD and GIS applications are not equipped with 3D tools and navigation systems intended to the user experience. In particular, 3D game engines provide standard 3D navigation tools as well as any programmable view to create engaging navigation thorough the virtual environment. By using a game engine, it is possible to create other interaction such as object manipulation, non playing character (NPC interaction with player and/or environment. We conducted analysis on previous game engines and experiment on urban design project with Unity3D game engine for visualization and interactivity. At the end, we present the advantages and limitations using game technology as visual representation tool for architecture and urban design studies.

  17. The Investigation on Using Unity3D Game Engine in Urban Design Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aswin Indraprastha

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing a virtual 3D environment by using game engine is a strategy to incorporate various multimedia data into one platform. The characteristic of game engine that is preinstalled with interactive and navigation tools allows users to explore and engage with the game objects. However, most CAD and GIS applications are not equipped with 3D tools and navigation systems intended to the user experience. In particular, 3D game engines provide standard 3D navigation tools as well as any programmable view to create engaging navigation thorough the virtual environment. By using a game engine, it is possible to create other interaction such as object manipulation, non playing character (NPC interaction with player and/or environment. We conducted analysis on previous game engines and experiment on urban design project with Unity3D game engine for visualization and interactivity. At the end, we present the advantages and limitations using game technology as visual representation tool for architecture and urban design studies.

  18. A biotic game design project for integrated life science and engineering education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nate J Cira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Engaging, hands-on design experiences are key for formal and informal Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM education. Robotic and video game design challenges have been particularly effective in stimulating student interest, but equivalent experiences for the life sciences are not as developed. Here we present the concept of a "biotic game design project" to motivate student learning at the interface of life sciences and device engineering (as part of a cornerstone bioengineering devices course. We provide all course material and also present efforts in adapting the project's complexity to serve other time frames, age groups, learning focuses, and budgets. Students self-reported that they found the biotic game project fun and motivating, resulting in increased effort. Hence this type of design project could generate excitement and educational impact similar to robotics and video games.

  19. Serious games for higher education: a framework for reducing design complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westera, Wim; Nadolski, Rob; Hummel, Hans; Wopereis, Iwan

    2008-01-01

    Westera, W., Nadolski, R., Hummel, H. G. K., & Wopereis, I. (2008). Serious games for higher education: a framework for reducing design complexity. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 24(5), 420-432.

  20. A biotic game design project for integrated life science and engineering education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, Nate J; Chung, Alice M; Denisin, Aleksandra K; Rensi, Stefano; Sanchez, Gabriel N; Quake, Stephen R; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H

    2015-03-01

    Engaging, hands-on design experiences are key for formal and informal Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education. Robotic and video game design challenges have been particularly effective in stimulating student interest, but equivalent experiences for the life sciences are not as developed. Here we present the concept of a "biotic game design project" to motivate student learning at the interface of life sciences and device engineering (as part of a cornerstone bioengineering devices course). We provide all course material and also present efforts in adapting the project's complexity to serve other time frames, age groups, learning focuses, and budgets. Students self-reported that they found the biotic game project fun and motivating, resulting in increased effort. Hence this type of design project could generate excitement and educational impact similar to robotics and video games.

  1. Conceptual Model for the Design of a Serious Video Game Promoting Self-Management among Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Tom; Buday, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Video games are a popular form of entertainment. Serious video games for health attempt to use entertainment to promote health behavior change. When designed within a framework informed by behavioral science and supported by commercial game-design principles, serious video games for health have the potential to be an effective method for promoting self-management behaviors among youth with diabetes. This article presents a conceptual model of how this may be achieved. It concludes by identify...

  2. Video games and rehabilitation: using design principles to enhance engagement in physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Keith; Shirzad, Navid; Verster, Alida; Hodges, Nicola; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2013-12-01

    Patient nonadherence with therapy is a major barrier to rehabilitation. Recovery is often limited and requires prolonged, intensive rehabilitation that is time-consuming, expensive, and difficult. We review evidence for the potential use of video games in rehabilitation with respect to the behavioral, physiological, and motivational effects of gameplay. In this Special Interest article, we offer a method to evaluate effects of video game play on motor learning and their potential to increase patient engagement with therapy, particularly commercial games that can be interfaced with adapted control systems. We take the novel approach of integrating research across game design, motor learning, neurophysiology changes, and rehabilitation science to provide criteria by which therapists can assist patients in choosing games appropriate for rehabilitation. Research suggests that video games are beneficial for cognitive and motor skill learning in both rehabilitation science and experimental studies with healthy subjects. Physiological data suggest that gameplay can induce neuroplastic reorganization that leads to long-term retention and transfer of skill; however, more clinical research in this area is needed. There is interdisciplinary evidence suggesting that key factors in game design, including choice, reward, and goals, lead to increased motivation and engagement. We maintain that video game play could be an effective supplement to traditional therapy. Motion controllers can be used to practice rehabilitation-relevant movements, and well-designed game mechanics can augment patient engagement and motivation in rehabilitation. We recommend future research and development exploring rehabilitation-relevant motions to control games and increase time in therapy through gameplay.Video Abstract available (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A61) for more insights from the authors.

  3. Scienze cognitive e game design. Progettare dinamiche di gioco non finalizzate a un obiettivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Righi Riva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Stiamo vivendo gli anni della gamification: game designers e teorici del game design dibattono sui modi di trasporre meccaniche di gioco in servizi, applicazioni e marketing tools non strettamente legati al gioco. La gamification è finalizzata a determinare nel giocatore/utente un comportamento. Nella retorica che supporta la gamification traspare una visione del gioco fortemente orientata al reward, cioè alla gratificazione in termini di premi e obiettivi.

  4. Infusion of a Gaming Paradigm into Computer-Aided Engineering Design Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    engineering collaboration while executing a simulation-based design process. To this end, we developed an automobile racing game that permitted...across various terrains. Of course this type of interaction is not limited to such an automobile racing game, and represents interactions that must...could choose among partially-pre-configured chassis assemblies while more advanced users could construct one-off designs by pulling models from a

  5. Designing serious video games for health behavior change: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debbe

    2012-07-01

    Serious video games for health are designed to entertain while changing a specific health behavior. This article identifies behavioral principles that can guide the development of serious video games focused on changing a variety of health behaviors, including those attempting to decrease risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Guidelines discussed include how to develop video games that provide a solid foundation for behavior change by enhancing a player's knowledge and skill, ways in which personal mastery experiences can be incorporated into a video game environment, using game characters and avatars to promote observational learning, creating personalized experiences through tailoring, and the importance of achieving a balance between "fun-ness" and "seriousness." The article concludes with suggestions for future research needed to inform this rapidly growing field. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  6. Effective Design and Evaluation of Serious Games: The Case of the e-VITA Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Dimitra; Pannese, Lucia

    Learning and training are presently facing new challenges and a strong transformation. The use of electronic games for education (game-based learning) promotes an agile, immersive and stimulating form of learning that fosters learner engagement and motivation. Nonetheless, the design of effective and engaging educational games is a creative process that is unique to each situation. This paper discusses the inherent challenges of building intellectually appropriate and engaging games and presents the methodology adopted in the case of the e-VITA project that applies GBL to promote knowledge sharing and transfer for intergenerational learning. The paper analyses the e-VITAframework for SGs evaluation, which is central to the project's iterative development approach. Early findings stemming from the validation of the e-VITA prototype game are also presented.

  7. 30 : 2: A Game Designed to Promote the Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imma Boada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is a first-aid key survival technique used to stimulate breathing and keep blood flowing to the heart. Its effective administration can significantly increase the survival chances of cardiac arrest victims. We propose 30 : 2, a videogame designed to introduce the main steps of the CPR protocol. It is not intended for certification and training purpose. Driven by the 2010 European Resuscitation Council guidelines we have designed a game composed of eight mini games corresponding to the main steps of the protocol. The player acts as a helper and has to solve a different challenge. We present a detailed description of the game creation process presenting the requirements, the design decisions, and the implementation details. In addition, we present some first impressions of our testing users (25 children, five of each age from 8 to 12 years old and 12 males and 13 females. We evaluated clarity of instructions and three settings of the game: the aesthetics of scenarios, the playability, and the enjoyability of each mini game. All games were well punctuated, and there are no significantly differences between their sex. The proposed game can be a suitable tool to disseminate and promote CPR knowledge.

  8. Interactive design of patient-oriented video-games for rehabilitation: concept and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupinacci, Giorgia; Gatti, Gianluca; Melegari, Corrado; Fontana, Saverio

    2018-04-01

    Serious video-games are innovative tools used to train the motor skills of subjects affected by neurological disorders. They are often developed to train a specific type of patients and the rules of the game are standardly defined. A system that allows the therapist to design highly patient-oriented video-games, without specific informatics skills, is proposed. The system consists of one personal computer, two screens, a Kinect™ sensor and a specific software developed here for the design of the video-games. It was tested with the collaboration of three therapists and six patients, and two questionnaires were filled in by each patient to evaluate the appreciation of the rehabilitative sessions. The therapists learned easily how to use the system, and no serious difficulties were encountered by the patients. The questionnaires showed an overall good satisfaction by the patients and highlighted the key-role of the therapist in involving the patients during the rehabilitative session. It was found that the proposed system is effective for developing patient-oriented video-games for rehabilitation. The two main advantages are that the therapist is allowed to (i) develop personalized video-games without informatics skills and (ii) adapt the game settings to patients affected by different pathologies. Implications for rehabilitation Virtual reality and serious video games offer the opportunity to transform the traditional therapy into a more pleasant experience, allowing patients to train their motor and cognitive skills. Both the therapists and the patients should be involved in the development of rehabilitative solutions to be highly patient-oriented. A system for the design of rehabilitative games by the therapist is described and the feedback of three therapists and six patients is reported.

  9. Gamification Quest:* Design and Development of a gamification game

    OpenAIRE

    Alisandra Senabre, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Treball Final de Grau en Disseny i Desenvolupament de Videojocs. Codi: VJ1241. Curs acadèmic: 2016/2017 Nowadays video games are taking a more active role in our society. A field in which they have not yet highlighted but have great potential is in the education system. In this document, Gamification Quest: * is presented. It forms part of a bigger educational project named Gamification Quest which pretends to join the education system with video games, in order to motivate the students...

  10. Game design from blue sky to green light

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Just Cause, Avalanche Studios, Just Cause, March 2007 pulled off a remarkable feat: she's produced a book that's both inspirational and practical. Listen to her and the other video game industry experts she interviews, and save yourself years of forehead-slapping."""" -Corey Bridges, Multiverse, Multiverse, March 2007 Chapter 3: The Yin and Yang of Brainstorming """"Every good brainstorming session starts with a 15-minute discussion of Star Trek."""" - Noah Falstein , quoting Ron Gilbert -Game Career Guide, February 2007 """"Next-Gen.Biz Podcast Episode 22: Deborah Todd, author of the book Ga

  11. Usability Testing for Serious Games: Making Informed Design Decisions with User Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Moreno-Ger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Usability testing is a key step in the successful design of new technologies and tools, ensuring that heterogeneous populations will be able to interact easily with innovative applications. While usability testing methods of productivity tools (e.g., text editors, spreadsheets, or management tools are varied, widely available, and valuable, analyzing the usability of games, especially educational “serious” games, presents unique usability challenges. Because games are fundamentally different than general productivity tools, “traditional” usability instruments valid for productivity applications may fall short when used for serious games. In this work we present a methodology especially designed to facilitate usability testing for serious games, taking into account the specific needs of such applications and resulting in a systematically produced list of suggested improvements from large amounts of recorded gameplay data. This methodology was applied to a case study for a medical educational game, MasterMed, intended to improve patients’ medication knowledge. We present the results from this methodology applied to MasterMed and a summary of the central lessons learned that are likely useful for researchers who aim to tune and improve their own serious games before releasing them for the general public.

  12. Learning and Motivational Processes When Students Design Curriculum‐Based Digital Learning Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2016-01-01

    This design‐based research (DBR) project has developed an overall gamified learning design (big Game) to facilitate the learning process for adult students by inviting them to be their own learning designers through designing digital learning games (small games) in cross‐disciplinary subject...... matters. The DBR project has investigated and experimented with which elements, methods, and processes are important when aiming at creating a cognitive complex (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001) and motivating learning process within a reusable game‐based learning design. This project took place in a co......‐design process with teachers and students. The learning approach was founded in problem‐based learning (PBL) and constructionist pedagogical methodology, building on the thesis that there is a strong connection between designing and learning. The belief is that activities that involve making, building...

  13. Enhancing collaborative learning by means of collaborative serious games:providing requirements to collaborative serious games’ design

    OpenAIRE

    Parzhetskaya, L. (Lyana)

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The current study is a theoretical overview which aim is to define collaborative serious games, identify the problems arising in using and implementation of these games in learning and education and search of ways of improvement of the collaborative process by means of providing the requirements to collaborative serious games’ design. The study makes connections among the following concepts: collaboration, gaming a...

  14. Bug or Feature: The Role of "Gamestar Mechanic's" Material Dialog on the Metacognitive Game Design Strategies of Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Games, Alex

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the language and literacy practices of middle-school children as they worked toward constructing their own computer games using "Gamestar Mechanic," a game intended to teach them key ways of thinking and communicating germane to the discourse of game designers. It examines the changes that took place in what previous work…

  15. Examining key design decisions involved in developing a serious game for child sexual abuse prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Stieler-Hunt, Colleen; Jones, Christian M.; Rolfe, Ben; Pozzebon, Kay

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the key decisions made in the design of Orbit, a child sexual abuse prevention computer game targeted at school students between 8 and 10 years of age. Key decisions include providing supported delivery for the target age group, featuring adults in the program, not over-sanitising game content, having a focus on building healthy self-concept of players, making the game engaging and relatable for all players and evaluating the program. This case study has im...

  16. The science of memory - and how it should affect design of games for outside education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lieberoth, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    in education, great memories can now be shaped on the go. And of course we need memory to learn. Modern psychology is ripe with information about how we remember and forget the world around us, but for historical reasons, all this useful knowledge rarely reaches teachers or designers of educational games.......Games are great for learning. They inspire, engage and most importantly of all, they are different from other activities at school. We remember good experiences in unusual settings, and may mentally time-travel back to them again and again. With mobile phones as platforms for games and drama...

  17. Developing 21st Century Chemistry Learning through Designing Digital Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Ah-Nam; Osman, Kamisah

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of Malaysian "Kimia" (Chemistry) Digital Games (MyKimDG) module on students' achievement and motivation in chemistry as well as 21st century skills. Chemistry education in Malaysia should put greater emphasis on combination of cognitive, sociocultural and motivational aspects to…

  18. Design of Video Games for Children’s Diet and Physical Activity Behavior Change

    OpenAIRE

    Baranowski, Tom; Thompson, Debbe; Buday, Richard; Lu, Amy Shirong; Baranowski, Janice

    2010-01-01

    Serious video games (VG) offer new opportunities for promoting health related diet and physical activity change among children. Games can be designed to use storylines, characters, and behavior change procedures, including modeling (e.g., engaging characters make changes themselves, and face and overcome challenges related to fruit and vegetable (FV) and physical activity (PA) goal attainment and/or consumption), skill development (e.g., asking behaviors; virtual recipe preparation), self reg...

  19. Is Participatory Design Associated with the Effectiveness of Serious Digital Games for Healthy Lifestyle Promotion? A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSmet, Ann; Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Tom; Palmeira, Antonio; Verloigne, Maïté; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2016-04-29

    Serious digital games can be effective at changing healthy lifestyles, but large differences in their effectiveness exist. The extent of user involvement in game design may contribute to game effectiveness by creating a better fit with user preferences. Participatory design (PD), which represents active user involvement as informant (ie, users are asked for input and feedback) or codesigner (ie, users as equal partners in the design) early on and throughout the game development, may be associated with higher game effectiveness, as opposed to no user involvement or limited user involvement. This paper reports the results of a meta-analysis examining the moderating role of PD in the effectiveness of serious digital games for healthy lifestyle promotion. Four databases were searched for peer-reviewed papers in English that were published or in press before October 2014, using a (group-) randomized controlled trial design. Effectiveness data were derived from another meta-analysis assessing the role of behavior change techniques and game features in serious game effectiveness. A total of 58 games evaluated in 61 studies were included. As previously reported, serious digital games had positive effects on healthy lifestyles and their determinants. Unexpectedly, PD (g=0.075, 95% CI 0.017 to 0.133) throughout game development was related to lower game effectiveness on behavior (Q=6.74, PGames developed with PD (g=0.171, 95% CI 0.061 to 0.281, Pgame effectiveness on self-efficacy (Q=7.83, Pgame design (g=0.384, 95% CI 0.283 to 0.485, Pgame design element. Games developed with PD were more effective in changing behavioral determinants when they included users in design elements on game dynamics (beta=.215, 95% CI .075 to .356, Pgame levels was also related to higher game effectiveness (Q=7.02, Pgame challenge (Q=11.23, Pgame effectiveness when used to create characters (Q=4.36, Pgame world (Q=3.99, Pgames developed with PD. However, significant differences existed among PD

  20. Conceptual model for the design of a serious video game promoting self-management among youth with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Tom; Buday, Richard

    2010-05-01

    Video games are a popular form of entertainment. Serious video games for health attempt to use entertainment to promote health behavior change. When designed within a framework informed by behavioral science and supported by commercial game-design principles, serious video games for health have the potential to be an effective method for promoting self-management behaviors among youth with diabetes. This article presents a conceptual model of how this may be achieved. It concludes by identifying research needed to refine our knowledge regarding how to develop effective serious video games for health. (c) 2010 Diabetes Technology Society.

  1. Is Participatory Design Associated with the Effectiveness of Serious Digital Games for Healthy Lifestyle Promotion? A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Tom; Palmeira, Antonio; Verloigne, Maïté

    2016-01-01

    Background Serious digital games can be effective at changing healthy lifestyles, but large differences in their effectiveness exist. The extent of user involvement in game design may contribute to game effectiveness by creating a better fit with user preferences. Participatory design (PD), which represents active user involvement as informant (ie, users are asked for input and feedback) or codesigner (ie, users as equal partners in the design) early on and throughout the game development, may be associated with higher game effectiveness, as opposed to no user involvement or limited user involvement. Objective This paper reports the results of a meta-analysis examining the moderating role of PD in the effectiveness of serious digital games for healthy lifestyle promotion. Methods Four databases were searched for peer-reviewed papers in English that were published or in press before October 2014, using a (group-) randomized controlled trial design. Effectiveness data were derived from another meta-analysis assessing the role of behavior change techniques and game features in serious game effectiveness. Results A total of 58 games evaluated in 61 studies were included. As previously reported, serious digital games had positive effects on healthy lifestyles and their determinants. Unexpectedly, PD (g=0.075, 95% CI 0.017 to 0.133) throughout game development was related to lower game effectiveness on behavior (Q=6.74, PGames developed with PD (g=0.171, 95% CI 0.061 to 0.281, Pgame effectiveness on self-efficacy (Q=7.83, Pgame design (g=0.384, 95% CI 0.283 to 0.485, Pgame design element. Games developed with PD were more effective in changing behavioral determinants when they included users in design elements on game dynamics (beta=.215, 95% CI .075 to .356, Pgame levels was also related to higher game effectiveness (Q=7.02, Pgame challenge (Q=11.23, Pgame effectiveness when used to create characters (Q=4.36, Pgame world (Q=3.99, Pgames developed with PD. However

  2. Forest-themed learning games as a context for learning via collaborative designing of crafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinikka Pöllänen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This case study describes the types of learning games produced and the learning experiences of students who engaged in a project implementing the principles of learning by collaborative designing via forest-themed contextualization of crafts. The ultimate aim of this report is to describe how the project succeeded in changing the traditional instructional strategies used in craft education. This unique project was part of a craft course delivered as a component of primary school teacher education in the University of Eastern Finland. The students’ task was to design and produce a textilebased and forest-themed learning game for primary school children. The outputs of the study were the learning games produced (36 in number and student portfolios (215 pages. The games were illustrated and the written data analyzed using the inductive content approach and a hermeneutic viewpoint as the methodological basis. The results show that the design task guided learning in a multidisciplinary manner and increased the number of tools students could use to learn crafts and produce the games. Collaboration and working in teams changed the learning process from teacherand subject-centered to process-based. Forest-themed learning games may serve as a framework for collaborative designing; the approach offers a rich and non-traditional context for learning of crafts by university students. In terms of craft education, the approach highlights the importance of collaboration, the use of process-based crafts, and the possibilities afforded to shift the focus to more participatory activities to learn generic skills.Keywords: collaborative designing, crafts, craft education, learning by designing, learning game

  3. The impact of specially designed digital games-based learning in undergraduate pathology and medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthan, Rani; Senger, Jenna-Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The rapid advances of computer technologies have created a new e-learner generation of "Homo-zappien" students that think and learn differently. Digital gaming is an effective, fun, active, and encouraging way of learning, providing immediate feedback and measurable process. Within the context of ongoing reforms in medical education, specially designed digital games, a form of active learning, are effective, complementary e-teaching/learning resources. To examine the effectiveness of the use of specially designed digital games for student satisfaction and for measurable academic improvement. One hundred fourteen students registered in first-year pathology Medicine 102 had 8 of 16 lecture sessions reviewed in specially designed content-relevant digital games. Performance scores to relevant content sessions were analyzed at midterm and final examinations. Seventy-one students who registered in second-year pathology Medicine 202 were exposed to the games only during the final examination, with the midterm examination serving as an internal matched-control group. Outcome measures included performance at midterm and final examinations. Paired 2-tailed t test statistics compared means. A satisfaction survey questionnaire of yes or no responses analyzed student engagement and their perceptions to digital game-based learning. Questions relevant to the game-play sessions had the highest success rate in both examinations among 114 first-year students. In the 71 second-year students, the examination scores at the end of the final examination were significantly higher than the scores on the midterm examination. Positive satisfaction survey noted increased student engagement, enhanced personal learning, and reduced student stress. Specially constructed digital games-based learning in undergraduate pathology courses showed improved academic performance as measured by examination test scores with increased student satisfaction and engagement.

  4. Designing Leadership and Soft Skills in Educational Games: The e-Leadership and Soft Skills Educational Games Design Model (ELESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Sara; Routledge, Helen

    2013-01-01

    While the field of leadership studies includes a large corpus of literature and studies, the literature and scientific research in the field of e-leadership and soft skills used in learning game environments are at present small in scale. Towards contributing to this newly emerging field of literature and study, this research paper presents a new…

  5. A Design Case: Developing an Enhanced Version of the Diffusion Simulation Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney Myers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a design case describing the creation of a new online version of the Diffusion Simulation Game (DSG. The DSG is a serious game that teaches change management strategies aligned with Rogers’ (2003 diffusion of innovations theory. The goal of the game is to promote the understanding of strategies that result in the adoption of an instructional innovation by the staff members of a fictional junior high school. The original board version of the game was created in the 1970s (Molenda and Rice, 1979 and was played as part of a course in the School of Education of a large Midwestern university. With the opening of a distance master’s program, the first online version of the game was developed in 2002 (Frick, Ludwig, Kim, & Huang, 2003. In order to overcome some of the limitations of the first online version, a new online version of the DSG was developed. This new version was rapidly prototyped first on paper and then in Flex Builder, ActionScript, PHP and MySQL. A rapid prototype approach (Tripp & Bichelmeyer, 1990 was utilized to iteratively design the user interface. In addition to describing the design process and rationale for design decisions, we also report results of play-tests and usability evaluations of seven recruited participants and how the information collected from these evaluations will help us to improve the current design.

  6. Playful Politics: Developing a Framework for Designing Video Games for Political Participation in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew James Reid

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Political participation in the United Kingdom among young voters (aged 18-24 has steadily declined over the past two decades. Alongside this decline, video game popularity has meteorically risen among the same demographic, resulting in video games becoming increasingly more integrated within modern society. While these instances are not necessarily related, there is opportunity to explore the use of video games’ popularity to increase political participation.The basis of this research is to investigate video games as a medium for social change, and its application within a political context in order to encourage political participation in the United Kingdom. The research intends to critically analyse existing video game design theories with implications of social impact, such as transformative design, procedural rhetoric, ethical design, persuasive principles and the theory of play.This research has assisted in the development of the Political Design Framework, a design methodology that provides ethical definition and validation for video games that intend to promote political engagement.

  7. Studying Games in School: learning and teaching about game design, play and culture

    OpenAIRE

    Pelletier, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we will present findings from the first twelve months of a research and development project called ‘Making Games’, which is developing a software tool to enable 11-14 year olds create their own 3D computer games using object-oriented programming. The project is a collaboration between the Centre for the Study of Children, Youth and Media (University of London) and Immersive Education, a software development company set up by Elixir Studios and Math Engine. Over a three-year per...

  8. MetaBlast! Virtual Cell: A Pedagogical Convergence between Game Design and Science Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anson Call

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Cell is a game design solution to a specific scientific and educational problem; expressly, how to make advanced, university level plant biology instruction on molecular and anatomical levels an exciting, efficient learning experience. The advanced technologies of 3D modeling and animation, computer programming and game design are united and tempered with strong, scientific guidance for accuracy and art direction for a powerful visual and audio simulation. The additional strength of intense gaming as a powerful tool aiding memory, logic and problem solving has recently become well recognized. Virtual Cell will provide a unique gaming experience, while transparently teaching scientifically accurate facts and concepts about, in this case, a soybean plant's inner workings and dependant mechanisms on multiple scales and levels of complexity. Virtual Cell (from now on referred to as VC in the future may prove to be a reference for other scientific/education endeavors as scientists battle for a more prominent mind share among average citizens. This paper will discuss the difficulties of developing VC, its structure, intended game and educational goals along with additional benefits to both the sciences and gaming industry.

  9. The Influence of Game Design on the Collaborative Problem Solving Process: A Cross-Case Study of Multi-Player Collaborative Gameplay Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Nilay

    2013-01-01

    This cross-case study examines the relationships between game design attributes and collaborative problem solving process in the context of multi-player video games. The following game design attributes: sensory stimuli elements, level of challenge, and presentation of game goals and rules were examined to determine their influence on game…

  10. First among Equals: Hybridization of Cognitive Diagnostic Assessment and Evidence-Centered Game Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Chu, Man-Wai

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present article is to explore differences and similarities between cognitive diagnostic assessment (CDA) and evidence-centered game design (ECgD) in the service of intentional hybridization. Although some testing specialists might argue that both are essentially the same given their origins in principled assessment design and…

  11. Designing Philadelphia Land Science as a Game to Promote Identity Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barany, Amanda; Shah, Mamta; Cellitti, Jessica; Duka, Migela; Swiecki, Zachari; Evenstone, Amanda; Kinley, Hannah; Quigley, Peter; Shaffer, David Williamson; Foster, Aroutis

    2017-01-01

    Few digital tools are designed to support identity exploration around careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) that may help close existing representation gaps in STEM fields. The aim of this project is to inform the design of games that facilitate learning as identity change as defined by the Projective Reflection…

  12. Evaluating the Impact of Player Experience in the Design of a Serious Game for Upper Extremity Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro d'Ornellas, Marcos; Cargnin, Diego João; Cervi Prado, Ana Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Video games have become a major entertainment industry and one of the most popular leisure forms, ranging from laboratory experiments to a mainstream cultural medium. Indeed, current games are multimodal and multidimensional products, relying on sophisticated features including not only a narrative-driven story but also impressive graphics and detailed settings. All of these elements helped to create a seamless and appealing product that have resulted in a growing number of players and in the number of game genres. Although video games have been used in education, simulation, and training, another application that exploits serious gaming is the exploration of player experience in the context of game research. Recent advances in the natural user interfaces and player experience have brought new perspectives on the in-game assessment of serious games. This paper evaluates the impact of player experience in the design of a serious game for upper extremity stroke rehabilitation. The game combines biofeedback and mirror neurons both in single and multiplayer mode. Results have shown that the game is a feasible solution to integrate serious games into the physical therapy routine.

  13. ZBrush creature design creating dynamic concept imagery for film and games

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Zero in on the most cutting-edge trend in creature design for film and games: ZBrush! ZBrush allows you to develop a creature for film and games in realistic, 3D format. With this book, you will learn how to create a unique creature from start to finish and search for and repair any foreseeable problems. Clear instructions guide you through using Photoshop in combination with ZBrush to finely render a creature so you can see how it will appear on screen. Experienced ZBrush author and designer Scott Spencer shows you how to start with your concept in ZBrush as a preliminary digital model and th

  14. Platform Comparison Between Games Console, Mobile Games And PC Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldus Galehantomo P.S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In terms of platforms and game console, there are diffrences between, mobile games and pc gamesin the way it is used, the operator, the main event play, the game design and even the way the game work.We know that all the games on console platforms, PC and mobile, have their own characteristic which have advantages and drawbacks All platforms compete to win the rating for the sake of their platform continuity. For rating, all games platforms develop games that are more qualified. Those games will determine the quality of the platforms, so that the game developers of each platform developtheir games maximally to compete.

  15. Building a Better Mousetrap: How Design-Based Research Was Used to Improve Homemade PowerPoint Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siko, Jason P.; Barbour, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a review of a three-cycle, design-based research study that explored the relationship between the pedagogical research and the actual implementation of a game design project using Microsoft PowerPoint. Much of the initial literature on using homemade PowerPoint games showed no significant improvement in test scores when students…

  16. Involving consumers in product design through collaboration: the case of online role-playing games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shu-Yu

    2010-12-01

    The release of software attributes to users by software designers for the creation of user-designed forms is regarded as a producer-consumer collaboration, leading consumers to expend significant effort on a specific product. This article identifies such software/product attributes within online role-playing games and then explores how consumers' prior experience affects the evaluation of such attributes. In this article, product attributes comprise customized, content, and interactive externality-sensitive and complementary externality-sensitive attributes, with the value of each attribute being greater for experts than for novices. In Study 1, data were collected and analyzed for the purpose of identifying such features in online role-playing games. The results can also be generalized to convergent products, such as TV games that have been redesigned as online games or mobile games found in Study 2. For the introduction of a convergent product to be successful, our research suggests that the potential market-segment focus should be on knowledgeable consumers who accept such products more readily.

  17. A Study of Interaction Patterns and Awareness Design Elements in a Massively Multiplayer Online Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Y. Tang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs have been known to create rich and versatile social worlds for thousands of millions of players to participate. As such, various game elements and advance technologies such as artificial intelligence have been applied to encourage and facilitate social interactions in these online communities, the key to the success of MMOGs. However, there is a lack of studies addressing the usability of these elements in games. In this paper, we look into interaction patterns and awareness design elements that support the awareness in LastWorld and FairyLand. Experimental results obtained through both in-game experiences and player interviews reveal that not all awareness tools (e.g., an in-game map have been fully exploited by players. In addition, those players who are aware of these tools are not satisfied with them. Our findings suggest that awareness-oriented tools/channels should be easy to interpret and rich in conveying “knowledge” so as to reduce players-cognitive overload. These findings of this research recommend considerations of early stage MMOG design.

  18. Knotworking – changing the game in the building design processes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Henrik; Andersen, Michael; Hvid, Nicolaj

    have used BIM modelling, calculations and energy simulation. Benefits and challenges of implementing Knotworking as collaborative learning, collaboration, themes (knots) and the use of digital tools shall be analyzed, discussed and concluded. One of the key issues in Knotworking is to explore...... and develop a common understanding and solution of the tasks through model-based tools and IT simulations. Through thematizations (knots) and the establishment of different scenarios, the technology (BIM) and the collaborative workshop model allow clients, users and consultants to take informed decisions...... findings shows that facilitated collaboration between stakeholders, with the usage of BIM/ICT (Knotworking) can gain promising results. To change the game in the construction industry we still need new ideas and perspectives. New ways of working with BIM/ICT - technology driven collaboration - can get...

  19. Digital serious game for urban planning: “B3—Design your Marketplace!”

    OpenAIRE

    Alenka Poplin

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to study the design and implementation of a digital serious game for civic engagement in urban planning. Digital serious games are games that aim to support learning in a playful and engaging way. Learning about the environment and planned changes is essential in civic engagement. The study case is taken from a city district, Billstedt, in Hamburg, Germany. In the implementation of a game concept we concentrated on the design of a marketplace in Billstedt. The g...

  20. How to Design Tobacco Prevention and Control Games for Youth and Adolescents: A Qualitative Analysis of Expert Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Amanda K; Mercado, Rebeccah; Anderson-Lewis, Charkarra; Darville, Gabrielle; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2015-12-01

    Games for health, including digital videogames and gaming-based approaches, are increasingly being used in health promotion research and practice. Recently published research has shown that videogames have significant potential to promote healthy behaviors among youth and adolescents. Yet, there is a lack of available evidence-based resources to guide practitioners on the integration of games into tobacco prevention and smoking cessation interventions. To address this gap, expert researchers and game developers were interviewed to further define games for health, explore the current research, and provide recommendations for developing, evaluating, and promoting effective anti-tobacco games. Nationally recognized experts on game development, games for health, tobacco, and health behavior were asked to participate. A qualitative analysis of 25 in-depth individual interviews using a constant comparative approach for emerging themes was conducted. Main themes that emerged from the data analysis included the following: (1) the current state of games for health research to facilitate health behavior change, (2) strategies for how to develop and evaluate games for quality and impact, and (3) recommendations for how to effectively design tobacco prevention and smoking cessation educational videogames that engage youth and adolescents. The synthesized findings identified through these expert interviews offer stakeholders strategies for how to incorporate games for health within their current and future work. Specific recommendations are presented for developers and researchers to consider when developing and evaluating videogames for tobacco prevention and smoking cessation targeted at youth and adolescents.

  1. Altered reward processing in pathological computer gamers--ERP-results from a semi-natural gaming-design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duven, Eva C P; Müller, Kai W; Beutel, Manfred E; Wölfling, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Internet Gaming Disorder has been added as a research diagnosis in section III for the DSM-V. Previous findings from neuroscientific research indicate an enhanced motivational attention toward cues related to computer games, similar to findings in substance-related addictions. On the other hand in clinical observational studies tolerance effects are reported by patients with Internet Gaming disorder. In the present study we investigated whether an enhanced motivational attention or tolerance effects are present in patients with Internet Gaming Disorder. A clinical sample from the Outpatient Clinic for Behavioral Addictions in Mainz, Germany was recruited, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for Internet Gaming Disorder. In a semi-natural EEG design participants played a computer game during the recording of event-related potentials to assess reward processing. The results indicated an attenuated P300 for patients with Internet Gaming Disorder in response to rewards in comparison to healthy controls, while the latency of N100 was prolonged and the amplitude of N100 was increased. Our findings support the hypothesis that tolerance effects are present in patients with Internet Gaming Disorder, when actively playing computer games. In addition, the initial orienting toward the gaming reward is suggested to consume more capacity for patients with Internet Gaming Disorder, which has been similarly reported by other studies with other methodological background in disorders of substance-related addictions.

  2. The Use of Game Dynamics to Enhance Curriculum and Instruction: What Teachers Can Learn from the Design of Video Games

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis Chandler

    2013-01-01

    Video games have received an increased amount of attention from educational institutions due to their widespread use and their ability to engage and sustain players in difficult learning tasks for extended amounts of time. While many studies have been done on digital games' potential to impact learning, only recently has educational research begun to analyze the game dynamics embedded in video games used to immerse students in difficult problem-solving and to support their learning. This ar...

  3. Game mechanics engine

    OpenAIRE

    Magnusson, Lars V

    2011-01-01

    Game logic and game rules exists in all computer games, but they are created di erently for all game engines. This game engine dependency exists because of how the internal object model is implemented in the engine, as a place where game logic data is intermingled with the data needed by the low- level subsystems. This thesis propose a game object model design, based on existing theory, that removes this dependency and establish a general game logic framework. The thesis the...

  4. A Learning Outcome-Oriented Approach towards Classifying Pervasive Games for Learning Using Game Design Patterns and Contextual Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Birgit; Klemke, Roland; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Mobile and in particular pervasive games are a strong component of future scenarios for teaching and learning. Based on results from a previous review of practical papers, this work explores the educational potential of pervasive games for learning by analysing underlying game mechanisms. In order to determine and classify cognitive and affective…

  5. Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions on Tpack Development after Designing Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancar Tokmak, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative case study aimed to investigate Early Childhood Education (ECE) pre-service teachers' perception of development in their technological, pedagogical, content knowledge (TPACK) after designing educational computer games for young children. Participants included 21 ECE pre-service teachers enrolled in the course Instructional…

  6. Monetary and Fiscal Policy Design under EMU: A Dynamic Game Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarle, B. van; Engwerda, J.; Plasmans, J.E.J.; Weeren, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper analyzes the problem of designing macroeconomic stabilization policies within the European Monetary Union (EMU) as a dynamic game between a centralized monetary authority, the European Central Bank (ECB), and national fiscal policy makers. Non-cooperative feedback Nash equilibrium and

  7. Design of a game-based pre-hospital resuscitation training for first responders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Schmitz, Birgit; Biermann, Henning; Klemke, Roland; Ternier, Stefaan; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Kalz, M., Schmitz, B., Biermann, H., Klemke, R., Ternier, S., & Specht, M. (2013). Design of a game-based pre-hospital resuscitation training for first responders. In A. Holzinger, M. Ziefle, & V. Glavinić (Eds.), SouthCHI 2013, LNCS 7946 (pp. 363-372). Germany: Springer, Heidelberg.

  8. Playable stories: Making programming and 3D role-playing game design personally and socially relevant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram-Goble, Adam

    This is an exploratory design study of a novel system for learning programming and 3D role-playing game design as tools for social change. This study was conducted at two sites. Participants in the study were ages 9-14 and worked for up to 15 hours with the platform to learn how to program and design video games with personally or socially relevant narratives. This first study was successful in that students learned to program a narrative game, and they viewed the social problem framing for the practices as an interesting aspect of the experience. The second study provided illustrative examples of how providing less general structure up-front, afforded players the opportunity to produce the necessary structures as needed for their particular design, and therefore had a richer understanding of what those structures represented. This study demonstrates that not only were participants able to use computational thinking skills such as Boolean and conditional logic, planning, modeling, abstraction, and encapsulation, they were able to bridge these skills to social domains they cared about. In particular, participants created stories about socially relevant topics without to explicit pushes by the instructors. The findings also suggest that the rapid uptake, and successful creation of personally and socially relevant narratives may have been facilitated by close alignment between the conceptual tools represented in the platform, and the domain of 3D role-playing games.

  9. Syntax Error : -Affective Prosody and Vocalization based Musical Icons in Game Sound Design-

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tom Langhorst

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In this paper several meaningful audio icons of classic arcade games such as Pong, Donkey Kong, Mario World and Pac-Man are analyzed, using the PRAAT software for speech analysis and musical theory. The analysis results are used to describe how these examples of best practice sound design

  10. Using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory to Design and Evaluate an Educational Game in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarou, D.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a methodology for using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) at the initial stages of the design process of an educational game, by exploring how the theory can be used as a framework for producing not only usable but also useful computer tools. The research also aimed to investigate how the theory could…

  11. "She's a waterfall": motion aftereffect and perceptual design in video games involving virtual musicianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Benjamin J

    2010-01-01

    A particularly unpleasant version of motion aftereffect was revealed after extensively playing proprietary video games in which the task is to co-ordinate spatially distributed responses in time with music. During playing, key musical and rhythmic phrases descend as coloured shapes from the top of the screen. After playing, static text is presented that appears to slide upwards, reflecting a neural reaction contrary to the falling shapes. The game both serves as a contemporary example of motion aftereffect and also highlights certain cross-modal associations between space, time, and sound in the design of stimulus-response relations.

  12. A GOAL QUESTION METRIC (GQM APPROACH FOR EVALUATING INTERACTION DESIGN PATTERNS IN DRAWING GAMES FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Sulistiyo Kusumo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing interest to use smart devices’ drawing games for educational benefit. In Indonesia, our government classifies children age four to six years old as preschool children. Not all preschool children can use drawing games easily. Further, drawing games may not fulfill all Indonesia's preschool children’s drawing competencies. This research proposes to use Goal-Question Metric (GQM to investigate and evaluate interaction design patterns of preschool children in order to achieve the drawing competencies for preschool children in two drawing Android-based games: Belajar Menggambar (in English: Learn to Draw and Coret: Belajar Menggambar (in English: Scratch: Learn to Draw. We collected data from nine students of a preschool children education in a user research. The results show that GQM can assist to evaluate interaction design patterns in achieving the drawing competencies. Our approach can also yield interaction design patterns by comparing interaction design patterns in two drawing games used.

  13. Quittr: The Design of a Video Game to Support Smoking Cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindoff, Ivan; de Salas, Kristy; Peterson, Gregory; Ling, Tristan; Lewis, Ian; Wells, Lindsay; Gee, Peter; Ferguson, Stuart G

    2016-12-01

    Smoking is recognized as the largest, single, preventable cause of death and disease in the developed world. While the majority of smokers report wanting to quit, and many try each year, smokers find it difficult to maintain long-term abstinence. Behavioral support, such as education, advice, goal-setting, and encouragement, is known to be beneficial in improving the likelihood of succeeding in a quit attempt, but it remains difficult to effectively deliver this behavioral support and keep the patient engaged with the process for a sufficient duration. In an attempt to solve this, there have been numerous mobile apps developed, yet engagement and retention have remained key challenges that limit the potential effectiveness of these interventions. Video games have been clearly linked with the effective delivery of health interventions, due to their capacity to increase motivation and engagement of players. The objective of this study is to describe the design and development of a smartphone app that is theory-driven, and which incorporates gaming characteristics in order to promote engagement with content, and thereby help smokers to quit. Game design and development was informed by a taxonomy of motivational affordances for meaningful gamified and persuasive technologies. This taxonomy describes a set of design components that is grounded in well-established psychological theories on motivation. This paper reports on the design and development process of Quittr, a mobile app, describing how game design principles, game mechanics, and game elements can be used to embed education and support content, such that the app actually requires the user to access and engage with relevant educational content. The next stage of this research is to conduct a randomized controlled trial to determine whether the additional incentivization game features offer any value in terms of the key metrics of engagement-how much content users are consuming, how many days users are persisting

  14. Systematizing game learning analytics for serious games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso-Fernandez, Cristina; Calvo Morata, Antonio; Freire, Manuel; Martinez-Ortiz, Ivan; Fernandez-Manjon, Baltasar

    2017-01-01

    Applying games in education provides multiple benefits clearly visible in entertainment games: their engaging, goal-oriented nature encourages students to improve while they play. Educational games, also known as Serious Games (SGs) are video games designed with a main purpose other than

  15. 30: 2: A Game Designed to Promote the Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Boada, Imma; Rodriguez-Benitez, Antonio; Garcia-Gonzalez, Juan Manuel; Thió i Fernández de Henestrosa, Santiago; Sbert, Mateu

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a first-aid key survival technique used to stimulate breathing and keep blood flowing to the heart. Its effective administration can significantly increase the survival chances of cardiac arrest victims. We propose 30 : 2, a videogame designed to introduce the main steps of the CPR protocol. It is not intended for certification and training purpose. Driven by the 2010 European Resuscitation Council guidelines we have designed a game composed of eight min...

  16. Designing games for the rehabilitation of functional vision for children with cerebral visual impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Linehan, Conor; Waddington, Jonathan; Hodgson, Timothy; Hicks, Kieran; Banks, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated that visual rehabilitation for patients with neurological visual impairment can be effective. Unfortunately, the existing therapy tools are repetitive, uninteresting, and unsuitable for use with children. This project aims to improve the engaging qualities of visual rehabilitation for children, through the design of therapy tools based on game design principles. Development is ongoing in a participatory, user-centred manner in conjunction with a specialist centre for ...

  17. On the Need for Research Evidence to Guide the Design of Computer Games for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Computer games for learning (also called video games or digital games) have potential to improve education. This is the intriguing idea that motivates this special issue of the "Educational Psychologist" on "Psychological Perspectives on Digital Games and Learning." Computer games for learning are games delivered via computer…

  18. People with Disabilities Leading the Design of Serious Games and Virtual Worlds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurgos Politis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Games and virtual worlds have many potential benefits for people with intellectual disabilities (ID and autism spectrum disorder (ASD, in terms of training, education, and rehabilitation. However, because this population presents a wide range of specific needs and abilities, it can be difficult to design games which are engaging and present optimum levels of challenge to players. By including individuals with ID and ASD in the design phase we can help meet their specific needs and preferences by personalizing an intervention through the exploration of experimental techniques, methods and assistive technologies. By embracing the Responsible Research and Innovation approach, we bring science and society closer together to shape the world for future generations. A number of approaches for achieving such inclusion have been described, such as User Sensitive Inclusive Design, Universal Design, and Design for All. Here we discuss three specific examples of the design of games and virtual worlds for people with ID/ASD and illustrate how they attempt to meet their needs. Namely 1 a blended approach of computerised program and applied behaviour analysis for reading skills 2 immersive gameplay for employment and transferable skills training and 3 virtual reality training to enhance communication skills.

  19. Designing Serious Computer Games for People With Moderate and Advanced Dementia: Interdisciplinary Theory-Driven Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Daniel; Abikhzer, Judith

    2017-01-01

    Background The field of serious games for people with dementia (PwD) is mostly driven by game-design principals typically applied to games created by and for younger individuals. Little has been done developing serious games to help PwD maintain cognition and to support functionality. Objectives We aimed to create a theory-based serious game for PwD, with input from a multi-disciplinary team familiar with aging, dementia, and gaming theory, as well as direct input from end users (the iterative process). Targeting enhanced self-efficacy in daily activities, the goal was to generate a game that is acceptable, accessible and engaging for PwD. Methods The theory-driven game development was based on the following learning theories: learning in context, errorless learning, building on capacities, and acknowledging biological changes—all with the aim to boost self-efficacy. The iterative participatory process was used for game screen development with input of 34 PwD and 14 healthy community dwelling older adults, aged over 65 years. Development of game screens was informed by the bio-psychological aging related disabilities (ie, motor, visual, and perception) as well as remaining neuropsychological capacities (ie, implicit memory) of PwD. At the conclusion of the iterative development process, a prototype game with 39 screens was used for a pilot study with 24 PwD and 14 healthy community dwelling older adults. The game was played twice weekly for 10 weeks. Results Quantitative analysis showed that the average speed of successful screen completion was significantly longer for PwD compared with healthy older adults. Both PwD and controls showed an equivalent linear increase in the speed for task completion with practice by the third session (Pgame engaging and fun. Healthy older adults found the game too easy. Increase in self-reported self-efficacy was documented with PwD only. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that PwD’s speed improved with practice at the same rate

  20. Computational Intelligence and Game Design for Effective At-Home Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghese, Nunzio Alberto; Pirovano, Michele; Lanzi, Pier Luca; Wüest, Seline; de Bruin, Eling D

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this article is to describe a game engine that has all the characteristics needed to support rehabilitation at home. The low-cost tracking devices recently introduced in the entertainment market allow measuring reliably at home, in real time, players' motion with a hands-free approach. Such systems have also become a source of inspiration for researchers working in rehabilitation. Computer games appear suited to guide rehabilitation because of their ability to engage the users. However, commercial videogames and game engines lack the peculiar functionalities required in rehabilitation: Games should be adapted to each patient's functional status, and monitoring the patient's motion is mandatory to avoid maladaptation. Feedback on performance and progression of the exercises should be provided. Lastly, several tracking devices should be considered, according to the patient's pathology and rehabilitation aims. We have analyzed the needs of the clinicians and of the patients associated in performing rehabilitation at home, identifying the characteristics that the game engine should have. The result of this analysis has led us to develop the Intelligent Game Engine for Rehabilitation (IGER) system, which combines the principles upon which commercial games are designed with the needs of rehabilitation. IGER is heavily based on computational intelligence: Adaptation of the difficulty level of the exercise is carried out through a Bayesian framework from the observation of the patient's success rate. Monitoring is implemented in fuzzy systems and based on rules defined for the exercises by clinicians. Several devices can be attached to IGER through an input abstraction layer, like the Nintendo ® (Kyoto, Japan) Wii™ Balance Board™, the Microsoft ® (Redmond, WA) Kinect, the Falcon from Novint Technologies (Albuquerque, NM), or the Tyromotion (Graz, Austria) Timo ® plate balance board. IGER is complemented with videogames embedded in a specific taxonomy

  1. MiRTE: Mixed Reality Triage and Evacuation game for Mass Casualty information systems design, testing and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xunyi; Ganz, Aura

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a Mixed Reality Triage and Evacuation game, MiRTE, that is used in the development, testing and training of Mass Casualty Incident (MCI) information systems for first responders. Using the Source game engine from Valve software, MiRTE creates immersive virtual environments to simulate various incident scenarios, and enables interactions between multiple players/first responders. What distinguishes it from a pure computer simulation game is that it can interface with external mass casualty incident management systems, such as DIORAMA. The game will enable system developers to specify technical requirements of underlying technology, and test different alternatives of design. After the information system hardware and software are completed, the game can simulate various algorithms such as localization technologies, and interface with an actual user interface on PCs and Smartphones. We implemented and tested the game with the DIORAMA system.

  2. Adventures in Evaluation: Reviewing a CD-ROM Based Adventure Game Designed for Young People Recovering from Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimpton, Bradley; Hurworth, Rosalind

    2005-01-01

    Recently the Centre for Program Evaluation (CPE) at the University of Melbourne was approached by a mental health agency to undertake the unique and challenging task of evaluating a prototype CD-ROM based adventure game designed for young people recovering from psychosis. This unusual and inventive game, titled Pogo's Pledge, used…

  3. Selection of security system design via games of imperfect information and multi-objective genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lins, Isis Didier; Rêgo, Leandro Chaves; Moura, Márcio das Chagas

    2013-01-01

    This work analyzes the strategic interaction between a defender and an intelligent attacker by means of a game and reliability framework involving a multi-objective approach and imperfect information so as to support decision-makers in choosing efficiently designed security systems. A multi-objective genetic algorithm is used to determine the optimal security system's configurations representing the tradeoff between the probability of a successful defense and the acquisition and operational costs. Games with imperfect information are considered, in which the attacker has limited knowledge about the actual security system. The types of security alternatives are readily observable, but the number of redundancies actually implemented in each security subsystem is not known. The proposed methodology is applied to an illustrative example considering power transmission lines in the Northeast of Brazil, which are often targets for attackers who aims at selling the aluminum conductors. The empirical results show that the framework succeeds in handling this sort of strategic interaction. -- Highlights: ► Security components must have feasible costs and must be reliable. ► The optimal design of security systems considers a multi-objective approach. ► Games of imperfect information enable the choice of non-dominated configurations. ► MOGA, reliability and games support the entire defender's decision process. ► The selection of effective security systems may discourage attacker's actions

  4. Designing Serious Games for Safety Education: "Learn to Brace" versus Traditional Pictorials for Aircraft Passengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittaro, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Serious games for safety education (SGSE) are a novel tool for preparing people to prevent and\\or handle risky situations. Although several SGSE have been developed, design and evaluation methods for SGSE need to be better grounded in and guided by safety-relevant psychological theories. In particular, this paper focuses on threat appeals and the assessment of variables, such as safety locus of control, that influence human behavior in real risky situations. It illustrates how we took into account such models in the design and evaluation of "Learn to Brace", a first-of-its-kind serious game that deals with a major problem in aviation safety, i.e. the scarce effectiveness of the safety cards used by airlines. The study considered a sample of 48 users: half of them received instructions about the brace position through the serious game, the other half through a traditional safety card pictorial. Results showed that the serious game was much more effective than the traditional instructions both in terms of learning and of changing safety-relevant perceptions, especially safety locus of control and recommendation perception.

  5. Language Impairment, Family Interaction and the Design of a Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Guillermina

    2008-01-01

    This case study describes a user-centered design approach in the area of aphasia. Aphasia is a language impairment that can take many forms, so a particular case provides the foundation for this work. The particularities of the individual with this condition and his social context are key to developing and designing an intervention that supports…

  6. Learning Games and Student Teams: Their Effects on Student Attitudes and Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Keith J.; DeVries, David L.

    A 2x2x3 randomized block design was employed with 117 seventh grade students to investigate the independent and combined effects of a learning game and student teams on students' attitudes and achievement in mathematics. Multivariate and univariate analyses of variance revealed that students in classes using games were more positive toward math…

  7. Using Robotics and Game Design to Enhance Children's Self-Efficacy, STEM Attitudes, and Computational Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Jacqueline; Buss, Alan; Gamboa, Ruben; Mitchell, Monica; Fashola, Olatokunbo S.; Hubert, Tarcia; Almughyirah, Sultan

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the findings of a pilot study that used robotics and game design to develop middle school students' computational thinking strategies. One hundred and twenty-four students engaged in LEGO® EV3 robotics and created games using Scalable Game Design software. The results of the study revealed students' pre-post self-efficacy scores on the construct of computer use declined significantly, while the constructs of videogaming and computer gaming remained unchanged. When these constructs were analyzed by type of learning environment, self-efficacy on videogaming increased significantly in the combined robotics/gaming environment compared with the gaming-only context. Student attitudes toward STEM, however, did not change significantly as a result of the study. Finally, children's computational thinking (CT) strategies varied by method of instruction as students who participated in holistic game development (i.e., Project First) had higher CT ratings. This study contributes to the STEM education literature on the use of robotics and game design to influence self-efficacy in technology and CT, while informing the research team about the adaptations needed to ensure project fidelity during the remaining years of the study.

  8. Evolutionary optimization and game strategies for advanced multi-disciplinary design applications to aeronautics and UAV design

    CERN Document Server

    Periaux, Jacques; Lee, Dong Seop Chris

    2015-01-01

    Many complex aeronautical design problems can be formulated with efficient multi-objective evolutionary optimization methods and game strategies. This book describes the role of advanced innovative evolution tools in the solution, or the set of solutions of single or multi disciplinary optimization. These tools use the concept of multi-population, asynchronous parallelization and hierarchical topology which allows different models including precise, intermediate and approximate models with each node belonging to the different hierarchical layer handled by a different Evolutionary Algorithm. The efficiency of evolutionary algorithms for both single and multi-objective optimization problems are significantly improved by the coupling of EAs with games and in particular by a new dynamic methodology named “Hybridized Nash-Pareto games”. Multi objective Optimization techniques and robust design problems taking into account uncertainties are introduced and explained in detail. Several applications dealing with c...

  9. Quittr: The Design of a Video Game to Support Smoking Cessation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindoff, Ivan; Peterson, Gregory; Ling, Tristan; Lewis, Ian; Wells, Lindsay; Gee, Peter; Ferguson, Stuart G

    2016-01-01

    Background Smoking is recognized as the largest, single, preventable cause of death and disease in the developed world. While the majority of smokers report wanting to quit, and many try each year, smokers find it difficult to maintain long-term abstinence. Behavioral support, such as education, advice, goal-setting, and encouragement, is known to be beneficial in improving the likelihood of succeeding in a quit attempt, but it remains difficult to effectively deliver this behavioral support and keep the patient engaged with the process for a sufficient duration. In an attempt to solve this, there have been numerous mobile apps developed, yet engagement and retention have remained key challenges that limit the potential effectiveness of these interventions. Video games have been clearly linked with the effective delivery of health interventions, due to their capacity to increase motivation and engagement of players. Objective The objective of this study is to describe the design and development of a smartphone app that is theory-driven, and which incorporates gaming characteristics in order to promote engagement with content, and thereby help smokers to quit. Methods Game design and development was informed by a taxonomy of motivational affordances for meaningful gamified and persuasive technologies. This taxonomy describes a set of design components that is grounded in well-established psychological theories on motivation. Results This paper reports on the design and development process of Quittr, a mobile app, describing how game design principles, game mechanics, and game elements can be used to embed education and support content, such that the app actually requires the user to access and engage with relevant educational content. The next stage of this research is to conduct a randomized controlled trial to determine whether the additional incentivization game features offer any value in terms of the key metrics of engagement–how much content users are

  10. General game playing

    CERN Document Server

    Genesereth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    General game players are computer systems able to play strategy games based solely on formal game descriptions supplied at ""runtime"" (n other words, they don't know the rules until the game starts). Unlike specialized game players, such as Deep Blue, general game players cannot rely on algorithms designed in advance for specific games; they must discover such algorithms themselves. General game playing expertise depends on intelligence on the part of the game player and not just intelligence of the programmer of the game player.GGP is an interesting application in its own right. It is intell

  11. Instrumental Genesis in GeoGebra Based Board Game Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten

    2013-01-01

    for teaching skills with GeoGebra, as well as an entrepreneurial attitude towards mathematics. Using the instrumental approach I discuss how open ended transdisciplinary design activities can support instrumental genesis, by considering the extent to which the pupils address mathematical knowledge...

  12. design and production of trophies for selected sports and games

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEPT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

    Descriptive and Experimental Research meth- ods based on the qualitative and quantitative research approaches were employed. The De- scriptive method of research is necessary be- cause trophies existing at the Sports Section of. KNUST had to be documented, described and analysed before coming out with a design ...

  13. Early Synthetic Prototyping: Exploring Designs and Concepts Within Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    and capable design trade-off analysis environment that effectively meets these goals for evaluation and visualization ( Velazquez , 2014). FACT offers...2014.pdf. Velazquez , Luis. (2014, April 14) Framework for Assessing Cost and Technology [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v

  14. Understanding Computational Thinking before Programming: Developing Guidelines for the Design of Games to Learn Introductory Programming through Game-Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimoglu, Cagin; Kiernan, Mary; Bacon, Liz; MacKinnon, Lachlan

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines an innovative game-based approach to learning introductory programming that is grounded in the development of computational thinking at an abstract conceptual level, but also provides a direct contextual relationship between game-play and learning traditional introductory programming. The paper proposes a possible model for,…

  15. Designing Slow Fun! Physical Therapy Games to Remedy the Negative Consequences of Spasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Vanden Abeele, Vero; Geurts, Luc; Husson, Jelle; Windey, Frederik; Annema, Jan Henk; Verstraete, Mathijs; Desmet, Stef

    2010-01-01

    Spasticity is a motor disorder defined by involuntary muscle contractions, resulting in uncoordinated gait, stiff body posture and shortening of range of limb movement. The first line treatment of spasticity is physical and occupational therapy, involving physical exercises that focus on stretching and strengthening of muscles. In this paper, we report on the difficulty of designing fun games that build upon these physical exercises and remedy the negative consequences of...

  16. Pathways to designing and running an operational flood forecasting system: an adventure game!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, Louise; Pappenberger, Florian; Ramos, Maria-Helena; Cloke, Hannah; Crochemore, Louise; Giuliani, Matteo; Aalbers, Emma

    2017-04-01

    In the design and building of an operational flood forecasting system, a large number of decisions have to be taken. These include technical decisions related to the choice of the meteorological forecasts to be used as input to the hydrological model, the choice of the hydrological model itself (its structure and parameters), the selection of a data assimilation procedure to run in real-time, the use (or not) of a post-processor, and the computing environment to run the models and display the outputs. Additionally, a number of trans-disciplinary decisions are also involved in the process, such as the way the needs of the users will be considered in the modelling setup and how the forecasts (and their quality) will be efficiently communicated to ensure usefulness and build confidence in the forecasting system. We propose to reflect on the numerous, alternative pathways to designing and running an operational flood forecasting system through an adventure game. In this game, the player is the protagonist of an interactive story driven by challenges, exploration and problem-solving. For this presentation, you will have a chance to play this game, acting as the leader of a forecasting team at an operational centre. Your role is to manage the actions of your team and make sequential decisions that impact the design and running of the system in preparation to and during a flood event, and that deal with the consequences of the forecasts issued. Your actions are evaluated by how much they cost you in time, money and credibility. Your aim is to take decisions that will ultimately lead to a good balance between time and money spent, while keeping your credibility high over the whole process. This game was designed to highlight the complexities behind decision-making in an operational forecasting and emergency response context, in terms of the variety of pathways that can be selected as well as the timescale, cost and timing of effective actions.

  17. Participatory design of therapeutic video games for young people with neurological vision impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Waddington, Jonathan; Linehan, Conor; Gerling, Kathrin; Hicks, Kieran; Hodgson, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Neurological Vision Impairment (NVI) detrimentally impacts upon quality of life, as daily activities such as reading and crossing the road often become significantly impaired. Therapy strategies for NVI based on visual scanning of on-screen stimuli have recently been demonstrated as effective at improving functional vision. However, these strategies are repetitive, monotonous and unsuitable for use with children and young adults. This project explores the design of a game-based therapy progra...

  18. Making an IMPACT: Designing and Testing a Novel Attentional Training Game to Reduce Social Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Enock, Philip M.

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel candidate interventions to treat anxiety disorders is an important research priority, given the burden of these disorders, barriers to treatment access, and the promising but limited success of current approaches, including attentional bias modification treatment. I created a novel training game paradigm, Intrinsically-Motivating Playable Attentional Control Training (IMPACT), with several potential ways that its design could increase the strength of attentional change an...

  19. Forest-themed learning games as a context for learning via collaborative designing of crafts

    OpenAIRE

    Sinikka Pöllänen; Leena Vartiainen

    2013-01-01

    This case study describes the types of learning games produced and the learning experiences of students who engaged in a project implementing the principles of learning by collaborative designing via forest-themed contextualization of crafts. The ultimate aim of this report is to describe how the project succeeded in changing the traditional instructional strategies used in craft education. This unique project was part of a craft course delivered as a component of primary school teacher educa...

  20. Why people continue to play online games: in search of critical design factors to increase customer loyalty to online contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dongseong; Kim, Jinwoo

    2004-02-01

    As people increasingly play online games, numerous new features have been proposed to increase players' log-on time at online gaming sites. However, few studies have investigated why people continue to play certain online games or which design features are most closely related to the amount of time spent by players at particular online gaming sites. This study proposes a theoretical model using the concepts of customer loyalty, flow, personal interaction, and social interaction to explain why people continue to play online network games. The study then conducts a large-scale survey to validate the model. Finally, it analyzes current online games to identify design features that are closely related to the theoretical concepts. The results indicate that people continue to play online games if they have optimal experiences while playing the games. This optimal experience can be attained if the player has effective personal interaction with the system or pleasant social interactions with other people connected to the Internet. Personal interaction can be facilitated by providing appropriate goals, operators and feedback; social interaction can be facilitated through appropriate communication places and tools. This paper ends with the implications of applying the study results to other domains such as e-commerce and cyber communities.

  1. Games and Diabetes: A Review Investigating Theoretical Frameworks, Evaluation Methodologies, and Opportunities for Design Grounded in Learning Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazem, Shaimaa; Webster, Mary; Holmes, Wayne; Wolf, Motje

    2015-09-02

    Here we review 18 articles that describe the design and evaluation of 1 or more games for diabetes from technical, methodological, and theoretical perspectives. We undertook searches covering the period 2010 to May 2015 in the ACM, IEEE, Journal of Medical Internet Research, Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, and Google Scholar online databases using the keywords "children," "computer games," "diabetes," "games," "type 1," and "type 2" in various Boolean combinations. The review sets out to establish, for future research, an understanding of the current landscape of digital games designed for children with diabetes. We briefly explored the use and impact of well-established learning theories in such games. The most frequently mentioned theoretical frameworks were social cognitive theory and social constructivism. Due to the limitations of the reported evaluation methodologies, little evidence was found to support the strong promise of games for diabetes. Furthermore, we could not establish a relation between design features and the game outcomes. We argue that an in-depth discussion about the extent to which learning theories could and should be manifested in the design decisions is required. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  2. Effect of Game Design, Goal Type, and Player Numbers on the Physiological and Physical Demands of Hurling-Specific Small-Sided Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Shane; Collins, Kieran D

    2017-06-01

    The current study examined the effect that game design modification, goal type, and player numbers on the running performance and physiological demands of small-sided hurling games (SSG). Forty-eight hurling players (age, 25.5 ± 3.2 years; height, 178.9 ± 3.2 cm; body mass, 78.5 ± 4.5 kg) performed 4 types of SSG (possession [P], normal play [NP], regular goals [RG] and small goals [SG]) in 4-a-side, 5-a-side, and 6-a-side formats. Heart rate (Polar Electro Oy) and global positioning system technology (VX Sport, 4-Hz, Lower Hutt) were used to analyze the physical and physiological differences between SSG. Total distance (m), high-speed running distance (m) (≥17 km·h), very-high speed running distance (≥22 km·h) (m), peak and mean velocity (km·h) were analyzed as an indicator of the physical demands of play. The 4-a-side SSG independent of game design and goal type resulted in a significantly higher relative exercise intensity compared with 5-a-side (mean change: 6 ± 2%; p = 0.001; d = 1.9 ± 0.2; large) and 6-a-side SSG independent of game design or goal type (mean change: 12 ± 2%; p = 0.001; d = 2.9 ± 0.8; very large). The 4-a-side SG (619 ± 106-m [419-735-m]) resulted in the highest distance when compared with all PP (mean change: 141 ± 9 m; p = 0.05; d = 1.9 ± 0.3; moderate) and RG (mean change: 119 ± 39 m; p = 0.004; d = 2.1 ± 0.8; large). Similar trends were observed for 5-a-side and 6-a-side games with SG resulting in increased total running performance. In conclusion, the current observations reveal that 4-a-side NP, SG, and RG have the highest physiological demands with 4-a-side SG having increased running performance in contrast to other game design and goal-type games. Furthermore, independent of game design and goal type, 4-a-side SSG show increased relative intensity compared with 5-a-side and 6-a-side SSG.

  3. Game Changing: NASA's Space Launch System and Science Mission Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is directing efforts to build the Space Launch System (SLS), a heavy-lift rocket that will carry the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) and other important payloads far beyond Earth orbit (BEO). Its evolvable architecture will allow NASA to begin with Moon fly-bys and then go on to transport humans or robots to distant places such as asteroids and Mars. Designed to simplify spacecraft complexity, the SLS rocket will provide improved mass margins and radiation mitigation, and reduced mission durations. These capabilities offer attractive advantages for ambitious missions such as a Mars sample return, by reducing infrastructure requirements, cost, and schedule. For example, if an evolved expendable launch vehicle (EELV) were used for a proposed mission to investigate the Saturn system, a complicated trajectory would be required - with several gravity-assist planetary fly-bys - to achieve the necessary outbound velocity. The SLS rocket, using significantly higher C3 energies, can more quickly and effectively take the mission directly to its destination, reducing trip time and cost. As this paper will report, the SLS rocket will launch payloads of unprecedented mass and volume, such as "monolithic" telescopes and in-space infrastructure. Thanks to its ability to co-manifest large payloads, it also can accomplish complex missions in fewer launches. Future analyses will include reviews of alternate mission concepts and detailed evaluations of SLS figures of merit, helping the new rocket revolutionize science mission planning and design for years to come.

  4. Designing a Health-Game Intervention Supporting Health Literacy and a Tobacco-Free Life in Early Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisod, Heidi; Pakarinen, Anni; Axelin, Anna; Danielsson-Ojala, Riitta; Smed, Jouni; Salanterä, Sanna

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the design of a health game that aims to both support tobacco-related health literacy and a tobacco-free life in early adolescence and to meet adolescents' expectations. Data were collected from adolescents using an open-ended questionnaire (n = 83) and focus groups (n = 39) to obtain their view of a health game used for tobacco-related health education. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis. A group of experts combined the adolescents' views with theoretical information on health literacy and designed and produced the first version of the game. Adolescents (session 1, n = 16; session 3, n = 10; and session 4, n = 44) and health promotion professionals (session 2, n = 3) participated in testing the game. Feedback from testing sessions 3 and 4 was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Adolescents pointed out that the health game needs to approach the topic of tobacco delicately and focus on the adolescents' perspective and on the positive sides of a tobacco-free life rather than only on the negative consequences of tobacco. The adolescents expected the game to be of high quality, stimulating, and intellectually challenging and to offer possibilities for individualization. Elements from the adolescents' view and theoretical modelling were embedded into the design of a game called Fume. Feedback on the game was promising, but some points were highlighted for further development. Investing especially in high-quality design features, such as graphics and versatile content, using humoristic or otherwise stimulating elements, and maintaining sufficiently challenging gameplay would promote the acceptability of theory-based health games among adolescents.

  5. From M.C. Escher to Mass Effect: impossible spaces and hyper-real worlds in video games. How can hyper-real worlds be designed and interpreted in a 2D, 2.5D and 3D virtual environment and how will this implementation affect the stereoscopic 3D video games of the future?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Petrovits

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Game developers, even during the early years of game design, have always searched for new and interesting ways of creating more elaborate, immersive and realistic environments for their video games.

  6. Design of robotic leg and physiotherapy (ROLEP) assist with interactive game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, A. F.; Husin, M. F. Che; Hashim, M. N.; Rosli, K. A.; Roslim, F. R. A.; Abidin, A. F. Z.

    2017-09-01

    Injuries in certain parts of the feet can cause a person to have difficulty in walking or running if it is not treated through physiotherapy. In Malaysia, therapy centers only provide a service or the use of basic tools that are not efficient as more sophisticated equipment requires a high cost. In fact, exercise requiring close monitoring physiotherapist are also at a high cost. Therefore, using robot therapy is a new technology that can provide an alternative way to solve this problem. The implementation of this project has produced a robotic physiotherapy which has one degree of freedom, portable and inexpensive way to help the movement of the patient's leg. It covers basic electrical circuits, mechanical components, programming and has been combined with an interactive game as the main driver. ROLEP (Robotic-Leg-Physiotherapy) is able to help patients through the therapy process. It was built using CT-UNO as its microprocessor connected to MD10-C which acted as the motor driver. The interactive game produced by using Unity game software is a key driver in getting rid of boredom and reduce pain. As a result, ROLEP designed can operate well within its range of the patient's weight. It has the advantage of portability and easy to use by the patients. ROLEP expected to help patients undergoing therapy process more efficient and interesting in the process of recovery.

  7. Designing Serious Computer Games for People With Moderate and Advanced Dementia: Interdisciplinary Theory-Driven Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziraki, Chariklia; Berenbaum, Rakel; Gross, Daniel; Abikhzer, Judith; Ben-David, Boaz M

    2017-07-31

    The field of serious games for people with dementia (PwD) is mostly driven by game-design principals typically applied to games created by and for younger individuals. Little has been done developing serious games to help PwD maintain cognition and to support functionality. We aimed to create a theory-based serious game for PwD, with input from a multi-disciplinary team familiar with aging, dementia, and gaming theory, as well as direct input from end users (the iterative process). Targeting enhanced self-efficacy in daily activities, the goal was to generate a game that is acceptable, accessible and engaging for PwD. The theory-driven game development was based on the following learning theories: learning in context, errorless learning, building on capacities, and acknowledging biological changes-all with the aim to boost self-efficacy. The iterative participatory process was used for game screen development with input of 34 PwD and 14 healthy community dwelling older adults, aged over 65 years. Development of game screens was informed by the bio-psychological aging related disabilities (ie, motor, visual, and perception) as well as remaining neuropsychological capacities (ie, implicit memory) of PwD. At the conclusion of the iterative development process, a prototype game with 39 screens was used for a pilot study with 24 PwD and 14 healthy community dwelling older adults. The game was played twice weekly for 10 weeks. Quantitative analysis showed that the average speed of successful screen completion was significantly longer for PwD compared with healthy older adults. Both PwD and controls showed an equivalent linear increase in the speed for task completion with practice by the third session (Pgame engaging and fun. Healthy older adults found the game too easy. Increase in self-reported self-efficacy was documented with PwD only. Our study demonstrated that PwD's speed improved with practice at the same rate as healthy older adults. This implies that when tasks

  8. RealTimeChess : Lessons from a Participatory Design Process for a Collaborative Multi-Touch, Multi-User Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaboissier, Jonathan; Isenberg, Tobias; Vernier, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    We report on a long-term participatory design process during which we designed and improved RealTimeChess, a collaborative but competitive game that is played using touch input by multiple people on a tabletop display. During the design process we integrated concurrent input from all players and

  9. Effect of the Game Design, the Goal Type and the Number of Players on Intensity of Play in Small-Sided Soccer Games in Youth Elite Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Rodenas Joaquín

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effects of game design modification, the type of the goal and the number of players on the intensity of play in small-sided soccer games (SSGs in youth elite players. Twenty young soccer players (age 13.7 ± 0.5 years, body mass 57.4 ± 7.8 kg, body height 1.67 ± 7.8 m, maximal heart rate 201.1 ± 8.2 beats/min performed three types of SSGs (possession play (PP vs. regular goals (RG vs. small goals (SG in both four-a-side and six-a-side formats. The heart rate responses were recorded and analysed as an indicator of the intensity of play. The four-a-side format obtained higher intensity of play than six-a-side for PP (p<0.05, but not for SG and RG. SG showed higher intensity of play than RG for four-a-side (p<0.001, but not for six-a-side. PP registered higher intensity of play than RG (p<0.05, but not than SG in four-a-side, whereas in six-a-side no differences were found between the three formats. In conclusion, the modification of variables such as the number of players, the game design and the type of the goal influences the intensity of play in small-sided soccer games in youth players.

  10. Understanding Video Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Smith, Jonas; Tosca, Susana Pajares; Egenfeldt-Nielsen, Simon

    From Pong to PlayStation 3 and beyond, Understanding Video Games is the first general introduction to the exciting new field of video game studies. This textbook traces the history of video games, introduces the major theories used to analyze games such as ludology and narratology, reviews...... the economics of the game industry, examines the aesthetics of game design, surveys the broad range of game genres, explores player culture, and addresses the major debates surrounding the medium, from educational benefits to the effects of violence. Throughout the book, the authors ask readers to consider...... larger questions about the medium: * What defines a video game? * Who plays games? * Why do we play games? * How do games affect the player? Extensively illustrated, Understanding Video Games is an indispensable and comprehensive resource for those interested in the ways video games are reshaping...

  11. Video Games and Education: Designing Learning Systems for an Interactive Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Kurt D.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, attention has been paid to computer and video games as a medium for learning. This article provides a way of conceptualizing them as possibility spaces for learning. It provides an overview of two research programs: (1) an after-school program using commercial games to develop deep expertise in game play and game creation, and (2) an…

  12. An educational video game for nutrition of young people: Theory and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Playing Escape from Diab (DIAB) and Nanoswarm (NANO), epic video game adventures, increased fruit and vegetable consumption among a multi-ethnic sample of 10-12 year old children during pilot testing. Key elements of both games were educational mini-games embedded in the overall game that promoted k...

  13. Playful Play with Games: Linking Level Editing to Learning in Art and Design

    OpenAIRE

    Engeli, Maia

    2005-01-01

    There are different ways how meaning is creating in and around games. What I am presenting here as "Playful Play with Games" is about creative involvement with games mainly game modding and re-appropriating of games. Playful play means to become a creator or writer in addition to a reader and player, but nonetheless with a playful attitude and a good understanding of the game at hand. Three levels of meaning produced in and around games can be distinguished: Meaningful play, meaning beyond pl...

  14. Iterative Design and Testing for the Development of a Game-Based Chlamydia Awareness Intervention: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rui; McKanna, James; Calabrese, Samantha; Seif El-Nasr, Magy

    2017-08-01

    Herein we describe a methodology for developing a game-based intervention to raise awareness of Chlamydia and other sexually transmitted infections among youth in Boston's underserved communities. We engaged in three design-based experiments. These utilized mixed methods, including playtesting and assessment methods, to examine the overall effectiveness of the game. In this case, effectiveness is defined as (1) engaging the target group, (2) increasing knowledge about Chlamydia, and (3) changing attitudes toward Chlamydia testing. These three experiments were performed using participants from different communities and with slightly different versions of the game, as we iterated through the design/feedback process. Overall, participants who played the game showed a significant increase in participants' knowledge of Chlamydia compared with those in the control group (P = 0.0002). The version of the game, including elements specifically targeting systemic thinking, showed significant improvement in participants' intent to get tested compared with the version of the game without such elements (Stage 2: P > 0.05; Stage 3: P = 0.0045). Furthermore, during both Stage 2 and Stage 3, participants showed high levels of enjoyment, mood, and participation and moderate levels of game engagement and social engagement. During Stage 3, however, participants' game engagement (P = 0.0003), social engagement (P = 0.0003), and participation (P = 0.0003) were significantly higher compared with those of Stage 2. Thus, we believe that motivation improvements from Stage 2 to 3 were also effective. Finally, participants' overall learning effectiveness was correlated with their prepositive affect (r = 0.52) and their postproblem hierarchy (r = -0.54). The game improved considerably from its initial conception through three stages of iterative design and feedback. Our assessment methods for each stage targeted and integrated learning, health, and engagement

  15. Psychometric Testing of the Personal Internet Gaming Disorder Evaluation-9: A New Measure Designed to Assess Internet Gaming Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcy, Benjamin T D; Roberts, Lynne D; McEvoy, Peter M

    2016-05-01

    Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) is in the early stages of recognition as a disorder, following its inclusion in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association(1)) as a condition for further study. Existing measures of Internet gaming pathology are limited in their ability to measure IGD as defined in the DSM-5. We present the initial development and validation of a new measure derived from the proposed DSM-5 criteria for IGD, the Personal Internet Gaming Disorder Evaluation-9 (PIE-9). A student sample (n = 119) and a community sample (n = 285), sourced through a variety of online gaming forums, completed an online survey comprising the new measure, existing measures of IGD, and a range of health and demographic questions. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis supported a single factor structure for the 9-item PIE-9. Internal consistency (α = 0.89) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation [ICC] = 0.77) were high. Convergent validity was demonstrated with similar gaming addiction measures. Predictive validity was established through significant differences in distress and disability between those who met the criteria for IGD and those who did not. The distress and disability associated with meeting IGD criteria fell within the range of other common DSM-5 disorders. Preliminary testing of the PIE-9 has demonstrated that it is an efficient and straightforward measure for use in further research of IGD, and as a potential screening measure in clinical practice.

  16. Active video games as a tool to prevent excessive weight gain in adolescents: rationale, design and methods of a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Excessive body weight, low physical activity and excessive sedentary time in youth are major public health concerns. A new generation of video games, the ones that require physical activity to play the games –i.e. active games- may be a promising alternative to traditional non-active games to promote physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviors in youth. The aim of this manuscript is to describe the design of a study evaluating the effects of a family oriented active game intervention, incorporating several motivational elements, on anthropometrics and health behaviors in adolescents. Methods/Design The study is a randomized controlled trial (RCT), with non-active gaming adolescents aged 12 – 16 years old randomly allocated to a ten month intervention (receiving active games, as well as an encouragement to play) or a waiting-list control group (receiving active games after the intervention period). Primary outcomes are adolescents’ measured BMI-SDS (SDS = adjusted for mean standard deviation score), waist circumference-SDS, hip circumference and sum of skinfolds. Secondary outcomes are adolescents’ self-reported time spent playing active and non-active games, other sedentary activities and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. In addition, a process evaluation is conducted, assessing the sustainability of the active games, enjoyment, perceived competence, perceived barriers for active game play, game context, injuries from active game play, activity replacement and intention to continue playing the active games. Discussion This is the first adequately powered RCT including normal weight adolescents, evaluating a reasonably long period of provision of and exposure to active games. Next, strong elements are the incorporating motivational elements for active game play and a comprehensive process evaluation. This trial will provide evidence regarding the potential contribution of active games in prevention of excessive weight gain in

  17. Platform Comparison Between Games Console, Mobile Games And PC Games

    OpenAIRE

    Geraldus Galehantomo P.S

    2015-01-01

    In terms of platforms and game console, there are diffrences between, mobile games and pc gamesin the way it is used, the operator, the main event play, the game design and even the way the game work.We know that all the games on console platforms, PC and mobile, have their own characteristic which have advantages and drawbacks All platforms compete to win the rating for the sake of their platform continuity. For rating, all games platforms develop games that are more qualified. Those gam...

  18. Energy parity games

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Doyen, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Energy parity games are infinite two-player turn-based games played on weighted graphs. The objective of the game combines a (qualitative) parity condition with the (quantitative) requirement that the sum of the weights (i.e., the level of energy in the game) must remain positive. Beside their own interest in the design and synthesis of resource-constrained omega-regular specifications, energy parity games provide one of the simplest model of games with combined qualitative and quantitative o...

  19. Gaming Device Usage Patterns Predict Internet Gaming Disorder: Comparison across Different Gaming Device Usage Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Paik, Soo-Hyun; Cho, Hyun; Chun, Ji-Won; Jeong, Jo-Eun; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Gaming behaviors have been significantly influenced by smartphones. This study was designed to explore gaming behaviors and clinical characteristics across different gaming device usage patterns and the role of the patterns on Internet gaming disorder (IGD). Responders of an online survey regarding smartphone and online game usage were classified by different gaming device usage patterns: (1) individuals who played only computer games; (2) individuals who played computer games more than smart...

  20. Active video games as a tool to prevent excessive weight gain in adolescents: rationale, design and methods of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Monique; Chinapaw, Mai J M; van de Bovenkamp, Maaike; de Boer, Michiel R; Seidell, Jacob C; Brug, Johannes; de Vet, Emely

    2014-03-24

    Excessive body weight, low physical activity and excessive sedentary time in youth are major public health concerns. A new generation of video games, the ones that require physical activity to play the games--i.e. active games--may be a promising alternative to traditional non-active games to promote physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviors in youth. The aim of this manuscript is to describe the design of a study evaluating the effects of a family oriented active game intervention, incorporating several motivational elements, on anthropometrics and health behaviors in adolescents. The study is a randomized controlled trial (RCT), with non-active gaming adolescents aged 12-16 years old randomly allocated to a ten month intervention (receiving active games, as well as an encouragement to play) or a waiting-list control group (receiving active games after the intervention period). Primary outcomes are adolescents' measured BMI-SDS (SDS=adjusted for mean standard deviation score), waist circumference-SDS, hip circumference and sum of skinfolds. Secondary outcomes are adolescents' self-reported time spent playing active and non-active games, other sedentary activities and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. In addition, a process evaluation is conducted, assessing the sustainability of the active games, enjoyment, perceived competence, perceived barriers for active game play, game context, injuries from active game play, activity replacement and intention to continue playing the active games. This is the first adequately powered RCT including normal weight adolescents, evaluating a reasonably long period of provision of and exposure to active games. Next, strong elements are the incorporating motivational elements for active game play and a comprehensive process evaluation. This trial will provide evidence regarding the potential contribution of active games in prevention of excessive weight gain in adolescents. Dutch Trial register NTR3228.

  1. Exploring the Relation between the Theory of Multiple Intelligences and Games for the Purpose of Player-Centred Game Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Pejman; Vlieghe, Joachim; De Troyer, Olga

    2017-01-01

    A large body of research work demonstrates the importance and effectiveness of adapting a learning game to its players. This process is driven by understanding the differences between individuals in terms of abilities and preferences. One of the rather interesting but least explored approaches for understanding individual differences among…

  2. A Pilot Evaluation of a Tutorial to Teach Clients and Clinicians About Gambling Game Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nigel E; Robinson, Janine; Harrigan, Kevin; Ferentzy, Peter; Jindani, Farah

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the pilot evaluation of an Internet-based intervention, designed to teach counselors and problem gamblers about how electronic gambling machines (EGMs) work. This study evaluated the tutorial using assessment tools, such as rating scales and test of knowledge about EGMs and random chance. The study results are based on a number of samples, including problem gambling counselors ( n  = 25) and problem gamblers ( n  = 26). The interactive tutorial was positively rated by both clients and counselors. In addition, we found a significant improvement in scores on a content test about EGM games for both clients and counselors. An analysis of the specific items suggests that the effects of the tutorial were mainly on those items that were most directly related to the content of the tutorial and did not always generalize to other items. This tutorial is available for use with clients and for education counselors. The data also suggest that the tutorial is equally effective in group settings and in individual settings. These results are promising and illustrate that the tool can be used to teach counselors and clients about game design. Furthermore, research is needed to evaluate its impact on gambling behavior.

  3. Design of Video Games for Children’s Diet and Physical Activity Behavior Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Tom; Thompson, Debbe; Buday, Richard; Lu, Amy Shirong; Baranowski, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Serious video games (VG) offer new opportunities for promoting health related diet and physical activity change among children. Games can be designed to use storylines, characters, and behavior change procedures, including modeling (e.g., engaging characters make changes themselves, and face and overcome challenges related to fruit and vegetable (FV) and physical activity (PA) goal attainment and/or consumption), skill development (e.g., asking behaviors; virtual recipe preparation), self regulatory behaviors (problem solving, goal setting, goal review, decision making), rewards (e.g., points and positive statements generated by the program), immediate feedback (e.g., through characters and/or statements that appear on the computer screen at critical decision points), and personalization (e.g., tailored choices offered at critical junctures, based on responses to baselines questions related to preferences, outcome expectancies, etc). We are in the earliest stages of learning how to optimally design effective behavior change procedures for use in VG, and yet they have been demonstrated to change behavior. As we learn, VG offer more and better opportunities for obesity prevention that can adjust to individual needs and preferences. PMID:25364331

  4. Design of Video Games for Children's Diet and Physical Activity Behavior Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Tom; Thompson, Debbe; Buday, Richard; Lu, Amy Shirong; Baranowski, Janice

    2010-01-01

    Serious video games (VG) offer new opportunities for promoting health related diet and physical activity change among children. Games can be designed to use storylines, characters, and behavior change procedures, including modeling (e.g., engaging characters make changes themselves, and face and overcome challenges related to fruit and vegetable (FV) and physical activity (PA) goal attainment and/or consumption), skill development (e.g., asking behaviors; virtual recipe preparation), self regulatory behaviors (problem solving, goal setting, goal review, decision making), rewards (e.g., points and positive statements generated by the program), immediate feedback (e.g., through characters and/or statements that appear on the computer screen at critical decision points), and personalization (e.g., tailored choices offered at critical junctures, based on responses to baselines questions related to preferences, outcome expectancies, etc). We are in the earliest stages of learning how to optimally design effective behavior change procedures for use in VG, and yet they have been demonstrated to change behavior. As we learn, VG offer more and better opportunities for obesity prevention that can adjust to individual needs and preferences.

  5. (ludo) game

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    design of an interactive Petri net-based token (ludo) game is presented in which transition firing is determined by dice cast. Programming is ... that always invigorates every type of persons from small to big. This is the element of chance or ..... via the game, just like video films engaged people with watching TV. 5. Conclusion.

  6. A Theoretical Framework for Serious Game Design: Exploring Pedagogy, Play and Fidelity and Their Implications for the Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that digital games can provide an engaging, motivating and "fun" experience for students. However an entertaining game does not necessarily constitute a meaningful, valuable learning experience. For this reason, experts espouse the importance of underpinning serious games with a sound theoretical framework which…

  7. Three Designs for Using Game-Based Learning in Business Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lainema, Timo; Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents three didactic frameworks for integrating learning games with other syllabus activities in business education. These three models illustrate how different didactic framings of particular learning games allow for different learning processes, using Kolb’s learning model...

  8. InsuOnline, a Serious Game to Teach Insulin Therapy to Primary Care Physicians: Design of the Game and a Randomized Controlled Trial for Educational Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Rodrigo Martins; Alves, Juliano Barbosa; Gordan, Pedro Alejandro; Esteves, Roberto Zonato; Jorge, Maria Lúcia Silva Germano; Coelho, Izabel Cristina Meister

    2013-01-01

    Background Physicians´ lack of knowledge contributes to underuse of insulin and poor glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus (DM). Traditional continuing medical education have limited efficacy, and new approaches are required. Objective We report the design of a trial to assess the educational efficacy of InsuOnline, a game for education of primary care physicians (PCPs). The goal of InsuOnline was to improve appropriate initiation and adjustment of insulin for the treatment of DM. InsuOnline was designed to be educationally adequate, self-motivating, and attractive. Methods A multidisciplinary team of endocrinologists, experts in medical education, and programmers, was assembled for the design and development of InsuOnline. Currently, we are conducting usability and playability tests, with PCPs and medical students playing the game on a desktop computer. Adjustments will be made based on these results. An unblinded randomized controlled trial with PCPs who work in the city of Londrina, Brazil, will be conducted to assess the educational validity of InsuOnline on the Web. In this trial, 64 PCPs will play InsuOnline, and 64 PCPs will undergo traditional instructional activities (lecture and group discussion). Knowledge on how to initiate and adjust insulin will be assessed by a Web-based multiple choice questionnaire, and attitudes regarding diabetes/insulin will be assessed by Diabetes Attitude Scale 3 at 3 time points—before, immediately after, and 6 months after the intervention. Subjects´ general impressions on the interventions will be assessed by a questionnaire. Software logs will be reviewed. Results To our knowledge, this is the first research with the aim of assessing the educational efficacy of a computer game for teaching PCPs about insulin therapy in DM. We describe the development criteria used for creating InsuOnline. Evaluation of the game using a randomized controlled trial design will be done in future studies. Conclusions We

  9. InsuOnline, a Serious Game to Teach Insulin Therapy to Primary Care Physicians: Design of the Game and a Randomized Controlled Trial for Educational Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Leandro Arthur; Souza, Rodrigo Martins; Alves, Juliano Barbosa; Gordan, Pedro Alejandro; Esteves, Roberto Zonato; Jorge, Maria Lúcia Silva Germano; Coelho, Izabel Cristina Meister

    2013-01-21

    Physicians´ lack of knowledge contributes to underuse of insulin and poor glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus (DM). Traditional continuing medical education have limited efficacy, and new approaches are required. We report the design of a trial to assess the educational efficacy of InsuOnline, a game for education of primary care physicians (PCPs). The goal of InsuOnline was to improve appropriate initiation and adjustment of insulin for the treatment of DM. InsuOnline was designed to be educationally adequate, self-motivating, and attractive. A multidisciplinary team of endocrinologists, experts in medical education, and programmers, was assembled for the design and development of InsuOnline. Currently, we are conducting usability and playability tests, with PCPs and medical students playing the game on a desktop computer. Adjustments will be made based on these results. An unblinded randomized controlled trial with PCPs who work in the city of Londrina, Brazil, will be conducted to assess the educational validity of InsuOnline on the Web. In this trial, 64 PCPs will play InsuOnline, and 64 PCPs will undergo traditional instructional activities (lecture and group discussion). Knowledge on how to initiate and adjust insulin will be assessed by a Web-based multiple choice questionnaire, and attitudes regarding diabetes/insulin will be assessed by Diabetes Attitude Scale 3 at 3 time points-before, immediately after, and 6 months after the intervention. Subjects´ general impressions on the interventions will be assessed by a questionnaire. Software logs will be reviewed. To our knowledge, this is the first research with the aim of assessing the educational efficacy of a computer game for teaching PCPs about insulin therapy in DM. We describe the development criteria used for creating InsuOnline. Evaluation of the game using a randomized controlled trial design will be done in future studies. We demonstrated that the design and development of a game for

  10. Mathematical games, abstract games

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, Joao Pedro

    2013-01-01

    User-friendly, visually appealing collection offers both new and classic strategic board games. Includes abstract games for two and three players and mathematical games such as Nim and games on graphs.

  11. Evaluation of an adaptive game that uses EEG measures validated during the design process as inputs to a biocybernetic loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate eEwing

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biocybernetic adaptation is a form of physiological computing whereby real-time data streaming from the brain and body is used by a negative control loop to adapt the user interface. This paper describes the development of an adaptive game system that is designed to maximize player engagement by utilizing changes in real-time EEG to adjust the level of game demand. The research consists of four main stages (1 the development of a conceptual framework upon which to model the interaction between person and system, (2 the validation of the psychophysiological inference underpinning the loop, (3 the construction of a working prototype, and (4 an evaluation of the adaptive game. Two studies are reported; the first demonstrates the sensitivity of EEG power in the (frontal theta and (parietal alpha bands to changing levels of game demand. These variables were then reformulated within the working biocybernetic control loop designed to maximize player engagement. The second study evaluated the performance of an adaptive game of Tetris with respect to system behavior and user experience. Important issues for the design and evaluation of closed-loop interfaces are discussed.

  12. Evaluation of an Adaptive Game that Uses EEG Measures Validated during the Design Process as Inputs to a Biocybernetic Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Kate C; Fairclough, Stephen H; Gilleade, Kiel

    2016-01-01

    Biocybernetic adaptation is a form of physiological computing whereby real-time data streaming from the brain and body is used by a negative control loop to adapt the user interface. This article describes the development of an adaptive game system that is designed to maximize player engagement by utilizing changes in real-time electroencephalography (EEG) to adjust the level of game demand. The research consists of four main stages: (1) the development of a conceptual framework upon which to model the interaction between person and system; (2) the validation of the psychophysiological inference underpinning the loop; (3) the construction of a working prototype; and (4) an evaluation of the adaptive game. Two studies are reported. The first demonstrates the sensitivity of EEG power in the (frontal) theta and (parietal) alpha bands to changing levels of game demand. These variables were then reformulated within the working biocybernetic control loop designed to maximize player engagement. The second study evaluated the performance of an adaptive game of Tetris with respect to system behavior and user experience. Important issues for the design and evaluation of closed-loop interfaces are discussed.

  13. Using Problem Based Learning and Game Design to motivate Non-technical Students to engage in Technical Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reng, Lars; Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    of Medialogy, we employ problem based learning and game design to engage these students in learning the technical elements. This paper will describe our approach and exemplify the method by introducing various examples of student projects, where the interest in game design combined with problem based learning...... technology, a broader segment of students are consequently enrolled. One of the challenges of these new educations is to motivate the artistic minded students in learning the technical aspects of the curriculum, as they need these qualifications to work in the industry. At Aalborg University’s department...... have engaged and motivated artistic students to learn technical topics on their own....

  14. Effect of the Game Design, the Goal Type and the Number of Players on Intensity of Play in Small-Sided Soccer Games in Youth Elite Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodenas, Joaquín; Calabuig, Ferran; Aranda, Rafael

    2015-12-22

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of game design modification, the type of the goal and the number of players on the intensity of play in small-sided soccer games (SSGs) in youth elite players. Twenty young soccer players (age 13.7 ± 0.5 years, body mass 57.4 ± 7.8 kg, body height 1.67 ± 7.8 m, maximal heart rate 201.1 ± 8.2 beats/min) performed three types of SSGs (possession play (PP) vs. regular goals (RG) vs. small goals (SG)) in both four-a-side and six-a-side formats. The heart rate responses were recorded and analysed as an indicator of the intensity of play. The four-a-side format obtained higher intensity of play than six-a-side for PP (pgame design and the type of the goal influences the intensity of play in small-sided soccer games in youth players.

  15. Serious Gaming for Test & Evaluation of Clean-Slate (Ab Initio) National Airspace System (NAS) Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, B. Danette; Alexandrov, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Incremental approaches to air transportation system development inherit current architectural constraints, which, in turn, place hard bounds on system capacity, efficiency of performance, and complexity. To enable airspace operations of the future, a clean-slate (ab initio) airspace design(s) must be considered. This ab initio National Airspace System (NAS) must be capable of accommodating increased traffic density, a broader diversity of aircraft, and on-demand mobility. System and subsystem designs should scale to accommodate the inevitable demand for airspace services that include large numbers of autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and a paradigm shift in general aviation (e.g., personal air vehicles) in addition to more traditional aerial vehicles such as commercial jetliners and weather balloons. The complex and adaptive nature of ab initio designs for the future NAS requires new approaches to validation, adding a significant physical experimentation component to analytical and simulation tools. In addition to software modeling and simulation, the ability to exercise system solutions in a flight environment will be an essential aspect of validation. The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Autonomy Incubator seeks to develop a flight simulation infrastructure for ab initio modeling and simulation that assumes no specific NAS architecture and models vehicle-to-vehicle behavior to examine interactions and emergent behaviors among hundreds of intelligent aerial agents exhibiting collaborative, cooperative, coordinative, selfish, and malicious behaviors. The air transportation system of the future will be a complex adaptive system (CAS) characterized by complex and sometimes unpredictable (or unpredicted) behaviors that result from temporal and spatial interactions among large numbers of participants. A CAS not only evolves with a changing environment and adapts to it, it is closely coupled to all systems that constitute the environment. Thus, the ecosystem that

  16. Designing After-School Learning Using the Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Digital games have become popular for engaging students in a range of learning goals, both in the classroom and the after-school space. In this article, I discuss a specific genre of video game, the massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMO), which has been identified as a dynamic environment for encountering 21st-century workplace…

  17. Design of Tangible Games for Children Undergoing Occupational and Physical Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Delden, Robertus Wilhelmus; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Aarts, Pauline; Herrlich, Marc; Malaka, Rainer; Masuch, Maic

    2012-01-01

    Games can offer an entertaining alternative to repetitive tasks. In this paper, we propose the use of tangible interactive games for the repetitive training of upper limbs in the therapy of children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). We obtained promising results. The total of four created games succeeded in

  18. Code Red: Triage or COgnition-Based DEsign Rules Enhancing Decisionmaking TRaining in a Game Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Spek, Erik D.; Wouters, Pieter; van Oostendorp, Herre

    2011-01-01

    Serious games have a great potential for training and educating people in novel and engaging ways. However, little empirical research has been done on the effectiveness of serious games, and although early findings do point to a moderately positive direction, even less is known about why some games succeed in effectively educating while others do…

  19. Health Education Video Games for Children and Adolescents: Theory, Design, and Research Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Debra A.

    This study examined whether video games could be effective health education and therapeutic interventions for children and adolescents with diabetes. KIDZ Health Software developed a game about diabetes self-management, and tested its effectiveness for children with diabetes. The Packy and Marlon Super Nintendo video game promotes fun,…

  20. New…Now?: Or Why a Design History of Coin-Op Video Game Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guins, Raiford

    2017-01-01

    The author asks what has occurred in game history scholarship to warrant the use of the adjective "new" in "New Video Game History" and suggests an awareness of process may now be influencing the study of games. In support of this observation, he organizes the article along two interrelated fronts. The first speaks to the…

  1. What Do Deep Statistical Analysis on Gaming Motivation and Game Characteristics Clusters Reveal about Targeting Demographics when Designing Gamified Contents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Tavakkoli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the comprehensive results of the study of a cohort of college graduate and undergraduate students who participated in playing a Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game (MMORPG as a gameplay rich with social interaction as well as intellectual and aesthetic features. We present the full results of the study in the form of inferential statistics and a review of our descriptive statistics previously reported in [46]. Separate one-way independent-measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA's were used to analyze the data from several instruments to determine if there were statistically significant differences first by gender, then by age group, and then by degree. Moreover, a one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to determine if there was a statistically significant difference between the clusters in the 5 gaming clusters on the Game Characteristic Survey. Follow-up paired samples t-tests were used to see if there was a statistically significant difference between each of the 10 possible combinations of paired clusters. Our results support the hypotheses and outline the features that may need to be taken into account in support of tailoring gamified educational content targeting a certain demographic. Sections 1, 2, and 3 below from our pervious study [46] are included because this is the second part of the two-part study. [46] Tavakkoli, A., Loffredo, D., Ward, M., Sr. (2014. "Insights from Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games to Enhance Gamification in Education", Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics, and Informatics, 12(4, 66-78.

  2. Designing and evaluating the effectiveness of a serious game for safe administration of blood transfusion: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Apphia Jia Qi; Lee, Cindy Ching Siang; Lin, Patrick Yongxing; Cooper, Simon; Lau, Lydia Siew Tiang; Chua, Wei Ling; Liaw, Sok Ying

    2017-08-01

    Preparing nursing students for the knowledge and skills required for the administration and monitoring of blood components is crucial for entry into clinical practice. Serious games create opportunities to develop this competency, which can be used as a self-directed learning strategy to complement existing didactic learning and simulation-based strategies. To describe the development and evaluation of a serious game to improve nursing students' knowledge, confidence, and performance in blood transfusion. An experiential gaming model was applied to guide the design of the serious game environment. A clustered, randomized controlled trial was conducted with 103 second-year undergraduate nursing students who were randomized into control or experimental groups. After a baseline evaluation of the participants' knowledge and confidence on blood transfusion procedure, the experimental group undertook a blood transfusion serious game and completed a questionnaire to evaluate their learning experience. All participants' clinical performances were evaluated in a simulated environment. The post-test knowledge and confidence mean scores of the experimental group improved significantly (pgame intervention compared to pre-test mean scores and to post-test mean scores of the control group (pgame positively. The study provided evidence on the effectiveness of a serious game in improving the knowledge and confidence of nursing students on blood transfusion practice. The features of this serious game could be further developed to incorporate additional scenarios with repetitive exercises and feedback to enhance the impact on clinical performance. Given the flexibility, practicality, and scalability of such a game, they can serve as a promising approach to optimize learning when blended with high-fidelity simulation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Learning with Calculator Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Educational games provide a fun introduction to new material and a review of mathematical algorithms. Specifically, games can be designed to assist students in developing mathematical skills as an incidental consequence of the game-playing process. The programs presented in this article are adaptations of board games or television shows that…

  4. Design of the incentive mechanism in electricity auction market based on the signaling game theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Xiliang; Lieu, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    At present, designing a proper bidding mechanism to decrease the generators' market power is considered to be one of the key approaches to deepen the reform of the electricity market. Based on the signaling game theory, the paper analyzes the main electricity bidding mechanisms in the electricity auction markets and considers the degree of information disturbance as an important factor for evaluating bidding mechanisms. Under the above studies, an incentive electricity bidding mechanism defined as the Generator Semi-randomized Matching (GSM) mechanism is proposed. In order to verify the new bidding mechanism, this paper uses the Swarm platform to develop a simulation model based on the multi-agents. In the simulation model, the generators and purchasers use the partly superior study strategy to adjust their price and their electricity quantity. Then, the paper examines a simulation experiment of the GSM bidding mechanism and compares it to a simulation of the High-Low Matching (HLM) bidding mechanism. According to the simulation results, several conclusions can be drawn when comparing the proposed GSM bidding mechanism to the equilibrium state of HLM: the clearing price decreases, the total transaction volume increases, the profits of electricity generators decreases, and the overall benefits of purchasers increases. Index Terms - signaling game; semi-randomized matching; high-low match. (author)

  5. Designing informed game-based rehabilitation tasks leveraging advances in virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Belinda; Koenig, Sebastian; Chang, Chien-Yen; McConnell, Eric; Suma, Evan; Bolas, Mark; Rizzo, Albert

    2012-01-01

    This paper details a brief history and rationale for the use of virtual reality (VR) technology for clinical research and intervention, and then focuses on game-based VR applications in the area of rehabilitation. An analysis of the match between rehabilitation task requirements and the assets available with VR technology is presented. Low-cost camera-based systems capable of tracking user behavior at sufficient levels for game-based virtual rehabilitation activities are currently available for in-home use. Authoring software is now being developed that aims to provide clinicians with a usable toolkit for leveraging this technology. This will facilitate informed professional input on software design, development and application to ensure safe and effective use in the rehabilitation context. The field of rehabilitation generally stands to benefit from the continual advances in VR technology, concomitant system cost reductions and an expanding clinical research literature and knowledge base. Home-based activity within VR systems that are low-cost, easy to deploy and maintain, and meet the requirements for "good" interactive rehabilitation tasks could radically improve users' access to care, adherence to prescribed training and subsequently enhance functional activity in everyday life in clinical populations.

  6. An Educational Board Game to Assist PharmD Students in Learning Autonomic Nervous System Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J Shawn; Tincher, Lindsay; Odeng-Otu, Emmanuel; Herdman, Michelle

    2015-10-25

    Objective. To examine whether playing a board game can assist PharmD students in learning autonomic nervous system (ANS) pharmacology. Design. Of 72 students enrolled in a required second-year pharmacology course, 22 students volunteered to play the board game, which was followed by an in-class examination consisting of 42 ANS questions (ANSQs) and 8 control questions (CTLQs). Participants were given a pretest and a posttest to assess immediate educational improvement. Participants' scores for pretest, posttest, in-class examination, and ANSQs were compared. Also, scores for examination, ANSQs, and CTLQs were compared between board game participants (PART) and nonparticipating classmates (NPART). Assessment. Board game participants scored progressively higher between the pretest, posttest, examination, and ANSQs. Additionally, PART scores were higher than NPART scores for examination and ANSQs. Difference between PART and NPART CTLQ scores was not significant. Conclusion. A board game can assist PharmD students in learning ANS pharmacology.

  7. Alternate Reality Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    What. Urban Games are games that take place in the real-world of the players, and which make use of the properties of the city. Alternate Reality Games (ARGs) are urban games that pretend to be conspiracy theories that really are happening in the life of the players. The games are experienced...... through events, challenges and collaborative puzzle solving and may evolve through the engagement of the players. This new design method, Aulaia, addresses the design of urban games in the form of ARGs. Along with the design method several examples from real world ARGs are given. Why. ARGs and other urban...... games are usually large and complicated undertakings, which require many coordinated activities in order to make successful games. This design method secures a structured approach, not only for the design of the game, but also for the launch and running. ARGs develop along with the players and require...

  8. A conceptual framework for the design and analysis of first-person shooter audio and its potential use for game engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark Nicholas; Schott, Gareth

    2007-01-01

    We introduce and describe a new conceptual framework for the design and analysis of audio for immersive first-person shooter games, and discuss its potential implications for the development of the audio component of game engines. The framework was created in order to illustrate and acknowledge...... the direct role of in-game audio in shaping player-player interactions and in creating a sense of immersion in the game world. Furthermore, it is argued that the relationship between player and sound is best conceptualized theoretically as an acoustic ecology. Current game engines are capable of game world...... spatiality through acoustic shading, but the ideas presented here provide a framework to explore other immersive possibilities for game audio through realtime synthesis....

  9. A game is a game is a game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ida Kathrine Hammeleff

    2017-01-01

    Recently self-referentiality have occurred as a trend among game designers and have also enjoyed sporadic attention in academia. However, in academia, discussions of self-referential games often rest on proceduralist arguments and a too exclusive focus on the game object. This paper draws...... on the typology of meta-pictures developed by art historian J.W.T. Mitchell. Based on this typology, this paper discusses the notion of meta-games and suggest a broad conception of such games that includes not only the game object, but also the player and the discourse in which it is interpreted....

  10. Designing and Building of 3D Adventure Game “Tetuko: Childhood of Ghatotkacha” Using Kinect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Basuki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the young people are not interested in the local culture as a “wayang” puppet. This condition threatens the extinction of some of the local culture that should be a mainstay of the industry entering an era of creative industries. On the other hand, theyare more interested in playing computer games as changing of people's lifestyles. It becomes our basic idea to produce a game as a creative product. The genre of this game is fighting-adventure. This game depictures a story of fighting between the baby Tetuko and giant Kala Pracona. The game uses Kinect and 3D platform technology to attract more players to feel their adventures. With Kinect technology, the player can control the character with his gesture. Thus, this game will increase the awareness of young people about the culture of Wayang. Keywords : 3D game, kinect,adventure, local culture, creative industry.

  11. Game Analytics for Game User Research, Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seif El-Nasr, Magy; Desurvire, Heather; Aghabeigi, Bardia

    2013-01-01

    The emerging field of game user research (GUR) investigates interaction between players and games and the surrounding context of play. Game user researchers have explored methods from, for example, human-computer interaction, psychology, interaction design...

  12. Benefits and Factors Influencing the Design of Intergenerational Digital Games: A Systematic Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Hera Conde-Pumpido, T.; Loos, E.F.; Simons, M.; Blom, J.

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to review the benefits and factors to be taken into consideration for the design of intergenerational digital games. We conducted a systematic in Scopus, Web of Science, PsicInfo, Pubmed and Science Direct, finally including 16 empirical studies written in English.

  13. Designing stereoscopic information visualization for 3D-TV: What can we can learn from S3D gaming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Jonas; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    This paper explores graphical design and spatial alignment of visual information and graphical elements into stereoscopically filmed content, e.g. captions, subtitles, and especially more complex elements in 3D-TV productions. The method used is a descriptive analysis of existing computer- and video games that have been adapted for stereoscopic display using semi-automatic rendering techniques (e.g. Nvidia 3D Vision) or games which have been specifically designed for stereoscopic vision. Digital games often feature compelling visual interfaces that combine high usability with creative visual design. We explore selected examples of game interfaces in stereoscopic vision regarding their stereoscopic characteristics, how they draw attention, how we judge effect and comfort and where the interfaces fail. As a result, we propose a list of five aspects which should be considered when designing stereoscopic visual information: explicit information, implicit information, spatial reference, drawing attention, and vertical alignment. We discuss possible consequences, opportunities and challenges for integrating visual information elements into 3D-TV content. This work shall further help to improve current editing systems and identifies a need for future editing systems for 3DTV, e.g., live editing and real-time alignment of visual information into 3D footage.

  14. Design considerations to improve cognitive ergonomic issues of unmanned vehicle interfaces utilizing video game controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppold, P; Rupp, M; Mouloua, M; Hancock, P A; Martin, J

    2012-01-01

    Unmanned (UAVs, UCAVs, and UGVs) systems still have major human factors and ergonomic challenges related to the effective design of their control interface systems, crucial to their efficient operation, maintenance, and safety. Unmanned system interfaces with a human centered approach promote intuitive interfaces that are easier to learn, and reduce human errors and other cognitive ergonomic issues with interface design. Automation has shifted workload from physical to cognitive, thus control interfaces for unmanned systems need to reduce mental workload on the operators and facilitate the interaction between vehicle and operator. Two-handed video game controllers provide wide usability within the overall population, prior exposure for new operators, and a variety of interface complexity levels to match the complexity level of the task and reduce cognitive load. This paper categorizes and provides taxonomy for 121 haptic interfaces from the entertainment industry that can be utilized as control interfaces for unmanned systems. Five categories of controllers were based on the complexity of the buttons, control pads, joysticks, and switches on the controller. This allows the selection of the level of complexity needed for a specific task without creating an entirely new design or utilizing an overly complex design.

  15. Emotional engagement, social interactions, and the development of an afterschool game design curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwah, Helen; Milne, Catherine; Tsai, Tzuchi; Goldman, Ricki; Plass, Jan L.

    2016-09-01

    This formative design study examines how a program curriculum and implementation was emergently (re)designed in dynamic relation to the expressed emotions of teachers and students. The context was a yearlong afterschool game design program for STEM learning at an urban and public all-girls middle school. Using Randall Collins' (Interaction ritual chains, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 2004) sociology of emotions framework, our analysis of field notes and video data reveal how the original intended curriculum hindered the generation of positive emotions, mutual foci of attention, and feelings of group solidarity—factors important in the generation of successful group interactions. In response to teacher and student expressed emotions, we took these factors as a guide for redesigning the program curriculum and implementation in order to foster a more positive emotional climate and redirect students' positive emotions toward engagement in learning goals. This study's implications point to the possibilities for designing curricula and program implementations to engender more emotionally responsive environments for STEM learning.

  16. The facial and subjective emotional reaction in response to a video game designed to train emotional regulation (Playmancer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Laurence; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Santamaría, Juan J; Moussa, Maher B; Sánchez, Isabel; Forcano, Laura; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia; Konstantas, Dimitri; Overby, Mikkel L; Nielsen, Jeppe; Bults, Richard G A; Granero, Roser; Lam, Tony; Kalapanidas, Elias; Treasure, Janet; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2012-11-01

    Several aspects of social and emotional functioning are abnormal in people with eating disorders. The aim of the present study was to measure facial emotional expression in patients with eating disorders and healthy controls whilst playing a therapeutic video game (Playmancer) designed to train individuals in emotional regulation. Participants were 23 ED patients (11 AN, 12 BN) and 11 HCs. ED patients self reported more anger at baseline but expressed less facial expression of anger during the Playmancer game. The discrepancy between self-report and non-verbal expression may lead to problems in social communication. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  17. Authoring of digital games via card games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Literature and previous studies show that creative play is easy to emerge when children interact with tangible, low-tech toys and games than with digital games. This paradoxical situation is linked to the long-standing problem of end-users (or players) authoring of digital contents and systems. We...... propose a new scenario in which trading card games help making sense and re-design computer games, to support players express themselves aesthetically and in a highly creative way. Our aim is to look for a middle ground between players becoming programmers and simply editing levels. The main contributions...... are to show how card games can represent digital games, how playful play can emerge in card games and digital games, and to begin defining a new way to express game behavior without the use of universal programming languages....

  18. Assessment of the usefulness and appeal of stigma-stop by psychology students: a serious game designed to reduce the stigma of mental illness

    OpenAIRE

    Adolfo J. Cangas; Noelia Navarro; Juan J. Ojeda; Diego Cangas; Jose A. Piedra; José Gallego

    2017-01-01

    The present work describes the first serious game designed to reduce the stigma among students towards mental health problems. The game is called Stigma-Stop, and it features characters who suffer from various mental disorders. Players are provided with information about different mental illnesses, and they are presented with several options on how to act when they encounter characters with these problems. In addition, the game questions the participants as to whether they have ever felt like...

  19. Design of an online EEG based neurofeedback game for enhancing attention and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kavitha P; Vinod, A P; Guan, Cuntai

    2013-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is an alternative communication and control channel between brain and computer which finds applications in neuroprosthetics, brain wave controlled computer games etc. This paper proposes an Electroencephalogram (EEG) based neurofeedback computer game that allows the player to control the game with the help of attention based brain signals. The proposed game protocol requires the player to memorize a set of numbers in a matrix, and to correctly fill the matrix using his attention. The attention level of the player is quantified using sample entropy features of EEG. The statistically significant performance improvement of five healthy subjects after playing a number of game sessions demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed game in enhancing their concentration and memory skills.

  20. Contributions from the ludological analysis for the design of serious games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GOLDONI, D.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to describe contributions that the Ludological Analysis can offer to the development of serious games. We describe a case study evaluating the characteristics of different digital Serious Games for the understanding of the main elements that make players feel challenged and motivated. This study was conducted based on the application of concepts of Ludology, seeking to validate the factors associated with the liminality, a psychological state in which the player feels so engaged in the gaming experience that focuses, almost entirely, in the game. After identifying these factors in the games analyzed in the case study, these features are mapped to the needs and possibilities in the field of education, specifically in the analysis and planning of digital Serious Games, considering that it's observation may represent improvement in the conception and use of these materials.

  1. The game of catapult to understand the design of experiments: one proposal of playful approach for teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Torres Júnior

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the use of the Catapult game for teaching design of experiments. This game consists of a small catapult capable of launching small objects. This can have different settings, so up to five control variables can be changed. The possibility of introducing different adjustments to the catapult allows driving of several types of treatments and the use of various DOE techniques. In this direction, one 2k factorial experiment was performed and is presented. Moreover, the text addresses the DOE through the Multiple Linear Regression using the regression coefficient R2 as a measure for assessing the significance of the factors and the interaction between them. Despite the simplicity of the catapult device, several existing activities in conducting industrial experiments are present in this game. This work provides several important concepts of this technique through play.

  2. The Design and Use of Planetary Science Video Games to Teach Content while Enhancing Spatial Reasoning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziffer, Julie; Nadirli, Orkhan; Rudnick, Benjamin; Pinkham, Sunny; Montgomery, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    Traditional teaching of Planetary Science requires students to possess well developed spatial reasoning skills (SRS). Recent research has demonstrated that SRS, long known to be crucial to math and science success, can be improved among students who lack these skills (Sorby et al., 2009). Teaching spatial reasoning is particularly valuable to women and minorities who, through societal pressure, often doubt their abilities (Hill et al., 2010). To address SRS deficiencies, our team is developing video games that embed SRS training into Planetary Science content. Our first game, on Moon Phases, addresses the two primary challenges faced by students trying to understand the Sun-Earth-Moon system: 1) visualizing the system (specifically the difference between the Sun-Earth orbital plane and the Earth-Moon orbital plane) and 2) comprehending the relationship between time and the position-phase of the Moon. In our second video game, the student varies an asteroid's rotational speed, shape, and orientation to the light source while observing how these changes effect the resulting light curve. To correctly pair objects to their light curves, students use spatial reasoning skills to imagine how light scattering off a three dimensional rotating object is imaged on a sensor plane and is then reduced to a series of points on a light curve plot. These two games represent the first of our developing suite of high-interest video games designed to teach content while increasing the student's competence in spatial reasoning.

  3. Modeling and Generating Strategy Games Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahlmann, Tobias

    Strategy games are a popular genre of games with a long history, originating from games like Chess or Go. The first strategy games were published as “Kriegspiele” (engl. wargames) in the late 18th century, intended for the education of young cadets. Since then strategy games were refined...... and transformed over two centuries into a medium of entertainment. Today’s computer strategy games have their roots in the board- and roleplaying games of the 20th century and enjoy great popularity. We use strategy games as an application for the procedural generation of game content. Procedural game content...... of the game is, how players may manipulate the game world, etc. We present the Strategy Games Description Language (SGDL), a tree-based approach to model the game mechanics of strategy games. SGDL allows game designers to rapid prototype their game ideas with the help of our customisable game engine. We...

  4. Design process and preliminary psychometric study of a video game to detect cognitive impairment in senior adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares-Rodriguez, Sonia; Perez-Rodriguez, Roberto; Facal, David; Fernandez-Iglesias, Manuel J; Anido-Rifon, Luis; Mouriño-Garcia, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of episodic memory has been traditionally used to evaluate potential cognitive impairments in senior adults. Typically, episodic memory evaluation is based on personal interviews and pen-and-paper tests. This article presents the design, development and a preliminary validation of a novel digital game to assess episodic memory intended to overcome the limitations of traditional methods, such as the cost of its administration, its intrusive character, the lack of early detection capabilities, the lack of ecological validity, the learning effect and the existence of confounding factors. Our proposal is based on the gamification of the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) and it has been designed to comply with the psychometric characteristics of reliability and validity. Two qualitative focus groups and a first pilot experiment were carried out to validate the proposal. A more ecological, non-intrusive and better administrable tool to perform cognitive assessment was developed. Initial evidence from the focus groups and pilot experiment confirmed the developed game's usability and offered promising results insofar its psychometric validity is concerned. Moreover, the potential of this game for the cognitive classification of senior adults was confirmed, and administration time is dramatically reduced with respect to pen-and-paper tests. Additional research is needed to improve the resolution of the game for the identification of specific cognitive impairments, as well as to achieve a complete validation of the psychometric properties of the digital game. Initial evidence show that serious games can be used as an instrument to assess the cognitive status of senior adults, and even to predict the onset of mild cognitive impairments or Alzheimer's disease.

  5. A game plan: Gamification design principles in mHealth applications for chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron S; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Seto, Emily

    2016-06-01

    Effective chronic disease management is essential to improve positive health outcomes, and incentive strategies are useful in promoting self-care with longevity. Gamification, applied with mHealth (mobile health) applications, has the potential to better facilitate patient self-management. This review article addresses a knowledge gap around the effective use of gamification design principles, or mechanics, in developing mHealth applications. Badges, leaderboards, points and levels, challenges and quests, social engagement loops, and onboarding are mechanics that comprise gamification. These mechanics are defined and explained from a design and development perspective. Health and fitness applications with gamification mechanics include: bant which uses points, levels, and social engagement, mySugr which uses challenges and quests, RunKeeper which uses leaderboards as well as social engagement loops and onboarding, Fitocracy which uses badges, and Mango Health, which uses points and levels. Specific design considerations are explored, an example of the efficacy of a gamified mHealth implementation in facilitating improved self-management is provided, limitations to this work are discussed, a link between the principles of gaming and gamification in health and wellness technologies is provided, and suggestions for future work are made. We conclude that gamification could be leveraged in developing applications with the potential to better facilitate self-management in persons with chronic conditions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. A game-based decision support methodology for competitive systems design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceno, Simon Ignacio

    This dissertation describes the development of a game-based methodology that facilitates the exploration and selection of research and development (R&D) projects under uncertain competitive scenarios. The proposed method provides an approach that analyzes competitor positioning and formulates response strategies to forecast the impact of technical design choices on a project's market performance. A critical decision in the conceptual design phase of propulsion systems is the selection of the best architecture, centerline, core size, and technology portfolio. This selection can be challenging when considering evolving requirements from both the airframe manufacturing company and the airlines in the market. Furthermore, the exceedingly high cost of core architecture development and its associated risk makes this strategic architecture decision the most important one for an engine company. Traditional conceptual design processes emphasize performance and affordability as their main objectives. These areas alone however, do not provide decision-makers with enough information as to how successful their engine will be in a competitive market. A key objective of this research is to examine how firm characteristics such as their relative differences in completing R&D projects, differences in the degree of substitutability between different project types, and first/second-mover advantages affect their product development strategies. Several quantitative methods are investigated that analyze business and engineering strategies concurrently. In particular, formulations based on the well-established mathematical field of game theory are introduced to obtain insights into the project selection problem. The use of game theory is explored in this research as a method to assist the selection process of R&D projects in the presence of imperfect market information. The proposed methodology focuses on two influential factors: the schedule uncertainty of project completion times and

  7. Automated Measurement of Visual Acuity in Pediatric Ophthalmic Patients Using Principles of Game Design and Tablet Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Aslam, Tariq M; Tahir, Humza J; Parry, Neil R A; Murray, Ian J; Kwak, Kun; Heyes, Richard; Salleh, Mahani M; Czanner, Gabriela; Ashworth, Jane

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report on the utility of a computer tablet-based method for automated testing of visual acuity in children based on the principles of game design. We describe the testing procedure and present repeatability as well as agreement of the score with accepted visual acuity measures.DESIGN: Reliability and validity study.METHODS: Setting: Manchester Royal Eye Hospital Pediatric Ophthalmology Outpatients Department.PATIENT POPULATION: Total of 112 sequentially recruited patients.INTERVEN...

  8. A game-theoretic parameter configuration technique for aquifer restoration design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eheart, J. Wayland; Rahman, M. Rezaur; Keith, Stevan M.; Valocchi, Albert J.

    1990-10-01

    The problem of designing an active hydraulic system for remediation of a polluted aquifer is addressed for the case when parameters are not known with certainty. The design problem is cast as a game in which the protagonist-designer is pitted against an antagonist which alters the values of the uncertain parameters, within prescribed limits, so as to render the engineered system most ineffective. A solution method for the antagonist's problem, referred to as the parameter configuration technique (PCT), is developed and discussed in this paper. This technique selects spatially dependent values of the distributed parameter, transmissivity, such that the pattern of variation represents a pessimistic (but realistic) set of design conditions. The task of finding the "worst" set of parameter values is cast as a constrained optimization problem whose objective function is to thwart the remedial action design to the greatest degree possible. A rudimentary objective function is arbitrarily specified by the researchers. Several types of feasibility constraints restrict the distribution of parameter values to those combinations that are "realistic." One type limits the variogram, another type, the mean, and a third type, the trend, of the log transmissivity. The resulting optimization problem is ill-behaved; difficulty was encountered obtaining a mathematically optimal solution. However, it may not always be necessary to find such a mathematically optimal solution in order to derive practical utility from the results. Two special heuristic techniques for obtaining a near-optimal solution are discussed. The technique is applied to a hypothetical contaminated aquifer with a simple single-extraction well flushing system. The solution is compared to a Monte Carlo approach applied to the same aquifer. The required pumping rate for a pessimistic parameter set generated by the new technique is about the same as the second largest of 100 Monte Carlo realizations.

  9. Design & evaluation of game-based health interventions : A case study in physiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Jonker; drs E.P. Braad; J. Folkerts

    2013-01-01

    Posterpresentatie tijdens Games for Health Europe, Amsterdam, gehouden op 29 oktober 2013. Experimental setup of motivating physiotherapy clients to perform balancing exercises at home through the use of a game with custom ‘wobble board’ hardware and iPadaccelerometer data.

  10. A Framework for Structuring Learning Assessment in a Online Educational Game: Experiment Centered Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Shawn; Clarke-Midura, Jody; Klopfer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Educational games offer an opportunity to engage and inspire students to take interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematical (STEM) subjects. Unobtrusive learning assessment techniques coupled with machine learning algorithms can be utilized to record students' in-game actions and formulate a model of the students' knowledge…

  11. Design and Evaluation of a Prompting Instrument to Support Learning within the Diffusion Simulation Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Seolim; Lara, Miguel; Enfield, Jake; Frick, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    Conducting an iterative usability testing, a set of prompts used as a form of instructional support was developed in order to facilitate the comprehension of the diffusion of innovations theory (Rogers, 2003) in a simulation game called the Diffusion Simulation Game (DSG) (Molenda & Rice, 1979). The six subjects who participated in the study…

  12. A Model for the Design of Puzzle-Based Games Including Virtual and Physical Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, Javier; Hernandez-Leo, Davinia

    2014-01-01

    Multiple evidences in the Technology-Enhanced Learning domain indicate that Game-Based Learning can lead to positive effects in students' performance and motivation. Educational games can be completely virtual or can combine the use of physical objects or spaces in the real world. However, the potential effectiveness of these approaches…

  13. On Problem Based Learning and Application to Computer Games Design Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timcenko, Olga; Stojic, Radoslav

    2012-01-01

    is Medialogy education, which was established in 2002. This paper presents transfer of experiences from Medialogy education in Denmark to Game development education in Serbia - a new (2 years old) study line successfully developed in the country where game development companies hardly exist, but a need...... for newly educated programmers is evident....

  14. Multimodality and the Multiliteracies Pedagogy: "Design" and "Recruitment" in South African Children's Musical Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop-Allin, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on a study of children's musical games in urban South Africa, this article employs two theoretical frames: that of multimodality and the multiliteracies pedagogy. These are applied to a contextual analysis of the forms of musicality that musical games embody and to ways of incorporating children's play into pedagogy. Based on ethnographic…

  15. Designing Tutorial Modalities and Strategies for Digital Games: Lessons from Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Matthew M.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary digital games do little to help novice and disadvantaged players wanting to learn to play. The novice-expert divide is a significant barrierfor entry for disadvantaged groups who want to play digital games; this is especially true for women (Jenson, Fisher, & De Castell, 2011). In response to this problem, three new tutorial…

  16. Strategies of Collaborative Work in the Classroom through the Design of Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz González, Juan Manuel; Rubio García, Sebastián; Cruz Pichardo, Ivanovna M.

    2015-01-01

    At the present time, the use of video games goes beyond mere amusement or entertainment due to its potential for developing capacities, dexterity and skills. Thus, video games have extended to environments like that of education, serving as didactic resources within dynamics that respond to the interests and necessities of the 21st century…

  17. The yin and yang of formative research in designing serious (exer-)games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite its relevance, formative research on games may be an undervalued part of the game development process. At the 2014 International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity exergaming preconference satellite meeting, a roundtable discussion was held to assemble experiences and sugg...

  18. User experience & user-centered design : Health games user research model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jef Folkerts

    2014-01-01

    This poster sketches the outlines of a theoretical research framework to assess whether and on what grounds certain behavioral effects may be attributed to particular game mechanics and game play aspects. It is founded on the Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion (ELM), which is quite

  19. From Users to Designers: Building a Self-Organizing Game-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Kurt; Giovanetto, Levi; Devane, Ben; Durga, Shree

    2005-01-01

    The simultaneous publication of Steven Johnson's Everything Bad is Good for You and appearance of media reports of X-rated content in the popular game Grand Theft Auto has renewed controversies surrounding the social effects of computer and video games. On the one hand, videogames scholars argue that videogames are complex, cognitively challenging…

  20. Design Rationale Behind the Serious Self-Regulation Game Intervention “Balance-It”: Overweight Prevention Among Secondary Vocational Education Students in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spook, J.E.; Paulussen, T.G.W.M.; Paulissen, R.T; Visschedijk, G.C.; Kok, G.; Empelen, P. van

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This article describes the design rationale behind a serious self-regulation game intervention. The aim of the game is to promote healthy dietary intake and physical activity among secondary vocational educational students in The Netherlands (approximately 16-20 years of age). Materials

  1. The Design of Video Games in the Implementation of Malay Language Learning among Foreign Students in an Institution of Higher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Fuziah; Alias, Norlidah; Rahman, Mohd Nazri Abdul; Dewitt, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at reviewing the curriculum design by including video games in the implementation of the Malay language course at an Institute of Higher Learning. The objective of this study is to obtain expert opinion on the expected manner of implementation of video games in learning the Malay language. The Fuzzy Delphi technique (FDM) is used…

  2. Using the Saliency-Based Model to Design a Digital Archaeological Game to Motivate Players' Intention to Visit the Digital Archives of Taiwan's Natural Science Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Chen, Yu-Ju; Lin, Pei-Hsin; Huang, Yao-Tien; Cheng, Hao-Yueh; Lee, Chih-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Museums in Taiwan have developed various digital archives, but few people have visited these digital archives. Therefore, this study designed a digital archaeology game for high school students to play. Based on the concept of "learning for playing" (i.e., players who want to win will study more), the digital archaeology game contest…

  3. A multimodal interface device for online board games designed for sight-impaired people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporusso, Nicholas; Mkrtchyan, Lusine; Badia, Leonardo

    2010-03-01

    Online games between remote opponents playing over computer networks are becoming a common activity of everyday life. However, computer interfaces for board games are usually based on the visual channel. For example, they require players to check their moves on a video display and interact by using pointing devices such as a mouse. Hence, they are not suitable for visually impaired people. The present paper discusses a multipurpose system that allows especially blind and deafblind people playing chess or other board games over a network, therefore reducing their disability barrier. We describe and benchmark a prototype of a special interactive haptic device for online gaming providing a dual tactile feedback. The novel interface of this proposed device is able to guarantee not only a better game experience for everyone but also an improved quality of life for sight-impaired people.

  4. Design process and preliminary psychometric study of a video game to detect cognitive impairment in senior adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Valladares-Rodriguez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Assessment of episodic memory has been traditionally used to evaluate potential cognitive impairments in senior adults. Typically, episodic memory evaluation is based on personal interviews and pen-and-paper tests. This article presents the design, development and a preliminary validation of a novel digital game to assess episodic memory intended to overcome the limitations of traditional methods, such as the cost of its administration, its intrusive character, the lack of early detection capabilities, the lack of ecological validity, the learning effect and the existence of confounding factors. Materials and Methods Our proposal is based on the gamification of the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT and it has been designed to comply with the psychometric characteristics of reliability and validity. Two qualitative focus groups and a first pilot experiment were carried out to validate the proposal. Results A more ecological, non-intrusive and better administrable tool to perform cognitive assessment was developed. Initial evidence from the focus groups and pilot experiment confirmed the developed game’s usability and offered promising results insofar its psychometric validity is concerned. Moreover, the potential of this game for the cognitive classification of senior adults was confirmed, and administration time is dramatically reduced with respect to pen-and-paper tests. Limitations Additional research is needed to improve the resolution of the game for the identification of specific cognitive impairments, as well as to achieve a complete validation of the psychometric properties of the digital game. Conclusion Initial evidence show that serious games can be used as an instrument to assess the cognitive status of senior adults, and even to predict the onset of mild cognitive impairments or Alzheimer’s disease.

  5. Game Development: Sci-Fi Endless Runner

    OpenAIRE

    Boronin, Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Game development is the one of the most popular fields in IT, which is responsible for creating games. Many people like playing games on different platforms such as PC, consoles. Therefore, this point is very profitable for game developers. The purposes of this project were to learn basic things about game development, game engines and to make a game with the original design. The tutorials and instructions were used to get the necessary information about game ...

  6. Principles underlying the design of "The Number Race", an adaptive computer game for remediation of dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anna J; Dehaene, Stanislas; Pinel, Philippe; Revkin, Susannah K; Cohen, Laurent; Cohen, David

    2006-05-30

    Adaptive game software has been successful in remediation of dyslexia. Here we describe the cognitive and algorithmic principles underlying the development of similar software for dyscalculia. Our software is based on current understanding of the cerebral representation of number and the hypotheses that dyscalculia is due to a "core deficit" in number sense or in the link between number sense and symbolic number representations. "The Number Race" software trains children on an entertaining numerical comparison task, by presenting problems adapted to the performance level of the individual child. We report full mathematical specifications of the algorithm used, which relies on an internal model of the child's knowledge in a multidimensional "learning space" consisting of three difficulty dimensions: numerical distance, response deadline, and conceptual complexity (from non-symbolic numerosity processing to increasingly complex symbolic operations). The performance of the software was evaluated both by mathematical simulations and by five weeks of use by nine children with mathematical learning difficulties. The results indicate that the software adapts well to varying levels of initial knowledge and learning speeds. Feedback from children, parents and teachers was positive. A companion article describes the evolution of number sense and arithmetic scores before and after training. The software, open-source and freely available online, is designed for learning disabled children aged 5-8, and may also be useful for general instruction of normal preschool children. The learning algorithm reported is highly general, and may be applied in other domains.

  7. Principles underlying the design of "The Number Race", an adaptive computer game for remediation of dyscalculia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Laurent

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adaptive game software has been successful in remediation of dyslexia. Here we describe the cognitive and algorithmic principles underlying the development of similar software for dyscalculia. Our software is based on current understanding of the cerebral representation of number and the hypotheses that dyscalculia is due to a "core deficit" in number sense or in the link between number sense and symbolic number representations. Methods "The Number Race" software trains children on an entertaining numerical comparison task, by presenting problems adapted to the performance level of the individual child. We report full mathematical specifications of the algorithm used, which relies on an internal model of the child's knowledge in a multidimensional "learning space" consisting of three difficulty dimensions: numerical distance, response deadline, and conceptual complexity (from non-symbolic numerosity processing to increasingly complex symbolic operations. Results The performance of the software was evaluated both by mathematical simulations and by five weeks of use by nine children with mathematical learning difficulties. The results indicate that the software adapts well to varying levels of initial knowledge and learning speeds. Feedback from children, parents and teachers was positive. A companion article 1 describes the evolution of number sense and arithmetic scores before and after training. Conclusion The software, open-source and freely available online, is designed for learning disabled children aged 5–8, and may also be useful for general instruction of normal preschool children. The learning algorithm reported is highly general, and may be applied in other domains.

  8. Perception Of Space, Empathy And Cognitive Processes: Design Of A Video Game For The Measurement Of Perspective Taking Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pio Alfredo Di Tore

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The perspective-taking skills require the ability to manipulate spatial reference systems and are the basis of the empathetic process. Empathy, in its relations with space representation and manipulation of spatial reference systems, is the investigation subject of this work, whose aim is the design of a videogame aimed at the measurement of the player's perspective taking skills. The idea of creating a video game on perspective taking is based on a classic Piagetian task, the three mountains problem, object of recent attention by the Italian scientific community that is involved in research in education. The current stage of the project has produced a video game, now in alpha testing release. The article discusses the software theoretical framework (spatial theory of empathy, describes the choices made in the design stage and comment on first results obtained during the alpha testing.

  9. Feasibility, design and conduct of a pragmatic randomized controlled trial to reduce overweight and obesity in children: The electronic games to aid motivation to exercise (eGAME study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodgers Anthony

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions in developed countries. Sedentary screen-based activities such as video gaming are thought to displace active behaviors and are independently associated with obesity. Active video games, where players physically interact with images onscreen, may have utility as a novel intervention to increase physical activity and improve body composition in children. The aim of the Electronic Games to Aid Motivation to Exercise (eGAME study is to determine the effects of an active video game intervention over 6 months on: body mass index (BMI, percent body fat, waist circumference, cardio-respiratory fitness, and physical activity levels in overweight children. Methods/Design Three hundred and thirty participants aged 10–14 years will be randomized to receive either an active video game upgrade package or to a control group (no intervention. Discussion An overview of the eGAME study is presented, providing an example of a large, pragmatic randomized controlled trial in a community setting. Reflection is offered on key issues encountered during the course of the study. In particular, investigation into the feasibility of the proposed intervention, as well as robust testing of proposed study procedures is a critical step prior to implementation of a large-scale trial. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12607000632493

  10. “Cinema! : a proposition on how to design and position the game in the digital boardgame market”

    OpenAIRE

    Leite, Lourenço de Simões Pinto

    2017-01-01

    This master thesis evaluates the potential of a new product, a Digital Boardgame named Cinema!. The main objective of this study is to design and position the game in the Digital Boardgame market. The dissertation defines Cinema! relevant market, presents its main competitors, specifies its competitive advantages, proposes a segmentation and targeting strategies and, finally, suggests a go-to-market plan. The methodology included the development of interviews and an online q...

  11. GOLIAH: A gaming platform for home based intervention in Autism - Principles and Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eBono

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Meeting the required intensive intervention hour for treating children with autism is challenging in terms of trained manpower needed and costs. Advances in Information Communication Technology and computer gaming may help in this respect by creating a nomadically deployable closed loop intervention system involving the child and active participation of parents and therapists.An automated serious gaming platform enabling intensive intervention in nomadic settings has been developed by mapping two pivotal skills in autism spectrum disorder: Imitation and Joint Attention (JA. Eleven games – seven Imitation and four JA – were derived from the Early Start Denver Model. The games involved application of visual and audio stimuli with multiple difficulty levels and a wide variety of tasks and actions pertaining to the Imitation and JA. The platform runs on mobile devices and allows the therapist to (1 characterize the child’s initial difficulties/strengths, ensuring tailored and adapted intervention by choosing appropriate games and (2 investigate and track the temporal evolution of the child’s progress through a set of automatically extracted quantitative performance metrics. The platform allows the therapist to change the game or its difficulty levels during the intervention depending on the child’s progress. Performance of the platform was assessed in a 3-month open trial with 10 children with autism. The children and the parents participated in 80% of the sessions both at home (77.5% and at hospital (90%. All children went through all games but, given the diversity of the games and the heterogeneity of children profiles and abilities, for a given game the number of sessions dedicated to the game varied and could be tailored through automatic scoring. Parents (N = 10 highlighted enhancement in the child’s concentration, flexibility and self-esteem in 78%, 89% and 44% of the cases respectively and 56% observed an enhanced parents

  12. What games do

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Jari Due; Jessen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    When interacting with computer games, users are forced to follow the rules of the game in return of the excitement, joy, fun, or other pursued experiences. In this paper, we investigate how games achieve these experiences in the perspective of Actor Network Theory (ANT). Based on a qualitative...... study we conclude that both board games and computer games are actors that produce experiences by exercising power over the user’s abilities, for example their cognitive functions. Games are designed to take advantage of the characteristics of the human players....

  13. Dance-Based ExerGaming: User Experience Design Implications for Maximizing Health Benefits Based on Exercise Intensity and Perceived Enjoyment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thin, Alasdair G.; Poole, Nicola

    Dance is a form of exercise that is considered to have widespread popular appeal and in particular to adolescent females. Dance-based body-movement controlled video games are a popular form of ExerGaming that is being adopted for use in school-based physical activity health promotion programs. The results of this study indicate that the game play mechanics and skill demands of the dance-based ExerGames would appear to have limited the subjects' level of physical exertion over the period of study. After training there was an increase in enjoyment rating for the Step Aerobics game which appears related to a perceptible improvement in game performance. It is therefore recommended that ExerGames should be designed with very low initial skill demands in order to maximize the user's level of exertion and to realize and reward progress, thereby helping to promote an enjoyable exercise experience and counterbalance any sense of exertional discomfort. Keywords: exercise; health promotion; exergaming; user experience; design; video game; enjoyment.

  14. Playful Sounds From The Classroom: What Can Designers of Digital Music Games Learn From Formal Educators?

    OpenAIRE

    Duysburgh, Pieter; Slegers, Karin; Mouws, Karen; Nouwen, Marije

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, formal music education is seen as a starting point to understand how digital music games can further innovate to heighten their educational potential. In the paper, seven opportunities for innovation of digital music games are presented. These are the result of observations of music lessons, and interviews and stimulated recall sessions with music educators. During the data analysis, the researchers looked at the strategies used by the educators and compared these to an overvie...

  15. User-Centered Design of a Controller-Free Game for Hand Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proffitt, Rachel; Sevick, Marisa; Chang, Chien-Yen; Lange, Belinda

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a hand therapy game using the Microsoft (Redmond, WA) Kinect(®) sensor with a customized videogame. Using the Microsoft Kinect sensor as an input device, a customized game for hand rehabilitation was developed that required players to perform various gestures to accomplish a virtual cooking task. Over the course of two iterative sessions, 11 participants with different levels of wrist, hand, and finger injuries interacted with the game in a single session, and user perspectives and feedback were obtained via a questionnaire and semistructured interviews. Participants reported high levels of enjoyment, specifically related to the challenging nature of the game and the visuals. Participant feedback from the first iterative round of testing was incorporated to produce a second prototype for the second round of testing. Additionally, participants expressed the desire to have the game adapt and be customized to their unique hand therapy needs. The game tested in this study has the potential to be a unique and cutting edge method for the delivery of hand rehabilitation for a diverse population.

  16. Using gaming to help nursing students understand ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Barbara L; Yankou, Dawn

    2003-05-01

    The authors developed an ethics game that uses specially designed ethical situations for students to consider. Two students argue a course of action based on the scenario and defend that action using content discussed in class. Substantive issues include decision-making models, values as they pertain to the situation, professional responsibilities, ethical principles, social expectations, and legal requirements. Points are awarded based on how compelling each argument is. All students have an opportunity to participate. The benefits of using the game are that students gain confidence in their ability to defend an ethical decision, are able to see ethical situations from more than one perspective, and have an opportunity to clarify values. In addition, ethical principles and decision-making models are brought to life in a fun way. Difficulties involved in using the game include class size and limited time between the students learning course content and using it in the game.

  17. Games of Rapport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Sandra J.

    1980-01-01

    Board games called Games of Rapport are being developed at the University of Alberta. The first, "Angels and Devils," is designed for play by nursing home residents. Results of a study involving "Angels and Devils" show that board games are useful in communicating rehabilitative objectives and sources of conflict. (Author/BEF)

  18. Gaming: An Emergent Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    This personal narrative traces the background of instructional gaming from 1958 to 1995. The advantages and disadvantages of gaming as a disciplined activity are considered. The evolution of professional organizations, related academic activity, the game design process, and the need for consistent use of terms are addressed. Contains 57…

  19. Sender-Receiver Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, R.J.A.P.; Potters, J.A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Standard game-theoretic solution concepts do not guarantee meaningful commu- nication in cheap-talk games. In this paper, we define a solution concept which guarantees communication for a large class of games by designing a behavior pro- tocol which the receiver uses to judge messages sent by the

  20. Assessment of the usefulness and appeal of stigma-stop by psychology students: a serious game designed to reduce the stigma of mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo J. Cangas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the first serious game designed to reduce the stigma among students towards mental health problems. The game is called Stigma-Stop, and it features characters who suffer from various mental disorders. Players are provided with information about different mental illnesses, and they are presented with several options on how to act when they encounter characters with these problems. In addition, the game questions the participants as to whether they have ever felt like the individuals portrayed in the game, with the goal of fostering empathy for those that suffer from these types of disorders. Stigma-Stop was applied to a sample of second-year university Psychology students to evaluate the game’s usefulness and appeal. The results demonstrate the importance of this game and that these students consider it to be highly useful. The most notable characteristics are described in depth in the present paper.