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Sample records for improving pediatric asthma

  1. Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Asthma (Pediatric) Asthma (Pediatric) Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... meet the rising demand for asthma care. Our pediatric asthma team brings together physicians, nurses, dietitians, physical ...

  2. Use of inhaled corticosteroids in pediatric asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    1997-01-01

    to normal when introduced for moderately severe asthma. This finding highlights the need to improve treatment strategy in pediatric asthma. The natural progression of persistent asthma may lead to loss of lung function and chronic bronchial hyperreactivity for children and adults. There is evidence...

  3. Mechanisms Mediating Pediatric Severe Asthma and Potential Novel Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldara Martin Alonso

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although a rare disease, severe therapy-resistant asthma in children is a cause of significant morbidity and results in utilization of approximately 50% of health-care resources for asthma. Improving control for children with severe asthma is, therefore, an urgent unmet clinical need. As a group, children with severe asthma have severe and multiple allergies, steroid resistant airway eosinophilia, and significant structural changes of the airway wall (airway remodeling. Omalizumab is currently the only add-on therapy that is licensed for use in children with severe asthma. However, limitations of its use include ineligibility for approximately one-third of patients because of serum IgE levels outside the recommended range and lack of clinical efficacy in a further one-third. Pediatric severe asthma is thus markedly heterogeneous, but our current understanding of the different mechanisms underpinning various phenotypes is very limited. We know that there are distinctions between the factors that drive pediatric and adult disease since pediatric disease develops in the context of a maturing immune system and during lung growth and development. This review summarizes the current data that give insight into the pathophysiology of pediatric severe asthma and will highlight potential targets for novel therapies. It is apparent that in order to identify novel treatments for pediatric severe asthma, the challenge of undertaking mechanistic studies using age appropriate experimental models and airway samples from children needs to be accepted to allow a targeted approach of personalized medicine to be achieved.

  4. Rising utilization of inpatient pediatric asthma pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Sunitha V; Rodean, Jonathan; Bekmezian, Arpi; Hall, Matt; Shah, Samir S; Mahant, Sanjay; Parikh, Kavita; Morse, Rustin; Puls, Henry; Cabana, Michael D

    2018-02-01

    Clinical pathways are detailed care plans that operationalize evidence-based guidelines into an accessible format for health providers. Their goal is to link evidence to practice to optimize patient outcomes and delivery efficiency. It is unknown to what extent inpatient pediatric asthma pathways are being utilized nationally. (1) Describe inpatient pediatric asthma pathway design and implementation across a large hospital network. (2) Compare characteristics of hospitals with and without pathways. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional, survey study of hospitals in the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings Network (75% children's hospitals, 25% community hospitals). Our survey determined if each hospital used a pathway and pathway characteristics (e.g. pathway elements, implementation methods). Hospitals with and without pathways were compared using Chi-square tests (categorical variables) and Student's t-tests (continuous variables). Surveys were distributed to 3-5 potential participants from each hospital and 302 (74%) participants responded, representing 86% (106/123) of surveyed hospitals. From 2005-2015, the proportion of hospitals utilizing inpatient asthma pathways increased from 27% to 86%. We found variation in pathway elements, implementation strategies, electronic medical record integration, and compliance monitoring across hospitals. Hospitals with pathways had larger inpatient pediatric programs [mean 12.1 versus 6.1 full-time equivalents, p = 0.04] and were more commonly free-standing children's hospitals (52% versus 23%, p = 0.05). From 2005-2015, there was a dramatic rise in implementation of inpatient pediatric asthma pathways. We found variation in many aspects of pathway design and implementation. Future studies should determine optimal implementation strategies to better support hospital-level efforts in improving pediatric asthma care and outcomes.

  5. Pediatric Obesity-Related Asthma: The Role of Metabolic Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakanthi, Nandini; Greally, John M; Rastogi, Deepa

    2016-05-01

    The burden of obesity-related asthma among children, particularly among ethnic minorities, necessitates an improved understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms. Although obesity is an independent risk factor for asthma, not all obese children develop asthma. Several recent studies have elucidated mechanisms, including the role of diet, sedentary lifestyle, mechanical fat load, and adiposity-mediated inflammation that may underlie the obese asthma pathophysiology. Here, we review these recent studies and emerging scientific evidence that suggest metabolic dysregulation may play a role in pediatric obesity-related asthma. We also review the genetic and epigenetic factors that may underlie susceptibility to metabolic dysregulation and associated pulmonary morbidity among children. Lastly, we identify knowledge gaps that need further exploration to better define pathways that will allow development of primary preventive strategies for obesity-related asthma in children. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. A Multi-center Study on Improvement in Life Quality of Pediatric Patients with Asthma via Continuous Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ying; Cao, Junhua; Kan, Ruixue; Liu, Yuping; Zhao, Li; Hu, Ming; Zhang, Xuemei

    2017-11-01

    To analyze and summarize the effect of continuous care on the life quality and control of asthma of pediatric patients with asthma discharged from multiple hospitals. Retrospective analysis was carried out on 172 pediatric patients with asthma aged between 6 and 11 yr old randomly selected from those admitted to five hospitals between January 2014 and December 2015. Among these 172 patients, only 86 (intervention group) received the continuous care between January 2015 and December 2015, while the rest (control group) did not receive from January 2014 and December 2014. After the patients in the intervention group were discharged from the hospital, the ratio of practical forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) to the expected FEV1 at the 12 th month was (90.28±10.35)%, and the ratio of peak expiratory flow to the expected value was (84.24±3.43)%, respectively higher than those [(82.73±8.86)% and (75.80±4.67)%] in the control group. Regarding pediatric asthma quality of life questionnaire (PAQLQ) between the intervention group and the control group, the difference had statistical significance ( Z =-7.254, PContinuous care can improve the pediatric patient's pulmonary function and life quality, and effectively control the asthmatic symptoms.

  7. Economic Burden of Pediatric Asthma: Annual Cost of Disease in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Laleh; Dashti, Raheleh; Pourpak, Zahra; Fazlollahi, Mohammad Reza; Movahedi, Masoud; Chavoshzadeh, Zahra; Soheili, Habib; Bokaie, Saied; Kazemnejad, Anoushiravan; Moin, Mostafa

    2018-02-01

    Asthma is the first cause of children hospitalization and need for emergency and impose high economic burden on the families and governments. We aimed to investigate the economic burden of pediatric asthma and its contribution to family health budget in Iran. Overall, 283 pediatric asthmatic patients, who referred to two tertiary pediatric referral centers in Tehran capital of Iran, included from 2010-2012. Direct and indirect asthma-related costs were recorded during one-year period. Data were statistically analyzed for finding association between the costs and factors that affect this cost (demographic variables, tobacco smoke exposure, control status of asthma and asthma concomitant diseases). Ninety-two (32.5%) females and 191(67.5%) males with the age range of 1-16 yr old were included. We found the annual total pediatrics asthma related costs were 367.97±23.06 USD. The highest cost belonged to the medications (69%) and the lowest one to the emergency (2%). We noticed a significant increasing in boys' total costs ( P =0.011), and 7-11 yr old age group ( P =0.018). In addition, we found significant association between total asthma costs and asthma control status ( P =0.011). The presence of an asthmatic child can consume nearly half of the health budget of a family. Our results emphasis on improving asthma management programs, which leads to successful control status of the disease and reduction in economic burden of pediatric asthma.

  8. Epidemiological Pattern and Management of Pediatric Asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    Egypt J Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2008; 6(2): 51-56. 51. Epidemiological Pattern and Management of Pediatric Asthma. Review of Ain Shams Pediatric Hospital Chest Clinic Data. Cairo, Egypt 1995-2004. INTRODUCTION. Bronchial asthma is a major worldwide health problem, which has received increased attention in.

  9. Long-term maintenance of pediatric asthma: focus on budesonide/formoterol inhalation aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter N Huynh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Peter N Huynh1, Lyne G Scott1, Kenny YC Kwong21Division of Allergy-Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Los Angeles County, University of Southern California Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Division of Allergy-Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USAAbstract: Current national and international asthma guidelines recommend treatment of children with asthma towards achieving and maintaining asthma control. These guidelines provide more stringent recommendations to increase therapy for patients with uncontrolled asthma in order to reduce asthma-related morbidity and mortality. Newer combination agents such as budesonide and formoterol have been shown to be safe and effective in treatment of asthma in children. Use of long-term controller agents like this in combination with improved compliance and treatment of co-morbid conditions have been successful in this endeavor. This review discusses control of pediatric asthma with focus on the use of budesonide in combination with formoterol.Keywords: asthma, control, children, budesonide, formoterol, long-term

  10. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  11. Enhancing Pediatric Asthma Care and Nursing Education Through an Academic Practice Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Natasha; Lutenbacher, Melanie; O'Kelley, Ellen; Dietrich, Mary S

    Home environmental assessments and interventions delivered via academic practice partnerships (APP) between clinics and schools of nursing may be a low or no cost delivery model of pediatric asthma care and professional education. Patients receive enhanced clinical resources that can improve self-management and healthcare utilization. Additionally, students can practice chronic disease management skills in actual patient encounters. To describe outcomes of the implementation of an APP between a school of nursing and a pediatric asthma specialty clinic (PASC) to deliver a home visit program (HVP). The HVP was designed to reduce emergency department visits and asthma related hospitalizations in PASC patients and provide clinical experiences for nursing students. PASC referred patients to the HVP based on their level of asthma control. Students provided an individualized number of home visits to 17 participants over a nine month period. A 12-month pre- and post-HVP comparison of emergency department visits and asthma related hospitalizations was conducted. Additional information was gathered from stakeholders via an online survey, and interviews with APP partners and HVP families. Children had fewer asthma related hospitalizations post HVP. Findings suggest a reduction in exposure to environmental triggers, improved patient and family management of asthma, and increased PASC knowledge of asthma triggers in the home and increased student knowledge and skills related to asthma management. Multiple clinical and educational benefits may be realized through the development of APPs as an infrastructure supporting targeted interventions in home visits to pediatric asthma patients and their families. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Association of an Asthma Improvement Collaborative With Health Care Utilization in Medicaid-Insured Pediatric Patients in an Urban Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kercsmar, Carolyn M; Beck, Andrew F; Sauers-Ford, Hadley; Simmons, Jeffrey; Wiener, Brandy; Crosby, Lisa; Wade-Murphy, Susan; Schoettker, Pamela J; Chundi, Pavan K; Samaan, Zeina; Mansour, Mona

    2017-11-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic condition of childhood. Hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits for asthma are more frequently experienced by minority children and adolescents and those with low socioeconomic status. To reduce asthma-related hospitalizations and ED visits for Medicaid-insured pediatric patients residing in Hamilton County, Ohio. From January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2015, a multidisciplinary team used quality-improvement methods and the chronic care model to conduct interventions in inpatient, outpatient, and community settings in a large, urban academic pediatric hospital in Hamilton County, Ohio. Children and adolescents aged 2 to 17 years who resided in Hamilton County, had a diagnosis of asthma, and were Medicaid insured were studied. Interventions were implemented in 3 phases: hospital-based inpatient care redesign, outpatient-based care enhancements, and community-based supports. Plan-do-study-act cycles allowed for small-scale implementation of change concepts and rapid evaluation of how such tests affected processes and outcomes of interest. The study measured asthma-related hospitalizations and ED visits per 10 000 Medicaid-insured pediatric patients. Data were measured monthly on a rolling 12-month mean basis. Data from multiple previous years were used to establish a baseline. Data were tracked with annotated control charts and with interrupted time-series analysis. Of the estimated 36 000 children and adolescents with asthma in Hamilton County (approximately 13 000 of whom are Medicaid insured and 6000 of whom are cared for in Cincinnati Children's Hospital primary care practices), asthma-related hospitalizations decreased from 8.1 (95% CI, 7.7-8.5) to 4.7 (95% CI, 4.3-5.1) per 10 000 Medicaid patients per month by June 30, 2014, a 41.8% (95% CI, 41.7%-42.0%) relative reduction. Emergency department visits decreased from 21.5 (95% CI, 20.6-22.3) to 12.4 (95% CI, 11.5-13.2) per 10 000 Medicaid patients per

  13. Pediatric Asthma Care Coordination in Underserved Communities: A Quasiexperimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janevic, Mary R; Stoll, Shelley; Wilkin, Margaret; Song, Peter X K; Baptist, Alan; Lara, Marielena; Ramos-Valencia, Gilberto; Bryant-Stephens, Tyra; Persky, Victoria; Uyeda, Kimberly; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Wang, Wen; Malveaux, Floyd J

    2016-11-01

    To assess the effect of care coordination on asthma outcomes among children in underserved urban communities. We enrolled children, most of whom had very poorly or not well-controlled asthma, in medical-social care coordination programs in Los Angeles, California; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and San Juan, Puerto Rico in 2011 to 2014. Participants (n = 805; mean age = 7 years) were 60% male, 50% African American, and 42% Latino. We assessed asthma symptoms and health care utilization via parent interview at baseline and 12 months. To prevent overestimation of intervention effects, we constructed a comparison group using bootstrap resampling of matched control cases from previous pediatric asthma trials. At follow-up, intervention participants had 2.2 fewer symptom days per month (SD = 0.3; P < .01) and 1.9 fewer symptom nights per month (SD = 0.35; P < .01) than did the comparison group. The relative risk in the past year associated with the intervention was 0.63 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.45, 0.89) for an emergency department visit and 0.69 (95% CI = 0.47, 1.01) for hospitalization. Care coordination may improve pediatric asthma symptom control and reduce emergency department visits. Expanding third-party reimbursement for care coordination services may help reduce pediatric asthma disparities.

  14. The Impact of Relaxation and Hypnosis on Medical Resources Utilization in Pediatric Asthma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barber, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    .... The estimated economic impact of asthma in the United States exceeds $6.2 billion. Behavioral interventions have been shown to improve the management of pediatric asthma, as well as reduce the utilization of medical resources...

  15. Illness Experience, Self-Determination, and Recreational Activities in Pediatric Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Peter M; Crane, Ian; Manning, Sarah Waterman

    2017-06-01

    Although asthma self-management depends on ongoing and accurate self-assessment by the patient, pediatric asthma patients have weak skills in the area of symptom perception. Before developing an asthma game targeted to improving asthma self-management and improved symptom awareness, we sought to identify gaps in existing games. To clarify the role of relatedness and autonomy in asthma health game design, we investigated symptom awareness, vocabulary, and self-determination through a series of semi-structured interviews with children suffering from asthma. Using self-determination theory as a framework, interviews were oriented to patients' illness experience and vocabulary related to symptomatology, as well as to recreational activities. Formative analysis of the interviews reveals attitudes, perceptions, and motivational factors arising in the context of childhood asthma, and it elucidates the images and vocabulary associated with both illness experience and recreational activities. Qualitative assessment of patient perspectives leads to specific recommendations for game design ideas that will support market entry of a spirometer-controlled game for children with asthma.

  16. A snapshot of pharmacist attitudes and behaviors surrounding the management of pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaro, Amanda; Shah, Smita; Armour, Carol L; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the current status of pediatric asthma management in the Australian community pharmacy setting from the pharmacists' perspective. This research will allow us to identify training needs of community pharmacists. Pharmacists were recruited from the Sydney metropolitan region and asked to complete a self-reported questionnaire that elucidated information on four general domains relating to pediatric asthma management within community pharmacy. All data collected were analysed descriptively. Bivariate Pearson correlations were performed to determine whether interrelationships existed between specific domains. All 77 pharmacists completed the questionnaire. Thirty-two percent had not completed any asthma related CPD in the past year and only 25% of pharmacists reported using the national asthma guidelines in practice. Just over half of the pharmacists (54%) reported that they provide device technique demonstrations for new inhaled medicines, and 35% of pharmacists reported that they check for written asthma self-management plan possession. Although 65% of pharmacists reported confidence in communication skills, most pharmacists were not confident in setting short-/long-term goals with the patient and carer for managing asthma at home. Pharmacists believed that they are just as effective as doctors in providing asthma counseling and education. Lack of time was identified as a significant barrier. We have identified a gap between guideline recommended practices and the self-reported practices of community pharmacists. Pharmacists need more appropriate continuing education programs that can translate into improved pediatric asthma self-management practices and thus improved asthma outcomes in children. This may require an alternative approach.

  17. Does specialist physician supply affect pediatric asthma health outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filler, Guido; Kovesi, Tom; Bourdon, Erik; Jones, Sarah Ann; Givelichian, Laurentiu; Rockman-Greenberg, Cheryl; Gilliland, Jason; Williams, Marion; Orrbine, Elaine; Piedboeuf, Bruno

    2018-04-05

    Pediatrician and pediatric subspecialist density varies substantially among the various Canadian provinces, as well as among various states in the US. It is unknown whether this variability impacts health outcomes. To study this knowledge gap, we evaluated pediatric asthma admission rates within the 2 Canadian provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan, which have similarly sized pediatric populations and substantially different physician densities. This was a retrospective cross-sectional cohort study. Health regions defined by the provincial governments, have, in turn, been classified into "peer groups" by Statistics Canada, on the basis of common socio-economic characteristics and socio-demographic determinants of health. To study the relationship between the distribution of the pediatric workforce and health outcomes in Canadian children, asthma admission rates within comparable peer group regions in both provinces were examined by combining multiple national and provincial health databases. We generated physician density maps for general practitioners, and general pediatricians practicing in Manitoba and Saskatchewan in 2011. At the provincial level, Manitoba had 48.6 pediatricians/100,000 child population, compared to 23.5/100,000 in Saskatchewan. There were 3.1 pediatric asthma specialists/100,000 child population in Manitoba and 1.4/100,000 in Saskatchewan. Among peer-group A, the differences were even more striking. A significantly higher number of patients were admitted in Saskatchewan (590.3/100,000 children) compared to Manitoba (309.3/100,000, p < 0.0001). Saskatchewan, which has a lower pediatrician and pediatric asthma specialist supply, had a higher asthma admission rate than Manitoba. Our data suggest that there is an inverse relationship between asthma admissions and pediatrician and asthma specialist supply.

  18. Effects of pediatric asthma care coordination in underserved communities on parent perceptions of care and asthma-management confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janevic, Mary R; Baptist, Alan P; Bryant-Stephens, Tyra; Lara, Marielena; Persky, Victoria; Ramos-Valencia, Gilberto; Uyeda, Kimberly; Hazan, Rebecca; Garrity, Ashley; Malveaux, Floyd J

    2017-06-01

    Disparities by race and socioeconomic status persist in pediatric asthma morbidity, mortality, and treatment. Improving parent/provider communication and parents' asthma-management confidence may result in better asthma control in vulnerable populations. The Merck Childhood Asthma Network, Inc. funded an initiative to implement medical-social care coordination to improve asthma outcomes at sites in four low-income, urban communities (Los Angeles, CA; Philadelphia, PA; Chicago, IL; and San Juan, PR.) As part of a cross-site evaluation of this effort, pre- post-program changes in parents' reports of asthma care and management were assessed. Across sites, 805 parents or other caregivers responded to a baseline survey that was repeated one year later following their child's participation in care coordination. Parents' asthma-management confidence, as well as their perceptions of provider access, trust, and communication, were measured with Likert scales. Linear mixed models were used to assess improvement in these variables, across and within sites, adjusting for sociodemographics. Pooled across sites, the adjusted mean estimate for all outcomes showed a significant improvement (p asthma care coordination, as implemented variously in diverse settings, was associated with improvement in parents' perceptions of asthma care and self-reported asthma-management knowledge and confidence. This positive impact on parents may help sustain care coordination's impact on children.

  19. Benefits and Barriers of Pediatric Healthcare Providers toward Using Social Media in Asthma Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinasek, Mary P.; Panzera, Anthony D.; Schneider, Tali; Lindenberger, James H.; Bryant, Carol A.; McDermott, Robert J.; Couluris, Marisa

    2011-01-01

    Background: Adolescents with asthma are the least compliant age group for asthma management. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore attitudes, beliefs and perceptions of two pediatric physician groups towards using social media technology (SMT) to improve asthma management in adolescents. Methods: We employed in-depth interviews and a…

  20. The case for exploring the usage of employee wellness programs for pediatric asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassal, Mandeep S; Butz, Arlene

    2018-01-18

    The multiple socioecological determinants of asthma mandate that pediatricians develop a treatment strategy beyond the practice-based setting. To expand to a more impactful community-based role, pediatricians must look to form partnerships with groups that are capable of promoting social and environmental change. Traditionally, these groups have included schools, governmental agencies, and child care establishments. One group that is not actively being availed of are employers who have shown success in improving adult-based outcomes through wellness programs. Employers are stakeholders in pediatric asthma care through its impact on reduced worker productivity and higher health insurance premiums. An employer's focus on pediatric asthma will be a collective win for the employer and employee. The article herein describes the rationale for the focus of employers on pediatric asthma care and potential incorporation within employer-based wellness strategies.

  1. Parental asthma education and risks for nonadherence to pediatric asthma treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Eva M; Cho, Christine S; Gildengorin, Ginny; Leibovich, Sara A; Morris, Claudia R

    2014-11-01

    Targeted parental education reduces acute visits for pediatric asthma. Whether the use of education sources readily available to parents relates to nonadherence to asthma treatments is uncertain. This study describes asthma education sources and assesses for a relationship to risks for nonadherence. Caregivers of children with asthma completed a cross-sectional survey at 2 sites: a pediatric emergency department (ED) and an asthma clinic (AC). Measured items included the use of 7 education sources (primary care, ED, AC, friends/family, TV, internet, and printed materials), scores of child asthma morbidity, parental asthma knowledge, and risks for nonadherence, the primary outcome. Recruitment site, preferred language (English/Spanish), and demographics were recorded. Descriptive statistics, bivariate analyses, and multivariate regressions were performed. A total of 260 participants, 158 from ED and 102 from AC, used a variety of education sources. They reported 4.1 (2.0) of 13 risk factors for nonadherence, with more risks in ED parents than AC parents (4.8 vs 3.9, P The ED parents worried more about medications and had worse access to primary care. The regression did not show a significant relationship between education sources and risks for nonadherence, but ED recruitment, Spanish language, and worse morbidity contributed to higher risks. The use of more asthma education sources was not associated with reduced risks for nonadherence. Of the education sources, a primary care provider may benefit ED parents, who also need refills and education about medications. Spanish-speaking parents report more risks for nonadherence, warranting further study of Spanish-language asthma education.

  2. [The utility of the interrupter technique in pediatric asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimura, Akiko; Yoshihara, Shigemi; Arisaka, Osamu

    2002-11-01

    Interrupter respiratory resistance (Rint) is a new lung function test for measuring airway resistance. We investigated the utility of the Rint lung function test in pediatric patients with asthma. Thirty seven asthmatic patients with mild or moderate asthma attack (asthma group) and 9 healthy children (control group) were enrolled in the study, and the utility of the Ring test was compared with that of the PEF lung function test. Rint and PEF were measured after the inhalation of saline or beta(2) stimulant, and the values for the asthma and control groups were compared. The rint and PEF values did not change after the inhalation of saline, but both values improved after the inhalation of beta(2) stimulant in the asthma group. In the control group, the PEF and Rint values measured after saline or beta(2) stimulant were not significantly different. Rint measurements may be more useful than PEF tests for evaluating therapeutic responses to mild asthma attacks in children. These findings suggest that Rint is a useful respiratory function test for evaluating children with asthma.

  3. Advances in pediatric asthma and atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Shabnam; Thyagarajan, Ananth; Stone, Kelly D

    2005-10-01

    Allergic diseases, including asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, food allergy, and urticaria are common in general pediatric practice. This review highlights several significant advances in pediatric allergy over the past year, focusing on asthma and atopic dermatitis. With increasing options for the treatment of allergic diseases, much work is now focused on methods for individualizing treatments to a patient's phenotype and genotype. Progress over the past year includes the characterization of effects of regular albuterol use in patients with genetic variations in the beta-adrenergic receptor. Maintenance asthma regimens for children in the first years of life are also an ongoing focus. The relation between upper airway allergic inflammation and asthma has continued to accumulate support and now extends to the middle ear. Environmental influences on asthma and interventions have been described, including environmental controls for asthma and the role of air pollution on lung development in children. Finally, concerns have been raised regarding the use of topical immunomodulators in young children with atopic dermatitis. Progress continues in the care of children with atopic diseases. Attention to treatment with appropriate medications, patient-individualized environmental controls, and extensive education are the keys to successfully treating atopic children. This review highlights several recent advances but is not intended to be a comprehensive review.

  4. Child maltreatment and pediatric asthma: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Hannah M C; Chen, Edith; Miller, Gregory E

    2016-01-01

    Child maltreatment is a common problem with known adverse consequences, yet its contributions to the development and course of pediatric asthma are only poorly understood. This review first describes possible pathways connecting child maltreatment to pediatric asthma, including aspects of the physical home environment, health behaviors and disease management, and psychological consequences of child maltreatment. We subsequently review existing studies, which generally report an association between maltreatment experiences and asthma outcomes in childhood. However, this literature is in its early stages; there are only a handful studies, most of them rely on self-reports of both child maltreatment and asthma history, and none have investigated the physiological underpinnings of this association. Taken together, however, the studies are suggestive of child maltreatment playing a role in pediatric asthma incidence and expression that should be explored further. Existing data are sparse and do not allow for specific conclusions. However, the data are suggestive of child maltreatment influencing asthma risk and morbidity long before the adult years. Future research should focus on understanding how child maltreatment contributes to asthma disease risk and progression in this highly vulnerable population.

  5. Racial Disparities in Asthma Morbidity Among Pediatric Patients Seeking Asthma Specialist Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Stephanie J; Bilderback, Andrew L; Okelo, Sande O

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate whether there may be a higher morbidity threshold for African American versus white children to be referred to or seek asthma specialist care. Secondary analysis of registry data captured from children presenting for an initial routine outpatient asthma consultation. Parents completed standard survey instruments, and spirometry was conducted when deemed appropriate by the provider. Wilcoxon rank sum tests revealed that African American patients had been hospitalized twice as often and admitted to the intensive care unit or intubated significantly more than 1½ times more frequently than their white patient counterparts. t tests indicated African American patients' forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) percentage predicted was significantly worse than that of whites, but there was no significant difference for FEV1/forced vital capacity ratio. t tests suggested that African American patients had statistically worse asthma control than did white patients at the time of initial presentation to the pulmonologist, but there was no difference in the distribution of asthma severity categories. Multivariate regression models indicated that racial differences in parent education did not explain the disparities in asthma morbidity. African American patients had significantly worse asthma morbidity than their white counterparts, including higher rates of hospitalization and intensive care unit admission and poorer lung functioning. Given that receipt of asthma specialist care can improve those outcomes that are disparately experienced by African American children, methods of increasing their access to and use of asthma specialist care need to be developed. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Short or Long End of the Lever? Associations between Provider Communication of the "Asthma-Action Plan" and Outpatient Revisits for Pediatric Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, Pavani; Mehta, Renuka; Rethemeyer, R Karl; Ferrang, Carole; Dennis, Clifton; Redd, Vickie

    2015-10-01

    At the Children's Hospital of Georgia (CHOG), we found that outpatient revisits for pediatric asthma were significantly above national norms. According to the NIH, costly hospital revisits for asthma can be prevented through guidelines-based self-management of asthma, central to which, is the use of a written Asthma-Action Plan (AAP). The asthma services literature has emphasized the role of the healthcare provider in promoting asthma self-management using the AAP, to prevent hospital revisits. On the other hand, the asthma policy literature has emphasized the need for community-based interventions to promote asthma self-management. A gap remains in understanding the extent of leverage that healthcare providers may have in preventing hospital revisits for asthma, through effective communication of AAP in the outpatient setting. Our study sought to address this gap. We conducted a 6-month intervention to implement "patient-and-family-centered communication of the AAP" in CHOG outpatient clinics, based on the "change-management" theoretical framework. Provider communication of AAP was assessed through a survey of "Parent Understanding of the Child's AAP." A quasi-experimental approach was used to measure outpatient revisits for pediatric asthma, pre- and post-intervention. Survey results showed that provider communication of the AAP was unanimously perceived highly positively by parents of pediatric asthma patients, across various metrics of patient-centered care. However, there were no statistically significant differences in outpatient "revisit behavior" for pediatric asthma between pre- and post-intervention periods after controlling for several demographic variables. Additionally, revisits remained significantly above national norms. Results suggest limited potential of "effective provider communication of AAP," in reducing outpatient revisits for pediatric asthma; and indicate need for broader community-based interventions to address patient life variables

  7. Child maltreatment and pediatric asthma: a review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Schreier, Hannah M. C.; Chen, Edith; Miller, Gregory E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Child maltreatment is a common problem with known adverse consequences, yet its contributions to the development and course of pediatric asthma are only poorly understood. Main This review first describes possible pathways connecting child maltreatment to pediatric asthma, including aspects of the physical home environment, health behaviors and disease management, and psychological consequences of child maltreatment. We subsequently review existing studies, which generally report a...

  8. Pediatric asthma and ambient pollutant levels in industrializing nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassal, Mandeep S

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood and its prevalence has been increasing within industrializing nations. The contribution of ambient pollutants to asthma symptomatology has been explored in some countries through epidemiological investigations, molecular analysis and monitoring functional outcomes. The health effects of rising environmental pollution have been of increasing concern in industrializing nations with rising urbanization patterns. This review article provides an overview of the link between pediatric asthma and exposure to rising sources of urban air pollution. It primarily focuses on the asthma-specific effects of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone and particulate matter. Worldwide trends of asthma prevalence are also provided which detail the prominent rise in asthma symptoms in many urban areas of Africa, Latin America and Asia. The molecular and functional correlation of ambient pollutants with asthma-specific airway inflammation in the pediatric population are also highlighted. The final aspect of the review considers the correlation of motor vehicle, industrial and cooking energy sources, ascribed as the major emitters among the pollutants in urban settings, with asthma epidemiology in children. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Leukotriene modifiers in pediatric asthma management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    -acting beta-agonists as complementary treatment to inhaled corticosteroids in pediatric asthma management because they provide bronchodilation and bronchoprotection without development of tolerance, and complement the antiinflammatory activity unchecked by steroids. In addition, the Cys-LTRA montelukast has...

  10. A cost-effectiveness threshold analysis of a multidisciplinary structured educational intervention in pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Sossa-Briceño, Monica P; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A

    2018-05-01

    Asthma educational interventions have been shown to improve several clinically and economically important outcomes. However, these interventions are costly in themselves and could lead to even higher disease costs. A cost-effectiveness threshold analysis would be helpful in determining the threshold value of the cost of educational interventions, leading to these interventions being cost-effective. The aim of the present study was to perform a cost-effectiveness threshold analysis to determine the level at which the cost of a pediatric asthma educational intervention would be cost-effective and cost-saving. A Markov-type model was developed in order to estimate costs and health outcomes of a simulated cohort of pediatric patients with persistent asthma treated over a 12-month period. Effectiveness parameters were obtained from a single uncontrolled before-and-after study performed with Colombian asthmatic children. Cost data were obtained from official databases provided by the Colombian Ministry of Health. The main outcome was the variable "quality-adjusted life-years" (QALYs). A deterministic threshold sensitivity analysis showed that the asthma educational intervention will be cost-saving to the health system if its cost is under US$513.20. Additionally, the analysis showed that the cost of the intervention would have to be below US$967.40 in order to be cost-effective. This study identified the level at which the cost of a pediatric asthma educational intervention will be cost-effective and cost-saving for the health system in Colombia. Our findings could be a useful aid for decision makers in efficiently allocating limited resources when planning asthma educational interventions for pediatric patients.

  11. Short or Long End of the Lever? Associations between Provider Communication of the “Asthma-Action Plan” and Outpatient Revisits for Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, Pavani; Mehta, Renuka; Rethemeyer, R. Karl; Ferrang, Carole; Dennis, Clifton; Redd, Vickie

    2017-01-01

    Background At the Children’s Hospital of Georgia (CHOG), we found that outpatient revisits for pediatric asthma were significantly above national norms. According to the NIH, costly hospital revisits for asthma can be prevented through guidelines-based self-management of asthma, central to which, is the use of a written Asthma-Action Plan (AAP). Purpose The asthma services literature has emphasized the role of the healthcare provider in promoting asthma self-management using the AAP, to prevent hospital revisits. On the other hand, the asthma policy literature has emphasized the need for community-based interventions to promote asthma self-management. A gap remains in understanding the extent of leverage that healthcare providers may have in preventing hospital revisits for asthma, through effective communication of AAP in the outpatient setting. Our study sought to address this gap. Methods We conducted a 6-month intervention to implement “patient-and-family-centered communication of the AAP” in CHOG outpatient clinics, based on the “change-management” theoretical framework. Provider communication of AAP was assessed through a survey of “Parent Understanding of the Child’s AAP.” A quasi-experimental approach was used to measure outpatient revisits for pediatric asthma, pre- and post-intervention. Results Survey results showed that provider communication of the AAP was unanimously perceived highly positively by parents of pediatric asthma patients, across various metrics of patient-centered care. However, there were no statistically significant differences in outpatient “revisit behavior” for pediatric asthma between pre- and post-intervention periods after controlling for several demographic variables. Additionally, revisits remained significantly above national norms. Conclusions Results suggest limited potential of “effective provider communication of AAP,” in reducing outpatient revisits for pediatric asthma; and indicate need for

  12. Effectiveness of the Spirometry 360 Quality Improvement Program for Improving Asthma Care: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione-Smith, Rita; Zhou, Chuan; Corwin, Michael J; Taylor, James A; Rice, Fiona; Stout, James W

    To determine the effectiveness of the Spirometry 360 distance learning quality improvement (QI) program for enhancing the processes and outcomes of care for children with asthma. Cluster randomized controlled trial involving 25 matched pairs of pediatric primary care practices. Practices were recruited from 2 practice-based research networks: the Slone Center Office-based Research Network at Boston University, Boston, Mass, and the Puget Sound Pediatric Research Network, Seattle, Wash. Study participants included providers from one of the 50 enrolled pediatric practices and 626 of their patients with asthma. Process measures assessed included spirometry test quality and appropriate prescription of asthma controller medications. Outcome measures included asthma-specific health-related quality of life, and outpatient, emergency department, and inpatient utilization for asthma. At baseline, 25.4% of spirometry tests performed in control practices and 50.4% of tests performed in intervention practices were of high quality. During the 6-month postintervention period, 28.7% of spirometry tests performed in control practices and 49.9% of tests performed in intervention practices were of high quality. The adjusted difference-of-differences analysis revealed no intervention effect on spirometry test quality. Adjusted differences-of-differences analysis also revealed no intervention effect on appropriate use of controller medications or any of the parent- or patient-reported outcomes examined. In this study, the Spirometry 360 distance learning QI program was ineffective in improving spirometry test quality or parent- or patient-reported outcomes. QI programs like the one assessed here may need to focus on practices with lower baseline performance levels or may need to be tailored for those with higher baseline performance. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Wireless Sensor-Dependent Ecological Momentary Assessment for Pediatric Asthma mHealth Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonocore, Chris M; Rocchio, Rosemary A; Roman, Alfonso; King, Christine E; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2017-07-01

    Pediatric asthma is a prevalent chronic disease condition that can benefit from wireless health systems through constant symptom management. In this paper, we propose a smart watch based wireless health system that incorporates wireless sensing and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to determine an individual's asthma symptoms. Since asthma is a multifaceted disease, this approach provides individualized symptom assessments through various physiological and environmental wireless sensor based EMA triggers specific to common asthma exacerbations. Furthermore, the approach described here improves compliance to use of the system through insightful EMA scheduling related to sensor detected environmental and physiological changes, as well as the patient's own schedule. After testing under several real world conditions, it was found that the system is sensitive to both physiological and environmental conditions that would cause asthma symptoms. Furthermore, the EMA questionnaires that were triggered based on these changes were specific to the asthma trigger itself, allowing for invaluable context behind the data to be collected.

  14. Integrating Environmental Management of Asthma into Pediatric Health Care: What Worked and What Still Needs Improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James R; Newman, Nicholas; McCurdy, Leyla E; Chang, Jane S; Salas, Mauro A; Eskridge, Bernard; De Ybarrondo, Lisa; Sandel, Megan; Mazur, Lynnette; Karr, Catherine J

    2016-12-01

    The National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF) launched an initiative in 2005 to integrate environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This study, a follow-up to a 2013 study, evaluated the program's impact and assessed training results by 5 new faculty champions. We surveyed attendees at training sessions to measure knowledge and the likelihood of asking about and managing environmental triggers of asthma. To conduct the program evaluation, a workshop was held with the faculty champions and NEEF staff in which we identified major program benefits, as well as challenges and suggestions for the future. Trainee baseline knowledge of environmental triggers was low, but they reported robust improvement in environmental triggers knowledge and intention to recommend environmental management. The program has a broad, national scope, reaching more than 12 000 physicians, health care providers, and students, and some faculty champions successfully integrated materials into health record. Program barriers and future endeavors were identified.

  15. Validation of parental reports of asthma trajectory, burden, and risk by using the pediatric asthma control and communication instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okelo, Sande O; Eakin, Michelle N; Riekert, Kristin A; Teodoro, Alvin P; Bilderback, Andrew L; Thompson, Darcy A; Loiaza-Martinez, Antonio; Rand, Cynthia S; Thyne, Shannon; Diette, Gregory B; Patino, Cecilia M

    2014-01-01

    Despite a growing interest, few pediatric asthma questionnaires assess multiple dimensions of asthma morbidity, as recommended by national asthma guidelines, or use patient-reported outcomes. To evaluate a questionnaire that measures multiple dimensions of parent-reported asthma morbidity (Direction, Bother, and Risk). We administered the Pediatric Asthma Control and Communication Instrument (PACCI) and assessed asthma control (PACCI Control), quality of life, and lung function among children who presented for routine asthma care. The PACCI was evaluated for discriminative validity. A total of 317 children participated (mean age, 8.2 years; 58% boys; 44% African American). As parent-reported PACCI Direction changed from "better" to "worse," we observed poorer asthma control (P < .001), mean Pediatric Asthma Caregiver Quality of Life Questionnaire (PACQLQ) scores (P < .001), and FEV1% (P = .025). Linear regression showed that, for each change in PACCI Direction, the mean PACQLQ score decreased by -0.6 (95% CI, -0.8 to -0.4). As parent-reported PACCI Bother changed from "not bothered" to "very bothered," we observed poorer asthma control (P < .001) and lower mean PACQLQ scores (P < .001). Linear regression showed that, for each change in PACCI Bother category, the mean PACQLQ score decreased by -1.1 (95% CI, -1.3 to -0.9). Any reported PACCI Risk event (emergency department visit, hospitalization, or use of an oral corticosteroid) was associated with poorer asthma control (P < .05) and PACQLQ scores (P < .01). PACCI Direction, Bother, and Risk are valid measures of parent-reported outcomes and show good discriminative validity. The PACCI is a simple clinical tool to assess multiple dimensions of parent-reported asthma morbidity, in addition to risk and control. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Communication during pediatric asthma visits and child asthma medication device technique 1 month later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleath, Betsy; Carpenter, Delesha M; Ayala, Guadalupe X; Williams, Dennis; Davis, Stephanie; Tudor, Gail; Yeatts, Karin; Gillette, Chris

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated how provider demonstration of and assessment of child use of asthma medication devices and certain aspects of provider-patient communication during medical visits is associated with device technique 1 month later. Two hundred and ninety-six children aged 8-16 years with persistent asthma and their caregivers were recruited at five North Carolina pediatric practices. All of the medical visits were audio-tape recorded. Children were interviewed 1 month later and their device technique was observed and rated. If the provider asked the child to demonstrate metered dose inhaler technique during the medical visit, then the child was significantly more likely to perform a greater percentage of inhaler steps correctly 1 month later. Children with higher asthma management self-efficacy scores were significantly more likely to perform a greater percentage of diskus steps correctly. Additionally, children were significantly more likely to perform a greater percentage of diskus steps correctly if the provider discussed a written action plan during the visit. Children were significantly more likely to perform a greater percentage of turbuhaler steps correctly if they asked more medication questions. Providers should ask children to demonstrate their inhaler technique during medical visits so that they can educate children about proper technique and improve child asthma management self-efficacy. Providers should encourage children to ask questions about asthma medication devices during visits and they should discuss asthma action plans with families.

  17. How Often is Chest Radiography Ordered for Patients with Pediatric Asthma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Özmen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although many children with asthma can be diagnosed clinically, chest radiographs are routinely requested in asthma attacks. The aim of this study is to determine how often chest radiographs are requested and the factors affecting these requests in pediatric patients with asthma. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed by studying the electronic radiographic records of pediatric patients with asthma who were referred to our Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Department over a six-month period. A questionnaire was designed to obtain further information from the parents of the patients. Results: The records of 100 children with bronchial asthma, aged 21 to 192 months, were evaluated. The average number of chest radiographs was 3.9±3.8 (between 1-30. Fifty-one percent of the children underwent three or more chest radiographs. There was a positive correlation between the number of chest X-rays before asthma diagnosis and the frequency of antibiotic usage (r=0.222, p=0.026. An inverse correlation was found between the number of chest radiographs and the patients’ ages and the age at which asthma was diagnosed (r=−0.335, p=0.001; r=−0.211, p=0.035, respectively. In contrast, there was a positive correlation between the number of chest X-rays and the number of hospital admissions (r=0.205, p=0.040. A positive correlation between the frequency of antibiotic usage and the annual number of hospital admissions was determined (r=0.428, p=0.000. Furthermore, a positive correlation between the frequency of antibiotic usage and the frequency of asthma attacks was observed (r=0.292, p=0.003. Conclusion: The results of our study show that the use of chest radiographs is high in cases of childhood asthma, especially in younger children.

  18. Family functionality in pediatric asthma patients in a public hospital in Sonora, Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Vázquez Armenta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The family and psychological approaches in asthma patients are essential because a dysfunctional family can increase asthma symptoms of the sick child. Aim: To determine family functioning and classification of asthma in pediatric patients, and the condition in the areas that comprises it. Method: A cross-sectional study in asthmatic patients treated in pediatrics Regional General Hospital No. 1 between April and July 2015 was done. Asthma severity was classified in response to the GINA 2010 guide. The Dr. Emma Espejel Scale of Family Functioning was applied to the patient's family. Results: The male presented more severe asthma by 70%, especially in school age. The dysfunction of the control area of family dynamics in the Mexican family impact on the severity of asthma. Discussion and Conclusion: 50% of families with a carrier member of asthma reflect dysfunction; control area was the most affected. Family and psychological approaches in patients with asthma are basic to prevent changes in family function.

  19. Examining Profiles of Family Functioning in Pediatric Asthma: Longitudinal Associations With Child Adjustment and Asthma Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al G Hriwati, Nour; Winter, Marcia A; Everhart, Robin S

    2017-05-01

    Identify profiles of functioning in families of children with asthma and examine whether profile membership predicts subsequent child mental and physical well-being. Primary caregivers and children ( N  = 1,030) from the Childhood Asthma Management Program completed questionnaires assessing family functioning and child adaptation at five time points. Asthma severity was also assessed via spirometry. Latent profile analyses identified a four-profile solution as best fitting the data: cohesive, permissive, controlling/disengaged, and controlling/enmeshed families. Distal outcome analyses using Bolck-Croon-Hagenaars techniques suggested that children from families that were more cohesive had fewer internalizing and externalizing symptoms. These associations remained stable across time. Family profiles did not differ with regards to child asthma severity. Results highlight the importance of looking beyond the effects of distinct components of family functioning and instead using pattern-based approaches. Recommendations for incorporating screenings and services for families in pediatric care settings are provided. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Auditing Practice Style Variation in Pediatric Inpatient Asthma Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Jeffrey H; Rosenbaum, Paul R; Wang, Wei; Ludwig, Justin M; Calhoun, Shawna; Guevara, James P; Zorc, Joseph J; Zeigler, Ashley; Even-Shoshan, Orit

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic illness among children, remaining a leading cause of pediatric hospitalizations and representing a major financial burden to many health care systems. To implement a new auditing process examining whether differences in hospital practice style may be associated with potential resource savings or inefficiencies in treating pediatric asthma admissions. A retrospective matched-cohort design study, matched for asthma severity, compared practice patterns for patients admitted to Children's Hospital Association hospitals contributing data to the Pediatric Hospital Information System (PHIS) database. With 3 years of PHIS data on 48 887 children, an asthma template was constructed consisting of representative children hospitalized for asthma between April 1, 2011, and March 31, 2014. The template was matched with either a 1:1, 2:1, or 3:1 ratio at each of 37 tertiary care children's hospitals, depending on available sample size. Treatment at each PHIS hospital. Cost, length of stay, and intensive care unit (ICU) utilization. After matching patients (n = 9100; mean [SD] age, 7.1 [3.6] years; 3418 [37.6%] females) to the template (n = 100, mean [SD] age, 7.2 [3.7] years; 37 [37.0%] females), there was no significant difference in observable patient characteristics at the 37 hospitals meeting the matching criteria. Despite similar characteristics of the patients, we observed large and significant variation in use of the ICUs as well as in length of stay and cost. For the same template-matched populations, comparing utilization between the 12.5th percentile (lower eighth) and 87.5th percentile (upper eighth) of hospitals, median cost varied by 87% ($3157 vs $5912 per patient; P audit, hospitals and stakeholders can better understand where this excess variation occurs and can help to pinpoint practice styles that should be emulated or avoided.

  1. Discovering Pediatric Asthma Phenotypes on the Basis of Response to Controller Medication Using Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Mindy K; Yoon, Jinsung; van der Schaar, Auke; van der Schaar, Mihaela

    2018-01-01

    Pediatric asthma has variable underlying inflammation and symptom control. Approaches to addressing this heterogeneity, such as clustering methods to find phenotypes and predict outcomes, have been investigated. However, clustering based on the relationship between treatment and clinical outcome has not been performed, and machine learning approaches for long-term outcome prediction in pediatric asthma have not been studied in depth. Our objectives were to use our novel machine learning algorithm, predictor pursuit (PP), to discover pediatric asthma phenotypes on the basis of asthma control in response to controller medications, to predict longitudinal asthma control among children with asthma, and to identify features associated with asthma control within each discovered pediatric phenotype. We applied PP to the Childhood Asthma Management Program study data (n = 1,019) to discover phenotypes on the basis of asthma control between assigned controller therapy groups (budesonide vs. nedocromil). We confirmed PP's ability to discover phenotypes using the Asthma Clinical Research Network/Childhood Asthma Research and Education network data. We next predicted children's asthma control over time and compared PP's performance with that of traditional prediction methods. Last, we identified clinical features most correlated with asthma control in the discovered phenotypes. Four phenotypes were discovered in both datasets: allergic not obese (A + /O - ), obese not allergic (A - /O + ), allergic and obese (A + /O + ), and not allergic not obese (A - /O - ). Of the children with well-controlled asthma in the Childhood Asthma Management Program dataset, we found more nonobese children treated with budesonide than with nedocromil (P = 0.015) and more obese children treated with nedocromil than with budesonide (P = 0.008). Within the obese group, more A + /O + children's asthma was well controlled with nedocromil than with budesonide (P = 0.022) or with placebo

  2. Pulmonary functions of children with asthma improve following massage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, Mohammed Abdel; Hamdy, Basant

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of massage therapy on the pulmonary functions of stable Egyptian children with asthma. This study was an open, randomized, controlled trial. The study was conducted in pediatric allergy and chest unit of the New Children's Hospital of Cairo University, Egypt. Sixty (60) children with asthma were divided randomly into two equal groups: massage therapy group and control group. Subjects in the massage therapy group received a 20-minute massage therapy by their parents at home before bedtime every night for 5 weeks in addition to the standard asthma treatment. The control group received the standard asthma treatment alone for 5 weeks. Spirometry was performed for all children on the first and last days of the study. Forced expiratory flow in first second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC and peak expiratory flow (PEF) were recorded. At the end of the study, mean FEV1 of the massage therapy group was significantly higher than controls (2.3-0.8 L versus 1.9-0.9 L, p=0.04). There was no significant difference in FVC (2.5-0.8 L versus 2.7-0.7 L, p=0.43). However, FEV1/FVC ratio showed a significant improvement in the massage therapy group (92.3-21.5 versus 69.5-17, pmassage therapy in pediatric asthma is suggested. It improved the key pulmonary functions of the children, namely, FEV1 and FEV1/FVC ratio. However, further research on a larger scale is warranted. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  3. Use of a low-literacy written action plan to improve parent understanding of pediatric asthma management: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hsiang Shonna; Gupta, Ruchi S; Mendelsohn, Alan L; Dreyer, Benard; van Schaick, Linda; Brown, Christina R; Encalada, Karen; Sanchez, Dayana C; Warren, Christopher M; Tomopoulos, Suzy

    2017-11-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether parents who use a low-literacy, pictogram- and photograph-based written asthma action plan (WAAP) have a better understanding of child asthma management compared to parents using a standard plan. A randomized controlled study was carried out in 2 urban pediatric outpatient clinics. Inclusion criteria were English- and Spanish-speaking parents of 2- to 12-year-old asthmatic children. Parents were randomized to receive a low-literacy or standard asthma action plan (American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology) for a hypothetical patient on controller and rescue medications. A structured questionnaire was used to assess whether there was an error in knowledge of (1) medications to give everyday and when sick, (2) need for spacer use, and (3) appropriate emergency response to give albuterol and seek medical help. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed, adjusting for parent age, health literacy (Newest Vital Sign); child asthma severity, medications; and site. 217 parents were randomized (109 intervention and 108 control). Parents who received the low-literacy plan were (1) less likely to make an error in knowledge of medications to take everyday and when sick compared to parents who received the standard plan (63.0 vs. 77.3%, p = 0.03; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.5[95% confidence interval: 0.2-0.9]) and (2) less likely to make an error regarding spacer use (14.0 vs. 51.1%, p plan improves child asthma outcomes.

  4. HIPAA Compliant Wireless Sensing Smartwatch Application for the Self-Management of Pediatric Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Anahita; Buonocore, Chris M; Hashemzadeh, Sepideh; Hojaiji, Hannaneh; Kalantarian, Haik; Sideris, Costas; Bui, Alex A T; King, Christine E; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2016-06-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic disease among pediatrics, as it is the leading cause of student absenteeism and hospitalization for those under the age of 15. To address the significant need to manage this disease in children, the authors present a mobile health (mHealth) system that determines the risk of an asthma attack through physiological and environmental wireless sensors and representational state transfer application program interfaces (RESTful APIs). The data is sent from wireless sensors to a smartwatch application (app) via a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliant cryptography framework, which then sends data to a cloud for real-time analytics. The asthma risk is then sent to the smartwatch and provided to the user via simple graphics for easy interpretation by children. After testing the safety and feasibility of the system in an adult with moderate asthma prior to testing in children, it was found that the analytics model is able to determine the overall asthma risk (high, medium, or low risk) with an accuracy of 80.10 ± 14.13%. Furthermore, the features most important for assessing the risk of an asthma attack were multifaceted, highlighting the importance of continuously monitoring different wireless sensors and RESTful APIs. Future testing this asthma attack risk prediction system in pediatric asthma individuals may lead to an effective self-management asthma program.

  5. Improved Guideline Adherence With Integrated Sickle Cell Disease and Asthma Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Brandi L; Ivy, Zalaya K; Bryant, Valencia; Rodeghier, Mark; DeBaun, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    In children with sickle cell disease (SCD), concomitant asthma is associated with increased morbidity and mortality when compared with children with SCD without asthma. Despite the well-established burden of asthma in children with SCD, no paradigm of care exists for the co-management of these two diseases. To address this gap, an integrated SCD and asthma clinic was created in a community health center that included (1) a dual respiratory therapist/asthma case manager; (2) an SCD nurse practitioner with asthma educator certification; (3) an onsite pulmonary function test laboratory; (4) a pediatric hematologist with expertise in managing SCD and asthma; and (5) application of the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines. A before (2010-2012) and after (2013-2014) study design was used to assess for improved quality of care with implementation of an integrative care model among 61 children with SCD and asthma followed from 2010 to 2014. Asthma action plan utilization after initial diagnosis increased with the integrative care model (n=16, 56% before, 100% after, p=0.003), as did the use of spirometry in children aged ≥5 years (n=41, 65% before, 95% after, pintegrative care model for SCD and asthma improved evidence-based asthma care, longer follow-up and evaluation will be needed to determine the impact on SCD-related morbidity. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Spirometry in Asthma Care: A Review of the Trends and Challenges in Pediatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuk, Adaeze C; Uwaezuoke, Samuel N; Ndukwu, Chizalu I; Ndu, Ikenna K; Iloh, Kenechukwu K; Okoli, Chinyere V

    2017-01-01

    Background: Given the rising incidence of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) globally, especially bronchial asthma, there is the need to reduce the associated morbidity and mortality by adopting an objective means of diagnosis and monitoring. Aim: This article aims to review the trends and challenges in the use of spirometry for managing childhood bronchial asthma especially in developing countries. Methods: We conducted a literature search of published data on the use of spirometry for the diagnosis of childhood bronchial asthma with special emphasis resource-poor countries. Results: Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of childhood asthma recommend the use of spirometry, but this is currently underused in both tertiary and primary care settings especially in developing countries. Lack of spirometers and proper training in their use and interpretation of findings as well as a dearth of asthma guidelines remains core to the underuse of spirometry in managing children with asthma. Targeting education of health care staff was, however, observed to improve its utility, and practical implementable strategies are highlighted. Conclusions: Spirometry is not frequently used for asthma diagnosis in pediatric practice especially in resource-poor countries where the NCD burden is higher. Strategies to overcome the obstacles are implementable and can make a difference in reducing the burden of NCD. PMID:28781518

  7. Clinical significance of determination of serum TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF levels in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Donglin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF levels were measured with RIA in 32 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma and 30 controls. Results: Serum levels of TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF were very significantly higher in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma than those in controls (P<0.01). After one week treatment, the levels dropped considerably but still remained significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.05). Conclusion: These cytokines participated in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Monitoring the changes of their serum levels was helpful for the management of the diseases. (authors)

  8. Impact of a quality improvement program on care and outcomes for children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Charles J; Forbes, Peter; Horvitz, Lisa; Peterson, Laura E; Wypij, David; Heinrich, Patricia

    2005-05-01

    To test a quality improvement intervention, a learning collaborative based on the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Breakthrough Series methodology, specifically intended to improve care and outcomes for patients with childhood asthma. Randomized trial in primary care practices. Practices in greater Boston, Mass, and greater Detroit, Mich. Forty-three practices, with 13 878 pediatric patients with asthma, randomized to intervention and control groups. Intervention Participation in a learning collaborative project based on the Breakthrough Series methodology of continuous quality improvement. Change from baseline in the proportion of children with persistent asthma who received appropriate medication therapy for asthma, and in the proportion of children whose parent received a written management plan for their child's asthma, as determined by telephone interviews with parents of 631 children. After adjusting for state, practice size, child age, sex, and within-practice clustering, no overall effect of the intervention was found. This methodologically rigorous assessment of a widely used quality improvement technique did not demonstrate a significant effect on processes or outcomes of care for children with asthma. Potential deficiencies in program implementation, project duration, sample selection, and data sources preclude making the general inference that this type of improvement program is ineffective. Additional rigorous studies should be undertaken under more optimal settings to assess the efficacy of this method for improving care.

  9. Optimizing community-level surveillance data for pediatric asthma management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wande O. Benka-Coker

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Community-level approaches for pediatric asthma management rely on locally collected information derived primarily from two sources: claims records and school-based surveys. We combined claims and school-based surveillance data, and examined the asthma-related risk patterns among adolescent students.Symptom data collected from school-based asthma surveys conducted in Oakland, CA were used for case identification and determination of severity levels for students (high and low. Survey data were matched to Medicaid claims data for all asthma-related health care encounters for the year prior to the survey. We then employed recursive partitioning to develop classification trees that identified patterns of demographics and healthcare utilization associated with severity.A total of 561 students had complete matched data; 86.1% were classified as high-severity, and 13.9% as low-severity asthma. The classification tree consisted of eight subsets: three indicating high severity and five indicating low severity. The risk subsets highlighted varying combinations of non-specific demographic and socioeconomic predictors of asthma prevalence, morbidity and severity. For example, the subset with the highest class-prior probability (92.1% predicted high-severity asthma and consisted of students without prescribed rescue medication, but with at least one in-clinic nebulizer treatment. The predictive accuracy of the tree-based model was approximately 66.7%, with an estimated 91.1% of high-severity cases and 42.3% of low-severity cases correctly predicted.Our analysis draws on the strengths of two complementary datasets to provide community-level information on children with asthma, and demonstrates the utility of recursive partitioning methods to explore a combination of features that convey asthma severity. Keywords: Asthma, Classification, Risk stratification, Statistical data analysis, Disease management

  10. Direct concurrent comparison of multiple pediatric acute asthma scoring instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael D; Nkoy, Flory L; Sheng, Xiaoming; Greene, Tom; Stone, Bryan L; Garvin, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    Appropriate delivery of Emergency Department (ED) treatment to children with acute asthma requires clinician assessment of acute asthma severity. Various clinical scoring instruments exist to standardize assessment of acute asthma severity in the ED, but their selection remains arbitrary due to few published direct comparisons of their properties. Our objective was to test the feasibility of directly comparing properties of multiple scoring instruments in a pediatric ED. Using a novel approach supported by a composite data collection form, clinicians categorized elements of five scoring instruments before and after initial treatment for 48 patients 2-18 years of age with acute asthma seen at the ED of a tertiary care pediatric hospital ED from August to December 2014. Scoring instruments were compared for inter-rater reliability between clinician types and their ability to predict hospitalization. Inter-rater reliability between clinician types was not different between instruments at any point and was lower (weighted kappa range 0.21-0.55) than values reported elsewhere. Predictive ability of most instruments for hospitalization was higher after treatment than before treatment (p < 0.05) and may vary between instruments after treatment (p = 0.054). We demonstrate the feasibility of comparing multiple clinical scoring instruments simultaneously in ED clinical practice. Scoring instruments had higher predictive ability for hospitalization after treatment than before treatment and may differ in their predictive ability after initial treatment. Definitive conclusions about the best instrument or meaningful comparison between instruments will require a study with a larger sample size.

  11. Review of family relational stress and pediatric asthma: the value of biopsychosocial systemic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Beatrice L; Miller, Bruce D; Lehman, Heather K

    2015-06-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease in children. Despite dramatic advances in pharmacological treatments, asthma remains a leading public health problem, especially in socially disadvantaged minority populations. Some experts believe that this health gap is due to the failure to address the impact of stress on the disease. Asthma is a complex disease that is influenced by multilevel factors, but the nature of these factors and their interrelations are not well understood. This paper aims to integrate social, psychological, and biological literatures on relations between family/parental stress and pediatric asthma, and to illustrate the utility of multilevel systemic models for guiding treatment and stimulating future research. We used electronic database searches and conducted an integrated analysis of selected epidemiological, longitudinal, and empirical studies. Evidence is substantial for the effects of family/parental stress on asthma mediated by both disease management and psychobiological stress pathways. However, integrative models containing specific pathways are scarce. We present two multilevel models, with supporting data, as potential prototypes for other such models. We conclude that these multilevel systems models may be of substantial heuristic value in organizing investigations of, and clinical approaches to, the complex social-biological aspects of family stress in pediatric asthma. However, additional systemic models are needed, and the models presented herein could serve as prototypes for model development. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  12. Asthma and obesity: does weight loss improve asthma control? a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juel CTB

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Trunk-Black Juel,1 Zarqa Ali,1 Lisbeth Nilas,2 Charlotte Suppli Ulrik11Respiratory Section, Internal Medicine Unit, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hvidovre Hospital and University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre, DenmarkAim and methods: Obesity is a major health problem, and obesity is associated with a high incidence of asthma and poor asthma control. The aim of the present paper is to systematically review the current knowledge of the effect on overall asthma control of weight reduction in overweight and obese adults with asthma.Results: Weight loss in obese individuals with doctor-diagnosed asthma is associated with a 48%–100% remission of asthma symptoms and use of asthma medication. Published studies, furthermore, reveal that weight loss in obese asthmatics improves asthma control, and that especially surgically induced weight loss results in significant improvements in asthma severity, use of asthma medication, dyspnoea, exercise tolerance, and acute exacerbations, including hospitalizations due to asthma. Furthermore, weight loss in obese asthmatics is associated with improvements in level of lung function and airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine, whereas no significant improvements have been observed in exhaled nitric oxide or other markers of eosinophilic airway inflammation.Conclusion: Overweight and obese adults with asthma experience a high symptomatic remission rate and significant improvements in asthma control, including objective measures of disease activity, after weight loss. Although these positive effects of weight loss on asthma-related health outcomes seem not to be accompanied by remission or improvements in markers of eosinophilic airway inflammation, it has potentially important implications for the future burden of asthma.Keywords: asthma, weight loss, diet, bariatric surgery, asthma control

  13. The effects of combining Web-based eHealth with telephone nurse case management for pediatric asthma control: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, David; Wise, Meg; Bhattacharya, Abhik; Pulvermacher, Alice; Shanovich, Kathleen; Phillips, Brenda; Lehman, Erik; Chinchilli, Vernon; Hawkins, Robert; Kim, Jee-Seon

    2012-07-26

    Asthma is the most common pediatric illness in the United States, burdening low-income and minority families disproportionately and contributing to high health care costs. Clinic-based asthma education and telephone case management have had mixed results on asthma control, as have eHealth programs and online games. To test the effects of (1) CHESS+CM, a system for parents and children ages 4-12 years with poorly controlled asthma, on asthma control and medication adherence, and (2) competence, self-efficacy, and social support as mediators. CHESS+CM included a fully automated eHealth component (Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System [CHESS]) plus monthly nurse case management (CM) via phone. CHESS, based on self-determination theory, was designed to improve competence, social support, and intrinsic motivation of parents and children. We identified eligible parent-child dyads from files of managed care organizations in Madison and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, sent them recruitment letters, and randomly assigned them (unblinded) to a control group of treatment as usual plus asthma information or to CHESS+CM. Asthma control was measured by the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) and self-reported symptom-free days. Medication adherence was a composite of pharmacy refill data and medication taking. Social support, information competence, and self-efficacy were self-assessed in questionnaires. All data were collected at 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Asthma diaries kept during a 3-week run-in period before randomization provided baseline data. Of 305 parent-child dyads enrolled, 301 were randomly assigned, 153 to the control group and 148 to CHESS+CM. Most parents were female (283/301, 94%), African American (150/301, 49.8%), and had a low income as indicated by child's Medicaid status (154/301, 51.2%); 146 (48.5%) were single and 96 of 301 (31.9%) had a high school education or less. Completion rates were 127 of 153 control group dyads (83.0%) and 132 of 148 CHESS

  14. Determination of blood ET-1 and related cytokines in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jiangang; Ling Wanli; Ma Yunbao; Zhang Xiaoyi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the role of endothelin and related cytokines (IL-5, IL-6, IL-8) in the development of bronchial asthma in pediatric patients. Methods: Plasma ET-1 (with RIA) and serum IL-5 (with ELISA), IL-6, IL-8 (with RIA) levels were measured in 42 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma and 30 controls. Results: The plasma ET-1 levels in the patients during acute attack (n=22) were significantly higher than those in patients during remission (n=20) as well as in controls (P 0.05). Levels of ET-1 were positively correlated with those of IL-5 (during attack, r=0.560, P<0.01; during remission, r=0.435, P<0.01). Conclusion: ET and the cytokines IL-5, IL-6, IL-8 participated in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma through different mechanisms and dynamic determination of which could reflect the progression of the disease. (authors)

  15. The Chinese version of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL™) 3.0 Asthma Module: reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lifen; Zhang, Yingfen; Chen, Ruoqing; Hao, Yuantao

    2011-08-07

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has been recognized as an important health outcome measurement for pediatric patients. One of the most promising instruments in measuring pediatric HRQOL emerged in recent years is the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL™). The PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module, one of the PedsQL™disease-specific scales, was designed to measure HRQOL dimensions specifically tailored for pediatric asthma. The present study is aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module. The PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module was translated into Chinese following the PedsQL™ Measurement Model Translation Methodology. The Chinese version scale was administered to 204 children with asthma and 337 parents of children with asthma from four Triple A hospitals. The psychometric properties were then evaluated. The percentage of missing value for each item of the scale ranged from 0.00% to 8.31%. All child self-report subscales and parent proxy-report subscales approached or exceeded the minimum reliability standard of 0.70 for alpha coefficient, except 3 subscales of Young Child (aged 5-7) self-report (alphas ranging from 0.59 to 0.68). Test-retest reliability was satisfactory with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) which exceeded the recommended standard of 0.80 in all subscales. Correlation coefficients between items and their hypothesized subscales were higher than those with other subscales. The PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module distinguished between outpatients and inpatients. Patients with mild asthma reported higher scores than those with moderate/severe asthma in majority of subscales. The intercorrelations among the PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module subscales and the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales were in medium to large effect size. The child self-report scores were consistent with the parent proxy-report scores. The Chinese version of the PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module has acceptable psychometric

  16. The relationship of different respiratory virus infection with pediatric asthma attack as well as cytokine and lymphocyte subset levels

    OpenAIRE

    Hua Miao; Xiao-Rong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship of different respiratory virus infection with pediatric asthma attack as well as cytokine and lymphocyte subset levels. Methods: A total of 85 children who were diagnosed with bronchial asthma in our hospital between May 2013 and March 2016 were selected as asthma group and further divided into asthma-RSV group, asthma-AV group, asthma-PIV group, asthma-IFV group and pure asthma group according to the condition of respiratory virus infection...

  17. Performance of a novel clinical score, the Pediatric Asthma Severity Score (PASS), in the evaluation of acute asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Marc H; Stevens, Molly W; Schultz, Theresa R; Scribano, Philip V

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of a new clinical asthma score, the Pediatric Asthma Severity Score (PASS), in children aged 1 through 18 years in an acute clinical setting. This was a prospective cohort study of children treated for acute asthma at two urban pediatric emergency departments (EDs). A total of 852 patients were enrolled at one site and 369 at the second site. Clinical findings were assessed at the start of the ED visit, after one hour of treatment, and at the time of disposition. Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) (for patients aged 6 years and older) and pulse oximetry were also measured. Composite scores including three, four, or five clinical findings were evaluated, and the three-item score (wheezing, prolonged expiration, and work of breathing) was selected as the PASS. Interobserver reliability for the PASS was good to excellent (kappa = 0.72 to 0.83). There was a significant correlation between PASS and PEFR (r = 0.27 to 0.37) and pulse oximetry (r = 0.29 to 0.41) at various time points. The PASS was able to discriminate between those patients who did and did not require hospitalization, with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.82. Finally, the PASS was shown to be responsive, with a 48% relative increase in score from start to end of treatment and an overall effect size of 0.62, indicating a moderate to large effect. This clinical score, the PASS, based on three clinical findings, is a reliable and valid measure of asthma severity in children and shows both discriminative and responsive properties. The PASS may be a useful tool to assess acute asthma severity for clinical and research purposes.

  18. Cluster Analysis of Acute Care Use Yields Insights for Tailored Pediatric Asthma Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abir, Mahshid; Truchil, Aaron; Wiest, Dawn; Nelson, Daniel B; Goldstick, Jason E; Koegel, Paul; Lozon, Marie M; Choi, Hwajung; Brenner, Jeffrey

    2017-09-01

    We undertake this study to understand patterns of pediatric asthma-related acute care use to inform interventions aimed at reducing potentially avoidable hospitalizations. Hospital claims data from 3 Camden city facilities for 2010 to 2014 were used to perform cluster analysis classifying patients aged 0 to 17 years according to their asthma-related hospital use. Clusters were based on 2 variables: asthma-related ED visits and hospitalizations. Demographics and a number of sociobehavioral and use characteristics were compared across clusters. Children who met the criteria (3,170) were included in the analysis. An examination of a scree plot showing the decline in within-cluster heterogeneity as the number of clusters increased confirmed that clusters of pediatric asthma patients according to hospital use exist in the data. Five clusters of patients with distinct asthma-related acute care use patterns were observed. Cluster 1 (62% of patients) showed the lowest rates of acute care use. These patients were least likely to have a mental health-related diagnosis, were less likely to have visited multiple facilities, and had no hospitalizations for asthma. Cluster 2 (19% of patients) had a low number of asthma ED visits and onetime hospitalization. Cluster 3 (11% of patients) had a high number of ED visits and low hospitalization rates, and the highest rates of multiple facility use. Cluster 4 (7% of patients) had moderate ED use for both asthma and other illnesses, and high rates of asthma hospitalizations; nearly one quarter received care at all facilities, and 1 in 10 had a mental health diagnosis. Cluster 5 (1% of patients) had extreme rates of acute care use. Differences observed between groups across multiple sociobehavioral factors suggest these clusters may represent children who differ along multiple dimensions, in addition to patterns of service use, with implications for tailored interventions. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians

  19. The Chinese version of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module: reliability and validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ruoqing

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL has been recognized as an important health outcome measurement for pediatric patients. One of the most promising instruments in measuring pediatric HRQOL emerged in recent years is the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL™. The PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module, one of the PedsQL™disease-specific scales, was designed to measure HRQOL dimensions specifically tailored for pediatric asthma. The present study is aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module. Methods The PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module was translated into Chinese following the PedsQL™ Measurement Model Translation Methodology. The Chinese version scale was administered to 204 children with asthma and 337 parents of children with asthma from four Triple A hospitals. The psychometric properties were then evaluated. Results The percentage of missing value for each item of the scale ranged from 0.00% to 8.31%. All child self-report subscales and parent proxy-report subscales approached or exceeded the minimum reliability standard of 0.70 for alpha coefficient, except 3 subscales of Young Child (aged 5-7 self-report (alphas ranging from 0.59 to 0.68. Test-retest reliability was satisfactory with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs which exceeded the recommended standard of 0.80 in all subscales. Correlation coefficients between items and their hypothesized subscales were higher than those with other subscales. The PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module distinguished between outpatients and inpatients. Patients with mild asthma reported higher scores than those with moderate/severe asthma in majority of subscales. The intercorrelations among the PedsQL™ 3.0 Asthma Module subscales and the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales were in medium to large effect size. The child self-report scores were consistent with the parent proxy-report scores. Conclusions The Chinese version of

  20. HIPAA Compliant Wireless Sensing Smartwatch Application for the Self-Management of Pediatric Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Anahita; Buonocore, Chris M.; Hashemzadeh, Sepideh; Hojaiji, Hannaneh; Kalantarian, Haik; Sideris, Costas; Bui, Alex A.T.; King, Christine E.; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic disease among pediatrics, as it is the leading cause of student absenteeism and hospitalization for those under the age of 15. To address the significant need to manage this disease in children, the authors present a mobile health (mHealth) system that determines the risk of an asthma attack through physiological and environmental wireless sensors and representational state transfer application program interfaces (RESTful APIs). The data is sent from wirel...

  1. Health Disparities in Pediatric Asthma: Comprehensive Tertiary Care Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Laurens; Kalle, Fanta; Grinstead, Laura; Jimenez, Maritza; Murphy, Meghan; Oceanic, Pat; Fitzgerald, Diane; Dabney, Kirk

    2015-03-01

    Study conducted at Nemours /Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE 19803 BACKGROUND: Although the treatment and management of asthma hasimproved over time, incidence and prevalence among children continues to rise in the United States. Asthma prevalence, health services utilization, and mortality rate demonstrate remarkable disparities. The underlying causes of these disparities are not fully understood. We aimed to examine racial/ethnic variances in pediatric asthma prevalence/admission. We retrospectively reviewed data on 1070 patients and applied a cross-sectional design to assess asthma admission between 2010 and 2011. Information was available on race/ethnicity, sex, insurance status, severity of illness (SOI), and length of stay/hospitalization (LOS).Chi-square statistic was used for the association between race and other variables in an attempt to explain the racial/ethnic variance. The proportionate morbidity of asthma was highest amongCaucasians (40.92%) and African Americans (40.54%), intermediate among others (16.57%), and lowest among Asian (0.56%), American Indian/Alaska Native (0.28%), and Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander (0.28%). Overall there were disparities by sex, with more boys (61.80%) diagnosed with asthma than girls (38.20%), χ2(7)=20.1, p=0.005. Insurance status, and SOI varied by race/ethnicity, but not LOS. Caucasian children were more likely to have private insurance, while African Americans and Hispanics were more likely to have public insurance (p<0.005). Asthma was more severe among non-Hispanic children, χ2(14)=154.6, p<0.001. While the overall readmission proportion was 2.8%, readmission significantly varied by race/ethnicity. Racial/ethnic disparities in asthma admission exist among children in the Delaware Valley. There were racial/ethnic disparities in insurance status, asthma severity, and sex differed by race/ethnicity, but not in length of hospitalization. © 2015 National Medical Association. Published by

  2. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum GM-CSF, CGRP levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lihua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of serum GM-CSF and CGRP levels both before and after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum GM-CSF and CGRP levels were measured with RIA in 33 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum GM-CSF levels was significantly higher in the patients than those in the controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Abnormal high serum GM -CSF and low CGRP levels played important role in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma in children. (authors)

  3. Understanding mild persistent asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Szefler, Stanley J

    2005-01-01

    Limitations in asthma prevalence studies and difficulties in diagnosing pediatric asthma lead to uncertainty over the full extent of mild persistent asthma in children and adolescents. Although recent surveys have reported that the majority of pediatric patients with asthma in the United States...... and Europe have symptoms consistent with mild disease, these surveys have limitations in design. Thus, the true prevalence of mild asthma remains unknown. It is unclear whether children with mild persistent asthma progress to more severe asthma, but the risk of severe asthma exacerbations seems...... to be unrelated to the symptom severity. Clinical studies restricted to pediatric patients with mild asthma are limited, but available data do suggest substantial morbidity of mild persistent asthma in this population and support inhaled corticosteroid intervention. There is a need for further investigation...

  4. Exercise and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Exercise and Asthma Page Content Article Body Almost every child (and ... of Pediatrics about asthma and exercise. What is asthma Asthma is the most common chronic medical problem ...

  5. Environmental Air Pollutants as Risk Factors for Asthma Among Children Seen in Pediatric Clinics in UKMMC, Kuala Lumpur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Idayu Badilla; Ghazi, Hasanain Faisal; Zhie, Khor Hui; Khairuman, Khairul Aliff; Yahya, Siti Kasuma; Abd Zaim, Farah Azureen; Nam, Chok Wai; Abdul Rasid, Hazwan Zuhairi; Isa, Zaleha Md

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma is increasing, especially among children in Malaysia, with environmental factors as one of the main preventable contributors. The aim of this study was to determine the association between environmental air pollutants and the occurrence of asthma among children seen in pediatric clinics in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center (UKMMC), Kuala Lumpur. An unmatched case control study among children who attended the pediatric clinic was carried out from May to August 2015. A total of 223 children who were diagnosed with asthma (105 cases) and who did not have asthma (118 controls) were included in this study. Their parents or caregivers were interviewed using questionnaires modified from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Data obtained were analyzed using SPSS software version 20. There was a higher risk of asthma in those who had carpet at home (OR = 2.15 CI [1.25-3.68]), those who lived within 200 m of heavy traffic (OR = 1.72 CI [1.01-2.93]), and those who were exposed to lorry fumes (OR = 2.61. CI [1.38-4.93]). Environmental air pollutants increased the risk of asthma among children in Malaysia. Exposure to congested roads, lorry fumes, and indoor carpet were associated with asthma among children in this study. Parents or caretakers of children with asthma should be given adequate education on the prevention of asthmatic attack among these children. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical significance of determination of serum IL-2, IL-6 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhuo; Sun Jin; Yao Li

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum IL-2, IL-6 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum levels of IL-2, IL-6 and GM-CSF were measured with RIA in 36 pediatric patients with bronchiol asthma and 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum levels of IL-6, GM-CSF were significantly higher in the patients than those in controls (P 0.05), Serum IL-2 levels were negatively correlated with the IL-6 and GM-CSF levels (r=-0.5846, -0.6018, P<0.01). Conclusion: These cytokines participated in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma in pediatric patients. Mornitoring the changes of their serum levels was helpful for the management of the diseases. (authors)

  7. Pulmonary Function Tests in Emergency Department Pediatric Patients with Acute Wheezing/Asthma Exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Giordano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pulmonary function tests (PFT have been developed to analyze tidal breathing in patients who are minimally cooperative due to age and respiratory status. This study used tidal breathing tests in the ED to measure asthma severity. Design/Method. A prospective pilot study in pediatric patients (3 to 18 yrs with asthma/wheezing was conducted in an ED setting using respiratory inductance plethysmography and pneumotachography. The main outcome measures were testing feasibility, compliance, and predictive value for admission versus discharge. Results. Forty patients were studied, of which, 14 (35% were admitted. Fifty-five percent of the patients were classified as a mild-intermittent asthmatic, 30% were mild-persistent asthmatics, 12.5% were moderate-persistent asthmatics, and 2.5% were severe-persistent. Heart rate was higher in admitted patients as was labored breathing index, phase angle, and asthma score. Conclusions. Tidal breathing tests provide feasible, objective assessment of patient status in the enrolled age group and may assist in the evaluation of acute asthma exacerbation in the ED. Our results demonstrate that PFT measurements, in addition to asthma scores, may be useful in indicating the severity of wheezing/asthma and the need for admission.

  8. Validation of the Spanish and English versions of the asthma portion of the Brief Pediatric Asthma Screen Plus among Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Carolyn A; Quinn, Kelly; Wolf, Raoul; Mosnaim, Giselle; Shalowitz, Madeleine

    2005-07-01

    The health and health care needs of non-English-speaking Hispanic families with children are poorly understood, in part because they are often excluded from research owing to language barriers. Instruments that are valid in English and Spanish are necessary to accurately evaluate the magnitude of asthma prevalence and morbidity among Hispanics. To establish the sensitivity and specificity of the English and Spanish versions of the asthma portion of the Brief Pediatric Asthma Screen Plus (BPAS+) in a low-income Hispanic population. The validation sample consisted of 145 children whose parents completed the BPAS+ in Spanish and 78 whose parents completed it in English. Bilingual clinicians conducted the examinations on which the clinical assessments were based. We compared the BPAS+ results with the clinical assessment findings to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the BPAS + among Hispanics in terms of identifying children who warrant further medical evaluation for asthma. The sensitivity and specificity of the asthma portion of the Spanish BPAS+ were 74% and 86%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the asthma portion of the English BPAS+ were 61% and 83%, respectively. The asthma portion of the BPAS+, a valid screen for identifying children who are in need of further evaluation for potentially undiagnosed asthma, is valid for low-income Hispanics in Spanish and English. As the Hispanic population continues to grow, it is imperative that researchers have English and Spanish instruments that are valid for this population.

  9. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Wenjing

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of Serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels were measured with RIA in 33 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Detection of serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels were useful for assessment of therapeutic efficacy and were of important clinical values in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. (authors)

  10. The effects of indoor environmental exposures on pediatric asthma: a discrete event simulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian M Patricia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United States, asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood across all socioeconomic classes and is the most frequent cause of hospitalization among children. Asthma exacerbations have been associated with exposure to residential indoor environmental stressors such as allergens and air pollutants as well as numerous additional factors. Simulation modeling is a valuable tool that can be used to evaluate interventions for complex multifactorial diseases such as asthma but in spite of its flexibility and applicability, modeling applications in either environmental exposures or asthma have been limited to date. Methods We designed a discrete event simulation model to study the effect of environmental factors on asthma exacerbations in school-age children living in low-income multi-family housing. Model outcomes include asthma symptoms, medication use, hospitalizations, and emergency room visits. Environmental factors were linked to percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%, which in turn was linked to risk equations for each outcome. Exposures affecting FEV1% included indoor and outdoor sources of NO2 and PM2.5, cockroach allergen, and dampness as a proxy for mold. Results Model design parameters and equations are described in detail. We evaluated the model by simulating 50,000 children over 10 years and showed that pollutant concentrations and health outcome rates are comparable to values reported in the literature. In an application example, we simulated what would happen if the kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans were improved for the entire cohort, and showed reductions in pollutant concentrations and healthcare utilization rates. Conclusions We describe the design and evaluation of a discrete event simulation model of pediatric asthma for children living in low-income multi-family housing. Our model simulates the effect of environmental factors (combustion pollutants and allergens

  11. Relationships between pediatric asthma and socioeconomic/urban variables in Baltimore, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, Daniel; Ullah, Asad; Levine, Elissa; Nelson, Ross; Timmins, Sidey; Weiss, Sheila; Bollinger, Mary E.; Blaisdell, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Spatial relationships between clinical data for pediatric asthmatics (hospital and emergency department utilization rates), and socioeconomic and urban characteristics in Baltimore City were analyzed with the aim of identifying factors that contribute to increased asthma rates. Socioeconomic variables and urban characteristics derived from satellite data explained 95% of the spatial variation in hospital rates. The proportion of families headed by a single female was the most important variable accounting for 89% of the spatial variation. Evidence suggests that the high rates of hospital admissions and emergency department (ED) visits may partially be due to the difficulty of single parents with limited resources managing their child's asthma condition properly. This knowledge can be used for education towards mitigating ED and hospital events in Baltimore City.

  12. Association between pediatric asthma care quality and morbidity and English language proficiency in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Martha P; Allen, Elizabeth D; Thomas, Olivia; Robinson, Byron F; Clark, Donnie; Connelly, Ann; Mott, Joshua A; Conrey, Elizabeth

    2018-05-08

    Limited English proficiency can be a barrier to asthma care and is associated with poor outcomes. This study examines whether pediatric patients in Ohio with limited English proficiency experience lower asthma care quality or higher morbidity. We used electronic health records for asthma patients aged 2-17 years from a regional, urban, children's hospital in Ohio during 2011-2015. Community-level demographics were included from U.S. Census data. By using chi-square and t-tests, patients with limited English proficiency and bilingual English-speaking patients were compared with English-only patients. Five asthma outcomes-two quality and three morbidity measures-were modeled using generalized estimating equations. The study included 15 352 (84%) English-only patients, 1744 (10%) patients with limited English proficiency, and 1147 (6%) bilingual patients. Pulmonary function testing (quality measure) and multiple exacerbation visits (morbidity measure) did not differ by language group. Compared with English-only patients, bilingual patients had higher odds of ever having an exacerbation visit (morbidity measure) (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.6) but lower odds of admission to intensive care (morbidity measure) (aOR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.2-0.7), while patients with limited English proficiency did not differ on either factor. Recommended follow-up after exacerbation (quality measure) was higher for limited English proficiency (aOR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.4-2.3) and bilingual (aOR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.3-2.1), compared with English-only patients. In this urban, pediatric population with reliable interpreter services, limited English proficiency was not associated with worse asthma care quality or morbidity.

  13. Effect of inhaled corticosteroid use on weight (BMI) in pediatric patients with moderate-severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jennifer; Nguyen, John; Kim, Yuna; Geng, Bob; Romanowski, Gale; Alejandro, Lawrence; Proudfoot, James; Xu, Ronghui; Leibel, Sydney

    2018-04-19

    Assess the relationship between inhaled corticosteroid use (ICS) and weight (BMI) in pediatric patients with moderate-severe asthma. Assess if the number of emergency department (ED) visits correlates with overall BMI trajectory. Assess the trend of prescribing biologic therapy in pediatric patients with moderate-severe asthma and determine its relationship with weight (BMI). A retrospective chart review was performed on 93 pediatric patients with moderate-severe asthma to determine the relationship between ICS use and weight (BMI), biologic therapy and BMI, and number of ED visits and BMI trajectory. A mixed effects model was employed with the correlation between repeated measures accounted for through the random effects. There is a statistically significant increase of 0.369 kg/m 2 in BMI trajectory per year in subjects on high-dose steroids compared to an increase of 0.195 kg/m 2 in the low dose group (p BMI of subjects initiated on biologic therapy (omalizumab or mepolizumab) had a statistically significant decrease in BMI trajectory of 0.818 kg/m 2 per year (p BMI trajectory (p BMI trajectory; the higher the dose, the greater the projected BMI increase per year. Initiation of biologic therapy decreased BMI trajectory over time. Lastly, those with frequent ED visits had a higher BMI trend. Future prospective studies are warranted that further evaluate the potential metabolic impacts of ICS and assess the effects of biologic therapy on BMI.

  14. Effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Inflammatory Mediators in Pediatric Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Du

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To observe the effects of empirical prescriptions of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM on inflammatory mediators in pediatric asthma and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism in the treatment of asthma. Methods. A total of 182 children with asthma were randomly placed into either the TCM group (n=97 or the salbutamol and montelukast (SM group (n=85. Patients in the TCM group were treated with a series of empirical prescriptions of TCM, while those in the SM group received salbutamol and montelukast. Both groups received their respective treatment for 12 weeks. There were 35 patients in TCM group and 34 patients in SM group providing venous blood. Real-time PCR was used to determine the mRNA expression levels of interleukin- (IL- 10, IL-17, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and after treatment. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the levels of IL-10, IL-17, MMP-9, and TGF-β1 in peripheral blood before and after treatment. Results. The mRNA expression of TGF-β1 in the SM group was downregulated (P=0.00 after treatment. No significant differences were found between the TCM group and the SM group after treatment (P>0.05. In the TCM group, the levels of IL-10, IL-17, and MMP-9 significantly decreased after treatment (P=0.01, 0.04, and 0.03, resp.. In the SM group, IL-17, MMP-9, and TGF-β1 levels significantly decreased after treatment (P=0.00, 0.03, and 0.00, resp.. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the levels of IL-10, IL-17, TGF-β1, and MMP-9 (P>0.05. The difference of the level of IL-17 was negatively correlated with the change of C-ACT score in TCM group and SM group. Conclusion. TCM has a regulatory effect on the balance of some inflammatory mediators in pediatric asthma.

  15. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum GM-CSF, IL-8, IL-6 levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Hongfeng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum GM-CSF, IL-8 and IL-6 levels both before and after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum GM-CSF, IL-8 and IL-6 levels were measured with RIA in 32 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum GM-CSF, IL-8, IL-6 levels were significantly higher in the patients than those in the controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Abnormal high serum GM-CSF, IL-8, IL-6 levels played important role in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma in children. (authors)

  16. Pharmacists' perspectives of the current status of pediatric asthma management in the U.S. community pharmacy setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaro, Amanda; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Kraus, Kathleen; Farris, Karen B; Shah, Smita; Armour, Carol; Patel, Minal R

    2017-08-01

    Objective To explore community pharmacists' continuing education, counseling and communication practices, attitudes and barriers in relation to pediatric asthma management. Setting Community pharmacies in Michigan, United States. Methods Between July and September 2015 a convenience sample of community pharmacists was recruited from southeastern Michigan and asked to complete a structured, self-reported questionnaire. The questionnaire elucidated information on 4 general domains relating to pharmacists' pediatric asthma management including: (1) guidelines and continuing education (CE); (2) counseling and medicines; (3) communication and self-management practices; (4) attitudes and barriers to practice. Regression analyses were conducted to determine predictors towards pharmacists' confidence/frequency of use of communication/counseling strategies. Main outcome measure Confidence in counseling skills around asthma. Results 105 pharmacists completed the study questionnaire. Fifty-four percent of pharmacists reported participating in asthma related CE in the past year. Over 70% of pharmacists reported confidence in general communication skills, while a lower portion reported confidence in engaging in higher order self-management activities that involved tailoring the regimen (58%), decision-making (50%) and setting short-term (47%) and long-term goals (47%) with the patient and caregiver for managing asthma at home. Pharmacists who reported greater use of recommended communication/self-management strategies were more likely to report confidence in implementing these communication/self-management strategies when counseling caregivers and children with asthma [Beta (B) Estimate 0.58 SE (0.08), p management strategies. Conclusion A pharmacists' confidence may influence their ability to implement recommended self-management counseling strategies. This study showed that community pharmacists are confident in general communication. However pharmacists are reporting lower

  17. Exposure to Mobile Source Air Pollution in Early-life and Childhood Asthma Incidence: The Kaiser Air Pollution and Pediatric Asthma Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Audrey Flak; Strickland, Matthew J; Klein, Mitchel; Zhai, Xinxin; Bates, Josephine T; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn; Hansen, Craig; Russell, Armistead G; Tolbert, Paige E; Darrow, Lyndsey A

    2018-01-01

    Early-life exposure to traffic-related air pollution exacerbates childhood asthma, but it is unclear what role it plays in asthma development. The association between exposure to primary mobile source pollutants during pregnancy and during infancy and asthma incidence by ages 2 through 6 was examined in the Kaiser Air Pollution and Pediatric Asthma Study, a racially diverse birth cohort of 24,608 children born between 2000 and 2010 and insured by Kaiser Permanente Georgia. We estimated concentrations of mobile source fine particulate matter (PM2.5, µg/m), nitrogen oxides (NOX, ppb), and carbon monoxide (CO, ppm) at the maternal and child residence using a Research LINE source dispersion model for near-surface releases. Asthma was defined using diagnoses and medication dispensings from medical records. We used binomial generalized linear regression to model the impact of exposure continuously and by quintiles on asthma risk. Controlling for covariates and modeling log-transformed exposure, a 2.7-fold increase in first year of life PM2.5 was associated with an absolute 4.1% (95% confidence interval, 1.6%, 6.6%) increase in risk of asthma by age 5. Quintile analysis showed an increase in risk from the first to second quintile, but similar risk across quintiles 2-5. Risk differences increased with follow-up age. Results were similar for NOX and CO and for exposure during pregnancy and the first year of life owing to high correlation. Results provide limited evidence for an association of early-life mobile source air pollution with childhood asthma incidence with a steeper concentration-response relationship observed at lower levels of exposure.

  18. Asthma - child - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric asthma - discharge; Wheezing - discharge; Reactive airway disease - discharge ... Your child has asthma , which causes the airways of the lungs to swell and narrow. In the hospital, the doctors and nurses helped ...

  19. Asthma disease management-Australian pharmacists' interventions improve patients' asthma knowledge and this is sustained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Bandana; LeMay, Kate; Emmerton, Lynne; Krass, Ines; Smith, Lorraine; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Stewart, Kay; Burton, Deborah; Armour, Carol

    2011-06-01

    To assess any improvements in knowledge of asthma patients after a tailored education program delivered by pharmacists and measure the sustainability of any improvements. To ascertain patients' perceptions about any changes in their knowledge. Ninety-six specially trained pharmacists recruited patients based on their risk of poor asthma control. A tailored intervention was delivered to patients based on individual needs and goals, and was conducted at three or four time points over six months. Asthma knowledge was assessed at the beginning and end of the service, and six and 12 months after it had ended. Patients' perceptions of the impact of the service on their knowledge were explored qualitatively in interviews. The 96 pharmacists recruited 570 patients, 398 (70%) finished. Asthma knowledge significantly improved as a result of the service (7.65 ± 2.36, n=561, to 8.78 ± 2.14, n=393). This improvement was retained for at least 12 months after the service. Patients reported how the knowledge and skills gained had led to a change in the way they managed their asthma. Improvements in knowledge are achievable and sustainable if pharmacists used targeted educational interventions. Pharmacist educational interventions are an efficient way to improve asthma knowledge in the community. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Breathmobile Program: structure, implementation, and evolution of a large-scale, urban, pediatric asthma disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Craig A; Clement, Loran T; Hanley-Lopez, Jean; Morphew, Tricia; Kwong, Kenny Yat Choi; Lifson, Francene; Opas, Lawrence; Guterman, Jeffrey J

    2005-08-01

    Despite more than a decade of education and research-oriented intervention programs, inner city children with asthma continue to engage in episodic "rescue" patterns of healthcare and experience a disproportionate level of morbidity. The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a sustainable community-wide pediatric asthma disease management program designed to shift inner city children in Los Angeles from acute episodic care to regular preventive care in accordance with national standards. In 1995 the Southern California Chapter of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LAC DHS), and the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) established an agreement to initiate and sustain the Breathmobile Program. This program includes automated case identification, mobile school-based clinics, and highly structured clinical encounters supported by an advanced information technology solution. Interdisciplinary teams of asthma care specialists provide regular and ongoing care to children at school and county clinic sites over a wide geographic area of urban Los Angeles. Each team operates in a specially equipped mobile clinic (Breathmobile), efficiently moving a structured healthcare process to school and county clinic sites with large numbers of children. Demographic, clinical, and participation data is tracked carefully in an electronic medical record system. Program operations, clinical oversight, and patient tracking are centralized at a care coordination center. Clinical operations and methods have been replicated in fixed specialty clinic sites at the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center. Clinical and process measures are regularly evaluated to assure quality, plan iterative improvement, and support evidence-based care. Four Breathmobiles deliver ongoing care at more than 90 school sites. The program has engaged over five thousand patients and their families in a

  1. Associated factors to repeated consultations to the urgencies service for asthma in pediatric patient: Implications for an educational program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Martinez, Carlos; Sossa, Monica Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is one of the most frequent respiratory diseases in childhood. Recurrent emergency department visits for asthma produce anxiety and high costs for the system of health and for the family. It is important to know the factors related to these recurrent emergency department visits to assist the targeting of appropriate future interventions aimed at reducing this avoidable presentation. The objective of the present study was to identify factors associated with recurrent emergency department visits for asthma in children liable to be modified by means of an education program. Data obtained from a survey of parents of 146 pediatric patients with asthma attending an asthma clinic and educational program were examined. Parents completed an asthma knowledge and attitudes questionnaire that also included other socio demographic and illness-related variables, including the number of consultations to emergency department by their children asthma in the previous 6 months. Of the 146 asthmatic patients enrolled, 41 (28.1%) consulted repeatedly to the emergency department for asthma. After controlling for age of the patient, educational level of the parents, and functional severity of the disease, we found that parents who reported that they attended to emergency room because asthma attacks of their children were severe enough to go elsewhere (OR, 4.57; CL95%, 1.76- 11.85; P = 0.002), parents who reported that asthma medications should be administered only in symptomatic moments (OR 278, CL 95%, 1.05 - 7.33, P = 0.038 and parents that did not recognize the fact that asthma attacks can be avoided if medications are administered when there are no symptoms (between asthma attacks) (OR 2.61; CL95%; 1.03 - 7.02; p = 0,045), had a greater probability to attend rapidly the emergency room because of asthma of their children. The fact that parents of asthmatic patients have thought that asthma medications should be administered only in symptomatic patients, that they hadn

  2. Race and asthma control in the pediatric population of Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Brian H; Cabana, Michael D; Hilton, Joan F; Ly, Ngoc P

    2011-05-01

    The racially unique population of Hawaii has one of the highest prevalences of childhood asthma in America. We estimate the prevalence of impaired asthma control among asthmatic children in Hawaii and determine which factors are associated with impaired control. We analyzed data from 477 asthmatic children living in Hawaii participating in the 2006-2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Asthma Call-Back Surveys. Impaired asthma control was modeled after 2007 National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify factors associated with impaired asthma control. Children (53.8%) with asthma were either part or full Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander. While 35.6% of asthmatic children met criteria for impaired asthma control, being part or full Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander was not associated with impaired control. Only 31.1% of children with impaired control reported the use of inhaled corticosteroids despite >80% having had a routine checkup for asthma in the past year and receipt of asthma education from a healthcare provider. A large proportion of asthmatic children in Hawaii have impaired asthma control that does not appear to be associated with race but may be associated with inadequate pharmacologic therapy. While a significant percentage reported receiving routine asthma care and asthma education, a minority reported using inhaled corticosteroids. Reasons for this discrepancy between asthma assessment and treatment are unclear. However, additional education on part of the physician, community, and healthcare system are likely to improve management and reduce morbidity in this population. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Asthma Risk Profiles of Children Participating in an Asthma Education and Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Candice; Rapp, Kristi Isaac; Jack, Leonard, Jr.; Hayes, Sandra; Post, Robert; Malveaux, Floyd

    2015-01-01

    Background: Focused risk assessment is essential in the effective management of asthma. Purpose: This study identified and examined correlations among areas of pediatric asthma risk and determined associations between these risks and demographic characteristics. Methods: This exploratory study identified risk factors that affect asthma management…

  4. Feasibility of a Secure Wireless Sensing Smartwatch Application for the Self-Management of Pediatric Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Anahita; Buonocore, Chris M; Hashemzadeh, Sepideh; Hojaiji, Hannaneh; Kalantarian, Haik; Sideris, Costas; Bui, Alex A T; King, Christine E; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2017-08-03

    To address the need for asthma self-management in pediatrics, the authors present the feasibility of a mobile health (mHealth) platform built on their prior work in an asthmatic adult and child. Real-time asthma attack risk was assessed through physiological and environmental sensors. Data were sent to a cloud via a smartwatch application (app) using Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant cryptography and combined with online source data. A risk level (high, medium or low) was determined using a random forest classifier and then sent to the app to be visualized as animated dragon graphics for easy interpretation by children. The feasibility of the system was first tested on an adult with moderate asthma, then usability was examined on a child with mild asthma over several weeks. It was found during feasibility testing that the system is able to assess asthma risk with 80.10 ± 14.13% accuracy. During usability testing, it was able to continuously collect sensor data, and the child was able to wear, easily understand and enjoy the use of the system. If tested in more individuals, this system may lead to an effective self-management program that can reduce hospitalization in those who suffer from asthma.

  5. Omalizumab for pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Robert G; Agrawal, Swati; Sapkota, Kiran

    2010-11-01

    Omalizumab is of proven efficacy in the treatment of severe allergic bronchial asthma and works through inhibiting the activity of IgE and the allergic immune mechanism IgE mediates. It has been demonstrated to be efficacious in children with asthma but is not approved by the FDA for use in children below 12 years of age. Omalizumab is a 95% humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to circulating IgE at the same site on the Fc domain as the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcϵRI. This blocks the interaction between IgE and mast cells and basophils, thereby preventing the release of inflammatory mediators that cause allergic signs and symptoms. From the review of the literatures and statements from the FDA, Genentec and Novartis, the reader will gain a better appreciation of the value of omalizumab in treatment of severe asthma and the current status of its reported side effects. Omalizumab is of proven efficacy in adults and children with severe asthma and allows a markedly reduced dependence on oral and inhaled corticosteroids and decreased hospitalizations. A potential mechanism of omalizumab's effect on thrombus formation and cardiovascular effect is postulated.

  6. Researching asthma across the ages: insights from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Asthma Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Michael D; Kunselman, Susan J; Nyenhuis, Sharmilee M; Wechsler, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Clinical asthma studies across different age groups (ie, cross-age studies) can potentially offer insight into the similarities, differences, and relationships between childhood and adult asthma. The National Institutes of Health's Asthma Research Network (AsthmaNet) is unique and innovative in that it has merged pediatric and adult asthma research into a single clinical research network. This combination enhances scientific exchange between pediatric and adult asthma investigators and encourages the application of cross-age studies that involve participants from multiple age groups who are generally not studied together. The experience from AsthmaNet in the development of cross-age protocols highlights some of the issues in the evaluation of cross-age research in asthma. The aim of this review is to summarize these challenges, including the selection of parallel cross-age clinical interventions, identification of appropriate controls, measurement of meaningful clinical outcomes, and various ethical and logistic issues. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fixed versus variable practice for teaching medical students the management of pediatric asthma exacerbations using simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, David; Truchot, Jennifer; Fabbro, Eleonora; Ceccaldi, Pierre-François; Plaisance, Patrick; Tesnière, Antoine; Hadchouel, Alice

    2018-02-01

    Simulation-based trainings represent an interesting approach to teach medical students the management of pediatric asthma exacerbations (PAEs). In this study, we compared two pedagogical approaches, training students once on three different scenarios of PAEs versus training students three times on the same scenario of PAE. Eighty-five third-year medical students, novice learners for the management of PAEs, were randomized and trained. Students were assessed twice, 1 week and 4 months after the training, on a scenario of PAE new to both groups and on scenarios used during the training. The main outcome was the performance score on the new scenario of PAE at 1 week, assessed on a checklist custom-designed for the study. All students progressed rapidly and acquired excellent skills. One week after the training, there was no difference between the two groups on all the scenarios tested, including the new scenario of PAE (median performance score (IQR) of 8.3 (7.4-10.0) in the variation group versus 8.0 (6.0-10.0) in the repetition group (p = 0.16)). Four months later, the performance of the two groups remained similar. Varying practice with different scenarios was equivalent to repetitive practice on the same scenario for novice learners, with both methods leading to transfer and long-term retention of the skills acquired during the training. What is known: • Simulation-based trainings represent an interesting approach to teach medical students the management of pediatric asthma exacerbations. • It is unclear whether students would benefit more from repetitive practice on the same scenario of asthma exacerbation or from practice on different scenarios in terms of transfer of skills. What is new: • An individual 30-min training on the management of pediatric asthma exacerbations using simulation allows transfer and long-term retention of the skills acquired. • Varying practice with different scenarios is equivalent to repetitive practice on the same

  8. Association of Food Allergies, Cow’s Milk Allergy, and Asthma With Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam-Hossein Fallahi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available There are controversies on the association of childhood allergic diseases with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. The aim of this study was to examine the association between food allergy, cow’s milk allergy (CMA, and asthma with pediatric IBD in Iranian population. This case-control study was conducted on 200 individuals less than 18-year-old (100 with IBD and 100 as control group. Medical records, clinical presentation, and laboratory and para-clinical findings related to food allergy, CMA, and asthma were reviewed for all participants in both groups and were recorded. Among 100 children with IBD, 40 had Crohn's disease, and 60 had ulcerative colitis. The frequency of food allergy, cow's milk allergy, and asthma in children with IBD was significantly higher than the control group (P<0.001. Asthma in children with Crohn's disease was significantly more prevalent than children with ulcerative colitis (P=0.008. Food allergy (OR: 22.1, 95% CI: 5.1-95.05, P<0.001, CMA (OR: 15, 95% CI: 3-67, P<0.001, and asthma (OR: 10, 95% CI: 3-37.05, P<0.001 were significantly associated with increased risk of IBD in children. Food allergy, CMA in infancy and asthma are more prevalent in children with different subtypes of IBD. The diagnosis of these risk factors is associated with increased risk of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

  9. The development of an educational video to motivate teens with asthma to be more involved during medical visits and to improve medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleath, Betsy; Carpenter, Delesha M; Lee, Charles; Loughlin, Ceila E; Etheridge, Dana; Rivera-Duchesne, Laura; Reuland, Daniel S; Batey, Karolyne; Duchesne, Cristina I; Garcia, Nacire; Tudor, Gail

    2016-09-01

    Our objective was to develop a series of short educational videos for teens and parents to watch before pediatric visits to motivate teens to be more actively involved during their visits. The development of the short educational videos was theoretically guided by Social Cognitive Theory. First we conducted four focus groups with teens (ages 11 to 17) with asthma, four focus groups with the teens' parents, and seven focus groups with pediatric providers from four clinics. The research team, which included two teens with asthma and their parents, analyzed the focus group transcripts for themes and then developed the initial video script. Next, a visual storyboard was reviewed by focus groups with parents and four with teens to identify areas of the script for improvement. The English videos were then produced. Focus groups with Hispanic parents and teens were then conducted for advice on how to modify the videos to make a more culturally appropriate Spanish version. Based on focus group results, teen newscasters narrate six one- to two-minute videos with different themes: (a) how to get mom off your back, (b) asthma triggers, (c) staying active with asthma, (d) tracking asthma symptoms, (e) how to talk to your doctor and (f) having confidence with asthma. Each video clip has three key messages and emphasizes how teens should discuss these messages with their providers. Teens, parents, and providers gave us excellent insight into developing videos to increase teen involvement during medical visits.

  10. Sleep-disordered breathing in children with asthma: a systematic review on the impact of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez T

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trinidad Sánchez,1 José A Castro-Rodríguez,2 Pablo E Brockmann2,3 1Division of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, 2Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Pulmonology, Division of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, 3Sleep Medicine Center, Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile Background: The objective was to perform a systematic review in order to describe the relationship between asthma and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB in children, especially regarding the impact of treatment and management. Methods: We performed an electronic search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS database. Study inclusion criteria were the following: 1 studies that examined the relationship between asthma/wheezing and SDB/obstructive sleep apnea (OSA; and 2 studies conducted in children <18 years of age. Primary outcomes were the prevalence of asthma and SDB, the tests used for diagnosis, and the influence of their treatment and management. Results: One thousand and twenty studies were identified, among which 32 were selected (n=143,343 children; 51% males; age [mean ± standard deviation] 8.4±2.5 years. Most studies (n=26 diagnosed SDB using questionnaires or clinical history. Nine studies performed a sleep study for diagnosing OSA. The diagnosis of asthma was based on clinical history (n=16, previous medical diagnosis (n=4, questionnaires (n=12, and spirometry (n=5. Children with asthma were more likely to develop habitual snoring and OSA, and children with SDB were more likely to develop asthma. Moreover, asthma was associated with more severe OSA, and the presence of SDB was associated with severe asthma. Treatment of SDB with adenotonsillectomy was associated with significant asthma improvement. Conclusion: The relationship between asthma and SDB appears to be bidirectional, and adenotonsillectomy appears to improve asthma control. Future trials on how asthma treatment could impact on SDB are needed

  11. Flow-volume loops measured with electrical impedance tomography in pediatric patients with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Chuong; Dippel, Falk; Tenbrock, Klaus; Leonhardt, Steffen; Lehmann, Sylvia

    2018-05-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) provides information on global and regional ventilation during tidal breathing and mechanical ventilation. During forced expiration maneuvers, the linearity of EIT and spirometric data has been documented in healthy persons. The present study investigates the potential diagnostic use of EIT in pediatric patients with asthma. EIT and spirometry were performed in 58 children with asthma (average age ± SD: 11.86 ± 3.13 years), and 58 healthy controls (average age ± SD: 12.12 ± 2.9 years). The correlation between EIT data and simultaneously acquired spirometric data were tested for FEV 1 , FEV 0.5 , MEF 75 , MEF 50 , and MEF 25 . Binary classification tests were performed for the EIT-derived Tiffeneau index FEV 1 /FVC and the bronchodilator test index ΔFEV 1 . Average flow-volume (FV) loops were generated for patients with pathologic spirometry to demonstrate the feasibility of EIT for graphic diagnosis of asthma. Spirometry and global EIT-based FV loops showed a strong correlation (P  0.9 in FEV 1 and FEV 0.5 ). In all criteria, the binary classification tests yielded high specificity (>93%), a high positive predictive value (≥75%) and a high negative predictive value (>80%), while sensitivity was higher in ΔFEV 1 (86.67%) and lower in FEV 1 /FVC (25% and 35.29%). A typical concave shape of the EIT-derived average FV loops was observed for asthmatic children with improvement after bronchospasmolysis. Global FV loops derived from EIT correlate well with spirometry. Positive bronchospasmolysis can be observed in EIT-derived FV loops. Flow-volume loops originated from EIT have a potential to visualize pulmonary function. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. My Child Is Diagnosed with Asthma, Now What?: Motivating Parents to Help Their Children Control Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepney, Cesalie; Kane, Katelyn; Bruzzese, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric asthma is often undiagnosed, and therefore untreated. It negatively impacts children's functioning, including school attendance and performance, as well as quality of life. Schoolwide screening for asthma is becoming increasingly common, making identification of possible asthma particularly relevant for school nurses. Nurses may need to…

  13. Parental Perceptions and Practices toward Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani K. Abu-Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Parental perceptions and practices are important for improving the asthma outcomes in children; indeed, evidence shows that parents of asthmatic children harbor considerable misperceptions of the disease. Objective. To investigate the perceptions and practices of parents toward asthma and its management in Saudi children. Methods. Using a self-administered questionnaire, a two-stage cross-sectional survey of parents of children aged between 3 and 15 years, was conducted from schools located in Riyadh province in central Saudi Arabia. Results. During the study interval, 2000 parents were asked to participate in the study; 1450 parents responded, of whom 600 (41.4% reported that their children had asthma, dyspnea, or chest allergy (recurrent wheezing or coughing, while 478 (32.9% of the parents reported that their children were diagnosed earlier with asthma by a physician. Therefore, the final statistical analyses were performed with 600 participants. Furthermore, 321 (53.5% respondents believed that asthma is solely a hereditary disease. Interestingly, 361 (60.3% were concerned about side effects of inhaled corticosteroids and 192 (32% about the development of dependency on asthma medications. Almost 76% of parents had previously visited a pediatric emergency department during an asthma attack. Conclusions. Parents had misperceptions regarding asthma and exhibited ineffective practices in its management. Therefore, improving asthma care and compliance requires added parental education.

  14. Parental Perceptions and Practices toward Childhood Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Shaheen, Amani K; Nofal, Abdullah; Heena, Humariya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction . Parental perceptions and practices are important for improving the asthma outcomes in children; indeed, evidence shows that parents of asthmatic children harbor considerable misperceptions of the disease. Objective. To investigate the perceptions and practices of parents toward asthma and its management in Saudi children. Methods . Using a self-administered questionnaire, a two-stage cross-sectional survey of parents of children aged between 3 and 15 years, was conducted from schools located in Riyadh province in central Saudi Arabia. Results . During the study interval, 2000 parents were asked to participate in the study; 1450 parents responded, of whom 600 (41.4%) reported that their children had asthma, dyspnea, or chest allergy (recurrent wheezing or coughing), while 478 (32.9%) of the parents reported that their children were diagnosed earlier with asthma by a physician. Therefore, the final statistical analyses were performed with 600 participants. Furthermore, 321 (53.5%) respondents believed that asthma is solely a hereditary disease. Interestingly, 361 (60.3%) were concerned about side effects of inhaled corticosteroids and 192 (32%) about the development of dependency on asthma medications. Almost 76% of parents had previously visited a pediatric emergency department during an asthma attack. Conclusions . Parents had misperceptions regarding asthma and exhibited ineffective practices in its management. Therefore, improving asthma care and compliance requires added parental education.

  15. Asthma: a major pediatric health issue

    OpenAIRE

    Smyth Rosalind L

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The incidence, prevalence, and mortality of asthma have increased in children over the past three to four decades, although there has been some decline in the most recent decade. These trends are particularly marked and of greatest concern in preschool children. Internationally, there are huge variations among countries and continents, as demonstrated by the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. In general, asthma rates were highest in English-speaking countries (...

  16. The need for precision medicine clinical trials in childhood asthma : rationale and design of the PUFFIN trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, Susanne J. H.; Pijnenburg, Marielle W.; Hovels, Anke M.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse

    A `one-size fits all'-approach does not fit all pediatric asthma patients. Current evidence suggests that in children with persistent asthma, ADRB2 genotype-guided treatment can improve treatment outcomes, yet this evidence is mainly derived from observational and genotype-stratified studies.

  17. The need for precision medicine clinical trials in childhood asthma: rationale and design of the PUFFIN trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, Susanne Jh; Pijnenburg, Mariëlle W.; Hövels, Anke M.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse

    2017-01-01

    A 'one-size fits all'-approach does not fit all pediatric asthma patients. Current evidence suggests that in children with persistent asthma, ADRB2 genotype-guided treatment can improve treatment outcomes, yet this evidence is mainly derived from observational and genotype-stratified studies.

  18. Asthma: a major pediatric health issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyth Rosalind L

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The incidence, prevalence, and mortality of asthma have increased in children over the past three to four decades, although there has been some decline in the most recent decade. These trends are particularly marked and of greatest concern in preschool children. Internationally, there are huge variations among countries and continents, as demonstrated by the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. In general, asthma rates were highest in English-speaking countries (UK, New Zealand, Australia, and North America and some Latin American countries (Peru and Costa Rica, and lowest in South Korea, Russia, Uzbekistan, Indonesia, and Albania. There is currently no unifying hypothesis to explain these trends or any associated risk factors. Environmental factors that may lead to asthma include air pollution; genetic factors, the hygiene hypothesis, and lifestyle differences also play potentially causative roles. Asthma may develop as a result of persistent activation of the immune system alone or in combination with physiologic airway remodeling in early childhood. Further studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  19. Guideline on management of the acute asthma attack in children by Italian Society of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indinnimeo, Luciana; Chiappini, Elena; Miraglia Del Giudice, Michele

    2018-04-06

    Acute asthma attack is a frequent condition in children. It is one of the most common reasons for emergency department (ED) visit and hospitalization. Appropriate care is fundamental, considering both the high prevalence of asthma in children, and its life-threatening risks. Italian Society of Pediatrics recently issued a guideline on the management of acute asthma attack in children over age 2, in ambulatory and emergency department settings. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was adopted. A literature search was performed using the Cochrane Library and Medline/PubMed databases, retrieving studies in English or Italian and including children over age 2 year. Inhaled ß 2 agonists are the first line drugs for acute asthma attack in children. Ipratropium bromide should be added in moderate/severe attacks. Early use of systemic steroids is associated with reduced risk of ED visits and hospitalization. High doses of inhaled steroids should not replace systemic steroids. Aminophylline use should be avoided in mild/moderate attacks. Weak evidence supports its use in life-threatening attacks. Epinephrine should not be used in the treatment of acute asthma for its lower cost / benefit ratio, compared to β 2 agonists. Intravenous magnesium solphate could be used in children with severe attacks and/or forced expiratory volume1 (FEV1) lower than 60% predicted, unresponsive to initial inhaled therapy. Heliox could be administered in life-threatening attacks. Leukotriene receptor antagonists are not recommended. This Guideline is expected to be a useful resource in managing acute asthma attacks in children over age 2.

  20. The effectiveness of newly developed written asthma action plan in improvement of asthma outcome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakupoch, Kingthong; Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Preutthipan, Aroonwan; Kamalaporn, Harutai

    2017-09-17

    Providing asthma education about controller medication use and appropriate management of asthma exacerbation are the keys to improving the disease outcome. Many asthma guidelines recommend that physicians provide written asthma action plan (WAAP) to all of their asthmatic patients. However, the benefit of WAAP is unclear. Thus, we have created a new WAAP which is simplified in Thai and more user friendly. To determine the effectiveness of the newly developed asthma action plan in management of children with asthma. Asthmatic children who meet inclusion criteria all received the WAAP and they were followed up for 6 months with measurement of outcome variables, such as asthma exacerbation that required emergency room visit, unscheduled OPD visit, admission and school absence in order to compare with the past 6 months before receiving the WAAP. The analyzed outcomes of forty-nine children show significantly reduced emergency room visit (P-value 0.005), unscheduled OPD visit (P-value 0.046), admission days (P-value 0.026) and school absence days (P-value 0.022). Well controlled group and mild severity group were not the factors that contribute to decreased emergency room visit but step up therapy may be the co-factor to decreased ER visit. The results of this study suggest that the provision of newly developed WAAP is useful for improving self-care of asthma patients and reducing asthma exacerbation.

  1. Asthma Academy: Developing educational technology to improve Asthma medication adherence and intervention efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Aiswaria S; DeMuth, Karen; Chih-Wen Cheng; Wang, May D

    2017-07-01

    Asthma is a leading chronic disorder among children and adolescents. Although some children outgrow asthma while transitioning into adulthood, there are others who continue to suffer from life-threatening asthmatic exacerbations. Teenagers tend to have certain misconceptions about their asthmatic condition and treatment which are rarely recognized or addressed in regular clinical consultations. After reviewing the literature in this field, we have identified that improving patient knowledge can be effective in augmenting engagement, and considerably improving their clinical outcomes. It is necessary to develop an effective educational intervention that can help Asthma patients change their perception about self-efficacy and ultimately reduce the total health care costs incurred. Hence, a sound transfer of knowledge during the transition from childcare to adult care is highly recommended. On these very lines, Georgia Institute of Technology designed an interactive educational application called Asthma Academy in conjunction with Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. This website resides in the public cloud and uses a novel animation video-based curriculum to deliver essential healthcare education to asthmatic adolescents in an interactive manner. What distinguishes it from similar initiatives is the use of a cost-effective technique to simulate caregiver-patient interactions and the ability to cater to a wide range of socio-economic statuses and educational levels. A group-based study with twenty asthma adolescents was conducted to evaluate the user acceptance and performance of Asthma Academy supplemented by regular check-ups over a period of eight to ten weeks. Observations recorded post the study clearly indicate higher levels of engagement and the systematic dissemination of information offered by Asthma Academy.

  2. Ciclesonide improves measures of small airway involvement in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, J.; Douma, W. R.; ten Hacken, N. H. T.; Vonk, J. M.; Oudkerk, M.; Postma, D. S.

    Ciclesonide is delivered as a small-particle inhaled corticosteroid and improves lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness. The objective of the present study was to assess whether ciclesonide can specifically improve small airway function in asthma. A total of 16 mild-to-moderate asthma patients

  3. A Health-Related Quality of Life Measure for Older Adolescents With Asthma: Child Health Survey for Asthma-T (Teen Version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Laughlen, Mary C; Hollen, Patricia J; Rance, Karen; Rovnyak, Virginia; Hinton, Ivora; Hellems, Martha A; Radecki, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Although adolescent substance use can have direct effects on asthma symptoms and interact with medications used to treat asthma, no validated health-related quality of life (HRQL) instrument exists for adolescents 17 to 19 years of age with asthma. The American Academy of Pediatric's HRQL instrument, the Child Health Survey for Asthma (CHSA)-Child version, was modified with a substance use subscale to address outcomes specific to adolescents ages 17 to 19 years with asthma. Two cohorts (N = 70) were recruited for instrument testing at pediatric primary care practices and two university clinics. A small methodological study with 24 adolescents was conducted to obtain initial support of the psychometric properties for the CHSA-Teen version at baseline, day 14, and day 16. A follow-up study included 46 teens to provide further support. The psychometric properties of the CHSA-Teen version were good and comparable with the CHSA-Child version for feasibility, reliability, and validity. Health care providers need to be aware of each adolescent's substance use to personalize counseling related to asthma medications. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Asthma-like symptoms, diagnostic tests, and asthma medication use in children and adolescents: a population-based nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Magalhães, Manuel; Sá-Sousa, Ana; Morais-Almeida, Mário; Pité, Helena; Azevedo, Luis Filipe; Azevedo, Maria Inês; Bugalho-Almeida, António; Fonseca, João Almeida

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of asthma-like symptoms, current asthma (CA), asthma diagnostic tests, and inhaled medication use in a nationwide pediatric population (Pediatric-specific data from a cross-sectional, population-based telephone survey (INAsma study) in Portugal were analyzed. CA was defined as lifetime asthma and (1) wheezing, (2) waking with breathlessness, or (3) asthma attack in the previous 12 months, and/or (4) taking asthma medication at the time of the interview. In total, 716 children were included. The prevalence of asthma-like symptoms was 39.4% [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 35.7-43.3]. The most common symptoms were waking with cough (30.9%) and wheezing (19.1%). The prevalence of CA was 8.4% (95% CI: 6.6-10.7). Among children with CA, 79.9% and 52.9% reported prior allergy testing and pulmonary function testing (PFT), respectively. Inhaled medication use in the previous 12 months was reported by 67.6% (reliever inhalers, 40.1%; controller inhalers, 41.5%). Those who only used inhaled reliever medications experienced more asthma attacks [odds ratio (OR): 2.69]. Significantly fewer children with CA living in rural areas than those living in urban areas had undergone PFT or used inhaled medication (OR: 0.06 for PFT, 0.20 for medication]. The prevalence of CA in the Portuguese pediatric population was 8.4%. Only half of children with CA had ever undergone PFT; more than half did not use controller inhalers, and those who only used reliever inhalers reported more asthma attacks. These findings suggest that asthma management has been substandard, mainly in rural areas.

  5. Application of quality-improvement methods in a community practice: the Sandhills Pediatrics Asthma Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroth, Thomas H; Boals, Joseph C

    2005-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the use of quality improvement methods to improve asthma care in a busy community practice. The practice used disease-management strategies, such as population identification, self-management education, and performance measurement and feedback. The practice then applied several practice-based quality improvement methods, such as PDSA cycles, to improve care. From 1998 to 2003, process measures, such as staging of asthmatics, use of long-term control medications, use of peak flow meters and spacers, and use of action plans, improved. There was also a substantial decrease in emergency department use and hospitalizations among patients with asthma. Although there have been several studies demonstrating the efficacy of disease management strategies, most lack generalizability to community practices. Often, interventions are so intensive and cumbersome, that they are unlikely to be replicated in primary care setting. Researchers have been unable to determine which components of the interventions are most effective and replicable. Furthermore, many studies of disease management strategies enroll participants who lack the co-morbidities seen in community practice. There are also few studies of disadvantaged populations that face other barriers to care, such as lack of transportation, poor access to specialists, and medical illiteracy. In this case study, there were several unique factors that enabled the practice to improve care for this population. The AccessCare case manager who worked with the practice not only provided data and feedback to the practice team, but also served as an improvement "coach," often pushing the team and facilitating many of the improvement efforts. AccessCare's approach is in contrast to many of the commercial disease management companies' "carve out" models that do not sufficiently involve providers or practices in their interventions. The other necessary ingredient for success in this project was organizational

  6. Japanese guidelines for childhood asthma 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hirokazu; Hamasaki, Yuhei; Kohno, Yoichi; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Kondo, Naomi; Nishima, Sankei; Nishimuta, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Akihiro

    2017-04-01

    The Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Diseases 2017 (JAGL 2017) includes a minor revision of the Japanese Pediatric Guideline for the Treatment and Management of Asthma 2012 (JPGL 2012) by the Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology. The section on child asthma in JAGL 2017 provides information on how to diagnose asthma between infancy and adolescence (0-15 years of age). It makes recommendations for best practices in the management of childhood asthma, including management of acute exacerbations and non-pharmacological and pharmacological management. This guideline will be of interest to non-specialist physicians involved in the care of children with asthma. JAGL differs from the Global Initiative for Asthma Guideline in that JAGL emphasizes diagnosis and early intervention of children with asthma at asthma control levels, is easy to understand; thus, this guideline is suitable for the routine medical care of children with asthma. JAGL also recommends using a control test in children, so that the physician aims for complete control by avoiding exacerbating factors and appropriately using anti-inflammatory drugs (for example, inhaled corticosteroids and leukotriene receptor antagonists). Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Failure to refill essential prescription medications for asthma among pediatric Medicaid beneficiaries with persistent asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidya V

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Varun Vaidya,1 Renuka Gupte,2 Rajesh Balkrishnan31Pharmacy Health Care Administration, Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Toledo College of Pharmacy, Toledo, OH, USA; 2Private Practice, Sylvania, OH, USA; 3Department of Clinical, Social and Administrative Sciences, Pharmacy, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: The problem of patients not taking medications as prescribed, also known as "lack of medication adherence," is widely discussed as an issue related to suboptimal outcomes and excess health care expenditure. Although medication adherence is defined as patients not taking medications as prescribed, there are two elements to it: first, those who fail to follow the medication regimen by skipping a dose or not following the instructions, resulting in poor adherence with prescribed medicines; and, second, the patient who does not take the medication at all or stops after the initial fill. The existing literature contains a lot of studies on the first element, but very little is known about those who stop taking their medication after the initial fill or do not take it at all. In this study, our focus is on identifying patients who fail to refill a prescription for essential medicines, such as asthma-controlling drugs. Using Medicaid claims datasets, this study analyzed a pediatric population diagnosed with persistent asthma that discontinued an essential controlling medication after the initial fill. We found that more than half of this population did not continue their medication after the first fill. While there might be many reasons behind the failure to refill such medications, our data indicate that race/ethnicity, comorbid illness, and type of Medicaid plan are potentially associated with such behavior. Future research is warranted to understand this issue further and identify specific factors causing such behavior, such that strategies may be formulated by which poor adherence can be minimized

  8. Participation of CD161(+) and invariant natural killer T cells in pediatric asthma exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpio-Pedroza, Juan C; Vaughan, Gilberto; del Rio-Navarro, Blanca E; del Río-Chivardí, Jaime M; Vergara-Castañeda, Arely; Jiménez-Zamudio, Luis A; Morales-Flores, Amelia; Rodríguez-Moreno, Guadalupe; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Gonçalves Rossi, Livia M; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Asthma has been defined as a disease of chronic airway inflammation in which many cells and cellular products participate with variable degrees of airflow obstruction and hyperresponsiveness that lead to recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. Prominent among these cellular elements are two cell types referred to as the invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and a subpopulation of T cells expressing the molecule CD161, which are both thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Although the presence of iNKT and other CD161(+) cells in murine models has been associated with asthma, relatively few studies have been performed in the adult patient with asthma that have been often conflicting and even fewer studies are available in children. The present study was performed to investigate the peripheral blood frequencies of iNKT and CD161(+) T cells in children with asthma. A total of 35 children, 19 stable asthmatic patients, 6 who had experienced an asthmatic attack within 24 hours and had not received any treatment, and 10 healthy controls, aged 6-12 years, were enrolled in the study. iNKT and CD161(+) T-cell frequencies in blood were measured together with quantitative levels of IL-4 and interferon (IFN) γ using a cytofluorimetric approach. The results show that iNKT cells are increased in pediatric asthmatic patients undergoing exacerbations of asthma. These cells also produced less IFN-γ and more IL-4 than children with stable asthma and in healthy control children. These results suggest that iNKT cells might participate in the development of the asthmatic exacerbations. The increased production of IL-4 in conjunction with the decrease of IFN-γ may be mechanistically responsible, at least partially, for the heightening of the immunologic response leading to the asthmatic attack in children. Knowledge of these interactive mechanisms involving the iNKT cell and our understanding of its role in the exacerbation of

  9. Thai pediatricians' current practice toward childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalaporn, Harutai; Chawalitdamrong, Pongpan; Preutthipan, Aroonwan

    2018-04-01

    Childhood asthma is a substantial health burden in Thailand. Due to a lack of pediatric respiratory specialists (pediatric pulmonologists and allergists; RS), most Thai children are cared for by general pediatricians (pediatric primary care providers (PCP)). We investigated whether current practices of Thai pediatricians complied with asthma guidelines and compared practices (diagnosis and treatments) provided by PCP and RS. A cross-sectional study was conducted using electronic surveys including four case scenarios of different asthma phenotypes distributed to Thai pediatricians. Asthma diagnosis and management were evaluated for compliance with standard guidelines. The practices of PCP and RS were compared. From 800 surveys distributed, there were 405 respondents (51%). Most respondents (81%) were PCP, who preferred to use clinical diagnosis rather than laboratory investigations to diagnose asthma. For acute asthmatic attacks, 58% of the pediatricians prescribed a systemic corticosteroid. For uncontrolled asthma, 89% of the pediatricians prescribed at least one controller. For exercise-induced bronchospasm, 55% of the pediatricians chose an inhaled bronchodilator, while 38% chose a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA). For virus-induced wheeze, 40% of the respondents chose an LTRA, while 15% chose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). PCP prescribed more oral bronchodilators (31% vs. 18%, p = 0.02), antibiotics (20% vs. 6%, p attack. Most of the Thai pediatricians' practices toward diagnosis and treatment of acute asthmatic attack and uncontrolled asthma conform to the guidelines. PCP prescribed more oral bronchodilators, antibiotics, and antihistamines than RS.

  10. The relationship of different respiratory virus infection with pediatric asthma attack as well as cytokine and lymphocyte subset levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Miao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the relationship of different respiratory virus infection with pediatric asthma attack as well as cytokine and lymphocyte subset levels. Methods: A total of 85 children who were diagnosed with bronchial asthma in our hospital between May 2013 and March 2016 were selected as asthma group and further divided into asthma-RSV group, asthma-AV group, asthma-PIV group, asthma-IFV group and pure asthma group according to the condition of respiratory virus infection, and 70 healthy children who received physical examination in our hospital during the same period were selected as the control group. Spirometer was used to determine airway function parameters, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits were used to determine serum cytokine contents, and flow cytometry was used to determine peripheral blood lymphocyte subset contents. Results: FEV1/FVC, FEF25, FEF50 and FEF75 levels, serum IL-2, IFN-γ and TGF-β1 contents as well as peripheral blood Th1 and Treg cell contents of asthma groups were significantly lower than those of control group while serum IL-4, IL-5 and IL-17 contents as well as peripheral blood Th2 and Th17 cell contents were significantly higher than those of control group; FEV1/FVC, FEF25, FEF50 and FEF75 levels, serum IL-2, IFN-γ and TGF-β1 contents as well as peripheral blood Th1 and Treg cell contents of asthma-RSV group and asthma-IFV group were significantly lower than those of pure asthma group while serum IL-4, IL-5 and IL-17 contents as well as peripheral blood Th2 and Th17 cell contents were significantly higher than those of pure asthma group; these indexes of asthma-AV group and asthma-PIV group were not significantly different from those of pure asthma group. Conclusion: RSV and IFV infection can affect the airway function and the balance of CD4+T cell subsets to promote the development of asthma.

  11. Patient Factors Used by Pediatricians to Assign Asthma Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okelo, Sande O.; Patino, Cecilia M.; Riekert, Kristin A.; Merriman, Barry; Bilderback, Andrew; Hansel, Nadia N.; Thompson, Kathy; Thompson, Jennifer; Quartey, Ruth; Rand, Cynthia S.; Diette, Gregory B.

    2009-01-01

    to help further improve pediatric asthma care. PMID:18595964

  12. Electronic Adherence Monitoring in a High-Utilizing Pediatric Asthma Cohort: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Chén Collin; Chang, Joyce; Wynter, Sheri-Ann; Fowler, Jessica C; Long, Jin; Bryant-Stephens, Tyra C

    2016-06-22

    Inner-city, minority children with asthma have the highest rates of morbidity and death from asthma and the lowest rates of asthma controller medication adherence. Some recent electronic medication monitoring interventions demonstrated dramatic improvements in adherence in lower-risk populations. The feasibility and acceptability of such an intervention in the highest-risk children with asthma has not been studied. Our objective was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a community health worker-delivered electronic adherence monitoring intervention among the highest utilizers of acute asthma care in an inner-city practice. This was a prospective cohort pilot study targeting children with the highest frequency of asthma-related emergency department and hospital care within a local managed care Medicaid plan. The 3-month intervention included motivational interviewing, electronic monitoring of controller and rescue inhaler use, and outreach by a community health worker for predefined medication alerts. We measured acceptability by using a modified technology acceptability model and changes in asthma control using the Asthma Control Test (ACT). Given prominent feasibility issues, we describe qualitative patterns of medication use at baseline only. We enrolled 14 non-Hispanic black children with a median age of 3.5 years. Participants averaged 7.8 emergency or hospital visits in the year preceding enrollment. We observed three distinct patterns of baseline controller use: 4 patients demonstrated sustained use, 5 patients had periodic use, and 5 patients lapsed within 2 weeks. All participants initiated use of the electronic devices; however, no modem signal was transmitted for 5 or the 14 participants after a mean of 45 days. Of the 9 (64% of total) caregivers who completed the final study visit, all viewed the electronic monitoring device favorably and would recommend it to friends, and 5 (56%) believed that the device helped to improve asthma control. ACT

  13. The Child Opportunity Index and Disparities in Pediatric Asthma Hospitalizations Across One Ohio Metropolitan Area, 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Andrew F; Huang, Bin; Wheeler, Kathryn; Lawson, Nikki R; Kahn, Robert S; Riley, Carley L

    2017-11-01

    To determine whether the Child Opportunity Index (COI), a nationally available measure of relative educational, health/environmental, and social/economic opportunity across census tracts within metropolitan areas, is associated with population- and patient-level asthma morbidity. This population-based retrospective cohort study was conducted between 2011 and 2013 in a southwest Ohio county. Participants included all children aged 1-16 years with hospitalizations or emergency department visits for asthma or wheezing at a major pediatric hospital. Patients were identified using discharge diagnosis codes and geocoded to their home census tract. The primary population-level outcome was census tract asthma hospitalization rate. The primary patient-level outcome was rehospitalization within 12 months of the index hospitalization. Census tract opportunity was characterized using the COI and its educational, health/environmental, and social/economic domains. Across 222 in-county census tracts, there were 2539 geocoded hospitalizations. The median asthma-related hospitalization rate was 5.0 per 1000 children per year (IQR, 1.9-8.9). Median hospitalization rates in very low, low, moderate, high, and very high opportunity tracts were 9.1, 7.6, 4.6, 2.1, and 1.8 per 1000, respectively (P asthma morbidity. The details provided by the COI may inform interventions aimed at increasing opportunity and reducing morbidity across regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Uncovering Longitudinal Health Care Behaviors for Millions of Medicaid Enrollees: A Multistate Comparison of Pediatric Asthma Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Ross; Zheng, Yuchen; Fitzpatrick, Anne; Serban, Nicoleta

    2018-01-01

    This study introduces a framework for analyzing and visualizing health care utilization for millions of children, with a focus on pediatric asthma, one of the major chronic respiratory conditions. The data source is the 2005 to 2012 Medicaid Analytic Extract claims for 10 Southeast states. The study population consists of Medicaid-enrolled children with persistent asthma. We translate multiyear, individual-level medical claims into sequences of discrete utilization events, which are modeled using Markov renewal processes and model-based clustering. Network analysis is used to visualize utilization profiles. The method is general, allowing the study of other chronic conditions. The study population consists of 1.5 million children with persistent asthma. All states have profiles with high probability of asthma controller medication, as large as 60.6% to 90.2% of the state study population. The probability of consecutive asthma controller prescriptions ranges between 0.75 and 0.95. All states have utilization profiles with uncontrolled asthma with 4.5% to 22.9% of the state study population. The probability for controller medication is larger than for short-term medication after a physician visit but not after an emergency department (ED) visit or hospitalization. Transitions from ED or hospitalization generally have a lower probability into physician office (between 0.11 and 0.38) than into ED or hospitalization (between 0.20 and 0.59). In most profiles, children who take asthma controller medication do so regularly. Follow-up physician office visits after an ED encounter or hospitalization are observed at a low rate across all states. Finally, all states have a proportion of children who have uncontrolled asthma, meaning they do not take controller medication while they have severe outcomes.

  15. Medication education program for Indian children with asthma: A feasibility stud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, C; Goel, N; Armour, C; Van Asperen, P P; Gaur, S N; Moles, R J; Saini, B

    2016-01-01

    It is postulated that children with asthma who receive an interactive, comprehensive, culturally relevant education program would improve their asthma knowledge (AK), asthma control, and adherence compared with children receiving usual care. The aim of this study was to develop, implement, and evaluate the efficacy of a culturally relevant asthma education intervention for children with asthma and their parents in India. Children with asthma (7-12 years) and their parents were recruited from an outpatient clinic in a Chest Diseases Hospital in New Delhi, and were randomly assigned to either an intervention or usual care group. At baseline, outcome data collected included pediatric asthma caregiver quality of life (PACQL, primary outcome), AK, asthma control, adherence, inhaler technique, action plan ownership, and goal achievement. These data were collected again at 1 and 6 months after baseline. Outcomes were compared within and between groups using ANOVA techniques. Forty parent-child pairs were recruited. Of these, 24 pairs of children with asthma and their parents received the educational intervention. The PACQL significantly improved from baseline to 6 months in the intervention (5.87 ± 0.94-7.00 ± 0.03) versus the usual care group (5.90 ± 0.52-6.34 ± 0.56) (P management skills.

  16. Quality assurance of asthma clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmstrom, Kerstin; Peszek, Iza; Al Botto; Lu, Susan; Enright, Paul L; Reiss, Theodore F

    2002-04-01

    Accuracy and repeatability of spirometry measurements are essential to obtain reliable efficacy data in randomized asthma clinical trials. We report our experience with a centralized spirometry quality assurance program that we implemented in our phase III asthma trials. Six asthma trials of 4 to 21 weeks in duration were conducted at 232 clinical centers in 31 countries. Approximately 23,100 prebronchodilator and 13,700 postbronchodilator spirometry tests were collected from 2523 adult and 336 pediatric asthmatic patients. The program used a standard spirometer (the Renaissance spirometry system) with maneuver quality messages and automated quality grading of the spirometry tests. Each clinical center transmitted spirometry data weekly to a central database, where uniform monitoring of data quality was performed and feedback was provided in weekly quality reports. Seventy-nine percent of all patients performed spirometry sessions with quality that either met or exceeded American Thoracic Society standards and improved over time. Good-quality spirometry was associated with (1) less severe asthma; (2) active treatment; (3) infrequent nocturnal awakenings; (4) age above 15 years; and (5) low body weight. Maneuver-induced bronchospasm was rare. Good-quality spirometry was observed in multicenter asthma clinical trials that employed a standard spirometer and continuous monitoring. Both within- and between-patient variability decreased. Spirometry quality improved with time as study participants and technicians gained experience.

  17. Epidemiological study of risk factors in pediatric asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    Methods: This cross sectional study involved 206 asthmatic children, 5 to 15 years old. They were enrolled from the School ... exercise-induced asthma while 64.6% stated that emotional stress triggered their symptoms. ... Keywords: asthma severity; asthma triggers; children; residence; risk factors; smoking; social status.

  18. Using stakeholder engagement to develop a patient-centered pediatric asthma intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelef, Deborah Q; Rand, Cynthia; Streisand, Randi; Horn, Ivor B; Yadav, Kabir; Stewart, Lisa; Fousheé, Naja; Waters, Damian; Teach, Stephen J

    2016-12-01

    Stakeholder engagement has the potential to develop research interventions that are responsive to patient and provider preferences. This approach contrasts with traditional models of clinical research in which researchers determine the study's design. This article describes the effect of stakeholder engagement on the design of a randomized trial of an intervention designed to improve child asthma outcomes by reducing parental stress. The study team developed and implemented a stakeholder engagement process that provided iterative feedback regarding the study design, patient-centered outcomes, and intervention. Stakeholder engagement incorporated the perspectives of parents of children with asthma; local providers of community-based medical, legal, and social services; and national experts in asthma research methodology and implementation. Through a year-long process of multidimensional stakeholder engagement, the research team successfully refined and implemented a patient-centered study protocol. Key stakeholder contributions included selection of patient-centered outcome measures, refinement of intervention content and format, and language framing the study in a culturally appropriate manner. Stakeholder engagement was a useful framework for developing an intervention that was acceptable and relevant to our target population. This approach might have unique benefits in underserved populations, leading to sustainable improvement in health outcomes and reduced disparities. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Shared care and implementation of a pediatric clinical pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langfrits, Mette Sørensen; Thomsen, RW; Rubak, Jens Mørck

    with uncontrolled asthma should be followed at the pediatrics department. Study 2) An increased overall proportion of children with well-controlled asthma. Study 3) Favorable changes in the use of asthma medication. Study 4) Self-reported higher quality of life among children with asthma Material and methods...... specialist out-patient clinic at the pediatrics department at Viborg hospital or at one of 100 GPs in the Viborg area. At baseline the involved health care professionals participated in an introduction to the clinical pathway and treatment guide. Furthermore the clinical pathway and treatment guide...... Midten. We sincerely thank Lars G. Hansen (Head of Department of Pediatrics, Viborg Hospital) for his help and participation....

  20. Endotypes of difficult-to-control asthma in inner-city African American children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K R Brown

    Full Text Available African Americans have higher rates of asthma prevalence, morbidity, and mortality in comparison with other racial groups. We sought to characterize endotypes of childhood asthma severity in African American patients in an inner-city pediatric asthma population. Baseline blood neutrophils, blood eosinophils, and 38 serum cytokine levels were measured in a sample of 235 asthmatic children (6-17 years enrolled in the NIAID (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases-sponsored Asthma Phenotypes in the Inner City (APIC study (ICAC (Inner City Asthma Consortium-19. Cytokines were quantified using a MILLIPLEX panel and analyzed on a Luminex analyzer. Patients were classified as Easy-to-Control or Difficult-to-Control based on the required dose of controller medications over one year of prospective management. A multivariate variable selection procedure was used to select cytokines associated with Difficult-to-Control versus Easy-to-Control asthma, adjusting for age, sex, blood eosinophils, and blood neutrophils. In inner-city African American children, 12 cytokines were significant predictors of Difficult-to-Control asthma (n = 235. CXCL-1, IL-5, IL-8, and IL-17A were positively associated with Difficult-to-Control asthma, while IL-4 and IL-13 were positively associated with Easy-to-Control asthma. Using likelihood ratio testing, it was observed that in addition to blood eosinophils and neutrophils, serum cytokines improved the fit of the model. In an inner-city pediatric population, serum cytokines significantly contributed to the definition of Difficult-to-Control asthma endotypes in African American children. Mixed responses characterized by TH2 (IL-5 and TH17-associated cytokines were associated with Difficult-to-Control asthma. Collectively, these data may contribute to risk stratification of Difficult-to-Control asthma in the African American population.

  1. Determining the Content of a Pediatric Asthma Website from Parents’ Perspective: The Internet Use and Information Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezvan Ansari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The acquisition of knowledge by parents of children with asthma plays an important role in the treatment of children. Thus, it is important to understand their needs and provide this information through available methods such as a website.The aim of this studywas to determine the content of a pediatric asthma website based on the evaluation of parents information needs. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional studywas conducted by a descriptive-analytical approach in Kerman, Iran. Data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire.The questionnaire was distributed among a sample of 300 parents visiting allergy and asthma specialists’ offices. Three experts confirmed validity of the questionnaire. The reliability of the questionnairewas confirmed using the test- retest method on 40 participants (r = 0.82. Data were analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistics by SPSS version 20.0 software. Results Participants demanded information concerning asthma nutrition (79.0%, prevention (78.1%, treatment (77.1%, medications (72.4% as well as general information (71.4% and information about etiology of the disease (70.5%, respectively. The results showed that the fathers use the Internet significantly more than the mothers (p=0.0001. There was a statistically significant relationship between participants’ educational level and the type of resources they use to obtain information (P

  2. Quality of life of asthmatic children and adolescents: Portuguese translation, adaptation, and validation of the questionnaire "Pediatric Quality of Life (PedsQL) Asthma Module".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Fernanda Pereira; Solé, Dirceu; Wandalsen, Gustavo

    2017-11-01

    The objectives of the study were to translate, validate, and verify the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the instrument "Pediatric Quality of Life Asthma Module" (PedsQL Asthma) culturally adapted for the Brazilian culture. After being translated to Portuguese and being culturally adapted, the questionnaire was answered by 200 asthmatic children and adolescents (aged 2-18) as well as the adults responsible for them. Validation required the use of the following instruments: PedsQL Asthma Children (applied to children and adolescents), PedsQL Asthma Parents (applied to adults responsible for children and adolescents), Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life (PAQLQ), Asthma Control Test (ACT) or Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT), as well as socioeconomic and personal information questionnaires. A group of 45 clinically stable children repeated the questionnaires 15-60 days after answering the first questionnaire. Correlations between the scores of PedsQL Children and PedsQL Parents (r  =  0.67), PedsQL Children and PAQLQ (r  =  0.66), and PedsQL Parents and PAQLQ (r  =  0.64) were moderate and significant. Correlations were higher for men (r  =  0.72) when analyzing the children's and parents' answers to PedsQL according to gender. The 5- to 7-year-old age group had the strongest correlations with PAQLQ (r  =  0.79). Cronbach's alpha coefficient for PedsQL Children and Parents had values of 0.85 and 0.87, respectively. A high concordance was observed in both tests at different times, with kappa values of 0.89 and 0.87 for PedsQL Children and Parents, respectively. The instrument used in this study was considered valid, consistent, and reproducible and has acceptable psychometric properties for the Brazilian population.

  3. Prodromal features of asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Beer, S; Laver, J; Karpuch, J; Chabut, S; Aladjem, M

    1987-01-01

    One hundred and thirty four ambulatory children with bronchial asthma were investigated in the Pediatric Pulmonary-Allergic Service. In 95 patients an interval characterised by prodromal respiratory symptoms (cough, rhinorrhoea, and wheezing), behavioural changes (irritability, apathy, anxiety, and sleep disorders), gastrointestinal symptoms (abdominal pain and anorexia), fever, itching, skin eruptions, and toothache preceded the onset of the attack of asthma. Each child had his own constant ...

  4. Inhaler Reminders Significantly Improve Asthma Patients' Use of Controller Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... controller medications Share | Inhaler reminders significantly improve asthma patients’ use of controller medications Published Online: July 22, ... the burden and risk of asthma, but many patients do not use them regularly. This poor adherence ...

  5. Medication use in children with asthma: not a child size problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Charu; Armour, Carol; Asperen, Peter Paul Van; Moles, Rebekah; Saini, Bandana

    2011-12-01

    The global burden of pediatric asthma is high. Governments and health-care systems are affected by the increasing costs of childhood asthma--in terms of direct health-care costs and indirect costs due to loss of parental productivity, missed school days, and hospitalizations. Despite the availability of effective treatment, the current use of medications in children with asthma is suboptimal. The purpose of this review is to scope the empirical literature to identify the problems associated with the use of pediatric asthma medications. The findings will help to design interventions aiming to improve the use of asthma medications among children. A literature search using electronic search engines (i.e., Medline, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA), PubMed, PsycINFO, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL)) and the search terms "asthma," "children," and "medicines" (and derivatives of these keywords) was conducted. The search terms were expanded to include emergent themes arising out of search findings. Content themes relating to parents, children themselves, health-care professionals, organizational systems, and specific medications and devices were found. Within these themes, key issues included a lack of parental knowledge about asthma and asthma medications, lack of information provided to parents, parental beliefs and fears, parental behavioral problems, the high costs of medications and devices, the child's self-image, the need for more child responsibility, physician nonadherence to prescribing guidelines, "off-label" prescribing, poor understanding of teachers, lack of access to educational resources, and specific medications. These key issues should be taken into account when modifying the development of educational tools. These tools should focus on targeting the children themselves, the parent/carers, the health-care professionals, and various organizational systems.

  6. A Scalable Data Integration and Analysis Architecture for Sensor Data of Pediatric Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripelis, Dimitris; Ambite, José Luis; Chiang, Yao-Yi; Eckel, Sandrah P; Habre, Rima

    2017-04-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, in the United States there are 6.8 million children living with asthma. Despite the importance of the disease, the available prognostic tools are not sufficient for biomedical researchers to thoroughly investigate the potential risks of the disease at scale. To overcome these challenges we present a big data integration and analysis infrastructure developed by our Data and Software Coordination and Integration Center (DSCIC) of the NIBIB-funded Pediatric Research using Integrated Sensor Monitoring Systems (PRISMS) program. Our goal is to help biomedical researchers to efficiently predict and prevent asthma attacks. The PRISMS-DSCIC is responsible for collecting, integrating, storing, and analyzing real-time environmental, physiological and behavioral data obtained from heterogeneous sensor and traditional data sources. Our architecture is based on the Apache Kafka, Spark and Hadoop frameworks and PostgreSQL DBMS. A main contribution of this work is extending the Spark framework with a mediation layer, based on logical schema mappings and query rewriting, to facilitate data analysis over a consistent harmonized schema. The system provides both batch and stream analytic capabilities over the massive data generated by wearable and fixed sensors.

  7. Cost-consequence analysis of multimodal interventions with environmental components for pediatric asthma in the state of Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassal, Mandeep S; Diette, Gregory B; Dowdy, David W

    2013-08-01

    Applied environmental strategies for asthma control are often expensive, but may save longer-term healthcare costs. Whether these savings outweigh additional costs of implementing these strategies is uncertain. We conducted a systematic review to estimate the expenditures and savings of environmental interventions for asthma in the state of Maryland. Direct costs included hospitalizations, emergency room, and clinic visits. Indirect expenditures included costs of lost work productivity and travel incurred during the usage of healthcare services. We used decision analysis, assuming a hypothetical cohort of the approximated 49,290 pediatric individuals in Maryland with persistent asthma, to compare costs and benefits of environmental asthma interventions against the standard of care (no intervention) from the societal perspective. Three interventions among nine articles met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review: 1) environmental education using medical professionals; 2) education using non-medical personnel; and 3) multi-component strategy involving education with non-medical personnel, allergen-impermeable covers, and pest management. All interventions were found to be cost-saving relative to the standard of care. Home environmental education using non-medical professionals yielded the highest net savings of $14.1 million (95% simulation interval (SI): $-.283 million, $19.4 million), while the multi-component intervention resulted in the lowest net savings of $8.1 million (95% SI: $-4.9 million, $15.9 million). All strategies were most sensitive to the baseline number of hospitalizations in those not receiving targeted interventions for asthma. Limited environmental reduction strategies for asthma are likely to be cost-saving to the healthcare system in Maryland and should be considered for broader scale-up in other economically similar settings.

  8. Assesment of Quality of Life in Children with Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhat Gümüş

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Bronchial asthma is among the most common chronic pediatric diseases that can result in variable restriction in the physical, emotional and social aspects of the patient%u2019s life. The aim of this study was to assess impairment on quality of life (QOL in asthmatic children. Material and Method: Ninety seven patients aged between 7 and 15 years which followed up at Pediatric Pulmonology Department of Dicle University Hospital were included into the study, during October 2009 %u2013 January 2010. To assess the quality of life Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life questionnaire%u2019s (PAQLQ self-applied Turkish version was used. In addition, the severity of asthma was measured using by Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT. Results: The male to female ratio of asthmatic children was 2/1 and the mean age was 10.0 %uF0B1 2.5 years. Severity of asthma, history of steroid use and low family income were found as having negative effect on the PAQLQ scores (p < 0.001. Mother%u2019s education level also had statistically significant effect on the PAQLQ scores (P = 0.02. Father%u2019s education level; patient%u2019s age, gender, passive smoking exposure, family history of asthma or eczema and duration of disease did not have statistically significant effect on PAQLQ scores (p>0.05. Asthma control test score had a significant correlation with PAQLQ score (p

  9. An association study of 13 SNPs from seven candidate genes with pediatric asthma and a preliminary study for genetic testing by multiple variants in Taiwanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiu-Yao; Liou, Ya-Huei; Wu, Ying-Jye; Hsiao, Ya-Hsin; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2009-03-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in children. It is caused by complex interactions between various genetic factors and exposures to environmental allergens and irritants. Because of the heterogeneity of the disease and the genetic and cultural differences among different populations, a proper association study and genetic testing for asthma and susceptibility genes is difficult to perform. We assessed 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in seven well-known asthma susceptibility genes and looked for association with pediatric asthma using 449 asthmatic subjects and 512 non-asthma subjects in Taiwanese population. CD14-159 C/T and MS4A2 Glu237Gly were identified to have difference in genotype/allele frequencies between the control group and asthma patients. Moreover, the genotype synergistic analysis showed that the co-contribution of two functional SNPs was riskier or more protective from asthma attack. Our study provided a genotype synergistic method for studying gene-gene interaction on polymorphism basis and genetic testing using multiple polymorphisms.

  10. Stepwise management of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Ayesha N

    2015-09-01

    Stepwise management of asthma remains an area of evolving research. Asthma is one of the most expensive chronic diseases in the United States; stepwise management is an important area of focus, with several recent guidelines recommending management. This is a review of published English language literature, focusing on management guidelines for asthma in adult and pediatric patients. Asthma is a chronic disease whose assessment of severity allows for therapeutic goals to match the impairment noted. Good evidence exists to aid risk reduction, leading to decreased emergency room visits, preventing loss of lung function in adults and lung growth in children, and optimizing pharmacotherapy with reduced side effects profile. Recent asthma management guidelines incorporate 4 components of asthma care including: monitoring of severity, patient education, controlling external triggers, and medications, including recent attention to medication adherence. Asthma is an expensive chronic disease with preventive measures leading to reduced healthcare costs. Future targeted cytokine therapy to decrease serum and blood eosinophils may become an integral part of asthma management. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  11. Comprehensive Neighborhood Portraits and Child Asthma Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranjac, Ashley W; Kimbro, Rachel T; Denney, Justin T; Osiecki, Kristin M; Moffett, Brady S; Lopez, Keila N

    2017-07-01

    Objectives Previous research has established links between child, family, and neighborhood disadvantages and child asthma. We add to this literature by first characterizing neighborhoods in Houston, TX by demographic, economic, and air quality characteristics to establish differences in pediatric asthma diagnoses across neighborhoods. Second, we identify the relative risk of social, economic, and environmental risk factors for child asthma diagnoses. Methods We geocoded and linked electronic pediatric medical records to neighborhood-level social and economic indicators. Using latent profile modeling techniques, we identified Advantaged, Middle-class, and Disadvantaged neighborhoods. We then used a modified version of the Blinder-Oaxaca regression decomposition method to examine differences in asthma diagnoses across children in these different neighborhoods. Results Both compositional (the characteristics of the children and the ambient air quality in the neighborhood) and associational (the relationship between child and air quality characteristics and asthma) differences within the distinctive neighborhood contexts influence asthma outcomes. For example, unequal exposure to PM 2.5 and O 3 among children in Disadvantaged and Middle-class neighborhoods contribute to asthma diagnosis disparities within these contexts. For children in Disadvantaged and Advantaged neighborhoods, associational differences between racial/ethnic and socioeconomic characteristics and asthma diagnoses explain a significant proportion of the gap. Conclusions for Practice Our results provide evidence that differential exposure to pollution and protective factors associated with non-Hispanic White children and children from affluent families contribute to asthma disparities between neighborhoods. Future researchers should consider social and racial inequalities as more proximate drivers, not merely as associated, with asthma disparities in children.

  12. Clinical significance of determination the changes of serum CGRP, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 levels both before and after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guijin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of serum CGRP, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum CGRP(with RIA), MMP-9, TIMP-1 (with ELISA) levels were measured in 32 patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum CGRP levels was significantly lower in patients than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Abnormal lower CGRP and high MMP-9, TIMP-1 levels might play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of bronchial asthma in children. (authors)

  13. Long-acting beta(2)-agonists in management of childhood asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2000-01-01

    This review assesses the evidence regarding the use of long-acting beta(2)-agonists in the management of pediatric asthma. Thirty double-blind, randomized, controlled trials on the effects of formoterol and salmeterol on lung function in asthmatic children were identified. Single doses of inhaled......, long-acting beta(2)-agonists provide effective bronchodilatation and bronchoprotection when used as intermittent, single-dose treatment of asthma in children, but not when used as regular treatment. Future studies should examine the positioning of long-acting beta(2)-agonists as an "as needed" rescue...... medication instead of short-acting beta(2)-agonists for pediatric asthma management....

  14. Practice Variation in Management of Childhood Asthma Is Associated with Outcome Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbutt, Jane M; Yan, Yan; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Although specialist asthma care improves children's asthma outcomes, the impact of primary care management is unknown. To determine whether variation in preventive and acute care for asthma in pediatric practices affects patients' outcomes. For 22 practices, we aggregated 12-month patient data obtained by chart review and parent telephone interviews for 948 children, 3 to 12 years old, diagnosed with asthma to obtain practice-level measures of preventive (≥1 asthma maintenance visit/year) and acute (≥1 acute asthma visit/year) asthma care. Relationships between practice-level measures and individual asthma outcomes (symptom-free days, parental quality of life, emergency department [ED] visits, and hospitalizations) were explored using generalized estimating equations, adjusting for seasonality, specialist care, Medicaid insurance, single-family status, and race. For every 10% increase in the proportion of children in the practice receiving preventive care, symptom-free days per child increased by 7.6 days (P = .02) and ED visits per child decreased by 16.5% (P = .002), with no difference in parental quality of life or hospitalizations. Only the association between more preventive care and fewer ED visits persisted in adjusted analysis (12.2% reduction; P = .03). For every 10% increase in acute care provision, ED visits per child and hospitalizations per child decreased by 18.1% (P = .02) and 16.5% (P asthma care had improved outcomes, both impairment and risk. Persistence of improved risk outcomes in the adjusted analyses suggests that practice-level interventions to increase asthma care may reduce childhood asthma disparities. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Simulation-Based Quality Improvement Initiative Improves Pediatric Readiness in Community Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfill, Travis; Gawel, Marcie; Auerbach, Marc

    2017-07-17

    The National Pediatric Readiness Project Pediatric Readiness Survey (PRS) measured pediatric readiness in 4149 US emergency departments (EDs) and noted an average score of 69 on a 100-point scale. This readiness score consists of 6 domains: coordination of pediatric patient care (19/100), physician/nurse staffing and training (10/100), quality improvement activities (7/100), patient safety initiatives (14/100), policies and procedures (17/100), and availability of pediatric equipment (33/100). We aimed to assess and improve pediatric emergency readiness scores across Connecticut's hospitals. The aim of this study was to compare the National Pediatric Readiness Project readiness score before and after an in situ simulation-based assessment and quality improvement program in Connecticut hospitals. We leveraged in situ simulations to measure the quality of resuscitative care provided by interprofessional teams to 3 simulated patients (infant septic shock, infant seizure, and child cardiac arrest) presenting to their ED resuscitation bay. Assessments of EDs were made based on a composite quality score that was measured as the sum of 4 distinct domains: (1) adherence to sepsis guidelines, (2) adherence to cardiac arrest guidelines, (3) performance on seizure resuscitation, and (4) teamwork. After the simulation, a detailed report with scores, comparisons to other EDs, and a gap analysis were provided to sites. Based on this report, a regional children's hospital team worked collaboratively with each ED to develop action items and a timeline for improvements. The National Pediatric Readiness Project PRS scores, the primary outcome of this study, were measured before and after participation. Twelve community EDs in Connecticut participated in this project. The PRS scores were assessed before and after the intervention (simulation-based assessment and gap analysis/report-out). The average time between PRS assessments was 21 months. The PRS scores significantly improved 12

  16. A repeated short educational intervention improves asthma control and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Vicente; Peiró, Meritxell; Torrejón, Montserrat; Fletcher, Monica; López-Viña, Antolín; Ignacio, José María; Quintano, José Antonio; Bardagí, Santiago; Gich, Ignasi

    2015-11-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of an asthma educational programme based on a repeated short intervention (AEP-RSI) to improve asthma control (symptom control and future risk) and quality of life. A total of 230 adults with mild-to-moderate persistent uncontrolled asthma participated in a 1-year cluster randomised controlled multicentre study. The AEP-RSI was given in four face-to-face sessions at 3-month intervals, and included administration of a written personalised action plan and training on inhaler technique. Centres were randomised to the AEP-RSI (intervention) group or usual clinical practice group. Specialised centres using a standard educational programme were the gold standard group. A significant improvement in the Asthma Control Test score was observed in all three groups (pQuality of Life Questionnaire scores (0.95±1.04 and 0.89±0.84 versus 0.52±0.97, respectively). The AEP-RSI was effective in improving asthma symptom control, future risk and quality of life. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  17. Education in Quality Improvement for Pediatric Practice: an online program to teach clinicians QI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, David G; Morawski, Lori F; Lazorick, Suzanne; Bradbury, Scott; Kamachi, Karen; Suresh, Gautham K

    2014-01-01

    Education in Quality Improvement for Pediatric Practice (EQIPP) is an online program designed to improve evidence-based care delivery by teaching front-line clinicians quality improvement (QI) skills. Our objective was to evaluate EQIPP data to characterize 1) participant enrollment, use patterns, and demographics; 2) changes in performance in clinical QI measures from baseline to follow-up measurement; and 3) participant experience. We conducted an observational study of EQIPP participants utilizing 1 of 3 modules (asthma, immunizations, gastroesophageal reflux disease) from 2009 to 2013. Enrollment and use, demographic, and quality measure data were extracted directly from the EQIPP system; participant experience was assessed via an optional online survey. Study participants (n = 3501) were diverse in their gender, age, and race; most were board certified. Significant quality gaps were observed across many of the quality measures at baseline; sizable improvements were observed across most quality measures at follow-up. Participants were generally satisfied with their experience. The most influential module elements were collecting and analyzing data, creating and implementing aim statements and improvement plans, and completing "QI Basics." Online educational programs, such as EQIPP, hold promise for front-line clinicians to learn QI. The sustainability of the observed improvements in care processes and their linkage to improvements in health outcomes are unknown and are an essential topic for future study. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pharmacy Asthma Care Program (PACP) improves outcomes for patients in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Carol; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Brillant, Martha; Burton, Debbie; Emmerton, Lynne; Krass, Ines; Saini, Bandana; Smith, Lorraine; Stewart, Kay

    2007-06-01

    Despite national disease management plans, optimal asthma management remains a challenge in Australia. Community pharmacists are ideally placed to implement new strategies that aim to ensure asthma care meets current standards of best practice. The impact of the Pharmacy Asthma Care Program (PACP) on asthma control was assessed using a multi-site randomised intervention versus control repeated measures study design. Fifty Australian pharmacies were randomised into two groups: intervention pharmacies implemented the PACP (an ongoing cycle of assessment, goal setting, monitoring and review) to 191 patients over 6 months, while control pharmacies gave their usual care to 205 control patients. Both groups administered questionnaires and conducted spirometric testing at baseline and 6 months later. The main outcome measure was asthma severity/control status. 186 of 205 control patients (91%) and 165 of 191 intervention patients (86%) completed the study. The intervention resulted in improved asthma control: patients receiving the intervention were 2.7 times more likely to improve from "severe" to "not severe" than control patients (OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.64 to 4.37; p<0.001). The intervention also resulted in improved adherence to preventer medication (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.30; p = 0.03), decreased mean daily dose of reliever medication (difference -149.11 microg, 95% CI -283.87 to -14.36; p=0.03), a shift in medication profile from reliever only to a combination of preventer, reliever with or without long-acting beta agonist (OR 3.80, 95% CI 1.40 to 10.32; p=0.01) and improved scores on risk of non-adherence (difference -0.44, 95% CI -0.69 to -0.18; p=0.04), quality of life (difference -0.23, 95% CI -0.46 to 0.00; p=0.05), asthma knowledge (difference 1.18, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.63; p<0.01) and perceived control of asthma questionnaires (difference -1.39, 95% CI -2.44 to -0.35; p<0.01). No significant change in spirometric measures occurred in either group. A pharmacist

  19. The business case for pediatric asthma quality improvement in low-income populations: examining a provider-based pay-for-reporting intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Kristin L; Lemos, Kristin Andrews; Williams, Charlotte E; Esposito, Dominick; Greene, Sandra B

    2015-06-01

    To measure the return on investment (ROI) for a pediatric asthma pay-for-reporting intervention initiated by a Medicaid managed care plan in New York State. Practice-level, randomized prospective evaluation. Twenty-five primary care practices providing care to children enrolled in the Monroe Plan for Medical Care (the Monroe Plan). Practices were randomized to either treatment (13 practices, 11 participated) or control (12 practices). For each of its eligible members assigned to a treatment group practice, the Monroe plan paid a low monthly incentive fee to the practice. To receive the incentive, treatment group practices were required to conduct, and report to the Monroe Plan, the results of chart audits on eligible members. Chart audits were conducted by practices every 6 months. After each chart audit, the Monroe Plan provided performance feedback to each practice comparing its adherence to asthma care guidelines with averages from all other treatment group practices. Control practices continued with usual care. Intervention implementation and operating costs and per member, per month claims costs. ROI was measured by net present value (discounted cash flow analysis). The ROI to the Monroe Plan was negative, primarily due to high intervention costs and lack of reductions in spending on emergency department and hospital utilization for children in treatment relative to control practices. A pay-for-reporting, chart audit intervention is unlikely to achieve the meaningful reductions in utilization of high-cost services that would be necessary to produce a financial ROI in 2.5 years. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  20. Hypnosis in pediatrics: applications at a pediatric pulmonary center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbar, Ran D

    2002-01-01

    Background This report describes the utility of hypnosis for patients who presented to a Pediatric Pulmonary Center over a 30 month period. Methods Hypnotherapy was offered to 303 patients from May 1, 1998 – October 31, 2000. Patients offered hypnotherapy included those thought to have pulmonary symptoms due to psychological issues, discomfort due to medications, or fear of procedures. Improvement in symptoms following hypnosis was observed by the pulmonologist for most patients with habit cough and conversion reaction. Improvement of other conditions for which hypnosis was used was gauged based on patients' subjective evaluations. Results Hypnotherapy was associated with improvement in 80% of patients with persistent asthma, chest pain/pressure, habit cough, hyperventilation, shortness of breath, sighing, and vocal cord dysfunction. When improvement was reported, in some cases symptoms resolved immediately after hypnotherapy was first employed. For the others improvement was achieved after hypnosis was used for a few weeks. No patients' symptoms worsened and no new symptoms emerged following hypnotherapy. Conclusions Patients described in this report were unlikely to have achieved rapid improvement in their symptoms without the use of hypnotherapy. Therefore, hypnotherapy can be an important complementary therapy for patients in a pediatric practice. PMID:12460456

  1. Adolescent asthma self-management: patient and parent-caregiver perspectives on using social media to improve care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzera, Anthony D; Schneider, Tali K; Martinasek, Mary P; Lindenberger, James H; Couluris, Marisa; Bryant, Carol A; McDermott, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    Self-management of asthma can now leverage new media technologies. To optimize implementation they must employ a consumer-oriented developmental approach. This study explored benefits of and barriers to improved asthma self-management and identified key elements for the development of a digital media tool to enhance asthma control. Between August 2010 and January 2011, 18 teens with asthma and 18 parent-caregivers participated in semistructured in-depth interviews to identify mechanisms for improving asthma self-management and propose characteristics for developing a digital media tool to aid such efforts. Teens and caregivers enumerated physician-recommended strategies for asthma management as well as currently employed strategies. Both groups thought of a potential digital media solution as positive, but indicated specific design requirements for such a solution to have utility. Whereas most participants perceived mobile platforms to be viable modes to improve asthma self-management, interest in having social networking capabilities was mixed. A digital media product capable of tracking conditions, triggers, and related asthma activities can be a core element of improved asthma control for youth. Improved asthma control will help decrease school absenteeism. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  2. Effect of long-acting beta2 agonists on exacerbation rates of asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to examine the effect of long-acting beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists (LABAs) on the asthma exacerbation rate in pediatric patients. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) that included the use of LABAs to treat symptoms of pediatric asthma in children on inhaled cortico...

  3. ANTI-IGE THERAPY FOR SEVERE ASTHMA IN CHILDREN: TWO-YEAR TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Yu. Kulichenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes a two-year experience of treating children and adolescents with severe uncontrolled atopic asthma using Omalizumab. This treatment facilitated to achieve full asthma control in 70% of patients and partial control in 30% of patients. Anti-Ig Etherapy contributes to reduce the frequency of asthma relapses 77%, and the number of those seeking emergency medical treatment, particularly no need for in-patient asthma care. Thanks to treatment, lung function parameters improve, particularly in children with low bronchial patency parameters even after administration of broncholytics. Thanks to treatment with omalizumab, the dosage of inhalant glucocorticosteroids is reduced 1.5 to 2.5 times in 75% patients. Treatment tolerance in all children is satisfactory, no serious adverse events associated with the medication or any system side effects are registered in patients. Anti-IgE therapy is a good alternative to use of high and ultra-high doses of inhalant glucocorticosteroids in children with severe atopic asthma. Key words: omalizumab, anti-IgE-antibodies, treatment-resistant asthma, atopic asthma, treatment, children, adolescents, asthma control. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:57-65

  4. A systematic review of predictive models for asthma development in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Nkoy, Flory L; Stone, Bryan L; Schmick, Darell; Johnson, Michael D

    2015-11-28

    Asthma is the most common pediatric chronic disease affecting 9.6 % of American children. Delay in asthma diagnosis is prevalent, resulting in suboptimal asthma management. To help avoid delay in asthma diagnosis and advance asthma prevention research, researchers have proposed various models to predict asthma development in children. This paper reviews these models. A systematic review was conducted through searching in PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, the ACM Digital Library, IEEE Xplore, and OpenGrey up to June 3, 2015. The literature on predictive models for asthma development in children was retrieved, with search results limited to human subjects and children (birth to 18 years). Two independent reviewers screened the literature, performed data extraction, and assessed article quality. The literature search returned 13,101 references in total. After manual review, 32 of these references were determined to be relevant and are discussed in the paper. We identify several limitations of existing predictive models for asthma development in children, and provide preliminary thoughts on how to address these limitations. Existing predictive models for asthma development in children have inadequate accuracy. Efforts to improve these models' performance are needed, but are limited by a lack of a gold standard for asthma development in children.

  5. Regulation of CBL and ESR1 expression by microRNA-22‑3p, 513a-5p and 625-5p may impact the pathogenesis of dust mite-induced pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoyan; Xu, Miao; Ren, Zhaorui; Gu, Jianlei; Lu, Min; Lu, Quan; Zhong, Nanbert

    2016-08-01

    Despite evidence for the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) in pediatric asthma, the mechanism responsible has not yet been fully elucidated. We aimed to identify novel miRNAs and to study their pathogenic role(s) in children with dust mite-induced asthma in order to gain a better understanding of the underlying mechanism responsible for this disease. For this purpose, 62 patients with asthma as well as 62 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were recruited. Twelve pairs of subjects were randomly subjected to microarray-based discovery analysis using a miRCURY LNA™ array. The differential expression of miRNAs and their targeted messenger RNAs were validated using RT-qPCR. Plasma concentrations of cytokines were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. The results revealed that three novel miRNAs - miR-22-3p, miR‑513a-5p and miR-625-5p - were significantly downregulated in the asthma group compared with the control group (pasthma attack. Our findings may provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of pediatric asthma.

  6. Pharmacy Asthma Care Program (PACP) improves outcomes for patients in the community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Carol; Bosnic‐Anticevich, Sinthia; Brillant, Martha; Burton, Debbie; Emmerton, Lynne; Krass, Ines; Saini, Bandana; Smith, Lorraine; Stewart, Kay

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite national disease management plans, optimal asthma management remains a challenge in Australia. Community pharmacists are ideally placed to implement new strategies that aim to ensure asthma care meets current standards of best practice. The impact of the Pharmacy Asthma Care Program (PACP) on asthma control was assessed using a multi‐site randomised intervention versus control repeated measures study design. Methods Fifty Australian pharmacies were randomised into two groups: intervention pharmacies implemented the PACP (an ongoing cycle of assessment, goal setting, monitoring and review) to 191 patients over 6 months, while control pharmacies gave their usual care to 205 control patients. Both groups administered questionnaires and conducted spirometric testing at baseline and 6 months later. The main outcome measure was asthma severity/control status. Results 186 of 205 control patients (91%) and 165 of 191 intervention patients (86%) completed the study. The intervention resulted in improved asthma control: patients receiving the intervention were 2.7 times more likely to improve from “severe” to “not severe” than control patients (OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.64 to 4.37; p<0.001). The intervention also resulted in improved adherence to preventer medication (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.30; p = 0.03), decreased mean daily dose of reliever medication (difference −149.11 μg, 95% CI −283.87 to −14.36; p = 0.03), a shift in medication profile from reliever only to a combination of preventer, reliever with or without long‐acting β agonist (OR 3.80, 95% CI 1.40 to 10.32; p = 0.01) and improved scores on risk of non‐adherence (difference −0.44, 95% CI −0.69 to −0.18; p = 0.04), quality of life (difference −0.23, 95% CI −0.46 to 0.00; p = 0.05), asthma knowledge (difference 1.18, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.63; p<0.01) and perceived control of asthma questionnaires (difference −1.39, 95% CI −2.44 to −0.35; p<0

  7. Asthma Management in the Era of Smart-Medicine: Devices, Gadgets, Apps and Telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katwa, Umakanth; Rivera, Estefania

    2018-03-10

    Asthma is the most common chronic pediatric condition. Effective asthma management requires a proactive and inclusive approach that controls the patient's symptoms and prevents recurrence of exacerbations. Clinicians should encourage patients to become involved in their management since self-management approaches have proven to be an effective means for chronic illness treatment. Novel forms of self-monitoring and management are technological interventions. In the last decade, novel technology has been developed and used to improve asthma control since it is a powerful agent that addresses a variety of challenges in chronic disease management such as education, communication and adherence. A myriad of technology-based strategies are available although many of these are not evidence based and further studies are needed to evaluate their efficacy in specific asthma-control endpoints. Herein, authors present a review of current and future technology-based options for asthma management and a comparison between them.

  8. Poor sleep quality has an adverse effect on childhood asthma control and lung function measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Youn Ho; Choi, Sun Hee; Jang, Sun Jung; Baek, Ji Hyeon; Jee, Hye Mi; Kim, Mi Ae; Chae, Kyu Young; Han, Man Yong

    2017-08-01

    It is unclear as to whether sleep respiratory breathing disorder (SRBD) is a risk factor for uncontrolled asthma in children. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate whether SRBD may have an adverse effect on childhood asthma control and lung function measures. This was a cross-sectional study of 220 children with well-controlled (n = 108), partly controlled (n = 92), and uncontrolled asthma (n = 20) according to the Global Initiative for Asthma guideline. SRBD was assessed using the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ). The association of SRBD with partly controlled/uncontrolled asthma was investigated on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Of 220 children with asthma, 43 (19.6%) had SRBD: well-controlled, 16.7% (18/108); partly controlled, 21.7% (20/92); and uncontrolled, 25.0% (5/20; P = 0.54). There was a significant difference in forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV 1 /FVC; P = 0.007) and childhood asthma control test (C-ACT) score (P asthma control status, but not in PSQ score (P = 0.18). Children with obstructive sleep apnea (PSQ >0.33) had a lower C-ACT score compared with controls (PSQ ≤0.33; 19.6 ± 5.1 vs 22.0 ± 4.2, P = 0.002). PSQ score was negatively correlated with FEV 1 /FVC (r = -0.16, P = 0.02). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, high PSQ score increased the odds of having partly controlled/uncontrolled asthma by 9.12 (95% CI: 1.04-79.72, P = 0.046) after adjusting for confounding factors. SRBD is an independent risk factor for partly controlled/uncontrolled asthma and has an adverse effect on lung function measures in children. Further research is warranted to determine whether the improvement of sleep quality may also enhance level of asthma control and lung function in children. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. Asthma symptoms improvement in moderate persistent asthma patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD: the role of proton-pump inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus D. Susanto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate effect of proton pump inhibitor (esomeprazole on asthma symptoms, use of inhaled bronchodilator and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR in moderate persistent asthma with gastroesofageal refluks disease (GERD. This randomized single blind, controlled clinical trial study was conducted at Persahabatan Hospital, Jakarta from July 2004 until October 2005. Samples were moderate persistent asthma patients with GERD. GERD is diagnosed GERD symptoms and proof of oesophagitis from endoscopy and or histapatologic examination from oesophagus biopsy. Phase 1:2 week run-in period patient received inhaled budesonide 2x200 ug/day. Phase 2: patient randomised to receive inhaled budesonide 2 x 400 ug/day with esomeprazole 40 mg/day or without esomeprazole (control group for 8 weeks. Phase 3: 4 week wash out period, patient receive inhaled budesonide 2 x 200 ug/day. Diary cards were assessed at run-in periode, after treatment 4 weeks, 8 weeks and wash out. There were 32 patients (23 female and 9 male completed the study. Mean total asthma symptoms score daily were significantly decreased on esomeprazole vs without esomeprazole after 8 weeks (-2.29 vs -0.90; p < 0.05. Mean use of inhaled bronchodilator was significantly decreased on esomeprazole vs without esomeprazole after 8 weeks (-1.09 vs -0.42; p < 0.05. Morning and evening PEFR improved higher on esomeprazole than without esomeprazol but were not significantly difference. In conclusion, administration esomeprazole 40 mg daily improved asthma symptoms and lower the use of inhaled bronchodilator in moderate persistent asthma patients with GERD. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 169-74Keywords: Asthma symptoms, inhaled bronchodilator, moderate persistent asthma, GERD, esomeprazole

  10. Rural Asthma: Current Understanding of Prevalence, Patterns, and Interventions for Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Robin Dawson; Ownby, Dennis R

    2017-06-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic illness of children and adolescents in the USA. While asthma has been understood to disproportionately affect urban dwellers, recent investigations have revealed rural pediatric asthma prevalence to be very similar to urban and to be more closely correlated with socioeconomic and environmental factors than geographic location or population density. Rural children experience factors unique to location that impact asthma development and outcomes, including housing quality, cigarette smoke exposure, and small/large-scale farming. Additionally, there are challenging barriers to appropriate asthma care that frequently are more severe for those living in rural areas, including insurance status, lack of primary care providers and pulmonary specialists, knowledge deficits (both patient and provider), and a lack of culturally tailored asthma interventions. Interventions designed to address rural pediatric asthma disparities are more likely to be successful when targeted to specific challenges, such as the use of school-based services or telemedicine to mitigate asthma care access issues. Continued research on understanding the complex interaction of specific rural environmental factors with host factors can inform future interventions designed to mitigate asthma disparities.

  11. Outpatient Management of Asthma in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Schultz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal aims of asthma management in childhood are to obtain symptom control that allows individuals to engage in unrestricted physical activities and to normalize lung function. These aims should be achieved using the fewest possible medications. Ensuring a correct diagnosis is the first priority. The mainstay of asthma management remains pharmacotherapy. Various treatment options are discussed. Asthma monitoring includes the regular assessment of asthma severity and asthma control, which then informs decisions regarding the stepping up or stepping down of therapy. Delivery systems and devices for inhaled therapy are discussed, as are the factors influencing adherence to prescribed treatment. The role of the pediatric health care provider is to establish a functional partnership with the child and their family in order to minimize the impact of asthma symptoms and exacerbations during childhood.

  12. [QOL questionnaire for pediatric patients with bronchial asthma and their parents or caregivers. Preparation and evaluation of the short form version 2008 (Gifu)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Naomi; Hirayama, Koichiro; Matsui, Eiko; Teramoto, Takahide; Kaneko, Hideo; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Orii, Kenji; Kawamoto, Minako; Funato, Michinori; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Kawamoto, Norio; Morita, Hideyuki; Kimura, Takeshi; Nada, Masatoshi; Tokumi, Tetsuji; Hori, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Rinko

    2008-08-01

    The QOL questionnaire version 2001 for pediatric patients with bronchial asthma and their parents or caregivers includes 15 questions for patients under the age of 4 years and 20 questions for patients over the age of 4 years. We have already reported that the QOL questionnaire version 2001 reflects reliability (including reproducibility), factorial validity, and changes in paroxysmal attacks of asthma. In this study, we revised the questionnaire for use in routine medical practice. In this study, based on the data of a previous report, the number of questions was reduced further and it was revised to the questionnaire the short form by integrated data. The revised version 2008 (Gifu) consisted of emotional burden, asthma attack, instability of symptoms and proper acceptance of asthma as a common factor, moreover 4 or more years old added load of exercise factor which consisted of two questions in each factor. This QOL short form questionnaire version 2008 (Gifu) is a disease specific questionnaire in comparison with health control, bronchial asthma and non-asthmatic patients, such as atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis. Although Cronbach's alpha fell with reduction of the number of questions, we conclude that it was acceptable in the clinical practice.

  13. Medical charge of asthma care in admitted Thai children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visitsunthorn, Nualanong; Durongpisitkul, Worawan; Uoonpan, Srisakul; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Vichyanond, Pakit

    2005-11-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in children. Due to high admission rate for acute asthmatic attack, children often miss their schools and parents have to stop working to take care of them. These affect both mental and physical health as well as socioeconomic status of the family and the country. To evaluate medical charge of asthma care in children admitted to the Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University. The study was a retrospective and descriptive study. Data were collected from children with asthmatic attack admitted to the Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand from January 1st, 2000 to June 30th, 2003. Cost of room, food, drugs, devices, laboratory study and service charge were recorded. Total medical charges per year, per patient per admission and per patient per day were calculated. Data were analyzed with Chi square test, ANOVA and Post Hoc test. A p value of attack admitted to the Department of Pediatrics, Siriraj Hospital increased between 2000-2002 (113,147 and 176 in 2000, 2001, and 2002). Seventy two percent of the patients were asthma. The average duration of hospitalization was 4 days (95% CI, 3.6-4.3). Average medical charge per patient per admission and per day was 3236.20 and 998.60 Bahts respectively. There was no significant difference in the medical charge per patient among the admitted years. Medical charge of admission was significantly associated with the asthma severity. (p attack in children at Siriraj Hospital and the total medical charge per year increased between 2000-2002. Nevertheless, medical charge of asthma admission per person was unchanged. Main expense in medical charge of asthma admission was the cost of medication and room. Severity of asthma was related directly to medical charge.

  14. Hypnosis in pediatrics: applications at a pediatric pulmonary center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anbar Ran D

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This report describes the utility of hypnosis for patients who presented to a Pediatric Pulmonary Center over a 30 month period. Methods Hypnotherapy was offered to 303 patients from May 1, 1998 – October 31, 2000. Patients offered hypnotherapy included those thought to have pulmonary symptoms due to psychological issues, discomfort due to medications, or fear of procedures. Improvement in symptoms following hypnosis was observed by the pulmonologist for most patients with habit cough and conversion reaction. Improvement of other conditions for which hypnosis was used was gauged based on patients' subjective evaluations. Results Hypnotherapy was associated with improvement in 80% of patients with persistent asthma, chest pain/pressure, habit cough, hyperventilation, shortness of breath, sighing, and vocal cord dysfunction. When improvement was reported, in some cases symptoms resolved immediately after hypnotherapy was first employed. For the others improvement was achieved after hypnosis was used for a few weeks. No patients' symptoms worsened and no new symptoms emerged following hypnotherapy. Conclusions Patients described in this report were unlikely to have achieved rapid improvement in their symptoms without the use of hypnotherapy. Therefore, hypnotherapy can be an important complementary therapy for patients in a pediatric practice.

  15. Adaptation of an asthma management program to a small clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Kenny Yat-Choi; Redjal, Nasser; Scott, Lyne; Li, Marilyn; Thobani, Salima; Yang, Brian

    2017-07-01

    Asthma management programs, such as the Breathmobile program, have been extremely effective in reducing asthma morbidity and increasing disease control; however, their high start-up costs may preclude their implementation in smaller health systems. In this study, we extended validated asthma disease management principles from the Breathmobile program to a smaller clinic system utilizing existing resources and compared clinical outcomes. Cox-regression analyses were conducted to determine the cumulative probability that a new patient entering the program would achieve improved clinical control of asthma with each subsequent visit to the program. A weekly asthma disease management clinic was initiated in an existing multi-specialty pediatric clinic in collaboration with the Breathmobile program. Existing nursing staff was utilized in conjunction with an asthma specialist provider. Patients were referred from a regional healthcare maintenance organization and patients were evaluated and treated every 2 months. Reduction in emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations, and improvements in asthma control were assessed at the end of 1 year. A total of 116 patients were enrolled over a period of 1 year. Mean patient age was 6.4 years at the time of their first visit. Patient ethnicity was self-described predominantly as Hispanic or African American. Initial asthma severity for most patients, classified in accordance with national guidelines, was "moderate persistent." After 1 year of enrollment, there was a 69% and 92% reduction in ED/urgent care visits and hospitalizations, respectively, compared with the year before enrollment. Up to 70% of patients achieved asthma control by the third visit. Thirty-six different patients were seen during 1 year for a total of $15,938.70 in contracted reimbursements. A large-scale successful asthma management program can be adapted to a stationary clinic system and achieve comparable results.

  16. Inhibition of Common Cold-Induced Aggravation of Childhood Asthma by Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Shigemi Yoshihara; Hironobu Fukuda; Toshio Abe; Mitsuhiro Nishida; Yumi Yamada; Noriko Kanno; Osamu Arisaka

    2012-01-01

    Background: : Virus infection is an important risk factor for aggravation of childhood asthma. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of drugs on aggravation of asthma induced by a common cold. Methods: : Asthma control was examined in a survey of 1,014 Japanese pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. The occurrence of common cold, asthma control, and drugs used for asthma control were investigated using a modified Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) for patients aged

  17. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisawa, Motohiro; Nishima, Sankei; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Kondo, Naomi

    2013-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JSPACI) was started in 1966 and currently has 3613 members as of August 1, 2012. The number of pediatricians specializing in allergies who have been certified by the Japanese Society of Allergology is 817. Among these, there are 125 training directors and training facilities for allergy and clinical immunology. The JSPACI first published an asthma guideline specific for children in 2000, and this has been revised every 3 yrs, contributing to better control of pediatric asthma. Food allergy management guidelines were first developed in 2005, which have helped to improve the care of food allergy patients. Among 514 pediatric training programs by the Japanese Society of Pediatrics, there are 312 facilities routinely performing oral food challenges. Among these, there were already 53 facilities performing oral immunotherapy at the end of 2011, treating 1400 cases of food allergy. The prevalence of pediatric allergic diseases has increased in Japan over the past 50 yrs. A number of International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood surveys have been conducted in the past at specific times. The prevalence of wheezing among children aged 13-14 yrs in 2002 was 13.0%. Multi-year surveys found a 1.5- to 2-fold increase every 10 yrs until 2002. However, according to the latest data in 2012, asthma prevalence seems to have slightly decreased in Japan. Food allergy mainly associated with infantile atopic eczema among infants younger than 1 yr of age is the most common form as with other developed countries. The estimated food allergy prevalence based on data from several surveys is 5-10% among infants (0-6 yrs) and 1-2% among schoolchildren (6-15 yrs). A variety of patients suffering from primary deficiency syndrome have been actively analyzed. Previously, antibody defects and well-defined syndromes with immunodeficiency were analyzed, but recent research is focusing on not only acquired immune

  18. Characteristics of asthma attack with long-term management for bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Noriko; Hasegawa, Shunji; Hashimoto, Kunio; Matsubara, Tomoyo; Ichiyama, Takashi; Furukawa, Susumu

    2009-10-01

    There have been no reports on the evaluation of the usefulness of long-term asthma management based on the Japanese Pediatric Guideline for the Treatment and Management of Bronchial Asthma 2005 (JPGL 2005). The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the records of 350 patients admitted to Yamaguchi University Hospital who had asthma attacks from January 2006 to June 2008. There were 149 patients who were treated for more than 3 months in accordance with the guideline (long-term management group) and 201 who were not (non-long-term management group). The patients were divided into three age groups: 100 infants, 159 toddlers, and 91 schoolchildren. The onset age of asthma in the long-term management group was earlier than that in the non-long-term management group in toddlers and schoolchildren. The white blood cell counts and C-reactive protein levels were higher in the non-long-term management group in schoolchildren, suggesting the complication of some infections. The severity of asthma in the long-term management group was greater than that in the non-long-term management group among all three age groups. There were no significant differences, however, in the severity of asthma attack at admission between the long-term and non-long-term management groups in the three age groups. Patients who had severe asthma tended to be treated with long-term management, which suggests that long-term asthma management according to JPGL 2005 may reduce the severity of asthma attack at that admission, because the severity of asthma in patients undergoing long-term management correlates with the severity of asthma attack.

  19. Examining Household Asthma Management Behavior through a Microeconomic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Brandt, Sylvia J.; Tager, Ira B.

    2014-01-01

    National guidelines on the effective management of pediatric asthma have been promoted for over 20 years, yet asthma-related morbidity among low-income children remains disproportionately high. To date, household and clinical interventions designed to remediate these differences have been informed largely by a health behavior framework. However,…

  20. [Epigenetics in allergic diseases and asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Rodríguez, José A; Krause, Bernardo J; Uauy, Ricardo; Casanello, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases and asthma are the result of complex interactions between genetic predisposition and environmental factors. Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic disease among children. In this article we review some environmental factors like: allergen exposition, tobacco, bacteria, microbial components, diet, obesity and stress, which influences during intrauterine and infancy life in the epigenetic regulation of asthma and allergic diseases. The review has been done in three models: in-vitro, animal and human. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. The Medical Home Model and Pediatric Asthma Symptom Severity: Evidence from a National Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanasarot, Sirikan; Carlson, Angeline M

    2018-04-01

    The objective was to investigate the association between receiving care under the medical home model and parental assessment of the severity of asthma symptoms. It was hypothesized that parents of children who received care under the medical home model reported less severe asthma symptoms compared with their counterparts, whose care did not meet the medical home criteria. Secondary analyses were conducted using cross-sectional data from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health. Children with asthma aged 0-17 years were included and classified as receiving care from the medical home if their care contained 5 components: a personal doctor, a usual source of sick care, family-centered care, no problems getting referrals, and effective care coordination. Ordinal logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between parent-rated severity of asthma symptoms (mild, moderate, and severe symptoms) and the medical home. Approximately 52% of 8229 children who reported having asthma received care from the medical home. Only 30.8% of children with severe asthma symptoms received care that met the medical home criteria, compared to 55.7% of children with mild symptoms. After accounting for confounding factors, obtaining care under the medical home model decreased the odds of parent-reported severe asthma symptoms by 31% (adjusted odds ratio 0.69; 95% CI, 0.56-0.85). Study results suggest that the medical home model can reduce parent-rated severity of asthma symptoms. The findings highlight the importance of providing medical home care to children with asthma to improve the outcomes that matter most to children and their families.

  2. Low-dose budesonide treatment improves lung function in patients with infrequent asthma symptoms at baseline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddel, H. K.; Busse, W. W.; Pedersen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    symptom frequency groups (Figure). CONCLUSIONS: Long-term, once-daily, low-dose budesonide treatment plus usual asthma medication improves lung function in patients with mild, recent-onset asthma. These beneficial effects were seen even in patients with the lowest baseline asthma symptom frequency (0......RATIONALE: Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are highly effective in low doses for improving asthma outcomes, including lung function. In the past, ICS treatment was recommended for patients with 'persistent' asthma, defined by symptoms >2 days/week.1 However, evidence is lacking for the benefit of ICS...... in patients with less frequent symptoms at presentation. This was investigated in a post-hoc analysis of the multinational inhaled Steroid Treatment As Regular Therapy in early asthma (START) study.2 METHODS: Patients aged 4-66 years (median 21 years) with a history of recent-onset mild asthma (11 years...

  3. The Potential of Mobile Apps for Improving Asthma Self-Management: A Review of Publicly Available and Well-Adopted Asthma Apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinschert, Peter; Jakob, Robert; Barata, Filipe; Kramer, Jan-Niklas

    2017-01-01

    Background Effective disease self-management lowers asthma’s burden of disease for both individual patients and health care systems. In principle, mobile health (mHealth) apps could enable effective asthma self-management interventions that improve a patient’s quality of life while simultaneously reducing the overall treatment costs for health care systems. However, prior reviews in this field have found that mHealth apps for asthma lack clinical evaluation and are often not based on medical guidelines. Yet, beyond the missing evidence for clinical efficacy, little is known about the potential apps might have for improving asthma self-management. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the potential of publicly available and well-adopted mHealth apps for improving asthma self-management. Methods The Apple App store and Google Play store were systematically searched for asthma apps. In total, 523 apps were identified, of which 38 apps matched the selection criteria to be included in the review. Four requirements of app potential were investigated: app functions, potential to change behavior (by means of a behavior change technique taxonomy), potential to promote app use (by means of a gamification components taxonomy), and app quality (by means of the Mobile Application Rating Scale [MARS]). Results The most commonly implemented functions in the 38 reviewed asthma apps were tracking (30/38, 79%) and information (26/38, 68%) functions, followed by assessment (20/38, 53%) and notification (18/38, 47%) functions. On average, the reviewed apps applied 7.12 of 26 available behavior change techniques (standard deviation [SD]=4.46) and 4.89 of 31 available gamification components (SD=4.21). Average app quality was acceptable (mean=3.17/5, SD=0.58), whereas subjective app quality lied between poor and acceptable (mean=2.65/5, SD=0.87). Additionally, the sum scores of all review frameworks were significantly correlated (lowest correlation: r36=.33, P=.04 between

  4. Disparities in assessments of asthma control between children, parents, and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shefer, Galit; Donchin, Milka; Manor, Orly; Levy-Hevroni, Revital; Schechter, Abraham; Cohen, Rinat; Cohen, Herman A; Kerem, Eitan; Engelhard, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of asthma control in children by physicians, patients and their parents was compared, assuming parents may underestimate symptoms in asthmatic children and exploring whether physicians tend to agree with them. Asthma control perception was assessed in 4- to 11-year-old asthmatic children and their parents, using C-ACT, during 2011-2012. Pediatric pulmonologists used GINA guidelines for their assessment; pediatricians, not having spirometry, used the information given in addition to physical examination. The C-ACT scores given by the children and their parents were further analyzed separately, and compared with their physicians' assessment. Statistical methods, which also measured possible influence of different variables, included kappa, Chi-square, linear-by-linear association, McNemar test and logistic regression. The study comprised 354 parents and children aged 4-11 years with moderate-severe asthma; 129 (36.4%) were treated by 23 pediatricians; 225 (63.6%) by 11 pediatric pulmonologists. The C-ACT was generally found valid in assessing asthma control (P children the asthma was uncontrolled. Nevertheless, of the 229 children who indicated their asthma was uncontrolled, 124 (54.1%) of their parents (κ 0.245; CI 0.15, 0.34) and 96 (41.9%) of their physicians believed it to be controlled (κ 0.331; 0.24, 0.43). Comparing the physician-child discordance vis-à-vis the parents, the significant difference was when 96/229 children (41.9%) and 34/126 parents (27.0%) indicated the asthma was uncontrolled while the physician determined it controlled (OR 1.95; 1.19, 3.24). There were no significant differences between pediatric pulmonologists and pediatricians. In addition to increasing awareness of parents to symptoms in their asthmatic children, physicians should question the child appropriately, as well as using the children's responses to C-ACT as an information source for properly assessing asthma control. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Associations between ozone, PM2.5, and four pollen types on emergency department pediatric asthma events during the warm season in New Jersey: a case-crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Jessie A; Bielory, Leonard; Fagliano, Jerald A

    2014-07-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases among school-aged children in the United States. Environmental respiratory irritants exacerbate asthma among children. Understanding the impact of a variety of known and biologically plausible environmental irritants and triggers among children in New Jersey - ozone, fine particulate matter (PM2.5), tree pollen, weed pollen, grass pollen and ragweed - would allow for informed public health interventions. Time-stratified case-crossover design was used to study the transient impact of ozone, PM2.5 and pollen on the acute onset of pediatric asthma. Daily emergency department visits were obtained for children aged 3-17 years with a primary diagnosis of asthma during the warm season (April through September), 2004-2007 (inclusive). Bi-directional control sampling was used to select two control periods for each case for a total of 65,562 inclusion days. Since the period of exposure prior to emergency department visit may be the most clinically relevant, lag exposures were investigated (same day (lag0), 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 as well as 3-day and 5-day moving averages). Multivariable conditional logistic regression controlling for holiday, school-in-session indicator, and 3-day moving average for temperature and relative humidity was used to examine the associations. Odds ratios are based on interquartile range (IQR) increases or 10 unit increases when IQR ranges were narrow. Single-pollutant models as well as multipollutant models were examined. Stratification on gender, race, ethnicity and socioeconomic status was explored. The associations with ozone and PM2.5 were strongest on the same day (lag0) of the emergency department visit (RR IQR=1.05, 95% CI 1.04-1.06) and (RR IQR=1.03, 95% CI 1.02-1.04), respectively, with a decreasing lag effect. Tree and weed pollen were associated with pediatric ED visits; the largest magnitudes of association was with the 5-day average (RR IQR=1.23, 95% CI 1.21-1.25) and (RR 10=1.13, 95% CI 1

  6. Longitudinal patterns of predominant asthma disease activity in pediatric patients enrolled in an asthma-specific disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lyne; Nichols, Breck; Choi Kwong, Kenny Yat; Morphew, Tricia; Jones, Craig A

    2008-08-01

    To determine if patterns of predominant asthma disease activity are more closely related than baseline asthma severity to measures of morbidity (acute asthma attack, emergency room visit/hospitalization, missed school days, and/or steroid burst). Retrospective analysis was performed for inner-city Los Angeles asthmatic children (3 to 18 years of age) during their first year of enrollment in an asthma-specific disease management program. All measures of morbidity were more closely related to patterns of predominant disease activity than baseline severity. We conclude that patterns of predominant disease activity are a more significant predictor of asthma morbidity than is baseline severity.

  7. Improvement of Pediatric Drug Development: Regulatory and Practical Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Katusra; Carroll, Kelly A; Onishi, Taku; Matsumaru, Naoki; Brasseur, Daniel; Nakamura, Hidefumi

    2016-03-01

    A dearth in pediatric drug development often leaves pediatricians with no alternative but to prescribe unlicensed or off-label drugs with a resultant increased risk of adverse events. We present the current status of pediatric drug development and, based on our data analysis, clarify the problems in this area. Further action is proposed to improve the drug development that has pediatric therapeutic orphan status. We analyzed all Phase II/III and Phase III trials in ClinicalTrials.gov that only included pediatric participants (Performance index, an indicator of pediatric drug development, was calculated by dividing the annual number of pediatric clinical trials by million pediatric populations acquired from Census.gov. Effects of the 2 Japanese premiums introduced in 2010, for the enhancement of pediatric drug development, were analyzed by comparing mean performance index prepremiums (2006-2009) and postpremiums (2010-2014) among Japan, the European Union, and the United States. The European Union Clinical Trials Register and published reports from the European Medicines Agency were also surveyed to investigate the Paediatric Committee effect on pediatric clinical trials in the European Union. Mean difference of the performance index in prepremiums and postpremiums between Japan and the European Union were 0.296 (P 15% after 2008. Recruitment and ethical obstacles make conducting pediatric clinical trials challenging. An improved operational framework for conducting clinical trials should mirror the ever-improving regulatory framework that incentivizes investment in pediatric clinical trials. Technological approaches, enhancements in electronic medical record systems, and community approaches that actively incorporate input from physicians, researchers, and patients could offer a sustainable solution to recruitment of pediatric study participants. The key therefore is to improve pediatric pharmacotherapy collaboration among industry, government, academia, and

  8. The Potential of Mobile Apps for Improving Asthma Self-Management: A Review of Publicly Available and Well-Adopted Asthma Apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinschert, Peter; Jakob, Robert; Barata, Filipe; Kramer, Jan-Niklas; Kowatsch, Tobias

    2017-08-02

    Effective disease self-management lowers asthma's burden of disease for both individual patients and health care systems. In principle, mobile health (mHealth) apps could enable effective asthma self-management interventions that improve a patient's quality of life while simultaneously reducing the overall treatment costs for health care systems. However, prior reviews in this field have found that mHealth apps for asthma lack clinical evaluation and are often not based on medical guidelines. Yet, beyond the missing evidence for clinical efficacy, little is known about the potential apps might have for improving asthma self-management. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of publicly available and well-adopted mHealth apps for improving asthma self-management. The Apple App store and Google Play store were systematically searched for asthma apps. In total, 523 apps were identified, of which 38 apps matched the selection criteria to be included in the review. Four requirements of app potential were investigated: app functions, potential to change behavior (by means of a behavior change technique taxonomy), potential to promote app use (by means of a gamification components taxonomy), and app quality (by means of the Mobile Application Rating Scale [MARS]). The most commonly implemented functions in the 38 reviewed asthma apps were tracking (30/38, 79%) and information (26/38, 68%) functions, followed by assessment (20/38, 53%) and notification (18/38, 47%) functions. On average, the reviewed apps applied 7.12 of 26 available behavior change techniques (standard deviation [SD]=4.46) and 4.89 of 31 available gamification components (SD=4.21). Average app quality was acceptable (mean=3.17/5, SD=0.58), whereas subjective app quality lied between poor and acceptable (mean=2.65/5, SD=0.87). Additionally, the sum scores of all review frameworks were significantly correlated (lowest correlation: r 36 =.33, P=.04 between number of functions and gamification

  9. Interventions to Improve Asthma Management of the School-Age Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Mary; Morrison, Amber

    2015-06-01

    Improvement of medication adherence in the school-age child can lead to improvement in quality of life, decreased morbidity, and a potential decreased risk of deferred academic, social, and emotional development. The objective of this article is to review barriers to asthma medication adherence and identify evidence-based techniques that improve medication management of the asthmatic child 5 to 12 years of age. A literature review was performed and articles were obtained through database searches within Medline, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), and PubMed. Research indicates that barriers to the adherence of medication regimens required for asthmatic children include poor understanding of the medication regimen, substandard education on symptom recognition and environmental triggers, rejection of the diagnosis, and a lack of support or understanding within the community. Researched techniques aimed to improve medication management in 5- to 12-year-olds include: computer-based education; workshops for parents, teachers, and children; incorporation of asthma education into classroom lessons; use of case managers; the introduction of a nurse practitioner in the school to provide care, including medication prescriptions for the asthmatic child; and assessment and evaluation of environmental and emotional triggers in the home and school. Collaboration of current data may help lead to a successful interventional model that can improve asthma management in this population. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Development of oral dispersible tablets containing prednisolone nanoparticles for the management of pediatric asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Dan; Liang, Zhong-Yuan; Cen, Yan-Yan; Zhang, He; Han, Mei-Gui; Tian, Yun-Qiao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Shu-Jun; Yang, Da-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop oral dispersible tablets containing prednisolone (PDS)-loaded chitosan nanoparticles using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC 101), lactose, and croscarmellose sodium (CCS). The PDS-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were formulated by ionotropic external gelation technique in order to enhance the solubility of PDS in salivary pH. Prepared nanoparticles were used for the development of oral fast disintegrating tablets by direct compression method. The prepared tablets were evaluated for disintegration time (DT), in vitro drug release (DR), thickness, weight variation, drug content uniformity, friability, and hardness. The effect of concentrations of the dependent variables (MCC, lactose, CCS) on DT and in vitro DR was studied. Fast disintegrating tablets of PDS can be prepared by using MCC, CCS, and lactose with enhanced solubility of PDS. The minimum DT was found to be 15 seconds, and the maximum DR within 30 minutes was 98.50%. All independent variables selected for the study were statistically significant. Oral fast disintegrating tablets containing PDS nanoparticles could be the better choice for the pediatric patients that would result in better patient compliance. From this study, it can be concluded that fast disintegrating tablets could be a potential drug delivery technology for the management of asthma in pediatrics. PMID:26640367

  11. Pediatric allergy and immunology in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gary W K; Li, Jing; Bao, Yi-Xiao; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Leung, Ting Fan; Li, Luan-Luan; Shao, Jie; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Liu, En-Mei; Shen, Kun-Ling; Chen, Yu-Zhi

    2018-03-01

    Over the past 30 years, China has enjoyed rapid economic development along with urbanization at a massive scale that the world has not experienced before. Such development has also been associated with a rapid rise in the prevalence of allergic disorders. Because of the large childhood population in the country, the burden of childhood allergic disorders has become one of the major challenges in the healthcare system. Among the Chinese centers participating in the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood, the data clearly showed a continuing rise in the prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic eczema. However, the discipline of pediatric allergy in mainland China is still in its infancy due to the lack of formal training program and subspecialty certification. Clinicians and researchers are increasingly interested in providing better care for patients with allergies by establishing pediatric allergy centers in different regions of the country. Many of them have also participated in national or international collaborative projects hoping to answer the various research questions related to the discipline of pediatric allergy and immunology. It is our hope that the research findings from China will not only improve the quality of care of affected children within this country but also the millions of patients with allergies worldwide. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  12. Steroid requirements and immune associations with vitamin D are stronger in children than adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goleva, Elena; Searing, Daniel A; Jackson, Leisa P; Richers, Brittany N; Leung, Donald Y M

    2012-05-01

    The effects of serum vitamin D status on atopy, steroid requirement, and functional responsiveness to corticosteroids in children versus adults with asthma have not been studied systematically. We sought to explore the age-specific effects of vitamin D in asthmatic patients. Serum vitamin D levels were examined in a prospective study of adults and children (102 healthy control subjects and 103 asthmatic patients). PBMCs were cultured for 3 hours with or without 100 nmol/L dexamethasone, and the expression of corticosteroid-regulated genes was detected by using real-time PCR. Serum IgE levels were measured, and information about asthmatic patients' steroid requirements was collected. Deficient serum vitamin D levels (<20 ng/mL) were found in 47.6% of asthmatic patients and 56.8% of healthy control subjects, with means ± SDs of 20.7 ± 9.8 and 19.2 ± 7.7 ng/mL, respectively. In multivariate regression models a significant positive correlation between serum vitamin D levels and the expression of vitamin D-regulated targets, cytochrome P450, family 24, subfamily a (cyp24a) expression by PBMCs (P = .0084, pediatric asthma group only) and serum LL-37 levels (P = .0006 in the pediatric group but P = .0067 in the adult asthma group), was found. An inverse association between vitamin D and serum IgE levels was observed in the pediatric (P = .006) asthma group. Serum vitamin D level (P = .05), as well as PBMC cyp24a expression (P = .0312), demonstrated a significant inverse relationship with daily inhaled corticosteroid dose in the pediatric asthma group only. Cyp24a expression in PBMCs correlated positively with in vitro suppression of TNF-α by dexamethasone (P = .05) and IL-13 (P = .0094) in PBMCs in the pediatric asthma group only. This study demonstrated significant associations between serum vitamin D status and steroid requirement and in vitro responsiveness to corticosteroids in the pediatric but not the adult asthma group. Vitamin D was also related to IgE levels

  13. Asthma exacerbation and proximity of residence to major roads: a population-based matched case-control study among the pediatric Medicaid population in Detroit, Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahl Robert

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between asthma and traffic-related pollutants has received considerable attention. The use of individual-level exposure measures, such as residence location or proximity to emission sources, may avoid ecological biases. Method This study focused on the pediatric Medicaid population in Detroit, MI, a high-risk population for asthma-related events. A population-based matched case-control analysis was used to investigate associations between acute asthma outcomes and proximity of residence to major roads, including freeways. Asthma cases were identified as all children who made at least one asthma claim, including inpatient and emergency department visits, during the three-year study period, 2004-06. Individually matched controls were randomly selected from the rest of the Medicaid population on the basis of non-respiratory related illness. We used conditional logistic regression with distance as both categorical and continuous variables, and examined non-linear relationships with distance using polynomial splines. The conditional logistic regression models were then extended by considering multiple asthma states (based on the frequency of acute asthma outcomes using polychotomous conditional logistic regression. Results Asthma events were associated with proximity to primary roads with an odds ratio of 0.97 (95% CI: 0.94, 0.99 for a 1 km increase in distance using conditional logistic regression, implying that asthma events are less likely as the distance between the residence and a primary road increases. Similar relationships and effect sizes were found using polychotomous conditional logistic regression. Another plausible exposure metric, a reduced form response surface model that represents atmospheric dispersion of pollutants from roads, was not associated under that exposure model. Conclusions There is moderately strong evidence of elevated risk of asthma close to major roads based on the results obtained

  14. Asthma exacerbation and proximity of residence to major roads: a population-based matched case-control study among the pediatric Medicaid population in Detroit, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between asthma and traffic-related pollutants has received considerable attention. The use of individual-level exposure measures, such as residence location or proximity to emission sources, may avoid ecological biases. Method This study focused on the pediatric Medicaid population in Detroit, MI, a high-risk population for asthma-related events. A population-based matched case-control analysis was used to investigate associations between acute asthma outcomes and proximity of residence to major roads, including freeways. Asthma cases were identified as all children who made at least one asthma claim, including inpatient and emergency department visits, during the three-year study period, 2004-06. Individually matched controls were randomly selected from the rest of the Medicaid population on the basis of non-respiratory related illness. We used conditional logistic regression with distance as both categorical and continuous variables, and examined non-linear relationships with distance using polynomial splines. The conditional logistic regression models were then extended by considering multiple asthma states (based on the frequency of acute asthma outcomes) using polychotomous conditional logistic regression. Results Asthma events were associated with proximity to primary roads with an odds ratio of 0.97 (95% CI: 0.94, 0.99) for a 1 km increase in distance using conditional logistic regression, implying that asthma events are less likely as the distance between the residence and a primary road increases. Similar relationships and effect sizes were found using polychotomous conditional logistic regression. Another plausible exposure metric, a reduced form response surface model that represents atmospheric dispersion of pollutants from roads, was not associated under that exposure model. Conclusions There is moderately strong evidence of elevated risk of asthma close to major roads based on the results obtained in this population

  15. Asthma and cystic fibrosis: A tangled web.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, Brian D

    2014-03-01

    Successfully diagnosing concomitant asthma in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a challenging proposition, and the utility of conventional diagnostic criteria of asthma in CF populations remains uncertain. Nonetheless, the accurate identification of individuals with CF and asthma allows appropriate tailoring of therapy, and should reduce the unnecessary use of asthma medication in broader CF cohorts. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic challenge posed by asthma in CF, both in terms of clinical evaluation, and of interpretation of pulmonary function testing and non-invasive markers of airway inflammation. We also examine how the role of cross-sectional thoracic imaging in CF and asthma can assist in the diagnosis of asthma in these patients. Finally, we critically appraise the evidence base behind the use of asthma medications in CF populations, with a particular focus on the use of inhaled corticosteroids and bronchodilators. As shall be discussed, the gaps in the current literature make further high-quality research in this field imperative. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2014; 49:205-213. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Readability, suitability, and characteristics of asthma action plans: examination of factors that may impair understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, H Shonna; Gupta, Ruchi S; Tomopoulos, Suzy; Wolf, Michael S; Mendelsohn, Alan L; Antler, Lauren; Sanchez, Dayana C; Lau, Claudia Hillam; Dreyer, Benard P

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of the complexity of asthma management has led to the development of asthma treatment guidelines that include the recommendation that all pediatric asthma patients receive a written asthma action plan. We assessed the readability, suitability, and characteristics of asthma action plans, elements that contribute to the effectiveness of action plan use, particularly for those with limited literacy. This was a descriptive study of 30 asthma action plans (27 state Department of Health (DOH)-endorsed, 3 national action plans endorsed by 6 states). (1) readability (as assessed by Flesch Reading Ease, Flesch-Kincaid, Gunning Fog, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, Forcast), (2) suitability (Suitability Assessment of Materials [SAM], adequate: ≥ 0.4; unsuitable: typography (30.0%), learning stimulation/motivation (26.7%), and graphics (13.3%). There were no statistically significant differences between the average grade level or SAM score of state DOH developed action plans and those from or adapted from national organizations. Plans varied with respect to terms used, symptoms included, and recommended actions. Specific improvements in asthma action plans could maximize patient and parent understanding of appropriate asthma management and could particularly benefit individuals with limited literacy skills.

  17. Predictive value of serum sST2 in preschool wheezers for development of asthma with high FeNO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelaar, M E; van de Kant, K D; Dijk, F N; Klaassen, E M; Grotenboer, N S; Nawijn, M C; Dompeling, E; Koppelman, G H

    2017-11-01

    Wheezing is common in childhood. However, current prediction models of pediatric asthma have only modest accuracy. Novel biomarkers and definition of subphenotypes may improve asthma prediction. Interleukin-1-receptor-like-1 (IL1RL1 or ST2) is a well-replicated asthma gene and associates with eosinophilia. We investigated whether serum sST2 predicts asthma and asthma with elevated exhaled NO (FeNO), compared to the commonly used Asthma Prediction Index (API). Using logistic regression modeling, we found that serum sST2 levels in 2-3 years-old wheezers do not predict doctors' diagnosed asthma at age 6 years. Instead, sST2 predicts a subphenotype of asthma characterized by increased levels of FeNO, a marker for eosinophilic airway inflammation. Herein, sST2 improved the predictive value of the API (AUC=0.70, 95% CI 0.56-0.84), but had also significant predictive value on its own (AUC=0.65, 95% CI 0.52-0.79). Our study indicates that sST2 in preschool wheezers has predictive value for the development of eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthmatic children at school age. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  18. Use of mobile devices and the internet for multimedia informed consent delivery and data entry in a pediatric asthma trial: Study design and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Kathryn; Holbrook, Janet T; Antal, Holly; Shade, David; Bunnell, H Timothy; McCahan, Suzanne M; Wise, Robert A; Pennington, Chris; Garfinkel, Paul; Wysocki, Tim

    2015-05-01

    Phase III/IV clinical trials are expensive and time consuming and often suffer from poor enrollment and retention rates. Pediatric trials are particularly difficult because scheduling around the parent, participant and potentially other sibling schedules can be burdensome. We are evaluating using the internet and mobile devices to conduct the consent process and study visits in a streamlined pediatric asthma trial. Our hypothesis is that these study processes will be non-inferior and will be less expensive compared to a traditional pediatric asthma trial. Parents and participants, aged 12 through 17 years, complete the informed consent process by viewing a multi-media website containing a consent video and study material in the streamlined trial. Participants are provided an iPad with WiFi and EasyOne spirometer for use during FaceTime visits and online twice daily symptom reporting during an 8-week run-in followed by a 12-week study period. Outcomes are compared with participants completing a similarly designed traditional trial comparing the same treatments within the same pediatric health-system. After 8 weeks of open-label Advair 250/50 twice daily, participants in both trial types are randomized to Advair 250/50, Flovent 250, or Advair 100/50 given 1 inhalation twice daily. Study staff track time spent to determine study costs. Participants have been enrolled in the streamlined and traditional trials and recruitment is ongoing. This project will provide important information on both clinical and economic outcomes for a novel method of conducting clinical trials. The results will be broadly applicable to trials of other diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Asthma outcomes improve with continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pariente, J; Plaza, V; Soriano, J B; Mayos, M; López-Viña, A; Picado, C; Vigil, L

    2017-05-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in asthma patients with concomitant obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) seems to have a favorable impact on asthma, but data are inconsistent due to methodological limitations of previous studies. Prospective, multicenter study. We examined asthma outcomes after 6 months of CPAP in 99 adult asthma patients (mean age 57 years) with OSAS (respiratory disturbance index ≥20). Asthma control and quality of life were assessed with the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) and the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (MiniAQLQ), respectively. Data were analyzed by intention-to-treat basis. The mean ± SD score of the ACQ decreased from 1.39 ± 0.91 at baseline to 1.0 ± 0.78 at 6 months (P = 0.003), the percentage of patients with uncontrolled asthma from 41.4% to 17.2% (P = 0.006), and the percentage of patients with asthma attacks in the 6 months before and after treatment from 35.4% to 17.2% (P = 0.015). The score of the mAQLQ increased from 5.12 ± 1.38 to 5.63 ± 1.17 (P = 0.009). There were also significant improvements in symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and rhinitis, bronchial reversibility, and exhaled nitric oxide values (all P obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. © 2016 The Authors. Allergy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Improving Asthma Communication in High-Risk Children

    OpenAIRE

    Butz, Arlene M.; Walker, Jennifer; Land, Cassia Lewis; Vibbert, Carrie; Winkelstein, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    Few child asthma studies address the specific content and techniques needed to enhance child communication during asthma preventive care visits. This study examined the content of child and parent communications regarding their asthma management during a medical encounter with their primary care provider (PCP). The majority of parents and children required prompting to communicate symptom information to the PCP during the clinic visit. Some high-risk families may require an asthma advocate to...

  1. Omalizumab Improves Quality of Life and Asthma Control in Chinese Patients With Moderate to Severe Asthma: A Randomized Phase III Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Kang, Jian; Wang, Changzheng; Yang, Jing; Wang, Linda; Kottakis, Ioannis; Humphries, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Omalizumab is the preferred add-on therapy for patients with moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma and has demonstrated efficacy and safety in various ethnicities. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of omalizumab in Chinese patients with moderate-to-severe allergic asthma. Methods This randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, phase III study assessed lung function, quality of life, asthma control, and safety of omalizumab after 24-week therapy in Chinese patients (18-75 years of age). Results A total of 616 patients were randomized (1:1) to omalizumab or placebo. The primary endpoint, least squares mean treatment difference (LSM-TD) in morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) (omalizumab vs placebo), at Weeks >20-24 was 8.85 L/min (Full analysis set; P=0.062). Per-protocol analysis set showed significant improvements with LSM-TD of 11.53 L/min in mean mPEF at Weeks >20-24 (P=0.022). The FEV1 % predicted was significantly improved with omalizumab vs placebo from 8 to 24 weeks (after 24-week treatment: LSM-TD=4.12%; P=0.001). At Week 24, a higher proportion of omalizumab-treated patients achieved clinically relevant improvements in standardized AQLQ (58.2% vs 39.3%; LSM=0.51 vs 0.10; Pquality of life, and asthma control in Chinese patients with moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma and has a good safety profile. PMID:27126725

  2. Effects of Transdermal Tulobuterol in Pediatric Asthma Patients on Long-Term Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist Therapy: Results of a Randomized, Open-Label, Multicenter Clinical Trial in Japanese Children Aged 4–12 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Katsunuma

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: These results suggest that short-term use of a transdermal β2 agonist is an effective therapy for pediatric asthma without inducing airway inflammation in children on long-term LTRA therapy.

  3. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte S

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant negative impact on asthma control and risk of exacerbations. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent studies evaluating the effects of weight reduction on asthma control in obese adults. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical studies have shown that weight...... reduction in obese patients is associated with improvements in symptoms, use of controller medication, and asthma-related quality of life together with a reduction in the risk for severe exacerbations. Furthermore, several studies have also revealed improvements in lung function and airway responsiveness...... reduction in obese adults with asthma leads to an overall improvement in asthma control, including airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Weight reduction should be a cornerstone in the management of obese patients with asthma....

  4. Can asthma control be improved by understanding the patient's perspective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Østrem Anders

    2007-05-01

    agreement between the healthcare professional and patient on a predefined target regarding asthma control and a treatment plan to achieve this. Summary Optimum review of asthma is essential to improve control. A key priority is the development of simple and effective tools for identifying poor control for individual patients coupled with a tailored approach to treatment to enable patients to set and achieve realistic goals for asthma control.

  5. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Evelim L F D; Carvalho, Celso R F; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Teixeira-Carvalho, Etiene Farah; Mendonça, Juliana Fernandes Barreto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma. A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function. No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvement in their exercise capacity and a reduction in pulmonary inflammation. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294.

  6. Designing clinical trials to address the needs of childhood and adult asthma: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's AsthmaNet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, E Rand; Busse, William W

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute announced its intent to support a new asthma network known as AsthmaNet. This clinical trials consortium, now in its fifth year, has been charged with developing and executing clinical trials to address the most important asthma management questions and identify new treatment approaches in pediatric and adult patients. This review will discuss the organization of AsthmaNet and the scientific context in which the network was developed and began its work, report the results of an internal priority-setting exercise designed to guide the network's scientific strategy, and highlight the portfolio of clinical trials, proof-of-concept studies, and mechanistic studies planned for the 7-year period of the network to update the global asthma community regarding the progress and processes of the network. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term CPAP treatment improves asthma control in patients with asthma and obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Paula; Bachour, Patrick; Maasilta, Paula; Bachour, Adel

    2016-12-01

    Both asthma and obstructive sleep apnoea cause sleep disturbance, daytime sleepiness and diminished quality of life. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is efficient in reducing symptoms related to sleep apnoea. Here we report the impact of long-term use of CPAP on asthma symptoms. A survey questionnaire was distributed to all of our obstructive sleep apnoea patients with CPAP therapy in 2013. We used the Finnish version of the Asthma Control Test™ (ACT) and a visual analogue scale (0 = no symptoms, 100 = severe asthma symptoms). Asthma was defined as self-reported physician-diagnosed disease and a special reimbursement for asthma medication by the Social Insurance Institution. We sent 2577 questionnaires and received 1586 answers (61 %). One hundred ninety-seven patients were asthmatics with a prevalence of asthma among CPAP users of 13 %. We studied 152 patients (58 females) whose CPAP therapy was initiated after starting asthma medication. Their mean (SD) age was 62 (10) years, duration of CPAP 5.7 (4.7) years and their CPAP daily use was 6.3 (2.4) h. Self-reported asthma severity decreased significantly from 48.3 (29.6) to 33.1 (27.4) (p CPAP (P CPAP in patients with both asthma and obstructive sleep apnoea.

  8. A computable phenotype for asthma case identification in adult and pediatric patients: External validation in the Chicago Area Patient-Outcomes Research Network (CAPriCORN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Majid; Press, Valerie G; Robison, Rachel G; Kho, Abel N; Bandi, Sindhura; Biswas, Ashvini; Avila, Pedro C; Kumar, Harsha Vardhan Madan; Yu, Byung; Naureckas, Edward T; Nyenhuis, Sharmilee M; Codispoti, Christopher D

    2017-10-13

    Comprehensive, rapid, and accurate identification of patients with asthma for clinical care and engagement in research efforts is needed. The original development and validation of a computable phenotype for asthma case identification occurred at a single institution in Chicago and demonstrated excellent test characteristics. However, its application in a diverse payer mix, across different health systems and multiple electronic health record vendors, and in both children and adults was not examined. The objective of this study is to externally validate the computable phenotype across diverse Chicago institutions to accurately identify pediatric and adult patients with asthma. A cohort of 900 asthma and control patients was identified from the electronic health record between January 1, 2012 and November 30, 2014. Two physicians at each site independently reviewed the patient chart to annotate cases. The inter-observer reliability between the physician reviewers had a κ-coefficient of 0.95 (95% CI 0.93-0.97). The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of the computable phenotype were all above 94% in the full cohort. The excellent positive and negative predictive values in this multi-center external validation study establish a useful tool to identify asthma cases in in the electronic health record for research and care. This computable phenotype could be used in large-scale comparative-effectiveness trials.

  9. Managing Asthma in Low-Income, Underrepresented Minority, and Other Disadvantaged Pediatric Populations: Closing the Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisias, Margee; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2017-09-15

    In this article, we review current understanding of the epidemiology and etiology of disparities in asthma. We also highlight current and emerging literature on solutions to tackle disparities while underscoring gaps and pressing future directions. Tailored, multicomponent approaches including the home, school, and clinician-based interventions show great promise. Managing asthma in disadvantaged populations can be challenging as they tend to have disproportionately worse outcomes due to a multitude of factors. However, multifaceted, innovative interventions that are sustainable and scalable are key to improving outcomes.

  10. Prevalence of childhood asthma in Korea: international study of asthma and allergies in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Il

    2010-04-01

    Childhood asthma is a major concern because it leads to more hospital visits and a heavy economic burden. Proper management and prevention strategies for childhood asthma must be based on correct evaluation of prevalence and risk factors for its development. In Korea, nationwide studies were conducted in 1995 and 2000 on students from 68 elementary schools (age, 6-12 years) and junior high schools (age, 12-15 years) by the Korean Academy of Pediatric Allergy and Respiratory Diseases. We used the Korean version of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) written and video questionnaires at the same schools during the same period (October-November). The prevalence of asthma in junior high school children seemed to increase over 5 years. However, in elementary school children, the prevalence of asthma symptoms decreased, although the prevalence of 'diagnosis of asthma, ever' and 'treatment of asthma, last 12 months' increased. In addition, it was found that various factors, such as obesity, passive smoking, dietary habits, raising pets at home, and fever/antibiotic use during infancy were associated with childhood asthma. When prevalence of asthma in Korea was compared with that in different regions, the prevalence changes in the 6-7 years age group did not seem to be consistent between regions, whereas similar trends were observed among children aged 13-14 years. To conduct another epidemiological study to evaluate the time trend over time, a third nationwide survey is planned in 2010, and we anticipate ISAAC Phase 3 will explore recent changes in the prevalence of childhood asthma and assess its risk factors in Korean children. On the basis of accurate data on the current status of childhood asthma in 2010, we will be able to establish proper management strategies.

  11. Provider-caregiver-child discussions about risks associated with asthma control medications: content and prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, Chris; Blalock, Susan J; Rao, Jaya K; Williams, Dennis; Loughlin, Ceila E; Sleath, Betsy

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) describe the extent to which general pediatric providers discuss risks associated with asthma control medications with families, and (2) examine factors that are associated with risk discussions. This study was a cross-sectional secondary analysis of audio taped medical visits involving 35 pediatric providers and 248 children with asthma with their caregivers. Transcripts of the visits were coded for discussions about asthma medication risks. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Providers discussed asthma control medication risks during 23% of visits. Risks were more likely to be discussed when the visit was longer and when the provider prescribed a new asthma control medication. When providers discussed asthma control medication risks, they were most likely to ask the family general questions and make general statements. Across all of the visits, caregivers asked a total of 16 questions and made a total of 20 statements about risks associated with asthma medications; children asked a total of 3 questions and made two statements about risks associated with asthma control medications. Providers discussed risks associated with asthma control medications in less than one-quarter of medical visits. Providers should involve families in discussions about risks associated with medications during every visit to assess potential barriers to medication adherence. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Asthma and hemoglobinopathy: when is supplemental oxygen required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Leon; Brickner-Braun, Inbal; Pinshow, Berry; Goldberg, Shmuel; Miskin, Hagit; Picard, Elie

    2013-10-01

    Asthma is the most common reason for referral to the emergency department in childhood. In severe attacks, supplemental O2 is given when oxygen saturation level is asthma attack. Simultaneously, P(a)O2 was normal. A diagnosis of abnormal hemoglobin with decreased oxygen affinity (hemoglobin Seattle) was made on hemoglobin electrophoresis and genetic analysis. To ascertain when supplemental oxygen was needed, an oxygen dissociation curve was plotted using the tonometer technique, and it was found that an S(p)O2 of 70% is parallel to a P(a)O2 of 60 mmHg. Plotting an oxygen dissociation curve is a simple reproducible method to determine when supplemental oxygen is required for a child with a hemoglobinopathy. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  13. Data-mining of medication records to improve asthma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereznicki, Bonnie J; Peterson, Gregory M; Jackson, Shane L; Walters, E Haydn; Fitzmaurice, Kimbra D; Gee, Peter R

    2008-07-07

    To use community pharmacy medication records to identify patients whose asthma may not be well managed and then implement and evaluate a multidisciplinary educational intervention to improve asthma management. We used a multisite controlled study design. Forty-two pharmacies throughout Tasmania ran a software application that "data-mined" medication records, generating a list of patients who had received three or more canisters of inhaled short-acting beta(2)-agonists in the preceding 6 months. The patients identified were allocated to an intervention or control group. Pre-intervention data were collected for the period May to November 2006 and post-intervention data for the period December 2006 to May 2007. Intervention patients were contacted by the community pharmacist via mail, and were sent educational material and a letter encouraging them to see their general practitioner for an asthma management review. Pharmacists were blinded to the control patients' identities until the end of the post-intervention period. Dispensing ratio of preventer medication (inhaled corticosteroids [ICSs]) to reliever medication (inhaled short-acting beta(2)-agonists). Thirty-five pharmacies completed the study, providing 702 intervention and 849 control patients. The intervention resulted in a threefold increase in the preventer-to-reliever ratio in the intervention group compared with the control group (P < 0.01) and a higher proportion of patients in the intervention group using ICS therapy than in the control group (P < 0.01). Community pharmacy medication records can be effectively used to identify patients with suboptimal asthma management, who can then be referred to their GP for review. The intervention should be trialled on a national scale to determine the effects on clinical, social, emotional and economic outcomes for people in the Australian community, with a longer follow-up to determine sustainability of the improvements noted.

  14. Asthma and Adolescents: Review of Strategies to Improve Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy-Harstad, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    One of every 10 adolescents in the United States has asthma. Adolescents who lack asthma control are at increased risk for severe asthma episodes and death. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2007 asthma guidelines and research studies indicated that school nurses are instrumental in assisting adolescents to monitor their asthma, learn…

  15. Objective confirmation of asthma diagnosis improves medication adherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, V; Stensen, L; Sverrild, A

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The impact of diagnostic work-up in asthma management on medication redemption and probably also drug adherence is largely unknown, but we hypothesized that a confirmed diagnosis of asthma in a hospital-based out-patient clinic increases the willingness to subsequent medication...... redemption in a real life setting. METHODS: In a retrospective register-based study, 300 medical records of patients referred with possible asthma during one year were examined, of whom 171 had asthma (57%). One-year data on dispensed medicine was collected using the Danish Registry of Medicinal Product...... more frequently prescribed new therapy compared to those with unverified asthma (88.9% vs. 65.0%, respectively, p time redemption of prescriptions (72% vs. 64%, respectively, p = 0.3), whereas the second (52% vs. 27%, p = 0.001) and third or more asthma...

  16. Airway Autoimmune Inflammatory Response (AAIR) Syndrome: An Asthma-Autoimmune Overlap Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Chantal Y; Millman, Jennifer; Veiga, Keila; Vicencio, Alfin G

    2018-02-15

    Asthma encompasses numerous phenotypes that may require alternate approaches to diagnosis and therapy, particularly for patients whose symptoms remain poorly controlled despite escalating treatment. We describe 3 patients with apparent asthma who demonstrated unusual findings on cryobiopsy by flexible bronchoscopy and responded to therapy directed against autoimmune disease. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Adolescent Asthma Self-Management: Patient and Parent-Caregiver Perspectives on Using Social Media to Improve Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzera, Anthony D.; Schneider, Tali K.; Martinasek, Mary P.; Lindenberger, James H.; Couluris, Marisa; Bryant, Carol A.; McDermott, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-management of asthma can now leverage new media technologies. To optimize implementation they must employ a consumer-oriented developmental approach. This study explored benefits of and barriers to improved asthma self-management and identified key elements for the development of a digital media tool to enhance asthma control.…

  18. 2003 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines Executive Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Allan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma have been published over the last 15 years; however, there has been little focus on issues relating to asthma in childhood. Since the last revision of the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report, important new studies, particularly in children, have highlighted the need to incorporate new information into the asthma guidelines. The objectives of this article are to review the literature on asthma published between January 2000 and June 2003 and to evaluate the influence of new evidence on the recommendations made in the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report and its 2001 update, with a major focus on pediatric issues. Methods The diagnosis of asthma in young children and prevention strategies, pharmacotherapy, inhalation devices, immunotherapy, and asthma education were selected for review by small expert resource groups. The reviews were discussed in June 2003 at a meeting under the auspices of the Canadian Network For Asthma Care and the Canadian Thoracic Society. Data published through December 2004 were subsequently reviewed by the individual expert resource groups. Results This report evaluates early-life prevention strategies and focuses on treatment of asthma in children, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis and preventive therapy, the benefits of additional therapy, and the essential role of asthma education. Conclusion We generally support previous recommendations and focus on new issues, particularly those relevant to children and their families. This document is a guide for asthma management based on the best available published data and the opinion of health care professionals, including asthma experts and educators.

  19. Spirometry use in children hospitalized with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Chun; McDowell, Karen M; Fenchel, Matthew; Szczesniak, Rhonda; Kercsmar, Carolyn M

    2014-05-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disorder of childhood and continues to be a leading cause of pediatric hospital admission. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) recommends that spirometry be obtained for asthma patients upon hospital admission, after bronchodilation during the acute phase of asthma symptoms, and at least one additional time before discharge from the hospital. The objectives of this study were to describe the use of spirometry in children hospitalized with asthma and to determine association of pulmonary function with future exacerbations. A retrospective cohort study design was utilized involving review of medical records of children ≥5 years old admitted with asthma to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center from September 1, 2009 to March 31, 2011. Hospitalization or emergency department (ED) visits were identified by the ICD-9-CM codes of having either a primary diagnosis of asthma (493) or a respiratory illness (460-496) plus a secondary diagnosis of asthma. Asthma re-exacerbation was defined as either having an ED visit or hospitalization for asthma that occurred within 3 months after the index hospitalization. All spirometries were performed in a pediatric pulmonary function laboratory. Among 1,037 admissions included in this study, 89 (8.6%) had spirometry that was recommended by a consulting asthma specialist and usually performed on the day of discharge. Spirometries for forty-five of these patients (54.9%) met all acceptability and repeatability criteria of the American Thoracic Society. Patients who performed acceptable spirometry were significantly older (12.4 ± 3.8 vs. 10.7 ± 3.0 years; P = 0.041). The average forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1 ) was 84.4 ± 19.7% predicted; forced vital capacity (FVC) was 98.1 ± 16.0% predicted; FEV1 /FVC was 74.6 ± 9.6%; forced expiratory flow at 25-75% (FEF25-75 ) was 61.2 ± 30.1% predicted. Ten patients (22%) who

  20. Patient-centered care and its effect on outcomes in the treatment of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qamar N

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nashmia Qamar1,*, Andrea A Pappalardo2,*, Vineet M Arora3, Valerie G Press41Pediatric Residency Program, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Internal Medicine-Pediatric Residency Program, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 4Section of Hospital Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA *Drs Qamar and Pappalardo contributed equally to this paperAbstract: Patient-centered care may be pivotal in improving health outcomes for patients with asthma. In addition to increased attention in both research and clinical forums, recent legislation also highlights the importance of patient-centered outcomes research in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. However, whether patient-centered care has been shown to improve outcomes for this population is unclear. To answer this question, we performed a systematic review of the literature that aimed to define current patient-focused management issues, characterize important patient-defined outcomes in asthma control, and identify current and emerging treatments related to patient outcomes and perspectives. We used a parallel search strategy via Medline®, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL® (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycINFO®, complemented with a reference review of key articles that resulted in a total of 133 articles; 58 were interventions that evaluated the effect on patient-centered outcomes, and 75 were descriptive studies. The majority of intervention studies demonstrated improved patient outcomes (44; “positive” results; none showed true harm (0; “negative”; and the remainder were equivocal (14; “neutral”. Key themes emerged relating to patients’ desires for asthma knowledge, preferences for tailored management plans, and

  1. Analysis of correlation between pediatric asthma exacerbation and exposure to pollutant mixtures with association rule mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toti, Giulia; Vilalta, Ricardo; Lindner, Peggy; Lefer, Barry; Macias, Charles; Price, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Traditional studies on effects of outdoor pollution on asthma have been criticized for questionable statistical validity and inefficacy in exploring the effects of multiple air pollutants, alone and in combination. Association rule mining (ARM), a method easily interpretable and suitable for the analysis of the effects of multiple exposures, could be of use, but the traditional interest metrics of support and confidence need to be substituted with metrics that focus on risk variations caused by different exposures. We present an ARM-based methodology that produces rules associated with relevant odds ratios and limits the number of final rules even at very low support levels (0.5%), thanks to post-pruning criteria that limit rule redundancy and control for statistical significance. The methodology has been applied to a case-crossover study to explore the effects of multiple air pollutants on risk of asthma in pediatric subjects. We identified 27 rules with interesting odds ratio among more than 10,000 having the required support. The only rule including only one chemical is exposure to ozone on the previous day of the reported asthma attack (OR=1.14). 26 combinatory rules highlight the limitations of air quality policies based on single pollutant thresholds and suggest that exposure to mixtures of chemicals is more harmful, with odds ratio as high as 1.54 (associated with the combination day0 SO 2 , day0 NO, day0 NO 2 , day1 PM). The proposed method can be used to analyze risk variations caused by single and multiple exposures. The method is reliable and requires fewer assumptions on the data than parametric approaches. Rules including more than one pollutant highlight interactions that deserve further investigation, while helping to limit the search field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 447 Asthma Knowledge among Parents and/or Caregivers of Asthmatic Children Attending a Practical Allergy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Ramírez, Eunice; Livano Prez, Mayra Alondra; Tercero-Quintanilla, Gabriela; Rosas-Vargas, Miguel Angel; del Rio, Blanca; del Río-Chivardí, Jaime Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Background Asthma is one of the most frequent chronic diseases, with worldwide prevalence of 1 to 18%. Patient and the patient's family education is considered by all International Guides fundamental to achieve this disease control. The aim of this study is to asses the asthma knowledge among parents and/or caregivers of pediatric asthmatic patients before and after attending to a Practical Allergy Course given at Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez by the Pediatric Allergy Department. Methods Transversal Study that included 115 persons attending to a Practical Allergy Course that answered the previously validated instrument to asses the asthma knowledge among parents or caregivers NAKQ (Newcastle Asthma Knowledge Questionnaire); its Spanish version consisting in 31 questions; before and after the practical course. A descriptive annalysis was made; usefullness of the course was determinated by x2. Stadistical packagge used was SPSS 17. Results A total of 115 questionnaires were applied, only 99 were properly answered and were included in the analysis; from these 35 were male and 64 female; 80% with high-school and middle school schooling; 92% were small families with 1 to 3 children; 90% of the families had only one child with asthma; 63% was receiving the practical course for the first time. Before attending the practical course the mean answered questions was 30 and after attending the mean answered questions was 31 (LR = 57.465; P < 0.000); for the first evaluation the mean correct answers was 19 and the latter 22 correct answers, finding statistical significant differences (LR = 30.253; P < 0.000). Conclusions We found improved asthma knowledge among parents and caregivers of asthmatic children after attending to a Practical Allergy Course.

  3. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical efficacy of omalizumab for the treatment of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Maxime; Bardou, Marc; Bonniaud, Philippe; Goirand, Françoise

    2016-12-01

    Omalizumab is a subcutaneously administrated monoclonal anti-IgE antibody indicated in adults, adolescents and children 6 years of age and older with moderate to severe allergic asthma uncontrolled by conventional pharmacological treatments and sensitization to at least one perennial allergen. Area covered: This drug evaluation summarizes published data on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of omalizumab, on clinical efficacy and safety, including real-world evidence, and provides a medico-economic evaluation of the drug. Expert opinion: Omalizumab represents an efficient therapeutic option for the management of patients with uncontrolled moderate/severe allergic asthma. It provides a significant reduction in the asthma exacerbation rate with a steroid-sparing effect, an improvement in quality of life in adults and adolescents, despite a lack of evidence about its efficacy specifically in severe allergic asthma. Clinical trials have demonstrated its efficacy in the pediatric population but further real-life evidence is expected to better characterize long-term effects in this population. There is still some debate about the optimal treatment duration but, to date, it is recommended not to stop the treatment as cessation has resulted in symptom recurrence. Omalizumab is an expensive treatment, but a key therapeutic option when used for uncontrolled severe allergic asthma.

  4. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Carvalho, Celso R. F.; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Teixeira-Carvalho, Etiene Farah; Mendonça, Juliana Fernandes Barreto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma. Design A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function. Results No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvementin their exercise capacity and a reductionin pulmonary inflammation. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294 PMID:26301706

  5. Lessons learnt from a primary care asthma improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenney, Warren; Clayton, Sadie; Gilchrist, Francis J; Price, David; Small, Iain; Smith, Judy; Sutton, Emma J

    2016-01-07

    Asthma is a very common disease that can occur at any age. In the UK and in many other countries it is mainly managed in primary care. The published evidence suggests that the key to improving diagnosis and management lies in better training and education rather than in the discovery of new medications. An asthma improvement project managed through the British Lung Foundation is attempting to do this. The project has three pilot sites: two in England supported by the Department of Health and one in Scotland supported by the Scottish Government. If the project is successful it will be rolled out to other health areas within the UK. The results of this project are not yet available. This article highlights the challenges encountered in setting up the project and may well be applicable to other areas in the UK and to other countries where similar healthcare systems exist. The encountered challenges reflect the complex nature of healthcare systems and electronic data capture in primary care. We discuss the differences between general practices in their ability and willingness to support the project, the training and education of their staff on asthma management, governance issues in relation to information technology systems, and the quality of data capture. Virtually all the challenges have now been overcome, but discussing them should ensure that others become aware of them at an early stage should they wish to undertake similar projects in the future.

  6. Intermittent or daily montelukast versus placebo for episodic asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovirta, Erkka; Boza, Maria L; Robertson, Colin F; Verbruggen, Nadia; Smugar, Steven S; Nelsen, Linda M; Knorr, Barbara A; Reiss, Theodore F; Philip, George; Gurner, Deborah M

    2011-06-01

    No standard, optimal treatment exists for severe intermittent (ie, episodic) asthma in children. However, evidence suggests that both daily and episode-driven montelukast are effective for this phenotype. To assess the regimen-related efficacy of montelukast in treating pediatric episodic asthma. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel-group, 52-week study was performed in children 6 months to 5 years of age comparing placebo with two regimens of montelukast 4 mg: (1) daily; or (2) episode-driven for 12 days beginning with signs/symptoms consistent with imminent cold or breathing problem. The main outcome measure was the number of asthma episodes (symptoms requiring treatment) culminating in an asthma attack (symptoms requiring physician visit, emergency room visit, corticosteroids, or hospitalization). Five hundred eighty-nine patients were randomized to daily montelukast, 591 to intermittent montelukast, and 591 to placebo. Compared with placebo, no significant difference was seen between daily montelukast (P = .510) or intermittent montelukast (P = .884) in the number of asthma episodes culminating in an asthma attack over 1 year. Daily montelukast reduced symptoms over the 12-day treatment period of asthma episodes compared with placebo (P = .045). Beta-agonist use was reduced with both daily (P = .048) and intermittent montelukast (P = .028) compared with placebo. However, because of prespecified rules for multiplicity adjustments (requiring a positive primary endpoint), statistical significance for secondary endpoints cannot be concluded. All treatments were well tolerated. Montelukast did not reduce the number of asthma episodes culminating in an asthma attack over 1 year in children 6 months to 5 years of age, although numerical improvements occurred in some endpoints. Copyright © 2011 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to childhood asthma: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dong-Dong; Yu, Dan-Dan; Ren, Qiong-Qiong; Dong, Bao; Zhao, Feng; Sun, Ye-Huan

    2017-04-01

    As for the association of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to pediatric asthma, results of published studies yielded conflicts. A systematic review was conducted on the relationship between childhood asthma and VDR gene polymorphisms, including ApaI (rs7975232), BsmI (rs1544410), FokI (rs2228570), and TaqI (rs731236). PubMed, Web of Science, CBM (Chinese Biomedical Database), CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure), and Wanfang (Chinese) database were searched for relevant studies. Pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Overall results suggested that there was a statistically significant association between ApaI polymorphism and childhood asthma in homozygote model (OR = 1.674, 95%CI = 1.269-2.208, P childhood asthma in the homozygote (OR = 1.462, 95%CI = 1.016-2.105, P = 0.041) and allele models (OR = 1.181, 95%CI = 1.006-1.386, P = 0.042). This association reached significance only in the Caucasian group (OR = 1.236, 95%CI = 1.029-1.485, P = 0.023). For FokI, a statistical association was detected in dominant model (OR = 1.281, 95%CI = 1.055-1.555, P = 0.012); this association was significant in allele model (OR = 1.591, 95%CI = 1.052-2.405, P = 0.028) in Caucasian. ApaI polymorphism plays a particular role in childhood asthma in Asians. FokI polymorphism may be connected with pediatric asthma in Caucasian population. And BsmI polymorphism marginally contributes to childhood asthma susceptibility, while there might be no association between TaqI polymorphism and childhood asthma risk. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2017;52:423-429. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The Integrated Care of Asthma in Switzerland (INCAS) Study: Changes in Asthma Control and Perception of Health Care through Asthma Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Selina; Hersberger, Kurt E; Zeller, Andreas; Scheuzger, Jonas; Miedinger, David; Gregoriano, Claudia; Joos Zellweger, Ladina; Steurer-Stey, Claudia; Leuppi, Jörg Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Despite great efforts in establishing optimal asthma management, asthma may remain uncontrolled. To effectively manage chronic diseases, such as asthma, it is important to train patients in self-management skills. The aim of this study was to assess the potential benefit of standardised asthma education in Switzerland for asthma control and patients' perception of received asthma care and of self-management support. For this multicentre longitudinal controlled study, asthma patients were recruited in Switzerland. The Asthma Control Test (ACT) was used to assess asthma control. The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care questionnaire (PACIC 5A) was applied to evaluate received health-care services and self-management support. Patients were offered the possibility to attend asthma education sessions conducted by the Swiss Lung League and Swiss Allergy Centre. After 1 year, attenders and non-attenders completed the questionnaires again. Changes in ACT and PACIC 5A scores were analysed using dependent t tests. Overall, 223 patients with asthma were investigated (mean age 43 ± 12 years, 38% male, 13% current smokers, 29% ex-smokers). Sixty-one (27%) patients attended education sessions. Both groups had improved asthma control at follow-up (attenders: t(56) = -3.2, r = 0.4 [medium effect size], p = 0.002; non-attenders: t(141) = -2.6, r = 0.2 [small effect size], p = 0.010). Attenders improved in PACIC and 5A sum scores (t(50) = -3.6, r = 0.5 [medium effect size], p = 0.001). A comprehensive self-management asthma education programme in Switzerland improved asthma control and patients' perception of received asthma care and of self-management support. Professionals should motivate patients to attend asthma education in order to become active partners in managing their disease. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Quality of Life in Children With Asthma: A Developmental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miadich, Samantha A; Everhart, Robin S; Borschuk, Adrienne P; Winter, Marcia A; Fiese, Barbara H

    2015-08-01

    The current study investigated whether factors associated with quality of life (QOL) in children with asthma (e.g., family functioning, asthma routines, asthma severity) differed by child age. Participants included 192 children with asthma (5-12 years) and their caregivers. Both children and caregivers completed questionnaires at an initial research session. Family functioning was determined from a mealtime observation that occurred in family homes. Child age moderated the association between asthma severity and child QOL and between routine burden and QOL in children with asthma. Post hoc probing analyses revealed that among older children, QOL levels were lower in the presence of worse asthma severity and more routine burden. Findings suggest that associations between asthma severity, routine burden, and QOL may differ by child age. Treatment programs and health-care recommendations addressing QOL in children with asthma may need to be tailored to address differences in factors associated with QOL by child age. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Risk factors and treatment of pediatric chronic diseases : Type 1 diabetes, asthma and allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadizar, F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and asthma are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The increase in the number of children with chronic diseases is a major concern. Early detection through improved screening and diagnostic tests, better diagnosis based on updated

  11. Corticosteroid use in management of pediatric emergency conditions [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Asalim; Greenfield, Tyler; Cantor, Richard M; Wilson, Bryan

    2018-03-01

    Corticosteroids have been used for over half a century to treat various inflammatory disorders; however, their use in many pediatric conditions remains controversial. This issue reviews evidence on corticosteroid treatment in acute asthma exacerbations, croup, acute pharyngitis, anaphylaxis, acute spinal injury, and bacterial meningitis. While corticosteroids are clearly indicated for management of asthma exacerbations and croup, they are not universally recommended for potential spinal cord injury. Due to insufficient data or conflicting data, corticosteroids may be considered in children with acute pharyngitis, anaphylaxis, and bacterial meningitis. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  12. Childhood asthma clusters and response to therapy in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Timothy S; Lemanske, Robert F; Mauger, David T; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Sorkness, Christine A; Szefler, Stanley J; Gangnon, Ronald E; Page, C David; Jackson, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Childhood asthma clusters, or subclasses, have been developed by computational methods without evaluation of clinical utility. To replicate and determine whether childhood asthma clusters previously identified computationally in the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) are associated with treatment responses in Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network clinical trials. A cluster assignment model was determined by using SARP participant data. A total of 611 participants 6 to 18 years old from 3 CARE trials were assigned to SARP pediatric clusters. Primary and secondary outcomes were analyzed by cluster in each trial. CARE participants were assigned to SARP clusters with high accuracy. Baseline characteristics were similar between SARP and CARE children of the same cluster. Treatment response in CARE trials was generally similar across clusters. However, with the caveat of a smaller sample size, children in the early-onset/severe-lung function cluster had best response with fluticasone/salmeterol (64% vs 23% 2.5× fluticasone and 13% fluticasone/montelukast in the Best ADd-on Therapy Giving Effective Responses trial; P = .011) and children in the early-onset/comorbidity cluster had the least clinical efficacy to treatments (eg, -0.076% change in FEV1 in the Characterizing Response to Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist and Inhaled Corticosteroid trial). In this study, we replicated SARP pediatric asthma clusters by using a separate, large clinical trials network. Early-onset/severe-lung function and early-onset/comorbidity clusters were associated with differential and limited response to therapy, respectively. Further prospective study of therapeutic response by cluster could provide new insights into childhood asthma treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Harold

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma is the most common respiratory disorder in Canada. Despite significant improvement in the diagnosis and management of this disorder, the majority of Canadians with asthma remain poorly controlled. In most patients, however, control can be achieved through the use of avoidance measures and appropriate pharmacological interventions. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs represent the standard of care for the majority of patients. Combination ICS/long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA inhalers are preferred for most adults who fail to achieve control with ICS therapy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy represents a potentially disease-modifying therapy for many patients with asthma, but should only be prescribed by physicians with appropriate training in allergy. Regular monitoring of asthma control, adherence to therapy and inhaler technique are also essential components of asthma management. This article provides a review of current literature and guidelines for the appropriate diagnosis and management of asthma.

  14. Improving asthma-related health outcomes among low-income, multiethnic, school-aged children: results of a demonstration project that combined continuous quality improvement and community health worker strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Patrick; Porter, Patricia G; Lob, Sibylle H; Boer, Jennifer Holloman; Rocha, David A; Adelson, Joel W

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve asthma-related health outcomes in an ethnically and geographically disparate population of economically disadvantaged school-aged children by using a team-based approach using continuous quality improvement and community health workers. A demonstration project was conducted with 7 community clinics treating approximately 3000 children with asthma 5 to 18 years of age. The overall clinic population with asthma was assessed for care-process changes through random cross-sectional chart reviews at baseline and 24 months (N = 560). A subset of patients with either moderate or severe persistent asthma or poorly controlled asthma (N = 405) was followed longitudinally for specific asthma-related clinical outcomes, satisfaction with care, and confidence managing asthma by family interview at baseline and at 12 or 24 months. Patient-centered and care-process outcomes included patient/parent assessment of quality of care and confidence in self-management, asthma action plan review, and documentation of guideline-based indicators of quality of care. Direct clinical outcomes included daytime and nighttime symptoms, use of rescue medications, acute care and emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and missed school days. Each clinic site's degree of adherence to the intervention model was evaluated and ranked to examine the correlation between model adherence and outcomes. Cross-sectional data showed clinic-wide improvements in the documentation of asthma severity, review of action plans, health services use, and asthma symptoms. At follow-up in the longitudinal sample, fewer patients reported acute visits, emergency department visits, hospitalizations, frequent daytime and nighttime symptoms, and missed school days compared with baseline. More patients reported excellent or very good quality of care and confidence in asthma self-management. Linear regression analysis of the clinical sites' model adherence ranks against site

  15. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease in preschool children with asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yukinori; Kameda, Makoto; Nishikido, Tomoki; Takamatu, Isamu; Doi, Satoru

    2008-05-01

    In pediatric intractable asthma, there is occasionally an association with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). It is not clear in which cases GERD should be suspected or how effective the GERD therapy is in treating the asthma. Twenty-seven preschool children (asthma attack in spite of asthma therapy underwent 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring. We examined retrospectively the incidence of GERD and the effectiveness of famotidine in GERD positive patients. 18 of the 27 patients (66.7%) had positive results (GERD positive group). In 12 of the 15 patients (80%) who underwent GERD therapy (famotidine), respiratory symptoms were decreased. In the GERD positive group, the incidence of acid reflux during waking hours was more frequent than during sleeping hours. In 8 of 12 patients (66.7%) in whom famotidine was effective, cough and wheeze often occurred during the daytime and corresponded with the time when acid reflux must commonly occurred. We conclude that children suffering from recurrent asthma attack in spite of asthma therapy must be examined for the presence of GERD.

  16. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelim L F D Gomes

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma.A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20 or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16. Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO, maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol and lung function.No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05. Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG.The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvement in their exercise capacity and a reduction in pulmonary inflammation.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294.

  17. Metabolic acidosis as an underlying mechanism of respiratory distress in children with severe acute asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meert, Kathleen L; Clark, Jeff; Sarnaik, Ashok P

    2007-11-01

    1) To alert the clinician that increasing rate and depth of breathing during treatment of acute asthma may be a manifestation of metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation rather than worsening airway obstruction; and 2) to describe the frequency of metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation in children with severe acute asthma admitted to our pediatric intensive care unit. Retrospective medical record review. University-affiliated children's hospital. All patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with a diagnosis of asthma between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2005. None. Fifty-three patients with asthma (median age 7.8 yrs, range 0.7-17.9 yrs; 35 [66%] male; 46 [87%] black and 7 [13%] white) were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit during the study period. Fifteen (28%) patients developed metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation (pH 120 mg/dL [6.7 mmol/L]). Patients who developed metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation received asthma therapy similar to that received by patients who did not develop the disorder. Metabolic acidosis resolved contemporaneously with tapering of beta2-adrenergic agonists and administration of supportive care. All patients survived. Metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation manifesting as respiratory distress can occur in children with severe acute asthma. A pathophysiologic rationale exists for the contribution of beta2-adrenergic agents to the development of this acid-base disorder. Failure to recognize metabolic acidosis as the underlying mechanism of respiratory distress may lead to inappropriate intensification of bronchodilator therapy. Supportive care and tapering of beta2-adrenergic agents are recommended to resolve this condition.

  18. Aptitud clínica ante el paciente pediátrico con asma grave en residentes de pediatría y urgencias Clinical skills at the pediatric patient with severe asthma of Pediatrics and Emergency residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Loría-Castellanos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Construir, validar y aplicar un instrumento para evaluar la aptitud clínica de los residentes de pediatría y urgencia ante los pacientes pediátricos con asma grave. Sujetos y métodos. Estudio observacional autorizado por el comité de investigación. El instrumento se construyó a través de cinco casos clínicos reales, validado por consenso de expertos en pediatría, urgencias e investigación educativa, obteniéndose una versión final de 150 ítems con una consistencia de 0,89. Se evaluaron 10 residentes de pediatría y 21 de urgencias. Se realizó un análisis estadístico no paramétrico. Resultados. La mayoría de los residentes (79,73% se ubicaron en los niveles bajos-muy bajos de aptitud clínica, ninguno alcanzó niveles superiores. Las pruebas estadísticas no encontraron diferencias entre los grados académicos o la especialidad. Conclusiones. El instrumento construido tiene una adecuada consistencia. El proceso educativo al que se han sometido estos residentes parece no favorecer el desarrollo de reflexión, lo que podría limitar su práctica profesional real.Aim. To develop, validate and implement a tool to assess the clinical competence of pediatric residents and medical emergencies to pediatric patients with severe asthma. Subjects and methods. An observational study approved by the research committee. The instrument was built through five problematized clinical cases, validated by consensus by experts in pediatrics, emergency and educational research, obtaining a final version of 150 items with a consistency of 0.89. It evaluated 10 pediatric residents and 21 of emergency. We performed a nonparametric statistical analysis. Results. Most residents (79.73% were located in low-very low levels of clinical competence, none reached higher levels. Statistical tests found no differences between academic degrees or specialty. Conclusions. The educational process that these students have had seems to favor the development

  19. A survey of pediatricians' knowledge on asthma management in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagozlou, Mohammad; Abdollahpour, Hengameh; Moinfar, Zahra; Bemanian, Mohammad Hassan; Sedaghat, Mojtaba

    2008-06-01

    Asthma is one of the most common acute and chronic conditions in children, and the pediatricians are expected to provide an important role for asthma care in this age group, however there is no published information describing the different aspects of their practices about children asthma in Iran. This study was done to characterize the knowledge of the Iranian pediatricians about the diagnosis, treatment and education of asthma in children. Validated questionnaires were completed by 193 pediatricians from different parts of Iran during the International Congress of Pediatrics in Tehran. A total of 193 returned questionnaires (96.5%) were eligible for the survey and analysis. About 49% of the respondents were male and 18% were sub-specialists. Wheezing was the most common mentioned symptoms in taking asthma into consideration. About 40% of these physicians had no plan for doing spirometry in eligible children and 35.2% of them did not have familiarity with peak flowmeter. Also about 17.6% of them paid no regular visits to their asthmatic patients. Only 29% of the respondents indicated that they would prescribe inhaled corticosteroids for a 6-year-old child with moderate persistent asthma and 73.3% of them would prescribe inhaled bronchodilator (Salbutamol) for an acute asthmatic attack as the first drug, while 17.1% of them used epinephrine injection for this purpose. About 42.2% of the respondents did not consider any education or action plan for their patients and only 60.6% of them had access to standard guidelines and educational programs. The results show that there are numerous aspects of children asthma management in Iran which are not consistent with standardized guidelines and recommendations. This survey and the attained information suggest areas for interventions to improve the pediatricians' knowledge about asthma and the disease management.

  20. AsthmaVent – Effect of Ventilation on Asthma Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogaard, Nina Viskum; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck; Halken, Susanne

    sensitive towards. Reducing this exposure may improve the asthma control in these children. Previous studies give conflicting information on the effect of mechanical ventilation on asthma control in children. Objectives We aim at investigating whether mechanical ventilation is capable of improving indoor...... air quality in the home and health outcomes in the outpatient clinic every three months. Fig. 1 and 2. Primary outcome is reduction in minimal effective dose of inhalation steroid. Secondary endpoints….. Perspectives Asthma patients and their families rely on good evidence-based advice on behavior...

  1. Asthma and food allergy management in Chicago Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ruchi S; Rivkina, Victoria; DeSantiago-Cardenas, Lilliana; Smith, Bridget; Harvey-Gintoft, Blair; Whyte, Stephanie A

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to characterize asthma and food allergy reporting and management in Chicago Public Schools. Demographic and health data for students who have asthma and food allergy were extracted from the Chicago Public Schools database. Demographic and geographic variability and the existence of school health management plans were analyzed, and multiple logistic regression models were computed. Home addresses were geocoded to create maps of case counts per community area. Approximately 18,000 asthmatic and 4000 food allergic students were identified. Of asthmatic students, 9.3% had a food allergy; of food allergic students, 40.1% had asthma. Asthma odds were significantly higher among black and Hispanic students (odds ratio [OR] = 2.3 and 1.3, respectively), whereas food allergy odds were significantly higher among black students (OR = 1.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-1.3) and significantly lower among Hispanic students (OR = 0.8; 95% CI, 0.7-0.9). Only 24.3% of students who had asthma and 50.9% of students who had food allergy had a school health management plan on file. Odds of having a school health management plan were significantly higher among students with both conditions, but the likelihood of having a plan on file was significantly lower among racial/ethnic minority and low-income students, regardless of medical condition. Only 1 in 4 students who have asthma and half of food allergic students have health management plans in schools, with lower numbers among minority and low-income students. Improving chronic disease reporting and access to school health management plans is critical. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. PHARMACOECONOMIC ASPECT OF OMALIZUMAB APPLICATION AMONG THE PATIENTS, SUFFERING FROM THE BRONCHIAL ASTHMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Kolbin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the given article, the authors discuss the most difficult issue of the pediatrics, which is the treatment of the severe bronchial asthma. Our columnist is professor A.S. Kolbin introduces omalizumab, a new medication from the monoclonal antibodies group, to our readers. It allows practitioners to control the severe persistent bronchial asthma. The article accentuates the clinical effectiveness and pharmacoeconomic aspects of the medication application.Key words: bronchial asthma, severe run, treatment, monoclonal antibodies, children.

  3. Latino caregiver experiences with asthma health communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Antonio; Ocasio, Agueda; Tiyyagura, Gunjan; Krumeich, Lauren; Ragins, Kyle; Thomas, Anita; Trevino, Sandra; Vaca, Federico E

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we analyze qualitative data from a purposeful sample of limited English proficiency (LEP) asthma health caregivers. We used ethnically concordant, semistructured, in-depth Spanish-language interviews and a follow-up focus group to explore issues related to communication during pediatric asthma encounters in medical settings. Inductive coding of Spanish transcripts by a bilingual research team was performed until thematic saturation was reached. Several key findings emerged. LEP caregivers encountered significant asthma burdens related to emotional stress, observed physical changes, and communication barriers. Language-discordant communication and the use of ad hoc interpreters were common. This finding is complex, and was influenced by perceptions of interpreter availability, delays in care, feelings of mistrust toward others, and individual emotional responses. Language-concordant education and suitable action plans were valued and desired. We discuss a revealing depiction of the LEP caregiver experience with asthma health communication and recommend areas for further inquiry. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. A guide to the translation of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) strategy into improved care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe; FitzGerald, J Mark; Levy, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    In 1995, the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) published an evidence-based workshop report as a guide to clinicians managing asthma patients, and has updated it annually to ensure that recommendations remain current. Although the report has been widely disseminated and influenced clinical...... practice and research, its major objective, of forming the basis for local and national initiatives to improve services for asthma patients, remains to be achieved. Over recent years, the science of guideline implementation has progressed, and encouraging examples of successful asthma programmes have been...... published. This report is intended to draw on this experience and assist with the translation of asthma guideline recommendations into quality programmes for patients with asthma using current knowledge translation principles. It also provides examples of successful initiatives in various socioeconomic...

  5. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Bronchial Asthma in Children in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejias, Stephanie G; Ramphul, Kamleshun

    2018-02-20

    Background Bronchial asthma is an important health problem worldwide. There is insufficient data on the prevalence of bronchial asthma among school children in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Objective The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of asthma and its related risk factors among school children in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study using a modified questionnaire was conducted in Santo Domingo among 600 children aged three to 11 eleven years. The prevalence of asthma and its associated risk factors such as birth order, family history of asthma, family history of allergy, exposure to pets at home, exposure to tobacco smoke, and source of fuel used at home were collected. The relevant data collected was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 24.0. (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY) software. Results The prevalence of asthma was found to be 22.0%. Age, family history of asthma, family history of allergy, exposure to tobacco smoke, and birth order showed statistical significance. The source of fuel used at home, gender, and exposure to pets were not statistically significant to be considered as risk factors associated with asthma in the population studied. Conclusion With an asthma prevalence of 22.0% in the pediatric population, the Dominican Republic has one of the highest national rates of asthma in the pediatric population in Latin America. Proper education, screening, and prevention can help lower the burden of this disease economically and socially.

  6. The treatment of allergic rhinitis improves the recovery from asthma and upper respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Sarti

    Full Text Available Forty-six asthmatic children with repeated respiratory infections presented symptoms of allergic rhinitis. All patients were treated locally for allergic rhinitis either with disodium cromoglycate or beclomethasone dipropionate. After six months of treatment, 95% of the children showed improvement of allergic rhinitis and 84% improvement of bronchial asthma, as well as fewer infections. We concluded that allergic rhinitis plays an important role in facilitating infections of the upper respiratory tract, and a possible association of rhinitis, viral infections and bronchial asthma is discussed.

  7. Peripheral blood MDSCs, IL-10 and IL-12 in children with asthma and their importance in asthma development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Li; Luan, Bin; Wang, Xiu-Fang; Qiao, Jun-Ying; Song, Li; Lei, Rui-Rui; Gao, Wei-Xia; Liu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    To investigate myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) accumulation and interleukin 10 (IL-10) and interleukin 12 (IL-12) levels during the onset of asthma in both pediatric patients and mouse models, as well as their possible roles in the development of asthma. Peripheral blood samples were gathered from children with asthma attacks (attack group) and alleviated asthma (alleviated group), as well as two control groups, children with pneumonia and healthy children. The pathological characteristics of asthma in asthmatic mice, budesonide-treated asthmatic mice, and normal control mice were also evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. MDSC accumulation and serum IL-10 levels were significantly elevated in the children with asthma compared with the budesonide-treated alleviated group, normal healthy controls, and pneumonia controls (p0.05). The level of serum IL-12 in the asthmatic children was drastically reduced compared to the budesonide-treated alleviated group, healthy controls, and pneumonia controls (pasthma was positively correlated with the level of serum IL-10 and negatively correlated with the level of serum IL-12. The levels of MDSCs and IL-10 in asthmatic mice were significantly higher than those in the normal control mice (both pasthma, the accumulation of MDSCs and the level of serum IL-10 increase, while the level of IL-12 decreases. These fluctuations may play an important role in the development of asthma.

  8. Adaptação e validação do Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ-A em crianças e adolescentes brasileiros com asma Adaptation and validation of the Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ in Brazilian asthmatic children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia S. K. La Scala

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Traduzir e adaptar ao português (cultura brasileira o Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ para uso em crianças e adolescentes com asma e validar a versão adaptada (PAQLQ-A. MÉTODOS: Crianças e adolescentes (7 a 17 anos com asma foram entrevistados e responderam o PAQLQ-A à admissão, sendo avaliados por escore clínico de gravidade. Segundo o escore clínico de gravidade, os pacientes foram classificados em leves ( 2. Eles foram reavaliados em pelo menos mais duas ocasiões, com intervalo de 2 a 4 semanas. RESULTADOS: Durante o seguimento, alguns se mantiveram sem mudança no escore clínico de gravidade e foram identificados como estáveis; já os que variaram foram identificados como instáveis. A reprodutibilidade do PAQLQ-A foi avaliada entre os estáveis comparando-se as médias dos domínios sintomas, emoções, atividades e total e do escore clínico de gravidade em dois tempos predeterminados (15 a 30 dias de intervalo, sem diferenças entre elas. A avaliação da suscetibilidade à alteração foi feita entre os pacientes instáveis. As médias dos domínios e o total em dois tempos foram significantemente diferentes, assim como o escore clínico de gravidade. A validação do instrumento foi realizada pela aplicação do teste de confiabilidade de Cronbach (a = 0,909. CONCLUSÕES: A tradução do PAQLQ para a língua portuguesa não modificou estruturalmente o questionário original; o PAQLQ-A é de fácil aplicação, reprodutível, capaz de detectar mudanças e constitui-se em instrumento valioso para a avaliação da qualidade de vida em crianças e adolescentes com asma.OBJECTIVES: To translate the Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ into Portuguese and adapt it to the Brazilian context, for use in children and adolescents with asthma and to validate the adapted version of the questionnaire (PAQLQ-A. METHODS: Children and adolescents (7 to 17 years old with asthma answered the

  9. Effectiveness of Evidence-Based Asthma Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Suzanne; Bailey, Ryan; Jaffee, Katy; Markus, Anne; Gerstein, Maya; Stevens, David M; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Malveaux, Floyd J; Mitchell, Herman

    2017-06-01

    Researchers often struggle with the gap between efficacy and effectiveness in clinical research. To bridge this gap, the Community Healthcare for Asthma Management and Prevention of Symptoms (CHAMPS) study adapted an efficacious, randomized controlled trial that resulted in evidence-based asthma interventions in community health centers. Children (aged 5-12 years; N = 590) with moderate to severe asthma were enrolled from 3 intervention and 3 geographically/capacity-matched control sites in high-risk, low-income communities located in Arizona, Michigan, and Puerto Rico. The asthma intervention was tailored to the participant's allergen sensitivity and exposure, and it comprised 4 visits over the course of 1 year. Study visits were documented and monitored prospectively via electronic data capture. Asthma symptoms and health care utilization were evaluated at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months. A total of 314 intervention children and 276 control children were enrolled in the study. Allergen sensitivity testing (96%) and home environmental assessments (89%) were performed on the majority of intervention children. Overall study activity completion (eg, intervention visits, clinical assessments) was 70%. Overall and individual site participant symptom days in the previous 4 weeks were significantly reduced compared with control findings (control, change of -2.28; intervention, change of -3.27; difference, -0.99; P asthma in these high-need populations. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The) - Vol 6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiological Pattern and Management of Pediatric Asthma Review of Ain Shams Pediatric Hospital Chest Clinic Data Cairo, Egypt 1995-2004 · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Magda Y El-Saify, Malak A Shaheen, Sahar M Sabbour, Ahmed A Basal ...

  11. The sustainability of a community pharmacy intervention to improve the quality use of asthma medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereznicki, B; Peterson, G; Jackson, S; Walters, E H; Gee, P

    2011-04-01

    A previously published asthma intervention used a software application to data mine pharmacy dispensing records and generate a list of patients with potentially suboptimal management of their asthma; in particular, a high rate of provision of reliever medication. These patients were sent educational material from their community pharmacists and advised to seek a review of their asthma management from their general practitioner. The intervention resulted in a 3-fold improvement in the ratio of dispensed preventer medication (inhaled corticosteroids) to reliever medication (short-acting beta-2 agonists). This follow-up study aimed to determine the long-term effects of the intervention programme on the preventer-to-reliever (P:R) ratio. The same data mining software was modified so that it could re-identify patients who were originally targeted for the intervention. Community pharmacists who participated in the previous intervention installed the modified version of the software. The dispensing data were then de-identified, encrypted and transferred via the Internet to a secure server. The follow-up dispensing data for all patients were compared with their pre- and post-intervention data collected originally. Of the 1551 patients who were included in the original study, 718 (46·3%) were eligible to be included in the follow-up study. The improved P:R ratio was sustained for at least 12 months following the intervention (P < 0·01). The sustained increase in the P:R ratio was attributed to significant decreases in the average daily usage of reliever medication (P < 0·0001). The follow-up study demonstrated a sustained improvement in the ratio of dispensed preventer medication to reliever medication for asthma. The intervention has the potential to show long-lasting and widespread improvements in asthma management, improved health outcomes for patients, and ultimately, a reduced burden on the health system. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Improving the timeliness of procedures in a pediatric endoscopy suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Gitit; Choi, Steven; Montalvo, Andrea; Sutton, Sheila; Thompson, John; Rivas, Yolanda

    2014-02-01

    Pediatric endoscopic procedures are essential in the evaluation and treatment of gastrointestinal diseases in children. Although pediatric endoscopists are greatly interested in increasing efficiency and through-put in pediatric endoscopy units, there is scarcely any literature on this critical process. The goal of this study was to improve the timeliness of pediatric endoscopy procedures at Children's Hospital at Montefiore. In June 2010, a pediatric endoscopy quality improvement initiative was formed at Children's Hospital at Montefiore. We identified patient-, equipment-, and physician-related causes for case delays. Pareto charts, cause and effect diagrams, process flow mapping, and statistical process control charts were used for analysis. From June 2010 to December 2012, we were able to significantly decrease the first case endoscopy delay from an average of 17 to 10 minutes (P < .001), second case delay from 39 to 25 minutes (P = .01), third case delay from 61 to 45 minutes (P = .05), and fourth case delay from 79 to 51 minutes (P = .05). Total delay time decreased from 196 to 131 minutes, resulting in a reduction of 65 minutes (P = .02). From June 2010 to August 2011 (preintervention period), an average of 36% of first endoscopy cases started within 5 minutes, 51% within 10 minutes, and 61% within 15 minutes of the scheduled time. From September 2011 to December 2012 (postintervention period), the percentage of cases starting within 5 minutes, 10 minutes, and 15 minutes increased to 47% (P = .07), 61% (P = .04), and 79% (P = .01), respectively. Applying quality improvement methods and tools helped improve pediatric endoscopy timeliness and significantly decreased total delays.

  13. Spirometry in primary care for children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasiak, Nancy Cantey

    2014-01-01

    Spirometry is an essential part of diagnosing a child with asthma. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) expert panels recommend spirometry to be performed on children five years of age and older as an objective assessment of lung function, to diagnosis asthma, and for ongoing yearly management of asthma (GINA, 2012; NAEPP, 2007). According to the NAEPP expert panel, history and physical examination alone are not reliable to accurately diagnose asthma, exclude alternative diagnosis, or determine lung impairment (NAEPP, 2007 Dombkowski, Hassan, Wasilevich, and Clark (2010) found 52% of physicians who provide primary care to children used spirometry, but only 21% used spirometry according to the national guidelines, and only 35% of physicians surveyed were comfortable interpreting the test results. Zanconato, Meneghelli, Braga, Zacchello, and Baraldi (2005) found that 21% of spirometry readings were interpreted incorrectly, concluding that proper training and quality control were important to provide if spirometry in the primary care office setting is to be used. The purpose of this article is to review the appropriate use of spirometry in pediatric primary care.

  14. Predicting asthma in preschool children with asthma symptoms: study rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafkamp-de Groen Esther

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In well-child care it is difficult to determine whether preschool children with asthma symptoms actually have or will develop asthma at school age. The PIAMA (Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy Risk Score has been proposed as an instrument that predicts asthma at school age, using eight easy obtainable parameters, assessed at the time of first asthma symptoms at preschool age. The aim of this study is to present the rationale and design of a study 1 to externally validate and update the PIAMA Risk Score, 2 to develop an Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool to predict asthma at school age in (specific subgroups of preschool children with asthma symptoms and 3 to test implementation of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care. Methods and design The study will be performed within the framework of Generation R, a prospective multi-ethnic cohort study. In total, consent for postnatal follow-up was obtained from 7893 children, born between 2002 and 2006. At preschool age the PIAMA Risk Score will be assessed and used to predict asthma at school age. Discrimination (C-index and calibration will be assessed for the external validation. We will study whether the predictive ability of the PIAMA Risk Score can be improved by removing or adding predictors (e.g. preterm birth. The (updated PIAMA Risk Score will be converted to the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool- to predict asthma at school age in preschool children with asthma symptoms. Additionally, we will conduct a pilot study to test implementation of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care. Discussion Application of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care will help to distinguish preschool children at high- and low-risk of developing asthma at school age when asthma symptoms appear. This study will increase knowledge about the validity of the PIAMA risk score and might improve risk assessment of developing asthma at school age in (specific subgroups

  15. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Diamant, Zuzana; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant impact on asthma incidence and manifestations. The purpose of the review is to discuss recent observations regarding the association between obesity and asthma focusing on underlying mechanisms, clinical presentation, response to therapy and effect...... of weight reduction. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical and epidemiological studies indicate that obese patients with asthma may represent a unique phenotype, which is more difficult to control, less responsive to asthma medications and by that may have higher healthcare utilization. A number of common comorbidities...... have been linked to both obesity and asthma, and may, therefore, contribute to the obese-asthma phenotype. Furthermore, recently published studies indicate that even a modest weight reduction can improve clinical manifestations and outcome of asthma. SUMMARY: Compared with normal-weight patients, obese...

  16. Asthma changes at a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit after 10 years: Observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman A Al-Eyadhy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the change in the management, and outcome of children with acute severe asthma (ASA admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU at tertiary institute, as compared to previously published report in 2003. Methods : This is a retrospective observational study. All consecutive pediatric ASA patients who were admitted to PICU during the study period were included. The data were extracted from PICU database and medical records. The Cohort in this study (2013 Cohort was compared with the Cohort of ASA, which was published in 2003 from the same institution (2003 Cohort. Results: In comparison to previous 2003 Cohort, current Cohort (2013 revealed higher mean age (5.5 vs. 3.6 years; P ≤ 0.001, higher rate of PICU admission (20.3% vs. 3.6%; P ≤ 0.007, less patients who received maintenance inhaled steroids (43.3% vs. 62.4%; P ≤ 0.03, less patients with pH <7.3 (17.9% vs. 42.9%; P ≤ 0.001. There were more patients in 2013 Cohort who received: Inhaled Ipratropium bromide (97% vs. 68%; P ≤ 0.001, intravenous magnesium sulfate (68.2% vs. none, intravenous salbutamol (13.6% vs. 3.6%; P ≤ 0.015, and noninvasive ventilation (NIV (35.8% vs. none while no patients were treated with theophylline (none vs. 62.5%. The median length of stay (LOS was 2 days while mean LOS was half a day longer in the 2013 Cohort. None of our patients required intubation, and there was no mortality. Conclusion: We observed slight shift toward older age, considerably increased the rate of PICU admission, increased utilization of Ipratropium bromide, magnesium sulfate, and NIV as important modalities of treatment.

  17. Inhibition of common cold-induced aggravation of childhood asthma by leukotriene receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Shigemi; Fukuda, Hironobu; Abe, Toshio; Nishida, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Yumi; Kanno, Noriko; Arisaka, Osamu

    2012-09-01

    Virus infection is an important risk factor for aggravation of childhood asthma. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of drugs on aggravation of asthma induced by a common cold. Asthma control was examined in a survey of 1,014 Japanese pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. The occurrence of common cold, asthma control, and drugs used for asthma control were investigated using a modified Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) for patients aged cold and aggravation of asthma were significantly higher in patients aged cold-induced aggravation was significantly less effective in patients aged cold, asthma control was significantly more effective for those treated with leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs) compared to treatment without LTRAs. Asthma control did not differ between patients who did or did not take inhaled corticosteroids or long-acting β2 stimulants. These findings showed a high prevalence of common cold in younger patients with childhood asthma and indicated that common cold can induce aggravation of asthma. LTRAs are useful for long-term asthma control in very young patients who develop an asthma attack due to a common cold.

  18. Role of health education and self-action plan in improving the drug compliance in bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaude, Gajanan S; Hattiholi, Jyothi; Chaudhury, Alisha

    2014-01-01

    Considering the prevalence and associated burden of disease due to bronchial asthma, it is mandatory to obtain an optimal control of the disease and to improve outcomes for these patients. But it has been observed that there is very poor adherence to the inhalational therapy which leads to the suboptimal control of the disease. To study the adherence for aerosol therapy in bronchial asthma patients and to assess the impact of health education and self-action plan in improving the compliance to the therapy. A prospective study was done in a total of 500 bronchial asthma patients over a period of 2 years. Once included in the study, the patients were followed-up for a total of 12 weeks for calculation of nonadherence to the aerosol therapy. In nonadherent patients, we employed various health education strategies to improve the compliance in these cases. A total of 500 patients of bronchial asthma who were started on aerosol therapy over duration of 2 years were included in the study. At the end of 12 weeks, it was observed that, only 193 patients (38.6%) had regular compliance and 307 patients (61.4%) were noncompliant to aerosol therapy as prescribed for bronchial asthma. Factors that were associated with poor compliance were: Lower educational level status, poor socioeconomic status, cumbersome regimens, dislike of medication, and distant pharmacies. Nondrug factors that reduced the compliance were: Fears about side effects, anger about condition or its treatment, forgetfulness or complacency, and patient's ill attitudes toward health. After employing the various strategies for improving the compliance in these patients, the compliance increased in 176 patients (57.3%) among the earlier defaulted patients, while the remaining 131 patients (42.7%) were found to be noncompliant even after various educational techniques. Noncompliance in asthma management is a fact of life and no single compliance improving strategy probably will be as effective as a good physician

  19. Family socioeconomic status, household tobacco smoke, and asthma attack among children below 12 years of age: gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Carol; Chang, Ly-Yun

    2014-12-01

    Studies have demonstrated the negative impact of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) or parental cigarette smoking on pediatric asthma. Little is known, however, regarding whether there is a gender difference in the effect of household ETS on pediatric asthma. Using a nationwide survey in Taiwan, we examined the relationship between asthma prevalence in the past year and household ETS among children below 12 years of age (N = 3761). We used multivariate regression models to assess odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of household ETS and asthma attacks by gender. In about 3% of the sample, parents reported that their children had an asthma attack in the past year, confirmed by physicians. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that household ETS predicted asthma attacks for girls (OR = 3.11, 95%CI = 1.24-7.76) but not for boys. Father's education was significantly associated with asthma attack for both girls (OR = 1.24, 95%CI = 1.04-1.47) and boys (OR = 1.15, 95%CI = 1.05-1.26). Girls with lower family income were more likely to have had an asthma attack in the last year (OR = .48, 95%CI = .27-.87). The impact of household ETS and family socioeconomic status on asthma attacks differs by gender among children below 12 years. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Increased ultrafine particles and carbon monoxide concentrations are associated with asthma exacerbation among urban children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Kristin A.; Halterman, Jill S.; Hopke, Philip K.; Fagnano, Maria; Rich, David Q.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Increased air pollutant concentrations have been linked to several asthma-related outcomes in children, including respiratory symptoms, medication use, and hospital visits. However, few studies have examined effects of ultrafine particles in a pediatric population. Our primary objective was to examine the effects of ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles on asthma exacerbation among urban children and determine whether consistent treatment with inhaled corticosteroids could attenuate these effects. We also explored the relationship between asthma exacerbation and ambient concentrations of accumulation mode particles, fine particles (≤ 2.5 micrograms [μm]; PM2.5), carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and ozone. We hypothesized that increased 1 to 7 day concentrations of ultrafine particles and other pollutants would be associated with increases in the relative odds of an asthma exacerbation, but that this increase in risk would be attenuated among children receiving school-based corticosteroid therapy. Methods We conducted a pilot study using data from 3–10 year-old children participating in the School-Based Asthma Therapy trial. Using a time-stratified case-crossover design and conditional logistic regression, we estimated the relative odds of a pediatric asthma visit treated with prednisone (n=96 visits among 74 children) associated with increased pollutant concentrations in the previous 7 days. We re-ran these analyses separately for children receiving medications through the school-based intervention and children in a usual care control group. Results Interquartile range increases in ultrafine particles and carbon monoxide concentrations in the previous 7 days were associated with increases in the relative odds of a pediatric asthma visit, with the largest increases observed for 4-day mean ultrafine particles (interquartile range=2088 p/cm3; OR=1.27; 95% CI=0.90–1.79) and 7-day mean carbon monoxide (interquartile range=0.17 ppm; OR=1.63; 95

  1. Comparing clinical efficacy of Symbicort versus Pulmicort in reducing asthma symptom and improving its control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Emami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, higher efficacy of the combination of long-acting beta2-adrenoceptor agonist and inhaled corticosteroids on controlling asthma symptoms has been hypothesized. This study aimed to examine the clinical effects of the combination of Budesonide with formoterol (Symbicort and Budesonide (Pulmicort alone in persistent asthma. Materials and Methods: In a randomized double-blinded clinical trial, 76 patients with definite diagnosis of moderate-to-severe asthma were randomized to receive Pulmicort 180 mcg/inhalation two puffs twice daily, or receive Symbicort 80/4.5 mg/inhalation two puffs twice daily, or receive Symbicort 160/4.5 mg/inhalation two puffs twice daily for 3 months. All participants were initially evaluated by spirometry for assessing respiratory parameters and also the level of asthma control was assessed by Asthma Control Test (ACT. Results: More significant improvement in spirometry parameters, including forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio, as well as in peak expiratory flow (PEF in both groups of Symbicort with the regimens 80/4.5 mg/inhalation or 160/4.5 mg/inhalation 2 puffs twice daily compared with Pulmicort group, ACT score was significantly improved in Symbicort group with the regimens 160/4.5 mg/inhalation compared with both Symbicort groups with lower dosage and Pulmicort group . Response to treatment in PEF parameter and also in ACT level was significantly more in those who received Symbicort with the regimens 160/4.5 mg/inhalation compared with other two interventional groups adjusted for gender and age. Conclusion: Symbicort with the regimens 160/4.5 mg/inhalation has higher efficacy in reducing asthma symptom and improving its control compared with low doses of this drug and with Pulmicort.

  2. Residency factors that influence pediatric in-training examination score improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Lindsay H; Highbaugh-Battle, Angela P; Buchter, Susie

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine which measurable factors of resident training experience contribute to improvement of in-training examination (ITE) and certifying examination (CE) scores. This is a descriptive retrospective study analyzing data from July 2003 through June 2006 at a large academic pediatric training program. Pediatric categorical residents beginning residency in July 2003 were included. Regression analyses were used to determine if the number of admissions performed, core lectures attended, acute care topics heard, grand rounds attended, continuity clinic patients encountered, or procedures performed correlated with improvement of ITE scores. These factors were then analyzed in relation to CE scores. Seventeen residents were included in this study. The number of general pediatric admissions was the only factor found to correlate with an increase in ITE score (P = .04). Scores for the ITE at pediatric levels 1 and 3 were predictive of CE scores. No other factors measured were found to influence CE scores. Although all experiences of pediatric residents likely contribute to professional competence, some experiences may have more effect on ITE and CE scores. In this study, only general pediatric admissions correlated significantly with an improvement in ITE scores from year 1 to year 3. Further study is needed to identify which elements of the residency experience contribute most to CE success. This would be helpful in optimizing residency program structure and curriculum within the limitations of duty hour regulations.

  3. e-Monitoring of Asthma Therapy to Improve Compliance in children (e-MATIC): a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasbinder, E.C.; Goossens, J.M.A.W.; Rutten-van Mölken, M.P.M.H.; Winter, B.C.M. de; Dijk, L. van; Vulto, A.G.; Blankman, E.; Dehhan, N; Veenstra-van Schie, M.T.M.; Versteegh, F.G.A.; Wolf, B.H.M.; Janssens, H.M.; Bemt, P.M.L.A. van den

    2016-01-01

    Real-time medication monitoring (RTMM) is a promising tool for improving adherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), but has not been sufficiently tested in children with asthma. We aimed to study the effects of RTMM with short message service (SMS) reminders on adherence to ICS, asthma control,

  4. Educational interventions to improve inhaler techniques and their impact on asthma and COPD control: a pilot effectiveness-implementation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricoto, Tiago; Madanelo, Sofia; Rodrigues, Luís; Teixeira, Gilberto; Valente, Carla; Andrade, Lília; Saraiva, Alcina

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact that educational interventions to improve inhaler techniques have on the clinical and functional control of asthma and COPD, we evaluated 44 participants before and after such an intervention. There was a significant decrease in the number of errors, and 20 patients (46%) significantly improved their technique regarding prior exhalation and breath hold. In the asthma group, there were significant improvements in the mean FEV1, FVC, and PEF (of 6.4%, 8.6%, and 8.3% respectively). Those improvements were accompanied by improvements in Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test scores but not in Asthma Control Test scores. In the COPD group, there were no significant variations. In asthma patients, educational interventions appear to improve inhaler technique, clinical control, and functional control. RESUMO Para avaliar o impacto do ensino da técnica inalatória no controle clínico e funcional de pacientes com asma ou DPOC, incluíram-se 44 participantes antes e após essa intervenção. Houve uma diminuição significativa no número de erros cometidos, sendo que 20 pacientes (46%) melhoraram significativamente sua técnica na expiração prévia e apneia final. No grupo asma, houve significativa melhora nas médias de FEV1 (6,4%), CVF (8,6%) e PFE (8,3%), e essa melhora correlacionou-se com os resultados no Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test, mas não com os do Asthma Control Test. No grupo DPOC, não houve variações significativas. O ensino da técnica inalatória parece melhorar seu desempenho e os controles clínico e funcional em pacientes com asma.

  5. Assesment of Quality of Life in Children with Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Serhat Gümüş; Selvi Kelekçi; İlyas Yolbaş; Mehmet Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Bronchial asthma is among the most common chronic pediatric diseases that can result in variable restriction in the physical, emotional and social aspects of the patient%u2019s life. The aim of this study was to assess impairment on quality of life (QOL) in asthmatic children. Material and Method: Ninety seven patients aged between 7 and 15 years which followed up at Pediatric Pulmonology Department of Dicle University Hospital were included into the study, during October 2009 %u2013 Jan...

  6. Health-Related Quality of Life of Children with Asthma: Self and Parental Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyva, Efrosini; Eiser, Christine; Papathanasiou, Aikaterini

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to explore whether age, gender, asthma severity, asthma duration, and exposure to parental smoking were associated with levels of asthma-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among Greek children with asthma and to identify any differences between self- and proxy ratings of asthma-specific HRQoL. One hundred and seventy-three (173) children with asthma (8-12 years old) and their parents completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Asthma Module self- and proxy measures. Asthma severity, age, and asthma duration explained almost half of the variance in asthma-specific HRQoL scores according to self- and proxy reports. Older male children with more severe asthma who were diagnosed for a longer period of time and had at least one smoking parent reported lower asthma-specific HRQoL according to self- and proxy reports. Although children and their parents seemed to agree in their views of asthma-specific HRQoL, there were significant differences in ratings of specific parameters of asthma-specific HRQoL. This study identifies the factors that account for a significant variance in asthma-specific HRQoL scores according to self- and proxy reports and is among the first to record the effect of parental smoking on children's and parents' perceptions of asthma-specific HRQoL.

  7. Management of natural health products in pediatrics: a provider-focused quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Emily; Silbert-Flagg, JoAnne; Vohra, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    The use of natural health products by pediatric patients is common, yet health care providers often do not provide management guidance. The purpose of this project was to improve management of natural health products by pediatric nurse practitioners. Pediatric nurse practitioners from large metropolitan city were recruited (n = 32). A paired pretest-posttest design was used. Study participants were engaged to improve knowledge of natural health products, and a management toolkit was created and tested. Mean knowledge scores increased from 59.19 to 76.3 (p improved with regard to patient guidance (p product use (p = .51) and drug/herb interactions (p = .35) were not significant. This investigation is the first known study to improve knowledge and management of natural health products in pediatric clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Call-Center Based Disease Management of Pediatric Asthmatics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quinn, James M

    2005-01-01

    .... This intervention will be compared to a control population of pediatric asthma patients receiving printed education materials and usual care at three DoD military treatment facilities in a similar geographic region...

  9. Efficiency of physiotherapy with Caycedian Sophrology on children with asthma: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romieu, Huguette; Charbonnier, Françoise; Janka, Dora; Douillard, Aymeric; Macioce, Valérie; Lavastre, Kathleen; Abassi, Hamouda; Renoux, Marie-Catherine; Mura, Thibault; Amedro, Pascal

    2018-05-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease in pediatrics. Along with the usual drug therapy using corticosteroids and bronchodilators, some interest has been shown for adjuvant therapies, such as sophrology. However, the level of evidence for non-pharmaceutical therapies in asthma remains low, especially in children. This study aimed to assess whether in children with asthma, peak expiratory flow (PEF) improved more after a sophrology session alongside standard treatment than after standard treatment alone. We carried out a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial among 74 children aged 6-17 years old, hospitalized for an asthma attack. Group 1: conventional treatment (oxygen, corticosteroids, bronchodilators, physiotherapy) added to one session of sophrology. Group 2: conventional treatment alone. The primary outcome was the PEF variation between the initial and final evaluations (PEF 2 -PEF 1 ). Demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in both groups at baseline. Measures before and after the sophrology session showed that the PEF increased by mean 30 L/min in the sophrology group versus 20 L/min in the control group (P = 0.02). Oxygen saturation increased by 1% versus 0% (P = 0.02) and the dyspnea score with visual analogue scale improved by two points point (P = 0.01). No differences were observed between the two groups in terms of duration of hospitalization, use and doses of conventional medical treatment (oxygen, corticosteroids, and bronchodilators), and quality of life scores. Sophrology appears as a promising adjuvant therapy to current guideline-based treatment for asthma in children. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Genetic approach identifies distinct asthma pathways in overweight vs normal weight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butsch Kovacic, M; Martin, L J; Biagini Myers, J M; He, H; Lindsey, M; Mersha, T B; Khurana Hershey, G K

    2015-08-01

    The pathogenesis of asthma in the context of excess body weight may be distinct from asthma that develops in normal weight children. The study's objective was to explore the biology of asthma in the context of obesity and normal weight status using genetic methodologies. Associations between asthma and SNPs in 49 genes were assessed, as well as, interactions between SNPs and overweight status in child participants of the Greater Cincinnati Pediatric Clinic Repository. Asthma was significantly associated with weight (OR = 1.38; P = 0.037). The number of genes and the magnitude of their associations with asthma were notably greater when considering overweight children alone vs normal weight and overweight children together. When considering weight, distinct sets of asthma-associated genes were observed, many times with opposing effects. We demonstrated that the underlying heterogeneity of asthma is likely due in part to distinct pathogenetic pathways that depend on preceding/comorbid overweight and/or allergy. It is therefore important to consider both obesity and asthma when conducting studies of asthma. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Targeting small airways in asthma: Improvement in clinical benefit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim:  Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung...... half the daily dose with no increased risk of systemic effects. Clinical studies of adults with asthma have shown a greater effect of ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, on quality of life, small airway patency, and markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation, but no difference...... with regard to conventional clinical indices of lung function and asthma control. Conclusions:  Asthma patients treated with ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, have at least similar chance of achieving asthma control at a lower daily dose. Further clinical studies are needed to explore whether...

  12. Targeting small airways in asthma: Improvement in clinical benefit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim: Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung...... half the daily dose with no increased risk of systemic effects. Clinical studies of adults with asthma have shown a greater effect of ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, on quality of life, small airway patency, and markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation, but no difference...... with regard to conventional clinical indices of lung function and asthma control. Conclusions: Asthma patients treated with ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, have at least similar chance of achieving asthma control at a lower daily dose. Further clinical studies are needed to explore whether...

  13. e-Monitoring of asthma therapy to improve compliance in children using a real-time medication monitoring system (RTMM): the e-MATIC study protocol.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasbinder, E.C.; Janssens, H.M.; Rutten-van Mölken, M.P.M.H.; Dijk, L. van; Winter, B.C.M. de; Groot, R.C.A. de; Vulto, A.G.; Bemt, P.M.L.A. van den

    2013-01-01

    Background: Many children with asthma do not have sufficient asthma control, which leads to increased healthcare costs and productivity loss of parents. One of the causative factors are adherence problems. Effective interventions improving medication adherence may therefore improve asthma control

  14. Fathers and Asthma Care: Paternal Involvement, Beliefs, and Management Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Deborah; Masek, Bruce; Barreto, Esteban; Baer, Lee; Lapey, Allen; Budge, Eduardo; McQuaid, Elizabeth L

    2015-09-01

    To compare asthma care roles of maternal and paternal caregivers, and examine associations between caregiver involvement and the outcomes of adherence, morbidity, and parental quality of life (QoL). Mothers and fathers in 63 families of children, ages 5-9 years, with persistent asthma completed semistructured interviews and questionnaires. Adherence was measured via electronic monitoring. Paired t tests compared parental asthma care roles, and analysis of covariance, controlling for socioeconomic status, evaluated associations of asthma outcomes with caregiver involvement scores. Mothers had higher scores on measures of involvement, beliefs in medication necessity, and on four subscales of the Family Asthma Management System Scale interview (Asthma Knowledge, Relationship with Provider, Symptom Assessment, and Response to Symptoms). Maternal QoL was lowest when both maternal and paternal involvement was high. Paternal involvement was associated with increased morbidity. There is room for enhancement of fathers' asthma care roles. Higher levels of paternal involvement may be driven by family need. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Asthma management in rural New South Wales: perceptions of health care professionals and people with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovski, Biljana; Armour, Carol; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia

    2009-08-01

    To investigate the perceptions and attitudes towards asthma management of general practitioners, pharmacists and people with asthma in a rural area. Qualitative semistructured interviews. Small rural centre in New South Wales. General practitioners, pharmacists and people with asthma in a rural area. General practitioners perceived that the patient provided a barrier to the implementation of optimal asthma services. They were aware that other health care professionals had a role in asthma management but were not aware of the details, particularly in relation to that of the pharmacist and would like to improve communication methods. Pharmacists also perceived the patient to be a barrier to the delivery of optimal asthma management services and would like to improve communication with the general practitioner. The impact of the rural environment for the health care professionals included workforce shortages, availability of support services and access to continuing education. People with asthma were satisfied with their asthma management and the service provided by the health care professionals and described the involvement of family members and ambulance officers in their overall asthma management. The rural environment was an issue with regards to distance to the hospital during an emergency. General practitioners and pharmacists confirmed their existing roles in asthma management while expressing a desire to improve communication between the two professions to help overcome barriers and optimise the asthma service delivered to the patient. The patient described minimal barriers to optimising asthma management, which might suggest that they might not have great expectations of asthma care.

  16. Self-hypnosis for anxiety associated with severe asthma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anbar Ran D

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of asthma can be complicated by both medical and psychiatric conditions, such as gastroesophageal reflux, chronic sinusitis, and anxiety. When symptoms of asthma are interpreted without regard to such conditions treatment may yield a suboptimal outcome. For example, anxiety-associated dyspnea, tachypnea, and chest tightness can be mistakenly interpreted as resulting from an exacerbation of asthma. Medical treatment directed only for asthma may thus lead to overuse of asthma medications and increased hospitalizations. Case Presentation The described case illustrates how a systemic steroid-dependent patient with asthma benefited from receiving care from a pediatric pulmonologist who also was well versed in the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety. By using self-hypnosis, the patient was able to reduce her dependence on bronchodilators. Following modification of her medical therapy under supervision of the pulmonologist, and regular use of hypnosis, the patient ultimately was weaned off her systemic steroid therapy. Conclusions This report emphasizes that anxiety must be considered as a comorbid condition in the treatment of asthma. Self-hypnosis can be a useful skill in the treatment of a patient with anxiety and asthma.

  17. Asthma Severity in patients initiating controller monotherapy versus combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diette, Gregory B; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L; Allen-Ramey, Felicia; Hopper, April; Sajjan, Shiva G; Markson, Leona E

    2011-04-01

    Asthma treatment guidelines recommend medications based on the level of asthma control. To evaluate differences in asthma control between patients who initiated asthma controller monotherapy versus combination therapy. Children (5-16 years; n = 488) and adults (17-80 years; n = 530) with asthma and no controller therapy in the prior 6 months were included. Telephone surveys were conducted within 5 days of filling a new asthma controller prescription with either the caregiver of children or the adult patient. Demographics, asthma control before therapy, and asthma-related resource use were assessed for patients initiating monotherapy (filling one asthma controller prescription) and combination therapy (filling more than one controller medication or a fixed-dose combination). Mean pediatric age was 10 years; 53% were male. Mean adult age was 47 years; 25% were male. There were no significant differences in asthma control score between patients receiving monotherapy and combination therapy. Children on combination therapy did not have more nighttime awakening or short-acting β-agonist use but were more likely to have been hospitalized due to asthma attack (p = .05) and have more unscheduled (p = .0374) and scheduled (p = .009) physician visits. Adults on combination therapy were more likely to have been hospitalized due to asthma attack (p asthma (p asthma control scores in the 4 weeks before index medication suggests that asthma severity during a treatment-free period did not differ significantly for patients initiating controller monotherapy versus combination therapy. From these findings, it appears that although physicians may not focus on asthma control when choosing the intensity of initial controller therapy, the intensity of health-care encounters may be an influence.

  18. Management preferences of pediatricians in moderate and severe acute asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arga, Mustafa; Bakirtas, Arzu; Catal, Ferhat; Derinoz, Oksan; Topal, Erdem; Demirsoy, M Sadik; Turktas, Ipek

    2013-05-01

    To assess and compare management preferences of physicians for moderate and severe acute asthma based on case scenarios and to determine the factors influencing their decisions. A questionnaire based on the Global Initiative on Asthma (GINA) guideline and comprising eight questions on management of acute asthma was delivered to participants of two national pediatric congresses. Management of moderate and severe acute asthma cases was evaluated by two clinical case scenarios for estimation of acute attack severity, initial treatment, treatment after 1h, and discharge recommendations. A uniform answer box comprising the possible choices was provided just below the questions, and respondents were requested to tick the answers they thought was appropriate. Four-hundred and eighteen questionnaires were analyzed. All questions regarding moderate and severe acute asthma case scenarios were answered accurately by 15.8% and 17.0% of physicians, respectively. The initial treatment of moderate and severe cases was known by 100.0% and 78.2% of physicians, respectively. Knowledge of the appropriate plan for treatment after 1h was low both for moderate (45.0%) and severe attacks (35.4%). Discharge recommendations were adequate in 32.5% and 70.8% of physicians for moderate and severe attacks, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that working at a hospital with a continuing medical education program was the only significant predictor of a correct response to all questions regarding severe attacks (p = .04; 95%CI, 1.02-3.21). No predictors were found for information on moderate attacks. Pediatricians have difficulty in planning treatment after 1 hour both for moderate and severe asthma attacks. Postgraduate education programs that target physicians in hospitals without continuing medical education facilities may improve guideline adherence.

  19. Overlap of obstructive sleep apnea and bronchial asthma: Effect on asthma control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Zidan

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: A high index of suspicion is warranted for the overlap of OSA and asthma, particularly in the presence of obesity, GERD, and in patients with severe asthma. Individualized therapy addressing these moderating factors is warranted for optimal health outcomes. Recognition and treatment of OSA in asthmatics is an important element in improving asthma control.

  20. Predicting quality of life in pediatric asthma: the role of emotional competence and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaye, Magali; Van Broeck, Nady; Bodart, Eddy; Luminet, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    The present study examined the predictive value of emotional competence and the five-factor model of personality on the quality of life of children with asthma. Participants were 90 children (M age = 11.73, SD = 2.60) having controlled and partly controlled asthma, undergoing everyday treatment. Children filled in questionnaires assessing emotional competence and quality of life. Parents completed questionnaires assessing the personality of their child. Results showed that two emotional competences, bodily awareness and verbal sharing of emotions, were related to the quality of life of children with asthma. Moreover, one personality trait, benevolence, was associated with children's quality of life. Regression analyses showed that the predictive value of these three dimensions remained significant over and above asthma control and socio-demographic variables frequently associated with the quality of life of children with asthma (age, gender, and educational level of parents). These findings emphasize the importance of alerting the clinician who works with children with asthma to observe and assess the child's expression of emotions, attention to bodily sensations, and benevolence.

  1. Peripheral blood MDSCs, IL-10 and IL-12 in children with asthma and their importance in asthma development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Li Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC accumulation and interleukin 10 (IL-10 and interleukin 12 (IL-12 levels during the onset of asthma in both pediatric patients and mouse models, as well as their possible roles in the development of asthma. METHODS: Peripheral blood samples were gathered from children with asthma attacks (attack group and alleviated asthma (alleviated group, as well as two control groups, children with pneumonia and healthy children. The pathological characteristics of asthma in asthmatic mice, budesonide-treated asthmatic mice, and normal control mice were also evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining. RESULTS: MDSC accumulation and serum IL-10 levels were significantly elevated in the children with asthma compared with the budesonide-treated alleviated group, normal healthy controls, and pneumonia controls (p0.05. The level of serum IL-12 in the asthmatic children was drastically reduced compared to the budesonide-treated alleviated group, healthy controls, and pneumonia controls (p<0.05, whereas the latter three groups showed no significant differences in their serum IL-12 levels. The percentage of MDSCs in children with asthma was positively correlated with the level of serum IL-10 and negatively correlated with the level of serum IL-12. The levels of MDSCs and IL-10 in asthmatic mice were significantly higher than those in the normal control mice (both p<0.05 and were reduced after budesonide treatment (both p<0.05. IL-12 expression in the asthmatic mice was significantly lower than the control and was increased upon budesonide treatment (both p<0.05. CONCLUSION: During the onset of asthma, the accumulation of MDSCs and the level of serum IL-10 increase, while the level of IL-12 decreases. These fluctuations may play an important role in the development of asthma.

  2. Reduction in exhaled nitric oxide tracks improved patient inhaler compliance in difficult asthma-a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Eoin; Flynn, Deirdre; MacHale, Elaine; Costello, Richard W; Murphy, Desmond M

    2017-12-26

    Exhaled nitric oxide is believed be a useful surrogate for airways inflammation while non-adherence with therapy is known to be associated with worsening of asthma control. We present the case of a 49-year-old female with steroid-dependent asthma and an exacerbation rate of >20/year. She was enrolled in a 3-month-long prospective study using a validated diagnostic inhaler device that provided objective evidence of inhaler compliance. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), peak expiratory flow rates, asthma control questionnaires were measured throughout the study period. Peripheral eosinophil count was obtained prior to the study, during the study, and immediately afterwards. Improvement in compliance at the end of the study led to significant improvements in lung function peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), and objective scores of asthma. There was an observed improvement in PEFR after 4 weeks, with an associated decrease in FeNO from 92 to 9 ppb that plateaued over the remainder of the study. Her eosinophil count was 0.79 × 10 9 /litre prior to starting in the study, 0.37 × 10 9 /litre after 2 months, and 0.1 × 10 9 /litre at the end of the study. We believe that this is the first case study to objectively prove that improvements in compliance can lead to dramatic reductions in the overall inflammatory airway response and in particular that improvements in patient compliance are mirrored by marked reduction in FeNO levels. These changes occurred in tandem with an observed clinical improvement in our patient.

  3. Correlation of cutaneous sensitivity and cytokine response in children with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food allergy occurs in a significant portion of pediatric asthma. Various cells and their mediators/cytokines play a pivotal role in orchestrating the airway inflammatory response in asthma. Objective: To study the cutaneous hypersensitivity, Th1, Th2, and Th17 response of pediatric population with asthma and genetic predisposition to atopy, by determining total immunoglobulin E (IgE level in response to various food allergens. Materials and Methods: Fifty asthmatic children with a history of worsening symptoms by various food allergens (study group and twenty healthy children (control group were included. Food allergy was assessed through skin prick test (SPT of various food allergens. Total serum IgE level was measured by sandwich ELISA, and T-cell (Th1, Th2, and Th17-dependent cytokines were measured by flow cytometry. Results: All 50 asthmatic children in the study group showed SPT positivity against various food allergens (rice = 17; banana, fish and groundnut = 10; wheat = 9; milk and orange = 7; egg = 6; and mango = 4. The average total IgE level in the study group was 316.8 ± 189.8 IU/mL. A significant positive correlation of total IgE with interleukin 17 (IL-17 (r = 0.796; P < 0.0001, IL-13 (r = 0.383; P = 0.01, and IL-4 (r = 0.263; P = 0.043 level was noted. A significant negative correlation of total IgE was noted with interferon gamma (r = −0.5823; P < 0.0001 and IL-10 (r = −0.4474; P < 0.001 level and the duration of breastfeeding (r = −0.31, P = 0.03. Conclusions: The present study found a positive correlation between total serum IgE level and Th2, Th17 cytokines in a pediatric population with asthma. A significant negative correlation was found between the duration of breastfeeding and the cytokines.

  4. Evaluation of a novel educational strategy, including inhaler-based reminder labels, to improve asthma inhaler technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheti, Iman A; Armour, Carol L; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia Z; Reddel, Helen K

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of a brief intervention about inhaler technique, delivered by community pharmacists to asthma patients. Thirty-one pharmacists received brief workshop education (Active: n=16, CONTROL: n=15). Active Group pharmacists were trained to assess and teach dry powder inhaler technique, using patient-centered educational tools including novel Inhaler Technique Labels. Interventions were delivered to patients at four visits over 6 months. At baseline, patients (Active: 53, CONTROL: 44) demonstrated poor inhaler technique (mean+/-S.D. score out of 9, 5.7+/-1.6). At 6 months, improvement in inhaler technique score was significantly greater in Active cf. CONTROL patients (2.8+/-1.6 cf. 0.9+/-1.4, p<0.001), and asthma severity was significantly improved (p=0.015). Qualitative responses from patients and pharmacists indicated a high level of satisfaction with the intervention and educational tools, both for their effectiveness and for their impact on the patient-pharmacist relationship. A simple feasible intervention in community pharmacies, incorporating daily reminders via Inhaler Technique Labels on inhalers, can lead to improvement in inhaler technique and asthma outcomes. Brief training modules and simple educational tools, such as Inhaler Technique Labels, can provide a low-cost and sustainable way of changing patient behavior in asthma, using community pharmacists as educators.

  5. Severe asthma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciznar, P.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with severe asthma are clinically, physiologically and biologically a heterogeneous group. About half of children referred for medical examination for severe asthma have true severe, therapy resistant asthma. The rest of referred patients have difficult to treat asthma. Symptoms persist mostly due to drug non-compliance, inappropriate inhalation technique, persistent environmental exposures or co-morbid conditions. Compared with adults have children more frequently atopic form of severe asthma. This is associated with eosinophilia in peripheral blood and sensitization to inhaled allergens. The IgE levels are high. Therapy of co-morbidities and improvement of treatment compliance lead in most cases to full asthma control. Proportion of children will benefit from biologics like anti-IgE monoclonal antibody, administered by subcutaneous injections in 2 to 4 week intervals. By this therapy it is not only possible to suppress symptoms, but also decrease the total steroid dose and the risk of adverse effects associated with its long-term administration. By achieving a full asthma control we lower future risk of exacerbations and probably improve long-term prognosis of disease, frequently persisting for the rest of life. (author)

  6. Assessing asthma control and associated risk factors among persons with current asthma - findings from the child and adult Asthma Call-back Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahran, Hatice S; Bailey, Cathy M; Qin, Xiaoting; Moorman, Jeanne E

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring the level of asthma control is important in determining the effectiveness of current treatment which may decrease the frequency and intensity of symptoms and functional limitations. Uncontrolled asthma has been associated with decreased quality of life and increased health care use. The objectives of this study were to assess the level of asthma control and identify related risk factors among persons with current asthma. Using the 2006 to 2010 BRFSS child and adult Asthma Call-back Survey, asthma control was classified as well-controlled or uncontrolled (not-well-controlled or very-poorly-controlled) using three impairment measures: daytime symptoms, night-time symptoms, and taking short-acting β2-agonists for symptom control. Multivariate logistic regression identified predictors of asthma control. Fifty percent of adults and 38.4% of children with current asthma had uncontrolled asthma. About 63% of children and 53% of adults with uncontrolled asthma were on long-term asthma control medications. Among children, uncontrolled asthma was significantly associated with being younger than 5 years, having annual household income asthma (low educational attainment, low income, cigarette smoking, and co-morbid conditions including obesity and depression) could improve asthma control.

  7. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Alberto E; Armenio, Lucio; Bernardini, Roberto; Boner, Attilio; Calvani, Mauro; Cardinale, Fabio; Cavagni, Giovanni; Dondi, Arianna; Duse, Marzia; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Marseglia, Gian L; del Giudice, Michele Miraglia; Muraro, Antonella; Pajno, Giovanni B; Paravati, Francesco; Peroni, Diego; Tripodi, Salvatore; Ugazio, Alberto G; Indinnimeo, Luciana

    2011-05-01

    In Italy, according to the International Study on Asthma and Allergies in Childhood study, the prevalence of current asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic eczema in 2006 was 7.9%, 6.5%, and 10.1% among children aged 6-7 and 8.4%, 15.5%, and 7.75% among children aged 13-14 yr. University education in this field is provided by the Postgraduate Schools of Pediatrics and those of Allergology and Clinical Immunology, as well as several annual Master courses. The Italian Society of Pediatric Allergology and Immunology (SIAIP) was founded in 1996 and counts about 1000 members. SIAIP promotes evidence-based management of allergic children and disseminates information to patients and their families through a quite innovative website and the National Journal 'Rivista Italiana di Allergologia Pediatrica'. In the last decade, four major regional, inter-regional, and national web-based networks have been created to link pediatric allergy centers and to share their clinical protocols and epidemiologic data. In addition, National Registers of Primary Immune-deficiencies and on Pediatric HIV link all clinical excellence centers. Research projects in the field of pediatric allergy and immunology are founded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR) and by the National Research Council (CNR), but the overall investments in this research area are quite low. Only a handful Italian excellence centers participate in European Projects on Pediatric Allergy and Immunology within the 7th Framework Program. The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology currently hosts two Italians in its Executive Committee (EC) and one in the EC of the Pediatric Section; moreover, major European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology meetings and courses in the area of pediatrics (e.g., PAAM, Venice, 2009) have been held in Italy in the last 3 yr. Italian hallmarks in the management of allergic diseases in childhood are a quite alive and spread interest in

  8. Quality improvement in pediatrics: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Stephanie P; Rehder, Kyle J

    2017-01-01

    Almost two decades ago, the landmark report "To Err is Human" compelled healthcare to address the large numbers of hospitalized patients experiencing preventable harm. Concurrently, it became clear that the rapidly rising cost of healthcare would be unsustainable in the long-term. As a result, quality improvement methodologies initially rooted in other high-reliability industries have become a primary focus of healthcare. Multiple pediatric studies demonstrate remarkable quality and safety improvements in several domains including handoffs, catheter-associated blood stream infections, and other serious safety events. While both quality improvement and research are data-driven processes, significant differences exist between the two. Research utilizes a hypothesis driven approach to obtain new knowledge while quality improvement often incorporates a cyclic approach to translate existing knowledge into clinical practice. Recent publications have provided guidelines and methods for effectively reporting quality and safety work and improvement implementations. This review examines not only how quality improvement in pediatrics has led to improved outcomes, but also looks to the future of quality improvement in healthcare with focus on education and collaboration to ensure best practice approaches to caring for children.

  9. No direct association among respiratory function, disease control and family functioning in a sample of Mexican children with intermittent asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain Raimundo; Núñez-Tapia, Rosa María; Ramírez-Silva, Armando; Gómez-Alonso, Carlos

    2013-05-15

    Asthma has been linked to family disfunctioning and poor control of the disease.This study was conducted to analyze the interactions between the level of intermittent asthma control, family functioning and respiratory function and between quality of life of asthmatic patients and their caregivers.7 to 15 years old children with intermittent asthma were included. Asthma Control Test Questionnaire, Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ) test, and flowmetry were applied to children and Pediatric Asthma Caregiver´s Quatily of Life Questionnaire (PAQCLQ) and the Family Functioning Perception Test (FF-SIL) were applied to their parents.The most affected areas of family functioning in dysfunctional families were adaptability and permeability. A medium to high strength of association was founded between the emotional function of parents and the emotional function of children, R2=0.552. The most remarkable associations were among parents' limitation of activities and parents' emotional function (r=0.837), parents' limitation of activities and child's emotional function (r=0.722), parents' emotional role and limitation of activities (r=0.837), parents' emotional role and emotional functioning of children with asthma (r=0.743) and the limitation of activities of children with asthma and the emotional function of children with asthma (r=0.870).No direct associations were founded among respiratory function, disease control and family functioning in Mexican children with intermittent asthma and emotional function of parents and children were associated in both groups.

  10. TRPA1 gene polymorphisms and childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Valentina; Dijk, F Nicole; Holloway, John W; Ring, Susan M; Koppelman, Gerard H; Postma, Dirkje S; Strachan, David P; Granell, Raquel; de Jongste, Johan C; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; den Dekker, Herman T; Duijts, Liesbeth; Henderson, A John; Shaheen, Seif O

    2017-03-01

    Animal data have suggested that the transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) ion channel plays a key role in promoting airway inflammation in asthma and may mediate effects of paracetamol on asthma, yet confirmatory human data are lacking. To study associations of TRPA1 gene variants with childhood asthma and total IgE concentration, and interactions between TRPA1 and prenatal paracetamol exposure on these outcomes. We analysed associations between 31 TRPA1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and current doctor-diagnosed asthma and total IgE concentration at 7.5 years in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort. We sought to confirm the most significant associations with comparable outcomes in the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy (PIAMA) and Generation R birth cohorts. In ALSPAC, we explored interactions with prenatal paracetamol exposure. In ALSPAC, there was strong evidence for association between six SNPs and asthma: rs959974 and rs1384001 (per-allele odds ratio for both: 1.30 (95% CI: 1.15-1.47), p = 0.00001), rs7010969 (OR 1.28 (1.13-1.46), p = 0.00004), rs3735945 (OR 1.30 (1.09-1.55), p = 0.003), rs920829 (OR 1.30 (1.09-1.54), p = 0.004) and rs4738202 (OR 1.22 (1.07-1.39), p = 0.004). In a meta-analysis across the three cohorts, the pooled effect estimates confirmed that all six SNPs were significantly associated with asthma. In ALSPAC, TRPA1 associations with asthma were not modified by prenatal paracetamol, although associations with IgE concentration were. This study suggests that TRPA1 may play a role in the development of childhood asthma. (249 words). © 2016 The Authors Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. [Association between paracetamol exposure and asthma: update and practice guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moral, L; Torres-Borrego, J; Korta Murua, J; Valverde-Molina, J; Pellegrini Belinchón, J; Praena-Crespo, M; Ortega Casanueva, C; Callén-Blecua, M T; Fernández-Llamazares, C M; Calvo Rey, C

    2013-09-01

    Asthma prevalence has increased over the last few decades, especially in developed countries, and possibly due to different reasons. An association between paracetamol use or exposure at different periods of life, including gestation and childhood, and asthma prevalence has been observed in the last few years. Causality can not be established from observational reports, due to the arguable presence of many confounding factors and biases. Randomised trials are needed to elucidate the nature of this association. The Spanish Paediatric societies subscribing to this paper consider that current evidence is insufficient to discourage the use of paracetamol during gestation or in children with or at risk of asthma. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Behavior problems and prevalence of asthma symptoms among Brazilian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa, Caroline A; Santos, Darci N; Barreto do Carmo, Maria B; Santos, Letícia M; Teles, Carlos A S; Rodrigues, Laura C; Barreto, Mauricio L

    2011-09-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease in childhood and has been designated a public health problem due to the increase in its prevalence in recent decades, the amount of health service expenditure it absorbs and an absence of consensus about its etiology. The relationships among psychosocial factors and the occurrence, symptomatology, and severity of asthma have recently been considered. There is still controversy about the association between asthma and a child's mental health, since the pathways through which this relationship is established are complex and not well researched. This study aims to investigate whether behavior problems are associated with the prevalence of asthma symptoms in a large urban center in Latin America. It is a cross-section study of 869 children between 6 and 12 years old, residents of Salvador, Brazil. The International Study of Allergy and Asthma in Childhood (ISAAC) instrument was used to evaluate prevalence of asthma symptoms. The Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) was employed to evaluate behavioral problems. 19.26% (n=212) of the children presented symptoms of asthma. 35% were classified as having clinical behavioral problems. Poisson's robust regression model demonstrated a statistically significant association between the presence of behavioral problems and asthma symptoms occurrence (PR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.10-1.85). These results suggest an association between behavioral problems and pediatric asthma, and support the inclusion of mental health care in the provision of services for asthma morbidity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. PhD Forum: Multimodal IoT and EMR based Smart Health Application for Asthma Management in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimini, Utkarshani

    2017-05-01

    According to a study done in 2014 by National Health Interview Survey around 6.3 million children in United States suffer from asthma [1]. Asthma remains one of the leading reasons for pediatric admissions to children's hospitals, and has a prevalence rate of approximately 10% in children and it leads to missed days from school and other societal costs. This occurs despite improved medications to control asthma symptoms. Asthma management is challenging as it involves understanding asthma causes and avoiding asthma triggers that are both multi-factorial and individualistic in nature. It is almost impossible for doctors to constantly monitor each patient's health and environmental triggers. According to a recent article, the IoT device market in health-care will increase to a worth of $117 billion by the year 2020 [2]. The monitoring segment of IoT devices have predicted to increase $15 billion in 2017 [5]. The sales of smart watches, fitness and health trackers, are expected to account for more than 70% of all wearables sale worldwide in 2016 [6]. According to IBM, the volume of health-care data has reached to 150 exabytes in 2017 [7]. The data generated from these consumer graded devices is increasing day by day. This data collection has exacerbated the problem of understanding the data and making sense of it.

  14. CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL EFFICACY OF INOSINE PRANOBEX FOR ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC ASTHMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Bulgakova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence rate of atopic asthma in children remains high. One of the reasons for lack of control over asthma symptoms is repeated infection. The article describes results from the study of immunomodulating medication inosine pranobex used in treatment of acute respiratory infections in children with atopic asthma. The results obtained prove the efficacy and safety of this medication. The use of this immunomodifier with antiviral activity during the period of acute respiratory infection in children with atopic asthma contributes to shortening of intoxication and catarrhal signs duration, elimination of viral agents. Key words: asthma, acute respiratory infections, immunomodifiers, inosine pranobex, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:98-105

  15. Parents' asthma information needs and preferences for school-based asthma support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Aloola, Noha Abdullah; Nissen, Lisa; Alewairdhi, Huda Abdullaziz; Al Faryan, Nawaf; Saini, Bandana

    2017-11-01

    This study sought to investigate parents' needs and preferences for school-based asthma support in Saudi Arabian primary schools. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted in the period between November 2015 and February 2016, with a convenience sample that comprised Saudi parents and carers of children with asthma. Recruitment of participants was primarily driven through Saudi primary schools; passive snowballing and social networks were used to boost participation rates further. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, translated and data were thematically organised using a latent content analysis approach. Twenty interviews were conducted. Six themes emerged from the interviews and were grouped into three major categories: (1) general asthma management issues; (2) school-based asthma management issues; and (3) communication dissatisfaction. Participants expressed concern at schools' social and physical environments and a lack of confidence in the ability of schools to manage their child's asthma, especially when their child was ill. Most of the participants advocated for staff training and school community engagement to improve the management of asthma in Saudi primary schools. This research clearly describes a need for school-based asthma support, including asthma-related policies, procedures and education on asthma and first aid in Saudi primary schools.

  16. Improvement in pulmonary functions and clinical parameters due to addition of breathing exercises in asthma patients receiving optimal treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipti Agarwal

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Breathing exercises provided significant improvements in spirometric parameters and significant reduction in breathlessness, wheezing, and nocturnal symptoms as well as requirements of rescue medicines in asthma patients who were receiving optimal asthma treatment.

  17. Pediatric Interstitial Lung Disease Masquerading as Difficult Asthma: Management Dilemmas for Rare Lung Disease in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EY Chan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic nontransplant-related childhood bronchiolitis obliterans is an uncommon disease. Most patients present with chronic recurrent dyspnea, cough and wheezing, which are also features of asthma, by far a much more common condition. The present case study reports on a six-year-old girl who presented to a tertiary care centre with recurrent episodes of respiratory distress on a background of baseline tachypnea, chronic hypoxemia and exertional dyspnea. Her past medical history revealed significant lung disease in infancy, including respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and repaired gastroesophageal reflux. She was treated for 'asthma exacerbations' throughout her early childhood years. Bronchiolitis obliterans was subsequently diagnosed with an open lung biopsy. She did not have sustained improvement with systemic corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine or clarithromycin. Cardiac catheterization confirmed the presence of secondary pulmonary hypertension. Treatment options remain a dilemma for this patient because there is no known effective treatment for this condition, and the natural history is not well understood. The present case demonstrates the need for careful workup in 'atypical asthma', and the urgent need for further research into the rare lung diseases of childhood.

  18. Handgrip strength test as a complementary tool in monitoring asthma in daily clinical practice in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Román, Pedro Ángel; Navarro-Martínez, Ana Vanesa; Mañas-Bastidas, Alfonso; García-Pinillos, Felipe

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that handgrip strength test can discriminate the presence/absence of asthma and between intermittent and moderate persistent asthma in children. 140 children (70 healthy and 70 with asthma) completed the Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ) and performed the handgrip strength test. Forty-eight hours later, subjects performed spirometry. The results showed Handgrip strength was significantly lower (pstrength test was a predictive factor for asthma (cut-off at 16.84 kg) and for severity of pathology (cut-off at 15.06 kg). Handgrip strength was reduced in children with asthma. Handgrip strength was positively associated with lung capacity and quality of life. The fact that the handgrip strength test was able to discriminate between presence/absence of asthma and between intermittent and moderate persistent asthma in children suggested that this test could be used as a complementary tool in the monitoring of asthma in daily clinical practice.

  19. Health outcomes in low-income children with current asthma in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, T; Dell, S; Tassoudji, M; Wang, C

    2009-01-01

    Data collected from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) in 1994/95 and 1996/97 were used to measure longitudinal health outcomes among children with asthma. Over 10 000 children aged 1 to 11 years with complete data on asthma status in both years were included. Outcomes included hospitalizations and health services use (HSU). Current asthma was defined as children diagnosed with asthma by a physician and who took prescribed inhalants regularly, had wheezing or an attack in the previous year, or had their activities limited by asthma. Children having asthma significantly increased their odds of hospitalization (OR = 2.52; 95% CI: 1.71, 3.70) and health services use (OR = 3.80; 95% CI: 2.69, 5.37). Low-income adequacy (LIA) in 1994/ 95 significantly predicts hospitalization and HSU in 1996/97 (OR = 2.68; 95% CI: 1.29, 5.59 and OR = 0.67; 95% CI: 0.45, 0.99, respectively). Our results confirmed that both having current asthma and living in low-income families had a significant impact on the health status of children in Canada. Programs seeking to decrease the economic burden of pediatric hospitalizations need to focus on asthma and low-income populations.

  20. Single parent households and increased child asthma morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrief, Terri; Beck, Andrew F; Simmons, Jeffrey M; Huang, Bin; Kahn, Robert S

    2014-04-01

    To characterize whether single parent households are associated with pediatric asthma-related repeat healthcare utilization and to examine family-level psychosocial variables that may explain this relationship. We analyzed a prospective cohort of 526 children aged 1-16 years hospitalized for asthma or bronchodilator-responsive wheezing whose caregivers self-reported their marital status. Those reporting being "single" were considered the at-risk category. The outcome was repeat asthma-related utilization (emergency room (ER) revisit or hospital readmission) within 12 months. We assessed, a priori, four psychosocial variables (household income, caregiver risk of psychological distress, ratio of in-home children to adults, and regular attendance at childcare or a secondary home). Among all children enrolled in the cohort, 40% returned to the ER or hospital for asthma within 12 months. Of all caregivers, 59% self-identified as single. Single status was significantly associated with each psychosocial variable. Children in households with lower incomes and higher ratios of children to adults were both more likely to return to the ER or hospital than children with higher incomes and lower ratios, respectively (each p asthma from single parent households were more likely to have asthma-related reutilization within 12 months than children from homes with married parents. This was driven, in large part, by underlying differences in household income.

  1. Evaluating asthma websites using the Brief DISCERN instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banasiak NC

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nancy Cantey Banasiak,1 Mikki Meadows-Oliver2 1Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Specialty, Yale University School of Nursing, New Haven, CT, USA; 2University of Connecticut School of Nursing, Storrs, CT, USA Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to examine the quality of sponsored and unsponsored asthma websites using the Brief DISCERN instrument and to evaluate whether the Health On the Net Code of Conduct (HONcode logo was present, thereby indicating that the site met the criteria. The Internet is an important source of health information for patients and their families. The primary purpose of this study was to examine the quality of sponsored and unsupported asthma websites. A secondary aim was to determine the readability and reading ease of the materials for each website along with the grade level. Methods: We queried seven Internet search engines using the keyword “asthma.” The websites were evaluated using the six-item Brief DISCERN instrument and by ascertaining whether the HONcode quality label was present. The websites were also evaluated for readability employing Flesch-Kincaid grade level and Flesch reading ease tools using Microsoft Office Word 2013 software. Results: A total of 22 unique websites were included in the study. Approximately 68% of the websites reviewed had a Brief DISCERN cutoff score of ≥16. The overall Brief DISCERN scores ranged from 6 to 30, and the mean score was 17.32 (SD =6.71. The Flesch-Kincaid grade level scores ranged from 2.9 to 15.4, and the average reading grade score was 9.49 (SD =2.7. The Flesch reading ease scores ranged from 17 to 82.7, with a mean reading ease score of 53.57 (SD =15.03. Sites with a HONcode quality label had significantly higher Brief DISCERN scores than those without one (t=2.3795; df=20; p=0.02. Conclusion: Brief DISCERN scores revealed that there is quality asthma information for children and their families available on the Internet. The grade level ranged between 2

  2. Importin-13 genetic variation is associated with improved airway responsiveness in childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasky-Su Jessica

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoid function is dependent on efficient translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of cells. Importin-13 (IPO13 is a nuclear transport receptor that mediates nuclear entry of GR. In airway epithelial cells, inhibition of IPO13 expression prevents nuclear entry of GR and abrogates anti-inflammatory effects of glucocorticoids. Impaired nuclear entry of GR has been documented in steroid-non-responsive asthmatics. We hypothesize that common IPO13 genetic variation influences the anti-inflammatory effects of inhaled corticosteroids for the treatment of asthma, as measured by change in methacholine airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR-PC20. Methods 10 polymorphisms were evaluated in 654 children with mild-to-moderate asthma participating in the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP, a clinical trial of inhaled anti-inflammatory medications (budesonide and nedocromil. Population-based association tests with repeated measures of PC20 were performed using mixed models and confirmed using family-based tests of association. Results Among participants randomized to placebo or nedocromil, IPO13 polymorphisms were associated with improved PC20 (i.e. less AHR, with subjects harboring minor alleles demonstrating an average 1.51–2.17 fold increase in mean PC20 at 8-months post-randomization that persisted over four years of observation (p = 0.01–0.005. This improvement was similar to that among children treated with long-term inhaled corticosteroids. There was no additional improvement in PC20 by IPO13 variants among children treated with inhaled corticosteroids. Conclusion IPO13 variation is associated with improved AHR in asthmatic children. The degree of this improvement is similar to that observed with long-term inhaled corticosteroid treatment, suggesting that IPO13 variation may improve nuclear bioavailability of endogenous glucocorticoids.

  3. Study protocol for improving asthma outcomes through cross-cultural communication training for physicians: a randomized trial of physician training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Minal R; Thomas, Lara J; Hafeez, Kausar; Shankin, Matthew; Wilkin, Margaret; Brown, Randall W

    2014-06-16

    Massive resources are expended every year on cross-cultural communication training for physicians. Such training is a focus of continuing medical education nationwide and is part of the curriculum of virtually every medical school in America. There is a pressing need for evidence regarding the effects on patients of cross-cultural communication training for physicians. There is a need to understand the added benefit of such training compared to more general communication. We know of no rigorous study that has assessed whether cross-cultural communication training for physicians results in better health outcomes for their patients. The current study aims to answer this question by enhancing the Physician Asthma Care Education (PACE) program to cross cultural communication (PACE Plus), and comparing the effect of the enhanced program to PACE on the health outcomes of African American and Latino/Hispanic children with asthma. A three-arm randomized control trial is used to compare PACE Plus, PACE, and usual care. Both PACE and PACE Plus are delivered in two, two-hour sessions over a period of two weeks to 5-10 primary care physicians who treat African American and Latino/Hispanic children with asthma. One hundred twelve physicians and 1060 of their pediatric patients were recruited who self-identify as African American or Latino/Hispanic and experience persistent asthma. Physicians were randomized into receiving either the PACE Plus or PACE intervention or into the control group. The comparative effectiveness of PACE and PACE Plus on clinician's therapeutic and communication practices with the family/patient, children's urgent care use for asthma, asthma control, and quality of life, and parent/caretaker satisfaction with physician performance will be assessed. Data are collected via telephone survey and medical record review at baseline, 9 months following the intervention, and 21 months following the intervention. This study aims to reduce disparities in asthma

  4. The integrated care of asthma in Switzerland (INCAS)-study: Patients' perspective of received asthma care and their interest in asthma education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Selina; Hersberger, Kurt E; Zeller, Andreas; Scheuzger, Jonas; Miedinger, David; Gregoriano, Claudia; Leuppi, Jörg D; Steurer-Stey, Claudia

    2016-11-01

    For successful long-term asthma care, self-management education is a cornerstone. Little is known about associations between patients' interest in education, asthma control and care delivery. We compared patients' characteristics, asthma control and patients' perspective about asthma care in subjects with and without interest in asthma education. Moreover, we assessed reasons, why patients denied participating in asthma education. Baseline data of 223 patients with asthma (age 43 ± 12 years, 38% male, 58% non-smokers, 13% current smokers), who participated in a multicentre longitudinal controlled study, are reported. At baseline, patients completed the Asthma Control Test (ACT), the Patient Assessment Chronic Illness Care questionnaire (PACIC 5A) and stated their interest in an asthma education programme. Overall, 34% of all participants showed uncontrolled asthma. One hundred and twenty-five (56%) patients were interested in education. Compared to patients without interest, they were characterised by male gender (p = 0.013), worse asthma control (p < 0.001), and perception of lower quality of chronic asthma care delivery, in particular lower self-management support (p < 0.001). Main reasons for rejecting asthma education were having sufficient asthma knowledge, having only mild asthma, receiving adequate medical support and lack of time. More than half of the patients were interested in asthma education. Interest was associated with worse asthma control and lower receipt of care according to the Chronic Care Model. Considering these aspects, this approach may help to improve care quality and allow targeting interventions to those patients who are interested in becoming active participants in their care and who might benefit most.

  5. Kickin' Asthma: school-based asthma education in an urban community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Patel, Bina; Davis, Adam; Edelstein, Joan; Tager, Ira B

    2008-12-01

    In urban communities with high prevalence of childhood asthma, school-based educational programs may be the most appropriate approach to deliver interventions to improve asthma morbidity and asthma-related outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implementation of Kickin' Asthma, a school-based asthma curriculum designed by health educators and local students, which teaches asthma physiology and asthma self-management techniques to middle and high school students in Oakland, CA. Eligible students were identified through an in-class asthma case identification survey. Approximately 10-15 students identified as asthmatic were recruited for each series of the Kickin' Asthma intervention. The curriculum was delivered by an asthma nurse in a series of four 50-minute sessions. Students completed a baseline and a 3-month follow-up survey that compared symptom frequency, health care utilization, activity limitations, and medication use. Of the 8488 students surveyed during the first 3 years of the intervention (2003-2006), 15.4% (n = 1309) were identified as asthmatic; approximately 76% of eligible students (n = 990) from 15 middle schools and 3 high schools participated in the program. Comparison of baseline to follow-up data indicated that students experienced significantly fewer days with activity limitations and significantly fewer nights of sleep disturbance after participation in the intervention. For health care utilization, students reported significantly less frequent emergency department visits or hospitalizations between the baseline and follow-up surveys. A school-based asthma curriculum designed specifically for urban students has been shown to reduce symptoms, activity limitations, and health care utilization for intervention participants.

  6. A review of barriers to effective asthma management in Puerto Ricans: cultural, healthcare system and pharmacogenomic issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Alvarez, Norma; Swanson-Biearman, Brenda; Kelsen, Steven G

    2014-02-01

    Among the Hispanic community, Puerto Ricans have the highest prevalence of asthma and manifest the worst outcomes. The expected growth of the Hispanic population in the USA in the next several decades make elimination of disparate care in Puerto Rican asthmatics a matter of national importance. The purpose of this review of the literature (ROL) is to examine a variety of health system, genetic and cultural barriers in the Puerto Rican community which have created disparities in asthma care and outcomes among adult and pediatric Hispanic populations. In addition, this ROL describes several culturally sensitive, community-based educational interventions which can be used as a framework for future projects to improved asthma outcomes. Databases searched included Medline, PubMED, EBSCOhost, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Google Scholar and ERIC. Papers published in English from January 1990 to January 2012 were reviewed. Health system policies, insurer compensation patterns, clinician attitudes and cultural values/folk remedies in the Puerto Rican community represent barriers to effective asthma management, the use of controller medication and the implementation of educational interventions. In addition, genetic factors involving the beta-2 adrenergic receptor gene, which impair the response to albuterol, appear to contribute to poorer outcomes in Puerto Rican asthmatics. In contrast, several comprehensive, community-based, culturally sensitive educational interventions such as Controlling Asthma in American Cities Project (CAACP), the Racial and Ethnic Approach to Community Health in the US Program and Healthy Hoops programs (REACH) have been described. We believe that culturally sensitive community-based asthma education programs can serve as models for programs targeted toward Puerto Ricans to help decrease asthma morbidity. Moreover, greater sensitivity to Puerto Rican mores and folk remedies on the part of healthcare providers may improve the patient-clinician rapport and

  7. Co-morbidities in severe asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, Celeste; Menzies-Gow, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Patients with severe asthma represent a minority of the total asthma population, but carry a majority of the morbidity and healthcare costs. Achieving better asthma control in this group of patients is therefore of key importance. Systematic assessment of patients with possible severe asthma...... to identify treatment barriers and triggers of asthma symptoms, including co-morbidities, improves asthma control and reduces healthcare costs and is recommended by international guidelines on management of severe asthma. This review provides the clinician with an overview of the prevalence and clinical...... impact of the most common co-morbidities in severe asthma, including chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyposis, allergic rhinitis, dysfunctional breathing, vocal cord dysfunction, anxiety and depression, obesity, obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD...

  8. Genome-wide association studies in asthma: progress and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    March ME

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael E March,1 Patrick MA Sleiman,1,2 Hakon Hakonarson1,2 1Center for Applied Genomics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, 2Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Genetic studies of asthma have revealed that there is considerable heritability to the phenotype. An extensive history of candidate-gene studies has identified a long list of genes associated with immune function that are potentially involved in asthma pathogenesis. However, many of the results of candidate-gene studies have failed to be replicated, leaving in question the true impact of the implicated biological pathways on asthma. With the advent of genome-wide association studies, geneticists are able to examine the association of hundreds of thousands of genetic markers with a phenotype, allowing the hypothesis-free identification of variants associated with disease. Many such studies examining asthma or related phenotypes have been published, and several themes have begun to emerge regarding the biological pathways underpinning asthma. The results of many genome-wide association studies have currently not been replicated, and the large sample sizes required for this experimental strategy invoke difficulties with sample stratification and phenotypic heterogeneity. Recently, large collaborative groups of researchers have formed consortia focused on asthma, with the goals of sharing material and data and standardizing diagnosis and experimental methods. Additionally, research has begun to focus on genetic variants that affect the response to asthma medications and on the biology that generates the heterogeneity in the asthma phenotype. As this work progresses, it will move asthma patients closer to more specific, personalized medicine. Keywords: asthma, genetics, GWAS, pharmacogenetics, biomarkers

  9. Childhood overweight/obesity and pediatric asthma: the role of parental perception of child weight status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaad, Salma M A; Paige, Katie N; Teran-Garcia, Margarita; Donovan, Sharon M; Fiese, Barbara H; The Strong Kids Research Team

    2013-09-23

    Childhood obesity and asthma are on the rise in the U.S. Clinical and epidemiological data suggest a link between the two, in which overweight and obese children are at higher risk for asthma. Prevention of childhood obesity is preferred over treatment, however, in order to be receptive to messages, parents must perceive that their child is overweight. Many parents do not accurately assess their child's weight status. Herein, the relation between parental perceptions of child weight status, observed body mass index (BMI) percentiles, and a measure of child feeding practices were explored in the context of asthma, food allergy, or both. Out of the children with asthma or food allergy that were classified as overweight/obese by BMI percentiles, 93% were not perceived as overweight/obese by the parent. Mean scores for concern about child weight were higher in children with both asthma and food allergy than either condition alone, yet there were no significant differences among the groups in terms of pressure to eat and restrictive feeding practices. In summary, parents of children with asthma or food allergy were less likely to recognize their child's overweight/obese status and their feeding practices did not differ from those without asthma and food allergy.

  10. Omalizumab therapy for children and adolescents with severe allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Ciro

    2015-01-01

    Omalizumab, a therapeutic humanized monoclonal antibody specific for human IgE, was introduced in clinical practice more than a decade ago as an add-on therapy for moderate-to-severe allergic asthma in patients aged ≥12 years. Omalizumab has been demonstrated to be effective in adults with uncontrolled persistent asthma, with an excellent safety profile. In simple terms, omalizumab works by inhibiting the allergic cascade, that is, by neutralization of the circulating free IgE. This leads to reduction in the quantity of cell-bound IgE, downregulation of high-affinity IgE receptors, and, eventually, prevention of mediator release from effector cells. Evidence is far less abundant on the role of omalizumab in pediatric asthma. Although efficacy and safety of omalizumab in children and adolescents with uncontrolled, persistent allergic asthma has been recognized as well, further studies are needed to clarify a number of open questions in this specific patient population.

  11. Evaluation of clinical data in childhood asthma. Application of a computer file system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, D.; Twarog, F.J.; Geha, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    A computer file system was used in our pediatric allergy clinic to assess the value of chest roentgenograms and hemoglobin determinations used in the examination of patients and to correlate exposure to pets and forced hot air with the severity of asthma. Among 889 children with asthma, 20.7% had abnormal chest roentgenographic findings, excluding hyperinflation and peribronchial thickening, and 0.7% had abnormal hemoglobin values. Environmental exposure to pets or forced hot air was not associated with increased severity of asthma, as assessed by five measures of outcome: number of medications administered, requirement for corticosteroids, frequency of clinic visits, frequency of emergency room visits, and frequency of hospitalizations

  12. Pediatric CT quality management and improvement program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, David B.; Chan, Frandics P.; Newman, Beverley; Fleischmann, Dominik; Molvin, Lior Z.; Wang, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Modern CT is a powerful yet increasingly complex technology that continues to rapidly evolve; optimal clinical implementation as well as appropriate quality management and improvement in CT are challenging but attainable. This article outlines the organizational structure on which a CT quality management and improvement program can be built, followed by a discussion of common as well as pediatric-specific challenges. Organizational elements of a CT quality management and improvement program include the formulation of clear objectives; definition of the roles and responsibilities of key personnel; implementation of a technologist training, coaching and feedback program; and use of an efficient and accurate monitoring system. Key personnel and roles include a radiologist as the CT director, a qualified CT medical physicist, as well as technologists with specific responsibilities and adequate time dedicated to operation management, CT protocol management and CT technologist education. Common challenges in managing a clinical CT operation are related to the complexity of newly introduced technology, of training and communication and of performance monitoring. Challenges specific to pediatric patients include the importance of including patient size in protocol and dose considerations, a lower tolerance for error in these patients, and a smaller sample size from which to learn and improve. (orig.)

  13. Pediatric CT quality management and improvement program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, David B.; Chan, Frandics P.; Newman, Beverley; Fleischmann, Dominik [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Molvin, Lior Z. [Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, CA (United States); Wang, Jia [Stanford University, Environmental Health and Safety, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Modern CT is a powerful yet increasingly complex technology that continues to rapidly evolve; optimal clinical implementation as well as appropriate quality management and improvement in CT are challenging but attainable. This article outlines the organizational structure on which a CT quality management and improvement program can be built, followed by a discussion of common as well as pediatric-specific challenges. Organizational elements of a CT quality management and improvement program include the formulation of clear objectives; definition of the roles and responsibilities of key personnel; implementation of a technologist training, coaching and feedback program; and use of an efficient and accurate monitoring system. Key personnel and roles include a radiologist as the CT director, a qualified CT medical physicist, as well as technologists with specific responsibilities and adequate time dedicated to operation management, CT protocol management and CT technologist education. Common challenges in managing a clinical CT operation are related to the complexity of newly introduced technology, of training and communication and of performance monitoring. Challenges specific to pediatric patients include the importance of including patient size in protocol and dose considerations, a lower tolerance for error in these patients, and a smaller sample size from which to learn and improve. (orig.)

  14. Cost-utility analysis of the inhaled steroids available in a developing country for the management of pediatric patients with persistent asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Carlos E; Sossa-Briceño, Mónica P; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A

    2013-05-01

    The choice among the different treatments available can have a great impact on the costs of asthma, The objective of this study was to estimate the incremental cost-utility ratio of three inhaled corticosteroids (ICs): budesonide (BUD), fluticasone propionate (FP), and ciclesonide, compared to beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) (the only IC included in the Compulsory Health Insurance Plan of Colombia), A Markov-type model was developed to estimate costs and health outcomes of a simulated cohort of patients less than 18 years of age with persistent asthma treated over a 12-month period. Effectiveness parameters were obtained from a systematic review of the literature. Cost data were obtained from a hospital´s bills and from the national manual of drug prices. The study assumed the perspective of the national healthcare in Colombia. The main outcome was the variable "quality-adjusted life years" (QALY), RESULTS: While treatment with BDP was associated with the lowest cost (£106.16 average cost per patient during 12 months), treatment with FP resulted in the greatest gain in QUALYs (0.9325 QALYs). FP was associated with a greater gain in QALYs compared to BUD and ciclesonide (0.9325 vs. 0.8999 and 0.9051 QALYs, respectively) at lower costs (£231.19 vs. £309.27 and £270.15, respectively), thus leading to dominance. The incremental cost-utility ratio of FP compared to BDP was £19,835.28 per QALY, CONCLUSIONS: BDP is the most cost-effective therapy for treating pediatric patients with persistent asthma when willingness to pay (WTP) is less than £21,129.22/QALY, otherwise, FP is the most cost-effective therapy.

  15. Stress and Quality of Life in Urban Caregivers of Children With Poorly Controlled Asthma: A Longitudinal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, Melissa H; Osteen, Philip; Kub, Joan; Bollinger, Mary E; Tsoukleris, Mona; Chaikind, Laurie; Butz, Arlene M

    2015-01-01

    The intent of this analysis was to examine the longitudinal effects of risk and protective factors on quality of life (QOL) in caregivers of minority children with asthma. Caregivers (n = 300) reported on demographics, child asthma characteristics, daily asthma caregiving stress, general life stress, social support, and QOL. Latent growth curve modeling examined changes in QOL across 12 months as a function of stress, asthma control, and social support. Caregivers were primarily the biological mother (92%), single (71%), unemployed (55%), and living in poverty. Children were African American (96%), Medicaid eligible (92%), and had poorly controlled asthma (93%). Lower QOL was associated with higher life stress, greater asthma caregiving stress, and lower asthma control over time. Findings underscore the importance of assessing objective and subjective measures of asthma burden and daily life stress in clinical encounters with urban, low-income caregivers of children with poorly controlled asthma. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of a mobile health, sensor-driven asthma management platform on asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Meredith A; Humblet, Olivier; Marcus, Justine E; Henderson, Kelly; Smith, Ted; Eid, Nemr; Sublett, J Wesley; Renda, Andrew; Nesbitt, LaQuandra; Van Sickle, David; Stempel, David; Sublett, James L

    2017-11-01

    Asthma inflicts a significant health and economic burden in the United States. Self-management approaches to monitoring and treatment can be burdensome for patients. To assess the effect of a digital health management program on asthma outcomes. Residents of Louisville, Kentucky, with asthma were enrolled in a single-arm pilot study. Participants received electronic inhaler sensors that tracked the time, frequency, and location of short-acting β-agonist (SABA) use. After a 30-day baseline period during which reference medication use was recorded by the sensors, participants received access to a digital health intervention designed to enhance self-management. Changes in outcomes, including mean daily SABA use, symptom-free days, and asthma control status, were compared among the initial 30-day baseline period and all subsequent months of the intervention using mixed-model logistic regressions and χ 2 tests. The mean number of SABA events per participant per day was 0.44 during the control period and 0.27 after the first month of the intervention, a 39% reduction. The percentage of symptom-free days was 77% during the baseline period and 86% after the first month, a 12% improvement. Improvement was observed throughout the study; each intervention month demonstrated significantly lower SABA use and higher symptom-free days than the baseline month (P asthma during the baseline period, 67% during the first month of the intervention. Each intervention month demonstrated significantly higher percentages than the baseline month (P asthma management intervention demonstrated significant reductions in SABA use, increased number of symptom-free days, and improvements in asthma control. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02162576. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of trait mindfulness in quality of life and asthma control among adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillessen, Linda; van de Ven, Monique O; Karremans, Johan C

    2017-08-01

    The current study focused on the role of trait mindfulness in asthma-related quality of life (QoL) and asthma control in adolescent asthma patients. Furthermore, potential underlying mechanisms (general and asthma-specific stress) of this relationship were investigated. In this cross-sectional study, questionnaire data of 94 adolescents with asthma that were prescribed daily asthma medication were included. Two Structural Equation Models (SEMs), a direct model and an indirect model, were tested. We found that trait mindfulness was directly related to asthma-related QoL, but not to asthma control. The relationship between trait mindfulness and asthma-related QoL was explained by asthma-specific, but not by general stress. Furthermore, an indirect relation from mindfulness to asthma control via asthma-specific stress was found. Cross-sectional evidence for a relation between mindfulness and asthma-related QoL is found. These findings may point to the possibility that an intervention aimed at increasing mindfulness could be a promising tool to improve asthma-related QoL in adolescents via a decrease in asthma-specific stress. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The cytogenetic effect of the new asthma and allergy drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Black Code

    The most common adverse effects of Montelukast in pediatric studies were headache, asthma, and ... chromosomal gaps and centric fusion represent the most predominant types of aberrations. The highest readings ... At the 10mg/d treatment, it is obvious that the most frequent types of aberrations are deletions and centric ...

  19. Strategies for addressing barriers to publishing pediatric quality improvement research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cleave, Jeanne; Dougherty, Denise; Perrin, James M

    2011-09-01

    Advancing the science of quality improvement (QI) requires dissemination of the results of QI. However, the results of few QI interventions reach publication. To identify barriers to publishing results of pediatric QI research and provide practical strategies that QI researchers can use to enhance publishability of their work. We reviewed and summarized a workshop conducted at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2007 meeting in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on conducting and publishing QI research. We also interviewed 7 experts (QI researchers, administrators, journal editors, and health services researchers who have reviewed QI manuscripts) about common reasons that QI research fails to reach publication. We also reviewed recently published pediatric QI articles to find specific examples of tactics to enhance publishability, as identified in interviews and the workshop. We found barriers at all stages of the QI process, from identifying an appropriate quality issue to address to drafting the manuscript. Strategies for overcoming these barriers included collaborating with research methodologists, creating incentives to publish, choosing a study design to include a control group, increasing sample size through research networks, and choosing appropriate process and clinical quality measures. Several well-conducted, successfully published QI studies in pediatrics offer guidance to other researchers in implementing these strategies in their own work. Specific, feasible approaches can be used to improve opportunities for publication in pediatric, QI, and general medical journals.

  20. Age at asthma onset and asthma self-management education among adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli, Maria C; Beavers, Suzanne F; Shepler, Samantha H; Chatterjee, Arjun B

    2015-01-01

    Asthma self-management education improves asthma-related outcomes. We conducted this analysis to evaluate variation in the percentages of adults with active asthma reporting components of asthma self-management education by age at asthma onset. Data from 2011 to 2012 Asthma Call-back Surveys were used to estimate percentages of adults with active asthma reporting six components of asthma self-management education. Components of asthma self-management education include having been taught to what to do during an asthma attack and receiving an asthma action plan. Differences in the percentages of adults reporting each component and the average number of components reported across categories of age at asthma onset were estimated using linear regression, adjusted for age, education, race/ethnicity, sex, smoking status, and years since asthma onset. Overall, an estimated 76.4% of adults with active asthma were taught what to do during an asthma attack and 28.7% reported receiving an asthma action plan. Percentages reporting each asthma self-management education component declined with increasing age at asthma onset. Compared with the referent group of adults whose asthma onset occurred at 5-14 years of age, the percentage of adults reporting being taught what to do during an asthma attack was 10% lower among those whose asthma onset occurred at 65-93 years of age (95% CI: -18.0, -2.5) and the average number of components reported decreased monotonically across categories of age at asthma onset of 35 years and older. Among adults with active asthma, reports of asthma self-management education decline with increasing age at asthma onset.

  1. Prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease in patients with difficult to control asthma and effect of proton pump inhibitor therapy on asthma symptoms, reflux symptoms, pulmonary function and requirement for asthma medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandur, V; Murugesh, M; Banait, V; Rathi, P M; Bhatia, S J; Joshi, J M; Kate, A

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis that GER can trigger or exacerbate asthma is supported by several clinical trials that have shown amelioration in asthma symptoms and/or an improvement in pulmonary function after antireflux therapy. To investigate the prevalence of GER in patients with difficult to control asthma and to determine the effect of omeprazole on asthma symptoms, reflux symptoms, pulmonary function and on the requirement of asthma medications. Patients with difficult to control asthma were recruited into the study. All patients underwent esophageal manometry and 24 hour esophageal pH monitoring. Pulmonary function tests were done before and after treatment. The severity of asthma and reflux was assessed by a 1 week pulmonary symptom score(PSS) and reflux symptom score(RSS) respectively before and after treatment. Those who had an abnormal pH study (pH 5% of the time) underwent anti-GER treatment with lifestyle changes, and a proton pump inhibitor (omeprazole 40 mg, bid) for 3 months. Asthma medications were added or deleted based on severity of asthma. Out of 250 asthmatic patients screened, forty patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Twenty eight of 40 patients(70%) were diagnosed to have GERD. Of the patients 28 with GER, 8 patients(28.5%) had no reflux symptoms. On 24 hr pH metry, the percentage time pH reflux symptom score(RSS) improved from 22.39 ± 14.99 to 1.04 ± 1.07, pulmonary symptom score(PSS) improved from 27.14 ± 7.49 to 13.82 ± 4.21 and night time asthma symptom score(NASS) improved from 6.71 ± 1.80 to 3.04 ± 1.23 (p-value <0.0001). After treatment, FEV1 and PEFR increased from 1.38 ± 0.57 and 4.14 ± 1.97 to 1.47 ± 0.54 and 5.56 ± 1.72, respectively (p-value 0.00114). PPI therapy improves nocturnal asthma symptoms, daytime asthma symptoms, pulmonary function and decreases requirement of asthma medications in these patients.

  2. Burden of Obesity on Pediatric Inpatients with Acute Asthma Exacerbation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Yusuke; Nochioka, Kotaro; Hataya, Hiroshi; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro; Testa, Marcia

    Obesity and asthma are common health problems in the United States. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical and economic burdens of obesity on hospitalized children with acute asthma exacerbation in 2012. Hospital discharge records of patients aged 2 to 18 years with a diagnosis of asthma were obtained from the 2012 Kids' Inpatient Database, wherein the data were compiled by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The discharge records were weighted to estimate the number of hospitalizations because of asthma exacerbations in the United States. To classify whether the patient was obese or not, we used the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code 278.0x. We compared the odds of using noninvasive or invasive mechanical ventilation, mean total charges for inpatient service, and length of hospital stay between obese and nonobese patients. A total of 74,338 patient discharges were extracted. Of these, 3,494 discharges were excluded because of chronic medical conditions. Using discharge weight variables, we estimated a total of 100,157 hospitalizations with asthma exacerbations among children aged between 2 and 18 years in 2012. Obesity was significantly associated with higher odds of using mechanical ventilation (odds ratio 1.59, 95% CI 1.28-1.99), higher mean total hospital charges (adjusted difference: $1588, 95% CI $802-$2529), and longer mean length of hospital stay (0.24 days, 95% CI 0.17-0.32 days) compared with nonobesity. These findings suggest that obesity is a significant risk factor of severe asthma exacerbation that requires mechanical ventilation, and obesity is an economically complicating factor. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Asthma and Therapeutics: Recombinant Therapies in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cockcroft Donald W

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Numerous recombinant therapies are being investigated for the treatment of asthma. This report reviews the current status of several of these novel agents. Anti-immunoglobulin (IgE (omalizumab, Xolair markedly inhibits all aspects of the allergen challenge in subjects who have reduction of free serum IgE to undetectable levels. Several clinical studies in atopic asthma have demonstrated benefit by improved symptoms and lung function and a reduction in corticosteroid requirements. Early use in atopic asthmatics may be even more effective. Several approaches target interleukin (IL-4. Soluble IL-4 receptor has been shown to effectively replace inhaled corticosteroid; further studies are under way. Recombinant anti-IL-5 and recombinant IL-12 inhibit blood and sputum eosinophils and allergen-induced eosinophilia without any effect on airway responsiveness, allergen-induced airway responses, or allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. Efalizumab, a recombinant antibody that inhibits lymphocyte trafficking, is effective in psoriasis. A bronchoprovocation study showed a reduction in allergen-induced late asthmatic response and allergen-induced eosinophilia, which suggests that it should be effective in clinical asthma. These exciting novel therapies provide not only promise of new therapies for asthma but also valuable tools for investigation of asthma mechanisms.

  4. Obese and Allergic Related Asthma Phenotypes Among Children Across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Mindy K; Romero, Tahmineh; Sim, Myung S; Szilagyi, Peter G

    2018-04-19

    Pediatric asthma is heterogeneous with phenotypes that reflect differing underlying inflammation and pathophysiology. Little is known about the national prevalence of certain obesity and allergy related asthma phenotypes or associated characteristics. We therefore assessed the national prevalence, risk factors, and parent-reported severity of four asthma phenotypes: not-allergic-not-obese, allergic-not-obese, obese-not-allergic, and allergic-and-obese. We analyzed data from the 2007-2008 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH) of 10-17 year-olds with parent-reported asthma. We described sociodemographic and health risk factors of each phenotype and then applied logistic and ordinal regression models to identify associated risk factors and level of severity of the phenotypes. Among 4,427 children with asthma in this NSCH cohort, the association between race and phenotype is statistically significant (p<0.0001); white children with asthma were most likely to have allergic-not-obese asthma while black and Hispanic children with asthma were most likely to have the obese-non-allergic phenotype (p<0.001). ADD/ADHD was more likely to be present in allergic-not-obese children (OR 1.50, CI 1.14-1.98, p = 0.004). The phenotype with the highest risk for more severe compared to mild asthma was the obese-and-allergic asthma phenotype (OR 3.34, CI 2.23-5.01, p<0.001). Allergic-not-obese asthma comprised half of our studied asthma phenotypes, while obesity-related asthma (with or without allergic components) comprised one-fifth of asthma phenotypes in this cohort representative of the U.S. Children with both obese and allergic asthma are most likely to have severe asthma. Future management of childhood asthma might consider more tailoring of treatment and management plans based upon different childhood asthma phenotypes.

  5. Moisture damage and asthma: a birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvonen, Anne M; Hyvärinen, Anne; Korppi, Matti; Haverinen-Shaughnessy, Ulla; Renz, Harald; Pfefferle, Petra I; Remes, Sami; Genuneit, Jon; Pekkanen, Juha

    2015-03-01

    Excess moisture and visible mold are associated with increased risk of asthma. Only a few studies have performed detailed home visits to characterize the extent and location of moisture damage and mold growth. Structured home inspections were performed in a birth cohort study when the children were 5 months old (on average). Children (N = 398) were followed up to the age of 6 years. Specific immunoglobulin E concentrations were determined at 6 years. Moisture damage and mold at an early age in the child's main living areas (but not in bathrooms or other interior spaces) were associated with the risk of developing physician-diagnosed asthma ever, persistent asthma, and respiratory symptoms during the first 6 years. Associations with asthma ever were strongest for moisture damage with visible mold in the child's bedroom (adjusted odds ratio: 4.82 [95% confidence interval: 1.29-18.02]) and in the living room (adjusted odds ratio: 7.51 [95% confidence interval: 1.49-37.83]). Associations with asthma ever were stronger in the earlier part of the follow-up and among atopic children. No consistent associations were found between moisture damage with or without visible mold and atopic sensitization. Moisture damage and mold in early infancy in the child's main living areas were associated with asthma development. Atopic children may be more susceptible to the effects of moisture damage and mold. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. A multifaceted community-based asthma intervention in Chicago: effects of trigger reduction and self-management education on asthma morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyk, Mary; Banda, Elizabeth; Chisum, Gay; Weems, Dolores; Liu, Yangyang; Damitz, Maureen; Williams, Rhonda; Persky, Victoria

    2013-09-01

    Home-based, multifaceted interventions have been effective in reducing asthma morbidity in children. However, identification of independent components that contribute to outcomes and delineating effectiveness by level of asthma symptoms would help to refine the intervention and target appropriate populations. A community health educator led asthma intervention implemented in a low-income African-American neighborhood included asthma management education, individually tailored low-cost asthma home trigger remediation, and referrals to social and medical agencies, when appropriate. Changes in asthma morbidity measures were assessed in relation to implementation of individual intervention components using multivariable logistic regression. Among the 218 children who completed the year-long program, there were significant reductions in measures of asthma morbidity, including symptoms, urgent care visits, emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, missed school days, and missed work days for caretakers. We also found significant decreases in the prevalence of many home asthma triggers and improvements in asthma management practices. Improvement in caretaker's ability to manage the child's asthma was associated with reduction in ED visits for asthma and uncontrolled asthma. Specific home interventions, such as repair of water leaks and reduced exposure to plants, dust, clutter and stuffed toys, may be related to reduction in asthma morbidity. This program was effective in reducing asthma morbidity in low-income African-American children and identified specific interventions as possible areas to target in future projects. Furthermore, the intervention was useful in children with persistent asthma symptoms as well as those with less frequent asthma exacerbations.

  7. Herbal Medicine Cordyceps sinensis Improves Health-Related Quality of Life in Moderate-to-Severe Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningqun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Moderate-to-severe asthma has a substantial impact on the health-related quality of life (HR-QOL of the patients. Cordyceps sinensis is a traditional Chinese medicine that is evaluated clinically for the treatment of many diseases, such as chronic allograft nephropathy, diabetic kidney disease, and lung fibrosis. In order to investigate the effects of Cordyceps sinensis on patients with moderate-to-severe persistent asthma, 120 subjects were randomized to receive Corbin capsule containing Cordyceps sinensis for 3 months (treatment group, n=60, whereas the control group (n=60 did not receive treatment with Corbin capsule. Inhaled corticosteroid and as-needed β-agonists were used in the treatment of both groups. HR-QOL was measured with the Juniper’s Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ. The incidence of asthma exacerbation, pulmonary function testing, and serum measurements of inflammatory mediators were also evaluated. The results showed that the treatment group indicated a significant increase in AQLQ scores and lung function compared with the control group. The expression levels of the inflammation markers IgE, ICAM-1, IL-4, and MMP-9 in the serum were decreased and IgG increased in the treatment group compared with the control group. Therefore, the conclusion was reached that a formulation of Cordyceps sinensis improved the HR-QOL, asthma symptoms, lung function, and inflammatory profile of the patients with moderate-to-severe asthma. This trial is registered with ChiCTR-IPC-16008730.

  8. Herbal Medicine Cordyceps sinensis Improves Health-Related Quality of Life in Moderate-to-Severe Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ningqun; Li, Jie; Huang, Xiaobo; Chen, Wenqiang; Chen, Yujing

    2016-01-01

    Moderate-to-severe asthma has a substantial impact on the health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) of the patients. Cordyceps sinensis is a traditional Chinese medicine that is evaluated clinically for the treatment of many diseases, such as chronic allograft nephropathy, diabetic kidney disease, and lung fibrosis. In order to investigate the effects of Cordyceps sinensis on patients with moderate-to-severe persistent asthma, 120 subjects were randomized to receive Corbin capsule containing Cordyceps sinensis for 3 months (treatment group, n = 60), whereas the control group ( n = 60) did not receive treatment with Corbin capsule. Inhaled corticosteroid and as-needed β -agonists were used in the treatment of both groups. HR-QOL was measured with the Juniper's Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). The incidence of asthma exacerbation, pulmonary function testing, and serum measurements of inflammatory mediators were also evaluated. The results showed that the treatment group indicated a significant increase in AQLQ scores and lung function compared with the control group. The expression levels of the inflammation markers IgE, ICAM-1, IL-4, and MMP-9 in the serum were decreased and IgG increased in the treatment group compared with the control group. Therefore, the conclusion was reached that a formulation of Cordyceps sinensis improved the HR-QOL, asthma symptoms, lung function, and inflammatory profile of the patients with moderate-to-severe asthma. This trial is registered with ChiCTR-IPC-16008730.

  9. The impact of asthma medication guidelines on asthma controller use and on asthma exacerbation rates comparing 1997-1998 and 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Matthew A; Liesinger, Juliette T; Ziegenfuss, Jeanette Y; Branda, Megan E; Lim, Kaiser G; Yawn, Barbara P; Shah, Nilay D

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between asthma controller medication use and exacerbation rates over time is unclear at the population level. To estimate the change in asthma controller medication use between 2 time periods as measured by the controller-to-total asthma medication ratio and its association with changes in asthma exacerbation rates between 1997-1998 and 2004-2005. The study design was a cross-sectional population-level comparison between individuals from 1997-1998 and 2004-2005. Study participants were individuals aged 5 to 56 years identified as having asthma in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). The main outcome measures were a controller-to-total asthma medication ratio greater than 0.5 and asthma exacerbation rates (dispensing of systemic corticosteroid or emergency department visit/hospitalization for asthma) in 1997-1998 compared with 2004-2005. The proportion of individuals with a controller-to-total asthma medication ratio greater than 0.5, when adjusted for other demographic factors, has improved by 16.1% (95% CI: 10.8%, 21.3%) for all individuals from 1997-1998 to 2004-2005. Annual asthma exacerbation rates did not change significantly in any group from 1997-1998 to 2004-2005 (0.27/year to 0.23/year). African American and Hispanic individuals with asthma had higher asthma exacerbation rates and a lower proportion with a controller-to-total asthma medication ratio greater than 0.5 than whites in both 1997-1998 and 2004-2005; however, these differences were not statistically significant. An increase in asthma controller-to-total medication ratio in a sample reflective of the US population was not associated with a decreased asthma exacerbation rate comparing 1997-1998 and 2004-2005. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario-Filho, Nelson A; Jacob, Cristina M; Sole, Dirceu; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Arruda, Luisa K; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz; Cocco, Renata R; Camelo-Nunes, Inês; Chong-Neto, Herberto J; Wandalsen, Gustavo F; Castro, Ana P M; Yang, Ariana C; Pastorino, Antonio C; Sarinho, Emanuel S

    2013-06-01

    The subspecialty of pediatric allergy and immunology in Brazil is in its early years and progressing steadily. This review highlights the research developed in the past years aiming to show the characteristics of allergic and immunologic diseases in this vast country. Epidemiologic studies demonstrated the high prevalence of asthma in infants, children, and adolescents. Mortality rates and average annual variation of asthma hospitalization have reduced in all pediatric age groups. Indoor aeroallergen exposure is excessively high and contributes to the high rates of allergy sensitization. Prevalence of food allergy has increased to epidemic levels. Foods (35%), insect stings (30%), and drugs (23%) are the main etiological agents of anaphylaxis in children and adolescents. Molecular diagnosis of primary immunodeficiencies (PID) showed a high incidence of fungal infections including paracoccidioidomycosis in X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome, and the occurrence of BCG adverse reactions or other mycobacterial infections in patients with chronic granulomatous disease. Education in pediatric allergy and immunology is deficient for medical students, but residency programs are effective in training internists and pediatricians for the practice of allergy. The field of PID requires further training. Last, this review is a tribute to Prof. Dr. Charles Naspitz, one of the pioneers of our specialty in Brazil. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. RESULTS OF BONE DENSITY RESEARCH IN CHILDREN WITH ASTHMA TREATED BY INHALED GLUCOCORTICOSTEROIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Kiseleva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that asthma and its treatment could have negative impact on the bone tissue in adults. In childhood, bone is most sensitive to the influence of adverse factors. In the study 105 children with asthma and 700 healthy children were examined by bone ultrasonometry to reveal the relation of asthma and the treatment of inhaled glucocorticosteroids on bone density. The results of this study are demonstrated that the therapy with inhaled glucocorticosteroids have no adverse effects on the bone density. The reductions of bone density in children with asthma in some age groups are not associated with the severity of illness, age and therapy with inhaled glucocorticosteroids. Reduction of bone density is due to a way of life of children, the level of physical activity and consumption of dairy products. Key words: bone density, asthma, inhaled glucocorticosteroids, bone ultrasonometer, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(1:42-47

  12. Living with Asthma: Part I, Manual for Teaching Parents the Self-Management of Childhood Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Lung Diseases.

    The Living with Asthma Program is designed to teach asthma self-management skills to children (ages 8-12) with asthma and to give their parents the knowledge and behavior modification skills to help their children take over responsibility for managing the condition. Both groups receive training in problem solving and in ways to improve family…

  13. Prevalence of IgE sensitization in Danish children with suspected asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Petersen, Benjamin; Høst, Arne; Larsen, Kirsten Toksvig

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article was to estimate the prevalence of IgE sensitization in Danish children with suspected asthma and to characterize the pattern of sensitization. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a cross-sectional study including 1744 children from 0 to 15 yr suspected of asthma who were...... referred to pediatric outpatient clinics in the region of southern Denmark from 2003 to 2005. The children were subjected to an extensive questionnaire-based interview, clinical examination, and both skin prick testing (SPT) and IgE measurements for 17 allergens. RESULTS: Asthma was confirmed in 1024...... of the 1744 children. Among the children in whom the asthma diagnosis was confirmed, sensitization to one or more of the 17 allergens tested was found in 67.5% by either SPT or s-IgE ≥ class 2. Sensitization to any food allergen was found in 31.1%, to any outdoor allergen in 36.2%, and to any indoor allergen...

  14. Current issues on sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy in children with asthma and allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Zorica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1993 the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology was the first official organization to recognize that sublingual administration could be “promising route” for allergic desensitization. A few years later, the World Health Organization recommended this therapy as “a viable alternative to the injection route in adults.” The first meta-analysis showed sublingual allergen specific immunotherapy (SLIT effectiveness for allergic rhinitis and another study showed SLIT can actually help prevent the development of asthma both in adults and in children. The main goal of this review article is to present insight into the most up-to-date understanding of the clinical efficacy and safety of immunotherapy in the treatment of pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma. A literature review was performed on PubMed from 1990 to 2015 using the terms “asthma,” “allergic rhinitis,” “children,” “allergen specific immune therapy.” Evaluating data from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials (DB-PC-RCTs, the clinical efficacy (assessed as the reduction of symptom score and the need of rescue medicament of SLIT for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma, has been confirmed in various meta-analysis Outcomes such as rhinoconjunctivitis score and medication scores, combined scores, quality of life, days with severe symptoms, immunological endpoints, and safety parameters were all improved in the SLIT-tablet compared with placebo group. SLIT safety has been already proven in many DB-PC-RCTs and real-life settings. In accordance with all of the above mentioned, the goals for future trials and studies are the development of comprehensive guidelines for clinical practice on immunotherapy, embracing all the different potential participants. The importance of allergen immunotherapy is of special relevance in the pediatric age, when the plasticity and modulability of the immune system are maximal, and when

  15. Group play therapy for improving mental coping ability in children with asthma

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    Qian WANG

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the role of group play therapy in the improvement of mental coping ability in children with asthma. Methods Forty-four asthmatic children with behavior problems were randomly divided into experimental group (n=25 and control group (n=19. All children received two tests. The tools in this research were Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL and Coping with a Disease Questionnaire (CODI. Before intervention, both groups received pretest. Members from the experimental group were provided with counseling for 3 months, once every two weeks for a total of 6 times, while during this period the members of the control group had not any experimental intervention.After intervention, the two groups received posttest. Five patients dropped out, and 39 went through this research (20 in experimental group and 19 in control group. The effects of group play therapy on behavior problems and coping strategy of children with asthma were evaluated. Results There was no statistically significant differences in the general information (age, sex, education, parents' marriage status and family structure and basic score of CBCL and CODI between the two groups (P > 0.05. After intervention, the scores of social problems, social withdrawal, depression, compulsive behavior, aggressive behavior and immature and total behavior problem score dropped significantly in experimental group (P < 0.05 while there were no significant changes in control group. And the scores of acceptance, avoidance and emotional reaction increased significantly in experimental group (P < 0.05 while there were no significant changes in control group. Conclusions Group play therapy can improve the children's confidence and interpersonal adaptability and emotion management capacity, thus correcting deviant behavior, ameliorate coping strategy, improving mental coping capability, and promote the development of mental health in children with asthma.

  16. Aspirin-induced asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botey, J; Navarro, C; Marín, A; Eseverri, J L

    1988-01-01

    Since Cooke first described bronchospasm induced by acetyl salicylic acid in asthmatic patients in 1919, numerous studies have been done with the objective of understanding the pathology, treatment and incidence of aspirin-induced asthma. The incidence is difficult to establish but according to two recent studies, the percentage in the infantile asthmatic population was estimated at 13% and 28%. This prevalence is greater than that suspected at first and reveals the necessity of reviewing this problem. In this study we present 4 pediatric patients, 2 atopics and 2 non-atopics affected with aspirin-induced asthma. A detailed clinical history, oral provocation test to acetyl salicylic acid, other non-steroid anti-inflammatory analgesics and additives was performed. The oral provocation test with acetyl salicylic acid was positive in all 4 cases. The oral provocation with non-steroid anti-inflammatory analgesics and other additives was negative in 2 patients. In the remaining 2 patients, one demonstrated sensitivity only to tartrazine and the other to tartrazine, red coccine, mefenamic acid and benorylate. In conclusion, aspirin-induced asthma is not infrequent in infancy. Therefore, it is important to bear it always in mind and to diagnose it through oral provocation besides looking for possible cross reactions.

  17. E-Monitoring of Asthma Therapy to Improve Compliance in children using a real-time medication monitoring system (RTMM): The e-MATIC study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Vasbinder (Erwin); H.M. Janssens (Hettie); M.P.M.H. Rutten-van Mölken (Maureen); L. van Dijk (Liset); B.C.M. de Winter (Brenda); R.C.A. de Groot (Ruben); A.G. Vulto (Arnold); P.M.L.A. van den Bemt (Patricia)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Many children with asthma do not have sufficient asthma control, which leads to increased healthcare costs and productivity loss of parents. One of the causative factors are adherence problems. Effective interventions improving medication adherence may therefore improve

  18. Exploring youth and caregiver preferences for asthma education video content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geryk, Lorie L; Arrindell, Courtney C; Sage, Adam J; Blalock, Susan J; Reuland, Daniel S; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Lee, Charles; Sleath, Betsy L; Carpenter, Delesha M

    2016-01-01

    This study examines (1) whether youth and their caregivers have different preferences for asthma education video topics and (2) if education topic preferences vary by youth and caregiver sociodemographic characteristics. Youth (n = 83) ages 7-17 years with persistent asthma and their caregivers were recruited at two pediatric practices in North Carolina. Sociodemographic information and youth and caregiver preferences for nine asthma video education topics were collected during in-person interviews. Bonferroni-corrected Chi-square or McNemar tests (α = 0.0056) were used to compare youth and caregivers differences in topic preferences and topic preferences by youth and caregiver sociodemographic characteristics, including gender, race, ethnicity, and age. Youth were primarily male (52%) and from low-income families (74%; caregiver annual income less than $30,000) and many were Hispanic (45%). Youth and parents expressed the most interest in the following two topics: "how to deal with triggers" (90% and 95%, respectively) and "how to keep asthma under control" (87% and 96%, respectively). Caregivers and children were discordant for two topics: "the difference between a rescue and controller medicine" and "how to [help your child] talk to your [his/her] friends about asthma." No differences were found between youth and caregiver sociodemographic characteristics and video topic preferences. Youth with persistent asthma and their caregivers differed in their asthma education topic preferences, but preferences did not vary by caregiver or youth sociodemographic characteristics. Studies examining the effectiveness of interventions tailored to differences in educational preferences of youth with asthma and their caregivers are needed.

  19. Zoneterapi og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, Thor; Heinig, John Hilligsøe; Collins, Philippa

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many patients with asthma seek alternative or adjunctive therapies. One such modality is reflexology. Our aim was to examine the popular claim that reflexology treatment benefits bronchial asthma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten weeks of either active or simulated (placebo) reflexology were...... compared in an otherwise blind, controlled trial of 40 patients with asthma. RESULTS: Objective lung function tests did not change. Subjective scores and bronchial sensitivity to histamine improved on both regimens, but no differences were found in the groups receiving active or placebo reflexology....... However, a trend in favour of reflexology became significant when a supplementary analysis of symptom diaries was carried out. At the same time a significant pattern compatible with subconscious un-blinding was found. DISCUSSION: We found no evidence that reflexology has a specific effect on asthma beyond...

  20. Air Pollutants, Climate, and the Prevalence of Pediatric Asthma in Urban Areas of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prevalence of childhood asthma varies significantly among regions, while its reasons are not clear yet with only a few studies reporting relevant causes for this variation. Objective. To investigate the potential role of city-average levels of air pollutants and climatic factors in order to distinguish differences in asthma prevalence in China and explain their reasons. Methods. Data pertaining to 10,777 asthmatic patients were obtained from the third nationwide survey of childhood asthma in China’s urban areas. Annual mean concentrations of air pollutants and other climatic factors were obtained for the same period from several government departments. Data analysis was implemented with descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficient, and multiple regression analysis. Results. Pearson correlation analysis showed that the situation of childhood asthma was strongly linked with SO2, relative humidity, and hours of sunshine (p<0.05. Multiple regression analysis indicated that, among the predictor variables in the final step, SO2 was found to be the most powerful predictor variable amongst all (β=-19.572, p < 0.05. Furthermore, results had shown that hours of sunshine (β = -0.014, p < 0.05 was a significant component summary predictor variable. Conclusion. The findings of this study do not suggest that air pollutants or climate, at least in terms of children, plays a major role in explaining regional differences in asthma prevalence in China.

  1. Sensitization predicts asthma development among wheezing toddlers in secondary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Nienke A; Meijneke, Ruud W H; Kelder, Johannes C; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Balemans, Walter A F

    2017-06-01

    Some wheezing toddlers develop asthma later in childhood. Sensitization is known to predict asthma in birth cohorts. However, its predictive value in secondary healthcare is uncertain. This study examines the predictive value of sensitization to inhalant allergens among wheezing toddlers in secondary healthcare for the development of asthma at school age (≥6 years). Preschool children (1-3 years) who presented with wheezing in secondary healthcare were screened on asthma at school age with the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire. The positive and negative predictive value (PPV and NPV) of specific IgE to inhalant allergens (cut-off concentration 0.35 kU/L) and several non-invasive variables from a child's history (such as hospitalization, eczema, and parental atopy) were calculated. The additional predictive value of sensitization when combined with non-invasive predictors was examined in multivariate analysis and by ROC curves. Of 116 included children, 63% developed asthma at school age. Sensitization to inhalant allergens was a strong asthma predictor. The odds ratio (OR), PPV and NPV were 7.4%, 86%, and 55%, respectively. Eczema (OR 3.4) and hospital admission (OR 2.6) were significant non-invasive determinants. Adding sensitization to these non-invasive predictors in multivariate analysis resulted in a significantly better asthma prediction. The area under the ROC curve increased from 0.70 with only non-invasive predictors to 0.79 after adding sensitization. Sensitization to inhalant allergens is a strong predictor of school age asthma in secondary healthcare and has added predictive value when combined with non-invasive determinants. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2017;52:729-736. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Association of Youth and Caregiver Anxiety and Asthma Care Among Urban Young Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzese, Jean-Marie; Reigada, Laura C; Lamm, Alexandra; Wang, Jing; Li, Meng; Zandieh, Stephanie O; Klein, Rachel G

    To examine the association of adolescent asthma-related anxiety, social anxiety, separation anxiety, and caregiver asthma-related anxiety with asthma care by urban adolescents. Participants were 386 ethnic minority adolescents (mean age 12.8 years) with persistent asthma and their caregivers. Adolescents reported what they do to prevent asthma symptoms and to manage acute symptoms, and if they or their caregiver is responsible for their asthma care. Adolescents completed the Youth Asthma-Related Anxiety Scale, and the social and separation anxiety subscales of the Screen for Child Anxiety and Emotional Disorders (SCARED); caregivers completed the Parent Asthma-Related Anxiety Scale. Linearity of the associations was assessed by generalized additive models. When there was no evidence for nonlinearity, linear mixed effects models were used to evaluate the effects of the predictors. Adolescent asthma-related anxiety had a strong curvilinear relationship with symptom prevention (P Adolescents took more prevention steps as their anxiety increased, with a plateau at moderate anxiety. There was a linear relationship of adolescent asthma-related anxiety to symptom management (β = 0.03, P = .021) and to asthma responsibility (β = 0.11, P = .015), and of caregiver asthma-related anxiety to adolescent symptom prevention (β = 0.04, P = .001). Adolescent social and separation anxiety had weak to no relationship with asthma care. Results remained consistent when controlling for each of the other anxieties. Asthma-related anxiety plays an important, independent role in asthma care. When low, adolescents may benefit from increased support from caregivers and awareness of the consequences of uncontrolled asthma. When elevated, health providers should ensure the adolescents are not assuming responsibility for asthma care prematurely. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards Excellence in Asthma Management: final report of an eight-year program aimed at reducing care gaps in asthma management in Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Dorval, E; Labrecque, M; Turgeon, M; Montague, T; Thivierge, R L

    2008-09-01

    Asthma care in Canada and around the world persistently falls short of optimal treatment. To optimize care, a systematic approach to identifying such shortfalls or 'care gaps', in which all stakeholders of the health care system (including patients) are involved, was proposed. Several projects of a multipartner, multidisciplinary disease management program, developed to optimize asthma care in Quebec, was conducted in a period of eight years. First, two population maps were produced to identify regional variations in asthma-related morbidity and to prioritize interventions for improving treatment. Second, current care was evaluated in a physician-patient cohort, confirming the many care gaps in asthma management. Third, two series of peer-reviewed outcome studies, targeting high-risk populations and specific asthma care gaps, were conducted. Finally, a process to integrate the best interventions into the health care system and an agenda for further research on optimal asthma management were proposed. Key observations from these studies included the identification of specific patterns of noncompliance in using inhaled corticosteroids, the failure of increased access to spirometry in asthma education centres to increase the number of education referrals, the transient improvement in educational abilities of nurses involved with an asthma hotline telephone service, and the beneficial effects of practice tools aimed at facilitating the assessment of asthma control and treatment needs by general practitioners. Disease management programs such as Towards Excellence in Asthma Management can provide valuable information on optimal strategies for improving treatment of asthma and other chronic diseases by identifying care gaps, improving guidelines implementation and optimizing care.

  4. Efficacy and tolerability of salmeterol/fluticasone propionate versus montelukast in childhood asthma: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel-group study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maspero, Jorge; Guerra, Frances; Cuevas, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma control remains suboptimal in adults and children worldwide. Inhaled salmeterol/fluticasone propionate combination (SFC) and oral montelukast (MON) are 2 treatments available for childhood asthma. OBJECTIVE: This study, the PEdiatric Asthma Control Evaluation (PEACE......), investigated the efficacy and tolerability of SFC compared with MON for the control of persistent asthma in children. METHODS: Children with asthma (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV(1)] 55%-80% predicted; reversibility >or=12%) aged 6 to 14 years who were receiving only short-acting beta(2)-agonists...... in morning peak expiratory flow (PEF). Efficacy assessments included lung function, asthma symptoms, rescue medication use, and asthma control. Tolerability was assessed by recording the number and type of adverse events (AEs) and the number of asthma exacerbations. RESULTS: Of 607 patients screened, 548...

  5. Advances in asthma 2015: Across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Andrew H; Anderson, William C; Dutmer, Cullen M; Searing, Daniel A; Szefler, Stanley J

    2016-08-01

    In 2015, progress in understanding asthma ranged from insights to asthma inception, exacerbations, and severity to advancements that will improve disease management throughout the lifespan. 2015's insights to asthma inception included how the intestinal microbiome affects asthma expression with the identification of specific gastrointestinal bacterial taxa in early infancy associated with less asthma risk, possibly by promoting regulatory immune development at a critical early age. The relevance of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating asthma-related gene expression was strengthened. Predicting and preventing exacerbations throughout life might help to reduce progressive lung function decrease and disease severity in adulthood. Although allergy has long been linked to asthma exacerbations, a mechanism through which IgE impairs rhinovirus immunity and underlies asthma exacerbations was demonstrated and improved by anti-IgE therapy (omalizumab). Other key molecular pathways underlying asthma exacerbations, such as cadherin-related family member 3 (CDHR3) and orosomucoid like 3 (ORMDL3), were elucidated. New anti-IL-5 therapeutics, mepolizumab and reslizumab, were US Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of patients with severe eosinophilic asthma. In a clinical trial the novel therapeutic inhaled GATA3 mRNA-specific DNAzyme attenuated early- and late-phase allergic responses to inhaled allergen. These current findings are significant steps toward addressing unmet needs in asthma prevention, severity modification, disparities, and lifespan outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Factors impacting the mental health of the caregivers of children with asthma in china: effects of family socioeconomic status, symptoms control, proneness to shame, and family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Yi, Chunli; Zhang, Xuxia; Wang, Yuyin

    2014-12-01

    Caregiver mental health is widely considered to be an important factor influencing children's asthma symptoms. The present study aimed to examine key factors that contribute to caregiver mental health in pediatric asthma with a Chinese sample. Two hundred participants reported their family socioeconomic status (SES), proneness to shame, asthma symptoms control of their child, family functioning, and their depression and anxiety symptoms. Results suggested that low family SES, low family functioning, and a high level of shame proneness were associated with high levels of anxiety and depression for caregivers. Family functioning mediated the effects of SES and shame on caregiver mental health and also moderated the effects of SES and shame on caregiver depression. This study highlights the importance of reducing experience of shame and enhancing family functioning in families affected by pediatric asthma. © 2014 Family Process Institute.

  7. Improvement of Skills in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation of Pediatric Residents by Recorded Video Feedbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantasit, Nattachai; Vaewpanich, Jarin; Kuptanon, Teeradej; Kamalaporn, Haruitai; Khositseth, Anant

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the pediatric residents' cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills, and their improvements after recorded video feedbacks. Pediatric residents from a university hospital were enrolled. The authors surveyed the level of pediatric resuscitation skill confidence by a questionnaire. Eight psychomotor skills were evaluated individually, including airway, bag-mask ventilation, pulse check, prompt starting and technique of chest compression, high quality CPR, tracheal intubation, intraosseous, and defibrillation. The mock code skills were also evaluated as a team using a high-fidelity mannequin simulator. All the participants attended a concise Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) lecture, and received video-recorded feedback for one hour. They were re-evaluated 6 wk later in the same manner. Thirty-eight residents were enrolled. All the participants had a moderate to high level of confidence in their CPR skills. Over 50 % of participants had passed psychomotor skills, except the bag-mask ventilation and intraosseous skills. There was poor correlation between their confidence and passing the psychomotor skills test. After course feedback, the percentage of high quality CPR skill in the second course test was significantly improved (46 % to 92 %, p = 0.008). The pediatric resuscitation course should still remain in the pediatric resident curriculum and should be re-evaluated frequently. Video-recorded feedback on the pitfalls during individual CPR skills and mock code case scenarios could improve short-term psychomotor CPR skills and lead to higher quality CPR performance.

  8. Randomized controlled study of CBT in bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grover Naveen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to find out efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy, as an adjunct to standard pharmacotherapy, in bronchial asthma. In a random-ized two-group design with pre-and post assessments, forty asthma patients were randomly allotted to two groups: self management group and cognitive behavior therapy group. Both groups were exposed to 6-8 weeks of intervention, asthma self management program and cognitive behavior therapy. Assessment measures used were-Semi structured interview schedule, Asthma Symptom Checklist, Asthma di-ary, Asthma Bother Profile, Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale, AQLQ and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate. Within group comparison showed significant improvement in both groups at the post assessment. Between group comparisons showed that CBT group reported significantly greater change than that of SM group. Cognitive behavior therapy helps in improving the managment of asthma.

  9. A statewide model program to improve emergency department readiness for pediatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichon, Mark E; Fuchs, Susan; Lyons, Evelyn; Leonard, Daniel

    2009-08-01

    Pediatric emergency patients have unique needs, requiring specialized personnel, training, equipment, supplies, and medications. Deficiencies in these areas have resulted in historically poorer outcomes for pediatric patients versus adults. Since 1985, federally funded Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) programs in each state have been working to improve the quality of pediatric emergency care. The Health Resources and Services Administration now requires that all EMSC grantees report on specific performance measures. This includes implementation of a standardized system recognizing hospitals that are able to stabilize or manage pediatric medical emergencies and trauma cases. We describe the steps involved in implementing Illinois' 3-level facility recognition process to illustrate a model that other states might use to provide appropriate pediatric care and comply with new Health Resources and Services Administration performance measures.

  10. Association Between Gasdermin A and Gasdermin B Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Adult and Childhood Asthma Among Jordanians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zihlif, Malek; Obeidat, Nathir M; Zihlif, Nadwa; Mahafza, Tareq; Froukh, Tawfiq; Ghanim, Marcel T; Beano, Hamza; Al-Akhras, Fatima M; Naffa, Randa

    2016-03-01

    Gasdermin A (GSDMA) and gasdermin B (GSDMB) have been associated with childhood, and to a lesser extent with adult, asthma in many populations. In this study, we investigated the association between GSDMA and GSDMB variants and the incidence of adult and childhood asthma among Jordanians. Subjects were divided into two groups: adults and children. Within the adult group there were 129 asthma patients and 111 healthy controls. In the pediatric group there were 98 asthma patients and 112 healthy children. Gasdermin A (GSDMA) (rs7212938, T/G) and Gasdermin B (rs7216389, T/C) polymorphisms were genotyped using the PCR-RFLP method. Three analysis models were applied to the genotype data: co-dominant, dominant and recessive. An association between the GSDMB T/C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype and the incidence of childhood asthma was found (asthma in children while none of the tested haplotypes were found to be associated with asthma risk in adults. The findings of this study confirm the previously reported association between the GSDMB gene and the risk of childhood asthma.

  11. Spirometry and regular follow-up do not improve quality of life in children or adolescents with asthma: Cluster randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Michael J; Schattner, Rosa L; Holton, Christine; Simpson, Pam; Briggs, Nancy; Beilby, Justin; Nelson, Mark R; Wood-Baker, Richard; Thien, Francis; Sulaiman, Nabil D; Colle, Eleonora Del; Wolfe, Rory; Crockett, Alan J; Massie, R John

    2015-10-01

    To determine whether spirometry and regular medical review improved quality of life or other outcomes in children and adolescents with asthma. We conducted two cluster randomized controlled trials. We recruited 238 asthma patients aged between 7 and 17 years from 56 general practices in South Eastern Australia. Participants were randomized to receive an intervention that included spirometry or usual care. The main outcome measure was asthma related quality of life. Baseline characteristics were well matched between the intervention and control groups. Neither trial found any difference in asthma related quality of life between groups. However because of measurement properties, a formal meta-analysis could not be performed. Nor were there any significant effects of the intervention upon asthma attacks, limitation to usual activities, nocturnal cough, bother during physical activity, worry about asthma, or written asthma action plans. The findings do not support more widespread use of spirometry for the management of childhood asthma in general practice, unless it is integrated into a complete management model. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. International Variation in Asthma and Bronchiolitis Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakel, Leigh Anne; Hamid, Jemila; Ewusie, Joycelyne; Liu, Kai; Mussa, Joseph; Straus, Sharon; Parkin, Patricia; Cohen, Eyal

    2017-11-01

    Guideline recommendations for the same clinical condition may vary. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of agreement among comparable asthma and bronchiolitis treatment recommendations from guidelines. National and international guidelines were searched by using guideline databases (eg, National Guidelines Clearinghouse: December 16-17, 2014, and January 9, 2015). Guideline recommendations were categorized as (1) recommend, (2) optionally recommend, (3) abstain from recommending, (4) recommend against a treatment, and (5) not addressed by the guideline. The degree of agreement between recommendations was evaluated by using an unweighted and weighted κ score. Pairwise comparisons of the guidelines were evaluated similarly. There were 7 guidelines for asthma and 4 guidelines for bronchiolitis. For asthma, there were 166 recommendation topics, with 69 recommendation topics given in ≥2 guidelines. For bronchiolitis, there were 46 recommendation topics, with 21 recommendation topics provided in ≥2 guidelines. The overall κ for asthma was 0.03, both unweighted (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.01 to 0.07) and weighted (95% CI: -0.01 to 0.10); for bronchiolitis, it was 0.32 unweighted (95% CI: 0.16 to 0.52) and 0.15 weighted (95% CI: -0.01 to 0.5). Less agreement was found in national and international guidelines for asthma than for bronchiolitis. Additional studies are needed to determine if differences are based on patient preferences and values and economic considerations or if other recommendation-level, guideline-level, and condition-level factors are driving these differences. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Association of pediatric asthma severity with exposure to common household dust allergens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gent, Janneane F.; Belanger, Kathleen; Triche, Elizabeth W.; Bracken, Michael B.; Beckett, William S.; Leaderer, Brian P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Reducing exposure to household dust inhalant allergens has been proposed as one strategy to reduce asthma. Objective: To examine the dose-response relationships and health impact of five common household dust allergens on disease severity, quantified using both symptom frequency and medication use, in atopic and non-atopic asthmatic children. Methods: Asthmatic children (N=300) aged 4-12 years were followed for 1 year. Household dust samples from two indoor locations were analyzed for allergens including dust mite (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1), cockroach (Bla g 1). Daily symptoms and medication use were collected in monthly telephone interviews. Annual disease severity was examined in models including allergens, specific IgE sensitivity and adjusted for age, gender, atopy, ethnicity, and mother's education. Results: Der p 1 house dust mite allergen concentration of 2.0 μg/g or more from the main room and the child's bed was related to increased asthma severity independent of allergic status (respectively, OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.37, 6.30 for 2.0-10.0 μg/g and OR 2.55 95% CI 1.13, 5.73 for ≥10.0 μg/g). Higher pet allergen levels were associated with greater asthma severity, but only for those sensitized (cat OR 2.41 95% CI 1.19, 4.89; dog OR 2.06 95% CI 1.01, 4.22). Conclusion: Higher levels of Der p 1 and pet allergens were associated with asthma severity, but Der p 1 remained an independent risk factor after accounting for pet allergens and regardless of Der p 1 specific IgE status.

  14. Association of pediatric asthma severity with exposure to common household dust allergens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gent, Janneane F., E-mail: janneane.gent@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Belanger, Kathleen [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Triche, Elizabeth W. [Brown University, Department of Community Health/Epidemiology, Providence, RI (United States); Bracken, Michael B. [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Beckett, William S. [Mount Auburn Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Cambridge, MA (United States); Leaderer, Brian P. [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Background: Reducing exposure to household dust inhalant allergens has been proposed as one strategy to reduce asthma. Objective: To examine the dose-response relationships and health impact of five common household dust allergens on disease severity, quantified using both symptom frequency and medication use, in atopic and non-atopic asthmatic children. Methods: Asthmatic children (N=300) aged 4-12 years were followed for 1 year. Household dust samples from two indoor locations were analyzed for allergens including dust mite (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1), cockroach (Bla g 1). Daily symptoms and medication use were collected in monthly telephone interviews. Annual disease severity was examined in models including allergens, specific IgE sensitivity and adjusted for age, gender, atopy, ethnicity, and mother's education. Results: Der p 1 house dust mite allergen concentration of 2.0 {mu}g/g or more from the main room and the child's bed was related to increased asthma severity independent of allergic status (respectively, OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.37, 6.30 for 2.0-10.0 {mu}g/g and OR 2.55 95% CI 1.13, 5.73 for {>=}10.0 {mu}g/g). Higher pet allergen levels were associated with greater asthma severity, but only for those sensitized (cat OR 2.41 95% CI 1.19, 4.89; dog OR 2.06 95% CI 1.01, 4.22). Conclusion: Higher levels of Der p 1 and pet allergens were associated with asthma severity, but Der p 1 remained an independent risk factor after accounting for pet allergens and regardless of Der p 1 specific IgE status.

  15. Diagnostic challenges of childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakirtas, Arzu

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of asthma in childhood is challenging. Both underdiagnosis and overdiagnosis of asthma are important issues. The present review gives information about challenging factors for an accurate diagnosis of childhood asthma. Although underdiagnosis of asthma in childhood has always been the most important diagnostic problem, overdiagnosis of asthma has also been increasingly recognized. This is probably due to diagnosis of asthma based on symptoms and signs alone. Demonstration of variable airflow obstruction by lung function tests is the most common asthma diagnostic tests used in practice and is therefore strongly recommended in children who can cooperate. Recently, an asthma guideline combining the clinical and economic evidences with sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic procedures was developed to improve accuracy of diagnosis and to avoid overdiagnosis. This guideline provided an algorithmic clinical and cost-effective approach and included fractional exhaled nitric oxide measurement as one of the diagnostic tests in addition to lung function. Diagnosis of asthma in children should be made by combining relevant history with at least two confirmatory diagnostic tests whenever possible. Diagnosis based on short-period treatment trials should be limited to young children who are unable to cooperate with these tests.

  16. Treatment of bronchial asthma with low-level laser in attack-free period at children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailioaie, C.; Ailioaie, Laura

    2000-06-01

    Bronchial asthma is a common disease in both the pediatric and adult populations, characterized by wide variations over short periods of time in resistance to airflow in intrapulmonary airways. A primary goal in the use of low- level laser therapy (LLLT) was the safe, effective and rapid palliation of symptoms owing to tracheal or bronchial obstruction. We have investigated the effects of LLLT comparatively with other modality trials in children's asthma. In the study were included 98 patients aged 10-18 years diagnosed with moderate or severe asthma, in attack- free period. The patients were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 received only laser therapy using extra meridian acupuncture points and scanning technique. Group 2 was treated only with inhaled Serevent 2 X 25 micrometers , two times daily, 3 months. Group 3 was tread with Theophylline retard in dosage of 15-mg/kg/12 h, 3 months. At the end of treatment we remarked a noticeable improvement of the clinical, functional and immunological characteristics at 83 percent of patients in group 1, comparatively with only 70 percent (group 2) and 53 percent (group 3). The LLLT had a very good action on bronchial patency , displayed an immunocorrecting action and is recommended in attack-free periods at children.

  17. The better model to predict and improve pediatric health care quality: performance or importance-performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Rebecca M; Bryant, Carol A; McDermott, Robert J; Ortinau, David

    2013-01-01

    The perpetual search for ways to improve pediatric health care quality has resulted in a multitude of assessments and strategies; however, there is little research evidence as to their conditions for maximum effectiveness. A major reason for the lack of evaluation research and successful quality improvement initiatives is the methodological challenge of measuring quality from the parent perspective. Comparison of performance-only and importance-performance models was done to determine the better predictor of pediatric health care quality and more successful method for improving the quality of care provided to children. Fourteen pediatric health care centers serving approximately 250,000 patients in 70,000 households in three West Central Florida counties were studied. A cross-sectional design was used to determine the importance and performance of 50 pediatric health care attributes and four global assessments of pediatric health care quality. Exploratory factor analysis revealed five dimensions of care (physician care, access, customer service, timeliness of services, and health care facility). Hierarchical multiple regression compared the performance-only and the importance-performance models. In-depth interviews, participant observations, and a direct cognitive structural analysis identified 50 health care attributes included in a mailed survey to parents(n = 1,030). The tailored design method guided survey development and data collection. The importance-performance multiplicative additive model was a better predictor of pediatric health care quality. Attribute importance moderates performance and quality, making the importance-performance model superior for measuring and providing a deeper understanding of pediatric health care quality and a better method for improving the quality of care provided to children. Regardless of attribute performance, if the level of attribute importance is not taken into consideration, health care organizations may spend valuable

  18. Asthma and Respiratory Foundation NZ child and adolescent asthma guidelines: a quick reference guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Innes; McNamara, David; Davies, Cheryl; Demetriou, Teresa; Fleming, Theresa; Harwood, Matire; Hetaraka-Stevens, Lorraine; Ingham, Tristram; Kristiansen, John; Reid, Jim; Rickard, Debbie; Ryan, Debbie

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the New Zealand Child and adolescent asthma guidelines: a quick reference guide is to provide simple, practical, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment and management of asthma in children and adolescents in New Zealand, with the aim of improving outcomes and reducing inequities. The intended users are health professionals responsible for delivering asthma care in the community and hospital emergency department settings, and those responsible for the training of such health professionals.

  19. Variations in pediatric asthma hospitalization rates and costs between and within Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kocevar, Vasilisa Sazonov; Bisgaard, Hans; Jönsson, Linus

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We assessed variations in hospitalization parameters and costs among asthmatic children in four Nordic countries by geographic location and age groups. METHODS: Cross-sectional, county-level aggregate data on asthma-related hospitalizations in 1999, obtained from public national...... not differ significantly from Sweden. CONCLUSIONS: Large variations in all parameters were observed between and within countries. Given the similarities among the four countries studied, these results may, among other reasons, indicate different efficiencies of the various asthma management plans between...

  20. Allergic rhinitis is associated with poor asthma control in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Eric P; Nijkamp, Anke; Duiverman, Eric J; Brand, Paul L P

    2012-07-01

    Asthma and allergic rhinitis are the two most common chronic disorders in childhood and adolescence. To date, no study has examined the impact of comorbid allergic rhinitis on asthma control in children. To examine the prevalence of allergic rhinitis in children with asthma, and the impact of the disease and its treatment on asthma control. A cross-sectional survey in 203 children with asthma (5-18 years) using validated questionnaires on rhinitis symptoms (stuffy or runny nose outside a cold) and its treatment, and the paediatric Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ). Fraction of nitric oxide in exhaled air (FeNO) was measured with a Niox Mino analyser; total and specific IgE levels were assessed by the Immunocap system. 157 children (76.2%) had symptoms of allergic rhinitis but only 88 of these (56.1%) had been diagnosed with the condition by a physician. ACQ scores were worse in children with allergic rhinitis than in those without the condition (p=0.012). An ACQ score ≥ 1.0 (incomplete asthma control) was significantly more likely in children with allergic rhinitis than in those without (OR 2.74, 95% CI 1.28 to 5.91, p=0.0081), also after adjustment for FeNO levels and total serum IgE. After adjustment for nasal corticosteroid therapy, allergic rhinitis was no longer associated with incomplete asthma control (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.47 to 1.12, p=0.150). Allergic rhinitis is common in children with asthma, and has a major impact on asthma control. The authors hypothesise that recognition and treatment of this condition with nasal corticosteroids may improve asthma control in children, but randomised clinical trials are needed to test this hypothesis.

  1. Asthma symptoms in obese adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2016-01-01

    The association between asthma and obesity is well-described, but not straightforward, and according to current guidelines asthma control is more difficult to achieve in obese patients. The currently available studies evaluating response to pharmacological asthma therapy in obese patients show...... that these patients have an altered, in general less favorable, response to both reliever and controller medication compared to normal weight patients. However, at present, the limited available evidence precludes evidence-based recommendations. The 'obesity-related asthma' phenotype has different characteristics......, including association with atopy and type of airway inflammation, compared to 'classic' asthma. Furthermore, weight loss in patients with this phenotype leads to an improvement in symptoms, lung function, and airway responsiveness, as well as a reduction in medication utilization and hospital admissions...

  2. Do indoor environments influence asthma and asthma-related symptoms among adults in homes? A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the results of epidemiological studies focusing on the detrimental effects of home environmental factors on asthma morbidity in adults. We reviewed the literature on indoor air quality (IAQ, physical and sociodemographic factors, and asthma morbidity in homes, and identified commonly reported asthma, allergic, and respiratory symptoms involving the home environment. Reported IAQ and asthma morbidity data strongly indicated positive associations between indoor air pollution and adverse health effects in most studies. Indoor factors most consistently associated with asthma and asthma-related symptoms in adults included fuel combustion, mold growth, and environmental tobacco smoke. Environmental exposure may increase an adult’s risk of developing asthma and also may increase the risk of asthma exacerbations. Evaluation of present IAQ levels, exposure characteristics, and the role of exposure to these factors in relation to asthma morbidity is important for improving our understanding, identifying the burden, and for developing and implementing interventions aimed at reducing asthma morbidity.

  3. [Knowledge and experience of 2- to 15-year-old children's parents consulting in pediatric emergency departments for asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franquet, M; Husson, M; Dubus, J-C; Rimet, Y

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed at assessing parents' knowledge and perception in relation to their child's condition when arriving at the emergency ward following an asthma attack. The overall objective was to determine how parent education could be improved. This study was conducted over 9 months as a multicenter descriptive and qualitative study based on a self-administered questionnaire for parents of asthmatic children, aged 2-15 years. The questionnaire was delivered to 88 children out of 1472 (6%). Approximately 69% of the children included in the study presented with partially controlled or uncontrolled asthma. Fifty percent of the patients were insufficiently monitored and without therapy. Half of the parents said they had never received any information concerning their child's condition. The majority (86%) did not know the basic cause of the disease, 30% percent were unable to detect the features of clinical exacerbation, and 17% were not using an adequate emergency protocol. The illness experience was relatively easy for two-thirds of the children and the parents' perceptions were in line in 50% of the cases. Knowledge of parents and their children suffering from asthma is insufficient for optimal control and disease management. Instructions on detecting the signs of asthma severity as well as the establishment of an individualized emergency protocol and medical follow-up should be of prime concern and could reduce emergency department use. Doctors have a key role to play in educating and explaining disease characteristics to patients and their families. Therapeutic education also needs to be intensified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. PAEDIATRIC ASTHMA AND MANUAL THERAPY- A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Pandey

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asthma is an inflammatory clutter of the airways that causes wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. In India, approximate calculation indicates a prevalence of between 10% and 15% in 5-11 year old children. Modern Western treatment focuses on controlling asthma with two classes of medication corticosteroids and bronchodilatorss. Another plan of action for reducing and potentially even throw out asthma manifestation affects manipulation of the craniosacral fascial system. This system is a unification of the craniosacral and fascial or connective tissue part. This idea can help in making clear the greatly high rate of achievement with manual therapy in pediatric asthma. Methods: In this case report first I have taken a brief history of the patient condition after the full assessment like brain cycle rhythm, chest and systemic. I have given cranio sacral therapy, Intercostal release, PNF for diaphragm release on child for seven sitting of about 45 minutes of each session. Results: After completion of treatment session of seven sitting his lungs to be bright of any wheezing or other impediment. Brain cycle was of 90 seconds. His peak flow meter readings were between 250 and 300 Liters/minute, which were in a satisfactory range for him. The physician suggested that at this point there was no requirement for any additional asthma medicines. Conclusion: It comes into sight that the loss to the respiratory system caused by fascial burden early in life may be fully reversible, if treated immediately. The latent grace of this interdependent approach is that it crop up to address the pathological origin of asthma.

  5. Improved outcomes after successful implementation of a pediatric early warning system (PEWS) in a resource-limited pediatric oncology hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agulnik, Asya; Mora Robles, Lupe Nataly; Forbes, Peter W; Soberanis Vasquez, Doris Judith; Mack, Ricardo; Antillon-Klussmann, Federico; Kleinman, Monica; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos

    2017-08-01

    Hospitalized pediatric oncology patients are at high risk of clinical decline and mortality, particularly in resource-limited settings. Pediatric early warning systems (PEWS) aid in the early identification of clinical deterioration; however, there are limited data regarding their feasibility or impact in low-resource settings. This study describes the successful implementation of PEWS at the Unidad Nacional de Oncología Pediátrica (UNOP), a pediatric oncology hospital in Guatemala, resulting in improved inpatient outcomes. A modified PEWS was implemented at UNOP with systems to track errors, transfers to a higher level of care, and high scores. A retrospective cohort study was used to evaluate clinical deterioration events in the year before and after PEWS implementation. After PEWS implementation at UNOP, there was 100% compliance with PEWS documentation and an error rate of <10%. Implementation resulted in 5 high PEWS per week, with 30% of patients transferring to a higher level of care. Among patients requiring transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), 93% had an abnormal PEWS before transfer. The rate of clinical deterioration events decreased after PEWS implementation (9.3 vs 6.5 per 1000-hospitalpatient-days, p = .003). Despite an 18% increase in total hospital patient-days, PICU utilization for inpatient transfers decreased from 1376 to 1088 PICU patient-days per year (21% decrease; P<.001). This study describes the successful implementation of PEWS in a pediatric oncology hospital in Guatemala, resulting in decreased inpatient clinical deterioration events and PICU utilization. This work demonstrates that PEWS is a feasible and effective quality improvement measure to improve hospital care for children with cancer in hospitals with limited resources. Cancer 2017;123:2965-74. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. Chest radiography in supporting the diagnosis of asthma in children with persistent cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaby, Claudia; Feuerman, Martin; Barlev, Dan; Pirzada, Melodi

    2014-03-01

    To establish whether chest radiographic findings suggestive of lower airway obstruction (LAO) disease support the diagnosis of asthma in pediatric patients with persistent cough in an outpatient setting. 180 patient charts were reviewed. The patients were children aged 1 to 18 years referred over a 3-year period to a pediatric pulmonary subspecialty clinic for evaluation of cough lasting ≥ 4 weeks. Chest radiographic images obtained after the initial evaluation of 90 patients diagnosed with cough-variant asthma and 90 patients diagnosed with persistent cough from nonasthma origins were compared with radiologic findings of a control group consisting of patients with a positive tuberculin skin test and no respiratory symptoms. Increased peribronchial markings/peribronchial cuffing and hyperinflation were considered radiographically suggestive findings of LAO disease. Children diagnosed with cough-variant asthma at the initial evaluation had higher rates of chest radiographic findings suggestive of LAO disease (30.00%) than children with persistent cough from other causes (17.80%) or those with a positive tuberculin skin test and no respiratory symptoms (8.16%) (overall P value = 0.0063). They also had higher rates of spirometry abnormalities suggestive of an LAO defect. Children with chest radiographic findings suggestive of LAO disease were found to be younger than those with normal chest radiographic findings (5.0 ± 2.7 years vs 8.6 ± 4.7 years; P < 0.0001). This study suggests that chest radiographic findings indicative of an LAO in correlation with the clinical presentation can support the diagnostic suspicion of asthma, especially in younger children unable to perform spirometry.

  7. Asthma control and management in 8,000 European patients: the REcognise Asthma and LInk to Symptoms and Experience (REALISE) survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, David; Fletcher, Monica; van der Molen, Thys

    2014-01-01

    Background: Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in the world, and previous studies have reported low levels of control. Recent developments in the availability and use of online sources of information about asthma might add to patients’ knowledge and help improve control. Aims: To investigate whether asthma control has improved by assessing levels of symptoms, exacerbations and Global Initiative for Asthma-defined control in a real-life population of patients who use the Internet and social media, as well as evaluate patient perception of control and attitudes to asthma. Methods: Online surveys were conducted among 8,000 patients with asthma (aged 18–50 years, ⩾2 prescriptions in the previous 2 years, use of social media) from 11 European countries. Results: Levels of asthma control were low: 45% of respondents had uncontrolled asthma. Acute exacerbations were common: 44% of respondents reported having used oral steroids for asthma in the previous 12 months, 24% had visited an emergency department and 12% had been hospitalised. More than 80% of respondents (overall, and among those with a history of exacerbations) considered their asthma to be controlled. Of those who had an exacerbation requiring oral steroids, 75% regarded their asthma as not serious. Conclusions: Asthma control in Europe remains poor; symptoms and exacerbations are common. Many patients regard their asthma as controlled and not serious despite experiencing symptoms and exacerbations. There is a need to assess patients’ control, risk and inhaler technique, and to ensure that patients are prescribed, and take, appropriate treatments. PMID:24921985

  8. Pediatrics Residents' Confidence and Performance Following a Longitudinal Quality Improvement Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtlandt, Cheryl; Noonan, Laura; Koricke, Maureen Walsh; Zeskind, Philip Sanford; Mabus, Sarah; Feld, Leonard

    2016-02-01

    Quality improvement (QI) training is an integral part of residents' education. Understanding the educational value of a QI curriculum facilitates understanding of its impact. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a longitudinal QI curriculum on pediatrics residents' confidence and competence in the acquisition and application of QI knowledge and skills. Three successive cohorts of pediatrics residents (N = 36) participated in a longitudinal curriculum designed to increase resident confidence in QI knowledge and skills. Key components were a succession of progressive experiential projects, QI coaching, and resident team membership culminating in leadership of the project. Residents completed precurricular and postcurricular surveys and demonstrated QI competence by performance on the pediatric QI assessment scenario. Residents participating in the Center for Advancing Pediatric Excellence QI curriculum showed significant increases in pre-post measures of confidence in QI knowledge and skills. Coaching and team leadership were ranked by resident participants as having the most educational value among curriculum components. A pediatric QI assessment scenario, which correlated with resident-perceived confidence in acquisition of QI skills but not QI knowledge, is a tool available to test pediatrics residents' QI knowledge. A 3-year longitudinal, multimodal, experiential QI curriculum increased pediatrics residents' confidence in QI knowledge and skills, was feasible with faculty support, and was well-accepted by residents.

  9. Development of six PROMIS pediatrics proxy-report item banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Debra E; Gross, Heather E; Stucky, Brian D; Thissen, David; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Lai, Jin Shei; Amtmann, Dagmar; Khastou, Leyla; Varni, James W; DeWalt, Darren A

    2012-02-22

    Pediatric self-report should be considered the standard for measuring patient reported outcomes (PRO) among children. However, circumstances exist when the child is too young, cognitively impaired, or too ill to complete a PRO instrument and a proxy-report is needed. This paper describes the development process including the proxy cognitive interviews and large-field-test survey methods and sample characteristics employed to produce item parameters for the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) pediatric proxy-report item banks. The PROMIS pediatric self-report items were converted into proxy-report items before undergoing cognitive interviews. These items covered six domains (physical function, emotional distress, social peer relationships, fatigue, pain interference, and asthma impact). Caregivers (n = 25) of children ages of 5 and 17 years provided qualitative feedback on proxy-report items to assess any major issues with these items. From May 2008 to March 2009, the large-scale survey enrolled children ages 8-17 years to complete the self-report version and caregivers to complete the proxy-report version of the survey (n = 1548 dyads). Caregivers of children ages 5 to 7 years completed the proxy report survey (n = 432). In addition, caregivers completed other proxy instruments, PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales Parent Proxy-Report version, PedsQL™ Asthma Module Parent Proxy-Report version, and KIDSCREEN Parent-Proxy-52. Item content was well understood by proxies and did not require item revisions but some proxies clearly noted that determining an answer on behalf of their child was difficult for some items. Dyads and caregivers of children ages 5-17 years old were enrolled in the large-scale testing. The majority were female (85%), married (70%), Caucasian (64%) and had at least a high school education (94%). Approximately 50% had children with a chronic health condition, primarily asthma, which was diagnosed or treated within 6

  10. Questionnaire Survey on Asthma Management of Japanese Allergists I. Diagnosis patient education and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuharu Tsukioka

    1996-01-01

    Responses to the questionnaire on the diagnosis, patient education and management of asthma indicated that a reduced number of patients with severe asthma were seen in 1993 in both Pediatric and Internal Medicine Departments compared with 5 years before, despite the increase in total number of asthma patients in Japan. Specifiic IgE radioallergosorbent test (RAST measurements were frequently performed instead of skin testing for diagnosis, and eosinophil count and bronchodilator response served as an adjunct to the diagnosis. Patients were frequently asked detailed questions about aspirin-induced asthma, which accounted for 8.8, 2.2 and 1.5% of patients with asthma in the adult, schoolchildren (6–16 years and infant (≤ 5 years groups, respectively. In achieving ‘control of asthma’, first priority was given to coping with the symptoms in children aged 5 years or less and to enabling routine daily life activities in patients 6 years of age or older. Usefulness of peak flow measurements was widely recognized and a detailed plan for allergen avoidance (house dust was often given to patients.

  11. The Importance of Asthma and Health Programs in Improving Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    School air quality has a major impact on asthma and other respiratory illnesses. Airborne allergens or irritants frequently trigger asthma attacks, yet environmental assessments demonstrate that schools often harbor allergen levels at or close to the th

  12. Impact of community pharmacists' interventions on asthma self-management care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačević, Milena; Ćulafić, Milica; Jovanović, Marija; Vučićević, Katarina; Kovačević, Sandra Vezmar; Miljković, Branislava

    2018-06-01

    Asthma self-management is aimed to improve the quality and effectiveness of asthma care by supporting the patients to manage their illness by themselves. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of pharmacist-delivered counselling on patients knowledge and beliefs about the medicines, adherence level, and asthma control. A prospective intervention study was conducted in community pharmacies. A total of 90 patients completed the study. Four questionnaires were used: (1) Beliefs about medicines questionnaire (BMQ), (2) Knowledge of asthma and asthma medicine (KAM), (3) Asthma control test (ACT), and (4) 8-item Morisky medication adherence scale questionnaire (MMAS-8). Questionnaires were completed at baseline and 3 months later. Low level of adherence and poor asthma control were determined initially. Better asthma control was significantly associated with higher adherence level, lower concerns regarding the medication use, and knowledge of triggers. Statistically significant improvement was found after 3 months in patients knowledge of asthma and its medications, their attitude towards medications (decrease in harm, overuse and concern; increase in necessity score), asthma control score (increased from 19 to 20, p < 0.05) and level of adherence (MMAS-8 score decreased from 3 to 2 p < 0.05). Better asthma control was achieved in 60% of patients. Sixteen patients (18%) were transferred from poor to well-controlled asthma, implying no need for patients' referral to the doctor and no additional cost for the health system. Improved disease control could be a result of enhanced knowledge and understanding of the disease-medication relationship, improved inhalation technique, and support on patients' adherence. Acquired knowledge and skills, as well as improved attitude, empowered patients to take a more active part in asthma management. Education in further patients' follow-up should consider topics tailored to the patients' characteristics, needs, and prior

  13. A systematic review of adverse drug events associated with administration of common asthma medications in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S Leung

    Full Text Available To systematically review the literature and determine frequencies of adverse drug events (ADE associated with pediatric asthma medications.Following PRISMA guidelines, we systematically searched six bibliographic databases between January 1991 and January 2017. Study eligibility, data extraction and quality assessment were independently completed and verified by two reviewers. We included randomized control trials (RCT, case-control, cohort, or quasi-experimental studies where the primary objective was identifying ADE in children 1 month- 18 years old exposed to commercial asthma medications. The primary outcome was ADE frequency.Our search identified 14,540 citations. 46 studies were included: 24 RCT, 15 cohort, 4 RCT pooled analyses, 1 case-control, 1 open-label trial and 1 quasi-experimental study. Studies examined the following drug classes: inhaled corticosteroids (ICS (n = 24, short-acting beta-agonists (n = 10, long-acting beta-agonists (LABA (n = 3, ICS + LABA (n = 3, Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists (n = 3 and others (n = 3. 29 studies occurred in North America, and 29 were industry funded. We report a detailed index of 406 ADE descriptions and frequencies organized by drug class. The majority of data focuses on ICS, with 174 ADE affecting 13 organ systems including adrenal and growth suppression. We observed serious ADE, although they were rare, with frequency ranging between 0.9-6% per drug. There were no confirmed deaths, except for 13 potential deaths in a LABA study including combined adult and pediatric participants. We identified substantial methodological concerns, particularly with identifying ADE and determining severity. No studies utilized available standardized causality, severity or preventability assessments.The majority of studies focus on ICS, with adrenal and growth suppression described. Serious ADE are relatively uncommon, with no confirmed pediatric deaths. We identify substantial methodological concerns

  14. Urban residence, neighborhood poverty, race/ethnicity, and asthma morbidity among children on Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keet, Corinne A; Matsui, Elizabeth C; McCormack, Meredith C; Peng, Roger D

    2017-09-01

    Although poor-urban (inner-city) areas are thought to have high asthma prevalence and morbidity, we recently found that inner cities do not have higher prevalent pediatric asthma. Whether asthma morbidity is higher in inner-city areas across the United States is not known. This study sought to examine relationships between residence in poor and urban areas, race/ethnicity, and asthma morbidity among children with asthma who are enrolled in Medicaid. Children aged 5 to 19 enrolled in Medicaid in 2009 to 2010 were included. Asthma was defined by at least 1 outpatient or emergency department (ED) visit with a primary diagnosis code of asthma over the 2-year period. Urbanization status was defined at the county level and neighborhood poverty at the zip-code level. Among children with asthma, logistic models were created to examine the effects of urbanization, neighborhood poverty, and race/ethnicity on rates of asthma outpatient visits, ED visits, and hospitalizations. This study included 16,860,716 children (1,534,820 with asthma). Among children enrolled in Medicaid, residence in inner-city areas did not confer increased risk of prevalent asthma in either crude or adjusted analyses, but it was associated with significantly more asthma-related ED visits and hospitalizations among those with asthma in crude analyses (risk ratio, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.24-1.36; and 1.97; 95% CI, 1.50-1.72, respectively) and when adjusted for race/ethnicity, age, and sex (adjusted risk ratio, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.08-1.15; and 1.62; 95% CI, 1.26-1.43). Residence in urban or poor areas and non-Hispanic black race/ethnicity were all independently associated with increased risk of asthma-related ED visits and hospitalizations. Residence in poor and urban areas is an important risk factor for asthma morbidity, but not for prevalence, among low-income US children. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. In situ pediatric trauma simulation: assessing the impact and feasibility of an interdisciplinary pediatric in situ trauma care quality improvement simulation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Marc; Roney, Linda; Aysseh, April; Gawel, Marcie; Koziel, Jeannette; Barre, Kimberly; Caty, Michael G; Santucci, Karen

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and measure the impact of an in situ interdisciplinary pediatric trauma quality improvement simulation program. Twenty-two monthly simulations were conducted in a tertiary care pediatric emergency department with the aim of improving the quality of pediatric trauma (February 2010 to November 2012). Each session included 20 minutes of simulated patient care, followed by 30 minutes of debriefing that focused on teamwork, communication, and the identification of gaps in care. A single rater scored the performance of the team in real time using a validated assessment instrument for 6 subcomponents of care (teamwork, airway, intubation, breathing, circulation, and disability). Participants completed a survey and written feedback forms. A trend analysis of the 22 simulations found statistically significant positive trends for overall performance, teamwork, and intubation subcomponents; the strength of the upward trend was the strongest for the teamwork (τ = 0.512), followed by overall performance (τ = 0.488) and intubation (τ = 0.433). Two hundred fifty-one of 398 participants completed the participant feedback form (response rate, 63%), reporting that debriefing was the most valuable aspect of the simulation. An in situ interdisciplinary pediatric trauma simulation quality improvement program resulted in improved validated trauma simulation assessment scores for overall performance, teamwork, and intubation. Participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the program, and debriefing was reported as the most valuable component of the program.

  16. Control of moderate-to-severe asthma with randomized ciclesonide doses of 160, 320 and 640 μg/day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen SE

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Søren E Pedersen,1 Niyati Prasad,2 Udo-Michael Goehring,3 Henrik Andersson,4 Dirkje S Postma5 1Pediatric Research Unit, Kolding Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark; 2Vertex, Phase IV & Global Strategy, London, UK; 3Vifor Pharma Ltd, Clinical Research & Biometrics, Glattbrugg, Switzerland; 4Swedish Social Insurance Agency, Government Offices of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden; 5Department of Pulmonology, Griac Research Institute, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands Background: The inhaled corticosteroid (ICS ciclesonide (Cic, controls asthma symptoms in the majority of patients at the recommended dose of 160 µg/day. However, the relationship between the level of asthma control and increasing doses of Cic is unknown. This study investigated whether long-term treatment with higher doses of Cic would further improve asthma symptoms in patients with uncontrolled asthma despite ICS use. Patients and methods: In a double-blind, randomized, parallel-group study, 367 patients were allocated to one of three treatment arms (Cic 160, 320 and 640 μg/day. After a single-blind, 3-week baseline period with Cic 160 µg/day, eligible patients were randomized to receive 52 weeks of treatment with Cic 160, 320 or 640 μg/day (double-blind period during which forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, exacerbations and Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ scores were measured. Results: Treatment with all the three doses was associated with significant improvements in ACQ scores, FEV1 and asthma symptoms (P<0.01. There were no statistically significant differences between the three doses. The results of the primary end point analysis showed a numerical improvement in the ACQ score with Cic 640 μg/day compared with Cic 160 μg/day (least square [LS] mean: -0.122; two-sided P-value: 0.30. Post hoc subgroup analyses showed that the improvement in the ACQ score with Cic 640 μg/day compared

  17. Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The) - Vol 5 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiological study of risk factors in pediatric asthma · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Mohamed A Tageldin, Gamal S Aly, Salah Mostafa, Hany Khalil. Antineuronal antibodies in autistic children: relation to blood mercury · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ...

  18. Physician Asthma Management Practices in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jin

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To establish national baseline information on asthma management practices of physicians, to compare the reported practices with the Canadian Consensus recommendations and to identify results potentially useful for interventions that improve physician asthma management practices.

  19. Asthma in inner city children: recent insights: United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutmer, Cullen M; Kim, Haejin; Searing, Daniel A; Zoratti, Edward M; Liu, Andrew H

    2018-04-01

    Children living in US inner cities experience disparate burdens of asthma, especially in severity, impairment, exacerbations, and morbidity. Investigations seeking to better understand the factors and mechanisms underlying asthma prevalence, severity, and exacerbation in children living in these communities can lead to interventions that can narrow asthma disparities and potentially benefit all children with asthma. This update will focus on recent (i.e. late 2016-2017) advances in the understanding of asthma in US inner city children. Studies published in the past year expand understanding of asthma prevalence, severity, exacerbation, and the outcomes of guidelines-based management of these at-risk children, including: asthma phenotypes in US inner city children that are severe and difficult-to-control; key environmental determinants and mechanisms underlying asthma severity and exacerbations (e.g. allergy-mediated exacerbation susceptibility to rhinovirus); the importance of schools as a place for provocative exposures (e.g. mouse allergen, nitrogen dioxide) as well as a place where asthma care and outcomes can be improved; and the development and validation of clinically useful indices for gauging asthma severity and predicting exacerbations. These recent studies provide a trove of actionable findings that can improve asthma care and outcomes for these at-risk children.

  20. Swimming attendance during childhood and development of asthma: Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriani, Federica; Protano, Carmela; Vitali, Matteo; Romano Spica, Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    The association between asthma and swimming pool attendance has not been demonstrated and currently there are conflicting results. In order to clarify the association between asthma diagnosis in children and swimming pool attendance, and to assess the consistency of the available epidemiological studies, we completed a literature analysis on the relationship between the exposure to disinfection by-products in indoor swimming pools during childhood and asthma diagnosis. Following the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) criteria, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by searching MEDLINE via PubMed, TOXNET, and Scopus databases (from inception to 20 April 2015) using the key word "Asthma" together with "swimming pool", "disinfection by-products", "indoor air pollution" and "children". Inclusion criteria were: English language, a complete analytic study design involving a cohort of children (0-16 years), a well-defined definition of exposure, and the presence of data on effect and variance. Studies on in vivo, in vitro or professional and accidental exposure were excluded. After a screening process, seven reports (n = 5851 subjects) were included out of a total of 2928 references. The reported OR of the association between swimming pool attendance and asthma prevalence ranged from 0.58 to 2.30. The present meta-analysis failed to identify a significant difference in asthma development between children attending swimming pools and controls (OR, 1.084; 95% CI: 0.89-1.31). Swimming in childhood does not increase the likelihood of doctor-diagnosed asthma. Based on this meta-analysis review, the association of the disease with indoor pool attendance is still unclear. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  1. Maternal obesity in pregnancy, gestational weight gain, and risk of childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forno, Erick; Young, Omar M; Kumar, Rajesh; Simhan, Hyagriv; Celedón, Juan C

    2014-08-01

    Environmental or lifestyle exposures in utero may influence the development of childhood asthma. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to assess whether maternal obesity in pregnancy (MOP) or increased maternal gestational weight gain (GWG) increased the risk of asthma in offspring. We included all observational studies published until October 2013 in PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, The Cochrane Database, and Ovid. Random effects models with inverse variance weights were used to calculate pooled risk estimates. Fourteen studies were included (N = 108 321 mother-child pairs). Twelve studies reported maternal obesity, and 5 reported GWG. Age of children was 14 months to 16 years. MOP was associated with higher odds of asthma or wheeze ever (OR = 1.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.49) or current (OR = 1.21; 95% CI, 1.07-1.37); each 1-kg/m(2) increase in maternal BMI was associated with a 2% to 3% increase in the odds of childhood asthma. High GWG was associated with higher odds of asthma or wheeze ever (OR = 1.16; 95% CI, 1.001-1.34). Maternal underweight and low GWG were not associated with childhood asthma or wheeze. Meta-regression showed a negative association of borderline significance for maternal asthma history (P = .07). The significant heterogeneity among existing studies indicates a need for standardized approaches to future studies on the topic. MOP and high GWG are associated with an elevated risk of childhood asthma; this finding may be particularly significant for mothers without asthma history. Prospective randomized trials of maternal weight management are needed. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Impact of omalizumab on medical cost of childhood asthma in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hideki; Iwata, Mihoko; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Ono, Rintaro; Murakami, Yoko; Taba, Naohiko; Honjo, Satoshi; Motomura, Chikako; Odajima, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Omalizumab is effective in children with severe asthma, but its impact on medical cost in Japan is not clear. We evaluated the impact of omalizumab on medical cost by comparing the pre- vs post-omalizumab-initiation medical costs of 12 children with severe asthma who received omalizumab for 2 years, and calculating incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for omalizumab therapy. Health outcome was measured as hospital-free days (HFD). The median total medical costs and medication fee per patient increased significantly after omalizumab initiation because of the high cost of omalizumab. The median hospitalization fee per patient, however, decreased significantly after omalizumab initiation due to reduction in hospitalization. Omalizumab led to an estimated increase of 40.8 HFD per omalizumab responder patient per 2 years. The cost was JPY 20 868 per additional HFD. Omalizumab can therefore reduce hospitalization cost in children with severe asthma in Japan. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  3. Evaluating the association of allergies with multiple sclerosis susceptibility risk and disease activity in a pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Theresa; Waltz, Michael; Casper, T C; Kavak, K; Aaen, G; Belman, A; Benson, L; Candee, M; Chitnis, T; Graves, J; Greenberg, B; Gorman, M; Harris, Y; Krupp, L; Lotze, T; Mar, S; Ness, J; Olsen, C; Roalstad, S; Rodriguez, M; Rose, J; Rubin, J; Schreiner, T; Tillema, J M; Kahn, I; Waldman, A; Barcellos, L; Waubant, E; Weinstock-Guttman, B

    2017-04-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and allergies are both considered to be related to imbalanced Th1 and Th2 immune responses. Previous studies evaluating the relationship between MS and allergies provide conflicting results. To assess allergies and asthma as risk factors for MS and as predictors of MS relapses in a pediatric cohort. The environment and genetic risk factors for pediatric MS study is a national case-control project with 16 participating US sites. An environmental questionnaire is used that includes history of allergies in the first five years of life. Case-control data are entered in the pediatric MS Network database and cases at 12 of the 16 sites enter relapse data prospectively. Annualized relapse rate was calculated for patients with follow-up and adjusted for age at disease onset, gender, race, ethnicity, and use of disease-modifying therapy (DMT). We included 271 cases (mean age at disease onset of 15.7years and 62% female) and 418 controls. Relapse data were available for 193 cases. There was no difference in prevalence of allergies or asthma between cases and controls. Patients with food allergies had fewer relapses compared to patients without food allergies (0.14 vs 0.48, p=0.01). While allergies and asthma are not associated with pediatric MS, cases with food allergies have fewer relapses compared to those without food allergies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular endotypes of pediatric asthma: a novel language directs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The). Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 1 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  5. The virtual asthma guideline e-learning program: learning effectiveness and user satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Kwon, Yong-Eun; Kim, Tae-Bum; Park, Hye-Kyung; Park, Heung-Woo; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Jee, Young-Koo; Moon, Hee-Bom; Min, Kyung-Up; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2018-05-01

    Effective educational tools are important for increasing adherence to asthma guidelines and clinical improvement of asthma patients. We developed a computer-based interactive education program for asthma guideline named the Virtual Learning Center for Asthma Management (VLCAM). We evaluated the usefulness of program in terms of its effects on user awareness of asthma guideline and level of satisfaction. Physicians-in-training at tertiary hospitals in Korea were enrolled in a cross-sectional questionnaire survey. The e-learning program on asthma guideline was conducted over a 2-week period. We investigated changes in the awareness of asthma guideline using 35-item self-administered questionnaire aiming at assessing physicians' knowledge, attitude, and practice. Satisfaction with the program was scored on 4-point Likert scales. A total of 158 physicians-in-training at six tertiary hospitals completed the survey. Compared with baseline, the overall awareness obtained from the scores of knowledge, attitude, and practice was improved significantly. Participants were satisfied with the VLCAM program in the following aspects: helpfulness, convenience, motivation, effectiveness, physicians' confidence, improvement of asthma management, and willingness to recommend. All items in user satisfaction questionnaires received high scores over 3 points. Moreover, the problem-based learning with a virtual patient received the highest user satisfaction among all parts of the program. Our computer-based e-learning program is useful for improving awareness of asthma management. It could improve adherence to asthma guidelines and enhance the quality of asthma care.

  6. Sparse modeling of spatial environmental variables associated with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Timothy S; Gangnon, Ronald E; David Page, C; Buckingham, William R; Tandias, Aman; Cowan, Kelly J; Tomasallo, Carrie D; Arndt, Brian G; Hanrahan, Lawrence P; Guilbert, Theresa W

    2015-02-01

    Geographically distributed environmental factors influence the burden of diseases such as asthma. Our objective was to identify sparse environmental variables associated with asthma diagnosis gathered from a large electronic health record (EHR) dataset while controlling for spatial variation. An EHR dataset from the University of Wisconsin's Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Departments was obtained for 199,220 patients aged 5-50years over a three-year period. Each patient's home address was geocoded to one of 3456 geographic census block groups. Over one thousand block group variables were obtained from a commercial database. We developed a Sparse Spatial Environmental Analysis (SASEA). Using this method, the environmental variables were first dimensionally reduced with sparse principal component analysis. Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling was then used to identify block group variables associated with asthma from sparse principal components. The addresses of patients from the EHR dataset were distributed throughout the majority of Wisconsin's geography. Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling captured spatial variation of asthma. Four sparse principal components identified via model selection consisted of food at home, dog ownership, household size, and disposable income variables. In rural areas, dog ownership and renter occupied housing units from significant sparse principal components were associated with asthma. Our main contribution is the incorporation of sparsity in spatial modeling. SASEA sequentially added sparse principal components to Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling. This method allowed association of geographically distributed environmental factors with asthma using EHR and environmental datasets. SASEA can be applied to other diseases with environmental risk factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Therapy with omalizumab for patients with severe allergic asthma improves asthma control and reduces overall healthcare costs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costello, R W

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with asthma who have persistent symptoms despite treatment with inhaled steroids and long-acting beta agonists are considered to have severe asthma. Omalizumab is a monoclonal antibody directed against IgE, which is used as an add-on treatment for patients who have severe persistent allergic asthma. AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical benefit and healthcare utilisation of patients who responded to omalizumab therapy and to establish an overall cost implication. METHODS: This was an observational retrospective cohort study designed to investigate the effect of omalizumab on exacerbations of asthma before and after 6 months of treatment in Irish patients. RESULTS: Centres who had treated patients with severe allergic asthma for the 6 months prior and post omalizumab treatment were audited with a standardised assessment tool. Sixty-three (32 male) patients were studied. In the 6 months prior to omalizumab 41 of 63 (66%) had been hospitalised, and this fell to 15 of 63 (24%), p < 0.0001 in the 6 months after treatment was started. Hospital admissions reduced from 2.4 +\\/- 0.41 to 0.8 +\\/- 0.37 and the mean number of bed days occupied was reduced from 16.6 +\\/- 2.94 to 5.3 +\\/- 2.57 days, p < 0.001. The number of oral corticosteroid doses used fell from 3.1 +\\/- 0.27 to 1.2 +\\/- 0.17, p < 0.001. The overall cost saving per omalizumab responder patients for 6 months was 834. CONCLUSIONS: Six months therapy with omalizumab reduced the number of bed days, the number of hospitalisations and the use of oral corticosteroids compared to the 6 months prior to commencement. Despite the cost of the additional therapy there were overall savings in health costs.

  8. The role of the primary care physician in helping adolescent and adult patients improve asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P

    2011-09-01

    Many adolescents and adults with asthma continue to have poorly controlled disease, often attributable to poor adherence to asthma therapy. Failure to adhere to recommended treatment may result from a desire to avoid regular reliance on medications, inappropriate high tolerance of asthma symptoms, failure to perceive the chronic nature of asthma, and poor inhaler technique. Primary care physicians need to find opportunities and methods to address these and other issues related to poor asthma control. Few adolescents or adults with asthma currently have asthma "checkup" visits, usually seeking medical care only with an exacerbation. Therefore, nonrespiratory-related office visits represent an important opportunity to assess baseline asthma control and the factors that most commonly lead to poor control. Tools such as the Asthma Control Test, the Asthma Therapy Assessment Questionnaire, the Asthma Control Questionnaire, and the Asthma APGAR provide standardized, patient-friendly ways to capture necessary asthma information. For uncontrolled asthma, physicians can refer to the stepwise approach in the 2007 National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines to adjust medication use, but they must consider step-up decisions in the context of quality of the patient's inhaler technique, adherence, and ability to recognize and avoid or eliminate triggers. For this review, a literature search of PubMed from 2000 through August 31, 2010, was performed using the following terms (or a combination of these terms): asthma, asthma control, primary care, NAEPP guidelines, assessment, uncontrolled asthma, burden, impact, assessment tools, triggers, pharmacotherapy, safety. Studies were limited to human studies published in English. Articles were also identified by a manual search of bibliographies from retrieved articles and from article archives of the author.

  9. Adherence to management guidelines for childhood asthma in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereznicki, Bonnie J; Beggs, Sean; Duff, Caitlin; Bereznicki, Luke

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about doctors' treatment preferences for childhood asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate adherence to management guidelines for childhood asthma. One thousand general practitioners (GPs) and paediatric specialists in Australia were invited to take part in a survey, which collected demographic details and explored their familiarity with and adherence to childhood asthma management guidelines. Two hundred doctors (20% response rate) responded and were eligible for inclusion in the survey. Approximately half (54.5%) of the respondents were very familiar with at least one of the childhood asthma management guidelines. The majority of respondents (86.8%) followed guideline recommendations when prescribing initial maintenance therapy for childhood asthma, while 89.2% and 68.0% followed guideline recommendations regarding step-up and step-down therapy respectively. Overall familiarity with childhood asthma management guidelines could be improved. There is scope for improvement in the adherence to these guidelines when prescribing medication in childhood asthma, particularly for step-down therapy.

  10. The self-reported quality of life of Lithuanian children with asthma was comparable to Western populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taminskiene, Vaida; Vaitkaitiene, Egle; Valiulis, Algirdas; Turner, Steve; Hadjipanayis, Adamos; Stukas, Rimantas; Valiulis, Arunas

    2018-02-01

    Quality of life (QoL) has been widely researched among children with asthma in Western countries, but there is a lack of data from eastern Europe, where the prevalence is relatively low, but hospital admission rates are higher. We evaluated the overall level and major determinants of QoL in Lithuanian children aged 5-11 years with asthma. This study was carried out in six asthma outpatient clinics in the two largest cities of Lithuania from January 2015 to July 2016. The children's QoL was measured using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) asthma module, which was completed by the child and one parent. We collected questionnaires from 226 children (68% boys) with a mean age of eight (±2) years: 65% had mild asthma, 31% had moderate asthma and 4% had severe asthma. One in 10 had been hospitalised in the preceding 6 months. The mean self-reported QoL score was 74 and the parent-reported QoL score was 73. QoL was associated with asthma severity and control, shortness of breath and the child's general health, but not socioeconomic factors. The overall level and major determinants of QoL in children with asthma in Lithuania were comparable with Western populations. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effects of improved home heating on asthma in community dwelling children: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden-Chapman, Philippa; Pierse, Nevil; Nicholls, Sarah; Gillespie-Bennett, Julie; Viggers, Helen; Cunningham, Malcolm; Phipps, Robyn; Boulic, Mikael; Fjällström, Pär; Free, Sarah; Chapman, Ralph; Lloyd, Bob; Wickens, Kristin; Shields, David; Baker, Michael; Cunningham, Chris; Woodward, Alistair; Bullen, Chris; Crane, Julian

    2008-09-23

    To assess whether non-polluting, more effective home heating (heat pump, wood pellet burner, flued gas) has a positive effect on the health of children with asthma. Randomised controlled trial. Households in five communities in New Zealand. 409 children aged 6-12 years with doctor diagnosed asthma. Installation of a non-polluting, more effective home heater before winter. The control group received a replacement heater at the end of the trial. The primary outcome was change in lung function (peak expiratory flow rate and forced expiratory volume in one second, FEV(1)). Secondary outcomes were child reported respiratory tract symptoms and daily use of preventer and reliever drugs. At the end of winter 2005 (baseline) and winter 2006 (follow-up) parents reported their child's general health, use of health services, overall respiratory health, and housing conditions. Nitrogen dioxide levels were measured monthly for four months and temperatures in the living room and child's bedroom were recorded hourly. Improvements in lung function were not significant (difference in mean FEV(1) 130.7 ml, 95% confidence interval -20.3 to 281.7). Compared with children in the control group, however, children in the intervention group had 1.80 fewer days off school (95% confidence interval 0.11 to 3.13), 0.40 fewer visits to a doctor for asthma (0.11 to 0.62), and 0.25 fewer visits to a pharmacist for asthma (0.09 to 0.32). Children in the intervention group also had fewer reports of poor health (adjusted odds ratio 0.48, 95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.74), less sleep disturbed by wheezing (0.55, 0.35 to 0.85), less dry cough at night (0.52, 0.32 to 0.83), and reduced scores for lower respiratory tract symptoms (0.77, 0.73 to 0.81) than children in the control group. The intervention was associated with a mean temperature rise in the living room of 1.10 degrees C (95% confidence interval 0.54 degrees C to 1.64 degrees C) and in the child's bedroom of 0.57 degrees C (0.05 degrees C

  12. Enhancing Asthma Self-Management in Rural School-Aged Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Sharon D; Brown, Adama; Brown, Sharon A; Rew, D Lynn

    2016-06-01

    To test the effects of 2 modes of delivering an asthma educational intervention on health outcomes and asthma self-management in school-aged children who live in rural areas. Longitudinal design with data collected 4 times over 12 months. The target sample was composed of children in grades 2-5 who had a provider diagnosis of asthma. Elementary schools were stratified into high or low socioeconomic status based on student enrollment in the free or reduced-cost lunch program. Schools were then randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment arms: in-school asthma class, asthma day camp, or the attention-control group. Sample retention was good (87.7%) and equally distributed by study arm. Improvements in emergency department visits and office visits were related to attending either the asthma class or asthma day camp. Asthma severity significantly decreased in both asthma treatment groups. Other factors such as hospitalizations, parent asthma management, and child asthma management improved for all groups. Both asthma class and asthma day camp yielded significant reductions in asthma severity. There were reductions in the emergency department and office visits for the 2 asthma arms, and hospitalizations declined significantly for all groups. Asthma self-management also improved in all groups, while it was somewhat higher in the asthma arms. This may be due to the attention being drawn to asthma management by study participation and the action of completing questionnaires about asthma management, asthma symptoms, and health outcomes. © 2015 National Rural Health Association.

  13. [Trends of asthma control, disease management and perception in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J T; Wang, W Q; Zhou, X; Yin, K S; Liu, C T; Wang, C Z; Huang, M; Chen, P; Yuan, Y D; Cai, S X; Wu, C G; Li, J; Lin, Q C; Zhou, J Y; Liu, H G; Gu, Y H; Huang, X G; Sun, D J; Yang, X H; Yang, L; Huo, J M; Chen, Z C; Zhou, W; Jiang, P; Tang, H P; Liu, R Y; Zhang, W; Chen, Y Q; Huang, Y J; Liu, X J; Dai, L M; Ye, X W; Hu, C P; Zhang, J; Xu, J Y

    2018-03-12

    Objective: To evaluate the changes of asthma control, disease management and perception in recent years in China. Methods: We conducted 2 multi-center, cross-sectional surveys. Outpatient asthmatic patients from 10 cities in mainland China (2007-2008) and 30 central cities from 30 provinces in China (except Tibet)(2015-2016) were recruited respectively. Data of asthma control, disease management and perception from the 2 surveys were compared for 10 cities which took part in both of the 2 surveys. Chi-square test was used for comparison between groups. Results: The asthma control level improved from 28.7%(839/2 928) in 2007-2008 to 39.2%(533/1 361) in 2015-2016( P control asthma when asthma symptoms deteriorated in 2015-2016, which was higher than the result of 2007-2008(31.8%, 803/2 524)( P control and disease perception in China improved significantly in recent years, while the rate of PFM usage showed no significant improvement. Asthma action plan including PFM monitoring and asthma self-management should be further promoted nationwide.

  14. Management of asthma: new approaches to establishing control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, Nancy; Murphy, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The high burden of asthma indicates suboptimal control of this chronic condition. This review describes approaches for establishing asthma control based on an understanding of potential issues in the achievement and maintenance of asthma control, recent changes in asthma management guidelines that facilitate attainment of treatment goals, and the importance of the healthcare provider-patient partnership to emphasize treatment based on asthma control. Review of the published literature, asthma management guidelines, and patient asthma education resources. Asthma control is best achieved by patient-oriented versus disease-oriented management strategies that incorporate a combination of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment modalities. Tools that assess and monitor asthma may facilitate the achievement and maintenance of asthma control. Key components of an optimal management strategy include solid partnerships between healthcare providers and patients, comprehensive patient and caregiver education, personalized written asthma action plans, patient-reported evaluation of symptom control, appropriate drug therapy, strategies for improving compliance with asthma medication regimens, and a treatment algorithm that outlines the facets of asthma management. Information presented in this article will guide nurse practitioners in helping patients with asthma achieve and maintain long-term disease control.

  15. Knowledge of asthma in school teachers in nine Spanish cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Angel López-Silvarrey; Esteban, Santiago Rueda; Díaz, Sonia Pértega; Murúa, Javier Korta; Fernández-Oliva, Carmen Rosa Rodríguez; Jiménez, Jose Sánchez; Sansano, María Isabel Ubeda; Bernabé, Juan José Morell; López, Bárbara Iglesias; Gómez, Máximo Martínez; Piñana, Juana María Román

    2016-07-01

    To analyze the knowledge of asthma and its management in Spanish school teachers using the Newcastle Asthma Questionnaire (NAKQ). Descriptive, observational prevalence study, using a self-report questionnaire on knowledge about childhood asthma and its management by teachers in pre-school, primary, and secondary schools in nine Spanish cities. Age, sex, academic training, teaching experience, courses in which they taught, and personal and family history of asthma, were collected from each teacher. For knowledge determination, the validated Spanish version of the NAKQ was used. A total of 208 centers participated, including 7,494 teachers. The questionnaire was completed by 4,679 teachers (62.4%). The mean score of correct responses was 16.0 ± 4.8 points out of 31 (median = 17, range: 0-30). Only 6.8% of teachers were capable of pointing out the three main symptoms of the disease; 1.5% knew the triggering factors of an asthma attack; 8.6% knew two medicines useful during an asthma attack; 32.7% knew that inhaled medications had less side effects than pills, and only 3.8% knew of ways to prevent asthma attacks during exercise. In the multivariate analysis, variables significantly associated with a higher questionnaire score were a "lower age" (Beta coefficient = -0.09), "male gender" (Beta = 0.77), "being asthmatic" (Beta = 2.10), or "having close relatives with asthma" (Beta = 1.36) and "teaching in a private school" (Beta = 0.66) or in "compulsory secondary education" (Beta = 0.59). Teachers have a low level of knowledge about asthma, with an important limitation in some aspects of the disease. They should be trained to recognize the main symptoms of the disease, on how to act in the event of symptoms, and the early identification of situations in which the pupils require health care assistance. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:678-687. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A Website to Improve Asthma Care by Suggesting Patient Questions for Physicians: Qualitative Analysis of User Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamanna, Christopher N; Blanch, Danielle C; Mui, Sarah; Lawless, Heather; Manocchia, Michael; Rosen, Rochelle K; Pietropaoli, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Background Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions in the United Sates, yet despite the existence of national guidelines, nearly three fourths of patients with asthma do not have adequate control and clinical adherence to guidelines is low. While there are many reasons for this, physician inertia with respect to treatment change is partly to blame. Research suggests that patients who ask for specific tests and treatments are more likely to receive them. Objectives This study investigated the impact and experience of using an interactive patient website designed to give patients individual feedback about their condition and to suggest tailored questions for patients to ask their physician. The website was designed to be used prior to a physician visit, to increase the likelihood that patients would receive recommended tests and treatments. Methods A total of 37 adult patients with asthma participated in semi-structured telephone interviews aimed at eliciting information about their experiences with the website. Transcripts were coded using qualitative data analysis techniques and software. Themes were developed from subsets of codes generated through the analysis. In addition, 26 physicians were surveyed regarding their impressions of the website. Results Opportunities exist for improving website feedback, although the majority of both patient and physician respondents held favorable opinions about the site. Two major themes emerged regarding patients’ experiences with the website. First, many patients who used the website had a positive shift in their attitudes regarding interactions with their physicians. Second, use of the website prompted patients to become more actively involved in their asthma care. No patient reported any negative experiences as a result of using the website. Physicians rated the website positively. Conclusions Patients perceived that the interactive website intervention improved communication and interaction with their

  17. Pediatric Price Transparency: Still Opaque With Opportunities for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faherty, Laura J; Wong, Charlene A; Feingold, Jordyn; Li, Joan; Town, Robert; Fieldston, Evan; Werner, Rachel M

    2017-10-01

    Price transparency is gaining importance as families' portion of health care costs rise. We describe (1) online price transparency data for pediatric care on children's hospital Web sites and state-based price transparency Web sites, and (2) the consumer experience of obtaining an out-of-pocket estimate from children's hospitals for a common procedure. From 2015 to 2016, we audited 45 children's hospital Web sites and 38 state-based price transparency Web sites, describing availability and characteristics of health care prices and personalized cost estimate tools. Using secret shopper methodology, we called children's hospitals and submitted online estimate requests posing as a self-paying family requesting an out-of-pocket estimate for a tonsillectomy-adenoidectomy. Eight children's hospital Web sites (18%) listed prices. Twelve (27%) provided personalized cost estimate tool (online form n = 5 and/or phone number n = 9). All 9 hospitals with a phone number for estimates provided the estimated patient liability for a tonsillectomy-adenoidectomy (mean $6008, range $2622-$9840). Of the remaining 36 hospitals without a dedicated price estimate phone number, 21 (58%) provided estimates (mean $7144, range $1200-$15 360). Two of 4 hospitals with online forms provided estimates. Fifteen (39%) state-based Web sites distinguished between prices for pediatric and adult care. One had a personalized cost estimate tool. Meaningful prices for pediatric care were not widely available online through children's hospital or state-based price transparency Web sites. A phone line or online form for price estimates were effective strategies for hospitals to provide out-of-pocket price information. Opportunities exist to improve pediatric price transparency. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. University and public health system partnership: A real-life intervention to improve asthma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Janaina; Moreno, Adriana; Ferriani, Virginia; Araujo, Ana Carla; Vianna, Elcio; Borges, Marcos; Roxo, Pérsio; Gonçalves, Marcos; Mello, Luane; Parreira, Rosa; Silva, Jorgete; Stefanelli, Patricia; Panazolo, Larissa; Cetlin, Andrea; Queiroz, Luana; Araujo, Rosângela; Dias, Marina; Aragon, Davi; Domingos, Nélio; Arruda, L Karla

    2017-05-01

    Asthma is under-diagnosed in many parts of the world. We aimed to assess the outcome of a capacitating program on asthma for non-specialist physicians and other healthcare professionals working in the public system in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. A group of 16 asthma specialists developed a one-year capacitating program in 11 healthcare clinics in the Northern District of the city, which included lectures on asthma, training on inhalation device use and spirometry, and development of an asthma management protocol. Researchers visited one health unit 2-4 times monthly, working with doctors on patients' care, discussing cases, and delivering lectures. Asthma education was also directed to the general population, focusing on recognition of signs and symptoms and long-term treatment, including production of educational videos available on YouTube. Outcome measures were the records of doctors' prescriptions of individual asthma medications pre- and post-intervention. Prior to the program, 3205 units of inhaled albuterol and 2876 units of inhaled beclomethasone were delivered by the Northern District pharmacy. After the one-year program, there was increase to 4850 units (51.3%) for inhaled albuterol and 3526 units (22.6%) for inhaled beclomethasone. The albuterol increase followed the recommendation given to the non-specialist doctors by the asthma experts, that every patient with asthma should have inhaled albuterol as a rescue medication, by protocol. No increase was observed in other districts where no capacitating program was conducted. A systematic capacitating program was successful in changing asthma prescription profiles among non-specialist doctors, with increased delivery of inhaled albuterol and beclomethasone.

  19. Vitamin D as an adjunctive therapy in asthma. Part 2: A review of human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerley, Conor P; Elnazir, Basil; Faul, John; Cormican, Liam

    2015-06-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is highly prevalent worldwide, with adverse effects on bone health but also potentially other unfavorable consequences. VDD and asthma-incidence/severity share many common risk factors, including winter season, industrialization, poor diet, obesity, dark skin pigmentation, and high latitude. Multiple anatomical areas relevant to asthma contain both the enzyme responsible for producing activated vitamin D and the vitamin D receptor suggesting that activated vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) may have important local effects at these sites. Emerging evidence suggests that VDD is associated with increased airway hyperresponsiveness, decreased pulmonary function, worse asthma control, and possibly decreased response to standard anti-asthma therapy. However the effect is inconsistent with preliminary evidence from different studies suggesting vitamin D is both beneficial and detrimental to asthma genesis and severity. Current evidence suggests that supplementation with moderate doses of vitamin D may be appropriate for maintenance of bone health in asthmatics, particularly steroid users. However emerging data from an increasing number of randomized, controlled, intervention studies of vitamin D supplementation in pediatric and adult asthma are becoming available and should help determine the importance, if any of vitamin D for asthma pathogenesis. The purpose of this second of a two-part review is to review the current human literature on vitamin D and asthma, discussing the possible consequences of VDD for asthma and the potential for vitamin D repletion as adjunct therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Psychologically Based Therapies to Improve Lung Functioning in Students with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maykel, Cheryl; Bray, Melissa; Gelbar, Nicholas; Caterino, Linda; Avitia, Maria; Sassu, Kari; Root, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a common, chronic respiratory disease that can be costly to both society and the individual. In addition to increased absenteeism, children with asthma may also be at a greater risk for developing comorbid anxiety and depression. Various complementary psychological treatments have been effective at reducing both asthmatic symptoms and…

  1. The use of focus groups in the development of the PROMIS pediatrics item bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Tasanee R; Irwin, Debra E; Meier, Andrea; Varni, James W; DeWalt, Darren A

    2008-06-01

    To understand differences in perceptions of patient-reported outcome domains between children with asthma and children from the general population. We used this information in the development of patient-reported outcome items for the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Pediatrics project. We conducted focus groups composed of ethnically, racially, and geographically diverse youth (8-12, 13-17 years) from the general population and youth with asthma. We performed content analysis to identify important themes. We identified five unique and different challenges that may confront youth with asthma as compared to general population youth: (1) They experience more difficulties when participating in physical activities; (2) They may experience anxiety about having an asthma attack at anytime and anywhere; (3) They may experience sleep disturbances and fatigue secondary to their asthma symptoms; (4) Their health condition has a greater effect on their emotional well-being and interpersonal relationships; and (5) Youth with asthma report that asthma often leaves them with insufficient energy to complete their school activities, especially physical activities. The results confirm unique experiences for children with asthma across a broad range of health domains and enhance the breadth of all domains when creating an item bank.

  2. Effect of cat and daycare exposures on the risk of asthma in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffin, Jonathan M; Spergel, Jonathan M; Boguniewicz, Mark; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Paller, Amy S; Fowler, Joseph F; Dinulos, James G; Tilles, Stephen A; Schneider, Lynda C; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) in young children is often followed by the development of asthma (atopic march). The role of environmental exposures is unclear in this high-risk population. We aimed to determine the predictive relationship between indoor allergen exposures, particularly pets, rodents, and cockroaches, to the development of asthma in a prospective pediatric cohort. Children with AD and a family history of allergy were followed prospectively with questionnaire ascertainment of environmental exposure to cats, dogs, cockroaches, rats, and mice. Asthma was diagnosed by study physicians based on caregiver reports of symptoms continually assessed over the course of the study period. Fifty-five of the 299 children developed asthma by the end of the study. Cat exposure had a strong and independent effect to reduce the risk of developing asthma across all analyses (odds ratio [OR], 0.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-0.53). Dog, mouse, rat, and cockroach exposures did not significantly influence the development of asthma. Daycare exposure had the largest risk reduction for the development of asthma (OR, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.03-0.19). Maternal asthma (OR, 2.93; 95% CI, 1.29-6.67), baseline body mass index (OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.08-1.42), and specific immunoglobulin E to house-dust mix at 3 years were each independent risk factors for the development of asthma. In children with AD, cat and daycare exposure may reduce the risk of developing early childhood asthma.

  3. Tiotropium improves lung function, exacerbation rate, and asthma control, independent of baseline characteristics including age, degree of airway obstruction, and allergic status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerstjens, Huib A M; Moroni-Zentgraf, Petra; Tashkin, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    performed in parallel in patients with severe symptomatic asthma. Exploratory subgroup analyses of peak forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), trough FEV1, time to first severe exacerbation, time to first episode of asthma worsening, and seven-question Asthma Control Questionnaire responder rate were......BACKGROUND: Many patients with asthma remain symptomatic despite treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) with or without long-acting β2-agonists (LABAs). Tiotropium add-on to ICS plus a LABA has been shown to improve lung function and reduce exacerbation risk in patients with symptomatic...... asthma. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the efficacy of tiotropium add-on therapy is dependent on patients' baseline characteristics. METHODS: Two randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, twin trials (NCT00772538 and NCT00776984) of once-daily tiotropium Respimat(®) 5 μg add-on to ICS plus a LABA were...

  4. The Effectiveness of Web-Based Asthma Self-Management System, My Asthma Portal (MAP): A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sara; Ernst, Pierre; Bartlett, Susan J; Valois, Marie-France; Zaihra, Tasneem; Paré, Guy; Grad, Roland; Eilayyan, Owis; Perreault, Robert; Tamblyn, Robyn

    2016-12-01

    Whether Web-based technologies can improve disease self-management is uncertain. My Asthma Portal (MAP) is a Web-based self-management support system that couples evidence-based behavioral change components (self-monitoring of symptoms, physical activity, and medication adherence) with real-time monitoring, feedback, and support from a nurse case manager. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of access to a Web-based asthma self-management patient portal linked to a case-management system (MAP) over 6 months compared with usual care on asthma control and quality of life. A multicenter, parallel, 2-arm, pilot, randomized controlled trial was conducted with 100 adults with confirmed diagnosis of asthma from 2 specialty clinics. Asthma control was measured using an algorithm based on overuse of fast-acting bronchodilators and emergency department visits, and asthma-related quality of life was assessed using the Mini-Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (MAQLQ). Secondary mediating outcomes included asthma symptoms, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, and beliefs about medication. Process evaluations were also included. A total of 49 individuals were randomized to MAP and 51 to usual care. Compared with usual care, participants in the intervention group reported significantly higher asthma quality of life (mean change 0.61, 95% CI 0.03 to 1.19), and the change in asthma quality of life for the intervention group between baseline and 3 months (mean change 0.66, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.98) was not seen in the control group. No significant differences in asthma quality of life were found between the intervention and control groups at 6 (mean change 0.46, 95% CI -0.12 to 1.05) and 9 months (mean change 0.39, 95% CI -0.2 to 0.98). For poor control status, there was no significant effect of group, time, or group by time. For all self-reported measures, the intervention group had a significantly higher proportion of individuals, demonstrating a minimal clinically

  5. Pathophysiological characterization of asthma transitions across adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Syed Hasan; Raza, Abid; Lau, Laurie; Bawakid, Khalid; Karmaus, Wilfried; Zhang, Hongmei; Ewart, Susan; Patil, Veersh; Roberts, Graham; Kurukulaaratchy, Ramesh

    2014-11-29

    Adolescence is a period of change, which coincides with disease remission in a significant proportion of subjects with childhood asthma. There is incomplete understanding of the changing characteristics underlying different adolescent asthma transitions. We undertook pathophysiological characterization of transitional adolescent asthma phenotypes in a longitudinal birth cohort. The Isle of Wight Birth Cohort (N = 1456) was reviewed at 1, 2, 4, 10 and 18-years. Characterization included questionnaires, skin tests, spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide, bronchial challenge and (in a subset of 100 at 18-years) induced sputum. Asthma groups were "never asthma" (no asthma since birth), "persistent asthma" (asthma at age 10 and 18), "remission asthma" (asthma at age 10 but not at 18) and "adolescent-onset asthma" (asthma at age 18 but not at age 10). Participants whose asthma remitted during adolescence had lower bronchial reactivity (odds ratio (OR) 0.30; CI 0.10 -0.90; p = 0.03) at age 10 plus greater improvement in lung function (forced expiratory flow 25-75% gain: 1.7 L; 1.0-2.9; p = 0.04) compared to persistent asthma by age 18. Male sex (0.3; 0.1-0.7; p adolescent-onset asthma showed eosinophilic airway inflammation (3.0%, 0.7-6.6), not seen in persistent asthma (1.0%, 0-3.9), while remission group had the lowest sputum eosinophil count (0.3%, 0-1.4) and lowest eosinophils/neutrophils ratio of 0.0 (Interquartile range: 0.1). Asthma remission during adolescence is associated with lower initial BHR and greater gain in small airways function, while adolescent-onset asthma is primarily eosinophilic.

  6. [Asthma and professional life (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, P; Diamant-Berger, O; Gervais, A

    1979-01-01

    In world industry and agriculture as a whole, the number of people with asthma and complex pneumopathies related to chemical and organic pollution seems important. Indeed, subjects with an atopic inclination are often the first to be jeoparized. However, it must be stressed that occurrence of asthma in relation with work should always lead to investigate an anomaly in professional hygiene. For other workers this latter eventuality constitutes in the long run a threat of precipitin pneumopathy, chronic bronchitis, pulmonary fibrosis, or even cancer (in the case of nickel). Selection upon hiring is an unsatisfactory measure. The improvement of the atmospheric conditions at work should always be sought for. In some professional asthma cases, we were able to confirm that medication provides efficient protection. This solution, however, seems only slightly satisfactory since the subject is still left in contact with substances which have harmful effects other than asthma. It is therefore important that doctors track down and explore the cases of professional asthma, declaring their existence to social security and work inspection organizations, in order to establish an epidemiological knowledge, regularly updated, which would provide an indispensable basis for any prevention through improvement of working conditions.

  7. Does teaching crisis resource management skills improve resuscitation performance in pediatric residents?*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Jaime; Duff, Jonathan P; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Djogovic, Dennis; Joynt, Chloe

    2014-05-01

    The effect of teaching crisis resource management skills on the resuscitation performance of pediatric residents is unknown. The primary objective of this pilot study was to determine if teaching crisis resource management to residents leads to improved clinical and crisis resource management performance in simulated pediatric resuscitation scenarios. A prospective, randomized control pilot study. Simulation facility at tertiary pediatric hospital. Junior pediatric residents. Junior pediatric residents were randomized to 1 hour of crisis resource management instruction or no additional training. Time to predetermined resuscitation tasks was noted in simulated resuscitation scenarios immediately after intervention and again 3 months post intervention. Crisis resource management skills were evaluated using the Ottawa Global Rating Scale. Fifteen junior residents participated in the study, of which seven in the intervention group. The intervention crisis resource management group placed monitor leads 24.6 seconds earlier (p = 0.02), placed an IV 47.1 seconds sooner (p = 0.04), called for help 50.4 seconds faster (p = 0.03), and checked for a pulse after noticing a rhythm change 84.9 seconds quicker (p = 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference in time to initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (p = 0.264). The intervention group had overall crisis resource management performance scores 1.15 points higher (Ottawa Global Rating Scale [out of 7]) (p = 0.02). Three months later, these differences between the groups persisted. A 1-hour crisis resource management teaching session improved time to critical initial steps of pediatric resuscitation and crisis resource management performance as measured by the Ottawa Global Rating Scale. The control group did not develop these crisis resource management skills over 3 months of standard training indicating that obtaining these skills requires specific education. Larger studies of crisis resource education are

  8. Asthma 1-2-3: a low literacy multimedia tool to educate African American adults about asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Rina M; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Waite, Katherine R; Rittner, Sarah S; Wilson, Elizabeth A H; Wolf, Michael S

    2009-08-01

    Asthma 1-2-3 is a newly-developed low-literacy multimedia education tool designed to promote asthma self-care concepts among African American adults. An expert panel (n = 10) informed content development for the tool. The video script and storyboard imagery were shown to 30 African Americans recruited from the American Lung Association, whose reactions and comments guided further revisions. The final version was pilot tested in three diverse community settings in Chicago to determine the efficacy of Asthma 1-2-3 at improving patient understanding of asthma and its symptoms. In all, 130 adults participated in the pilot test. Knowledge scores significantly improved from pretest to posttest following presentation of the developed tool for subjects across all literacy levels (Pretest: Mean = 4.2 [SD = 1.6]; Posttest: M = 6.8 [SD = 2.0], P < 0.001). Symptom pathophysiology concepts were the least understood. Individuals with low literacy had less total knowledge score gains compared to those with marginal and adequate literacy (1.8, 2.6, and 3.2 respectively; P = 0.002). The multimedia tool significantly improved understanding of asthma. Individuals with limited literacy may require additional instruction, repeated viewing, or added tangible cues (i.e. supplementary print materials) to support knowledge retention. In general, feedback from the target population was particularly helpful in the development of the tool and its initial evaluation, and should be considered as a necessary step in the creation of other patient education materials.

  9. Randomized trial of teaching brief motivational interviewing to pediatric trainees to promote healthy behaviors in families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Paula; McPhillips, Heather A; Hartzler, Bryan; Robertson, Andrea S; Runkle, Cecilia; Scholz, Kelley A; Stout, James W; Kieckhefer, Gail M

    2010-06-01

    That pediatric resident trainees would demonstrate increased counseling skill following training in brief motivational interviewing (MI). Randomized controlled trial. University of Washington Pediatric Residency. Pediatric residents (N = 18), including residents in postgraduate years 1, 2, 3, and 4. Collaborative Management in Pediatrics, a 9-hour behavior change curriculum based on brief MI plus written feedback on communication skills (based on a 3-month Objective Standardized Clinical Evaluation [OSCE]). The percentage of MI-consistent behavior (%MICO), a summary score for MI skill, was assessed via OSCEs in which standardized patients portray parents of children with asthma in 3 clinical scenarios (stations). The OSCEs were conducted at baseline and 3 and 7 months. Blinded coders rated videotaped OSCEs using a validated tool to tally communication behaviors. Training effects were assessed using linear regression controlling for baseline %MICO. Global ratings of counseling style served as secondary outcome measures. Trained residents demonstrated a trend toward increased skill (%MICO score) at 3 months compared with control residents. At 7 months, %MICO scores increased 16% to 20% (P < .02) across all OSCE stations after the combined intervention of Collaborative Management in Pediatrics training plus written feedback. The effect of training on global ratings supported the main findings. Pediatric trainees' skills in behavior change counseling improved following the combination of training in brief MI plus personalized feedback.

  10. Development of six PROMIS pediatrics proxy-report item banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin Debra E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediatric self-report should be considered the standard for measuring patient reported outcomes (PRO among children. However, circumstances exist when the child is too young, cognitively impaired, or too ill to complete a PRO instrument and a proxy-report is needed. This paper describes the development process including the proxy cognitive interviews and large-field-test survey methods and sample characteristics employed to produce item parameters for the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS pediatric proxy-report item banks. Methods The PROMIS pediatric self-report items were converted into proxy-report items before undergoing cognitive interviews. These items covered six domains (physical function, emotional distress, social peer relationships, fatigue, pain interference, and asthma impact. Caregivers (n = 25 of children ages of 5 and 17 years provided qualitative feedback on proxy-report items to assess any major issues with these items. From May 2008 to March 2009, the large-scale survey enrolled children ages 8-17 years to complete the self-report version and caregivers to complete the proxy-report version of the survey (n = 1548 dyads. Caregivers of children ages 5 to 7 years completed the proxy report survey (n = 432. In addition, caregivers completed other proxy instruments, PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales Parent Proxy-Report version, PedsQL™ Asthma Module Parent Proxy-Report version, and KIDSCREEN Parent-Proxy-52. Results Item content was well understood by proxies and did not require item revisions but some proxies clearly noted that determining an answer on behalf of their child was difficult for some items. Dyads and caregivers of children ages 5-17 years old were enrolled in the large-scale testing. The majority were female (85%, married (70%, Caucasian (64% and had at least a high school education (94%. Approximately 50% had children with a chronic health condition, primarily

  11. The public health implications of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Jean; Bousquet, Philippe J; Godard, Philippe; Daures, Jean-Pierre

    2005-07-01

    Asthma is a very common chronic disease that occurs in all age groups and is the focus of various clinical and public health interventions. Both morbidity and mortality from asthma are significant. The number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost due to asthma worldwide is similar to that for diabetes, liver cirrhosis and schizophrenia. Asthma management plans have, however, reduced mortality and severity in countries where they have been applied. Several barriers reduce the availability, affordability, dissemination and efficacy of optimal asthma management plans in both developed and developing countries. The workplace environment contributes significantly to the general burden of asthma. Patients with occupational asthma have higher rates of hospitalization and mortality than healthy workers. The surveillance of asthma as part of a global WHO programme is essential. The economic cost of asthma is considerable both in terms of direct medical costs (such as hospital admissions and the cost of pharmaceuticals) and indirect medical costs (such as time lost from work and premature death). Direct costs are significant in most countries. In order to reduce costs and improve quality of care, employers and health plans are exploring more precisely targeted ways of controlling rapidly rising health costs. Poor control of asthma symptoms is a major issue that can result in adverse clinical and economic outcomes. A model of asthma costs is needed to aid attempts to reduce them while permitting optimal management of the disease. This paper presents a discussion of the burden of asthma and its socioeconomic implications and proposes a model to predict the costs incurred by the disease.

  12. Efficacy and safety of omalizumab in children and adolescents with moderate-to-severe asthma: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corren, Jonathan; Kavati, Abhishek; Ortiz, Benjamin; Colby, Jennifer A; Ruiz, Kimberly; Maiese, Brett A; Cadarette, Sarah M; Panettieri, Reynold A

    2017-07-01

    There are limited pediatric data about the use of omalizumab, especially the effectiveness and safety of omalizumab in the real-world management of allergic asthma. The objective of this study was to summarize the safety and efficacy of omalizumab in both randomized clinical trials (RCT) used for U.S. Food and Drug Administration registration and real-world studies (RWS) based on clinical care of children with moderate-to-severe asthma. Studies that evaluated omalizumab use in patients omalizumab RCTs. Overall, the mean rate of annual exacerbations was significantly lower after 6 months to 2 years of treatment with omalizumab in both RCTs and RWS. In two RCTs and three RWS, inhaled corticosteroid use was significantly reduced in patients who used omalizumab. Similar reductions in the use of rescue medication were also observed in the RCTs and RWS on omalizumab. Real-world evidence demonstrated improvement in forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration (% predicted) in patients treated with omalizumab as well as significant improvement in the level of asthma control observed over 1 year. There also was evidence that omalizumab treatment reduced health care resource utilization, including fewer hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and unscheduled medical visits. Safety outcomes in all five RWS showed no new safety signals and demonstrated that omalizumab was well tolerated. Overall, RCT evidence strongly supported omalizumab efficacy and safety as add-on treatment in children 6 to 11 years old with moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma. RWS data confirmed these findings in an extended patient population of children and adolescents that is more generalizable to the actual day-to-day management of these patients.

  13. Vitamin D and asthma-life after VIDA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, John M

    2014-09-01

    The vitamin D hypothesis postulates that lower vitamin D levels are causally associated with increased asthma risk and asthma severity. Multiple epidemiological studies have shown an inverse relationship between circulating vitamin D levels (in the form of 25-hydroxy vitamin D) and asthma severity and control and lung function. However, in the recently published vitamin D and asthma (VIDA) study, vitamin D supplementation failed to show an improvement in asthma control in adults. This article reviews the current epidemiological and trial evidence for vitamin D and asthma and explores some of the possible alternative explanations for previous findings (including "reverse causation" and the importance of studying children and adults). We also address some of the unique challenges of conducting vitamin D trials and potential ways to address them. Finally, I will argue for further clinical trials of vitamin D in asthma, especially in children, using knowledge gained from the VIDA trial.

  14. [Warning symptoms of asthma attack and asthma self-management: a national asthma control survey from China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J T; Wang, W Q; Zhou, X; Wang, C Z; Huang, M; Cai, S X; Chen, P; Lin, Q C; Zhou, J Y; Gu, Y H; Yuan, Y D; Sun, D J; Yang, X H; Yang, L; Huo, J M; Chen, Z C; Jiang, P; Zhang, J; Ye, X W; Liu, H G; Tang, H P; Liu, R Y; Liu, C T; Zhang, W; Hu, C P; Chen, Y Q; Liu, X J; Dai, L M; Zhou, W; Huang, Y J; Xu, J Y

    2017-08-08

    Objective: To investigate warning symptoms of asthma attack and evaluate asthma self-management status of asthma patients in urban China. Methods: A multi-center, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was carried out from 30 general hospitals dispersed in 30 provinces of mainland China (except for Tibet) during Oct 2015 to May 2016. Information of frequency and warning symptoms of asthma attack, the time from warning symptoms to asthma attack, the impact of asthma attack and asthma self-management were collected from asthma patients of outpatient department. Results: Altogether 3 875 asthmatic outpatients were recruited. 78.1% (3 026/3 875) of the patients reported restriction of exercise and daily activities during asthma exacerbation. 82.5% (3 160/3 829) of the patients had warning symptoms before asthma attack, the most common warning symptoms were cough, chest tightness and shortness of breath. The median time from warning symptoms to asthma attack was 2 h, the mean time was 90 h. Only 4.4% (167/3 829) of the patients had definite confidence to control asthma when symptoms deteriorated. 76.7% (2 937/3 828) of the patients used medications to control asthma when asthma symptoms deteriorated. Medication choice: inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) + formoterol 45.8% (1 776/3 875), short-acting beta-agonist (SABA) 23.9% (927/3 875). Conclusions: Most asthma patients have warning symptoms before asthma attack, the most common symptoms are cough, chest tightness and shortness of breath. The proportion of patients conducting effective asthma self-management remains low.

  15. Current concepts of severe asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raundhal, Mahesh; Oriss, Timothy B.; Ray, Prabir; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2016-01-01

    The term asthma encompasses a disease spectrum with mild to very severe disease phenotypes whose traditional common characteristic is reversible airflow limitation. Unlike milder disease, severe asthma is poorly controlled by the current standard of care. Ongoing studies using advanced molecular and immunological tools along with improved clinical classification show that severe asthma does not identify a specific patient phenotype, but rather includes patients with constant medical needs, whose pathobiologic and clinical characteristics vary widely. Accordingly, in recent clinical trials, therapies guided by specific patient characteristics have had better outcomes than previous therapies directed to any subject with a diagnosis of severe asthma. However, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of the full scope of this disease that hinder the development of effective treatments for all severe asthmatics. In this Review, we discuss our current state of knowledge regarding severe asthma, highlighting different molecular and immunological pathways that can be targeted for future therapeutic development. PMID:27367183

  16. The Detroit Young Adult Asthma Project: Proposal for a Multicomponent Technology Intervention for African American Emerging Adults With Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonell, Karen; Naar, Sylvie; Gibson-Scipio, Wanda; Bruzzese, Jean-Marie; Wang, Bo; Brody, Aaron

    2018-05-07

    Racial and ethnic minority youth have poorer asthma status than white youth, even after controlling for socioeconomic variables. Proper use of asthma controller medications is critical in reducing asthma mortality and morbidity. The clinical consequences of poor asthma management include increased illness complications, excessive functional morbidity, and fatal asthma attacks. There are significant limitations in research on interventions to improve asthma management in racial minority populations, particularly minority adolescents and young adults, although illness management tends to deteriorate after adolescence during emerging adulthood, the unique developmental period beyond adolescence but before adulthood. The objective of the pilot study was to test the feasibility, acceptability, and signals of efficacy of an intervention targeting adherence to controller medication in African American youth (ages 18-29) with asthma. All elements of the protocol were piloted in a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-funded pilot study (1R34HL107664 MacDonell). Results suggested feasibility and acceptability of the protocol as well as proof of concept. We are now ready to test the intervention in a larger randomized clinical trial. The proposed study will include 192 African American emerging adults with moderate to severe persistent asthma and low controller medication adherence recruited from clinic, emergency department, and community settings. Half of the sample will be randomized to receive a multicomponent technology-based intervention targeting adherence to daily controller medication. The multicomponent technology-based intervention consists of 2 components: (1) 2 sessions of computer-delivered motivational interviewing targeting medication adherence and (2) individualized text messaging focused on medication adherence between the sessions. Text messages will be individualized based on ecological momentary assessment. The remaining participants will

  17. Partnering health disparities research with quality improvement science in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, K Casey; Raphael, Jean L

    2015-02-01

    Disparities in pediatric health care quality are well described in the literature, yet practical approaches to decreasing them remain elusive. Quality improvement (QI) approaches are appealing for addressing disparities because they offer a set of strategies by which to target modifiable aspects of care delivery and a method for tailoring or changing an intervention over time based on data monitoring. However, few examples in the literature exist of QI interventions successfully decreasing disparities, particularly in pediatrics, due to well-described challenges in developing, implementing, and studying QI with vulnerable populations or in underresourced settings. In addition, QI interventions aimed at improving quality overall may not improve disparities, and in some cases, may worsen them if there is greater uptake or effectiveness of the intervention among the population with better outcomes at baseline. In this article, the authors review some of the challenges faced by researchers and frontline clinicians seeking to use QI to address health disparities and propose an agenda for moving the field forward. Specifically, they propose that those designing and implementing disparities-focused QI interventions reconsider comparator groups, use more rigorous evaluation methods, carefully consider the evidence for particular interventions and the context in which they were developed, directly engage the social determinants of health, and leverage community resources to build collaborative networks and engage community members. Ultimately, new partnerships between communities, providers serving vulnerable populations, and QI researchers will be required for QI interventions to achieve their potential related to health care disparity reduction. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Pharmacists' interventions on clinical asthma outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cardenas, Victoria; Armour, Carol; Benrimoj, Shalom I; Martinez-Martinez, Fernando; Rotta, Inajara; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the impact of pharmacists' interventions on clinical asthma outcomes on adult patients and to identify the outcome indicators used.PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Scielo were searched. Studies addressing pharmacists' interventions on adult asthma patients reporting clinical asthma outcomes were incorporated.11 clinical outcomes were identified in 21 studies. 10 studies measured the impact of the intervention on asthma control. Randomised controlled trials (RCT) and non-RCTs found positive results in percentages of controlled patients and Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) scores. Discordant results were found for Asthma Control Test results. Asthma severity was assessed in four studies. One RCT found a significant decrease in the percentage of severe patients; two non-RCTs found significant improvements in severity scores. 11 studies reported pulmonary function indicators, showing inconsistent results. Eight studies measured asthma symptoms; three RCTs and four non-RCTs showed significant improvements.RCTs and non-RCTs generated similar results for most outcomes. Based on the evidence generated by RCTs, pharmacists' have a positive impact on the percentage of controlled patients, ACQ scores, severity and symptoms. Future research should report using the core outcome set of indicators established for asthma (PROSPERO CRD42014007019). Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  19. [Epidemiological survey of childhood asthma in Kunming City, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhi-Ye; Duan, Jing; Zhang, Quan; Cao, Zhi-Lan; Dai, Mei; Xiong, Jing-Jing; Mo, Ya-Xiong; Lu, Ping

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the prevalence of childhood asthma, and to find the distribution characteristics, precipitating factors, diagnosis and treatment status, and to provide scientific data for improving the prevention and management of asthma in children in Kunming City, China. Children were selected by random cluster sampling. A standardized preliminary questionnaire was used for screening out possible patients in the survey. Diagnosis of asthma was confirmed by diagnostic criteria in suspected asthmatic children. Asthmatic children were further asked for past diagnosis and treatment with the questionnaire of asthma in children. The total asthma incidence rate was 1.40%. The prevalence of asthma in male and female children was 1.89% and 0.88% respectively (Pasthma (1.69%) than that of school-age children (6-14 years old, 1.21%). In all asthmatic children, 51.3% were previously diagnosed with classical asthma or cough variant asthma, 26.0% were suffered attacks from December to February, and 54.0% were suffered attacks at midnight or dawn. Respiratory tract infection (87.3%) was the most common triggers of asthma exacerbation. Antibiotics were used in 80.0%, bronchodilators in 66.0%, inhaled corticosteroid in 64.0%. A peak flow meter for monitoring lung function was used in 17% of asthmatic children over 5 years old. The prevalence of asthma is associated with age and gender in children aged 0-14 years old in Kunming City. Acute asthma attack occurs mostly in winter and at midnight or dawn. Respiratory tract infection is the most common trigger of asthma exacerbation. Nearly a half of patients with asthma had not been diagnosed with asthma in the early stage. Most asthmatic children use antibiotics and only two-thirds use bronchodilators or inhaled corticosteroid in the treatment. The treatment and management of asthma in children awaits improvement as well.

  20. The effect of indoor air pollutants on otitis media and asthma in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daigler, G.E.; Markello, S.J.; Cummings, K.M. (State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (USA))

    1991-03-01

    This case-control study investigated the possible association between home environmental air pollutants and their effect on otitis media and asthma in children. Patients with physician-diagnosed otitis (n = 125, 74% response), with asthma (n = 137, 80% response), and controls (n = 237, 72% response) from a private pediatric practice seen between October 1986 and May 1987 were studied. A questionnaire inquired about housing characteristics (i.e., age, insulation, heating system) and sources of indoor air pollution such as cigarette smoking, use of woodburning stoves, household pets, etc. Analysis of the responses confirmed previous findings of significant relationships between maternal smoking (P = .021), and the presence of pets (P = .034) and the occurrence of asthma. A newly reported relationship between exposure to woodburning stoves and the occurrence of otitis (P less than .05) was reported. This implicates yet another risk factor (wood burning) in the etiology of otitis media.

  1. Asthma control during the year after bronchial thermoplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Gerard; Thomson, Neil C.; Rubin, Adalberto S.

    2007-01-01

    scheduled 2-week periods of abstinence from LABA at 3, 6, and 12 months. Airflow, airway responsiveness, asthma symptoms, the number of symptom-free days, use of rescue medication, and scores on the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) and the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) were also assessed....... RESULTS: The mean rate of mild exacerbations, as compared with baseline, was reduced in the bronchial-thermoplasty group but was unchanged in the control group (change in frequency per subject per week, -0.16+/-0.37 vs. 0.04+/-0.29; P=0.005). At 12 months, there were significantly greater improvements......-thermoplasty group than in the control group but were similar during the period from 6 weeks to 12 months after treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Bronchial thermoplasty in subjects with moderate or severe asthma results in an improvement in asthma control. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00214526 [ClinicalTrials.gov].)....

  2. Encouraging Physical Activity in Pediatric Asthma: A Case–Control Study of the Wonders of Walking (WOW) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walders-Abramson, Natalie; Wamboldt, Frederick S.; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Zhang, Lening

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objectives The complex overlap between asthma and obesity may be explained in part by activity avoidance in asthma. We compared responses to a walking intervention between matched groups of children with and without asthma. We expected youth with asthma to have lower baseline and post-intervention activity levels. Psychosocial, demographic, and physiologic correlates of activity were also examined. Design/Participants We compared baseline and post-intervention activity levels among 59 children aged 10–16 with well-controlled asthma and 59 healthy matched controls. Participants completed spirometry, physical examination, anthropometric measurement, and psychosocial questionnaires. Intervention/Outcome Measure Participants wore blinded calibrated pedometers for a baseline typical activity week, returning to complete the Wonders of Walking (WOW) intervention, followed by a week of post-intervention pedometer monitoring. Results Contrary to expectation, no differences between cases (median steps = 6,348/day) and controls (median steps = 6,825/day) in baseline activity were found. Response to the WOW intervention was comparable, with both groups demonstrating an increase of approximately 1,485 steps per day (equivalent to more than 5 additional miles walked during the post-intervention week). Health beliefs did not correlate to activity at baseline or intervention response. No significant associations between activity and asthma control, FEV1, or duration of diagnosis were found. Intervention response was comparable across racial/ethnic groups, children versus adolescents, and between normal weight and overweight youth. Conclusions Contrary to expectation, we found similar rates of objectively measured physical activity among youth with well-controlled asthma and controls. Importantly, we documented statistically significant increases in physical activity across both groups following a brief, pedometer-based intervention. The intervention was successful even

  3. Encouraging physical activity in pediatric asthma: a case-control study of the wonders of walking (WOW) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walders-Abramson, Natalie; Wamboldt, Frederick S; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Zhang, Lening

    2009-09-01

    The complex overlap between asthma and obesity may be explained in part by activity avoidance in asthma. We compared responses to a walking intervention between matched groups of children with and without asthma. We expected youth with asthma to have lower baseline and post-intervention activity levels. Psychosocial, demographic, and physiologic correlates of activity were also examined. We compared baseline and post-intervention activity levels among 59 children aged 10-16 with well-controlled asthma and 59 healthy matched controls. Participants completed spirometry, physical examination, anthropometric measurement, and psychosocial questionnaires. INTERVENTION/OUTCOME MEASURE: Participants wore blinded calibrated pedometers for a baseline typical activity week, returning to complete the Wonders of Walking (WOW) intervention, followed by a week of post-intervention pedometer monitoring. Contrary to expectation, no differences between cases (median steps = 6,348/day) and controls (median steps = 6,825/day) in baseline activity were found. Response to the WOW intervention was comparable, with both groups demonstrating an increase of approximately 1,485 steps per day (equivalent to more than 5 additional miles walked during the post-intervention week). Health beliefs did not correlate to activity at baseline or intervention response. No significant associations between activity and asthma control, FEV1, or duration of diagnosis were found. Intervention response was comparable across racial/ethnic groups, children versus adolescents, and between normal weight and overweight youth. Contrary to expectation, we found similar rates of objectively measured physical activity among youth with well-controlled asthma and controls. Importantly, we documented statistically significant increases in physical activity across both groups following a brief, pedometer-based intervention. The intervention was successful even among typically sedentary groups, and represents an effective

  4. [Does implementation of benchmarking in quality circles improve the quality of care of patients with asthma and reduce drug interaction?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann-Kolle, Petra; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Broge, Björn; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Schneider, Antonius

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this cluster-randomised controlled trial was to evaluate the efficacy of quality circles (QCs) working either with general data-based feedback or with an open benchmark within the field of asthma care and drug-drug interactions. Twelve QCs, involving 96 general practitioners from 85 practices, were randomised. Six QCs worked with traditional anonymous feedback and six with an open benchmark. Two QC meetings supported with feedback reports were held covering the topics "drug-drug interactions" and "asthma"; in both cases discussions were guided by a trained moderator. Outcome measures included health-related quality of life and patient satisfaction with treatment, asthma severity and number of potentially inappropriate drug combinations as well as the general practitioners' satisfaction in relation to the performance of the QC. A significant improvement in the treatment of asthma was observed in both trial arms. However, there was only a slight improvement regarding inappropriate drug combinations. There were no relevant differences between the group with open benchmark (B-QC) and traditional quality circles (T-QC). The physicians' satisfaction with the QC performance was significantly higher in the T-QCs. General practitioners seem to take a critical perspective about open benchmarking in quality circles. Caution should be used when implementing benchmarking in a quality circle as it did not improve healthcare when compared to the traditional procedure with anonymised comparisons. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. Therapy with omalizumab for patients with severe allergic asthma improves asthma control and reduces overall healthcare costs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costello, R W

    2011-05-11

    BACKGROUND: Patients with asthma who have persistent symptoms despite treatment with inhaled steroids and long-acting beta agonists are considered to have severe asthma. Omalizumab is a monoclonal antibody directed against IgE, which is used as an add-on treatment for patients who have severe persistent allergic asthma. AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical benefit and healthcare utilisation of patients who responded to omalizumab therapy and to establish an overall cost implication. METHODS: This was an observational retrospective cohort study designed to investigate the effect of omalizumab on exacerbations of asthma before and after 6 months of treatment in Irish patients. RESULTS: Centres who had treated patients with severe allergic asthma for the 6 months prior and post omalizumab treatment were audited with a standardised assessment tool. Sixty-three (32 male) patients were studied. In the 6 months prior to omalizumab 41 of 63 (66%) had been hospitalised, and this fell to 15 of 63 (24%), p < 0.0001 in the 6 months after treatment was started. Hospital admissions reduced from 2.4 ± 0.41 to 0.8 ± 0.37 and the mean number of bed days occupied was reduced from 16.6 ± 2.94 to 5.3 ± 2.57 days, p < 0.001. The number of oral corticosteroid doses used fell from 3.1 ± 0.27 to 1.2 ± 0.17, p < 0.001. The overall cost saving per omalizumab responder patients for 6 months was 834. CONCLUSIONS: Six months therapy with omalizumab reduced the number of bed days, the number of hospitalisations and the use of oral corticosteroids compared to the 6 months prior to commencement. Despite the cost of the additional therapy there were overall savings in health costs.

  6. Feasibility of Adapting Multisystemic Therapy to Improve Illness Management Behaviors and Reduce Asthma Morbidity in High Risk African American Youth: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naar-King, Sylvie; Ellis, Deborah; Kolmodin, Karen; Cunningham, Phillippe; Secord, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    African-American adolescents have the highest rates of asthma morbidity and mortality, yet there are few successful behavioral interventions to improve illness management for this group. Mental health providers have an opportunity to expand their services and impact by targeting adolescents with poor asthma management. We describe the adaptation…

  7. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers were…

  8. Update on epinephrine (adrenaline) for pediatric emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David M

    2009-06-01

    Epinephrine (adrenaline) is a medication widely used in the pediatric emergency department. This article reviews the most recent evidence and recommendations behind the many applications of epinephrine as they apply to the care of children in emergency departments. Recent publications address epinephrine's role in the treatment of anaphylaxis, croup, asthma, bronchiolitis and as an adjunct to local anesthesia. Additionally, authors discuss epinephrine autoinjectors and the various routes of epinephrine administration. Epinephrine is the recommended first-line treatment for anaphylaxis and moderate-to-severe croup. Its role in asthma and bronchiolitis is less clear. Traditional beta2-agonists are seen as first-line therapies for moderate bronchiolitis and asthma exacerbations. Epinephrine may have a role for subsets of patients with both of these illnesses. The preferred route for parenteral treatment is intramuscular. Epinephrine is well tolerated as an adjunct to local anesthesia when used in digital blocks in digits with normal perfusion. Although autoinjectors allow faster access to epinephrine for anaphylaxis, there are many issues surrounding their use and indications.

  9. 4th Pediatric Allergy and Asthma Meeting (PAAM)

    OpenAIRE

    Yavuz, S. Tolga; Koc, Ozan; Gungor, Ali; Gok, Faysal; Hawley, Jessica; O?Brien, Christopher; Thomas, Matthew; Brodlie, Malcolm; Michaelis, Louise; Mota, In?s; Gaspar, ?ngela; Piedade, Susana; Sampaio, Gra?a; Dias, Jos? Geraldo; Paiva, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents WORKSHOP 4: Challenging clinical scenarios (CS01?CS06) CS01 Bullous lesions in two children: solitary mastocytoma S. Tolga Yavuz, Ozan Koc, Ali Gungor, Faysal Gok CS02 Multi-System Allergy (MSA) of cystic fibrosis: our institutional experience Jessica Hawley, Christopher O?Brien, Matthew Thomas, Malcolm Brodlie, Louise Michaelis CS03 Cold urticaria in pediatric age: an invisible cause for severe reactions In?s Mota, ?ngela Gaspar, Susana Piedade, Gra?a Sampaio, Jos? Geraldo ...

  10. Vitamin D as an adjunctive therapy in asthma. Part 2: A review of human studies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kerley, Conor P

    2015-03-05

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is highly prevalent worldwide, with adverse effects on bone health but also potentially other unfavorable consequences. VDD and asthma-incidence\\/severity share many common risk factors, including winter season, industrialization, poor diet, obesity, dark skin pigmentation, and high latitude. Multiple anatomical areas relevant to asthma contain both the enzyme responsible for producing activated vitamin D and the vitamin D receptor suggesting that activated vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) may have important local effects at these sites. Emerging evidence suggests that VDD is associated with increased airway hyperresponsiveness, decreased pulmonary function, worse asthma control, and possibly decreased response to standard anti-asthma therapy. However the effect is inconsistent with preliminary evidence from different studies suggesting vitamin D is both beneficial and detrimental to asthma genesis and severity. Current evidence suggests that supplementation with moderate doses of vitamin D may be appropriate for maintenance of bone health in asthmatics, particularly steroid users. However emerging data from an increasing number of randomized, controlled, intervention studies of vitamin D supplementation in pediatric and adult asthma are becoming available and should help determine the importance, if any of vitamin D for asthma pathogenesis. The purpose of this second of a two-part review is to review the current human literature on vitamin D and asthma, discussing the possible consequences of VDD for asthma and the potential for vitamin D repletion as adjunct therapy.

  11. Managing problematic severe asthma: beyond the guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Katharine C; Levy, Mark L; Moreiras, John; Fleming, Louise

    2018-04-01

    This review discusses issues related to managing problematic severe asthma in children and young people. A small minority of children have genuinely severe asthma symptoms which are difficult to control. Children with genuinely severe asthma need investigations and treatments beyond those described within conventional guidelines. However, the majority of children with poor symptom control despite high-intensity treatment achieve improvement in their asthma control once attention has been paid to the basics of asthma management. Basic asthma management requires optimisation of inhaler technique and treatment adherence, avoidance of environmental triggers and self-management education. It is also important that clinicians recognise risk factors that predispose patients to asthma exacerbations and potentially life-threatening attacks. These correctable issues need to be tackled in partnership with children and young people and their families. This requires a coordinated approach between professionals across healthcare settings. Establishing appropriate infrastructure for coordinated asthma care benefits not only those with problematic severe asthma, but also the wider asthma population as similar correctable issues exist for children with asthma of all severities. Investigation and management of genuine severe asthma requires specialist multidisciplinary expertise and a systematic approach to characterising patients' asthma phenotypes and delivering individualised care. While inhaled corticosteroids continue to play a leading role in asthma therapy, new treatments on the horizon might further support phenotype-specific therapy. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Omalizumab in children with uncontrolled allergic asthma: Review of clinical trial and real-world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, Bradley E; Lanier, Bob; Milgrom, Henry; Deschildre, Antoine; Hedlin, Gunilla; Szefler, Stanley J; Kattan, Meyer; Kianifard, Farid; Ortiz, Benjamin; Haselkorn, Tmirah; Iqbal, Ahmar; Rosén, Karin; Trzaskoma, Benjamin; Busse, William W

    2017-05-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. Allergen sensitization and high frequencies of comorbid allergic diseases are characteristic of severe asthma in children. Omalizumab, an anti-IgE mAb, is the first targeted biologic therapeutic approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma (AA) that remains uncontrolled despite high-dose inhaled corticosteroids plus other controller medications. Since its initial licensing for use in adults and adolescents 12 years of age and older, the clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability of omalizumab have been demonstrated in several published clinical trials in children aged 6 to less than 12 years with moderate-to-severe AA. These studies supported the approval of the pediatric indication (use in children aged ≥6 years) by the European Medicines Agency in 2009 and the US Food and Drug Administration in 2016. After this most recent change in licensing, we review the outcomes from clinical trials in children with persistent AA receiving omalizumab therapy and observational studies from the past 7 years of clinical experience in Europe. Data sources were identified by using PubMed in 2016. Guidelines and management recommendations and materials from the recent US Food and Drug Administration's Pediatric Advisory Committee meeting are also reviewed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Asthma mortality in the Danish child population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Inger Merete; Jensen, V B; Bülow, S

    2003-01-01

    Child death due to asthma is a rare and potentially preventable event. We investigated possible risk factors for death due to asthma in children and adolescents, as a step towards preventing or minimizing asthma death in this age group, and improving asthma management and care. We reviewed all 108...... children and young adults should regularly receive medical care and assessment, even if they suffer only a few symptoms. This study underlines the need for ongoing education of the patient's family, the patient, and doctors on long-term management and management of acute attacks. Copies of clearly written...

  14. Perceptions and Practices in Parents of Saudi Children with Asthma: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Shaheen, Amani; AlFayyad, Isamme; Nofal, Abdullah; Al-Tannir, Mohamad; AlMadaney, May; Heena, Humariya

    2018-02-21

    To acquire more precise data on perceptions and practices adopted by Saudi parents of asthmatic children regarding asthma and its management. A cross-sectional study was conducted through 2015 on 292 parents of children (aged 3-15 years) with asthma visiting the outpatient clinics and the emergency departments (ED) of two tertiary care medical centers in Riyadh city, using a self-administered questionnaire. Out of 292 parents who participated in this study, 60.2% reported that their children had previously difficulty in sleeping at night due to an asthma attack. The majority (70.4%) of parents was worried about adverse effects of inhaled corticosteroids, and 58.8% of participants were worried about other inhaler adverse effects, whereas 29.0% believed that their child would develop a dependency on asthma medications. Around 82% reported visiting the pediatric emergency department for asthma treatment and 61.2% of participants reported going to the routine physician follow-up visits. Family income was significantly associated with parental concerns about the adverse effects of inhaled medications and corticosteroids as well as drug dependency (p = 0.044, p = 0.033, and p = 0.001, respectively). One hundred and seventy (57%) of the children used inhaled β-agonists while only 39 (13.3%) were using inhaled corticosteroids. Participated parents had misperceptions regarding the use of asthma medications and thus adopted ineffectual practices in its management. Therefore, to enhance asthma care and compliance in children, it is essential to develop different comprehensive parental education programs.

  15. Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Arrest in the Postanesthesia Care Unit, Rare but Preventable: Analysis of Data From Wake Up Safe, The Pediatric Anesthesia Quality Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Robert E; Haydar, Bishr; Voepel-Lewis, Terri D

    2017-04-01

    Nearly 20% of anesthesia-related pediatric cardiac arrests (CAs) occur during emergence or recovery. The aims of this case series were to use the Wake Up Safe database to describe the following: (1) the nature of pediatric postanesthesia care unit (PACU) CA and subsequent outcomes and (2) factors associated with harm after pediatric PACU CA. Pediatric CAs in the PACU were identified from the Wake Up Safe Pediatric Anesthesia Quality Improvement Initiative, a multicenter registry of adverse events in pediatric anesthesia. Demographics, underlying conditions, cause of CA, and outcomes were extracted. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize data and to assess risk of harm in those suffering CA. A total of 26 CA events were included: 67% in children anesthesia care providers until emergence from anesthesia may further reduce the preventable arrest rate. The root cause analyses conducted by individual institutions reporting these data to the Wake Up Safe provided only limited insight, so multicenter collaborative approaches may allow for greater insight into effective CA-prevention strategies.

  16. Novel targets of omalizumab in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Caroline; Garcia, Gilles; Humbert, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Omalizumab is a recombinant humanized anti-IgE monoclonal antibody approved in the US for moderate to severe persistent allergic asthma (severe persistent asthma in the European Union), uncontrolled despite treatment with inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting beta2 agonists. It reduces asthma exacerbations, symptoms, oral corticosteroid doses, and improves quality of life. Omalizumab may have an antiviral effect when used as a preventive therapy for fall exacerbations in children and teenagers. Two proof-of-concept studies have evaluated omalizumab in nonatopic asthma and showed that it is safe and possibly efficacious in some patients. Omalizumab has been successfully studied as add-on to specific immunotherapy in moderate allergic asthma. Its safety in pregnancy has been assessed in the EXPECT registry. Case series also report positive effects in cases of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and in nasal disorders frequently associated with asthma. Last, omalizumab may have corticosteroid-sparing effect in a subset of patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Churg-Strauss syndrome). Recent studies argue in favor of positive effects of omalizumab beyond its current indications in asthma. Well-designed studies are needed in order to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of omalizumab in these possible novel indications.

  17. Work-related asthma, financial barriers to asthma care, and adverse asthma outcomes: asthma call-back survey, 37 states and District of Columbia, 2006 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoeller, Gretchen E; Mazurek, Jacek M; Moorman, Jeanne E

    2011-12-01

    Proper asthma management and control depend on patients having affordable access to healthcare yet financial barriers to asthma care are common. To examine associations of work-related asthma (WRA) with financial barriers to asthma care and adverse asthma outcomes. Cross-sectional, random-digit-dial survey conducted in 37 states and District of Columbia. A total of 27,927 ever-employed adults aged ≥18 years with current asthma. Prevalence ratios (PR) for the associations of WRA with financial barriers to asthma care and of WRA with adverse asthma outcomes stratified by financial barriers. Persons with WRA were significantly more likely than those with non-WRA to have at least 1 financial barrier to asthma care [PR, 1.66; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.43-1.92]. Individuals with WRA were more likely to experience adverse asthma outcomes such as asthma attack (PR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.22-1.40), urgent treatment for worsening asthma (PR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.39-1.78), asthma-related emergency room visit (PR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.41-2.03), and very poorly controlled asthma (PR, 1.54; 95% CI: 1.36-1.75). After stratifying for financial barriers to asthma care, the associations did not change. Financial barriers to asthma care should be considered in asthma management, and individuals with WRA are more likely to experience financial barriers. However, individuals with WRA are more likely to experience adverse asthma outcomes than individuals with non-WRA, regardless of financial barriers. Additional studies are needed to identify medical, behavioral, occupational, or environmental factors associated with adverse asthma outcomes among individuals with WRA.

  18. 4th Pediatric Allergy and Asthma Meeting (PAAM)

    OpenAIRE

    Yavuz, S. Tolga; Koc, Ozan; Gungor, Ali; Gok, Faysal; Hawley, Jessica; O’Brien, Christopher; Thomas, Matthew; Brodlie, Malcolm; Michaelis, Louise; Mota, Inês; Gaspar, Ângela; Piedade, Susana; Sampaio, Graça; Dias, José Geraldo; Paiva, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents WORKSHOP 4: Challenging clinical scenarios (CS01–CS06) CS01 Bullous lesions in two children: solitary mastocytoma S. Tolga Yavuz, Ozan Koc, Ali Gungor, Faysal Gok CS02 Multi-System Allergy (MSA) of cystic fibrosis: our institutional experience Jessica Hawley, Christopher O’Brien, Matthew Thomas, Malcolm Brodlie, Louise Michaelis CS03 Cold urticaria in pediatric age: an invisible cause for severe reactions Inês Mota, Ângela Gaspar, Susana Piedade, Graça Sampaio, José Geraldo ...

  19. Developing and Implementing a Citywide Asthma Action Plan: A Community Collaborative Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudt, Amanda Marie; Alamgir, Hasanat; Long, Debra Lynn; Inscore, Stephen Curtis; Wood, Pamela Runge

    2015-12-01

    Asthma affects 1 in 10 children in the United States, with higher prevalence among children living in poverty. Organizations in San Antonio, Texas, partnered to design and implement a uniform, citywide asthma action plan to improve asthma management capacity in schools. The asthma action plan template was modified from that of the Global Initiative for Asthma. School personnel were trained in symptom recognition, actions to take, and use of equipment before the asthma action plan implementation. The annual Asthma Action Plan Summit was organized as a forum for school nurses, healthcare providers, and members of the community to exchange ideas and strategies on implementation, as well as to revise the plan. The asthma action plan was implemented in all 16 local school districts. Feedback received from school nurses suggests that the citywide asthma action plan resulted in improved asthma management and student health at schools. The evidence in this study suggests that community organizations can successfully collaborate to implement a citywide health initiative similar to the asthma action plan.

  20. Marked improvement of vulvovaginitis of unknown origin in a pediatric patient--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Check, J H; Cohen, R

    2014-01-01

    To present a novel therapy for pediatric vulvovaginitis. An eight-year-old girl with persistent severe vulvovaginitis of unknown origin also complained of unexplained weight gain and sudden academic difficulties. She was treated with dextroamphetamine sulfate. She not only showed very quick and excellent relief from her vulvovaginitis but she also lost weight and improved her mentality. Sympathomimetic amine therapy may benefit pediatric vulvovaginitis when an infectious cause cannot be ascertained.

  1. Noninvasive assessment of asthma severity using pulse oximeter plethysmograph estimate of pulsus paradoxus physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Cathy A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulsus paradoxus estimated by dynamic change in area under the oximeter plethysmograph waveform (PEP might provide a measure of acute asthma severity. Our primary objective was to determine how well PEP correlates with forced expiratory volume in 1-second (%FEV1 (criterion validity and change of %FEV1 (responsiveness during treatment in pediatric patients with acute asthma exacerbations. Methods We prospectively studied subjects 5 to 17 years of age with asthma exacerbations. PEP, %FEV1, airway resistance and accessory muscle use were recorded at baseline and at 2 and 4 hours after initiation of corticosteroid and bronchodilator treatments. Statistical associations were tested with Pearson or Spearman rank correlations, logistic regression using generalized estimating equations, or Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Results We studied 219 subjects (median age 9 years; male 62%; African-American 56%. Correlation of PEP with %FEV1 demonstrated criterion validity (r = - 0.44, 95% confidence interval [CI], - 0.56 to - 0.30 and responsiveness at 2 hours (r = - 0.31, 95% CI, - 0.50 to - 0.09 and 4 hours (r = - 0.38, 95% CI, - 0.62 to - 0.07. PEP also correlated with airway resistance at baseline (r = 0.28 for ages 5 to 10; r = 0.45 for ages 10 to 17, but not with change over time. PEP was associated with accessory muscle use (OR 1.16, 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.21, P Conclusions PEP demonstrates criterion validity and responsiveness in correlations with %FEV1. PEP correlates with airway resistance at baseline and is associated with accessory muscle use at baseline and at 2 and 4 hours after initiation of treatment. Incorporation of this technology into contemporary pulse oximeters may provide clinicians improved parameters with which to make clinical assessments of asthma severity and response to treatment, particularly in patients who cannot perform spirometry because of young age or severity of illness. It might also allow for earlier recognition

  2. Evaluating Emergency Department Asthma Management Practices in Florida Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Alexandra C H; Carretta, Henry J; Dudley, Julie K; Forrest, Jamie R; Folsom, Abbey N

    2016-01-01

    To assess gaps in emergency department (ED) asthma management at Florida hospitals. Survey instrument with open- and closed-ended questions. Topics included availability of specific asthma management modalities, compliance with national guidelines, employment of specialized asthma care personnel, and efforts toward performance improvement. Emergency departments at 10 large hospitals in the state of Florida. Clinical care providers and health administrators from participating hospitals. Compliance with national asthma care guideline standards, provision of specific recommended treatment modalities and resources, employment of specialized asthma care personnel, and engagement in performance improvement efforts. Our results suggest inconsistency among sampled Florida hospitals' adherence to national standards for treatment of asthma in EDs. Several hospitals were refining their emergency care protocols to incorporate guideline recommendations. Despite a lack of formal ED protocols in some hospitals, adherence to national guidelines for emergency care nonetheless remained robust for patient education and medication prescribing, but it was weaker for formal care planning and medical follow-up. Identified deficiencies in emergency asthma care present a number of opportunities for strategic mitigation of identified gaps. We conclude with suggestions to help Florida hospitals achieve success with ED asthma care reform. Team-based learning activities may offer an optimal strategy for sharing and implementing best practices.

  3. Validation of a questionnaire of knowledge about asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Martinez, Carlos; Sossa, Monica Patricia

    2004-01-01

    An educative intervention destined to increase the knowledge in asthma allows the children and/or its parents to acquire abilities that allow to prevent and/or to handle the asthmatic attacks, decreasing the morbidity produced by the disease, nevertheless we do not account with a validated instrument that allows us to quantify the level of asthma knowledge. The objective is to develop and to validate a questionnaire of knowledge about asthma to be filled out by the parents and/or people in charge of the care of the asthmatic pediatric patients. The 17 items that conform the questionnaire were obtained alter literature review, realization of focal groups the professional experience of the investigators and the realization of pilot studies. The face content and concurrent validity of the instrument was evaluated; we also determined the factor structure, test-retest reproducibility, and sensitivity to change of the questionnaire. We included 120 patients with average age of 4.5 %3.7 years the factor analysis demonstrated a probable structure of three factors that altogether explain 85% of the total variance of the results the face and content validity was based on the concept of a multi-disciplinary group of experts in the field the concurrent validity was demonstrated by the ability of the questionnaire to distinguish low from high knowledge parents. Test-retest reproducibility and sensitivity to change were demonstrated comparing scores of the questionnaire filled out in two different occasions. The questionnaire of knowledge of asthma developed in the study is a useful and reliable tool to quantify the basal level of asthma knowledge in parents of asthmatic children and to determine the effectiveness of an educative intervention destined to increase the knowledge and understanding of the disease

  4. Pediatric Trauma Transfer Imaging Inefficiencies-Opportunities for Improvement with Cloud Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Yana; To, Alvin

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the inefficiencies of radiologic imaging transfers from one hospital to the other during pediatric trauma transfers in an era of cloud based information sharing. Retrospective review of all patients transferred to a pediatric trauma center from 2008-2014 was performed. Imaging was reviewed for whether imaging accompanied the patient, whether imaging was able to be uploaded onto computer for records, whether imaging had to be repeated, and whether imaging obtained at outside hospitals (OSH) was done per universal pediatric trauma guidelines. Of the 1761 patients retrospectively reviewed, 559 met our inclusion criteria. Imaging was sent with the patient 87.7% of the time. Imaging was unable to be uploaded 31.9% of the time. CT imaging had to be repeated 1.8% of the time. CT scan was not done per universal pediatric trauma guidelines 1.2% of the time. Our study demonstrated that current imaging transfer is inefficient, leads to excess ionizing radiation, and increased healthcare costs. Universal implementation of cloud based radiology has the potential to eliminate excess ionizing radiation to children, improve patient care, and save cost to healthcare system.

  5. Pediatric Trauma Transfer Imaging Inefficiencies—Opportunities for Improvement with Cloud Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Puckett

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study examines the inefficiencies of radiologic imaging transfers from one hospital to the other during pediatric trauma transfers in an era of cloud based information sharing. METHODS: Retrospective review of all patients transferred to a pediatric trauma center from 2008–2014 was performed. Imaging was reviewed for whether imaging accompanied the patient, whether imaging was able to be uploaded onto computer for records, whether imaging had to be repeated, and whether imaging obtained at outside hospitals (OSH was done per universal pediatric trauma guidelines. RESULTS: Of the 1761 patients retrospectively reviewed, 559 met our inclusion criteria. Imaging was sent with the patient 87.7% of the time. Imaging was unable to be uploaded 31.9% of the time. CT imaging had to be repeated 1.8% of the time. CT scan was not done per universal pediatric trauma guidelines 1.2% of the time. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated that current imaging transfer is inefficient, leads to excess ionizing radiation, and increased healthcare costs. Universal implementation of cloud based radiology has the potential to eliminate excess ionizing radiation to children, improve patient care, and save cost to healthcare system.

  6. Identifying Local Hotspots of Pediatric Chronic Diseases Using Emergency Department Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David C.; Yi, Stella S.; Fong, Hiu-Fai; Athens, Jessica K.; Ravenell, Joseph E.; Sevick, Mary Ann; Wall, Stephen P.; Elbel, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To use novel geographic methods and large-scale claims data to identify the local distribution of pediatric chronic diseases in New York City. Methods Using a 2009 all-payer emergency claims database, we identified the proportion of unique children aged 0 to 17 with diagnosis codes for specific medical and psychiatric conditions. As a proof of concept, we compared these prevalence estimates to traditional health surveys and registry data using the most geographically granular data available. In addition, we used home addresses to map local variation in pediatric disease burden. Results We identified 549,547 New York City children who visited an emergency department at least once in 2009. Though our sample included more publicly insured and uninsured children, we found moderate to strong correlations of prevalence estimates when compared to health surveys and registry data at pre-specified geographic levels. Strongest correlations were found for asthma and mental health conditions by county among younger children (0.88, p=0.05 and 0.99, pdisease prevalence with higher geographic resolution. More studies are needed to investigate limitations of these methods and assess reliability of local disease estimates. What’s New This study demonstrated how emergency department surveillance may improve estimates of pediatric disease prevalence with higher geographic resolution. We identified 29% of New York City children with a single year of data and identified local hotspots of pediatric chronic diseases. PMID:28385326

  7. Using Simulation to Model Improvements in Pediatric Bed Placement in an Acute Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambton, Judith; Roeder, Theresa; Saltzman, Robert; Param, Lila; Fernandes, Roxanne

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this project was to use an interdisciplinary approach to analyze strategies through simulation technology for improving patient flow in a pediatric hospital. Various statistics have been offered on the number of children admitted annually to hospitals. For administrators, particularly in smaller systems, the financial burden of equipping and staffing pediatric units often outweighs the moral desire to maintain a pediatric unit as a viable option for patients and pediatricians. Discrete event simulation was used to model current operations of a pediatric unit. Cost analysis was conducted using simulation reflecting various percentages of patients being referred to a discharge holding area (DHA) upon discharge and of the use of all private rooms. Both DHA and private rooms resulted in increased patient volumes. Administrators should consider the use of a DHA and/or private rooms to ease the census strains of pediatric units and the resultant revenue of this service.

  8. Determinants of low risk of asthma exacerbation during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Z; Nilas, L; Ulrik, C S

    2018-01-01

    of Asthma during Pregnancy (MAP) programme at Hvidovre Hospital since 2007. Assessment of asthma control, adjustment of treatment, spirometry and measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) were performed, and baseline characteristics and exacerbation history were collected at enrolment. Determinants of low......: Clinically stable asthma at enrolment, together with no history of previous exacerbations and no prescribed controller medication, is a determinant of low risk of an asthma exacerbation during pregnancy, which may guide clinicians in individualizing surveillance of asthma during pregnancy.......BACKGROUND: Assessment of asthma control every 4-6 weeks during pregnancy is recommended to reduce risk of exacerbation, and by that improve outcome. OBJECTIVE: To identify determinants of pregnancies with low risk of asthma exacerbation. METHODS: All pregnant women enrolled into the Management...

  9. Pediatric Hypovitaminosis D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiu Ariganjoye MD, MBA, FAAP, FAIHQ, CPE, CHCQM

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D, a secosteroid, is essential for the development and maintenance of healthy bone in both the adult and pediatric populations. Low level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-(OH-D is highly prevalent in children worldwide and has been linked to various adverse health outcomes including rickets, osteomalacia, osteomalacic myopathy, sarcopenia, and weakness, growth retardation, hypocalcemia, seizure and tetany, autism, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, cancers (prostate, colon, breast, infectious diseases (viral, tuberculosis, and autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Risk factors for hypovitaminosis D are people with darker skin pigmentation, use of sunscreen, insufficient ultraviolet B exposure, prematurity, living in northern latitudes, malnutrition, obesity, exclusive breastfeeding, low maternal vitamin D level, certain medications, drinking unfortified cow’s milk, liver failure, chronic renal insufficiency, cystic fibrosis, asthma, and sickle cell hemoglobinopathy. This review highlights and summarizes the molecular perspectives of vitamin D deficiency and its potential adverse health outcomes in pediatric age groups. The recommended treatment regimen is beyond the scope of this review.

  10. Asthma-Related School Absenteeism, Morbidity, and Modifiable Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Joy; Qin, Xiaoting; Beavers, Suzanne F; Mirabelli, Maria C

    2016-07-01

    Asthma is a leading cause of chronic disease-related school absenteeism. Few data exist on how information on absenteeism might be used to identify children for interventions to improve asthma control. This study investigated how asthma-related absenteeism was associated with asthma control, exacerbations, and associated modifiable risk factors using a sample of children from 35 states and the District of Columbia. The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Child Asthma Call-back Survey is a random-digit dial survey designed to assess the health and experiences of children aged 0-17 years with asthma. During 2014-2015, multivariate analyses were conducted using 2006-2010 data to compare children with and without asthma-related absenteeism with respect to clinical, environmental, and financial measures. These analyses controlled for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Compared with children without asthma-related absenteeism, children who missed any school because of asthma were more likely to have not well controlled or very poorly controlled asthma (prevalence ratio=1.50; 95% CI=1.34, 1.69) and visit an emergency department or urgent care center for asthma (prevalence ratio=3.27; 95% CI=2.44, 4.38). Mold in the home and cost as a barrier to asthma-related health care were also significantly associated with asthma-related absenteeism. Missing any school because of asthma is associated with suboptimal asthma control, urgent or emergent asthma-related healthcare utilization, mold in the home, and financial barriers to asthma-related health care. Further understanding of asthma-related absenteeism could establish how to most effectively use absenteeism information as a health status indicator. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Asthma Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Asthma KidsHealth / For Parents / Asthma What's in this article? ... I Know? Print en español Asma What Is Asthma? Asthma is a condition that causes breathing problems. ...

  12. The clinical significance of lung hypoexpansion in acute childhood asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spottswood, Stephanie E.; Allison, Kelley Z.; Narla, Lakshmana D.; Lowry, Patricia A.; Lopatina, Olga A.; Sethi, Narinder N.; Nettleman, Mary D.

    2004-01-01

    Many children experiencing acute asthmatic episodes have chest radiographs, which may show lung hyperinflation, hypoinflation, or normal inflation. Lung hypoinflation may be a sign of respiratory fatigue and poor prognosis. To compare the clinical course in children with asthma according to the degree of lung inflation on chest radiographs. We conducted a retrospective study during a 24-month period (from July 1999 to July 2001) of children aged 0-17 years, who presented to a pediatric emergency department or outpatient clinic with an asthma exacerbation. Chest radiographs obtained at presentation were reviewed independently by three pediatric radiologists who were blinded to the admission status of the patient. The correlation between hypoinflation and hospital admission was assessed in three age groups: 0-2 years, 3-5 years, and 6-17 years. Hypoinflation on chest radiographs was significantly correlated with hospital admission for children aged 6-17 years (odds ratio 16.00, 95% confidence interval 1.89-135.43). The inter-reader agreement for interpretation of these radiographs was strong, with a kappa score of 0.76. Hypoinflation was not correlated with admission in younger children. Lung hypoinflation is associated with a greater likelihood of hospital admission in children aged 6 years or older. Therefore, hypoinflation was a poor prognostic sign and may warrant more aggressive therapy. (orig.)

  13. The clinical significance of lung hypoexpansion in acute childhood asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spottswood, Stephanie E. [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Box 980615, 23298-0615, Richmond, VA (United States); Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of the King' s Daughters, 601 Children' s Lane, Norfolk, VA 23507 (United States); Allison, Kelley Z.; Narla, Lakshmana D.; Lowry, Patricia A. [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Box 980615, 23298-0615, Richmond, VA (United States); Lopatina, Olga A.; Sethi, Narinder N. [School of Medicine, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, VA (United States); Nettleman, Mary D. [Department of Internal Medicine, B-427 Clinical Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Many children experiencing acute asthmatic episodes have chest radiographs, which may show lung hyperinflation, hypoinflation, or normal inflation. Lung hypoinflation may be a sign of respiratory fatigue and poor prognosis. To compare the clinical course in children with asthma according to the degree of lung inflation on chest radiographs. We conducted a retrospective study during a 24-month period (from July 1999 to July 2001) of children aged 0-17 years, who presented to a pediatric emergency department or outpatient clinic with an asthma exacerbation. Chest radiographs obtained at presentation were reviewed independently by three pediatric radiologists who were blinded to the admission status of the patient. The correlation between hypoinflation and hospital admission was assessed in three age groups: 0-2 years, 3-5 years, and 6-17 years. Hypoinflation on chest radiographs was significantly correlated with hospital admission for children aged 6-17 years (odds ratio 16.00, 95% confidence interval 1.89-135.43). The inter-reader agreement for interpretation of these radiographs was strong, with a kappa score of 0.76. Hypoinflation was not correlated with admission in younger children. Lung hypoinflation is associated with a greater likelihood of hospital admission in children aged 6 years or older. Therefore, hypoinflation was a poor prognostic sign and may warrant more aggressive therapy. (orig.)

  14. Effects of regular exercise on asthma control in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Sirpa A M; Mäkikyrö, Elina M S; Hugg, Timo T; Jaakkola, Maritta S; Jaakkola, Jouni J K

    2017-08-28

    According to our systematic literature review, no previous study has assessed potential effects of regular exercise on asthma control among young adults. We hypothesized that regular exercise improves asthma control among young adults. We studied 162 subjects with current asthma recruited from a population-based cohort study of 1,623 young adults 20-27 years of age.