WorldWideScience

Sample records for improved response time

  1. Reclaiming Spare Capacity and Improving Aperiodic Response Times in Real-Time Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Scheduling recurring task sets that allow some instances of the tasks to be skipped produces holes in the schedule which are nonuniformly distributed. Similarly, when the recurring tasks are not strictly periodic but are sporadic, there is extra processor bandwidth arising because of irregular job arrivals. The additional computation capacity that results from skips or sporadic tasks can be reclaimed to service aperiodic task requests efficiently and quickly. We present techniques for improving the response times of aperiodic tasks by identifying nonuniformly distributed spare capacity—because of skips or sporadic tasks—in the schedule and adding such extra capacity to the capacity queue of a BASH server. These gaps can account for a significant portion of aperiodic capacity, and their reclamation results in considerable improvement to aperiodic response times. We present two schemes: NCLB-CBS, which performs well in periodic real-time environments with firm tasks, and NCLB-CUS, which can be deployed when the basic task set to schedule is sporadic. Evaluation via simulations and implementation suggests that performance improvements for aperiodic tasks can be obtained with limited additional overhead.

  2. Improving Item Response Theory Model Calibration by Considering Response Times in Psychological Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Research findings indicate that response times in personality scales are related to the trait level according to the so-called speed-distance hypothesis. Against this background, Ferrando and Lorenzo-Seva proposed a latent trait model for the responses and response times in a test. The model consists of two components, a standard item response…

  3. Improved Detection of Time Windows of Brain Responses in Fmri Using Modified Temporal Clustering Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Temporal clustering analysis (TCA) has been proposed recently as a method to detect time windows of brain responses in functional MRI (fMRI) studies when the timing and location of the activation are completely unknown. Modifications to the TCA technique are introduced in this report to further improve the sensitivity in detecting brain activation.

  4. Improved Time Response of Stabilization in Synchronization of Chaotic Oscillators Using Mathematica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shahzad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chaotic dynamics are an interesting topic in nonlinear science that has been intensively studied during the last three decades due to its wide availability. Motivated by much researches on synchronization, the authors of this study have improved the time response of stabilization when parametrically excited Φ6—Van der Pol Oscillator (VDPO and Φ6—Duffing Oscillator (DO are synchronized identically as well as non-identically (with each other using the Linear Active Control (LAC technique using Mathematica. Furthermore, the authors have synchronized the same pairs of the oscillators using a more robust synchronization with faster time response of stability called Robust Adaptive Sliding Mode Control (RASMC. A comparative study has been done between the previous results of Njah’s work and our results based on Mathematica via LAC. The time response of stabilization of synchronization using RASMC has been discussed.

  5. Improving linear accelerator service response with a real- time electronic event reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoisak, Jeremy D P; Pawlicki, Todd; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Fletcher, Richard; Moore, Kevin L

    2014-09-08

    To track linear accelerator performance issues, an online event recording system was developed in-house for use by therapists and physicists to log the details of technical problems arising on our institution's four linear accelerators. In use since October 2010, the system was designed so that all clinical physicists would receive email notification when an event was logged. Starting in October 2012, we initiated a pilot project in collaboration with our linear accelerator vendor to explore a new model of service and support, in which event notifications were also sent electronically directly to dedicated engineers at the vendor's technical help desk, who then initiated a response to technical issues. Previously, technical issues were reported by telephone to the vendor's call center, which then disseminated information and coordinated a response with the Technical Support help desk and local service engineers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the improvements to clinical operations resulting from this new service model. The new and old service models were quantitatively compared by reviewing event logs and the oncology information system database in the nine months prior to and after initiation of the project. Here, we focus on events that resulted in an inoperative linear accelerator ("down" machine). Machine downtime, vendor response time, treatment cancellations, and event resolution were evaluated and compared over two equivalent time periods. In 389 clinical days, there were 119 machine-down events: 59 events before and 60 after introduction of the new model. In the new model, median time to service response decreased from 45 to 8 min, service engineer dispatch time decreased 44%, downtime per event decreased from 45 to 20 min, and treatment cancellations decreased 68%. The decreased vendor response time and reduced number of on-site visits by a service engineer resulted in decreased downtime and decreased patient treatment cancellations.

  6. A hybrid model for improving response time in distributed data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Shonali; Loke, Seng W; Zaslasvky, Arkady

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents a hybrid distributed data mining (DDM) model for optimization of response time. The model combines a mobile agent approach with client server strategies to reduce the overall response time. The hybrid model proposes and develops accurate a priori estimates of the computation and communication components of response time as the costing strategy to support optimization. Experimental evaluation of the hybrid model is presented.

  7. Improving the time response of a gamma/neutron liquid detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Robert M.; Buckles, Robert A.; DeYoung, Anemarie; Garza, Irene; Frayer, Daniel K.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Morgan, George L.; Obst, Andrew W.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Tinsley, Jim; Waltman, Tom B.; Yuan, Vincent W.

    2016-09-01

    A pulsed neutron source is used to interrogate a target, producing secondary gammas and neutrons. In order to make good use of the relatively small number of gamma rays that emerge from the system after the neutron flash, our detector system must be both efficient in converting gamma rays to a detectable electronic signal and reasonably large in volume. Isotropic gamma rays are emitted from the target. These signals are converted to light within a large chamber of a liquid scintillator. To provide adequate time-of-flight separation between the gamma and neutron signals, the liquid scintillator is placed meters away from the target under interrogation. An acrylic PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) light guide directs the emission light from the chamber into a 5-inch-diameter photomultiplier tube. However, this PMMA light guide produces a time delay for much of the light. Illumination design programs count rays traced from the source to a receiver. By including the index of refraction of the different materials that the rays pass through, the optical power at the receiver is calculated. An illumination design program can be used to optimize the optical material geometries to maximize the ray count and/or the receiver power. A macro was written to collect the optical path lengths of the rays and import them into a spreadsheet, where histograms of the time histories of the rays are plotted. This method allows optimization on the time response of different optical detector systems. One liquid scintillator chamber has been filled with a grid of reflective plates to improve its time response. Cylindrical detector geometries are more efficient.

  8. Improving the Response Time of Online Buyers in Nigeria: The Way Forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Ajayi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Though electronic commerce (e-commerce is yet at its infancy in Africa and other developing countries, several factors such as lack of trust, technology infrastructure, funds and shortage of manpower can be attributed to this. However, the current model of web server response time as it pertains to developing countries will however hinder its general acceptability. The ability of E-commerce sites to satisfy and retain their customers will no doubt depend largely on the quality of their service delivery. Existing Quality of Service (QoS provisioning architectures for E-commerce placed emphasis on WWW server and bandwidth inadequacies. This study identified the necessity to include client’s device limitation into e-commerce QoS frameworks especially for web applications to be deployed in Africa, if user-perceived QoS (usually measured by response time is to be improved. As indicated in the study, client’s device limitation is an important factor that should be given priority. Most computer users in Africa due to the high cost of ownership of PCs used outdated or cloned PCs whose performance could not be guaranteed

  9. Improved nutrient removal using in situ continuous on-line sensors with short response time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingildsen, P; Wendelboe, H

    2003-01-01

    Nutrient sensors that can be located directly in the activated sludge processes are gaining in number at wastewater treatment plants. The in situ location of the sensors means that they can be located close to the processes that they aim to control and hence are perfectly suited for automatic process control. Compared to the location of automatic analysers in the effluent from the sedimentation reactors the in situ location means a large reduction in the response time. The settlers typically work as a first-order delay on the signal with a retention time in the range of 4-12 hours depending on the size of the settlers. Automatic process control of the nitrogen and phosphorus removal processes means that considerable improvements in the performance of aeration, internal recirculation, carbon dosage and phosphate precipitation dosage can be reached by using a simple control structure as well as simple PID controllers. The performance improvements can be seen in decreased energy and chemicals consumption and less variation in effluent concentrations of ammonium, total nitrogen and phosphate. Simple control schemes are demonstrated for the pre-denitrification and the post precipitation system by means of full-scale plant experiments and model simulations.

  10. Fabrication of a porous fiber cladding material using microsphere templating for improved response time with fiber optic sensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Paul E; Rigo, M Veronica; Geissinger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A highly porous optical-fiber cladding was developed for evanescent-wave fiber sensors, which contains sensor molecules, maintains guiding conditions in the optical fiber, and is suitable for sensing in aqueous environments. To make the cladding material (a poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) polymer) highly porous, a microsphere templating strategy was employed. The resulting pore network increases transport of the target analyte to the sensor molecules located in the cladding, which improves the sensor response time. This was demonstrated using fluorescein-based pH sensor molecules, which were covalently attached to the cladding material. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the structure of the templated polymer and the large network of interconnected pores. Fluorescence measurements showed a tenfold improvement in the response time for the templated polymer and a reliable pH response over a pH range of five to nine with an estimated accuracy of 0.08 pH units.

  11. Polymer Inclusion Membranes with Condensed Phase Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometry (CP-MIMS): Improved Analytical Response Time and Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergrift, Gregory W; Krogh, Erik T; Gill, Chris G

    2017-05-16

    Condensed phase membrane introduction mass spectrometry (CP-MIMS) is an online, in situ analysis technique for low volatility analytes. Analytes diffuse through a hollow fiber membrane, where they are then dissolved by a liquid (condensed) acceptor phase flowing through the membrane lumen. Permeating analytes are entrained to an atmospheric pressure ionization source for subsequent measurement by a mass spectrometer. Larger analytes, with inherently lower diffusivities, suffer from lengthy response times and lower sensitivity, limiting the use of CP-MIMS for their online, real-time measurement. We present the use of a heptane cosolvent in a methanol acceptor phase in combination with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane. The heptane generates an in situ polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) with the PDMS. We report improved measurement response times and greater sensitivity across a suite of analytes studied (gemfibrozil, nonylphenol, triclosan, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and naphthenic acids), with detection limits in the low parts per trillion (ppt) range. These improvements are attributed to increasing analyte diffusivities, as well as increased analyte partitioning across the PIM. Response times are ∼3× faster for the larger analytes studied, and calibration sensitivity is improved by up to ∼3.5× using 0.046 mole fraction heptane in the methanol acceptor. We report the use of short sample exposure times and the use of non-steady-state signals to reduce the analytical duty cycle, and illustrate that the use of a PIM provides a simple and robust variant of CP-MIMS amenable to rapid screening of analytes in complex samples.

  12. Response time improvement of AIGaN photoconductive detectors by adjusting crystal-nuclei coalescence process in metal organic vapor phase epitaxy*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lai; Hao Zhibiao; Han Yanjun; Luo Yi; Wang Lanxi; Chen Xuekang

    2011-01-01

    AIGaN photoconductive ultraviolet detectors are fabricated to study their time response characteristics.Persistent photoconductivity, a deterring factor for the detector response time, is found to be strongly related to the grain boundary density in AIGaN epilayers. By improving the crystal-nuclei coalescence process in metal organic vapor phase epitaxy, the grain-boundary density can be reduced, resulting in an-order-of-magnitude decrease in response time.

  13. Estimation of time varying system parameters from ambient response using improved Particle-Kalman filter with correlated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Subhamoy; Crinière, Antoine; Mevel, Laurent; Cerou, Frederic; Dumoulin, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Keywords: Parameter estimation; Kalman filter; Particle filter; Particle-Kalman filter; Correlated noise Although Kalman filter (KF) was originally proposed for system control i.e. steering a system as desired by monitoring the system states, its application for parameter estimation problems is widespread because of the excellent similarity between these two apparently different problem types in state space description. In standard Kalman filter, system dynamics is described through the dynamics of certain internal variable, termed as states, evolving over time as defined by an assumed process model, while a measurement model maps these states to measurements. In some parameter estimation problems, the system is replaced by a state space formulation of the dynamic model with parameters appended in the unobserved states and collectively observed through the response measurements. Filtering based parameter estimation problems are thus inherently nonlinear due to the required nonlinear mapping of parameters to the corresponding observations. Being a linear estimator, Kalman Filter (KF) cannot be employed for such nonlinear system estimation and alternative filtering algorithms (eg. Particle filter) are therefore generally used. However, being model based, these filters optimally estimate the parameters of a quasi-static model of the real dynamic system. Consequently, any time variation in the system dynamics may completely diverge the estimation yielding a false or infeasible solution. By decoupling the estimation of system states and parameters, and applying concurrent filtering strategy that attempts conditional estimation of states based on parameters and vice versa, time varying systems can be estimated. This article attempts to combine KF with Particle filter (PF) and apply them for estimation of states and system parameters respectively on a system with correlated noise in process and measurement. The idea is to nest a bank of linear KFs for state estimation

  14. Improving the safety of health information technology requires shared responsibility: It is time we all step up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittig, Dean F; Belmont, Elisabeth; Singh, Hardeep

    2017-07-14

    In 2011, an Institute of Medicine report on health information technology (IT) and patient safety highlighted that building health-IT for safer use is a shared responsibility between key stakeholders including: "vendors, care providers, healthcare organizations, health-IT departments, and public and private agencies". Use of electronic health records (EHRs) involves all these stakeholders, but they often have conflicting priorities and requirements. Since 2011, the concept of shared responsibility has gained little traction and EHR developers and users continue to attribute the substantial, long list of problems to each other. In this article, we discuss how these key stakeholders have complementary roles in improving EHR safety and must share responsibility to improve the current state of EHR use. We use real-world safety examples and outline a comprehensive shared responsibility approach to help guide development of future rules, regulations, and standards for EHR usability, interoperability and security as outlined in the 21st Century Cures Act. This approach clearly defines the responsibilities of each party and helps create appropriate measures for success. National and international policymakers must facilitate the local organizational and socio-political climate to stimulate the adoption of shared responsibility principles. When all major stakeholders are sharing responsibility, we will be more likely to usher in a new age of progress and innovation related to health IT. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Probing human response times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Anders

    2004-07-01

    In a recent preprint (Dialog in e-mail traffic, preprint cond-mat/0304433), the temporal dynamics of an e-mail network has been investigated by Eckmann, Moses and Sergi. Specifically, the time period between an e-mail message and its reply were recorded. It will be shown here that their data agrees quantitatively with the frame work proposed to explain a recent experiment on the response of “internauts” to a news publication (Physica A 296(3-4) (2001) 539) despite differences in communication channels, topics, time-scale and socio-economic characteristics of the two population. This suggest a generalized response time distribution ∼ t-1 for human populations in the absence of deadlines with important implications for psychological and social studies as well the study of dynamical networks.

  16. Trapping of defect point to improve response time via controlled azimuthal anchoring in a vertically aligned liquid crystal cell with polymer wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Sung Min; Kim, Youn Sik; Lee, Hee Kyu; Lee, Seung Hee [Polymer BIN Fusion Research Center, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Chonju, Chonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lyu, Jae-Jin; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon [AMLCD Division, Samsung Electronics, Kiheung, Kyunggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Lu, Ruibo; Wu, Shin-Tson [College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando FL 32816 (United States)], E-mail: lsh1@chonbuk.ac.kr

    2008-03-07

    Conventional multi-domain vertically aligned liquid crystal (LC) cells have defect points due to the collision of LC directors during the formation of multiple domains. In addition, the location of defects changes with time resulting in a slow response time. This paper proposes a robust vertically aligned LC cell, where the LCs are locked by polymer walls, and the azimuthal anchoring on the surface of the alignment layer is controlled by the polymerization of a UV curable reactive mesogen monomer. As a result, the defect points are trapped at a single position, resulting in a greatly improved response time.

  17. Understanding chemical-potential-related transient pore-pressure response to improve real-time borehole (in)stability predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tare, U.A.; Mody, F.K.; Mese, A.I. [Halliburton Energy Services, Cairo (Egypt)

    2000-11-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to explain the concept of a real-time wellbore (in)stability logging methodology. The role of the chemical potential of drilling fluids on transient pore pressure and time-dependent rock property alterations of shale formations was examined by providing details about a pore pressure transmission (PPT) test. The PPT experiments exposed formation (shale) cores under simulated downhole conditions to various salt solutions and drilling fluids. The main objective was to translate the results of the PPT tests to actual drilling conditions. A 20 per cent w/w calcium chloride solution was exposed to a Pierre II shale under high pressure in the PPT apparatus. The PPT test was used to estimate the impact of a drilling fluid on shale pore pressure. The efficiency of the salt solution/shale system was also estimated. Estimates of the dynamic rock properties were made based on the obtained acoustic data. It was determined that in order to accurately model time-dependent wellbore (in)stability in the field, it is important to calibrate representative shale core response to drilling fluids under realistic in-situ conditions. The 20 per cent w/w calcium chloride solution showed very low membrane efficiency of 4.45 per cent. It was concluded that changes in the shale dynamic rock properties as a function of test fluid exposure can be obtained from the simultaneous acquisition of sonic compression and shear wave velocity data. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Improving federal response to drought

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhite, D.A.; Rosenberg, N.J.; Glantz, M.H.

    1986-03-01

    Severe and widespread drought occurred over a large portion of the US between 1974 and 1977. Impacts on agriculture and other industries, as well as local water supplies, were substantial. The federal government responded with forty assistance programs administered by sixteen federal agencies. Assistance was provided primarily in the form of loans and grants to people, businesses and governments experiencing hardship caused by drought. The total cost of the program is estimated at $7-8 billion. Federal response to the mid-1970s drought was largely untimely, ineffective and poorly coordinated. Four recommendations are offered that, if implemented, would improve future drought assessment and response efforts: 1) reliable and timely informational products and dissemination plans; 2) improved impact assessment techniques, especially in the agricultural sector, for use by government to identify periods of enhanced risk and to trigger assistance measures; 3) administratively centralized drought declaration procedures that are well publicized and consistently applied; and 4) standby assistance measures that encourage appropriate levels of risk management by producers and that are equitable, consistent and predictable. The development of a national drought plan that incorporates these four items is recommended. Atmospheric scientists have an important role to play in the collection and interpretation of near-real time weather data for use by government decision makers.

  19. Understanding chemical-potential-related transient pore-pressure response to improve real-time borehole (in)stability predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tare, U. A.; Mody, F. K.; Mese, A. I. [Haliburton Energy Services, TX (United States)

    2002-07-01

    In order to develop a real-time wellbore (in)stability modelling capability, experimental work was carried out to investigate the role of the chemical potential of drilling fluids on transient pore pressure and time-dependent rock property alterations of shale formations. Time-dependent alterations in the pore pressure, acoustic and rock properties of formations subjected to compressive tri-axial test were recorded during the experiments involving the Pore Pressure Transmission (PPT) test. Based on the transient pore pressure of shale exposed to the test fluid presented here, the 20 per cent calcium chloride showed a very low membrane efficiency of 4.45 per cent. The need for a thorough understanding of the drilling fluid/shale interaction prior to applying any chemical potential wellbore (in)stability model to real-time drilling operations was emphasized. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Improving productivity through more effective time management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Edwin; Pulich, Marcia

    2004-01-01

    Effective time management has become increasingly important for managers as they seek to accomplish objectives in today's organizations, which have been restructured for efficiency while employing fewer people. Managers can improve their ability to manage time effectively by examining their attitudes toward time, analyzing time-wasting behaviors, and developing better time management skills. Managers can improve their performance and promotion potential with more effective time utilization. Strategies for improving time management skills are presented.

  1. ISO 14001: time for improvements?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tine Herreborg

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss a number of issues related to ISO 14001:2004, the international standard for Environmental Management Systems (EMS) with the purpose of improving the next edition in order to recognise and reflect new recognitions in approaches to pollution prevention. A case s...... improvements and to include a demand for publication of an environmental report to promote a constructive dialogue with relevant stakeholders....... study is presented and shows lack of life cycle thinking in product development. This paper suggests changes of ISO 14001:2004 in order to include a more product-oriented approach and a stronger focus on stakeholders. It also suggests to formulate clearer demands for targets and environmental...

  2. ISO 14001: time for improvements?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tine Herreborg

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss a number of issues related to ISO 14001:2004, the international standard for Environmental Management Systems (EMS) with the purpose of improving the next edition in order to recognise and reflect new recognitions in approaches to pollution prevention. A case...... study is presented and shows lack of life cycle thinking in product development. This paper suggests changes of ISO 14001:2004 in order to include a more product-oriented approach and a stronger focus on stakeholders. It also suggests to formulate clearer demands for targets and environmental...

  3. Improvement of the Response Time in an Open Source Audioconference Architecture Based on SIP Multicast Implemented with JainSIP, JainSDP and JGAP Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. Moreno

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Group services like the audioconference require a minimum level of quality of service for multicast sessions. This work proposes a new overlay multicast architecture based on SIP extensions and a genetic algorithm. The architecture consists of a SIP Extender client (SE, a Multicast Gateway Agent (MGA and a Multicast Manager (MM. The SE receives information about the most adequate MGA for it determined by a genetic algorithm inside the MM, then connects the chosen MGA and maintains connection with the MM itself. The genetic algorithm is implemented with JGAP(Java Genetic Algorithm Package libraries. The SE and MGA are programmed with JainSIP and JainSDP libraries which contain Java structures associated with the SIP protocol and session description. Some experiments over UTP wired and WiFi IEEE802.11n network were performed. Partial results with static and dynamic MGA selection show that, if we compare the joining and leaving time measured inside a station containing SE client programmed with JainSIP and JainSDP libraries versus SJphone proprietary client, the software engineering may have more influence than the medium access method in the response time for a potential group member. Even more, the genetic algorithm at the MM minimizes the response time at great scale.

  4. A Lower Extremity Musculoskeletal and Vascular Trauma Protocol in a Children's Hospital May Improve Treatment Response Times and Appropriate Microvascular Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Itai; Baldwin, Keith D; Levin, L Scott; Nance, Michael L; Chang, Benjamin; Kovach, Stephen J; Serletti, Joseph M; Flynn, John M

    2015-05-01

    Pediatric lower extremity (LE) vascular injuries present many issues: microvascular surgeons are usually unavailable to stand-alone pediatric institutions, and the rate of morbidity including limb loss can be high if revascularization is delayed beyond the critical period of 8 hours. We assessed if time to revascularization was impacted by institution of a lower extremity vascular trauma protocol (LEVP). Level II retrospective prognostic. Level I pediatric trauma center. Pediatric patients presenting with ischemic lower extremities requiring urgent management (2000-2013). LEVP-a team of specialized microvascular surgeons, who have developed and manage a call schedule for our pediatric trauma center to offer care 24 h-1·d-1, 7 d-1·wk-1, and 365 d-1·y-1 to our children's hospital. Treatment team expertise, time to revascularization, and use of time-delaying preoperative radiographic vascular studies performed before and after initiation of LEVP. We identified 22 patients with ischemic LEs (16 patients treated before/6 patients treated after LEVP initiation). Mean time from admission to definitive vascular care was 6.4 hours preprotocol (20% > 8 hours)/4.6 hours postprotocol (0% > 8 hours). Before protocol initiation, 38% of LE vascular injuries were treated by LE microvascular repair-capable surgeons, and 37.5% had a preoperative radiographic vascular study compared with 100% and 0%, respectively, postprotocol initiation. Before protocol initiation, 37.5% had a preoperative radiographic vascular study compared with 0% after protocol initiation. Since LEVP initiation, we have required no preoperative radiographic vascular studies, there has not been a revascularization delay of >8 hours, and with appropriate staff surgeon coverage, the flow of care has improved with the new ability to address and care for these challenging injuries. To potentially improve the timeliness of vascular care and better match the skills of the practitioner to the injury, pediatric

  5. Using response times for item selection in adaptive testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der Wim J.

    2008-01-01

    Response times on items can be used to improve item selection in adaptive testing provided that a probabilistic model for their distribution is available. In this research, the author used a hierarchical modeling framework with separate first-level models for the responses and response times and a s

  6. Response Features Determining Spike Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J. Richmond

    1999-01-01

    redundant with that carried by the coarse structure. Thus, the existence of precisely timed spike patterns carrying stimulus-related information does not imply control of spike timing at precise time scales.

  7. Technology improves CBRNE response, detection

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, OUT OF THE CLASSROOM The Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department uses numerous programs designed to assist in the detection and response to Chemical-Biological-Radiological-Nuclear and Explosive (CBRNE incidents). These programs include deployment of detection and...

  8. Immune responses to improving welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghman, L R

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that "increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better" because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as "sickness behavior," includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  9. Anti-TNF-Alpha-Adalimumab Therapy Had Time Lag of Improvement in Synovial Hypertrophy Compared to Rapid Response in Power Doppler Synovial Vascularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chou Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The quantification of synovitis is of great significance for follow-up in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. This study aimed to validate the use of power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS for evaluating synovial vascularity and synovial hypertrophy for synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with adalimumab. Materials and Methods. The synovial disease activity and vascularity of RA on both wrists (radio-carpal joint were assessed using GS and PDUS to derive the composite US scores based on abnormal counts and severity. The relationship between each measure was determined. Results. The 71 patients who received adalimumab therapy had significantly decreased DAS28, ESR, and CRP. After one month, PD score decreased and then remained low for 12 months. Synovial hypertrophy did not change until 3–6 months after, when it started to improve (p=0.017. By multivariate analysis, sex, age, BMI, and DAS28 did not lead to any difference between synovial hypertrophy and PDUS changes (p=0.498. Discussion. Composite US markers of synovial hypertrophy correlate significantly to the DAS28 score and ESR/CRP in adult RA. The time needed for synovial hypertrophy to decrease may be up to 3–6 months after adalimumab therapy. Switching to biological therapy before 3–6 months is inappropriate and ineffective.

  10. 28 CFR 542.18 - Response time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Response time. 542.18 Section 542.18... REMEDY Administrative Remedy Program § 542.18 Response time. If accepted, a Request or Appeal is... later than the third calendar day after filing. If the time period for response to a Request or...

  11. Improving Patient Satisfaction with Waiting Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilers, Gayleen M.

    2004-01-01

    Waiting times are a significant component of patient satisfaction. A patient satisfaction survey performed in the author's health center showed that students rated waiting time lowest of the listed categories--A ratings of 58% overall, 63% for scheduled appointments, and 41% for the walk-in clinic. The center used a quality improvement process and…

  12. Assessing Subgroup Differences in Item Response Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnipke, Deborah L.; Pashley, Peter J.

    Differences in test performance on time-limited tests may be due in part to differential response-time rates between subgroups, rather than real differences in the knowledge, skills, or developed abilities of interest. With computer-administered tests, response times are available and may be used to address this issue. This study investigates…

  13. Sensitivity improvement of time overcurrent relays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez, Arturo Conde; Martinez, Ernesto Vazquez [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Apdo. Postal 114-F, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 66450, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2007-02-15

    In this paper, we recommend a new adaptive function for time overcurrent relays. The purpose of the adaptation process is to improve the sensitivity of time overcurrent relays, which then operate with a dynamic pickup setting such as a load current. The results obtained from time overcurrent adaptive relays are collated, and the results from analysis of negative sequence relays and conventional time overcurrent relays are also presented. In this article, we describe the control logic structure of an adaptive pickup current and its performance under different operating states. (author)

  14. Approximate Distance Oracles with Improved Query Time

    CERN Document Server

    Wulff-Nilsen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Given an undirected graph $G$ with $m$ edges, $n$ vertices, and non-negative edge weights, and given an integer $k\\geq 2$, we show that a $(2k-1)$-approximate distance oracle for $G$ of size $O(kn^{1 + 1/k})$ and with $O(\\log k)$ query time can be constructed in $O(\\min\\{kmn^{1/k},\\sqrt km + kn^{1 + c/\\sqrt k}\\})$ time for some constant $c$. This improves the $O(k)$ query time of Thorup and Zwick. For any $0 0$ and $k = O(\\log n/\\log\\log n)$.

  15. Silicon timing response to different laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronzhin, Anatoly [Fermilab

    2017-01-17

    The purpose of the work was to measure pulse shape and timing response of the silicon under picosecond lasers light illumination. Timing response for different laser wavelengths, 405 nm, 635 nm and 1060 nm was a point of interest. The performed measurements could be useful for CMS HGCal upgrade

  16. Reducing ambulance response times using discrete event simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei Lam, Sean Shao; Zhang, Zhong Cheng; Oh, Hong Choon; Ng, Yih Ying; Wah, Win; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop a discrete-event simulation (DES) model for the Singapore Emergency Medical Services (EMS), and to demonstrate the utility of this DES model for the evaluation of different policy alternatives to improve ambulance response times. A DES model was developed based on retrospective emergency call data over a continuous 6-month period in Singapore. The main outcome measure is the distribution of response times. The secondary outcome measure is ambulance utilization levels based on unit hour utilization (UHU) ratios. The DES model was used to evaluate different policy options in order to improve the response times, while maintaining reasonable fleet utilization. Three policy alternatives looking at the reallocation of ambulances, the addition of new ambulances, and alternative dispatch policies were evaluated. Modifications of dispatch policy combined with the reallocation of existing ambulances were able to achieve response time performance equivalent to that of adding 10 ambulances. The median (90th percentile) response time was 7.08 minutes (12.69 minutes). Overall, this combined strategy managed to narrow the gap between the ideal and existing response time distribution by 11-13%. Furthermore, the median UHU under this combined strategy was 0.324 with an interquartile range (IQR) of 0.047 versus a median utilization of 0.285 (IQR of 0.051) resulting from the introduction of additional ambulances. Response times were shown to be improved via a more effective reallocation of ambulances and dispatch policy. More importantly, the response time improvements were achieved without a reduction in the utilization levels and additional costs associated with the addition of ambulances. We demonstrated the effective use of DES as a versatile platform to model the dynamic system complexities of Singapore's national EMS systems for the evaluation of operational strategies to improve ambulance response times.

  17. Improved gamma bang time measurements on omega

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, H W; Caldwell, S E; Evans, S C; Mack, J M; Sanchez, P; Sedillo, T; Wilson, D C; Young, C S [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States); Drew, D; Horsfield, C J [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Glebov, V Y; Stoeckl, C [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Macrum, G S; Miller, E K [National Security Technologies/Special Technologies Lab, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)], E-mail: herrmann@lanl.gov

    2008-05-15

    The time of peak fusion reactivity with respect to the impingement of laser light on an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsule is known as Bang Time (BT). For deuterium-tritium fueling, fusion reactivity and BT can be measured using either fusion neutrons or fusion gammas. Initial gamma bang time (GBT) measurements on Omega using a Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) have been previously reported. Recent improvements have significantly enhanced the ability to measure GBT precisely. By relating the peak of the GCD gamma signal to laser timing fiducials, and cross calibrating the resulting raw bang time to the neutron bang time obtained using the absolutely calibrated Neutron Temporal Diagnostic (NTD), we demonstrate a precision of better than 25 ps on Omega. Bang time, along with other aspects of reaction history (RH), is an essential component of diagnosing failed attempts at ICF ignition. For the NIF, gammas are preferred over neutrons for this application due to the unacceptably large neutron temporal spreading resulting from detector standoff limitations on the NIF. The NIF System Design Requirement specifies a gamma bang time accuracy of better than 50 ps.

  18. Improving Treatment Response for Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ege, Sarah; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is considered the treatment of choice for paediatric anxiety disorders, yet there remains substantial room for improvement in treatment outcomes. This paper examines whether theory and research into the role of information-processing in the underlying psychopat......Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is considered the treatment of choice for paediatric anxiety disorders, yet there remains substantial room for improvement in treatment outcomes. This paper examines whether theory and research into the role of information-processing in the underlying...... psychopathology of paediatric anxiety disorders indicate possibilities for improving treatment response. Using a critical review of recent theoretical, empirical and academic literature, the paper examines the role of information-processing biases in paediatric anxiety disorders, the extent to which CBT targets...... in improving response to CBT for paediatric anxiety disorders. Many important questions remain to be answered....

  19. Improving predictions by cross pollination in time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schevenhoven, Francine; Selten, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Given a set of imperfect weather models, one could ask how these models can be combined in order to improve weather predictions produced with these models. In this study we explore a technique called cross-pollination in time (CPT, Smith 2001). In the CPT approach the models exchange states during the prediction. The number of possible predictions grows quickly with time and a strategy to retain only a small number of predictions, called pruning, needs to be developed. In the learning phase a pruning strategy is proposed based on retaining those solutions that remain closest to the truth. From the learning phase probabilities are derived that determine weights to be applied to the imperfect models in the forecast phase. The CPT technique is explored using low-order dynamical systems and applied to a global atmospheric model. First results indicate that the CPT approach improves the forecast quality over the individual models.

  20. Improving the prediction of chaotic time series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李克平; 高自友; 陈天仑

    2003-01-01

    One of the features of deterministic chaos is sensitive to initial conditions. This feature limits the prediction horizons of many chaotic systems. In this paper, we propose a new prediction technique for chaotic time series. In our method, some neighbouring points of the predicted point, for which the corresponding local Lyapunov exponent is particularly large, would be discarded during estimating the local dynamics, and thus the error accumulated by the prediction algorithm is reduced. The model is tested for the convection amplitude of Lorenz systems. The simulation results indicate that the prediction technique can improve the prediction of chaotic time series.

  1. Humanitarian response: improving logistics to save lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    Each year, millions of people worldwide are affected by disasters, underscoring the importance of effective relief efforts. Many highly visible disaster responses have been inefficient and ineffective. Humanitarian agencies typically play a key role in disaster response (eg, procuring and distributing relief items to an affected population, assisting with evacuation, providing healthcare, assisting in the development of long-term shelter), and thus their efficiency is critical for a successful disaster response. The field of disaster and emergency response modeling is well established, but the application of such techniques to humanitarian logistics is relatively recent. This article surveys models of humanitarian response logistics and identifies promising opportunities for future work. Existing models analyze a variety of preparation and response decisions (eg, warehouse location and the distribution of relief supplies), consider both natural and manmade disasters, and typically seek to minimize cost or unmet demand. Opportunities to enhance the logistics of humanitarian response include the adaptation of models developed for general disaster response; the use of existing models, techniques, and insights from the literature on commercial supply chain management; the development of working partnerships between humanitarian aid organizations and private companies with expertise in logistics; and the consideration of behavioral factors relevant to a response. Implementable, realistic models that support the logistics of humanitarian relief can improve the preparation for and the response to disasters, which in turn can save lives.

  2. Timely bystander CPR improves outcomes despite longer EMS times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwan Jin; Song, Kyoung Jun; Shin, Sang Do; Lee, Kyung Won; Ahn, Ki Ok; Lee, Eui Jung; Hong, Ki Jeong; Ro, Young Sun

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the impact of bystander CPR on clinical outcomes in patients with increasing response time from collapse to EMS response. A population-based observational study was conducted in patients with witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) of presumed cardiac etiology from 2012 to 2014. The time interval from collapse to CPR by EMS providers was categorized into quartile groups: fastest group (bystander CPR and the time interval from collapse to CPR by EMS providers. A total of 15,354 OHCAs were analyzed. Bystander CPR was performed in 8591 (56.0%). Survival to hospital discharge occurred in 1632 (10.6%) and favorable neurological outcome in 996 (6.5%). In an interaction model of bystander CPR, compared to the fastest group, adjusted odds ratios (AORs) (95% CIs) for survival to discharge were 0.89 (0.66-1.20) in the fast group, 0.76 (0.57-1.02) in the late group, and 0.52 (0.37-0.73) in the latest group. For favorable neurological outcome, AORs were 1.12 (0.77-1.62) in the fast group, 0.90 (0.62-1.30) in the late group, 0.59 (0.38-0.91) in the latest group. The survival from OHCA decreases as the ambulance response time increases. The increase in mortality and worsening neurologic outcomes appear to be mitigated in those patients who receive bystander CPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Silicon Timing Response to Particles and Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronzhin, Anatoly [Fermilab; Spiropulu, Maria [Caltech

    2015-01-01

    It is observed growing interest to fast timing detectors in high energy physics, related, for example, with collider luminosity increase (LHC) [1]. The options of CMS [2] calorimeter upgrade based on silicon detectors renewed interest to the timing study of this type of detectors. The article is devoted to study of silicon timing response to particles and light.

  4. Approximate Distance Oracles with Improved Preprocessing Time

    CERN Document Server

    Wulff-Nilsen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Given an undirected graph $G$ with $m$ edges, $n$ vertices, and non-negative edge weights, and given an integer $k\\geq 1$, we show that for some universal constant $c$, a $(2k-1)$-approximate distance oracle for $G$ of size $O(kn^{1 + 1/k})$ can be constructed in $O(\\sqrt km + kn^{1 + c/\\sqrt k})$ time and can answer queries in $O(k)$ time. We also give an oracle which is faster for smaller $k$. Our results break the quadratic preprocessing time bound of Baswana and Kavitha for all $k\\geq 6$ and improve the $O(kmn^{1/k})$ time bound of Thorup and Zwick except for very sparse graphs and small $k$. When $m = \\Omega(n^{1 + c/\\sqrt k})$ and $k = O(1)$, our oracle is optimal w.r.t.\\ both stretch, size, preprocessing time, and query time, assuming a widely believed girth conjecture by Erd\\H{o}s.

  5. Improving Culture, One Quality Improvement Project at a Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Schaaf, Emily B; Cornett, Amanda C; Randolph, Greg D

    2017-04-04

    A culture of quality improvement (QI) values collaboration, transparency, and staff empowerment. Organizations exhibiting a culture of QI are more likely to engage in QI. We examined whether local health departments' (LHDs') participation in a longitudinal, experiential QI training program changes QI culture. Prior to and following participation in a QI training program, all employees of participating LHDs were asked to complete an 8-item survey assessing components of QI culture on a 5-point scale. From 2010 to 2015, multidisciplinary teams from North Carolina LHDs participated in sequential cohorts of a 6-month QI training program, during which the teams completed a QI project. We dichotomized culture survey responses, with 4 or 5 being "Supportive." We compared adjusted proportions, using linear regression, clustering at LHD, and controlling for cohort. Data from 42 LHDs were included. At baseline, 7.8% responded that their LHD had a supportive culture for all 8 components, compared with 12% at follow-up (P cultures increased for all components of culture including communication by 4.1% (95% CI: 2.0%-6.2%), problem solving by 2.9% (95% CI: 1.6%-5.5%), team work by 5.2% (95% CI: 2.5%-7.8%), vision by 4.3% (95% CI: 1.1%-7.5%), performance measures by 5.6% (95% CI: 1.6%-9.6%), recognition by 4.7% (95% CI: 1.4%-8.0%), for conflict by 5.5% (95% CI: 1.7%-9.4%), and alignment by 5.8% (95% CI: 2.3%-9.2%). Engagement with structured QI training programs-and perhaps simply completing QI projects-can cause small, but important changes in organizations' cultures, thus increasing engagement in future QI and improving overall care and services. The article demonstrates that when LHDs participate in a longitudinal, experiential QI training program, their cultures of QI improve. Local health departments participating in similar training programs might experience similar improvements in culture, increasing subsequent participation in QI projects and improving related health

  6. Using random response input in Ibrahim Time Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Peter; Brincker, R.

    2013-01-01

    of the technique being Single Input Multiple Output (SIMO). It has earlier been showed that when modifying ITD with Toeplitz matrix averaging. Identification of time data with closely spaced modes is improved. In the traditional formulation of ITD the time data has to be free decays or impulse response functions...

  7. An improved algorithm for numerical calculation of seismic response spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengwang Liao; Wei Ding; Fei Li

    2016-01-01

    The information of seismic response spectra is key to many problems concerned with aseismic structure and is also helpful for earthquake disaster relief if it is generated in time when earthquake happens. While current numerical calculation methods suffer from poor precision, especially in frequency band near Nyquist frequency, we present a set of improved parameters for precision improvement. It is shown that precision of displace-ment and velocity response spectra are both further improved compared to current nu-merical algorithms. A uniform fitting formula is given for computing these parameters for damping ratio range of 0.01e0.9, quite convenient for practical application.

  8. Human response times in a graphic environment

    CERN Document Server

    Yule, A

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the results obtained from measuring the response times of the users of an interactive graphics system available on the CERN central computers is presented. These results are then used to find an optimum time to wait before rolling the user's program to disc.

  9. Hierarchical Bayes Models for Response Time Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigmile, Peter F.; Peruggia, Mario; Van Zandt, Trisha

    2010-01-01

    Human response time (RT) data are widely used in experimental psychology to evaluate theories of mental processing. Typically, the data constitute the times taken by a subject to react to a succession of stimuli under varying experimental conditions. Because of the sequential nature of the experiments there are trends (due to learning, fatigue,…

  10. Improved Time Complexities for Learning Boolean Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Keong Kwoh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Existing algorithms for learning Boolean networks (BNs have time complexities of at least O(N · n0:7(k+1, where n is the number of variables, N is the number of samples and k is the number of inputs in Boolean functions. Some recent studies propose more efficient methods with O(N · n2 time complexities. However, these methods can only be used to learn monotonic BNs, and their performances are not satisfactory when the sample size is small. In this paper, we mathematically prove that OR/AND BNs, where the variables are related with logical OR/AND operations, can be found with the time complexity of O(k·(N+ logn·n2, if there are enough noiseless training samples randomly generated from a uniform distribution. We also demonstrate that our method can successfully learn most BNs, whose variables are not related with exclusive OR and Boolean equality operations, with the same order of time complexity for learning OR/AND BNs, indicating our method has good efficiency for learning general BNs other than monotonic BNs. When the datasets are noisy, our method can still successfully identify most BNs with the same efficiency. When compared with two existing methods with the same settings, our method achieves a better comprehensive performance than both of them, especially for small training sample sizes. More importantly, our method can be used to learn all BNs. However, of the two methods that are compared, one can only be used to learn monotonic BNs, and the other one has a much worse time complexity than our method. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that Boolean networks can be learned with improved time complexities.

  11. Analysing students’ response times with classroom response systems

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Classroom response systems (‘clickers’ etc.) are well documented as having potential for developing knowledge and engagement in the classroom, so much so that they are ubiquitous, almost passé. The wealth of data gathered from such systems is beginning to be analysed and recent work in the peer instruction community (e.g. Miller et. al, 2014) suggests that in some contexts students answering correctly tend to have the shortest (quickest) response times. Recent work at Kingston University ...

  12. Effect of fatigue on reaction time, response time, performance time, and kick impact in taekwondo roundhouse kick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Ana, Jader; Franchini, Emerson; da Silva, Vinicius; Diefenthaeler, Fernando

    2017-06-01

    Reaction time and response time are considered important abilities and can potentially affect combat performance. This study investigated the effect of a specific fatigue protocol on reaction time, response time, performance time, and kick impact. Seven male athletes reported to the laboratory on two different days. During day one, athletes performed a specific progressive taekwondo test, and on day two, a protocol for determining reaction time, response time, performance time, and kick impact before and after a time to exhaustion test at an intensity level corresponding to the maximal kick frequency obtained during the specific progressive taekwondo test. Muscle activation from rectus femoris and kick impact of the preferred limb were assessed. No differences were observed for response time and performance time. However, kick impact decreased (43 ± 27 to 13 ± 10 g, p taekwondo training programmes on coordination-based exercises leading to improve response time and to reduce fatigue effects in order to improve technique effectiveness and enhance the possibilities of scoring in a competitive situation.

  13. Time Domain Response of the ARIANNA Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Barwick, S W; Besson, D Z; Hanson, J C; Klein, S R; Kleinfelder, S A; Piasecki, M; Ratzlaff, K; Reed, C; Roumi, M; Stezelberger, T; Tatar, J; Walker, J; Young, R; Zou, L

    2014-01-01

    The Antarctic Ross Ice Shelf Antenna Neutrino Array (ARIANNA) is a high-energy neutrino detector designed to record the Askaryan electric field signature of cosmogenic neutrino interactions in ice. To understand the inherent radio-frequency (RF) neutrino signature, the time-domain response of the ARIANNA RF receiver must be measured. ARIANNA uses Create CLP5130-2N log-periodic dipole arrays (LPDAs). The associated effective height operator converts incident electric fields to voltage waveforms at the LDPA terminals. The effective height versus time and incident angle was measured, along with the associated response of the ARIANNA RF amplifier. The results are verified by correlating to field measurements in air and ice, using oscilloscopes. Finally, theoretical models for the Askaryan electric field are combined with the detector response to predict the neutrino signature.

  14. Mental Speed, Response Time, and Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoosain, Rumjahn

    1980-01-01

    In this study with bilingual Chinese college students, faster subjects in a word-judging task had lower Raven's Progressive Matrices scores. The distinction between test response time and actual mental speed as a correlate of intelligence is discussed. (Author/SJL)

  15. Search for an optimum time response of spark counters

    CERN Document Server

    Devismes, A; Kress, T; Gobbi, A; Eschke, J; Herrmann, N; Hildenbrand, K D; Koczón, P; Petrovici, M

    2002-01-01

    A spark counter of the type developed by Pestov has been tested with the aim of searching for an optimum time response function, changing voltage, content of noble and quencher gases, pressure and energy-loss. Replacing the usual argon by neon has brought an improvement of the resolution and a significant reduction of tails in the time response function. It has been proven that a counter as long as 90 cm can deliver, using neon gas mixture, a time resolution sigma<60 ps with about 1% absolute tail and an efficiency of about 90%.

  16. Improving Ecological Response Monitoring of Environmental Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alison J.; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D.; Nielsen, Daryl L.; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  17. Effects of Response Preparation on Developmental Improvements in Inhibitory Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz, Sarah; Stephanie, Davis; Luna, Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    Studies in adults indicate that response preparation is crucial to inhibitory control, but it remains unclear whether preparation contributes to improvements in inhibitory control over the course of childhood and adolescence. In order to assess the role of response preparation in developmental improvements in inhibitory control, we parametrically manipulated the duration of the instruction period in an antisaccade (AS) task given to participants ages 8 to 31 years. Regressions showing a protracted development of AS performance were consistent with existing research, and two novel findings emerged. First, all participants showed improved performance with increased preparation time, indicating that response preparation is crucial to inhibitory control at all stages of development. Preparatory processes did not deteriorate at even the longest preparatory period, indicating that the youngest participants were able to sustain preparation at even the longest interval. Second, developmental trajectories did not differ for different preparatory period lengths, highlighting that the processes supporting response preparation continue to mature in tandem with improvements in AS performance. Our findings suggest that developmental improvements are not simply due to an inhibitory system that is faster to engage but may also reflect qualitative changes in the processes engaged during the preparatory period. PMID:20347061

  18. Improving Science Communication with Responsive Web Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilverda, M.

    2013-12-01

    the world use low-bandwidth connections. Communicating science effectively includes efficient delivery of the information to the reader. To meet this criteria, responsive designs should also incorporate "mobile first" elements such as serving ideal image sizes (a low resolution cell phone does not need to receive a large desktop image) and a focus on fast, readable content delivery. The technical implementation of responsive web design is constantly changing as new web standards and approaches become available. However, fundamental design principles such as grid layouts, clear typography, and proper use of white space should be an important part of content delivery within any responsive design. This presentation will discuss current responsive design approaches for improving scientific communication across multiple devices, operating systems, and bandwidth capacities. The presentation will also include example responsive designs for scientific papers and websites. Implementing a responsive design approach with a focus on content and fundamental design principles is an important step to ensuring scientific information remains clear and accessible as screens and devices continue to evolve.

  19. Response time of light emitting diode-logarithmic electrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Y. B.; Vyavahare, P. D.

    1998-02-01

    In a logarithmic electrometer which uses a transistor as a nonlinear element, a capacitance is generally connected across the feedback element of the operational amplifier. This stabilizes the loop but degrades the response at low current levels. However the stability problem is not so serious when a junction diode is used. In the present work an attempt was made to study the response time of a logarithmic electrometer which uses a light emitting diode (LED) as a nonlinear element and without external capacitance. The calculated values of rise time are based on an equivalent circuit with a depletion layer capacitance and voltage dependent conductance. These values are found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured values. This study will be useful in the estimation of dynamical errors in logarithmic electrometers using junction diode/LED, LED photometers and will be helpful in the techniques for improvements of the response time of logarithmic electrometers using a junction diode, particularly at low currents.

  20. Improving Pulsar Timing Precision with Single Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The measurement error of pulse times of arrival (TOAs) in the high S/N limit is dominated by the quasi-random variation of a pulsar's emission profile from rotation to rotation. Like measurement noise, this noise is only reduced as the square root of observing time, posing a major challenge to future pulsar timing campaigns with large aperture telescopes, e.g. the Five-hundred-metre Aperture Spherical Telescope and the Square Kilometre Array. We propose a new method of pulsar timing that attempts to approximate the pulse-to-pulse variability with a small family of 'basis' pulses. If pulsar data are integrated over many rotations, this basis can be used to measure sub-pulse structure. Or, if high-time resolution data are available, the basis can be used to 'tag' single pulses and produce an optimal timing template. With realistic simulations, we show that these applications can dramatically reduce the effect of pulse-to-pulse variability on TOAs. Using high-time resolution data taken from the bright PSR J0835-...

  1. Improving Intercomparability of Marine Biogeochemical Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benway, Heather M.; Telszewski, Maciej; Lorenzoni, Laura

    2013-04-01

    Shipboard biogeochemical time series represent one of the most valuable tools scientists have to quantify marine elemental fluxes and associated biogeochemical processes and to understand their links to changing climate. They provide the long, temporally resolved data sets needed to characterize ocean climate, biogeochemistry, and ecosystem variability and change. However, to monitor and differentiate natural cycles and human-driven changes in the global oceans, time series methodologies must be transparent and intercomparable when possible. To review current shipboard biogeochemical time series sampling and analytical methods, the International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP; http://www.ioccp.org/) and the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program (http://www.us-ocb.org/) convened an international ocean time series workshop at the Bermuda Institute for Ocean Sciences.

  2. Electrodeposited submicron thermocouples with microsecond response times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, M E; van der Veer, W E; Güell, A G; Grüell, A G; Penner, R M

    2007-10-01

    We describe a procedure for preparing submicron scale silver-nickel thermocouples (TCs) using electrochemical step edge decoration on graphite surfaces. Each fabrication operation produced ensembles of 2-20 TCs with diameters in the 1.0 microm to 500 nm range. These "sub-mum TCs" (SMTCs) produced linear voltage versus temperature output over the range from 20 to 100 degrees C characterized by a Seebeck coefficient of 20 +/- 1 microV/degrees C, equal to the 21 microV/degrees C that is theoretically expected for a junction between these two metals. The time response of SMTCs was evaluated using two different laser-heating methods and compared with the smallest mechanically robust commercially available type J TCs. Electrochemical etching of the silver wire introduced constrictions at grain boundaries that reduced the thermal mass of the junction without altering its integrity or its overall diameter, producing a decrease of the measured rise time for SMTCs up to 96%.

  3. Response time accuracy in Apple Macintosh computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neath, Ian; Earle, Avery; Hallett, Darcy; Surprenant, Aimée M

    2011-06-01

    The accuracy and variability of response times (RTs) collected on stock Apple Macintosh computers using USB keyboards was assessed. A photodiode detected a change in the screen's luminosity and triggered a solenoid that pressed a key on the keyboard. The RTs collected in this way were reliable, but could be as much as 100 ms too long. The standard deviation of the measured RTs varied between 2.5 and 10 ms, and the distributions approximated a normal distribution. Surprisingly, two recent Apple-branded USB keyboards differed in their accuracy by as much as 20 ms. The most accurate RTs were collected when an external CRT was used to display the stimuli and Psychtoolbox was able to synchronize presentation with the screen refresh. We conclude that RTs collected on stock iMacs can detect a difference as small as 5-10 ms under realistic conditions, and this dictates which types of research should or should not use these systems.

  4. Managing the medical workforce: time for improvements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, A; Walker, A

    1995-01-01

    There has been a regular cycle of Government committees in Britain that have forecast 'shortages' and 'surpluses' in medical manpower. It is remarkable how little change there has been in the methods used in these forecasts despite criticism of their methods and the move towards competitive markets in the delivery of health care. The practice of medical manpower planning was criticised in the 1960s because of the failure to explore the implications of alternative skill mixes and incentives. Whilst these criticisms were ignored, the forecasters now pay more regard to budget constraints and produce more regular estimates. The 1992 forecast could be improved by sensitivity analysis (e.g. for GP/population ratios). However, unless the issue of scope (forecasting for all health care staff, not just for doctors alone) and the implications of skill mix and incentives identified in the 1960s are addressed effectively, the current recommendations may produce doctor 'surpluses' in the early twenty-first century. The Government's analysis should be challenged at the level of principle and practice, and this implies that the research activity proposed in the 1960s is carried out in the 1990s to facilitate efficiency in the twenty-first century. Furthermore, the issue of policy priorities and their ranking needs to be spelt out explicitly: does the Government want a competitive NHS internal market, and if it does, what is the role of central manpower planning? One implication of current policy choice and the maintenance of manpower planning is that cost containment is of more importance to policy makers than the internal market.

  5. Engineering Titanium for Improved Biological Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C; Bearinger, J; Dimasi, E; Gilbert, J

    2002-01-23

    titanium dioxide surface atomic structure and the biological response at an implantation site. To date, most researchers in this area have surgically implanted materials into living organisms and then retrieved the implant after varying amounts of time have elapsed. The virtue of this style of experiment is that the full, correct chemistry of the body acts on the implant. The difficulty with these experiments is that it is then impossible to link cause with effect because too many variables are changing simultaneously. Another difficulty is that changes in the very early times are missed. The purpose of these experiments is to visualize the early time response of oxide films to electric fields and to solution variations found in the body near bone. Specifically these studies are meant to understand how chemical and electric stress affect the corrosion resistance and the formation of a biolayer. Instead of performing in vivo experiments as described above, our strategy uses titanium manufactured for implants and places these samples in controlled, simplified, solutions that mimic the electrolytic environment near the bone. We use an electrochemical atomic force microscope to image the real-time dynamics of the substrate in One of the most remarkable systems in the body is bone remodeling. Even in a purely natural solution as the oxide film is growing. While imaging we apply a potential between a reference electrode and the titanium substrate which creates a driving force for oxide growth and dissolution. We simultaneously collect the transient current that flows across the oxide layer and use step impedance polarization spectroscopy to determine electrical properties of the oxide layer. We will look for films that successfully nucleate the calcium phosphate crystals that comprise the inorganic phase of bone, but do not corrode under these challenging conditions. The goal is to correlate corrosion resistance and biolayer adhesion with oxide film morphology and material

  6. Improving Survey Response Rates in Online Panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Jin; Nielsen, Christian Videbæk

    2016-01-01

    experiment among 6,162 members of an online survey panel, this article shows how low-cost incentives and cost-free text appeal interventions may impact the survey response rate in online panels. The experimental treatments comprise (a) a cash prize lottery incentive, (b) two donation incentives equating......Identifying ways to efficiently maximize the response rate to surveys is important to survey-based research. However, evidence on the response rate effect of donation incentives and especially altruistic and egotistic-type text appeal interventions is sparse and ambiguous. By a randomized survey...... survey response with a monetary donation to a good cause, (c) an egotistic-type text appeal, and (d) an altruistic-type text appeal. Relative to a control group, we find higher response rates among the recipients of the egotistic-type text appeal and the lottery incentive. Donation incentives yield lower...

  7. IRT parameter estimation with response times as collateral information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, W.J. van der; RKlein Entink, R.H.; Fox, J.-P.

    2010-01-01

    Hierarchical modeling of responses and response times on test items facilitates the use of response times as collateral information in the estimation of the response parameters. In addition to the regular information in the response data, two sources of collateral information are identified: (a) the

  8. Improving the Material Response for Slow Heat of Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, A L

    2010-03-08

    The goal of modern high explosive slow heat cookoff modeling is to understand the level of mechanical violence. This requires understanding the coupled thermal-mechanical-chemical system that such an environment creates. Recent advances have improved our ability to predict the time to event, and we have been making progress on predicting the mechanical response. By adding surface tension to the product gas pores in the high explosive, we have been able to reduce the current model's tendency to overpressurize confinement vessels. We describe the model and demonstrate how it affects a LX-10 STEX experiment. Issues associated with current product gas equations of state are described and examined.

  9. Change in response time of stroke patients and controls during rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korner-Bitensky, N; Mayo, N E; Kaizer, F

    1990-02-01

    In this study we investigated motor response times of stroke patients at admission to a rehabilitation hospital and again after 6 wk of hospitalization. A prospective comparative study was carried out on 164 stroke patients; 48 hospitalized patients served as controls. Mean motor response times to visual stimuli presented in the left and right visual fields and to centrally presented stimuli were studied. The principle finding was that stroke patients improved significantly in their response times from initial to final evaluation. While at initial assessment they performed significantly more slowly than controls, by final assessment the response times of the two groups did not differ. Visual hemineglect influenced change in response time differentially depending on side of lesion: right hemisphere lesion patients with neglect improved, whereas left hemisphere lesion patients with neglect actually deteriorated. The presence of depression influenced right hemisphere lesion patients' response times and change in response times but it did not have any influence for left hemisphere lesion patients. The findings that response time generally improved during rehabilitation has important implications for the treatment of individuals with brain injury. It will be important to identify therapeutic practices which will be effective in the remediation of response time for all patients. Ultimately the goal of intervening in slow response time is to improve performance of functional activities which are influenced by an individual's ability to respond to visual stimuli.

  10. The improved broadband Real-Time Seismic Network in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neagoe, C.; Ionescu, C.

    2009-04-01

    available within a few minutes after the earthquake occurred. One of the greatest challenges in the near future is to provide shaking intensity maps and other ground motion parameters, within 5 minutes post-event, on the Internet and GIS-based format in order to improve emergency response, public information, preparedness and hazard mitigation

  11. Timing and position response of a block detector for fast neutron time-of-flight imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, M. A.; Hayward, J. P.; Zhang, X.; Cates, J. W.

    2014-11-01

    Our research effort seeks to improve the spatial and timing performance of a block detector made of a pixilated plastic scintillator (EJ-200), first demonstrated as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Advanced Portable Neutron Imaging System. Improvement of the position and time response is necessary to achieve better resolution and contrast in the images of shielded special nuclear material. Time-of-flight is used to differentiate between gamma and different sources of neutrons (e.g., transmission and fission neutrons). Factors limiting the timing and position performance of the neutron detector have been revealed through simulations and measurements. Simulations have suggested that the degradation in the ability to resolve pixels in the neutron detector is due to those interactions occurring near the light guide. The energy deposition within the neutron detector is shown to affect position performance and imaging efficiency. This examination details how energy cuts improve the position performance and degrade the imaging efficiency. Measurements have shown the neutron detector to have a timing resolution of σ=238 ps. The majority of this timing uncertainty is from the depth-of-interaction (DOI) of the neutron which is confirmed by simulations and analytical calculations.

  12. Improvement of the detection response time of gas sensors using the association of artificial neural networks with pattern recognition technique; Amelioration de la reponse temporelle de capteurs de gaz par reconnaissance de forme a l'aide de reseaux de neurones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordieu, Ch.; Rebiere, D. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., Lab. IXL, UMR CNRS 5818, 33 (France); Pistre, J.; Planata, R. [Centre d' Etudes du Bouchet, 91 - Vert-le-Petit (France)

    1999-07-01

    The association of artificial neural networks (multilayer perceptrons) with a real time pattern recognition technique (shifting windows) allowed the development of systems for the detection and the quantification of gases. Shifting window technique is presented and offers an interesting way to improve the detection response time. The partial detector characterization with regard to its parameters was realized. Applications dealing with the detection of gas compounds using surface acoustic sensors permit to show the shifting window technique feasibility. (author)

  13. Improving dynamic response of a temperature-only FBG sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI En-bang; YAO Jian-quan; ZHANG Wei-gang

    2006-01-01

    We report a method for improving temporal response of FBG-based temperature sensors.It has been demonstrated that by filling thermal conductive pastes between a sensing FBG and its package,the temporal response of the FBG-based temperature sensor can be significantly improved while isolating the strain and vibration.

  14. Improved reproductive response of sheep in intrauterine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and conception rates obtained with the use of progesterone (P4) cream in intravaginal sponges in conjunction with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) or eCG plus royal jelly (RJ) given at the time of sponge withdrawal. ... Article Metrics.

  15. Response time in online stated choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Danny; Mørkbak, Morten Raun; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    2017-01-01

    use scale-adjusted latent class models to address preference and variance heterogeneity and explore how class membership varies with response latency. To test our methodology, we use stated choice data collected via an online survey to establish German anglers’ preferences for fishing site attributes...... models to identify the most appropriate ‘fast’ and ‘slow’ thresholds. Not doing so is likely to lead to an inferior model and has repercussions for marginal willingness to pay estimates and choice predictions....

  16. Determinants of ambulance response time: A study in Sabah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Su Na; Cheah, Phee Kheng; Arifin, Muhamad Yaakub; Wong, Boh Leng; Omar, Zaturrawiah; Yassin, Fouziah Md; Gabda, Darmesah

    2017-04-01

    Ambulance response time (ART) is one of the standard key performance indicators (KPI) in measuring the emergency medical services (EMS) delivery performances. When the mean time of ART of EMS system reaches the KPI target, it shows that the EMS system performs well. This paper considers the determinants of ART, using data sampled from 967 ambulance runs in a government hospital in Sabah. Multiple regression analysis with backward elimination was proposed for the identification of significant factors. Amongst the underlying factors, travel distance, age of patients, type of treatment and peak hours were identified to be significantly affecting ART. Identifying factors that influence ART helps the development of strategic improvement planning for reducing the ART.

  17. A lognormal model for response times on test items

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.

    2006-01-01

    A lognormal model for the response times of a person on a set of test items is investigated. The model has a parameter structure analogous to the two-parameter logistic response models in item response theory, with a parameter for the speed of each person as well as parameters for the time intensity

  18. Quality improvement cycles that reduced waiting times at Tshwane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TDH is a level-one hospital, delivering services in the centre of Pretoria since February 2006. ... finding better ways to provide better care and service.11 The QI cycle is a recognised tool for analysing and improving the efficiency and quality ..... in reducing waiting times and improving patient satisfaction.14 The need for ...

  19. Efficient allocation of heterogeneous response times in information spreading process

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Ai-Xiang; Tang, Ming; Fu, Yan; Liang, Xiaoming; Do, Younghae

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the impacts of spatiotemporal heterogeneities of human activities on spreading dynamics have attracted extensive attention. In this paper, to study heterogeneous response times on information spreading, we focus on the susceptible-infected spreading dynamics with adjustable power-law response time distribution based on uncorrelated scale-free networks. We find that the stronger the heterogeneity of response times is, the faster the information spreading is in the early and middle stages. Following a given heterogeneity, the procedure of reducing the correlation between the response times and degrees of individuals can also accelerate the spreading dynamics in the early and middle stages. However, the dynamics in the late stage is slightly more complicated, and there is an optimal value of the full prevalence time changing with the heterogeneity of response times and the response time-degree correlation, respectively. The optimal phenomena results from the efficient allocation of heterogeneous respon...

  20. Improving models to predict phenological responses to global change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Andrew D. [Harvard College, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-11-25

    The term phenology describes both the seasonal rhythms of plants and animals, and the study of these rhythms. Plant phenological processes, including, for example, when leaves emerge in the spring and change color in the autumn, are highly responsive to variation in weather (e.g. a warm vs. cold spring) as well as longer-term changes in climate (e.g. warming trends and changes in the timing and amount of rainfall). We conducted a study to investigate the phenological response of northern peatland communities to global change. Field work was conducted at the SPRUCE experiment in northern Minnesota, where we installed 10 digital cameras. Imagery from the cameras is being used to track shifts in plant phenology driven by elevated carbon dioxide and elevated temperature in the different SPRUCE experimental treatments. Camera imagery and derived products (“greenness”) is being posted in near-real time on a publicly available web page (http://phenocam.sr.unh.edu/webcam/gallery/). The images will provide a permanent visual record of the progression of the experiment over the next 10 years. Integrated with other measurements collected as part of the SPRUCE program, this study is providing insight into the degree to which phenology may mediate future shifts in carbon uptake and storage by peatland ecosystems. In the future, these data will be used to develop improved models of vegetation phenology, which will be tested against ground observations collected by a local collaborator.

  1. The improved local linear prediction of chaotic time series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Qing-Fang; Peng Yu-Hua; Sun Jia

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Bayesian information criterion, this paper proposes the improved local linear prediction method to predict chaotic time aeries. This method uses spatial correlation and temporal correlation simultaneously. Simulation results show that the improved local linear prediction method can effectively make multi-step and one-step prediction of chaotic time aeries and the multi-step prediction performance and one-step prediction accuracy of the improved local linear prediction method are superior to those of the traditional local linear prediction method.

  2. Response time patterns in a stated choice experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börjesson, Maria; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies how response times vary between unlabelled binary choice occasions in a stated choice (SC) experiment, with alternatives differing with respect to in-vehicle travel time and travel cost. The pattern of response times is interpreted as an indicator of the cognitive processes emp...

  3. Study on Response Time of SPE Carbon Monoxide Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The influence of structural design and the parameters of the working electrode on the response time of a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) carbon monoxide sensor has been studied. Results show that the response time is mainly determined by the RC time constant of the catalyst layer and also related with the working electrode potential.

  4. An Improved Scheduling Technique for Time-Triggered Embedded Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul; Eles, Petru; Peng, Zebo

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an improved scheduling technique for the synthesis of time-triggered embedded systems. Our system model captures both the flow of data and that of control. We have considered communication of data and conditions for a time-triggered protocol implementation that supports...

  5. The Importance of Responsibility in Times of Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Dahl Rendtorff

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I would like to show the importance of the concept of responsibility as the foundation of ethics in times of crisis in particular in the fields of politics and economics in the modern civilisation marked by globalization and technological progres. I consider the concept of responsibility as the key notion in order to understand the ethical duty in a modern technological civilisation. We can indeed observe a moralization of the concept of responsibility going beyond a strict legal definition in terms of imputability. The paper begins by discussing the humanistic foundations of such a concept of responsibility. It treats the historical origins of responsibility and it relates this concept to the concept of accountability. On the basis of this historical determination of the concept I would like to present the definition of the concept of responsibility as fundamental ethical principle that has increasing importance as the foundation of the principles of governance in modern welfare states. In this context the paper discusses the extension of the concept of responsibility towards institutional or corporate responsibility where responsibility does not only concerns the responsibility of individuals but also deals with the responsibility of institutional collectivities. In this way the paper is based on the following structure : 1 The ethical foundation of the concept of responsibility 2 Responsibility in technological civilisation 3 Political responsibility for good governance in the welfare state 4 Social responsibility of business corporations in times of globalization 5 Conclusion and discussion : changed conditions of responsibility in modern times.

  6. Response Times of Operators in a Control Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platz, O.; Rasmussen, J.; Skanborg, Preben Zacho

    A statistical analysis was made of operator response times recorded in the control room of a research reactor during the years 1972-1974. A homogeneity test revealed that the data consist of a mixture of populations. A small but statistically significant difference is found between day and night ...... response times. Lognormal distributions are found to provide the best fit of the day and the night response times....

  7. Vertical footbridge vibrations: Towards an improved and codifiable response evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingólfsson, Einar Thór; Georgakis, Christos; Jönsson, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    An improved and codifiable footbridge response evaluation is presented herewith, in which peak vertical accelerations are provided as a function of load return period in the form of response spectra. To achieve this, a series of Monte Carlo simulations are employed to generate vertical loads...

  8. Capturing Real-Time Data in Disaster Response Logistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezban Yagci Sokat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The volume, accuracy, accessibility and level of detail of near real-time data emerging from disaster-affected regions continue to significantly improve. Integration of dynamically evolving in-field data is an important, yet often overlooked, component of the humanitarian logistics models. In this paper, we present a framework for real-time humanitarian logistics data focused on use in mathematical modeling along with modeling implications of this framework. We also discuss how one might measure the attributes of the framework and describe the application of the presented framework to a case study of near real-time data collection in the days following the landfall of Typhoon Haiyan. We detail our first-hand experience of capturing data as the post-disaster response unfolds starting on November 10, 2013 until March 31, 2014 and assess the characteristics and evolution of data pertaining to humanitarian logistics modeling using the proposed framework. The presented logistical content analysis examines the availability of data and informs modelers about the current state of near real-time data. This analysis illustrates what data is available, how early it is available, and how data changes after the disaster. The study describes how our humanitarian logistics team approached the emergence of dynamic online data after the disaster and the challenges faced during the collection process, as well as recommendations to address these challenges in the future (when possible from an academic humanitarian logistics perspective.

  9. Improved Stabilization Criteria for Neutral Time-Delay Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lianglin Xiong; Haiyang Zhang; Yongkun Li; Zixin Liu

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the stabilization conditions for neutral systems with mixed time delays. By constructing a novel class of Lyapunov functionals which contains an augmented Lyapunov functional, using a new class of improved Jensen’s like inequalities, two improved delay-dependent stability criteria are firstly established. Next, state feedback controllers are designed according to the stability conditions in different cases. Finally, five numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the ...

  10. Computation Offloading for Frame-Based Real-Time Tasks under Given Server Response Time Guarantees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas S. M. Toma

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Computation offloading has been adopted to improve the performance of embedded systems by offloading the computation of some tasks, especially computation-intensive tasks, to servers or clouds. This paper explores computation offloading for real-time tasks in embedded systems, provided given response time guarantees from the servers, to decide which tasks should be offloaded to get the results in time. We consider frame-based real-time tasks with the same period and relative deadline. When the execution order of the tasks is given, the problem can be solved in linear time. However, when the execution order is not specified, we prove that the problem is NP-complete. We develop a pseudo-polynomial-time algorithm for deriving feasible schedules, if they exist.  An approximation scheme is also developed to trade the error made from the algorithm and the complexity. Our algorithms are extended to minimize the period/relative deadline of the tasks for performance maximization. The algorithms are evaluated with a case study for a surveillance system and synthesized benchmarks.

  11. Improving Autopsy Report Turnaround Times by Implementing Lean Management Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Susan; Chiasson, David A; Cassidy, Debra; Somers, Gino R

    2017-01-01

    The autopsy is an integral part of the service of a large academic pathology department. Timely reporting is central to providing good service and is beneficial for many stakeholders, including the families, the clinical team, the hospital, and the wider community. The current study aimed to improve hospital-consented autopsy reporting times (turnaround time, TAT) by using lean principles modified for a healthcare setting, with an aim of signing out 90% of autopsies in 90 days. An audit of current and historical TATs was performed, and a working group incorporating administrative, technical, and professional staff constructed a value stream map documenting the steps involved in constructing an autopsy report. Two areas of delay were noted: examination of the microscopy and time taken to sign-out the report after the weekly autopsy conference. Several measures were implemented to address these delays, including visual tracking using a whiteboard and individualized tracking sheets, weekly whiteboard huddles, and timelier scheduling of clinicopathologic conference rounds. All measures resulted in an improvement of TATs. In the 30 months prior to the institution of lean, 37% of autopsies (53/144) were signed out in 90 days, with a wide variation in reporting times. In the 30 months following the institution of lean, this improved to 74% (136/185) ( P lean; 63 days post-lean). The application of lean principles to autopsy sign-out workflow can significantly improve TATs and reduce variability, without changing staffing levels or significantly altering scheduling structure.

  12. Improving the precision of pulsar timing through polarization statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Osłowski, Stefan; Demorest, Paul; Bailes, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    At the highest levels of pulsar timing precision achieved to date, experiments are limited by noise intrinsic to the pulsar. This stochastic wideband impulse modulated self-noise (SWIMS) limits pulsar timing precision by randomly biasing the measured times of arrival and thus increasing the root mean square (rms) timing residual. We discuss an improved methodology of removing this bias in the measured times of arrival by including information about polarized radiation. Observations of J0437-4715 made over a one-week interval at the Parkes Observatory are used to demonstrate a nearly 40 per cent improvement in the rms timing residual with this extended analysis. In this way, based on the observations over a 64 MHz bandwidth centred at 1341 MHz with integrations over 16.78 s we achieve a 476 ns rms timing residual. In the absence of systematic error, these results lead to a predicted rms timing residual of 30 ns in one hour integrations; however the data are currently limited by variable Faraday rotation in the...

  13. Improved Continuous-Time Higher Harmonic Control Using Hinfinity Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Frank H.

    The helicopter is a versatile aircraft that can take-off and land vertically, hover efficiently, and maneuver in confined space. This versatility is enabled by the main rotor, which also causes undesired harmonic vibration during operation. This unwanted vibration has a negative impact on the practicality of the helicopter and also increases its operational cost. Passive control techniques have been applied to helicopter vibration suppression, but these methods are generally heavy and are not robust to changes in operating conditions. Feedback control offers the advantages of robustness and potentially higher performance over passive control techniques, and amongst the various feedback schemes, Shaw's higher harmonic control algorithm has been shown to be an effective method for attenuating harmonic disturbance in helicopters. In this thesis, the higher harmonic disturbance algorithm is further developed to achieve improved performance. One goal in this thesis is to determine the importance of periodicity in the helicopter rotor dynamics for control synthesis. Based on the analysis of wind tunnel data and simulation results, we conclude the helicopter rotor can be modeled reasonably well as linear and time-invariant for control design purposes. Modeling the helicopter rotor as linear time-invariant allows us to apply linear control theory concepts to the higher harmonic control problem. Another goal in this thesis is to find the limits of performance in harmonic disturbance rejection. To achieve this goal, we first define the metrics to measure the performance of the controller in terms of response speed and robustness to changes in the plant dynamics. The performance metrics are incorporated into an Hinfinity control problem. For a given plant, the resulting Hinfinity controller achieves the maximum performance, thus allowing us to identify the performance limitation in harmonic disturbance rejection. However, the Hinfinity controllers are of high order, and may

  14. Improved time complexity analysis of the Simple Genetic Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveto, Pietro S.; Witt, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    A runtime analysis of the Simple Genetic Algorithm (SGA) for the OneMax problem has recently been presented proving that the algorithm with population size μ≤n1/8−ε requires exponential time with overwhelming probability. This paper presents an improved analysis which overcomes some limitations...

  15. Impact of time on improvement of outcome after stroke.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkel, G.; Kollen, B.; Twisk, J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Longitudinal conducted studies show that neurologic and functional recovery show faster recovery in the first weeks poststroke. The aim of the present study was to study the effects of progress of time on observed improvements in motor strength, synergisms, and activities dur

  16. Impact of time on improvement of outcome after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkel, Gert; Kollen, Boudewijn; Twisk, Jos

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Longitudinal conducted studies show that neurologic and functional recovery show faster recovery in the first weeks poststroke. The aim of the present study was to study the effects of progress of time on observed improvements in motor strength, synergisms, and activities duri

  17. Improving Emergency Response and Human-Robotic Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David I. Gertman; David J. Bruemmer; R. Scott Hartley

    2007-08-01

    Preparedness for chemical, biological, and radiological/nuclear incidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs) includes the deployment of well trained emergency response teams. While teams are expected to do well, data from other domains suggests that the timeliness and accuracy associated with incident response can be improved through collaborative human-robotic interaction. Many incident response scenarios call for multiple, complex procedure-based activities performed by personnel wearing cumbersome personal protective equipment (PPE) and operating under high levels of stress and workload. While robotic assistance is postulated to reduce workload and exposure, limitations associated with communications and the robot’s ability to act independently have served to limit reliability and reduce our potential to exploit human –robotic interaction and efficacy of response. Recent work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on expanding robot capability has the potential to improve human-system response during disaster management and recovery. Specifically, increasing the range of higher level robot behaviors such as autonomous navigation and mapping, evolving new abstractions for sensor and control data, and developing metaphors for operator control have the potential to improve state-of-the-art in incident response. This paper discusses these issues and reports on experiments underway intelligence residing on the robot to enhance emergency response.

  18. Model for Predicting End User Web Page Response Time

    CERN Document Server

    Nagarajan, Sathya Narayanan

    2012-01-01

    Perceived responsiveness of a web page is one of the most important and least understood metrics of web page design, and is critical for attracting and maintaining a large audience. Web pages can be designed to meet performance SLAs early in the product lifecycle if there is a way to predict the apparent responsiveness of a particular page layout. Response time of a web page is largely influenced by page layout and various network characteristics. Since the network characteristics vary widely from country to country, accurately modeling and predicting the perceived responsiveness of a web page from the end user's perspective has traditionally proven very difficult. We propose a model for predicting end user web page response time based on web page, network, browser download and browser rendering characteristics. We start by understanding the key parameters that affect perceived response time. We then model each of these parameters individually using experimental tests and statistical techniques. Finally, we d...

  19. A time-domain method to generate artificial time history from a given reference response spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Gang Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Oh Seop [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Seismic qualification by test is widely used as a way to show the integrity and functionality of equipment that is related to the overall safety of nuclear power plants. Another means of seismic qualification is by direct integration analysis. Both approaches require a series of time histories as an input. However, in most cases, the possibility of using real earthquake data is limited. Thus, artificial time histories are widely used instead. In many cases, however, response spectra are given. Thus, most of the artificial time histories are generated from the given response spectra. Obtaining the response spectrum from a given time history is straightforward. However, the procedure for generating artificial time histories from a given response spectrum is difficult and complex to understand. Thus, this paper presents a simple time-domain method for generating a time history from a given response spectrum; the method was shown to satisfy conditions derived from nuclear regulatory guidance.

  20. Improved hybrid information filtering based on limited time window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wen-Jun; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2014-12-01

    Adopting the entire collecting information of users, the hybrid information filtering of heat conduction and mass diffusion (HHM) (Zhou et al., 2010) was successfully proposed to solve the apparent diversity-accuracy dilemma. Since the recent behaviors are more effective to capture the users' potential interests, we present an improved hybrid information filtering of adopting the partial recent information. We expand the time window to generate a series of training sets, each of which is treated as known information to predict the future links proven by the testing set. The experimental results on one benchmark dataset Netflix indicate that by only using approximately 31% recent rating records, the accuracy could be improved by an average of 4.22% and the diversity could be improved by 13.74%. In addition, the performance on the dataset MovieLens could be preserved by considering approximately 60% recent records. Furthermore, we find that the improved algorithm is effective to solve the cold-start problem. This work could improve the information filtering performance and shorten the computational time.

  1. The Effect of Police Response Time on Crime Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanes i Vidal, Jordi; Kirchmaier, Tom

    Police agencies devote vast resources to minimising the time that it takes them to attend the scene of a crime. Despite this, the long-standing consensus is that police response time has no meaningful effect on the likelihood of catching offenders. We revisit this question using a uniquely rich...... preferred estimate, a 10% increase in response time leads to a 4.6 percentage points decrease in the likelihood of detection. A faster response time also decreases the number of days that it takes for the police to detect a crime, conditional on eventual detection. We find stronger effects for thefts than...... for violent offenses, although the effects are large for every type of crime. We identify the higher likelihood that a suspect will be named by a victim or witness as an important mechanism though which response time makes a difference....

  2. Modeling of the Response Time of Thermal Flow Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Lang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a simple theoretical model for the response time of thermal flow sensors. Response time is defined here as the time needed by the sensor output signal to reach 63.2% of amplitude due to a change of fluid flow. This model uses the finite-difference method to solve the heat transfer equations, taking into consideration the transient conduction and convection between the sensor membrane and the surrounding fluid. Program results agree with experimental measurements and explain the response time dependence on the velocity and the sensor geometry. Values of the response time vary from about 5 ms in the case of stagnant flow to 1.5 ms for a flow velocity of 44 m/s.

  3. Planck 2013 results. VII. HFI time response and beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.;

    2013-01-01

    of the telescope and feeds, the processing of the time-ordered data and deconvolution of the bolometric and electronic time response, and the merging of several surveys to produce maps. The time response transfer functions are measured with observations of Jupiter and Saturn and by minimizing survey difference...... residuals. The scanning beam is the post-deconvolution angular response of the instrument, and is characterized with observations of Mars. The main beam solid angles are determined to better than 0.5% at each HFI frequency band. Observations of Jupiter and Saturn limit near sidelobes to ~0.1% of the total...

  4. Thermal emittance and response time of a cesium antimonide photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Merluzzi, Richard; Nichols, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the intrinsic emittance and response time of a Cs3Sb photocathode are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. Photoemission response time is evaluated using a RF deflecting cavity synchronized to a picosecond laser pulse train. We find that Cs3Sb has both small mean transverse energy, 160 ± 10 meV at 532 nm laser wavelength, and a prompt response time (below the resolution of our measurement) making it a suitable material for high brightness electron photoinjectors.

  5. Improved time complexity analysis of the Simple Genetic Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveto, Pietro S.; Witt, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    A runtime analysis of the Simple Genetic Algorithm (SGA) for the OneMax problem has recently been presented proving that the algorithm with population size μ≤n1/8−ε requires exponential time with overwhelming probability. This paper presents an improved analysis which overcomes some limitations...... this is a major improvement towards the reusability of the techniques in future systematic analyses of GAs. Finally, we consider the more natural SGA using selection with replacement rather than without replacement although the results hold for both algorithmic versions. Experiments are presented to explore...

  6. Distance measure with improved lower bound for multivariate time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailin

    2017-02-01

    Lower bound function is one of the important techniques used to fast search and index time series data. Multivariate time series has two aspects of high dimensionality including the time-based dimension and the variable-based dimension. Due to the influence of variable-based dimension, a novel method is proposed to deal with the lower bound distance computation for multivariate time series. The proposed method like the traditional ones also reduces the dimensionality of time series in its first step and thus does not directly apply the lower bound function on the multivariate time series. The dimensionality reduction is that multivariate time series is reduced to univariate time series denoted as center sequences according to the principle of piecewise aggregate approximation. In addition, an extended lower bound function is designed to obtain good tightness and fast measure the distance between any two center sequences. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed lower bound function has better tightness and improves the performance of similarity search in multivariate time series datasets.

  7. Minimizing Maximum Response Time and Delay Factor in Broadcast Scheduling

    CERN Document Server

    Chekuri, Chandra; Moseley, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    We consider online algorithms for pull-based broadcast scheduling. In this setting there are n pages of information at a server and requests for pages arrive online. When the server serves (broadcasts) a page p, all outstanding requests for that page are satisfied. We study two related metrics, namely maximum response time (waiting time) and maximum delay-factor and their weighted versions. We obtain the following results in the worst-case online competitive model. - We show that FIFO (first-in first-out) is 2-competitive even when the page sizes are different. Previously this was known only for unit-sized pages [10] via a delicate argument. Our proof differs from [10] and is perhaps more intuitive. - We give an online algorithm for maximum delay-factor that is O(1/eps^2)-competitive with (1+\\eps)-speed for unit-sized pages and with (2+\\eps)-speed for different sized pages. This improves on the algorithm in [12] which required (2+\\eps)-speed and (4+\\eps)-speed respectively. In addition we show that the algori...

  8. Distinguishing Fast and Slow Processes in Accuracy - Response Time Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Coomans

    Full Text Available We investigate the relation between speed and accuracy within problem solving in its simplest non-trivial form. We consider tests with only two items and code the item responses in two binary variables: one indicating the response accuracy, and one indicating the response speed. Despite being a very basic setup, it enables us to study item pairs stemming from a broad range of domains such as basic arithmetic, first language learning, intelligence-related problems, and chess, with large numbers of observations for every pair of problems under consideration. We carry out a survey over a large number of such item pairs and compare three types of psychometric accuracy-response time models present in the literature: two 'one-process' models, the first of which models accuracy and response time as conditionally independent and the second of which models accuracy and response time as conditionally dependent, and a 'two-process' model which models accuracy contingent on response time. We find that the data clearly violates the restrictions imposed by both one-process models and requires additional complexity which is parsimoniously provided by the two-process model. We supplement our survey with an analysis of the erroneous responses for an example item pair and demonstrate that there are very significant differences between the types of errors in fast and slow responses.

  9. Improved Response of ZnO Films for Pyroelectric Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yuan Yu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the temperature variation rate is a useful method for enhancing the response of pyroelectric devices. A three-dimensional ZnO film was fabricated by the aerosol deposition (AD rapid process using the shadow mask method, which induces lateral temperature gradients on the sidewalls of the responsive element, thereby increasing the temperature variation rate. To enhance the quality of the film and reduce the concentration of defects, the film was further treated by laser annealing, and the integration of a comb-like top electrode enhanced the voltage response and reduced the response time of the resulting ZnO pyroelectric devices.

  10. GPS computer navigators to shorten EMS response and transport times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, F S; Muramatsu, R S; Yoshida, B H; Yamamoto, L G

    2001-05-01

    GPS (global positioning satellite system to determine one's position on earth) units have become inexpensive and compact. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a GPS enhanced computer street map navigator to improve the ability of EMS drivers in an urban setting to locate their destination and shorten response times. For part I, residential addresses in the city were randomly selected from a telephone directory. Two driver/navigator teams were assigned to drive to the address adhering to speed limits. One team used a standard street map, whereas the other team used a GPS computer navigator. The travel time and distance of the runs were compared. For part II, the computer GPS navigator was placed on an ambulance to supplement their normal methods of navigation to find the address requesting EMS. After the run was completed, EMS providers were interviewed to determine their opinion of whether the GPS navigator was helpful. For part I the results showed that in the 29 initial test runs, comparing the GPS team versus the standard map team, the mean distances traveled were 8.7 versus 9.0 kilometers (not significant) and the mean travel times were 13.5 versus 14.6 minutes (P=.02), respectively. The GPS team arrived faster in 72% runs. For part II the results showed that most EMS providers surveyed noted that the GPS computer navigator enhanced their ability to find the destination and all EMS providers acknowledged that it would enhance their ability to find a destination in an area in which they were unfamiliar. These results suggest that a portable GPS computer navigator system is helpful and can enhance the ability of prehospital care providers to locate their destination. Because these units are accurate and inexpensive, GPS computer navigators may be a valuable tool in reducing pre-hospital transport times.

  11. Diminished response of arctic plants to warming over time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelseyann S Kremers

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to determine if the response of arctic plants to warming is consistent across species, locations and time. This study examined the impact of experimental warming and natural temperature variation on plants at Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska beginning in 1994. We considered observations of plant performance collected from 1994-2000 "short-term" and those from 2007-2012 "long-term". The plant traits reported are the number of inflorescences, inflorescence height, leaf length, and day of flower emergence. These traits can inform us about larger scale processes such as plant reproductive effort, plant growth, and plant phenology, and therefore provide valuable insight into community dynamics, carbon uptake, and trophic interactions. We categorized traits of all species monitored at each site into temperature response types. We then compared response types across traits, plant growth forms, sites, and over time to analyze the consistency of plant response to warming. Graminoids were the most responsive to warming and showed a positive response to temperature, while shrubs were generally the least responsive. Almost half (49% of response types (across all traits, species, and sites combined changed from short-term to long-term. The percent of plants responsive to warming decreased from 57% (short-term to 46% (long-term. These results indicate that the response of plants to warming varies over time and has diminished overall in recent years.

  12. Response surface analysis to improve dispersed crude oil biodegradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahed, Mohammad A.; Aziz, Hamidi A.; Mohajeri, Leila [School of Civil Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Isa, Mohamed H. [Civil Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2012-03-15

    In this research, the bioremediation of dispersed crude oil, based on the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus supplementation in the closed system, was optimized by the application of response surface methodology and central composite design. Correlation analysis of the mathematical-regression model demonstrated that a quadratic polynomial model could be used to optimize the hydrocarbon bioremediation (R{sup 2} = 0.9256). Statistical significance was checked by analysis of variance and residual analysis. Natural attenuation was removed by 22.1% of crude oil in 28 days. The highest removal on un-optimized condition of 68.1% were observed by using nitrogen of 20.00 mg/L and phosphorus of 2.00 mg/L in 28 days while optimization process exhibited a crude oil removal of 69.5% via nitrogen of 16.05 mg/L and phosphorus 1.34 mg/L in 27 days therefore optimization can improve biodegradation in shorter time with less nutrient consumption. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. An Improved Time Domain Procedure For Separating Incident And Reflected Water Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans Falk; Matsumoto, A.; Tayasu, M.;

    2002-01-01

    Impulse responses of digital filters for use in separating incident and reflected water waves in a time domain are improved by using a nonlinear least square formulation. The applicability and limitations of the method are discussed. Trial computations using a set of analytical examples with know...

  14. Improving the Timing of Extended Finite State Machines Via Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Yu Huang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a timing optimization technique for a complex finite state machine that consists of not only random logic but also data operators. In such a design, the timing critical path often forms a cycle and thus cannot be cut down easily by popular techniques such as pipelining or retiming. The proposed technique, based on the concept of catalyst, adds a functionally redundant block—which includes a piece of combinational logic and several other registers—to the circuits under consideration so that the timing critical paths are divided into stages. During this transformation, the circuit's functionality is not affected, while the speed is improved significantly. This technique has been successfully applied to an industrial application—a Built-In Self-Test (BIST circuit for static random access memories (SRAMs. The synthesis result indicates a 47% clock cycle time reduction.

  15. Improved test of time dilation in special relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saathoff, G; Karpuk, S; Eisenbarth, U; Huber, G; Krohn, S; Muñoz Horta, R; Reinhardt, S; Schwalm, D; Wolf, A; Gwinner, G

    2003-11-07

    An improved test of time dilation in special relativity has been performed using laser spectroscopy on fast ions at the heavy-ion storage-ring TSR in Heidelberg. The Doppler-shifted frequencies of a two-level transition in 7Li+ ions at v=0.064c have been measured in the forward and backward direction to an accuracy of Deltanu/nu=1 x 10(-9) using collinear saturation spectroscopy. The result confirms the relativistic Doppler formula and sets a new limit of 2.2 x 10(-7) for deviations from the time dilation factor gamma(SR)=(1-v2/c2)(-1/2).

  16. The Importance of Responsibility in Times of Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob Dahl Rendtorff

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I would like to show the importance of the concept of responsibility as the foundation of ethics in times of crisis in particular in the fields of politics and economics in the modern civilisation marked by globalization and technological progres. I consider the concept of responsibility as the key notion in order to understand the ethical duty in a modern technological civilisation. We can indeed observe a moralization of the concept of responsibility going beyond a strict lega...

  17. Model for Predicting End User Web Page Response Time

    OpenAIRE

    Nagarajan, Sathya Narayanan; Ravikumar, Srijith

    2012-01-01

    Perceived responsiveness of a web page is one of the most important and least understood metrics of web page design, and is critical for attracting and maintaining a large audience. Web pages can be designed to meet performance SLAs early in the product lifecycle if there is a way to predict the apparent responsiveness of a particular page layout. Response time of a web page is largely influenced by page layout and various network characteristics. Since the network characteristics vary widely...

  18. 18 CFR 1301.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... PROCEDURES Freedom of Information Act § 1301.5 Timing of responses to requests. (a) In general, TVA... person's knowledge and belief, explaining in detail the basis for requesting expedited processing. For...

  19. 36 CFR 1600.4 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Procedures for Disclosure of Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 1600.4 Timing of responses to... true and correct to the best of your knowledge and belief, explaining in detail the basis for...

  20. 6 CFR 5.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... INFORMATION Freedom of Information Act § 5.5 Timing of responses to requests. (a) In general. Components... true and correct to the best of that person's knowledge and belief, explaining in detail the basis for...

  1. Congestion Service Facilities Location Problem with Promise of Response Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In many services, promise of specific response time is advertised as a commitment by the service providers for the customer satisfaction. Congestion on service facilities could delay the delivery of the services and hurts the overall satisfaction. In this paper, congestion service facilities location problem with promise of response time is studied, and a mixed integer nonlinear programming model is presented with budget constrained. The facilities are modeled as M/M/c queues. The decision variables of the model are the locations of the service facilities and the number of servers at each facility. The objective function is to maximize the demands served within specific response time promised by the service provider. To solve this problem, we propose an algorithm that combines greedy and genetic algorithms. In order to verify the proposed algorithm, a lot of computational experiments are tested. And the results demonstrate that response time has a significant impact on location decision.

  2. Timely Response and Containment of 2016 Cholera Outbreak in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cholera outbreak to guide outbreak preparedness and timely response ... place to investigate an outbreak of diarrhoeal disease of undetermined ... brought to Kapisha health post for treatment. Although ..... in place it has spread rapidly in Haiti.

  3. Improving decision making in crisis response through critical thinking support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraagen, Jan Maarten; Ven, van de Josine G.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we describe how to use innovative techniques to improve the decision-making process in crisis response organizations. The focus was on building situation awareness of a crisis and overcoming pitfalls such as tunnel vision and information bias through using critical thinking. We starte

  4. Improving Completion Rates in Adult Education through Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Mariager-Anderson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Dropout is a serious problem within education. This article reports on an intervention project, titled "New Roles for the Teacher--Increased Completion Rates Through Social Responsibility," which sought to reduce nonattendance and drop-out rates in the Danish adult educational system by improving teachers' competences. This goal was…

  5. Improving Completion Rates in Adult Education through Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Mariager-Anderson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Dropout is a serious problem within education. This article reports on an intervention project, titled "New Roles for the Teacher--Increased Completion Rates Through Social Responsibility," which sought to reduce nonattendance and drop-out rates in the Danish adult educational system by improving teachers' competences. This goal was…

  6. A Mechanism for Error Detection in Speeded Response Time Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, Clay B.; Yeung, Nick; Coles, Michael G. H.; Cohen, Jonathan D.

    2005-01-01

    The concept of error detection plays a central role in theories of executive control. In this article, the authors present a mechanism that can rapidly detect errors in speeded response time tasks. This error monitor assigns values to the output of cognitive processes involved in stimulus categorization and response generation and detects errors…

  7. Response time to colored stimuli in the full visual field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, R. F.; Dawson, L. M.; Galvan, T.; Reid, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    Peripheral visual response time was measured in seven dark adapted subjects to the onset of small (45' arc diam), brief (50 msec), colored (blue, yellow, green, red) and white stimuli imaged at 72 locations within their binocular field of view. The blue, yellow, and green stimuli were matched for brightness at about 2.6 sub log 10 units above their absolute light threshold, and they appeared at an unexpected time and location. These data were obtained to provide response time and no-response data for use in various design disciplines involving instrument panel layout. The results indicated that the retina possesses relatively concentric regions within each of which mean response time can be expected to be of approximately the same duration. These regions are centered near the fovea and extend farther horizontally than vertically. Mean foveal response time was fastest for yellow and slowest for blue. Three and one-half percent of the total 56,410 trials presented resulted in no-responses. Regardless of stimulus color, the lowest percentage of no-responses occurred within 30 deg arc from the fovea and the highest within 40 deg to 80 deg arc below the fovea.

  8. Time domain modeling of tunable response of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokopeva, Ludmila; Emani, Naresh K.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    We present a causal numerical model for time domain simulations of the optical response of graphene. The dielectric function is approximated with a conductivity term, a Drude term and a number of the critical points terms.......We present a causal numerical model for time domain simulations of the optical response of graphene. The dielectric function is approximated with a conductivity term, a Drude term and a number of the critical points terms....

  9. Networked Control System Time-Delay Compensation Based on Time-Delay Prediction and Improved Implicit GPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Da Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The random time delay in a networked control system can usually deteriorate the control performance and stability of the networked control system. In order to solve this problem, this paper puts forward a networked control system random time-delay compensation method based on time-delay prediction and improved implicit generalized predictive control (GPC. The least squares support vector machine is used to predict the future time delay of network. The parameters of the least squares support vector machine time-delay prediction model are difficult to determine, and the genetic algorithm is used for least squares support vector machine optimal prediction parameter optimization. Then, an improved implicit generalized predictive control method is adopted to compensate for the time delay. The simulation results show that the method in this paper has high prediction accuracy and a good compensation effect for the random time delay of the networked control system, has a small amount of on-line calculation and that the output response and control stability of the system are improved.

  10. Femtosecond response time measurements of a Cs2Te photocathode

    CERN Document Server

    Aryshev, A; Honda, Y; Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J

    2015-01-01

    We present the response time measurements of a Cs2Te photocathode illuminated with two 100 fs duration, variable time separation laser pulses at 266 nm wavelength. The response time was confirmed in dispersive region downstream of a 12-cell standing wave S-band acceleration structure using a well-known RF zero-crossing technique. At the same time it was also measured by changing mechanical path-length difference between two micro-bunches. Both methods agree that Cs2Te photocathode time response is of the order of 250 fs and thereby it is possible to generate and control a THz sequence of relativistic electron bunches by a conventional S-band RF gun. This result further opens a possibility to construct wide-range tunable THz FEL.

  11. Improvement in global forecast for chaotic time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, P. R. L.; Duarte, L. G. S.; da Mota, L. A. C. P.

    2016-10-01

    In the Polynomial Global Approach to Time Series Analysis, the most costly (computationally speaking) step is the finding of the fitting polynomial. Here we present two routines that improve the forecasting. In the first, an algorithm that greatly improves this situation is introduced and implemented. The heart of this procedure is implemented on the specific routine which performs a mapping with great efficiency. In comparison with the similar procedure of the TimeS package developed by Carli et al. (2014), an enormous gain in efficiency and an increasing in accuracy are obtained. Another development in this work is the establishment of a level of confidence in global prediction with a statistical test for evaluating if the minimization performed is suitable or not. The other program presented in this article applies the Shapiro-Wilk test for checking the normality of the distribution of errors and calculates the expected deviation. The development is employed in observed and simulated time series to illustrate the performance obtained.

  12. Process improvement by cycle time reduction through Lean Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siva, R.; patan, Mahamed naveed khan; lakshmi pavan kumar, Mane; Purusothaman, M.; pitchai, S. Antony; Jegathish, Y.

    2017-05-01

    In present world, every customer needs their products to get on time with good quality. Presently every industry is striving to satisfy their customer requirements. An aviation concern trying to accomplish continuous improvement in all its projects. In this project the maintenance service for the customer is analyzed. The maintenance part service is split up into four levels. Out of it, three levels are done in service shops and the fourth level falls under customer’s privilege to change the parts in their aircraft engines at their location. An enhancement for electronics initial provisioning (eIP) is done for fourth level. Customers request service shops to get their requirements through Recommended Spare Parts List (RSPL) by eIP. To complete this RSPL for one customer, it takes 61.5 hours as a cycle time which is very high. By mapping current state VSM and takt time, future state improvement can be done in order to reduce cycle time using Lean tools such as Poke-Yoke, Jidoka, 5S, Muda etc.,

  13. Engaging Frontline Leaders and Staff in Real-Time Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer; Hebish, Linda J; Mann, Sharon; Ching, Joan M; Blackmore, C Craig

    2016-04-01

    The relationship of staff satisfaction and engagement to organizational success, along with the integral influence of frontline managers on this dimension, is well established in health care and other industries. To specifically address staff engagement, Virginia Mason Medical Center, an integrated, single-hospital health system, developed an approach that involved leaders, through the daily use of standard work for leaders, as well as staff, through a Lean-inspired staff idea system. Kaizen Promotion Office (KPO) staff members established three guiding principles: (1) Staff engagement begins with leader engagement; (2) Integrate daily improve- ment (kaizen) as a habitual way of life not as an add-on; and (3) Create an environment in which staff feel psycho- logically safe and valued. Two design elements--Standard Work for Leaders (SWL) and Everyday Lean Ideas (ELIs) were implemented. For the emergency department (ED), an early adopter of the staff engagement work, the challenge was to apply the guiding principles to improve staff engagement while improving quality and patient and staff satisfaction, even as patient volumes were increasing. Daily huddles for the KPO staff members and weekly leader rounds are used to elicit staff ideas and foster ELIs in real time. Overall progress to date has been tracked in terms of staff satisfaction surveys, voluntary staff turnover, adoption of SWL, and testing and implementation of staff ideas. For example, voluntary turnover of ED staff decreased from 14.6% in 2011 to 7.5% in 2012, and 2.0% in 2013. Organizationwide, at least 800 staff ideas are in motion at any given time, with finished ones posted in an idea supermarket website. A leadership and staff engagement approach that focuses on SWL and on capturing staff ideas for daily problem solving and improvement can contribute to organization success and improve the quality of health care delivery.

  14. Analysis and improvement of SNR using time slicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanam, Srikrishna; Singh, Amarjot; Kumar, Devinder; Choubey, Akash; Bacchuwar, Ketan

    2011-06-01

    Noise is a very important factor which in most cases, plays an antagonistic role in the vast field of image processing. Thus noise needs to be studied in great depth in order to improve the quality of images. The quantity of signal in an image, corrupted by noise is generally described by the term Signal-to-Noise ratio. Capturing multiple photos at different focus settings is a powerful approach for improving SNR. The paper analyses a frame work for optimally balancing the tradeoff's between defocus and sensor noise by experimenting on synthetic as well as real video sequences. The method is first applied to synthetic image where the improvement in SNR is studied by the ability of Hough transform to extract the number of lines with respect to the variation in SNR. The paper further experiments on real time video sequences while the improvement in SNR is analyzed using different edge operators like Sobel, Canny, Prewitt, Roberts and Laplacian. The result obtained is further analyzed using different edge operators. The main aim is to detect the edges at different values of SNR which will be a prominent measure of the signal strength as well as clarity of an image. The paper also explains in depth the modeling of noise leading to better understanding of SNR. The results obtain from both synthetic image and real time video sequences elaborate the increase in SNR with the increment in the total number of time slices in a fixed budget leading to clear pictures. This technique can be very effectively applied to capture high quality images from long distances.

  15. Uniqueness of system response time for transient condensing flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedekind, G.L.; Bhatt, B.L. (Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI (United States)); Beck, B.T. (Kansas State Univ., Manhattan (United States)); Roslund, G.L. (General Motors Corp., Detroit, MI (United States))

    1989-11-01

    The unique characteristics under consideration in this paper are encountered in condensing flows, and have to do with a system's response time for various degrees of outlet flow quality. Specifically, the system response time for condensing flows appears to increase monotonically with decreasing outlet flow quality, reaching a maximum for systems having an outlet flow quality of between 10 and 20%. The system response time then decreases for outlet flow qualities that are less than that value. These unique characteristics are predicted theoretically by system mean void fraction model. The purpose of this paper is to develop analytically the characteristics, explain the physics of the phenomena responsible, and discuss the experimental verification efforts that have thus far been carried out.

  16. Response Mixture Modeling of Intraindividual Differences in Responses and Response Times to the Hungarian WISC-IV Block Design Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, D.; Bolsinova, M.; Rozsa, S.; De Boeck, P.

    2016-01-01

    Response times may constitute an important additional source of information about cognitive ability as it enables to distinguishing between different intraindividual response processes. In this paper, we present a method to disentangle interindividual variation from intraindividual variation in the

  17. Conceptual Question Response Times in Peer Instruction Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly; Lasry, Nathaniel; Lukoff, Brian; Schell, Julie; Mazur, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Classroom response systems are widely used in interactive teaching environments as a way to engage students by asking them questions. Previous research on the time taken by students to respond to conceptual questions has yielded insights on how students think and change conceptions. We measure the amount of time students take to respond to…

  18. Infection of Wolbachia may improve the olfactory response of Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yu; WANG YuFeng

    2009-01-01

    The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia infects various insects and is primarily known for its ability to manipulate host reproduction.Recent investigations reveal that Wolbachia also affects the activity of somatic cells.We here demonstrated by trap method and T-maze that Wolbachia infection had signifi-cant impact on the olfactory response of Drosophila simulans.Wolbachia-infected flies took shorter time to enter the food trap and were more sensitive to odorant in T-maze than those uninfected controls,The time of olfactory response was relative to Wolbachia density in flies.Wolbachia density in 15-day-old flies that were caught in a shorter time (less than 60 min) by food trap was significantly higher than those taken in a longer time (more than 100 min).Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the transcript of an important odorant receptor gene or83b in flies with fast olfactory response was sig-nificantly more than those with slow olfactory response.These results suggest that Wolbachia might Increase olfactory response of flies by regulating the expression of olfaction-related genes in hosts.

  19. Use of Response Time for Measuring Cognitive Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Kyllonen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review some of the key literature on response time as it has played a role in cognitive ability measurement, providing a historical perspective as well as covering current research. We discuss the speed-level distinction, dimensions of speed and level in cognitive abilities frameworks, speed–accuracy tradeoff, approaches to addressing speed–accuracy tradeoff, analysis methods, particularly item response theory-based, response time models from cognitive psychology (ex-Gaussian function, and the diffusion model, and other uses of response time in testing besides ability measurement. We discuss several new methods that can be used to provide greater insight into the speed and level aspects of cognitive ability and speed–accuracy tradeoff decisions. These include item-level time limits, the use of feedback (e.g., CUSUMs, explicit scoring rules that combine speed and accuracy information (e.g., count down timing, and cognitive psychology models. We also review some of the key psychometric advances in modeling speed and level, which combine speed and ability measurement, address speed–accuracy tradeoff, allow for distinctions between response times on items responded to correctly and incorrectly, and integrate psychometrics with information-processing modeling. We suggest that the application of these models and tools is likely to advance both the science and measurement of human abilities for theory and applications.

  20. Lean intervention improves patient discharge times, improves emergency department throughput and reduces congestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michael J; Okerblom, Davin; Kumar, Anika; Bandyopadhyay, Subhankar; Scalzi, Lisabeth V

    2016-12-01

    To determine if a lean intervention improved emergency department (ED) throughput and reduced ED boarding by improving patient discharge efficiency from a tertiary care children's hospital. The study was conducted at a tertiary care children's hospital to study the impact lean that changes made to an inpatient pediatric service line had on ED efficiency. Discharge times from the general pediatrics' service were compared to patients discharged from all other pediatric subspecialty services. The intervention was multifaceted. First, team staffing reconfiguration permitted all discharge work to be done at the patient's bedside using a new discharge checklist. The intervention also incorporated an afternoon interdisciplinary huddle to work on the following day's discharges. Retrospectively, we determined the impact this had on median times of discharge order entry, patient discharge, and percent of patients discharged before noon. As a marker of ED throughput, we determined median hour of day that admitted patients left the ED to move to their hospital bed. As marker of ED congestion we determined median boarding times. For the general pediatrics service line, the median discharge order entry time decreased from 1:43pm to 11:28am (p Lean principles implemented by one hospital service line improved patient discharge times enhanced patient ED throughput, and reduced ED boarding times.

  1. Response Time Optimization for Replica Selection Service in Data Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husni H.E. AL-Mistarihi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Data Grid architecture provides a scalable infrastructure for grid services in order to manage data files and their corresponding replicas that were distributed across the globe. The grid services are designed to support a variety of data grid applications (jobs and projects. Replica selection is a high-level service that chooses a replica location from among many distributed replicas with the minimum response time for the users' jobs. Estimating the response time accurately in the grid environment is not an easy task. The current systems expose high response time in selecting the required replicas because the response time is estimated by considering the data transfer time only. Approach: We proposed a replica selection system that selects the best replica location for the users' running jobs in a minimum response time that can be estimated by considering new factors besides the data transfer time, namely, the storage access latency and the replica requests that waiting in the storage queue. Results: The performance of the proposed system was compared with a similar system that exists in the literature namely, SimpleOptimiser. The simulation results demonstrated that our system performed better than the SimpleOptimiser on an average of 6%. Conclusions: The proposed system can select the best replica location in a lesser response time than the SimpleOptimise. The efficiency of the proposed system is 6% higher than the SimpleOptimise. The efficiency level has a high impact on the quality of service that is perceived by grid users in a data grid environment where the data files are relatively big. For example, the data files produced from the scientific applications are of the size hundreds of Terabytes.

  2. Conceptual question response times in Peer Instruction classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly; Lasry, Nathaniel; Lukoff, Brian; Schell, Julie; Mazur, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Classroom response systems are widely used in interactive teaching environments as a way to engage students by asking them questions. Previous research on the time taken by students to respond to conceptual questions has yielded insights on how students think and change conceptions. We measure the amount of time students take to respond to in-class, conceptual questions [ConcepTests (CTs)] in two introductory physics courses taught using Peer Instruction and use item response theory to determine the difficulty of the CTs. We examine response time differences between correct and incorrect answers both before and after the peer discussion for CTs of varying difficulty. We also determine the relationship between response time and student performance on a standardized test of incoming physics knowledge, precourse self-efficacy, and gender. Our data reveal three results of interest. First, response time for correct answers is significantly faster than for incorrect answers, both before and after peer discussion, especially for easy CTs. Second, students with greater incoming physics knowledge and higher self-efficacy respond faster in both rounds. Third, there is no gender difference in response rate after controlling for incoming physics knowledge scores, although males register significantly more attempts before committing to a final answer than do female students. These results provide insight into effective CT pacing during Peer Instruction. In particular, in order to maintain a pace that keeps everyone engaged, students should not be given too much time to respond. When around 80% of the answers are in, the ratio of correct to incorrect responses rapidly approaches levels indicating random guessing and instructors should close the poll.

  3. Lag time in water quality response to best management practices: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meals, Donald W; Dressing, Steven A; Davenport, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    Nonpoint source (NPS) watershed projects often fail to meet expectations for water quality improvement because of lag time, the time elapsed between adoption of management changes and the detection of measurable improvement in water quality in the target water body. Even when management changes are well-designed and fully implemented, water quality monitoring efforts may not show definitive results if the monitoring period, program design, and sampling frequency are not sufficient to address the lag between treatment and response. The main components of lag time include the time required for an installed practice to produce an effect, the time required for the effect to be delivered to the water resource, the time required for the water body to respond to the effect, and the effectiveness of the monitoring program to measure the response. The objectives of this review are to explore the characteristics of lag time components, to present examples of lag times reported from a variety of systems, and to recommend ways for managers to cope with the lag between treatment and response. Important processes influencing lag time include hydrology, vegetation growth, transport rate and path, hydraulic residence time, pollutant sorption properties, and ecosystem linkages. The magnitude of lag time is highly site and pollutant specific, but may range from months to years for relatively short-lived contaminants such as indicator bacteria, years to decades for excessive P levels in agricultural soils, and decades or more for sediment accumulated in river systems. Groundwater travel time is also an important contributor to lag time and may introduce a lag of decades between changes in agricultural practices and improvement in water quality. Approaches to deal with the inevitable lag between implementation of management practices and water quality response lie in appropriately characterizing the watershed, considering lag time in selection, siting, and monitoring of management

  4. Improving Emergency Department Door to Doctor Time and Process Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Mazen J.; El-Eid, Ghada R.; Saliba, Miriam; Jabbour, Rima; Hitti, Eveline A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of using lean management methods on improving emergency department door to doctor times at a tertiary care hospital. We performed a before and after study at an academic urban emergency department with 49,000 annual visits after implementing a series of lean driven interventions over a 20 month period. The primary outcome was mean door to doctor time and the secondary outcome was length of stay of both admitted and discharged patients. A convenience sample from the preintervention phase (February 2012) was compared to another from the postintervention phase (mid-October to mid-November 2013). Individual control charts were used to assess process stability. Postintervention there was a statistically significant decrease in the mean door to doctor time measure (40.0 minutes ± 53.44 vs 25.3 minutes ± 15.93 P < 0.001). The postintervention process was more statistically in control with a drop in the upper control limits from 148.8 to 72.9 minutes. Length of stay of both admitted and discharged patients dropped from 2.6 to 2.0 hours and 9.0 to 5.5 hours, respectively. All other variables including emergency department visit daily volumes, hospital occupancy, and left without being seen rates were comparable. Using lean change management techniques can be effective in reducing door to doctor time in the Emergency Department and improving process reliability. PMID:26496278

  5. Improving completion rates in adult education through social responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Mariager-Anderson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Dropout is a serious problem within education. This article reports on an intervention project, titled “New Roles for the Teacher—Increased Completion Rates Through Social Responsibility,” which sought to reduce nonattendance and dropout rates in the Danish adult educational system by improving t...... of reducing drop-out rates. As a consequence, the teachers acted more consistently and purposefully to prevent dropout, and a positive effect of the intervention on drop-out rates was documented....

  6. Response rate, response time, and economic costs of survey research: A randomized trial of practicing pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardigan, Patrick C; Popovici, Ioana; Carvajal, Manuel J

    2016-01-01

    There is a gap between increasing demands from pharmacy journals, publishers, and reviewers for high survey response rates and the actual responses often obtained in the field by survey researchers. Presumably demands have been set high because response rates, times, and costs affect the validity and reliability of survey results. Explore the extent to which survey response rates, average response times, and economic costs are affected by conditions under which pharmacist workforce surveys are administered. A random sample of 7200 U.S. practicing pharmacists was selected. The sample was stratified by delivery method, questionnaire length, item placement, and gender of respondent for a total of 300 observations within each subgroup. A job satisfaction survey was administered during March-April 2012. Delivery method was the only classification showing significant differences in response rates and average response times. The postal mail procedure accounted for the highest response rates of completed surveys, but the email method exhibited the quickest turnaround. A hybrid approach, consisting of a combination of postal and electronic means, showed the least favorable results. Postal mail was 2.9 times more cost effective than the email approach and 4.6 times more cost effective than the hybrid approach. Researchers seeking to increase practicing pharmacists' survey participation and reduce response time and related costs can benefit from the analytical procedures tested here. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A time-dependent model for improved biogalvanic tissue characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, J H; Culmer, P R; Jayne, D G; Neville, A

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of the passive electrical resistance of biological tissues through biogalvanic characterisation has been proposed as a simple means of distinguishing healthy from diseased tissue. This method has the potential to provide valuable real-time information when integrated into surgical tools. Characterised tissue resistance values have been shown to be particularly sensitive to external load switching direction and rate, bringing into question the stability and efficacy of the technique. These errors are due to transient variations observed in measurement data that are not accounted for in current electrical models. The presented research proposes the addition of a time-dependent element to the characterisation model to account for losses associated with this transient behaviour. Influence of switching rate has been examined, with the inclusion of transient elements improving the repeatability of the characterised tissue resistance. Application of this model to repeat biogalvanic measurements on a single ex vivo human colon tissue sample with healthy and cancerous (adenocarcinoma) regions showed a statistically significant difference (p  0.05) between tissue types was found when measurements were subjected to the current model, suggesting that the proposed model may allow for improved biogalvanic tissue characterisation. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reinterpreting space, time lags, and functional responses in ecological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, M J; Wilson, H B; Pacala, S W

    2000-12-01

    Natural enemy-victim interactions are of major applied importance and of fundamental interest to ecologists. A key question is what stabilizes these interactions, allowing the long-term coexistence of the two species. Three main theoretical explanations have been proposed: behavioral responses, time-dependent factors such as delayed density dependence, and spatial heterogeneity. Here, using the powerful moment-closure technique, we show a fundamental equivalence between these three elements. Limited movement by organisms is a ubiquitous feature of ecological systems, allowing spatial structure to develop; we show that the effects of this can be naturally described in terms of time lags or within-generation functional responses.

  9. Regional changes over time in initial virological response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, W; Kirk, O; Gatell, J;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS......: Virologic response (viral load Virologic.......026) and time (P virologic response after adjustment for confounders. Stratified by period, regional differences were less evident (early cART, P = 0.967; mid cART, P = 0.291; late cART, P = 0.163). Stratified by region, temporal changes were observed (south, P = 0.061; central west, P

  10. How Photonic Crystals Can Improve the Timing Resolution of Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P; Knapitsch, A

    2013-01-01

    Photonic crystals (PhCs) and quantum optics phenomena open interesting perspectives to enhance the light extraction from scintillating me dia with high refractive indices as demonstrated by our previous work. By doing so, they also in fl uence the timing resolution of scintillators by improving the photostatistics. The present cont ribution will demonstrate that they are actually doing much more. Indeed, photonic crystals, if properly designed, allow the extr action of fast light propagation modes in the crystal with higher efficiency, therefore contributing to increasing the density of photons in the early phase of the light pulse. This is of particular interest to tag events at future high-energy physics colliders, such as CLIC, with a bunch-crossing rate of 2 GHz, as well as for a new generation of time-of-flight positron emission tomographs (TOFPET) aiming at a coincidence timing resolution of 100 ps FWHM. At this level of precision, good control of the light propagation modes is crucial if we consid...

  11. Time dependent density functional calculation of plasmon response in clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Feng(王锋); Zhang Feng-Shou(张丰收); Eric Suraud

    2003-01-01

    We have introduced a theoretical scheme for the efficient description of the optical response of a cluster based on the time-dependent density functional theory. The practical implementation is done by means of the fully fledged timedependent local density approximation scheme, which is solved directly in the time domain without any linearization.As an example we consider the simple Na2 cluster and compute its surface plasmon photoabsorption cross section, which is in good agreement with the experiments.

  12. Information Gap Analysis: near real-time evaluation of disaster response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Trevor

    2014-05-01

    Disasters, such as major storm events or earthquakes, trigger an immediate response by the disaster management system of the nation in question. The quality of this response is a large factor in its ability to limit the impacts on the local population. Improving the quality of disaster response therefore reduces disaster impacts. Studying past disasters is a valuable exercise to understand what went wrong, identify measures which could have mitigated these issues, and make recommendations to improve future disaster planning and response. While such ex post evaluations can lead to improvements in the disaster management system, there are limitations. The main limitation that has influenced this research is that ex post evaluations do not have the ability to inform the disaster response being assessed for the obvious reason that they are carried out long after the response phase is over. The result is that lessons learned can only be applied to future disasters. In the field of humanitarian relief, this limitation has led to the development of real time evaluations. The key aspect of real time humanitarian evaluations is that they are completed while the operation is still underway. This results in findings being delivered at a time when they can still make a difference to the humanitarian response. Applying such an approach to the immediate disaster response phase requires an even shorter time-frame, as well as a shift in focus from international actors to the nation in question's government. As such, a pilot study was started and methodology developed, to analyze disaster response in near real-time. The analysis uses the information provided by the disaster management system within the first 0 - 5 days of the response. The data is collected from publicly available sources such as ReliefWeb and sorted under various categories which represent each aspect of disaster response. This process was carried out for 12 disasters. The quantity and timeliness of information

  13. Planck 2013 results. VII. HFI time response and beams

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bowyer, J W; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Haissinski, J; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hou, Z; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matsumura, T; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polegre, A M; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Sauvé, A; Savini, G; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper characterizes the effective beams,the effective beam window functions and the associated errors for the Planck HFI detectors. The effective beam is the angular response including the effect of the optics,detectors,data processing and the scan strategy. The window function is the representation of this beam in the harmonic domain which is required to recover an unbiased measurement of the CMB angular power spectrum. The HFI is a scanning instrument and its effective beams are the convolution of: (a) the optical response of the telescope and feeds;(b)the processing of the time-ordered data and deconvolution of the bolometric and electronic time response; and (c) the merging of several surveys to produce maps. The time response functions are measured using observations of Jupiter and Saturn and by minimizing survey difference residuals. The scanning beam is the post-deconvolution angular response of the instrument, and is characterized with observations of Mars. The main beam solid angles are determin...

  14. 5 CFR 1820.4 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1820.4 Section 1820.4 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF SPECIAL COUNSEL FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUESTS... knowledge and belief, explaining in detail the basis for requesting expedited processing. For example, a...

  15. Real-Time Continuous Response Spectra Exceedance Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Frank; Harvey, Danny; Lindquist, Kent; Franke, Mathias

    2017-04-01

    A novel approach is presented for near real-time earthquake alarms for critical structures at distributed locations using real-time estimation of response spectra obtained from near free-field motions. Influential studies dating back to the 1980s identified spectral response acceleration as a key ground motion characteristic that correlates well with observed damage in structures. Thus, monitoring and reporting on exceedance of spectra-based thresholds are useful tools for assessing the potential for damage to facilities or multi-structure campuses based on input ground motions only. With as little as one strong-motion station per site, this scalable approach can provide rapid alarms on the damage status of remote towns, critical infrastructure (e.g., hospitals, schools) and points of interests (e.g., bridges) for a very large number of locations enabling better rapid decision making during critical and difficult immediate post-earthquake response actions. Real-time calculation of PSA exceedance and alarm dissemination are enabled with Bighorn, a module included in the Antelope software package that combines real-time spectral monitoring and alarm capabilities with a robust built-in web display server. Examples of response spectra from several M 5 events recorded by the ANZA seismic network in southern California will be presented.

  16. 48 CFR 1505.203 - Publicizing and response time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Publicizing and response time. 1505.203 Section 1505.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... in FAR 5.202(a)(7), if to do so would disclose the originality of thought or innovativeness of...

  17. A generic and compositional framework for multicore response time analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altmeyer, S.; Davis, R.I.; Indrusiak, L.; Maiza, C.; Nelis, V.; Reineke, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a Multicore Response Time Analysis (MRTA) framework. This framework is extensible to different multicore architectures, with various types and arrangements of local memory, and different arbitration policies for the common interconnects. We instantiate the framework for s

  18. From Zero to Sixty: Calibrating Real-Time Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulis, Theodoro; Ramsay, James O.; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in data recording technology have given researchers new ways of collecting on-line and continuous data for analyzing input-output systems. For example, continuous response digital interfaces are increasingly used in psychophysics. The statistical problem related to these input-output systems reduces to linking time-varying…

  19. Mean Response Time Approximation for HTTP Transactions over Transport Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. J. Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses mean response time that end-users experience when using the Internet. HTTP (Hyper Text Transfer Protocol is a widely used transfer protocol to retrieve web objects in the Internet. Generally, HTTP uses TCP (Transmission Control Protocol in a transport layer. But it is known that HTTP interacts with TCP inefficiently. As an example of such inefficiencies, HTTP does not require TCP to deliver the rigid order, which may cause head-of-line blocking. As another transport layer protocol, SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol has attractive features such as multi-streaming and multi-homing unlike TCP. Within an SCTP association, multi-streaming allows for independent delivery among streams, thus can avoid the head-of-line blocking. In addition, SCTP provides very large number of streams; therefore, it can transfer multiple objects more efficiently than the typical HTTP/1.1 over TCP which limits the number of pipelines. Mean response time is one of the main measures that end users using Internet concern. This paper presents the simple analytical model and algorithm to find the mean response time for HTTP over SCTP including the previous HTTP over TCP. Some computational experiences show that the proposed model and algorithm are well approximated to the real environment. Also, it is shown that mean response time for HTTP over SCTP can be less than that for HTTP over TCP.

  20. Linear-response thermal time-dependent density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron

    2015-01-01

    The van Leeuwen proof of linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is generalized to thermal ensembles. This allows generalization to finite temperatures of the Gross-Kohn relation, the exchange-correlation kernel of TDDFT, and fluctuation dissipation theorem for DFT. This produces a natural method for generating new thermal exchange-correlation (XC) approximations.

  1. Timing and causality in the generation of learned eyelid responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raudel eSánchez-Campusano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum-red nucleus-facial motoneuron (Mn pathway has been reported as being involved in the proper timing of classically conditioned eyelid responses. This special type of associative learning serves as a model of event timing for studying the role of the cerebellum in dynamic motor control. Here, we have re-analyzed the firing activities of cerebellar posterior interpositus (IP neurons and orbicularis oculi (OO Mns in alert behaving cats during classical eyeblink conditioning, using a delay paradigm. The aim was to revisit the hypothesis that the IP neurons can be considered a neuronal phase-modulating device supporting OO Mns firing with an emergent timing mechanism and an explicit correlation code during learned eyelid movements. Optimized experimental and computational tools allowed us to determine the different causal relationships (temporal order and correlation code during and between trials. These intra- and inter-trial timing strategies expanding from sub-second range (millisecond timing to longer-lasting ranges (interval timing expanded the functional domain of cerebellar timing beyond motor control. Interestingly, the results supported the above-mentioned hypothesis. The causal inferences were influenced by the precise motor and premotor spike-timing in the cause-effect interval, and, in addition, the timing of the learned responses depended on cerebellar-Mn network causality. Furthermore, the timing of CRs depended upon the probability of simulated causal conditions in the cause-effect interval and not the mere duration of the inter-stimulus interval. In this work, the close relation between timing and causality was verified. It could thus be concluded that the firing activities of IP neurons may be related more to the proper performance of ongoing CRs (i.e., the proper timing as a consequence of the pertinent causality than to their generation and/or initiation.

  2. Time-lapse and slow-motion tracking of temperature changes: response time of a thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moggio, L.; Onorato, P.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2017-03-01

    We propose the use of a smartphone based time-lapse and slow-motion video techniques together with tracking analysis as valuable tools for investigating thermal processes such as the response time of a thermometer. The two simple experimental activities presented here, suitable also for high school and undergraduate students, allow one to measure in a simple yet rigorous way the response time of an alcohol thermometer and show its critical dependence on the properties of the surrounding environment giving insight into instrument characteristics, heat transfer and thermal equilibrium concepts.

  3. Aircraft Fault Detection Using Real-Time Frequency Response Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.

    2016-01-01

    A real-time method for estimating time-varying aircraft frequency responses from input and output measurements was demonstrated. The Bat-4 subscale airplane was used with NASA Langley Research Center's AirSTAR unmanned aerial flight test facility to conduct flight tests and collect data for dynamic modeling. Orthogonal phase-optimized multisine inputs, summed with pilot stick and pedal inputs, were used to excite the responses. The aircraft was tested in its normal configuration and with emulated failures, which included a stuck left ruddervator and an increased command path latency. No prior knowledge of a dynamic model was used or available for the estimation. The longitudinal short period dynamics were investigated in this work. Time-varying frequency responses and stability margins were tracked well using a 20 second sliding window of data, as compared to a post-flight analysis using output error parameter estimation and a low-order equivalent system model. This method could be used in a real-time fault detection system, or for other applications of dynamic modeling such as real-time verification of stability margins during envelope expansion tests.

  4. Direct Torque Control Induction Motor Drive with Improved Flux Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhoopendra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate flux estimation and control of stator flux by the flux control loop is the determining factor in effective implementation of DTC algorithm. In this paper a comparison of voltage-model-based flux estimation techniques for flux response improvement is carried out. The effectiveness of these methods is judged on the basis of Root Mean Square Flux Error (RMSFE, Total Harmonic Distortion (THD of stator current, and dynamic flux response. The theoretical aspects of these methods are discussed and a comparative analysis is provided with emphasis on digital signal processor (DSP based controller implementation. The effectiveness of the proposed flux estimation algorithm is investigated through simulation and experimentally validated on a test drive.

  5. Dose-time-response modeling using negative binomial distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Munmun; Choudhury, Kanak; Islam, M M; Matin, M A

    2013-01-01

    People exposed to certain diseases are required to be treated with a safe and effective dose level of a drug. In epidemiological studies to find out an effective dose level, different dose levels are applied to the exposed and a certain number of cures is observed. Negative binomial distribution is considered to fit overdispersed Poisson count data. This study investigates the time effect on the response at different time points as well as at different dose levels. The point estimation and confidence bands for ED(100p)(t) and LT(100p)(d) are formulated in closed form for the proposed dose-time-response model with the negative binomial distribution. Numerical illustrations are carried out in order to check the performance level of the proposed model.

  6. The Time Course Effect of Moderate Intensity Exercise on Response Execution and Response Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Jennifer; Graydon, Jan; McMorris, Terry; Davranche, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the time course effect of a moderate steady-state exercise session on response execution and response inhibition using a stop-task paradigm. Ten participants performed a stop-signal task whilst cycling at a carefully controlled workload intensity (40% of maximal aerobic power), immediately following exercise and…

  7. Statistical tests of conditional independence between responses and/or response times on test items

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.; Glas, Cornelis A.W.

    2010-01-01

    Three plausible assumptions of conditional independence in a hierarchical model for responses and response times on test items are identified. For each of the assumptions, a Lagrange multiplier test of the null hypothesis of conditional independence against a parametric alternative is derived. The t

  8. Seismic Response of Wind Turbines: Time Domain Simulations Including SSI

    OpenAIRE

    Amdal, Åse Marit Wist

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a numerical model of a 5MW offshore wind turbine on a monopile foundation was created in order to calculate the dynamic response of the structure including soil-structure interaction. The main focus was to develop a reliable numerical model of the coupled system - including the tower, monopile foundation and the surrounding soil. The wind turbine was subjected to earthquake load in the time-domain. The global response of the wind turbine was compared for the two prevalent meth...

  9. Ultimate response time of high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, Sergey; Rupper, Greg [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States); Shur, Michael [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    We present theoretical studies of the response time of the two-dimensional gated electron gas to femtosecond pulses. Our hydrodynamic simulations show that the device response to a short pulse or a step-function signal is either smooth or oscillating time-decay at low and high mobility, μ, values, respectively. At small gate voltage swings, U{sub 0} = U{sub g} − U{sub th}, where U{sub g} is the gate voltage and U{sub th} is the threshold voltage, such that μU{sub 0}/L < v{sub s}, where L is the channel length and v{sub s} is the effective electron saturation velocity, the decay time in the low mobility samples is on the order of L{sup 2}/(μU{sub 0}), in agreement with the analytical drift model. However, the decay is preceded by a delay time on the order of L/s, where s is the plasma wave velocity. This delay is the ballistic transport signature in collision-dominated devices, which becomes important during very short time periods. In the high mobility devices, the period of the decaying oscillations is on the order of the plasma wave velocity transit time. Our analysis shows that short channel field effect transistors operating in the plasmonic regime can meet the requirements for applications as terahertz detectors, mixers, delay lines, and phase shifters in ultra high-speed wireless communication circuits.

  10. Ultimate response time of high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Sergey; Rupper, Greg; Shur, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We present theoretical studies of the response time of the two-dimensional gated electron gas to femtosecond pulses. Our hydrodynamic simulations show that the device response to a short pulse or a step-function signal is either smooth or oscillating time-decay at low and high mobility, μ, values, respectively. At small gate voltage swings, U0 = Ug - Uth, where Ug is the gate voltage and Uth is the threshold voltage, such that μU0/L < vs, where L is the channel length and vs is the effective electron saturation velocity, the decay time in the low mobility samples is on the order of L2/(μU0), in agreement with the analytical drift model. However, the decay is preceded by a delay time on the order of L/s, where s is the plasma wave velocity. This delay is the ballistic transport signature in collision-dominated devices, which becomes important during very short time periods. In the high mobility devices, the period of the decaying oscillations is on the order of the plasma wave velocity transit time. Our analysis shows that short channel field effect transistors operating in the plasmonic regime can meet the requirements for applications as terahertz detectors, mixers, delay lines, and phase shifters in ultra high-speed wireless communication circuits.

  11. Image segmentation techniques for improved processing of landmine responses in ground-penetrating radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrione, Peter A.; Collins, Leslie

    2007-04-01

    As ground penetrating radar sensor phenomenology improves, more advanced statistical processing approaches become applicable to the problem of landmine detection in GPR data. Most previous studies on landmine detection in GPR data have focused on the application of statistics and physics based prescreening algorithms, new feature extraction approaches, and improved feature classification techniques. In the typical framework, prescreening algorithms provide spatial location information of anomalous responses in down-track / cross-track coordinates, and feature extraction algorithms are then tasked with generating low-dimensional information-bearing feature sets from these spatial locations. However in time-domain GPR, a significant portion of the data collected at prescreener flagged locations may be unrelated to the true anomaly responses - e.g. ground bounce response, responses either temporally "before" or "after" the anomalous response, etc. The ability to segment the information-bearing region of the GPR image from the background of the image may thus provide improved performance for feature-based processing of anomaly responses. In this work we will explore the application of Markov random fields (MRFs) to the problem of anomaly/background segmentation in GPR data. Preliminary results suggest the potential for improved feature extraction and overall performance gains via application of image segmentation approaches prior to feature extraction.

  12. Immune Modulation and Stereotactic Radiation: Improving Local and Abscopal Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New and innovative treatment strategies for cancer patients in the fields of immunotherapy and radiotherapy are rapidly developing in parallel. Among the most promising preclinical treatment approaches is combining immunotherapy with radiotherapy where early data suggest synergistic effects in several tumor model systems. These studies demonstrate that radiation combined with immunotherapy can result in superior efficacy for local tumor control. More alluring is the emergence of data suggesting an equally profound systemic response also known as “abscopal” effects with the combination of radiation and certain immunotherapies. Studies addressing optimal radiation dose, fractionation, and modality to be used in combination with immunotherapy still require further exploration. However, recent anecdotal clinical reports combining stereotactic or hypofractionated radiation regimens with immunotherapy have resulted in dramatic sustained clinical responses, both local and abscopal. Technologic advances in clinical radiation therapy has made it possible to deliver hypofractionated regimens anywhere in the body using stereotactic radiation techniques, facilitating further clinical investigations. Thus, stereotactic radiation in combination with immunotherapy agents represents an exciting and potentially fruitful new space for improving cancer therapeutic responses.

  13. Time- and space-dependent electric response of Ovonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoboni, C.; Piccinini, E.; Brunetti, R.; Rudan, M.

    2017-06-01

    A time- and space-dependent 1D model including the self-consistent solution of the Poisson equation is presented to study the electric response of nanometer Ovonic samples. The model accounts for the main features of the relevant microscopic processes occurring inside the material, and is easily incorporated in commercial device-simulation tools. Numerical results are presented and discussed for Ovonic samples of different lengths and material parameters, and successfully compared to recent optimized experimental results for AgInTeSb. The analysis indicates a very short intrinsic response time of Ovonic devices, of the order of tens of ps and a minimum device length of the order of 5-10 nm, in order to guarantee the device functionality. Tests on the sensitivity of the model on some physical parameters have also been carried out.

  14. Improving the gradient in least-squares reverse time migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiancheng

    2016-04-01

    Least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) is a linearized inversion technique used for estimating high-wavenumber reflectivity. However, due to the redundant overlay of the band-limited source wavelet, the gradient based on the cross-correlated imaging principle suffers from a loss of wavenumber information. We first prepare the residuals between observed and demigrated data by deconvolving with the amplitude spectrum of the source wavelet, and then migrate the preprocessed residuals by using the cross-correlation imaging principle. In this way, a gradient that preserves the spectral signature of data residuals is obtained. The computational cost of source-wavelet removal is negligible compared to that of wavefield simulation. The two-dimensional Marmousi model containing complex geology structures is considered to test our scheme. Numerical examples show that our improved gradient in LSRTM has a better convergence behavior and promises inverted results of higher resolution. Finally, we attempt to update the background velocity with our inverted velocity perturbations to approach the true velocity.

  15. Crossmodal synesthetic congruency improves visual timing in dyslexic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihan; Zhang, Manli; Ai, Feng; Xie, Weiyi; Meng, Xiangzhi

    2016-08-01

    Consistent with the temporal ventriloquism effect, synesthetic correspondence between the features of visual size and auditory pitch has been shown to modulate the performance of visual temporal order judgment (TOJ) in typical adults. Here in the two main experiments we recruited seventeen dyslexic children and twenty typically developing children to perform a visual TOJ task and measured their ability of synesthetic correspondence between visual size and auditory pitch. In Experiment 1, participants were shown two consecutively presented visual discs that were temporally flanked by two synesthetic congruent or incongruent auditory beeps. In Experiment 2, participants received a crossmodal matching test (visual-size vs. auditory pitch). The results showed that compared to the typically developing group, dyslexic children benefited more from cross-modal synesthetic correspondence to partially compensate for their deficiency in visual TOJ task. The multisensory facilitation for timing performance was correlated with reading ability (Exp.1). Moreover, dyslexic children formed intact "congruent" matching of visually larger shapes to lower auditory pitch, and visually smaller shapes to higher auditory pitch, as did their typically developing peers (Exp 2). The results of our present study suggested general deficits of temporal processing in dyslexic children, However, with relatively intact ability of auditory pitch-visual size matching, dyslexic children could separate visual events using auditory cues. The current study also indicates a feasible way to improve the reading ability by exploiting temporal ventriloquism effect, modulated by appropriate crossmodal synesthetic associations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The cumulative energy effect for improved ignition timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markhotok, A., E-mail: amarhotk@phys.washington.edu [Physics Department, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A technique capable of improving timing in ignition applications is proposed. It is based on the use of shock waves propagating in a specific medium that allows achieving extremely high speeds and energies. The model uses the energy cumulation effect in the presence of the shock wave refraction on an interface with plasma. The problem was solved analytically and the effects were demonstrated for a cylindrically symmetrical geometry. Numerical results show very quick and uneven acceleration of different portions of the shock front. Its strong distortions lead to formation of a sharply focused jet near the axis of symmetry. The ability of the shock to achieve extremely high speeds and energies can be useful in design of efficient combustors for hypersonic systems, and possibly offers an alternative way of construction of a nuclear fusion reactor. Recommendations are given in terms of adjustment parameters and can be applied at any problem scale and for various combinations of the strengths of the effects involved in the problem.

  17. Time series analysis of the response of measurement instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakaki, Dimitra; Polatoglou, Hariton

    2012-01-01

    In this work the significance of treating a set of measurements as a time series is being explored. Time Series Analysis (TSA) techniques, part of the Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) approach, can provide much insight regarding the stochastic correlations that are induced on the outcome of an experiment by the measurement system and can provide criteria for the limited use of the classical variance in metrology. Specifically, techniques such as the Lag Plots, Autocorrelation Function, Power Spectral Density and Allan Variance are used to analyze series of sequential measurements, collected at equal time intervals from an electromechanical transducer. These techniques are used in conjunction with power law models of stochastic noise in order to characterize time or frequency regimes for which the usually assumed white noise model is adequate for the description of the measurement system response. However, through the detection of colored noise, usually referred to as flicker noise, which is expected to appear ...

  18. Exact response functions within the time-dependent Gutzwiller approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünemann, J.; Wasner, S.; Oelsen, E. v.; Seibold, G.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the applicability of the two existing versions of a time-dependent Gutzwiller approach (TDGA) beyond the frequently used limit of infinite spatial dimensions. To this end, we study the two-particle response functions of a two-site Hubbard model where we can compare the exact results and those derived from the TDGA. It turns out that only the more recently introduced version of the TDGA can be combined with a diagrammatic approach which allows for the evaluation of Gutzwiller wave functions in finite dimensions. For this TDGA method, we derive the time-dependent Lagrangian for general single-band Hubbard models.

  19. Climatic response to a time varying solar constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, G. R.; Short, D. A.; Mengel, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Recent measurements of the solar constant, theoretical arguments, and climatic measurements combined with signal processing suggest the possibility that the solar constant varies significantly on time scales ranging from billions of years to 11-yr (sunspot) cycles, and even to scales of a few weeks. Simple climate models with a time varying solar constant are examined here, with emphasis on the heat balance models (North et al., 1981). Linear heat balance model results are presented for high (10 cycles/yr) and low (0.1 cycle/yr) frequencies, providing a useful guide in estimating the direct heat response to solar variability.

  20. Collecting response times using Amazon Mechanical Turk and Adobe Flash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcox, Travis; Fiez, Julie A

    2014-03-01

    Crowdsourcing systems like Amazon's Mechanical Turk (AMT) allow data to be collected from a large sample of people in a short amount of time. This use has garnered considerable interest from behavioral scientists. So far, most experiments conducted on AMT have focused on survey-type instruments because of difficulties inherent in running many experimental paradigms over the Internet. This study investigated the viability of presenting stimuli and collecting response times using Adobe Flash to run ActionScript 3 code in conjunction with AMT. First, the timing properties of Adobe Flash were investigated using a phototransistor and two desktop computers running under several conditions mimicking those that may be present in research using AMT. This experiment revealed some strengths and weaknesses of the timing capabilities of this method. Next, a flanker task and a lexical decision task implemented in Adobe Flash were administered to participants recruited with AMT. The expected effects in these tasks were replicated. Power analyses were conducted to describe the number of participants needed to replicate these effects. A questionnaire was used to investigate previously undescribed computer use habits of 100 participants on AMT. We conclude that a Flash program in conjunction with AMT can be successfully used for running many experimental paradigms that rely on response times, although experimenters must understand the limitations of the method.

  1. Response Time Analysis of Distributed Web Systems Using QPNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Rak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A performance model is used for studying distributed Web systems. Performance evaluation is done by obtaining load test measurements. Queueing Petri Nets formalism supports modeling and performance analysis of distributed World Wide Web environments. The proposed distributed Web systems modeling and design methodology have been applied in the evaluation of several system architectures under different external loads. Furthermore, performance analysis is done to determine the system response time.

  2. Effect of time of day on performance, hormonal and metabolic response during a 1000-M cycling time trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Lins Fernandes

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of time of day on performance, pacing, and hormonal and metabolic responses during a 1000-m cycling time-trial. Nine male, recreational cyclists visited the laboratory four times. During the 1st visit the participants performed an incremental test and during the 2nd visit they performed a 1000-m cycling familiarization trial. On the 3rd and 4th visits, the participants performed a 1000-m TT at either 8 am or 6 pm, in randomized, repeated-measures, crossover design. The time to complete the time trial was lower in the evening than in the morning (88.2±8.7 versus 94.7±10.9 s, respectively, p0.05, but the norepinephrine response to the exercise was increased in the morning (+46%, p0.05. Our findings suggest that performance was improved in the evening, and it was accompanied by an improved hormonal and metabolic milieu.

  3. Femtosecond response time measurements of a Cs2Te photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryshev, A.; Shevelev, M.; Honda, Y.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.

    2017-07-01

    Success in design and construction of a compact, high-brightness accelerator system is strongly related to the production of ultra-short electron beams. Recently, the approach to generate short electron bunches or pre-bunched beams in RF guns directly illuminating a high quantum efficiency semiconductor photocathode with femtosecond laser pulses has become attractive. The measurements of the photocathode response time in this case are essential. With an approach of the interferometer-type pulse splitter deep integration into a commercial Ti:Sa laser system used for RF guns, it has become possible to generate pre-bunched electron beams and obtain continuously variable electron bunch separation. In combination with a well-known zero-phasing technique, it allows us to estimate the response time of the most commonly used Cs2Te photocathode. It was demonstrated that the peak-to-peak rms time response of Cs2Te is of the order of 370 fs, and thereby, it is possible to generate and control a THz sequence of relativistic electron bunches by a conventional S-band RF gun. This result can also be applied for investigation of other cathode materials and electron beam temporal shaping and further opens a possibility to construct wide-range tunable, table-top THz free electron laser.

  4. Response time in adults with a history of language difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carol A; Poll, Gerard H

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate speed of processing in college students with a history of problems with language. Affected individuals (n=16) were identified through a self-reported history of language and/or reading difficulties, and compared to a group of 16 unaffected individuals. Measures of language ability and a battery of response time tasks were administered. Results showed that the affected group had lower language performance and slower response time than the unaffected group. Better language performance was associated with faster response time, and this relationship was stronger in the affected group. These findings are consistent with the literature showing that language impairment often persists into adulthood. Further investigation of the relation between processing speed and language ability may help describe vulnerabilities for adults with language problems, as well as ways to promote compensation for those vulnerabilities. Readers will (1) increase understanding of associations between processing speed and language in children and adults; (2) become familiar with a method for assessing processing speed; and (3) increase understanding of possible vulnerabilities in adults with a history of language and/or reading problems.

  5. Predicting aquifer response time for application in catchment modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Glen R; Gilfedder, Mat; Dawes, Warrick R; Rassam, David W

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that changes in catchment land use can lead to significant impacts on water resources. Where land-use changes increase evapotranspiration there is a resultant decrease in groundwater recharge, which in turn decreases groundwater discharge to streams. The response time of changes in groundwater discharge to a change in recharge is a key aspect of predicting impacts of land-use change on catchment water yield. Predicting these impacts across the large catchments relevant to water resource planning can require the estimation of groundwater response times from hundreds of aquifers. At this scale, detailed site-specific measured data are often absent, and available spatial data are limited. While numerical models can be applied, there is little advantage if there are no detailed data to parameterize them. Simple analytical methods are useful in this situation, as they allow the variability in groundwater response to be incorporated into catchment hydrological models, with minimal modeling overhead. This paper describes an analytical model which has been developed to capture some of the features of real, sloping aquifer systems. The derived groundwater response timescale can be used to parameterize a groundwater discharge function, allowing groundwater response to be predicted in relation to different broad catchment characteristics at a level of complexity which matches the available data. The results from the analytical model are compared to published field data and numerical model results, and provide an approach with broad application to inform water resource planning in other large, data-scarce catchments. © 2014, CommonWealth of Australia. Groundwater © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  6. Quality improvement in nursing: administrative mandate or professional responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Shigeko

    2012-01-01

    For professionals, providing quality service and striving for excellence are ethical responsibilities. In many hospitals in the United States, however, there is evidence indicating that current quality improvement (QI) involving nurses is not always driven by their professional accountability and professional values. QI has become more an administrative mandate than an ethical standard for nurses. In this paper, the tension between QI as nurses' professional ethics and an administrative mandate will be described, and the implicit ideal-reality gap of QI will be examined. The threat to professional nursing posed by the current approach to QI will be examined, and ways to incorporate nursing professional values in a practical QI effort will be explored. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Exactly solvable model for the time response function of RPCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangiarotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Sezione INFN, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Largo Enrico Fermi 2, 50125 Florence (Italy)]. E-mail: mangiaro@fi.infn.it; Fonte, P. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); Gobbi, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    The fluctuation theory for the growth of several avalanches is briefly summarized and extended to include the case of electronegative gas mixtures. Based on such physical picture, the intrinsic time response function of an RPC can be calculated in a closed form and its average and rms extracted from series representations. The corresponding timing resolution, expressed in units of 1/(({alpha}-{eta})vd), is a universal function of the mean number of 'effective' clusters n0 reduced by electron attachment: n0(1-{eta}/{alpha}). A comparison to a few selected good-quality experimental data is attempted for the timing resolution of both 1-gap and 4-gaps RPCs, finding a reasonable agreement.

  8. Field exercises are useful for improving public health emergency responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Hope

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Problem: Emergencies resulting from disease outbreaks and extreme environmental events present significant challenges for health services.Context: Preparing to effectively manage emergencies is a core activity in public health units. Field exercises support consolidation of biopreparedness by testing plans, identifying weaknesses, providing training opportunities and developing surge capacity.Action: An extended field exercise to test response to a novel influenza strain was conducted in New South Wales, Australia in September 2008, eight months before the influenza A(H1N1 2009 pandemic emerged. Lasting four days and involving over 300 participants, the exercise was set in the early response phase with the staggered presentation of 41 cases to 36 emergency departments in the health area. An additional 150 contacts were written into a complex scenario to test the public health response.Outcome: The subsequent pandemic emergence in mid-2009 offered a unique opportunity to assess the field exercise format for disaster preparedness. Most roles were adequately tested with recognized benefit during the actual pandemic response. However, the exercise did not adequately challenge the public health planning team that synthesizes surveillance data and forecasts risk, nor did it identify planning issues that became evident during the subsequent pandemic. Discussion: Field exercises offer the opportunity to rigorously test public health emergency preparedness but can be expensive and labour-intensive. Our exercise provided effective and timely preparation for the influenza A(H1N1 2009 pandemic but showed that more emphasis needs to be placed on the role and training of the public health planning team.

  9. Breaking the DNA damage response to improve cervical cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieringa, Hylke W; van der Zee, Ate G J; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2016-01-01

    Every year, cervical cancer affects ∼500,000 women worldwide, and ∼275,000 patients die of this disease. The addition of platin-based chemotherapy to primary radiotherapy has increased 5-year survival of advanced-stage cervical cancer patients, which is, however, still only 66%. One of the factors thought to contribute to treatment failure is the ability of tumor cells to repair chemoradiotherapy-induced DNA damage. Therefore, sensitization of tumor cells for chemoradiotherapy via inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) as a novel strategy to improve therapy effect, is currently studied pre-clinically as well as in the clinic. Almost invariably, cervical carcinogenesis involves infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), which inactivates part of the DNA damage response. This HPV-mediated partial inactivation of the DDR presents therapeutic targeting of the residual DDR as an interesting approach to achieve chemoradio-sensitization for cervical cancer. How the DDR can be most efficiently targeted, however, remains unclear. The fact that cisplatin and radiotherapy activate multiple signaling axes within the DDR further complicates a rational choice of therapeutic targets within the DDR. In this review, we provide an overview of the current preclinical and clinical knowledge about targeting the DDR in cervical cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. In the interests of time: improving HIV allocative efficiency modelling via optimal time-varying allocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Shattock

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: International investment in the response to HIV and AIDS has plateaued and its future level is uncertain. With many countries committed to ending the epidemic, it is essential to allocate available resources efficiently over different response periods to maximize impact. The objective of this study is to propose a technique to determine the optimal allocation of funds over time across a set of HIV programmes to achieve desirable health outcomes. Methods: We developed a technique to determine the optimal time-varying allocation of funds (1 when the future annual HIV budget is pre-defined and (2 when the total budget over a period is pre-defined, but the year-on-year budget is to be optimally determined. We use this methodology with Optima, an HIV transmission model that uses non-linear relationships between programme spending and associated programmatic outcomes to quantify the expected epidemiological impact of spending. We apply these methods to data collected from Zambia to determine the optimal distribution of resources to fund the right programmes, for the right people, at the right time. Results and discussion: Considering realistic implementation and ethical constraints, we estimate that the optimal time-varying redistribution of the 2014 Zambian HIV budget between 2015 and 2025 will lead to a 7.6% (7.3% to 7.8% decrease in cumulative new HIV infections compared with a baseline scenario where programme allocations remain at 2014 levels. This compares to a 5.1% (4.6% to 5.6% reduction in new infections using an optimal allocation with constant programme spending that recommends unrealistic programmatic changes. Contrasting priorities for programme funding arise when assessing outcomes for a five-year funding period over 5-, 10- and 20-year time horizons. Conclusions: Countries increasingly face the need to do more with the resources available. The methodology presented here can aid decision-makers in planning as to when to

  11. Improved Undecidability Results for Reachability Games on Recursive Timed Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankara Narayanan Krishna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We study reachability games on recursive timed automata (RTA that generalize Alur-Dill timed automata with recursive procedure invocation mechanism similar to recursive state machines. It is known that deciding the winner in reachability games on RTA is undecidable for automata with two or more clocks, while the problem is decidable for automata with only one clock. Ouaknine and Worrell recently proposed a time-bounded theory of real-time verification by claiming that restriction to bounded-time recovers decidability for several key decision problem related to real-time verification. We revisited games on recursive timed automata with time-bounded restriction in the hope of recovering decidability. However, we found that the problem still remains undecidable for recursive timed automata with three or more clocks. Using similar proof techniques we characterize a decidability frontier for a generalization of RTA to recursive stopwatch automata.

  12. Two-parameter Failure Model Improves Time-independent and Time-dependent Failure Predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huddleston, R L

    2004-01-27

    A new analytical model for predicting failure under a generalized, triaxial stress state was developed by the author and initially reported in 1984. The model was validated for predicting failure under elevated-temperature creep-rupture conditions. Biaxial data for three alloy steels, Types 304 and 316 stainless steels and Inconel 600, demonstrated two to three orders of magnitude reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed creep-rupture times as compared to the classical failure models of Mises, Tresca, and Rankine. In 1990, the new model was incorporated into American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N47-29 for design of components operating under creep-rupture conditions. The current report provides additional validation of the model for predicting failure under time-independent conditions and also outlines a methodology for predicting failure under cyclic, time-dependent, creep-fatigue conditions. The later extension of the methodology may have the potential to improve failure predictions there as well. These results are relevant to most design applications, but they have special relevance to high-performance design applications such as components for high-pressure equipment, nuclear reactors, and jet engines.

  13. Two-parameter Failure Model Improves Time-independent and Time-dependent Failure Predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huddleston, R L

    2004-01-27

    A new analytical model for predicting failure under a generalized, triaxial stress state was developed by the author and initially reported in 1984. The model was validated for predicting failure under elevated-temperature creep-rupture conditions. Biaxial data for three alloy steels, Types 304 and 316 stainless steels and Inconel 600, demonstrated two to three orders of magnitude reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed creep-rupture times as compared to the classical failure models of Mises, Tresca, and Rankine. In 1990, the new model was incorporated into American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N47-29 for design of components operating under creep-rupture conditions. The current report provides additional validation of the model for predicting failure under time-independent conditions and also outlines a methodology for predicting failure under cyclic, time-dependent, creep-fatigue conditions. The later extension of the methodology may have the potential to improve failure predictions there as well. These results are relevant to most design applications, but they have special relevance to high-performance design applications such as components for high-pressure equipment, nuclear reactors, and jet engines.

  14. Engine Control Improvement through Application of Chaotic Time Series Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, J.B., Jr.; Daw, C.S.

    2003-07-15

    The objective of this program was to investigate cyclic variations in spark-ignition (SI) engines under lean fueling conditions and to develop options to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) in compression-ignition direct-injection (CIDI) engines at high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rates. The CIDI activity builds upon an earlier collaboration between ORNL and Ford examining combustion instabilities in SI engines. Under the original CRADA, the principal objective was to understand the fundamental causes of combustion instability in spark-ignition engines operating with lean fueling. The results of this earlier activity demonstrated that such combustion instabilities are dominated by the effects of residual gas remaining in each cylinder from one cycle to the next. A very simple, low-order model was developed that explained the observed combustion instability as a noisy nonlinear dynamical process. The model concept lead to development of a real-time control strategy that could be employed to significantly reduce cyclic variations in real engines using existing sensors and engine control systems. This collaboration led to the issuance of a joint patent for spark-ignition engine control. After a few years, the CRADA was modified to focus more on EGR and CIDI engines. The modified CRADA examined relationships between EGR, combustion, and emissions in CIDI engines. Information from CIDI engine experiments, data analysis, and modeling were employed to identify and characterize new combustion regimes where it is possible to simultaneously achieve significant reductions in NOx and PM emissions. These results were also used to develop an on-line combustion diagnostic (virtual sensor) to make cycle-resolved combustion quality assessments for active feedback control. Extensive experiments on engines at Ford and ORNL led to the development of the virtual sensor concept that may be able to detect simultaneous reductions in NOx and PM

  15. Study on I/O response time bounds of networked storage systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Bao-jiang; LIU Jun; WANG Gang; LIU Jing

    2006-01-01

    In order to predict and improve the performance of networked storage systems,this paper explored the relationship between the system I/O response time and its performance factors by quantitative analytical method.Through analyzing data flow in networked RAID storage system,we established its analytical model utilizing closed queueing networks and studied the performance bounds of the system I/O response time.Experimental results show that the theoretical bounds are found to be in agreement with the actual performance bounds of the networked RAID storage system and reflect the dynamic trend of its actual performance.Furthermore,it concludes that the CPU processing power and cache hit rate of the central storage server are the key factors affecting the I/O response time as the concurrent jobs are lower,while the network bandwidth and cache hit rate of the central storage server become the key factors as the concurrent jobs go higher.

  16. Does chronomodulated radiotherapy improve pathological response in locally advanced rectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Tim; Buchanan, Grant; Rangiah, David; Davis, Ian; Yip, Desmond; Chua, Yu Jo; Rich, Tyvin; Elsaleh, Hany

    2017-01-01

    The predominant mode of radiation-induced cell death for solid tumours is mitotic catastrophe, which is in part dependent on sublethal damage repair being complete at around 6 h. Circadian variation appears to play a role in normal cellular division, and this could influence tumour response of radiation treatment depending on the time of treatment delivery. We tested the hypothesis that radiation treatment later in the day may improve tumour response and nodal downstaging in rectal cancer patients treated neoadjuvantly with radiation therapy. Recruitment was by retrospective review of 267 rectal cancer patients treated neoadjuvantly in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Canberra Hospital between January 2010 and November 2015. One hundred and fifty-five patients met the inclusion criteria for which demographic, pathological and imaging data were collected, as well as the time of day patients received treatment with each fraction of radiotherapy. Data analysis was performed using the Statistical Package R with nonparametric methods of significance for all tests set at p < 0.05. Of the 45 female and 110 male patients, the median age was 64. Seventy-three percent had cT3 disease and there was a mean tumour distance from the anal verge of 7 cm. Time to surgical resection following radiotherapy ranged from 4 to 162 days with a median of 50 days, with a complete pathological response seen in 21% of patients. Patients exhibiting a favourable pathological response had smaller median pre- and postradiotherapy tumour size and had a greater change in tumour size following treatment (p < 0.01). Patients who received the majority of their radiotherapy fractions after 12:00 pm were more likely to show a complete or moderate pathological response (p = 0.035) and improved nodal downstaging. There were also more favourable responses amongst patients with longer time to surgical resection postradiotherapy (p < 0.004), although no relationship was seen between response and

  17. Improved Dynamic Postural Task Performance without Improvements in Postural Responses: The Blessing and the Curse of Dopamine Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Foreman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Dopamine-replacement medications may improve mobility while not improving responses to postural challenges and could therefore increase fall risk. The purpose of this study was to measure reactive postural responses and gait-related mobility of patients with PD during ON and OFF medication conditions. Methods. Reactive postural responses to the Pull Test and performance of the Functional Gait Assessment (FGA were recorded from 15 persons with PD during ON and OFF medication conditions. Results. Persons with PD demonstrated no significant difference in the reactive postural responses between medication conditions but demonstrated significantly better performance on the FGA when ON medications compared to OFF. Discussion/Conclusion. Dopamine-replacement medications alone may improve gait-related mobility without improvements in reactive postural responses and therefore could result in iatrogenic increases in fall risk. Rehabilitation providers should be aware of the side effects and limitations of medication treatment and implement interventions to improve postural responses.

  18. Solving a Location, Allocation, and Capacity Planning Problem with Dynamic Demand and Response Time Service Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Ka Yuk Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Logistic systems with uncertain demand, travel time, and on-site processing time are studied here where sequential trip travel is allowed. The relationship between three levels of decisions: facility location, demand allocation, and resource capacity (number of service units, satisfying the response time requirement, is analysed. The problem is formulated as a stochastic mixed integer program. A simulation-based hybrid heuristic is developed to solve the dynamic problem under different response time service level. An initial solution is obtained from solving static location-allocation models, followed by iterative improvement of the three levels of decisions by ejection, reinsertion procedure with memory of feasible and infeasible service regions. Results indicate that a higher response time service level could be achieved by allocating a given resource under an appropriate decentralized policy. Given a response time requirement, the general trend is that the minimum total capacity initially decreases with more facilities. During this stage, variability in travel time has more impact on capacity than variability in demand arrivals. Thereafter, the total capacity remains stable and then gradually increases. When service level requirement is high, the dynamic dispatch based on first-come-first-serve rule requires smaller capacity than the one by nearest-neighbour rule.

  19. Modeling responses and response times in personality tests with rating scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Ranger

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article several latent trait models for the joint distribution of the responses and response times in rating scales are compared. Among these models are two generalizations of established models for binary items, namely a generalization of the approach of Ferrando and Lorenzo-Seva (2007a and a generalization of the approach of Ranger and Ortner (2011. Two new models and a variant of the hierarchical model of van der Linden (2007 are also considered. All these models combine the graded response model with a response time model based on the log-normal distribu-tion. The models differ in the assumed relationship between the expected log response time and the underlying latent traits. Although the proposed models have different interpretations and implications they can all be calibrated within the same general framework using marginal maximum likelihood estimation and an application of the ECM-algorithm. The models are used for the analysis of an empirical data set. According to the AIC index, the generalization of the model of Ranger and Ortner (2011 can represent the data best.

  20. Fast-Response-Time Shape-Memory-Effect Foam Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Bulk shape memory alloys, such as Nitinol or CuAlZn, display strong recovery forces undergoing a phase transformation after being strained in their martensitic state. These recovery forces are used for actuation. As the phase transformation is thermally driven, the response time of the actuation can be slow, as the heat must be passively inserted or removed from the alloy. Shape memory alloy TiNi torque tubes have been investigated for at least 20 years and have demonstrated high actuation forces [3,000 in.-lb (approximately equal to 340 N-m) torques] and are very lightweight. However, they are not easy to attach to existing structures. Adhesives will fail in shear at low-torque loads and the TiNi is not weldable, so that mechanical crimp fits have been generally used. These are not reliable, especially in vibratory environments. The TiNi is also slow to heat up, as it can only be heated indirectly using heater and cooling must be done passively. This has restricted their use to on-off actuators where cycle times of approximately one minute is acceptable. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) has been used in the past to make porous TiNi metal foams. Shape Change Technologies has been able to train SHS derived TiNi to exhibit the shape memory effect. As it is an open-celled material, fast response times were observed when the material was heated using hot and cold fluids. A methodology was developed to make the open-celled porous TiNi foams as a tube with integrated hexagonal ends, which then becomes a torsional actuator with fast response times. Under processing developed independently, researchers were able to verify torques of 84 in.-lb (approximately equal to 9.5 Nm) using an actuator weighing 1.3 oz (approximately equal to 37 g) with very fast (less than 1/16th of a second) initial response times when hot and cold fluids were used to facilitate heat transfer. Integrated structural connections were added as part of the net shape process, eliminating

  1. Development of a practice framework for improving nurses' responses to intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Clark, Maria T; Parry, Jayne; Taylor, Julie

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss critically the theoretical concepts of awareness, recognition and empowerment as manifested in intimate partner violence and to show how these can be translated into a practice framework for improving nurses' response. Intimate partner violence is a universal problem and is considered a significant public health issue. Nurses are in an ideal position to recognise and respond to intimate partner violence, but many lack confidence in this area of practice. In our previous empirical work, we identified three concepts through which nurses' responses to intimate partner violence can be understood: awareness, recognition and empowerment. In this article, we advance nursing knowledge by showing how these concepts can form a practice framework to improve nurses' responses to intimate partner violence. A discussion paper and development of a practice framework to improve nurses' responses to intimate partner violence. The framework comprises three principal needs of women and three related key requirements for nurses to meet these needs. Arising from these are a range of practice outcomes: enhanced understanding of intimate partner violence, increased confidence in recognising intimate partner violence, establishment of trusting relationships, increased likelihood of disclosure and optimised safety. Nurses sometimes lack confidence in recognising and responding to intimate partner violence. Awareness, recognition and empowerment are important concepts that can form the basis of a framework to support them. When nurses feel empowered to respond to intimate partner violence, they can work together with women to optimise their safety. Access to adequate and timely intimate partner violence education and training is important in improving nurses' responses to intimate partner violence. Getting this right can lead to enhanced safety planning and better health outcomes for women who experience intimate partner violence. Although difficult to

  2. Time domain responses of hydraulic bushing with two flow passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Tan; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-02-01

    Hydraulic bushings are commonly employed in vehicle suspension and body sub-frame systems to control motion, vibration, and structure-borne noise. Since literature on this topic is sparse, a controlled bushing prototype which accommodates a combination of long and short flow passages and flow restriction elements is first designed, constructed and instrumented. Step-up and step-down responses of several typical fluid-filled bushing configurations are measured along with steady harmonic time histories of transmitted force and internal pressures. To analyze the experimental results and gain physical insights into the hydraulic bushing system, lumped system models of bushings with different design features are developed, and analytical expressions of transmitted force and internal pressure responses are derived by using the convolution method. Parametric studies are also conducted to examine the effect of hydraulic element parameters. System parameters are successfully estimated for both harmonic and step responses using theory and measurements, and the dynamic force measurements are analyzed using analytical predictions. Finally, some nonlinearities of the system are also observed, and the fluid resistance of flow passage is found to be the most nonlinear element.

  3. Improving Efficiency Using Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibor, Laura C; Schultz, Stacy R; Menaker, Ronald; Weber, Bradley D; Ness, Jay; Smith, Paula; Young, Phillip M

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to increase efficiency in MR enterography using a time-driven activity-based costing methodology. In February 2015, a multidisciplinary team was formed to identify the personnel, equipment, space, and supply costs of providing outpatient MR enterography. The team mapped the current state, completed observations, performed timings, and calculated costs associated with each element of the process. The team used Pareto charts to understand the highest cost and most time-consuming activities, brainstormed opportunities, and assessed impact. Plan-do-study-act cycles were developed to test the changes, and run charts were used to monitor progress. The process changes consisted of revising the workflow associated with the preparation and administration of glucagon, with completed implementation in November 2015. The time-driven activity-based costing methodology allowed the radiology department to develop a process to more accurately identify the costs of providing MR enterography. The primary process modification was reassigning responsibility for the administration of glucagon from nurses to technologists. After implementation, the improvements demonstrated success by reducing non-value-added steps and cost by 13%, staff time by 16%, and patient process time by 17%. The saved process time was used to augment existing examination time slots to more accurately accommodate the entire enterographic examination. Anecdotal comments were captured to validate improved staff satisfaction within the multidisciplinary team. This process provided a successful outcome to address daily workflow frustrations that could not previously be improved. A multidisciplinary team was necessary to achieve success, in addition to the use of a structured problem-solving approach. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Principal response curves: analysis of time-dependent multivariate responses of biological community to stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den P.J.; Braak, ter C.J.F.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a novel multivariate method is proposed for the analysis of community response data from designed experiments repeatedly sampled in time. The long-term effects of the insecticide chlorpyrifos on the invertebrate community and the dissolved oxygen (DO)–pH–alkalinity–conductivity syndrom

  5. Intrusion Detection Forecasting Using Time Series for Improving Cyber Defence

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Azween Bin; Pillai, Thulasyammal Ramiah; Cai, Long Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The strength of time series modeling is generally not used in almost all current intrusion detection and prevention systems. By having time series models, system administrators will be able to better plan resource allocation and system readiness to defend against malicious activities. In this paper, we address the knowledge gap by investigating the possible inclusion of a statistical based time series modeling that can be seamlessly integrated into existing cyber defense system. Cyber-attack ...

  6. Improving alkenone paleothermometry by incorporating cell response to environmental stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahl, F. G.; Wolfe, G. V.; Mix, A. C.; Sparrow, M. A.

    2003-04-01

    A linear, global coretop calibration now exists for the alkenone unsaturation index Uk’37 and mean annual SST (maSST). The calibration equation is statistically the same as that for a subarctic Pacific strain of Emiliania huxleyi (Ehux) grown exponentially under isothermal conditions in batch culture. Although the calibration has been applied widely for paleoSST reconstruction, uncertainty still exists, stemming from two key factors: genetic variability among strains, and physiologic response to stress and growth state. We will discuss in this talk the extent that Uk’37 and other aspects of cellular alkenone composition vary in response to nutrient depletion and light deprivation in isothermal (15^oC) batch cultures of Ehux isolated from three different ocean locations - a Norwegian fjord (CCMP370); the subarctic Pacific (CCMP1742) and the Sargasso Sea (CCMP 372). We will also present results from detailed alkenone compositional analysis in thirty surface sediments collected between ˜50^oS and 10^oS along the Chile-Peru margin in the SE Pacific Ocean. The Uk’37 - maSST relationship derived from this dataset is statistically indistinguishable from the global coretop calibration. But, comparison of other compositional properties shows that the alkenone signature preserved in the Chile-Peru margin sediments is also not consistent with that expressed by exponentially growing cells of any of the three cultured Ehux strains. Alkenone signatures preserved in sediments appear more like that in algal cells that have experienced some level of non-thermal, physiological stress such as nutrient and light limitation. Given our observations as a precedent, improved confidence in paleotemperature estimates derived from Uk’37 measurements may require interpretation of unsaturation patterns in full context with the overall alkenone composition preserved in the sediment.

  7. Effect of defence response time during lunge in foil fencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Cruz, Carmen; Rojas, F Javier; Gutiérrez-Davila, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of stimulus change timing on reaction response time parameters, horizontal velocity of the centre of mass (CM) and precision during offensive actions in fencing. Twelve fencers from the Spanish National Foil Team were included in the study. Two 500 Hz force plates were used to register the horizontal component of the reaction force while a 3D video camera set at 250 Hz recorded the spatial position of 11 body markers and a projector connected to a programmed stopwatch projected a moving target (stimulus) on a screen. When the circle (target) appeared in the centre of the plastron, fencers had to execute a step-forward-lunge as fast as possible, trying to touch the circle with the tip of the foil. During the lunge, the position of the target could randomly shift or not to three different positions. The stimulus change was performed randomly at four different times with a progressive delay. The results show that target changes did not have any effect when they occurred at the beginning of the movement sequence. However, when the target change was delayed, reaction and movement times increased and the technical execution of the lunge changed, leading to more errors.

  8. Improved Capacity Spectrum Method Using Structural Inelastic Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Cheng; Zhao Renda

    2006-01-01

    Existing problems of capacity-demand diagram were considered, and the conversion method between the results of the capacitydemand curves method and dynamic time-history analysis is presented. The factors causing the relative error between the different capacity curves, such as the distribution type for lateral load, assumptions of member bar model , surface irregularity of the structures and P-△ effects, were analyzed to build the statistical correlation between the maximum base shear and the top displacements of the components under the different pushover analysis. ATC-40 (Procedure-B) method is verified to be more accurate in calculating the roof displacements of buildings. Meanwhile, the improved method is refined in three aspects and proved effective by a real concrete-frame building.

  9. AUTOMOTIVE MAINTENANCE PLAN IMPROVEMENT BASED ON DISTRIBUTION OF FAILURE TIMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru BOROIU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the concept of "RCM - Reliability Centered Maintenance", the paper presents a study on the possibility to improve maintenance plan for the most frequently replaced parts from a sample of cars, followed during the operation period: front/rear brake pads. After analyzing the reliability of these components, it is found that there is the possibility of introducing the obligatory replacement operation of brake pads who have reached the third technical inspection without being replaced, sacrificing resource exploitation of them, but improving the benefits for the client - the automotive availability.

  10. New improvements for Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, Sébastien; Sauser, Florian

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents new techniques designed to improve the performances of a BOTDR. The first one introduces a second pump to the sensor, thus doubling the Brillouin signal on the receiver. The second one uses image processing with a two-dimensional Gaussian filter whose parameters are defined. The last technique explores the possibilities offered by colour codes. The benefits of each, in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, is presented by comparing measurements over a distance range of 50km with a spatial resolution of 5m. These techniques can easily be combined and the global improvement is estimated at 10dB, compared to conventional sensors.

  11. Improving Music Genre Classification by Short Time Feature Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Anders; Ahrendt, Peter; Larsen, Jan

    . The problem of making new features on the larger time scale from the short-time features (feature integration) has only received little attention. This paper investigates different methods for feature integration (early information fusion) and late information fusion (assembling of probabilistic outputs...

  12. Improved calendar time approach for measuring long-run anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Dutta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although a large number of recent studies employ the buy-and-hold abnormal return (BHAR methodology and the calendar time portfolio approach to investigate the long-run anomalies, each of the methods is a subject to criticisms. In this paper, we show that a recently introduced calendar time methodology, known as Standardized Calendar Time Approach (SCTA,, controls well for heteroscedasticity problem which occurs in calendar time methodology due to varying portfolio compositions. In addition, we document that SCTA has higher power than the BHAR methodology and the Fama–French three-factor model while detecting the long-run abnormal stock returns. Moreover, when investigating the long-term performance of Canadian initial public offerings, we report that the market period (i.e. the hot and cold period markets does not have any significant impact on calendar time abnormal returns based on SCTA.

  13. Improving lung cancer survival; time to move on

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. Heuvers (Marlies); J.P.J.J. Hegmans (Joost); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); J.G.J.V. Aerts (Joachim)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: During the past decades, numerous efforts have been made to decrease the death rate among lung cancer patients. Nonetheless, the improvement in long-term survival has been limited and lung cancer is still a devastating disease.Discussion: With this article we would like to

  14. Modulating the DNA Damage Response to Improve Treatment Response in Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossar, L H; Schache, A G; Risk, J M; Sacco, J J; Jones, N J; Lord, R

    2017-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide and new therapeutic approaches are needed to improve clinical outcomes for this group of patients. Current treatment protocols for locally advanced and metastatic disease consist of ionising radiation and chemotherapy. Chemoradiation induces cytotoxic levels of DNA double-strand breaks, which activates programmed cell death via the DNA damage response (DDR). Cervical cancers are unique given an almost exclusive association with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection; a potent manipulator of the DDR, with the potential to alter tumour sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and influence treatment response. This review highlights the wide range of therapeutic strategies in development that have the potential to modulate DDR and sensitise cervical tumours to DNA-damaging agents in the context of HPV oncogenesis. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Previous utilization of service does not improve timely booking in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    Multivariate analysis revealed that respondents who received advice on recommended time of booking, ... Utilization of health services is a complex behavioral phenomenon. ..... Chandiok N, Dhillon B.S, Kambo I, et al. Determinanats of ANC ...

  16. Time Analysis for Improved Upper Limb Movement Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-12

    both speech and handwriting data allow a clear separation into individual sub-components like vowels or strokes. This allows application of hidden...available at the time of writing because the publication pro- cess was either still ongoing or the articles could not be obtained by the author at reason...record- ing of timing irJormation during writing [ 143]. However, most approaches do not utilize the full temponl information but instead only

  17. Later Start Time for Teens Improves Grades, Mood, and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlstrom, Kyla L.

    2017-01-01

    A recent study by the University of Minnesota looked at eight high schools across the U.S. that chose later start times, from 8:00 a.m. to 8:55 a.m. The study found significant decreases in absences and tardiness as well as greater academic benefits for schools with the latest start times. Among the 9,395 students in the study, those who slept…

  18. Improving Music Genre Classification by Short-Time Feature Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Anders; Ahrendt, Peter; Larsen, Jan

    2005-01-01

    of seconds instead of milliseconds. The problem of making new features on the larger time scale from the short-time features (feature integration) has only received little attention. This paper investigates different methods for feature integration and late information fusion for music genre classification....... A new feature integration technique, the AR model, is proposed and seemingly outperforms the commonly used mean-variance features....

  19. Later Start Time for Teens Improves Grades, Mood, and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlstrom, Kyla L.

    2017-01-01

    A recent study by the University of Minnesota looked at eight high schools across the U.S. that chose later start times, from 8:00 a.m. to 8:55 a.m. The study found significant decreases in absences and tardiness as well as greater academic benefits for schools with the latest start times. Among the 9,395 students in the study, those who slept…

  20. Can Transient Phenomena Help Improving Time Resolution in Scintillators?

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P; Vasiliev, A

    2014-01-01

    The time resolution of a scintillator-based detector is directly driven by the density of photoelectrons generated in the photodetector at the detection threshold. At the scintillator level it is related to the intrinsic light yield, the pulse shape (rise time and decay time) and the light transport from the gamma-ray conversion point to the photodetector. When aiming at 10 ps time resolution, fluctuations in the thermalization and relaxation time of hot electrons and holes generated by the interaction of ionization radiation with the crystal become important. These processes last for up to a few tens of ps and are followed by a complex trapping-detrapping process, Poole-Frenkel effect, Auger ionization of traps and electron-hole recombination, which can last for a few ns with very large fluctuations. This paper will review the different processes at work and evaluate if some of the transient phenomena taking place during the fast thermalization phase can be exploited to extract a time tag with a precision in...

  1. Improvement in hearing loss over time in Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek, Kevin C; Smith, David F; Kline, Antonie D; Benke, James R; Chen, Mei-Ling; Kimball, Amy; Ishman, Stacey L

    2016-08-01

    Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) are reported to have conductive (CHL) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), but there is little information pertaining to the progression of hearing loss over time. The goal of this study was to examine the prevalence of CHL and SNHL in adults and children with CdLS and look for changes in SNHL over time. Retrospective chart review of patients with CdLS presenting to a CdLS clinic was conducted. Also, a written survey of clinical concerns was collected from additional patients/families seen in the clinic and through the Cornelia de Lange Foundation. Seventy-eight patients (50% female) were included in the chart review. Mean age was 16.8 ± 11.4 years (range-0.6-50 years) and mean age at diagnosis of hearing loss was 4.6 ± 10.6 years (n = 26). Five patients (6.4%) had severe to profound SNHL that improved with time, including 2 who had complete normalization of audiogram results. Thirty-five families/patients completed the clinical survey, and 45.5% of the families reported a noticeable improvement of hearing over time. Conductive hearing loss and SNHL are common in CdLS. More than 50% of the patients seen in an adult CdLS clinic reported improvement in hearing loss over time, and a subset of patients had an improvement in SNHL. In light of these findings, we recommend longitudinal evaluations of hearing loss in these patients with both auditory brainstem response and otoacoustic emissions testing if SNHL is identified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cross inhibition improves activity selection when switching incurs time costs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James A.R.MARSHALL; Angélique FAVREAU-PEIGN(E); Lutz FROMHAGE; John M.MCNAMARA; Lianne F.S.MEAH; Alasdair I.HOUSTON

    2015-01-01

    We consider a behavioural model of an animal choosing between two activities,based on positive feedback,and examine the effect of introducing cross inhibition between the motivations for the two activities.While cross-inhibition has previously been included in models of decision making,the question of what benefit it may provide to an animal's activity selection behaviour has not previously been studied.In neuroscience and in collective behaviour cross-inhibition,and other equivalent means of coupling evidence-accumulating pathways,have been shown to approximate statistically-optimal decision-making and to adaptively break deadlock,thereby improving decision performance.Switching between activities is an ongoing decision process yet here we also find that cross-inhibition robustly improves its efficiency,by reducing the frequency of costly switches between behaviours [Current Zoology 61 (2):242-250,2015].

  3. PARETO-IMPROVING WATER MANAGEMENT OVER SPACE AND TIME

    OpenAIRE

    Pitafi, Basharat A.K.; Roumasset, James A.

    2004-01-01

    Proposals for marginal cost water pricing have often been found to be politically infeasible because current users will have to pay a higher price even though future users will be better off. We show how efficiency pricing can be rendered Pareto-improving, and thus politically feasible, by compensating the users suffering a loss due to higher prices. We also provide a method for determining efficient spatial and inter-temporal water management for a system with consumption at significantly di...

  4. Improving Seek Time for Column Store Using MMH Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Apte, Tejaswini; Goyal, Dr A K

    2012-01-01

    Hash based search has, proven excellence on large data warehouses stored in column store. Data distribution has significant impact on hash based search. To reduce impact of data distribution, we have proposed Memory Managed Hash (MMH) algorithm that uses shift XOR group for Queries and Transactions in column store. Our experiments show that MMH improves read and write throughput by 22% for TPC-H distribution.

  5. Can leisure-time physical activity improve health checkup results? Evidence from Japanese occupational panel data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshio, Takashi; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Inoue, Akiomi

    2016-07-22

    We examined the extent to which changes in worker health, as measured by health checkup items, were associated with increased intensity of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) after controlling for individual time-invariant attributes. We used panel data from two to four waves of a Japanese occupational cohort survey, focusing on 30,206 observations of 10,106 individuals (7,669 men and 2,437 women) aged 18-76 years. We estimated first-difference and mean-centered fixed effects models to examine how changes in 10 health checkup items were associated with changes in LTPA intensity. We considered four LTPA intensity levels (none, low, moderate, and vigorous), based on self-reported assessments. For men, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, glycated hemoglobin levels, body mass index, and waist circumference improved when LTPA intensity was increased even at a low level, whereas triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose levels improved when LTPA intensity was increased to moderate or vigorous levels. Blood pressure (both systolic and diastolic) and total cholesterol levels were only modestly responsive to changes in LTPA intensity. For women, blood pressure (both systolic and diastolic) and waist circumference were negatively associated with LTPA intensity, whereas the other variables showed more modest effects. The results suggest that even low- to moderate-intensity LTPA can improve health checkup results; however, the lowest LTPA intensity associated with improvement in health depends on health-risk factors as well as gender.

  6. Capsule endoscopy: Improving transit time and image view

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zvi Fireman; D Paz; Y Kopelman

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of various methods of small bowel preparation on the transit time and the quality of visualization of the entire small bowel mucosa.METHODS: Ninety-five patients underwent capsule endoscopy (CE) by easily swallowing the capsule. They were divided into three study groups according to the preparation used: group A (n = 26) by polyethylene glycol (PEG) liter or with sodium phosphate (SP) 12 h prior to the CE study; group B (n = 29) by erythromycin 1 h prior to the CE study; and group C (n = 40) without any preparation. Visualization ranged from good to satisfactory to poor.RESULTS: The gastric emptying time in the group prepared with erythromycin was shorter but without statistical significance and the small bowel transit time was unaffected. In elderly subjects prepared by PEG or SP, the gastric emptying time was significantly longer (163.7 min, P = 0.05). The transit times of the three sub-groups were not affected by gender or pathology.The grade of cleaning of the entire study group was 3.27±1.1. The erythromycin group presented significantly the worst quality of images (P = 0.05) compared to the other sub-groups. Age, gender, and pathology had no effect on the quality of the cleaning of the small bowel in the sub-groups. One (1.05%) case had no natural excretion.CONCLUSION: Erythromycin markedly reduces gastric emptying time, but has a negative effect on the quality of the image in the small bowel. The preparation of elderly subjects with PEG or SP has a negative effect on the small bowel transit time.

  7. Improving Kepler Pipeline Sensitivity with Pixel Response Function Photometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robert L.; Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of our investigation into the feasibility and expected benefits of implementing PRF-fitting photometry in the Kepler Science Processing Pipeline. The Kepler Pixel Response Function (PRF) describes the expected system response to a point source at infinity and includes the effects of the optical point spread function, the CCD detector responsivity function, and spacecraft pointing jitter. Planet detection in the Kepler pipeline is currently based on simple aperture photometry (SAP), which is most effective when applied to uncrowded bright stars. Its effectiveness diminishes rapidly as target brightness decreases relative to the effects of noise sources such as detector electronics, background stars, and image motion. In contrast, PRF photometry is based on fitting an explicit model of image formation to the data and naturally accounts for image motion and contributions of background stars. The key to obtaining high-quality photometry from PRF fitting is a high-quality model of the system's PRF, while the key to efficiently processing the large number of Kepler targets is an accurate catalog and accurate mapping of celestial coordinates onto the focal plane. If the CCD coordinates of stellar centroids are known a priori then the problem of PRF fitting becomes linear. A model of the Kepler PRF was constructed at the time of spacecraft commissioning by fitting piecewise polynomial surfaces to data from dithered full frame images. While this model accurately captured the initial state of the system, the PRF has evolved dynamically since then and has been seen to deviate significantly from the initial (static) model. We construct a dynamic PRF model which is then used to recover photometry for all targets of interest. Both simulation tests and results from Kepler flight data demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA’s Science

  8. Improvement of worker safety through the investigation of the site response to rockbursts

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hagan, TO

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation is to improve worker safety through a better understanding of mine excavation response to rockbursts. The improved understanding should lead to improved mine layout and support design. The project is continuation...

  9. Community Building at the Time of Nargis: The ASEAN Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Santiago Amador III

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclone Nargis was one of the most powerful disasters to hit Myanmar and Southeast Asia. Myanmar was criticized internationally for its allegedly slow effort in allowing international aid to enter into the country. This paper examines the criticism levelled against the ASEAN for its slow response in providing aid to the beleaguered in Myanmar and relates that criticism to ASEAN’s disaster management policy. It focuses on ASEAN’s engagement with Myanmar in order to allow humanitarian aid to flow into the country. The paper suggests that in time ASEAN will have to move from its doctrine of non-intervention in the affairs of a sovereign state to one of non-indifference if it wishes to remain relevant. Ultimately, ASEAN will have to re-evaluate its own goals in order to be a more successful apparatus for interstate and regional affairs, especially with respect to humanitarian crises brought about by natural disasters.

  10. Improved scatterometry time-to-solution using virtual reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaid, Alok; Iddawela, Givantha; Tsai, Jamie; Wainreb, Gilad; Isbester, Paul; Kang, Byung Cheol (Charles); Klots, Michael; Katz, Yinon; Bozdog, Cornel; Sendelbach, Matt

    2015-03-01

    Advanced nodes require precise detection and control of intricate profile details - scatterometry is tool of choice for such requirements. Scatterometry is a model-based technique, and needs extensive reference metrology for qualification. Such reference measurements are costly, time-consuming and often destructive causing delays in deployment. With increasing number of scatterometry steps in flow, and the requirement to collect more reference data points to statistically qualify shrinking metrology specifications, the cost and time for reference metrology is exponentially increasing. This work is aimed to significantly reduce this need. We developed a novel methodology whereby scatterometry spectral information itself is used to predict "virtual" reference data. We qualify this methodology on several key applications from 20nm and 14nm node. We find that performance of solution developed using proposed methodology is indeed similar to performance of solution obtained using real reference data, thereby significantly reducing the lead time to develop scatterometry solutions.

  11. REAL TIME FACE RECOGNITION USING ADABOOST IMPROVED FAST PCA ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Susheel Kumar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an automated system for human face recognition in a real time background world fora large homemade dataset of persons face. The task is very difficult as the real time backgroundsubtraction in an image is still a challenge. Addition to this there is a huge variation in human face imagein terms of size, pose and expression. The system proposed collapses most of this variance. To detect realtime human face AdaBoost with Haar cascade is used and a simple fast PCA and LDA is used torecognize the faces detected. The matched face is then used to mark attendance in the laboratory, in ourcase. This biometric system is a real time attendance system based on the human face recognition with asimple and fast algorithms and gaining a high accuracy rate..

  12. QUERY RESPONSE TIME COMPARISON NOSQLDB MONGODB WITH SQLDB ORACLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humasak T. A. Simanjuntak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Penyimpanan data saat ini terdapat dua jenis yakni relational database dan non-relational database. Kedua jenis DBMS (Database Managemnet System tersebut berbeda dalam berbagai aspek seperti per-formansi eksekusi query, scalability, reliability maupun struktur penyimpanan data. Kajian ini memiliki tujuan untuk mengetahui perbandingan performansi DBMS antara Oracle sebagai jenis relational data-base dan MongoDB sebagai jenis non-relational database dalam mengolah data terstruktur. Eksperimen dilakukan untuk mengetahui perbandingan performansi kedua DBMS tersebut untuk operasi insert, select, update dan delete dengan menggunakan query sederhana maupun kompleks pada database Northwind. Untuk mencapai tujuan eksperimen, 18 query yang terdiri dari 2 insert query, 10 select query, 2 update query dan 2 delete query dieksekusi. Query dieksekusi melalui sebuah aplikasi .Net yang dibangun sebagai perantara antara user dengan basis data. Eksperimen dilakukan pada tabel dengan atau tanpa relasi pada Oracle dan embedded atau bukan embedded dokumen pada MongoDB. Response time untuk setiap eksekusi query dibandingkan dengan menggunakan metode statistik. Eksperimen menunjukkan response time query untuk proses select, insert, dan update pada MongoDB lebih cepatdaripada Oracle. MongoDB lebih cepat 64.8 % untuk select query;MongoDB lebihcepat 72.8 % untuk insert query dan MongoDB lebih cepat 33.9 % untuk update query. Pada delete query, Oracle lebih cepat 96.8 % daripada MongoDB untuk table yang berelasi, tetapi MongoDB lebih cepat 83.8 % daripada Oracle untuk table yang tidak memiliki relasi.Untuk query kompleks dengan Map Reduce pada MongoDB lebih lambat 97.6% daripada kompleks query dengan aggregate function pada Oracle.

  13. Improving changeover time: a tailored SMED approach for welding cells

    OpenAIRE

    Guzmán, Ferradás P; Salonitis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Short changeover times have always been critical in manufacturing business. Set-up duration reduction initiatives have been associated with Shingós ‘Single Minute Exchange of Die' (SMED) method. Although a great number of companies have initiated SMED, some failed on implementation. The main reason is that strict application of Shingós SMED methodology is not the most efficient way to reduce set-up times in all situations. In the present study a tailored methodology is presented that has been...

  14. The simulation of temperature dependence of responsivity and response time for 6H-SiC UV photodetector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yi-Men; Zhou Yong-Hua; Zhang Yu-Ming

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the temperature dependence of responsivity and response time for 6H-SiC ultraviolet (UV) photodetector is simulated based on numerical model in the range from 300 K to 900 K. The simulation results show that the responsivity and the response time of device are less sensitive to temperature and this kind of UV photodetector has excellent temperature stability. Also the effects of device structure and bias voltage on the responsivity and the response time are presented. The thicker the drift region is, the higher the responsivity and the longer the response time are. So the thickness of drift region has to be carefully designed to make trade-off between responsivity and response time.

  15. Dietary Chlorella supplementation effect on immune responses and growth performances of broiler chickens exposed to post hatch holding time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiharto, S; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to investigate the effect of dietary Chlorella sp. supplementation on immune response and growth performance of broiler chickens exposed to post hatch holding time. Allotted in 36 pens, a total of 180 newly hatched chicks were assigned in a 3 × 2 factorial design...... to improve the immune response and to decrease the abdominal fat content of broilers....

  16. Ready for Prime Time: Implementing a Formal Afterschool Quality Improvement System by Prime Time Palm Beach County, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberger, Julie; Lockaby, Tracey; Mayers, Leifa; Guterman, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This is the fourth report of a process evaluation of Palm Beach County Prime Time, Inc., an intermediary organization dedicated to improving the quality of afterschool programs, by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago. It covers the 2007-2008 program year, which was the inaugural year of Prime Time's formal Quality Improvement System (QIS)…

  17. An important improvement in Ferron-timed spectrophotometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Jing; Chang, Fang; Ren, Yijin; Shi, Qiuyi

    Ferron dosage ([Ferron]) is key to ferron-timed spectrophotometry (ferron assay). In order to clarify some important questions, the following studies were conducted: (1) The effect of [Ferron] on the sensitivity of total aluminum (AlT) determination was experimentally investigated and ²⁷Al nuclear

  18. An important improvement in Ferron-timed spectrophotometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Jing; Chang, Fang; Ren, Yijin; Shi, Qiuyi

    2013-01-01

    Ferron dosage ([Ferron]) is key to ferron-timed spectrophotometry (ferron assay). In order to clarify some important questions, the following studies were conducted: (1) The effect of [Ferron] on the sensitivity of total aluminum (AlT) determination was experimentally investigated and ²⁷Al nuclear m

  19. Improved jet noise modeling using a new acoustic time scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azarpeyvand, M.; Self, R.H.; Golliard, J.

    2006-01-01

    To calculate the noise emanating from a turbulent flow (such as a jet flow) using Lighthill's analogy, knowledge concerning the unsteady characteristics of the turbulence is required. Specifically, the form of the turbulent correlation tensor together with various time and length-scales and convecti

  20. Improving real-time train dispatching: models, algorithms and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Ariano, A.

    2008-01-01

    Traffic controllers monitor railway traffic sequencing train movements and setting routes with the aim of ensuring smooth train behaviour and limiting as much as existing delays. Due to the strict time limit available for computing a new timetable during operations, which so far is rather infeasible

  1. An intervention to improve the timing of vancomycin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Stacy E F; Mijailovic, Aleksandar S; Wright, Aileen P M; Szumita, Paul M; Bates, David W; Tanasijevic, Milenko J

    2013-12-01

    Blood samples for vancomycin levels are often drawn too early, leading to potential misinterpretation of results. However, only a few studies describe interventions to reduce mistimed vancomycin levels. We implemented an information technology (IT)-based intervention that provided educational instructions to nurses and determined the percentage of levels drawn too early for 27 months before (n = 6,291) and 14 months after (n = 3,608) the intervention. In addition, we conducted nurse interviews (n = 40) and dataset analysis to assess the root causes of mistimed levels. The percentage of vancomycin timing errors decreased from 39% (2,438/6,291) to 32% (1,137/3,608), though in a time series analysis this decrease was not statistically significant (P = .64). Four common causes of mistimed levels were found: (1) unclear provider orders, (2) scheduling levels to be drawn with morning laboratory tests, (3) lack of communication between providers, and (4) failure to adjust the blood draw in relation to the previous dose. A real-time, IT-based intervention that links the timing of levels with medication administration might have a more substantial impact.

  2. Emergency care center turnaround time--an improvement story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelrud, Joan; Burroughs, Helen; Koterwas, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Emergency department overcrowding is a nationally recognized barrier to patient safety. Other obstacles to efficiency and adequate care in emergency rooms include lengthy patient waits and side-tracked ambulances. This article explores one community hospital's approach to significantly decreasing emergency visit turnaround times while increasing patient satisfaction.

  3. Action Video Games Improve Direction Discrimination of Parafoveal Translational Global Motion but Not Reaction Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Andrea; Boyce, Matthew; Ghin, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    Playing action video games enhances visual motion perception. However, there is psychophysical evidence that action video games do not improve motion sensitivity for translational global moving patterns presented in fovea. This study investigates global motion perception in action video game players and compares their performance to that of non-action video game players and non-video game players. Stimuli were random dot kinematograms presented in the parafovea. Observers discriminated the motion direction of a target random dot kinematogram presented in one of the four visual quadrants. Action video game players showed lower motion coherence thresholds than the other groups. However, when the task was performed at threshold, we did not find differences between groups in terms of distributions of reaction times. These results suggest that action video games improve visual motion sensitivity in the near periphery of the visual field, rather than speed response.

  4. Trunk Flexibility Improvement in Response to Powered Assisted Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Bains

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background study: Flexibility in human spine has always plays an important role in dexterity and seamless ambulatory activities. When optimum range is not maintained by the trunk column, due to lack of flexibility, the posture gets affected resulting in reduce trunk rotation flexibility and mobility hence loss of complete trunk rotation. Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of Shapemaster Power Assisted Exercise Equipment (SPAEE on trunk flexibility. Methodology: Twenty healthy individual ages between 40 to 60 years were randomly divided into control and exercise groups. Shapemaster exercise program performed two times per week for 5 weeks and 45 minutes per session. Before and after 10 sessions of Shapemaster exercise protocol, Seated trunk rotation test was used to measure trunk flexibility. Results: Repeated measurement ANOVA were used to analysis data between groups. The results of this study illustrated that after 10th sessions trunk flexibility significantly improved (F (1.0, 18 = 11.732, p < 0.003. Conclusion: In conclusion results were determined that SPAEE is safe and it did effectively enhance flexibility among individual healthy adults. Keyword: Shapemaster Power Assisted Exercise Equipment (SPAEE, Trunk Flexibility, Healthy individual

  5. How heterogeneous timing of participation across people improves diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Akbarpour, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that non-Poisson ("bursty") behaviors in human interactions can impede the diffusion of information or infectious diseases in social networks. Those studies generally consider models in which nodes are independently active according to the same random timing process, and vary that timing. In reality, people differ widely in the patterns of their active periods of interaction. In this paper, we develop a simple model of diffusion on networks in which agents can differ in the autocorrelation of their activity patterns. We show that bursty behavior does not always hurt the diffusion, and depending on the features of the environment, having some (but not all) of the population being bursty significantly helps diffusion. Moreover, we prove that in a variety of settings maximizing diffusion requires heterogeneous activity patterns across agents and does not involve any Poisson behavior.

  6. Regional changes over time in initial virologic response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole; Gatell, Jose M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS......: Virologic response (viral load ART was analyzed in antiretroviral-naive EuroSIDA patients. Analyses were stratified by region (south, central west, north, east) or time started cART (early, 1996-1997; mid, 1998-1999; late, 2000-1904). RESULTS: Virologic...... suppression was achieved by 60% of 2102 patients: 57% south (n = 560), 61% central west (n = 466), 63% north (n = 606), 58% east (n = 470) (P = 0.091). An increase was observed over time: 52% early cART, 56% mid cART, 69% late cART (P

  7. Regional changes over time in initial virological response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, W; Kirk, O; Gatell, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS......: Virologic response (viral load ART was analyzed in antiretroviral-naive EuroSIDA patients. Analyses were stratified by region (south, central west, north, east) or time started cART (early, 1996-1997; mid, 1998-1999; late, 2000-1904). RESULTS: Virologic...... suppression was achieved by 60% of 2102 patients: 57% south (n = 560), 61% central west (n = 466), 63% north (n = 606), 58% east (n = 470) (P = 0.091). An increase was observed over time: 52% early cART, 56% mid cART, 69% late cART (P

  8. Improved pulse transit time estimation by system identification analysis of proximal and distal arterial waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Da; Ryan, Kathy L; Rickards, Caroline A; Zhang, Guanqun; Convertino, Victor A; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the system identification approach for potentially improved estimation of pulse transit time (PTT), a popular arterial stiffness marker. In this approach, proximal and distal arterial waveforms are measured and respectively regarded as the input and output of a system. Next, the system impulse response is identified from all samples of the measured input and output. Finally, the time delay of the impulse response is detected as the PTT estimate. Unlike conventional foot-to-foot detection techniques, this approach is designed to provide an artifact robust estimate of the true PTT in the absence of wave reflection. The approach is also applicable to arbitrary types of arterial waveforms. We specifically applied a parametric system identification technique to noninvasive impedance cardiography (ICG) and peripheral arterial blood pressure waveforms from 15 humans subjected to lower-body negative pressure. We assessed the technique through the correlation coefficient (r) between its 1/PTT estimates and measured diastolic pressure (DP) per subject and the root mean squared error (RMSE) of the DP predicted from these estimates and measured DP. The technique achieved average r and RMSE values of 0.81 ± 0.16 and 4.3 ± 1.3 mmHg. For comparison, the corresponding values were 0.59 ± 0.37 (P system identification approach can indeed improve PTT estimation.

  9. The PMAC Code of Marketing Practices: Time for improvement?

    OpenAIRE

    Desjardins, J. G.

    1997-01-01

    In this issue (see pages 351 to 356) Dr. Joel Lexchin proposes reforms that could help the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association of Canada (PMAC) adapt its Code of Marketing Practices to changing times. The PMAC code reflects the ethical concerns of drug manufacturers and speaks to the need for high standards in promotional activities. The code is a commendable beginning, but it does not go far enough in ensuring ethical practice. The PMAC should take this opportunity to address the concer...

  10. Prairie forb response to timing of vole herbivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Amy T; Howe, Henry F

    2009-05-01

    The timing of herbivory can be an important factor in the strength and direction of plant response to herbivore damage. To determine the effect of vole herbivory timing within a growing season on tallgrass prairie forbs, we used individual plant enclosures to limit vole access to three species, Desmanthus illinoensis, Echinacea purpurea, and Heliopsis helianthoides, in an experimental restoration in northern Illinois, USA. As part of a long-term experiment, we implemented five vole access treatments in 2003: (1) vole access for the entire growing season, (2) early-season access, (3) mid-season access, (4) late-season access, and (5) no vole access. We protected all plants from herbivory in the following growing season (2004) to test whether the effects of herbivory in one growing season carried over to the next. We also tested how restoration planting design, including seeding time (June or December) and density (35 or 350 seeds/m2 of each species) affected patterns of herbivory and plant recovery. Vole access for the entire growing season was most detrimental for the growth and reproduction of all three species. In contrast, vole access for a portion of the growing season had different effects on the three species: Desmanthus growth and reproduction was negatively affected by early-season access, Echinacea reproductive output was reduced by late-season access, and Heliopsis was not affected by early-, mid-, or late-season vole access. Negative effects of continual vole access carried over to the following growing season for Desmanthus and Heliopsis, but not for Echinacea. Effects of herbivory did not carry over to the next season for Echinacea and Heliopsis when plants were accessible to voles for only part of the growing season. In contrast, Desmanthus plants exposed to early-season herbivory in one year continued to produce fewer seeds per plant after being protected from vole herbivory for a growing season. Planting density and planting season had mixed effects

  11. Improved Appliance Coordination Scheme with Waiting Time in Smart Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas A. Al Balas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Smart grids aim to merge the advances in communications and information technologies with traditional power grids. In smart grids, users can generate energy and sell it to the local utility supplier. The users can reduce energy consumption by shifting appliances’ start time to off-peak hours. Many researchers have proposed techniques to reduce the previous issue for home appliances, such as the Appliances Coordination (ACORD scheme and Appliances Coordination with Feed In (ACORD-FI scheme. The goal of this work is to introduce an efficient scheme to reduce the total cost of energy bills by utilizing the ACORD-FI scheme to obtain an effective solution. In this work three scheduling schemes are proposed: the Appliances Coordination by Giving Waiting Time (ACORD-WT, the Appliances Coordination by Giving Priority (ACORD-P, and using photovoltaic (PV with priority and waiting time scheduling algorithms. A simulator written in C++ is used to test the performance of the proposed schemes using. The performance metric used is the total savings in the cost of the energy bill in dollars. The first comparison for the proposed schemes with the ACORD-FI, and the results show that the efficiency of the proposed ACORD-WT is better than the ACORD-FI, regardless of the number of appliances. Moreover, the proposed ACORD-P, is also better than the standard ACORD-FI.

  12. An Improved Time Domain Pitch Detection Algorithm for Pathological Voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd R. Jamaludin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The present study proposes a new pitch detection algorithm which could potentially be used to detect pitch for disordered or pathological voices. One of the parameters required for dysphonia diagnosis is pitch and this prompted the development of a new and reliable pitch detection algorithm capable of accurately detect pitch in disordered voices. Approach: The proposed method applies a technique where the frame size of the half wave rectified autocorrelation is adjusted to a smaller frame after two potential pitch candidates are identified within the preliminary frame. Results: The method is compared to PRAATs standard autocorrelation and the result shows a significant improvement in detecting pitch for pathological voices. Conclusion: The proposed method is more reliable way to detect pitch, either in low or high pitched voice without adjusting the window size, fixing the pitch candidate search range and predefining threshold like most of the standard autocorrelation do.

  13. Connecting Entanglement in Time and Space: Improving the Folding Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Hastings, M B

    2014-01-01

    The "folding algorithm"\\cite{fold1} is a matrix product state algorithm for simulating quantum systems that involves a spatial evolution of a matrix product state. Hence, the computational effort of this algorithm is controlled by the temporal entanglement. We show that this temporal entanglement is, in many cases, equal to the spatial entanglement of a modified Hamiltonian. This inspires a modification to the folding algorithm, that we call the "hybrid algorithm". We find that this leads to improved accuracy for the same numerical effort. We then use these algorithms to study relaxation in a transverse plus parallel field Ising model, finding persistent quasi-periodic oscillations for certain choices of initial conditions.

  14. Early Flood Detection for Rapid Humanitarian Response: Harnessing Near Real-Time Satellite and Twitter Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenden Jongman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Humanitarian organizations have a crucial role in response and relief efforts after floods. The effectiveness of disaster response is contingent on accurate and timely information regarding the location, timing and impacts of the event. Here we show how two near-real-time data sources, satellite observations of water coverage and flood-related social media activity from Twitter, can be used to support rapid disaster response, using case-studies in the Philippines and Pakistan. For these countries we analyze information from disaster response organizations, the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS satellite flood signal, and flood-related Twitter activity analysis. The results demonstrate that these sources of near-real-time information can be used to gain a quicker understanding of the location, the timing, as well as the causes and impacts of floods. In terms of location, we produce daily impact maps based on both satellite information and social media, which can dynamically and rapidly outline the affected area during a disaster. In terms of timing, the results show that GFDS and/or Twitter signals flagging ongoing or upcoming flooding are regularly available one to several days before the event was reported to humanitarian organizations. In terms of event understanding, we show that both GFDS and social media can be used to detect and understand unexpected or controversial flood events, for example due to the sudden opening of hydropower dams or the breaching of flood protection. The performance of the GFDS and Twitter data for early detection and location mapping is mixed, depending on specific hydrological circumstances (GFDS and social media penetration (Twitter. Further research is needed to improve the interpretation of the GFDS signal in different situations, and to improve the pre-processing of social media data for operational use.

  15. Improved integration time estimation of endogenous retroviruses with phylogenetic data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Martins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs are genetic fossils of ancient retroviral integrations that remain in the genome of many organisms. Most loci are rendered non-functional by mutations, but several intact retroviral genes are known in mammalian genomes. Some have been adopted by the host species, while the beneficial roles of others remain unclear. Besides the obvious possible immunogenic impact from transcribing intact viral genes, endogenous retroviruses have also become an interesting and useful tool to study phylogenetic relationships. The determination of the integration time of these viruses has been based upon the assumption that both 5' and 3' Long Terminal Repeats (LTRs sequences are identical at the time of integration, but evolve separately afterwards. Similar approaches have been using either a constant evolutionary rate or a range of rates for these viral loci, and only single species data. Here we show the advantages of using different approaches. RESULTS: We show that there are strong advantages in using multiple species data and state-of-the-art phylogenetic analysis. We incorporate both simple phylogenetic information and Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC methods to date the integrations of these viruses based on a relaxed molecular clock approach over a Bayesian phylogeny model and applied them to several selected ERV sequences in primates. These methods treat each ERV locus as having a distinct evolutionary rate for each LTR, and make use of consensual speciation time intervals between primates to calibrate the relaxed molecular clocks. CONCLUSIONS: The use of a fixed rate produces results that vary considerably with ERV family and the actual evolutionary rate of the sequence, and should be avoided whenever multi-species phylogenetic data are available. For genome-wide studies, the simple phylogenetic approach constitutes a better alternative, while still being computationally feasible.

  16. Improving Oral English in Break Time in Junior High School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小丹

    2013-01-01

      Teachers have been paying more attention to oral English teaching in junior high school than ever before. Generally, teachers focus on teaching oral English in class, where they give preeminence to creating an environment in the classroom which approximates to the“real-life”communicative use of language (Yang Chaochun&Cheng Lian 2005). However, there are some limits teaching oral English in class. This essay puts forwards to provide input during the break time for students to acquire oral English unconsciously in junior high school to make up for the insufficiency.

  17. IMPROVED REAL-TIME SCAN MATCHING USING CORNER FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The automation of unmanned vehicle operation has gained a lot of research attention, in the last few years, because of its numerous applications. The vehicle localization is more challenging in indoor environments where absolute positioning measurements (e.g. GPS are typically unavailable. Laser range finders are among the most widely used sensors that help the unmanned vehicles to localize themselves in indoor environments. Typically, automatic real-time matching of the successive scans is performed either explicitly or implicitly by any localization approach that utilizes laser range finders. Many accustomed approaches such as Iterative Closest Point (ICP, Iterative Matching Range Point (IMRP, Iterative Dual Correspondence (IDC, and Polar Scan Matching (PSM handles the scan matching problem in an iterative fashion which significantly affects the time consumption. Furthermore, the solution convergence is not guaranteed especially in cases of sharp maneuvers or fast movement. This paper proposes an automated real-time scan matching algorithm where the matching process is initialized using the detected corners. This initialization step aims to increase the convergence probability and to limit the number of iterations needed to reach convergence. The corner detection is preceded by line extraction from the laser scans. To evaluate the probability of line availability in indoor environments, various data sets, offered by different research groups, have been tested and the mean numbers of extracted lines per scan for these data sets are ranging from 4.10 to 8.86 lines of more than 7 points. The set of all intersections between extracted lines are detected as corners regardless of the physical intersection of these line segments in the scan. To account for the uncertainties of the detected corners, the covariance of the corners is estimated using the extracted lines variances. The detected corners are used to estimate the transformation parameters

  18. Improving predictability of time series using maximum entropy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chliamovitch, G.; Dupuis, A.; Golub, A.; Chopard, B.

    2015-04-01

    We discuss how maximum entropy methods may be applied to the reconstruction of Markov processes underlying empirical time series and compare this approach to usual frequency sampling. It is shown that, in low dimension, there exists a subset of the space of stochastic matrices for which the MaxEnt method is more efficient than sampling, in the sense that shorter historical samples have to be considered to reach the same accuracy. Considering short samples is of particular interest when modelling smoothly non-stationary processes, which provides, under some conditions, a powerful forecasting tool. The method is illustrated for a discretized empirical series of exchange rates.

  19. Improved Real-Time Scan Matching Using Corner Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, H. A.; Moussa, A. M.; Elhabiby, M. M.; El-Sheimy, N.; Sesay, Abu B.

    2016-06-01

    The automation of unmanned vehicle operation has gained a lot of research attention, in the last few years, because of its numerous applications. The vehicle localization is more challenging in indoor environments where absolute positioning measurements (e.g. GPS) are typically unavailable. Laser range finders are among the most widely used sensors that help the unmanned vehicles to localize themselves in indoor environments. Typically, automatic real-time matching of the successive scans is performed either explicitly or implicitly by any localization approach that utilizes laser range finders. Many accustomed approaches such as Iterative Closest Point (ICP), Iterative Matching Range Point (IMRP), Iterative Dual Correspondence (IDC), and Polar Scan Matching (PSM) handles the scan matching problem in an iterative fashion which significantly affects the time consumption. Furthermore, the solution convergence is not guaranteed especially in cases of sharp maneuvers or fast movement. This paper proposes an automated real-time scan matching algorithm where the matching process is initialized using the detected corners. This initialization step aims to increase the convergence probability and to limit the number of iterations needed to reach convergence. The corner detection is preceded by line extraction from the laser scans. To evaluate the probability of line availability in indoor environments, various data sets, offered by different research groups, have been tested and the mean numbers of extracted lines per scan for these data sets are ranging from 4.10 to 8.86 lines of more than 7 points. The set of all intersections between extracted lines are detected as corners regardless of the physical intersection of these line segments in the scan. To account for the uncertainties of the detected corners, the covariance of the corners is estimated using the extracted lines variances. The detected corners are used to estimate the transformation parameters between the

  20. Knowledge Translation Interventions to Improve the Timing of Dialysis Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Elaine M. T.; Manns, Braden J.; Garg, Amit X.; Sood, Manish M.; Kim, S. Joseph; Naimark, David; Nesrallah, Gihad E.; Soroka, Steven D.; Beaulieu, Monica; Dixon, Stephanie; Alam, Ahsan; Tangri, Navdeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early initiation of chronic dialysis (starting dialysis with higher vs lower kidney function) has risen rapidly in the past 2 decades in Canada and internationally, despite absence of established health benefits and higher costs. In 2014, a Canadian guideline on the timing of dialysis initiation, recommending an intent-to-defer approach, was published. Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a knowledge translation intervention to promote the intent-to-defer approach in clinical practice. Design: This study is a multicenter, 2-arm parallel, cluster randomized trial. Setting: The study involves 55 advanced chronic kidney disease clinics across Canada. Patients: Patients older than 18 years who are managed by nephrologists for more than 3 months, and initiate dialysis in the follow-up period are included in the study. Measurements: Outcomes will be measured at the patient-level and enumerated within a cluster. Data on characteristics of each dialysis start will be determined by linkages with the Canadian Organ Replacement Register. Primary outcomes include the proportion of patients who start dialysis early with an estimated glomerular filtration rate greater than 10.5 mL/min/1.73 m2 and start dialysis in hospital as inpatients or in an emergency room setting. Secondary outcomes include the rate of change in early dialysis starts; rates of hospitalizations, deaths, and cost of predialysis care (wherever available); quarterly proportion of new starts; and acceptability of the knowledge translation materials. Methods: We randomized 55 multidisciplinary chronic disease clinics (clusters) in Canada to receive either an active knowledge translation intervention or no intervention for the uptake of the guideline on the timing of dialysis initiation. The active knowledge translation intervention consists of audit and feedback as well as patient- and provider-directed educational tools delivered at a comprehensive in

  1. A Near Real-time Decision Support System Improving Forest Management in the Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, K.; Musinsky, J.; Ledezma, J.; Rasolohery, A.; Mendoza, E.; Kistler, H.; Steininger, M.; Morton, D. C.; Melton, F. S.; Manwell, J.; Koenig, K.

    2013-12-01

    Conservation International (CI) has a decade of experience developing near real-time fire and deforestation monitoring and forecasting systems that channel monitoring information from satellite observations directly to national and sub-national government agencies, Non-Government Organizations (NGOs), and local communities. These systems are used to strengthen forest surveillance and monitoring, fire management and prevention, protected areas management and sustainable land use planning. With support from a NASA Wildland Fires grant, in September 2013 CI will launch a brand new near real-time alert system (FIRECAST) to better meet the outstanding needs and challenges users face in addressing ecosystem degradation from wildland fire and illegal forest activities. Outreach efforts and user feedback have indicated the need for seasonal fire forecasts for effective land use planning, faster alert delivery to enhance response to illegal forest activities, and expanded forest monitoring capabilities that enable proactive responses and that strengthen forest conservation and sustainable development actions. The new FIRECAST system addresses these challenges by integrating the current fire alert and deforestation systems and adding improved ecological forecasting of fire risk; expanding data exchange capabilities with mobile technologies; and delivering a deforestation alert product that can inform policies related to land use management and Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+). In addition to demonstrating the capabilities of this new real-time alert system, we also highlight how coordination with host-country institutions enhances the system's capacity to address the implementation needs of REDD+ forest carbon projects, improve tropical forest management, strengthen environmental law enforcement, and facilitate the uptake of near real-time satellite monitoring data into business practices of these national/sub-national institutions.

  2. Improving uniformity in brain death determination policies over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hilary H.; Varelas, Panayiotis N.; Henderson, Galen V.; Wijdicks, Eelco F.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate that progress has been made in unifying brain death determination guidelines in the last decade by directly comparing the policies of the US News and World Report's top 50 ranked neurologic institutions from 2006 and 2015. Methods: We solicited official hospital guidelines in 2015 from these top 50 institutions, generated summary statistics of their criteria as benchmarked against the American Academy of Neurology Practice Parameters (AANPP) and the comparison 2006 cohort in 5 key categories, and statistically compared the 2 cohorts' compliance with the AANPP. Results: From 2008 to 2015, hospital policies exhibited significant improvement (p = 0.005) in compliance with official guidelines, particularly with respect to criteria related to apnea testing (p = 0.009) and appropriate ancillary testing (p = 0.0006). However, variability remains in other portions of the policies, both those with specific recommendation from the AANPP (e.g., specifics for ancillary tests) and those without firm guidance (e.g., the level of involvement of neurologists, neurosurgeons, or physicians with education/training specific to brain death in the determination process). Conclusions: While the 2010 AANPP update seems to be concordant with progress in achieving greater uniformity in guidelines at the top 50 neurologic institutions, more needs to be done. Whether further interventions come as grassroots initiatives that leverage technological advances in promoting adoption of new guidelines or as top-down regulatory rulings to mandate speedier approval processes, this study shows that solely relying on voluntary updates to professional society guidelines is not enough. PMID:28077490

  3. Accelerometer-measured dose-response for physical activity, sedentary time, and mortality in US adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Charles E; Keadle, S. K.; Troiano, Richard P

    2016-01-01

    Background: Moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity is recommended to maintain and improve health, but the mortality benefits of light activity and risk for sedentary time remain uncertain. Objectives: Using accelerometer-based measures, we 1) described the mortality dose-response for se......Background: Moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity is recommended to maintain and improve health, but the mortality benefits of light activity and risk for sedentary time remain uncertain. Objectives: Using accelerometer-based measures, we 1) described the mortality dose......-response for sedentary time and light-and moderateto-vigorous-intensity activity using restricted cubic splines, and 2) estimated the mortality benefits associated with replacing sedentary time with physical activity, accounting for total activity. Design: US adults (n = 4840) from NHANES (2003-2006) wore...... an accelerometer for #7 d and were followed prospectively for mortality. Proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for mortality associations with time spent sedentary and in light-and moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity. Splines were used to graphically present...

  4. Reconstruction of high-resolution time series from slow-response atmospheric measurements by deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, André; Wendisch, Manfred

    2017-04-01

    Measurements of high temporal resolution are often needed to study the spatial or temporal variation of atmospheric parameters. An efficient method to enhance the temporal resolution of slow-response measurements is introduced. It is based on the deconvolution theorem of Fourier transform to restore amplitude and phase shift of high frequent fluctuations. It is shown that the quality of reconstruction depends on the instrument noise, the sensor response time and the frequency of the oscillations. The method is demonstrated by application to measurements of broadband terrestrial irradiance using pyrgeometer and temperature and humidity measurements by drop sondes. Using a CGR-4 pyrgeometer with response time of 3 s, the method is tested in laboratory measurements for synthetic time series including a boxcar function and periodic oscillations. The originally slow-response pyrgeometer data were reconstructed to higher resolution and compared to the predefined synthetic time series. The reconstruction of the time series worked up to oscillations of 0.5 Hz frequency and 2 W m-2 amplitude if the sampling frequency of the data acquisition is 16 kHz or higher. For oscillations faster than 2 Hz, the instrument noise exceeded the reduced amplitude of the oscillations in the measurements and the reconstruction failed. The method was applied to airborne measurements of upward terrestrial irradiance and drop sonde profiles from the VERDI (Vertical Distribution of Ice in Arctic Clouds) field campaign. Pyrgeometer data above open leads in sea ice and a broken cloud field were reconstructed and compared to KT19 infrared thermometer data. The reconstruction of amplitude and phase shift of the deconvoluted data improved the agreement with the KT19 data and removed biases for the maximum and minimum values. By application to temperature and humidity profiles measured by drop sonde profiles, the resolution of the cloud top inversion cloud be improved.

  5. Improving operating room turnover time: a systems based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ankeet S; Carlson, Grant W; Deckers, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    Operating room (OR) turnover time (TT) has a broad and significant impact on hospital administrators, providers, staff and patients. Our objective was to identify current problems in TT management and implement a consistent, reproducible process to reduce average TT and process variability. Initial observations of TT were made to document the existing process at a 511 bed, 24 OR, academic medical center. Three control groups, including one consisting of Orthopedic and Vascular Surgery, were used to limit potential confounders such as case acuity/duration and equipment needs. A redesigned process based on observed issues, focusing on a horizontally structured, systems-based approach has three major interventions: developing consistent criteria for OR readiness, utilizing parallel processing for patient and room readiness, and enhancing perioperative communication. Process redesign was implemented in Orthopedics and Vascular Surgery. Comparisons of mean and standard deviation of TT were made using an independent 2-tailed t-test. Using all surgical specialties as controls (n = 237), mean TT (hh:mm:ss) was reduced by 0:20:48 min (95 % CI, 0:10:46-0:30:50), from 0:44:23 to 0:23:25, a 46.9 % reduction. Standard deviation of TT was reduced by 0:10:32 min, from 0:16:24 to 0:05:52 and frequency of TT≥30 min was reduced from 72.5to 11.7 %. P systems-based focus should drive OR TT design.

  6. Real-time Responsiveness for Ethics Oversight During Disaster Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenwiler, Lisa; Pringle, John; Boulanger, Renaud; Hunt, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Disaster research has grown in scope and frequency. Research in the wake of disasters and during humanitarian crises--particularly in resource-poor settings--is likely to raise profound and unique ethical challenges for local communities, crisis responders, researchers, and research ethics committees (RECs). Given the ethical challenges, many have questioned how best to provide research ethics review and oversight. We contribute to the conversation concerning how best to ensure appropriate ethical oversight in disaster research and argue that ethical disaster research requires of researchers and RECs a particular sort of ongoing, critical engagement which may not be warranted in less exceptional research. We present two cases that typify the concerns disaster researchers and RECs may confront, and elaborate upon what this ongoing engagement might look like--how it might be conceptualized and utilized--using the concept of real-time responsiveness (RTR). The central aim of RTR, understood here as both an ethical ideal and practice, is to lessen the potential for research conducted in the wake of disasters to create, perpetuate, or exacerbate vulnerabilities and contribute to injustices suffered by disaster-affected populations. Well cultivated and deployed, we believe that RTR may enhance the moral capacities of researchers and REC members, and RECs as institutions where moral agency is nurtured and sustained.

  7. Is transcranial direct current stimulation a potential method for improving response inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Kwon, Jung Won

    2013-04-15

    Inhibitory control of movement in motor learning requires the ability to suppress an inappropriate action, a skill needed to stop a planned or ongoing motor response in response to changes in a variety of environments. This study used a stop-signal task to determine whether transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area alters the reaction time in motor inhibition. Forty healthy subjects were recruited for this study and were randomly assigned to either the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition or a sham-transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. All subjects consecutively performed the stop-signal task before, during, and after the delivery of anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, and post-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase). Compared to the sham condition, there were significant reductions in the stop-signal processing times during and after transcranial direct-current stimulation, and change times were significantly greater in the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. There was no significant change in go processing-times during or after transcranial direct-current stimulation in either condition. Anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation was feasibly coupled to an interactive improvement in inhibitory control. This coupling led to a decrease in the stop-signal process time required for the appropriate responses between motor execution and inhibition. However, there was no transcranial direct-current stimulation effect on the no-signal reaction time during the stop-signal task. Transcranial direct-current stimulation can adjust certain behaviors, and it could be a useful clinical intervention for patients who have difficulties with response inhibition.

  8. Is transcranial direct current stimulation a potential method for improving response inhibition?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Hyun Kwon; Jung Won Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitory control of movement in motor learning requires the ability to suppress an inappropriate action, a skill needed to stop a planned or ongoing motor response in response to changes in a variety of environments. This study used a stop-signal task to determine whether transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area alters the reaction time in motor inhibition. Forty healthy subjects were recruited for this study and were randomly assigned to either the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition or a sham-transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. All subjects consecutively performed the stop-signal task before, during, and after the delivery of anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, and post-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase). Compared to the sham condition, there were significant reductions in the stop-signal processing times during and after transcranial direct-current stimulation, and change times were significantly greater in the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. There was no significant change in go processing-times during or after transcranial direct-current stimulation in either condition. Anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation was feasibly coupled to an interactive improvement in inhibitory control. This coupling led to a decrease in the stop-signal process time required for the appropriate responses between motor execution and inhibition. However, there was no transcranial direct-current stimulation effect on the no-signal reaction time during the stop-signal task. Transcranial direct-current stimulation can adjust certain behaviors, and it could be a useful clinical intervention for patients who have difficulties with response inhibition.

  9. Influence of time domain unsteady aerodynamics on coupled flap-lag-torsional aeroelastic stability and response of rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Robinson, L. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the incorporation of finite-state, time-domain aerodynamics in a flag-lag-torsional aeroelastic stability and response analysis in forward flight. Improvements to a previous formulation are introduced which eliminate spurious singularities. The methodology for solving the aeroelastic stability and response problems with augmented states, in the time domain, is presented using an implicit formulation. Results describing the aeroelastic behavior of soft and stiff in-plane hingeless rotor blades, in forward flight, are presented to illustrate the sensitivity of both the stability and response problems to time domain unsteady aerodynamics.

  10. Influence of time domain unsteady aerodynamics on coupled flap-lag-torsional aeroelastic stability and response of rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Robinson, L. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the incorporation of finite-state, time-domain aerodynamics in a flag-lag-torsional aeroelastic stability and response analysis in forward flight. Improvements to a previous formulation are introduced which eliminate spurious singularities. The methodology for solving the aeroelastic stability and response problems with augmented states, in the time domain, is presented using an implicit formulation. Results describing the aeroelastic behavior of soft and stiff in-plane hingeless rotor blades, in forward flight, are presented to illustrate the sensitivity of both the stability and response problems to time domain unsteady aerodynamics.

  11. A stochastic model updating strategy-based improved response surface model and advanced Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xue; Fei, Cheng-Wei; Choy, Yat-Sze; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2017-01-01

    To improve the accuracy and efficiency of computation model for complex structures, the stochastic model updating (SMU) strategy was proposed by combining the improved response surface model (IRSM) and the advanced Monte Carlo (MC) method based on experimental static test, prior information and uncertainties. Firstly, the IRSM and its mathematical model were developed with the emphasis on moving least-square method, and the advanced MC simulation method is studied based on Latin hypercube sampling method as well. And then the SMU procedure was presented with experimental static test for complex structure. The SMUs of simply-supported beam and aeroengine stator system (casings) were implemented to validate the proposed IRSM and advanced MC simulation method. The results show that (1) the SMU strategy hold high computational precision and efficiency for the SMUs of complex structural system; (2) the IRSM is demonstrated to be an effective model due to its SMU time is far less than that of traditional response surface method, which is promising to improve the computational speed and accuracy of SMU; (3) the advanced MC method observably decrease the samples from finite element simulations and the elapsed time of SMU. The efforts of this paper provide a promising SMU strategy for complex structure and enrich the theory of model updating.

  12. Improving Waiting Time of Tasks Scheduled Under Preemptive Round Robin Using Changeable Time Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Mostafa, Samih Mohemmed

    2010-01-01

    Minimizing waiting time for tasks waiting in the queue for execution is one of the important scheduling cri-teria which took a wide area in scheduling preemptive tasks. In this paper we present Changeable Time Quan-tum (CTQ) approach combined with the round-robin algorithm, we try to adjust the time quantum according to the burst times of the tasks in the ready queue. There are two important benefits of using (CTQ) approach: minimizing the average waiting time of the tasks, consequently minimizing the average turnaround time, and keeping the number of context switches as low as possible, consequently minimizing the scheduling overhead. In this paper, we consider the scheduling problem for preemptive tasks, where the time costs of these tasks are known a priori. Our experimental results demonstrate that CTQ can provide much lower scheduling overhead and better scheduling criteria.

  13. Parasitic infection improves survival from septic peritonitis by enhancing mast cell responses to bacteria in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E Sutherland

    Full Text Available Mammals are serially infected with a variety of microorganisms, including bacteria and parasites. Each infection reprograms the immune system's responses to re-exposure and potentially alters responses to first-time infection by different microorganisms. To examine whether infection with a metazoan parasite modulates host responses to subsequent bacterial infection, mice were infected with the hookworm-like intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, followed in 2-4 weeks by peritoneal injection of the pathogenic bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae. Survival from Klebsiella peritonitis two weeks after parasite infection was better in Nippostrongylus-infected animals than in unparasitized mice, with Nippostrongylus-infected mice having fewer peritoneal bacteria, more neutrophils, and higher levels of protective interleukin 6. The improved survival of Nippostrongylus-infected mice depends on IL-4 because the survival benefit is lost in mice lacking IL-4. Because mast cells protect mice from Klebsiella peritonitis, we examined responses in mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh/Kit(W-sh mice, in which parasitosis failed to improve survival from Klebsiella peritonitis. However, adoptive transfer of cultured mast cells to Kit(W-sh/Kit(W-sh mice restored survival benefits of parasitosis. These results show that recent infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis protects mice from Klebsiella peritonitis by modulating mast cell contributions to host defense, and suggest more generally that parasitosis can yield survival advantages to a bacterially infected host.

  14. BASIN PEAT SORBTION CAPACITY IMPROVEMENT FOR OIL SPILL RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHUKHAREVA N.V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with the investigation of basin peat sorption capacity in Tomsk field. Experimental results showed the thermal treatment efficiency of sorbent production for oil spill response.

  15. Ways to improve of corporate social responsibility in Ukrainian forestry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyinenko Irina

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the marketing techniques of corporate social responsibility in the current conditions of the Ukrainian wood industry with an emphasis on the need to conduct non-financial reporting

  16. Military Munitions Response Program: Opportunities Exist to Improve Program Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    the eviden Page 36 GAO-10-384 Military Munitions Response Program Appendix I: Objectives, Scope, and Methodology obtained provides a...and obtained information and data needed for our review from a key senior DOD official responsible for the MMRP within DOD’s Office of the Deputy...accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain sufficient

  17. Mathematical modeling improves EC50 estimations from classical dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Elin; Lindgren, Isa; Lövfors, William; Lundengård, Karin; Cervin, Ida; Sjöström, Theresia Arbring; Altimiras, Jordi; Cedersund, Gunnar

    2015-03-01

    The β-adrenergic response is impaired in failing hearts. When studying β-adrenergic function in vitro, the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50 ) is an important measure of ligand response. We previously measured the in vitro contraction force response of chicken heart tissue to increasing concentrations of adrenaline, and observed a decreasing response at high concentrations. The classical interpretation of such data is to assume a maximal response before the decrease, and to fit a sigmoid curve to the remaining data to determine EC50 . Instead, we have applied a mathematical modeling approach to interpret the full dose-response curve in a new way. The developed model predicts a non-steady-state caused by a short resting time between increased concentrations of agonist, which affect the dose-response characterization. Therefore, an improved estimate of EC50 may be calculated using steady-state simulations of the model. The model-based estimation of EC50 is further refined using additional time-resolved data to decrease the uncertainty of the prediction. The resulting model-based EC50 (180-525 nm) is higher than the classically interpreted EC50 (46-191 nm). Mathematical modeling thus makes it possible to re-interpret previously obtained datasets, and to make accurate estimates of EC50 even when steady-state measurements are not experimentally feasible. The mathematical models described here have been submitted to the JWS Online Cellular Systems Modelling Database, and may be accessed at http://jjj.bio.vu.nl/database/nyman. © 2015 FEBS.

  18. Networked Control System Time-Delay Compensation Based on Time-Delay Prediction and Improved Implicit GPC

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong-Da Tian; Shu-Jiang Li; Yan-Hong Wang; Hong-Xia Yu

    2015-01-01

    The random time delay in a networked control system can usually deteriorate the control performance and stability of the networked control system. In order to solve this problem, this paper puts forward a networked control system random time-delay compensation method based on time-delay prediction and improved implicit generalized predictive control (GPC). The least squares support vector machine is used to predict the future time delay of network. The parameters of the least squares support...

  19. Ambulance call-outs and response times in Birmingham and the impact of extreme weather and climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornes, John Edward; Fisher, Paul Anthony; Rayment-Bishop, Tracy; Smith, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    Although there has been some research on the impact of extreme weather on the number of ambulance call-out incidents, especially heat waves, there has been very little research on the impact of cold weather on ambulance call-outs and response times. In the UK, there is a target response rate of 75% of life threatening incidents (Category A) that must be responded to within 8 min. This paper compares daily air temperature data with ambulance call-out data for Birmingham over a 5-year period (2007-2011). A significant relationship between extreme weather and increased ambulance call-out and response times can clearly be shown. Both hot and cold weather have a negative impact on response times. During the heat wave of August 2003, the number of ambulance call-outs increased by up to a third. In December 2010 (the coldest December for more than 100 years), the response rate fell below 50% for 3 days in a row (18 December-20 December 2010) with a mean response time of 15 min. For every reduction of air temperature by 1°C there was a reduction of 1.3% in performance. Improved weather forecasting and the take up of adaptation measures, such as the use of winter tyres, are suggested for consideration as management tools to improve ambulance response resilience during extreme weather. Also it is suggested that ambulance response times could be used as part of the syndromic surveillance system at the Health Protection Agency.

  20. Quality Improvement, Inventory Management, Lead Time Reduction and Production Scheduling in High-Mix Manufacturing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-13

    Quality Improvement, Inventory Management, Lead Time Reduction and Production Scheduling in High-mix Manufacturing Environments by Sean Daigle B.S...Mechanical Engineering Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Theses 2 Quality Improvement, Inventory Management, Lead Time Reduction and...material shortage reduction and lead time reduction of system sub-assemblies. Man- ufacturing quality was found to be impacted by material shortages

  1. Improvements to a Response Surface Thermal Model for Orion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stephen W.; Walker, William Q.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to determine if a Design of Experiments (DOE)/Response Surface Methodology could be applied to on-orbit thermal analysis and produce a set of Response Surface Equations (RSE) that predict Orion vehicle temperatures within 10 F. The study used the Orion Outer Mold Line model. Five separate factors were identified for study: yaw, pitch, roll, beta angle, and the environmental parameters. Twenty-three external Orion components were selected and their minimum and maximum temperatures captured over a period of two orbits. Thus, there are 46 responses. A DOE case matrix of 145 runs was developed. The data from these cases were analyzed to produce a fifth order RSE for each of the temperature responses. For the 145 cases in the DOE matrix, the agreement between the engineering data and the RSE predictions was encouraging with 40 of the 46 RSEs predicting temperatures within the goal band. However, the verification cases showed most responses did not meet the 10 F goal. After reframing the focus of the study to better align the RSE development with the purposes of the model, a set of RSEs for both the minimum and maximum radiator temperatures was produced which predicted the engineering model output within +/-4 F. Therefore, with the correct application of the DOE/RSE methodology, RSEs can be developed that provide analysts a fast and easy way to screen large numbers of environments and assess proposed changes to the RSE factors.

  2. Heat shock response improves heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Österlund, Tobias; Liu, Zihe

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used platform for the production of heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. However, heterologous protein productivity is often low due to limitations of the host strain. Heat shock response (HSR) is an inducible, global, cellular...... stress response, which facilitates the cell recovery from many forms of stress, e.g., heat stress. In S. cerevisiae, HSR is regulated mainly by the transcription factor heat shock factor (Hsf1p) and many of its targets are genes coding for molecular chaperones that promote protein folding and prevent...... the accumulation of mis-folded or aggregated proteins. In this work, we over-expressed a mutant HSF1 gene HSF1-R206S which can constitutively activate HSR, so the heat shock response was induced at different levels, and we studied the impact of HSR on heterologous protein secretion. We found that moderate and high...

  3. Improved potentiometric response of solid-contact lanthanum (III) selective electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Xiujuan; Chai, Yaqin, E-mail: yqchai@swu.edu.cn; Yuan, Ruo; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-05-24

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •The magnetic nanomaterial GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-DTDP acts as integrate ionophore-transducer. •A covalent mode was adopted to avoid the leaching out of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. •GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} hybrids improved the sensitivity of lanthanum (III) ion selective electrode. •The prepared electrode showed low detection limit and excellent Nernstian response. -- Abstract: For the first time, the analytical application of integrate ionophore-transducer material based on magnetic graphene hybrids and 2,2-dithiodipyridine (DTDP) in solid-contact lanthanum (III) selective electrode is reported. The attachment of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) to graphene oxide (GO) for magnetic graphene hybrid is achieved by covalent bonding, and the universal problem, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs may easily leach out from the graphene during application, is successfully solved by the method above. The proposed electrode exhibits an excellent near-Nernstian response to lanthanum (III) ranging from 1.0 × 10{sup −9} to 1.0 × 10{sup −3} M with a slope of 17.81 mV/dec. Moreover, the excellent performance on fairly good selectivity, wide applicable pH range (3.0{sup {sub 8}}.0), fast response time (10 s) and long life time (2 months) reveal the superiority of the electrode. Most importantly, we have made a great improvement in the detection limit (2.75 × 10{sup −10} M), which brings new dawn to the real-time detection of lanthanum (III) using ion selective electrode.

  4. Ranitidine improves postoperative suppression of antibody response to preoperative vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the histamine-2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (100 mg intravenously every 12 hours for 72 hours) on postoperative serum antibody responses to preoperative immunization with six limit of flocculation tetanus toxoid and six limit of flocculation diphtheria toxoid was assessed...... and antidiphtheria toxoid were drawn before skin incision and on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28. Ranitidine significantly increased the postoperative antibody response to tetanus toxoid, (p less than 0.01) and insignificantly increased that to diphtheria toxoid vaccination (p less than 0...

  5. Improving on-time performance in health care organizations: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, S D; Batson, C; McCaskey, S

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a strategy to build a measurement system that helps improve on-time performance in health care organizations. We analyze the measurement system for monitoring the performance of daily start times of first surgeries in a U.S. hospital. Although surgeons appear to be the main cause of delay, efforts to improve their on-time performance alone are not sufficient to improve on-time performance for first surgeries. Therefore, working on the main source of delay to improve performance, as the Pareto principle suggests, does not always work in the health care context. Rather, we found that ameliorating the hospital's overall on-time performance achieves the desired result of improving surgeons' performance through a snowball effect (a self-reinforcing effect) and, consequently, the on-time performance for first surgeries also improves.

  6. Can response time be trained with bilateral limb training in children with Down syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratiksha Tilak Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Response time (RT, that is, the time taken to respond is known to be delayed in children with Down syndrome (DS. We performed a pilot study to evaluate whether bilateral limb training can be used to train RT, in children with DS. Settings and Design: 10 children with DS (5 males were recruited from a special school in a suburban region using convenience sampling. Subjects and Methods: Response time was measured using an indigenously developed RT Analyzer, before and after intervention, from right and left hand. Structured bilateral limb training was given for a period of 4 weeks, using low-cost, locally available materials, in community settings. Statistical Analysis Used: The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Significant improvements in RT following 4 weeks of intervention were seen in the left hand (P = 0.006 but not in the right hand (P = 0.104. Conclusions: Response time can be trained in children with DS using 4 weeks of bilateral limb training activities using low-cost, locally available materials.

  7. Time-variant modelling of heart rate responses to exercise intensity during road cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefever, Joris; Berckmans, Daniel; Aerts, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if heart rate responses to training intensity during road cycling could be modelled with compact time-variant mathematical model structures. The model performance was evaluated in terms of model order (complexity), number of inputs and parameter estimation methods used (time-invariant vs. time-variant). Thirteen male cyclists performed two identical cycling tests of 27 km on the road. Uphill sections were introduced to induce dynamic variations in heart rate. The heart rate and training intensity, represented by power output and road inclination, were measured in real-time. Taking only power as system input allowed to explain the variations in heart rate in an accurate way R2 T = 0.86 ± 0.08, since adding the road inclination as an additional input did not significantly improve the modelling performance R2 T = 0.87 ± 0.08, P = 0.32. Furthermore, we demonstrated that models with first-order dynamics accurately describes the heart rate responses to power variations R2 T = 0.86 ± 0.08, but that more complex second-order model structures R2 T = 0.88 ± 0.08 were significantly better than the first-order model structures (P = 0.028). Finally, the heart rate dynamics appeared to be time-variant, since the time-variant model structures R2 T = 0.89 ± 0.07 were significantly better than the time-invariant model structures R2 T = 0.84 ± 0.08, P = 0.0002. So, compact time-variant second-order model structures could be used to model the heart rate response to training intensity as a basis for training optimisation.

  8. Glacier Volume Change Estimation Using Time Series of Improved Aster Dems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girod, Luc; Nuth, Christopher; Kääb, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Volume change data is critical to the understanding of glacier response to climate change. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) system embarked on the Terra (EOS AM-1) satellite has been a unique source of systematic stereoscopic images covering the whole globe at 15m resolution and at a consistent quality for over 15 years. While satellite stereo sensors with significantly improved radiometric and spatial resolution are available to date, the potential of ASTER data lies in its long consistent time series that is unrivaled, though not fully exploited for change analysis due to lack of data accuracy and precision. Here, we developed an improved method for ASTER DEM generation and implemented it in the open source photogrammetric library and software suite MicMac. The method relies on the computation of a rational polynomial coefficients (RPC) model and the detection and correction of cross-track sensor jitter in order to compute DEMs. ASTER data are strongly affected by attitude jitter, mainly of approximately 4 km and 30 km wavelength, and improving the generation of ASTER DEMs requires removal of this effect. Our sensor modeling does not require ground control points and allows thus potentially for the automatic processing of large data volumes. As a proof of concept, we chose a set of glaciers with reference DEMs available to assess the quality of our measurements. We use time series of ASTER scenes from which we extracted DEMs with a ground sampling distance of 15m. Our method directly measures and accounts for the cross-track component of jitter so that the resulting DEMs are not contaminated by this process. Since the along-track component of jitter has the same direction as the stereo parallaxes, the two cannot be separated and the elevations extracted are thus contaminated by along-track jitter. Initial tests reveal no clear relation between the cross-track and along-track components so that the latter seems not to be

  9. Subunit Stabilization and Polyethylene Glycolation of Cocaine Esterase Improves In Vivo Residence Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Collins, Gregory T.; Nance, Mark R.; Nichols, Joseph; Edwald, Elin; Chan, Jimmy; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Woods, James H.; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K. (Michigan)

    2012-03-15

    No small-molecule therapeutic is available to treat cocaine addiction, but enzyme-based therapy to accelerate cocaine hydrolysis in serum has gained momentum. Bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE) is the fastest known native enzyme that hydrolyzes cocaine. However, its lability at 37 C has limited its therapeutic potential. Cross-linking subunits through disulfide bridging is commonly used to stabilize multimeric enzymes. Herein we use structural methods to guide the introduction of two cysteine residues within dimer interface of CocE to facilitate intermolecular disulfide bond formation. The disulfide-crosslinked enzyme displays improved thermostability, particularly when combined with previously described mutations that enhance stability (T172R-G173Q). The newly modified enzyme yielded an extremely stable form of CocE (CCRQ-CocE) that retained greater than 90% of its activity after 41 days at 37 C, representing an improvement of more than 4700-fold over the wild-type enzyme. CCRQ-CocE could also be modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, which improved its in vivo residence time from 24 to 72 h, as measured by a cocaine lethality assay, by self-administration in rodents, and by measurement of inhibition of cocaine-induced cardiovascular effects in rhesus monkeys. PEG-CCRQ elicited negligible immune response in rodents. Subunit stabilization and PEGylation has thus produced a potential protein therapeutic with markedly higher stability both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Science Partnerships Enabling Rapid Response: Designing a Strategy for Improving Scientific Collaboration during Crisis Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mease, L.; Gibbs, T.; Adiseshan, T.

    2014-12-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster required unprecedented engagement and collaboration with scientists from multiple disciplines across government, academia, and industry. Although this spurred the rapid advancement of valuable new scientific knowledge and tools, it also exposed weaknesses in the system of information dissemination and exchange among the scientists from those three sectors. Limited government communication with the broader scientific community complicated the rapid mobilization of the scientific community to assist with spill response, evaluation of impact, and public perceptions of the crisis. The lessons and new laws produced from prior spills such as Exxon Valdez were helpful, but ultimately did not lead to the actions necessary to prepare a suitable infrastructure that would support collaboration with non-governmental scientists. As oil demand pushes drilling into increasingly extreme environments, addressing the challenge of effective, science-based disaster response is an imperative. Our study employs a user-centered design process to 1) understand the obstacles to and opportunity spaces for effective scientific collaboration during environmental crises such as large oil spills, 2) identify possible tools and strategies to enable rapid information exchange between government responders and non-governmental scientists from multiple relevant disciplines, and 3) build a network of key influencers to secure sufficient buy-in for scaled implementation of appropriate tools and strategies. Our methods include user ethnography, complex system mapping, individual and system behavioral analysis, and large-scale system design to identify and prototype a solution to this crisis collaboration challenge. In this talk, we will present out insights gleaned from existing analogs of successful scientific collaboration during crises and our initial findings from the 60 targeted interviews we conducted that highlight key collaboration challenges that government

  11. Ranitidine improves postoperative suppression of antibody response to preoperative vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F;

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the histamine-2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (100 mg intravenously every 12 hours for 72 hours) on postoperative serum antibody responses to preoperative immunization with six limit of flocculation tetanus toxoid and six limit of flocculation diphtheria toxoid was assessed...

  12. Understanding and improving global crop response to ozone pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concentrations of ground-level ozone ([O3]) over much of the Earth’s land surface have more than doubled since pre-industrial times. The air pollutant is highly variable over time and space, which makes it difficult to assess the average agronomic and economic impacts of the pollutant as well as to ...

  13. Improving Technology Education: Understanding Reform--Assuming Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a strategic framework for standards-based reform: (1) dissemination (develop awareness); (2) interpretation (increase understanding and support); (3) implementation (change policies, programs, and practices); (4) evaluation (monitor and adjust); and (5) revision (improve efficiency and influence of standards). Outlines roles for various…

  14. Dynamic Response of Inextensible Beams by Improved Energy Balance Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sfahani, M. G.; Barari, Amin; Omidvar, M.

    2011-01-01

    An improved He's energy balance method (EBM) for solving non-linear oscillatory differential equation using a new trial function is presented. The problem considered represents the governing equations of the non-linear, large-amplitude free vibrations of a slender cantilever beam...

  15. Morinda citrifolia leaf enhanced performance by improving angiogenesis, mitochondrial biogenesis, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory & stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Shalan, Nor Aijratul Asikin; Mustapha, Noordin M; Mohamed, Suhaila

    2016-12-01

    Morinda citrifolia fruit, (noni), enhanced performances in athletes and post-menopausal women in clinical studies. This report shows the edible noni leaves water extract enhances performance in a weight-loaded swimming animal model better than the fruit or standardized green tea extract. The 4weeks study showed the extract (containing scopoletin and epicatechin) progressively prolonged the time to exhaustion by threefold longer than the control, fruit or tea extract. The extract improved (i) the mammalian antioxidant responses (MDA, GSH and SOD2 levels), (ii) tissue nutrient (glucose) and metabolite (lactate) management, (iii) stress hormone (cortisol) regulation; (iv) neurotransmitter (dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin) expressions, transporter or receptor levels, (v) anti-inflammatory (IL4 & IL10) responses; (v) skeletal muscle angiogenesis (VEGFA) and (v) energy and mitochondrial biogenesis (via PGC, UCP3, NRF2, AMPK, MAPK1, and CAMK4). The ergogenic extract helped delay fatigue by enhancing energy production, regulation and efficiency, which suggests benefits for physical activities and disease recovery.

  16. Enhanced responses to tumor immunization following total body irradiation are time-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Diab

    Full Text Available The development of successful cancer vaccines is contingent on the ability to induce effective and persistent anti-tumor immunity against self-antigens that do not typically elicit immune responses. In this study, we examine the effects of a non-myeloablative dose of total body irradiation on the ability of tumor-naïve mice to respond to DNA vaccines against melanoma. We demonstrate that irradiation followed by lymphocyte infusion results in a dramatic increase in responsiveness to tumor vaccination, with augmentation of T cell responses to tumor antigens and tumor eradication. In irradiated mice, infused CD8(+ T cells expand in an environment that is relatively depleted in regulatory T cells, and this correlates with improved CD8(+ T cell functionality. We also observe an increase in the frequency of dendritic cells displaying an activated phenotype within lymphoid organs in the first 24 hours after irradiation. Intriguingly, both the relative decrease in regulatory T cells and increase in activated dendritic cells correspond with a brief window of augmented responsiveness to immunization. After this 24 hour window, the numbers of dendritic cells decline, as does the ability of mice to respond to immunizations. When immunizations are initiated within the period of augmented dendritic cell activation, mice develop anti-tumor responses that show increased durability as well as magnitude, and this approach leads to improved survival in experiments with mice bearing established tumors as well as in a spontaneous melanoma model. We conclude that irradiation can produce potent immune adjuvant effects independent of its ability to induce tumor ablation, and that the timing of immunization and lymphocyte infusion in the irradiated host are crucial for generating optimal anti-tumor immunity. Clinical strategies using these approaches must therefore optimize such parameters, as the correct timing of infusion and vaccination may mean the difference

  17. Time dependent viscoelastic rheological response of pure, modified and synthetic bituminous binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, G. D.; Grenfell, J. R. A.; Apeagyei, A.; Subhy, A.; Lo Presti, D.

    2016-08-01

    Bitumen is a viscoelastic material that exhibits both elastic and viscous components of response and displays both a temperature and time dependent relationship between applied stresses and resultant strains. In addition, as bitumen is responsible for the viscoelastic behaviour of all bituminous materials, it plays a dominant role in defining many of the aspects of asphalt road performance, such as strength and stiffness, permanent deformation and cracking. Although conventional bituminous materials perform satisfactorily in most highway pavement applications, there are situations that require the modification of the binder to enhance the properties of existing asphalt material. The best known form of modification is by means of polymer modification, traditionally used to improve the temperature and time susceptibility of bitumen. Tyre rubber modification is another form using recycled crumb tyre rubber to alter the properties of conventional bitumen. In addition, alternative binders (synthetic polymeric binders as well as renewable, environmental-friendly bio-binders) have entered the bitumen market over the last few years due to concerns over the continued availability of bitumen from current crudes and refinery processes. This paper provides a detailed rheological assessment, under both temperature and time regimes, of a range of conventional, modified and alternative binders in terms of the materials dynamic (oscillatory) viscoelastic response. The rheological results show the improved viscoelastic properties of polymer- and rubber-modified binders in terms of increased complex shear modulus and elastic response, particularly at high temperatures and low frequencies. The synthetic binders were found to demonstrate complex rheological behaviour relative to that seen for conventional bituminous binders.

  18. Responsive parenting is associated with improved type 1 diabetes-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botello-Harbaum, M; Nansel, T; Haynie, D L; Iannotti, R J; Simons-Morton, B

    2008-09-01

    Improved quality of life is an important treatment goal for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. While previous research supports a relationship between family environment and quality of life, little research has addressed the relationship of parenting style constructs to quality of life in children with chronic disease. The present investigation assesses the relationship of parent responsiveness and demandingness with diabetes-related quality of life among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Baseline and 12-month follow-up self-report assessments were collected on a sample of 81 children with type 1 diabetes participating in an efficacy trial of a behavioural intervention to enhance adherence. The sample had a mean age of 13.3 years (SD=1.7) and duration of diabetes of 7.7 years (SD=3.7). Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship of parent responsiveness and demandingness to diabetes-related quality of life at each time point. After adjusting for demographic and diabetes characteristics, as well as diabetes-specific parent-child behaviours, parent responsiveness was significantly associated with baseline diabetes-related quality of life (beta=0.23; P=0.04). This relationship was sustained at 12-month follow-up (beta=0.22; P=0.04) after adjusting for baseline quality of life and treatment group assignment, suggesting that parent responsiveness is associated with improved quality of life. Findings indicate the importance of a supportive and emotionally warm parenting style in promoting improved quality of life for children with type 1 diabetes. Appropriate parenting skills should be an element of diabetes family management health care.

  19. Clicker response timings and their association with grades.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Classroom response systems, including single-function hardware devices known as “clickers” and systems that utilise multifunction mobile devices such as mobile phones, are widely used for education and training. In higher education there is a growing evidence-base showing how they can be used effectively to promote active learning in the classroom and the ubiquity of mobile device ownership amongst students is increasing the access that instructors have to these kinds of response systems. Rec...

  20. Ranitidine improves postoperative suppression of antibody response to preoperative vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F;

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the histamine-2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (100 mg intravenously every 12 hours for 72 hours) on postoperative serum antibody responses to preoperative immunization with six limit of flocculation tetanus toxoid and six limit of flocculation diphtheria toxoid was assessed...... in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized study in 26 patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. The preoperative antitetanus antibody level was less than 0.1 IU/ml in all patients, and they were inoculated with both antigens 48 hours before surgery. Serum samples for analysis of antitetanus toxoid...... and antidiphtheria toxoid were drawn before skin incision and on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28. Ranitidine significantly increased the postoperative antibody response to tetanus toxoid, (p less than 0.01) and insignificantly increased that to diphtheria toxoid vaccination (p less than 0...

  1. Vaccines against Human Carcinomas: Strategies to Improve Antitumor Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Palena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple observations in preclinical and clinical studies support a role for the immune system in controlling tumor growth and progression. Various components of the innate and adaptive immune response are able to mediate tumor cell destruction; however, certain immune cell populations can also induce a protumor environment that favors tumor growth and the development of metastasis. Moreover, tumor cells themselves are equipped with various mechanisms that allow them to evade surveillance by the immune system. The goal of cancer vaccines is to induce a tumor-specific immune response that ultimately will reduce tumor burden by tipping the balance from a protumor to an antitumor immune environment. This review discusses common mechanisms that govern immune cell activation and tumor immune escape, and some of the current strategies employed in the field of cancer vaccines aimed at enhancing activation of tumor-specific T-cells with concurrent reduction of immunosuppression.

  2. Speech sound discrimination training improves auditory cortex responses in a rat model of autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal T Engineer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Children with autism often have language impairments and degraded cortical responses to speech. Extensive behavioral interventions can improve language outcomes and cortical responses. Prenatal exposure to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA increases the risk for autism and language impairment. Prenatal exposure to VPA also causes weaker and delayed auditory cortex responses in rats. In this study, we document speech sound discrimination ability in VPA exposed rats and document the effect of extensive speech training on auditory cortex responses. VPA exposed rats were significantly impaired at consonant, but not vowel, discrimination. Extensive speech training resulted in both stronger and faster anterior auditory field responses compared to untrained VPA exposed rats, and restored responses to control levels. This neural response improvement generalized to non-trained sounds. The rodent VPA model of autism may be used to improve the understanding of speech processing in autism and contribute to improving language outcomes.

  3. Speech sound discrimination training improves auditory cortex responses in a rat model of autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Crystal T.; Centanni, Tracy M.; Im, Kwok W.; Kilgard, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Children with autism often have language impairments and degraded cortical responses to speech. Extensive behavioral interventions can improve language outcomes and cortical responses. Prenatal exposure to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA) increases the risk for autism and language impairment. Prenatal exposure to VPA also causes weaker and delayed auditory cortex responses in rats. In this study, we document speech sound discrimination ability in VPA exposed rats and document the effect of extensive speech training on auditory cortex responses. VPA exposed rats were significantly impaired at consonant, but not vowel, discrimination. Extensive speech training resulted in both stronger and faster anterior auditory field (AAF) responses compared to untrained VPA exposed rats, and restored responses to control levels. This neural response improvement generalized to non-trained sounds. The rodent VPA model of autism may be used to improve the understanding of speech processing in autism and contribute to improving language outcomes. PMID:25140133

  4. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trommelen, Jorn; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-11-28

    Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training.

  5. Streamflow response of a small forested catchment on different time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zabaleta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The hydrological response of a catchment to rainfall on different time scales is result of a complex system involving a range of physical processes which may operate simultaneously and have different spatial and temporal influences. This paper presents the analysis of streamflow response of a small humid-temperate catchment (Aixola, 4.8 km2 in the Basque Country on different time scales and discusses the role of the controlling factors. Firstly, daily time series analysis was used to establish a hypothesis on the general functioning of the catchment through the relationship between precipitation and discharge on an annual and multi-annual scale (2003–2008. Second, rainfall-runoff relationships and relationships among several hydrological variables, including catchment antecedent conditions, were explored at the event scale (222 events to check and improve the hypothesis. Finally, the evolution of electrical conductivity (EC during some of the monitored storm events (28 events was examined to identify the time-origin of waters. Quick response of the catchment to almost all the rainfall events as well as a considerable regulation capacity was deduced from the correlation and spectral analyses. These results agree with runoff event scale data analysis; however the event analysis revealed the non-linearity of the system, as antecedent conditions play a significant role in this catchment. Further, analysis at the event scale made possible to clarify factors controlling (precipitation, precipitation intensity and initial discharge the different aspects of the runoff response (runoff coefficient and discharge increase for this catchment. Finally, the evolution of EC of the waters enabled the time origin (event or pre-event waters of the quickflow to be established; specifically, the conductivity showed that pre-event waters usually represent a high percentage of the total discharge during runoff peaks. The importance of soil waters in the

  6. Time-Lag in Responses of Birds to Atlantic Forest Fragmentation: Restoration Opportunity and Urgency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uezu, Alexandre; Metzger, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    There are few opportunities to evaluate the relative importance of landscape structure and dynamics upon biodiversity, especially in highly fragmented tropical landscapes. Conservation strategies and species risk evaluations often rely exclusively on current aspects of landscape structure, although such limited assumptions are known to be misleading when time-lag responses occur. By relating bird functional-group richness to forest patch size and isolation in ten-year intervals (1956, 1965, 1978, 1984, 1993 and 2003), we revealed that birds with different sensitivity to fragmentation display contrasting responses to landscape dynamics in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. For non-sensitive groups, there was no time-lag in response: the recent degree of isolation best explains their variation in richness, which likely relates to these species' flexibility to adapt to changes in landscape structure. However, for sensitive bird groups, the 1978 patch area was the best explanatory variable, providing evidence for a 25-year time-lag in response to habitat reduction. Time-lag was more likely in landscapes that encompass large patches, which can support temporarily the presence of some sensitive species, even when habitat cover is relatively low. These landscapes potentially support the most threatened populations and should be priorities for restoration efforts to avoid further species loss. Although time-lags provide an opportunity to counteract the negative consequences of fragmentation, it also reinforces the urgency of restoration actions. Fragmented landscapes will be depleted of biodiversity if landscape structure is only maintained, and not improved. The urgency of restoration action may be even higher in landscapes where habitat loss and fragmentation history is older and where no large fragment remained to act temporarily as a refuge.

  7. Pulse Responses of a Two-layered Printed Circuit with an Improved Line-Pad Connected Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Furukawa, Shinichi; Hinata, Takashi

    The peak value of transmitted pulse in printed circuit boards (PCB) is important for a pulse peak detection devices. When an input line and an output line are connected to each pad with the direction of right angle, the propagating pulses with the narrow time duration separate into some parts and decrease the peak value of pulse response. This paper presents an improved line-pad connected structure. The microstrip line is in contact with a pad from outside by considering the pulse propagation time passing through the via structure. We obtained the large peak value of the pulse response for which the time duration is larger than 0.2ps.

  8. Dynamic Response of Inextensible Beams by Improved Energy Balance Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sfahani, M. G.; Barari, Amin; Omidvar, M.

    2011-01-01

    An improved He's energy balance method (EBM) for solving non-linear oscillatory differential equation using a new trial function is presented. The problem considered represents the governing equations of the non-linear, large-amplitude free vibrations of a slender cantilever beam with a rotationa......An improved He's energy balance method (EBM) for solving non-linear oscillatory differential equation using a new trial function is presented. The problem considered represents the governing equations of the non-linear, large-amplitude free vibrations of a slender cantilever beam...... procedure for a particular value of the initial condition is then used to estimate the constants. This semi-analytical representation gives excellent approximations to the exact solutions for the whole range of the oscillation amplitude, reducing the respective error of angular frequency in comparison...

  9. Use of biguanides to improve response to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandulache, Vlad C; Yang, Liangpeng; Skinner, Heath D

    2014-01-01

    Metformin is a commonly utilized antidiabetic agent, which has been associated with improved clinical outcomes in cancer patients. The precise mechanism of action remains unclear, but preclinical evidence suggests that metformin can sensitize tumor cells to the effects to conventional chemotherapeutic agents and ionizing radiation (IR). In this chapter we discuss the general background of an approach to evaluate the effects of metformin on conventional chemotherapeutic agent toxicity in a preclinical model.

  10. Response Time Evaluation for the Plant Protection System Using a Combined Technique of Analysis and Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Jae; Han, Seung; Yun, Jae Hee; Baek, Seung Min [KECO EnC, Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper proposes the response time evaluation methodology for the plant protection system (PPS) trip channel for the advance power reactor 1400 (APR1400) nuclear power plant. To demonstrate that the PPS tip channel is functioning within its allowable response time limit, the proposed methodology uses the combined technique of both the response time analysis and test. The main purpose of determining the trip setpoint for safety systems is to meet the requirement of an analytical limit assumed in performing safety analyses. In addition, the response time assumed during safety analyses shall also be satisfied by the safety-related instrumentation. The response time is another critical factor required to ensure that the safety-related instrumentation channels accept the crucial assumptions of safety analyses. The response time evaluation methodology proposed herein is applied to the low steam generator level (LSGL) reactor trip parameter for the APR1400. The response time analysis for the LSGL trip parameter demonstrated that the analyzed response time would not exceed the allocated response time. The results of the response time also showed that all of the measured response times would be less than the analyzed response time.

  11. Validation of a simple response-time measure of listening effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pals, Carina; Sarampalis, Anastasios; van Rijn, Hedderik; Başkent, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    This study compares two response-time measures of listening effort that can be combined with a clinical speech test for a more comprehensive evaluation of total listening experience; verbal response times to auditory stimuli (RTaud) and response times to a visual task (RTsvis) in a dual- task paradi

  12. Optimizing Oceanographic Big Data Browse and Visualization Response Times by Implementing the Lambda Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, R. D.; Howard, M.; Kirkpatrick, B. A.

    2016-02-01

    Visualizing large-scale data sets using standard web-based mapping tools can result in significant delays and response time issues for users. Load times for data sets comprised of millions of records can be in excess of thirty seconds when the data sets are served using traditional architectures and techniques. In this paper we demonstrate the efficiency gains created by utilizing the Lambda Architecture on a low velocity, high volume hypoxia-nutrient decision support system with 25M records. While traditionally employed on high velocity, high volume data we demonstrate significant improvements in data load times and the user browse experience on low velocity, high volume data. Optimizing query and visualization response times becomes increasingly important as data sets grow in size. Time series data from extended autonomous underwater vehicle deployments can exceed 500M records. Applying the Lambda Architecture to these data sets will allow users to browse, visualize and fuse data in a manner not possible using traditional methodologies.

  13. Uncertainty analysis of accident notification time and emergency medical service response time in work zone traffic accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qiang; Weng, Jinxian

    2013-01-01

    Taking into account the uncertainty caused by exogenous factors, the accident notification time (ANT) and emergency medical service (EMS) response time were modeled as 2 random variables following the lognormal distribution. Their mean values and standard deviations were respectively formulated as the functions of environmental variables including crash time, road type, weekend, holiday, light condition, weather, and work zone type. Work zone traffic accident data from the Fatality Analysis Report System between 2002 and 2009 were utilized to determine the distributions of the ANT and the EMS arrival time in the United States. A mixed logistic regression model, taking into account the uncertainty associated with the ANT and the EMS response time, was developed to estimate the risk of death. The results showed that the uncertainty of the ANT was primarily influenced by crash time and road type, whereas the uncertainty of EMS response time is greatly affected by road type, weather, and light conditions. In addition, work zone accidents occurring during a holiday and in poor light conditions were found to be statistically associated with a longer mean ANT and longer EMS response time. The results also show that shortening the ANT was a more effective approach in reducing the risk of death than the EMS response time in work zones. To shorten the ANT and the EMS response time, work zone activities are suggested to be undertaken during non-holidays, during the daytime, and in good weather and light conditions.

  14. Limited information estimation of the diffusion-based item response theory model for responses and response times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias; Szardenings, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Psychological tests are usually analysed with item response models. Recently, some alternative measurement models have been proposed that were derived from cognitive process models developed in experimental psychology. These models consider the responses but also the response times of the test takers. Two such models are the Q-diffusion model and the D-diffusion model. Both models can be calibrated with the diffIRT package of the R statistical environment via marginal maximum likelihood (MML) estimation. In this manuscript, an alternative approach to model calibration is proposed. The approach is based on weighted least squares estimation and parallels the standard estimation approach in structural equation modelling. Estimates are determined by minimizing the discrepancy between the observed and the implied covariance matrix. The estimator is simple to implement, consistent, and asymptotically normally distributed. Least squares estimation also provides a test of model fit by comparing the observed and implied covariance matrix. The estimator and the test of model fit are evaluated in a simulation study. Although parameter recovery is good, the estimator is less efficient than the MML estimator.

  15. Sub-Millisecond Response Time in a Photorefractive Composite Operating under CW Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong-Sik; Stevens, Tyler E.; Monson, Todd C.; Huber, Dale L.; Jin, Sung-Ho; Oh, Jin-Woo; Winiarz, Jeffrey G.

    2016-08-01

    Extensive study of photorefractive polymeric composites photosensitized with semiconductor nanocrystals has yielded data indicating that the inclusion of such nanocrystals enhances the charge-carrier mobility, and subsequently leads to a reduction in the photorefractive response time. Unfortunately, the included nanocrystals may also act as a source of deep traps, resulting in diminished diffraction efficiencies as well as reduced two beam coupling gain coefficients. Nonetheless, previous studies indicate that this problem is mitigated through the inclusion of semiconductor nanocrystals possessing a relatively narrow band-gap. Here, we fully exploit this property by doping PbS nanocrystals into a newly formulated photorefractive composite based on molecular triphenyldiamine photosensitized with C60. Through this approach, response times of 399 μs are observed, opening the door for video and other high-speed applications. It is further demonstrated that this improvement in response time occurs with little sacrifice in photorefractive efficiency, with internal diffraction efficiencies of 72% and two-beam-coupling gain coefficients of 500 cm-1 being measured. A thorough analysis of the experimental data is presented, supporting the hypothesized mechanism of enhanced charge mobility without the accompaniment of superfluous traps. It is anticipated that this approach can play a significant role in the eventual commercialization of this class of materials.

  16. Prediction of pharmacological and xenobiotic responses to drugs based on time course gene expression profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Huang

    Full Text Available More and more people are concerned by the risk of unexpected side effects observed in the later steps of the development of new drugs, either in late clinical development or after marketing approval. In order to reduce the risk of the side effects, it is important to look out for the possible xenobiotic responses at an early stage. We attempt such an effort through a prediction by assuming that similarities in microarray profiles indicate shared mechanisms of action and/or toxicological responses among the chemicals being compared. A large time course microarray database derived from livers of compound-treated rats with thirty-four distinct pharmacological and toxicological responses were studied. The mRMR (Minimum-Redundancy-Maximum-Relevance method and IFS (Incremental Feature Selection were used to select a compact feature set (141 features for the reduction of feature dimension and improvement of prediction performance. With these 141 features, the Leave-one-out cross-validation prediction accuracy of first order response using NNA (Nearest Neighbor Algorithm was 63.9%. Our method can be used for pharmacological and xenobiotic responses prediction of new compounds and accelerate drug development.

  17. Improving Response Rates among Students with Orthopedic and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Christian P.; Kuntzler, Patrice M.; Cardenas, Shaun; O'Malley, Eileen; Phillips, Carolyn; Singer, Jacqueline; Stoeger, Alex; Kindler, Keith

    2014-01-01

    One challenge teachers of students with orthopedic and multiple disabilities face is providing sufficient time and opportunity to communicate. This challenge is universal across countries, schools, and settings: teachers want students to communicate because communication lies at the core of what makes us human. Yet students with orthopedic and…

  18. Response of vegetation to drought time-scales across global land biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M; Gouveia, Célia; Camarero, Jesús Julio; Beguería, Santiago; Trigo, Ricardo; López-Moreno, Juan I; Azorín-Molina, César; Pasho, Edmond; Lorenzo-Lacruz, Jorge; Revuelto, Jesús; Morán-Tejeda, Enrique; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2013-01-02

    We evaluated the response of the Earth land biomes to drought by correlating a drought index with three global indicators of vegetation activity and growth: vegetation indices from satellite imagery, tree-ring growth series, and Aboveground Net Primary Production (ANPP) records. Arid and humid biomes are both affected by drought, and we suggest that the persistence of the water deficit (i.e., the drought time-scale) could be playing a key role in determining the sensitivity of land biomes to drought. We found that arid biomes respond to drought at short time-scales; that is, there is a rapid vegetation reaction as soon as water deficits below normal conditions occur. This may be due to the fact that plant species of arid regions have mechanisms allowing them to rapidly adapt to changing water availability. Humid biomes also respond to drought at short time-scales, but in this case the physiological mechanisms likely differ from those operating in arid biomes, as plants usually have a poor adaptability to water shortage. On the contrary, semiarid and subhumid biomes respond to drought at long time-scales, probably because plants are able to withstand water deficits, but they lack the rapid response of arid biomes to drought. These results are consistent among three vegetation parameters analyzed and across different land biomes, showing that the response of vegetation to drought depends on characteristic drought time-scales for each biome. Understanding the dominant time-scales at which drought most influences vegetation might help assessing the resistance and resilience of vegetation and improving our knowledge of vegetation vulnerability to climate change.

  19. Improved Tet-responsive promoters with minimized background expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hampf Mathias

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The performance of the tetracycline controlled transcriptional activation system (Tet system depends critically on the choice of minimal promoters. They are indispensable to warrant low expression levels with the system turned "off". On the other hand, they must support high level of gene expression in the "on"-state. Results In this study, we systematically modified the widely used Cytomegalovirus (CMV minimal promoter to further minimize background expression, resulting in an improved dynamic expression range. Using both plasmid-based and retroviral gene delivery, our analysis revealed that especially background expression levels could be significantly reduced when compared to previously established "standard" promoter designs. Our results also demonstrate the possibility to fine-tune expression levels in non-clonal cell populations. They also imply differences regarding the requirements for tight regulation and high level induction between transient and stable gene transfer systems. Conclusions Until now, our understanding of mammalian transcriptional regulation including promoter architecture is limited. Nevertheless, the partly empirical modification of cis-elements as shown in this study can lead to the specific improvement of the performance of minimal promoters. The novel composite Ptet promoters introduced here will further expand the utility of the Tet system.

  20. Leveraging First Response Time into the Knowledge Tracing Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yutao; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2012-01-01

    The field of educational data mining has been using the Knowledge Tracing model, which only look at the correctness of student first response, for tracking student knowledge. Recently, lots of other features are studied to extend the Knowledge Tracing model to better model student knowledge. The goal of this paper is to analyze whether or not the…

  1. Timing and tuning for familiarity of cortical responses to faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Bobes

    Full Text Available Different kinds of known faces activate brain areas to dissimilar degrees. However, the tuning to type of knowledge, and the temporal course of activation, of each area have not been well characterized. Here we measured, with functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activity elicited by unfamiliar, visually familiar, and personally-familiar faces. We assessed response amplitude and duration using flexible hemodynamic response functions, as well as the tuning to face type, of regions within the face processing system. Core face processing areas (occipital and fusiform face areas responded to all types of faces with only small differences in amplitude and duration. In contrast, most areas of the extended face processing system (medial orbito-frontal, anterior and posterior cingulate had weak responses to unfamiliar and visually-familiar faces, but were highly tuned and exhibited prolonged responses to personally-familiar faces. This indicates that the neural processing of different types of familiar faces not only differs in degree, but is probably mediated by qualitatively distinct mechanisms.

  2. Timing and tuning for familiarity of cortical responses to faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobes, Maria A; Lage Castellanos, Agustin; Quiñones, Ileana; García, Lorna; Valdes-Sosa, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Different kinds of known faces activate brain areas to dissimilar degrees. However, the tuning to type of knowledge, and the temporal course of activation, of each area have not been well characterized. Here we measured, with functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activity elicited by unfamiliar, visually familiar, and personally-familiar faces. We assessed response amplitude and duration using flexible hemodynamic response functions, as well as the tuning to face type, of regions within the face processing system. Core face processing areas (occipital and fusiform face areas) responded to all types of faces with only small differences in amplitude and duration. In contrast, most areas of the extended face processing system (medial orbito-frontal, anterior and posterior cingulate) had weak responses to unfamiliar and visually-familiar faces, but were highly tuned and exhibited prolonged responses to personally-familiar faces. This indicates that the neural processing of different types of familiar faces not only differs in degree, but is probably mediated by qualitatively distinct mechanisms.

  3. Frozen in Time: A Response to David Crandall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Chester E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Replies to Crandall's claim that Finn had disrupted a decade of solid research in the Office of Educational Research and Improvement Office (OERI) regional educational laboratories. According to Finn, these labs have wasted taxpayers' money. Currently, states command school policy and finances, and key decision-makers are governors and…

  4. Real-time, real-space implementation of the linear response time-dependent density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabana, K.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Iwata, J.-I.; Bertsch, G. F.

    We review our methods to calculate optical response of molecules in the linear response time-dependent density-functional theory. Three distinct formalisms which are implemented in the three-dimensional grid representation are explained in detail. They are the real-time method solving the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation in the time domain, the modified Sternheimer method which calculates the response to an external field of fixed frequency, and the matrix eigenvalue approach. We also illustrate treatments of the scattering boundary condition, needed to accurately describe photoionization processes. Finally, we show how the real-time formalism for molecules can be used to determine the response of infinite periodic systems.

  5. Real-time, real-space implementation of the linear response time-dependent density-functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabana, K.; Nakatsukasa, T. [Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Iwata, J.I. [Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Bertsch, G.F. [Department of Physics and Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle 98195 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    We review our methods to calculate optical response of molecules in the linear response time-dependent density-functional theory. Three distinct formalisms which are implemented in the three-dimensional grid representation are explained in detail. They are the real-time method solving the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation in the time domain, the modified Sternheimer method which calculates the response to an external field of fixed frequency, and the matrix eigenvalue approach. We also illustrate treatments of the scattering boundary condition, needed to accurately describe photoionization processes. Finally, we show how the real-time formalism for molecules can be used to determine the response of infinite periodic systems. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. European consumer response to packaging technologies for improved beef safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wezemael, Lynn; Ueland, Øydis; Verbeke, Wim

    2011-09-01

    Beef packaging can influence consumer perceptions of beef. Although consumer perceptions and acceptance are considered to be among the most limiting factors in the application of new technologies, there is a lack of knowledge about the acceptability to consumers of beef packaging systems aimed at improved safety. This paper explores European consumers' acceptance levels of different beef packaging technologies. An online consumer survey was conducted in five European countries (n=2520). Acceptance levels among the sample ranged between 23% for packaging releasing preservative additives up to 73% for vacuum packaging. Factor analysis revealed that familiar packaging technologies were clearly preferred over non-familiar technologies. Four consumer segments were identified: the negative (31% of the sample), cautious (30%), conservative (17%) and enthusiast (22%) consumers, which were profiled based on their attitudes and beef consumption behaviour. Differences between consumer acceptance levels should be taken into account while optimising beef packaging and communicating its benefits.

  7. Rapid Time Response: A solution for Manufacturing Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norazlin N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Respond time in manufacturing give the major impact that able to contribute too many manufacturing issues. Based on two worst case scenario occurred where Toyota in 2009 made a massive vehicles call due to car complexity of 11 major models and over 9 million vehicles. The recalls cost at least $2 billion in cost of repair, lost deals and result in lost 5% of its market share in United State of America, while A380 was reported on missing target in new production and leads to delayed market entry due to their weak product life cycle management (PLM. These cases give a sign to all industries to possess and optimize the facilities for better traceability in shortest time period. In Industry 4.0, the traceability and time respond become the factors for high performance manufacturing and rapid time respond able to expedite the traceability process and strengthen the communication level between man, machine and management. The round trip time (RTT experiment gives variant time respond between two difference operating system for intra and inter-platform signal. If this rapid time respond is adopted in any manufacturing process, the delay in traceability on every issue that lead to losses can be successfully avoided.

  8. An improved non-contact thermometer and hygrometer with rapid response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, R.; Gardiner, T.; Finlayson, A.; Bell, S.; de Podesta, M.

    2017-02-01

    Previously (Underwood et al 2015 Meteorol. Appl. 22 830) we reported first tests of a device capable of simultaneous, non-contact, temperature and humidity (NCTAH) measurements in air. The device used an acoustic thermometer and a tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS), a combination which should be capable of an extremely rapid response to changes in humidity as it does not require moisture in a solid-state matrix to equilibrate with the surrounding air. In this paper we report recent developments of the instrument focussed on reducing its response time so that it can be used as a reference instrument for assessing the response time of conventional humidity sensors. In addition, the interdependence of the temperature and humidity estimates is now accounted for in real-time using an iterative procedure, which eliminates the need for data post-processing. The TDLAS measures water molecule number density based on the transmission of an infrared beam (approximate wavelength 1360 nm) through a 0.6 m path length. The acoustic thermometer is based around a fixed-path acoustic interferometer. The improved NCTAH device now produces estimates of the water molecule number density every 20 ms and the temperature output displays an RC filter-like response, with a time constant of approximately 30 ms. The instrument has been tested in a climatic chamber through a temperature range of  -40 °C to  +40 °C and a dew point range of  -43 °C to  +38 °C, at atmospheric pressure, comparing the instrument readings with those from a calibrated hygrometer and four platinum resistance thermometers. In steady-state conditions, the instrument readings are in good agreement with the conventional sensors, with temperature differences less than 1 °C (repeatability 0.1 °C), and humidity differences mostly within 5% of mixing ratio. Under transient conditions, we demonstrate how the instrument can be used to evaluate the response times of conventional

  9. rTMS neuromodulation improves electrocortical functional measures of information processing and behavioral responses in autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estate M Sokhadze

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Reports in autism spectrum disorders (ASD of a minicolumnopathy with consequent deficits of lateral inhibition help explain observed behavioral and executive dysfunctions. We propose that neuromodulation based on rTMS will enhance lateral inhibition through activation of inhibitory double bouquet interneurons and will be accompanied by improvements in the prefrontal executive functions. Methods: The current study used ERPs in a visual oddball task with illusory figures. We compared clinical, behavioral and electrocortical outcomes in 2 groups of children with autism (TMS, wait-list group [WTL]. We predicted that 18 session long course in autistic patients will have better behavioral and ERP outcomes as compared to age- and IQ-matched wait-list group. We used 18 sessions of 1Hz rTMS applied over the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex in 27 individuals with ASD diagnosis. The WTL group was comprised of 27 age-matched ASD subjects. Results: Post-TMS evaluations showed decreased irritability and hyperactivity and decreased stereotypic behaviors. Following rTMS we found decreased amplitude and prolonged latency in the fronto-central ERPs to non-targets in the TMS group. These ERP changes along with increased centro-parietal ERPs to targets are indicative of more efficient processing of information post-TMS. Another finding was increased magnitude of error-related negativity (ERN during commission errors. We calculated normative post-error reaction time (RT slowing response in both groups and found that rTMS was accompanied by post-error RT slowing and higher accuracy of responses, whereas the WTL group kept on showing typical for ASD post-error RT speeding and had higher error rate. Conclusion: Results from our study indicate that rTMS improves executive functioning in ASD as evidenced by normalization of ERP responses and behavioral reactions during executive function test, and also by improvements in clinical behavioral evaluations.

  10. 28 CFR 16.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INFORMATION Procedures for Disclosure of Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 16.5 Timing of... knowledge and belief, explaining in detail the basis for requesting expedited processing. For example, a...

  11. Extending Ideas on Improving Teaching: Response to Lampert; Lewis, Perry, Friedkin, and Roth; and Zeichner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, James; Morris, Anne K.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the authors' response to the comments of their article about extending ideas on improving teaching. The authors continue the conversation about improving teaching by focusing on two points that deserve further consideration: (1) the willingness or motivation of teachers to engage in the work of improving teaching; and (2) the…

  12. Modeling an Application's Theoretical Minimum and Average Transactional Response Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiz, Mary Rose [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical minimum transactional response time of an application serves as a ba- sis for the expected response time. The lower threshold for the minimum response time represents the minimum amount of time that the application should take to complete a transaction. Knowing the lower threshold is beneficial in detecting anomalies that are re- sults of unsuccessful transactions. On the converse, when an application's response time falls above an upper threshold, there is likely an anomaly in the application that is causing unusual performance issues in the transaction. This report explains how the non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value distribution is used to estimate the lower threshold of an ap- plication's daily minimum transactional response time. It also explains how the seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series model is used to estimate the upper threshold for an application's average transactional response time.

  13. Integrated response and transit time distributions of watersheds by combining hydrograph separation and long-term transit time modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Roa-García

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a new modeling approach analyzing and predicting the Transit Time Distribution (TTD and the Response Time Distribution (RTD from hourly to annual time scales as two distinct hydrological processes. The model integrates Isotope Hydrograph Separation (IHS and the Instantaneous Unit Hydrograph (IUH approach as a tool to provide a more realistic description of transit and response time of water in catchments. Individual event simulations and parameterizations were combined with long-term baseflow simulation and parameterizations; this provides a comprehensive picture of the catchment response for a long time span for the hydraulic and isotopic processes. The proposed method was tested in three Andean headwater catchments to compare the effects of land use on hydrological response and solute transport. Results show that the characteristics of events and antecedent conditions have a significant influence on TTD and RTD, but in general the RTD of the grassland dominated catchment is concentrated in the shorter time spans and has a higher cumulative TTD, while the forest dominated catchment has a relatively higher response distribution and lower cumulative TTD. The catchment where wetlands concentrate shows a flashier response, but wetlands also appear to prolong transit time.

  14. Integrated response and transit time distributions of watersheds by combining hydrograph separation and long-term transit time modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Roa-García

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new modeling approach analyzing and predicting the Transit Time Distribution (TTD and the Response Time Distribution (RTD from hourly to annual time scales as two distinct hydrological processes. The model integrates Isotope Hydrograph Separation (IHS and the Instantaneous Unit Hydrograph (IUH approach as a tool to provide a more realistic description of transit and response time of water in catchments. Individual event simulations and parameterizations were combined with long-term baseflow simulation and parameterizations to provide a comprehensive picture of the catchment response for a long time span for the hydraulic and isotopic processes. The proposed method was tested in three Andean headwater catchments to compare the effects of land use on hydrological response and solute transport. Results show that the characteristics of events and antecedent conditions have a significant influence on TTD and RTD, but in general the RTD of the grassland dominated catchment is concentrated in the shorter time spans and has a higher cumulative TTD, while the forest dominated catchment has a relatively longer response distribution and lower cumulative TTD. The catchment where wetlands concentrate shows a flashier response, but wetlands also appear to contribute to prolong transit time.

  15. Improving the transient response of a bolt-clamped Langevin transducer using a parallel resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuo Tsi

    2003-08-01

    This paper suggests a parallel resistor to reduce DC time constant and DC response time of the transient response, induced immediately after an AC voltage connected to a bolt-clamped Langevin transducer (BLT) is switched off. An equivalent circuit is first expressed. Then, an open-circuit transient response at the terminals induced by initial states is derived and measured, and thus parameters for losses of the BLT device are estimated by DC and AC time constants of the transient response. Moreover, a driving and measuring system is designed to determine transient response and steady-state responses of the BLT device, and a parallel resistor is connected to the BLT device to reduce the DC time constant. Experimental results indicate that the DC time constant greatly exceeds the AC time constant without the parallel resistor, and greatly decreases from 42 to 1 ms by a 100-kOmega parallel resistor.

  16. Accuracy of three-dimensional seismic ground response analysis in time domain using nonlinear numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fayun; Chen, Haibing; Huang, Maosong

    2017-07-01

    To provide appropriate uses of nonlinear ground response analysis for engineering practice, a three-dimensional soil column with a distributed mass system and a time domain numerical analysis were implemented on the OpenSees simulation platform. The standard mesh of a three-dimensional soil column was suggested to be satisfied with the specified maximum frequency. The layered soil column was divided into multiple sub-soils with a different viscous damping matrix according to the shear velocities as the soil properties were significantly different. It was necessary to use a combination of other one-dimensional or three-dimensional nonlinear seismic ground analysis programs to confirm the applicability of nonlinear seismic ground motion response analysis procedures in soft soil or for strong earthquakes. The accuracy of the three-dimensional soil column finite element method was verified by dynamic centrifuge model testing under different peak accelerations of the earthquake. As a result, nonlinear seismic ground motion response analysis procedures were improved in this study. The accuracy and efficiency of the three-dimensional seismic ground response analysis can be adapted to the requirements of engineering practice.

  17. Field Experience with and Potential for Multi-time Scale Grid Transactions from Responsive Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-08-01

    The need for and concepts behind demand response are evolving. As the electric system changes with more intermittent renewable electric supply systems, there is a need to allow buildings to provide more flexible demand. This paper presents results from field studies and pilots, as well as engineering estimates of the potential capabilities of fast load responsiveness in commercial buildings. We present a sector wide analysis of flexible loads in commercial buildings, which was conducted to improve resource planning and determine which loads to evaluate in future demonstrations. These systems provide important capabilities for future transactional systems. The field analysis is based on results from California, plus projects in the northwest and east coast. End-uses considered include heating, ventilation, air conditioning and lighting. The timescales of control include day-ahead, as well as day-of, 10-minute ahead and even faster response. This technology can provide DR signals on different times scales to interact with responsive building loads. We describe the latency of the control systems in the building and the round trip communications with the wholesale grid operators.

  18. Pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD improves exercise time rather than exercise tolerance: effects and mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki K

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Keisuke Miki,1 Ryoji Maekura,1 Seigo Kitada,1 Mari Miki,1 Kenji Yoshimura,1 Hiroshi Yamamoto,2 Toshiko Kawabe,2 Hiroyuki Kagawa,1 Yohei Oshitani,1 Akitoshi Satomi,1 Kohei Nishida,1 Nobuhiko Sawa,1 Kimiko Inoue2 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, National Hospital Organization, Toneyama National Hospital, Toyonaka, Japan Background: COPD patients undergoing pulmonary rehabilitation (PR show various responses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible mechanisms and predictors of the response to PR in COPD patients.Methods: Thirty-six stable COPD patients underwent PR including a 4-week high-intensity exercise training program, and they were evaluated by cardiopulmonary exercise testing. All patients (mean age 69 years, severe and very severe COPD 94% were classified into four groups by whether the exercise time (Tex or the peak oxygen uptake (VO2 increased after PR: two factors increased (both the Tex and the peak VO2 increased; two factors decreased; time only increased (the Tex increased, but the peak VO2 economized; and VO2 only increased (the Tex decreased, but the peak VO2 increased. Within all patients, the relationships between baseline variables and the post-to-pre-change ratio of the time–slope, Tex/(peak minus resting VO2, were investigated.Results: Compared with the two factors increased group (n=11, in the time only increased group (n=18, the mean differences from pre-PR at peak exercise in 1 minute ventilation (VE (P=0.004, VO2 (P<0.0001, and carbon dioxide output (VCO2 (P<0.0001 were lower, 2 VE/VO2 (P=0.034 and VE/VCO2 (P=0.006 were higher, and 3 the dead space/tidal volume ratio (VD/VT and the dyspnea level were similar. After PR, there was no significant difference in the ratio of the observed peak heart rate (HR to the predicted peak HR (220 – age [years] between the two groups. A significant negative correlation with the baseline time–slope (r=-0.496, P=0.002 and a

  19. A theoretical model for fluvial channel response time during time-dependent climatic and tectonic forcing and its inverse applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Liran

    2016-10-01

    The fluvial response time dictates the duration of fluvial channel adjustment in response to changing climatic and tectonic conditions. However, when these conditions vary continuously, the channel cannot equilibrate and the response time is not well defined. Here I develop an analytical solution to the linear stream power model of fluvial incision that predicts the channel topography as a function of time-dependent climatic and tectonic conditions. From this solution, a general definition of the fluvial response time emerges: the duration over which the tectonic history needs to be known to evaluate channel topography. This new definition is used in linear inversion schemes for inferring climatic or tectonic histories from river long profiles. The analytic solution further reveals that high-frequency climatic oscillations, such as Milankovitch cycles, are not expected to leave significant fingerprints on the long profiles of fluvially incised detachment-limited rivers.

  20. The Effects of Caffeine on Arousal, Response Time, Accuracy, and Performance in Division I Collegiate Fencers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Taylor P; Lutz, Rafer S; Pellegrino, Joseph K; Sanders, David J; Arent, Shawn M

    2016-11-01

    Doyle, TP, Lutz, RS, Pellegrino, JK, Sanders, DJ, and Arent, SM. The effects of caffeine on arousal, response time, accuracy, and performance in Division I collegiate fencers. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3228-3235, 2016-Caffeine has displayed ergogenic effects on aerobic performance. However, sports requiring precision and quick reaction may also be impacted by central nervous system arousal because of caffeine consumption. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of caffeine on arousal, response time (RT), and accuracy during a simulated fencing practice. Using a randomized, within-subjects, placebo-controlled, double-blind design, Division I male and female college fencers (N = 13; 69.1 ± 3.5 kg) were administered caffeine doses of 0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, or 7.5 mg·kg during separate testing days. Performance was assessed via RT and accuracy to a 4-choice reaction task. A total of 25 trials were performed each day using a random 2- to 8-s delay between trials. Arousal was assessed using the activation-deactivation adjective check list. Results of repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance revealed a significant dose effect (p = 0.02) on performance. Follow-up analyses indicated this was due to a significant effect for RT (p = 0.03), with the dose-response curve exhibiting a quadratic relationship. Response time was significantly faster (p caffeine dose (p ≤ 0.05). Based on these results, caffeine improves RT and overall performance in fencers, particularly as doses increase up to 4.5-6.0 mg·kg. Above this level, performance begins to deteriorate, consistent with an "inverted-U" model of arousal and performance.

  1. An Action Learning Approach to the Question: Are Ambulance Response Time Targets Achievable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Alan

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, NHS Ambulance Trusts throughout the UK have consistently failed to achieve their response time targets for both actual and potential life-threatening calls. To avoid a media and public outcry, the NHS response has been to change the basic parameters upon which the response time targets are calculated. An action learning study,…

  2. Negotiating Political Responsibility in Times of National Tragedy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FlorenţaTOADER

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the way political responsibility is constructed through discourse by Romanian politicians in the Web 2.0 era. Drawing on an analytical framework proposed by Augoustinos, Hastie and Wright (2011, based on discursive psychology, and critical discourse analysis, this paper analyses the Facebook messages released by the main political actors in Romania, after the Colectiv nightclub fire. The empirical endeavour is guided by two research objectives: to analyse the discursive strategies used to create discursive identities, to assign political responsibility and to express solidarity with the victims; and to analyse a specific kind of rhetoric, the political apology, focusing on its pragmatic and linguistic features and on the emotion categories (empathy, sympathy, anger, guilt, sadness deployed to deliver the apology. The results of the study show that when faced with a situation where the offender is hard to define, political actors prefer the use of another speech act: the expression of solidarity and compassion. While the political apology is offered only after and explicit demand, the expression of solidarity is offered promptly and willingly.

  3. 4 CFR 201.7 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 201.7 Timing of... disclosed in part shall be marked or annotated to show the amount of information deleted unless doing so would harm an interest protected by an applicable exemption. The location of the information...

  4. Time-Varying Affective Response for Humanoid Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshkina, Lilia; Arkin, Ronald C.; Lee, Jamee K.; Jung, Hyunryong

    This paper describes the design of a complex time-varying affective architecture. It is an expansion of the TAME architecture (traits, attitudes, moods, and emotions) as applied to humanoid robotics. It particular it is intended to promote effective human-robot interaction by conveying the robot’s affective state to the user in an easy-to-interpret manner.

  5. Improvement of polypyrrole nanowire devices by plasmonic space charge generation: high photocurrent and wide spectral response by Ag nanoparticle decoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Seung Woo; Jang, Jaw-Won

    In this study, improvement of the opto-electronic properties of non-single crystallized nanowire devices with space charges generated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. The photocurrent and spectral response of single polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire (NW) devices are increased by electrostatically attached Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). The photocurrent density is remarkably improved, up to 25.3 times, by the Ag NP decoration onto the PPy NW (PPyAgNPs NW) under blue light illumination. In addition, the PPyAgNPs NW shows a photocurrent decay time twice that of PPy NW, as well as an improved spectral response of the photocurrent. The improved photocurrent efficiency, decay time, and spectral response resulted from the space charges generated by the LSPR of Ag NPs. Furthermore, the increasing exponent (m) of the photocurrent (JPC ~Vm) and finite-differential time domain (FDTD) simulation straightforwardly indicate relatively large plasmonic space charge generation. Supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (no. 2013K1A3A1A32035429 and 2015R1A1A1A05027681).

  6. An Empirical Correction Method for Improving off-Axes Response Prediction in Component Type Flight Mechanics Helicopter Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, M. Hossein; Tischler, Mark B.

    1997-01-01

    Historically, component-type flight mechanics simulation models of helicopters have been unable to satisfactorily predict the roll response to pitch stick input and the pitch response to roll stick input off-axes responses. In the study presented here, simple first-order low-pass filtering of the elemental lift and drag forces was considered as a means of improving the correlation. The method was applied to a blade-element model of the AH-64 APache, and responses of the modified model were compared with flight data in hover and forward flight. Results indicate that significant improvement in the off-axes responses can be achieved in hover. In forward flight, however, the best correlation in the longitudinal and lateral off-axes responses required different values of the filter time constant for each axis. A compromise value was selected and was shown to result in good overall improvement in the off-axes responses. The paper describes both the method and the model used for its implementation, and presents results obtained at hover and in forward flight.

  7. Time series analysis of physiological response during ICU visitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, J T; Hendrickson, S G; Lopez, J

    1994-12-01

    Time series analysis (TSA) is an important statistical procedure for clinical nursing research. The current paucity of nursing research reports using TSA may be due to unfamiliarity with this technique. In this article, TSA is compared with the ordinary least squares regression model; validity concerns of time series designs are discussed; and concomitant and interrupted TSA of data collected on the effects of family visitation on intracranial pressure (ICP), heart rate, and blood pressure of patients in ICUs are presented. The concomitant TSA of the effect of family on ICP suggested that family presence tended to be associated with decreased ICP. Interrupted TSA indicated the effect of family on heart rate and blood pressure was not as consistent: The overall effect on blood pressure appeared to be negligible, and heart rate may increase overall. Restrictive visiting policies, once typical of intensive care units, should be reconsidered.

  8. The time response function of spark counters and RPCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobbi, A. E-mail: a.gobbi@gsi.de; Mangiarotti, A. E-mail: mangiaro@fi.infn.it

    2003-08-01

    The fluctuation theory for the avalanche growth with and without space charge effects is briefly summarized and compared to a broad field of applications. These include spark counters as well as timing and trigger RPCs operated in avalanche mode. A large domain in electrical field strength, pressure, gap size and gas mixture type is covered. A reasonable agreement with the experiment is observed, giving confidence on the validity of both assumptions and treatment of the theory.

  9. Adiabatic approximation of time-dependent density matrix functional response theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernal, Katarzyna; Giesbertz, Klaas; Gritsenko, Oleg; Baerends, Evert Jan

    2007-12-07

    Time-dependent density matrix functional theory can be formulated in terms of coupled-perturbed response equations, in which a coupling matrix K(omega) features, analogous to the well-known time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) case. An adiabatic approximation is needed to solve these equations, but the adiabatic approximation is much more critical since there is not a good "zero order" as in TDDFT, in which the virtual-occupied Kohn-Sham orbital energy differences serve this purpose. We discuss a simple approximation proposed earlier which uses only results from static calculations, called the static approximation (SA), and show that it is deficient, since it leads to zero response of the natural orbital occupation numbers. This leads to wrong behavior in the omega-->0 limit. An improved adiabatic approximation (AA) is formulated. The two-electron system affords a derivation of exact coupled-perturbed equations for the density matrix response, permitting analytical comparison of the adiabatic approximation with the exact equations. For the two-electron system also, the exact density matrix functional (2-matrix in terms of 1-matrix) is known, enabling testing of the static and adiabatic approximations unobscured by approximations in the functional. The two-electron HeH(+) molecule shows that at the equilibrium distance, SA consistently underestimates the frequency-dependent polarizability alpha(omega), the adiabatic TDDFT overestimates alpha(omega), while AA improves upon SA and, indeed, AA produces the correct alpha(0). For stretched HeH(+), adiabatic density matrix functional theory corrects the too low first excitation energy and overpolarization of adiabatic TDDFT methods and exhibits excellent agreement with high-quality CCSD ("exact") results over a large omega range.

  10. A method for improving predictive modeling by taking into account lag time: Example of selenium bioaccumulation in a flowing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckon, William N., E-mail: William_Beckon@fws.gov

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • A method for estimating response time in cause-effect relationships is demonstrated. • Predictive modeling is appreciably improved by taking into account this lag time. • Bioaccumulation lag is greater for organisms at higher trophic levels. • This methodology may be widely applicable in disparate disciplines. - Abstract: For bioaccumulative substances, efforts to predict concentrations in organisms at upper trophic levels, based on measurements of environmental exposure, have been confounded by the appreciable but hitherto unknown amount of time it may take for bioaccumulation to occur through various pathways and across several trophic transfers. The study summarized here demonstrates an objective method of estimating this lag time by testing a large array of potential lag times for selenium bioaccumulation, selecting the lag that provides the best regression between environmental exposure (concentration in ambient water) and concentration in the tissue of the target organism. Bioaccumulation lag is generally greater for organisms at higher trophic levels, reaching times of more than a year in piscivorous fish. Predictive modeling of bioaccumulation is improved appreciably by taking into account this lag. More generally, the method demonstrated here may improve the accuracy of predictive modeling in a wide variety of other cause-effect relationships in which lag time is substantial but inadequately known, in disciplines as diverse as climatology (e.g., the effect of greenhouse gases on sea levels) and economics (e.g., the effects of fiscal stimulus on employment).

  11. The cortisol awakening response is associated with performance of a serial sequence reaction time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodyl, Nicolette A; Schneider, Luke; Vallence, Ann-Maree; Clow, Angela; Ridding, Michael C; Pitcher, Julia B

    2016-02-01

    There is emerging evidence of a relationship between the cortisol awakening response (CAR) and the neural mechanisms underlying learning and memory. The aim of this study was to determine whether the CAR is associated with acquisition, retention and overnight consolidation or improvement of a serial sequence reaction time task. Salivary samples were collected at 0, 15, 30 and 45 min after awakening in 39 healthy adults on 2 consecutive days. The serial sequence reaction time task was repeated each afternoon. Participants completed the perceived stress scale and provided salivary samples prior to testing for cortisol assessment. While the magnitude of the CAR (Z score) was not associated with either baseline performance or the timed improvement during task acquisition of the serial sequence task, a positive correlation was observed with reaction times during the stable performance phase on day 1 (r=0.373, p=0.019). Residuals derived from the relationship between baseline and stable phase reaction times on day 1 were used as a surrogate for the degree of learning: these residuals were also correlated with the CAR mean increase on day 1 (r=0.357, p=0.048). Task performance on day 2 was not associated with the CAR obtained on this same day. No association was observed between the perceived stress score, cortisol at testing or task performance. These data indicate that a smaller CAR in healthy adults is associated with a greater degree of learning and faster performance of a serial sequence reaction time task. These results support recognition of the CAR as an important factor contributing to cognitive performance throughout the day.

  12. Presentation and response timing accuracy in Adobe Flash and HTML5/JavaScript Web experiments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reimers, Stian; Stewart, Neil

    2015-01-01

    ...: most recently, through the development of the HTML5 standard. Although in most studies participants give untimed responses, there is a growing interest in being able to record response times online...

  13. Bayesian Procedures for Identifying Aberrant Response-Time Patterns in Adaptive Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.; Guo, Fanmin

    In order to identify aberrant response-time patterns on educational and psychological tests, it is important to be able to separate the speed at which the test taker operates from the time the items require. A lognormal model for response times with this feature was used to derive a Bayesian

  14. Bayesian Procedures for Identifying Aberrant Response-Time Patterns in Adaptive Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der Wim J.; Guo, Fanmin

    2008-01-01

    In order to identify aberrant response-time patterns on educational and psychological tests, it is important to be able to separate the speed at which the test taker operates from the time the items require. A lognormal model for response times with this feature was used to derive a Bayesian procedu

  15. Reducing Response Time Bounds for DAG-Based Task Systems on Heterogeneous Multicore Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Har- tig. Response-time analysis of parallel fork-join workloads with real- time constraints. In 25th ECRTS, 2013. [2] R. Bajaj and D. Agrawal...University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 2006. [11] G. Elliott, N. Kim, J. Erickson, C. Liu, and J. Anderson. Minimizing response times of automotive

  16. Bayesian Procedures for Identifying Aberrant Response-Time Patterns in Adaptive Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.; Guo, Fanmin

    2008-01-01

    In order to identify aberrant response-time patterns on educational and psychological tests, it is important to be able to separate the speed at which the test taker operates from the time the items require. A lognormal model for response times with this feature was used to derive a Bayesian procedu

  17. Improving the Material Response for Slow Heat of Energetic Materials (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, A L

    2010-12-15

    The goal of modern high explosive slow heat cookoff modeling is to understand the level of mechanical violence. This requires understanding the coupled thermal-mechanical-chemical system that such an environment creates. Recent advances have improved our ability to predict the time to event, and we have been making progress on predicting the mechanical response. By adding surface tension to the product gas pores in the high explosive, we have been able to reduce the current model's tendency to over-pressurize confinement vessels. We describe the model and demonstrate how it affects a LX-10 STEX experiment. Issues associated with current product gas equations of state are described and examined.

  18. Vitamin D supplementation improves sustained virologic response in chronic hepatitis C(genotype 1)-naive patientsaa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saif Abu-Mouch; Zvi Fireman; Jacob Jarchovsky; Abdel-Rauf Zeina; Nimer Assy

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether adding vitamin D, a potent immunomodulator, improves the hepatitis C virus (HCV) response to antiviral therapy. METHODS: Seventy-two consecutive patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 were randomized into two groups: the treatment group (n = 36, 50% male, mean age 47 ± 11 years) received Peg-α-2b interferon (1.5 μg/kg per week) plus ribavirin (1000-1200 mg/d) together with vitamin D3 (2000 IU/d, target serum level > 32 ng/mL), and the control group (n = 36, 60% male, mean age 49 ± 7 years) received identical therapy without vitamin D. HCV-RNA was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (sensitivity, 10 IU/mL). The sustained virologic response (SVR) was defined as undetectable HCV-RNA at 24 wk post-treatment. RESULTS: Clinical characteristics were similar in both groups. The treatment group had a higher mean body mass index (27 ± 4 kg/m2 vs 24 ± 3 kg/m2, P F2: 42% vs 19%, P < 0.001) than the controls. At week 4, 16 (44%) treated patients and 6 (17%) controls were HCV-RNA negative (P < 0.001). At week 12, 34 (94%) treated patients and 17 (48%) controls were HCV-RNA negative (P < 0.001). At 24 wk post-treatment (SVR), 31 (86%) treated patients and 15 (42%) controls were HCV-RNA negative (P < 0.001). Viral load, advanced fibrosis and vitamin D supplementation were strongly and independently associated with SVR (multivariate analysis). Adverse events were mild and typical of Peg-α-2b/ribavirin. CONCLUSION: Adding vitamin D to conventional Peg-α-2b/ribavirin therapy for treatment-naive patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection significantly improves the viral response.

  19. Response time analysis of mixed messages in CAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Arthy,

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Controller Area Network (CAN is a network protocol that allows multiple processors in a system to communicate efficiently with each other. Microprocessors became small enough and powerful enough to start appearing everywhere, not just inside personal computers. A CAN system sends messages using a serial bus network, with the individual nodes (processors in the network linked together in a daisy chain. Every node in the system is equal to every other node. Any processor can send a message to any other processor, and if any processor fails, the other systems in the machine will continue to work properly and communicate with each other.In modern vehicle technology CAN is used to reduce point to point wiring harness for vehicle automation and for data communication. To overcome the drawbacks of analog vehicle driving interface, this paper presents the development and implementation of a digital driving system for a semi-autonomous vehicle to improve the driver-vehicle interface. This offers increased flexibility and expandability. This system uses sensors to measure temperature, distance from the other car, presence of alcohol in car, position monitoring, theft monitoring and etc., and sends a warning signal to the driver if any of the parameter goes out of range to avoid accidents. In addition to this if accident occurs in any remote area then using vibration sensor, accident is detected and SMS is send immediately using GSM and preventing him from potentially getting into a serious problems.

  20. Homeopathic Doses of Gelsemium sempervirens Improve the Behavior of Mice in Response to Novel Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bellavite

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gelsemium sempervirens is used in homeopathy for treating patients with anxiety related symptoms, however there have been few experimental studies evaluating its pharmacological activity. We have investigated the effects of homeopathic doses of G. sempervirens on mice, using validated behavioral models. Centesimal (CH dilutions/dynamizations of G. sempervirens, the reference drug diazepam (1 mg/kg body weight or a placebo (solvent vehicle were intraperitoneally delivered to groups of mice of CD1 strain during 8 days, then the effects were assessed by the Light-Dark (LD choice test and by the Open-Field (OF exploration test, in a fully blind manner. In the LD test, the mean time spent in the illuminated area by control and placebo-treated animals was 15.98%, for mice treated with diazepam it increased to 19.91% (P = .047, while with G. sempervirens 5 CH it was 18.11% (P = .341, non-significant. The number of transitions between the two compartments increased with diazepam from 6.19 to 9.64 (P < .001 but not with G. Sempervirens. In the OF test, G. sempervirens 5 CH significantly increased the time spent and the distance traveled in the central zone (P = .009 and P = .003, resp., while diazepam had no effect on these OF test parameters. In a subsequent series of experiments, G. sempervirens 7 and 30 CH also significantly improved the behavioral responses of mice in the OF test (P < .01 for all tested variables. Neither dilutions of G. sempervirens affected the total distance traveled, indicating that the behavioral effect was not due to unspecific changes in locomotor activity. In conclusion, homeopathic doses of G. sempervirens influence the emotional responses of mice to novel environments, suggesting an improvement in exploratory behavior and a diminution of thigmotaxis or neophobia.

  1. Real-time, whole-brain, temporally resolved pressure responses in translational head impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Ji, Songbai

    2016-02-01

    Theoretical debate still exists on the role of linear acceleration ( a lin) on the risk of brain injury. Recent injury metrics only consider head rotational acceleration ( a rot) but not a lin, despite that real-world on-field head impacts suggesting a lin significantly improves a concussion risk function. These controversial findings suggest a practical challenge in integrating theory and real-world experiment. Focusing on tissue-level mechanical responses estimated from finite-element (FE) models of the human head, rather than impact kinematics alone, may help address this debate. However, the substantial computational cost incurred (runtime and hardware) poses a significant barrier for their practical use. In this study, we established a real-time technique to estimate whole-brain a lin-induced pressures. Three hydrostatic atlas pressures corresponding to translational impacts (referred to as 'brain print') along the three major axes were pre-computed. For an arbitrary a lin profile at any instance in time, the atlas pressures were linearly scaled and then superimposed to estimate whole-brain responses. Using 12 publically available, independently measured or reconstructed real-world a lin profiles representative of a range of impact/injury scenarios, the technique was successfully validated (except for one case with an extremely short impulse of approx. 1 ms). The computational cost to estimate whole-brain pressure responses for an entire a lin profile was less than 0.1 s on a laptop versus typically hours on a high-end multicore computer. These findings suggest the potential of the simple, yet effective technique to enable future studies to focus on tissue-level brain responses, rather than solely relying on global head impact kinematics that have plagued early and contemporary brain injury research to date.

  2. Improved Thévenin equivalent methods for real-time voltage stability assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Angel; Jóhannsson, Hjörtur; Østergaard, Jacob;

    2016-01-01

    An improved Thévenin equivalent method for real-time voltage stability assessment that uses wide-area information from synchrophasors is proposed. The improvements are a better modeling of the limited synchronous generators, and a processing that anticipates the effect of field current limiters, ...

  3. Do Young and Old Preschoolers Exhibit Response Bias Due to Different Mechanisms? Investigating Children's Response Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that younger preschoolers exhibit a yes bias due to underdeveloped cognitive abilities, whereas older preschoolers exhibit a response bias due to other factors. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the response latency to yes-no questions pertaining to familiar and unfamiliar objects in 3- to 6-year-olds. The…

  4. Changes in cerebro-cerebellar interaction during response inhibition after performance improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Satoshi; Jimura, Koji; Kunimatsu, Akira; Abe, Osamu; Ohtomo, Kuni; Miyashita, Yasushi; Konishi, Seiki

    2014-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that motor learning is supported by the cerebellum and the cerebro-cerebellar interaction. Response inhibition involves motor responses and the higher-order inhibition that controls the motor responses. In this functional MRI study, we measured the cerebro-cerebellar interaction during response inhibition in two separate days of task performance, and detected the changes in the interaction following performance improvement. Behaviorally, performance improved in the second day, compared to the first day. The psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis revealed the interaction decrease from the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) to the cerebellum (lobule VII or VI). It was also revealed that the interaction increased from the same cerebellar region to the primary motor area. These results suggest the involvement of the cerebellum in response inhibition, and raise the possibility that the performance improvement was supported by the changes in the cerebro-cerebellar interaction.

  5. Driver Vision Based Perception-Response Time Prediction and Assistance Model on Mountain Highway Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Chen, Yuren

    2016-01-01

    To make driving assistance system more humanized, this study focused on the prediction and assistance of drivers’ perception-response time on mountain highway curves. Field tests were conducted to collect real-time driving data and driver vision information. A driver-vision lane model quantified curve elements in drivers’ vision. A multinomial log-linear model was established to predict perception-response time with traffic/road environment information, driver-vision lane model, and mechanical status (last second). A corresponding assistance model showed a positive impact on drivers’ perception-response times on mountain highway curves. Model results revealed that the driver-vision lane model and visual elements did have important influence on drivers’ perception-response time. Compared with roadside passive road safety infrastructure, proper visual geometry design, timely visual guidance, and visual information integrality of a curve are significant factors for drivers’ perception-response time. PMID:28042851

  6. Driver Vision Based Perception-Response Time Prediction and Assistance Model on Mountain Highway Curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To make driving assistance system more humanized, this study focused on the prediction and assistance of drivers’ perception-response time on mountain highway curves. Field tests were conducted to collect real-time driving data and driver vision information. A driver-vision lane model quantified curve elements in drivers’ vision. A multinomial log-linear model was established to predict perception-response time with traffic/road environment information, driver-vision lane model, and mechanical status (last second. A corresponding assistance model showed a positive impact on drivers’ perception-response times on mountain highway curves. Model results revealed that the driver-vision lane model and visual elements did have important influence on drivers’ perception-response time. Compared with roadside passive road safety infrastructure, proper visual geometry design, timely visual guidance, and visual information integrality of a curve are significant factors for drivers’ perception-response time.

  7. Driver Vision Based Perception-Response Time Prediction and Assistance Model on Mountain Highway Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Chen, Yuren

    2016-12-30

    To make driving assistance system more humanized, this study focused on the prediction and assistance of drivers' perception-response time on mountain highway curves. Field tests were conducted to collect real-time driving data and driver vision information. A driver-vision lane model quantified curve elements in drivers' vision. A multinomial log-linear model was established to predict perception-response time with traffic/road environment information, driver-vision lane model, and mechanical status (last second). A corresponding assistance model showed a positive impact on drivers' perception-response times on mountain highway curves. Model results revealed that the driver-vision lane model and visual elements did have important influence on drivers' perception-response time. Compared with roadside passive road safety infrastructure, proper visual geometry design, timely visual guidance, and visual information integrality of a curve are significant factors for drivers' perception-response time.

  8. Balance perturbation system to improve balance compensatory responses during walking in old persons

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Ageing commonly disrupts the balance control and compensatory postural responses that contribute to maintaining balance and preventing falls during perturbation of posture. This can lead to increased risk of falling in old adults (65 years old and over). Therefore, improving compensatory postural responses during walking is one of the goals in fall prevention programs. Training is often used to achieve this goal. Most fall prevention programs are usually directed towards improving vo...

  9. Runoff response time of a loosely defined supraglacial microbasin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Scott Munro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A micrometeorological experiment was conducted in the summer of 2008, at Peyto Glacier, during four meltwater production periods of 1, 3, 4 and 5 days duration, the last two days marked by late summer snow cover. The data include a breakdown of net radiation into its short- and long-wave components, as well as wind speed, temperature and humidity profile data for use in bulk transfer estimates of sensible heat and moisture transfer. In addition, a hydrological experiment was conducted, the data comprising sonic sounder measurements of ablation and stage level records of discharge from a supraglacial microbasin. As expected, the ratio of daily average runoff flow measurement to energy budget flow estimates is less than one on most days because of weathering crust development. Also, the conversion of stage level data into discharge from a supraglacial catchment presents challenges, notably defining the area of a loosely defined basin and specifying stage level on a downward moving surface. Nevertheless, it is clear that peak discharge lags peak meltwater energy input by periods of four to six hours. A suitably lagged flow estimate can be achieved by passing the flow through a simple storage reservoir, using delay times of 14.5, 15, 7.5 and 9 h for each respective measurement period. This suggests that a substantial part of the delay in runoff from a glacier basin is tied up in ice surface hydrological processes.

  10. Nonparametric Bayesian time-series modeling and clustering of time-domain ground penetrating radar landmine responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Kenneth D., Jr.; Torrione, Peter A.; Collins, Leslie

    2010-04-01

    Time domain ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been shown to be a powerful sensing phenomenology for detecting buried objects such as landmines. Landmine detection with GPR data typically utilizes a feature-based pattern classification algorithm to discriminate buried landmines from other sub-surface objects. In high-fidelity GPR, the time-frequency characteristics of a landmine response should be indicative of the physical construction and material composition of the landmine and could therefore be useful for discrimination from other non-threatening sub-surface objects. In this research we propose modeling landmine time-domain responses with a nonparametric Bayesian time-series model and we perform clustering of these time-series models with a hierarchical nonparametric Bayesian model. Each time-series is modeled as a hidden Markov model (HMM) with autoregressive (AR) state densities. The proposed nonparametric Bayesian prior allows for automated learning of the number of states in the HMM as well as the AR order within each state density. This creates a flexible time-series model with complexity determined by the data. Furthermore, a hierarchical non-parametric Bayesian prior is used to group landmine responses with similar HMM model parameters, thus learning the number of distinct landmine response models within a data set. Model inference is accomplished using a fast variational mean field approximation that can be implemented for on-line learning.

  11. An Umeclidinium membrane sensor; Two-step optimization strategy for improved responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehia, Ali M; Monir, Hany H

    2017-09-01

    In the scientific context of membrane sensors and improved experimentation, we devised an experimentally designed protocol for sensor optimization. Two-step strategy was implemented for Umeclidinium bromide (UMEC) analysis which is a novel quinuclidine-based muscarinic antagonist used for maintenance treatment of symptoms accompanied with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In the first place, membrane components were screened for ideal ion exchanger, ionophore and plasticizer using three categorical factors at three levels in Taguchi design. Secondly, experimentally designed optimization was followed in order to tune the sensor up for finest responses. Twelve experiments were randomly carried out in a continuous factor design. Nernstian response, detection limit and selectivity were assigned as responses in these designs. The optimized membrane sensor contained tetrakis-[3,5-bis(trifluoro- methyl)phenyl] borate (0.44wt%) and calix[6]arene (0.43wt%) in 50.00% PVC plasticized with 49.13wt% 2-ni-tro-phenyl octylether. This sensor, along with an optimum concentration of inner filling solution (2×10(-4)molL(-1) UMEC) and 2h of soaking time, attained the design objectives. Nernstian response approached 59.7mV/decade and detection limit decreased by about two order of magnitude (8×10(-8)mol L(-1)) through this optimization protocol. The proposed sensor was validated for UMEC determination in its linear range (3.16×10(-7) -1×10(-3)mol L(-1)) and challenged for selective discrimination of other congeners and inorganic cations. Results of INCRUSE ELLIPTA(®) inhalation powder analyses obtained from the proposed sensor and manufacturer's UPLC were statistically compared. Moreover the proposed sensor was successfully used for the determination of UMEC in plasma samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Improvement of the Original Isolation Procedure for Hormone Studies in Short-Time Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukadder Atmaca

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Earlier studies indicated that hormone responsiveness of cells and metabolic activity was lost during various of experimental procedure. In the light of this observation, I aimed to investigate to obtain optimal conditions for short time cultured hepatocytes and also to determine the type of test can be used to evaluate suitablity of hepatocytes for hormones studies. During the isolation period 50 IU/ml and 100 IU/ml collagenase were used. Adrenaline (10-6M was used to measure sensitivity of hepatocytes to hormones and glycogenolsis was measured at the end of 2hr incubation period. Adrenaline significantly increased gylcogenolysis (Control: 0.16±0.01 mg/2hr; Adrenaline: 0.30±0.01 mg/2hr only when the 50 IU/ml collagenase was used and the viability of the cells were over 95%. Viability tests were applied to hepatocytes that obtained by using 50 IU collagenase. Cellular glutathione, methylthiazoltetrazolium reduction, lactatedehdrogenase leakage, ATP level measured to determine viability following the attachment and incubation period. No differences were observed at the end of each period.Altogether, the present study indicated that membrane integrity and metabolic function of the hepatocytes can be improved by modifying slightly the original procedure of Reese and Byard.

  13. Combining instruction prefetching with partial cache locking to improve WCET in real-time systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Ni

    Full Text Available Caches play an important role in embedded systems to bridge the performance gap between fast processor and slow memory. And prefetching mechanisms are proposed to further improve the cache performance. While in real-time systems, the application of caches complicates the Worst-Case Execution Time (WCET analysis due to its unpredictable behavior. Modern embedded processors often equip locking mechanism to improve timing predictability of the instruction cache. However, locking the whole cache may degrade the cache performance and increase the WCET of the real-time application. In this paper, we proposed an instruction-prefetching combined partial cache locking mechanism, which combines an instruction prefetching mechanism (termed as BBIP with partial cache locking to improve the WCET estimates of real-time applications. BBIP is an instruction prefetching mechanism we have already proposed to improve the worst-case cache performance and in turn the worst-case execution time. The estimations on typical real-time applications show that the partial cache locking mechanism shows remarkable WCET improvement over static analysis and full cache locking.

  14. Combining instruction prefetching with partial cache locking to improve WCET in real-time systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Fan; Long, Xiang; Wan, Han; Gao, Xiaopeng

    2013-01-01

    Caches play an important role in embedded systems to bridge the performance gap between fast processor and slow memory. And prefetching mechanisms are proposed to further improve the cache performance. While in real-time systems, the application of caches complicates the Worst-Case Execution Time (WCET) analysis due to its unpredictable behavior. Modern embedded processors often equip locking mechanism to improve timing predictability of the instruction cache. However, locking the whole cache may degrade the cache performance and increase the WCET of the real-time application. In this paper, we proposed an instruction-prefetching combined partial cache locking mechanism, which combines an instruction prefetching mechanism (termed as BBIP) with partial cache locking to improve the WCET estimates of real-time applications. BBIP is an instruction prefetching mechanism we have already proposed to improve the worst-case cache performance and in turn the worst-case execution time. The estimations on typical real-time applications show that the partial cache locking mechanism shows remarkable WCET improvement over static analysis and full cache locking.

  15. An Improved NHPP Model with Time-Varying Fault Removal Delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Yang; Nan Sang; Hang Lei

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, an improved NHPP model isproposed by replacing constant fault removal time withtime-varying fault removal delay in NHPP model,proposed by Daniel R Jeske. In our model, a time-dependent delay function is established to fit the faultremoval process. By using two sets of practical data, thedescriptive and predictive abilities of the improved NHPPmodel are compared with those of the NHPP model, G-Omodel, and delayed S-shape model. The results show that the improved model can fit and predict the data better.

  16. Effects of cognitive load and prosthetic liner on volitional response times to vibrotactile feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Sharma, MHSc

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Artificial tactile feedback systems can improve prosthetic function for people with amputation by substituting for lost proprioception in the missing limb. However, limited data exists to guide the design and application of these systems for mobility and balance scenarios. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a noninvasive artificial sensory feedback (ASF system on lower-limb function in the presence of a cognitive load and a liner interface. Reaction times (RTs and accuracy of leg-movement responses to vibratory stimuli at the thigh were recorded for 12 nondisabled individuals and 3 participants with transfemoral amputation using a custom-built testing apparatus. The results indicate that the addition of a cognitive load increases response times relative to the baseline condition by 0.26 to 0.33 s. The prosthetic liner produced a less pronounced increase in RT of 0.06 to 0.11 s. Participants were able to correctly identify the stimulus location with nearly 100% accuracy. These increased RTs are nontrivial and must be considered in designing ASF systems.

  17. Ambulance response time and emergency medical dispatcher program: a study in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, C H Mohd Shaharudin; Ismail, I Mohd; Mohsin, S S J Syed

    2008-11-01

    This study provided data by a simple method of acquiring information related to ambulance response time (ART) and determined whether it met the international standards of ART. Additionally, this paper also compared the duration of ART at this hospital before and after the implementation of an Emergency Medical Dispatcher (EMD) program. The ART, which started when details like phone number of the caller, exact location of the incident and the nature of the main complaint were received and ended when the emergency team arrived at the scene of the incident. The parameters recorded include call processing time, time taken to prepare the team and time taken to travel to the scene. The results of the study revealed that the ART for the university hospital (HUSM) was at 913.2 +/- 276.5 seconds (mean +/- SD) and it was far below the international standard of ART as a benchmark of a good ambulance service. However, the study suggested that the EMD program that was recently implemented at the HUSM gave a significantly improvement to the ART score.

  18. Improving Survey Response Rates of School Counselors: Comparing the Use of Incentives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Sheri

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of incentives in improving survey response rates of school counselors and compares the findings with those of previously researched populations. A $1 cash incentive increased response rates for a one-wave mailing of a questionnaire, while a raffle opportunity did not. The number and length of optional…

  19. Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on hamstrings' response times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Francisco; De Ste Croix, Mark; Sainz de Baranda, Pilar; Santonja, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The main purposes of this study were to (a) investigate acute effects of static and dynamic lower limb stretching routines on total response time, pre-motor time and motor time of the medial and lateral hamstrings during maximal eccentric isokinetic knee flexion; and (b) determine whether static and dynamic routines elicit similar responses. A total of 38 active adults completed the following intervention protocols in a randomised order on separate days: (a) non-stretching (control condition), (b) static stretching and (c) dynamic stretching. After the stretching or control intervention, total response time, pre-motor time and motor time of the medial and lateral hamstrings were assessed during eccentric knee flexion movements with participants prone. Measures were compared via a mixed-design factorial ANOVA. There were no main effects for total response time, pre-motor time and motor time. The results suggest that dynamic and static stretching has no influence on hamstrings response times (total response time, pre-motor time and motor time) and hence neither form of stretching reduces this primary risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  20. Natural capsaicinoids improve swallow response in older patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofes, Laia; Arreola, Viridiana; Martin, Alberto; Clavé, Pere

    2013-09-01

    There is no pharmacological treatment for oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD). The aim of this study was to compare the therapeutic effect of stimulation of oropharyngeal transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) with that of thickeners in older patients with OD. A clinical videofluoroscopic non-randomised study was performed to assess the signs of safety and efficacy of swallow and the swallow response in (1) 33 patients with OD (75.94 ± 1.88 years) while swallowing 5, 10 and 20 ml of liquid (20.4 mPa.s), nectar (274.4 mPa.s), and pudding (3930 mPa.s) boluses; (2) 33 patients with OD (73.94 ± 2.23 years) while swallowing 5, 10 and 20 ml nectar boluses, and two series of nectar boluses with 150 μM capsaicinoids and (3) 8 older controls (76.88 ± 1.51 years) while swallowing 5, 10 and 20 ml nectar boluses. Increasing bolus viscosity reduced the prevalence of laryngeal penetrations by 72.03% (p < 0.05), increased pharyngeal residue by 41.37% (p < 0.05), delayed the upper esophageal sphincter opening time and the larynx movement and did not affect the laryngeal vestibule closure time and maximal hyoid displacement. Treatment with capsaicinoids reduced both, penetrations by 50.% (p < 0.05) and pharyngeal residue by 50.% (p < 0.05), and shortened the time of laryngeal vestibule closure (p < 0.001), upper esophageal sphincter opening (p < 0.05) and maximal hyoid and laryngeal displacement. Stimulation of TRPV1 by capsaicinoids strongly improved safety and efficacy of swallow and shortened the swallow response in older patients with OD. Stimulation of TRPV1 might become a pharmacologic strategy to treat OD.

  1. Simulating the Thermal Response of High Explosives on Time Scales of Days to Microseconds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoh, J J; McClelland, M A

    2003-07-16

    We present an overview of computational techniques for simulating the thermal cookoff of high explosives using a multi-physics hydrodynamics code, ALE3D. Recent improvements to the code have aided our computational capability in modeling the response of energetic materials systems exposed to extreme thermal environments, such as fires. We consider an idealized model process for a confined explosive involving the transition from slow heating to rapid deflagration in which the time scale changes from days to hundreds of microseconds. The heating stage involves thermal expansion and decomposition according to an Arrhenius kinetics model while a pressure-dependent burn model is employed during the explosive phase. We describe and demonstrate the numerical strategies employed to make the transition from slow to fast dynamics.

  2. "It's about Improving My Practice": The Learner Experience of Real-Time Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharplin, Erica J.; Stahl, Garth; Kehrwald, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on pre-service teachers' experience of the Real-Time Coaching model, an innovative technology-based approach to teacher training. The Real-Time Coaching model uses multiple feedback cycles via wireless technology to develop within pre-service teachers the specific skills and mindset toward continual improvement. Results of…

  3. Adjunctive Phosphodiesterase-4 Inhibitor Therapy Improves Antibiotic Response to Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a Rabbit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvakumar Subbian

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Adjunctive CC-11050 therapy significantly improves the response of rabbits with experimental pulmonary TB to INH treatment. We propose that CC-11050 may be a promising candidate for host directed therapy of patients with pulmonary TB, reducing the duration and improving clinical outcome of antibiotic treatment.

  4. 34 CFR 403.204 - What are the State's responsibilities for program evaluation and improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation and improvement? 403.204 Section 403.204 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... responsibilities for program evaluation and improvement? (a) If, one year after an eligible recipient has....201 and 403.202, the State shall work jointly with the recipient and with teachers, parents,...

  5. On the physical origin of tails in the time response of spark counters

    CERN Document Server

    Mangiarotti, A

    2002-01-01

    The time response function of a spark counter is calculated considering that the time delay and its fluctuations originate from the avalanche growth, under space charge effects. The deduced asymmetric time response probability density displays a peak and a tail which both correlate with an increase of the overall time delay. From a comparison to experiment, it is shown that the calculations can reproduce the general trends of the measurements.

  6. On the physical origin of tails in the time response of spark counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangiarotti, A. E-mail: mangiaro@fi.infn.it; Gobbi, A. E-mail: a.gobbi@gsi.de

    2002-04-11

    The time response function of a spark counter is calculated considering that the time delay and its fluctuations originate from the avalanche growth, under space charge effects. The deduced asymmetric time response probability density displays a peak and a tail which both correlate with an increase of the overall time delay. From a comparison to experiment, it is shown that the calculations can reproduce the general trends of the measurements.

  7. 75 FR 38603 - State Responsibility for the Timely Reporting and Posting of Certain Convictions and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration State Responsibility for the Timely Reporting and Posting of... part of its responsibility to ensure State compliance with the minimum CDL program standards... SDLA as having responsibility to engage in judicial outreach activities; Ensure that all involved...

  8. If climate action becomes urgent: The importance of response times for various climate strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vuuren, D.P.; Stehfest, E.

    2013-01-01

    Most deliberations on climate policy are based on a mitigation response that assumes a gradually increasing reduction over time. However, situations may occur where a more urgent response is needed. A key question for climate policy in general, but even more in the case a rapid response is needed, i

  9. Significantly improved photocurrent response of ZnS-reduced graphene oxide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sookhakian, M., E-mail: m.sokhakian@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Amin, Y.M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Zakaria, R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Photonics Research Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Basirun, W.J. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Institute of Nanotechnology & Catalysis Research (NanoCat), University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Mahmoudian, M.R. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Nasiri-Tabrizi, B.; Baradaran, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Azarang, Majid [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • ZnS/reduced graphene oxide nanoparticles by hydrothermal method. • ZnS nanoparticles in a gelatin medium without agglomeration. • Support of ZnS shows efficient photocurrent response. • The fabricated solar cell electrode improved in the presence of reduced graphene oxide. - Abstract: ZnS-nanoparticles (NPs) reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composites with a high degree of crystallinity and high dispersity were successfully synthesized via a facile solvothermal method in the gelatin medium, during which the formation of ZnS NPs, reduction of graphene oxide and loading of ZnS NPs into the rGO surface occur simultaneously. Gelatin, as a natural capping agent, plays a significant role in controlling the degree of dispersion and coverage of ZnS NPs. The effect of rGO on the crystalline structure and optical properties of ZnS NPs were determined via X-ray diffraction, UV–visible diffused reflectance spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The ZnS–rGO composites exhibit excellent potential for photocurrent generation compared with pure ZnS NPs under visible light irradiation, provided that efficient photoinduced charge separation and transportation can be achieved at the interface. The maximum photocurrent response was obtained for ZnS–rGO composite with a 3% mass fraction of rGO, which is 2 times that achieved on pure ZnS NPs.

  10. Iron-responsive olfactory uptake of manganese improves motor function deficits associated with iron deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghan Kim

    Full Text Available Iron-responsive manganese uptake is increased in iron-deficient rats, suggesting that toxicity related to manganese exposure could be modified by iron status. To explore possible interactions, the distribution of intranasally-instilled manganese in control and iron-deficient rat brain was characterized by quantitative image analysis using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Manganese accumulation in the brain of iron-deficient rats was doubled after intranasal administration of MnCl(2 for 1- or 3-week. Enhanced manganese level was observed in specific brain regions of iron-deficient rats, including the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Iron-deficient rats spent reduced time on a standard accelerating rotarod bar before falling and with lower peak speed compared to controls; unexpectedly, these measures of motor function significantly improved in iron-deficient rats intranasally-instilled with MnCl(2. Although tissue dopamine concentrations were similar in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT and dopamine receptor D(1 (D1R levels were reduced and dopamine receptor D(2 (D2R levels were increased in manganese-instilled rats, suggesting that manganese-induced changes in post-synaptic dopaminergic signaling contribute to the compensatory effect. Enhanced olfactory manganese uptake during iron deficiency appears to be a programmed "rescue response" with beneficial influence on motor impairment due to low iron status.

  11. How Plant Hydraulics can Improve the Modeling of Plant and Ecosystem Responses to Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, J.; Anderegg, W.; Mackay, D. S.; Venturas, M.

    2016-12-01

    Stomatal regulation is an important, yet problematic component in modeling plant-environment interactions. The problem is that stomata respond to so many environmental cues via complex and uncertain mechanisms. But the assumed end result of regulation is conceptually simple: an optimization of CO2 for H2O exchange in response to changing conditions. Stomata open when photosynthetic opportunity is high and water is cheap. They close if photosynthetic opportunity is low or water is very expensive. Photosynthetic opportunity is relatively easy to model. The cost of water loss is also easy to model if it is assumed to rise with greater proximity to hydraulic failure and desiccation. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curves of soil- and plant are used to estimate proximity to failure. At any given instant, a model can calculate opportunity and cost curves associated with greater stomatal opening. If stomata regulate to maximize the instantaneous difference between photosynthetic gain and hydraulic cost, then a model can predict the trajectory of stomatal responses to changes in environment across time. Results of this optimization routine extend the utility of hydraulic predecessor models, and are consistent with widely used empirical models across a wide range of vapor pressure deficit and ambient CO2 concentrations for wet soil. The advantage of the optimization approach is the absence of empirical coefficients, applicability to dry as well as wet soil, and prediction of plant hydraulic status along with gas exchange. The optimization algorithm is a trait- and process-based approach that could improve next generation land surface models.

  12. Does including physiology improve species distribution model predictions of responses to recent climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Lauren B; Waaser, Stephanie A; MacLean, Heidi J; Fox, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Thermal constraints on development are often invoked to predict insect distributions. These constraints tend to be characterized in species distribution models (SDMs) by calculating development time based on a constant lower development temperature (LDT). Here, we assessed whether species-specific estimates of LDT based on laboratory experiments can improve the ability of SDMs to predict the distribution shifts of six U.K. butterflies in response to recent climate warming. We find that species-specific and constant (5 degrees C) LDT degree-day models perform similarly at predicting distributions during the period of 1970-1982. However, when the models for the 1970-1982 period are projected to predict distributions in 1995-1999 and 2000-2004, species-specific LDT degree-day models modestly outperform constant LDT degree-day models. Our results suggest that, while including species-specific physiology in correlative models may enhance predictions of species' distribution responses to climate change, more detailed models may be needed to adequately account for interspecific physiological differences.

  13. Intravenous Immunoglobulin with Enhanced Polyspecificity Improves Survival in Experimental Sepsis and Aseptic Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoumerska-Alexieva, Iglika; Roumenina, Lubka; Pashov, Anastas; Dimitrov, Jordan; Hadzhieva, Maya; Lindig, Sandro; Voynova, Elisaveta; Dimitrova, Petya; Ivanovska, Nina; Bockmeyer, Clemens; Stefanova, Zvetanka; Fitting, Catherine; Bläss, Markus; Claus, Ralf; von Gunten, Stephan; Kaveri, Srini; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Bauer, Michael; Vassilev, Tchavdar

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause for death worldwide. Numerous interventional trials with agents neutralizing single proinflammatory mediators have failed to improve survival in sepsis and aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndromes. This failure could be explained by the widespread gene expression dysregulation known as “genomic storm” in these patients. A multifunctional polyspecific therapeutic agent might be needed to thwart the effects of this storm. Licensed pooled intravenous immunoglobulin preparations seemed to be a promising candidate, but they have also failed in their present form to prevent sepsis-related death. We report here the protective effect of a single dose of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations with additionally enhanced polyspecificity in three models of sepsis and aseptic systemic inflammation. The modification of the pooled immunoglobulin G molecules by exposure to ferrous ions resulted in their newly acquired ability to bind some proinflammatory molecules, complement components and endogenous “danger” signals. The improved survival in endotoxemia was associated with serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, diminished complement consumption and normalization of the coagulation time. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin preparations with additionally enhanced polyspecificity have a clinical potential in sepsis and related systemic inflammatory syndromes. PMID:26701312

  14. Improvement and Simulation of an Autonomous Time Synchronization Algorithm for a Layered Satellite Constellation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feijiang Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous time synchronization for satellite constellations is a key technology to establish a constellation system time without the use of a ground station. The characteristics of satellite visibility time for layered satellite constellations containing geostationary earth orbit (GEO, inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO, and medium earth orbit (MEO satellites are simulated by establishing a visible satellite model. Based on the satellite visible simulation results for a layered constellation, this study investigates the autonomous time synchronization algorithm that corresponds to the layered constellation structure, analyzes the main error of the time synchronization algorithm, and proposes methods to improve the characteristics of satellite movement in the constellation. This study uses an improved two-way time synchronization algorithm for autonomous time synchronization in the GEO-MEO satellite layer of a layered satellite constellation. The simulation results show that in a condition with simulation errors, the time synchronization precision of this improved algorithm can be controlled within 5 ns and used in high-precision autonomous time synchronization between layered satellite constellations.

  15. Forecasting and analyzing high O3 time series in educational area through an improved chaotic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Nor Zila Abd; Adenan, Nur Hamiza; Noorani, Mohd Salmi Md

    2017-08-01

    Forecasting and analyzing the ozone (O3) concentration time series is important because the pollutant is harmful to health. This study is a pilot study for forecasting and analyzing the O3 time series in one of Malaysian educational area namely Shah Alam using chaotic approach. Through this approach, the observed hourly scalar time series is reconstructed into a multi-dimensional phase space, which is then used to forecast the future time series through the local linear approximation method. The main purpose is to forecast the high O3 concentrations. The original method performed poorly but the improved method addressed the weakness thereby enabling the high concentrations to be successfully forecast. The correlation coefficient between the observed and forecasted time series through the improved method is 0.9159 and both the mean absolute error and root mean squared error are low. Thus, the improved method is advantageous. The time series analysis by means of the phase space plot and Cao method identified the presence of low-dimensional chaotic dynamics in the observed O3 time series. Results showed that at least seven factors affect the studied O3 time series, which is consistent with the listed factors from the diurnal variations investigation and the sensitivity analysis from past studies. In conclusion, chaotic approach has been successfully forecast and analyzes the O3 time series in educational area of Shah Alam. These findings are expected to help stakeholders such as Ministry of Education and Department of Environment in having a better air pollution management.

  16. Lean six sigma methodologies improve clinical laboratory efficiency and reduce turnaround times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inal, Tamer C; Goruroglu Ozturk, Ozlem; Kibar, Filiz; Cetiner, Salih; Matyar, Selcuk; Daglioglu, Gulcin; Yaman, Akgun

    2017-02-15

    Organizing work flow is a major task of laboratory management. Recently, clinical laboratories have started to adopt methodologies such as Lean Six Sigma and some successful implementations have been reported. This study used Lean Six Sigma to simplify the laboratory work process and decrease the turnaround time by eliminating non-value-adding steps. The five-stage Six Sigma system known as define, measure, analyze, improve, and control (DMAIC) is used to identify and solve problems. The laboratory turnaround time for individual tests, total delay time in the sample reception area, and percentage of steps involving risks of medical errors and biological hazards in the overall process are measured. The pre-analytical process in the reception area was improved by eliminating 3 h and 22.5 min of non-value-adding work. Turnaround time also improved for stat samples from 68 to 59 min after applying Lean. Steps prone to medical errors and posing potential biological hazards to receptionists were reduced from 30% to 3%. Successful implementation of Lean Six Sigma significantly improved all of the selected performance metrics. This quality-improvement methodology has the potential to significantly improve clinical laboratories. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Combined ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and fenofibrate in primary biliary cholangitis patients with incomplete UDCA response may improve outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, A C; Lapointe-Shaw, L; Kowgier, M; Meza-Cardona, J; Hirschfield, G M; Janssen, H L A; Feld, J J

    2016-01-01

    Fibrates appear to improve biochemistry in patients with primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), but it is unclear which factors predict response and whether treatment improves transplant-free survival. To evaluate biochemical profiles, liver-related outcomes and adverse events following fenofibrate therapy in PBC patients with incomplete response to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). A retrospective cohort study was performed at a tertiary centre. Cox regression was used to compare outcomes between patients treated with fibrates and UDCA (FF) or UDCA alone, adjusted for a propensity score to account for treatment selection bias. A total of 120 patients were included (FF group n = 46, UDCA group n = 74, median fenofibrate treatment 11 months); 41% vs. 7% met the Toronto criteria for biochemical response [alkaline phosphatase ≤1.67 times the upper limit of normal] in the FF and UDCA groups, respectively (P = 0.0001). Fenofibrate was also associated with improved decompensation-free and transplant-free survival [hazard ratio (HR) 0.09, 95% CI 0.03-0.32, P = 0.0002]. However, only fenofibrate use, not biochemical response, was independently associated with improved outcomes on multivariable analysis (HR 0.40, 95% CI 0.17-0.93, P = 0.03). Twenty-two percent discontinued fenofibrate due to adverse events (most common: abdominal pain and myalgias). In cirrhotic patients, bilirubin increased more rapidly in the FF group (P = 0.005). Fenofibrate therapy is associated with significant improvement in alkaline phosphatase, decompensation-free and transplant-free survival in PBC patients with incomplete UDCA response. However, fenofibrate should be used cautiously in cirrhosis, with close monitoring for clinical/biochemical decompensation. Additional studies are required to assess the validity of alkaline phosphatase as an appropriate response criteria for fibrate therapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Measuring Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care: Interrupted Time Series Analysis of Door-to-Needle Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Margreet van Dishoeck

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In patients with acute ischemic stroke, early treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA improves functional outcome by effectively reducing disability and dependency. Timely thrombolysis, within 1 h, is a vital aspect of acute stroke treatment, and is reflected in the widely used performance indicator ‘door-to-needle time' (DNT. DNT measures the time from the moment the patient enters the emergency department until he/she receives intravenous rtPA. The purpose of the study was to measure quality improvement from the first implementation of thrombolysis in stroke patients in a university hospital in the Netherlands. We further aimed to identify specific interventions that affect DNT. Methods: We included all patients with acute ischemic stroke consecutively admitted to a large university hospital in the Netherlands between January 2006 and December 2012, and focused on those treated with thrombolytic therapy on admission. Data were collected routinely for research purposes and internal quality measurement (the Erasmus Stroke Study. We used a retrospective interrupted time series design to study the trend in DNT, analyzed by means of segmented regression. Results: Between January 2006 and December 2012, 1,703 patients with ischemic stroke were admitted and 262 (17% were treated with rtPA. Patients treated with thrombolysis were on average 63 years old at the time of the stroke and 52% were male. Mean age (p = 0.58 and sex distribution (p = 0.98 did not change over the years. The proportion treated with thrombolysis increased from 5% in 2006 to 22% in 2012. In 2006, none of the patients were treated within 1 h. In 2012, this had increased to 81%. In a logistic regression analysis, this trend was significant (OR 1.6 per year, CI 1.4-1.8. The median DNT was reduced from 75 min in 2006 to 45 min in 2012 (p Conclusion and Implications: The DNT steadily improved from the first implementation of thrombolysis. Specific

  19. Disentangling the impact of social groups on response times and movement dynamics in evacuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Nikolai W F; Holl, Stefan; Mehner, Wolfgang; Seyfried, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Crowd evacuations are paradigmatic examples for collective behaviour, as interactions between individuals lead to the overall movement dynamics. Approaches assuming that all individuals interact in the same way have significantly improved our understanding of pedestrian crowd evacuations. However, this scenario is unlikely, as many pedestrians move in social groups that are based on friendship or kinship. We test how the presence of social groups affects the egress time of individuals and crowds in a representative crowd evacuation experiment. Our results suggest that the presence of social groups increases egress times and that this is largely due to differences at two stages of evacuations. First, individuals in social groups take longer to show a movement response at the start of evacuations, and, second, they take longer to move into the vicinity of the exits once they have started to move towards them. Surprisingly, there are no discernible time differences between the movement of independent individuals and individuals in groups directly in front of the exits. We explain these results and discuss their implications. Our findings elucidate behavioural differences between independent individuals and social groups in evacuations. Such insights are crucial for the control of crowd evacuations and for planning mass events.

  20. Disentangling the impact of social groups on response times and movement dynamics in evacuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai W F Bode

    Full Text Available Crowd evacuations are paradigmatic examples for collective behaviour, as interactions between individuals lead to the overall movement dynamics. Approaches assuming that all individuals interact in the same way have significantly improved our understanding of pedestrian crowd evacuations. However, this scenario is unlikely, as many pedestrians move in social groups that are based on friendship or kinship. We test how the presence of social groups affects the egress time of individuals and crowds in a representative crowd evacuation experiment. Our results suggest that the presence of social groups increases egress times and that this is largely due to differences at two stages of evacuations. First, individuals in social groups take longer to show a movement response at the start of evacuations, and, second, they take longer to move into the vicinity of the exits once they have started to move towards them. Surprisingly, there are no discernible time differences between the movement of independent individuals and individuals in groups directly in front of the exits. We explain these results and discuss their implications. Our findings elucidate behavioural differences between independent individuals and social groups in evacuations. Such insights are crucial for the control of crowd evacuations and for planning mass events.

  1. Improved Real-time Denoising Method Based on Lifting Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhaohua

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Signal denoising can not only enhance the signal to noise ratio (SNR but also reduce the effect of noise. In order to satisfy the requirements of real-time signal denoising, an improved semisoft shrinkage real-time denoising method based on lifting wavelet transform was proposed. The moving data window technology realizes the real-time wavelet denoising, which employs wavelet transform based on lifting scheme to reduce computational complexity. Also hyperbolic threshold function and recursive threshold computing can ensure the dynamic characteristics of the system, in addition, it can improve the real-time calculating efficiency as well. The simulation results show that the semisoft shrinkage real-time denoising method has quite a good performance in comparison to the traditional methods, namely soft-thresholding and hard-thresholding. Therefore, this method can solve more practical engineering problems.

  2. A Comparison of HTML4 and HTML5 with Respect to Server Response Time and Page Load Time

    OpenAIRE

    Hushi, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    HTML5 is a language for structuring and presenting content for the World Wide Web. It is expected to provide better flexibility and interoperability for HTML implementations and offering better user experience than the current HTML4. Previous studies have shown some HTML5 elements are able to provide better accessibility and interaction. In this study, we compare the page load time and server response time of equivalent page, implemented in HTML5 or HTML4, 15 HTML5 elements such as

  3. An Improved Ant Colony Algorithm for a Single-machine Scheduling Problem with Setup Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Qiang; LIU Xinbao; LIU Lin; YANG Shanglin

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by industrial applications we study a single-machine scheduling problem in which all the jobs are mutually independent and available at time zero. The machine processes the jobs sequentially and it is not idle if there is any job to be processed. The operation of each job cannot be interrupted. The machine cannot process more than one job at a time. A setup time is needed if the machine switches from one type of job to another. The objective is to find an optimal schedule with the minimal total jobs' completion time. While the sum of jobs' processing time is always a constant, the objective is to minimize the sum of setup times. Ant colony optimization (ACO) is a meta-heuristic that has recently been applied to scheduling problem. In this paper we propose an improved ACO-Branching Ant Colony with Dynamic Perturbation (DPBAC) algorithm for the single-machine scheduling problem. DPBAC improves traditional ACO in following aspects: introducing Branching Method to choose starting points; improving state transition rules; introducing Mutation Method to shorten tours; improving pheromone updating rules and introducing Conditional Dynamic Perturbation Strategy. Computational results show that DPBAC algorithm is superior to the traditional ACO algorithm.

  4. A hazard analysis via an improved timed colored petri net with time-space coupling safety constraint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zelin; Wang Shihai; Zhao Tingdi; Liu Bin

    2016-01-01

    Petri nets are graphical and mathematical tools that are applicable to many systems for modeling, simulation, and analysis. With the emergence of the concept of partitioning in time and space domains proposed in avionics application standard software interface (ARINC 653), it has become difficult to analyze time–space coupling hazards resulting from resource partitioning using classical or advanced Petri nets. In this paper, we propose a time–space coupling safety constraint and an improved timed colored Petri net with imposed time–space coupling safety constraints (TCCP-NET) to fill this requirement gap. Time–space coupling hazard analysis is conducted in three steps: specification modeling, simulation execution, and results analysis. A TCCP-NET is employed to model and analyze integrated modular avionics (IMA), a real-time, safety-critical system. The analysis results are used to verify whether there exist time–space coupling hazards at runtime. The method we propose demonstrates superior modeling of safety-critical real-time systems as it can specify resource allocations in both time and space domains. TCCP-NETs can effectively detect underlying time–space coupling hazards.

  5. Real-time tracking of motor response activation and response competition in a Stroop task in young children: a lateralized readiness potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, Dénes; Soltész, Fruzsina; Bryce, Donna; Whitebread, David

    2009-11-01

    The ability to select an appropriate motor response by resolving competition among alternative responses plays a major role in cognitive performance. fMRI studies suggest that the development of this skill is related to the maturation of the frontal cortex that underlies the improvement of motor inhibition abilities. However, fMRI cannot characterize the temporal properties of motor response competition and motor activation in general. We studied the development of the time course of resolving motor response competition. To this end, we used the lateralized readiness potential (LRP), an ERP measure, for tracking correct and incorrect motor cortex activation in children in real time. Fourteen children and 14 adults took part in an animal-size Stroop task where they selected between two animals, presented simultaneously on the computer screen, which was larger in real life. In the incongruent condition, the LRP detected stronger and longer lasting incorrect response activation in children than in adults. LRP results could explain behavioral congruency effects, the generally longer RT in children than in adults and the larger congruency effect in children than in adults. In contrast, the peak latency of ERP waves, usually associated with stimulus processing speed, could explain neither of the above effects. We conclude that the development of resolving motor response competition, relying on motor inhibition skills, is a crucial factor in child development. Our study demonstrates that the LRP is an excellent tool for studying motor activation in children.

  6. Improved exponential convergence result for generalized neural networks including interval time-varying delayed signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajchakit, G; Saravanakumar, R; Ahn, Choon Ki; Karimi, Hamid Reza

    2017-02-01

    This article examines the exponential stability analysis problem of generalized neural networks (GNNs) including interval time-varying delayed states. A new improved exponential stability criterion is presented by establishing a proper Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) and employing new analysis theory. The improved reciprocally convex combination (RCC) and weighted integral inequality (WII) techniques are utilized to obtain new sufficient conditions to ascertain the exponential stability result of such delayed GNNs. The superiority of the obtained results is clearly demonstrated by numerical examples.

  7. Timing Successive Product Introductions with Demand Diffusion and Stochastic Technology Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    R. Mark Krankel; Izak Duenyas; Roman Kapuscinski

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers a firm's decisions on the introduction timing for successive product generations. We examine the case where a firm introduces multiple generations of a durable product for which demand is characterized by a demand diffusion process. Under fixed introduction costs, we consider the case where available product technology improves stochastically. As such, delaying introduction to a later date may lead to the capture of further technology improvements, potentially at the cost...

  8. Dynamic responses of deep underground explosions based on improved Grigorian model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈万祥; 范新; 郭志昆; 王明洋

    2015-01-01

    It is important to investigate the dynamic behaviors of deep rocks near explosion cavity to reveal the mechanisms of deformations and fractures. Some improvements are carried out for Grigorian model with focuses on the dilation effects and the relaxation effects of deep rocks, and the high pressure equations of states with Mie-Grüneisen form are also established. Numerical calculations of free field parameters for deep underground explosions are carried out based on the user subroutines which are compiled by means of the secondary development functions of LS-DYNA9703D software. The histories of radial stress, radial velocity and radial displacement of rock particles are obtained, and the calculation results are compared with those of U.S. Hardhat nuclear test. It is indicated that the dynamic responses of free field for deep underground explosions are well simulated based on improved Grigorian model, and the calculation results are in good agreement with the data of U.S. Hardhat nuclear test. The peak values of particle velocities are consistent with those of test, but the waveform widths and the rising times are obviously greater than those without dilation effects. The attenuation rates of particle velocities are greater than the calculation results with classic plastic model, and they are consistent with the results of Hardhat nuclear test. The attenuation behaviors and the rising times of stress waves are well shown by introducing dilation effects and relaxation effects into the calculation model. Therefore, the defects of Grigorian model are avoided. It is also indicated that the initial stress has obvious influences on the waveforms of radial stress and the radial displacements of rock particles.

  9. An Improved Group Space-Time Block Code Through Constellation Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-wei; ZHANG Hai-bin; SONG Wen-tao; LUO Han-wen; LIU Xing-zhao

    2005-01-01

    A new improved group space-time block code (G-STBC) based on constellation rotation for four transmit antennas was proposed. In comparison with the traditional G-STBC coding scheme, the proposed space-time code has longer code length and adopts proper rotation-based symbols, which can increase the minimum distance of space-time codes and thereby improve code gain and achieve full diversity performance. The simulation results verify that the proposed group space-time code can achieve better bit error performance than both the traditional group space-time code and other quasi-orthogonal space-time codes. Compared with Ma's full diversity full rate (FDFR) codes, the proposed space-time code also can achieve the same excellent error performance. Furthermore, the design of the new space-time code gives another new and simple method to construct space-time codes with full diversity and high rate in case that it is not easy to design the traditional FDFR space-time codes.

  10. Improving Door-to-balloon Time by Decreasing Door-to-ECG time for Walk-in STEMI Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coyne, Christopher J.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines recommend rapid door-to-electrocardiography (ECG times for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI. Previous quality improvement research at our institution revealed that we were not meeting this benchmark for walk-in STEMI patients. The objective is to investigate whether simple, directed changes in the emergency department (ED triage process for potential cardiac patients could decrease door-to-ECG times and secondarily door-to-balloon times. Methods: We conducted an interventional study at a large, urban, public teaching hospital from April 2010 to June 2012. All patients who walked into the ED with a confirmed STEMI were enrolled in the study. The primary intervention involved creating a chief complaint-based “cardiac triage” designation that streamlined the evaluation of potential cardiac patients. A secondary intervention involved moving our ECG technician and ECG station to our initial triage area. The primary outcome measure was door-to-ECG time and the secondary outcome measure was door-to-balloon time. Results: We enrolled 91 walk-in STEMI patients prior to the intervention period and 141 patients after the invention. We observed statistically significant reductions in door-to-ECG time (43±93 to 30±72 minutes, median 23 to 14 minutes p<0.01, ECG-to-activation time (87±134 to 52±82 minutes, median 43 to 31 minutes p<0.01, and door-to-balloon time (134±146 to 84±40 minutes, median 85 -75 minutes p=0.03. Conclusion: By creating a chief complaint-based cardiac triage protocol and by streamlining ECG completion, walk-in STEMI patients are systematically processed through the ED. This is not only associated with a decrease in door-to-balloon time, but also a decrease in the variability of the time sensitive intervals of door-to-ECG and ECG-to-balloon time. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:184–189.

  11. Lean-driven improvements slash wait times, drive up patient satisfaction scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Administrators at LifePoint Hospitals, based in Brentwood, TN, used lean manufacturing techniques to slash wait times by as much as 30 minutes and achieve double-digit increases in patient satisfaction scores in the EDs at three hospitals. In each case, front-line workers took the lead on identifying opportunities for improvement and redesigning the patient-flow process. As a result of the new efficiencies, patient volume is up by about 25% at all three hospitals. At each hospital, the improvement process began with Kaizen, a lean process that involves bringing personnel together to flow-chart the current system, identify problem areas, and redesign the process. Improvement teams found big opportunities for improvement at the front end of the flow process. Key to the approach was having a plan up front to deal with non-compliance. To sustain improvements, administrators gather and disseminate key metrics on a daily basis.

  12. Reliability and Responsiveness of the Timed Up and Go Test in Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Helen; Martin, Kathy; Combs-Miller, Stephanie; Heathcock, Jill C

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the absolute reliability and responsiveness of the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, as measured using minimal detectable change (MDC) and minimal clinical important difference (MCID) values. Prospective observational study of children aged 3 to 10 years with cerebral palsy (CP) in Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I-III who completed the TUG test. Minimal detectable change estimates were calculated using baseline data. MCID estimates for each Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level were calculated using distribution- and anchor-based methods. Minimal detectable change values ranged from 1.40 to 8.74 seconds and MCID estimates ranged from 0.22 to 5.31 seconds. The TUG test is a reliable and responsive measure of balance and mobility for children with CP between 3 and 10 years of age in GMFCS levels I-III. Study results support improved use of the TUG test in clinical and research settings by providing reliability values and estimates of meaningful change. For more insights from the authors, see Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at http://links.lww.com/PPT/A117.

  13. Measure Guideline: Condensing Boilers-Optimizing Efficiency and Response Time During Setback Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Conventional wisdom surrounding space heating has consistently stated two things: size the mechanical systems to the heating loads, and setting the thermostat back at night will result in energy savings. The problem is these two recommendations oppose each other. A system that is properly sized to the heating load will not have the extra capacity necessary to recover from a thermostat setback, especially at design conditions. The implication of this is that, for setback to be successfully implemented, the heating system must be oversized. This issue is exacerbated further when an outdoor reset control is used with a condensing boiler, because not only is the system matched to the load at design, the outdoor reset control matches the output to the load under varying outdoor temperatures. Under these circumstances, the home may never recover from setback. Special controls to bypass the outdoor reset sensor are then needed. Properly designing a hydronic system for setback operation can be accomplished but depends on several factors. The first step is to determine the appropriateness of setback for a particular project. This is followed by proper sizing of the boiler and baseboard to ensure the needed capacity can be met. Finally, control settings must be chosen that result in the most efficient and responsive performance. This guide provides step-by-step instructions for heating contractors and hydronic designers for selecting the proper control settings to maximize system performance and improve response time when using a thermostat setback.

  14. Measure Guideline: Condensing Boilers - Optimizing Efficiency and Response Time During Setback Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.

    2014-02-01

    Conventional wisdom surrounding space heating has told us a couple of things consistently for several years now: size the mechanical systems to the heating loads and setting the thermostat back at night will result in energy savings. The problem is these two recommendations oppose each other. A system that is properly sized to the heating load will not have the extra capacity necessary to recover from a thermostat setback, especially at design conditions. The implication of this is that, for setback to be successfully implemented, the heating system must be oversized. This issue is exacerbated further when an outdoor reset control is used with a condensing boiler, because not only is the system matched to the load at design, the outdoor reset control matches the output to the load under varying outdoor temperatures. Under these circumstances, the home may never recover from setback. Special controls to bypass the outdoor reset sensor are then needed. Properly designing a hydronic system for setback operation can be accomplished but depends on several factors. Determining the appropriateness of setback for a particular project is the first step. This is followed by proper sizing of the boiler and baseboard to ensure the needed capacity can be met. Finally, control settings must be chosen that result in the most efficient and responsive performance. This guide provides step by step instructions for heating contractors and hydronic designers for selecting the proper control settings to maximize system performance and improve response time when using a thermostat setback.

  15. Relationship Between Time Consumption and Quality of Responses to Drug-related Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amundstuen Reppe, Linda; Lydersen, Stian; Schjøtt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to assess the quality of responses produced by drug information centers (DICs) in Scandinavia, and to study the association between time consumption processing queries and the quality of the responses. Methods We posed six identical drug-related queries to seven...... DICs in Scandinavia, and the time consumption required for processing them was estimated. Clinical pharmacologists (internal experts) and general practitioners (external experts) reviewed responses individually. We used mixed model linear regression analyses to study the associations between time...... consumption on one hand and the summarized quality scores and the overall impression of the responses on the other hand. Findings Both expert groups generally assessed the quality of the responses as “satisfactory” to “good.” A few responses were criticized for being poorly synthesized and less relevant...

  16. Improving time to optimal Staphylococcus aureus treatment using a penicillin-binding protein 2a assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sonia N; Wang, Sheila K; Gonzalez Zamora, Jose; Hanson, Amy P; Polisetty, Radhika S; Singh, Kamaljit

    2016-12-01

    The penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) assay is a quick, accurate and inexpensive test for determining methicillin susceptibility in Staphylococcus aureus. A pre-post-study design was conducted using a PBP2a assay with and without the impact of an antimicrobial stewardship intervention to improve time to optimal therapy for methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates. Our results demonstrate significantly improved time to optimal therapy and support the use of a PBP2a assay as part of an programme for all healthcare facilities, especially those with limited resources.

  17. rTMS neuromodulation improves electrocortical functional measures of information processing and behavioral responses in autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhadze, Estate M.; El-Baz, Ayman S.; Sears, Lonnie L.; Opris, Ioan; Casanova, Manuel F.

    2014-01-01

    changes along with increased centro-parietal P100 and P300 (P3b) to targets are indicative of more efficient processing of information post-TMS treatment. Another important finding was decrease of the latency and increase of negativity of error-related negativity (ERN) during commission errors that may reflect improvement in error monitoring and correction function. Enhanced information processing was also manifested in lower error rate. In addition we calculated normative post-error treaction time (RT) slowing response in both groups and found that rTMS treatment was accompanied by post-error RT slowing and higher accuracy of responses, whereas the WTL group kept on showing typical for ASD post-error RT speeding and higher commission and omission error rates. Conclusion: Results from our study indicate that rTMS improves executive functioning in ASD as evidenced by normalization of ERP responses and behavioral reactions (RT, accuracy) during executive function test, and also by improvements in clinical evaluations. PMID:25147508

  18. Improved Multi-Agent System for the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAN Zhenggang; CAI Linning; ZHENG Li

    2009-01-01

    The vehicle routing problem with time windows (VRPTW) involves assigning a fleet of limited ca-pacity vehicles to serve a set of customers without violating the capacity and time constraints. This paper presents a multi-agent model system for the VRPTW based on the internal behavior of agents and coordina-tion among the agents. The system presents a formal view of coordination using the traditional contract-net protocol (CNP) that relies on the basic loop of agent behavior for order receiving, order announcement, bid calculation, and order scheduling followed by order execution. An improved CNP method based on a vehicle selection strategy is used to reduce the number of negotiations and the negotiation time. The model is vali-dated using Solomon's benchmarks, with the results showing that the improved CNP uses only 30% as many negotiations and only 70% of the negotiation time of the traditional CNP.

  19. Physics Impact of Improvements to the Beam Timing Resolution at MicroBooNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, Tia; MicroBooNE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The MicroBooNE detector is a liquid argon time-projection chamber (89 tons active mass) at Fermilab designed to measure interactions of neutrinos from the Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB) and the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline. During the first year of data-taking, the arrival time of the neutrinos was only understood with an accuracy of 100 ns for the BNB, and was unverified for NuMI. A set of upgrades has been implemented that will reduce the uncertainty in beam delivery time by two orders of magnitude, significantly improving our ability to observe neutral-current elastic interactions in the BNB, and kaon decays at rest using NuMI. This talk explains the improvements in neutrino arrival timing, their impact on these two analyses, and the overall benefit to all other MicroBooNE measurements. DOE Office of Science.

  20. Neural Mechanisms of Improvements in Social Motivation after Pivotal Response Treatment: Two Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery C.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; Tirrell, Jonathan; Bolling, Danielle Z.; Vander Wyk, Brent; Kaiser, Martha D.; McPartland, James C.; Volkmar, Fred R.; Ventola, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Pivotal response treatment (PRT) is an empirically validated behavioral treatment that has widespread positive effects on communication, behavior, and social skills in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). For the first time, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to identify the neural correlates of successful response to…

  1. Palm Beach County's Prime Time Initiative: Improving the Quality of After-School Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberger, Julie; Lockaby, Tracey

    2008-01-01

    This report covers the third year of Chapin Hall's process evaluation of the Prime Time Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida, a system-building effort to strengthen the quality of after-school programs in the county. During the past two decades, the after-school field has expanded enormously, partly in response to increasing concern about…

  2. A new method for measuring the response time of the high pressure ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhentao; Shen, Yixiong; An, Jigang

    2012-08-01

    Time response is an important performance characteristic for gas-pressurized ionization chambers. To study the time response, it is especially crucial to measure the ion drift time in high pressure ionization chambers. In this paper, a new approach is proposed to study the ion drift time in high pressure ionization chambers. It is carried out with a short-pulsed X-ray source and a high-speed digitizer. The ion drift time in the chamber is then determined from the digitized data. By measuring the ion drift time of a 15 atm xenon testing chamber, the method has been proven to be effective in the time response studies of ionization chambers.

  3. Improving GOOGLE'S Cartographer 3d Mapping by Continuous-Time Slam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüchter, A.; Bleier, M.; Schauer, J.; Janotta, P.

    2017-02-01

    This paper shows how to use the result of Google's SLAM solution, called Cartographer, to bootstrap our continuous-time SLAM algorithm. The presented approach optimizes the consistency of the global point cloud, and thus improves on Google's results. We use the algorithms and data from Google as input for our continuous-time SLAM software. We also successfully applied our software to a similar backpack system which delivers consistent 3D point clouds even in absence of an IMU.

  4. Approximate distance oracles for planar graphs with improved query time-space tradeoff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff-Nilsen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We consider approximate distance oracles for edge-weighted n-vertex undirected planar graphs. Given fixed ϵ > 0, we present a (1 + ϵ)-approximate distance oracle with O(n(log log n)2) space and O((loglogr?,)3) query time. This improves the previous best product of query time and space of the orac...... of the oracles of Thorup (FOCS 2001, J. ACM 2004) and Klein (SODA 2002) from O(nlogn) to O(n(loglogn)5)....

  5. Real-Time Gas Identification by Analyzing the Transient Response of Capillary-Attached Conductive Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Bahraminejad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the ability of the Capillary-attached conductive gas sensor (CGS in real-time gas identification was investigated. The structure of the prototype fabricated CGS is presented. Portions were selected from the beginning of the CGS transient response including the first 11 samples to the first 100 samples. Different feature extraction and classification methods were applied on the selected portions. Validation of methods was evaluated to study the ability of an early portion of the CGS transient response in target gas (TG identification. Experimental results proved that applying extracted features from an early part of the CGS transient response along with a classifier can distinguish short-chain alcohols from each other perfectly. Decreasing time of exposition in the interaction between target gas and sensing element improved the reliability of the sensor. Classification rate was also improved and time of identification was decreased. Moreover, the results indicated the optimum interval of the early transient response of the CGS for selecting portions to achieve the best classification rates.

  6. Next-Generation Library Catalogs and the Problem of Slow Response Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Brown-Sica

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Response time as defined for this study is the time that it takes for all files that constitute a single webpage to travel across the Internet from a Web server to the end user’s browser. In this study, the authors tested response times on queries for identical items in five different library catalogs, one of them a next-generation (NextGen catalog. The authors also discuss acceptable response time and how it may affect the discovery process. They suggest that librarians and vendors should develop standards for acceptable response time and use it in the product selection and development processes.

  7. Using lean principles to improve outpatient adult infusion clinic chemotherapy preparation turnaround times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Matthew H; Eckel, Stephen; Daniels, Rowell; Amerine, Lindsey B

    2015-07-01

    The workflow and chemotherapy preparation turnaround times at an adult infusion clinic were evaluated to identify opportunities to optimize workflow and efficiency. A three-phase study using Lean Six Sigma methodology was conducted. In phase 1, chemotherapy turnaround times in the adult infusion clinic were examined one year after the interim goal of a 45-minute turnaround time was established. Phase 2 implemented various experiments including a five-day Kaizen event, using lean principles in an effort to decrease chemotherapy preparation turnaround times in a controlled setting. Phase 3 included the implementation of process-improvement strategies identified during the Kaizen event, coupled with a final refinement of operational processes. In phase 1, the mean turnaround time for all chemotherapy preparations decreased from 60 to 44 minutes, and a mean of 52 orders for adult outpatient chemotherapy infusions was received each day. After installing new processes, the mean turnaround time had improved to 37 minutes for each chemotherapy preparation in phase 2. In phase 3, the mean turnaround time decreased from 37 to 26 minutes. The overall mean turnaround time was reduced by 26 minutes, representing a 57% decrease in turnaround times in 19 months through the elimination of waste and the implementation of lean principles. This reduction was accomplished through increased efficiencies in the workplace, with no addition of human resources. Implementation of Lean Six Sigma principles improved workflow and efficiency at an adult infusion clinic and reduced the overall chemotherapy turnaround times from 60 to 26 minutes. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Statin therapy is associated with improved pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Adam G; Gantt, Gerald A; Skacel, Marek; Pai, Rish; Hammel, Jeff P; Kalady, Matthew F

    2013-11-01

    Achieving a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation improves prognosis in rectal cancer. Statin therapy has been shown to enhance the impact of treatment in several malignancies, but little is known regarding the impact on rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether statin use during neoadjuvant chemoradiation improves pathologic response in rectal cancer. This was a retrospective cohort study based on data from a prospectively maintained colorectal cancer database. The 2 cohorts were defined by statin use during neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This study was performed at a single tertiary referral center. Four hundred seven patients with primary rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant therapy then proctectomy between 2000 and 2012 were included. Ninety-nine patients (24.3%) took a statin throughout the entire course of neoadjuvant therapy. The primary outcome measure was pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy as defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer tumor regression grading system, grades 0 to 3. Patients in the statin cohort had a lower median regression grade (1 vs 2, p = 0.01) and were more likely to have a better response (grades 0-1 vs 2-3) than those not taking a statin (65.7% vs 48.7%, p = 0.004). Statin use remained a significant predictor of an American Joint Committee on Cancer grade 0 to 1 (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.33-3.82) in multivariate analyses. Although statin use itself did not significantly improve oncologic outcomes, an American Joint Committee on Cancer grade 0 to 1 response was associated with statistically significant improvements in overall survival, disease-free survival, cancer-specific mortality, and local recurrence. This was a retrospective study and subject to nonrandomization of patients and incorporated patients on variable statin agents and doses. Statin therapy is associated with an improved response of rectal cancer to

  9. Towards continuous and real-time attention monitoring at work: reaction time versus brain response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijović, Pavle; Ković, Vanja; De Vos, Maarten; Mačužić, Ivan; Todorović, Petar; Jeremić, Branislav; Gligorijević, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    Continuous and objective measurement of the user attention state still represents a major challenge in the ergonomics research. Recently available wearable electroencephalography (EEG) opens new opportunities for objective and continuous evaluation of operators' attention, which may provide a new paradigm in ergonomics. In this study, wearable EEG was recorded during simulated assembly operation, with the aim to analyse P300 event-related potential component, which provides reliable information on attention processing. In parallel, reaction times (RTs) were recorded and the correlation between these two attention-related modalities was investigated. Negative correlation between P300 amplitudes and RTs has been observed on the group level (p attention monitoring in ergonomics research. On the other hand, no significant correlation between RTs and P300 latency was found on group, neither on individual level. Practitioner Summary: Ergonomic studies of assembly operations mainly investigated physical aspects, while mental states of the assemblers were not sufficiently addressed. Presented study aims at attention tracking, using realistic workplace replica. It is shown that drops in attention could be successfully traced only by direct brainwave observation, using wireless electroencephalographic measurements.

  10. Effects of Arm Ergometry Exercise on the Reaction, Movement and Response Times of the Lower Extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Richard G.

    A study determined the effects of fatigue produced in the upper extremities on the reaction time, movement time, and response time of the lower extremities in 30 male subjects, 19-25 years old. Each subject participated in a 10 trial practice session one day prior to the experiment and immediately preceding the pre-test. The pre-test consisted of…

  11. Design and testing of magnetorheological valve with fast force response time and great dynamic force range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubík, M.; Macháček, O.; Strecker, Z.; Roupec, J.; Mazůrek, I.

    2017-04-01

    The paper deals with design, simulation and experimental testing of a magnetorheological (MR) valve with short response time. The short response time is achieved by a suitable design of an active zone in combination with use of a ferrite material for magnetic circuit. The magneto-static model and the simplified hydraulic model of the MR valve are examined and experimentally verified. The development the MR valve achieves an average response time 4.1 ms and the maximum dynamic force range of eight.

  12. Time-Motion and Biological Responses in Simulated Mixed Martial Arts Sparring Matches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coswig, Victor S; Ramos, Solange de P; Del Vecchio, Fabrício B

    2016-08-01

    Coswig, VS, Ramos, SdP, and Del Vecchio, FB. Time-motion and biological responses in simulated mixed martial arts sparring matches. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2156-2163, 2016-Simulated matches are a relevant component of training for mixed martial arts (MMA) athletes. This study aimed to characterize time-motion responses and investigate physiological stress and neuromuscular changes related to MMA sparring matches. Thirteen athletes with an average age of 25 ± 5 years, body mass of 81.3 ± 9.5 kg, height of 176.2 ± 5.5 cm, and time of practice in MMA of 39 ± 25 months participated in the study. The fighters executed three 5-minute rounds with 1-minute intervals. Blood and salivary samples were collected and physical tests and psychometric questionnaires administered at 3 time points: before (PRE), immediately after (POST), and 48 hours after the combat (48 h). Statistical analysis applied analysis of variance for repeated measurements. In biochemical analysis, significant changes (p ≤ 0.05) were identified between PRE and POST (glucose: 80.3 ± 12.7 to 156.5 ± 19.1 mg·ml; lactate: 4 ± 1.7 to 15.6 ± 4.8 mmol·dl), POST and 48 hours (glucose: 156.5 ± 19.1 to 87.6 ± 15.5 mg·ml; lactate: 15.6 ± 4.8 to 2.9 ± 3.5 mmol·dl; urea: 44.1 ± 8.9 to 36.3 ± 7.8 mg·ml), and PRE and 48 hours (creatine kinase [CK]: 255.8 ± 137.4 to 395.9 ± 188.7 U/L). In addition, time-motion analyses showed a total high:low intensity of 1:2 and an effort:pause ratio of 1:3. In conclusion, simulated MMA sparring matches feature moderate to high intensity and a low degree of musculoskeletal damage, which can be seen by absence of physical performance and decrease in CK. Results of the study indicate that sparring training could be introduced into competitive microcycles to improve technical and tactical aspects of MMA matches, due to the high motor specificity and low muscle damage.

  13. Improving perfusion quantification in arterial spin labeling for delayed arrival times by using optimized acquisition schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramme, Johanna [Fraunhofer MEVIS-Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Univ. Bremen (Germany). Faculty of Physics and Electronics; Gregori, Johannes [mediri GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany); Diehl, Volker [Fraunhofer MEVIS-Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); ZEMODI (Zentrum fuer morderne Diagnostik), Bremen (Germany); Madai, Vince I.; Sobesky, Jan [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Samson-Himmelstjerna, Frederico C. von [Fraunhofer MEVIS-Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Lentschig, Markus [ZEMODI (Zentrum fuer morderne Diagnostik), Bremen (Germany); Guenther, Matthias [Fraunhofer MEVIS-Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Univ. Bremen (Germany). Faculty of Physics and Electronics; mediri GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The improvement in Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion quantification, especially for delayed bolus arrival times (BAT), with an acquisition redistribution scheme mitigating the T1 decay of the label in multi-TI ASL measurements is investigated. A multi inflow time (TI) 3D-GRASE sequence is presented which adapts the distribution of acquisitions accordingly, by keeping the scan time constant. The MR sequence increases the number of averages at long TIs and decreases their number at short TIs and thus compensating the T1 decay of the label. The improvement of perfusion quantification is evaluated in simulations as well as in-vivo in healthy volunteers and patients with prolonged BATs due to age or steno-occlusive disease. The improvement in perfusion quantification depends on BAT. At healthy BATs the differences are small, but become larger for longer BATs typically found in certain diseases. The relative error of perfusion is improved up to 30% at BATs > 1500 ms in comparison to the standard acquisition scheme. This adapted acquisition scheme improves the perfusion measurement in comparison to standard multi-TI ASL implementations. It provides relevant benefit in clinical conditions that cause prolonged BATs and is therefore of high clinical relevance for neuroimaging of steno-occlusive diseases.

  14. Nonlinear response to a click in a time-domain model of the mammalian ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaud, Julien; Lemons, Charlsie

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a state-space implementation of a previously developed frequency-domain model of the cochlea is coupled to a lumped parameter model of the middle ear. After validation of the time-domain model by comparison of its steady-state response to results obtained with a frequency-domain formulation, the nonlinear response of the cochlea to clicks is investigated. As observed experimentally, a compressive nonlinearity progressively develops within the first few cycles of the response of the basilar membrane (BM). Furthermore, a time-frequency analysis shows that the instantaneous frequency of the BM response to a click progressively approaches the characteristic frequency. This phenomenon, called glide, is predicted at all stimulus intensities, as in experiments. In typical experiments with sensitive animals, the click response is characterized by a long ringing and the response envelope includes several lobes. In order to achieve similar results, inhomogeneities are introduced in the cochlear model. Simulations demonstrate the strong link between characteristics of the frequency response, such as dispersion and frequency-dependent nonlinearity, and characteristics of the time-domain response, such as the glide and a time-dependent nonlinearity. The progressive buildup of cochlear nonlinearity in response to a click is shown to be a consequence of the glide and of frequency-dependent nonlinearity.

  15. Routes to improving the reliability of low level DNA analysis using real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burns Malcolm J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate quantification of DNA using quantitative real-time PCR at low levels is increasingly important for clinical, environmental and forensic applications. At low concentration levels (here referring to under 100 target copies DNA quantification is sensitive to losses during preparation, and suffers from appreciable valid non-detection rates for sampling reasons. This paper reports studies on a real-time quantitative PCR assay targeting a region of the human SRY gene over a concentration range of 0.5 to 1000 target copies. The effects of different sample preparation and calibration methods on quantitative accuracy were investigated. Results At very low target concentrations of 0.5–10 genome equivalents (g.e. eliminating any replicates within each DNA standard concentration with no measurable signal (non-detects compromised calibration. Improved calibration could be achieved by eliminating all calibration replicates for any calibration standard concentration with non-detects ('elimination by sample'. Test samples also showed positive bias if non-detects were removed prior to averaging; less biased results were obtained by converting to concentration, including non-detects as zero concentration, and averaging all values. Tube plastic proved to have a strongly significant effect on DNA quantitation at low levels (p = 1.8 × 10-4. At low concentrations (under 10 g.e., results for assays prepared in standard plastic were reduced by about 50% compared to the low-retention plastic. Preparation solution (carrier DNA or stabiliser was not found to have a significant effect in this study. Detection probabilities were calculated using logistic regression. Logistic regression over large concentration ranges proved sensitive to non-detected replicate reactions due to amplification failure at high concentrations; the effect could be reduced by regression against log (concentration or, better, by eliminating invalid responses

  16. Reconstruction of high resolution time series from slow-response broadband solar and terrestrial irradiance measurements by deconvolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ehrlich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Broadband solar and terrestrial irradiance measurements of high temporal resolution are needed to study inhomogeneous clouds or surfaces and to derive vertical profiles of heating/cooling rates at cloud top. An efficient method to enhance the temporal resolution of slow-response measurements of broadband irradiance using pyranometer or pyrgeometer is introduced. It is based on the deconvolution theorem of Fourier transform to restore amplitude and phase shift of high frequent fluctuations. It is shown that the quality of reconstruction depends on the instrument noise, the pyrgeometer response time and the frequency of the oscillations. The method is tested in laboratory measurements for synthetic time series including a boxcar function and periodic oscillations using a CGR-4 pyrgeometer with response time of 3 s. The originally slow-response pyrgeometer data were reconstructed to higher resolution and compared to the predefined synthetic time series. The reconstruction of the time series worked up to oscillations of 0.5 Hz frequency and 2 W m−2 amplitude if the sampling frequency of the data acquisition is 16 kHz or higher. For oscillations faster than 2 Hz the instrument noise exceeded the reduced amplitude of the oscillations in the measurements and the reconstruction failed. The method was applied to airborne measurements of upward terrestrial irradiance from the VERDI (Vertical Distribution of Ice in Arctic Clouds field campaign. Pyrgeometer data above open leads in sea ice and a broken cloud field were reconstructed and compared to KT19 infrared thermometer data. The reconstruction of amplitude and phase shift of the deconvoluted data improved the agreement with the KT19 data. Cloud top temperatures were improved by up to 1 K above broken clouds while an underestimation of 2.5 W m−2 was found for the upward irradiance over small leads when using the slow-response data. The limitations of the method with respect to instrument noise and

  17. Improving Instructional Leadership Behaviors of School Principals by Means of Implementing Time Management Training Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu

    2013-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 increases school accountability and requires educators to improve student academic outcomes using evidence-based practice. One factor that contributes to desirable school outcomes is principals' instructional leadership behaviors. Principals who allocate more time to instructional leadership behaviors are more…

  18. Improving automated disturbance maps using snow-covered landsat time series stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk M. Stueve; Ian W. Housman; Patrick L. Zimmerman; Mark D. Nelson; Jeremy Webb; Charles H. Perry; Robert A. Chastain; Dale D. Gormanson; Chengquan Huang; Sean P. Healey; Warren B. Cohen

    2012-01-01

    Snow-covered winter Landsat time series stacks are used to develop a nonforest mask to enhance automated disturbance maps produced by the Vegetation Change Tracker (VCT). This method exploits the enhanced spectral separability between forested and nonforested areas that occurs with sufficient snow cover. This method resulted in significant improvements in Vegetation...

  19. Improved delay-dependent exponential stability for uncertain stochastic neural networks with time-varying delays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, O.M., E-mail: madwind@chungbuk.ac.k [School of Electrical Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S.M., E-mail: moony@daegu.ac.k [School of Electronics Engineering, Daegu University, Kyongsan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ju H., E-mail: jessie@ynu.ac.k [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Kyongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-22

    This Letter investigates the problem of delay-dependent exponential stability analysis for uncertain stochastic neural networks with time-varying delay. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, improved delay-dependent exponential stability criteria for the networks are established in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs).

  20. Helping States, Helping Students: Improving Education in Tough Times. 2011 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2011

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Southern Regional Education Board annual report describes SREB's recent achievements and how the organization has helped its 16 member states improve education in tough economic times. The report highlights program activities and also includes remarks from the Board Chair and President, acknowledgment of financial contributors, and lists…

  1. Improving Student Attitudes and Writing Abilities through Increased Writing Time and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gau, Elisabeth; Hermanson, Jennifer; Logar, Michele; Smerek, Christine

    This report describes a program for improving student abilities and attitudes toward writing through increased writing time and opportunities. The targeted population consists of second, third, fourth, and fifth grade students at the elementary level in a growing middle class community located in the northwest suburban area of Chicago, Illinois.…

  2. A Data Analytical Framework for Improving Real-Time, Decision Support Systems in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahav, Inbal

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation we develop a framework that combines data mining, statistics and operations research methods for improving real-time decision support systems in healthcare. Our approach consists of three main concepts: data gathering and preprocessing, modeling, and deployment. We introduce the notion of offline and semi-offline modeling to…

  3. Evaluation of probe chemistries and platforms to improve the detection limit of real-time PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynisson, E.; Josefsen, Mathilde Hartmann; Krause, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A validated PCR-based Salmonella method targeting a 94-bp sequence of the ttr gene was used as a model to compare six different combinations of reporter and quencher dyes of a TaqMan probe, on three different instruments, to improve the detection limit in a real-time PCR assay with the aim of a s...

  4. Effects of Improvements in Interval Timing on the Mathematics Achievement of Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Gordon E.; McGrew, Kevin S.; Keith, Timothy Z.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the effect of improvements in timing/rhythmicity on mathematics achievement. A total of 86 participants attending 1st through 4th grades completed pre- and posttest measures of mathematics achievement from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement. Students in the experimental group participated in a 4-week intervention…

  5. Improving Instructional Leadership Behaviors of School Principals by Means of Implementing Time Management Training Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu

    2013-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 increases school accountability and requires educators to improve student academic outcomes using evidence-based practice. One factor that contributes to desirable school outcomes is principals' instructional leadership behaviors. Principals who allocate more time to instructional leadership behaviors are more…

  6. A Data Analytical Framework for Improving Real-Time, Decision Support Systems in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahav, Inbal

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation we develop a framework that combines data mining, statistics and operations research methods for improving real-time decision support systems in healthcare. Our approach consists of three main concepts: data gathering and preprocessing, modeling, and deployment. We introduce the notion of offline and semi-offline modeling to…

  7. Genomic selection improves response to selection in resilience by exploiting genotype by environment interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Mulder

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Genotype by environment interactions (GxE are very common in livestock and hamper genetic improvement. On the other hand, GxE is a source of genetic variation: genetic variation in response to environment, e.g. environmental perturbations such as heat stress or disease. In livestock breeding, there is tendency to ignore GxE because of increased complexity of models for genetic evaluations and lack of accuracy in extreme environments. GxE, however, creates opportunities to increase resilience of animals towards environmental perturbations. The main aim of the paper is to investigate to which extent GxE can be exploited with traditional and genomic selection methods. Furthermore, we investigated the benefit of reaction norm models compared to conventional methods ignoring GxE. The questions were addressed with selection index theory. GxE was modelled according to a linear reaction norm model in which the environmental gradient is the contemporary group mean. Economic values were based on linear and non-linear profit equations.Accuracies of environment-specific (GEBV were highest in intermediate environments and lowest in extreme environments. Reaction norm models had higher accuracies of (GEBV in extreme environments than conventional models ignoring GxE. Genomic selection always resulted in higher response to selection in all environments than sib or progeny testing schemes. The increase in response was with genomic selection between 9% and 140% compared to sib testing and between 11% and 114% compared to progeny testing when the reference population consisted of 1 million animals across all environments. When the aim was to decrease environmental sensitivity, the response in slope of the reaction norm model with genomic selection was between 1.09 and 319 times larger than with sib or progeny testing and in the right direction in contrast to sib and progeny testing that still increased environmental sensitivity. This shows that genomic selection

  8. Genomic Selection Improves Response to Selection in Resilience by Exploiting Genotype by Environment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Han A.

    2016-01-01

    Genotype by environment interactions (GxE) are very common in livestock and hamper genetic improvement. On the other hand, GxE is a source of genetic variation: genetic variation in response to environment, e.g., environmental perturbations such as heat stress or disease. In livestock breeding, there is tendency to ignore GxE because of increased complexity of models for genetic evaluations and lack of accuracy in extreme environments. GxE, however, creates opportunities to increase resilience of animals toward environmental perturbations. The main aim of the paper is to investigate to which extent GxE can be exploited with traditional and genomic selection methods. Furthermore, we investigated the benefit of reaction norm (RN) models compared to conventional methods ignoring GxE. The questions were addressed with selection index theory. GxE was modeled according to a linear RN model in which the environmental gradient is the contemporary group mean. Economic values were based on linear and non-linear profit equations. Accuracies of environment-specific (G)EBV were highest in intermediate environments and lowest in extreme environments. RN models had higher accuracies of (G)EBV in extreme environments than conventional models ignoring GxE. Genomic selection always resulted in higher response to selection in all environments than sib or progeny testing schemes. The increase in response was with genomic selection between 9 and 140% compared to sib testing and between 11 and 114% compared to progeny testing when the reference population consisted of 1 million animals across all environments. When the aim was to decrease environmental sensitivity, the response in slope of the RN model with genomic selection was between 1.09 and 319 times larger than with sib or progeny testing and in the right direction in contrast to sib and progeny testing that still increased environmental sensitivity. This shows that genomic selection with large reference populations offers great

  9. Improving Wait Times to Care for Individuals with Multimorbidities and Complex Conditions Using Value Stream Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Sampalli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Recognizing the significant impact of wait times for care for individuals with complex chronic conditions, we applied a LEAN methodology, namely – an adaptation of Value Stream Mapping (VSM to meet the needs of people with multiple chronic conditions and to improve wait times without additional resources or funding. Methods Over an 18-month time period, staff applied a patient-centric approach that included LEAN methodology of VSM to improve wait times to care. Our framework of evaluation was grounded in the needs and perspectives of patients and individuals waiting to receive care. Patient centric views were obtained through surveys such as Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC and process engineering based questions. In addition, LEAN methodology, VSM was added to identify non-value added processes contributing to wait times. Results The care team successfully reduced wait times to 2 months in 2014 with no wait times for care anticipated in 2015. Increased patient engagement and satisfaction are also outcomes of this innovative initiative. In addition, successful transformations and implementation have resulted in resource efficiencies without increase in costs. Patients have shown significant improvements in functional health following Integrated Chronic Care Service (ICCS intervention. The methodology will be applied to other chronic disease management areas in Capital Health and the province. Conclusion Wait times to care in the management of multimoribidities and other complex conditions can add a significant burden not only on the affected individuals but also on the healthcare system. In this study, a novel and modified LEAN methodology has been applied to embed the voice of the patient in care delivery processes and to reduce wait times to care in the management of complex chronic conditions.

  10. UMTS rapid response real-time seismic networks: implementation and strategies at INGV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govoni, Aladino; Margheriti, Lucia; Moretti, Milena; Lauciani, Valentino; Sensale, Gianpaolo; Bucci, Augusto; Criscuoli, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    The benefits of portable real-time seismic networks are several and well known. During the management of a temporary experiment from the real-time data it is possible to detect and fix rapidly problems with power supply, time synchronization, disk failures and, most important, seismic signal quality degradation due to unexpected noise sources or sensor alignment/tampering. This usually minimizes field maintenance trips and maximizes both the quantity and the quality of the acquired data. When the area of the temporary experiment is not well monitored by the local permanent network, the real-time data from the temporary experiment can be fed to the permanent network monitoring system improving greatly both the real-time hypocentral locations and the final revised bulletin. All these benefits apply also in case of seismic crises when rapid deployment stations can significantly contribute to the aftershock analysis. Nowadays data transmission using meshed radio networks or satellite systems is not a big technological problem for a permanent seismic network where each site is optimized for the device power consumption and is usually installed by properly specialized technicians that can configure transmission devices and align antennas. This is not usually practical for temporary networks and especially for rapid response networks where the installation time is the main concern. These difficulties are substantially lowered using the now widespread UMTS technology for data transmission. A small (but sometimes power hungry) properly configured device with an omnidirectional antenna must be added to the station assembly. All setups are usually configured before deployment and this allows for an easy installation also by untrained personnel. We describe here the implementation of a UMTS based portable seismic network for both temporary experiments and rapid response applications developed at INGV. The first field experimentation of this approach dates back to the 2009 L

  11. Concept mediation in trilingual translation: evidence from response time and repetition priming patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Wendy S; Gallard, Sabrina L K

    2005-12-01

    Translation responses to individual words were elicited from 48 English-Spanish-French trilinguals, who translated in six directions at study and two directions at test. Patterns of translation response times and error rates at study reflected the relative proficiency of the trilinguals in comprehension and production of their three languages. At test, repeated items were translated more quickly than new items, with the strongest priming effects occurring for identical repetitions. Repetition priming was also substantial when only the stimulus language or only the response language matched from study to test, implying that repeated comprehension and production processes contribute to priming in translation. Patterns of response times and repetition priming indicate that translation in all directions involved conceptual access. Additive patterns in response time asymmetries and repetition priming were consistent with the treatment of word comprehension and production processes of translation as independent.

  12. Time Domain Simulation of Transient Responses of Very Large Floating Structures Under Unsteady External Loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Liu-chao; LIU Hua

    2005-01-01

    A time domain finite element method (FEM) for the analysis of transient elastic response of a very large floating structure (VLFS) subjected to arbitrary time-dependent external loads is presented. This method is developed directly in time domain and the hydrodynamic problem is formulated based on linear, inviscid and slightly compressible fluid theory and the structural response is analyzed on the thin plate assumption. The time domain finite element procedure herein is validated by comparing numerical results with available experimental data. Finally, the transient elastic response of a pontoon-type VLFS under the landing of an airplane is computed by the proposed time domain FEM. The time histories of the applied force and the position and velocity of an airplane during landing are modeled with data from a Boeing 747-400 jumbo jet.

  13. Improving real-time inflow forecasting into hydropower reservoirs through a complementary modelling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragne, A. S.; Sharma, A.; Mehrotra, R.; Alfredsen, K.

    2015-08-01

    Accuracy of reservoir inflow forecasts is instrumental for maximizing the value of water resources and benefits gained through hydropower generation. Improving hourly reservoir inflow forecasts over a 24 h lead time is considered within the day-ahead (Elspot) market of the Nordic exchange market. A complementary modelling framework presents an approach for improving real-time forecasting without needing to modify the pre-existing forecasting model, but instead formulating an independent additive or complementary model that captures the structure the existing operational model may be missing. We present here the application of this principle for issuing improved hourly inflow forecasts into hydropower reservoirs over extended lead times, and the parameter estimation procedure reformulated to deal with bias, persistence and heteroscedasticity. The procedure presented comprises an error model added on top of an unalterable constant parameter conceptual model. This procedure is applied in the 207 km2 Krinsvatn catchment in central Norway. The structure of the error model is established based on attributes of the residual time series from the conceptual model. Besides improving forecast skills of operational models, the approach estimates the uncertainty in the complementary model structure and produces probabilistic inflow forecasts that entrain suitable information for reducing uncertainty in the decision-making processes in hydropower systems operation. Deterministic and probabilistic evaluations revealed an overall significant improvement in forecast accuracy for lead times up to 17 h. Evaluation of the percentage of observations bracketed in the forecasted 95 % confidence interval indicated that the degree of success in containing 95 % of the observations varies across seasons and hydrologic years.

  14. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  15. Stochastic coordination of multiple actuators reduces latency and improves chemotactic response in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Michael W; Pontius, William; Emonet, Thierry

    2012-01-17

    Individual neuronal, signal transduction, and regulatory pathways often control multiple stochastic downstream actuators, which raises the question of how coordinated response to a single input can be achieved when individual actuators fluctuate independently. In Escherichia coli, the bacterial chemotaxis pathway controls the activity of multiple flagellar motors to generate the run-and-tumble motion of the cell. High-resolution microscopy experiments have identified the key conformational changes adopted by individual flagella during this process. By incorporating these observations into a stochastic model of the flagellar bundle, we demonstrate that the presence of multiple motors imposes a trade-off on chemotactic performance. Multiple motors reduce the latency of the response below the time scale of the stochastic switching of a single motor, which improves performance on steep gradients of attractants. However, the uncoordinated switching of multiple motors interrupts and shortens cell runs, which thereby reduces signal detection and performance on shallow gradients. Remarkably, when slow fluctuations generated by the adaptation mechanism of the chemotaxis system are incorporated in the model at levels measured in experiments, the chemotactic sensitivity and performance in shallow gradients is partially restored with marginal effects for steep gradients. The noise is beneficial because it simultaneously generates long events in the statistics of individual motors and coordinates the motors to generate a long tail in the run length distribution of the cell. Occasional long runs are known to enhance exploration of random walkers. Here we show that they have the additional benefit of enhancing the sensitivity of the bacterium to very shallow gradients.

  16. Ratio-based lengths of intervals to improve fuzzy time series forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huarng, Kunhuang; Yu, Tiffany Hui-Kuang

    2006-04-01

    The objective of this study is to explore ways of determining the useful lengths of intervals in fuzzy time series. It is suggested that ratios, instead of equal lengths of intervals, can more properly represent the intervals among observations. Ratio-based lengths of intervals are, therefore, proposed to improve fuzzy time series forecasting. Algebraic growth data, such as enrollments and the stock index, and exponential growth data, such as inventory demand, are chosen as the forecasting targets, before forecasting based on the various lengths of intervals is performed. Furthermore, sensitivity analyses are also carried out for various percentiles. The ratio-based lengths of intervals are found to outperform the effective lengths of intervals, as well as the arbitrary ones in regard to the different statistical measures. The empirical analysis suggests that the ratio-based lengths of intervals can also be used to improve fuzzy time series forecasting.

  17. Note: All-digital pulse-shrinking time-to-digital converter with improved dynamic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Hwang, Chorng-Sii; Lin, Yi; Chen, Guan-Hong

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an all-digital pulse-shrinking time-to-digital converter (TDC) using the offset error cancellation circuitry to widen its dynamic range and to improve its accuracy. Although the TDC based on a pulse-shrinking mechanism can achieve a sub-gate resolution without circuit complexity, it possesses an undesired offset error that results in a nonzero lower bound appeared in its dynamic range and then affects its accuracy. The proposed cancellation circuitry for eliminating the offset error consists of a time adder with a delay line and a time subtractor with an identical delay line. The experimental TDC is implemented on Xilinx field programmable gate arrays and it also functions successfully in improving its dynamic range.

  18. Time domain averaging and correlation-based improved spectrum sensing method for cognitive radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenghong; Bi, Guoan

    2014-12-01

    Based on the combination of time domain averaging and correlation, we propose an effective time domain averaging and correlation-based spectrum sensing (TDA-C-SS) method used in very low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) environments. With the assumption that the received signals from the primary users are deterministic, the proposed TDA-C-SS method processes the received samples by a time averaging operation to improve the SNR. Correlation operation is then performed with a correlation matrix to determine the existence of the primary signal in the received samples. The TDA-C-SS method does not need any prior information on the received samples and the associated noise power to achieve improved sensing performance. Simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed TDA-C-SS method.

  19. Note: All-digital pulse-shrinking time-to-digital converter with improved dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Hwang, Chorng-Sii; Lin, Yi; Chen, Guan-Hong

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an all-digital pulse-shrinking time-to-digital converter (TDC) using the offset error cancellation circuitry to widen its dynamic range and to improve its accuracy. Although the TDC based on a pulse-shrinking mechanism can achieve a sub-gate resolution without circuit complexity, it possesses an undesired offset error that results in a nonzero lower bound appeared in its dynamic range and then affects its accuracy. The proposed cancellation circuitry for eliminating the offset error consists of a time adder with a delay line and a time subtractor with an identical delay line. The experimental TDC is implemented on Xilinx field programmable gate arrays and it also functions successfully in improving its dynamic range.

  20. Influence of Exercise Intensity for Improving Depressed Mood in Depression: A Dose-Response Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jacob D; Koltyn, Kelli F; Stegner, Aaron J; Kim, Jee-Seon; Cook, Dane B

    2016-07-01

    Exercise effectively improves mood in major depressive disorder (MDD), but the optimal exercise stimulus to improve depressed mood is unknown. To determine the dose-response relationship of acute exercise intensity with depressed mood responses to exercise in MDD. We hypothesized that the acute response to exercise would differ between light, moderate, and hard intensity exercise with higher intensities yielding more beneficial responses. Once weekly, 24 women (age: 38.6±14.0) diagnosed with MDD underwent a 30-minute session at one of three steady-state exercise intensities (light, moderate, hard; rating of perceived exertion 11, 13 or 15) or quiet rest on a stationary bicycle. Depressed mood was evaluated with the Profile of Mood States before, 10 and 30 minutes post-exercise. Exercise reduced depressed mood 10 and 30 minutes following exercise, but this effect was not influenced by exercise intensity. Participants not currently taking antidepressants (n=10) had higher baseline depression scores, but did not demonstrate a different antidepressant response to exercise compared to those taking antidepressants. To acutely improve depressed mood, exercise of any intensity significantly improved feelings of depression with no differential effect following light, moderate, or hard exercise. Pharmacological antidepressant usage did not limit the mood-enhancing effect of acute exercise. Acute exercise should be used as a symptom management tool to improve mood in depression, with even light exercise an effective recommendation. These results need to be replicated and extended to other components of exercise prescription (e.g., duration, frequency, mode) to optimize exercise guidelines for improving depression. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Musically cued gait-training improves both perceptual and motor timing in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles-Etienne eBenoit

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that auditory cueing improves gait in patients with Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease (IPD. Disease-related reductions in speed and step length can be improved by providing rhythmical auditory cues via a metronome or music. However, effects on cognitive aspects of motor control have yet to be thoroughly investigated. If synchronization of movement to an auditory cue relies on a supramodal timing system involved in perceptual, motor and sensorimotor integration, auditory cueing can be expected to affect both motor and perceptual timing. Here we tested this hypothesis by assessing perceptual and motor timing in 15 IPD patients before and after a four-week music training program with rhythmic auditory cueing. Long-term effects were assessed one month after the end of the training. Perceptual and motor timing was evaluated with the Battery for the Assessment of Auditory Sensorimotor and Timing Abilities (BAASTA and compared to that of age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy controls. Prior to training, IPD patients exhibited impaired perceptual and motor timing. Training improved patients’ performance in tasks requiring synchronization with isochronous sequences, and enhanced their ability to adapt to durational changes in a sequence in hand tapping tasks. Benefits of cueing extended to time perception (duration discrimination and detection of misaligned beats in musical excerpts. The current results demonstrate that auditory cueing leads to benefits beyond gait and support the idea that coupling gait to rhythmic auditory cues in IPD patients relies on a neuronal network engaged in both perceptual and motor timing.

  2. Response Time Comparisons among Four Base Running Starting Techniques in Slow Pitch Softball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Richard G.; Brown, Rodney L.

    1981-01-01

    Response times among four starting techniques (cross-over step, jab step, standing sprinter's start, and momentum start) were compared. The results suggest that the momentum start was the fastest starting technique for optimum speed in running bases. (FG)

  3. Regional changes over time in initial virologic response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole; Gatell, Jose M;

    2006-01-01

    : Virologic response (viral load SIDA patients. Analyses were stratified by region (south, central west, north, east) or time started cART (early, 1996-1997; mid, 1998-1999; late, 2000-1904). RESULTS: Virologic...

  4. Tai chi improves oxidative stress response and DNA damage/repair in young sedentary females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xing-Yu; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Silsirivanit, Atit; Nakmareong, Saowanee; Wu, Xiu-Hua

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] This study was to examine the effects of 12 weeks of Tai Chi (TC) exercise on antioxidant capacity, and DNA damage/repair in young females who did not perform regular physical exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Ten female students from a Chinese university voluntarily participated in this program. All of them practiced the 24-form simplified Tai Chi, 5 times weekly, for 12 weeks. Plasma levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), hydroxyl radical inhibiting capacity (OH·-IC), 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) were measured at 0, 8, and 12 weeks. Heart rate (HR) was monitored during the last set of the training session at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. [Results] Plasma SOD and OH·-IC levels were increased at 8 and 12 weeks compared to the baseline (0 weeks). Gpx and GSH levels did not change significantly throughout the study period. The plasma MDA level was decreased significantly at 8 weeks but not at 12 weeks compared to the baseline value. While the plasma 8-OHdG level did not change throughout the study period, the plasma OGG1 level was significantly increased at 8 and 12 weeks compared to the baseline value. [Conclusion] TC practice for 12 weeks efficiently improved the oxidative stress response in young females who did not perform regular physical exercise. The TC exercise also increased the DNA repairing capacity.

  5. Iron-Responsive Olfactory Uptake of Manganese Improves Motor Function Deficits Associated with Iron Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jonghan; Li, Yuan; Buckett, Peter D.; Böhlke, Mark; Thompson, Khristy J.; Takahashi, Masaya; Maher, Timothy J.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Iron-responsive manganese uptake is increased in iron-deficient rats, suggesting that toxicity related to manganese exposure could be modified by iron status. To explore possible interactions, the distribution of intranasally-instilled manganese in control and iron-deficient rat brain was characterized by quantitative image analysis using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Manganese accumulation in the brain of iron-deficient rats was doubled after intranasal administration of MnCl2 for 1- or 3-week. Enhanced manganese level was observed in specific brain regions of iron-deficient rats, including the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Iron-deficient rats spent reduced time on a standard accelerating rotarod bar before falling and with lower peak speed compared to controls; unexpectedly, these measures of motor function significantly improved in iron-deficient rats intranasally-instilled with MnCl2. Although tissue dopamine concentrations were similar in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT) and dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) levels were reduced and dopamine receptor D2 (D2R) levels were increased in manganese-instilled rats, suggesting that manganese-induced changes in post-synaptic dopaminergic signaling contribute to the compensatory effect. Enhanced olfactory manganese uptake during iron deficiency appears to be a programmed “rescue response” with beneficial influence on motor impairment due to low iron status. PMID:22479410

  6. A phase transition model for the speed-accuracy trade-off in response time experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutilh, G.; Wagenmakers, E.-J.; Visser, I.; van der Maas, H.L.J.

    2011-01-01

    Most models of response time (RT) in elementary cognitive tasks implicitly assume that the speed-accuracy trade-off is continuous: When payoffs or instructions gradually increase the level of speed stress, people are assumed to gradually sacrifice response accuracy in exchange for gradual increases

  7. Time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the metallic response of solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romaniello, P; de Boeij, PL

    2005-01-01

    We extend the formulation of time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the linear response properties of dielectric and semi-metallic solids [Kootstra , J. Chem. Phys. 112, 6517 (2000)] to treat metals as well. To achieve this, the Kohn-Sham response functions have to include both interba

  8. Time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the metallic response of solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romaniello, P; de Boeij, PL

    We extend the formulation of time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the linear response properties of dielectric and semi-metallic solids [Kootstra , J. Chem. Phys. 112, 6517 (2000)] to treat metals as well. To achieve this, the Kohn-Sham response functions have to include both

  9. Hydrological response times in lowland urban catchments characteristed by looped drainage systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Veldhuis, J.A.E.; Skovgard Olsen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrological response times are often used to characterise runoff processes. They provide information about temporal resolution of catchments responses, thus of the required measurement resolutions of in-situ sensors as well as spatial sensors like rainfall radars. The objective of this study was to

  10. Research on Mail Surveys: Response Rates and Methods in Relation to Population Group and Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boser, Judith A.; Green, Kathy

    The purpose of this review was to look for trends across time in response rates and variables studied for published mail surveys and to compare response rates and variables studied for different target populations. Studies were identified in databases in four fields: education, psychology, business and marketing, and sociology. A total of 225…

  11. On the Analysis Methods for the Time Domain and Frequency Domain Response of a Buried Objects*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, Dragan; Šesnić, Silvestar; Cvetković, Mario

    2014-05-01

    There has been a continuous interest in the analysis of ground-penetrating radar systems and related applications in civil engineering [1]. Consequently, a deeper insight of scattering phenomena occurring in a lossy half-space, as well as the development of sophisticated numerical methods based on Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, Finite Element Method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Method of Moments (MoM) and various hybrid methods, is required, e.g. [2], [3]. The present paper deals with certain techniques for time and frequency domain analysis, respectively, of buried conducting and dielectric objects. Time domain analysis is related to the assessment of a transient response of a horizontal straight thin wire buried in a lossy half-space using a rigorous antenna theory (AT) approach. The AT approach is based on the space-time integral equation of the Pocklington type (time domain electric field integral equation for thin wires). The influence of the earth-air interface is taken into account via the simplified reflection coefficient arising from the Modified Image Theory (MIT). The obtained results for the transient current induced along the electrode due to the transmitted plane wave excitation are compared to the numerical results calculated via an approximate transmission line (TL) approach and the AT approach based on the space-frequency variant of the Pocklington integro-differential approach, respectively. It is worth noting that the space-frequency Pocklington equation is numerically solved via the Galerkin-Bubnov variant of the Indirect Boundary Element Method (GB-IBEM) and the corresponding transient response is obtained by the aid of inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT). The results calculated by means of different approaches agree satisfactorily. Frequency domain analysis is related to the assessment of frequency domain response of dielectric sphere using the full wave model based on the set of coupled electric field integral

  12. Dutch healthcare reform: did it result in performance improvement of health plans? A comparison of consumer experiences over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rademakers Jany

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many countries have introduced elements of managed competition in their healthcare system with the aim to accomplish more efficient and demand-driven health care. Simultaneously, generating and reporting of comparative healthcare information has become an important quality-improvement instrument. We examined whether the introduction of managed competition in the Dutch healthcare system along with public reporting of quality information was associated with performance improvement in health plans. Methods Experiences of consumers with their health plan were measured in four consecutive years (2005-2008 using the CQI® health plan instrument 'Experiences with Healthcare and Health Insurer'. Data were available of 13,819 respondents (response = 45% of 30 health plans in 2005, of 8,266 respondents (response = 39% of 32 health plans in 2006, of 8,088 respondents (response = 34% of 32 health plans in 2007, and of 7,183 respondents (response = 31% of 32 health plans in 2008. We performed multilevel regression analyses with three levels: respondent, health plan and year of measurement. Per year and per quality aspect, we estimated health plan means while adjusting for consumers' age, education and self-reported health status. We tested for linear and quadratic time effects using chi-squares. Results The overall performance of health plans increased significantly from 2005 to 2008 on four quality aspects. For three other aspects, we found that the overall performance first declined and then increased from 2006 to 2008, but the performance in 2008 was not better than in 2005. The overall performance of health plans did not improve more often for quality aspects that were identified as important areas of improvement in the first year of measurement. On six out of seven aspects, the performance of health plans that scored below average in 2005 increased more than the performance of health plans that scored average and/or above average in

  13. Statistical analysis of hydrological response in urbanising catchments based on adaptive sampling using inter-amount times

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Veldhuis, Marie-Claire; Schleiss, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Urban catchments are typically characterised by a more flashy nature of the hydrological response compared to natural catchments. Predicting flow changes associated with urbanisation is not straightforward, as they are influenced by interactions between impervious cover, basin size, drainage connectivity and stormwater management infrastructure. In this study, we present an alternative approach to statistical analysis of hydrological response variability and basin flashiness, based on the distribution of inter-amount times. We analyse inter-amount time distributions of high-resolution streamflow time series for 17 (semi-)urbanised basins in North Carolina, USA, ranging from 13 to 238 km2 in size. We show that in the inter-amount-time framework, sampling frequency is tuned to the local variability of the flow pattern, resulting in a different representation and weighting of high and low flow periods in the statistical distribution. This leads to important differences in the way the distribution quantiles, mean, coefficient of variation and skewness vary across scales and results in lower mean intermittency and improved scaling. Moreover, we show that inter-amount-time distributions can be used to detect regulation effects on flow patterns, identify critical sampling scales and characterise flashiness of hydrological response. The possibility to use both the classical approach and the inter-amount-time framework to identify minimum observable scales and analyse flow data opens up interesting areas for future research.

  14. Improvements and Additions to NASA Near Real-Time Earth Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cechini, Matthew; Boller, Ryan; Baynes, Kathleen; Schmaltz, Jeffrey; DeLuca, Alexandar; King, Jerome; Thompson, Charles; Roberts, Joe; Rodriguez, Joshua; Gunnoe, Taylor; hide

    2016-01-01

    For many years, the NASA Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) has worked closely with the Land, Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS (Earth Observing System) (LANCE) system to provide near real-time imagery visualizations of AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder), MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer), OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), and recently VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) science parameters. These visualizations are readily available through standard web services and the NASA Worldview client. Access to near real-time imagery provides a critical capability to GIBS and Worldview users. GIBS continues to focus on improving its commitment to providing near real-time imagery for end-user applications. The focus of this presentation will be the following completed or planned GIBS system and imagery enhancements relating to near real-time imagery visualization.

  15. Time-Dependant Responses of High-Definition Induction Log and Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of drilling mud filtrate invading into a reservoir is time dependant. It causes dynamic invasion profiles of formation parameters such as water saturation, salinity, and formation resistivity. Thus, the responses of a high-definition induction log (HDIL tool are time dependent. The logging time should be considered as an important parameter during logging interpretation for the purposes of determining true formation resistivity, estimating initial water saturation, and evaluating a reservoir. The time-dependent HDIL responses are helpful for log analysts to understand the invasion process physically. Field examples were illustrated for the application of present method.

  16. Implementation of Time and Frequency Response Analysis for Web-Based Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teyana Sapula

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The University of Dar Es Salaam has developed the web-based laboratory for Time and Frequency Response Analysis. The purpose of this web-based laboratory is the utilization of real data from real experiments, in terms of instrumentation and experimental circuits, rather than simulations. The use of webbased laboratory came after realizing the difficulties imposed by the traditional laboratories. Web-based laboratories allow students and educators to interact with real laboratory equipment located anywhere in the world at anytime. This paper presents the implementation of web-based laboratory of single stage common emitter, resistor capacitor coupled amplifier using National Instruments Educational Laboratory Virtual Instrument Suite platform. Two components are deployed: time response analysis and frequency response analysis. The experiment allows students to carryout time and frequency analysis of the amplifier. The modular can be used to any microelectronic circuits to carry out any time response and frequency response analysis. Both the time response and frequency response analysis results of the amplifier are validated.

  17. Time and flow-direction responses of shear-styress-sensitive liquid crystal coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Muraqtore, J. J.; Heinick, James T.

    1994-01-01

    Time and flow-direction responses of shear-stress liquid crystal coatings were exploresd experimentally. For the time-response experiments, coatings were exposed to transient, compressible flows created during the startup and off-design operation of an injector-driven supersonic wind tunnel. Flow transients were visualized with a focusing schlieren system and recorded with a 100 frame/s color video camera.

  18. Time and flow-direction responses of shear-styress-sensitive liquid crystal coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Muraqtore, J. J.; Heinick, James T.

    1994-01-01

    Time and flow-direction responses of shear-stress liquid crystal coatings were exploresd experimentally. For the time-response experiments, coatings were exposed to transient, compressible flows created during the startup and off-design operation of an injector-driven supersonic wind tunnel. Flow transients were visualized with a focusing schlieren system and recorded with a 100 frame/s color video camera.

  19. Acute acetaminophen (paracetamol) ingestion improves time to exhaustion during exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauger, Alexis R; Taylor, Lee; Harding, Christopher; Wright, Benjamin; Foster, Josh; Castle, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a commonly used over-the-counter analgesic and antipyretic and has previously been shown to improve exercise performance through a reduction in perceived pain. This study sought to establish whether its antipyretic action may also improve exercise capacity in the heat by moderating the increase in core temperature. On separate days, 11 recreationally active participants completed two experimental time-to-exhaustion trials on a cycle ergometer in hot conditions (30°C, 50% relative humidity) after ingesting a placebo control or an oral dose of acetaminophen in a randomized, double-blind design. Following acetaminophen ingestion, participants cycled for a significantly longer period of time (acetaminophen, 23 ± 15 min versus placebo, 19 ± 13 min; P = 0.005; 95% confidence interval = 90-379 s), and this was accompanied by significantly lower core (-0.15°C), skin (-0.47°C) and body temperatures (0.19°C; P 0.05). This is the first study to demonstrate that an acute dose of acetaminophen can improve cycling capacity in hot conditions, and that this may be due to the observed reduction in core, skin and body temperature and the subjective perception of thermal comfort. These findings suggest that acetaminophen may reduce the thermoregulatory strain elicited from exercise, thus improving time to exhaustion.

  20. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revdal, Anders; Hollekim-Strand, Siri M; Ingul, Charlotte B

    2016-06-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10) or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11) 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1), 10.4 %), p heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02). Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated. Key pointsLow volume high-intensity interval exercise can improve peak oxygen uptake in previously sedentary individuals with type 2 diabetesThe weekly exercise volumes in the two intervention groups of 81 and 30 minutes respectively, is substantially lower than recommended in current exercise guidelines and could reduce the time-barrier associated with exercise among patients with type 2 diabetes.However, 12 weeks of structured, supervised low-volume exercise did not improve glycemic control, indicating a need for exercise volumes or longer intervention period.

  1. Design PID controllers for desired time-domain or frequency-domain response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weidong; Xi, Yugeng; Yang, Genke; Xu, Xiaoming

    2002-10-01

    Practical requirements on the design of control systems, especially process control systems, are usually specified in terms of time-domain response, such as overshoot and rise time, or frequency-domain response, such as resonance peak and stability margin. Although numerous methods have been developed for the design of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, little work has been done in relation to the quantitative time-domain and frequency-domain responses. In this paper, we study the following problem: Given a nominal stable process with time delay, we design a suboptimal PID controller to achieve the required time-domain response or frequency-domain response for the nominal system or the uncertain system. An H(infinity) PID controller is developed based on optimal control theory and the parameters are derived analytically. Its properties are investigated and compared with that of two developed suboptimal controllers: an H2 PID controller and a Maclaurin PID controller. It is shown that all three controllers can provide the quantitative time-domain and frequency-domain responses.

  2. Genomic selection improves response to selection in resilience by exploiting genotype by environment interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Genotype by environment interactions (GxE) are very common in livestock and hamper genetic improvement. On the other hand, GxE is a source of genetic variation: genetic variation in response to environment, e.g., environmental perturbations such as heat stress or disease. In livestock breeding, t

  3. A low density, high stiffness flat loudspeaker with improved sound frequency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel flat loudspeaker with improved sound frequency response. Flat loudspeakers provide advantages of compact dimensions and high durability. Known flat loudspeaker technology is based on high modal density. However, the resonances in the panel are complex and difficult to

  4. Exploring New Service Models: Can Consolidating Public Service Points Improve Response to Customer Needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Pat; Horowitz, Lisa R.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an experimental integrated service point that combines the desks and staff who perform reference and circulation at one of Massachusetts Institute of Technology's libraries. Considers whether this service model can consolidate public service points to improve response to customer needs; discusses performance measurement; and offers…

  5. Microwave-assisted Preparation of Temperature Sensitive Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Hydrogel with Improved Responsive Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based hydrogel was prepared under microwave irradiation.The hydrogel thus prepared, comparing with that prepared by thermal heating method, exhibits faster swelling and shrinking kinetics. The improved responsive properties are due to the more heterogeneous and porous networks formed under microwave irradiation.

  6. Interventions to Improve Responses of Helping Professionals to Intimate Partner Violence: A Quick Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y. Joon; An, Soonok

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to systematically review the available evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to improve the response of various helping professionals who come into contact with female victims of intimate partner violence (IPV). Methods: Several databases were searched, and N = 38 studies met the inclusion criteria…

  7. [Evaluation of 2 inanimate models to improve percutaneous fluoroscopy-guided renal access time].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Alcaraz, Efraín; González-Meza García, Fernando; Serrano-Brambila, Eduardo Alonso

    2015-01-01

    Training devices for percutaneous renal access are expensive, have hazardous biological materials, or radiation. Two devices were designed that eliminate some or all of these characteristics (ManiPERC and iPERC). To compare the improvement in access time to the posterior lower calix with 2 inanimate models in a group of Urology residents. Quasi-experimental clinical trial with 16 Urology residents to compare the improvement over time of percutaneous renal access by training in 2 inanimate models (iPERC: simulated fluoroscopy and ManiPERC: real fluoroscopy). Subjects were assigned to one of 2 groups (iPERC and ManiPERC) and a video analysis of all of them was performed before and after 20 training sessions. Both groups improved their access time; with iPERC from 133.88±41.40 to 76±12.62s (p=0.006) and from 176.5±85.81 to 68.75 to 18.40s (p=0.007) with ManiPERC. Comparing iPERC versus ManiPERC there was no difference between them in improving access time (ANCOVA: Model F (1.13)=1.598, p=0.228). Both models are equivalent in improving skills; however, even though none of them generated bio-waste, the absence of radioactive emissions makes iPERC the more advantageous model. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute cocoa flavanol supplementation improves muscle macro- and microvascular but not anabolic responses to amino acids in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Bethan E; Atherton, Philip J; Varadhan, Krishna; Limb, Marie C; Williams, John P; Smith, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The anabolic effects of nutrition on skeletal muscle may depend on adequate skeletal muscle perfusion, which is impaired in older people. Cocoa flavanols have been shown to improve flow-mediated dilation, an established measure of endothelial function. However, their effect on muscle microvascular blood flow is currently unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore links between the consumption of cocoa flavanols, muscle microvascular blood flow, and muscle protein synthesis (MPS) in response to nutrition in older men. To achieve this objective, leg blood flow (LBF), muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV), and MPS were measured under postabsorptive and postprandial (intravenous Glamin (Fresenius Kabi, Germany), dextrose to sustain glucose ∼7.5 mmol·L(-1)) conditions in 20 older men. Ten of these men were studied with no cocoa flavanol intervention and a further 10 were studied with the addition of 350 mg of cocoa flavanols at the same time that nutrition began. Leg (femoral artery) blood flow was measured by Doppler ultrasound, muscle MBV by contrast-enhanced ultrasound using Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, Mass., USA) perflutren contrast agent and MPS using [1, 2-(13)C2]leucine tracer techniques. Our results show that although older individuals do not show an increase in LBF or MBV in response to feeding, these absent responses are apparent when cocoa flavanols are given acutely with nutrition. However, this restoration in vascular responsiveness is not associated with improved MPS responses to nutrition. We conclude that acute cocoa flavanol supplementation improves muscle macro- and microvascular responses to nutrition, independently of modifying muscle protein anabolism.

  9. Improved osteoblast response to UV-irradiated PMMA/TiO2 nanocomposites with controllable wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayan, Mahdis; Jung, Youngsoo; Huang, Po-Shun; Moradi, Marzyeh; Plakseychuk, Anton Y; Lee, Jung-Kun; Shankar, Ravi; Chun, Youngjae

    2014-12-01

    Osteoblast response was evaluated with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)/titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocomposite thin films that exhibit the controllable wettability with ultraviolet (UV) treatment. In this study, three samples of PMMA/TiO2 were fabricated with three different compositional volume ratios (i.e., 25/75, 50/50, and 75/25) followed by UV treatment for 0, 4, and 8 h. All samples showed the increased hydrophilicity after UV irradiation. The films fabricated with the greater amount of TiO2 and treated with the longer UV irradiation time increased the hydrophilicity more. The partial elimination of PMMA on the surface after UV irradiation created a durable hydrophilic surface by (1) exposing higher amount of TiO2 on the surface, (2) increasing the hydroxyl groups on the TiO2 surface, and (3) producing a mesoporous structure that helps to hold the water molecules on the surface longer. The partial elimination of PMMA on the surface was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Surface profiler and atomic force microscopy demonstrated the increased surface roughness after UV irradiation. Both scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy demonstrated that particles containing calcium and phosphate elements appeared on the 8 h UV-treated surface of PMMA/TiO2 25/75 samples after 4 days soaking in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium. UV treatment showed the osteoblast adhesion improved on all the surfaces. While all UV-treated hydrophilic samples demonstrated the improvement of osteoblast cell adhesion, the PMMA/TiO2 25/75 sample after 8 h UV irradiation (n = 5, P value = 0.000) represented the best cellular response as compared to other samples. UV-treated PMMA/TiO2 nanocomposite thin films with controllable surface properties represent a high potential for the biomaterials used in both orthopedic and dental applications.

  10. Manufacturing Supply Chain Optimization Problem with Time Windows Based on Improved Orthogonal Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xinhua

    2006-01-01

    Aim to the manufacturing supply chain optimization problem with time windows, presents an improved orthogonal genetic algorithm to solve it. At first, we decompose this problem into two sub-problems (distribution and routing) plus an interface mechanism to allow the two algorithms to collaborate in a master-slave fashion, with the distribution algorithm driving the routing algorithm. At second, we describe the proposed improved orthogonal genetic algorithm for solving giving problem detailedly. Finally, the examples suggest that this proposed approach is feasible, correct and valid.

  11. Improving GNSS time series for volcano monitoring: application to Canary Islands (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañada, Laura; Sevilla, Miguel J.; Pereda de Pablo, Jorge; Domínguez Cerdeña, Itahiza

    2017-04-01

    The number of permanent GNSS stations has increased significantly in recent years for different geodetic applications such as volcano monitoring, which require a high precision. Recently we have started to have coordinates time series long enough so that we can apply different analysis and filters that allow us to improve the GNSS coordinates results. Following this idea we have processed data from GNSS permanent stations used by the Spanish Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN) for volcano monitoring in Canary Islands to obtained time series by double difference processing method with Bernese v5.0 for the period 2007-2014. We have identified the characteristics of these time series and obtained models to estimate velocities with greater accuracy and more realistic uncertainties. In order to improve the results we have used two kinds of filters to improve the time series. The first, a spatial filter, has been computed using the series of residuals of all stations in the Canary Islands without an anomalous behaviour after removing a linear trend. This allows us to apply this filter to all sets of coordinates of the permanent stations reducing their dispersion. The second filter takes account of the temporal correlation in the coordinate time series for each station individually. A research about the evolution of the velocity depending on the series length has been carried out and it has demonstrated the need for using time series of at least four years. Therefore, in those stations with more than four years of data, we calculated the velocity and the characteristic parameters in order to have time series of residuals. This methodology has been applied to the GNSS data network in El Hierro (Canary Islands) during the 2011-2012 eruption and the subsequent magmatic intrusions (2012-2014). The results show that in the new series it is easier to detect anomalous behaviours in the coordinates, so they are most useful to detect crustal deformations in volcano monitoring.

  12. Aeroelastic response of an aircraft wing with mounted engine subjected to time-dependent thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazidi, A.; Kalantari, H.; Fazelzadeh, S. A.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the aeroelastic response of a wing containing an engine subjected to different types of time-dependent thrust excitations is presented. In order to precisely consider the spanwise and chordwise locations of the engine and the time-dependent follower force in governing equations, derived through Lagrange's method, the generalized function theory is used. Unsteady aerodynamic lift and moment in the time domain are considered in terms of Wagner's function. Numerical simulations of the aeroelastic response to different types of time-dependent thrust excitation and comparisons with the previously published results are supplied. Effects of the engine mass and location and also the type of time-dependent thrust on the wing aeroelastic response are studied and pertinent conclusions are outlined.

  13. Examining item difficulty and response time on perceptual ability test items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chien-Lin; O'Neill, Thomas R; Kramer, Gene A

    2002-01-01

    This study examined item calibration stability in relation to response time and the levels of item difficulty between different response time groups on a sample of 389 examinees responding to six different subtest items of the Perceptual Ability Test (PAT). The results indicated that no Differential Item Functioning (DIF) was found and a significant correlation coefficient of item difficulty was formed between slow and fast responders. Three distinct levels of difficulty emerged among the six subtests across groups. Slow responders spent significantly more time than fast responders on the four most difficult subtests. A positive significant relationship was found between item difficulty and response time across groups on the overall perceptual ability test items. Overall, this study found that: 1) the same underlying construct is being measured across groups, 2) the PAT scores were equally useful across groups, 3) different sources of item difficulty may exist among the six subtests, and 4) more difficult test items may require more time to answer.

  14. Synthesising empirical results to improve predictions of post-wildfire runoff and erosion response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakesby, Richard A.; Moody, John A.; Martin, Deborah A.; Robichaud, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in research into wildfire impacts on runoff and erosion have demonstrated increasing complexity of controlling factors and responses, which, combined with changing fire frequency, present challenges for modellers. We convened a conference attended by experts and practitioners in post-wildfire impacts, meteorology and related research, including modelling, to focus on priority research issues. The aim was to improve our understanding of controls and responses and the predictive capabilities of models. This conference led to the eight selected papers in this special issue. They address aspects of the distinctiveness in the controls and responses among wildfire regions, spatiotemporal rainfall variability, infiltration, runoff connectivity, debris flow formation and modelling applications. Here we summarise key findings from these papers and evaluate their contribution to improving understanding and prediction of post-wildfire runoff and erosion under changes in climate, human intervention and population pressure on wildfire-prone areas.

  15. Olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation improves sympathetic skin responses in chronic spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuncheng Zheng; Guifeng Liu; Yuexia Chen; Shugang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Forty-three patients with chronic spinal cord injury for over 6 months were transplanted with bryonic olfactory ensheathing cells, 2-4 × 106, into multiple sites in the injured area under the sur-gical microscope. The sympathetic skin response in patients was measured with an electromyo-graphy/evoked potential instrument 1 day before transplantation and 3-8 weeks after trans-tion. Spinal nerve function of patients was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale. The sympathetic skin response was elicited in 32 cases before olfactory en-sheathing celltransplantation, while it was observed in 34 cases after transplantation. tantly, sympathetic skin response latency decreased significantly and amplitude increased cantly after transplantation. Transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells also improved American Spinal Injury Association scores for movement, pain and light touch. Our findings indicate that factory ensheathing celltransplantation improves motor, sensory and autonomic nerve functions in patients with chronic spinal cord injury.

  16. An improved RST approach for timely alert and Near Real Time monitoring of oil spill disasters by using AVHRR data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. L. Grimaldi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Information acquired and provided in Near Real Time is fundamental in contributing to reduce the impact of different sea pollution sources on the maritime environment. Optical data acquired by sensors aboard meteorological satellites, thanks to their high temporal resolution as well as to their delivery policy, can be profitably used for a Near Real Time sea monitoring, provided that accurate and reliable methodologies for analysis and investigation are designed, implemented and fully assessed.

    In this paper, the results achieved by the application of an improved version of RST (Robust Satellite Technique to oil spill detection and monitoring will be shown. In particular, thermal infrared data acquired by the NOAA-AVHRR (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer have been analyzed and a new RST-based change detection index applied to the case of the oil spills that occurred off the Kuwait and Saudi Arabian coasts in January 1991 and during the Lebanon War in July 2006.

    The results obtained, even in comparison with those achieved by other AVHRR-based techniques, confirm the unique performance of the proposed approach in automatically detecting the presence of oil spill with a high level of reliability and sensitivity. Moreover, the potential of the extension of the proposed technique to sensors onboard geostationary satellites will be discussed within the context of oil spill monitoring systems, integrating products generated by high temporal (optical and high spatial (radar resolution satellite systems.

  17. Photomultiplier nonlinear response in time-domain laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro José Bossy Schip

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure to find the limiting range of the photomultiplier linear response of a low-cost, digital oscilloscope-based time-resolved laser-induced luminescence spectrometer (TRLS, is presented. A systematic investigation on the instrument response function with different signal input terminations, and the relationship between the luminescence intensity reaching the photomultiplier and the measured decay time are described. These investigations establish that setting the maximum intensity of the luminescence signal below 0.3V guarantees, for signal input terminations equal or higher than 99.7 ohm, a linear photomultiplier response.

  18. Analytical Call Center Model with Voice Response Unit and Wrap-Up Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Hampl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The last twenty years of computer integration significantly changed the process of service in a call center service systems. Basic building modules of classical call centers – a switching system and a group of humans agents – was extended with other special modules such as skills-based routing module, automatic call distribution module, interactive voice response module and others to minimize the customer waiting time and wage costs. A calling customer of a modern call center is served in the first stage by the interactive voice response module without any human interaction. If the customer requirements are not satisfied in the first stage, the service continues to the second stage realized by the group of human agents. The service time of second stage – the average handle time – is divided into a conversation time and wrap-up time. During the conversation time, the agent answers customer questions and collects its requirements and during the wrap-up time (administrative time the agent completes the task without any customer interaction. The analytical model presented in this contribution is solved under the condition of statistical equilibrium and takes into account the interactive voice response module service time, the conversation time and the wrap-up time.

  19. Development of seismic analysis model of LMFBR and seismic time history response analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, K. H.; Lee, J. H.; Yoo, B. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    The main objective of this paper is to develop the seismic analysis model of KALIMER reactor structures including the primary coolant of sodium and to evaulate the seismic responses of the maximum peak acceleration and the relative displacements by the time history seismic response analysis. The seismic time history response analyses were carried out for both cases of the seismic isolation design and the non-isolation one to verify the seismic isolation performance. From the results of seismic response analysis using the developed seismic analysis model, it is clearly verified that the seismic isolation design gives very significantly reduced seismic responses compared with the non-isolation design. All design criteria for the relative displacement repsonse were satisfied for KALIMER reactor structures.

  20. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L.; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L.

    2015-01-01

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2-5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models.