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Sample records for implant impression technique

  1. Effects of implant system, impression technique, and impression material on accuracy of the working cast.

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    Wegner, Kerstin; Weskott, Katharina; Zenginel, Martha; Rehmann, Peter; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to identify the effects of the implant system, impression technique, and impression material on the transfer accuracy of implant impressions. The null hypothesis tested was that, in vitro and within the parameters of the experiment, the spatial relationship of a working cast to the placement of implants is not related to (1) the implant system, (2) the impression technique, or (3) the impression material. A steel maxilla was used as a reference model. Six implants of two different implant systems (Standard Plus, Straumann; Semados, Bego) were fixed in the reference model. The target variables were: three-dimensional (3D) shift in all directions, implant axis direction, and rotation. The target variables were assessed using a 3D coordinate measuring machine, and the respective deviations of the plaster models from the nominal values of the reference model were calculated. Two different impression techniques (reposition/pickup) and four impression materials (Aquasil Ultra, Flexitime, Impregum Penta, P2 Magnum 360) were investigated. In all, 80 implant impressions for each implant system were taken. Statistical analysis was performed using multivariate analysis of variance. The implant system significantly influenced the transfer accuracy for most spatial dimensions, including the overall 3D shift and implant axis direction. There was no significant difference between the two implant systems with regard to rotation. Multivariate analysis of variance showed a significant effect on transfer accuracy only for the implant system. Within the limits of the present study, it can be concluded that the transfer accuracy of the intraoral implant position on the working cast is far more dependent on the implant system than on the selection of a specific impression technique or material.

  2. A Comparison of implant impression precision: Different materials and techniques

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    Tabesh, Mahtab; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2018-01-01

    Background Precision of implant impressions is a prerequisite for long-term success of implant supported prostheses. Impression materials and impression techniques are two important factors that impression precision relies on. Material and Methods A model of edentulous maxilla containing four implants inserted by All-on-4 guide was constructed. Seventy two impressions using polyether (PE), polyvinyl siloxane (PVS), and vinyl siloxanether (VSE) materials with direct and indirect techniques were made (n=12). Coordinates of implants in casts were measured using coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Data were analyzed with ANOVA; t-test and Tukey test were used for post hoc. Results With two-way ANOVA, mean values of linear displacements of implants were significantly different among materials and techniques. One-way ANOVA and Tukey showed significant difference between PE and VSE (P=0.019), PE and PVS (P=0.002) in direct technique, and between PVS and PE (Pimpression of implants, PE is recommended for direct technique while PE and VSE are recommended for indirect technique. Recommended technique for VSE is either direct or indirect; and for PE and PVS is direct. Key words:Polyvinyl siloxane, polyether, vinyl siloxanether, direct technique, indirect technique, All-on-4, coordinate measuring machine. PMID:29670733

  3. Passive fit and accuracy of three dental implant impression techniques.

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    Al Quran, Firas A; Rashdan, Bashar A; Zomar, AbdelRahman A Abu; Weiner, Saul

    2012-02-01

    To reassess the accuracy of three impression techniques relative to the passive fit of the prosthesis. An edentulous maxillary cast was fabricated in epoxy resin with four dental implants embedded and secured with heat-cured acrylic resin. Three techniques were tested: closed tray, open tray nonsplinted, and open tray splinted. One light-cured custom acrylic tray was fabricated for each impression technique, and transfer copings were attached to the implants. Fifteen impressions for each technique were prepared with medium-bodied consistency polyether. Subsequently, the impressions were poured in type IV die stone. The distances between the implants were measured using a digital micrometer. The statistical analysis of the data was performed with ANOVA and a one-sample t test at a 95% confidence interval. The lowest mean difference in dimensional accuracy was found within the direct (open tray) splinted technique. Also, the one-sample t test showed that the direct splinted technique has the least statistical significant difference from direct nonsplinted and indirect (closed tray) techniques. All discrepancies were less than 100 Μm. Within the limitations of this study, the best accuracy of the definitive prosthesis was achieved when the impression copings were splinted with autopolymerized acrylic resin, sectioned, and rejoined. However, the errors associated with all of these techniques were less than 100 Μm, and based on the current definitions of passive fit, they all would be clinically acceptable.

  4. A Simplified Technique for Implant-Abutment Level Impression after Soft Tissue Adaptation around Provisional Restoration

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    Kutkut, Ahmad; Abu-Hammad, Osama; Frazer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Impression techniques for implant restorations can be implant level or abutment level impressions with open tray or closed tray techniques. Conventional implant-abutment level impression techniques are predictable for maximizing esthetic outcomes. Restoration of the implant traditionally requires the use of the metal or plastic impression copings, analogs, and laboratory components. Simplifying the dental implant restoration by reducing armamentarium through incorporating conventional techniques used daily for crowns and bridges will allow more general dentists to restore implants in their practices. The demonstrated technique is useful when modifications to implant abutments are required to correct the angulation of malpositioned implants. This technique utilizes conventional crown and bridge impression techniques. As an added benefit, it reduces costs by utilizing techniques used daily for crowns and bridges. The aim of this report is to describe a simplified conventional impression technique for custom abutments and modified prefabricated solid abutments for definitive restorations. PMID:29563457

  5. A Simplified Technique for Implant-Abutment Level Impression after Soft Tissue Adaptation around Provisional Restoration

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    Ahmad Kutkut

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Impression techniques for implant restorations can be implant level or abutment level impressions with open tray or closed tray techniques. Conventional implant-abutment level impression techniques are predictable for maximizing esthetic outcomes. Restoration of the implant traditionally requires the use of the metal or plastic impression copings, analogs, and laboratory components. Simplifying the dental implant restoration by reducing armamentarium through incorporating conventional techniques used daily for crowns and bridges will allow more general dentists to restore implants in their practices. The demonstrated technique is useful when modifications to implant abutments are required to correct the angulation of malpositioned implants. This technique utilizes conventional crown and bridge impression techniques. As an added benefit, it reduces costs by utilizing techniques used daily for crowns and bridges. The aim of this report is to describe a simplified conventional impression technique for custom abutments and modified prefabricated solid abutments for definitive restorations.

  6. Effect of different impression materials and techniques on the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts.

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    Ebadian, Behnaz; Rismanchian, Mansor; Dastgheib, Badrosadat; Bajoghli, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Different factors such as impression techniques and materials can affect the passive fit between the superstructure and implant. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different impression materials and techniques on the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts. Four internal hex implants (Biohorizons Ø4 mm) were placed on a metal maxillary model perpendicular to the horizontal plane in maxillary lateral incisors, right canine and left first premolar areas. Three impression techniques including open tray, closed tray using ball top screw abutments and closed tray using short impression copings and two impression materials (polyether and polyvinyl siloxane) were evaluated (n = 60). The changes in distances between implant analogues in mediolateral (x) and anteroposterior (y) directions and analogue angles in x/z and y/z directions in the horizontal plane on the definitive casts were measured by coordinate measuring machine. The data were analyzed by multivariate two-way analysis of variance and one sample t-test (α = 0.05). No statistical significant differences were observed between different impression techniques and materials. However, deviation and distortion of definitive casts had a significant difference with the master model when short impression copings and polyvinyl siloxane impression material were used (P impression materials (P impression techniques; however, less distortion and deviation were observed in the open tray technique. In the closed tray impression technique, ball top screw was more accurate than short impression copings.

  7. Accuracy of Different Implant Impression Techniques: Evaluation of New Tray Design Concept.

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    Liu, David Yu; Cader, Fathima Nashmie; Abduo, Jaafar; Palamara, Joseph

    2017-12-29

    To evaluate implant impression accuracy with a new tray design concept in comparison to nonsplinted and splinted impression techniques for a 2-implant situation. A reference bar titanium framework was fabricated to fit on 2 parallel implants. The framework was used to generate a resin master model with 2 implants that fit precisely against the framework. Three impression techniques were evaluated: (1) nonsplinted, (2) splinted, and (3) nonsplinted with modified tray impressions. All the trays were fabricated from light-cured acrylic resin material with openings that corresponded to the implant impression copings. Ten impressions were taken for each technique using poly(vinyl siloxane) impression material. The impressions were poured with type IV dental stone to generate the test casts. A rosette strain gauge was bonded to the middle of the framework. As the framework retaining screws were tightened on each test cast, the developed strains were recorded until the completion of the tightening to 35 Ncm. The generated strains of the rosette strain gauge were used to calculate the maximum principal strain. A statistically significant difference was observed among the different impression techniques. The modified tray design impression technique was associated with the least framework strains, which indicates greater accuracy compared with the other techniques. There was no significant difference between the splinted and the nonsplinted impression techniques. The new tray design concept appeared to produce more accurate implant impressions than the other techniques. Despite the statistical difference among the impression techniques, the clinical significance of this difference is yet to be determined. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. Accuracy of 3 different impression techniques for internal connection angulated implants.

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    Tsagkalidis, George; Tortopidis, Dimitrios; Mpikos, Pavlos; Kaisarlis, George; Koidis, Petros

    2015-10-01

    Making implant impressions with different angulations requires a more precise and time-consuming impression technique. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the accuracy of nonsplinted, splinted, and snap-fit impression techniques of internal connection implants with different angulations. An experimental device was used to allow a clinical simulation of impression making by means of open and closed tray techniques. Three different impression techniques (nonsplinted, acrylic-resin splinted, and indirect snap-fit) for 6 internal-connected implants at different angulations (0, 15, 25 degrees) were examined using polyether. Impression accuracy was evaluated by measuring the differences in 3-dimensional (3D) position deviations between the implant body/impression coping before the impression procedure and the coping/laboratory analog positioned within the impression, using a coordinate measuring machine. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA. Means were compared with the least significant difference criterion at Pimpression technique exhibited a higher accuracy than the other techniques studied when increased implant angulations at 25 degrees were involved. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Accuracy of different abutment level impression techniques in All-On-4 dental implants

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    Marzieh Alikhasi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Passive fit of prosthetic frameworks is a major concern in implant dentistry. Impression technique is one of the several variables that may affect the outcome of dental implants. The purpose of this study was to compare the three dimensional accuracy of direct and indirect abutment level implant impressions ofALL-ON-4 treatment plan.Materials and Methods: A reference acrylic resin model with four Branemark fixtures was made according to All-On-4 treatment plan. Multiunit abutments were screwed into the fixtures and two special trays were made for direct and indirect impression techniques. Ten direct and ten indirect impression techniques with respective impression transfers were made. Impressions were poured with stone and the positional accuracy of the abutment analogues in each dimension of x, y, and z axes and also angular displacement (Δθ were evaluated using a Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM. Data were analyzed using T- test.Results: The results showed that direct impression technique was significantly more accurate than indirect technique (P<0.001.Conclusion: The results showed that the accuracy of direct impression technique was significantly more than that of indirect technique in Δθ and Δr coordinate and also Δx, Δy, Δz.

  10. A comparison of mandibular denture base deformation with different impression techniques for implant overdentures.

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    Elsyad, Moustafa Abdou; El-Waseef, Fatma Ahmad; Al-Mahdy, Yasmeen Fathy; Fouad, Mohammed Mohammed

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate mandibular denture base deformation along with three impression techniques used for implant-retained overdenture. Ten edentulous patients (five men and five women) received two implants in the canine region of the mandible and three duplicate mandibular overdentures which were constructed with mucostatic, selective pressure, and definitive pressure impression techniques. Ball abutments and respective gold matrices were used to connect the overdentures to the implants. Six linear strain gauges were bonded to the lingual polished surface of each duplicate overdenture at midline and implant areas to measure strain during maximal clenching and gum chewing. The strains recorded at midline were compressive while strains at implant areas were tensile. Clenching recorded significant higher strain when compared with gum chewing for all techniques. The mucostatic technique recorded the highest strain and the definite pressure technique recorded the lowest. There was no significant difference between the strain recorded with mucostatic technique and that registered with selective pressure technique. The highest strain was recorded at the level of ball abutment's top with the mucostatic technique during clenching. Definite pressure impression technique for implant-retained mandibular overdenture is associated with minimal denture deformation during function when compared with mucostatic and selective pressure techniques. Reinforcement of the denture base over the implants may be recommended to increase resistance of fracture when mucostatic or selective pressure impression technique is used. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Accuracy of five implant impression technique: effect of splinting materials and methods

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    Cho, Sung-Bum

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dimensional stability of splinting material on the accuracy of master casts. MATERIALS AND METHODS A stainless steel metal model with 6 implants embedded was used as a master model. Implant level impressions were made after square impression copings were splinted using 5 different techniques as follows. (1) Splinted with autopolymerizing resin and sectioned, reconnected to compensate polymerization shrinkage before the impression procedure. (2) Splinted with autopolymerizing resin just before impression procedure. (3) Primary impression made with impression plaster and secondary impression were made over with polyether impression material. (4) Splinted with impression plaster. (5) Splinted with VPS bite registration material. From master model, 5 impressions and 5 experimental casts, total 25 casts were made for each of 5 splinting methods. The distortion values of each splinting methods were measured using coordinate measuring machine, capable of recordings in the x-, y-, z-axes. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a confidence level of 95% was used to evaluate the data and Tukey's studentized range test was used to determine significant differences between the groups. RESULTS Group 1 showed best accuracy followed by Group 3 & 4. Group 2 and 5 showed relatively larger distortion value than other groups. No significant difference was found between group 3, 4, 5 in x-axis, group 2, 3, 4 in y-axis and group 1, 3, 4, 5 in z-axis (Pimpression copings with autopolymerizing resin following compensation of polymerization shrinkage and splinting method with impression plaster can enhance the accuracy of master cast and impression plaster can be used simple and effective splinting material for implant impression procedure. PMID:22259700

  12. Three-dimensional accuracy of different impression techniques for dental implants

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    Mohammadreza Nakhaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accurate impression making is an essential prerequisite for achieving a passive fit between the implant and the superstructure. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the three-dimensional accuracy of open-tray and three closed-tray impression techniques. Materials and Methods: Three acrylic resin mandibular master models with four parallel implants were used: Biohorizons (BIO, Straumann tissue-level (STL, and Straumann bone-level (SBL. Forty-two putty/wash polyvinyl siloxane impressions of the models were made using open-tray and closed-tray techniques. Closed-tray impressions were made using snap-on (STL model, transfer coping (TC (BIO model and TC plus plastic cap (TC-Cap (SBL model. The impressions were poured with type IV stone, and the positional accuracy of the implant analog heads in each dimension (x, y and z axes, and the linear displacement (ΔR were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey tests (α = 0.05. Results: The ΔR values of the snap-on technique were significantly lower than those of TC and TC-Cap techniques (P < 0.001. No significant differences were found between closed and open impression techniques for STL in Δx, Δy, Δz and ΔR values (P = 0.444, P = 0.181, P = 0.835 and P = 0.911, respectively. Conclusion: Considering the limitations of this study, the snap-on implant-level impression technique resulted in more three-dimensional accuracy than TC and TC-Cap, but it was similar to the open-tray technique.

  13. A Clinical Comparative Study of 3-Dimensional Accuracy between Digital and Conventional Implant Impression Techniques.

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    Alsharbaty, Mohammed Hussein M; Alikhasi, Marzieh; Zarrati, Simindokht; Shamshiri, Ahmed Reza

    2018-02-09

    To evaluate the accuracy of a digital implant impression technique using a TRIOS 3Shape intraoral scanner (IOS) compared to conventional implant impression techniques (pick-up and transfer) in clinical situations. Thirty-six patients who had two implants (Implantium, internal connection) ranging in diameter between 3.8 and 4.8 mm in posterior regions participated in this study after signing a consent form. Thirty-six reference models (RM) were fabricated by attaching two impression copings intraorally, splinted with autopolymerizing acrylic resin, verified by sectioning through the middle of the index, and rejoined again with freshly mixed autopolymerizing acrylic resin pattern (Pattern Resin) with the brush bead method. After that, the splinted assemblies were attached to implant analogs (DANSE) and impressed with type III dental stone (Gypsum Microstone) in standard plastic die lock trays. Thirty-six working casts were fabricated for each conventional impression technique (i.e., pick-up and transfer). Thirty-six digital impressions were made with a TRIOS 3Shape IOS. Eight of the digitally scanned files were damaged; 28 digital scan files were retrieved to STL format. A coordinate-measuring machine (CMM) was used to record linear displacement measurements (x, y, and z-coordinates), interimplant distances, and angular displacements for the RMs and conventionally fabricated working casts. CATIA 3D evaluation software was used to assess the digital STL files for the same variables as the CMM measurements. CMM measurements made on the RMs and conventionally fabricated working casts were compared with 3D software measurements made on the digitally scanned files. Data were statistically analyzed using the generalized estimating equation (GEE) with an exchangeable correlation matrix and linear method, followed by the Bonferroni method for pairwise comparisons (α = 0.05). The results showed significant differences between the pick-up and digital groups in all of the

  14. Effects of Impression Coping Design, Impression Technique, and Dental Undercuts on the Accuracy of Implant Impressions Assessed by 3-Dimensional Optical Scanning: An In Vitro Study.

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    Sabouhi, Mahmoud; Bajoghli, Farshad; Dakhilalian, Mansour; Beygi, Ali; Abolhasani, Majid

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of the type and design of the impression copings on the accuracy of implant impressions in 2 different conditions. A reference model with 2 implants inserted in bilateral mandibular canines was fabricated. The posterior teeth were inserted as tilted to simulate intra-oral undercuts. The teeth were eliminated to create an edentulous condition. Three different impression techniques were performed (open high retentive [OH], open low retentive [OL], closed [C]) for each condition. Total of 48 casts were made. Two scan-bodies were secured on each cast, scanned by an optical scanner. Then, they were compared to the scan of the reference model, and the calculated mean errors were analyzed with a 2-way ANOVA and Tukey test. There was no significant difference between the complete and partially edentulous groups (F = 3.252, P = 0.079). There was significant difference between the different designs of the impression copings (F = 31.789, P impression copings was more important than the undercuts. The accuracy of the closed tray coping was greater than the low retentive coping and equal to the high retentive coping.

  15. A sectional-splinting technique for impressing multiple implant units by eliminating the use of an open tray

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    Suryakant C. Deogade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the inception of root form implant dentistry by P-I Branemark in the early 1980′s, so many technical advances have been put forward by several authors. However, the open tray impression technique is still performed for impressing multiple implant fixtures as it was first described in the original Branemark procedure manual. The most critical aspect for a successful implant-supported restoration is the passive and an accurate fit of superstructures to avoid preload and loading stresses. Splinting impression technique in multiple implants has gained popularity. Auto-polymerizing acrylic resin is among the most routinely practiced splinting material for multiple implant units. However, unfortunately, it exhibits shrinkage, which makes an impression quite inaccurate. This case report presents the solution to minimize the shrinkage of resin by utilizing sectional-splinting technique as advocated in the previous implant literature.

  16. Impression of multiple implants using photogrammetry: description of technique and case presentation.

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    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Bagán, Leticia; Giménez, Beatriz; Peñarrocha, María

    2014-07-01

    To describe a technique for registering the positions of multiple dental implants using a system based on photogrammetry. A case is presented in which a prosthetic treatment was performed using this technique. Three Euroteknika® dental implants were placed to rehabilitate a 55-year-old male patient with right posterior maxillary edentulism. Three months later, the positions of the implants were registered using a photogrammetry-based stereo-camera (PICcamera®). After processing patient and implant data, special abutments (PICabutment®) were screwed onto each implant. The PICcamera® was then used to capture images of the implant positions, automatically taking 150 images in less than 60 seconds. From this information a file was obtained describing the relative positions - angles and distances - of each implant in vector form. Information regarding the soft tissues was obtained from an alginate impression that was cast in plaster and scanned. A Cr-Co structure was obtained using CAD/CAM, and its passive fit was verified in the patient's mouth using the Sheffield test and the screw resistance test. Twelve months after loading, peri-implant tissues were healthy and no marginal bone loss was observed. The clinical application of this new system using photogrammetry to record the position of multiple dental implants facilitated the rehabilitation of a patient with posterior maxillary edentulism by means of a prosthesis with optimal fit. The prosthetic process was accurate, fast, simple to apply and comfortable for the patient.

  17. Accuracy of implant transfer with open-tray and closed-tray impression techniques and surface detail reproduction of the tooth during impression

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    Hakimeh Siadat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Accurate recording of implant location is required to achieve passive fit and have the implants without stress concentration. The aim of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the dimensional and angular accuracy of open-tray and closed-tray impression techniques using polyether impression material and also to assess the surface detail reproduction of the tooth while impression making.Materials and Methods: One reference metal model with 2 implants (Implantium on the position of the maxillary second premolar and first molar and one molar tooth for evaluation of surface details was prepared. 27 polyether impressions of these models were made (9 using open-tray, 9 using closed-tray techniques and 9 were made just of the surface of the teeth without any implants. Impressions were poured with ADA type IV stone. Coordinate Measuring Machine was used for measuring the dimensional accuracy and video measuring machine for surface detail reproduction. All of these measurements were compared with the measurements on the reference model. Data were analyzed by and compared by T-test and One-way ANOVA.Results: There was a significant statistical difference between open-tray and closed-tray techniques (P0.05.Conclusion: The accuracy of open-tray impression technique was more than closed-tray technique. The surface detail reproduction of the tooth was not affected by impression technique.

  18. Accuracy of impressions with different impression materials in angulated implants.

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    Reddy, S; Prasad, K; Vakil, H; Jain, A; Chowdhary, R

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the dimensional accuracy of the resultant (duplicative) casts made from two different impression materials (polyvinyl siloxane and polyether) in parallel and angulated implants. Three definitive master casts (control groups) were fabricated in dental stone with three implants, placed at equi-distance. In first group (control), all three implants were placed parallel to each other and perpendicular to the plane of the cast. In the second and third group (control), all three implants were placed at 10° and 15 o angulation respectively to the long axis of the cast, tilting towards the centre. Impressions were made with polyvinyl siloxane and polyether impression materials in a special tray, using a open tray impression technique from the master casts. These impressions were poured to obtain test casts. Three reference distances were evaluated on each test cast by using a profile projector and compared with control groups to determine the effect of combined interaction of implant angulation and impression materials on the accuracy of implant resultant cast. Statistical analysis revealed no significant difference in dimensional accuracy of the resultant casts made from two different impression materials (polyvinyl siloxane and polyether) by closed tray impression technique in parallel and angulated implants. On the basis of the results of this study, the use of both the impression materials i.e., polyether and polyvinyl siloxane impression is recommended for impression making in parallel as well as angulated implants.

  19. Digital vs. conventional implant impressions: efficiency outcomes.

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    Lee, Sang J; Gallucci, German O

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficiency, difficulty and operator's preference of a digital impression compared with a conventional impression for single implant restorations. Thirty HSDM second year dental students performed conventional and digital implant impressions on a customized model presenting a single implant. The outcome of the impressions was evaluated under an acceptance criteria and the need for retake/rescan was decided. The efficiency of both impression techniques was evaluated by measuring the preparation, working, and retake/scan time (m/s) and the number of retakes/rescans. Participants' perception on the level of difficulty for the both impressions was assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS) questionnaire. Multiple questionnaires were obtained to assess the participants' perception on preference, effectiveness and proficiency. Mean total treatment time was of 24:42 m/s for conventional and 12:29 m/s for digital impressions (P impressions (P impression (P impression technique and 30.63 (±17.57) for digital impression technique (P = 0.006). Sixty percent of the participants preferred the digital impression, 7% the conventional impression technique and 33% preferred either technique. Digital impressions resulted in a more efficient technique than conventional impressions. Longer preparation, working, and retake time were consumed to complete an acceptable conventional impression. Difficulty was lower for the digital impression compared with the conventional ones when performed by inexperienced second year dental students. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. An in vitro comparison of photogrammetric and conventional complete-arch implant impression techniques.

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    Bergin, Junping Ma; Rubenstein, Jeffrey E; Mancl, Lloyd; Brudvik, James S; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2013-10-01

    Conventional impression techniques for recording the location and orientation of implant-supported, complete-arch prostheses are time consuming and prone to error. The direct optical recording of the location and orientation of implants, without the need for intermediate transfer steps, could reduce or eliminate those disadvantages. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of using a photogrammetric technique to record the location and orientation of multiple implants and to compare the results with those of a conventional complete-arch impression technique. A stone cast of an edentulous mandibular arch containing 5 implant analogs was fabricated to create a master model. The 3-dimensional (3D) spatial orientations of implant analogs on the master model were measured with a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) (control). Five definitive casts were made from the master model with a splinted impression technique. The positions of the implant analogs on the 5 casts were measured with a NobelProcera scanner (conventional method). Prototype optical targets were attached to the master model implant analogs, and 5 sets of images were recorded with a digital camera and a standardized image capture protocol. Dimensional data were imported into commercially available photogrammetry software (photogrammetric method). The precision and accuracy of the 2 methods were compared with a 2-sample t test (α=.05) and a 95% confidence interval. The location precision (standard error of measurement) for CMM was 3.9 µm (95% CI 2.7 to 7.1), for photogrammetry, 5.6 µm (95% CI 3.4 to 16.1), and for the conventional method, 17.2 µm (95% CI 10.3 to 49.4). The average measurement error was 26.2 µm (95% CI 15.9 to 36.6) for the conventional method and 28.8 µm (95% CI 24.8 to 32.9) for the photogrammetric method. The overall measurement accuracy was not significantly different when comparing the conventional to the photogrammetric method (mean difference = -2.6 µm, 95% CI

  1. Accuracy of implant transfer and surface detail reproduction with polyether and polyvinyl siloxane using closed-tray impression technique

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    Marzieh Alikhasi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Making accurate impressions of prepared teeth when they are adjacent to dental implants is of great importance. In these situations, disregarding the selection of appropriate impression material and technique, not only can affect accuracy of transferring of the 3-dimentional spatial status of implant, but also can jeopardize the accurate recording of tooth. In the present study, the accuracy of two impression materials with taper impression copings for recording implant position and surface details was evaluated.   Materials and Methods: One metal reference model with 2 implants (Implantium and a preparation of three grooves on a tooth according to ADA no. 19 standard was fabricated. 10 medium- consistency polyEther (PE impressions using custom trays and 10 polyVinyl Siloxane (PVS putty wash impressions using prefabricated trays with conical impression coping were made. Impressions were poured with ADA type IV stone. A Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM evaluated x, y and angular displacement of the implant analog heads and also accuracy of groove reproduction were measured using a Video Measuring Machine (VMM. These measurements were compared to the ones from reference model. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and T-test.   Results: Putty wash PVS had less linear discrepancy compared with reference model (P > 0.001. There was no significant difference in the surface detail reproduction (P = 0.15.   Conclusion: Putty wash PVS had better results for linear displacement compared with medium consistency PE. There was no significant difference in surface detail reproduction between the two impression materials.

  2. An in vitro study to compare the accuracy of the master cast fabricated by four different transfer impression techniques for single-tooth implant replacement.

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    Lahori, Manesh; Nagrath, Rahul; Agrawal, Prateek

    2014-03-01

    Single tooth implant retained crowns have become a recognized technique for the replacement of the missing teeth. With the predictable integration of implants, the emphasis is shifted towards precise prosthesis. Minor movement of the impression coping retained inside the impression material can occur during all the procedures, leading to the three-dimensional spatial inaccuracies in the master casts. Therefore, the present study was undertaken with the purpose to evaluate the accuracy of single-tooth implant impression techniques using four different impression copings, so as to obtain a precise definitive cast for a single-unit implant restoration. A maxillary acrylic resin model with a standard single implant in the first molar region was used to simulate a clinical situation. A total of 60 impressions were made with polyvinylsiloxane impression material, which were divided into four groups of 15 impressions each. Group I used non-modified square impression coping, while in group II, III and IV square impression coping were modified differently. Master casts fabricated for all the groups were analyzed to detect rotational position change of the hexagon on the implant replicas in the master casts in reference to the resin model. The master casts obtained with the roughened and adhesive-coated impression copings showed a lower amount of rotational movement than the masters casts achieved with the non-modified impression copings. Hence, the clinician should use sandblasted and adhesive coated impression copings to achieve a more accurate and precise orientation of the implant replicas in the laboratory master casts in single-tooth implant restorations.

  3. [Impressions techniques--Part 2].

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    Levartovsky, S; Masri, M; Alter, E; Pilo, R

    2012-10-01

    A dental impression is a positive replica of the teeth, the surrounding gingiva and the border between them; the purpose of which is to create an accurate master model. Two major techniques for impressions exist today: The conventional and the digital impressions. The current article describes both techniques. In the conventional impressions, it is important to choose a proper tray, stock or custom, and to mix the material properly. The commonly used impression techniques for making a conventional impression are described with a review on the effect of the technique on its accuracy. The effect of the wash bulk on the accuracy of the stone dies and/or the restoration is discussed, as well. The digital impressions with their advantages and disadvantages are described in comparison to the conventional impressions. Although, digital impressions eliminate some of the negative characteristics of conventional impressions, proper soft-tissue management and isolation of tooth preparation margins is still mandatory.

  4. Digital versus conventional implant impressions for edentulous patients: accuracy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaspyridakos, Panos; Gallucci, German O; Chen, Chun-Jung; Hanssen, Stijn; Naert, Ignace; Vandenberghe, Bart

    2016-04-01

    To compare the accuracy of digital and conventional impression techniques for completely edentulous patients and to determine the effect of different variables on the accuracy outcomes. A stone cast of an edentulous mandible with five implants was fabricated to serve as master cast (control) for both implant- and abutment-level impressions. Digital impressions (n = 10) were taken with an intraoral optical scanner (TRIOS, 3shape, Denmark) after connecting polymer scan bodies. For the conventional polyether impressions of the master cast, a splinted and a non-splinted technique were used for implant-level and abutment-level impressions (4 cast groups, n = 10 each). Master casts and conventional impression casts were digitized with an extraoral high-resolution scanner (IScan D103i, Imetric, Courgenay, Switzerland) to obtain digital volumes. Standard tessellation language (STL) datasets from the five groups of digital and conventional impressions were superimposed with the STL dataset from the master cast to assess the 3D (global) deviations. To compare the master cast with digital and conventional impressions at the implant level, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's post hoc test was used, while Wilcoxon's rank-sum test was used for testing the difference between abutment-level conventional impressions. Significant 3D deviations (P impressions (P > 0.001). Digital implant impressions are as accurate as conventional implant impressions. The splinted, implant-level impression technique is more accurate than the non-splinted one for completely edentulous patients, whereas there was no difference in the accuracy at the abutment level. The implant angulation up to 15° did not affect the accuracy of implant impressions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Accuracy of implant impressions without impression copings: a three-dimensional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Joo-Hyun; Son, Yong-Ha; Han, Chong-Hyun; Kim, Sunjai

    2011-06-01

    Implant impressions without impression copings can be used for cement-retained implant restorations. A comparison of the accuracy of implant impressions with and without impression copings is needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts that are fabricated by implant impressions with and without impression copings. An acrylic resin maxillary model was fabricated, and 3 implant replicas were secured in the right second premolar, first, and second molars. Two impression techniques were used to fabricate definitive casts (n=10). For the coping group (Group C), open tray impression copings were used for the final impressions. For the no-coping group (Group NC), cementable abutments were connected to the implant replicas, and final impressions were made assuming the abutments were prepared teeth. Computerized calculation of the centroids and long axes of the implant or stone abutment replicas was performed. The Mann-Whitney U test analyzed the amount of linear and rotational distortion between groups (α =.05). At the first molar site, Group NC showed significantly greater linear distortion along the Y-axis, with a small difference between the groups (Group C, 7.8 ± 7.4 μm; Group NC, 19.5 ± 12.2). At the second molar site, increased distortion was noted in Group NC for every linear and rotational variable, except for linear distortion along the Z-axis. Implant impression with open tray impression copings produced more accurate definitive casts than those fabricated without impression copings, especially those with greater inter-abutment distance. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Patients' preferences when comparing analogue implant impressions using a polyether impression material versus digital impressions (Intraoral Scan) of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wismeijer, Daniel; Mans, Ronny; van Genuchten, Michiel; Reijers, Hajo A

    2014-10-01

    The primary objective of this clinical study was to assess the patients' perception of the difference between an analogue impression approach on the one hand and an intra-oral scan (IO scan) on the other when restoring implants in the non-aesthetic zone. A second objective was to analyse the difference in time needed to perform these two procedures. Thirty consecutive patients who had received 41 implants (Straumann tissue level) in the non-aesthetic zone in an implant-based referral practice setting in the Netherlands. As they were to receive crown and or bridge work on the implants, in one session, the final impressions were taken with both an analogue technique and with an intraoral scan. Patients were also asked if, directly after the treatment was carried out, they would be prepared to fill out a questionnaire on their perception of both techniques. The time involved following these two procedures was also recorded. The preparatory activities of the treatment, the taste of the impression material and the overall preference of the patients were significantly in favour of the IO scan. The bite registration, the scan head and gag reflex positively tended to the IO scan, but none of these effects were significant. The overall time involved with the IO scan was more negatively perceived than the analogue impression. Overall less time was involved when following the analogue impression technique than with the IO scan. The overall preference of the patients in our sample is significantly in favour of the approach using the IO scan. This preference relates mainly to the differences between the compared approaches with respect to taste effects and their preparatory activities. The patients did perceive the duration of IO scan more negatively than the analogue impression approach. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Comparison of implant cast accuracy of multiple implant impression technique with different splinting materials: An in vitro study

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    Sunantha Selvaraj

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The master cast obtained by both the splinting material exhibits no difference from the reference model. So bis-GMA can be used, which is easy to handle, less time consuming, less technique sensitive, rigid, and readily available material in clinics.

  8. Effect of Splinting on Dimensional Accuracy of Impressions Made of Implants with Different Subgingival Alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Shamshiri, Ahmed Reza; Alikhasi, Marzieh; Monzavi, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    Placement of implants at deeper levels of gingiva is sometimes inevitable because of issues like esthetics or bone availability. The accuracy of impressions may be affected in these situations. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of splinting and length of impression copings on the accuracy of impressions made of deeply placed implants. A metal model with two parallel implants (Implantium; Dentium) was fabricated. One hundred and twenty impressions were made using the direct impression technique with and without splinting the impression copings (using short and long impression copings). Impressions were made of implants at three subgingival levels (1, 3, and 6 mm) using regular viscosity poly(vinyl siloxane). The impressions were poured with type IV dental stone. Displacements in the x, y, and z axes, as well as rotational discrepancies and interimplant distances were measured with a coordinate measuring machine. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and nonparametric adjusted rank transform tests. There was less rotational displacement using longer impression copings at different subgingival positions of the implants, either with splinted or nonsplinted direct technique (p impressions at different apico-coronal levels of implants than the splinted technique using short impression copings (p impression copings yielded better results than shorter ones in both splinted and nonsplinted techniques. Also, nonsplinted short impression copings produced more accurate impressions than splinted short impression copings. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Handling of Polyvinylsiloxane Versus Polyether for Implant Impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Daniel; Lauer, Wiebke; Heydecke, Guido; Aarabi, Ghazal; Reissmann, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    This study compared polyvinylsiloxane with polyether in handling dental impressions. Each participant (N = 39) made four impressions, each a combination of pickup and reseating techniques with polyether or polyvinylsiloxane, of one implant cast representing a specific clinical situation (tooth gaps, limited residual dentition, or edentulous jaw). Handling of impressions was subsequently rated by using a 12-item questionnaire with 100-mm visual analog scales. While mean satisfaction scores were higher for polyvinylsiloxane than for polyether (69.5/63.0, P < .001), differences among subgroups were statistically significant only for pickup technique, limited residual dentition, and edentulous jaw. Implant impressions made with polyvinylsiloxane using a pickup technique seem to be the best option for most clinical situations.

  10. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  11. Intraoral digital impressions to enhance implant esthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Kenneth F

    2014-09-01

    Providing an accurate soft-tissue transfer for anterior implants is not a new concept; however, it is currently an especially relevant one. There are numerous documented cases in which residual excess cement with cement-retained implant restorations was a contributing cause in periimplantitis. In 2012, Wadhwani et al reported the importance of placing the crown abutment margins supragingivally for ease of cement removal as a possible solution to address this important issue. Therefore, if placement of the crown abutment margin location is imperative, making an impression that reproduces the soft tissue is equally critical. In 1997, this author introduced the "custom impression coping" to achieve such an accurate transfer. Given the wide use of intraoral digital impressions in 2014, this discussion describes how to fabricate a "custom scan body" using that technology to replicate the transition zone in the virtual environment.

  12. Two-piece impression procedure for implant-retained orbital prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelik, Tuncer Burak; Yilmaz, Burak

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining an accurate impression of facial tissues with undercuts and extraoral implants has always been a challenge for both clinicians and patients. This report describes a three-step, two-piece technique that enables an accurate and comfortable impression of undercut tissues and extraoral implants in an orbital defect. An impression of the basal tissue surface of the defect area was made using a medium-body polyether impression material followed by an impression of the entire face of the patient made with a polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression material. First, the PVS impression material was removed; second, the impression posts were removed from the magnets; and third, the polyether impression was removed from the defect. The impression posts were attached to the implant analogs and placed in the negative spaces in the polyether impression. The polyether impression, which carries the implant analogs and impression posts, was placed in the PVS impression through the negative spaces. This technique minimizes trauma to the soft tissues and implants during impression making and also does not require additional materials.

  13. Effects of impression levels and trays on the accuracy of impressions taken from angulated implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geramipanah, Farideh; Sahebi, Majid; Davari, Maryam; Hajimahmoudi, Mohammadreza; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2015-09-01

    It is crucial to keep the misfit of the abutment-fixture unit at the lowest possible rate. There are a few controversial studies on the accuracy of impression making of angulated implants, and much fewer (and controversial) studies on the abutment-level impression technique, which is a convenient and clinically favorable method. Besides, there are no studies on comparison of sectional vs. full-arch trays. We aimed to assess these. A trapezoidal model with four angulated implants installed at 20° and 30° buccal tilts was fabricated. Forty impressions were taken from this model, with two groups of full-arch and sectional custom trays (n = 2 × 20), each divided into two subgroups of implant-level and abutment-level techniques (n = 2 × 2 × 10 in four subgroups). Absolute and non-absolute linear and angular impression errors were estimated by comparing the fabricated casts with the model, using a coordinate measuring machine. The effects of sectional/full-arch trays and abutment-level and fixture-level techniques on impression accuracies were analyzed using one- and two-way analyses of variance (ANOVA), Tukey, Mann-Whitney, and one-sample t-tests (α = 0.05, Mann-Whitney's α using the Bonferroni Bonferroni method). No significant differences between the absolute linear errors of the two trays (P = 0.100 [ANOVA]) and the two levels (P = 0.400 [ANOVA]) were observed. The assessment of absolute angular errors showed no significant differences (all P values ≥ 0.4 [ANOVA]). The difference between the linear errors in the full-arch vs. sectional trays was not significant in the fixture-level group (P = 0.290). However, in the abutment-level group, the linear error was significantly greater in the sectional tray compared to full-arch tray (P = 0.013, α = 0.025 [Mann-Whitney]). Using sectional trays might not be advantageous over full-arch trays. Sectional trays are not recommended for taking abutment-level impressions. The abutment

  14. Photogrammetry Impression Technique: A Case History Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Monescillo, Andrés; Sánchez-Turrión, Andrés; Vellon-Domarco, Elena; Salinas-Goodier, Carmen; Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this report is to present photogrammetry as a reliable step in the fabrication of a full-arch immediate rehabilitation. A 59-year-old man attended the department seeking dental rehabilitation for the sequelae of severe oral health neglect. The mandibular teeth suffered from advanced periodontal disease and the patient wore a maxillary complete denture. An irreversible hydrocolloid impression of the mandibular arch was made, poured in stone, and digitally scanned to create the first stereolithography (STL) file. All teeth with the exception of two retained as landmarks were extracted, and seven implants were placed under local anesthesia and their positions recorded using photogrammetry. Maxillary and mandibular dental arch alginate impressions were made, poured in laboratory stone, and scanned. A provisional restoration was placed 7 hours after surgery using the STL files to determine the best-fit line. Radiographic and clinical follow-up after 1 year showed a favorable evolution of the implants. No screw loosening or other mechanical or biologic complications were observed. The case history using the described system suggests certain advantages over conventional techniques. More research is needed to assess the possible benefits associated with photogrammetry when making implant-supported restorations.

  15. In Vitro Comparative Evaluation of Different Types of Impression Trays and Impression Materials on the Accuracy of Open Tray Implant Impressions: A Pilot Study

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    Sonam Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. For a precise fit of multiple implant framework, having an accurate definitive cast is imperative. The present study evaluated dimensional accuracy of master casts obtained using different impression trays and materials with open tray impression technique. Materials and Methods. A machined aluminum reference model with four parallel implant analogues was fabricated. Forty implant level impressions were made. Eight groups (n=5 were tested using impression materials (polyether and vinylsiloxanether and four types of impression trays, two being custom (self-cure acrylic and light cure acrylic and two being stock (plastic and metal. The interimplant distances were measured on master casts using a coordinate measuring machine. The collected data was compared with a standard reference model and was statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results. Statistically significant difference (p0.05 was observed between varied stock and custom trays. Conclusions. The polyether impression material proved to be more accurate than vinylsiloxanether impression material. The rigid nonperforated stock trays, both plastic and metal, could be an alternative for custom trays for multi-implant impressions when used with medium viscosity impression materials.

  16. Patients' preferences when comparing analogue implant impressions using a polyether impression material versus digital impressions (Intraoral Scan) of dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismeijer, D.; Mans, R.S.; Van Genuchten, M.J.I.M; Reijers, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective of this clinical study was to assess the patients' perception of the difference between an analogue impression approach on the one hand and an intra-oral scan (IO scan) on the other when restoring implants in the non-aesthetic zone. A second objective was to analyse

  17. Patients' preferences when comparing analogue implant impressions using a polyether impression material versus digital impressions (Intraoral Scan) of dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismeijer, D.; Mans, R.; van Genugten, M.; Reijers, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The primary objective of this clinical study was to assess the patients' perception of the difference between an analogue impression approach on the one hand and an intra-oral scan (IO scan) on the other when restoring implants in the non-aesthetic zone. A second objective was to analyse

  18. An evaluation of student and clinician perception of digital and conventional implant impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang J; Macarthur, Robert X; Gallucci, German O

    2013-11-01

    The accuracy and efficiency of digital implant impressions should match conventional impressions. Comparisons should be made with clinically relevant data. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difficulty level and operator's perception between dental students and experienced clinicians when making digital and conventional implant impressions. Thirty experienced dental professionals and 30 second-year dental students made conventional and digital impressions of a single implant model. A visual analog scale (VAS) and multiple-choice questionnaires were used to assess the participant's perception of difficulty, preference, and effectiveness. Wilcoxon signed-rank test within the groups and Wilcoxon rank-sum test between the groups were used for statistical analysis (α=.05). On a 0 to 100 VAS, the student group scored a mean difficulty level of 43.1 (±18.5) for the conventional impression technique and 30.6 (±17.6) for the digital impression technique (P=.006). The clinician group scored a mean (standard deviation) difficulty level of 30.9 (±19.6) for conventional impressions and 36.5 (±20.6) for digital impressions (P=.280). Comparison between groups showed a mean difficulty level with the conventional impression technique significantly higher in the student group (P=.030). The digital impression was not significantly different between the groups (P=.228). Sixty percent of the students preferred the digital impression and 7% the conventional impression; 33% expressed no preference. In the clinician group, 33% preferred the digital impression and 37% the conventional impression; 30% had no preference. Seventy-seven percent of the student group felt most effective with digital impressions, 10% with conventional impressions, and 13% with either technique, whereas 40% of the clinician group chose the digital impression as the most effective technique, 53% the conventional impression, and 7% either technique. The conventional impression was more difficult to

  19. Accuracy of various impression materials and methods for two implant systems: An effect size study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Alexander; Häussling, Teresa; Rehmann, Peter; Schaaf, Heidrun; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2018-04-01

    An accurate impression is required for implant treatment. The aim of this in-vitro study was to determine the effect size of the impression material/method, implant system and implant angulation on impression transfer precision. An upper jaw model with three BEGO and three Straumann implants (angulations 0°, 15°, 20°) in the left and right maxilla was used as a reference model. One polyether (Impregum Penta) and two polyvinyl siloxanes (Flexitime Monophase/Aquasil Ultra Monophase) were examined with two impression techniques (open and closed tray). A total of 60 impressions were made. A coordinate measurement machine was used to measure the target variables for 3D-shift, implant axis inclination and implant axis rotation. All the data were subjected to a four-way ANOVA. The effect size (partial eta-squared [η 2 P ]) was reported. The impression material had a significant influence on the 3D shift and the implant axis inclination deviation (p-values=.000), and both factors had very large effect sizes (3D-shift [η 2 P ]=.599; implant axis inclination [η 2 P ]=.298). Impressions made with polyvinyl siloxane exhibited the highest transfer precision. When the angulation of the implants was larger, more deviations occurred for the implant axis rotational deviation. The implant systems and impression methods showed partially significant variations (p-values=.001-.639) but only very small effect sizes (η 2 P =.001-.031). The impression material had the greatest effect size on accuracy in terms of the 3D shift and the implant axis inclination. For multiunit restorations with disparallel implants, polyvinyl siloxane materials should be considered. In addition, the effect size of a multivariate investigation should be reported. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Polyvinyl Siloxane Viscosity on Accuracy of Dental Implant Impressions

    OpenAIRE

    Ghahremanloo, Ahmad; Seifi, Mahdieh; Ghanbarzade, Jalil; Abrisham, Seyyed Mohammad; Javan, Rashid Abdolah

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of dental implant impressions obtained by a combination of different impression techniques and viscosities of polyvinyl siloxane (PVS).Materials and Methods: Four parallel fixtures were placed between mental foramina in a master model of lower dental arch. Three different viscosities (putty/light body, medium body/light body, and monophase: heavy body) and direct and indirect techniques (six groups) were used, and seven impressions...

  1. Accuracy of a new elastomeric impression material for complete-arch dental implant impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Mirza R; Buzayan, Muaiyed M; Yunus, Norsiah

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the accuracy of multi-unit dental implant casts obtained from two elastomeric impression materials, vinyl polyether silicone (VPES) and polyether (PE), and to test the effect of splinting of impression copings on the accuracy of implant casts. Forty direct impressions of a mandibular reference model fitted with six dental implants and multibase abutments were made using VPES and PE, and implant casts were poured (N = 20). The VPES and PE groups were split into four subgroups of five each, based on splinting type: (a) no splinting; (b) bite registration polyether; (c) bite registration addition silicone; and (d) autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The accuracy of implant-abutment replica positions was calculated on the experimental casts, in terms of interimplant distances in the x, y, and z-axes, using a coordinate measuring machine; values were compared with those measured on the reference model. Data were analyzed using non-parametrical Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests at α = .05. The differences between the two impression materials, VPES and PE, regardless of splinting type, were not statistically significant (P>.05). Non-splinting and splinting groups were also not significantly different for both PE and VPES (P>.05). The accuracy of VPES impression material seemed comparable with PE for multi-implant abutment-level impressions. Splinting had no effect on the accuracy of implant impressions. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Effect of Polyvinyl Siloxane Viscosity on Accuracy of Dental Implant Impressions

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    Ahmad Ghahremanloo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of dental implant impressions obtained by a combination of different impression techniques and viscosities of polyvinyl siloxane (PVS.Materials and Methods: Four parallel fixtures were placed between mental foramina in a master model of lower dental arch. Three different viscosities (putty/light body, medium body/light body, and monophase: heavy body and direct and indirect techniques (six groups were used, and seven impressions were obtained from each group (n=42. To measure the accuracy of impressions, drift, horizontal, and vertical angles of the implants, as well as the hex rotation of the implants in casts were evaluated using a digitizer device (1μm accuracy, in comparison with master arch. Data were analyzed using five-factor two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test.Results: The accuracy of impressions was assessed and the results showed that direct technique was not significantly different from indirect technique (P>0.05. Also, there were no significant differences between the mentioned viscosities except for the horizontal angle (P=0.006.Conclusions: Viscosity of impression materials is of high significance for the accuracy of dental impressions.Keywords: Dental Materials; Dental Implants; Dental Impression Technique; Viscosity; Vinyl Polysiloxane; Dimensional Measurement Accuracy

  3. Three-dimensional accuracy of a digitally coded healing abutment implant impression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Simon D; Tan, Keson B; Teoh, K H; Cheng, Ansgar C; Nicholls, Jack I

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the three-dimensional (3D) accuracy of the Encode Impression System (EN) in transferring the locations of two implants from master models to test models and compared this to the direct impression (DI) technique. The effect of interimplant angulation on the 3D accuracy of both impression techniques was also evaluated. Seven sectional polymethyl methacrylate mandibular arch master models were fabricated with implants in the first premolar and first molar positions. The implants were placed parallel to each other or angulated mesiodistally or buccolingually with total divergent angles of 10, 20, or 30 degrees. Each master model was secured onto an aluminum block containing a gauge block, which defined the local coordinate references. Encode healing abutments were attached to the implants before impressions were made for the EN test models; pickup impression copings were attached for the DI test models. For the seven test groups of each impression technique, a total of 70 test models were fabricated (n = 5). The EN test models were sent to Biomet 3i for implant analog placement. The centroid of each implant or implant analog and the angular orientation of the long axis relative to the x- and y-axes were measured with a coordinate measuring machine. Statistical analyses were performed. Impression technique had a significant effect on y distortion, global linear distortion, and absolute xz and yz angular distortions. Interimplant angulation had significant effects on x and y distortions. However, neither impression technique nor interimplant angulation had a significant effect on z distortion. Distortions were observed with both impression techniques. However, the results suggest that EN was less accurate than DI.

  4. Three-dimensional accuracy of plastic transfer impression copings for three implant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Juin Wei; Tan, Keson B; Nicholls, Jack I; Wong, Keng Mun; Uy, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the three-dimensional accuracy of indirect plastic impression copings and direct implant-level impression copings from three implant systems (Nobel Biocare [NB], Biomet 3i [3i], and Straumann [STR]) at three interimplant buccolingual angulations (0, 8, and 15 degrees). Two-implant master models were used to simulate a three-unit implant fixed partial denture. Test models were made from Impregum impressions using direct implant-level impression copings (DR). Abutments were then connected to the master models for impressions using the plastic impression copings (INDR) at three different angulations for a total of 18 test groups (n = 5 in each group). A coordinate measuring machine was used to measure linear distortions, three-dimensional (3D) distortions, angular distortions, and absolute angular distortions between the master and test models. Three-way analysis of variance showed that the implant system had a significant effect on 3D distortions and absolute angular distortions in the x- and y-axes. Interimplant angulation had a significant effect on 3D distortions and absolute angular distortions in the y-axis. Impression technique had a significant effect on absolute angular distortions in the y-axis. With DR, the NB and 3i systems were not significantly different. With INDR, 3i appeared to have less distortion than the other systems. Interimplant angulations did not significantly affect the accuracy of NBDR, 3iINDR, and STRINDR. The accuracy of INDR and DR was comparable at all interimplant angulations for 3i and STR. For NB, INDR was comparable to DR at 0 and 8 degrees but was less accurate at 15 degrees. Three-dimensional accuracy of implant impressions varied with implant system, interimplant angulation, and impression technique.

  5. Accuracy of different impression materials in parallel and nonparallel implants

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    Mahroo Vojdani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, in parallel conditions, the type of impression material cannot affect the accuracy of the implant impressions; however, in nonparallel conditions, polyvinyl siloxane is shown to be a better choice, followed by vinyl siloxanether and polyether respectively.

  6. An in vitro comparison of the accuracy of implant impressions with coded healing abutments and different implant angulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abdullah, Khaled; Zandparsa, Roya; Finkelman, Matthew; Hirayama, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Fabricating implant definitive casts with CAD/CAM technology (Robocasts) from coded healing abutment impressions represents a simpler and innovative alternative to conventional implant impression techniques. However, information about the accuracy of the impressions and the resultant definitive casts is limited. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Robocasts and compare them to those definitive casts fabricated with conventional implant impression techniques (open tray with splinted impression copings technique). A reference epoxy resin cast was fabricated and shaped to simulate a dental arch. Two regular platform implant replicas (Biomet 3i Certain, 4.1 mm diameter and 15 mm length) with internal connections were placed 10 mm apart with a 10-degree convergence for one side of the reference resin cast and a 30-degree convergence for the other. Coded healing abutments (Encode) were placed at 3 different heights above the level of the soft tissue replication material (approximately 1, 2, and 4 mm) and served as test groups (E1, E2, and E4), and open trays with splinted impression copings (OTSC) served as a control group. The control group was compared to the impressions of the coded healing abutments by using a standardized measurement protocol. Impressions were made for each group (n=18) and poured with vacuum mixed (100 g powder/20 mL water) Type IV dental stone. The vertical discrepancy (Z axis) between 2 prefabricated passively fitting titanium reference frameworks and the platforms of the implant replicas was measured with an optical comparator applying the 1 screw test. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc Mann-Whitney U tests, as well as the Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. The Bonferroni correction was used to account for multiple comparisons. The significance level (α) used in a given set of tests was equal to .05 divided by the number of tests performed in that set. The median vertical discrepancy of each coded healing

  7. A clinical report on the use of closed-tray, hex-lock-friction-fit implant impression copings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviv, Eli; Hanna, Jan; Raviv, Roy; Harel-Raviv, Mili

    2014-08-01

    The precision of an impression determines the subsequent accuracy and fit of the final restoration. Therefore, the ultimate search is for the most accurate impression material and the most efficient and least time consuming technique. One of the major debates in implant dentistry has focused on the advantages of the pick-up versus the transfer impression technique. The pick-up technique is widely accepted as the more accurate. However, the conventional transfer technique is simpler and less time consuming. The Hex-Lock-Friction-Fit impression coping (AB Dental Devices) combines the advantages of the transfer impression technique and the pick-up impression technique. In this article we will review the relevant literature, discuss the advantages of this unique implant impression technique, and present some related clinical cases.

  8. Preliminary impression techniques for microstomia patients

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    K Aswini Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Prosthetic rehabilitation of microstomia patients presents difficulties at all the stages. The difficulty starts with the preliminary impression making. This is due to the tongue rigidity and the decreased oral opening. A maximum oral opening which is smaller than the size of the tray can make prosthetic treatment challenging. Due to the restricted mouth opening, insertion and removal of the impression trays is extremely cumbersome and various modifications of the trays have been used in the past. Among these are the flexible trays and the sectional trays used with different modes of reassembling the segments extra orally after the impression is made. This article reviews the literature published from 1971 to 2015 concerning preliminary impression techniques used in making impressions for patients with microstomia based on various tray designs. An electronic search was performed across three databases (PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scolar for relevant citations. The keywords/combinations used for the search were microstomia, limited/constricted/restricted mouth opening/oral access, trismus, sectional trays, impressions and prosthetic/prosthodontic rehabilitation. The search was limited to papers written in English which resulted in a total of 45 related articles of which 17 articles were included for discussion of this review.

  9. A Comparative Evaluation of the Linear Dimensional Accuracy of Four Impression Techniques using Polyether Impression Material

    OpenAIRE

    Manoj, Smita Sara; Cherian, K. P.; Chitre, Vidya; Aras, Meena

    2013-01-01

    There is much discussion in the dental literature regarding the superiority of one impression technique over the other using addition silicone impression material. However, there is inadequate information available on the accuracy of different impression techniques using polyether. The purpose of this study was to assess the linear dimensional accuracy of four impression techniques using polyether on a laboratory model that simulates clinical practice. The impression material used was Impregu...

  10. Effect of Polyvinyl Siloxane Viscosity on Accuracy of Dental Implant Impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahremanloo, Ahmad; Seifi, Mahdieh; Ghanbarzade, Jalil; Abrisham, Seyyed Mohammad; Javan, Rashid Abdolah

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of dental implant impressions obtained by a combination of different impression techniques and viscosities of polyvinyl siloxane (PVS). Four parallel fixtures were placed between mental foramina in a master model of lower dental arch. Three different viscosities (putty/light body, medium body/light body, and monophase: heavy body) and direct and indirect techniques (six groups) were used, and seven impressions were obtained from each group (n=42). To measure the accuracy of impressions, drift, horizontal, and vertical angles of the implants, as well as the hex rotation of the implants in casts were evaluated using a digitizer device (1μm accuracy), in comparison with master arch. Data were analyzed using five-factor two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. The accuracy of impressions was assessed and the results showed that direct technique was not significantly different from indirect technique (P>0.05). Also, there were no significant differences between the mentioned viscosities except for the horizontal angle (P=0.006). Viscosity of impression materials is of high significance for the accuracy of dental impressions.

  11. Accuracy of Digital vs Conventional Implant Impression Approach: A Three-Dimensional Comparative In Vitro Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaki, Kinga; Alkumru, Hasan; De Souza, Grace; Finer, Yoav

    To assess the three-dimensional (3D) accuracy and clinical acceptability of implant definitive casts fabricated using a digital impression approach and to compare the results with those of a conventional impression method in a partially edentulous condition. A mandibular reference model was fabricated with implants in the first premolar and molar positions to simulate a patient with bilateral posterior edentulism. Ten implant-level impressions per method were made using either an intraoral scanner with scanning abutments for the digital approach or an open-tray technique and polyvinylsiloxane material for the conventional approach. 3D analysis and comparison of implant location on resultant definitive casts were performed using laser scanner and quality control software. The inter-implant distances and interimplant angulations for each implant pair were measured for the reference model and for each definitive cast (n = 20 per group); these measurements were compared to calculate the magnitude of error in 3D for each definitive cast. The influence of implant angulation on definitive cast accuracy was evaluated for both digital and conventional approaches. Statistical analysis was performed using t test (α = .05) for implant position and angulation. Clinical qualitative assessment of accuracy was done via the assessment of the passivity of a master verification stent for each implant pair, and significance was analyzed using chi-square test (α = .05). A 3D error of implant positioning was observed for the two impression techniques vs the reference model, with mean ± standard deviation (SD) error of 116 ± 94 μm and 56 ± 29 μm for the digital and conventional approaches, respectively (P = .01). In contrast, the inter-implant angulation errors were not significantly different between the two techniques (P = .83). Implant angulation did not have a significant influence on definitive cast accuracy within either technique (P = .64). The verification stent

  12. Evaluation of accuracy of complete-arch multiple-unit abutment-level dental implant impressions using different impression and splinting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzayan, Muaiyed; Baig, Mirza Rustum; Yunus, Norsiah

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the accuracy of multiple-unit dental implant casts obtained from splinted or nonsplinted direct impression techniques using various splinting materials by comparing the casts to the reference models. The effect of two different impression materials on the accuracy of the implant casts was also evaluated for abutment-level impressions. A reference model with six internal-connection implant replicas placed in the completely edentulous mandibular arch and connected to multi-base abutments was fabricated from heat-curing acrylic resin. Forty impressions of the reference model were made, 20 each with polyether (PE) and polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) impression materials using the open tray technique. The PE and PVS groups were further subdivided into four subgroups of five each on the bases of splinting type: no splinting, bite registration PE, bite registration addition silicone, or autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The positional accuracy of the implant replica heads was measured on the poured casts using a coordinate measuring machine to assess linear differences in interimplant distances in all three axes. The collected data (linear and three-dimensional [3D] displacement values) were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference resin model and analyzed with nonparametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney). No significant differences were found between the various splinting groups for both PE and PVS impression materials in terms of linear and 3D distortions. However, small but significant differences were found between the two impression materials (PVS, 91 μm; PE, 103 μm) in terms of 3D discrepancies, irrespective of the splinting technique employed. Casts obtained from both impression materials exhibited differences from the reference model. The impression material influenced impression inaccuracy more than the splinting material for multiple-unit abutment-level impressions.

  13. A Comparative Evaluation of the Linear Dimensional Accuracy of Four Impression Techniques using Polyether Impression Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoj, Smita Sara; Cherian, K P; Chitre, Vidya; Aras, Meena

    2013-12-01

    There is much discussion in the dental literature regarding the superiority of one impression technique over the other using addition silicone impression material. However, there is inadequate information available on the accuracy of different impression techniques using polyether. The purpose of this study was to assess the linear dimensional accuracy of four impression techniques using polyether on a laboratory model that simulates clinical practice. The impression material used was Impregum Soft™, 3 M ESPE and the four impression techniques used were (1) Monophase impression technique using medium body impression material. (2) One step double mix impression technique using heavy body and light body impression materials simultaneously. (3) Two step double mix impression technique using a cellophane spacer (heavy body material used as a preliminary impression to create a wash space with a cellophane spacer, followed by the use of light body material). (4) Matrix impression using a matrix of polyether occlusal registration material. The matrix is loaded with heavy body material followed by a pick-up impression in medium body material. For each technique, thirty impressions were made of a stainless steel master model that contained three complete crown abutment preparations, which were used as the positive control. Accuracy was assessed by measuring eight dimensions (mesiodistal, faciolingual and inter-abutment) on stone dies poured from impressions of the master model. A two-tailed t test was carried out to test the significance in difference of the distances between the master model and the stone models. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for multiple group comparison followed by the Bonferroni's test for pair wise comparison. The accuracy was tested at α = 0.05. In general, polyether impression material produced stone dies that were smaller except for the dies produced from the one step double mix impression technique. The ANOVA revealed a highly

  14. Dental impression technique using optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Barua, Souman; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Gabor, Alin Gabriel; Zaharia, Cristian; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2018-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: The use of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) as a non-invasive and high precision quantitative information providing tool has been well established by researches within the last decade. The marginal discrepancy values can be scrutinized in optical biopsy made in three dimensional (3D) micro millimetre scale and reveal detailed qualitative and quantitative information of soft and hard tissues. OCT-based high resolution 3D images can provide a significant impact on finding recurrent caries, restorative failure, analysing the precision of crown preparation, and prosthetic elements marginal adaptation error with the gingiva and dental hard tissues. During the CAD/CAM process of prosthodontic restorations, the circumvent of any error is important for the practitioner and the technician to reduce waste of time and material. Additionally, OCT images help to achieve a new or semi-skilled practitioner to analyse their crown preparation works and help to develop their skills faster than in a conventional way. The aim of this study is to highlight the advantages of OCT in high precision prosthodontic restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 25 preparations of frontal and lateral teeth were performed for 7 different patients. The impressions of the prosthetic fields were obtained both using a conventional optoelectronic system (Apolo Di, Syrona) and a Spectral Domain using OCT (Dental prototype, working at 860 nm). For the conventional impression technique the preparation margins were been prelevated by gingival impregnated cords. No specific treatments were performed by the OCT impression technique. RESULTS: The scanning performed by conventional optoelectronic system proved to be quick and accurate in terms of impression technology. The results were represented by 3D virtual models obtained after the scanning procedure was completed. In order to obtain a good optical impression a gingival retraction cord was inserted between the prepared tooth and the gingival

  15. Digital vs. conventional full-arch implant impressions: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Sarah; Weber, Hans Peter; Finkelman, Matthew; El Rafie, Khaled; Kudara, Yukio; Papaspyridakos, Panos

    2017-11-01

    To test whether or not digital full-arch implant impressions with two different intra-oral scanners (CEREC Omnicam and True Definition) have the same accuracy as conventional ones. The hypothesis was that the splinted open-tray impressions would be more accurate than digital full-arch impressions. A stone master cast representing an edentulous mandible using five internal connection implant analogs (Straumann Bone Level RC, Basel, Switzerland) was fabricated. The three median implants were parallel to each other, the far left implant had 10°, and the far right had 15° distal angulation. A splinted open-tray technique was used for the conventional polyether impressions (n = 10) for Group 1. Digital impressions (n = 10) were taken with two intra-oral optical scanners (CEREC Omnicam and 3M True Definition) after connecting polymer scan bodies to the master cast for groups 2 and 3. Master cast and conventional impression test casts were digitized with a high-resolution reference scanner (Activity 880 scanner; Smart Optics, Bochum, Germany) to obtain digital files. Standard tessellation language (STL) datasets from the three test groups of digital and conventional impressions were superimposed with the STL dataset from the master cast to assess the 3D deviations. Deviations were recorded as root-mean-square error. To compare the master cast with conventional and digital impressions at the implant level, Welch's F-test was used together with Games-Howell post hoc test. Group I had a mean value of 167.93 μm (SD 50.37); Group II (Omnicam) had a mean value of 46.41 μm (SD 7.34); Group III (True Definition) had a mean value of 19.32 μm (SD 2.77). Welch's F-test was used together with the Games-Howell test for post hoc comparisons. Welch's F-test showed a significant difference between the groups (P digital implant impressions using True Definition scanner and Omnicam were significantly more accurate than the conventional impressions with the splinted open

  16. Precision of fit between implant impression coping and implant replica pairs for three implant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Roxanna J; Sun, Albert; Haney, Stephan; Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2013-01-01

    The fabrication of an accurately fitting implant-supported fixed prosthesis requires multiple steps, the first of which is assembling the impression coping on the implant. An imprecise fit of the impression coping on the implant will cause errors that will be magnified in subsequent steps of prosthesis fabrication. The purpose of this study was to characterize the 3-dimensional (3D) precision of fit between impression coping and implant replica pairs for 3 implant systems. The selected implant systems represent the 3 main joint types used in implant dentistry: external hexagonal, internal trilobe, and internal conical. Ten impression copings and 10 implant replicas from each of the 3 systems, B (Brånemark System), R (NobelReplace Select), and A (NobelActive) were paired. A standardized aluminum test body was luted to each impression coping, and the corresponding implant replica was embedded in a stone base. A coordinate measuring machine was used to quantify the maximum range of displacement in a vertical direction as a function of the tightening force applied to the guide pin. Maximum angular displacement in a horizontal plane was measured as a function of manual clockwise or counterclockwise rotation. Vertical and rotational positioning was analyzed by using 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The Fisher protected least significant difference (PLSD) multiple comparisons test of the means was applied when the F-test in the ANOVA was significant (α=.05). The mean and standard deviation for change in the vertical positioning of impression copings was 4.3 ±2.1 μm for implant system B, 2.8 ±4.2 μm for implant system R, and 20.6 ±8.8 μm for implant system A. The mean and standard deviation for rotational positioning was 3.21 ±0.98 degrees for system B, 2.58 ±1.03 degrees for system R, and 5.30 ±0.79 degrees for system A. The P-value for vertical positioning between groups A and B and between groups A and R was <.001. No significant differences were found for

  17. Digital versus conventional implant impressions for partially edentulous arches: An evaluation of accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marghalani, Amin; Weber, Hans-Peter; Finkelman, Matthew; Kudara, Yukio; El Rafie, Khaled; Papaspyridakos, Panos

    2018-04-01

    To the authors' knowledge, while accuracy outcomes of the TRIOS scanner have been compared with conventional impressions, no available data are available regarding the accuracy of digital scans with the Omnicam and True Definition scanners versus conventional impressions for partially edentulous arches. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the accuracy of digital implant scans using 2 different intraoral scanners (IOSs) with that of conventional impressions for partially edentulous arches. Two partially edentulous mandibular casts with 2 implant analogs with a 30-degree angulation from 2 different implant systems (Replace Select RP; Nobel Biocare and Tissue level RN; Straumann) were used as controls. Sixty digital models were made from these 2 definitive casts in 6 different groups (n=10). Splinted implant-level impression procedures followed by digitization were used to produce the first 2 groups. The next 2 groups were produced by digital scanning with Omnicam. The last 2 groups were produced by digital scanning with the True Definition scanner. Accuracy was evaluated by superimposing the digital files of each test group onto the digital file of the controls with inspection software. The difference in 3-dimensional (3D) deviations (median ±interquartile range) among the 3 impression groups for Nobel Biocare was statistically significant among all groups (P3D deviations among the 3 impression groups for Straumann was statistically significant among all groups (P=.003), except for the conventional impression (22 ±5 μm) and True Definition (17 ±5 μm) groups; the median ±interquartile range for the Omnicam group was 26 ±15 μm. The difference in 3D deviations between the 2 implant systems was significant for the Omnicam (P=.011) and conventional (Pimpression techniques but not for the True Definition technique (P=.247). Within the limitations of this study, both the impression technique and the implant system affected accuracy. The True

  18. Effect of technique and impression material on the vertical misfit of a screw-retained, three-unit implant bridge: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Rajati Haghi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the following conclusions can be drawn: The impression method had no effect on marginal discrepancy of 3-unit screw retained fixed partial dentures. A higher marginal accuracy was obtained using polyether impression material compared to polyvinyl siloxane.

  19. Evaluation of accuracy of multiple dental implant impressions using various splinting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Rasasubramanian; Shankar, Chitra; Rajan, Manoj; Baig, Mirza Rustum; Azhagarasan, N S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of casts obtained from nonsplinted and splinted direct impression techniques employing various splinting materials for multiple dental implants. A reference model with four Nobel Replace Select implant replicas in the anterior mandible was fabricated with denture base heat-curing acrylic resin. Impressions of the reference model were made using polyether impression material by direct nonsplinted and splinted techniques. Impressions were divided into four groups: group A: nonsplinted technique; group B: acrylic resin-splinted technique; group C: bite registration addition silicone-splinted technique; and group D: bite registration polyether-splinted technique. Four impressions were made for each group and casts were poured in type IV dental stone. Linear differences in interimplant distances in the x-, y-, and z-axes and differences in interimplant angulations in the z-axis were measured on the casts using a coordinate measuring machine. The interimplant distance D1y showed significant variations in all four test groups (P = .043), while D3x values varied significantly between the acrylic resin-splinted and silicone-splinted groups. Casts obtained from the polyether-splinted group were the closest to the reference model in the x- and y-axes. In the z-axis, D2z values varied significantly among the three test groups (P = .009). Casts from the acrylic resin-splinted group were the closest to the reference model in the z-axis. Also, one of the three angles measured (angle 2) showed significant differences within three test groups (P = .009). Casts from the nonsplinted group exhibited the smallest angular differences. Casts obtained from all four impression techniques exhibited differences from the reference model. Casts obtained using the bite registration polyether-splinted technique were the most accurate versus the reference model, followed by those obtained via the acrylic resin-splinted, nonsplinted, and

  20. In Vitro Implant Impression Accuracy Using a New Photopolymerizing SDR Splinting Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiore, Adolfo; Meneghello, Roberto; Savio, Gianpaolo; Sivolella, Stefano; Katsoulis, Joannis; Stellini, Edoardo

    2015-10-01

    The study aims to evaluate three-dimensionally (3D) the accuracy of implant impressions using a new resin splinting material, "Smart Dentin Replacement" (SDR). A titanium model of an edentulous mandible with six implant analogues was used as a master model and its dimensions measured with a coordinate measuring machine. Before the total 60 impressions were taken (open tray, screw-retained abutments, vinyl polysiloxane), they were divided in four groups: A (test): copings pick-up splinted with dental floss and fotopolymerizing SDR; B (test): see A, additionally sectioned and splinted again with SDR; C (control): copings pick-up splinted with dental floss and autopolymerizing Duralay® (Reliance Dental Mfg. Co., Alsip, IL, USA) acrylic resin; and D (control): see C, additionally sectioned and splinted again with Duralay. The impressions were measured directly with an optomechanical coordinate measuring machine and analyzed with a computer-aided design (CAD) geometric modeling software. The Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test was used to compare groups. While there was no difference (p = .430) between the mean 3D deviations of the test groups A (17.5 μm) and B (17.4 μm), they both showed statistically significant differences (p impression techniques for edentulous jaws with multiple implants are highly accurate using the new fotopolymerizing splinting material SDR. Sectioning and rejoining of the SDR splinting had no impact on the impression accuracy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Management of the flabby ridge using a modified window technique and polyvinylsiloxane impression material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaf Labban

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Flabby ridge is a common clinical finding affecting the alveolar ridges of the mandibular or maxillary arches. The anterior region of maxilla is the most affected area in edentulous patients. Dentures on flabby ridges have compromised stability, support, and retention unless adequate measures for its management are employed. Methods applied for flabby ridge management, include surgical removal and augmentation, special impression techniques, balanced distribution of occlusal loads and implant therapy. Special impressions often involve window technique for static impression of flabby area, which present multiple challenges. The purpose of this technique report is to present a modified window technique for the impression of anterior maxillary flabby tissues for improved and controlled application of polyvinylsiloxane impression material that are routinely available in dental practice.

  2. A clinical report on the use of closed tray, hex-lock-friction-fit implant impression copings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviv, Eli; Hana, Jan; Raviv, Roy; Harel-Raviv, Mili

    2012-04-17

    Abstract AbstractThe precision of an impression determines the subsequent accuracy and fit of thefinal restoration. Therefore, the ultimate search is for the most accurate impressionmaterial and technique that is also the most efficient and least time consuming. One ofthe major debates in implant dentistry has been between the pick up versus the transferimpression technique. The pick up technique is widely accepted as the more accurate.However, the conventional transfer technique is simpler and less time consuming. TheHex-Lock-Friction-Fit impression coping (AB Dental Devices®) combines theadvantages of both the transfer impression technique and the pick up impressiontechnique. In this article we will review the relevant literature, discuss the advantages ofthis unique implant impression technique and present some related clinical cases.

  3. Two-step impression/ injection, an alternative putty/ wash impression technique: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputi, S; Murmura, G; Sinjari, B; Varvara, G

    2012-01-01

    We here describe a new technique for making a definitive impression that we refer to as the two-step impression/injection technique. This technique initially follows the classical one-step putty/ light-body impression technique with the polymerization of the putty and the light-body compound. This is then followed by the second step: injection of extra-light-body compound into the preparation through a hole in the metal stock tray. The aim of this additional step is to control the wash bulk and minimize the changes that can produce unfavorable impression results. This new two-step impression/injection technique allows displacement of soft tissues, such as the tongue, during the first seating of the putty and wash materials, while in the second step, the extra-light-body compound records all of the finer details without being compressed.

  4. Examination of the Position Accuracy of Implant Abutments Reproduced by Intra-Oral Optical Impression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaira, Chikayuki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    An impression technique called optical impression using intraoral scanner has attracted attention in digital dentistry. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the optical impression, comparing a virtual model reproduced by an intraoral scanner to a working cast made by conventional silicone impression technique. Two implants were placed on a master model. Working casts made of plaster were fabricated from the master model by silicone impression. The distance between the ball abutments and the angulation between the healing abutments of 5 mm and 7 mm height at master model were measured using Computer Numerical Control Coordinate Measuring Machine (CNCCMM) as control. Working casts were then measured using CNCCMM, and virtual models via stereo lithography data of master model were measured by a three-dimensional analyzing software. The distance between ball abutments of the master model was 9634.9 ± 1.2 μm. The mean values of trueness of the Lava COS and working casts were 64.5 μm and 22.5 μm, respectively, greater than that of control. The mean of precision values of the Lava COS and working casts were 15.6 μm and 13.5 μm, respectively. In the case of a 5-mm-height healing abutment, mean angulation error of the Lava COS was greater than that of the working cast, resulting in significant differences in trueness and precision. However, in the case of a 7-mm-height abutment, mean angulation errors of the Lava COS and the working cast were not significantly different in trueness and precision. Therefore, distance errors of the optical impression were slightly greater than those of conventional impression. Moreover, the trueness and precision of angulation error could be improved in the optical impression using longer healing abutments. In the near future, the development of information technology could enable improvement in the accuracy of the optical impression with intraoral scanners. PMID:27706225

  5. Torque resistance of impression copings after direct implant impression: An in vitro evaluation of impression materials with and without adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auroy, Pascal; Nicolas, Emanuel; Bedouin, Yvan

    2017-01-01

    No data are available on the ability of an impression coping to resist the manual placement of an abutment replica (implant analog) during prosthodontic laboratory procedures after a direct (pick-up) impression. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the torque resistance of impression copings after a direct impression, that is, the amount of rotational torque sufficient to induce irreversible displacement of impression copings in the impression material bulk once the impression has been made. A reference model with 5 abutment replicas was constructed. Five impression copings were screwed onto the abutment replicas, and standardized impressions were made. A controlled twisting force was applied to each impression coping. A torque tester recorded the torque variation. Three elastomeric impression materials were tested. ANOVA and the Tukey test (α=.05) were performed using an average of 30 measurements per impression material, with and without adhesive. ANOVA and the Tukey test results showed that the adhesive, cohesive, and mechanical bonds between the impression coping and the impression material depended greatly on the type of material and that the average rupture threshold of these bonds was statistically significantly different in pairwise comparisons (Ptorque. The polyether impression material is the direct impression material that showed the highest breakdown threshold for adhesive bonding when used without an adhesive. The use of an adhesive on impression copings leads to irreversible deformation of the interface at torque stresses well below the adhesive bond threshold of the same materials used without an adhesive. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Digital versus analog complete-arch impressions for single-unit premolar implant crowns: Operating time and patient preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepke, Ulf; Meijer, Henny J A; Kerdijk, Wouter; Cune, Marco S

    2015-09-01

    Digital impression-making techniques are supposedly more patient friendly and less time-consuming than analog techniques, but evidence is lacking to substantiate this assumption. The purpose of this in vivo within-subject comparison study was to examine patient perception and time consumption for 2 complete-arch impression-making methods: a digital and an analog technique. Fifty participants with a single missing premolar were included. Treatment consisted of implant therapy. Three months after implant placement, complete-arch digital (Cerec Omnicam; Sirona) and analog impressions (semi-individual tray, Impregum; 3M ESPE) were made, and the participant's opinion was evaluated with a standard questionnaire addressing several domains (inconvenience, shortness of breath, fear of repeating the impression, and feelings of helplessness during the procedure) with the visual analog scale. All participants were asked which procedure they preferred. Operating time was measured with a stopwatch. The differences between impressions made for maxillary and mandibular implants were also compared. The data were analyzed with paired and independent sample t tests, and effect sizes were calculated. Statistically significant differences were found in favor of the digital procedure regarding all subjective domains (P<.001), with medium to large effect sizes. Of all the participants, over 80% preferred the digital procedure to the analog procedure. The mean duration of digital impression making was 6 minutes and 39 seconds (SD=1:51) versus 12 minutes and 13 seconds (SD=1:24) for the analog impression (P<.001, effect size=2.7). Digital impression making for the restoration of a single implant crown takes less time than analog impression making. Furthermore, participants preferred the digital scan and reported less inconvenience, less shortness of breath, less fear of repeating the impression, and fewer feelings of helplessness during the procedure. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council

  7. Dimensional Accuracy of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic VPS Impression Materials Using Different Impression Techniques - An Invitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Ajai; Pathipaka, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The dimensional stability of the impression material could have an influence on the accuracy of the final restoration. Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression materials (VPS) are most frequently used as the impression material in fixed prosthodontics. As VPS is hydrophobic when it is poured with gypsum products, manufacturers added intrinsic surfactants and marketed as hydrophilic VPS. These hydrophilic VPS have shown increased wettability with gypsum slurries. VPS are available in different viscosities ranging from very low to very high for usage under different impression techniques. Aim To compare the dimensional accuracy of hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS using monophase, one step and two step putty wash impression techniques. Materials and Methods To test the dimensional accuracy of the impression materials a stainless steel die was fabricated as prescribed by ADA specification no. 19 for elastomeric impression materials. A total of 60 impressions were made. The materials were divided into two groups, Group1 hydrophilic VPS (Aquasil) and Group 2 hydrophobic VPS (Variotime). These were further divided into three subgroups A, B, C for monophase, one-step and two-step putty wash technique with 10 samples in each subgroup. The dimensional accuracy of the impressions was evaluated after 24 hours using vertical profile projector with lens magnification range of 20X-125X illumination. The study was analyzed through one-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey HSD test and unpaired t-test for mean comparison between groups. Results Results showed that the three different impression techniques (monophase, 1-step, 2-step putty wash techniques) did cause significant change in dimensional accuracy between hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS impression materials. One-way ANOVA disclosed, mean dimensional change and SD for hydrophilic VPS varied between 0.56% and 0.16%, which were low, suggesting hydrophilic VPS was satisfactory with all three impression techniques. However, mean

  8. Evaluation in Accuracy to Two Impression Techniques: In Case of Bone Anchored Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sularsih Sularsih

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the accuracy of two procedures: open tray with splinting technique and closed tray impression techniques, in innovative in vitro experiments. Materials and Methods: One master cast was fabricated with 4 abutment replica implants with almost parallel position in an anterior region of an edentuloys mandibular plaster cast. The working cast was taken impessions with open tray splinting technique (group 1 and closed tray technique (group 2 using polyvinyl siloxane impression material. The Type III dental stone ws poured into around the impressions. The accuracy of impression procedured were measured 24 hours long after pouring dental stone to each impression. Four sited were marked to measured on every platform of implant analogs. The analyzing stylus was positioned to each site and the heights, horizontal inclination and saggital incliniation were measured using the Laser displacement transducer (LK G115; Keyence, Osaka, Japan. Measurements of these 16 points of four implants per a model was repeated 7 times under the same condition. The gap between the abutment and superstructure at one screw test was evaluated with a digital microscope system (VH-Z100 & VH-5000; Keyence, Osaka, Japan. The mean and standard deviation estimated from the samples of each subgroup were statistically analyzed by ANOVA test (P<0.05 as the level of significance. Results: The relative differences of implant heights, horizontal inclination and saggital inclination of each implant on closed tray technique was statistically different to master cast and open tray with splinting (P<0.005. Conclusion: The open tray technique was more accurate comparing to the closed tray technique. The gap between the abutment and superstructure in the open tray with splinting technique was smaller comparing to closed tray technique.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v17i1.111

  9. Accuracy of a self-perforating impression tray for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotti, Juliana; Tortamano, Pedro; Castilho, Tatiana R R N; Steagall, Washington; Wolfart, Stefan; Haselhuhn, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    Difficulties are involved in impression making with conventional open impression trays. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of transferring implant impressions with a self-perforating impression tray. A reference model of a mandible was fabricated, and 4 implants were placed in the regions of the first premolars and lateral incisors (implants 1, 2, 3, 4). Ten impressions of the reference model with polyvinyl siloxane were made for each group; control (conventional open impression tray) and test (self-perforating impression tray; Miratray Implant). A metal bar was screw-retained on implant 1, and the gaps generated at the vestibular face of implants 3 and 4 were measured by optical microcopy. The 2-way ANOVA and least square difference post hoc test were used (α=.05). Higher mean (±SD) values were obtained for the test group than for the control group for both implants: implant 3: 150 ±84 μm for the test group, 73 ±63 μm for the control group (P=.019); implant 4: 129 ±65 μm for the test group, 62 ±61 μm for the control group (P=.04). The self-perforating impression tray provided less accuracy than the conventional open tray. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Management of excessive movable tissue: a modified impression technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Michael H C; Pow, Edmond H N

    2014-08-01

    Excessive movable tissue is a challenge in complete denture prosthetics. A modified impression technique is presented with polyvinyl siloxane impression material and a custom tray with relief areas and perforations in the area of the excessive movable tissue. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dental Students' Perceptions of Digital and Conventional Impression Techniques: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzmann, Nicola U; Kovaltschuk, Irina; Lenherr, Patrik; Dedem, Philipp; Joda, Tim

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to analyze inexperienced dental students' perceptions of the difficulty and applicability of digital and conventional implant impressions and their preferences including performance. Fifty undergraduate dental students at a dental school in Switzerland were randomly divided into two groups (2×25). Group A first took digital impressions in a standardized phantom model and then conventional impressions, while the procedures were reversed for Group B. Participants were asked to complete a VAS questionnaire (0-100) on the level of difficulty and applicability (user/patient-friendliness) of both techniques. They were asked which technique they preferred and perceived to be more efficient. A quotient of "effective scan time per software-recorded time" (TRIOS) was calculated as an objective quality indicator for intraoral optical scanning (IOS). The majority of students perceived IOS as easier than the conventional technique. Most (72%) preferred the digital approach using IOS to take the implant impression to the conventional method (12%) or had no preference (12%). Although total work was similar for males and females, the TRIOS quotient indicated that male students tended to use their time more efficiently. In this study, dental students with no clinical experience were very capable of acquiring digital tools, indicating that digital impression techniques can be included early in the dental curriculum to help them catch up with ongoing development in computer-assisted technologies used in oral rehabilitation.

  12. A Validation Study of the Impression Replica Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerström, Sofia; Wiking-Lima de Faria, Johanna; Braian, Michael; Ameri, Arman; Ahlgren, Camilla

    2018-04-17

    To validate the well-known and often-used impression replica technique for measuring fit between a preparation and a crown in vitro. The validation consisted of three steps. First, a measuring instrument was validated to elucidate its accuracy. Second, a specimen consisting of male and female counterparts was created and validated by the measuring instrument. Calculations were made for the exact values of three gaps between the male and female. Finally, impression replicas were produced of the specimen gaps and sectioned into four pieces. The replicas were then measured with the use of a light microscope. The values received from measuring the specimen were then compared with the values received from the impression replicas, and the technique was thereby validated. The impression replica technique overvalued all measured gaps. Depending on location of the three measuring sites, the difference between the specimen and the impression replicas varied from 47 to 130 μm. The impression replica technique overestimates gaps within the range of 2% to 11%. The validation of the replica technique enables the method to be used as a reference when testing other methods for evaluating fit in dentistry. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Complete Denture Impression Techniques Practiced by Private Dental Practitioners: A Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Kakatkar, Vinay R.

    2012-01-01

    Impression making is an important step in fabricating complete dentures. A survey to know the materials used and techniques practiced while recording complete denture impressions was conducted. It is disheartening to know that 33 % practitioners still use base plate custom trays to record final impressions. 8 % still use alginate for making final impressions. An acceptable technique for recording CD impressions is suggested.

  14. Accuracy of digital impression in dental implants: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Sudabe Kulivand; Maryam Moslemion

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of dental implants remains one of the most challenging aspects of implant dentistry. Although it is not clear whether prosthetic misfit could affect osseointegration, mechanical complications of implant-supported prostheses can be avoided by achieving a good passive fit between the framework and the implants. Passive fit is a difficult concept to define. Obtaining absolute passive fit of the prosthetic framework on implants has been reported to be nearly impossible. Because of ...

  15. Precision and Accuracy of a Digital Impression Scanner in Full-Arch Implant Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Paolo; Pera, Francesco; Setti, Paolo; Menini, Maria

    To evaluate the accuracy and precision of a digital scanner used to scan four implants positioned according to an immediate loading implant protocol and to assess the accuracy of an aluminum framework fabricated from a digital impression. Five master casts reproducing different edentulous maxillae with four tilted implants were used. Four scan bodies were screwed onto the low-profile abutments, and a digital intraoral scanner was used to perform five digital impressions of each master cast. To assess trueness, a metal framework of the best digital impression was produced with computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) technology and passive fit was assessed with the Sheffield test. Gaps between the frameworks and the implant analogs were measured with a stereomicroscope. To assess precision, three-dimensional (3D) point cloud processing software was used to measure the deviations between the five digital impressions of each cast by producing a color map. The deviation values were grouped in three classes, and differences were assessed between class 2 (representing lower discrepancies) and the assembled classes 1 and 3 (representing the higher negative and positive discrepancies, respectively). The frameworks showed a mean gap of 3D point cloud software, with higher frequencies of points in class 2 than in grouped classes 1 and 3 (P impression may represent a reliable method for fabricating full-arch implant frameworks with good passive fit when tilted implants are present.

  16. A comparative study of the accuracy between plastic and metal impression transfer copings for implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Monica A; Paez de Mendoza, Carmen Y; Platt, Jeffrey A; Levon, John A; Hovijitra, Suteera T; Nimmo, Arthur

    2013-07-01

    A precise transfer of the position and orientation of the antirotational mechanism of an implant to the working cast is particularly important to achieve optimal fit of the final restoration. This study evaluated and compared the accuracy of metal and plastic impression copings for use in a full-arch mandibular edentulous simulation with four implants. Metal and plastic impression transfer copings for two implant systems, Nobel Biocare™ Replace and Straumann SynOcta®, were assessed on a laboratory model to simulate clinical practice. The accuracy of producing stone casts using these plastic and metal impression transfer copings was measured against a standard prosthetic framework consisting of a cast gold bar. A total of 20 casts from the four combinations were obtained. The fit of the framework on the cast was tested by a noncontact surface profilometer, the Proscan 3D 2000 A, using the one-screw test. The effects of implant/system and impression/coping material on gap measurements were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. The findings of this in vitro study were as follows: plastic copings demonstrated significantly larger average gaps than metal for Straumann (p = 0.001). Plastic and metal copings were not significantly different for Nobel (p = 0.302). Nobel had significantly larger average gaps than Straumann for metal copings (p = 0.003). Nobel had marginally smaller average gaps than Straumann (p = 0.096) for plastic copings. The system-by-screw location interaction was significant as well (p impression copings were more accurate than plastic copings when using the Straumann system, and there was no difference between metal and plastic copings for the Nobel Replace system. The system-by-screw location was not conclusive, showing no correlation within each system. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. A comparison of the accuracy of polyether, polyvinyl siloxane, and plaster impressions for long-span implant-supported prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoods-Moonsammy, Vyonne J; Owen, Peter; Howes, Dale G

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the capacity of different impression materials to accurately reproduce the positions of five implant analogs on a master model by comparing the resulting cast with the stainless steel master model. The study was motivated by the knowledge that distortions can occur during impression making and the pouring of casts and that this distortion may produce inaccuracies of subsequent restorations, especially long-span castings for implant superstructures. The master model was a stainless steel model with five implant analogs. The impression materials used were impression plaster (Plastogum, Harry J Bosworth), a polyether (Impregum Penta, 3M ESPE), and two polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) materials (Aquasil Monophase and Aquasil putty with light-body wash, Dentsply). Five impressions were made with each impression material and cast in die stone under strictly controlled laboratory conditions. The positions of the implants on the master model, the impression copings, and the implant analogs in the subsequent casts were measured using a coordinate measuring machine that measures within 4 μm of accuracy. Statistical analyses indicated that distortion occurred in all of the impression materials, but inconsistently. The PVS monophase material reproduced the master model most accurately. Although there was no significant distortion between the impressions and the master model or between the impressions and their casts, there were distortions between the master model and the master casts, which highlighted the cumulative effects of the distortions. The polyether material proved to be the most reliable in terms of predictability. The impression plaster displayed cumulative distortion, and the PVS putty with light body showed the least reliability. Some of the distortions observed are of clinical significance and likely to contribute to a lack of passive fit of any superstructure. The inaccuracy of these analog materials and procedures suggested

  18. In vivo evaluation of inter-operator reproducibility of digital dental and conventional impression techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Kamimura

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the inter-operator reproducibility of three-dimensional (3D images of teeth captured by a digital impression technique to a conventional impression technique in vivo.Twelve participants with complete natural dentition were included in this study. A digital impression of the mandibular molars of these participants was made by two operators with different levels of clinical experience, 3 or 16 years, using an intra-oral scanner (Lava COS, 3M ESPE. A silicone impression also was made by the same operators using the double mix impression technique (Imprint3, 3M ESPE. Stereolithography (STL data were directly exported from the Lava COS system, while STL data of a plaster model made from silicone impression were captured by a three-dimensional (3D laboratory scanner (D810, 3shape. The STL datasets recorded by two different operators were compared using 3D evaluation software and superimposed using the best-fit-algorithm method (least-squares method, PolyWorks, InnovMetric Software for each impression technique. Inter-operator reproducibility as evaluated by average discrepancies of corresponding 3D data was compared between the two techniques (Wilcoxon signed-rank test.The visual inspection of superimposed datasets revealed that discrepancies between repeated digital impression were smaller than observed with silicone impression. Confirmation was forthcoming from statistical analysis revealing significantly smaller average inter-operator reproducibility using a digital impression technique (0.014± 0.02 mm than when using a conventional impression technique (0.023 ± 0.01 mm.The results of this in vivo study suggest that inter-operator reproducibility with a digital impression technique may be better than that of a conventional impression technique and is independent of the clinical experience of the operator.

  19. In vivo evaluation of inter-operator reproducibility of digital dental and conventional impression techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Emi; Tanaka, Shinpei; Takaba, Masayuki; Tachi, Keita; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the inter-operator reproducibility of three-dimensional (3D) images of teeth captured by a digital impression technique to a conventional impression technique in vivo. Materials and methods Twelve participants with complete natural dentition were included in this study. A digital impression of the mandibular molars of these participants was made by two operators with different levels of clinical experience, 3 or 16 years, using an intra-oral scanner (Lava COS, 3M ESPE). A silicone impression also was made by the same operators using the double mix impression technique (Imprint3, 3M ESPE). Stereolithography (STL) data were directly exported from the Lava COS system, while STL data of a plaster model made from silicone impression were captured by a three-dimensional (3D) laboratory scanner (D810, 3shape). The STL datasets recorded by two different operators were compared using 3D evaluation software and superimposed using the best-fit-algorithm method (least-squares method, PolyWorks, InnovMetric Software) for each impression technique. Inter-operator reproducibility as evaluated by average discrepancies of corresponding 3D data was compared between the two techniques (Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Results The visual inspection of superimposed datasets revealed that discrepancies between repeated digital impression were smaller than observed with silicone impression. Confirmation was forthcoming from statistical analysis revealing significantly smaller average inter-operator reproducibility using a digital impression technique (0.014± 0.02 mm) than when using a conventional impression technique (0.023 ± 0.01 mm). Conclusion The results of this in vivo study suggest that inter-operator reproducibility with a digital impression technique may be better than that of a conventional impression technique and is independent of the clinical experience of the operator. PMID:28636642

  20. Accuracy of the One-Stage and Two-Stage Impression Techniques: A Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidy, Ladan; Mozaffari, Hamid Reza; Faraji, Payam; Sharifi, Roohollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction . One of the main steps of impression is the selection and preparation of an appropriate tray. Hence, the present study aimed to analyze and compare the accuracy of one- and two-stage impression techniques. Materials and Methods . A resin laboratory-made model, as the first molar, was prepared by standard method for full crowns with processed preparation finish line of 1 mm depth and convergence angle of 3-4°. Impression was made 20 times with one-stage technique and 20 times with two-stage technique using an appropriate tray. To measure the marginal gap, the distance between the restoration margin and preparation finish line of plaster dies was vertically determined in mid mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual (MDBL) regions by a stereomicroscope using a standard method. Results . The results of independent test showed that the mean value of the marginal gap obtained by one-stage impression technique was higher than that of two-stage impression technique. Further, there was no significant difference between one- and two-stage impression techniques in mid buccal region, but a significant difference was reported between the two impression techniques in MDL regions and in general. Conclusion . The findings of the present study indicated higher accuracy for two-stage impression technique than for the one-stage impression technique.

  1. Accuracy of the One-Stage and Two-Stage Impression Techniques: A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Jamshidy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the main steps of impression is the selection and preparation of an appropriate tray. Hence, the present study aimed to analyze and compare the accuracy of one- and two-stage impression techniques. Materials and Methods. A resin laboratory-made model, as the first molar, was prepared by standard method for full crowns with processed preparation finish line of 1 mm depth and convergence angle of 3-4°. Impression was made 20 times with one-stage technique and 20 times with two-stage technique using an appropriate tray. To measure the marginal gap, the distance between the restoration margin and preparation finish line of plaster dies was vertically determined in mid mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual (MDBL regions by a stereomicroscope using a standard method. Results. The results of independent test showed that the mean value of the marginal gap obtained by one-stage impression technique was higher than that of two-stage impression technique. Further, there was no significant difference between one- and two-stage impression techniques in mid buccal region, but a significant difference was reported between the two impression techniques in MDL regions and in general. Conclusion. The findings of the present study indicated higher accuracy for two-stage impression technique than for the one-stage impression technique.

  2. Comparison of intraoral scanning and conventional impression techniques using 3-dimensional superimposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Ye-Kyu; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Cho, Lee-Ra; Park, Chan-Jin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the appropriate impression technique by analyzing the superimposition of 3D digital model for evaluating accuracy of conventional impression technique and digital impression. Twenty-four patients who had no periodontitis or temporomandibular joint disease were selected for analysis. As a reference model, digital impressions with a digital impression system were performed. As a test models, for conventional impression dual-arch and full-arch, impression techniques utilizing addition type polyvinylsiloxane for fabrication of cast were applied. 3D laser scanner is used for scanning the cast. Each 3 pairs for 25 STL datasets were imported into the inspection software. The three-dimensional differences were illustrated in a color-coded map. For three-dimensional quantitative analysis, 4 specified contact locations(buccal and lingual cusps of second premolar and molar) were established. For twodimensional quantitative analysis, the sectioning from buccal cusp to lingual cusp of second premolar and molar were acquired depending on the tooth axis. In color-coded map, the biggest difference between intraoral scanning and dual-arch impression was seen (Pimpression and the smallest difference was seen between dual-arch and full-arch impression. The two- and three-dimensional deviations between intraoral scanner and dual-arch impression was bigger than full-arch and dual-arch impression (P.05).

  3. Comparison of intraoral scanning and conventional impression techniques using 3-dimensional superimposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Ye-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study is to evaluate the appropriate impression technique by analyzing the superimposition of 3D digital model for evaluating accuracy of conventional impression technique and digital impression. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-four patients who had no periodontitis or temporomandibular joint disease were selected for analysis. As a reference model, digital impressions with a digital impression system were performed. As a test models, for conventional impression dual-arch and full-arch, impression techniques utilizing addition type polyvinylsiloxane for fabrication of cast were applied. 3D laser scanner is used for scanning the cast. Each 3 pairs for 25 STL datasets were imported into the inspection software. The three-dimensional differences were illustrated in a color-coded map. For three-dimensional quantitative analysis, 4 specified contact locations(buccal and lingual cusps of second premolar and molar) were established. For twodimensional quantitative analysis, the sectioning from buccal cusp to lingual cusp of second premolar and molar were acquired depending on the tooth axis. RESULTS In color-coded map, the biggest difference between intraoral scanning and dual-arch impression was seen (Pimpression and the smallest difference was seen between dual-arch and full-arch impression. CONCLUSION The two- and three-dimensional deviations between intraoral scanner and dual-arch impression was bigger than full-arch and dual-arch impression (P.05). PMID:26816576

  4. Single Visit Feeding Appliance for 1-day-old Neonate with Cleft Palate Using Safe Dental Putty-Gauze Hybrid Impression Technique for Maxillary Impression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathee, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common craniofacial anomalies of humans. Intraoral impression making is the first clinical step in the fabrication of feeding appliance for infants with oro-nasal communication. It is difficult to control the flow of the impression material in the cleft area and undercuts in a child patient. This clinical report presents a simple and safe impression technique for maxillary impression making in neonates and infants with cleft palate. A gauze piece was used to confine the impression material during functional movements of sucking while impression making in an awake child to avoid the risk of aspiration or swallowing.

  5. Single Visit Feeding Appliance for 1-day-old Neonate with Cleft Palate Using Safe Dental Putty-Gauze Hybrid Impression Technique for Maxillary Impression

    OpenAIRE

    Rathee, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common craniofacial anomalies of humans. Intraoral impression making is the first clinical step in the fabrication of feeding appliance for infants with oro-nasal communication. It is difficult to control the flow of the impression material in the cleft area and undercuts in a child patient. This clinical report presents a simple and safe impression technique for maxillary impression making in neonates and infants with cleft palate. A gauze piece was us...

  6. Comparison of Different Final Impression Techniques for Management of Resorbed Mandibular Ridge: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupender Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of complete denture impression procedures has been influenced largely by the development of impression materials from which new techniques and ideas arose. The purpose of this study was to compare the retention of complete dentures made by using different impression techniques like conventional, admixed, all green, and functional techniques. The results showed that there was significant difference in retention between the six techniques where functional technique showed the highest mean value of retention followed by elastomeric, all green, and admixed, while cocktail and green stick compound showed the lowest mean value. However, on clinical examination, the retention produced by the six techniques was satisfactory.

  7. Comparison of different final impression techniques for management of resorbed mandibular ridge: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Bhupender; Jayna, Manisha; Yadav, Harish; Suri, Shrey; Phogat, Shefali; Madan, Reshu

    2014-01-01

    The history of complete denture impression procedures has been influenced largely by the development of impression materials from which new techniques and ideas arose. The purpose of this study was to compare the retention of complete dentures made by using different impression techniques like conventional, admixed, all green, and functional techniques. The results showed that there was significant difference in retention between the six techniques where functional technique showed the highest mean value of retention followed by elastomeric, all green, and admixed, while cocktail and green stick compound showed the lowest mean value. However, on clinical examination, the retention produced by the six techniques was satisfactory.

  8. [Study of the appearance difference of lower complete denture between functional and anatomic impression techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qun; Wu, Xue-yin; Shen, Qing-yi; Shen, Qing-ping

    2012-04-01

    To compare the difference in oblique external ridge, oblique internal ridge and alveolar process crest of lower complete denture base made through functional impression and anatomic impression techniques. Fifteen patients were chosen to treat with two kinds of complete dentures through functional impression and anatomic impression technique respectively. 3D laser scanner was used to scan the three-dimensional model of the denture base and the differences of the surface structural between two techniques in alveolar process crest, external and internal oblique ridges were analyzed, using paired t test with SPSS 12.0 software package. Between the two techniques, there were significant differences in the areas of internal and external oblique ridge(P0.05). The results explain why there is less tenderness when functional impression technique is applied. The differences measured also indicate that sufficient buffering should be made in external and internal oblique ridge areas in clinic.

  9. Accuracy of two digital implant impression systems based on confocal microscopy with variations in customized software and clinical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Beatriz; Pradíes, Guillermo; Martínez-Rus, Francisco; Özcan, Mutlu

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of two digital impression systems based on the same technology but different postprocessing correction modes of customized software, with consideration of several clinical parameters. A maxillary master model with six implants located in the second molar, second premolar, and lateral incisor positions was fitted with six cylindrical scan bodies. Scan bodies were placed at different angulations or depths apical to the gingiva. Two experienced and two inexperienced operators performed scans with either 3D Progress (MHT) or ZFX Intrascan (Zimmer Dental). Five different distances between implants (scan bodies) were measured, yielding five data points per impression and 100 per impression system. Measurements made with a high-accuracy three-dimensional coordinate measuring machine (CMM) of the master model acted as the true values. The values obtained from the digital impressions were subtracted from the CMM values to identify the deviations. The differences between experienced and inexperienced operators and implant angulation and depth were compared statistically. Experience of the operator, implant angulation, and implant depth were not associated with significant differences in deviation from the true values with both 3D Progress and ZFX Intrascan. Accuracy in the first scanned quadrant was significantly better with 3D Progress, but ZFX Intrascan presented better accuracy in the full arch. Neither of the two systems tested would be suitable for digital impression of multiple-implant prostheses. Because of the errors, further development of both systems is required.

  10. Options in virtual 3D, optical-impression-based planning of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Sven; Kern, Thomas; Ritter, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    If a 3D radiograph, which in today's dentistry often consists of a CBCT dataset, is available for computerized implant planning, the 3D planning should also consider functional prosthetic aspects. In a conventional workflow, the CBCT is done with a specially produced radiopaque prosthetic setup that makes the desired prosthetic situation visible during virtual implant planning. If an exclusively digital workflow is chosen, intraoral digital impressions are taken. On these digital models, the desired prosthetic suprastructures are designed. The entire datasets are virtually superimposed by a "registration" process on the corresponding structures (teeth) in the CBCTs. Thus, both the osseous and prosthetic structures are visible in one single 3D application and make it possible to consider surgical and prosthetic aspects. After having determined the implant positions on the computer screen, a drilling template is designed digitally. According to this design (CAD), a template is printed or milled in CAM process. This template is the first physically extant product in the entire workflow. The article discusses the options and limitations of this workflow.

  11. A comparison of enhancement techniques for footwear impressions on dark and patterned fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Bandey, Helen; Dawson, Lorna; Daéid, Niamh Nic

    2013-11-01

    The use of chemical enhancement techniques on porous substrates, such as fabrics, poses several challenges predominantly due to the occurrence of background staining and diffusion as well as visualization difficulties. A range of readily available chemical and lighting techniques were utilized to enhance footwear impressions made in blood, soil, and urine on dark and patterned fabrics. Footwear impressions were all prepared at a set force using a specifically built footwear rig. In most cases, results demonstrated that fluorescent chemical techniques were required for visualization as nonfluorescent techniques provided little or no contrast with the background. Occasionally, this contrast was improved by oblique lighting. Successful results were obtained for the enhancement of footwear impressions in blood; however, the enhancement of footwear impressions in urine and soil on dark and patterned fabrics was much more limited. The results demonstrate that visualization and fluorescent enhancement on porous substrates such as fabrics is possible. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. Evaluation of shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ana Paula G. O.; Karam, Leandro Z.; Galvão, José R.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was evaluate the shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique. Two implants were placed in an artificial bone, with the two transfer copings joined with dental floss and acrylic resins; two dental resins are used. Measurements of deformation and temperature were performed with Fiber Braggs grating sensor for 17 minutes. The results revealed that one type of resin shows greater values of polymerization shrinkage than the other. Pattern resins did not present lower values of shrinkage, as usually reported by the manufacturer.

  13. Accuracy of digital impressions of multiple dental implants: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeweghe, Stefan; Vervack, Valentin; Dierens, Melissa; De Bruyn, Hugo

    2017-06-01

    Studies demonstrated that the accuracy of intra-oral scanners can be compared with conventional impressions for most indications. However, little is known about their applicability to take impressions of multiple implants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of four intra-oral scanners when applied for implant impressions in the edentulous jaw. An acrylic mandibular cast containing six external connection implants (region 36, 34, 32, 42, 44 and 46) with PEEK scanbodies was scanned using four intra-oral scanners: the Lava C.O.S. and the 3M True Definition, Cerec Omnicam and 3Shape Trios. Each model was scanned 10 times with every intra-oral scanner. As a reference, a highly accurate laboratory scanner (104i, Imetric, Courgenay, Switzerland) was used. The scans were imported into metrology software (Geomagic Qualify 12) for analyses. Accuracy was measured in terms of trueness (comparing test and reference) and precision (determining the deviation between different test scans). Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to detect statistically significant differences in trueness and precision respectively. The mean trueness was 0.112 mm for Lava COS, 0.035 mm for 3M TrueDef, 0.028 mm for Trios and 0.061 mm for Cerec Omnicam. There was no statistically significant difference between 3M TrueDef and Trios (P = 0.262). Cerec Omnicam was less accurate than 3M TrueDef (P = 0.013) and Trios (P = 0.005), but more accurate compared to Lava COS (P = 0.007). Lava COS was also less accurate compared to 3M TrueDef (P = 0.005) and Trios (P = 0.005). The mean precision was 0.066 mm for Lava COS, 0.030 mm for 3M TrueDef, 0.033 mm for Trios and 0.059 mm for Cerec Omnicam. There was no statistically significant difference between 3M TrueDef and Trios (P = 0.119). Cerec Omnicam was less accurate compared to 3M TrueDef (P < 0.001) and Trios (P < 0.001), but no difference was found with Lava COS (P = 0.169). Lava COS was also

  14. Impression Cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevda Söker

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Impression cytology is fast, easy to perform, economical and non-invasive technique for the diagnosis of conjunctival eye diseases. Conjunctival impression cytology using cellulose acetate filter paper of the ocular surface epithelium with no side effects or contraindication. In this article, technique of conjunctival impression cytology is reviewed.

  15. Single Stage Silicone Border Molded Closed Mouth Impression Technique-Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, E G R

    2011-09-01

    Functioning of a complete denture depends to a great extent on the impression technique. Several impression techniques have been described in the literature since the turn of this century when Greene [Clinical courses in dental prothesis, 1916] brothers introduced the first scientific system of recording dental impression. Advocates of each technique have their own claim of superiority over the other. The introduction of elastomeric impression materials [Skinner and Cooper, J Am Dent Assoc 51:523-536, 1955] has made possible new techniques of recording impression for complete denture construction. These rubber like materials are of two types; one has a polysulfide base and is popularily known as polysulfide rubber (Thiokol and Mercaptan). The other variety has a silicone base known as silicone rubber or silicone elastomer. Silicone elastomers are available in four different consistencies; a thin easy flowing light bodied material,a creamy medium bodied material, a highly viscous heavy bodied material and a kneadable putty material. This paper describes an active closed mouth impression technique with one stage border molding using putty silicone material as a substitute for low fusing compound.

  16. Digital Versus Conventional Impressions in Fixed Prosthodontics: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlholm, Pekka; Sipilä, Kirsi; Vallittu, Pekka; Jakonen, Minna; Kotiranta, Ulla

    2018-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review to evaluate the evidence of possible benefits and accuracy of digital impression techniques vs. conventional impression techniques. Reports of digital impression techniques versus conventional impression techniques were systematically searched for in the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, and Web of Science. A combination of controlled vocabulary, free-text words, and well-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria guided the search. Digital impression accuracy is at the same level as conventional impression methods in fabrication of crowns and short fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). For fabrication of implant-supported crowns and FDPs, digital impression accuracy is clinically acceptable. In full-arch impressions, conventional impression methods resulted in better accuracy compared to digital impressions. Digital impression techniques are a clinically acceptable alternative to conventional impression methods in fabrication of crowns and short FDPs. For fabrication of implant-supported crowns and FDPs, digital impression systems also result in clinically acceptable fit. Digital impression techniques are faster and can shorten the operation time. Based on this study, the conventional impression technique is still recommended for full-arch impressions. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. Performance of dental impression materials: Benchmarking of materials and techniques by three-dimensional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Heike; Graf, Michael R S; Kuhn, Katharina; Rupf-Köhler, Stephanie; Eirich, Alfred; Edelmann, Cornelia; Quaas, Sebastian; Luthardt, Ralph G

    2015-01-01

    Among other factors, the precision of dental impressions is an important and determining factor for the fit of dental restorations. The aim of this study was to examine the three-dimensional (3D) precision of gypsum dies made using a range of impression techniques and materials. Ten impressions of a steel canine were fabricated for each of the 24 material-method-combinations and poured with type 4 die stone. The dies were optically digitized, aligned to the CAD model of the steel canine, and 3D differences were calculated. The results were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. Depending on material and impression technique, the mean values had a range between +10.9/-10.0 µm (SD 2.8/2.3) and +16.5/-23.5 µm (SD 11.8/18.8). Qualitative analysis using colorcoded graphs showed a characteristic location of deviations for different impression techniques. Three-dimensional analysis provided a comprehensive picture of the achievable precision. Processing aspects and impression technique were of significant influence.

  18. Accuracy of a digital impression system based on parallel confocal laser technology for implants with consideration of operator experience and implant angulation and depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Beatriz; Özcan, Mutlu; Martínez-Rus, Francisco; Pradíes, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of a digital impression system based on parallel confocal red laser technology, taking into consideration clinical parameters such as operator experience and angulation and depth of implants. A maxillary master model with six implants (located bilaterally in the second molar, second premolar, and lateral incisor positions) was fitted with six polyether ether ketone scan bodies. One second premolar implant was placed with 30 degrees of mesial angulation; the opposite implant was positioned with 30 degrees of distal angulation. The lateral incisor implants were placed 2 or 4 mm subgingivally. Two experienced and two inexperienced operators performed intraoral scanning. Five different interimplant distances were then measured. The files obtained from the scans were imported with reverse-engineering software. Measurements were then made with a coordinate measurement machine, with values from the master model used as reference values. The deviations from the actual values were then calculated. The differences between experienced and inexperienced operators and the effects of different implant angulations and depths were compared statistically. Overall, operator 3 obtained significantly less accurate results. The angulated implants did not significantly influence accuracy compared to the parallel implants. Differences were found in the amount of error in the different quadrants. The second scanned quadrant had significantly worse results than the first scanned quadrant. Impressions of the implants placed at the tissue level were less accurate than implants placed 2 and 4 mm subgingivally. The operator affected the accuracy of measurements, but the performance of the operator was not necessarily dependent on experience. Angulated implants did not decrease the accuracy of the digital impression system tested. The scanned distance affected the predictability of the accuracy of the scanner, and the error increased with the increased length of the

  19. Comparison of digital and conventional impression techniques: evaluation of patients’ perception, treatment comfort, effectiveness and clinical outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare two impression techniques from the perspective of patient preferences and treatment comfort. Methods Twenty-four (12 male, 12 female) subjects who had no previous experience with either conventional or digital impression participated in this study. Conventional impressions of maxillary and mandibular dental arches were taken with a polyether impression material (Impregum, 3 M ESPE), and bite registrations were made with polysiloxane bite registration material (Futar D, Kettenbach). Two weeks later, digital impressions and bite scans were performed using an intra-oral scanner (CEREC Omnicam, Sirona). Immediately after the impressions were made, the subjects’ attitudes, preferences and perceptions towards impression techniques were evaluated using a standardized questionnaire. The perceived source of stress was evaluated using the State-Trait Anxiety Scale. Processing steps of the impression techniques (tray selection, working time etc.) were recorded in seconds. Statistical analyses were performed with the Wilcoxon Rank test, and p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results There were significant differences among the groups (p < 0.05) in terms of total working time and processing steps. Patients stated that digital impressions were more comfortable than conventional techniques. Conclusions Digital impressions resulted in a more time-efficient technique than conventional impressions. Patients preferred the digital impression technique rather than conventional techniques. PMID:24479892

  20. Comparison of digital and conventional impression techniques: evaluation of patients' perception, treatment comfort, effectiveness and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzbasioglu, Emir; Kurt, Hanefi; Turunc, Rana; Bilir, Halenur

    2014-01-30

    The purpose of this study was to compare two impression techniques from the perspective of patient preferences and treatment comfort. Twenty-four (12 male, 12 female) subjects who had no previous experience with either conventional or digital impression participated in this study. Conventional impressions of maxillary and mandibular dental arches were taken with a polyether impression material (Impregum, 3 M ESPE), and bite registrations were made with polysiloxane bite registration material (Futar D, Kettenbach). Two weeks later, digital impressions and bite scans were performed using an intra-oral scanner (CEREC Omnicam, Sirona). Immediately after the impressions were made, the subjects' attitudes, preferences and perceptions towards impression techniques were evaluated using a standardized questionnaire. The perceived source of stress was evaluated using the State-Trait Anxiety Scale. Processing steps of the impression techniques (tray selection, working time etc.) were recorded in seconds. Statistical analyses were performed with the Wilcoxon Rank test, and p < 0.05 was considered significant. There were significant differences among the groups (p < 0.05) in terms of total working time and processing steps. Patients stated that digital impressions were more comfortable than conventional techniques. Digital impressions resulted in a more time-efficient technique than conventional impressions. Patients preferred the digital impression technique rather than conventional techniques.

  1. Marginal adaptation of CAD-CAM onlays: Influence of preparation design and impression technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Fernanda Ferruzzi; Neto, Constantino Fernandes; Rubo, José H; Santos, Gildo Coelho; Moraes Coelho Santos, Maria Jacinta

    2018-03-15

    Factors that may affect the marginal adaptation of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) restorations include preparation design, impression technique, and CAD-CAM system. The influence of impression technique and preparation design on CAD-CAM partial coverage restorations has not been fully addressed. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of direct and indirect digital impression techniques and 2 preparation designs on the marginal adaptation of CAD-CAM onlays. Two mesio-occlusal buccal onlay preparations with reduction of the mesiobuccal cusp were made: conventional preparation (CP) with a 1.2-mm modified shoulder margin and modified preparation (MP) flat cuspal reduction without shoulder. Virtual models were generated from each preparation by using a digital scanner (BlueCam; Dentsply Sirona) from the plastic teeth (direct digital impression) or from the stone dies (indirect digital impression). Onlays were designed using a CAD-CAM system (CEREC 4.0; Dentsply Sirona), and nanoceramic resin blocks (Lava Ultimate Restorative; 3M ESPE) were milled using the CEREC MCX milling machine. Marginal discrepancy was evaluated using an optical stereomicroscope at ×25 magnification in 18 locations distributed along the margins of the preparation. The data were analyzed by using 3-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). CP presented a statistically significant reduced average marginal adaptation (59 ±50 μm) than did MP (69 ±58 μm) (Pmarginal discrepancy in the mesial and buccal locations of MP when compared with CP. Regarding impression techniques, the buccal location presented the smallest average marginal discrepancy in restorations fabricated with indirect impression when compared with direct impression (42 ±33 μm and 60 ±39 μm) (Pmargin presented improved marginal adaptation compared with modified preparation with flat cuspal reduction. Direct and indirect digital impression techniques produced

  2. Treatment comfort, time perception, and preference for conventional and digital impression techniques : A comparative study in young patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burhardt, Lukasz; Livas, Christos; Kerdijk, Wouter; van der Meer, Wicher Joerd; Ren, Yijin

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this crossover study was to assess perceptions and preferences for impression techniques in young orthodontic patients receiving alginate and 2 different digital impressions. METHODS: Thirty-eight subjects aged 10 to 17 years requiring impressions for orthodontic treatment

  3. Comparison of digital and conventional impression techniques: evaluation of patients’ perception, treatment comfort, effectiveness and clinical outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Yuzbasioglu, Emir; Kurt, Hanefi; Turunc, Rana; Bilir, Halenur

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare two impression techniques from the perspective of patient preferences and treatment comfort. Methods Twenty-four (12 male, 12 female) subjects who had no previous experience with either conventional or digital impression participated in this study. Conventional impressions of maxillary and mandibular dental arches were taken with a polyether impression material (Impregum, 3 M ESPE), and bite registrations were made with polysiloxane bite reg...

  4. Effect of mixing techniques on bacterial attachment and disinfection time of polyether impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Umut; Budak, Yasemin; Ruh, Emrah; Ocal, Yesim; Canay, Senay; Akyon, Yakut

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was 2-fold. The first aim was to evaluate the effects of mixing technique (hand-mixing or auto-mixing) on bacterial attachment to polyether impression materials. The second aim was to determine whether bacterial attachment to these materials was affected by length of exposure to disinfection solutions. Polyether impression material samples (n = 144) were prepared by hand-mixing or auto-mixing. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used in testing. After incubation, the bacterial colonies were counted and then disinfectant solution was applied. The effect of disinfection solution was evaluated just after the polymerization of impression material and 30 min after polymerization. Differences in adherence of bacteria to the samples prepared by hand-mixing and to those prepared by auto-mixing were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. For evaluating the efficiency of the disinfectant, Kruskal-Wallis multiple comparisons test was used. E. coli counts were higher in hand-mixed materials (P 2.394). The methods used for mixing polyether impression material did not affect bacterial attachment to impression surfaces. In contrast, the disinfection procedure greatly affects decontamination of the impression surface.

  5. A Comparative Analysis of Master Casts Obtained using Different Surface Treatments on Impression Copings for Single Tooth Implant Replacement -An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrol, Surbhi; Nagpal, Archana; Kaur, Rupandeep; Verma, Ramit; Katna, Vishal; Gupt, Parikshit

    2017-08-01

    Minor rotation of impression coping secured in the impression is an avoidable error that needs to be minimized to ensure precise positioning of implant analog in master cast. The aim of the study was to compare the precision in obtaining master casts by improving the stability of impression copings in the impression with the use of tray adhesive along various surface treatments to increase surface area and by mechanical locking. A total of 60 samples were made (15 samples for each group). A total of 15 samples for Group I were prepared with untreated impression copings, 15 samples for Group II with impression copings treated and modified by application of tray adhesive only. Group III includes 15 samples which were fabricated with impression copings modified by making four vertical grooves on surface of impression coping and coated with adhesive. Group IV had 15 samples which were fabricated with impression copings sandblasted with 50 μm aluminum oxide powder and coated with adhesive. Profile projector was used to evaluate the rotational accuracy of the implant analogs by comparing Molar Implant Angle (MIA) and Premolar Implant Angle (PIA) of test samples with reference model. One-way ANOVA and Student t-test were used to analyze the data. One-way ANOVA didn't show any significant differences for both MIA and PIA between the Groups I, II, III and IV. Student's unpaired t-test revealed no significant difference in the mean MIA and mean PIA. Conclusion: Though results were statistically non-significant, all types of surface treatments of the impression copings showed more accurate transfer than those with no treatment. Sandblasted and adhesive coated impression copings showed minimum amount of rotation followed by those with vertical slots and adhesive coated impression copings.

  6. Accuracy of Gypsum Casts after Different Impression Techniques and Double Pouring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephania Caroline Rodolfo Silva

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the accuracy of gypsum casts after different impression techniques and double pouring. Ten patients were selected and for each one it was obtained 5 partial putty/wash impressions with vinyl polysiloxane (VPS material from teeth #13 to #16 with partial metal stock trays. The following techniques were performed: (1 one-step; two-step relief with: (2 PVC film; (3 slow-speed tungsten carbide bur and scalpel blade, (4 small movements of the tray and (5 without relief-negative control. The impressions were disinfected with 0.5% sodium hypochlorite for 10 minutes and stored during 110 and 230 minutes for the first and second pouring, respectively, with type IV gypsum. Three intra-oral lateral photographs of each patient were taken using a tripod and a customized radiographic positioner. The images were imported into ImageJ software and the total area of the buccal surface from teeth #13 to #16 was measured. A 4.0% coefficient of variance was criterion for using these measurements as Baseline values. The casts were photographed and analyzed using the same standardization for the clinical images. The area (mm2 obtained from the difference between the measurements of each gypsum cast and the Baseline value of the respective patient were calculated and analyzed by repeated-measures two way-ANOVA and Mauchly's Sphericity test (α = 0.05. No significant effect was observed for Impression technique (P = 0.23, Second pouring (P = 0.99 and their interaction (P = 0.25. The impression techniques and double pouring did not influence the accuracy of the gypsum casts.

  7. Digital versus analog complete-arch impressions for single-unit premolar implant crowns : Operating time and patient preference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepke, Ulf; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Kerdijk, Wouter; Cune, Marco S.

    Statement of problem. Digital impression-making techniques are supposedly more patient friendly and less time-consuming than analog techniques, but evidence is lacking to substantiate this assumption. Purpose. The purpose of this in vivo within-subject comparison study was to examine patient

  8. In vitro evaluation of prosthodontic impression on natural dentition: a comparison between traditional and digital techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    MALAGUTI, G.; ROSSI, R.; MARZIALI, B.; ESPOSITO, A.; BRUNO, G.; DARIOL, C.; DI FIORE, A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the marginal and internal fit of zirconia core crowns manufactured following different digital and traditional workflows. Methods A 6° taper shoulder prepared abutment tooth was used to produce 20 zirconia core crowns using four different scanning techniques: scanned directly with the extraoral lab scanner, scanned with intraoral scanner, dental impressions using individual dental tray and polyether, dental casts from a polyether impressions. Marginal and internal fits were evaluated with digital photography and the silicone replica method. Results Medium marginal gaps were 76,00 μm ± 28.9 for extraoral lab scanner, 80.50 μm ± 36,2 for intraoral scanner, 88.10 μm ± 34,8 for dental impression scan and 112,4 μm ± 37,2 for dental cast scan. Medium internal gaps were 23.20 μm ± 10,3 for extraoral lab scanner, 16.20 μm ± 8.3 for intraoral scanner, 27.20 μm ± 16.7 for dental impression scan and 30.20 μm ± 12.7 for dental cast scan. Conclusion Internal gap were extensively lower than 70 μm described in literature. Marginal fit was higher than ideal values for all the techniques but within the limit of clinical success. Intraoral scanners obtained the best results for internal gap. PMID:28280529

  9. Magnetic filtered plasma deposition and implantation technique

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Hui Xing; Wu Xian Ying

    2002-01-01

    A high dense metal plasma can be produced by using cathodic vacuum arc discharge technique. The microparticles emitted from the cathode in the metal plasma can be removed when the metal plasma passes through the magnetic filter. It is a new technique for making high quality, fine and close thin films which have very widespread applications. The authors describe the applications of cathodic vacuum arc technique, and then a filtered plasma deposition and ion implantation system as well as its applications

  10. Manufacturing Implant Supported Auricular Prostheses by Rapid Prototyping Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Karatas, Meltem Ozdemir; Cifter, Ebru Demet; Ozenen, Didem Ozdemir; Balik, Ali; Tuncer, Erman Bulent

    2011-01-01

    Maxillofacial prostheses are usually fabricated on the models obtained following the impression procedures. Disadvantages of conventional impression techniques used in production of facial prosthesis are deformation of soft tissues caused by impression material and disturbance of the patient due to. Additionally production of prosthesis by conventional methods takes longer time. Recently, rapid prototyping techniques have been developed for extraoral prosthesis in order to reduce these disadv...

  11. Impression techniques for the resorbed mandibular arch: A guide to increased stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All clinicians face the common problems in making complete denture prosthesis for patients exhibiting high degree of bone resorption. Though resorption can be prevented to an extent but sooner or later it comes back to haunt the clinician. The result is a dis-satisfied patient with a loose prosthesis ready for a new one. The real problem lies in the capturing the oral tissues and using them for creating retention and stability in the prosthesis. Though ultimate success also depends on many other factors such as the occlusal scheme used and patient adaptability yet the most important step still remains the impression technique employed. A few impression techniques are suggested for increasing the success rates in such patients.

  12. A New Trend in Recording Subgingival Tissue around an Implant While Making a Direct Abutment Impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakant C. Deogade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A successful implant-supported restoration must provide adequate function and esthetics. Osseointegrated implants have given an alternative choice for patients who have lost their teeth. Most commonly encountered problems while doing a transfer from patient to the master cast in restoring implant-supported crowns are an uneven distribution of occlusal loads and undue torquing forces on the various elements of implant. This is caused due to poor fit of frameworks connected to implant, which further leads to marginal bone loss, loosening of screws, fatigue fracture of implant components, and ultimately implant failure. This paper presents a simplified and easy solution to overcome such problems by introducing an innovative gingival retraction system for restoring implant-supported crowns to achieve superior and predictable long-term outcomes.

  13. Application of digital diagnostic impression, virtual planning, and computer-guided implant surgery for a CAD/CAM-fabricated, implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Brandon M; Lin, Wei-Shao; Ntounis, Athanasios; Harris, Bryan T; Morton, Dean

    2014-09-01

    This clinical report demonstrated the use of an implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis fabricated with a contemporary digital approach. The digital diagnostic data acquisition was completed with a digital diagnostic impression with an intraoral scanner and cone-beam computed tomography with a prefabricated universal radiographic template to design a virtual prosthetically driven implant surgical plan. A surgical template fabricated with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) was used to perform computer-guided implant surgery. The definitive digital data were then used to design the definitive CAD/CAM-fabricated fixed dental prosthesis. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A comparison of profilometer and AutoCAD software techniques in evaluation of implant angulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Gomes, Erica Alves; Tabata, Lucas Fernando; Gennari-Filho, Humberto

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 2 different methods of assessment of implants at different inclinations (90 degrees and 65 degrees)--with a profilometer and AutoCAD software. Impressions (n = 5) of a metal matrix containing 2 implants, 1 at 90 degrees to the surface and 1 at 65 degrees to the surface, were obtained with square impression copings joined together with dental floss splinting covered with autopolymerizing acrylic resin, an open custom tray, and vinyl polysiloxane impression material. Measurement of the angles (in degrees) of the implant analogs were assessed by the same blinded operator with a profilometer and through analysis of digitized images by AutoCAD software. For each implant analog, 3 readings were performed with each method. The results were subjected to a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test, with P AutoCAD (89.95 degrees; P = .9142). In the analyses of the angled implants at 65 degrees in relation to the horizontal surface of the specimen, significant differences were observed (P = .0472) between the mean readings with the profilometer (65.73 degrees) and AutoCAD (66.25 degrees). The degrees of accuracy of implant angulation recording vary among the techniques available and may vary depending on the angle of the implant. Further investigation is needed to determine the best test conditions and the best measuring technique for determination of the angle of the implant in vitro.

  15. Why are mini-implants lost: the value of the implantation technique!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1) Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2) Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3) Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4) The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5) Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6) Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss.

  16. Why are mini-implants lost: The value of the implantation technique!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lourenço Romano

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1 Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2 Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3 Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4 The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5 Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6 Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss.

  17. Final-impression techniques and materials for making complete and removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Srinivasan; Singh, Balendra P; Ramanathan, Balasubramanian; Pazhaniappan Pillai, Murukan; MacDonald, Laura; Kirubakaran, Richard

    2018-04-04

    Endentulism is relatively common and is often treated with the provision of complete or partial removable dentures. Clinicians make final impressions of complete dentures (CD) and removable partial dentures (RPD) using different techniques and materials. Applying the correct impression technique and material, based on an individual's oral condition, improves the quality of the prosthesis, which may improve quality of life. To assess the effects of different final-impression techniques and materials used to make complete dentures, for retention, stability, comfort, and quality of life in completely edentulous people.To assess the effects of different final-impression techniques and materials used to make removable partial dentures, for stability, comfort, overextension, and quality of life in partially edentulous people. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 22 November 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Cochrane Register of Studies, to 22 November 2017), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 22 November 2017), and Embase Ovid (21 December 2015 to 22 November 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on language or publication status when searching the electronic databases, however the search of Embase was restricted by date due to the Cochrane Centralised Search Project to identify all clinical trials and add them to CENTRAL. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing different final-impression techniques and materials for treating people with complete dentures (CD) and removable partial dentures (RPD). For CD, we included trials that compared different materials or different techniques or both. In RPD for tooth-supported conditions, we included trials comparing the

  18. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Different Mixing Techniques and Disinfection on Microbial Colonization of Polyether Impression Materials: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Youginder; Pachar, Renu B; Poriya, Sangeeta; Mishra, Aalok; Sharma, Rajni; Garg, Anshu

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to determine the role of mixing techniques of polyether impression materials and efficacy of disinfection on microbial colonization of these impression materials. Polyether impression material was mixed using two methods: First by hand mixing (group I) and second using an automixer (group II) with a total of 100 samples. Four microbial strains were studied, which included Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. After incubation, the bacterial colonies were counted, and then, disinfectant solution was applied. The effect of disinfection solution was evaluated for each specimen. The surface of polyether impression materials mixed with an automixer has less number of voids and overall a smoother surface as compared with the hand-mixed ones. On comparing the disinfection procedures, i.e., specimens without any disinfection and specimens after disinfection, statistically highly significant difference was seen between all the groups. We can conclude that impression mixing procedures are important in determining the surface characteristics of the impression and ultimately the colonization of bacteria and also determine the importance of disinfection on microbial colonization. This study emphasises the deleterious role of nosocomial infections and specific measures that should be taken regarding the prevention of such diseases. Dental impressions are proved to be a source of such infections and may lead to transmission of such diseases. Thus, proper measures should be taken right from the first step of impression taking to minimizing and preventing such kind of contaminations in clinical practice.

  19. Treatment comfort, time perception, and preference for conventional and digital impression techniques: A comparative study in young patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhardt, Lukasz; Livas, Christos; Kerdijk, Wouter; van der Meer, Wicher Joerd; Ren, Yijin

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this crossover study was to assess perceptions and preferences for impression techniques in young orthodontic patients receiving alginate and 2 different digital impressions. Thirty-eight subjects aged 10 to 17 years requiring impressions for orthodontic treatment were randomly allocated to 3 groups that differed in the order that an alginate impressions and 2 different intraoral scanning procedures were administered. After each procedure, the patients were asked to score their perceptions on a 5-point Likert scale for gag reflex, queasiness, difficulty to breathe, uncomfortable feeling, perception of the scanning time, state of anxiety, and use of a powder, and to select the preferred impression system. Chairside time and maximal mouth opening were also registered. More queasiness (P = 0.00) and discomfort (P = 0.02) during alginate impression taking of the maxilla were perceived compared with the scans with the CEREC Omnicam (Sirona Dental Systems, Bensheim, Germany). There were no significant differences in perceptions between the alginate impressions and the Lava C.O.S. (3M ESPE, St Paul, Minn) and between the 2 scanners. Chairside times for the alginate impressions (9.7 ± 1.8 minutes) and the CEREC Omnicam (10.7 ± 1.8 minutes) were significantly lower (P <0.001) than for the Lava C.O.S. (17.8 ± 4.0 minutes). Digital impressions were favored by 51% of the subjects, whereas 29% chose alginate impressions, and 20% had no preference. Regardless of the significant differences in the registered times among the 3 impression-taking methods, the distributions of the Likert scores of time perception and maximal mouth opening were similar in all 3 groups. Young orthodontic patients preferred the digital impression techniques over the alginate method, although alginate impressions required the shortest chairside time. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment of edentulism: optimizing outcomes with tissue management and impression techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Thomas J

    2009-02-01

    Significant numbers of patients throughout the world seek treatment for edentulism. The trend toward tissue-integrated prostheses has been a monumental step in restoring edentulous patients to function; however, this treatment can be out of reach for those who fail to qualify or those who do not have sufficient resources to afford it. In these cases, conventional dentures remain an important primary course of treatment. Attention to detail when diagnosing, treatment planning, and performing treatment for these patients is still a prime consideration for the best possible outcome. In particular, many experienced denture wearers are afflicted with chronically inflamed denture-bearing mucosa. Clinicians must recognize the need for tissue conditioning, choices of impression materials, and accepted fabrication techniques that can have favorable outcomes when matched with patients who are philosophical and realistic in their expectations. The purpose of this article is to review impression philosophies, associated materials, and methods of tissue conditioning. Retention and stability of the denture bases can be augmented by the routine use of denture adhesive, and indications for use of denture adhesive will be discussed.

  1. Manufacturing implant supported auricular prostheses by rapid prototyping techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Meltem Ozdemir; Cifter, Ebru Demet; Ozenen, Didem Ozdemir; Balik, Ali; Tuncer, Erman Bulent

    2011-08-01

    Maxillofacial prostheses are usually fabricated on the models obtained following the impression procedures. Disadvantages of conventional impression techniques used in production of facial prosthesis are deformation of soft tissues caused by impression material and disturbance of the patient due to. Additionally production of prosthesis by conventional methods takes longer time. Recently, rapid prototyping techniques have been developed for extraoral prosthesis in order to reduce these disadvantages of conventional methods. Rapid prototyping technique has the potential to simplify the procedure and decrease the laboratory work required. It eliminates the need for measurement impression procedures and preparation of wax model to be performed by prosthodontists themselves In the near future this technology will become a standard for fabricating maxillofacial prostheses.

  2. Basic investigation of the laminated alginate impression technique: Setting time, permanent deformation, elastic deformation, consistency, and tensile bond strength tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Aya; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Laminated alginate impression for edentulous is simple and time efficient compared to border molding technique. The purpose of this study was to examine clinical applicability of the laminated alginate impression, by measuring the effects of different Water/Powder (W/P) and mixing methods, and different bonding methods in the secondary impression of alginate impression. Three W/P: manufacturer-designated mixing water amount (standard), 1.5-fold (1.5×) and 1.75-fold (1.75×) water amount were mixed by manual and automatic mixing methods. Initial and complete setting time, permanent and elastic deformation, and consistency of the secondary impression were investigated (n=10). Additionally, tensile bond strength between the primary and secondary impression were measured in the following surface treatment; air blow only (A), surface baking (B), and alginate impression material bonding agent (ALGI-BOND: AB) (n=12). Initial setting times significantly shortened with automatic mixing for all W/P (p<0.05). The permanent deformation decreased and elastic deformation increased as high W/P, regardless of the mixing method. Elastic deformation significantly reduced in 1.5× and 1.75× with automatic mixing (p<0.05). All of these properties resulted within JIS standards. For all W/P, AB showed a significantly high bonding strength as compared to A and B (p<0.01). The increase of mixing water, 1.5× and 1.75×, resulted within JIS standards in setting time, suggesting its applicability in clinical setting. The use of automatic mixing device decreased elastic strain and shortening of the curing time. For the secondary impression application of adhesives on the primary impression gives secure adhesion. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Potential study of bed filtration characteristics in impressed boreholes by radon tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinov, A.A.; Pinkenzon, D.B.; Makarov, M.S.; Vinarskij, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    Potential study of bed filtration characteristics in impressed boreholes by radon tracer method is shown. Effects recorded by radon tracer result from gamma radiation of short-living radon decay daughter products. During filtration of tracer through punched holes, cement stone, and rocks the products are deposited and cause a local effect for 2-3 hours. There is a shortage of short-living products in filtrated radon liquid and for some time (which is necessary for production of notable quantity of new decay products) it is practically not a gamma emitter. It is shown that the feature of effect formation governs the technique for well logging as well as interpretation of the results obtained

  4. Accuracy of Single-Step versus 2-Step Double-Mix Impression Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Herrera, Francyle Simões

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the accuracy of dies obtained from single-step and 2-step double-mix impressions. Material and Methods. Impressions (n = 10) of a stainless steel die simulating a complete crown preparation were performed using a polyether (Impregum Soft Heavy and Light body) and a vinyl...

  5. Comparison of digital scanning and polyvinyl siloxane impression techniques by dental students: instructional efficiency and attitudes towards technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, A M; Harris, B T; Metz, M J; Morton, D; Scarfe, W C; Metz, C J; Lin, W-S

    2017-08-01

    With increasing use of digital scanning with restorative procedures in the dental office, it becomes necessary that educational institutions adopt instructional methodology for introducing this technology together with conventional impression techniques. To compare the time differences between instructing dental students on digital scanning (DS) (LAVA C.O.S. digital impression system) and a conventional impression technique (CI) (polyvinyl siloxane), and to compare students' attitudes and beliefs towards both techniques. Volunteer sophomore dental students (n = 25) with no prior experience in clinical impressions were recruited and IRB consent obtained. Participants responded to a pre-and post-exposure questionnaire. Participants were instructed on the use of both DS and CI for a single tooth full coverage crown restoration using a consecutive sequence of video lecture, investigator-led demonstration and independent impression exercise. The time necessary for each step (minutes) was recorded. Statistical significance was calculated using dependent t-tests (time measurements) and 2-sample Mann-Whitney (questionnaire responses). The time spent teaching students was greater for DS than CI for video lecture (15.95 and 10.07 min, P = 0.0000), demonstration time (9.06 and 4.70 min, P = 0.0000) and impression time (18.17 and 8.59 min, P = 0.0000). Prior to the instruction and practice, students considered themselves more familiar with CI (3.96) than DS (1.96) (P = 0.0000). After the instruction and practice, participants reported CI technique proved significantly easier than expected (pre-instruction: 3.52 and post-instruction: 4.08, P = 0.002). However, overall participants' perception of ease of use for DS was not influenced by this instruction and practice experience (pre-instruction: 3.84 and post-instruction: 3.56, P = 0.106). Despite the results, 96% of participants expressed an expectation that DS will become their predominant impression technique during their

  6. Low dose monitoring by double implant technique in IC fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.B.; Weidemann, J.

    1995-01-01

    The utilisation of low dose implant monitoring (using Boron) in a manufacturing line has been discussed. The utilisation of phosphorus ions as the second implant dose were also studied as comparison. The technique relies on the fact that the sheet resistant of doped layer will increase significantly when damaged by relatively low implant dose. The technique is very sensitive and applicable for adjusting the channel dose so that an accurate threshold voltage in MOS device could be achieved

  7. Comparison of Accuracy Between a Conventional and Two Digital Intraoral Impression Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Junaid; Rodriguez, Jose; Weisbloom, Michael; Petridis, Haralampos

    To compare the accuracy (ie, precision and trueness) of full-arch impressions fabricated using either a conventional polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) material or one of two intraoral optical scanners. Full-arch impressions of a reference model were obtained using addition silicone impression material (Aquasil Ultra; Dentsply Caulk) and two optical scanners (Trios, 3Shape, and CEREC Omnicam, Sirona). Surface matching software (Geomagic Control, 3D Systems) was used to superimpose the scans within groups to determine the mean deviations in precision and trueness (μm) between the scans, which were calculated for each group and compared statistically using one-way analysis of variance with post hoc Bonferroni (trueness) and Games-Howell (precision) tests (IBM SPSS ver 24, IBM UK). Qualitative analysis was also carried out from three-dimensional maps of differences between scans. Means and standard deviations (SD) of deviations in precision for conventional, Trios, and Omnicam groups were 21.7 (± 5.4), 49.9 (± 18.3), and 36.5 (± 11.12) μm, respectively. Means and SDs for deviations in trueness were 24.3 (± 5.7), 87.1 (± 7.9), and 80.3 (± 12.1) μm, respectively. The conventional impression showed statistically significantly improved mean precision (P < .006) and mean trueness (P < .001) compared to both digital impression procedures. There were no statistically significant differences in precision (P = .153) or trueness (P = .757) between the digital impressions. The qualitative analysis revealed local deviations along the palatal surfaces of the molars and incisal edges of the anterior teeth of < 100 μm. Conventional full-arch PVS impressions exhibited improved mean accuracy compared to two direct optical scanners. No significant differences were found between the two digital impression methods.

  8. Nanotubular surface modification of metallic implants via electrochemical anodization technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu-Ning; Jin, Ming; Zheng, Yudong; Guan, Yueping; Lu, Xin; Luo, Jing-Li

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased awareness and interest in the biomedical implant field as a result of an aging population, research in the field of implantable devices has grown rapidly in the last few decades. Among the biomedical implants, metallic implant materials have been widely used to replace disordered bony tissues in orthopedic and orthodontic surgeries. The clinical success of implants is closely related to their early osseointegration (ie, the direct structural and functional connection between living bone and the surface of a load-bearing artificial implant), which relies heavily on the surface condition of the implant. Electrochemical techniques for modifying biomedical implants are relatively simple, cost-effective, and appropriate for implants with complex shapes. Recently, metal oxide nanotubular arrays via electrochemical anodization have become an attractive technique to build up on metallic implants to enhance the biocompatibility and bioactivity. This article will thoroughly review the relevance of electrochemical anodization techniques for the modification of metallic implant surfaces in nanoscale, and cover the electrochemical anodization techniques used in the development of the types of nanotubular/nanoporous modification achievable via electrochemical approaches, which hold tremendous potential for bio-implant applications. In vitro and in vivo studies using metallic oxide nanotubes are also presented, revealing the potential of nanotubes in biomedical applications. Finally, an outlook of future growth of research in metallic oxide nanotubular arrays is provided. This article will therefore provide researchers with an in-depth understanding of electrochemical anodization modification and provide guidance regarding the design and tuning of new materials to achieve a desired performance and reliable biocompatibility.

  9. Image fusion techniques in permanent seed implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Polo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last twenty years major software and hardware developments in brachytherapy treatment planning, intraoperative navigation and dose delivery have been made. Image-guided brachytherapy has emerged as the ultimate conformal radiation therapy, allowing precise dose deposition on small volumes under direct image visualization. In thisprocess imaging plays a central role and novel imaging techniques are being developed (PET, MRI-MRS and power Doppler US imaging are among them, creating a new paradigm (dose-guided brachytherapy, where imaging is used to map the exact coordinates of the tumour cells, and to guide applicator insertion to the correct position. Each of these modalities has limitations providing all of the physical and geometric information required for the brachytherapy workflow.Therefore, image fusion can be used as a solution in order to take full advantage of the information from each modality in treatment planning, intraoperative navigation, dose delivery, verification and follow-up of interstitial irradiation.Image fusion, understood as the visualization of any morphological volume (i.e. US, CT, MRI together with an additional second morpholo gical volume (i.e. CT, MRI or functional dataset (functional MRI, SPECT, PET, is a well known method for treatment planning, verification and follow-up of interstitial irradiation. The term image fusion is used when multiple patient image datasets are registered and overlaid or merged to provide additional information. Fused images may be created from multiple images from the same imaging modality taken at different moments (multi-temporalapproach, or by combining information from multiple modalities. Quality means that the fused images should provide additional information to the brachythe rapy process (diagnosis and staging, treatment planning, intraoperative imaging, treatment delivery and follow-up that cannot be obtained in other ways. In this review I will focus on the role of

  10. A Technique for Digital Impression and Bite Registration for a Single Edentulous Arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yiqin; Fang, Jing-Huan; Jeong, Seung-Mi; Choi, Byung-Ho

    2018-03-09

    Few studies have reported the application of digital technology for the process of impression and interocclusal recordings in edentulous patients. This article describes a digitizing system for generating digital edentulous models with a jaw relationship by taking direct digital impressions and a virtual bite registration using intraoral digital scanning. A specialized scan retractor was used to make digital impressions of edentulous jaws in patients' mouths using an intraoral scanner. Virtual bite registration was obtained with optical scanning of the buccal surfaces of both jaws at the occlusal vertical dimension. The registration was then used as a reference for aligning both jaws. Digital edentulous models that include the jaw relationship would be clinically beneficial for the fabrication of complete dentures in edentulous patients. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  11. Evaluation of stabilization techniques for ion implant processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Matthew F.; Wong, Selmer S.; Minter, Jason P.; Marlowe, Trey; Narcy, Mark E.; Livesay, William R.

    1999-06-01

    With the integration of high current ion implant processing into volume CMOS manufacturing, the need for photoresist stabilization to achieve a stable ion implant process is critical. This study compares electron beam stabilization, a non-thermal process, with more traditional thermal stabilization techniques such as hot plate baking and vacuum oven processing. The electron beam processing is carried out in a flood exposure system with no active heating of the wafer. These stabilization techniques are applied to typical ion implant processes that might be found in a CMOS production process flow. The stabilization processes are applied to a 1.1 micrometers thick PFI-38A i-line photoresist film prior to ion implant processing. Post stabilization CD variation is detailed with respect to wall slope and feature integrity. SEM photographs detail the effects of the stabilization technique on photoresist features. The thermal stability of the photoresist is shown for different levels of stabilization and post stabilization thermal cycling. Thermal flow stability of the photoresist is detailed via SEM photographs. A significant improvement in thermal stability is achieved with the electron beam process, such that photoresist features are stable to temperatures in excess of 200 degrees C. Ion implant processing parameters are evaluated and compared for the different stabilization methods. Ion implant system end-station chamber pressure is detailed as a function of ion implant process and stabilization condition. The ion implant process conditions are detailed for varying factors such as ion current, energy, and total dose. A reduction in the ion implant systems end-station chamber pressure is achieved with the electron beam stabilization process over the other techniques considered. This reduction in end-station chamber pressure is shown to provide a reduction in total process time for a given ion implant dose. Improvements in the ion implant process are detailed across

  12. Influence of prosthesis design and implantation technique on implant stresses after cementless revision THR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duda Georg N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Femoral offset influences the forces at the hip and the implant stresses after revision THR. For extended bone defects, these forces may cause considerable bending moments within the implant, possibly leading to implant failure. This study investigates the influences of femoral anteversion and offset on stresses in the Wagner SL revision stem implant under varying extents of bone defect conditions. Methods Wagner SL revision stems with standard (34 mm and increased offset (44 mm were virtually implanted in a model femur with bone defects of variable extent (Paprosky I to IIIb. Variations in surgical technique were simulated by implanting the stems each at 4° or 14° of anteversion. Muscle and joint contact forces were applied to the reconstruction and implant stresses were determined using finite element analyses. Results Whilst increasing the implant's offset by 10 mm led to increased implant stresses (16.7% in peak tensile stresses, altering anteversion played a lesser role (5%. Generally, larger stresses were observed with reduced bone support: implant stresses increased by as much as 59% for a type IIIb defect. With increased offset, the maximum tensile stress was 225 MPa. Conclusion Although increased stresses were observed within the stem with larger offset and increased anteversion, these findings indicate that restoration of offset, key to restoring joint function, is unlikely to result in excessive implant stresses under routine activities if appropriate fixation can be achieved.

  13. The use of a 3D laser scanner using superimpositional software to assess the accuracy of impression techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sinal; Sundaram, Geeta; Bartlett, David; Sherriff, Martyn

    2004-11-01

    Several studies have made comparisons in the dimensional accuracy of different elastomeric impression materials. Most have used two-dimensional measuring devices, which neglect to account for the dimensional changes that exist along a three-dimensional surface. The aim of this study was to compare the dimensional accuracy of an impression technique using a polyether material (Impregum) and a vinyl poly siloxane material (President) using a laser scanner with three-dimensional superimpositional software. Twenty impressions, 10 with a polyether and 10 with addition silicone, of a stone master model that resembled a dental arch containing three acrylic posterior teeth were cast in orthodontic stone. One plastic tooth was prepared for a metal crown. The master model and the casts were digitised with the non-contacting laser scanner to produce a 3D image. 3D surface viewer software superimposed the master model to the stone replica and the difference between the images analysed. The mean difference between the model and the stone replica made from Impregum was 0.072mm (SD 0.006) and that for the silicone 0.097mm (SD 0.005) and this difference was statistically significantly, p=0.001. Both impression materials provided an accurate replica of the prepared teeth supporting the view that these materials are highly accurate.

  14. Predicting the Failure of Dental Implants Using Supervised Learning Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hui Liu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Prosthodontic treatment has been a crucial part of dental treatment for patients with full mouth rehabilitation. Dental implant surgeries that replace conventional dentures using titanium fixtures have become the top choice. However, because of the wide-ranging scope of implant surgeries, patients’ body conditions, surgeons’ experience, and the choice of implant system should be considered during treatment. The higher price charged by dental implant treatments compared to conventional dentures has led to a rush among medical staff; therefore, the future impact of surgeries has not been analyzed in detail, resulting in medial disputes. Previous literature on the success factors of dental implants is mainly focused on single factors such as patients’ systemic diseases, operation methods, or prosthesis types for statistical correlation significance analysis. This study developed a prediction model for providing an early warning mechanism to reduce the chances of dental implant failure. We collected the clinical data of patients who received artificial dental implants at the case hospital for a total of 8 categories and 20 variables. Supervised learning techniques such as decision tree (DT, support vector machines, logistic regressions, and classifier ensembles (i.e., Bagging and AdaBoost were used to analyze the prediction of the failure of dental implants. The results show that DT with both Bagging and Adaboost techniques possesses the highest prediction performance for the failure of dental implant (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, AUC: 0.741; the analysis also revealed that the implant systems affect dental implant failure. The model can help clinical surgeons to reduce medical failures by choosing the optimal implant system and prosthodontics treatments for their patients.

  15. Modulation Techniques for Biomedical Implanted Devices and Their Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salina A. Samad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Implanted medical devices are very important electronic devices because of their usefulness in monitoring and diagnosis, safety and comfort for patients. Since 1950s, remarkable efforts have been undertaken for the development of bio-medical implanted and wireless telemetry bio-devices. Issues such as design of suitable modulation methods, use of power and monitoring devices, transfer energy from external to internal parts with high efficiency and high data rates and low power consumption all play an important role in the development of implantable devices. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on various modulation and demodulation techniques such as amplitude shift keying (ASK, frequency shift keying (FSK and phase shift keying (PSK of the existing wireless implanted devices. The details of specifications, including carrier frequency, CMOS size, data rate, power consumption and supply, chip area and application of the various modulation schemes of the implanted devices are investigated and summarized in the tables along with the corresponding key references. Current challenges and problems of the typical modulation applications of these technologies are illustrated with a brief suggestions and discussion for the progress of implanted device research in the future. It is observed that the prime requisites for the good quality of the implanted devices and their reliability are the energy transformation, data rate, CMOS size, power consumption and operation frequency. This review will hopefully lead to increasing efforts towards the development of low powered, high efficient, high data rate and reliable implanted devices.

  16. MEMS-Based Power Generation Techniques for Implantable Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Lueke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Implantable biosensing is attractive for both medical monitoring and diagnostic applications. It is possible to monitor phenomena such as physical loads on joints or implants, vital signs, or osseointegration in vivo and in real time. Microelectromechanical (MEMS-based generation techniques can allow for the autonomous operation of implantable biosensors by generating electrical power to replace or supplement existing battery-based power systems. By supplementing existing battery-based power systems for implantable biosensors, the operational lifetime of the sensor is increased. In addition, the potential for a greater amount of available power allows additional components to be added to the biosensing module, such as computational and wireless and components, improving functionality and performance of the biosensor. Photovoltaic, thermovoltaic, micro fuel cell, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric based generation schemes are evaluated in this paper for applicability for implantable biosensing. MEMS-based generation techniques that harvest ambient energy, such as vibration, are much better suited for implantable biosensing applications than fuel-based approaches, producing up to milliwatts of electrical power. High power density MEMS-based approaches, such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic schemes, allow for supplemental and replacement power schemes for biosensing applications to improve device capabilities and performance. In addition, this may allow for the biosensor to be further miniaturized, reducing the need for relatively large batteries with respect to device size. This would cause the implanted biosensor to be less invasive, increasing the quality of care received by the patient.

  17. MEMS-based power generation techniques for implantable biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied A

    2011-01-01

    Implantable biosensing is attractive for both medical monitoring and diagnostic applications. It is possible to monitor phenomena such as physical loads on joints or implants, vital signs, or osseointegration in vivo and in real time. Microelectromechanical (MEMS)-based generation techniques can allow for the autonomous operation of implantable biosensors by generating electrical power to replace or supplement existing battery-based power systems. By supplementing existing battery-based power systems for implantable biosensors, the operational lifetime of the sensor is increased. In addition, the potential for a greater amount of available power allows additional components to be added to the biosensing module, such as computational and wireless and components, improving functionality and performance of the biosensor. Photovoltaic, thermovoltaic, micro fuel cell, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric based generation schemes are evaluated in this paper for applicability for implantable biosensing. MEMS-based generation techniques that harvest ambient energy, such as vibration, are much better suited for implantable biosensing applications than fuel-based approaches, producing up to milliwatts of electrical power. High power density MEMS-based approaches, such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic schemes, allow for supplemental and replacement power schemes for biosensing applications to improve device capabilities and performance. In addition, this may allow for the biosensor to be further miniaturized, reducing the need for relatively large batteries with respect to device size. This would cause the implanted biosensor to be less invasive, increasing the quality of care received by the patient.

  18. Does the Implantation Technique for Totally Implantable Venous Access Ports (TIVAPs) Influence Long-Term Outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biacchi, Daniele; Sammartino, Paolo; Sibio, Simone; Accarpio, Fabio; Cardi, Maurizio; Sapienza, Paolo; De Cesare, Alessandro; Atta, Joseph Maher Fouad; Impagnatiello, Alessio; Di Giorgio, Angelo

    2016-02-01

    Totally implantable venous access ports (TIVAP) are eventually explanted for various reasons, related or unrelated to the implantation technique used. Having more information on long-term explantation would help improve placement techniques. From a series of 1572 cancer patients who had TIVAPs implanted in our center with the cutdown technique or Seldinger technique, we studied the 542 patients who returned to us to have their TIVAP explanted after 70 days or more. As outcome measures we distinguished between TIVAPs explanted for long-term complications (infection, catheter-, reservoir-, and patient-related complications) and TIVAPs no longer needed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were run to investigate the reasons for explantation and their possible correlation with implantation techniques. The most common reason for explantation was infection (47.6 %), followed by catheter-related (20.8 %), patient-related (14.7 %), and reservoir-related complications (4.7 %). In the remaining 12.2 % of cases, the TIVAP was explanted complication free after the planned treatments ended. Infection correlated closely with longer TIVAP use. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified the Seldinger technique as a major risk factor for venous thrombosis and catheter dislocation. The need for long-term TIVAP explantation in about one-third of cancer patients is related to the implantation techniques used.

  19. Results from impression packer technique for location of fissures in boreholes in white chalk, Mors, Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, L.J.; Byrne, L.; Frykman, P.

    1981-01-01

    In connection with site investigations to evaluate the possibility of geological disposal of radioactive waste in a salt dome a Hydrogeological Programme was carried out. A number of bore holes were drilled to depths of 550 m. Geological and hydrogeological investigations were performed. The hydrogeological tests were carried out as packer tests, bottomhole tests using one packer, or straddle-packer test using two packers. In connection with these tests a rubber sleeve was installed over the packer and sidewall impressions of the hole were taken. Irregularities such as faults and fissures and possibly solution features were localized. The paper describes the method, procedure, equipment and the results achieved

  20. Stresses generated by two zygomatic implant placement techniques associated with conventional inclined anterior implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo H.T. Almeida

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To make a comparative evaluation, by means of the finite element method, of the stress generated on supporting tissues and prosthetic system components, using zygomatic implants with the exteriorized and extramaxillary techniques, and different placement positions, associated either with inclined anterior implants, or those without inclination. Materials and methods: Eight (8 tridimensional models were created to represent the clinical situations being researched, using the dataset of scanned images of an edentulous model. The implants and prosthetic components were photographed on millimeter paper and inserted into Rhinoceros 3D modeling computer software. From the measurements made on the image, the virtual models were made. The application force was distributed on the occlusal surface of the working side of the left maxillary first molar, first and second premolars, and incisal regions of the central incisor, simulating the occlusal load during mastication, in a total of 150 N. Results: The extramaxillary technique presented considerable variation in increased tension on the prosthesis screws and bone tissue. In the exteriorized technique, the highest tension values occurred in the region of the ridge, and the lowest, on the zygomatic process; the absence of cantilever reduced the stress on bone tissue in almost all regions. Conclusion: The exteriorized technique was shown to be more favorable to the distribution of stresses on the micro-unit screws and bone tissue, with the model with zygomatic implant placed in the region of the first molar and inclined anterior implant presenting the best results. Keywords: Zygomatic implants, Atrophic maxilla, Finite element analysis, Cantilever, Inclined implant

  1. Surgical implantation techniques for electronic tags in fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Glenn N.; Cooke, Steven J.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracoelomic implantation of transmitters into fish requires making a surgical incision, incision closure, and other surgery related techniques; however, the tools and techniques used in the surgical process vary widely. We review the available literature and focus on tools and techniques used for conducting surgery on juvenile salmonids because of the large amount of research that is conducted on them. The use of sterilized surgical instruments properly selected for a given size of fish will minimize tissue damage and infection rates, and speed the wound healing of fish implanted with transmitters. For the implantation of transmitters into small fish, the optimal surgical methods include making an incision on the ventral midline along the linea alba (for studies under 1 month), protecting the viscera (by lifting the skin with forceps while creating the incision), and using absorbable monofilament suture with a small-swaged-on swaged-on tapered or reverse-cutting needle. Standardizing the implantation techniques to be used in a study involving particular species and age classes of fish will improve survival and transmitter retention while allowing for comparisons to be made among studies and across multiple years. This review should be useful for researchers working on juvenile salmonids and other sizes and species of fish.

  2. Accuracy of impressions with different impression materials in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the dimensional accuracy of the resultant (duplicative) casts made from two ... materials in a special tray, using a open tray impression technique from the master casts. These impressions were poured to obtain test casts.

  3. Comparative evaluation of efficacy and soft tissue wound healing using diode laser (810 nm versus conventional scalpel technique for second-stage implant surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvir Kaur

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was aimed to compare the efficacy and soft tissue wound healing using diode lasers (810 nm versus conventional scalpel approach as uncovering technique during the second-stage surgery in implants. This was a prospective, randomized study which was conducted on 20 subjects in which the implants were already placed using a two-stage technique. Implant sites were examined and the patients were randomly divided into two groups. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomly divided into two groups, i.e., Group A and Group B. In Group A, implants were uncovered as a part of Stage II surgery with conventional scalpel technique, and in Group B, implants were uncovered using 810 nm diode laser. Clinical parameters such as need and amount of local anesthesia, duration of surgery, intraoperative bleeding, pain index, wound healing index (HI, and time for impression taking were recorded at various intervals. Results: Statistical differences for clinical parameters were seen between Group A and Group B showing uncovery of implant with laser more effective, and for time of impression taking, difference was statistically significant showing that impressions were taken early in case of Group A because of better healing which was recorded with help of HI, but the difference in time of healing between Group A and Group B was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The use of a diode laser (810 nm in the second-stage implant surgery can minimize surgical trauma, reduce the amount of anesthesia, improve visibility during surgery due to the absence of bleeding, and eliminate postoperative discomfort.

  4. Accuracy of a separating foil impression using a novel polyolefin foil compared to a custom tray and a stock tray technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastoret, Marie-Hélène; Bühler, Julia; Weiger, Roland

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare the dimensional accuracy of three impression techniques- a separating foil impression, a custom tray impression, and a stock tray impression. MATERIALS AND METHODS A machined mandibular complete-arch metal model with special modifications served as a master cast. Three different impression techniques (n = 6 in each group) were performed with addition-cured silicon materials: i) putty-wash technique with a prefabricated metal tray (MET) using putty and regular body, ii) single-phase impression with custom tray (CUS) using regular body material, and iii) two-stage technique with stock metal tray (SEP) using putty with a separating foil and regular body material. All impressions were poured with epoxy resin. Six different distances (four intra-abutment and two inter-abutment distances) were gauged on the metal master model and on the casts with a microscope in combination with calibrated measuring software. The differences of the evaluated distances between the reference and the three test groups were calculated and expressed as mean (± SD). Additionally, the 95% confidence intervals were calculated and significant differences between the experimental groups were assumed when confidence intervals did not overlap. RESULTS Dimensional changes compared to reference values varied between -74.01 and 32.57 µm (MET), -78.86 and 30.84 (CUS), and between -92.20 and 30.98 (SEP). For the intra-abutment distances, no significant differences among the experimental groups were detected. CUS showed a significantly higher dimensional accuracy for the inter-abutment distances with -0.02 and -0.08 percentage deviation compared to MET and SEP. CONCLUSION The separation foil technique is a simple alternative to the custom tray technique for single tooth restorations, while limitations may exist for extended restorations with multiple abutment teeth. PMID:28874996

  5. Clinical marginal fit of zirconia crowns and patients' preferences for impression techniques using intraoral digital scanner versus polyvinyl siloxane material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakornwimon, Nawapat; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2017-09-01

    The use of digital intraoral scanners is increasing; however, evidence of its precision in making crown impressions clinically remains scarce. Patients should also feel more comfortable with digital impressions, but only a few studies evaluating this subject have been performed. The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the marginal fit of monolithic zirconia crowns and patients' preferences for digital impressions versus polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions. Sixteen participants with indications for single molar crowns were included. After crown preparation, digital impressions by intraoral scanner and PVS impressions were made. The participants were asked to complete a 6-item questionnaire with a visual analog scale related to perceptions of each of the following topics: time involved, taste/smell, occlusal registration, size of impression tray/scanner, gag reflex, and overall preference. Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing monolithic zirconia crowns were fabricated from both impressions. The crowns were evaluated intraorally, and a blinded examiner measured the marginal discrepancy of silicone replicas under a stereomicroscope. Intraexaminer reliability was evaluated by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient. Data for patients' preferences and marginal discrepancies were analyzed using the paired t test (α=.05). Visual analog scale scores for digital impressions were statistically significantly higher than those for PVS impressions in every topic (Pdigital group on all sides (P>.05). No differences were found in the clinical marginal fit of zirconia crowns fabricated from either digital impressions compared with PVS impressions. Furthermore, patients' satisfaction with digital impressions was significantly higher than with conventional impressions. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Combination of microscopic techniques reveals a comprehensive visual impression of biofilm structure and composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Qvortrup, Klaus; Liebrechts, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    are important to understand the physiology of biofilms. We compared conventional SEM, Focused Ion Beam (FIB)-SEM and CLSM with SEM techniques [cryo-SEM and environmental-SEM (ESEM)] that do not require dehydration. In the case of cryo-SEM, the biofilm is not dehydrated but kept frozen to obtain high...

  7. Ahmed glaucoma valve implant: surgical technique and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riva I

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ivano Riva,1 Gloria Roberti,1 Francesco Oddone,1 Anastasios GP Konstas,2 Luciano Quaranta3 1IRCCS “Fondazione GB Bietti per l’Oftalmologia”, Rome, Italy; 21st University Department of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma Unit, AHEPA Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece; 3Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Section of Ophthalmology, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy Abstract: Implantation of Ahmed glaucoma valve is an effective surgical technique to reduce intraocular pressure in patients affected with glaucoma. While in the past, the use of this device was reserved to glaucoma refractory to multiple filtration surgical procedures, up-to-date mounting experience has encouraged its use also as a primary surgery for selected cases. Implantation of Ahmed glaucoma valve can be challenging for the surgeon, especially in patients who already underwent previous multiple surgeries. Several tips have to be acquired by the surgeon, and a long learning curve is always needed. Although the valve mechanism embedded in the Ahmed glaucoma valve decreases the risk of postoperative hypotony-related complications, it does not avoid the need of a careful follow-up. Complications related to this type of surgery include early and late postoperative hypotony, excessive capsule fibrosis around the plate, erosion of the tube or plate edge, and very rarely infection. The aim of this review is to describe surgical technique for Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation and to report related complications. Keywords: glaucoma, surgical technique, glaucoma drainage devices, Ahmed glaucoma valve, complications

  8. Ahmed glaucoma valve implant: surgical technique and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Ivano; Roberti, Gloria; Oddone, Francesco; Konstas, Anastasios Gp; Quaranta, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    Implantation of Ahmed glaucoma valve is an effective surgical technique to reduce intraocular pressure in patients affected with glaucoma. While in the past, the use of this device was reserved to glaucoma refractory to multiple filtration surgical procedures, up-to-date mounting experience has encouraged its use also as a primary surgery for selected cases. Implantation of Ahmed glaucoma valve can be challenging for the surgeon, especially in patients who already underwent previous multiple surgeries. Several tips have to be acquired by the surgeon, and a long learning curve is always needed. Although the valve mechanism embedded in the Ahmed glaucoma valve decreases the risk of postoperative hypotony-related complications, it does not avoid the need of a careful follow-up. Complications related to this type of surgery include early and late postoperative hypotony, excessive capsule fibrosis around the plate, erosion of the tube or plate edge, and very rarely infection. The aim of this review is to describe surgical technique for Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation and to report related complications.

  9. Citologia de impressão da superfície ocular: técnica de exame e de coloração Impression cytology of the ocular surface: examination technique and staining procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeison de Nadai Barros

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Apresentar uma técnica de exame e de coloração de amostras de citologia de impressão da superfície ocular desenvolvida em serviço de referência. Método: Obtiveram-se 28 amostras de citologia de impressão de pacientes com alterações da superfície ocular no Setor de Doenças Externas Oculares no período de julho a novembro de 1999. Coraram-se e avaliaram-se as amostras microscopicamente no Laboratório de Microbiologia Ocular, do Departamento de Oftalmologia da Universidade Federal de São Paulo - Escola Paulista Medicina. Resultados: Desenvolveu-se um modelo de papel de filtro com ápice, base e abertura lateral, que forneceu seu posicionamento correto no olho no momento da colheita e na lâmina para a fixação e coloração. A técnica de coloração descrita, que usa ácido periódico-Schiff, hematoxilina e Papanicolaou, é um procedimento econômico e fácil, cora as células caliciformes de róseo e as epiteliais de roxo. Conclusões: A técnica de exame mostrou-se ideal na avaliação celular das amostras de citologia de impressão. A citologia de impressão é um método bastante confiável para o estudo da superfície ocular, no acompanhamento da evolução de patologias externas, e provou ser um procedimento realmente simples, mais barato e mais confortável para o paciente que as biópsias invasivas.Purpose: To present an examination technique and to standardize the staining procedure of samples of impression cytology of the ocular surface in a reference service. Methods: 28 samples of impression cytology were obtained from patients with ocular surfaces alterations of the External Eye Diseases Sector in the period of July to November 1999. They were stained and microscopically evaluated in the Ocular Microbiology Laboratory of the Federal University of São Paulo. Results: We developed a design of a filter paper with apex, base and lateral opening that promoted its adequate position both in the eye at collection

  10. Evolving practices in augmentation operative technique with Sientra HSC round implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calobrace, M Bradley; Kaufman, David L; Gordon, Ashley E; Reid, Dustin L

    2014-07-01

    As of 2012, breast augmentation surgery continues to be the most commonly performed aesthetic surgical procedure in the United States. Surgeons consider a multitude of factors when choosing the type and style of breast implant for a patient. With the continuous evolution of breast implant designs, there are a variety of breast implant options for plastic surgeons to choose from; however, round implants remain the implant of choice for breast augmentation. This article discusses preoperative planning, implant selection, surgical techniques, and postoperative management using Sientra's Silimed brand smooth and textured round implants.

  11. Controlling for Response Bias in Self-Ratings of Personality: A Comparison of Impression Management Scales and the Overclaiming Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sascha; Moshagen, Morten

    2018-04-12

    Self-serving response distortions pose a threat to the validity of personality scales. A common approach to deal with this issue is to rely on impression management (IM) scales. More recently, the overclaiming technique (OCT) has been proposed as an alternative and arguably superior measure of such biases. In this study (N = 162), we tested these approaches in the context of self- and other-ratings using the HEXACO personality inventory. To the extent that the OCT and IM scales can be considered valid measures of response distortions, they are expected to account for inflated self-ratings in particular for those personality dimensions that are prone to socially desirable responding. However, the results show that neither the OCT nor IM account for overly favorable self-ratings. The validity of IM as a measure of response biases was further scrutinized by a substantial correlation with other-rated honesty-humility. As such, this study questions the use of both the OCT and IM to assess self-serving response distortions.

  12. Performance enhancement of implantable medical antenna using differential feed technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Bhattacharjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The health care industry is continuously revolutionizing and advancing towards developing more efficient system suitable for human body. Today implantable devices have become a more interesting topic in health care services which primarily started with the pacemakers. Since then it is continuously evolving due to its non-invasive nature, instant monitoring and diagnosis, and periodic simulation. The main goal of these implantable devices is to efficiently monitor or inspect various ailments in the body and then transmits this to the server or base station. For proper communication between the implant and the base station, antenna design is of prime importance. In this paper MEMS based differentially fed dual band antenna has been proposed and can be used both in Medical Implant Communication Service (MICS band for transmission of data and industrial, scientific and medical (ISM band for wake-up purpose. The proposed antenna has been simulated for free space scenario and has been found to radiate in both MICS & ISM band with S11 of −17.62 dB and −14.31 dB respectively. Subsequently the antenna is inserted within a skin mimicking model with equivalent dielectric features and the results show variation in radiation characteristics between free space condition and within skin phantom. The design of the antenna has been optimized in such a way that minimum deviation occurs between the two conformal conditions. With the use of differential feeding technique performance of the antenna is quite enhanced in terms of various parameters when compared with single feed.

  13. Three-Dimensional Implant Positioning with a Piezosurgery Implant Site Preparation Technique and an Intraoral Surgical Navigation System: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Gerardo; Taraschi, Valerio; Vercellotti, Tomaso; Ben-Nissan, Besim; Marchetti, Claudio

    This case report describes new implant site preparation techniques joining the benefits of using an intraoral navigation system to optimize three-dimensional implant site positioning in combination with an ultrasonic osteotomy. A report of five patients is presented, and the implant positions as planned in the navigation software with the postoperative scan image were compared. The preliminary results are useful, although further clinical studies with larger populations are needed to confirm these findings.

  14. The Dermal Apron Technique for Immediate Implant Socket Management: A Novel Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Barry P

    2016-01-01

    With immediate implant placement and provisionalization (IIP) in the esthetic zone, measures to counter hard and soft tissue loss are frequently necessary. To reduce the morbidity associated with bone and connective tissue procurement, various exogenous materials are utilized. The "Dermal Apron Technique" presented in this article demonstrates the use of a composite bone particulate (allograft/xenograft) plus a dermal allograft, adapted around screw-retained temporary crowns and secured within a subperiosteal pouch. The purpose is to augment the thickness of peri-implant mucosa for the purpose of preserving ridge dimensions and preventing mucosal recession. Controlled studies are required to further support its use. Clinical significance: Soft tissue health and harmony are critical for successful implant therapy in the esthetic regions of the dentition. Often, autogenous soft tissue grafts are used to augment peri-implant soft tissues. The Dermal Apron Technique is a method, that in specific situations, obviates the need for autogenous grafting. This reduces treatment time and morbidity associated with procurement of these grafts. The Dermal Apron Technique is used simultaneous with immediate placement and provisionalization and can improve long-term esthetic outcomes for patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Establishment of reproducible osteosarcoma rat model using orthotopic implantation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhe; Sun, Honghui; Fan, Qingyu; Long, Hua; Yang, Tongtao; Ma, Bao'an

    2009-05-01

    In experimental musculoskeletal oncology, there remains a need for animal models that can be used to assess the efficacy of new and innovative treatment methodologies for bone tumors. Rat plays a very important role in the bone field especially in the evaluation of metabolic bone diseases. The objective of this study was to develop a rat osteosarcoma model for evaluation of new surgical and molecular methods of treatment for extremity sarcoma. One hundred male SD rats weighing 125.45+/-8.19 g were divided into 5 groups and anesthetized intraperitoneally with 10% chloral hydrate. Orthotopic implantation models of rat osteosarcoma were performed by injecting directly into the SD rat femur with a needle for inoculation with SD tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, 2x10(5) to 1x10(6) UMR106 cells in 50 microl were injected intraosseously into median or distal part of the femoral shaft and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from ultrasound with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. In the third stage, the orthotopically implanted tumors and lung nodules were resected entirely, sectioned, and then counter stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathologic evaluation. The tumor take rate was 100% for implants with 8x10(5) tumor cells or more, which was much less than the amount required for subcutaneous implantation, with a high lung metastasis rate of 93.0%. Ultrasound and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.942; p<0.01), which demonstrated that Doppler ultrasonography is a convenient and reliable technique for measuring cancer at any stage. Tumor growth curve showed that orthotopically implanted tumors expanded vigorously with time-lapse, especially in the first 3 weeks. The median time of survival was 38 days and surgical mortality was 0%. The UMR106 cell line has strong carcinogenic capability and high lung metastasis frequency. The present rat

  16. Does the Implant Surgical Technique Affect the Primary and/or Secondary Stability of Dental Implants? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadid, Rola Muhammed; Sadaqah, Nasrin Rushdi; Othman, Sahar Abdo

    2014-01-01

    Background. A number of surgical techniques for implant site preparation have been advocated to enhance the implant of primary and secondary stability. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to support the association between the surgical technique and implant stability. Purpose. This review aimed to investigate the influence of different surgical techniques including the undersized drilling, the osteotome, the piezosurgery, the flapless procedure, and the bone stimulation by low-level laser therapy on the primary and/or secondary stability of dental implants. Materials and methods. A search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and grey literature was performed. The inclusion criteria comprised observational clinical studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in patients who received dental implants for rehabilitation, studies that evaluated the association between the surgical technique and the implant primary and/or secondary stability. The articles selected were carefully read and classified as low, moderate, and high methodological quality and data of interest were tabulated. Results. Eight clinical studies were included then they were classified as moderate or high methodological quality and control of bias. Conclusions. There is a weak evidence suggesting that any of previously mentioned surgical techniques could influence the primary and/or secondary implant stability. PMID:25126094

  17. Does the Implant Surgical Technique Affect the Primary and/or Secondary Stability of Dental Implants? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rola Muhammed Shadid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A number of surgical techniques for implant site preparation have been advocated to enhance the implant of primary and secondary stability. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to support the association between the surgical technique and implant stability. Purpose. This review aimed to investigate the influence of different surgical techniques including the undersized drilling, the osteotome, the piezosurgery, the flapless procedure, and the bone stimulation by low-level laser therapy on the primary and/or secondary stability of dental implants. Materials and methods. A search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and grey literature was performed. The inclusion criteria comprised observational clinical studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs conducted in patients who received dental implants for rehabilitation, studies that evaluated the association between the surgical technique and the implant primary and/or secondary stability. The articles selected were carefully read and classified as low, moderate, and high methodological quality and data of interest were tabulated. Results. Eight clinical studies were included then they were classified as moderate or high methodological quality and control of bias. Conclusions. There is a weak evidence suggesting that any of previously mentioned surgical techniques could influence the primary and/or secondary implant stability.

  18. First Impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coen, Frank

    1969-01-01

    The unreliability of first impressions and subjective judgments is the subject of both Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and Lionel Trilling's "Of This Time, Of That Place"; consequently, the works are worthwhile parallel studies for high school students. Austen, by means of irony and subtle characterization, dramatizes the…

  19. Evaluation of primary and secondary stability of titanium implants using different surgical techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabassum, A.; Meijer, G.J.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of different surgical techniques on the primary and secondary implant stability using trabecular bone of goats as an implantation model. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the iliac crest of eight goats, 48 cylindrical-screw-type implants with a diameter of 4.2 mm

  20. Evaluation of marginal and internal gaps of metal ceramic crowns obtained from conventional impressions and casting techniques with those obtained from digital techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Rathika; Kumar, S Arun; Prabhu, R; Govindan, Ranjani Thillai; Tanveer, Faiz Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Accuracy in fit of cast metal restoration has always remained as one of the primary factors in determining the success of the restoration. A well-fitting restoration needs to be accurate both along its margin and with regard to its internal surface. The aim of the study is to evaluate the marginal fit of metal ceramic crowns obtained by conventional inlay casting wax pattern using conventional impression with the metal ceramic crowns obtained by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technique using direct and indirect optical scanning. This in vitro study on preformed custom-made stainless steel models with former assembly that resembles prepared tooth surfaces of standardized dimensions comprised three groups: the first group included ten samples of metal ceramic crowns fabricated with conventional technique, the second group included CAD/CAM-milled direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) crowns using indirect scanning, and the third group included DMLS crowns fabricated by direct scanning of the stainless steel model. The vertical marginal gap and the internal gap were evaluated with the stereomicroscope (Zoomstar 4); post hoc Turkey's test was used for statistical analysis. One-way analysis of variance method was used to compare the mean values. Metal ceramic crowns obtained from direct optical scanning showed the least marginal and internal gap when compared to the castings obtained from inlay casting wax and indirect optical scanning. Indirect and direct optical scanning had yielded results within clinically acceptable range.

  1. Bioceramic coatings for medical implants trends and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Heimann, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Reflecting the progress in recent years, this book provides in-depth information on the preparation, chemistry, and engineering of bioceramic coatings for medical implants. It is authored by two renowned experts with over 30 years of experience in industry and academia, who know the potentials and pitfalls of the techniques concerned. Following an introduction to the principles of biocompatibility, they present the structures and properties of various bioceramics from alumina to zirconia. The main part of the work focuses on coating technologies, such as chemical vapor deposition, sol-gel deposition and thermal spraying. There then follows a discussion of the major interactions of bioceramics with bone or tissue cells, complemented by an overview of the in-vitro testing methods of the biomineralization properties of bioceramics. The text is rounded off by chapters on the functionalization of bioceramic coatings and a look at future trends. As a result, the authors bring together all aspects of the latest tech...

  2. Experimental Analysis of Temperature Differences During Implant Site Preparation: Continuous Drilling Technique Versus Intermittent Drilling Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiore, Adolfo; Sivolella, Stefano; Stocco, Elena; Favero, Vittorio; Stellini, Edoardo

    2018-02-01

    Implant site preparation through drilling procedures may cause bone thermonecrosis. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate, using a thermal probe, overheating at implant sites during osteotomies through 2 different drilling methods (continuous drilling technique versus intermittent drilling technique) using irrigation at different temperatures. Five implant sites 13 mm in length were performed on 16 blocks (fresh bovine ribs), for a total of 80 implant sites. The PT-100 thermal probe was positioned 5 mm from each site. Two physiological refrigerant solutions were used: one at 23.7°C and one at 6.0°C. Four experimental groups were considered: group A (continuous drilling with physiological solution at 23.7°C), group B (intermittent drilling with physiological solution at 23.7°C), group C (continuous drilling with physiological solution at 6.0°C), and group D (intermittent drilling with physiological solution at 6.0°C). The Wilcoxon rank-sum test (2-tailed) was used to compare groups. While there was no difference between group A and group B (W = 86; P = .45), statistically significant differences were observed between experimental groups A and C (W = 0; P =.0001), B and D (W = 45; P =.0005), and C and D (W = 41; P = .003). Implant site preparation did not affect the overheating of the bone. Statistically significant differences were found with the refrigerant solutions. Using both irrigating solutions, bone temperature did not exceed 47°C.

  3. Stereotactic technique of RF antenna implantation for brain hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.; Uzuka, T.; Grinev, I.; Tanaka, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We have tried 13.56 MHz RF interstitial hyperthermia for the patients with malignant brain tumor. The purpose of this report is to assess the complication risk rate and the achievement yield of stereotactic procedure for RF antenna implantation into the deep-seated brain tumor. One hundred and twenty-five patients underwent 144 stereotactic RF antenna implantation procedures for interstitial hyperthermia for malignant brain tumors at Niigata University, Japan. One hundred and eight patients had malignant gliomas (54 primary, 54 recurrent), 24 had metastatic tumors, 5 had malignant lymphomas, 5 had meningiomas and 2 had miscellaneous tumors. Indication of this trial was the tumor with inoperative deep-seated tumor or elderly patients. RF antennas and catheters for thermistor probes were set into the tumor with stereotactic apparatus under local anesthesia. Postoperative CT scan underwent in order to assess the accuracy of antenna setting and to check the complications. The hyperthermic treatment underwent with a single antenna in 85 patients, 2 antennas in 43 patients, 3 in 2, 4 in 12, 5 in 1 and 6 antennas in 1 patient. Appropriate RF antenna positioning was obtained in 138 of 144 procedures (95.8 %). Six patients incurred complications (4.2 %). Three patients suffered intratumoral hemorrhage. RF antennas were set into the inappropriate position in 2 cases, hyperthermia was not achieved. One patient occurred with liquorrhea. However, six patients (4.2 %) incurred complications, stereotactic RF antenna setting was a safe and reliable technique of the hyperthermic treatment for the patients with malignant brain tumors. (author)

  4. Implant Monitoring Measurements On Ultra Shallow Implants Before And After Anneal Using Photomodulated Reflection And Junction Photovoltage Measurement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallian, M.; Pap, A.; Mocsar, K.; Somogyi, A.; Nadudvari, Gy.; Kosztka, D.; Pavelka, T.

    2011-01-01

    Ultra shallow junctions are becoming widely used in the micro- and nanoelectronic devices, and novel measurement methods are needed to monitor the manufacturing processes. Photomodulated Reflection measurements before anneal and Junction Photovoltage-based sheet resistance measurements after anneal are non-contact, nondestructive techniques suitable for characterizing both the implantation and the annealing process. Tests verify that these methods are consistent with each other and by using them together, defects originating in the implantation and anneal steps can be separated.

  5. Evaluation of marginal and internal gaps of metal ceramic crowns obtained from conventional impressions and casting techniques with those obtained from digital techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathika Rai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accuracy in fit of cast metal restoration has always remained as one of the primary factors in determining the success of the restoration. A well-fitting restoration needs to be accurate both along its margin and with regard to its internal surface. Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the marginal fit of metal ceramic crowns obtained by conventional inlay casting wax pattern using conventional impression with the metal ceramic crowns obtained by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM technique using direct and indirect optical scanning. Materials and Methods: This in vitro study on preformed custom-made stainless steel models with former assembly that resembles prepared tooth surfaces of standardized dimensions comprised three groups: the first group included ten samples of metal ceramic crowns fabricated with conventional technique, the second group included CAD/CAM-milled direct metal laser sintering (DMLS crowns using indirect scanning, and the third group included DMLS crowns fabricated by direct scanning of the stainless steel model. The vertical marginal gap and the internal gap were evaluated with the stereomicroscope (Zoomstar 4; post hoc Turkey's test was used for statistical analysis. One-way analysis of variance method was used to compare the mean values. Results and Conclusion: Metal ceramic crowns obtained from direct optical scanning showed the least marginal and internal gap when compared to the castings obtained from inlay casting wax and indirect optical scanning. Indirect and direct optical scanning had yielded results within clinically acceptable range.

  6. Dose measurement of ion implanted silicon by RBS technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamawanna, Teerasak; Intarasiri, Saweat; Prapunsri, Chowunchun; Thongleurm, Chome; Maleepatra, Saenee; Singkarat, Somsorn

    2003-10-01

    Surface modification can be achieved by ion implantation. This study used a 1 mm thick silicon wafer as a target which was implanted with Ar+ at 80 keV. The degree of the modification depends on both the ion energy and the implanted dose. The distribution of argon in the silicon substrate and the absolute implanted dose can be measured by using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). These investigations utilized a 1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator system at Chiang Mai University. The dose determination by a direct calculation is in agreement with the simulation by the SIMNRA code

  7. Percutaneous Endovascular Salvage Techniques for Implanted Venous Access Device Dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breault, Stéphane; Glauser, Frédéric; Babaker, Malik; Doenz, Francesco; Qanadli, Salah Dine

    2015-01-01

    PurposeImplanted venous access devices (IVADs) are often used in patients who require long-term intravenous drug administration. The most common causes of device dysfunction include occlusion by fibrin sheath and/or catheter adherence to the vessel wall. We present percutaneous endovascular salvage techniques to restore function in occluded catheters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of these techniques.Methods and MaterialsThrough a femoral or brachial venous access, a snare is used to remove fibrin sheath around the IVAD catheter tip. If device dysfunction is caused by catheter adherences to the vessel wall, a new “mechanical adhesiolysis” maneuver was performed. IVAD salvage procedures performed between 2005 and 2013 were analyzed. Data included clinical background, catheter tip position, success rate, recurrence, and rate of complication.ResultsEighty-eight salvage procedures were performed in 80 patients, mostly women (52.5 %), with a mean age of 54 years. Only a minority (17.5 %) of evaluated catheters were located at an optimal position (i.e., cavoatrial junction ±1 cm). Mechanical adhesiolysis or other additional maneuvers were used in 21 cases (24 %). Overall technical success rate was 93.2 %. Malposition and/or vessel wall adherences were the main cause of technical failure. No complications were noted.ConclusionThese IVAD salvage techniques are safe and efficient. When a catheter is adherent to the vessel wall, mechanical adhesiolysis maneuvers allow catheter mobilization and a greater success rate with no additional risk. In patients who still require long-term use of their IVAD, these procedures can be performed safely to avoid catheter replacement

  8. Percutaneous Endovascular Salvage Techniques for Implanted Venous Access Device Dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.breault@chuv.ch [Lausanne University Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Department (Switzerland); Glauser, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.glauser@chuv.ch [Lausanne University Hospital, Angiology and Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Departments (Switzerland); Babaker, Malik, E-mail: malik.babaker@chuv.ch; Doenz, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.doenz@chuv.ch; Qanadli, Salah Dine, E-mail: salah.qanadli@chuv.ch [Lausanne University Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Department (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeImplanted venous access devices (IVADs) are often used in patients who require long-term intravenous drug administration. The most common causes of device dysfunction include occlusion by fibrin sheath and/or catheter adherence to the vessel wall. We present percutaneous endovascular salvage techniques to restore function in occluded catheters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of these techniques.Methods and MaterialsThrough a femoral or brachial venous access, a snare is used to remove fibrin sheath around the IVAD catheter tip. If device dysfunction is caused by catheter adherences to the vessel wall, a new “mechanical adhesiolysis” maneuver was performed. IVAD salvage procedures performed between 2005 and 2013 were analyzed. Data included clinical background, catheter tip position, success rate, recurrence, and rate of complication.ResultsEighty-eight salvage procedures were performed in 80 patients, mostly women (52.5 %), with a mean age of 54 years. Only a minority (17.5 %) of evaluated catheters were located at an optimal position (i.e., cavoatrial junction ±1 cm). Mechanical adhesiolysis or other additional maneuvers were used in 21 cases (24 %). Overall technical success rate was 93.2 %. Malposition and/or vessel wall adherences were the main cause of technical failure. No complications were noted.ConclusionThese IVAD salvage techniques are safe and efficient. When a catheter is adherent to the vessel wall, mechanical adhesiolysis maneuvers allow catheter mobilization and a greater success rate with no additional risk. In patients who still require long-term use of their IVAD, these procedures can be performed safely to avoid catheter replacement.

  9. Implantation of 111In in NTDSi by heavy ion recoil technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakare, S.V.; Tomar, B.S.

    1998-01-01

    Heavy ion recoil implantation technique has been used to implant 111 In in n-type silicon using medium energy heavy ion accelerator Pelletron, at TIFR, Colaba, Mumbai. The nuclear reaction used for this purpose was 109 Ag( 7 Li,p4n) 111 In. The beam energy was optimised to be 50 MeV for maximum concentration of the implanted probe atoms. The gamma-ray spectrum of the implanted sample after 24 hours was found to contain only 171 and 245 keV gamma rays of 111 In. The penetration depth of ion is increased to 1.6 μm by heavy ion recoil implantation technique as compared to 0.16 μm with the conventional ion implantation technique. (author)

  10. Development of a novel technique for maxillofacial reconstruction using custom-made bioactive ceramic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbakin, D. E.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Kulkov, S. N.; Buyakova, S. P.; Chernov, V. I.; Mukhamedov, M. R.; Buyakov, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, there has been a trend towards the search for new, safe and effective methods of reconstruction of maxillofacial defects after tumor excision. Among various materials used for bone defect reconstruction, ceramics has attached a great deal of attention. The purpose of our study was to develop a technique for personified approach to the reconstruction of maxillofacial bone defects with bioactive ceramic implants. In our study we used the technique of virtual implant planning for maxillofacial reconstruction using preoperative CT data of the patient's facial skeleton. Bioactive ceramic implant materials meet all the requirements for medical materials used in reconstructive surgery. The technique described in this paper to customize prefabricated bioactive ceramic implants enables surgeons to perform reconstruction of large postoperative defects in the maxillofacial region, thereby making custom implants suitable for any patient. The use of this technique decreases surgical time, reduces time needed for postoperative recovery, lowers overall patient morbidity and optimizes aesthetic and functional results.

  11. Development and fabrication of patient-specific knee implant using additive manufacturing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammit, Robert; Rochman, Arif

    2017-10-01

    Total knee replacement is the most effective treatment to relief pain and restore normal function in a diseased knee joint. The aim of this research was to develop a patient-specific knee implant which can be fabricated using additive manufacturing techniques and has reduced wear rates using a highly wear resistant materials. The proposed design was chosen based on implant requirements, such as reduction in wear rates as well as strong fixation. The patient-specific knee implant improves on conventional knee implants by modifying the articulating surfaces and bone-implant interfaces. Moreover, tribological tests of different polymeric wear couples were carried out to determine the optimal materials to use for the articulating surfaces. Finite element analysis was utilized to evaluate the stresses sustained by the proposed design. Finally, the patient-specific knee implant was successfully built using additive manufacturing techniques.

  12. Two-stage implant placement technique for the management of irradiated jaws: An animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Arnaout, Mohamed A; Elsafi, Mohamed H; Kassem, Youssef M

    2017-10-01

    Radiotherapy results in diminished bone remodeling capacity and an elevated risk of osteoradionecrosis, which can negatively influence the survival rate of dental implants. Patients receiving radiotherapy are advised not to receive dental implants during or soon after completing their radiotherapy. The purpose of this animal study was to investigate a 2-stage implant placement technique designed to diminish applied trauma on irradiated bone. Two groups of white New Zealand rabbits received radiotherapy in ascending doses (2, 4, 8 Gy), while a nonirradiated group served as control. Three weeks after completion of the last radiotherapy session, one of the irradiated groups and the control group received titanium dental implants bilaterally in the femur head. For the second irradiated group, an osteotomy was performed, and the surgical wound was left to heal for 2 weeks before implant placement. All animals were sacrificed 4 weeks after implant placement, and histomorphometric analysis was used to study bone-implant contact (n=14, α=.05). Statistical analysis revealed significantly higher (F=159, P<.001) bone-implant contact in the 2-stage (40.2 ±1.9) implant placement technique than in the immediately placed implants (21.2 ±2.3) in irradiated bone. Both of the groups had a significantly lower bone-to-implant contact ratio than the non-irradiated control (64.2 ±3.8). Within the limitations of this animal study, the 2-stage implant placement technique could be used to reduce trauma in irradiated bone and to improve wound healing around dental implants. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dinosaur Impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taquet, Philippe

    1998-09-01

    Perhaps you are a paleontologist or have always wondered what it is like to be one. Or you are fascinated by fossils and like to read about the origins and natural history of dinosaurs. Or maybe you are an avid traveler and reader of travelogues. If you are any of these things, then this book is for you. Originally published in 1994 in French, Dinosaur Impressions is the engaging account of thirty years of travel and paleontological exploration by Philippe Taquet, one of the world's most noted paleontologists. Dr. Taquet takes the reader on a surprisingly far-flung tour ranging from the Provence countryside to the Niger desert, from the Brazilian bush to the Mongolian Steppes, and from the Laos jungle to the Moroccan mountains in search of dinosaur bones and what they have to tell us about a vanished world. With wry humor and lively anecdotes, Dr. Taquet retraces the history of paleontological research, along the way discussing the latest theories of dinosaur existence and extinction. Elegantly translated by Kevin Padian, Dinosaur Impressions provides a unique, thoughtful perspective not often encountered in American- and English-language works. This insightful, first-hand account of an exceptional career is also a travelogue par excellence that will enthrall enthusiasts and general readers alike. Philippe Taquet is the Director of the National Museum of Natural History in Paris and is a member of the French Academy of Sciences. Kevin Padian is a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology and Curator of the Museum of Paleontology at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also the editor of The Beginning of the Age of Dinosaurs (Cambridge, 1986) and The Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs (1997).

  14. Thermal conductivity measurement of the He-ion implanted layer of W using transient thermoreflectance technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Shilian; Li, Yuanfei [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Zhigang [Department of Electronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Jia, Yuzhen [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Science and Technology on Reactor Fuel and Materials Laboratory, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu 610213 (China); Li, Chun [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, North China University of Technology, Beijing 100144 (China); Xu, Ben; Chen, Wanqi [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Bai, Suyuan [School of Physics and Electronic Technology, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian 116029 (China); Huang, Zhengxing; Tang, Zhenan [Department of Electronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Wei, E-mail: liuw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Transient thermoreflectance method was applied on the thermal conductivity measurement of the surface damaged layer of He-implanted tungsten. Uniform damages tungsten surface layer was produced by multi-energy He-ion implantation with thickness of 450 nm. Result shows that the thermal conductivity is reduced by 90%. This technique was further applied on sample with holes on the surface, which was produced by the He-implanted at 2953 K. The thermal conductivity decreases to 3% from the bulk value.

  15. Heat generation during implant placement in low-density bone: effect of surgical technique, insertion torque and implant macro design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Aleksa; Mišić, Tijana; Miličić, Biljana; Calvo-Guirado, Jose Luis; Aleksić, Zoran; Ðinić, Ana

    2013-07-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of surgical technique, implant macrodesign and insertion torque on bone temperature changes during implant placement. In the in vitro study, 144 self-tapping (blueSKY(®) 4 × 10 mm; Bredent) and 144 non-self-tapping (Standard implant(®) 4.1 × 10 mm; Straumann) were placed in osteotomies prepared in pig ribs by lateral bone condensing or bone drilling techniques. The maximum insertion torque values of 30, 35 and 40 Ncm were used. Real-time bone temperature measurement during implant placement was performed by three thermocouples positioned vertically, in tripod configuration around every osteotomy, at a distance of 5 mm from it and at depths of 1, 5 and 10 mm. Data were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U-tests and Regression analysis. Significant predictor of bone temperature at the osteotomy depth of 1 mm was insertion torque (P = 0.003) and at the depth of 10-mm implant macrodesign (P = 0.029), while no significant predictor at depth of 5 mm was identified (P > 0.05). Higher insertion torque values as well as non-self-tapping implant macrodesign were related to higher temperatures. Implant placement in sites prepared by bone drilling induced significantly higher temperature increase (P = 0.021) compared with bone condensing sites at the depth of 5 mm, while no significant difference was recorded at other depths. Compared with 30 Ncm, insertion torque values of 35 and 40 Ncm produced significantly higher temperature increase (P = 0.005; P = 0.003, respectively) at the depth of 1 mm. There was no significant difference in temperature change induced by 35 and 40 Ncm, neither by implant macrodesign at all investigated depths (P > 0.05). Placement of self-tapping implants with low insertion torque into sites prepared by lateral bone condensing technique might be advantageous in terms of thermal effect on bone. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Investigation of Steel Surfaces Treated by a Hybrid Ion Implantation Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuther, H.; Richter, E.; Prokert, F.; Ueda, M.; Beloto, A. F.; Gomes, G. F.

    2004-01-01

    Implantation of nitrogen ions into stainless steel in combination with oxidation often results in a decrease or even complete removal of the chromium in the nitrogen containing outermost surface layer. While iron nitrides can be formed easily by this method, due to the absence of chromium, the formation of chromium nitrides is impossible and the beneficial influence of chromium in the steel for corrosion resistance cannot be used. To overcome this problem we use the following hybrid technique. A thin chromium layer is deposited on steel and subsequently implanted with nitrogen ions. Chromium can be implanted by recoil into the steel surface and thus the formation of iron/chromium nitrides should be possible. Both beam line ion implantation and plasma immersion ion implantation are used. Due to the variation of the process parameters, different implantation profiles and different compounds are produced. The produced layers are characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The obtained results show that due to the variation of the implantation parameters, the formation of iron/chromium nitrides can be achieved and that plasma immersion ion implantation is the most suitable technique for the enrichment of chromium in the outermost surface layer of the steel when compared to the beam line implantation.

  17. Pure high dose metal ion implantation using the plasma immersion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T.; Tang, B.Y.; Zeng, Z.M.; Kwok, T.K.; Chu, P.K.; Monteiro, O.R.; Brown, I.G.

    1999-01-01

    High energy implantation of metal ions can be carried out using conventional ion implantation with a mass-selected ion beam in scanned-spot mode by employing a broad-beam approach such as with a vacuum arc ion source, or by utilizing plasma immersion ion implantation with a metal plasma. For many high dose applications, the use of plasma immersion techniques offers a high-rate process, but the formation of a surface film along with the subsurface implanted layer is sometimes a severe or even fatal detriment. We describe here an operating mode of the metal plasma immersion approach by which pure implantation can be obtained. We have demonstrated the technique by carrying out Ti and Ta implantations at energies of about 80 and 120 keV for Ti and Ta, respectively, and doses on the order of 1x10 17 ions/cm 2 . Our experiments show that virtually pure implantation without simultaneous surface deposition can be accomplished. Using proper synchronization of the metal arc and sample voltage pulse, the applied dose that deposits as a film versus the part that is energetically implanted (the deposition-to-implantation ratio) can be precisely controlled.copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  18. New techniques for optical absorption measurement of implanted nanoparticles in float glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okur, I.; Townsend, P.D.; Chandler, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    New techniques are reported for optical absorption and waveguide loss measurement of copper, gold and silver implanted float glass. Implantations were carried out on the tin face of the float glass since this face is an optical waveguide. Specially made triangle shape masks were used during implantation to study the optical loss-implant length relation. Absorption coefficients were extracted as 2.4 and 1 cm -1 for the gold and silver implants at 633 nm, respectively. These values were found to be implant condition dependent. To analyse the shape of nanoparticles a sandwiched structure was used in an optical absorption measurement set-up in which two guiding faces were put in contact. The sandwiched structure places the colloids at the centre of the optical field distribution rather than on the boundary zone. These experiments have revealed that the copper and the gold particles may have non-spherical shapes, whereas for silver, the formation of spherical nanoparticles is more likely

  19. Immediate Implant Placement of a Single Central Incisor Using a CAD/CAM Crown-Root Form Technique: Provisional to Final Restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafiadis, Dean; Goldstein, Gary; Garber, David; Lambrakos, Anthony; Kowalski, Bj

    2017-02-01

    Preserving soft and hard tissues after extraction and implant placement is crucial for anterior esthetics. This technique will show how the information gathered from a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan of the maxillary left central incisor and an intra-oral digital impression can be merged to fabricate a CAD/CAM crown-root matrix to be used as an immediate provisional restoration that mimics the natural anatomy. Due to trauma, a left central incisor appeared to be fractured and was scheduled for extraction and implant placement. The crown-root configuration captured by the CBCT scan was merged with the digital files from an intra-oral digital impression. A CAD/CAM crown-root matrix was fabricated. Because the matrix shell was fabricated with the exact anatomy of the natural tooth, it replicated the position and three dimensional anatomy of the soft and hard tissue. It was connected to the implant with a customized provisional abutment. A digital impression of a coded healing abutment was made to fabricate the final implant abutment and final restoration. Throughout the treatment time and 36 months after completion, the thickness of tissue, emergence profile, and adjacent papilla was analyzed by clinical evaluation and photography and seemed to be maintained. The use of a pre-operative intra-oral digital scan of the clinical crown-root architecture and the CBCT scan of the bone/root anatomy, can be used together to fabricate a CAD/CAM crown-root form provisional matrix. This digital design helps in the preservation of the 3D tissue topography, as well as the final restoration. The preservation of soft and hard tissue after extraction and implant placement has always been paramount for ideal anterior implant esthetics. Using the information from digital files from CBCT scans and intra-oral scans may help the clinician identify critical anatomical features that can be replicated in the provisional and final CAD/CAM restoration. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29

  20. Technique to assess the alveolar bone width for immediate implant placement in fresh extraction sockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Kumar Chandraker

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: This technique will help the surgeon understand the thickness of labial plate especially the apical region without reflecting the flap, also aid in selection of proper dimension of dental implant, and if bone graft is needed.

  1. Influence of plasma density and plasma sheath dynamics on the ion implantation by plasma immersion technique

    OpenAIRE

    Ensinger, Wolfgang

    1996-01-01

    Influence of plasma density and plasma sheath dynamics on the ion implantation by plasma immersion technique / B. Rauschenbach ... - In: Nuclear instruments and methods in physics research. B. 113. 1996. S. 266-269

  2. Nanotubular surface modification of metallic implants via electrochemical anodization technique

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lu-Ning; Jin, Ming; Zheng, Yudong; Guan, Yueping; Lu, Xin; Luo, Jing-Li

    2014-01-01

    Lu-Ning Wang,1 Ming Jin,1 Yudong Zheng,1 Yueping Guan,1 Xin Lu,1 Jing-Li Luo21School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, CanadaAbstract: Due to increased awareness and interest in the biomedical implant field as a result of an aging population, research in the field of implantable devices has grown rapidly in the...

  3. Surface modification technique of structural ceramics: ion implantation-assisted multi-arc ion plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Zhijian; Miao Hezhuo; Si Wenjie; Qi Longhao; Li Wenzhi

    2003-01-01

    Through reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of the existed surface modification techniques, a new technique, ion implantation-assisted multi-arc ion plating, was proposed. Using the proposed technique, the surfaces of silicon nitride ceramics were modified by Ti ion implantation, and then three kinds of ternary coatings, (Ti,Al)N, (Ti,Zr)N and (Ti,Cr)N, were deposited on the as-implanted ceramics. The coatings prepared by this technique are of high-hardness and well adhesive to the ceramic substrates. The maximal hardness measured by nanoindentation tests is more than 40 GPa. The maximal critical load by nanoscratch tests is more than 60 mN. The cutting tools prepared by this technique with the presented coatings are of excellent performance in industrial applications. The technique may be promising for the surface modification of structural ceramics. (orig.)

  4. [The global impression technic in fixed dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, M; Mainjot, A

    2001-01-01

    The global impression technique allows to obtain in a single stage the impression of the abutment as well as their neighboring teeth. This technique often requires the placement of one or two retraction cords in the sulcus. The impression technique herein described is the double mix method. This method is based on the use of two elastomers with different viscosities, but from the same group thus allowing a simultaneous polymerization.

  5. Evaluation of primary and secondary stability of titanium implants using different surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Afsheen; Meijer, Gert J; Walboomers, X Frank; Jansen, John A

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the influence of different surgical techniques on the primary and secondary implant stability using trabecular bone of goats as an implantation model. In the iliac crest of eight goats, 48 cylindrical-screw-type implants with a diameter of 4.2 mm (Dyna(®) ; Bergen op Zoom, the Netherlands) were installed, using three different surgical techniques: (i) 5% undersized, using a final drill diameter of 4 mm; (ii) 15% undersized, using a final drill diameter of 3.6 mm; and (iii) 25% undersized, using a final drill diameter of 3.2 mm. Peak insertion torque values were measured by a Digital(®) (MARK-10 Corporation, New York, NY, USA) torque gauge instrument during placement. At 3 weeks after implantation, removal torque was measured. Histomorphometrically, the peri-implant bone volume was measured in three zones; the inner zone (0-500 μm), the middle zone (500-1000 μm) and the outer zone (1000-1500 μm). Evaluation of the obtained data demonstrated no statistically significant difference between different surgical techniques regarding removal torque values. With respect to the percentage peri-implant bone volume (%BV), also no significant difference could be observed between all three applied surgical techniques for both the inner, middle and outer zone. However, irrespective of the surgical technique, it was noticed that the %BV was significantly higher for the inner zone as compared to middle and outer zone (P < 0.05) around the implant. At 3 weeks after implant installation, independent of the used undersized surgical technique, the %BV in the inner zone (0-500 μm) peri-implant area was improved due to both condensation of the surrounding bone as also the translocation of host bone particles along the implant surface. Surprisingly, no mechanical beneficial effect of the 25% undersized surgical technique could be observed as compared to the 5% or 15% undersized surgical technique to improve primary or secondary implant stability. © 2013

  6. Rehabilitation with 4 zygomatic implants with a new surgical protocol using ultrasonic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzati, Marco; Mortellaro, Carmen; Arata, Valentina; Gallesio, Giorgia; Previgliano, Valter

    2015-05-01

    When the residual bone crest cannot allow the placement of standard implants, the treatment for complete arch rehabilitation of severely atrophic maxillae can be performed with 4 zygomatic implants (ZIs) and immediate function with predictable results in terms of aesthetics, function, and comfort for the patient. However, even if ZIs' rehabilitations showed a good success rate, this surgery is difficult and need a skillful operator. Complications in this kind of rehabilitation are not uncommon; the main difficulties can be related to the reduced surgical visibility and instrument control in a critical anatomic area. All the surgical protocols described in the literature used drilling techniques. Furthermore, the use of ultrasonic instruments in implant surgery compared with drilling instruments have shown advantages in many aspects of surgical procedures, tissues management, enhancement of control, surgical visualization, and healing. The aim of this study was to report on the preliminary experience using ultrasound technique for ZIs surgery in terms of safety and technical improvement. Ten consecutive patients with severely atrophic maxilla have been treated with 4 ZIs and immediate complete arch acrylic resin provisional prostheses. The patients were followed up from 30 to 32 months evaluating implant success, prosthetic success, and patient satisfaction with a questionnaire. No implants were lost during the study period, with a 100% implant and prosthetic success rate. Within the limitations of this preliminary study, these data indicate that ultrasonic implant site preparation for ZIs can be a good alternative to the drilling technique and an improvement for the surgeon.

  7. Fixation of revision implants is improved by a surgical technique to crack the sclerotic bone rim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kold, Søren; Bechtold, Joan E; Mouzin, Olivier; Elmengaard, Brian; Chen, Xinqian; Søballe, Kjeld

    2005-03-01

    Revision joint replacement has poorer outcomes compared with primary joint replacement, and these poor outcomes have been associated with poorer fixation. We investigated a surgical technique done during the revision operation to improve access from the marrow space to the implant interface by locally cracking the sclerotic bone rim that forms during aseptic loosening. Sixteen implants were inserted bilaterally by distal femur articulation of the knee joint of eight dogs, using our controlled experimental model that replicates the revision setting (sclerotic bone rim, dense fibrous tissue, macrophages, elevated cytokines) by pistoning a loaded 6.0-mm implant 500 microm into the distal femur with particulate PE. At 8 weeks, one of two revision procedures was done. Both revision procedures included complete removal of the membrane, scraping, lavaging, and inserting a revision plasma-spray Ti implant. The crack revision procedure also used a splined tool to circumferentially locally perforate the sclerotic bone rim before insertion of an identical revision implant. Superior fixation was achieved with the cracking procedure in this experimental model. Revision implants inserted with the rim cracking procedure had a significantly higher pushout strength (fivefold median increase) and energy to failure (sixfold median increase), compared with the control revision procedure. Additional evaluation is needed of local perforation of sclerotic bone rim as a simple bone-sparing means to improve revision implant fixation and thereby increase revision implant longevity.

  8. Imaging technique for the complete edentulous patient treated conventionally or with mini implant overdenture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleşcanu Imre, M; Preoteasa, E; Țâncu, AM; Preoteasa, CT

    2013-01-01

    Rationale. The imaging methods are more and more used in the clinical process of modern dentistry. Once the implant based treatment alternatives are nowadays seen as being the standard of care in edentulous patients, these techniques must be integrated in the complete denture treatment. Aim. The study presents some evaluation techniques for the edentulous patient treated by conventional dentures or mini dental implants (mini SKY Bredent) overdentures, using the profile teleradiography. These offer data useful for an optimal positioning of the artificial teeth and the mini dental implants, favoring to obtain an esthetic and functional treatment outcome. We proposed also a method to conceive a simple surgical guide that allows the prosthetically driven implants placement. Material and method. Clinical case reports were made, highlighting the importance of cephalometric evaluation on lateral teleradiographs in complete edentulous patients. A clinical case that gradually reports the surgical guide preparation (Bredent silicon radio opaque), in order to place the mini dental implants in the best prosthetic and anatomic conditions, was presented. Conclusions. The profile teleradiograph is a useful tool for the practitioner. It allows establishing the optimal site for implant placement, in a good relation with the overdenture. The conventional denture can be easily and relatively costless transformed in a surgical guide used during implant placement. PMID:23599828

  9. Immediate Placement of Ultrawide-Diameter Implants in Molar Sockets: Description of a Recommended Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattingh, André C; De Bruyn, Hugo; Ackermann, Andrew; Vandeweghe, Stefan

    Immediate implant placement is performed less frequently in molar extraction sockets than in single root sockets. This is mainly due to the tripodal anatomical configuration of molar roots, which is perceived as complex and therefore unsuitable. The mechanical burden of molar sites, combined with much larger socket dimensions, make it amenable to the use of ultrawide-diameter dental implants. This article describes a practical, sequenced technique that can be used predictably for immediate implant placement in maxillary and mandibular first molar sockets, using a dry skull model for clarification. This detailed description is based on the experience of more than 580 clinical cases over a 10-year period.

  10. “In vitro” Implantation Technique Based on 3D Printed Prosthetic Prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnita, D.; Boborelu, C.; Geonea, I.; Malciu, R.; Grigorie, L.; Tarnita, D. N.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, Rapid Prototyping ZCorp 310 system, based on high-performance composite powder and on resin-high strength infiltration system and three-dimensional printing as a manufacturing method are used to obtain physical prototypes of orthopaedic implants and prototypes of complex functional prosthetic systems directly from the 3D CAD data. These prototypes are useful for in vitro experimental tests and measurements to optimize and obtain final physical prototypes. Using a new elbow prosthesis model prototype obtained by 3D printing, the surgical technique of implantation is established. Surgical implantation was performed on male corpse elbow joint.

  11. A technique for the management of screw access opening in cement-retained implant restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kermanshah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abutment screw loosening has been considered as a common complication of implant-supported dental prostheses. This problem is more important in cement-retained implant restorations due to their invisible position of the screw access opening. Case Report: This report describes a modified retrievability method for cement-retained implant restorations in the event of abutment screw loosening. The screw access opening was marked with ceramic stain and its porcelain surface was treated using hydrofluoric acid (HF, silane, and adhesive to bond to composite resin. Discussion: The present modified technique facilitates screw access opening and improves the bond between the porcelain and composite resin.

  12. Moderate hypothermia technique for chronic implantation of a total artificial heart in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Grady, Patrick; Sinkewich, Martin; Sunagawa, Gengo; Dessoffy, Raymond; Byram, Nicole; Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2017-06-01

    The benefit of whole-body hypothermia in preventing ischemic injury during cardiac surgical operations is well documented. However, application of hypothermia during in vivo total artificial heart implantation has not become widespread because of limited understanding of the proper techniques and restrictions implied by constitutional and physiological characteristics specific to each animal model. Similarly, the literature on hypothermic set-up in total artificial heart implantation has also been limited. Herein we present our experience using hypothermia in bovine models implanted with the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart.

  13. The Historical Evolution of Dental Impression Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadiochos, Ioannis; Papadiochou, Sofia; Emmanouil, Ioannis

    The concept of impression making process in dentistry began in the mid 1800s. Dentists realized that the construction of a prosthetic restoration required both a detailed capture of the oral tissues along with stone cast fabrications. To accomplish these goals, impression materials were essential. Beeswax represents the first impression material, while important bechmarks during the historical evolution of dental impression materials are considered to be the introduction of dental trays in the early 1800s and the invention of the gutta-percha, thermoplastic resins and plaster of Paris. The double (corrective) impression technique, along with the functional impression concept that was established after mid 1800s, are also identified as pivotal innovations. During the 20th century, the advances in material development slowed significantly since the majority of the current impression materials had already been invented. However, the introduction of elastomeric impression materials in the field of prosthodontics that offered the advantages of accuracy and dimensional stability substantially upgraded both the impression accuracy and the quality of the final restoration. Presently, the dental practitioner has access to a variety of impression materials and should be aware of their properties, indications and limitations as well. Futhermore, while continuous attempts are being made to enhance these materials, the ideal impression material has yet to be developed. The purpose of this article was to provide a comprehensive review about the historical development of impression dental materials. Copyright American Academy of the History of Dentistry.

  14. Osseointegrated silicone finger prosthesis using dental implants: a renovated technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Dileep Nag; Sankar, V Vijay; Chirumamilla, Naveen; Reddy, V Vamsikrishna

    2014-11-01

    In clinical practice, we come across patients with traumatically amputated or congenitally missing partial or complete fingers that can be restored using microsurgical replantation or transplantation procedures. However, in some cases this might not be possible due to systemic or local factors and the lost or missing part has to be replaced prosthetically to offer psychological and functional wellbeing. These prostheses can be constructed with various materials like acrylics or silicone retained with the help of auxiliary aids. However, these prostheses cause some hindrance in performing functions like writing, typing, etc. The aim of the present trial was to ameliorate the existing design of implant supported finger prosthesis. Distal phalange of middle finger replaced with implant supported silicone finger prosthesis is modified by utilizing a metal framework to support silicone material to improve rigidity while working. We could achieve a good function, esthetics and tactile sensibility with this modified design. Whenever, feasible this design can improve the performance and patients feel a deep sense of satisfaction and improved self-esteem with this modified prosthesis.

  15. Transvenous permanent pacemaker implantation in dextrocardia: technique, challenges, outcome, and a brief review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenthar, Jayaprakash; Rai, Maneesh K; Walia, Rohit; Ghanta, Somasekhar; Sreekumar, Praveen; Reddy, Satish S

    2014-09-01

    Dextrocardia is a rare congenital anomaly. Pacemaker implantation in dextrocardia can be challenging because of the distorted anatomy and associated anomalies. The literature regarding implantation of pacemaker in dextrocardia is scarce. The study involved retrospective analysis of records of patients with dextrocardia who had undergone pacemaker implantation between January 2006 and July 2013 from a single centre. Six patients with dextrocardia (five males and one female) underwent permanent pacemaker implantation (PPI) between January 2006 and July 2013. Of them, three had situs solitus dextrocardia and three situs inversus dextrocardia. All three patients with situs solitus dextrocardia had associated corrected transposition of great arteries. The indication for pacemaker implantation was symptomatic complete atrioventricular (AV) block in four, high-grade AV block in one, and sinus node dysfunction in one patient. A favourable outcome was noted during a mean follow-up of 3.9 years (4 months to 7 years) with one patient needing a pulse generator replacement. Permanent pacemaker implantation in dextrocardia can be challenging because of the distorted anatomy. Use of a technique employing angiography to delineate chamber anatomy and relationship can assist the operator during such difficult PPIs. The medium- and long-term survival after a successful pacemaker implantation in dextrocardia is favourable. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Assessment of trabecular bone changes around endosseous implants using image analysis techniques: A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuki, Mervet El; Omami, Galal; Horner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the trabecular bone changes that occurred around functional endosseous dental implants by means of radiographic image analysis techniques. Immediate preoperative and postoperative periapical radiographs of de-identified implant patients at the University Dental Hospital of Manchester were retrieved, screened for specific inclusion criteria, digitized, and quantified for structural elements of the trabecular bone around the endosseous implants, by using image analysis techniques. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5. P values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. A total of 12 implants from 11 patients were selected for the study, and 26 regions of interest were obtained. There was a significant increase in the bone area in terms of the mean distance between nodes (p=0.006) and a significant decrease in the marrow area in terms of the bone area (p=0.006) and the length of marrow spaces (p=0.032). It appeared that the bone around the implant underwent remodeling that resulted in a net increase in bone after implant placement.

  17. Assessment of trabecular bone changes around endosseous implants using image analysis techniques: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuki, Mervet El [Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Benghazi University College of Dentistry, Benghazi (Libya); Omami, Galal [Oral Diagnosis and Polyclinics, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Horner, Keith [Dept. of Oral Radiology, University Dental Hospital of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the trabecular bone changes that occurred around functional endosseous dental implants by means of radiographic image analysis techniques. Immediate preoperative and postoperative periapical radiographs of de-identified implant patients at the University Dental Hospital of Manchester were retrieved, screened for specific inclusion criteria, digitized, and quantified for structural elements of the trabecular bone around the endosseous implants, by using image analysis techniques. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5. P values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. A total of 12 implants from 11 patients were selected for the study, and 26 regions of interest were obtained. There was a significant increase in the bone area in terms of the mean distance between nodes (p=0.006) and a significant decrease in the marrow area in terms of the bone area (p=0.006) and the length of marrow spaces (p=0.032). It appeared that the bone around the implant underwent remodeling that resulted in a net increase in bone after implant placement.

  18. Employment of an ion implantation technique for catalyst coating on various substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannikov, M.G.; Chattha, J.A.; Zlobin, V.N.; Vasilve, I.P.; Cherkasov, J.A.; Gawrilenko, P.N.

    2001-01-01

    Catalysts are widely used in the chemical industry as well as in the production of vehicle catalytic converters. Precious metals are employed increasingly as catalytic materials. Traditional methods of coating, such as impregnation, are thought to reduce the porosity and specific area of catalyst thus reducing the catalytic efficiency. Apart from that, impregnation technology leads to the high expense of precious metals. To reduce the content of noble metals in catalysts the ion implantation method of coating has been investigated. Several samples of catalysts on various substrates were prepared by ion implantation technique and tested. New catalysts have shown high nitric oxides (NO/sub x/) and carbon monoxide (CO) conversion efficiency, with the content of noble metals reduced substantially. Experiment has also shown that specific area of substrates coated by an ion implantation had not decreased. Schematic of an ion implanter and experimental results are provided. (author)

  19. [Implant placement in the aesthetic zone: the socket-shield-technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagas, L J; Pepplinkhuizen, J J F A A; Bergé, S J; Meijer, G J

    2015-01-01

    Following the extraction of an incisor in the maxilla, resorption of the -alveolar bone always occurs, especially on the buccal side. This often indicates that in the buccocervical area, insufficient bone is present to cover the dental implant. One treatment option is to carry out a bone transplant on the buccal side prior to or during the placement of the implant. An alternative way of supporting the buccocervical gingival is to leave the buccal part of the radixin situ, the so-called socket-shield technique. The results of this treatment for 16 consecutive patients were evaluated and revealed that the socket-shield technique produces good treatment results.

  20. Techniques used by United Kingdom consultant plastic surgeons to select implant size for primary breast augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, W J M; Timmons, M J; Kauser, S

    2015-10-01

    Techniques used to estimate implant size for primary breast augmentation have evolved since the 1970s. Currently no consensus exists on the optimal method to select implant size for primary breast augmentation. In 2013 we asked United Kingdom consultant plastic surgeons who were full members of BAPRAS or BAAPS what was their technique for implant size selection for primary aesthetic breast augmentation. We also asked what was the range of implant sizes they commonly used. The answers to question one were grouped into four categories: experience, measurements, pre-operative external sizers and intra-operative sizers. The response rate was 46% (164/358). Overall, 95% (153/159) of all respondents performed some form of pre-operative assessment, the others relied on "experience" only. The most common technique for pre-operative assessment was by external sizers (74%). Measurements were used by 57% of respondents and 3% used intra-operative sizers only. A combination of measurements and sizers was used by 34% of respondents. The most common measurements were breast base (68%), breast tissue compliance (19%), breast height (15%), and chest diameter (9%). The median implant size commonly used in primary breast augmentation was 300cc. Pre-operative external sizers are the most common technique used by UK consultant plastic surgeons to select implant size for primary breast augmentation. We discuss the above findings in relation to the evolution of pre-operative planning techniques for breast augmentation. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Limited Submuscular Direct-to-Implant Technique Utilizing AlloMax

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    Michal Brichacek, MD

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:. This study evaluates a novel limited submuscular direct-to-implant technique utilizing AlloMax where only the upper few centimeters of the implant is covered by the pectoralis, whereas the majority of the implant including the middle and lower poles are covered by acellular dermal matrix. Methods:. The pectoralis muscle is released off its inferior and inferior-medial origins and allowed to retract superiorly. Two sheets of AlloMax (6 × 16 cm are sutured together and secured to the inframammary fold, serratus fascia, and the superiorly retracted pectoralis. Thirty-seven breasts in 19 consecutive patients with follow-up at 6 months were reviewed. Results:. Nineteen consecutive patients with 37 reconstructed breasts were studied. Average age was 50 years, average BMI was 24.3. Ptosis ranged from grade 0–III, and average cup size was B (range, A–DDD. Early minor complications included 1 seroma, 3 minor postoperative hematomas managed conservatively, and 3 minor wound healing problems. Three breasts experienced mastectomy skin flap necrosis and were managed with local excision. There were no cases of postoperative infection, red breast, grade III/IV capsular contractures, or implant loss. A single patient complained of animation postoperatively. One patient desired fat grafting for rippling. Conclusions:. The limited submuscular direct-to-implant technique utilizing AlloMax appears to be safe with a low complication rate at 6 months. This technique minimizes the action of the pectoralis on the implant, reducing animation deformities but still providing muscle coverage of the upper limit of the implant. Visible rippling is reduced, and a vascularized bed remains for fat grafting of the upper pole if required.

  2. In vivo precision of conventional and digital methods for obtaining quadrant dental impressions

    OpenAIRE

    Ender, Andreas; Zimmermann, Moritz; Attin, Thomas; Mehl, Albert

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Quadrant impressions are commonly used as alternative to full-arch impressions. Digital impression systems provide the ability to take these impressions very quickly; however, few studies have investigated the accuracy of the technique in vivo. The aim of this study is to assess the precision of digital quadrant impressions in vivo in comparison to conventional impression techniques. MATERIALS AND METHODS Impressions were obtained via two conventional (metal full-arch tray, CI, ...

  3. A Monte Carlo technique for signal level detection in implanted intracranial pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avent, R K; Charlton, J D; Nagle, H T; Johnson, R N

    1987-01-01

    Statistical monitoring techniques like CUSUM, Trigg's tracking signal and EMP filtering have a major advantage over more recent techniques, such as Kalman filtering, because of their inherent simplicity. In many biomedical applications, such as electronic implantable devices, these simpler techniques have greater utility because of the reduced requirements on power, logic complexity and sampling speed. The determination of signal means using some of the earlier techniques are reviewed in this paper, and a new Monte Carlo based method with greater capability to sparsely sample a waveform and obtain an accurate mean value is presented. This technique may find widespread use as a trend detection method when reduced power consumption is a requirement.

  4. Analysis techniques of charging damage studied on three different high-current ion implanters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felch, S. B.; Larson, L. A.; Current, M. I.; Lindsey, D. W.

    1989-02-01

    One of the Greater Silicon Valley Implant Users' Group's recent activities has been to sponsor a round-robin on charging damage, where identical wafers were implanted on three different state-of-the-art, high-current ion implanters. The devices studied were thin-dielectric (250 Å SiO2), polysilicon-gate MOS capacitors isolated by thick field oxide. The three implanters involved were the Varian/Extrion 160XP, the Eaton/Nova 10-80, and the Applied Materials PI9000. Each implanter vendor was given 48 wafers to implant with 100 keV As+ ions at a dose of 1 × 1016 cm-2. Parameters that were varied include the beam current, electron flood gun current, and chamber pressure. The charge-to-breakdown, breakdown voltage, and leakage current of several devices before anneal have been measured. The results from these tests were inconclusive as to the physical mechanism of charging and as to the effectiveness of techniques to reduce its impact on devices. However, the methodology of this study is discussed in detail to aid in the planning of future experiments. Authors' industrial affiliations: S.B. Felch, Varian Research Center, 611 Hansen Way, Palo Alto, CA 94303, USA; L.A. Larson, National Semiconductor Corp., P.O. Box 58090, Santa Clara, CA 95052-8090, USA; M.I. Current, Applied Materials, 3050 Bowers Ave., Santa Clara, CA 95054, USA; D.W. Lindsey, Eaton/NOVA, 931 Benicia Ave, Sunnyvale, CA 94086, USA.

  5. The Suprameatal Approach: A Safe Alternative Surgical Technique for Cochlear Implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postelmans, Job T. F.; Tange, Rinze A.; Stokroos, Robert J.; Grolman, Wilko

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To report on surgical complications arising post-operatively in 104 patients undergoing cochlear implantation surgery using the suprameatal approach (SMA). Second, to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the SMA technique compared with the classic mastoidectomy using the posterior

  6. Effect of Simplifying Drilling Technique on Heat Generation During Osteotomy Preparation for Dental Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kholey, Khalid E; Ramasamy, Saravanan; Kumar R, Sheetal; Elkomy, Aamna

    2017-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that there would be no difference in heat production by reducing the number of drills during the implant site preparation relative to conventional drilling sequence. A total of 120 implant site preparations with 3 different diameters (3.6, 4.3, and 4.6 mm) were performed on bovine ribs. Within the same diameter group, half of the preparations were performed by a simplified drilling procedure (pilot drill + final diameter drill) and other half using the conventional drilling protocol (pilot drill followed by graduated series of drills to widen the site). Heat production by different drilling techniques was evaluated by measuring the bone temperature using k-type thermocouple and a sensitive thermometer before and after each drill. Mean for maximum temperature increase during site preparation of the 3.6, 4.3, and 4.6-mm implants was 2.45, 2.60, and 2.95° when the site was prepared by the simplified procedure, whereas it was 2.85, 3.10, and 3.60° for the sites prepared by the conventional technique, respectively. No significant difference in temperature increase was found when implants of the 3 different diameters were prepared either by the conventional or simplified drilling procedure. The simplified drilling technique produced similar amount of heat comparable to the conventional technique that proved the initial hypothesis.

  7. Improving neuromodulation technique for refractory voiding dysfunctions: two-stage implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janknegt, R A; Weil, E H; Eerdmans, P H

    1997-03-01

    Neuromodulation is a new technique that uses electrical stimulation of the sacral nerves for patients with refractory urinary urge/frequency or urge-incontinence, and some forms of urinary retention. The limiting factor for receiving an implant is often a failure of the percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE) test. Present publications mention only about a 50% success score for PNE of all patients, although the micturition diaries and urodynamic parameters are similar. We wanted to investigate whether PNE results improved by using a permanent electrode as a PNE test. This would show that improvement of the PNE technique is feasible. In 10 patients where the original PNE had failed to improve the micturition diary parameters more than 50%, a permanent electrode was implanted by operation. It was connected to an external stimulator. In those cases where the patients improved according to their micturition diary by more than 50% during a period of 4 days, the external stimulator was replaced by a permanent subcutaneous neurostimulator. Eight of the 10 patients had a good to very good result (60% to 90% improvement) during the testing period and received their implant 5 to 14 days after the first stage. The good results of the two-stage implant technique we used indicate that the development of better PNE electrodes may lead to an improvement of the testing technique and better selection between nonresponders and technical failures.

  8. The effects of implant surface roughness and surgical technique on implant fixation in an in vitro model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shalabi, M.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between implant surface parameters, surgical approach and initial implant fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty tapered, conical, screw-shaped implants with machined or etched surface topography were implanted into the

  9. Various Techniques to Increase Keratinized Tissue for Implant Supported Overdentures: Retrospective Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Elkhaweldi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this retrospective case series is to describe and compare different surgical techniques that can be utilized to augment the keratinized soft tissue around implant-supported overdentures. Materials and Methods. The data set was extracted as deidentified information from the routine treatment of patients at the Ashman Department of Periodontology and Implant Dentistry at New York University College of Dentistry. Eight edentulous patients were selected to be included in this study. Patients were treated for lack of keratinized tissue prior to implant placement, during the second stage surgery, and after delivery of the final prosthesis. Results. All 8 patients in this study were wearing a complete maxillary and/or mandibular denture for at least a year before the time of the surgery. One of the following surgical techniques was utilized to increase the amount of keratinized tissue: apically positioned flap (APF, pedicle graft (PG, connective tissue graft (CTG, or free gingival graft (FGG. Conclusions. The amount of keratinized tissue should be taken into consideration when planning for implant-supported overdentures. The apical repositioning flap is an effective approach to increase the width of keratinized tissue prior to the implant placement.

  10. Removal of a Dental Implant Displaced into the Maxillary Sinus by Means of the Bone Lid Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Fusari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rehabilitation of edentulous jaws with implant-supported prosthesis has become a common practice among oral surgeons in the last three decades. This therapy presents a very low incidence of complications. One of them is the displacement of dental implants into the maxillary sinus. Dental implants, such as any other foreign body into the maxillary sinus, should be removed in order to prevent sinusitis. Methods. In this paper, we report a case of dental implant migrated in the maxillary sinus and removed by means of the bone lid technique. Results and Conclusion. The migration of dental implants into the maxillary sinus is rarely reported. Migrated implants should be considered for removal in order to prevent possible sinusal diseases. The implant has been removed without any complications, confirming the bone lid technique to be safe and reliable.

  11. Fit Analysis of Different Framework Fabrication Techniques for Implant-Supported Partial Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spazzin, Aloísio Oro; Bacchi, Atais; Trevisani, Alexandre; Farina, Ana Paula; Dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the vertical misfit of implant-supported frameworks made using different techniques to obtain passive fit. Thirty three-unit fixed partial dentures were fabricated in cobalt-chromium alloy (n = 10) using three fabrication methods: one-piece casting, framework cemented on prepared abutments, and laser welding. The vertical misfit between the frameworks and the abutments was evaluated with an optical microscope using the single-screw test. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (α = .05). The one-piece casted frameworks presented significantly higher vertical misfit values than those found for framework cemented on prepared abutments and laser welding techniques (P Laser welding and framework cemented on prepared abutments are effective techniques to improve the adaptation of three-unit implant-supported prostheses. These techniques presented similar fit.

  12. Simplified Technique for Incorporating a Metal Mesh into Record Bases for Mandibular Implant Overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Antonio; Siegel, Sharon C

    2015-12-01

    Mandibular implant-retained overdentures have become the standard of care for patients with mandibular complete edentulism. As part of the treatment, the mandibular implant-retained overdenture may require a metal mesh framework to be incorporated to strengthen the denture and avoid fracture of the prosthesis. Integrating the metal mesh framework as part of the acrylic record base and wax occlusion rim before the jaw relation procedure will avoid the distortion of the record base and will minimize the chances of processing errors. A simplified method to incorporate the mesh into the record base and occlusion rim is presented in this technique article. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Soft tissue management for dental implants: what are the most effective techniques? A Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Maghaireh, Hassan; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Ziounas, Ioannis; Worthington, Helen V

    2012-01-01

    This review is based on a Cochrane systematic review entitled 'Interventions for replacing missing teeth: management of soft tissues for dental implants' published in The Cochrane Library (see http:// www.cochrane.org/ for information). Cochrane systematic reviews are regularly updated to include new research, and in response to comments and criticisms from readers. If you wish to comment on this review, please send your comments to the Cochrane website or to Marco Esposito. The Cochrane Library should be consulted for the most recent version of the review. The results of a Cochrane review can be interpreted differently, depending on people's perspectives and circumstances. Please consider the conclusions presented carefully. They are the opinions of the review authors, and are not necessarily shared by the Cochrane Collaboration. To evaluate whether flapless procedures are beneficial for patients and which is the ideal flap design, whether soft tissue correction/augmentation techniques are beneficial for patients and which are the best techniques, whether techniques to increase the peri-implant keratinised mucosa are beneficial for patients and which are the best techniques, and which are the best suturing techniques/ materials. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched up to the 9th of June 2011 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of rootform osseointegrated dental implants, with a follow-up of at least 6 months after function, comparing various techniques to handle soft tissues in relation to dental implants. Primary outcome measures were prosthetic failures, implant failures and biological complications. Screening of eligible studies, assessment of the methodological quality of the trials and data extraction were conducted at least in duplicate and independently by two or more review authors. The statistical unit was the patient and not the prosthesis, the procedure or the implant. RESULTS were expressed

  14. Positive Contrast MRI Techniques for Visualization of Iron-Loaded Hernia Mesh Implants in Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ciritsis

    Full Text Available In MRI, implants and devices can be delineated via susceptibility artefacts. To discriminate susceptibility voids from proton-free structures, different positive contrast techniques were implemented. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a pulse sequence-based positive contrast technique (PCSI and a post-processing susceptibility gradient mapping algorithm (SGM for visualization of iron loaded mesh implants in patients.Five patients with iron-loaded MR-visible inguinal hernia mesh implants were examined at 1.5 Tesla. A gradient echo sequence (GRE; parameters: TR: 8.3ms; TE: 4.3ms; NSA:2; FA:20°; FOV:350mm² and a PCSI sequence (parameters: TR: 25ms; TE: 4.6ms; NSA:4; FA:20°; FOV:350mm² with on-resonant proton suppression were performed. SGM maps were calculated using two algorithms. Image quality and mesh delineation were independently evaluated by three radiologists.On GRE, the iron-loaded meshes generated distinct susceptibility-induced signal voids. PCSI exhibited susceptibility differences including the meshes as hyperintense signals. SGM exhibited susceptibility differences with positive contrast. Visually, the different algorithms presented no significant differences. Overall, the diagnostic value was rated best in GRE whereas PCSI and SGM were barely "sufficient".Both "positive contrast" techniques depicted implanted meshes with hyperintense signal. SGM comes without additional acquisition time and can therefore be utilized in every patient.

  15. Effect of number of pontics and impression technique on the accuracy of four-unit monolithic zirconia fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woong Ki; Kim, Sunjai

    2018-03-08

    Because of their relatively small scanning area, intraoral scanners may result in less accurate fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) than do laboratory scanners. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the accuracy of monolithic zirconia FDPs with different numbers of pontics fabricated with different impression techniques. The mandibular right premolars and molars of an acrylic resin model were prepared to receive 4-unit FDPs. Three master models were fabricated with epoxy resin: model NP, no pontic; model 1P, 1 pontic; and model 2P, 2 pontics. Each master model was scanned by using direct (DD) and indirect digitalization (ID). Four-unit monolithic zirconia FDPs were fabricated and divided into 3 groups (groups NP, 1P, and 2P) and then subdivided according to the digitalization technique (group DD and ID; n=10). The FDPs were also evaluated based on the presence (Po) or absence (NPo) of an adjacent pontic. The marginal, axial, and occlusal gap widths of each FDP were measured, and statistical analyses were performed to evaluate and compare the amount of gap present (α=.05). For direct digitalization, group 2P had significantly greater marginal (69.4 μm versus 60.9 μm or 62.3 μm; Pdigitalization. Direct digitalization resulted in significantly smaller gap widths in all measurement areas than indirect digitalization; however, the mean differences were less than 12 μm, which is considered clinically insignificant. The presence of an adjacent pontic had a significant effect on the adjacent marginal and axial gap widths. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fixation of revision implants is improved by new surgical technique to crack the sclerotic endosteal rim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kold, S; Soballe, K; Mouzin, O; Chen, Xiangmei; Toft, M; Bechtold, J

    2002-01-01

    We used an experimental model producing a tissue response with a sclerotic endosteal neo-cortical rim associated with implant loosening in humans: a 6 mm PMMA cylinder pistoned 500 m concentrically in a 7.5 mm hole, with polyethylene particles. At a second operation at eight weeks, the standard revision procedure removed the fibrous membrane in one knee, and the crack revision procedure was used to crack the sclerotic endosteal rim in the contralateral knee. Once stability was achieved following the revision procedures, loaded Ti plasma sprayed implants were inserted into the revision cavities of 8 dogs for an additional 4 weeks. Revision implant fixation (ultimate shear strength and energy absorption) was significantly enhanced by cracking the sclerotic endosteal rim. In conclusion, we demonstrated a simple technique of cracking the sclerotic endosteal rim as an additional method for improving revision fixation. (Hip International 2002; 2: 77-9).

  17. Glycerol gelatin for 3D-printing of implants using a paste extrusion technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempin Wiebke

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fused deposition modeling as an additive manufacturing technique has gained great popularity for the fabrication of medical devices as well as pharmaceutical dosage forms over the last years. Particularly the variety of geometries that can be printed determines the attractiveness of this technique enabling a shape adaption of e.g. implants. In the presented work the soft hydrogel material glycerol gelatin was investigated towards its applicability in 3D-printing as an alternative to the commonly applied and mostly rigid polyesters. Model implants loaded with the model drug quinine and with the shape of a hollow cylinder were printed via an extrusion based technique utilizing the piston feed in a hydrogel filled heatable syringe. Glycerol gelatin hydrogels need to be crosslinked to avoid gel-sol-transition at body temperature. For this purpose three different crosslinking methods (insertion, dipping, spraying with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide (EDC and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS were evaluated regarding their crosslinking efficiency and drug losses during the crosslinking process. Dipping of the implant into an aqueous solution with at least 50 mM EDC and 10 mM NHS was found to be the most efficient crosslinking technique in conjunction with a smaller drug loss during processing compared to inserting. However, the use of hydrogels also causes problems as an intense and highly variable swelling of the printed structures during crosslinking (120.7 % ± 11.9 % for 10 times dipping in 50mM EDC/10 mM NHS and a great dependency of the volume on storage conditions complicate the preparation of tailor-made implants. The release of the model drug quinine from printed and crosslinked implants was fast and nearly completed within 6 hours.

  18. Virtual planning of dental implant placement using CT double scan-technique - own experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojciechowski, W.; Urbanik, A.; Kownacki, P.; Kownacki, S.

    2007-01-01

    The correctness of CT performed with the use of a double-scan technique is the basis for achieving proper quality of 3D reconstructions of the maxilla or mandible and subsequent virtual planning of dental implant placement. The aim of this study was the presentation of the methodology of computed tomography scanning and own experience with the use of the double-scan technique. The study group included 26 individuals who underwent MDCT with a double-scan technique using a MDCT scanner SOMATOM Sensation (Siemens, Germany). The parameters of the examination: slice-collimation 10 x 0.75 mm, slice-thickness 0.75 mm. The first CT scan in the procedure was the scan of the patient wearing a radiological prosthesis and occlusal index, which was followed by a separate scan of the radiological prosthesis. These two CT scans were copied and transferred to PC with Procera Software program (Nobel Biocare, Sweden) where dental implant placement was virtually planned. In all 26 patients, precise three-dimensional reconstructions of the anatomical structure were obtained. In 11 patients, on the basis of the virtual planning, the implant placement was performed, 5 patients were referred to preparatory procedures, that is, restoration of the alveolar process, otolaryngological treatment of the maxillary sinuses. The remaining 10 patients did not qualify to the procedure because of unfavorable anatomical ideation's. Correct computed tomography with double-scan technique enables virtual planning of dental implant placement, on the basis of which the real procedure of implantation can be performed. (author)

  19. [Technique of intraoperative planning in prostatic brachytherapy with permanent implants of 125I or 103Pd].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada Gómez, Pedro José; Juan Rijo, Germán; Hevia Suarez, Miguel; Abascal García, José María; Abascal García, Ramón

    2002-12-01

    Prostatic brachytherapy with permanent 125I or 123Pd seeds implantation is a therapeutic option for organ-confined prostate cancer. We analyze the technique based on previous planning, our current intraoperative planning procedure and the reasons that moved us to introduce this change. Changes in prostate volume and spatial localization observed between previous planning and intraoperative images, and possible difficulties for seed implantation due to pubic arch interference are some of the reasons that induce us to change technique. Before the operation, we calculate the prostatic volume by transrectal ultrasound; with this information we determine the total implant activity following Wu's nomogram, and per-seed activity; therefore, it is an individual process for each patient. We perform a peripheral implant, placing 75-80% of the seeds within the peripheral prostatic zone, generally through 12-15 needles, the rest of the seeds are placed in the central prostatic zone using a maximum of 3-4 needles in high volume prostates. The day of intervention, after positioning and catheter insertion, volumetry is re-checked. Ultrasound images (from base to apex every 5 mm) are transferred to the planner were a suitable seed distribution is determined. Implantation is then performed placing all needles unloaded, and then intraoperative post-planning to allow us to check implant precision is performed after cistoscopically check that there is no urethral or bladder penetration by any needle. We finish with the insertion of seeds into the prostate. Total time for the procedure is around 90 minutes. Intraoperative planning is an additional step for the treatment of prostate cancer with permanent seeds brachytherapy, which avoids the disadvantages of previous planning and improves tumor inclusion in the ideal irradiation dose area, which will translate into better local disease control.

  20. Deairing Techniques for Double-Ended Centrifugal Total Artificial Heart Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Horvath, David J; Byram, Nicole; Sunagawa, Gengo; Grady, Patrick; Sinkewich, Martin; Moazami, Nader; Sale, Shiva; Golding, Leonard A R; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2017-06-01

    The unique device architecture of the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) requires dedicated and specific air-removal techniques during device implantation in vivo. These procedures comprise special surgical techniques and intraoperative manipulations, as well as engineering design changes and optimizations to the device itself. The current study evaluated the optimal air-removal techniques during the Cleveland Clinic double-ended centrifugal CFTAH in vivo implants (n = 17). Techniques and pump design iterations consisted of developing a priming method for the device and the use of built-in deairing ports in the early cases (n = 5). In the remaining cases (n = 12), deairing ports were not used. Dedicated air-removal ports were not considered an essential design requirement, and such ports may represent an additional risk for pump thrombosis. Careful passive deairing was found to be an effective measure with a centrifugal pump of this design. In this report, the techniques and design changes that were made during this CFTAH development program to enable effective residual air removal and prevention of air embolism during in vivo device implantation are explained. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Urinary morbidity with a modified peripheral loading technique of transperineal 125i prostate implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Douglas; Colonias, Athanasios; Miller, Ralph; Benoit, Ronald; Cohen, Jeffrey; Arshoun, Youssef; Galloway, Michael; Karlovits, Stephen; Wu, Andrew; Johnson, Mark; Quinn, Annette; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of urinary morbidity within the first 12 months following a modified peripheral loading technique for permanent transperineal transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided 125 I prostate implantation and comparison of urinary morbidity with various clinical and implant parameters. Materials and Methods: Between October 1, 1996, and March 11, 1998, 87 patients with favorable, early stage prostate cancer were treated with permanent transperineal TRUS guided 125 I prostate implantation. A peripheral loading technique was utilized for source placement with 75-80% source distribution in the periphery and 20-25% source distribution centrally. A mean total activity of 38 mCi of 125 I was implanted (range, 19-66 mCi). The mean source activity was 0.43 mCi/source (range, 0.26-0.61 mCi/source) and the mean number of sources implanted was 88 (range, 56-134). The minimum prescribed dose to the prostate was 145 Gy. The median D 90 , V 100 , and V 150 were 152 Gy (range, 104-211 Gy), 92% (range, 71-99%), and 61% (range, 11-89%), respectively. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range, 12-29 months). Urinary morbidity was scored at 3 weeks and then at 3-month intervals for the first 2 years using a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading system (scale 0-5). Results: Most patients developed at least minor urinary symptoms with frequency or nocturia being the most common. Overall, 79% (69/87) of patients experienced urinary morbidity with 21% (18/87) reporting no symptoms. The incidence of overall Grade 1 urinary morbidity was 37% (32/87); Grade 2 morbidity was 37% (32/87); and Grade 3 morbidity was 6% (5/87). There was no Grade 4 or 5 morbidity. The incidence of Grade 0 frequency/nocturia was 36% (31/87); Grade 1 was 33% (29/87); Grade 2 was 30% (26/87); and Grade 3 was 1% (1/87). Grade 0 dysuria was seen in 56% (49/87) of patients; 32% (28/87) had Grade 1; 10% (9/87) Grade 2; and 1% (1/87) Grade 3 dysuria. Most urinary symptoms started a few weeks

  2. Median Sternotomy or Right Thoracotomy Techniques for Total Artificial Heart Implantation in Calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Moazami, Nader; Sunagawa, Gengo; Kobayashi, Mariko; Byram, Nicole; Sale, Shiva; Such, Kimberly A; Horvath, David J; Golding, Leonard A R; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2016-10-01

    The choice of optimal operative access technique for mechanical circulatory support device implantation ensures successful postoperative outcomes. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the median sternotomy and lateral thoracotomy incisions for placement of the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) in a bovine model. The CFTAH was implanted in 17 calves (Jersey calves; weight range, 77.0-93.9 kg) through a median sternotomy (n = 9) or right thoracotomy (n = 8) for elective chronic implantation periods of 14, 30, or 90 days. Similar preoperative preparation, surgical techniques, and postoperative care were employed. Implantation of the CFTAH was successfully performed in all cases. Both methods provided excellent surgical field visualization. After device connection, however, the median sternotomy approach provided better visualization of the anastomoses and surgical lines for hemostasis confirmation and repair due to easier device displacement, which is severely limited following right thoracotomy. All four animals sacrificed after completion of the planned durations (up to 90 days) were operated through full median sternotomy. Our data demonstrate that both approaches provide excellent initial field visualization. Full median sternotomy provides larger viewing angles at the anastomotic suture line after device connection to inflow and outflow ports. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A preliminary report on a novel electrospray technique for nanoparticle based biomedical implants coating: precision electrospraying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbar, Sangamesh G; Bhattacharyya, Subhabrata; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Laurencin, Cato T

    2007-04-01

    The compatibility and biological efficacy of biomedical implants can be enhanced by coating their surface with appropriate agents. For predictable functioning of implants in situ, it is often desirable to obtain an extremely uniform coating thickness without effects on component dimensions or functions. Conventional coating techniques require rigorous processing conditions and often have limited adhesion and composition properties. In the present study, the authors report a novel precision electrospraying technique that allows both degradable and nondegradable coatings to be placed. Thin metallic slabs, springs, and biodegradable sintered microsphere scaffolds were coated with poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) using this technique. The effects of process parameters such as coating material concentration and applied voltage were studied using PLAGA and poly(ethylene glycol) coatings. Morphologies of coated surfaces were qualitatively characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Qualitative observations suggested that the coatings were composed of particles of various size/shape and agglomerates with different porous architectures. PLAGA coatings of uniform thickness were observed on all surfaces. Spherical nanoparticle poly(ethylene glycol) coatings (462-930 nm) were observed at all concentrations studied. This study found that the precision electrospraying technique is elegant, rapid, and reproducible with precise control over coating thickness (mum to mm) and is a useful alternative method for surface modification of biomedical implants. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Conservative surgical and microsurgical techniques for the management of dental implants that impinge on the inferior alveolar nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, Paolo; Chisci, Glauco; Gabriele, Guido; Iannetti, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    Loss of sensation in the lip after insertion of an implant is annoying. The aim of this paper was to describe two techniques for management of osseointegrated dental implants that impinge on the mandibular nerve, the purpose of which is to improve sensation without unscrewing the dental implant. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Legal, ethical, and procedural bases for the use of aseptic techniques to implant electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    The popularity of implanting electronic devices such as transmitters and data loggers into captive and free-ranging animals has increased greatly in the past two decades. The devices have become smaller, more reliable, and more capable (Printz 2004; Wilson and Gifford 2005; Metcalfe et al. 2012). Compared with externally mounted devices, implanted devices are largely invisible to external viewers such as tourists and predators; exist in a physically protected, thermally stable environment in mammals and birds; and greatly reduce drag and risk of entanglement. An implanted animal does not outgrow its device or attachment method as can happen with collars and harnesses, which allows young animals to be more safely equipped. However, compared with mounting external devices, implantation requires greater technical ability to perform the necessary anesthesia, analgesia, and surgery. More than 83% of publications in the 1990s that used radiotelemetry on animals assumed that there were no adverse effects on the animal (Godfrey and Bryant 2003). It is likely that some studies using implanted electronic devices have not been published due to a high level of unexpected mortality or to aberrant behavior or disappearance of the implanted animals, a phenomenon known as the “file drawer” problem (Rosenthal 1979; Scargle 2000). The near absence of such studies from the published record may be providing a false sense of security that procedures being used are more innocuous than they actually are. Similarly, authors sometimes state that it was unlikely that device implantation was problematic because study animals appeared to behave normally, or authors state that previous investigators used the same technique and saw no problems. Such statements are suppositions if no supporting data are provided or if the animals were equipped because there was no other way to follow their activity. Moreover, such suppositions ignore other adverse effects that affect behavior indirectly, and

  6. Comparison of Adaptation between the Major Connectors Fabricated from Intraoral Digital Impressions and Extraoral Digital Impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ning; Ruan, Yaye; Sun, Jian; Xiong, Yaoyang; Jiao, Ting

    2018-01-11

    The objective was to compare the adaptation between the major connectors of removable partial dentures derived from intraoral digital impressions and extraoral digital impressions. Twenty-four volunteers were enrolled. Each volunteer received an intraoral digital impression and one extraoral digital impression digitized from conventional gypsum impression. A software was used to create the major connectors on digital impression datasets. After all the virtual major connectors designed from Group intraoral digital impressions (Group I) and Group extraoral digital impressions (Group E) were directly fabricated by 3D printing technique, the adaptation of the final major connectors in volunteers' mouths were measured. The adaptation ranged from 159.87 to 577.99 μm in Group I while from 120.83 to 536.17 μm in Group E. The adaptation of major connectors in Group I were found better at the midline palatine suture while the adaptation of major connectors in Group E were found better at the two sides of the palatal vault. In both groups, the highest accuracy in adaptation was revealed at the anterior margin of the major connectors. It is feasible to manufacture the major connectors by digital impression and 3D printing technique. Both the adaptation of the two kinds of digital impressions were clinical acceptable.

  7. Immediate Reconstruction of Failed Implants in the Esthetic Zone Using a Flapless Technique and Autogenous Composite Tuberosity Graft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar, Gerry M; Meijer, Henny J A; van Minnen, Baucke; Vissink, Arjan

    We describe a technique for immediate reconstruction of bone after removal of failed dental implants in the esthetic region to optimize the esthetic outcome of retreatment. We conducted a study of 16 consecutive patients in whom the bony defect resulting from implant removal was immediately

  8. Replacement of a hopeless maxillary central incisor: a technique for the fabrication of an immediate implant-supported interim restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graiff, Lorenzo; Vigolo, Paolo

    2012-04-01

    Placement of a dental implant and an interim restoration in the esthetic zone immediately following tooth extraction is now a common procedure. However, in such clinical situations, the fabrication of an appropriate interim restoration may be challenging. The aim of this article is to present a technique for modifying the extracted tooth so it can be used as an implant-supported interim restoration.

  9. Conventional Vs Digital Impressions: Acceptability, Treatment Comfort and Stress Among Young Orthodontic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Alessandro; Beretta, Matteo; Luongo, Giuseppe; Mangano, Carlo; Mangano, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare patients' acceptability, comfort and stress with conventional and digital impressions. Thirty young orthodontic patients (15 males and 15 females) who had no previous experience of impressions were enrolled in this study. Conventional impressions for orthodontic study models of the dental arches were taken using an alginate impression material (Hydrogum ® , Zhermack Spa, Badia Polesine, Rovigo, Italy). Fifteen days later, digital impressions of both arches were acquired using an intraoral scanner (CS3600 ® , Carestream Dental, Rochester, NY, USA). Immediately after impression taking, patients' acceptability, comfort and stress were measured using two questionnaires and the State anxiety scale. Data showed no difference in terms of anxiety and stress; however, patients preferred the use of digital impressions systems instead of conventional impression techniques. Alginate impressions resulted as fast as digital impressions. Digital impressions resulted the most accepted and comfortable impression technique in young orthodontic patients, when compared to conventional techniques.

  10. ETI: Our first impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Albert A.; Johnson, Joel T.

    2000-06-01

    Despite scant or ambiguous information, people are capable of developing comprehensive and detailed impressions. Consequently, if the detection of an electromagnetically-active civilization is announced, many people will rapidly form impressions of what the extraterrestrials and their civilization are "like". First impressions are crucial, not only because of their immediate psychological, social, and political consequences on Earth, but because they can influence the future of interstellar communication. Initial impressions will rest less on hard data than on the nature and tone of the "evidence" that is gleaned from the transmission; the interpretation and dissemination of this evidence; and the hard wiring, psychological programming, cultural conditioning, and social influence processes that shape human perception. We consider how dispositional inferences, implicit theories of personality, negatively toned or adverse information, physical appearance, prior expectations, the confirmation bias, and thinking and unthinking approaches to attitude formation are likely to affect human impressions of ETI.

  11. Three-Year Outcome of Fixed Partial Rehabilitations Supported by Implants Inserted with Flap or Flapless Surgical Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maló, Paulo; de Araújo Nobre, Miguel; Lopes, Armando

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical study was to evaluate the 3-year outcome of fixed partial prostheses supported by implants with immediate provisionalization without occlusal contacts inserted in predominantly soft bone with flap and flapless protocols. Forty-one patients partially rehabilitated with 72 NobelSpeedy implants (51 maxillary; 21 mandibular) were consecutively included and treated with a flapless surgical protocol (n = 20 patients; 32 implants) and flapped surgical protocol (n = 21 patients; 40 implants). Primary outcome measure was implant survival; secondary outcome measures were marginal bone resorption (comparing the bone levels at 1 and 3 years with baseline) and the incidence of biological, mechanical, and esthetic complications. Survival was computed through life tables; descriptive statistics were applied to the remaining variables of interest. Eight patients with eight implants dropped out of the study. One implant failed in one patient (flapless group) giving an overall cumulative survival rate (CSR) of 98.6%. No failures were noted with the flapped protocol (CSR 100%), while for the implants placed with the flapless surgical technique, a 96.9% CSR was registered. The overall average marginal bone resorption at 3 years was 1.37 mm (SD = 0.94 mm), with 1.14 mm (SD = 0.49 mm) and 1.60 mm (SD = 1.22 mm) for the flap and flapless groups, respectively. Mechanical complications occurred in nine patients (n = 5 patients in the flapless group; n = 4 patients in the flap group). Implant infection was registered in three implants and three patients (flapless group), who exhibited inadequate oral hygiene levels. Partial edentulism rehabilitation through immediate provisionalization fixed prosthesis supported by dental implants inserted through flap or flapless surgical techniques in areas of predominantly soft bone was viable at 3 years of follow-up. The limitations and risks of the "free-hand" method in flapless surgery should be considered when

  12. A GENERIC PACKAGING TECHNIQUE USING FLUIDIC ISOLATION FOR LOW-DRIFT IMPLANTABLE PRESSURE SENSORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A; Powell, C R; Ziaie, B

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on a generic packaging method for reducing drift in implantable pressure sensors. The described technique uses fluidic isolation by encasing the pressure sensor in a liquid-filled medical-grade polyurethane balloon; thus, isolating it from surrounding aqueous environment that is the major source of baseline drift. In-vitro tests using commercial micromachined piezoresistive pressure sensors show an average baseline drift of 0.006 cmH 2 O/day (0.13 mmHg/month) for over 100 days of saline soak test, as compared to 0.101 cmH 2 O/day (2.23 mmHg/month) for a non-fluidic-isolated one soaked for 18 days. To our knowledge, this is the lowest reported drift for an implantable pressure sensor.

  13. Ion implanters contamination on wafer surface analyzed by ToF-SIMS and SPV analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricciari, R.; Bertini, M.; Ferlito, E.P.; Pizzo, G.; Anastasi, G.; Mello, D.; Franco, G.

    2007-01-01

    In ULSI processes, metallic contamination controls are very important issues. For the ion implantation process it is known that several sources of contaminations still need to be controlled: metals from sputtering of the apertures or wafer holders, Na + contaminations from filament impurities and messy maintenance procedure. ToF-SIMS is one of the most promising candidates to perform in-line surface analysis due to its high sensitivity. It is very common to use surface photo-voltage (SPV) techniques to control ion implanter equipments but this kind of analysis is an indirect measure for metallic contamination. The aim of this work is to study the possibility to use ToF-SIMS instead of SPV for in line equipment contamination monitoring. For this reason a comparison between SPV and ToF-SIMS data occurred. Good correlation between the data is shown; moreover ToF-SIMS spectra give detailed information about the other contaminations present on the wafer surface

  14. Evaluation of intrastromal corneal ring segments for treatment of keratoconus with a mechanical implantation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeki Tunc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of intrastromal corneal ring segment (ICRS implantation in patients with keratoconus using a mechanical implantation technique. Materials and Methods: Thirty eyes of 17 patients with keratoconus were enrolled. ICRSs (Keraring were implanted after dissection of the tunnel using Tunc′s specially designed dissector under suction. A complete ophthalmic examination was performed, including uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA, corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA, spherical equivalent, keratometric readings, inferosuperior asymmetry index (ISAI, and ultrasound pachymetry. All 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups were completed, and statistical analysis was performed. Results: The mean preoperative UDVA for all eyes was 1.36 ± 0.64 logMAR. At 12 months, the mean UDVA was 0.51 ± 0.28 logMAR (P = 0.001, and the mean preoperative CDVA was 0.57 ± 0.29 logMAR, which improved to 0.23 ± 0.18 (P = 0.001 at 1 year. There was a significant reduction in spherical equivalent refractive error from -6.42 ± 4.69 diopters (D preoperatively to -1.26 ± 1.45 D (P = 0.001 at 1 year. In the same period, the mean K-readings improved from 49.38 ± 3.72 D to 44.43 ± 3.13 D (P = 0.001, and the mean ISAI improved from 7.92 ± 3.12 to 4.21 ± 1.96 (P = 0.003. No significant changes in mean central corneal thickness were observed postoperatively. There were no major complications during and or after surgery. Conclusion: ICRS implantation using a unique mechanical dissection technique is a safe and effective treatment for keratoconus. All parameters improved by the 1-year follow-up.

  15. Impression block with orientator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brilin, V I; Ulyanova, O S

    2015-01-01

    Tool review, namely the impression block, applied to check the shape and size of the top of fish as well as to determine the appropriate tool for fishing operation was realized. For multiple application and obtaining of the impress depth of 3 cm and more, the standard volumetric impression blocks with fix rods are used. However, the registered impress of fish is not oriented in space and the rods during fishing are in the extended position. This leads to rods deformation and sinking due to accidental impacts of impression block over the borehole irregularity and finally results in faulty detection of the top end of fishing object in hole. The impression blocks with copy rods and fixed magnetic needle allow estimating the object configuration and fix the position of magnetic needle determining the position of the top end of object in hole. However, the magnetic needle fixation is realized in staged and the rods are in extended position during fishing operations as well as it is in standard design. The most efficient tool is the impression block with copy rods which directs the examined object in the borehole during readings of magnetic needles data from azimuth plate and averaging of readings. This significantly increases the accuracy of fishing toll direction. The rods during fishing are located in the body and extended only when they reach the top of fishing object

  16. Trends in complete denture impressions in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vohra, F.; Rashid, H.; Hanif, A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple materials and techniques have been reported for complete denture impressions in literature. The aim of the study was to assess the trends in complete denture impression materials and techniques among general dental practitioners (GDP) and specialists (SP) in Pakistan. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, self-designed-structured questionnaires were distributed among 500 dentists in Pakistan. The three-part questionnaire enquired about the demographic features, preferred impression materials, impression techniques and related procedures commonly used in their clinical practice. A comparison between the responses of SP and GDP was also drawn. Frequency distribution and Chi-square test were performed to compare the responses. Results: A total of 294 questionnaires were completed at a response rate of 58.8%. 75% of GDP used alginate for primary impressions and 66% of SP preferred impression compound for the same. A majority of both SP and GDP favoured the used of custom trays (SP 81%, GDP 85%) and selective pressure technique (SP 84%, GDP 53%) for final impression. However, 85% of GDP used zinc-oxide eugenol and 62% of SP favoured elastomeric materials for the same. Most of the SP and GDP used chemical cured resin custom trays (SP 54%, GDP 75%), however, 86% of SP used spaced trays and almost 60% of GDP preferred close-fitting trays. Conclusions: The practice of GDP and SP with regards to CD impression materials and techniques differed significantly. Continued education and training for GDP and SP with respect to procedures and techniques related to CD is recommended. (author)

  17. Placement of replace select Ti-Unite-coated type implants using a combination of immediate and submerge techniques after tooth extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen Pramono D

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The high success rate of immediate implant placement both in the anterior and posterior regions were reported by many authors, therefore applying this techniques can be considered as a safe surgical procedure and minimizing the dental office visit for patient satisfaction. This paper reports the outcome of immediate placement of implants following extraction of anterior maxillary teeth. Combination technique of immediate and submerge implant placements including bone grafting procedure were used. Four implants with TiUnite surface type were placed immediately in two patients with the short-term result indicated that this technique may serve as a simple and safe procedure for immediate implant placement. It was concluded that immediate implant placement technique combined with TiUnite implant surface was successful in treating region directly after tooth extraction therefore this technique can be use as an alternative surgical method for dental implant rehabilitation.

  18. An Universal packaging technique for low-drift implantable pressure sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Albert; Powell, Charles R; Ziaie, Babak

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring bodily pressures provide valuable diagnostic and prognostic information. In particular, long-term measurement through implantable sensors is highly desirable in situations where percutaneous access can be complicated or dangerous (e.g., intracranial pressure in hydrocephalic patients). In spite of decades of progress in the fabrication of miniature solid-state pressure sensors, sensor drift has so far severely limited their application in implantable systems. In this paper, we report on a universal packaging technique for reducing the sensor drift. The described method isolates the pressure sensor from a major source of drift, i.e., contact with the aqueous surrounding environment, by encasing the sensor in a silicone-filled medical-grade polyurethane balloon. In-vitro soak tests for 100 days using commercial micromachined piezoresistive pressure sensors demonstrate a stable operation with the output remaining within 1.8 cmH2O (1.3 mmHg) of a reference pressure transducer. Under similar test conditions, a non-isolated sensor fluctuates between 10 and 20 cmH2O (7.4-14.7 mmHg) of the reference, without ever settling to a stable operation regime. Implantation in Ossabow pigs demonstrate the robustness of the package and its in-vivo efficacy in reducing the baseline drift.

  19. Manufacturing of individual biodegradable bone substitute implants using selective laser melting technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Markus; Hoeges, Simon; Meiners, Wilhelm; Wissenbach, Konrad; Smeets, Ralf; Telle, Rainer; Poprawe, Reinhart; Fischer, Horst

    2011-06-15

    The additive manufacturing technique selective laser melting (SLM) has been successfully proved to be suitable for applications in implant manufacturing. SLM is well known for metal parts and offers direct manufacturing of three-dimensional (3D) parts with high bulk density on the base of individual 3D data, including computer tomography models of anatomical structures. Furthermore, an interconnecting porous structure with defined and reproducible pore size can be integrated during the design of the 3D virtual model of the implant. The objective of this study was to develop the SLM processes for a biodegradable composite material made of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and poly(D, L)-lactide (PDLLA). The development of a powder composite material (β-TCP/PDLLA) suitable for the SLM process was successfully performed. The microstructure of the manufactured samples exhibit a homogeneous arrangement of ceramic and polymer. The four-point bending strength was up to 23 MPa. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the samples confirmed β-TCP as the only present crystalline phase and the gel permeations chromatography (GPC) analysis documented a degradation of the polymer caused by the laser process less than conventional manufacturing processes. We conclude that SLM presents a new possibility to manufacture individual biodegradable implants made of β-TCP/PDLLA. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Pigment dispersion syndrome associated with intraocular lens implantation: a new surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut Jordana, M Isabel; Pérez Formigó, Daniel; Abreu González, Rodrigo; Nadal Reus, Jeroni

    2010-11-11

    We report the case of a myopic patient who, after intraocular lens transplant in the posterior chamber, suffered elevated intraocular pressure due to pigment dispersion, with recurrent episodes of blurred vision. The patient was treated with a new surgical technique that can avoid potential iridolenticular contact. Complete ophthalmologic examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the anterior segment were performed. Contact between the pigmentary epithelium and the iris with an intraocular lens was revealed by utrasound biomicroscopy and OCT. In this case, Nd:YAG laser iridotomy and laser iridoplasty were not effective for iridolenticular separation and control of the pigment dispersion. We propose a new technique: stitches on the surface of the iris to obtain good iridolenticular separation and good intraocular pressure control. Stitches on the iris surface should be considered as optional therapy in pigmentary glaucoma secondary to intraocular lens implantation. This surgical technique can avoid potential iridolenticular contacts more definitively.

  1. Forehead Augmentation with a Methyl Methacrylate Onlay Implant Using an Injection-Molding Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Kwon Park

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The forehead, which occupies about one third of the face, is one of the majordeterminants of a feminine or masculine look. Various methods have been used for the augmentationof the forehead using autologous fat grafts or alloplastic materials. Methylmethacrylate(MMA is the most appropriate material for augmentation of the forehead, and we have usedan injection-molding technique with MMA to achieve satisfactory results.Methods Under local anesthesia with intravenous (IV sedation, an incision was made onthe scalp and a meticulous and delicate subperiosteal dissection was then performed. MMAmonomers and polymers were mixed, the dough was injected into the space created, andmanual molding was performed along with direct inspection. This surgery was indicated forpatients who wanted to correct an unattractive appearance by forehead augmentation. Everypatient in this study visited our clinics 3 months after surgery to evaluate the results. Wejudged the postoperative results in terms of re-operation rates caused by the dissatisfactionof the patients and complications.Results During a 13-year period, 516 patients underwent forehead augmentation with MMA.With the injection-molding technique, the inner surface of the MMA implant is positionedclose to the underlying frontal bone, which minimizes the gap between the implant and bone.The borders of the implant should be tapered sufficiently until no longer palpable or visible.Only 28 patients (5.4% underwent a re-operation due to an undesirable postoperative appearance.Conclusions The injection-molding technique using MMA is a simple, safe, and ideal methodfor the augmentation of the forehead.

  2. Forehead Augmentation with a Methyl Methacrylate Onlay Implant Using an Injection-Molding Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Kwon Park

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe forehead, which occupies about one third of the face, is one of the major determinants of a feminine or masculine look. Various methods have been used for the augmentation of the forehead using autologous fat grafts or alloplastic materials. Methylmethacrylate (MMA is the most appropriate material for augmentation of the forehead, and we have used an injection-molding technique with MMA to achieve satisfactory results.MethodsUnder local anesthesia with intravenous (IV sedation, an incision was made on the scalp and a meticulous and delicate subperiosteal dissection was then performed. MMA monomers and polymers were mixed, the dough was injected into the space created, and manual molding was performed along with direct inspection. This surgery was indicated for patients who wanted to correct an unattractive appearance by forehead augmentation. Every patient in this study visited our clinics 3 months after surgery to evaluate the results. We judged the postoperative results in terms of re-operation rates caused by the dissatisfaction of the patients and complications.ResultsDuring a 13-year period, 516 patients underwent forehead augmentation with MMA. With the injection-molding technique, the inner surface of the MMA implant is positioned close to the underlying frontal bone, which minimizes the gap between the implant and bone. The borders of the implant should be tapered sufficiently until no longer palpable or visible. Only 28 patients (5.4% underwent a re-operation due to an undesirable postoperative appearance.ConclusionsThe injection-molding technique using MMA is a simple, safe, and ideal method for the augmentation of the forehead.

  3. Soft Tissue Augmentation Techniques in Implants Placed and Provisionalized Immediately: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Rojo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of techniques for soft tissue augmentation in the placement of immediate implants with and without provisionalization and to assess the quality of the reports in the literature. Randomized clinical trials, prospective clinical trials, and case series were included in this review. Clinical questions were formulated and organised according to the PICOS strategy. An electronic search was performed in PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Scopus, and ISI Web up until June 2016. Interexaminer agreement on eligibility (k=0.842; p=0.103 and quality (k=0.933; p<0.001 was high. Methodological approaches were assessed using criteria based on design related forms designed by the Dutch Cochrane Collaboration. Finally, 14 papers were identified. In two studies, the implant survival was 90%; for the rest of the studies it was 100%. All studies reported favourable aesthetic, biological, and radiographic outcomes. Surgical and biomechanical complications of this technique were not relevant. This technique effectively compensates for the expected loss of volume of the oral soft tissues and maintains high success rates with good aesthetic results over time.

  4. Anodization: a promising nano-modification technique of titanium implants for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chang; Webster, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    Anodization is a well-established surface modification technique that produces protective oxide layers on valve metals such as titanium. Many studies have used anodization to produce micro-porous titanium oxide films on implant surfaces for orthopedic applications. An additional hydrothermal treatment has also been used in conjunction with anodization to deposit hydroxyapatite on titanium surfaces; this is in contrast to using traditional plasma spray deposition techniques. Recently, the ability to create nanometer surface structures (e.g., nano-tubular) via anodization of titanium implants in fluorine solutions have intrigued investigators to fabricate nano-scale surface features that mimic the natural bone environment. This paper will present an overview of anodization techniques used to produce micro-porous titanium oxide structures and nano-tubular oxide structures, subsequent properties of these anodized titanium surfaces, and ultimately their in vitro as well as in vivo biological responses pertinent for orthopedic applications. Lastly, this review will emphasize why anodized titanium structures that have nanometer surface features enhance bone forming cell functions.

  5. The Metal-Zirconia Implant Fixed Hybrid Full-Arch Prosthesis: An Alternative Technique for Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpel, Lambert J; Haechler, Walter

    2018-03-01

    The metal-resin hybrid full-arch prosthesis has been a traditionally used type of restoration for full-arch implant fixed dentures. A newer development has centered around the use of monolithic zirconia or zirconia veneered with porcelain. Being a ceramic, zirconia has the potential for fracture. This article describes a technique that utilizes a metal substructure to support a chemically and mechanically resinbonded shell of zirconia. The workflow is discussed, ranging from in-office master cast fabrication to the CAD/ CAM production of the provisional and the definitive metal-zirconia prosthesis. The article also highlights the advantages and disadvantages of various materials used for hybrid prostheses.

  6. Study of phosphorus implanted and annealed silicon by electrical measurements and ion channeling technique

    CERN Document Server

    Hadjersi, T; Zilabdi, M; Benazzouz, C

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of annealing temperature on the electrical activation of phosphorus implanted into silicon. The measurements performed using spreading resistance, four-point probe and ion channeling techniques have allowed us to establish the existence of two domains of variation of the electrical activation (350-700 deg. C) and (800-1100 deg. C). The presence of reverse annealing and the annihilation of defects have been put in a prominent position in the first temperature range. It has been shown that in order to achieve a complete electrical activation, the annealing temperature must belong to the second domain (800-1100 deg. C).

  7. A technique for accurate planning of stereotactic brain implants prior to head ring fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulin, Kenneth; Bornstein, Linda E.; Ling, Marilyn N.; Saris, Stephen; Wu, Julian K.; Curran, Bruce H.; Wazer, David E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A two-step procedure is described for accurate planning of stereotactic brain implants prior to head-ring fixation. Methods and Materials: Approximately 2 weeks prior to implant a CT scan without the head ring is performed for treatment-planning purposes. An entry point and a reference point, both marked with barium and later tattooed, facilitate planning and permit correlation of the images with a later CT scan. A plan is generated using a conventional treatment-planning system to determine the number and activity of I-125 seeds required and the position of each catheter. I-125 seed anisotropy is taken into account by means of a modification to the treatment planning program. On the day of the implant a second CT scan is performed with the head ring affixed to the skull and with the same points marked as in the previous scan. The planned catheter coordinates are then mapped into the coordinate system of the second CT scan by means of a manual translational correction and a computer-calculated rotational correction derived from the reference point coordinates in the two scans. Results: The rotational correction algorithm was verified experimentally in a Rando phantom before it was used clinically. For analysis of the results with individual patients a third CT scan is performed 1 day following the implant and is used for calculating the final dosimetry. Conclusion: The technique that is described has two important advantages: 1) the number and activity of seeds required can be accurately determined in advance; and 2) sufficient time is allowed to derive the best possible plan

  8. THE USE OF A CODED HEALING ABUTMENT AS AN IMPRESSION COPING TO DESIGN AND MILL AN INDIVIDUALIZED ANATOMIC ABUTMENT : A CLINICAL REPORT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telleman, Gerdien; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    A coded implant healing abutment makes an impression at the implant level no longer necessary. An impression is made of the healing abutment, which is placed onto the implant directly after implant placement. The codes embedded in the occlusal surface of the healing abutment provide essential

  9. The role of welding techniques in the biomechanical behavior of implant-supported prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sabrina Alessandra; Presotto, Anna Gabriella Camacho; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio Arruda; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz

    2017-09-01

    This in vitro study investigated the role of welding techniques of implant-supported prostheses in the 2D and 3D marginal misfits of prosthetic frameworks, strain induced on the mini abutment, and detorque of prosthetic screws. The correlations between the analyzed variables were also investigated. Frameworks were cast in commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti). A marginal misfit of 200μm was simulated in the working models (control group) (n=20). The 2D marginal misfit was analyzed according to the single-screw test protocol using a precision optical microscope. The 3D marginal misfit was performed by X-ray microtomography. Strain gauge analysis was performed to investigate the strain induced on the mini abutment. A digital torque meter was used for analysis of the detorque and the mean value was calculated for each framework. Afterwards, the frameworks were divided into two experimental groups (n=10): Laser (L) and TIG (T). The welding techniques were performed according to the following parameters: L (390V/9ms); T (36A/60ms). The L and T groups were reevaluated according to the marginal misfit, strain, and detorque. The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD test and Person correlation analysis (α=0.05). Welding techniques statistically reduced the 2D and 3D marginal misfits of prosthetic frameworks (p0.05). Positive correlations were observed between 2D and 3D marginal misfit reading methods (r=0.943, pwelding techniques improved the biomechanical behavior of the implant-supported system. TIG can be an acceptable and affordable technique to reduce the misfit of 3-unit Ti frameworks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Advances in the Surgical Management of Articular Cartilage Defects: Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Techniques in the Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Spencer; Strauss, Eric; Bosco, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to gain insight into the latest methods of articular cartilage implantation (ACI) and to detail where they are in the Food and Drug Administration approval and regulatory process. A PubMed search was performed using the phrase "Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation" alone and with the words second generation and third generation. Additionally, clinicaltrials.gov was searched for the names of the seven specific procedures and the parent company websites were referenced. Two-Stage Techniques: BioCart II uses a FGF2v1 culture and a fibrinogen, thrombin matrix, whereas Hyalograft-C uses a Hyaff 11 matrix. MACI uses a collagen I/III matrix. Cartipatch consists of an agarose-alginate hydrogel. Neocart uses a high-pressure bioreactor for culturing with a type I collagen matrix. ChondroCelect makes use of a gene expression analysis to predict chondrocyte proliferation and has demonstrated significant clinical improvement, but failed to show superiority to microfracture in a phase III trial. One Step Technique: CAIS is an ACI procedure where harvested cartilage is minced and implanted into a matrix for defect filling. As full thickness defects in articular cartilage continue to pose a challenge to treat, new methods of repair are being researched. Later generation ACI has been developed to address the prevalence of fibrocartilage with microfracture and the complications associated with the periosteal flap of first generation ACI such as periosteal hypertrophy. The procedures and products reviewed here represent advances in tissue engineering, scaffolds and autologous chondrocyte culturing that may hold promise in our quest to alter the natural history of symptomatic chondral disease.

  11. Novel digital imaging techniques to assess the outcome in oral rehabilitation with dental implants: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benic, Goran I; Elmasry, Moustafa; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2015-09-01

    To examine the literature on novel digital imaging techniques for the assessment of outcomes in oral rehabilitation with dental implants. An electronic search of Medline and Embase databases including studies published prior to 28th December 2014 was performed and supplemented by a manual search. A synthesis of the publications was presented describing the use of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonography, optical scanning, spectrophotometry or optical coherence tomography (OCT) related to the outcome measures in implant therapy. Most of the digital imaging techniques have not yet sufficiently been validated to be used for outcome measures in implant dentistry. In clinical research, cone beam CT (CBCT) is increasingly being used for 3D assessment of bone and soft tissue following augmentation procedures and implant placement. Currently, there are no effective methods for the reduction of artifacts around implants in CBCT. Optical scanning is being used for the 3D assessment of changes in the soft tissue contour. The combination of optical scan with pre-operative CBCT allows the determination of the implant position and its spatial relation to anatomical structures. Spectrophotometry is the method most commonly used to objectively assess the color match of reconstructions and peri-implant mucosa to natural dentition and gingiva. New optical imaging techniques may be considered possible approaches for monitoring peri-implant soft tissue health. MRI and ultrasonography appear promising non-ionizing radiation imaging modalities for the assessment of soft tissue and bone defect morphologies. Optical scanners and OCT may represent efficient clinical methods for accurate assessment of the misfit between the reconstructions and the implants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Assessment of I-125 seed implant accuracy when using the live-planning technique for low dose rate prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorrees Joshua

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low risk prostate cancers are commonly treated with low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy involving I-125 seeds. The implementation of a ‘live-planning’ technique at the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH in 2007 enabled the completion of the whole procedure (i.e. scanning, planning and implant in one sitting. ‘Live-planning’ has the advantage of a more reliable delivery of the planned treatment compared to the ‘traditional pre-plan’ technique (where patient is scanned and planned in the weeks prior to implant. During live planning, the actual implanted needle positions are updated real-time on the treatment planning system and the dosimetry is automatically recalculated. The aim of this investigation was to assess the differences and clinical relevance between the planned dosimetry and the updated real-time implant dosimetry. Methods A number of 162 patients were included in this dosimetric study. A paired t-test was performed on the D90, V100, V150 and V200 target parameters and the differences between the planned and implanted dose distributions were analysed. Similarly, dosimetric differences for the organs at risk (OAR were also evaluated. Results Small differences between the primary dosimetric parameters for the target were found. Still, the incidence of hotspots was increased with approximately 20% for V200. Statistically significant increases were observed in the doses delivered to the OAR between the planned and implanted data; however, these increases were consistently below 3% thus probably without clinical consequences. Conclusions The current study assessed the accuracy of prostate implants with I-125 seeds when compared to initial plans. The results confirmed the precision of the implant technique which RAH has in place. Nevertheless, geographical misses, anatomical restrictions and needle displacements during implant can have repercussions for centres without live-planning option if dosimetric changes are not

  13. Redesign of a fixture mount to be used as an impression coping and a provisional abutment as well

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Glenn Hsuan-Chen; Tian, Chen; Hung, Yuen-Siang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: An integrated fixture mount/impression coping/ temporary abutment can provide many advantages for immediate loading of dental implants, such as simpler procedure, less chair time, cost reduction, and comfort for the patients. Materials and Methods: A newly designed dental implant fixture mount (DIFMA) can be used as an impression coping for taking an immediate impression. An immediate load provisional prosthesis can then be fabricated shortly after implant placement to immediately lo...

  14. How the adoption of impression management goals alters impression formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Bryan; Poposki, Elizabeth M

    2010-11-01

    Five experiments (N = 390) tested the hypothesis that adopting an impression management goal leads the impression manager to view an interaction partner as having less of the trait he or she is attempting to express. This hypothesis was confirmed for the impression management goals of appearing introverted, extraverted, smart, confident, and happy. Experiment 2 shows that adoption of the impression goal could alter judgments even when participants could not act on the goal. Experiment 3 provides evidence that adopting an impression management goal prompted a comparison mind-set and that this comparison mind-set activation mediated target judgments. Experiment 4 rules out a potential alternative explanation and provides more direct evidence that comparison of the impression manager's self-concept mediates the impression of the target. Experiment 5 eliminates a potential confound and extends the effect to another impression goal. These experiments highlight the dynamic interplay between impression management and impression formation.

  15. Low-temperature technique of thin silicon ion implanted epitaxial detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordyasz, A.J.; Bednarek, A. [Warsaw University, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); Le Neindre, N.; Bougault, R.; Lopez, O.; Merrer, Y.; Vient, E. [Universite de Caen, LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ENSICAEN, Caen-Cedex (France); Parlog, M. [Universite de Caen, LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ENSICAEN, Caen-Cedex (France); ' ' Horia Hulubei' ' National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Casini, G.; Poggi, G.; Bini, M.; Valdre, S.; Scarlini, E.; Pasquali, G.; Pastore, G.; Piantelli, S.; Stefanini, A.; Olmi, A.; Barlini, S. [INFN Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Universita di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Kowalczyk, M. [Warsaw University, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); University of Warsaw, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Frankland, J.D.; Bonnet, E.; Chbihi, A.; Gruyer, D. [CEA et IN2P3-CNRS, GANIL, Caen-Cedex 05 (France); Borderie, B.; Ademard, G.; Edelbruck, P.; Rivet, M.F.; Salomon, F. [IN2P3-CNRS, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay-Cedex (France); Boiano, A.; Rosato, E.; Meoli, A.; Ordine, A.; Spadaccini, G.; Tortone, G.; Vigilante, M.; Vanzanella, E. [Universita di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Napoli (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Bruno, M.; Serra, S.; Morelli, L.; Guerzoni, M. [INFN, Bologna (Italy); Universita di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Alba, R.; Santonocito, D.; Maiolino, C. [INFN, Catania (Italy); Universita di Catania, LNS, Catania (Italy); Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T. [INFN LNL Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Kozik, T.; Kulig, P.; Twarog, T.; Sosin, Z. [Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Gasior, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Zipper, W. [University of Silesia, Silesian University, Katowice (Poland); Sarnecki, J.; Lipinski, D.; Wodzinska, H.; Brzozowski, A.; Teodorczyk, M.; Gajewski, M.; Zagojski, A.; Krzyzak, K. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Tarasiuk, K.J. [University of Warsaw, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Khabanowa, Z. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Kordyasz, L. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Mechatronics, Institute of Mikromechanics and Photonics, Department of Design of Precision Devices, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-02-01

    A new technique of large-area thin ion implanted silicon detectors has been developed within the R and D performed by the FAZIA Collaboration. The essence of the technique is the application of a low-temperature baking process instead of high-temperature annealing. This thermal treatment is performed after B{sup +} ion implantation and Al evaporation of detector contacts, made by using a single adjusted Al mask. Extremely thin silicon pads can be therefore obtained. The thickness distribution along the X and Y directions was measured for a prototype chip by the energy loss of α-particles from {sup 241}Am (left angle E{sub α} right angle = 5.5 MeV). Preliminary tests on the first thin detector (area ∼ 20 x 20 mm{sup 2}) were performed at the INFN-LNS cyclotron in Catania (Italy) using products emitted in the heavy-ion reaction {sup 84}Kr (E = 35 A MeV) + {sup 112}Sn. The ΔE - E ion identification plot was obtained using a telescope consisting of our thin ΔE detector (21 μm thick) followed by a typical FAZIA 510 μm E detector of the same active area. The charge distribution of measured ions is presented together with a quantitative evaluation of the quality of the Z resolution. The threshold is lower than 2 A MeV depending on the ion charge. (orig.)

  16. A Novel Technique for the Connection of Ceramic and Titanium Implant Components Using Glass Solder Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Mick

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Both titanium and ceramic materials provide specific advantages in dental implant technology. However, some problems, like hypersensitivity reactions, corrosion and mechanical failure, have been reported. Therefore, the combining of both materials to take advantage of their pros, while eliminating their respective cons, would be desirable. Hence, we introduced a new technique to bond titanium and ceramic materials by means of a silica-based glass ceramic solder. Cylindrical compound samples (Ø10 mm × 56 mm made of alumina toughened zirconia (ATZ, as well as titanium grade 5, were bonded by glass solder on their end faces. As a control, a two-component adhesive glue was utilized. The samples were investigated without further treatment, after 30 and 90 days of storage in distilled water at room temperature, and after aging. All samples were subjected to quasi-static four-point-bending tests. We found that the glass solder bonding provided significantly higher bending strength than adhesive glue bonding. In contrast to the glued samples, the bending strength of the soldered samples remained unaltered by the storage and aging treatments. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX analyses confirmed the presence of a stable solder-ceramic interface. Therefore, the glass solder technique represents a promising method for optimizing dental and orthopedic implant bondings.

  17. Techniques for the research on mass deposition effects in the bio-materials induced by heavy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Shibin; Wei Zengquan; Li Qiang

    2002-01-01

    Researchers have used heavy ion beams to implant small biomolecules, followed by advanced instrumental analysis to make preliminary studies on mass deposition induced by ion implantation. But research reports on the biological effects, i.e. mass deposition effects induced by mass deposition in living tissues, cells and macro-biomolecules have not been delivered hitherto. In the near future radioactive heavy ion beams will be possible to implant living cells and biomolecules, and auto-radiography, radioactive measurements and molecular biological techniques will be employed to further studies on the effects

  18. Adapted preparation technique for screw-type implants: explorative in vitro pilot study in a porcine bone model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Andreas; Gahleitner, André; Holm, Anders; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Homolka, Peter

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of adapted preparation on the insertion torque of self-tapping implants in cancellous bone. In adapted preparation, bone condensation - and thus, insertion torque - is controlled by changing the diameter of the drilling. After preparation of cancellous porcine vertebral bone with drills of 2.85, 3, 3.15 or 3.35 mm final diameters, Brånemark sytem Mk III implants (3.75 x 11.5 mm) were inserted in 141 sites. During implantation, the insertion torque was recorded. Prior to implant insertion, bone mineralization (bone mineral density (BMD)) was measured with dental quantative computed tomography. The BMD values measured at the implant position were correlated with insertion torque for varying bone condensation. Based on the average torque recorded during implant insertion into the pre-drilled canals with a diameter of 3 mm, torque increased by approximately 17% on reducing the diameter of the drill by 5% (to 2.85 mm). On increasing the diameter of the osteotomy to 3.15 mm (5%) or 3.35 mm (12%), torque values decreased by approximately 21% and 50%, respectively. The results demonstrate a correlation between primary stability (average insertion torque) and the diameter of the implant bed on using a screw-shaped implant. Thus, using an individualized bone mineralization-dependent drilling technique, optimized torque values could be achieved in all tested bone qualities with BMDs ranging from 330 to 500 mg/cm(3). The results indicate that using a bone-dependent drilling technique, higher torque values can also be achieved in poor bone using an individualized drilling resulting in higher bone condensation. As immediate function is dependent on primary stability (high insertion torque), this indicates that primary stability can be increased using a modified drilling technique in lesser mineralized bone.

  19. Effect of brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on cervical cancer implant dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anker, Christopher J., E-mail: chris.anker@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); O' Donnell, Kristen [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Boucher, Kenneth M. [Department of Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gaffney, David K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relationship between brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on dose to organs-at-risk (OARs) in patients undergoing high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From 1998 to 2008, 31 patients with cervical cancer with full dosimetric data were identified who received definitive external-beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy with tandem and ovoid applicators. Doses were recorded at point A, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)-38 rectal point, the ICRU-38 bladder point, the vaginal surface, and the pelvic sidewall. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the significance of changes in OAR to point A dose ratios with differences in brachytherapy technique or patient characteristics. Patients underwent a median of 5 brachytherapy procedures (range, 3 to 5), with a total of 179 procedures for 31 patients. For all brachytherapy treatments, the average ratios between the doses for the rectal, bladder, vaginal surface, and pelvic sidewall reference points to those at point A were 0.49, 0.59, 1.15, and 0.17, respectively. In general, decreased OAR dose was associated with a lower stage, younger age, increased ovoid size, increased tandem length, and earlier implant number. Increased tandem curvature significantly increased bladder dose and decreased rectal dose. Intravenous anesthesia usage was not correlated with improved dosimetry. This study allowed identification of patient and procedure characteristics influencing OAR dosing. Although the advent of 3-dimensional (3D) image-guided brachytherapy will bring new advances in treatment optimization, the actual technique involved at the time of the brachytherapy implant procedure will remain important.

  20. Aesthetic treatment of pectus excavatum: a new endoscopic technique using a porous polyethylene implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grappolini, Simone; Fanzio, Paolo M; D'Addetta, Pierluca G C; Todde, Alberto; Infante, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Pectus excavatum is the most frequent malformation of the rib cage. Functional aspects associated with this malformation often are absent even in adults not involved in competitive sports activities. Overall, these patients often live with extreme psychological discomfort when the malformations are minor. Traditionally, the correction of these malformations has been geared toward interventions that modify the architecture of the rib cage. However, all these interventions, even the most recent, involve considerably invasive major surgery. In fact, optimal results are not always achieved with corrective surgery using the insertion of silicone prosthesis, and patients often experience complications. To correct intermediate and modest pectus excavatum in a stable manner and with the least amount of invasiveness, the authors developed a camouflage technique that uses porous prostheses made from high-density linear polyethylene. This material is generally used for reconstruction of the brain case. Between February 2001 and March 2006, in the I Unit of Plastic Surgery of the authors' Institute, 11 adult pectus excavatum patients with no previous cardiorespiratory symptoms underwent the authors' surgical technique. The average patient age was 29 years. Surgical repair was successful in all cases, and the average hospital stay was short. There were no complications during the follow-up period. The described approach repairs nonfunctional pectus excavatum in the adult with satisfying aesthetic and stable results, short hospital stay, and high patient popularity ratings. The best therapeutic option for pectus excavatum, especially with intermediate or moderate severity, is still controversial: thoracic surgery or camouflage surgery with implant? Trying to address those issues we propose a new technique by a multidisciplinary, not aggressive approach using a high density linear polyethylene implant and Omentus flap and the early analysis of our data.

  1. Suprachoroidal drainage with collagen sheet implant- a novel technique for non-penetrating glaucoma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szurman, Peter; Januschowski, Kai; Boden, Karl Thomas; Seuthe, Anna-Maria

    2018-02-01

    Our purpose was both to introduce the new technique of suprachoroidal drainage with collagen sheet implantation as a novel technique of non-penetrating glaucoma surgery and to present first results of a prospective pilot study. A superficial rectangular sclera flap of half-scleral thickness sized 4 × 4.5 mm is dissected anteriorly until clear cornea. Then, a second scleral flap is created underneath the first one sized 3.5x4mm and is cut down full-thickness to the choroid exposing the suprachoroidal space. The flap is then bluntly prepared until the scleral spur is reached. Sharp dissection above the sclera spur exposes Schlemm's canal, which is located directly anteriorly. Schlemm's canal is unroofed, juxtacanalicular meshwork is peeled and the deep flap is cut off at its base. An absorbable collagen sheet (Ologen®, Dahlhausen, Cologne, Germany) is placed into the suprachoroidal space at the level of the ciliary body, and the superficial sclera flap is sutured tightly to prevent leakage. We prospectively analyzed 65 eyes that underwent suprachoroidal drainage with collagen sheet implantation. Mean reduction of intraocular pressure after 3 months was 35.1% (from 21.0 ± 4.3 mmHg to 13.5 ± 3.4 mmHg)(p < 0.01) and after 12 months 35.6% (from 21.0 ± 4.3 mmHg to 13.5 ± 3.0  mmHg)(p < 0.01). The number of topical IOP-reducing medication decreased significantly from 3.5 ± 0.7 to 0.6 ± 0.9 and to 0.9 ± 1.1 after 3 and 12 months, respectively (p < 0.01). No serious complications occurred. Suprachoroidal drainage with collagen sheet implantation seems to be a safe and effective surgical technique for non-penetrating glaucoma surgery that yields the opportunity of a sufficient IOP reduction for eyes unsuitable for canaloplasty.

  2. Totally implantable vascular access device (TIVAD) placement: a modified technique that takes post-procedure aesthetic aspects into account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberale, Gabriel

    2017-04-01

    Major progress has been made in breast cancer reconstruction surgery. The standard technique for totally implanted vascular access device (TIVAD) implantation generally requires an incision for port insertion on the anterior part of the thorax that leaves a scar in the middle of the neckline in patients who have undergone mastectomy with complex breast reconstruction. The aim of this technical note is to report our revised surgical technique for TIVAD placement. In patients with breast cancer, we take a lateralized approach, performing an oblique incision on the lowest part of the deltopectoral groove. This allows us to introduce the port and to place it on the anterolateral part of the thorax, thus avoiding an unaesthetic scar on the anterior part of the thorax. Our modified technique for TIVAD implantation is described.

  3. Findings from the experience with the punch technique for auditory osseointegrated implants: A retrospective single center comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Alfonso; Magri, Carlos; Juan, Eulalia

    To compare the punch technique and linear incision with soft tissue reduction for the placement of auditory osseointegrated implants (AOI) and analyze results of osseointegration obtained with the punch technique as measured with the Implant Stability Quotient (ISQ). Case review of 34 patients who received auditory osseointegrated implants between January 2010 and July 2015 and were divided into two groups according to the surgical technique: 18 with the punch technique (PT) and 16 with the linear incision technique (LI). Minimum follow-up was four months (mean: 24 months; range 4-64 months). Included in the analysis were patient profiles and records of the demographic data, surgical indications, surgical technique, implant placement, surgical time, intraoperative complications, as well as postsurgical complications (Holgers classification) and implant stability quotients (ISQ). Use of larger abutments was significantly greater in the PT group (PT, 10mm; LI, 6mm, p<0.001). The PT technique resulted in a shorter procedure than the LI (PT, 20min; LI, 45min, p<0.001). Holgers classification scores identified significantly fewer skin complications one week after surgery for the PT group; however, only small differences were seen between the two groups at the one- and three-month control visits. As shown for our cohort, the punch technique for surgical placement of AOI is faster and presents fewer immediate postoperative complications when compared to the linear incision technique. The clinical application of the ISQ is a useful, easy method to demonstrate the status of osseointegration and, thus, the stability of the device. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  4. Virtual First Impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2005-01-01

    Frequently, a nurse's first and only contact with a graduate school, legislator, public health official, professional organization, or school nursing colleague is made through e-mail. The format, the content, and the appearance of the e-mail create a virtual first impression. Nurses can manage their image and the image of the profession by…

  5. Magnesium nitride phase formation by means of ion beam implantation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeche, Daniel; Blawert, Carsten; Cavellier, Matthieu; Busardo, Denis; Gloriant, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen implantation technique (Hardion + ) has been applied in order to modify the surface properties of magnesium and Mg-based alloys (AM50, AZ31). Nitrogen ions with an energy of approximately 100 keV were used to form the Mg 3 N 2 phase leading to improved surface properties. The samples were investigated using various characterization methods. Mechanical properties have been tested by means of nanoindention, the electrochemical behavior was measured by potentiodynamic polarization and impedance spectroscopy, phase formation by using grazing incidence Xray diffraction, the chemical state was determined by means of Xray induced photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and depth profiling by using secondary ions mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Additionally, the results were compared to calculated depth profiles using SRIM2008. The correlation of the results shows the nitride formation behavior to a depth of about 600 nm.

  6. Effects of material growth technique and Mg doping on Er3+ photoluminescence in Er-implanted GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.; Henry, R. L.; Wickenden, A. E.; Koleske, D. D.; Rhee, S. J.; White, J. O.; Myoung, J. M.; Kim, K.; Li, X.; Coleman, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopies have been carried out at 6 K on the ∼1540 nm 4 I 13/2 - 4 I 15/2 emissions of Er 3+ in Er-implanted and annealed GaN. These studies revealed the existence of multiple Er 3+ centers and associated PL spectra in Er-implanted GaN films grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, hydride vapor phase epitaxy, and molecular beam epitaxy. The results demonstrate that the multiple Er 3+ PL centers and below-gap defect-related absorption bands by which they are selectively excited are universal features of Er-implanted GaN grown by different techniques. It is suggested that implantation-induced defects common to all the GaN samples are responsible for the Er site distortions that give rise to the distinctive, selectively excited Er 3+ PL spectra. The investigations of selectively excited Er 3+ PL and PLE spectra have also been extended to Er-implanted samples of Mg-doped GaN grown by various techniques. In each of these samples, the so-called violet-pumped Er 3+ PL band and its associated broad violet PLE band are significantly enhanced relative to the PL and PLE of the other selectively excited Er 3+ PL centers. More importantly, the violet-pumped Er 3+ PL spectrum dominates the above-gap excited Er 3+ PL spectrum of Er-implanted Mg-doped GaN, whereas it was unobservable under above-gap excitation in Er-implanted undoped GaN. These results confirm the hypothesis that appropriate codopants can increase the efficiency of trap-mediated above-gap excitation of Er 3+ emission in Er-implanted GaN. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  7. Fixation of Hydroxyapatite-Coated Revision Implants Is Improved by the Surgical Technique of Cracking the Sclerotic Bone Rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmengaard, Brian; Bechtold, Joan E.; Chen, Xinqian; Søballe, Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    Revision joint replacement has poorer outcomes that have been associated with poorer mechanical fixation. We investigate a new bone-sparing surgical technique that locally cracks the sclerotic bone rim formed during aseptic loosening. We inserted 16 hydroxyapatite-coated implants bilaterally in the distal femur of eight dogs, using a controlled weight-bearing experimental model that replicates important features of a typical revision setting. At 8 weeks, a control revision procedure and a crack revision procedure were performed on contralateral implants. The crack procedure used a splined tool to perform a systematic local perforation of the sclerotic bone rim of the revision cavity. After 4 weeks, the hydroxyapatite-coated implants were evaluated for mechanical fixation by a push-out test and for tissue distribution by histomorphometry. The cracking revision procedure resulted in significantly improved mechanical fixation, significantly more bone ongrowth and bone volume in the gap, and reduced fibrous tissue compared to the control revision procedure. The study demonstrates that the sclerotic bone rim prevents bone ingrowth and promotes fixation by fibrous tissue. The effect of the cracking technique may be due to improved access to the vascular compartment of the bone. The cracking technique is a simple surgical method that potentially can improve the fixation of revision implants in sclerotic regions important for obtaining the fixation critical for overall implant stability. PMID:19148940

  8. Pigment dispersion syndrome associated with intraocular lens implantation: a new surgical technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Isabel Canut Jordana

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available M Isabel Canut Jordana1, Daniel Pérez Formigó1, Rodrigo Abreu González2, Jeroni Nadal Reus11Barraquer Ophthalmology Centre, Barcelona, Spain; 2University Hospital of La Candelaria, Tenerife, SpainAims: We report the case of a myopic patient who, after intraocular lens transplant in the posterior chamber, suffered elevated intraocular pressure due to pigment dispersion, with recurrent episodes of blurred vision. The patient was treated with a new surgical technique that can avoid potential iridolenticular contact.Methods: Complete ophthalmologic examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT of the anterior segment were performed.Results: Contact between the pigmentary epithelium and the iris with an intraocular lens was revealed by utrasound biomicroscopy and OCT. In this case, Nd:YAG laser iridotomy and laser iridoplasty were not effective for iridolenticular separation and control of the pigment dispersion. We propose a new technique: stitches on the surface of the iris to obtain good iridolenticular separation and good intraocular pressure control.Conclusion: Stitches on the iris surface should be considered as optional therapy in pigmentary glaucoma secondary to intraocular lens implantation. This surgical technique can avoid potential iridolenticular contacts more definitively.Keywords: pigmentary glaucoma, intraocular lens, optical coherence tomography, laser

  9. Technique for systematic bone reduction for fixed implant-supported prosthesis in the edentulous maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidra, Avinash S

    2015-06-01

    Bone reduction for maxillary fixed implant-supported prosthodontic treatment is often necessary to either gain prosthetic space or to conceal the prosthesis-tissue junction in patients with excessive gingival display (gummy smile). Inadequate bone reduction is often a cause of prosthetic failure due to material fractures, poor esthetics, or inability to perform oral hygiene procedures due to unfavorable ridge lap prosthetic contours. Various instruments and techniques are available for bone reduction. It would be helpful to have an accurate and efficient method for bone reduction at the time of surgery and subsequently create a smooth bony platform. This article presents a straightforward technique for systematic bone reduction by transferring the patient's maximum smile line, recorded clinically, to a clear radiographic smile guide for treatment planning using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The patient's smile line and the amount of required bone reduction are transferred clinically by marking bone with a sterile stationery graphite wood pencil at the time of surgery. This technique can help clinicians to accurately achieve the desired bone reduction during surgery, and provide confidence that the diagnostic and treatment planning goals have been achieved. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The novel echo-guided ProGlide technique during percutaneous transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yohsuke; Araki, Motoharu; Yamawaki, Masahiro; Tokuda, Takahiro; Tsutumi, Masakazu; Mori, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Yasunari; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Hirano, Keisuke; Ito, Yoshiaki

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess clinical benefit of the Echo-guided ProGlide technique in patients undergoing percutaneous transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI). The efficacy of the Echo-guided ProGlide technique during percutaneous TF-TAVI was not previously clarified. A total of 121 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous TF-TAVI at our institution between February 2014 and July 2017 were enrolled in this study. According to the introduction of this novel technique in March 2016, patients were divided into two groups (echo-guided group who underwent TAVI from March 2016 to July 2017, n = 63; not echo-guided group who underwent TAVI from February 2014 to February 2016, n = 58). The incidence of major vascular complications, defined per the Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 criteria, and ProGlide complications including acute femoral artery stenosis or occlusion and bleeding requiring any intervention. The incidence of major vascular complication and ProGlide complication were significantly lower in the echo-guided group than in not echo-guided group (1.6% vs 17.2%, P guided ProGlide technique was independently associated with prevention of ProGlide complications (odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidential interval, 0.01-0.76; P = 0.03). This novel Echo-guided ProGlide technique was associated with a lower rate of major vascular complications, particularly ProGlide complications during percutaneous TF-TAVI. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Measurement and image processing evaluation of surface modifications of dental implants G4 pure titanium created by different techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulutsuz, A. G., E-mail: asligunaya@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, 34349 Besiktas, İstanbul (Turkey); Demircioglu, P., E-mail: pinar.demircioglu@adu.edu.tr; Bogrekci, I., E-mail: ismail.bogrekci@adu.edu.tr [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aytepe, 09010, Aydin (Turkey); Durakbasa, M. N., E-mail: durakbasa@gmx.at [Department of Interchangeable Manufacturing and Industrial Metrology, Institute for Production Engineering and Laser Technology, Vienna University of Technology, Karlsplatz 13/3113 A-1040 Wien (Austria); Katiboglu, A. B., E-mail: abkatiboglu@hotmail.com [Istanbul University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-03-30

    Foreign substances and organic tissue interaction placed into the jaw in order to eliminate tooth loss involves a highly complex process. Many biological reactions take place as well as the biomechanical forces that influence this formation. Osseointegration denotes to the direct structural and functional association between the living bone and the load-bearing artificial implant's surface. Taking into consideration of the requirements in the manufacturing processes of the implants, surface characterizations with high precise measurement techniques are investigated and thus long-term success of dental implant is emphasized on the importance of these processes in this study. In this research, the detailed surface characterization was performed to identify the dependence of the manufacturing techniques on the surface properties by using the image processing methods and using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphological properties in 3D and Taylor Hobson stylus profilometer for roughness properties in 2D. Three implant surfaces fabricated by different manufacturing techniques were inspected, and a machined surface was included into the study as a reference specimen. The results indicated that different surface treatments were strongly influenced surface morphology. Thus 2D and 3D precise inspection techniques were highlighted on the importance for surface characterization. Different image analyses techniques such as Dark-light technique were used to verify the surface measurement results. The computational phase was performed using image processing toolbox in Matlab with precise evaluation of the roughness for the implant surfaces. The relationship between the number of black and white pixels and surface roughness is presented. FFT image processing and analyses results explicitly imply that the technique is useful in the determination of surface roughness. The results showed that the number of black pixels in the image increases with increase in

  12. Optimization of technique for insertion of implants at the supra-acetabular corridor in pelvis and acetabular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosounidis, Theodoros H; Mauffrey, Cyril; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2018-01-01

    The technique for application of implants at the sciatic buttress has been well described in the pelvic and acetabular fracture reconstruction literature. We described a new use of the inlet-obturator oblique view for the identification of the anterior inferior iliac spine, which is the entry point of implants, and we provide a detailed fluoroscopic and radiographic description of this view. A small series of 15 patients who underwent an application of an anterior inferior pelvic external (supra-acetabular) fixator via this technique is presented. We consider the use of the obturator oblique for the identification of the entry point unnecessary, and we advocate for the use of only the inlet-obturator oblique and iliac oblique views when implants are applied to the sciatic buttress.

  13. Machine learning techniques for the optimization of joint replacements: Application to a short-stem hip implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilla, Myriam; Borgiani, Edoardo; Martínez, Javier; Duda, Georg N; Checa, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Today, different implant designs exist in the market; however, there is not a clear understanding of which are the best implant design parameters to achieve mechanical optimal conditions. Therefore, the aim of this project was to investigate if the geometry of a commercial short stem hip prosthesis can be further optimized to reduce stress shielding effects and achieve better short-stemmed implant performance. To reach this aim, the potential of machine learning techniques combined with parametric Finite Element analysis was used. The selected implant geometrical parameters were: total stem length (L), thickness in the lateral (R1) and medial (R2) and the distance between the implant neck and the central stem surface (D). The results show that the total stem length was not the only parameter playing a role in stress shielding. An optimized implant should aim for a decreased stem length and a reduced length of the surface in contact with the bone. The two radiuses that characterize the stem width at the distal cross-section in contact with the bone were less influential in the reduction of stress shielding compared with the other two parameters; but they also play a role where thinner stems present better results.

  14. Oxidation and corrosion studies of Al-implanted stainless steel AISI 321 using nuclear reaction and electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noli, F.; Misaelides, P.; Spathis, P.; Pilakouta, M.; Baumann, H.

    1992-01-01

    The oxidation of Al-implanted (implantation energy 40 keV, dose 10 16 -10 17 Al ions/cm 2 ) AISI 321 stainless steel samples in air has been studied at temperatures between 450 and 650degC using the 16 O(d,p) 17 O nuclear reaction. The determination of the distribution of the implanted Al atoms has been performed using the resonance at 992 keV of the 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si nuclear reaction. The determined oxygen profiles indicate that the implantation of 5x10 16 and 10 17 Al ions/cm 2 leads to an improvement of the oxidation resistance of the studied steel samples. The passivation/corrosion behaviour of the Al-implanted steel samples in 0.5M aqueous sulphuric acid solution has also been investigated electrochemically using potentiodynamic and cyclovoltammetric techniques. The passivation potential values and the repassivation moving to more positive values indicate an improvement of the corrosion resistance of the Al-implanted steel samples. (orig.)

  15. "Ride-on" technique and other simple and logical solutions to counter most common complications of silicone implants in augmentation rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil S Agrawal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmentation rhinoplasty can be carried out using a wide range of materials including autologous bone and/or cartilage as well as alloplasts. Use of biologic bone and cartilage grafts results in lower infection rates, but they are associated with long-term resorption and donor-site morbidity. Alloplastic materials, in particular silicone, have been associated in literature with extrusion, necrosis of the tip, mobility and deviation or displacement of the implant, immobile nasal tip and infection. However, they have the advantages of being readily available and easy to reshape with no requirement for harvesting autografts. Aim: To overcome these problems associated with silicone implants for which the authors have devised a novel technique, the "rideon technique". Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out on 11 patients over a period of 4 years. The authors have devised a simple technique to fix the silicone implant and retain it in place. Restricting the implant to only dorsum avoided common complications related to the silicone implant. Results: The authors have used this technique in 11 patients with encouraging results. Follow-up ranged from 12 months to 36 months during which patients were assessed for implant mobility, implant extrusion and tip necrosis. There was no incidence of above mentioned complications in these patients. Conclusion: The "rideon technique" provides excellent stability to silicone implants and restricting the implant only to dorsum not only eliminates chances of tip necrosis and thus implant extrusion but also maintains natural shape, feel and mobility of the tip.

  16. Managing impressions and forests

    OpenAIRE

    Ångman, Elin; Hallgren, Lars; Nordström, Eva-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Social interaction is an important—and often forgotten—aspect of conflicts in natural resource management (NRM). Building on the theoretical framework of symbolic interaction, this article explores how the concept of impression management during social interaction can help understand NRM conflicts. A qualitative study was carried out on a Swedish case involving a conflict over clear-cutting of a forest. To explain why the conflict escalated and destructivity increased, we investigated how the...

  17. Oxytocin and first impressions

    OpenAIRE

    Friberg, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Subtle facial expressions may cause "core impressions" of other people, i.e. a feeling of like or dislike witch is affected by facial cues that is not explicitly and consciously recognized. In the present investigation, we were interested in how the neuropeptide oxytocin affects recognition of these subtle facial expressions. Participants received oxytocin or placebo, and viewed static and dynamic "hybrid" faces that showed a facial expression (happiness, anger, fear, sadness) only in the lo...

  18. Impression cytology diagnosis of ulcerative eyelid malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, S; Lyngdoh, A D; Pushker, N; Meel, R; Bajaj, M S; Chawla, B

    2015-02-01

    The utility of impression cytology in ocular diseases has predominantly been restricted to the diagnosis of dry eye, limbal stem cell deficiency and conjunctival neoplasias. Its role in malignant eyelid lesions remains largely unexplored. Although scrape cytology is more popular for cutaneous lesions, impression cytology, being non-traumatic, has an advantage in small and delicate areas such as the eyelid. The present study has been designed to evaluate its role in the diagnosis and management of malignant eyelid lesions. Thirty-two histopathologically proven malignant eyelid lesions diagnosed over a 2-year period, including 13 basal cell carcinomas, 11 sebaceous carcinomas, four squamous cell carcinomas, two malignant melanomas and two poorly differentiated carcinomas, formed the study group. The results of impression cytology were compared with those of histopathology in the study group and with an age- and sex-matched group of benign cases as controls. The sensitivity of impression cytology was 84% (27/32) for the diagnosis of malignancy and 28% (9/32) for categorization of the type of malignancy. Impression cytology is a simple, useful, non-invasive technique for the detection of malignant ulcerative eyelid lesions. It is especially useful as a follow-up technique for the detection of recurrences. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The quality of fixed prosthodontic impressions: An assessment of crown and bridge impressions received at commercial laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Clayton T; Olafsson, Vilhelm G; Delgado, Alex J; Ritter, André V; Donovan, Terry E

    2017-09-01

    The authors evaluated and quantified clinically detectable errors commonly seen in impressions sent to commercial laboratories and determined possible relationships between finish line errors and other factors involved. The authors visited 3 large and 1 small commercial dental laboratories over a 12-month period. Three calibrated examiners evaluated the impressions. The examiners evaluated all impressions for errors by using ×2.5 magnification loupes under ambient room lighting without the aid of additional illumination. The authors evaluated 1,157 impressions; 86% of the examined impressions had at least 1 detectable error, and 55% of the noted errors were critical errors pertaining to the finish line. The largest single error categories evaluated were tissue over the finish line (49.09%), lack of unprepared stops in dual-arch impressions (25.63%), pressure of the tray on the soft tissue (25.06%), and void at the finish line (24.38%). The factors blood on the impression (odds ratio, 2.31; P impressions evaluated. The authors noted an increase in errors at the finish line with dual-arch impression techniques and in the presence of blood. Dentists have ethical, moral, and legal obligations bestowed on them by the profession and need to evaluate critically the work they send to laboratories. The authors strongly recommend an improvement in technique and reviewing of all impressions and working casts. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Evaluation of effectiveness of cement removal from implant-retained crowns using a proposed circular crisscross flossing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cimara Fortes; Shafter, Mohamed Amer; Jain, Vinay; Wicks, Russel Anthony; Linder, Erno; Ledo, Carlos Alberto da Silva

    2018-02-13

    Extruded cement during dental implant crown cementation may cause peri-implant diseases if not removed adequately. Evaluate the efficiency of removal of cement after cementation of implant crowns using an experimental "circular crisscross flossing technique (CCCFT) flossing technique, compared to the conventional "C" shape flossing technique (CSFT). Twenty-four patients rendered 29 experimental and 29 control crowns. Prefabricated abutments were secured to the implant with the margins at least 1 mm subgingivally. The abutments were scanned using CADCAM technology and Emax crowns were fabricated in duplicates. Each crown was cemented separately and excess cement was removed using the CSFT and the CCFT techniques. After completion of cementation was completed, the screw access holes were accessed and the crown was unscrewed along with the abutment. The samples were disinfected using 70% ethanol for 10 minutes. Crowns were divided into 4 parts using a marker in order to facilitate measurement data collection. Vertical and horizontal measurements were made for extruded cement for each control and experimental groups by means of a digital microscope. One-hundred and seventeen measurements were made for each group. Mann-Whitney test was applied to verify statistical significance between the groups. The CCFT showed a highly statistically significant result (104.8 ± 13.66, pcrowns cementation when compared with the CSFT.

  1. Splintless orthognathic surgery: a novel technique using patient-specific implants (PSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gander, Thomas; Bredell, Marius; Eliades, Theodore; Rücker, Martin; Essig, Harald

    2015-04-01

    In the past few years, advances in three-dimensional imaging have conducted to breakthrough in the diagnosis, treatment planning and result assessment in orthognathic surgery. Hereby error-prone and time-consuming planning steps, like model surgery and transfer of the face bow, can be eluded. Numerous positioning devices, in order to transfer the three-dimensional treatment plan to the intraoperative site, have been described. Nevertheless the use of positioning devices and intraoperative splints are failure-prone and time-consuming steps, which have to be performed during the operation and during general anesthesia of the patient. We describe a novel time-sparing and failsafe technique using patient-specific implants (PSI) as positioning guides and concurrently as rigid fixation of the maxilla in the planned position. This technique avoids elaborate positioning and removal of manufactured positioning devices and allows maxillary positioning without the use of occlusal splints. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cell Seeding Densities in Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Techniques for Cartilage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Gomoll, Andreas H; Lind, Martin; Spector, Myron

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage repair techniques have been among the most intensively investigated treatments in orthopedics for the past decade, and several different treatment modalities are currently available. Despite the extensive research effort within this field, the generation of hyaline cartilage remains a considerable challenge. There are many parameters attendant to each of the cartilage repair techniques that can affect the amount and types of reparative tissue generated in the cartilage defect, and some of the most fundamental of these parameters have yet to be fully investigated. For procedures in which in vitro-cultured autologous chondrocytes are implanted under a periosteal or synthetic membrane cover, or seeded onto a porous membrane or scaffold, little is known about how the number of cells affects the clinical outcome. Few published clinical studies address the cell seeding density that was employed. The principal objective of this review is to provide an overview of the cell seeding densities used in cell-based treatments currently available in the clinic for cartilage repair. Select preclinical studies that have informed the use of specific cell seeding densities in the clinic are also discussed.

  3. Substance Use as Impression Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Mark J.; Getz, J. Greg

    1996-01-01

    Examines the function of substance use as an impression management tactic. Introductory psychology students (n=377) responded to a survey instrument measuring self-monitoring, perceived success in impression management, interaction anxiety, and self-esteem. Results suggest that alcohol use may serve an impression management function. (JPS)

  4. Comparison of Venae Sectio vs. modified Seldinger Technique for Totally Implantable Access Ports; Portas-trial [ISRCTN:52368201

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luntz S

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The insertion of a Totally Implantable Access Port (TIAP is a routinely employed technique in patients who need a safe and permanent venous access. The number of TIAP implantations is increasing constantly mainly due to advanced treatment options for malignant diseases. Therefore it is important to identify the implantation technique which has the optimal benefit/risk ratio for the patient. Study design A single-centre, randomized, controlled superiority trial to compare two different TIAP implantation techniques. Sample size: 160 patients will be included and randomized intra-operatively. Eligibility criteria: Age equal or older than 18 years, patients scheduled for primary elective implantation of a TIAP in local anaesthesia and a signed informed consent. Primary endpoint: Primary success rate of the randomized technique. Intervention: Venae Sectio in combination with the Seldinger Technique (guide wire and a peel away sheath will be used to place a TIAP. Reference treatment: Conventional Venae Sectio will be used with a direct insertion of the TIAP without guide wire or peel away sheath. Duration of study: Approximately 20 months. Organisation/Responsibility The trial will be conducted in compliance with the protocol and in accordance with the moral, ethical, and scientific principles governing clinical research as set out in the Declaration of Helsinki (1989 and Good Clinical Practice (GCP. The trial will also be carried out in keeping with local and regulatory requirements. The Klinisches Studienzentrum Chirurgie (KSC – Centre of Clinical Trials in Surgery at the Department of Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg is responsible for planning and conduction of the trial. Documentation of patient's data will be accomplished via electronical Case Report Files (eCRF with MACRO®-Software by the KSC. Randomization, data management, monitoring and biometry are provided by the independent Koordinierungszentrum f

  5. Balloon osteoplasty--a new technique for reduction and stabilisation of impression fractures in the tibial plateau: a cadaver study and first clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Philipp; Sandmann, Gunther; Bauer, Jan; König, Benjamin; Martetschläger, Frank; Müller, Dirk; Siebenlist, Sebastian; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Neumaier, Markus; Biberthaler, Peter; Stöckle, Ulrich; Freude, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau are among the most severe injuries of the knee joint and lead to advanced gonarthrosis if the reduction does not restore perfect joint congruency. Many different reduction techniques focusing on open surgical procedures have been described in the past. In this context we would like to introduce a novel technique which was first tested in a cadaver setup and has undergone its successful first clinical application. Since kyphoplasty demonstrated effective ways of anatomical correction in spine fractures, we adapted the inflatable instruments and used the balloon technique to reduce depressed fragments of the tibial plateau. The technique enabled us to restore a congruent cartilage surface and bone reduction. In this technique we see a useful new method to reduce depressed fractures of the tibial plateau with the advantages of low collateral damage as it is known from minimally invasive procedures.

  6. A fully digital approach to replicate peri-implant soft tissue contours and emergence profile in the esthetic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Carlo; Evangelisti, Edoardo; Scotti, Roberto; Mignani, Giuseppe; Zucchelli, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    This short communication reports on a novel digital technique designated - the "Fully Digital Technique (FDT)" - to take the impression of the peri-implant soft tissue and emergence profile with an intraoral scanner, digitally capturing both the three dimensional position of the implant platform and the coronal and gingival parts of the provisional retained restoration. A first intraoral digital impression, which generated a standard triangulation language file (STL1), was taken using a standardized implant scanbody to detect the position of the implant. A second digital impression (STL2) with the provisional retained restoration in situ was performed in two steps: the first part of the scan captured all details of the vestibular and palatal sides of the provisional retained restoration and the adjacent teeth. The provisional retained restoration was then unscrewed, and the subgingival part of the restoration was scanned directly out of the mouth to determine its subgingival shape. STL1 and STL2 were imported into imaging software and superimposed using the "best fit" algorithm to achieve a new merged file (STL3) with the 3D implant position, the peri-implant mucosa, and emergence profile. The merged file was used to design the CAD/CAM customized abutment and to realize a stereolithographic model by 3D printing. The STL superimposition of digital impressions of the implant position and the provisional retained restoration constitute a novel technique to obtain a single STL file with the implant position and its peri-implant mucosal architecture. FDT is a rapid digital approach for achieving all information of the peri-implant soft tissue and emergence profile directly from the provisional retained restoration. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The behavior of implant-supported dentures and abutments using the cemented cylinder technique with different resinous cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida de Mathias Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the behavior of implant-supported dentures and their components, made by cemented cylinder technique, using threetypes of resin cements. Methods: Fifty three patients, of whom 26 were women and 27 men, aged between 25 and 82 years. Results: With partial (54.43% and total (45.57% implant-supported dentures, of the Cone Morse, external and internal hexagon types (Neodent®, Curitiba, Brazil, totaling 237 fixations, were analyzed. The resin cements used were Panavia® (21.94%, EnForce® (58.23% and Rely X® (19.83% and the components were used in accordance with the Laboratory Immediate Loading - Neodent® sequence. The period of time of denture use ranged between 1 and 5 years. The results reported that 5(2.1% cylinders were loosened from metal structure (both belonging to Rely X group, 2(0.48% implants were lost after the first year of use, 16(6.75% denture retention screws wereloosened and 31(13.08% abutment screws were unloosened.Conclusion: The reasons for these failures probably are: metal structure internal retention failure, occlusal pattern, cementation technique and loading conditions. The cemented cylinder technique was effective when used in partial and total implant-supported rehabilitations, keeping prosthetic components stable, despite the resin cement utilized. However, further clinical studies must be conducted.

  8. A Simple Method for Making Diagnostic Casts for Dental Implants Using Acrylic Abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Siadat

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of multiple implants in the same jaw requires a detailed knowledge of abutment angulation. The position and angulation of the abutments play an important role in treatment planning and fabrication of the custom tray. Therefore diagnostic casts thatcontain cover screws may cause problems during implant therapy.The current article describes a technique for making a preliminary cast with acrylic custom abutments in order to help the clinician select an appropriate impression technique and evaluate the location and angulations of the implant bodies. This method can also aid the technician to provide adequate and proper space for the fabrication of an open custom tray.

  9. Immediate implant placement in canine region using root membrane technique with follow up 2 years case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Dohiem

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Following tooth extraction the underlying bone would undergo a lot of a remodeling phases leading to horizontal and vertical bone loss especially in the anterior teeth which results in loss of buccal plate of bone. The presence of sufficient thickness of buccal bone is essential for preservation of natural look and installed implant. A technique was introduced to preserve the sufficient thickness of buccal plate in the anterior region known as root membrane (root shielding. This technique would aim to preserve the root periodontal ligament intact with the root to preserve the buccal plate of bone and prevent the ridge from collapsing thus achieving an esthetic appearance. This technique would Section of the teeth in two halves buccolingually, leaving the buccal fragment of root intact and then placing the implant lingual to it.

  10. In vivo Study of the Accuracy of Dual-arch Impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Luciana Martinelli Santayana; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Junior, Luiz Henrique Burnett; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated in vivo the accuracy of metal (Smart®) and plastic (Triple Tray®) dual-arch trays used with vinyl polysiloxane (Flexitime®), in the putty/wash viscosity, as well as polyether (Impregum Soft®) in the regular viscosity. In one patient, an implant-level transfer was screwed on an implant in the mandibular right first molar, serving as a pattern. Ten impressions were made with each tray and impression material. The impressions were poured with Type IV gypsum. The width and height of the pattern and casts were measured in a profile projector (Nikon). The results were submitted to Student's t-test for one sample (α = 0.05). For the width distance, the plastic dual-arch trays with vinyl polysiloxane (4.513 mm) and with polyether (4.531 mm) were statistically wider than the pattern (4.489 mm). The metal dual-arch tray with vinyl polysiloxane (4.504 mm) and with polyether (4.500 mm) did not differ statistically from the pattern. For the height distance, only the metal dual-arch tray with polyether (2.253 mm) differed statistically from the pattern (2.310 mm). The metal dual-arch tray with vinyl polysiloxane, in the putty/wash viscosities, reproduced casts with less distortion in comparison with the same technique with the plastic dual-arch tray. The plastic or metal dual-arch trays with polyether reproduced cast with greater distortion. How to cite the article: Santayana de Lima LM, Borges GA, Burnett LH Jr, Spohr AM. In vivo study of the accuracy of dual-arch impressions. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):50-5.

  11. Photoelastic analysis of mandibular full-arch implant-supported fixed dentures made with different bar materials and manufacturing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaparolli, Danilo; Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; Pupim, Denise; Macedo, Ana Paula; Toniollo, Marcelo Bighetti; Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello de

    2017-12-01

    To compare the stress distribution of mandibular full dentures supported with implants according to the bar materials and manufacturing techniques using a qualitative photoelastic analysis. An acrylic master model simulating the mandibular arch was fabricated with four Morse taper implant analogs of 4.5×6mm. Four different bars were manufactured according to different material and techniques: fiber-reinforced resin (G1, Trinia, CAD/CAM), commercially pure titanium (G2, cpTi, CAD/CAM), cobalt‑chromium (G3, Co-Cr, CAD/CAM) and cobalt‑chromium (G4, Co-Cr, conventional cast). Standard clinical and laboratory procedures were used by an experienced dental technician to fabricate 4 mandibular implant-supported dentures. The photoelastic model was created based on the acrylic master model. A load simulation (150N) was performed in total occlusion against the antagonist. Dentures with fiber-reinforced resin bar (G1) exhibited better stress distribution. Dentures with machined Co-Cr bar (G3) exhibited the worst standard of stress distribution, with an overload on the distal part of the posteriors implants, followed by dentures with cast Co-Cr bar (G4) and machined cpTi bar (G2). The fiber-reinforced resin bar exhibited an adequate stress distribution and can serve as a viable alternative for oral rehabilitation with mandibular full dentures supported with implants. Moreover, the use of the G1 group offered advantages including reduced weight and less possible overload to the implants components, leading to the preservation of the support structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Monorail Technique to Overcome Difficult Anatomical Course During Implantation of Central Venous Port via the Left Internal Jugular Vein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eu Hyun, E-mail: doorihyun6@gmail.com; Oh, Jung Suk; Chun, Ho Jong; Lee, Hae Giu; Choi, Byung Gil, E-mail: cbg@catholic.ac.kr [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    PurposeThe study aimed to introduce a monorail technique to overcome difficult anatomical course via left internal jugular vein in implantable port insertion.MethodsFrom 2007 to 2016, a total of 9346 patients were referred for implantable port insertion in our interventional unit, among which 79 cases were requested to insert on the left side. Our monorail technique was applied only when the technical challenge of the catheter tip entering the azygos vein instead of the superior vena cava occurred (n = 7). The technique consists of puncturing at the distal tip of the port catheter with a 21-gauge micropuncture needle and advancing a 0.018-in. hair-wire to guide and provide support for pre-assembled port.ResultsThe monorail technique was performed in seven patients and all but one case were technically successful, showing a technical success rate of 85.7%. There were no immediate or delayed complications.ConclusionsThe monorail technique is helpful to overcome the difficult anatomical course via left internal jugular vein in implantable port insertion.

  13. The Monorail Technique to Overcome Difficult Anatomical Course During Implantation of Central Venous Port via the Left Internal Jugular Vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eu Hyun; Oh, Jung Suk; Chun, Ho Jong; Lee, Hae Giu; Choi, Byung Gil

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThe study aimed to introduce a monorail technique to overcome difficult anatomical course via left internal jugular vein in implantable port insertion.MethodsFrom 2007 to 2016, a total of 9346 patients were referred for implantable port insertion in our interventional unit, among which 79 cases were requested to insert on the left side. Our monorail technique was applied only when the technical challenge of the catheter tip entering the azygos vein instead of the superior vena cava occurred (n = 7). The technique consists of puncturing at the distal tip of the port catheter with a 21-gauge micropuncture needle and advancing a 0.018-in. hair-wire to guide and provide support for pre-assembled port.ResultsThe monorail technique was performed in seven patients and all but one case were technically successful, showing a technical success rate of 85.7%. There were no immediate or delayed complications.ConclusionsThe monorail technique is helpful to overcome the difficult anatomical course via left internal jugular vein in implantable port insertion.

  14. The Monorail Technique to Overcome Difficult Anatomical Course During Implantation of Central Venous Port via the Left Internal Jugular Vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eu Hyun; Oh, Jung Suk; Chun, Ho Jong; Lee, Hae Giu; Choi, Byung Gil

    2017-03-01

    The study aimed to introduce a monorail technique to overcome difficult anatomical course via left internal jugular vein in implantable port insertion. From 2007 to 2016, a total of 9346 patients were referred for implantable port insertion in our interventional unit, among which 79 cases were requested to insert on the left side. Our monorail technique was applied only when the technical challenge of the catheter tip entering the azygos vein instead of the superior vena cava occurred (n = 7). The technique consists of puncturing at the distal tip of the port catheter with a 21-gauge micropuncture needle and advancing a 0.018-in. hair-wire to guide and provide support for pre-assembled port. The monorail technique was performed in seven patients and all but one case were technically successful, showing a technical success rate of 85.7%. There were no immediate or delayed complications. The monorail technique is helpful to overcome the difficult anatomical course via left internal jugular vein in implantable port insertion.

  15. Comparison Of The Dimensional Stability Of Alginate Impressions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: Alginate impressions of a master model of truncated metal cones were made and disinfected with 1% sodium hypochlorite constituted from 3.5% household bleach using the spray and immersion technique for 10;20 and 30 minutes. Impressions were cast in dental stone and the linear dimensional differences ...

  16. Postprostatectomy ultrasound-guided transrectal implantation of gold markers for external beam radiotherapy. Technique and complications rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenhuijsen, J.F.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Witjes, J.A. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Urology; Donker, R. [Medical Center Alkmaar (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; McColl, G.M.; Lin, E.N.J.T. van [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-06-15

    Background and purpose: Postprostatectomy radiotherapy (RT) improves survival in adjuvant and salvage settings. The implantation technique and complications rate of gold markers in the prostate bed for high-precision RT were analyzed. Patients and methods: Patients undergoing postprostatectomy RT for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse or high-risk disease were enrolled in the study. Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, three fine gold markers were implanted in the prostate bed and the technical difficulties of insertion were documented. Patients received our self-designed questionnaires concerning complications and pain. The influence of anticoagulants and coumarins on bleeding was analyzed, as was the effect of potential risk factors on pain. Results: In 77 consecutive patients, failure of marker implantation or marker migration was seen in six cases. Rectal bleeding was reported by 10 patients and 1 had voiding complaints. No macroscopic hematuria persisting for more than 3 days was observed. Other complications included rectal discomfort (n = 2), nausea (n = 1), abdominal discomfort (n = 1), and pain requiring analgesics (n = 4). No major complications were reported. On a 0-10 visual analogue scale (VAS), the mean pain score was 3.7. No clinically significant risk factors for complications were identified. Conclusion: Transrectal implantation of gold markers in the prostate bed is feasible and safe. Alternatives like cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) should be considered, but the advantages of gold marker implantation for high-precision postprostatectomy RT would seem to outweigh the minor risks involved. (orig.)

  17. NMR studies of preimplantation embryo metabolism in human assisted reproductive techniques: a new biomarker for assessment of embryo implantation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudakalakatti, Shivanand M; Uppangala, Shubhashree; D'Souza, Fiona; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Kumar, Pratap; Adiga, Satish Kumar; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2013-01-01

    There has been growing interest in understanding energy metabolism in human embryos generated using assisted reproductive techniques (ART) for improving the overall success rate of the method. Using NMR spectroscopy as a noninvasive tool, we studied human embryo metabolism to identify specific biomarkers to assess the quality of embryos for their implantation potential. The study was based on estimation of pyruvate, lactate and alanine levels in the growth medium, ISM1, used in the culture of embryos. An NMR study involving 127 embryos from 48 couples revealed that embryos transferred on Day 3 (after 72 h in vitro culture) with successful implantation (pregnancy) exhibited significantly (p < 10(-5) ) lower pyruvate/alanine ratios compared to those that failed to implant. Lactate levels in media were similar for all embryos. This implies that in addition to lactate production, successfully implanted embryos use pyruvate to produce alanine and other cellular functions. While pyruvate and alanine individually have been used as biomarkers, the present study highlights the potential of combining them to provide a single parameter that correlates strongly with implantation potential. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Examination of the ion-implantation route to fabrication of the Kane quantum computer using advanced imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakes, C.; Millar, V.; Peng, J.; Cimmino, A.; Prawer, S.; Jamieson, D.; Yang, C.; McKinnon, R.; Stanley, F.; Clark, R.; University of New South Wales, NSW; Dzurak, A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Kane solid-state quantum computer employs as qubits an array of 31 P atoms embedded with nanoscale precision in a silicon matrix. One proposal for the fabrication of such an array is by phosphorous-ion implantation. We present an overview of a program of research aiming to develop advanced imaging techniques to address key issues relating to the fabrication of the Kane device by ion implantation, focusing particularly on the development of surface-resist technology to allow the registration of single implanted ions and an examination of the extent of damage imposed on the silicon matrix. Our surface resists take the form of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin-films, which have been exposed both to MeV and keV ions. Registration of ion implantation is based on the development of localised chemical modification arising from latent damage caused within the PMMA layer by the passage of an implanted ion. On development of the resist, atomic force microscopy imaging demonstrates the formation of clearly defined etched holes, of typical diameter 30 nm, which are ascribed to single-ion impacts. The use of novel scanning probes, such as carbon nanotubes, for imaging complex PMMA resist structures will be illustrated. Potential applications to the fabrication of self-aligned gate structures will be discussed

  19. Use of microfocus computerized tomography as a new technique for characterizing bone tissue around oral implants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oossterwyck, H. van; Duyck, J.; Sloten, J. van der; Perre, G. van der; Jansen, J.A.; Wevers, M.; Naert, I.E.

    2000-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of peri-implant tissues around retrieved oral implants is typically done by means of light microscopy on thin histological sections containing the metal surface and the undecalcified bone. It remains, however, a labor-intensive and thus time-consuming job.

  20. Taurolidine as an effective and biocompatible additive for plaque-removing techniques on implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Gordon; Schwarz, Frank; Becker, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was the evaluation of the effectiveness and efficiency of two plaque-removing techniques, plastic curettes (PC) and glycine powder airflow (GLY) in combination with taurolidine (T), chlorhexidine (CHX), or pure water (PW) as additives and compared to groups without previous treatment (NT). Plaque was collected on titanium samples for 48 h in six subjects. Specimens were worn in a special splint in the upper jaw and randomly assigned to test and control groups. After biofilm removal procedures, clean implant surface (CIS) on the samples and treatment time were taken as parameters. Mean CIS was determined in the following descending order: T-GLY > CHX-GLY > NT-GLY > T-PC > PW-GLY > PW-PC > CHX-PC > NT-PC. Mean treatment time was determined in the following ascending order: T-GLY treatment times of the T groups were significantly lower than their corresponding PC or GLY groups. The results of the current study indicate that taurolidine seems to enhance effectiveness of plaque-removing procedures with plastic curettes and glycine powder airflow. Also, the efficiency of both treatment procedures seems to be increased.

  1. Retrospective radiographic study of marginal bone changes of 88 implants placed with split crest technique in the maxillary latero-posterior area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Longoni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim This article presents a retrospective study on the behavior of implants placed with split crest technique in lateroposterior maxillary class IV atrophy. Materials and Methods Subjects who underwent implant placement following split crest technique in the maxillary latero-posterior area were enrolled in the present retrospective study. After a mean period of 6.2 years of function implant survival and success rates were assessed. Moreover, radiographic examination was made on digital periapical radiographs and by means of a specific software. Bone level changes were measured as the difference between the peri-implants crestal bone level and the implants shoulder during the last patient’s visit recall examination. Results A total of 30 patients satisfied the inclusion criteria and were included in the study; the subjects were treated with 88 implants (64 transmucosal and 24 submerged. The observation period for all patients treated with split crest technique varied between 4 and 8 years (mean 6.2 years. The implants survival rate was 96.6% and the prostheses survival rate was 100%. Bone resorption ranged between 2.3 mm and 2.7 mm. Conclusion Implants inserted in conjunction with split crest technique seems to be a promising therapy with similar results as conventional implant surgery.

  2. An impressive start

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    This has been an excellent week for the LHC, with a succession of fills rapidly increasing the number of proton bunches to 194 per beam. This has allowed the experiments to reach a peak luminosity of 2.5 × 1032 cm-2s-1, thereby surpassing the record for 2010 where we reached 2.0 × 1032 cm-2s-1. At the time of writing, the integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC in 2011 is around 28 inverse picobarns, which is already more than half of the total 2010 dataset.   These are impressive numbers, but what impresses me most is how quickly the LHC operators are now able to turn the machine around between fills, and how well LHC running has been incorporated into the overall operation of CERN’s accelerator complex. The flexibility of the LHC was illustrated on Thursday when we started a short phase of running at 1.38 TeV per beam, equivalent to the energy-per-nucleon of a lead-ion run. This lower energy data will be used by the experiments, in particular by ALICE, to compare...

  3. A simple method for fabricating custom sectional impression trays for making definitive impressions in patients with microstomia

    OpenAIRE

    Bachhav, Vinay Chila; Aras, Meena Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A maximum mouth opening that is smaller than the size of a complete denture can make prosthetic treatment challenging. This article describes a simple technique used to fabricate maxillary and mandibular custom sectional impression trays for making definitive impressions in patients with microstomia.

  4. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Lateralization and Transposition for Dental Implant Placement. Part I: a Systematic Review of Surgical Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Abayev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this first part of a two-part series was to review the literature concerning the indications, contraindications, advantages, disadvantages and surgical techniques of the lateralization and transposition of the inferior alveolar nerve, followed by the placement of an implant in an edentulous atrophic posterior mandible. Material and Methods: A comprehensive review of the current literature was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines by accessing the NCBI PubMed and PMC database, academic sites and books. The articles were searched from January 1997 to July 2014 and comprised English-language articles that included adult patients between 18 and 80 years old with minimal residual bone above the mandibular canal who had undergone inferior alveolar nerve (IAN repositioning with a minimum 6 months of follow-up. Results: A total of 16 studies were included in this review. Nine were related to IAN transposition, 4 to IAN lateralization and 3 to both transposition and lateralization. Implant treatment results and complications were presented. Conclusions: Inferior alveolar nerve lateralization and transposition in combination with the installation of dental implants is sometimes the only possible procedure to help patients to obtain a fixed prosthesis, in edentulous atrophic posterior mandibles. With careful pre-operative surgical and prosthetic planning, imaging, and extremely precise surgical technique, this procedure can be successfully used for implant placement in edentulous posterior mandibular segments.

  5. Accuracy of stone casts obtained by different impression materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cláudia Lapria Faria

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Several impression materials are available in the Brazilian marketplace to be used in oral rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of different impression materials used for fixed partial dentures following the manufacturers' instructions. A master model representing a partially edentulous mandibular right hemi-arch segment whose teeth were prepared to receive full crowns was used. Custom trays were prepared with auto-polymerizing acrylic resin and impressions were performed with a dental surveyor, standardizing the path of insertion and removal of the tray. Alginate and elastomeric materials were used and stone casts were obtained after the impressions. For the silicones, impression techniques were also compared. To determine the impression materials' accuracy, digital photographs of the master model and of the stone casts were taken and the discrepancies between them were measured. The data were subjected to analysis of variance and Duncan's complementary test. Polyether and addition silicone following the single-phase technique were statistically different from alginate, condensation silicone and addition silicone following the double-mix technique (p .05 to alginate and addition silicone following the double-mix technique, but different from polysulfide. The results led to the conclusion that different impression materials and techniques influenced the stone casts' accuracy in a way that polyether, polysulfide and addition silicone following the single-phase technique were more accurate than the other materials.

  6. A randomised controlled trial of complete denture impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, T P; Craddock, H L; Gray, J C; Pavitt, S H; Hulme, C; Godfrey, M; Fernandez, C; Navarro-Coy, N; Dillon, S; Wright, J; Brown, S; Dukanovic, G; Brunton, P A

    2014-08-01

    There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7-67.3%, pUnilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Study by nuclear techniques of the impurity-defect interaction in implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, Lionel.

    1978-01-01

    The properties of out equilibrium alloys formed by impurity implantation are strongly influenced by radiation damage created during implantation. This work presents a study, via hyperfine interaction and lattice location experiments, of the impurity-defect interaction in ion implanted metals. When the impurity and defect concentrations in the implanted layer are small, i.e. when impurities are uniformly recoil implanted in the whole crystal volume following a nuclear reaction (Aq In experiments), the impurity interacts with its own damage cascade. In this case, a vacancy is found to be trapped by a fraction of impurities during an athermal process. The value of this fraction does not seem to depend critically on impurity and host. When the impurity and defect concentrations are such that defect cascades interact, i.e. when impurities are implanted with an isotope separator (Fe Yb experiments), the observed impurity-vacancy (or vacancy cluster) interactions depend then strongly on the nature of impurity and host. An empirical relation, which indicates the importance of elastic effects, has been found between the proportion of impurities interacting with defects and the difference between impurity and host atom radii. At implantation temperature such that vacancies are mobile, the impurity-defect interaction depends essentially on vacancy migration. A model based on chemical kinetics has been developed to account for the variation with temperature of measured quantities [fr

  8. Custom CAD-CAM healing abutment and impression coping milled from a poly(methyl methacrylate) block and bonded to a titanium insert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussaefs, Periklis

    2016-11-01

    This article describes a technique in which a custom-made computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) healing abutment milled from a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) block is fabricated and bonded to a titanium metal insert. An impression is made during dental implant surgery, and the CAD-CAM custom-made healing abutment is fabricated before second-stage surgery while appropriate healing time is allowed for the dental implant to osseointegrate. The contours of the healing abutment are based on the contours of a tentatively designed definitive prosthesis. The healing tissue obtains contours that will be compatible with the contours of the definitive prosthesis. After the milling process is complete, a titanium metal insert is bonded to the healing abutment. Placement of the custom-made CAD-CAM healing abutment at second-stage surgery allows the tissue to obtain contours similar to those of the definitive prosthesis. A custom-made CAD-CAM impression coping milled from a PMMA block and with a titanium insert is used for the definitive impression after the soft tissue has healed. This technique allows guided soft tissue healing by using a custom-made CAD-CAM healing abutment and impression coping. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sulcus depth reproduction with polyvinyl siloxane impression material: effects of hydrophilicity and impression temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidekazu; Finger, Werner J; Kurokawa, Rie; Furukawa, Masae; Komatsu, Masashi

    2010-03-01

    To determine the sulcus penetration ability of hydrophilic and hydrophobic polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials by impression technique, temperature, and sulcus width. Hydrophilic Flexitime (FLE; Heraeus Kulzer) and its hydrophobic counterpart (EXP) without surfactant were investigated, using light (L), monophase (M), and heavy (H) consistencies. A truncated steel cone surrounded by a 2-mm-deep and 50-, 100-, or 200-microm-wide sulcus, simulating the gingival tissue with agar, served as the test model. Impressions were made with single-mix (L or M) and double-mix (LM or LH) techniques at 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C, respectively. The reproduced sulcus heights were measured with a 3D laser scanner. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey HSD (P 1.9 mm); FLE-M, -LM, and-LH reproductions were shorter with narrow sulci. Reproductions of 50- and 100-microm sulci with EXP-L were shallower than with FLE-L. The shortest reproduction was, however, greater than 1.6 mm. In spite of some significant differences found in sulcus-reproducing ability with hydrophilic and hydrophobic impression materials applied at different impression-making temperatures and with different techniques, the practical relevance is limited.

  10. Influence of surgical and prosthetic techniques on marginal bone loss around titanium implants. Part I: immediate loading in fresh extraction sockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberi, Antoine N; Tehini, Georges E; Noujeim, Ziad F; Khairallah, Alexandre A; Abousehlib, Moustafa N; Salameh, Ziad A

    2014-10-01

    Delayed placement of implant abutments has been associated with peri-implant marginal bone loss; however, long-term results obtained by modifying surgical and prosthetic techniques after implant placement are still lacking. This study aimed to evaluate the marginal bone loss around titanium implants placed in fresh extraction sockets using two loading protocols after a 5-year follow-up period. A total of 36 patients received 40 titanium implants (Astra Tech) intended for single-tooth replacement. Implants were immediately placed into fresh extraction sockets using either a one-stage (immediate loading by placing an interim prosthesis into functional occlusion) or a two-stage prosthetic loading protocol (insertion of abutments after 8 weeks of healing time). Marginal bone levels relative to the implant reference point were evaluated at four time intervals using intraoral radiographs: at time of implant placement, and 1, 3, and 5 years after implant placement. Measurements were obtained from mesial and distal surfaces of each implant (α = 0.05). One-stage immediate implant placement into fresh extraction sockets resulted in a significant reduction in marginal bone loss (p sockets reduced marginal bone loss and did not compromise the success rate of the restorations. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  11. Accounting Narratives and Impression Management

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, Niamh; Merkl-Davies, Doris M.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter focuses on impression management in accounting communication. Impression management entails the construction of an impression by organisations with the intention to appeal to their audiences, including shareholders, stakeholders, the general public, and the media. If successful, it undermines the quality of financial reporting and capital misallocations may result. What is more, wider social and political consequences include unwarranted support by non-financial...

  12. Re-implant of the right coronary artery: a surgical technique for the treatment of ostial lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongiovani Hércules Lisboa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously described surgical treatment for ostial coronary artery stenosis relied on either venous or arterial bypasses or ostial patch angioplasty. These surgical procedures are performed with bovine pericardium, saphenous vein or internal thoracic artery. We describe a technique of right coronary artery re-implantation into the aorta. The procedure was performed in four patients with right coronary artery ostial stenosis along with other left coronary artery lesions.

  13. A technique to stabilize record bases for Gothic arch tracings in patients with implant-retained complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raigrodski, A J; Sadan, A; Carruth, P L

    1998-12-01

    Clinicians have long expressed concern about the accuracy of the Gothic arch tracing for recording centric relation in edentulous patients. With the use of dental implants to assist in retaining complete dentures, the problem of inaccurate recordings, made for patients without natural teeth, can be significantly reduced. This article presents a technique that uses healing abutments to stabilize the record bases so that an accurate Gothic arch tracing can be made.

  14. Implantation technique of the 50-cm3 SynCardia Total Artificial Heart: does size make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliopoulos, Sotirios; Guersoy, Dilek; Dimitriou, Alexandros Merkourios; Koerfer, Reiner; Tenderich, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Despite downsizing, implantation technique of the 50-cm(3) SynCardia Total Artificial Heart and settings of the Companion driver remain unchanged. Owing to the absence of de-airing nipples, de-airing procedure is even more crucial and has to be performed carefully. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. Palliative interstitial HDR brachytherapy for recurrent rectal cancer. Implantation techniques and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolotas, C.; Roeddiger, S.; Martin, T.; Tselis, N.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N.; Strassmann, G.; Aebersold, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To report the methods and clinical results of CT-based interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy procedures for the palliative treatment of recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 44 brachytherapy implants were performed in 38 patients. CT-guided catheter implants were performed in 34 patients under local anesthesia and sedation, and four patients were implanted intraoperatively. Of 40 CT-guided implants, 20 were done using metallic needles introduced via the sacrum and 20 were transperineal implants of plastic tubes in the presacral region. Postimplant CT scans were used for three-dimensional (3-D) conformal brachytherapy planning. Patients implanted with metallic needles were given a single fraction of 10-15 Gy using HDR 192 Ir, and those who received transperineal implants of plastic catheters were given fractionated brachytherapy, 5 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 30-40 Gy. The median tumor volume was 225 cm 3 with a range of 41-2,103 cm 3 . Results: After a median follow-up of 23.4 months, a total of 13/38 patients were alive. The median postbrachytherapy survival was 15 months with 18 of the 25 deaths due to distant metastases. Tumor response was as follows: 6/38 partial remission, 28/38 stable disease, and 4/38 local progression. A planning target volume (PTV) coverage > 85% was achieved in 42/44 implants. The treatment was well tolerated, and no acute complications were observed. One patient developed a fistula after 8 months. Pain relief was recorded in 34 patients (89.5%), and the median duration of this palliative effect was 5 months with a range of 1-13 months. Conclusions: Interstitial HDR brachytherapy is a valuable tool for the delivery of high doses and achieves effective palliation in recurrent rectal carcinoma. (orig.)

  16. Palliative interstitial HDR brachytherapy for recurrent rectal cancer. Implantation techniques and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolotas, C. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach Hospital, Offenbach (Germany); Dept. of Radio-Oncology, Univ. of Bern, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Roeddiger, S.; Martin, T.; Tselis, N.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach Hospital, Offenbach (Germany); Strassmann, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital, Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany); Aebersold, D.M. [Dept. of Radio-Oncology, Univ. of Bern, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    Purpose: To report the methods and clinical results of CT-based interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy procedures for the palliative treatment of recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 44 brachytherapy implants were performed in 38 patients. CT-guided catheter implants were performed in 34 patients under local anesthesia and sedation, and four patients were implanted intraoperatively. Of 40 CT-guided implants, 20 were done using metallic needles introduced via the sacrum and 20 were transperineal implants of plastic tubes in the presacral region. Postimplant CT scans were used for three-dimensional (3-D) conformal brachytherapy planning. Patients implanted with metallic needles were given a single fraction of 10-15 Gy using HDR {sup 192}Ir, and those who received transperineal implants of plastic catheters were given fractionated brachytherapy, 5 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 30-40 Gy. The median tumor volume was 225 cm{sup 3} with a range of 41-2,103 cm{sup 3}. Results: After a median follow-up of 23.4 months, a total of 13/38 patients were alive. The median postbrachytherapy survival was 15 months with 18 of the 25 deaths due to distant metastases. Tumor response was as follows: 6/38 partial remission, 28/38 stable disease, and 4/38 local progression. A planning target volume (PTV) coverage > 85% was achieved in 42/44 implants. The treatment was well tolerated, and no acute complications were observed. One patient developed a fistula after 8 months. Pain relief was recorded in 34 patients (89.5%), and the median duration of this palliative effect was 5 months with a range of 1-13 months. Conclusions: Interstitial HDR brachytherapy is a valuable tool for the delivery of high doses and achieves effective palliation in recurrent rectal carcinoma. (orig.)

  17. Note: Laser ablation technique for electrically contacting a buried implant layer in single crystal diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, M. P.; Baldwin, J. W.; Butler, J. E.; Pate, B. B.; Feygelson, T. I.

    2011-01-01

    The creation of thin, buried, and electrically conducting layers within an otherwise insulating diamond by annealed ion implantation damage is well known. Establishing facile electrical contact to the shallow buried layer has been an unmet challenge. We demonstrate a new method, based on laser micro-machining (laser ablation), to make reliable electrical contact to a buried implant layer in diamond. Comparison is made to focused ion beam milling.

  18. Predicting Implantation Outcome of In Vitro Fertilization and Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Using Data Mining Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pegah Hafiz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background In vitro fertilization (IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI are two important subsets of the assisted reproductive techniques, used for the treatment of infertility. Predicting implantation outcome of IVF/ICSI or the chance of pregnancy is essential for infertile couples, since these treatments are complex and expensive with a low probability of conception. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, the data of 486 patients were collected using census method. The IVF/ICSI dataset contains 29 variables along with an identifier for each patient that is either negative or positive. Mean accuracy and mean area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve are calculated for the classifiers. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and likelihood ratios of classifiers are employed as indicators of performance. The state-of-art classifiers which are candidates for this study include support vector machines, recursive partitioning (RPART, random forest (RF, adaptive boosting, and one-nearest neighbor. Results RF and RPART outperform the other comparable methods. The results revealed the areas under the ROC curve (AUC as 84.23 and 82.05%, respectively. The importance of IVF/ICSI features was extracted from the output of RPART. Our findings demonstrate that the probability of pregnancy is low for women aged above 38. Conclusion Classifiers RF and RPART are better at predicting IVF/ICSI cases compared to other decision makers that were tested in our study. Elicited decision rules of RPART determine useful predictive features of IVF/ICSI. Out of 20 factors, the age of woman, number of developed embryos, and serum estradiol level on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin administration are the three best features for such prediction.

  19. Comparison of irradiated and hydrogen implanted German RPV steels using PAS technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecko, Stanislav, E-mail: stanislav.pecko@stuba.sk; Sojak, Stanislav; Slugeň, Vladimír

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • German RPV steels were originally studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy. • Neutron irradiated and hydrogen ion implanted specimens were studied. • Both irradiation ways caused to increase of defect size. • We determined that the defect size was higher in implanted specimens. - Abstract: Radiation degradation of nuclear materials can be experimentally simulated via ion implantation. In our case, German reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels were studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). This spectroscopic method is a really effective tool for the evaluation of microstructural changes and for the analysis of degradation of reactor steels due to irradiation. German commercial reactor pressure vessel steels, originally from CARISMA program, were used in our study. The German experimental reactor VAK was selected as the proper irradiation facility in the 1980s. A specimen in as-received state and 2 different irradiated cuts from the same material were measured by PALS and size of defects with their intensity was indentified. Afterwards there was prepared an experiment with concern in simulation of neutron irradiation by hydrogen ion implantation on a linear accelerator with energy of 100 keV. Results are concerning on comparison between defects caused by neutron irradiation and hydrogen implantation. The size and intensity of defects reached a similar level as in the specimens irradiated in the nuclear reactor due to hydrogen ions implantation.

  20. Ventral impressions on the hypopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daschner, H.; Hannig, C.

    1991-01-01

    Two impressions can be seen on the ventral aspect of the hypopharynx and upper oesophagus; on static images it is difficult to differentiate these from small tumours. In order to evaluate this region more accurately, we have examined 150 patients by means of rapid rate cinematography. In 52.6% we found a constant irregular or convex impression formed by the cricoid; in the other cases this was not seen or was quite minimal. In 93% a sub-cricoid impression could be demonstrated which was due to lax mucosa. Characteristically this showed a variable appearance during the passage of a bolus. Only the cricoid impression was associated with dysphagia. (orig.) [de

  1. Analyzer-based imaging technique in tomography of cartilage and metal implants: A study at the ESRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coan, Paola; Mollenhauer, Juergen; Wagner, Andreas; Muehleman, Carol; Bravin, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Monitoring the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) and the effects of therapy during clinical trials is still a challenge for present clinical imaging techniques since they present intrinsic limitations and can be sensitive only in case of advanced OA stages. In very severe cases, partial or complete joint replacement surgery is the only solution for reducing pain and restoring the joint functions. Poor imaging quality in practically all medical imaging technologies with respect to joint surfaces and to metal implant imaging calls for the development of new techniques that are sensitive to stages preceding the point of irreversible damage of the cartilage tissue. In this scenario, X-ray phase contrast modalities could play an important role since they can provide improved contrast compared to conventional absorption radiography, with a similar or even reduced tissue radiation dose. In this study, the analyzer-based imaging (ABI), a technique sensitive to the X-ray refraction and permitting a high scatter rejection, has been successfully applied in vitro on excised human synovial joints and sheep implants. Pathological and healthy joints as well as metal implants have been imaged in projection and computed tomography ABI mode at high resolution and clinically compatible doses (<10 mGy). Volume rendering and segmentation permitted visualization of the cartilage from volumetric CT-scans. The results demonstrate that ABI can provide an unequivocal non-invasive diagnosis of the state of disease of the joint and be considered a new tool in orthopaedic research

  2. Assessment of the stress transmitted to dental implants connected to screw-retained bars using different casting techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselhuhn, Klaus; Marotti, Juliana; Tortamano, Pedro; Weiss, Claudia; Suleiman, Lubna; Wolfart, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Passive fit of the prosthetic superstructure is important to avoid complications; however, evaluation of passive fit is not possible using conventional procedures. Thus, the aim of this study was to check and locate mechanical stress in bar restorations fabricated using two casting techniques. Fifteen patients received four implants in the interforaminal region of the mandible, and a bar was fabricated using either the cast-on abutment or lost-wax casting technique. The fit accuracy was checked according to the Sheffield's test criteria. Measurements were recorded on the master model with a gap-free, passive fit using foil strain gauges both before and after tightening the prosthetic screws. Data acquisition and processing was analyzed with computer software and submitted to statistical analysis (ANOVA). The greatest axial distortion was at position 42 with the cast-on abutment technique, with a mean distortion of 450 μm/m. The lowest axial distortion occurred at position 44 with the lost-wax casting technique, with a mean distortion of 100 μm/m. The minimal differences between the means of axial distortion do not indicate any significant differences between the techniques (P = 0.2076). Analysis of the sensor axial distortion in relation to the implant position produced a significant difference (P casting techniques, with no significant difference between the sides.

  3. Influence of the surgical technique and surface roughness on the primary stability of an implant in artificial bone with a density equivalent to maxillary bone: a laboratory study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabassum, A.; Meijer, G.J.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this biomechanical study was to assess the effect of surgical technique and surface roughness on primary implant stability in low-density bone. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty screw-shaped (Biocomp) implants with machined or etched surface topography were inserted into a

  4. Influence of surgical technique and surface roughness on the primary stability of an implant in artificial bone with different cortical thickness: a laboratory study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabassum, A.; Meijer, G.J.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this biomechanical study was to assess the interrelated effect of both surface roughness and surgical technique on the primary stability of dental implants. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the experiment, 160 screw-designed implants (Biocomp), with either a machined or an etched

  5. A simplified method to reduce prosthetic misfit for a screw-retained, implant-supported complete denture using a luting technique and laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoni, Salvatore; Sartori, Matteo; Davide, Roberto

    2004-06-01

    An important aim of implant-supported prostheses is to achieve a passive fit of the framework with the abutments to limit the amount of stress transfer to the bone-implant interface. An efficient and standardized technique is proposed. A definitive screw-retained, implant-supported complete denture was fabricated for an immediately loaded provisional screw-retained implant-supported complete denture. Precise fit was achieved by the use of industrial titanium components and the passivity, by an intraoral luting sequence and laser welding.

  6. Investigation of Mn Implanted LiNbO3 applying electron paramagnetic resonance technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwish, A.; Ila, D.; Poker, D.B.; Hensley, D.K.

    1997-10-01

    The effect of ion implantation on the LiNbO 3 crystal is studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). EPR measurements on these crystals were performed as a function of ion species Mn and Fe and fluence at room temperature. Also the effect of the laser illumination on the EPR signal was determined by illuminating the crystal in situ and measuring the decay and growth of the EPR signal. LiNbO 3 :Mn 2+ at a depth of approximately 200 nm was formed by implantation of 2.5 x 10 14 Mncm 2 and 1 x 10 17 Mn/cm 2 at 2 MeV. The implanted samples were compared with bulk doped crystals. It was found that the decay and growth of Mn EPR for the implanted crystal is very small compared with the bulk doped LiNbO 3 :Mn crystal. This was found to be primarily due to the spin concentration on the crystals. On the other, hand the decay time of the high fluence is about 40% slower than the decay of the low fluence implanted crystal

  7. Search for internal oxidation of Eu in implanted in Cu matrix using IPAC technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurup, M.B.; Prasad, K.G.; Sharma, R.P.

    1976-01-01

    It has been recently reported that rare earth atoms implanted in iron host get oxidised on annealing the sample in hydrogen atmosphere. Integral PAC measurements have been carried out on samples of 153 Eu implanted in Cu foils (energy 400 keV, dose approximately 3 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 ) to investigate this phenomenon in detail. The implanted samples of 153 Eu are neutron irradiated to form 154 Eu → via β - 154 Gd activity. The angular correlation of the 1278→123 keV (2 - → 2 + → 0 + ) gamma-gamma cascade, studied using these irradiated implanted samples, is attenuated and the integral attenuation coefficient G 22 (infinity) is 0.482 +- 0.045. The measurements are repeated after annealing the sample in hydrogen atmosphere at (1) 325degC for 15 mins (2) 500degC for 30 mins. and (3) 500degC for 5 hrs respectively. The attenuation co-efficient G 22 (infinity) does not show any appreciable enhancement on annealing the sample indicating that there is no internal oxidation. The correlation in powdered EU 2 O 3 sample enriched in 153 Eu has been studied. The attenuation factor (G 22 (infinity)=0.77 +- 0.06) observed in this case is much higher than that for the annealed implanted sample; further indicating the absence in internal oxidation to any appreciable degree on annealing. (author)

  8. Making a Great First Impression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Renee

    2007-01-01

    Managers and business owners often base hiring decisions on first impressions. That is why it is so important to teach students to make a great first impression--before they go on that first job interview. Managers do not have unrealistic expectations, they just want to hire people who they believe can develop into valuable employees. A nice…

  9. Impression Management and Entrepreneurial Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halbinger, Maria; Reichstein, Toke

    2016-01-01

    into entrepreneurship. Analyzing individual-level data collected through online survey, field studies and experiments in hacker-and makerspaces, we find that impression management behavior that focuses others, i.e. accommodative impression management is positively associated with entrepreneurial experience while self...

  10. An evaluation of preservation of residual hearing using the suprameatal approach for cochlear implantation: can this implantation technique be used for preservation of residual hearing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postelmans, Job T. F.; van Spronsen, Erik; Grolman, Wilko; Stokroos, Robert J.; Tange, Rinze A.; Maré, Marcel J.; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2011-01-01

    The preservation of residual hearing has become a high priority in cochlear implant surgery. This study was designed to substantiate whether conservation of residual hearing can be preserved after cochlear implantation using the suprameatal approach. Retrospective chart review. Retrospective chart

  11. An evaluation of the effectiveness of different techniques for intraoperative infiltration of antibiotics into alloplastic implants for use in facial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Morgan S; Keefe, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Reconstruction in the head and neck can be difficult owing to the size of the defect or characteristics of the tissue that needs to be replaced. Facial wounds or reconstruction sites can be subject to contamination, thereby risking infection of any implanted material even under ideal circumstances. Particular areas of concern are sites where minimizing the bacterial contamination prior to placing an implant is difficult (eg, the oral cavity and internal nose). Reconstruction involves the facial subcutaneous soft tissue and/or bone, and the ideal implant provides support and natural feel, as well as a low risk of infection. The biocompatibility of alloplastic implants depends on the tissue inertness of the implant and the porosity, allowing connective tissue ingrowth, which in turn decreases the susceptibility to infection. Scalafani et al demonstrated that alloplastic implants contaminated prior to fibrovascular ingrowth had a much higher incidence of infection and rejection. To examine the effectiveness of several techniques for infiltrating antibiotics into alloplastic implants of different porosity using 2 commonly used alloplastic implants, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE, or GORE-TEX) and porous high-density polyethylene (Medpor). Using an in vitro bacterial growth inhibition model, we found that suction infiltration of the implant with antibiotics was the most effective technique, with a statistically significant advantage over other techniques used. The advantages of the suction impregnation were seen to be most effective using alloplasts with a smaller pore size (20-30 microm) (P < .001), but there was a statistically significant difference even with implants with a larger pore size (150-200 microm) (P < .001). Suction infiltration of antibiotics into porous implants seems to be the most effective method identified using an in vitro testing protocol. Further experiments will be needed to confirm the effectiveness in reducing the perioperative risk

  12. Dynamic behavior of protium and deuterium implanted into an oxide ceramic studied by means of ERD techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iizuka, Emi; Horikawa, Tomoaki; Tsuchiya, Bun; Soda, Kazuo; Morita, Kenji; Iwahara,; Hiroyasu, [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    We have investigated exchange of deuterium (or protium) implanted into an oxide ceramic, SrCe{sub 0.95}Yb{sub 0.05}O{sub 3-{delta}}, for protium (or deuterium) due to exposure to H{sub 2}O (or D{sub 2}O) vapor at room temperature by means of the elastic recoil detection (ERD) technique. It is found that D is completely exchanged for H by expose to H{sub 2}O vapor, while H is hardly exchanged for D by expose to D{sub 2}O vapor, namely there exists a great isotope difference between the exchange of D for H and that of H for D. This result suggests that the exchanges do not take place on a conventional model of following subsequent reactions; dissociative absorption at the surface, diffusion (H), replacement of D by H, diffusion (D), and release due to surface recombination, but on a new model of following reactions; dissociative absorption at the surface, diffusion and release through bulk recombination due to mixed molecule formation. In order to clarify the reaction leading to the great isotope difference, the experiments on the retention of H and D by simultaneous H{sup +}, D{sup +} implantation and the release of 5 keV D{sub 2}{sup +} implants by 0.5 keV H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation and 5 keV H{sub 2}{sup +} implants by 0.5 keV D{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation have been done. The retention experiment shows that the D/H ratio of the saturation implantation concentration is 1.3. Competition among H-H, H-D and D-D bulk recombination prefers to enrich D, which is opposite to the isotope difference observed. The release experiment shows that the slow and continuous decay of 5 keV D{sub 2}{sup +} implants is induced by 0.5 keV H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation for long term, while that of 5 keV H{sub 2}{sup +} implants is hardly induced by 0.5 keV D{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation for long term. The latter result suggests that the diffusion may play a major rule in the great isotope difference. (author)

  13. A Paradigm shift in the concept for making dental impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Sanjna; Mahadevan, R

    2015-04-01

    Digital dental impression is a revolutionary technological advancement that so surpasses the accuracy and efficiency of former techniques for obtaining replicas of prepared teeth for the purpose of fabricating restorations that its adoption by dentists is rapidly eclipsing the use of elastomeric impression materials. The ultimate goals of dentists dedicated to quality restorative dentistry are to make their treatment of patients as accurate, stressless, and efficient as possible. By elimination of the everyday problems described above, there is no question that the significant advantages of digital impressions will make intraoral digital scanning standard procedure in most dental offices within the next several years. Furthermore, digital impressions have proven to reduce remakes and returns, as well as increase overall efficiency. The patient also benefits by being provided a far more positive experience. Finally, through the use of digital impression making, it has been determined that laboratory products become more consistent and require less chair time at insertion.

  14. A Paradigm shift in the concept for making dental impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjna Nayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital dental impression is a revolutionary technological advancement that so surpasses the accuracy and efficiency of former techniques for obtaining replicas of prepared teeth for the purpose of fabricating restorations that its adoption by dentists is rapidly eclipsing the use of elastomeric impression materials. The ultimate goals of dentists dedicated to quality restorative dentistry are to make their treatment of patients as accurate, stressless, and efficient as possible. By elimination of the everyday problems described above, there is no question that the significant advantages of digital impressions will make intraoral digital scanning standard procedure in most dental offices within the next several years. Furthermore, digital impressions have proven to reduce remakes and returns, as well as increase overall efficiency. The patient also benefits by being provided a far more positive experience. Finally, through the use of digital impression making, it has been determined that laboratory products become more consistent and require less chair time at insertion.

  15. Técnica simplificada de implante de bioprótese aórtica sem suporte ("stentless" Simplified implantation technique of stentless aortic bioprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Botelho PINHEIRO

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A maior complexidade técnica de implante é provavelmente o mais importante fator limitante do uso mais amplo das biopróteses aórticas "stentless". CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODOS: Quinze pacientes foram submetidos a troca valvar aórtica por bioprótese porcina "stentless", tipo Labcor, com técnica simplificada de implante - um plano de sutura com pontos separados ao nível do anel aórtico e suspensão dos pilares com sutura contínua. Doze pacientes eram do sexo masculino e 3 do feminino, com idade variando de 9 a 56 anos. As indicações cirúrgicas foram a estenose valvar aórtica em 8 (53,3% casos, a dupla lesão em 4 (26,7% e a insuficiência aórtica em 3 (20%. Dez (66,7% pacientes apresentavam-se em classe funcional (CF III da NYHA e 5 (33,3% em CF IV. RESULTADOS: Não ocorreram complicações na fase hospitalar. Em 2 (13,3% pacientes constatou-se, antes da alta hospitalar, presença de insuficiência central discreta da prótese, sem repercussão hemodinâmica. Um paciente apresentou endocardite bacteriana 14 meses após o implante, necessitando de reoperacão, evoluindo com choque séptico e óbito. A curva atuarial de sobrevida é de 93,3% em seguimento médio de 23,5 meses, variando de 17 a 29 meses. Doze (85,7% pacientes apresentam-se em CF I (NYHA e 2 (14,3% pacientes em CF II, sem a ocorrência de complicações tromboembólicas, escape paravalvular ou hemólise, no período avaliado. CONCLUSÃO: A técnica em questão é de fácil execução, reprodutível e com baixo índice de complicações, podendo constituir-se em mais uma opção nas operações de troca valvar aórtica.OBJECTIVE: Probably the major drawback to a stentless porcine xenograft is the complexity of the technical demands required for inserting a competent aortic valve (usually two suture rows. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifteen patients underwent aortic valve replacement with the Labcor stentless porcine heterograft using a simplified technique for implantation

  16. Impressive Super Phenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olds, F.C.

    1979-01-01

    The 1200-MWe fast breeder reactor, Super Phenix at Creys-Malville, is scheduled for commercial operation in 1983. This is the world's first near-commercial-sized fast breeder. As a near-commercial-sized unit, it represents essentially the technology and hardware of the first fully commercial follow-on units. In its size, its components, its design, the technology it represents, and its project schedule, it is impressive. As of May 1979, the Super Phenix nuclear steam boiler in the Creys-Malville plant bore an estimated cost of $700 million, without fuel. The total cost of the Creys-Malville plant now is estimated at about $1.4 billion. This is about twice the cost of a comparable standardized PWR being built in France today. However, it should be borne in mind that Creys-Malville carries the high cost of a first-of-the-line prototype, and that France's PWRs are standardized, second-generation units. Electricity from Creys-Malville is estimated to cost a little more than electricity would cost from a coal-fired plant complete with flue gas scrubbing

  17. Impressions of a "Newcomer"

    CERN Multimedia

    Oreglia, M

    I guess I am passed "newcomer" status, so this report can be considered as paying in a debt from 2001 when world events prevented me from attending the Physics Workshop at Lund. At the outset I must compliment the Athens organizers for facilitating a superb workshop in a wonderful setting. The lovely evenings permitted us to recover from Fabiola's grueling meeting schedule :-) What really impressed me about the Athens workshop is the astounding progress in the last two years, particularly in the software. ATHENA is really a useful tool which all of us can implement now for realistic simulation and reconstruction. We are just starting to pass from the "euphoria" phase where our naive modelling suggested analyses would be easy, to the "realism" phase where we are making the analyses more robust. Detector noise is still an important missing ingredient, and some important analysis tools are still missing, but this was acknowledged and they do not appear to be far off. (It would be nice if the online documentati...

  18. Analysis of bacterial flora associated with peri-implantitis using obligate anaerobic culture technique and 16S rDNA gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Naoki; Ochi, Morio; Miyakawa, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Futoshi

    2013-01-01

    To analyze and characterize the predominant bacterial flora associated with peri-implantitis by using culture techniques under obligate anaerobic conditions and 16S rDNA gene sequences. Subgingival bacterial specimens were taken from 30 patients: control (n = 15), consisting of patients with only healthy implants; and test (n = 15), consisting of patients with peri-implantitis. In both groups, subgingival bacterial specimens were taken from the deepest sites. An anaerobic glove box system was used to cultivate bacterial strains. The bacterial strains were identified by 16S rDNA genebased polymerase chain reaction and comparison of the gene sequences. Peri-implantitis sites had approximately 10-fold higher mean colony forming units (per milliliter) than healthy implant sites. A total of 69 different bacterial species were identified in the peri-implantitis sites and 53 in the healthy implant sites. The predominant bacterial species in the peri-implantitis sites were Eubacterium nodatum, E. brachy, E. saphenum, Filifactor alocis, Slackia exigua, Parascardovia denticolens, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Centipeda periodontii, and Parvimonas micra. The predominant bacteria in healthy implant sites apart from Streptococcus were Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, Veillonella species, Actinomyces israelii, Actinomyces species, Propionibacterium acnes, and Parvimonas micra. These results suggest that the environment in the depths of the sulcus showing peri-implantitis is well suited for growth of obligate anaerobic bacteria. The present study demonstrated that the sulcus around oral implants with peri-implantitis harbors high levels of asaccharolytic anaerobic gram-positive rods (AAGPRs) such as E. nodatum, E. brachy, E. saphenum, Filifactor alocis, Slackia exigua, and gram-negative anaerobic rods, suggesting that conventional periodontopathic bacteria are not the only periodontal pathogens active in peri-implantitis, and that AAGPRs

  19. [Implant placement in the aesthetic zone: the socket-shield-technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagas, L.J.; Pepplinkhuizen, J.J.; Berge, S.J.; Meijer, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Following the extraction of an incisor in the maxilla, resorption of the -alveolar bone always occurs, especially on the buccal side. This often -indicates that in the buccocervical area, insufficient bone is present to cover the dental implant. One treatment option is to carry out a bone transplant

  20. Immediate Placement of Ultrawide-Diameter Implants in Molar Sockets: Description of a Recommended Technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hattingh, A.C.; Bruyn, H. de; Ackermann, A.; Vandeweghe, S.

    2018-01-01

    Immediate implant placement is performed less frequently in molar extraction sockets than in single root sockets. This is mainly due to the tripodal anatomical configuration of molar roots, which is perceived as complex and therefore unsuitable. The mechanical burden of molar sites, combined with

  1. A Randomised Controlled Trial of complete denture impression materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, T.P.; Craddock, H.L.; Gray, J.C.; Pavitt, S.H.; Hulme, C.; Godfrey, M.; Fernandez, C.; Navarro-Coy, N.; Dillon, S.; Wright, J.; Brown, S.; Dukanovic, G.; Brunton, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Methods Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Results Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7–67.3%, p alginate as their material of choice for secondary impressions for complete dentures. Trial Registration: ISRCTN 01528038.

 This article forms part of a project for which the author (TPH) won the Senior Clinical Unilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. PMID:24995473

  2. Conventional Vs Digital Impressions: Acceptability, Treatment Comfort and Stress Among Young Orthodontic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Alessandro; Beretta, Matteo; Luongo, Giuseppe; Mangano, Carlo; Mangano, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to compare patients’ acceptability, comfort and stress with conventional and digital impressions. Materials and Methods: Thirty young orthodontic patients (15 males and 15 females) who had no previous experience of impressions were enrolled in this study. Conventional impressions for orthodontic study models of the dental arches were taken using an alginate impression material (Hydrogum®, Zhermack Spa, Badia Polesine, Rovigo, Italy). Fifteen days later, digital impressions of both arches were acquired using an intraoral scanner (CS3600®, Carestream Dental, Rochester, NY, USA). Immediately after impression taking, patients’ acceptability, comfort and stress were measured using two questionnaires and the State anxiety scale. Results: Data showed no difference in terms of anxiety and stress; however, patients preferred the use of digital impressions systems instead of conventional impression techniques. Alginate impressions resulted as fast as digital impressions. Conclusions: Digital impressions resulted the most accepted and comfortable impression technique in young orthodontic patients, when compared to conventional techniques. PMID:29492177

  3. Immediate versus early loading of two implants placed with a flapless technique supporting mandibular bar-retained overdentures: a single-blinded, randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannizzaro, Gioacchino; Leone, Michele; Esposito, Marco

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of immediate loading versus early loading at 6 weeks of bar-retained mandibular overdentures supported by two implants placed with a flapless technique. Sixty patients were randomised: 30 to the immediately loaded group and 30 to the early loaded group. To be immediately loaded, implants had to be inserted with a minimum torque > 48 Ncm. Outcome measures were prosthesis and implant failures, biological and biomechanical complications, patient satisfaction, and Implant Stability Quotient (ISQ) assessed with a resonance frequency analysis instrument. Sixty implants were placed in each group. Flaps had to be raised in nine patients to check drill direction or to better visualise the area after multiple teeth extraction. Two implants in two patients did not reach the planned insertion torque and were immediately replaced by larger diameters ones. After 1 year no drop out occurred and two early loaded implants failed in two patients. There were no statistically significant differences between groups for prosthesis failures, implant losses, complications, and mean ISQ values; however, patients in the immediately loaded group were significantly more satisfied than those loaded early. When comparing mean ISQ values taken 6 weeks after placement with 1-year data within each group, values decreased significantly. Mandibular overdentures can be successfully loaded the same day of implant placement with a minimally invasive surgery, increasing patient satisfaction while decreasing treatment time and patient discomfort. No apparent advantages were seen when loading the overdentures at 6 weeks.

  4. Cranioplasty with individual carbon fibre reinforced polymere (CFRP) medical grade implants based on CAD/CAM technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saringer, W; Nöbauer-Huhmann, I; Knosp, E

    2002-11-01

    The authors present a new method for the reconstruction of large or complex-formed cranial bone defects using prefabricated, computer-generated, individual CFRP (carbon fibre reinforced plastics) medical grade implants. CFRP is a composite material containing carbon fibres embedded in an epoxy resin matrix. It is radiolucent, heat-resistant, extremely strong and light (its weight is 20% that of steel), has a modulus of elasticity close to that of bone, and an established biocompatibility. The utilisation of a CAD/CAM (computer aided design/computer aided manufacture) technique based on digitised computed tomography (CT) data, with stereolithographic modelling as intermediate step, enabled the production of individual, prefabricated CFRP medical grade implants with an arithmetical maximum aberration in extension of less than +/-0.25 mm. Between 1995 and February 2002, 29 patients (15 men and 14 women; mean age, 39.9 years; range, 16 to 67 years) underwent cranioplasty with CFRP medical grade implants at the neurosurgical department of the University of Vienna. Twenty-four patients were repaired secondarily (delayed cranioplasty) while 5 were repaired immediately following craniectomy (single stage cranioplasty). All cases were assessed for the accuracy of the intra-operative fit of the implant, restoration of the natural skull contour and aesthetics and adverse symptoms. The intra-operative fit was excellent in 93.1% and good in 6.9% of the implants. In two cases minor adjustments of the bony margin of the defect were required. The operating time for insertion ranged from 16 to 38 minutes, median 21 minutes. Postoperatively, 86.2% of the patients graded the restoration of their natural skull shape and symmetry as excellent while 13.8% termed it good. In one patient a non-space occupying subdural hygroma was found at the follow-up, but required no intervention. Two patients experienced atrophy of the frontal portion of the temporal muscle while one patient had a

  5. New Coating Technique of Ceramic Implants with Different Glass Solder Matrices for Improved Osseointegration-Mechanical Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, Enrico; Markhoff, Jana; Mitrovic, Aurica; Jonitz, Anika; Bader, Rainer

    2013-09-11

    Ceramics are a very popular material in dental implant technology due to their tribological properties, their biocompatibility and their esthetic appearance. However, their natural surface structure lacks the ability of proper osseointegration, which constitutes a crucial process for the stability and, thus, the functionality of a bone implant. We investigated the application of a glass solder matrix in three configurations-consisting mainly of SiO₂, Al₂O₃, K₂O and Na₂O to TZP-A ceramic specimens. The corresponding adhesive strength and surface roughness of the coatings on ceramic specimens have been analyzed. Thereby, high adhesive strength (70.3 ± 7.9 MPa) was found for the three different coatings. The obtained roughness (R z ) amounted to 18.24 ± 2.48 µm in average, with significant differences between the glass solder configurations. Furthermore, one configuration was also tested after additional etching which did not lead to significant increase of surface roughness (19.37 ± 1.04 µm) or adhesive strength (57.2 ± 5.8 MPa). In conclusion, coating with glass solder matrix seems to be a promising surface modification technique that may enable direct insertion of ceramic implants in dental and orthopaedic surgery.

  6. New Coating Technique of Ceramic Implants with Different Glass Solder Matrices for Improved Osseointegration-Mechanical Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Bader

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics are a very popular material in dental implant technology due to their tribological properties, their biocompatibility and their esthetic appearance. However, their natural surface structure lacks the ability of proper osseointegration, which constitutes a crucial process for the stability and, thus, the functionality of a bone implant. We investigated the application of a glass solder matrix in three configurations—consisting mainly of SiO2, Al2O3, K2O and Na2O to TZP-A ceramic specimens. The corresponding adhesive strength and surface roughness of the coatings on ceramic specimens have been analyzed. Thereby, high adhesive strength (70.3 ± 7.9 MPa was found for the three different coatings. The obtained roughness (Rz amounted to 18.24 ± 2.48 µm in average, with significant differences between the glass solder configurations. Furthermore, one configuration was also tested after additional etching which did not lead to significant increase of surface roughness (19.37 ± 1.04 µm or adhesive strength (57.2 ± 5.8 MPa. In conclusion, coating with glass solder matrix seems to be a promising surface modification technique that may enable direct insertion of ceramic implants in dental and orthopaedic surgery.

  7. Relevant insight of surface characterization techniques to study covalent grafting of a biopolymer to titanium implant and its acidic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Almeida, Mélanie; Amalric, Julien; Brunon, Céline; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Toury, Bérangère

    2015-02-01

    Peri-implant bacterial infections are the main cause of complications in dentistry. Our group has previously proposed the attachment of chitosan on titanium implants via a covalent bond to improve its antibacterial properties while maintaining its biocompatibility. A better knowledge of the coating preparation process allows a better understanding of the bioactive coating in biological conditions. In this work, several relevant characterization techniques were used to assess an implant device during its production phase and its resistance in natural media at different pH. The titanium surface was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) followed by grafting of an organic coupling agent; succinic anhydride, able to form two covalent links, with the substrate through a Ti-O-Si bond and the biopolymer through a peptide bond. Each step of the coating synthesis as well as the presence confirmation of the biopolymer on titanium after saliva immersion was followed by FTIR-ATR, SEM, EDS, 3D profilometry, XPS and ToF-SIMS analyses. Results allowed to highlight the efficiency of each step of the process, and to propose a mechanism occurring during the chitosan coating degradation in saliva media at pH 5 and at pH 3.

  8. A Novel Technique Using a Protection Filter During Fibrin Sheath Removal for Implanted Venous Access Device Dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotiriadis, Charalampos; Hajdu, Steven David [University Hospital of Lausanne, Cardiothoracic and Vascular Unit, Department of Radiology (Switzerland); Degrauwe, Sophie [University Hospital of Lausanne, Department of Cardiology (Switzerland); Barras, Heloise; Qanadli, Salah Dine, E-mail: salah.qanadli@chuv.ch [University Hospital of Lausanne, Cardiothoracic and Vascular Unit, Department of Radiology (Switzerland)

    2016-08-15

    With the increased use of implanted venous access devices (IVADs) for continuous long-term venous access, several techniques such as percutaneous endovascular fibrin sheath removal, have been described, to maintain catheter function. Most standard techniques do not capture the stripped fibrin sheath, which is subsequently released in the pulmonary circulation and may lead to symptomatic pulmonary embolism. The presented case describes an endovascular technique which includes stripping, capture, and removal of fibrin sheath using a novel filter device. A 64-year-old woman presented with IVAD dysfunction. Stripping was performed using a co-axial snare to the filter to capture the fibrin sheath. The captured fragment was subsequently removed for visual and pathological verification. No immediate complication was observed and the patient was discharged the day of the procedure.

  9. IMPLANTABLE RESONATORS – A TECHNIQUE FOR REPEATED MEASUREMENT OF OXYGEN AT MULTIPLE DEEP SITES WITH IN VIVO EPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbin; Hou, Huagang; Sucheta, Artur; Williams, Benjamin B.; Lariviere, Jean P.; Khan, Nadeem; Lesniewski, Piotr N.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2013-01-01

    EPR oximetry using implantable resonators allow measurements at much deeper sites than are possible with surface resonators (> 80 mm vs. 10 mm) and have greater sensitivity at any depth. We report here the development of an improvement of the technique that now enables us to obtain the information from multiple sites and at a variety of depths. The measurements from the various sites are resolved using a simple magnetic field gradient. In the rat brain multi-probe implanted resonators measured pO2 at several sites simultaneously for over 6 months to record under normoxic, hypoxic and hyperoxic conditions. This technique also facilitates measurements in moving parts of the animal such as the heart, because the orientation of the paramagnetic material relative to the sensitive small loop is not altered by the motion. The measured response is very fast, enabling measurements in real time of physiological and pathological changes such as experimental cardiac ischemia in the mouse heart. The technique also is quite useful for following changes in tumor pO2, including applications with simultaneous measurements in tumors and adjacent normal tissues. PMID:20204802

  10. Cochlear implantation with Pulsar Med El: a novel small incision technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuda, D

    2009-04-01

    Although still widely implanted, Pulsar Med-El is rarely considered for small incision approach. Overall, 30 teen-age and adult patients were operated upon with a novel small incision (4-5 cm). Full insertion of the electrode array was achieved in all cases. No major intra-operative complications occurred. At follow-up, no flap-related complications and no migration of the receiver-stimulator were observed in the "device suture" (14 patients) or "no device suture" groups (16 patients). All patients are full-time users of the device. In conclusion, a small incision for the Pulsar Med-El cochlear implant is feasible, safe and reproducible. Ligature fixation of the device is not critical with this operation. Also with this device, in adult and teen-age patients, it is, therefore, possible to retain several typical advantages of small incision approaches.

  11. Functional Impressions in Complete Denture and Overdenture Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Kršek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth loss can cause loss of occlusal, masticatory, esthetic, physiognomic, phonetic and psychosocial function of patients. The most frequently used treatment method of completely edentulous patients and patients with a small number of remaining teeth are complete dentures or overdentures. One of the most important clinical and laboratory procedures in their fabrication is functional impression taking. The aim of this paper was to present procedures of taking functional impressions in fabrication of complete dentures and overdentures, using standardized techniques and materials. An accurate functional impression together with other correctly performed clinical and laboratory procedures ensure good retention and stability of dentures, which is a precondition for restoring patients’ lost functions.

  12. Develop techniques for ion implantation of PLZT [lead-lanthanum-zirconate-titanate] for adaptive optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batishko, C.R.; Brimhall, J.L.; Pawlewicz, W.T.; Stahl, K.A.; Toburen, L.H.

    1987-09-01

    Research was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop high photosensitivity adaptive optical elements utilizing ion implanted lanthanum-doped lead-zirconate-titanate (PLZT). One centimeter square samples were prepared by implanting ferroelectric and anti-ferroelectric PLZT with a variety of species or combinations of species. These included Ne, O, Ni, Ne/Cr, Ne/Al, Ne/Ni, Ne/O, and Ni/O, at a variety of energies and fluences. An indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrode coating was designed to give a balance of high conductivity and optical transmission at near uv to near ir wavelengths. Samples were characterized for photosensitivity; implanted layer thickness, index of refraction, and density; electrode (ITO) conductivity; and in some cases, residual stress curvature. Thin film anti-ferroelectric PLZT was deposited in a preliminary experiment. The structure was amorphous with x-ray diffraction showing the beginnings of a structure at substrate temperatures of approximately 550 0 C. This report summarizes the research and provides a sampling of the data taken during the report period

  13. Impression management as symbolic capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lueg, Klarissa; Nielsen, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    in Germany and LinkedIn in Denmark. We summarize those differences and relate them to different cultural contexts and impression management practices. Our sample consists of Danish Higher Executives (HEs)/managers (e.g., CEOs) and companies that have profiles on both SNS, thus reaching out to both the German......Social Network Sites (SNS) play an increasingly important role in the European business world, especially with respect to cross-cultural impression management. Departing from the Bourdieusian concept of “capital,” this paper analyzes the differences in the use of two popular business SNS: XING...... and the Danish markets. It is apparent that even business experts operating in both markets could better adapt to the standards and possibilities offered by the German SNS with respect to impression management. We introduce a set of recommendations to foster SNS-related and culture-sensitive impression...

  14. Immediate Restoration of Immediate Implants in the Esthetic Zone of the Maxilla Via the Copy-Abutment Technique: 5-Year Follow-Up of Pink Esthetic Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürhauser, Rudolf; Mailath-Pokorny, Georg; Haas, Robert; Busenlechner, Dieter; Watzek, Georg; Pommer, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    Implant esthetics may benefit from individualized zirconia abutments copying the emergence profile of the natural tooth and delivered within days after immediate implant insertion. To investigate the esthetic outcome of the Copy-Abutment technique using the Pink Esthetic Score (PES). A total of 77 patients with single-tooth implants in the anterior maxilla restored at the day of immediate implant placement using Copy-Abutments and provisional crowns were followed-up after 1 week, 1 month, 4 months, 6 months, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years to assess implant esthetics. PES ranged between 7 and 14 (median: 13) and improved significantly between the 6 month and 1 year follow-up (p esthetic zone show satisfactory long-term esthetic outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Changes in implant stability using different site preparation techniques: twist drills versus piezosurgery. A single-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacchi, Claudio; Vercellotti, Tomaso; Torelli, Lucio; Furlan, Fabio; Di Lenarda, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to longitudinally monitor stability changes of implants inserted using traditional rotary instruments or piezoelectric inserts, and to follow their variations during the first 90 days of healing. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted on 20 patients. Each patient received two identical, adjacent implants in the upper premolar area: the test site was prepared with piezosurgery, and the control site was prepared using twist drills. Resonance frequency analysis measurements were taken by a blinded operator on the day of surgery and after 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, 56, and 90 days. At 90 days, 39 out of 40 implants were osseointegrated (one failure in the control group). Both groups showed an initial decrease in mean implant stability quotient (ISQ) values: a shift in implant stability to increasing ISQ values occurred after 14 days in the test group and after 21 days in the control group. The lowest mean ISQ value was recorded at 14 days for test implants (97.3% of the primary stability) and at 21 days for the control implants (90.8% of the primary stability). ISQ variations with respect to primary stability differed significantly between the two groups during the entire period of observation: from day 14 to day 42, in particular, the differences were extremely significant (p < .0001). All 39 implants were in function successfully at the visit scheduled 1 year after insertion. The findings from this study suggest that ultrasonic implant site preparation results in a limited decrease of ISQ values and in an earlier shifting from a decreasing to an increasing stability pattern, when compared with the traditional drilling technique. From a clinical point of view, implants inserted with the piezoelectric technique demonstrated a short-term clinical success similar to those inserted using twist drills. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A Paradigm shift in the concept for making dental impressions

    OpenAIRE

    Nayar, Sanjna; Mahadevan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Digital dental impression is a revolutionary technological advancement that so surpasses the accuracy and efficiency of former techniques for obtaining replicas of prepared teeth for the purpose of fabricating restorations that its adoption by dentists is rapidly eclipsing the use of elastomeric impression materials. The ultimate goals of dentists dedicated to quality restorative dentistry are to make their treatment of patients as accurate, stressless, and efficient as possible. By eliminati...

  17. Radioactive implant induced x-ray emission technique for noninvasive determination of iodine content in thyroid: experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, R; Ando, A; Hiraki, T [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Allied Medical Professions; Tonami, N; Hisada, K [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1984-02-01

    A new technique, radioactive implant x-ray emission spectrometry to determine the in vivo iodine content of the human thyroid is proposed. The variations of counting rate and effective excitation efficiencies of I Ksub(..cap alpha..) (28.6 keV) with iodine content, thyroid volume and skin-thyroid distance were studied for the /sup 201/Tl source to examine the properties of excitation and photon attenuation. As a result, the gland depth and volume could be estimated from the peak ratios of 30.7 keV/167.6 keV and 28.6 keV/167.6 keV. Using a 1 MBq /sup 201/Tl implant source, the detectable minimum iodine concentration found was approximately 70 ..mu..g/g for 2000 s measuring time in the phantom experiment. The effectiveness of the RIXE technique is discussed. It was concluded that the /sup 201/Tl RIXE spectrometry might serve to determine the in vivo iodine content of the human thyroid.

  18. Radioactive implant induced x-ray emission technique for noninvasive determination of iodine content in thyroid: experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, R; Tonami, N; Ando, A; Hiraki, T; Hisada, K

    1984-02-01

    A new technique, radioactive implant x-ray emission spectrometry to determine the in vivo iodine content of the human thyroid is proposed. The variations of counting rate and effective excitation efficiencies of I K alpha (28.6 keV) with iodine content, thyroid volume and skin-thyroid distance were studied for the /sup 201/Tl source to examine the properties of excitation and photon attenuation. As a result, the gland depth and volume could be estimated from the peak ratios of 30.7 keV/167.6 keV and 28.6 keV/167.6 keV. Using a 1 MBq /sup 201/Tl implant source, the detectable minimum iodine concentration found was approximately 70 micrograms/g for 2000 s measuring time in the phantom experiment. The effectiveness of the RIXE technique is discussed. It was concluded that the /sup 201/Tl RIXE spectrometry might serve to determine the in vivo iodine content of the human thyroid.

  19. Breast reconstruction with anatomical implants: A review of indications and techniques based on current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardani, Marco; Bertozzi, Nicolò; Grieco, Michele Pio; Pesce, Marianna; Simonacci, Francesco; Santi, PierLuigi; Raposio, Edoardo

    2017-09-01

    One important modality of breast cancer therapy is surgical treatment, which has become increasingly less mutilating over the last century. Breast reconstruction has become an integrated part of breast cancer treatment due to long-term psychosexual health factors and its importance for breast cancer survivors. Both autogenous tissue-based and implant-based reconstruction provides satisfactory reconstructive options due to better surgeon awareness of "the ideal breast size", although each has its own advantages and disadvantages. An overview of the current options in breast reconstruction is presented in this article.

  20. Assessing for Cardiotoxicity from Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants with Advanced Multimodality Imaging Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Reshid; Abdel-Gadir, Amna; Rosmini, Stefania; Captur, Gabriella; Nordin, Sabrina; Culotta, Veronica; Palla, Luigi; Kellman, Peter; Lloyd, Guy W; Skinner, John A; Moon, James C; Manisty, Charlotte; Hart, Alister J

    2017-11-01

    High failure rates of metal-on-metal (MoM) hip implants prompted regulatory authorities to issue worldwide safety alerts. Circulating cobalt from these implants causes rare but fatal autopsy-diagnosed cardiotoxicity. There is concern that milder cardiotoxicity may be common and underrecognized. Although blood metal ion levels are easily measured and can be used to track local toxicity, there are no noninvasive tests for organ deposition. We sought to detect correlation between blood metal ions and a comprehensive panel of established markers of early cardiotoxicity. Ninety patients were recruited into this prospective single-center blinded study. Patients were divided into 3 age and sex-matched groups according to implant type and whole-blood metal ion levels. Group-A patients had a ceramic-on-ceramic [CoC] bearing; Group B, an MoM bearing and low blood metal ion levels; and Group C, an MoM bearing and high blood metal-ion levels. All patients underwent detailed cardiovascular phenotyping using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) with T2*, T1, and extracellular volume mapping; echocardiography; and cardiac blood biomarker sampling. T2* is a novel CMR biomarker of tissue metal loading. Blood cobalt levels differed significantly among groups A, B, and C (mean and standard deviation [SD], 0.17 ± 0.08, 2.47 ± 1.81, and 30.0 ± 29.1 ppb, respectively) and between group A and groups B and C combined. No significant between-group differences were found in the left atrial or ventricle size, ejection fraction (on CMR or echocardiography), T1 or T2* values, extracellular volume, B-type natriuretic peptide level, or troponin level, and all values were within normal ranges. There was no relationship between cobalt levels and ejection fraction (R = 0.022, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.185 to 0.229) or T2* values (R = 0.108, 95% CI = -0.105 to 0.312). Using the best available technologies, we did not find that high (but not extreme) blood cobalt and chromium levels

  1. Digital versus conventional impressions for fixed prosthodontics: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chochlidakis, Konstantinos M; Papaspyridakos, Panos; Geminiani, Alessandro; Chen, Chun-Jung; Feng, I Jung; Ercoli, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    Limited evidence is available for the marginal and internal fit of fixed dental restorations fabricated with digital impressions compared with those fabricated with conventional impressions. The purpose of this systematic review was to compare marginal and internal fit of fixed dental restorations fabricated with digital techniques to those fabricated using conventional impression techniques and to determine the effect of different variables on the accuracy of fit. Medline, Cochrane, and EMBASE databases were electronically searched and enriched by hand searches. Studies evaluating the fit of fixed dental restorations fabricated with digital and conventional impression techniques were identified. Pooled data were statistically analyzed, and factors affecting the accuracy of fit were identified, and their impact on accuracy of fit outcomes were assessed. Dental restorations fabricated with digital impression techniques exhibited similar marginal misfit to those fabricated with conventional impression techniques (P>.05). Both marginal and internal discrepancies were greater for stone die casts, whereas digital dies produced restorations with the smallest discrepancies (Pdigital impression was used to generate stereolithographic (SLA)/polyurethane dies, misfit values were intermediate. The fabrication technique, the type of restoration, and the impression material had no effect on misfit values (P>.05), whereas die and restoration materials were statistically associated (Pdigital impression technique provided better marginal and internal fit of fixed restorations than conventional techniques did. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Materials and Techniques for Implantable Nutrient Sensing Using Flexible Sensors Integrated with Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Wei; Liew, Guoguang; Li, Ya; Hao, Yafeng; Pan, Huizhuo; Wang, Hanjie; Ning, Baoan; Xu, Hang; Huang, Xian

    2018-06-01

    The combination of novel materials with flexible electronic technology may yield new concepts of flexible electronic devices that effectively detect various biological chemicals to facilitate understanding of biological processes and conduct health monitoring. This paper demonstrates single- or multichannel implantable flexible sensors that are surface modified with conductive metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) such as copper-MOF and cobalt-MOF with large surface area, high porosity, and tunable catalysis capability. The sensors can monitor important nutriments such as ascorbicacid, glycine, l-tryptophan (l-Trp), and glucose with detection resolutions of 14.97, 0.71, 4.14, and 54.60 × 10 -6 m, respectively. In addition, they offer sensing capability even under extreme deformation and complex surrounding environment with continuous monitoring capability for 20 d due to minimized use of biological active chemicals. Experiments using live cells and animals indicate that the MOF-modified sensors are biologically safe to cells, and can detect l-Trp in blood and interstitial fluid. This work represents the first effort in integrating MOFs with flexible sensors to achieve highly specific and sensitive implantable electrochemical detection and may inspire appearance of more flexible electronic devices with enhanced capability in sensing, energy storage, and catalysis using various properties of MOFs. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Novel embryo selection techniques to increase embryo implantation in IVF attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigalos, George Α; Triantafyllidou, Olga; Vlahos, Nikos F

    2016-11-01

    The final success of an IVF attempt depends on several steps and decisions taken during the ovarian stimulation, the oocyte retrieval, the embryo culture and the embryo transfer. The final selection of the embryos most likely to implant is the final step in this process and the responsibility of the lab. Apart from strict morphologic criteria that historically have been used in embryo selection, additional information on genetic, metabolomic and morphokinetic characteristics of the embryo is recently combined to morphology to select the embryo most likely to produce a pregnancy. In this manuscript, we review the most recent information on the current methods used for embryo selection presenting the predictive capability of each one. A literature search was performed on Pubmed, Medline and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for published studies using appropriate key words and phrases with no limits placed on time. It seems that the combination of morphologic criteria in conjunction to embryo kinetics as documented by time-lapse technology provides the most reliable information on embryo quality. Blastocyst biopsy with subsequent comprehensive chromosome analysis allows the selection of the euploid embryos with the higher implantation potential. Embryo time-lapse imaging and blastocyst biopsy combined to comprehensive chromosome analysis are the most promising technologies to increase pregnancy rates and reduce the possibility of multiple pregnancies. However, further studies will demonstrate the capability of routinely using these technologies to significantly improve IVF outcomes.

  4. Plasma-polymerized hexamethyldisilazane treated by nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, R Y; Mota, R P; Batocki, R G S; Santos, D C R; Nicoleti, T; Kostov, K G; Kayama, M E; Algatti, M A [Laboratorio de Plasma, Faculdade de Engenharia, UNESP, Av. Dr Ariberto Pereira da Cunha-333, 12516-410, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil); Cruz, N C [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Unidade Diferenciada, UNESP, Av. Tres de Marco-511, 18085-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Ruggiero, L, E-mail: honda@feg.unesp.b [Faculdade de Ciencias, UNESP, Av. Luis E. Carrijo Coube 14-1, 17033-360, Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the effect of nitrogen Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) on chemical structure, refraction index and surface hardness of plasma-polymerized hexamethyldisilazane (PPHMDSN) thin films. Firstly, polymeric films were deposited at 13.56 MHz radiofrequency (RF) Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) and then, were treated by nitrogen PIII from 15 to 60 min. Fourier Transformed Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was employed to analyse the molecular structure of the samples, and it revealed that vibrations modes at 3350 cm{sup -1}, 2960 cm{sup -1}, 1650 cm{sup -1}, 1250 cm{sup -1} and 1050 cm{sup -1} were altered by nitrogen PIII. Visible-ultraviolet (vis-UV) spectroscopy was used to evaluate film refractive index and the results showed a slight increase from 1.6 to 1.8 following the implantation time. Nanoindentation revealed a surface hardness rise from 0.5 to 2.3 GPa as PIII treatment time increased. These results indicate nitrogen PIII is very promising in improving optical and mechanical properties of PPHMDSN films.

  5. In vivo precision of conventional and digital methods of obtaining complete-arch dental impressions

    OpenAIRE

    Ender, Andreas; Attin, Thomas; Mehl, Albert

    2016-01-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Digital impression systems have undergone significant development in recent years, but few studies have investigated the accuracy of the technique in vivo, particularly compared with conventional impression techniques. PURPOSE: The purpose of this in vivo study was to investigate the precision of conventional and digital methods for complete-arch impressions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Complete-arch impressions were obtained using 5 conventional (polyether, POE; vinylsilox...

  6. [To bite or to scan? Dental impressions with alginate, PVS or -intra-oral scanning; processing time and patient comfort. A pilotstudy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darroudi, M; Ariens, Z P A; Zinsmeister, V Z; Breuning, K H

    2017-02-01

    In recent years technology has enabled dental professionals to make digital dental models using intra-oral scanners. In a study involving 10 test cases, a comparison was made between the digital impression technique and 2 -conventional impression techniques, using alginate and Polivinyl Syloxane™. With the 3 different techniques, dental impressions were made of the lower and upper arches; the processing time required for each and the differences in patient comfort were recorded. The individuals in the test cases experienced no difference in comfort between the alginate and the digital impression. The impression technique involving Polivinyl Syloxane™ was experienced as less comfortable. The digital impression technique appeared to be the most time consuming.

  7. Impression management and food intake. Current directions in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanian, Lenny R

    2015-03-01

    This paper reviews recent research on consumption stereotypes (judgments of others based on what they eat) and impression management (modifying one's eating behavior in order to create a particular impression). A major recent focus in the literature has been on masculinity and meat eating, with research showing that meat is strongly associated with masculinity, and that individuals who follow a meat-based diet are perceived as more masculine than are individuals who follow a vegetarian diet. Although direct evidence for impression management through food intake remains sparse, a number of methodological approaches (including priming techniques and ecological valid assessments) are described that could be used in future research to identify the motives underlying people's eating behavior. Consumption stereotypes and impression management may be important influences on people's eating behavior, but the complexities of how, when, and for whom these factors influence food intake are still not well understood. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. In vivo precision of conventional and digital methods for obtaining quadrant dental impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ender, Andreas; Zimmermann, Moritz; Attin, Thomas; Mehl, Albert

    2016-09-01

    Quadrant impressions are commonly used as alternative to full-arch impressions. Digital impression systems provide the ability to take these impressions very quickly; however, few studies have investigated the accuracy of the technique in vivo. The aim of this study is to assess the precision of digital quadrant impressions in vivo in comparison to conventional impression techniques. Impressions were obtained via two conventional (metal full-arch tray, CI, and triple tray, T-Tray) and seven digital impression systems (Lava True Definition Scanner, T-Def; Lava Chairside Oral Scanner, COS; Cadent iTero, ITE; 3Shape Trios, TRI; 3Shape Trios Color, TRC; CEREC Bluecam, Software 4.0, BC4.0; CEREC Bluecam, Software 4.2, BC4.2; and CEREC Omnicam, OC). Impressions were taken three times for each of five subjects (n = 15). The impressions were then superimposed within the test groups. Differences from model surfaces were measured using a normal surface distance method. Precision was calculated using the Perc90_10 value. The values for all test groups were statistically compared. The precision ranged from 18.8 (CI) to 58.5 μm (T-Tray), with the highest precision in the CI, T-Def, BC4.0, TRC, and TRI groups. The deviation pattern varied distinctly depending on the impression method. Impression systems with single-shot capture exhibited greater deviations at the tooth surface whereas high-frame rate impression systems differed more in gingival areas. Triple tray impressions displayed higher local deviation at the occlusal contact areas of upper and lower jaw. Digital quadrant impression methods achieve a level of precision, comparable to conventional impression techniques. However, there are significant differences in terms of absolute values and deviation pattern. With all tested digital impression systems, time efficient capturing of quadrant impressions is possible. The clinical precision of digital quadrant impression models is sufficient to cover a broad variety of

  9. Optimal properties for coated titanium implants with the hydroxyapatite layer formed by the pulsed laser deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmlova, Lucia; Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinek, Miroslav; Bartova, Jirina; Pesakova, V.; Adam, M.

    1999-02-01

    Pulsed laser deposition technique allow to 'tailor' bioceramic coat for metal implants by the change of deposition conditions. Each attribute is influenced by the several deposition parameters and each parameter change several various properties. Problem caused that many parameters has an opposite function and improvement of one property is followed by deterioration of other attribute. This study monitor influence of each single deposition parameter and evaluate its importance form the point of view of coat properties. For deposition KrF excimer laser in stainless-steel deposition chamber was used. Deposition conditions (ambient composition and pressures, metallic substrate temperature, energy density and target-substrate distance) were changed according to the film properties. A non-coated titanium implant was used as a control. Films with promising mechanical quality underwent an in vitro biological tests -- measurement of proliferation activity, observing cell interactions with macrophages, fibroblasts, testing toxicity of percolates, observing a solubility of hydroxyapatite (HA) coat. Deposition conditions corresponding with the optimal mechanical and biochemical properties are: metal temperature 490 degrees Celsius, ambient-mixture of argon and water vapor, energy density 3 Jcm-2, target-substrate distance 7.5 cm.

  10. A new cable-tie based sternal closure system: description of the device, technique of implantation and first clinical evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grapow Martin TR

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wire closure still remains the preferred technique despite reasonable disadvantages. Associated complications, such as infection and sternal instability, cause time- and cost-consuming therapies. We present a new tool for sternal closure with its first clinical experience and results. Methods The sternal ZipFixTM System is based on the cable-tie principle. It primarily consists of biocompatible Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone implants and is predominantly used peristernally through the intercostal space. The system provides a large implant-to-bone contact for better force distribution and for avoiding bone cut through. Results 50 patients were closed with the ZipFixTM system. No sternal instability was observed at 30 days. Two patients developed a mediastinitis that necessitated the removal of the device; however, the ZipFixTM were intact and the sternum remained stable. Conclusions In our initial evaluation, the short-term results have shown that the sternal ZipFixTM can be used safely and effectively. It is fast, easy to use and serves as a potential alternative for traditional wire closure.

  11. Redesign of a fixture mount to be used as an impression coping and a provisional abutment as well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Hsuan-Chen Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: An integrated fixture mount/impression coping/ temporary abutment can provide many advantages for immediate loading of dental implants, such as simpler procedure, less chair time, cost reduction, and comfort for the patients. Materials and Methods: A newly designed dental implant fixture mount (DIFMA can be used as an impression coping for taking an immediate impression. An immediate load provisional prosthesis can then be fabricated shortly after implant placement to immediately load the implants. This fixture mount can also serve as a temporary abutment for immediate chair-side fabrication of provisional prosthesis. Two clinical cases are presented. Results: A clinical case utilizing the fixture mount abutment (DIFMA/implant assembly is presented. The precision of fitting between the impression copings and implants is secured with this system. The chair time for taking an immediate impression is greatly reduced. Less cost for the restoration is provided and patient comfort is delivered. Conclusions: More patient satisfaction can be conferred by employing the fixture mount in the process of immediate impression taking and as an immediate provisional abutment.

  12. Single-staged vs. two-staged implant placement using bone ring technique in vertically deficient alveolar ridges - Part 1: histomorphometric and micro-CT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Ken; Haga-Tsujimura, Maiko; Sawada, Kosaku; Kobayashi, Eizaburo; Mottini, Matthias; Schaller, Benoit; Saulacic, Nikola

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous implant placement with bone grafting shortens the overall treatment period, but might lead to the peri-implant bone loss or even implant failure. The aim of this study was to compare the single-staged to two-staged implant placement using the bone ring technique. Four standardized alveolar bone defects were made in the mandibles of nine dogs. Dental implants (Straumann BL ® , Basel, Switzerland) were inserted simultaneously with bone ring technique in test group and after 6 months of healing period in control group. Animals of both groups were euthanized at 3 and 6 months of osseointegration period. The harvested samples were analyzed by means of histology and micro-CT. The amount of residual bone decreased while the amount of new bone increased up to 9 months of healing period. All morphometric parameters remained stable between 3 and 6 months of osseointegration period within groups. Per a given time point, median area of residual bone graft was higher in test group and area of new bone in control group. The volume of bone ring was greater in test than in control group, reaching the significance at 6 months of osseointegration period (P = 0.002). In the present type of bone defect, single-staged implant placement may be potentially useful to shorten an overall treatment period. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Physician relationships: make your first impression count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepeau, Jason

    2012-05-01

    Strategies for physician recruitment should include the following: Consider creating an in-house recruiting system to save money and to "own" the health system's first impression. Gain a competitive advantage by nurturing relationships with prospects over the long-term. Use innovative recruitment techniques, such as video interviewing and electronic reference checking, to better coordinate recruitment, follow-up, and mentoring. Make a new hire's job satisfaction and home life a top priority during the first 90 days of employment, and then plan regular follow-ups to maintain a positive relationship.

  14. A comparative study of two advanced spraying techniques for the deposition of biologically active enzyme coatings onto bone-substituting implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonge, Lise T. de; Ju, J.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Yamagata, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Inoue, K.; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Surface modification of implant materials with biomolecule coatings is of high importance to improve implant fixation in bone tissue. In the current study, we present two techniques for the deposition of biologically active enzyme coatings onto implant materials. The well-established thin film ElectroSpray Deposition (ESD) technique was compared with the SAW-ED technique that combines high-frequency Surface Acoustic Wave atomization with Electrostatic Deposition. By immobilizing the enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP) onto implant surfaces, the influence of both SAW-ED and ESD deposition parameters on ALP deposition efficiency and ALP biological activity was investigated. ALP coatings with preserved enzyme activity were deposited by means of both the SAW-ED and ESD technique. The advantages of SAW-ED over ESD include the possibility to spray highly conductive protein solutions, and the 60-times faster deposition rate. Furthermore, significantly higher deposition efficiencies were observed for the SAW-ED technique compared to ESD. Generally, it was shown that protein inactivation is highly dependent on both droplet dehydration and the applied electrical field strength. The current study shows that SAW-ED is a versatile and flexible technique for the fabrication of functionally active biomolecule coatings.

  15. Turn Management or Impression Management?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maat, Mark; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Ruttkay, Z.M.; Kipp, M.; Nijholt, Antinus; Vilhjálmsson, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    We look at how some basic choices in the management of turns influence the impression that people get from an agent. We look at scales concerning personality, emotion and interpersonal stance. We do this by a person perception study, or rather an agent perception study, using simulated conversations

  16. Children's Impressions of Television Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartella, Ellen

    This research study examines the types of social behaviors portrayed by families in various television series and explores children's impressions of the TV family members. Content analysis of nine family-oriented TV series was employed to describe the ranges of behaviors of fathers, mothers and children on television. Eleven shows from each series…

  17. Intraoperative Ir-192 implantation for early breast cancer. Techniques and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with early breast cancer (T1-2 N0-1) can be treated by lumpectomy and irradiation with a local control and survival equal to more radical surgery. Between 1982 and 1988, 323 patients with early breast cancer were treated, when possible, with Ir-192 implants at the time of lumpectomy to a local dose of 2000 cGy in 40-50 hours. Ten to 14 days later, the whole breast was treated to 4500 cGy at 180 per fraction in 5 weeks. The 6-year actuarial survival for stages I and II disease was 98% and 91%, respectively, and the recurrence-free survival was 96% and 98%, respectively. When these 323 patients were evaluated by T status, a local control of 97% was the same for T1 and T2 lesions. The cosmetic results were good to excellent in 95% of the patients. This approach has improved our ability to accurately place the boost dose in the breast

  18. Full arch scans: conventional versus digital impressions--an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ender, A; Mehl, A

    2011-01-01

    The digital intraoral impression has become a central part of the CAD/CAM technique. The objective of the present study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of digital impressions of the full arch with that of conventional impressions on the in-vitro model. For this purpose, a master model was acquired with a new reference scanning process, the measuring trueness of which was +/- 4.1 microm and the precision +/- 2.5 microm. On the one hand, conventional impressions and then plaster models (n = 5) were produced from this master model, and on the other hand, digital impressions were made with the Cerec AC Bluecam and the Lava COS system (each n = 5). The plaster models were also scanned with the reference scanner. The available data records were superimposed and the differences determined. The deviation from the master model defines the trueness of the impression method. The deviations of the models among one another demonstrate the precision of the method. The trueness of the impressions was 55 +/- 21.8 microm in the conventional impression group, for digital impressions with Cerec Bluecam it was 49 +/- 14.2 microm and for digital impressions with Lava COS 40.3 +/- 14.1 microm. The precision was 61.3 +/- 17.9 microm for conventional impression with Impregum, 30.9 +/- 7.1 microm for digital impression with the Cerec Bluecam and 60.1 +/- 31.3 microm for digital impression with Lava COS. These in-vitro results show that accuracy of the digital impression is similar to that of the conventional impression. These results will have to be confirmed in further clinical studies.

  19. Proximity gettering technology for advanced CMOS image sensors using carbon cluster ion-implantation technique. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurita, Kazunari; Kadono, Takeshi; Okuyama, Ryousuke; Shigemastu, Satoshi; Hirose, Ryo; Onaka-Masada, Ayumi; Koga, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Hidehiko [SUMCO Corporation, Saga (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    A new technique is described for manufacturing advanced silicon wafers with the highest capability yet reported for gettering transition metallic, oxygen, and hydrogen impurities in CMOS image sensor fabrication processes. Carbon and hydrogen elements are localized in the projection range of the silicon wafer by implantation of ion clusters from a hydrocarbon molecular gas source. Furthermore, these wafers can getter oxygen impurities out-diffused to device active regions from a Czochralski grown silicon wafer substrate to the carbon cluster ion projection range during heat treatment. Therefore, they can reduce the formation of transition metals and oxygen-related defects in the device active regions and improve electrical performance characteristics, such as the dark current, white spot defects, pn-junction leakage current, and image lag characteristics. The new technique enables the formation of high-gettering-capability sinks for transition metals, oxygen, and hydrogen impurities under device active regions of CMOS image sensors. The wafers formed by this technique have the potential to significantly improve electrical devices performance characteristics in advanced CMOS image sensors. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Use of Clinical UV Chamber to Disinfect Dental Impressions: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeran, Himanshu; Sharma, Sakshi; Kumar, Varun; Gupta, Neelu

    2015-08-01

    Dental impressions are potential source of infection in a prosthodontic practice. Risk of transmission of infection through saliva, blood etc is considered as hazard for both dentist as well as dental auxiliary staff. A number of methods are currently employed for disinfecting the impressions which are technique sensitive and time consuming. This study focuses on disinfecting impression using dental UV chamber which is commonly employed for storing sterilized instruments. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate the use of clinical UV chamber to disinfect various impression materials at different time intervals and its comparison with 2% glutaraldehyde using standard immersion technique. Total sample size of 180 specimens was taken from three different impression materials. The impressions were made from 30 dentulous subjects. A total of ten impressions were made for each impression material i.e. alginate, addition silicone and polyether impression material. Six punch samples were taken from each impression. Out of 6 punch sample, one was kept as control, second was disinfected by immersing in freshly prepared 2% glutaraldehyde solution for 10 minutes and remaining four were exposed to UV rays for 3 minutes, 6 minutes, 10 minutes and 15 minutes using dental UV chamber. Amount of disinfection achieved was evaluated by counting the colonies over the culture plates with the help of digital colony. The results showed that the mean CFUs for alginate were found to be i.e. 11797.40 ± 5989.73 (mean ± SD). The mean CFUs for addition silicone impression material was found 7095.40 with a standard deviation of 4268.83 and the mean CFUs for polyether impression material was found to be 2168.92 ± 1676 (mean ± SD). For alginate and addition silicone impression material, disinfection was achieved on exposure to UV rays for a period of 10 minutes. However, for polyether impression material 3 minutes of exposure to UV rays was sufficient to cause complete disinfection.

  1. Digital impressions for fabrication of definitive "all-on-four" restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherlone, Enrico Felice; Ferrini, Francesco; Crespi, Roberto; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Capparé, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of digital impressions for "all-on-four" implant rehabilitation. Patients edentulous in one or both jaws were randomly selected for this study. Complete arch immediately loaded prostheses supported by 4 implants (2 axial and 2 tilted) were placed. Five hours after implant placement, screw-retained full-arch temporary prostheses were positioned. After 4 months, a digital scan body was used to finalize definitive prosthesis. Radiographic assessments were obtained immediately after surgery and at each follow-up visit. Bone level measurements were reported at 6 and 12 months, and bone loss between upright and tilted implants was compared. Fourteen definitive cast metal frameworks prosthesis were delivered to the patients. No implant dropout occurred. All prosthesis were screwed onto the dental implants, and x-ray examinations revealed a bar-implant connection accuracy. The implant survival rate was 100% for all positioned implants. No statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) in crestal bone loss between tilted and upright implants were detected. Digital impression creates an accurate physical model significantly improving efficiencies for the dental team and streamlining the workflow.

  2. Intralesional Osteophyte Regrowth Following Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation after Previous Treatment with Marrow Stimulation Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Marco Kawamura; Minas, Tom; von Keudell, Arvind; Sodha, Sonal; Bryant, Tim; Gomoll, Andreas H

    2017-04-01

    Objective Bone marrow stimulation surgeries are frequent in the treatment of cartilage lesions. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) may be performed after failed microfracture surgery. Alterations to subchondral bone as intralesional osteophytes are commonly seen after previous microfracture and removed during ACI. There have been no reports on potential recurrence. Our purpose was to evaluate the incidence of intralesional osteophyte development in 2 cohorts: existing intralesional osteophytes and without intralesional osteophytes at the time of ACI. Study Design We identified 87 patients (157 lesions) with intralesional osteophytes among a cohort of 497 ACI patients. Osteophyte regrowth was analyzed on magnetic resonance imaging and categorized as small or large (less or more than 50% of the cartilage thickness). Twenty patients (24 defects) without intralesional osteophytes at the time of ACI acted as control. Results Osteophyte regrowth was observed in 39.5% of lesions (34.4% of small osteophytes and 5.1% of large osteophytes). In subgroup analyses, regrowth was observed in 45.8% of periosteal-covered defects and in 18.9% of collagen membrane-covered defects. Large osteophyte regrowth occurred in less than 5% in either group. Periosteal defects showed a significantly higher incidence for regrowth of small osteophytes. In the control group, intralesional osteophytes developed in 16.7% of the lesions. Conclusions Even though intralesional osteophytes may regrow after removal during ACI, most of them are small. Small osteophyte regrowth occurs almost twice in periosteum-covered ACI. Large osteophytes occur only in 5% of patients. Intralesional osteophyte formation is not significantly different in preexisting intralesional osteophytes and control groups.

  3. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Neha; Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-09-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration.

  4. The Use of Digital Impressions to Fabricate Tooth-Supported Partial Removable Dental Prostheses: A Clinical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Mohamed; Sanchez, Eliana; Machado, Camilo

    2016-08-01

    Impression making is a critical step in the fabrication of a partial removable dental prosthesis (RDP). A technique is described for making final impressions to fabricate partial RDPs for Kennedy class III patients using a computer-aided design and computer-assisted manufacturing digital impression system. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Utilization of analytical techniques in aid the implantation of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.P.; Sabino, C.V.S.; Avelar, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear, physico-chemical and classic techniques developed and utilized by Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnicas Nucleares are presented, as back up to the implementation and operation of nuclear installations related with several parts of fuel cycle from uranium prospecting to waste treatment samples of soils, ores, alloys, plastics, paints, biological materials, air and water were analysed. (M.C.K) [pt

  6. Impressed by impression management: Newcomer reactions to ingratiated supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulk, Trevor A; Long, David M

    2016-10-01

    Organizational newcomers are unfamiliar with many aspects of their workplace and look for information to help them reduce uncertainty and better understand their new environment. One aspect critical to newcomers is the disposition of their supervisor-the person who arguably can impact the newcomer's career the most. To form an impression of their new supervisor, newcomers look to social cues from coworkers who have interpersonal contact with the supervisor. In the present research, we investigate the ways newcomers use observed ingratiation-a common impression management strategy whereby coworkers try to appear likable (Schlenker, 1980)-to form impressions of a supervisor's warmth. Research on social influence cannot easily account for how third parties will interpret ingratiation, as the behaviors linked to ingratiation suggest something positive about the target, yet the unsavory aspects of the behavior imply it may not have the same effects as other positive behaviors. Our findings suggest that newcomers are unique in that they are motivated to learn about their new supervisor, and are prone to ignore those unsavory aspects and infer something positive about a supervisor targeted with ingratiation. Our findings also suggest that this effect can be weakened based on the supervisor's response. In other words, newcomers rely less on evidence from a coworker's ingratiation in the presence of direct behaviors from the supervisor. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Intercavitary implants dosage calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehder, B.P.

    The use of spacial geometry peculiar to each treatment for the attainment of intercavitary and intersticial implants dosage calculation is presented. The study is made in patients with intercavitary implants by applying a modified Manchester technique [pt

  8. Fatigue Life of Titanium Alloys Fabricated by Additive Layer Manufacturing Techniques for Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Koike, Marie; Mason, Robert L.; Okabe, Toru

    2013-02-01

    Additive layer deposition techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM) and laser beam melting (LBM) have been utilized to fabricate rectangular plates of Ti-6Al-4V with extra low interstitial (ELI) contents. The layer-by-layer deposition techniques resulted in plates that have different surface finishes which can impact significantly on the fatigue life by providing potential sites for fatigue cracks to initiate. The fatigue life of Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloys fabricated by EBM and LBM deposition techniques was investigated by three-point testing of rectangular beams of as-fabricated and electro-discharge machined surfaces under stress-controlled conditions at 10 Hz until complete fracture. Fatigue life tests were also performed on rolled plates of Ti-6Al-4V ELI, regular Ti-6Al-4V, and CP Ti as controls. Fatigue surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy to identify the crack initiation site in the various types of specimen surfaces. The fatigue life data were analyzed statistically using both analysis of variance techniques and the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis method with the Gehan-Breslow test. The results indicate that the LBM Ti-6Al-4V ELI material exhibits a longer fatigue life than the EBM counterpart and CP Ti, but a shorter fatigue life compared to rolled Ti-6Al-4V ELI. The difference in the fatigue life behavior may be largely attributed to the presence of rough surface features that act as fatigue crack initiation sites in the EBM material.

  9. Effect of modified cementation technique on marginal fit and apical spread of excess cement for implant restorations: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate and compare the vertical marginal discrepancy and spread of excess cement after cementation with modified cementation technique and conventional technique. Materials and Methods: Ten implant analogs with prefabricated standard abutments of similar dimensions were mounted individually in self-cure acrylic blocks subcrestally. Forty ideal metal coping specimens were prepared by conventional lost wax technique. Measurement of the marginal discrepancy at the implant-crown interface was done using a stereomicroscope before cementation. Abutment replicas (ARs were prepared for twenty specimens using cast copings and pattern resin. All forty copings were cemented according to the following cementation techniques and cement types, with ten specimens in each group. (1 Group 1: Half filling (HF cementation technique using provisional cement. (2 Group 2: HF cementation technique using permanent cement. (3 Group 3: AR technique using provisional cement. (4 Group 4: AR technique using permanent cement. Specimens were subjected to measurement of marginal discrepancy and spread of excess cement using stereomicroscope after cementation procedure. Data were analyzed using paired t-test and unpaired t-test. Results: AR technique showed significantly less marginal discrepancy (P = 0.000 and apical spread of excess cement (P = 0.002 than conventional HF technique. Provisional cement showed significantly more marginal discrepancy (HF-P = 0.000 and AR-P = 0.001 and less apical spread of excess cement (HF-P = 0.023 and AR-P = 0.002 and among both technique. Statistical Analysis: Unpaired t-test. Conclusion: An alternative technique of using AR is effective technique to prevent peri-implant diseases.

  10. Implantable electronic medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Electronic Medical Devices provides a thorough review of the application of implantable devices, illustrating the techniques currently being used together with overviews of the latest commercially available medical devices. This book provides an overview of the design of medical devices and is a reference on existing medical devices. The book groups devices with similar functionality into distinct chapters, looking at the latest design ideas and techniques in each area, including retinal implants, glucose biosensors, cochlear implants, pacemakers, electrical stimulation t

  11. Impressions of functional food consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saher, Marieke; Arvola, Anne; Lindeman, Marjaana; Lähteenmäki, Liisa

    2004-02-01

    Functional foods provide a new way of expressing healthiness in food choices. The objective of this study was to apply an indirect measure to explore what kind of impressions people form of users of functional foods. Respondents (n=350) received one of eight versions of a shopping list and rated the buyer of the foods on 66 bipolar attributes on 7-point scales. The shopping lists had either healthy or neutral background items, conventional or functional target items and the buyer was described either as a 40-year-old woman or man. The attribute ratings revealed three factors: disciplined, innovative and gentle. Buyers with healthy background items were perceived as more disciplined than those having neutral items on the list, users of functional foods were rated as more disciplined than users of conventional target items only when the background list consisted of neutral items. Buyers of functional foods were regarded as more innovative and less gentle, but gender affected the ratings on gentle dimension. The impressions of functional food users clearly differ from those formed of users of conventional foods with a healthy image. The shopping list method performed well as an indirect method, but further studies are required to test its feasibility in measuring other food-related impressions.

  12. Use of Mitomycin C to reduce the incidence of encapsulated cysts following ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in refractory glaucoma patients: a new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minwen; Wang, Wei; Huang, Wenbin; Zhang, Xiulan

    2014-09-06

    To evaluate the surgical outcome of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation with a new technique of mitomycin C (MMC) application. This is a retrospective study. All patients with refractory glaucoma underwent FP-7 AGV implantation. Two methods of MMC application were used. In the traditional technique, 6 × 4 mm cotton soaked with MMC (0.25-0.33 mg/ml) was placed in the implantation area for 2-5mins; in the new technique, the valve plate first was encompassed with a thin layer of cotton soaked with MMC, then inserted into the same area. A 200 ml balanced salt solution was applied for irrigation of MMC. The surgical success rate, intraocular pressure (IOP), number of anti-glaucoma medications used, and postoperative complications were analyzed between the groups. The surgical outcomes of two MMC applied techniques were compared. The new technique group had only one case (2.6%) of encapsulated cyst formation out of 38 eyes, while there were eight (19.5%) cases out of 41 eyes the in traditional group. The difference was statistically significant (P = 0.030). According to the definition of success rate, there was 89.5% in the new technique group and 70.7% in the traditional group at the follow-up end point. There was a significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.035). Mean IOP in the new technique group were significantly lower than those of the traditional group at 3 and 6 months (P < 0.05). By using a thin layer of cotton soaked with MMC to encompass the valve plate, the new MMC application technique could greatly decrease the incidence of encapsulated cyst and increase the success rate following AGV implantation.

  13. Three-dimensional plotting and printing of an implant drilling guide: simplifying guided implant surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flügge, Tabea Viktoria; Nelson, Katja; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Metzger, Marc Christian

    2013-08-01

    To present an efficient workflow for the production of implant drilling guides using virtual planning tools. For this purpose, laser surface scanning, cone beam computed tomography, computer-aided design and manufacturing, and 3-dimensional (3D) printing were combined. Intraoral optical impressions (iTero, Align Technologies, Santa Clara, CA) and digital 3D radiographs (cone beam computed tomography) were performed at the first consultation of 1 exemplary patient. With image processing techniques, the intraoral surface data, acquired using an intraoral scanner, and radiologic 3D data were fused. The virtual implant planning process (using virtual library teeth) and the in-office production of the implant drilling guide was performed after only 1 clinical consultation of the patient. Implant surgery with a computer-aided design and manufacturing produced implant drilling guide was performed during the second consultation. The production of a scan prosthesis and multiple preoperative consultations of the patient were unnecessary. The presented procedure offers another step in facilitating the production of drilling guides in dental implantology. Four main advantages are realized with this procedure. First, no additional scan prosthesis is needed. Second, data acquisition can be performed during the first consultation. Third, the virtual planning is directly transferred to the drilling guide without a loss of accuracy. Finally, the treatment cost and time required are reduced with this facilitated production process. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be placed... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660...

  15. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6570 Impression tube. (a) Identification. An impression tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in...

  16. Prevention of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Infections: Single Operator Technique with Use of Povidone-Iodine, Double Gloving, Meticulous Aseptic/Antiseptic Measures and Antibiotic Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolis, Antonis S; Melita, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) implantation is complicated by infection still at a worrisome rate of 2-5%. Since early on during device implantation procedures, we have adopted an infection-preventive technique which has hitherto resulted in effective prevention of infections. Herein we present our results of applying this technique by a single operator in a prospective series of 762 consecutive patients undergoing device implantation. A meticulous search for and treatment of active, occult, or smoldering infection was undertaken preoperatively. An aseptic/antiseptic technique was used for implantation of each device. Skin preparation is thorough with initial cleansing performed with alcohol followed by povidone-iodine 10% solution, which is also used in the wound and inside the pocket. In addition, we routinely use double gloving, and IV antibiotic prophylaxis 1 hour before and for 48 hours afterwards followed by oral antibiotic for 2-3 days after discharge. The skin is closed with absorbable sutures. The study includes 382 patients having a new pacemaker (n = 333) or battery change, system upgrade or lead revision (n = 49), and 380 patients having a new implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) (n = 296) or device replacement/upgrade/lead revision (n = 84). The pacemaker group, aged 70.2 ± 16.5 years, includes 18% VVI, 49% DDD, 29% VDD, and 4% cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices. The ICD group, aged 61.3 ± 13.0 years, with a mean ejection fraction of 36 ± 13%, includes 325 ICD and 55 CRT implants. Over 26.6 ± 33.4 months for the pacemaker group and 36.6 ± 38.3 months for the ICD group, infection occurred in one patient in each group (0.26%) having a device replacement. A consistent and strict approach of aseptic/antiseptic technique with the use of double gloving and povidone-iodine solution within the pocket plus a 4-day regimen of antibiotic prophylaxis minimizes infections in CIED implants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Biocompatible cephalosporin-hydroxyapatite-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-coatings fabricated by MAPLE technique for the prevention of bone implant associated infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rădulescu, Dragoş [Bucharest University Hospital, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Bucharest (Romania); Grumezescu, Valentina [Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, University Politehnica of Bucharest (Romania); Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma & Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Andronescu, Ecaterina [Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, University Politehnica of Bucharest (Romania); Holban, Alina Maria [Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, University Politehnica of Bucharest (Romania); Microbiology Immunology Department, Faculty of Biology, University of Bucharest, 1–3 Portocalelor Lane, Sector 5, 77206 Bucharest (Romania); Research Institute of the University of Bucharest –ICUB, 91-95 Splaiul Independentei, 050095 Bucharest (Romania); Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai, E-mail: grumezescu@yahoo.com [Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, University Politehnica of Bucharest (Romania); Socol, Gabriel [Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma & Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Oprea, Alexandra Elena [Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, University Politehnica of Bucharest (Romania); Rădulescu, Marius [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, University Politehnica of Bucharest, 1–7 Polizu Street, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); and others

    2016-06-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • HAp/PLGA thin coatings by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation. • Anti-adherent coating on medical surfaces against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa colonization. • Coatings with potential applications in implant osseointegration. - Abstract: In this study we aimed to obtain functionalized thin films based on hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (HAp/PLGA) containing ceftriaxone/cefuroxime antibiotics (ATBs) deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique. The prepared thin films were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and infra red (IR) analysis. HAp/PLGA/ATBs thin films sustained the growth of human osteoblasts, proving their good biocompatibility. The microscopic evaluation and the culture-based quantitative assay of the E. coli biofilm development showed that the thin films inhibited the initial step of microbial attachment as well as the subsequent colonization and biofilm development on the respective surfaces. This study demonstrates that MAPLE technique could represent an appealing technique for the fabrication of antibiotics-containing polymeric implant coatings. The bioevaluation results recommend this type of surfaces for the prevention of bone implant microbial contamination and for the enhanced stimulation of the implant osseointegration process.

  18. SU-F-T-314: Estimation of Dose Distributions with Different Types of Breast Implants in Various Radiation Treatment Techniques for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M; Lee, S; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, J [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S; Cho, Y; Lee, I [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study investigates the effects of different kinds and designs of commercialized breast implants on the dose distributions in breast cancer radiotherapy under a variety of conditions. Methods: The dose for the clinical conventional tangential irradiation, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) breast plans was measured using radiochromic films and stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD). The radiochromic film was used as an integrating dosimeter, while the OSLDs were used for real-time dosimetry to isolate the contribution of dose from individual segment. The films were placed at various slices in the Rando phantom and between the body and breast surface OSLDs were used to measure skin dose at 18 positions spaced on the two (right/left) breast. The implant breast was placed on the left side and the phantom breast was remained on the right side. Each treatment technique was performed on different size of the breasts and different shape of the breast implant. The PTV dose was prescribed 50.4 Gy and V47.88≥95%. Results: In different shapes of the breast implant, because of the shadow formed extensive around the breast implant, dose variation was relatively higher that of prescribed dose. As the PTV was delineated on the whole breast, maximum 5% dose error and average 3% difference was observed averagely. VMAT techniques largely decrease the contiguous hot spot in the skin by an average of 25% compared with IMRT. The both IMRT and VMAT techniques resulted in lower doses to normal critical structures than tangential plans for nearly all dose analyzation. Conclusion: Compared to the other technique, IMRT reduced radiation dose exposure to normal tissues and maintained reasonable target homogeneity and for the same target coverage, VMAT can reduce the skin dose in all the regions of the body.

  19. SU-F-T-314: Estimation of Dose Distributions with Different Types of Breast Implants in Various Radiation Treatment Techniques for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M; Lee, S; Suh, T; Jung, J; Kim, S; Cho, Y; Lee, I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the effects of different kinds and designs of commercialized breast implants on the dose distributions in breast cancer radiotherapy under a variety of conditions. Methods: The dose for the clinical conventional tangential irradiation, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) breast plans was measured using radiochromic films and stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD). The radiochromic film was used as an integrating dosimeter, while the OSLDs were used for real-time dosimetry to isolate the contribution of dose from individual segment. The films were placed at various slices in the Rando phantom and between the body and breast surface OSLDs were used to measure skin dose at 18 positions spaced on the two (right/left) breast. The implant breast was placed on the left side and the phantom breast was remained on the right side. Each treatment technique was performed on different size of the breasts and different shape of the breast implant. The PTV dose was prescribed 50.4 Gy and V47.88≥95%. Results: In different shapes of the breast implant, because of the shadow formed extensive around the breast implant, dose variation was relatively higher that of prescribed dose. As the PTV was delineated on the whole breast, maximum 5% dose error and average 3% difference was observed averagely. VMAT techniques largely decrease the contiguous hot spot in the skin by an average of 25% compared with IMRT. The both IMRT and VMAT techniques resulted in lower doses to normal critical structures than tangential plans for nearly all dose analyzation. Conclusion: Compared to the other technique, IMRT reduced radiation dose exposure to normal tissues and maintained reasonable target homogeneity and for the same target coverage, VMAT can reduce the skin dose in all the regions of the body.

  20. Effects of Repeated Screw Tightening on Implant Abutment Interfaces in Terms of Bacterial and Yeast Leakage in Vitro: One-Time Abutment Versus the Multiscrewing Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcaterra, Roberta; Di Girolamo, Michele; Mirisola, Concetta; Baggi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Screw loosening can damage the interfaces of implant components, resulting in susceptibility to contamination of the internal parts by microorganisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of abutment screw retightening on the leakage of two different types of bacteria, Streptococcus sanguinis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, and of the yeast Candida albicans. Two types of implant-abutment systems with tube-in-tube interfaces were tested. Groups A and B each used a different type of system that consisted of 20 different pieces that were assembled according to the manufacturer's torque recommendations; four samples in each group were closed just one time, four samples three times, four samples five times, four samples seven times, and four samples nine times. The implants of groups A and B were contaminated with 0.1 μL of microbial solution just before being assembled for the last time to minimize the possibility of contamination. Results showed a direct correlation between the number of colony-forming units grown in the plates and the closing/opening cycles of the implant-abutment systems. Within the limitations of this study, the results indicate the possibility that repeated closing/opening cycles of the implant-abutment unit may influence bacterial/yeast leakage, most likely as a consequence of decreased precision of the coupling between the abutment and the internal part of the dental implant. These findings suggest that a one-time abutment technique may avoid microbiologic leakage in cases of implant-abutment systems with tube-in-tube interfaces.

  1. Accurate registration of peri-implant soft tissues to create an optimal emergence profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibraheem Fahad Alshiddi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges in restoring anterior space with implant restoration is maintaining the natural looking of peri-implant area. This case report presents a clinical procedure to create the soft tissue emergence profile for anterior maxillary teeth. A 49-year-old male presented with missing right maxillary lateral incisor. A provisional restoration was inserted 1 week after implant placement. Area of the provisional restoration related to the gingival tissue (transmucosal area was adjusted to create an optimum emergence profile. Two months later, an indirect method was used to accurately transfer the soft peri-implant tissues to the master cast. This clinical technique minimizes surgical procedure and avoids the possibility of soft tissue collapsing that may occur during the impression procedure.

  2. Experimental study of PLLA/INH slow release implant fabricated by three dimensional printing technique and drug release characteristics in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gui; Wu, Weigang; Zheng, Qixin; Li, Jingfeng; Zhou, Jianbo; Hu, Zhilei

    2014-07-19

    Local slow release implant provided long term and stable drug release in the lesion. The objective of this study was to fabricate biodegradable slow release INH/PLLA tablet via 3 dimensional printing technique (3DP) and to compare the drug release characteristics of three different structured tablets in vitro. Three different drug delivery systems (columnar-shaped tablet (CST), doughnut-shaped tablet (DST) and multilayer doughnut-shaped tablet (MDST)) were manufactured by the three dimensional printing machine and isoniazid was loaded into the implant. Dynamic soaking method was used to study the drug release characteristics of the three implants. MTT cytotoxicity test and direct contact test were utilized to study the biocompatibility of the implant. The microstructures of the implants' surfaces were observed with electron microscope. The PLLA powder in the tablet could be excellently combined through 3DP without disintegration. Electron microscope observations showed that INH distributed evenly on the surface of the tablet in a "nest-shaped" way, while the surface of the barrier layer in the multilayer doughnut shaped tablet was compact and did not contain INH. The concentration of INH in all of the three tablets were still higher than the effective bacteriostasis concentration (Isoniazid: 0.025 ~ 0.05 μg/ml) after 30 day's release in vitro. All of the tablets showed initial burst release of the INH in the early period. Drug concentration of MDST became stable and had little fluctuation starting from the 6th day of the release. Drug concentration of DST and CST decreased gradually and the rate of decrease in concentration was faster in DST than CST. MTT cytotoxicity test and direct contact test indicated that the INH-PLLA tablet had low cytotoxicity and favorable biocompatibility. Three dimensional printing technique was a reliable technique to fabricate complicated implants. Drug release pattern in MDST was the most stable among the three implants. It was

  3. Venous Access Ports: Indications, Implantation Technique, Follow-Up, and Complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walser, Eric M., E-mail: walser.eric@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The subcutaneous venous access device (SVAD or 'port') is a critical component in the care of patients with chronic disease. The modern SVAD provides reliable access for blood withdrawal and medication administration with minimal disruption to a patient's lifestyle. Because of improved materials and catheter technology, today's ports are lighter and stronger and capable of high-pressure injections of contrast for cross-sectional imaging. The majority of SVAD placement occurs in interventional radiology departments due to their ability to provide this service at lower costs, lower, complication rates, and greater volumes. Port-insertion techniques vary depending on the operator, but all consist of catheter placement in the central venous circulation followed by subcutaneous pocket creation and port attachment to the catheter with fixation and closure of the pocket. Venous access challenges occasionally occur in patients with central vein occlusions, necessitating catheterization of collateral veins or port placement in alternate locations. Complications of SVADs include those associated with the procedure as well as short- (<30 days) and long-term problems. Procedural and early complications are quite rare due to the near-universal use of real-time ultrasound guidance for vein puncture, but they can include hematoma, catheter malposition, arrhythmias, and pneumothorax. Late problems include both thrombotic complications (native venous or port-catheter thrombosis) and infections (tunnel or pocket infections or catheter-associated bloodstream infections). Most guidelines suggest that 0.3 infections/1000 catheter days is an appropriate upper threshold for the insertion of SVADs.

  4. Evaluation of oral scanning in comparison to impression using three-dimensional registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogle-Kim, Yur-Chung; Deyhle, Hans; Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Bormann, Therese; Beckmann, Felix; Jäger, Kurt

    2012-10-01

    Crown and bridge restorations are one of the main treatment methods in fixed prosthodontics. The fabrication requires data on the patient's denture shape. This information is generally obtained as a hard copy from an impression mold. Alternatively, one can acquire the data electronically using oral optical three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques, which determine the surface of the denture. The aim of the study was to quantitatively compare the accuracy of three dimensional scanning with that of conventional impressions and give a statement how far the scanner provides a clinical alternative with equal or better precision. Data from 10 teeth were acquired in the dental office with a polyether impression material and an oral scanner. Data from the impressions were digitalized by means of micro computed tomography. The data were then 3D registered to identify the potential differences between impression and optical scan. We could demonstrate that the oral scanner's data and the conventional impressions are comparable.

  5. Making an Impression: Portfolios as Instruments of Impression Management for Teachers in Early Childhood Education and Care Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The study presented here examines the contribution of portfolios to the communication between parents and early childhood education and care centres. Using content analysis techniques, 2104 portfolio entries are examined with a view to establishing what impression they are intended to create. While the actual purpose of portfolios emphasizes the…

  6. Comparison of the artifacts caused by metallic implants in breast MRI using dual-echo dixon versus conventional fat-suppression techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Yuan; Kipfer, Hal D; Majidi, Shadie S; Holz, Stephanie; Lin, Chen

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate and compare the artifacts caused by metal implants in breast MR images acquired with dual-echo Dixon and two conventional fat-suppression techniques. Two types of biopsy markers were embedded into a uniform fat-water emulsion. T1-weighted gradient-echo images were acquired on a clinical 3-T MRI scanner with three different fat-suppression techniques-conventional or quick fat saturation, spectrally selective adiabatic inversion recovery (SPAIR), and dual-echo Dixon-and the 3D volumes of artifacts were measured. Among the subjects of a clinical breast MRI study using the same scanner, five patients were found to have one or more metal implants. The artifacts in Dixon and SPAIR fat-suppressed images were evaluated by three radiologists, and the results were compared with those of the phantom study. In the phantom study, the artifacts appeared as interleaved bright and dark rings on SPAIR and quick-fat-saturation images, whereas they appeared as dark regions with a thin bright rim on Dixon images. The artifacts imaged with the Dixon technique had the smallest total volume. However, the reviewers found larger artifact diameters on patient images using the Dixon sequence because only the central region was recognized as an artifact on the SPAIR images. Metal implants introduce artifacts of different types and sizes, according to the different fat-suppression techniques used. The dual-echo Dixon technique produces a larger central void, allowing the implant to be easily identified, but presents a smaller overall artifact volume by obscuring less area in the image, according to a quantitative phantom study.

  7. Microdamage of the cortical bone during mini-implant insertion with self-drilling and self-tapping techniques: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sumit; Upadhyay, Madhur; Liu, Sean; Roberts, Eugene; Neace, William P; Nanda, Ravindra

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate microdamage accumulation after mini-implant placement by self-drilling (without a pilot hole) and self-tapping (screwed into a pilot hole) insertion techniques. The null hypothesis was that the mini-implant insertion technique would have no influence on microcrack accumulation and propagation in the cortical bones of the maxillae and mandibles of adult hounds. Mini-implants (n = 162; diameter, 1.6 mm; length, 6 mm) were placed in the maxillae and mandibles of 9 hounds (12-14 months old) with self-drilling and self-tapping insertion techniques. The techniques were randomly assigned to the left or the right side of each jaw. Each hound received 18 mini-implants (10 in the mandible, 8 in the maxilla). Histomorphometric parameters including total crack length and crack surface density were measured. The null hypothesis was rejected in favor of an alternate hypothesis: that the self-drilling technique results in more microdamage (microcracks) accumulation in the adjacent cortical bone in both the maxilla and the mandible immediately after mini-implant placement. A cluster level analysis was used to analyze the data on the outcome measured. Since the measurements were clustered within dogs, a paired-samples t test was used to analyze the average differences between insertion methods at both jaw locations. A significance level of 0.05 was used for both analyses. The self-drilling technique resulted in greater total crack lengths in both the maxilla and the mandible (maxilla: mean difference, 18.70 ± 7.04 μm/mm(2); CI, 13.29-24.11; mandible: mean difference, 22.98 ± 6.43 μm/mm(2); CI, 18.04-27.93; P hounds in both the maxilla and the mandible by the self-drilling insertion technique compared with the self-tapping technique. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sulcus reproduction with elastomeric impression materials: a new in vitro testing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Werner J; Kurokawa, Rie; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Komatsu, Masashi

    2008-12-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the depth reproduction of differently wide sulci with elastomeric impression materials by single- and double-mix techniques using a tooth and sulcus model, simulating clinical conditions. Impressions with one vinyl polysiloxane (VPS; FLE), two polyethers (PE; IMP and P2), and one hybrid VPS/PE elastomer (FUS) were taken from a truncated steel cone with a circumferential 2 mm deep sulcus, 50, 100 or 200 microm wide. The "root surface" was in steel and the "periodontal tissue" in reversible hydrocolloid. Single-mix impressions were taken with light-body (L) or monophase (M) pastes, double-mix impressions with L as syringe and M or heavy-body (H) as tray materials (n=8). Sulcus reproduction was determined by 3D laser topography of impressions at eight locations, 45 degrees apart. Statistical data analysis by ANOVA and multiple comparison tests (pimpression materials only: FLE=IMP>FUS=P2. At 50 and 100 microm width, significant differences were found between materials (IMP>FUS=FLE>P2) and techniques (L+H=L+M>M>L). The sulcus model is considered useful for screening evaluation of elastomeric impression materials ability to reproduce narrow sulci. All tested materials and techniques reproduced 200 microm wide sulci to almost nominal depth. Irrespective of the impression technique used, IMP showed the best penetration ability in 50 and 100 microm sulci. Double-mix techniques are more suitable to reproduce narrow sulci than single-mix techniques.

  9. In vivo precision of conventional and digital methods of obtaining complete-arch dental impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ender, Andreas; Attin, Thomas; Mehl, Albert

    2016-03-01

    Digital impression systems have undergone significant development in recent years, but few studies have investigated the accuracy of the technique in vivo, particularly compared with conventional impression techniques. The purpose of this in vivo study was to investigate the precision of conventional and digital methods for complete-arch impressions. Complete-arch impressions were obtained using 5 conventional (polyether, POE; vinylsiloxanether, VSE; direct scannable vinylsiloxanether, VSES; digitized scannable vinylsiloxanether, VSES-D; and irreversible hydrocolloid, ALG) and 7 digital (CEREC Bluecam, CER; CEREC Omnicam, OC; Cadent iTero, ITE; Lava COS, LAV; Lava True Definition Scanner, T-Def; 3Shape Trios, TRI; and 3Shape Trios Color, TRC) techniques. Impressions were made 3 times each in 5 participants (N=15). The impressions were then compared within and between the test groups. The cast surfaces were measured point-to-point using the signed nearest neighbor method. Precision was calculated from the (90%-10%)/2 percentile value. The precision ranged from 12.3 μm (VSE) to 167.2 μm (ALG), with the highest precision in the VSE and VSES groups. The deviation pattern varied distinctly according to the impression method. Conventional impressions showed the highest accuracy across the complete dental arch in all groups, except for the ALG group. Conventional and digital impression methods differ significantly in the complete-arch accuracy. Digital impression systems had higher local deviations within the complete arch cast; however, they achieve equal and higher precision than some conventional impression materials. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Rapid orthodontic treatment after the ridge-splitting technique--a combined surgical-orthodontic approach for implant site development: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Francesco; Mirabella, A Davide; Borlizzi, Diego

    2012-08-01

    This article presents a clinical case of bilateral partial edentulism in the posterior mandible with severe horizontal and moderate vertical bone atrophy. A new technique using rapid orthodontics after ridge splitting is presented. The split-crest technique was carried out using piezosurgical instruments in the first molar and second premolar areas to widen the bone crest and open a channel for tooth movement. Immediately after, orthodontic appliances were used to move the first premolars distally and the second molars mesially into the surgical site. The rationale was to facilitate and accelerate orthodontic movement of the teeth, which is otherwise difficult in a cortical knife-edged ridge. The bone defect was filled with the alveolar bone of the adjacent teeth that were moved into the surgically opened path. Adequate bone volume for implant placement was generated in the first premolar area. Implants were then inserted, and the patient was rehabilitated.

  11. Zero-fluoroscopy permanent pacemaker implantation using Ensite NavX system: Clinical viability or fanciful technique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ping; Qiu, Jie; Wang, Yan; Chen, Guangzhi; Proietti, Riccardo; Fadhle, Al-Selmi; Zhao, Chunxia; Wen Wang, Dao

    2018-02-01

    Fluoroscopy is the imaging modality routinely used for cardiac device implantation and electrophysiological procedures. Due to the rising concern regarding the harmful effects of radiation exposure to both the patients and operation staffs, novel 3D mapping systems have been developed and implemented in electrophysiological procedure for the navigation of catheters inside the heart chambers. Their applicability in cardiac device implantation has been rarely reported. Our aim is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of permanent pacemaker implantation without fluoroscopy. From January 2012 to June 2016, six patients (50 ± 15 years, four of six were female, one of who was at the 25th week of gestation) who underwent permanent pacemaker implantation were included (zero-fluoroscopy group). Data from 20 consecutive cases of implantation performed under fluoroscopy guidance were chosen as a control group (fluoroscopy group). Total implantation procedure time for single-chamber pacemaker was 51.3 ± 13.1 minutes in the zero-fluoroscopy group and 42.6 ± 7.4 minutes in the fluoroscopy group (P  =  0.155). The implantation procedural time for a dual-chamber pacemaker was 88.3 ± 19.6 minutes and 67.3 ± 7.6 minutes in the zero-fluoroscopy and fluoroscopy groups (P  =  0.013), respectively. No complications were observed during the procedure and the follow-up in the two groups, and all pacemakers worked with satisfactory parameters. Ensite NavX system can be used as a reliable and safe zero-fluoroscopy approach for the implantation of single- or dual-chamber permanent pacemakers in specific patients, such as pregnant women or in extreme situations when the x-ray machine is not available. © 2017 The Authors. Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Quality assurance: recommended guidelines for safe heating by capacitive-type heating technique to treat patients with metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hirokazu; Kondo, Motoharu; Imada, Hajime; Kuroda, Masahiro; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu; Saito, Kazuyuki; Kuroda, Kagayaki; Ito, Koichi; Takahashi, Hideaki; Matsuki, Hidetoshi

    2013-05-01

    This article is a redissemination of the previous Japanese Quality Assurance Guide guidelines. Specific absorption rate and temperature distribution were investigated with respect to various aspects including metallic implant size and shape, insertion site, insertion direction, blood flow and heating power, and simulated results were compared with adverse reactions of patients treated by radio frequency capacitive-type heating. Recommended guidelines for safe heating methods for patients with metallic implants are presented based on our findings.

  13. Dental CT and orthodontic implants: imaging technique and assessment of available bone volume in the hard palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahleitner, Andre E-mail: andre.gahleitner@univie.ac.at; Podesser, Birgit; Schick, Susanne; Watzek, Georg; Imhof, Herwig

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: Palatal implants (PI) have been introduced for orthodontic treatment of dental and skeletal dysgnathia. Due to the restricted amount of bone in this region, precise preoperative anatomic information is necessary. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental CT could serve as a tool to locate the optimal size and position for orthodontic implant placement. Materials and methods: In 32 patients, where palatal implant placement was planned, axial CT scans of the maxillary bone were acquired. Using a standard dental software package (Easy Vision dental software package 2.1, Philips; Best, The Netherlands), paracoronal views were reconstructed and measurements of palatal bone height in 3 mm increments, dorsally from the incisive canal, were performed in the median and both paramedian regions. Results: The overall mean bone height was 5.01 mm (S.D. 2.60), ranging from 0 to 16.9 mm. The maximum palatal bone height was 6.17 mm (S.D. 2.81) at 6 mm dorsally from the incisive canal. Due to the lack of adequate bone (less than 4 mm), implant placement was not performed in 3 cases (7%). In the remaining 39 cases (93.0%), primary implant stability was achieved and complications, such as perforation of the palate, could be avoided. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that dental CT promises to be a valuable tool in evaluating the potential and optimal size and site for orthodontic implant placement.

  14. Dental CT and orthodontic implants: imaging technique and assessment of available bone volume in the hard palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahleitner, Andre; Podesser, Birgit; Schick, Susanne; Watzek, Georg; Imhof, Herwig

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Palatal implants (PI) have been introduced for orthodontic treatment of dental and skeletal dysgnathia. Due to the restricted amount of bone in this region, precise preoperative anatomic information is necessary. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental CT could serve as a tool to locate the optimal size and position for orthodontic implant placement. Materials and methods: In 32 patients, where palatal implant placement was planned, axial CT scans of the maxillary bone were acquired. Using a standard dental software package (Easy Vision dental software package 2.1, Philips; Best, The Netherlands), paracoronal views were reconstructed and measurements of palatal bone height in 3 mm increments, dorsally from the incisive canal, were performed in the median and both paramedian regions. Results: The overall mean bone height was 5.01 mm (S.D. 2.60), ranging from 0 to 16.9 mm. The maximum palatal bone height was 6.17 mm (S.D. 2.81) at 6 mm dorsally from the incisive canal. Due to the lack of adequate bone (less than 4 mm), implant placement was not performed in 3 cases (7%). In the remaining 39 cases (93.0%), primary implant stability was achieved and complications, such as perforation of the palate, could be avoided. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that dental CT promises to be a valuable tool in evaluating the potential and optimal size and site for orthodontic implant placement

  15. Combination of chemical suppression techniques for dual suppression of fat and silicone at diffusion-weighted MR imaging in women with breast implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Dow-Mu; Hughes, J. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sutton (United Kingdom); Blackledge, M.; Leach, M.O.; Collins, D.J. [Institute of Cancer Research, CR UK-EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton (United Kingdom); Burns, S. [Nuada 3T MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Stemmer, A.; Kiefer, B. [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Silicone breast prostheses prove technically challenging when performing diffusion-weighted MR imaging in the breasts. We describe a combined fat and chemical suppression scheme to achieve dual suppression of fat and silicone, thereby improving the quality of diffusion-weighted images in women with breast implants. MR imaging was performed at 3.0 and 1.5 T in women with silicone breast implants using short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) fat-suppressed echo-planar (EPI) diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) on its own and combined with the slice-select gradient-reversal (SSGR) technique. Imaging was performed using dedicated breast imaging coils. Complete suppression of the fat and silicone signal was possible at 3.0 T using EPI DWI with STIR and SSGR, evaluated with dedicated breast coils. However, a residual silicone signal was still perceptible at 1.5 T using this combined approach. Nevertheless, a further reduction in silicone signal at 1.5 T could be achieved by employing thinner slice partitions and the addition of the chemical-selective fat-suppression (CHESS) technique. DWI using combined STIR and SSGR chemical suppression techniques is feasible to eliminate or reduce silicone signal from prosthetic breast implants. (orig.)

  16. Biocompatible cephalosporin-hydroxyapatite-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-coatings fabricated by MAPLE technique for the prevention of bone implant associated infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rădulescu, Dragoş; Grumezescu, Valentina; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Socol, Gabriel; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Rădulescu, Marius; Surdu, Adrian; Trusca, Roxana; Rădulescu, Radu; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Stan, Miruna S.; Constanda, Sabrina; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2016-06-01

    In this study we aimed to obtain functionalized thin films based on hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (HAp/PLGA) containing ceftriaxone/cefuroxime antibiotics (ATBs) deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique. The prepared thin films were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and infra red (IR) analysis. HAp/PLGA/ATBs thin films sustained the growth of human osteoblasts, proving their good biocompatibility. The microscopic evaluation and the culture-based quantitative assay of the E. coli biofilm development showed that the thin films inhibited the initial step of microbial attachment as well as the subsequent colonization and biofilm development on the respective surfaces. This study demonstrates that MAPLE technique could represent an appealing technique for the fabrication of antibiotics-containing polymeric implant coatings. The bioevaluation results recommend this type of surfaces for the prevention of bone implant microbial contamination and for the enhanced stimulation of the implant osseointegration process.

  17. Recursive grid partitioning on a cortical surface model: an optimized technique for the localization of implanted subdural electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Thomas A; Conner, Christopher R; Tandon, Nitin

    2013-05-01

    .2 to 11.7 mm for an individual electrode, with mean errors ranging between 2.9 and 4.1 mm depending on the method used. The authors also noted a larger error in all methods that used CT scans alone to localize electrodes compared with those that used both postoperative CT and postoperative MRI. The large mean errors reported with these methods are liable to affect intermodal data comparisons (for example, with functional mapping techniques) and may impact surgical decision making. The authors have presented several aspects of using new techniques to visualize electrodes implanted for localizing epilepsy. The ability to use automated labeling schemas to denote which gyrus a particular electrode overlies is potentially of great utility in planning resections and in corroborating the results of extraoperative stimulation mapping. Dilation of the pial mesh model provides, for the first time, a sense of the cortical surface not sampled by the electrode, and the potential roles this "electrophysiologically hidden" cortex may play in both eloquent function and seizure onset.

  18. In vitro and in vivo performance of bioactive Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA implants fabricated by a rapid microwave sintering technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Man Tik; Tang, Chak Yin; Chen, Ling; Wong, Chi Tak; Tsui, Chi Pong

    2014-09-01

    Failure of the bone-implant interface in a joint prosthesis is a main cause of implant loosening. The introduction of a bioactive substance, hydroxyapatite (HA), to a metallic bone-implant may enhance its fixation on human bone by encouraging direct bone bonding. Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA composites with a reproducible porous structure (porosity of 27% and pore size of 6-89 μm) were successfully fabricated by a rapid microwave sintering technique. This method allows the biocomposites to be fabricated in a short period of time under ambient conditions. Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA composites exhibited a compressive strength of 93 MPa, compressive modulus of 2.9 GPa and microhardness of 556 HV which are close to those of the human cortical bone. The in vitro preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on the Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA composite showed that the composite surface could provide a biocompatible environment for cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation without any cytotoxic effects. This is among the first attempts to study the in vivo performance of load-bearing Ti6Al4V/TiC and Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA composites in a live rabbit. The results indicated that the Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA composite had a better bone-implant interface compared with the Ti6Al4V/TiC implant. Based on the microstructural features, the mechanical properties, and the in vitro and in vivo test results from this study, the Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA composites have the potential to be employed in load-bearing orthopedic applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Precision of guided scanning procedures for full-arch digital impressions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Moritz; Koller, Christina; Rumetsch, Moritz; Ender, Andreas; Mehl, Albert

    2017-11-01

    System-specific scanning strategies have been shown to influence the accuracy of full-arch digital impressions. Special guided scanning procedures have been implemented for specific intraoral scanning systems with special regard to the digital orthodontic workflow. The aim of this study was to evaluate the precision of guided scanning procedures compared to conventional impression techniques in vivo. Two intraoral scanning systems with implemented full-arch guided scanning procedures (Cerec Omnicam Ortho; Ormco Lythos) were included along with one conventional impression technique with irreversible hydrocolloid material (alginate). Full-arch impressions were taken three times each from 5 participants (n = 15). Impressions were then compared within the test groups using a point-to-surface distance method after best-fit model matching (OraCheck). Precision was calculated using the (90-10%)/2 quantile and statistical analysis with one-way repeated measures ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test was performed. The conventional impression technique with alginate showed the lowest precision for full-arch impressions with 162.2 ± 71.3 µm. Both guided scanning procedures performed statistically significantly better than the conventional impression technique (p Cerec Omnicam Ortho were 74.5 ± 39.2 µm and for group Ormco Lythos 91.4 ± 48.8 µm. The in vivo precision of guided scanning procedures exceeds conventional impression techniques with the irreversible hydrocolloid material alginate. Guided scanning procedures may be highly promising for clinical applications, especially for digital orthodontic workflows.

  20. The application of low angle Rutherford backscattering and channelling techniques to determine implantation induced disorder profile distributions in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.A.G.; Christodoulides, C.E.; Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.; Titov, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    Low angle exit (9 0 ) Rutherford backscattering geometry and channelling of 2 MeV 4 He + are employed to investigate the disorder depth profiles created by 40 keV N + implantation in (111) silicon and (100) GaAs targets. Parameters which can influence the disordering rate and its spatial distribution, such as ion fluence flux, substrate type and substrate temperature are examined. Under certain implantation conditions, the damage profile distributions are asymmetric - exhibiting a bimodal form in silicon targets or confined much closer to the GaAs surface than the normally expected mean range of 40 keV N + ions. (orig.)

  1. Microbiological evaluation of ultrasonic nebulization for disinfecting dental impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Marcio Jose; Rafael, Renata Santos; Camilotti, Veridiana; Menolli, Rafael Andrade; Sicoli, Eliseu Augusto; Teixeira, Nancielli; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho

    2013-07-01

    Disinfecting dental impressions is necessary to decrease the risk of cross-contamination in dental offices. Ultrasonic nebulization has been mentioned as a microbicidal technique that can be used to disinfect contaminated dental impressions. This study compared the microbicidal effect of 2% glutaraldehyde and 0.2% peracetic acid for the disinfection of dental impressions made with vinyl polysiloxane, using 2 disinfection methods: immersion and ultrasonic nebulization. Bactericial efficacy was examined using Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus atrophaeus as indicators. Thirty impressions were obtained and distributed randomly in 5 groups (n = 6). Group 1 was immersed in 2% glutaraldehyde immersion for 10 minutes, Group 2 was immersed in 0.2% peracetic acid for 10 minutes, Group 3 underwent ultrasonic nebulization for 10 minutes in 2% glutaraldehyde solution, Group 4 underwent ultrasonic nebulization for 10 minutes in 0.2% peracetic acid solution, and Group 5 was a control group that received no disinfectant. Both solutions experienced a 100% reduction in microorganisms following ultrasonic nebulization, as did peracetic acid following immersion; however, immersion in glutaraldehyde demonstrated lower values of reduction in B atrophaeus group, with a statistically significant difference compared with the other experimental groups.

  2. From alginate impressions to digital virtual models: accuracy and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalstra, Michel; Melsen, Birte

    2009-03-01

    To compare the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements performed on digital virtual models with those taken on plaster casts from models poured immediately after the impression was taken, the 'gold standard', and from plaster models poured following a 3-5 day shipping procedure of the alginate impression. Direct comparison of two measuring techniques. The study was conducted at the Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Aarhus, Denmark in 2006/2007. Twelve randomly selected orthodontic graduate students with informed consent. Three sets of alginate impressions were taken from the participants within 1 hour. Plaster models were poured immediately from two of the sets, while the third set was kept in transit in the mail for 3-5 days. Upon return a plaster model was poured as well. Finally digital models were made from the plaster models. A number of measurements were performed on the plaster casts with a digital calliper and on the corresponding digital models using the virtual measuring tool of the accompanying software. Afterwards these measurements were compared statistically. No statistical differences were found between the three sets of plaster models. The intra- and inter-observer variability are smaller for the measurements performed on the digital models. Sending alginate impressions by mail does not affect the quality and accuracy of plaster casts poured from them afterwards. Virtual measurements performed on digital models display less variability than the corresponding measurements performed with a calliper on the actual models.

  3. Description and features of a technique of seeds implantation with 3D real time planning connected to an automatic afterloading and quality control device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz Seidal, M.; Cantera de Frutos, C.

    2002-07-01

    According to statistics, 9% of males older than 50 years will develop prostate cancer and 33% of them will finally die of their disease. Detection can be based on digital rectal examination, tumoral markers measurements as PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen). CT/MR or Ultra sound imaging. Treatments may be radical prostatectomy (usually combined with chemotherapy), external radiation therapy, brachytherapy, or a combination of the former two techniques. In the last years permanent seed implantation is becoming an attractive alternative for treatment of prostate cancer at early stages, either as monotherapy (total prescribed dose of 145 Gy) or as an additional boost after external beam irradiation (95-100Gy after external beam delivery of 50Gy). But not all cases are suitable for seed treatment. Tumors must be at an early state and not very active (low tumoral markers values), without extra-capsular spreading and no metastasis in surrounding area. There must be no trans-urethral resection, no calcifications nor public arc interference and, finally, the volume should not be bigger than 50 cm''3. The technique consists on the permanent implantation of radioactive seeds into the prostate that, while decaying, will deliver the prescribed dose to the tumor. Isotopes mostly used are I-125 and Pd-103. Procedures for seed implantation vary but traditional ones generally imply two stages. The first one is the manual pre-loading of needles which can be performed either by composing loose seeds and spacers, either by cutting off strands of seeds and re absorbable spacers. This process can be done according to a previously approved pre plan or based on the accumulated experience about the number of needles and loading usually needed. Second stage consist on the implantation of these preloaded needles on the operation room. (Author)

  4. The zygomatic implant perforated (ZIP) flap: a new technique for combined surgical reconstruction and rapid fixed dental rehabilitation following low-level maxillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, C J; Rogers, S N

    2017-12-01

    This aim of this report is to describe the development and evolution of a new surgical technique for the immediate surgical reconstruction and rapid post-operative prosthodontic rehabilitation with a fixed dental prosthesis following low-level maxillectomy for malignant disease.The technique involves the use of a zygomatic oncology implant perforated micro-vascular soft tissue flap (ZIP flap) for the primary management of maxillary malignancy with surgical closure of the resultant maxillary defect and the installation of osseointegrated support for a zygomatic implant-supported maxillary fixed dental prosthesis.The use of this technique facilitates extremely rapid oral and dental rehabilitation within a few weeks of resective surgery, providing rapid return to function and restoring appearance following low-level maxillary resection, even in cases where radiotherapy is required as an adjuvant treatment post-operatively. The ZIP flap technique has been adopted as a standard procedure in the unit for the management of low-level maxillary malignancy, and this report provides a detailed step-by-step approach to treatment and discusses modifications developed over the treatment of an initial cohort of patients.

  5. Novel Techniques for Retroperitoneal Implantation of Telemetry Transmitters for Physiologic Monitoring in Gottingen Minipigs (Sus scrofa domesticus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    that this procedure permitted effective monitoring of complex physiologic data, including transthoracic impedance, without negatively affecting the...retroperitoneal implantation of the telemetry device permitted effective monitoring of complex physiologic data, including transthoracic impedance...nerve agent and cyanide poisoning in minipigs after intraosseous administration. Ann Emerg Med 60:424–430. 26. Ngawhirunpat T, Opanasopit P

  6. Synthesis of polycaprolactone-titanium oxide multilayer films by nanosecond laser pulses and electrospinning technique for better implant fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghshine, Babak B.; Cosman, James A.; Kiani, Amirkianoosh

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a combination of electrospinning and laser texturing is introduced as a novel method for increasing the biocompatibility of metal implants. Besides having a rough laser treated surface, the implant benefits from the high porosity and better wettability of an electrospun fibrous structure, which is a more favorable environment for cell proliferation. Titanium samples were patterned using a nanosecond laser beam and were placed as collectors in an electrospinning machine. They were then soaked in simulated body fluid for four weeks. Energy Dispersive X-ray and X-Ray Diffraction results indicate significantly more hydroxyapatite formation on laser treated samples with nanoscale fibers deposited on their surface. This shows that having a laser treated surface underneath the fibrous layer can improve short-term biocompatibility even before degradation of fibers. The thermal conductivity of the electrospun layer, measured using a Hot Disk Transient Plane Source instrument and computer code, was shown to be considerably lower than that of titanium and very close to bone. The presence of this layer can therefore be beneficial in making the implant more compatible to a biological medium. In case of dental implants, it was shown that this layer can act as a thermal barrier while a hot beverage is consumed and it can decrease the temperature rise by about 60%, which avoids any possible damage to newly formed cells during the healing period.

  7. Video-assisted thoracoscopic implantation of a diaphragmatic pacemaker in a child with tetraplegia: indications, technique, and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcy Ribeiro Pinto Filho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a child with tetraplegia after cervical trauma, who subsequently underwent diaphragmatic pacemaker implantation. We reviewed the major indications for diaphragmatic pacing and the types of devices employed. We highlight the unequivocal benefit of diaphragmatic pacing in the social and educational reintegration of individuals with tetraplegia.

  8. Synthesis of polycaprolactone-titanium oxide multilayer films by nanosecond laser pulses and electrospinning technique for better implant fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naghshine, Babak B.; Cosman, James A.; Kiani, Amirkianoosh, E-mail: a.kiani@unb.ca [Silicon Hall: Laser Micro/Nano Fabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2016-08-28

    In this study, a combination of electrospinning and laser texturing is introduced as a novel method for increasing the biocompatibility of metal implants. Besides having a rough laser treated surface, the implant benefits from the high porosity and better wettability of an electrospun fibrous structure, which is a more favorable environment for cell proliferation. Titanium samples were patterned using a nanosecond laser beam and were placed as collectors in an electrospinning machine. They were then soaked in simulated body fluid for four weeks. Energy Dispersive X-ray and X-Ray Diffraction results indicate significantly more hydroxyapatite formation on laser treated samples with nanoscale fibers deposited on their surface. This shows that having a laser treated surface underneath the fibrous layer can improve short-term biocompatibility even before degradation of fibers. The thermal conductivity of the electrospun layer, measured using a Hot Disk Transient Plane Source instrument and computer code, was shown to be considerably lower than that of titanium and very close to bone. The presence of this layer can therefore be beneficial in making the implant more compatible to a biological medium. In case of dental implants, it was shown that this layer can act as a thermal barrier while a hot beverage is consumed and it can decrease the temperature rise by about 60%, which avoids any possible damage to newly formed cells during the healing period.

  9. Randomized controlled clinical trial on the three-dimensional accuracy of fast-set impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Heike; Quaas, Sebastian; Haim, Manuela; Preißler, Jörg; Walter, Michael H; Koch, Rainer; Luthardt, Ralph G

    2013-06-01

    The use of fast-setting impression materials with different viscosities for the one-stage impression technique demands precise working times when mixing. We examined the effect of varying working time on impression precision in a randomized clinical trial. Focusing on tooth 46, three impressions were made from each of 96 volunteers, using either a polyether (PE: Impregum Penta H/L DuoSoft Quick, 3 M ESPE) or an addition-curing silicone (AS: Aquasil Ultra LV, Dentsply/DeTrey), one with the manufacturer's recommended working time (used as a reference) and two with altered working times. All stages of the impression-taking were subject to randomization. The three-dimensional precision of the non-standard working time impressions was digitally analyzed compared to the reference impression. Statistical analysis was performed using multivariate models. The mean difference in the position of the lower right first molar (vs. the reference impression) ranged from ±12 μm for PE to +19 and -14 μm for AS. Significantly higher mean values (+62 to -40 μm) were found for AS compared to PE (+21 to -26 μm) in the area of the distal adjacent tooth. Fast-set impression materials offer high precision when used for single tooth restorations as part of a one-stage impression technique, even when the working time (mixing plus application of the light- and heavy-body components) diverges significantly from the manufacturer's recommended protocol. Best accuracy was achieved with machine-mixed heavy-body/light-body polyether. Both materials examined met the clinical requirements regarding precision when the teeth were completely syringed with light material.

  10. Digital Workflow for Computer-Guided Implant Surgery in Edentulous Patients: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji-Hyeon; An, Xueyin; Jeong, Seung-Mi; Choi, Byung-Ho

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a fully digital workflow used to perform computer-guided flapless implant placement in an edentulous patient without the use of conventional impressions, models, or a radiographic guide. Digital data for the workflow were acquired using an intraoral scanner and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The image fusion of the intraoral scan data and CBCT data was performed by matching resin markers placed in the patient's mouth. The definitive digital data were used to design a prosthetically driven implant position, surgical template, and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing fabricated fixed dental prosthesis. The authors believe this is the first published case describing such a technique in computer-guided flapless implant surgery for edentulous patients. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro and in vivo performance of bioactive Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA implants fabricated by a rapid microwave sintering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choy, Man Tik; Tang, Chak Yin; Chen, Ling; Wong, Chi Tak; Tsui, Chi Pong

    2014-01-01

    Failure of the bone–implant interface in a joint prosthesis is a main cause of implant loosening. The introduction of a bioactive substance, hydroxyapatite (HA), to a metallic bone–implant may enhance its fixation on human bone by encouraging direct bone bonding. Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA composites with a reproducible porous structure (porosity of 27% and pore size of 6–89 μm) were successfully fabricated by a rapid microwave sintering technique. This method allows the biocomposites to be fabricated in a short period of time under ambient conditions. Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA composites exhibited a compressive strength of 93 MPa, compressive modulus of 2.9 GPa and microhardness of 556 HV which are close to those of the human cortical bone. The in vitro preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on the Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA composite showed that the composite surface could provide a biocompatible environment for cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation without any cytotoxic effects. This is among the first attempts to study the in vivo performance of load-bearing Ti6Al4V/TiC and Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA composites in a live rabbit. The results indicated that the Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA composite had a better bone–implant interface compared with the Ti6Al4V/TiC implant. Based on the microstructural features, the mechanical properties, and the in vitro and in vivo test results from this study, the Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA composites have the potential to be employed in load-bearing orthopedic applications. - Highlights: • Ti6Al4V/TiC and Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA composites were fabricated by microwave sintering. • Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA exhibited mechanical properties close to human cortical bone. • Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA could provide a biocompatible environment for bone cell growth. • Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA showed a better bone–implant interface than Ti6Al4V/TiC. • Ti6Al4V/TiC/HA could be used for bone replacement under load-bearing conditions

  12. Three dimensional rotational angiography for assessment of coronary arteries during melody valve implantation: introducing a technique that may improve outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pockett, C R; Moore, J W; El-Said, H G

    2017-02-01

    Adverse events from Melody valve implantation may be catastrophic. To date a role for three dimensional rotational angiography of the aortic root (3DRAA) during Melody valve implantation has not been established. To describe the role of 3DRAA in the assessment of Melody valve candidacy and to demonstrate that it may improve outcomes. All patients who underwent cardiac catheterisation for Melody valve implantation and 3DRAA between August 2013 and February 2015 were reviewed. 31 patients had 3DRAA with balloon sizing. Ten were deemed not Melody candidates (5 coronary compression, 2 aortic root distortion with cusp flattening, 2 RVOT was too large, and 1 had complex branch stenosis and a short landing zone). Of the 21 patients who were Melody candidates, 12 had conduits, 6 prosthetic valves and 3 native RVOTs. In patients with conduits, the technique of stenting the conduit prior to dilation was used after measuring the distance between the conduit and the coronary arteries on 3DRAA. In the Melody patients, we had 100% procedural success and no serious adverse events (coronary compression, tears, stent fracture or endocarditis). As a tool for case selection, 3DRAA may facilitate higher procedural success and decreased risk of serious adverse events. Furthermore, 3D rotational angiography allows stenting of the conduit prior to dilation, which may prevent tears and possibly endocarditis.

  13. A lower border augmentation technique to allow implant placement after a bilateral mandibular fracture as a complication of vertical distraction osteogenesis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdijk, F B T; Meijer, G J; Soehardi, A; Koole, R

    2013-07-01

    As with other techniques, vertical distraction osteogenesis (VDO) can also induce complications. The case of a patient with a residual alveolar ridge in the symphyseal area of 8 mm is presented. After performing VDO, the patient returned at 1-day postoperatively complaining of pain and dislocation of the distractor device, due to a fracture of the lower mandibular segment on the right side. After removal of the distractor device and application of osteosynthesis plates, the patient returned 2 weeks later due to a second fracture of the lower segment, yet on the left side. After removing the osteosynthesis material, stabilization of the mandible was achieved with an acrylic splint, which was fixated with peri-mandibular wiring. Finally, reconstruction was accomplished by lower border onlay grafting, limited to the symphyseal area, in preparation for implant insertion. Ultimately, after a healing period of 5 months, two endosseous implants were installed. The patient's function has remained satisfactory for 3 years. Reinforcement of the extreme resorbed edentulous mandible after fracture healing by lower border bone augmentation can be a reliable method to allow implant installation in a second stage. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sport fans' impressions of gay male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jamonn; Cothren, Denise; Rogers, Ross; Kistler, Lindsay; Osowski, Anne; Greenauer, Nathan; End, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine sport fans' impressions of gay male athletes. Participants formed impressions of a fictional athlete from their favorite team after reading a short scenario about the player. The scenarios described the athlete as being gay or straight, and either becoming a distraction or not causing a distraction to the team. While males' ratings of the athlete did not significantly differ, female fans formed significantly more positive impressions of the gay male player than the straight athlete. These results are discussed in terms of the ingroup bias and the shifting culture of homophobia in sport.

  15. SU-E-I-42: Normalized Embryo/fetus Doses for Fluoroscopically Guided Pacemaker Implantation Procedures Calculated Using a Monte Carlo Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damilakis, J; Stratakis, J; Solomou, G [University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is well known that pacemaker implantation is sometimes needed in pregnant patients with symptomatic bradycardia. To our knowledge, there is no reported experience regarding radiation doses to the unborn child resulting from fluoroscopy during pacemaker implantation. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for estimating embryo/fetus dose from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all trimesters of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study. Three mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing the average pregnant patient at the first, second and third trimesters of gestation were generated using Bodybuilder software (White Rock science, White Rock, NM). The normalized embryo/fetus dose from the posteroanterior (PA), the 30° left-anterior oblique (LAO) and the 30° right-anterior oblique (RAO) projections were calculated for a wide range of kVp (50–120 kVp) and total filtration values (2.5–9.0 mm Al). Results: The results consist of radiation doses normalized to a) entrance skin dose (ESD) and b) dose area product (DAP) so that the dose to the unborn child from any fluoroscopic technique and x-ray device used can be calculated. ESD normalized doses ranged from 0.008 (PA, first trimester) to 2.519 μGy/mGy (RAO, third trimester). DAP normalized doses ranged from 0.051 (PA, first trimester) to 12.852 μGy/Gycm2 (RAO, third trimester). Conclusion: Embryo/fetus doses from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be estimated using the method developed in this study. This study was supported by the Greek Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, General Secretariat for Research and Technology, Operational Program ‘Education and Lifelong Learning’, ARISTIA (Research project: CONCERT)

  16. SU-E-I-42: Normalized Embryo/fetus Doses for Fluoroscopically Guided Pacemaker Implantation Procedures Calculated Using a Monte Carlo Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damilakis, J; Stratakis, J; Solomou, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is well known that pacemaker implantation is sometimes needed in pregnant patients with symptomatic bradycardia. To our knowledge, there is no reported experience regarding radiation doses to the unborn child resulting from fluoroscopy during pacemaker implantation. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for estimating embryo/fetus dose from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all trimesters of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study. Three mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing the average pregnant patient at the first, second and third trimesters of gestation were generated using Bodybuilder software (White Rock science, White Rock, NM). The normalized embryo/fetus dose from the posteroanterior (PA), the 30° left-anterior oblique (LAO) and the 30° right-anterior oblique (RAO) projections were calculated for a wide range of kVp (50–120 kVp) and total filtration values (2.5–9.0 mm Al). Results: The results consist of radiation doses normalized to a) entrance skin dose (ESD) and b) dose area product (DAP) so that the dose to the unborn child from any fluoroscopic technique and x-ray device used can be calculated. ESD normalized doses ranged from 0.008 (PA, first trimester) to 2.519 μGy/mGy (RAO, third trimester). DAP normalized doses ranged from 0.051 (PA, first trimester) to 12.852 μGy/Gycm2 (RAO, third trimester). Conclusion: Embryo/fetus doses from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be estimated using the method developed in this study. This study was supported by the Greek Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, General Secretariat for Research and Technology, Operational Program ‘Education and Lifelong Learning’, ARISTIA (Research project: CONCERT)

  17. Comparison of acetate tape impression with squeezing versus skin scraping for the diagnosis of canine demodicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A V; Pereira, S A; Gremião, I D F; Campos, M P; Ferreira, A M R

    2012-11-01

    This study compared the sensitivity of acetate tape impression and skin squeezing with that of deep skin scraping for the diagnosis of demodicosis in dogs. Demodex canis was detected in 100% of acetate tape impressions obtained after skin squeezing and in 90% of deep skin scrapings. There was a significant difference (P < 0.001) between the techniques in the total number of mites detected. Acetate tape impression with skin squeezing was found to be more sensitive than deep skin scraping and is an alternative diagnostic method for canine demodicosis. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2012 Australian Veterinary Association.

  18. Effect of disinfection on irreversible hydrocolloid and alternative impression materials and the resultant gypsum casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suprono, Montry S; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Goodacre, Charles J; Winer, Myron S

    2012-10-01

    Many new products have been introduced and marketed as alternatives to traditional irreversible hydrocolloid materials. These alternative materials have the same structural formula as addition reaction silicone, also known as vinyl polysiloxane (VPS), impression materials. Currently, there is limited in vitro and in vivo research on these products, including on the effects of chemical disinfectants on the materials. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a spray disinfecting technique on a traditional irreversible hydrocolloid and 3 new alternative impression materials in vitro. The tests were performed in accordance with the American National Standards Institute/American Dental Association (ANSI/ADA) Specification Nos. 18 and 19. Under standardized conditions, 100 impressions were made of a ruled test block with an irreversible hydrocolloid and 3 alternative impression materials. Nondisinfected irreversible hydrocolloid was used as the control. The impressions were examined for surface detail reproduction before and after disinfection with a chloramine-T product. Type III and Type V dental stone casts were evaluated for linear dimensional change and gypsum compatibility. Comparisons of linear dimensional change were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA of mean ranks with the Scheffé post hoc comparisons (α=.05). Data for surface detail reproduction were analyzed with the Wilcoxon Signed-Rank procedure and gypsum compatibility with the Kruskal-Wallis Rank procedure (α=.05). The alternative impression materials demonstrated significantly better outcomes with all 3 parameters tested. Disinfection with chloroamine-T did not have any effect on the 3 alternative impression materials. The irreversible hydrocolloid groups produced the most variability in the measurements of linear dimensional change. All of the tested materials were within the ADA's acceptable limit of 1.0% for linear dimensional change, except for the disinfected irreversible hydrocolloid

  19. pipelines cathodic protection design methodologies for impressed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    oil and gas pipelines corrosion in the United State of. American alone ... or preventing external corrosion of pipeline steels and other metallic .... 2.1 Materials and Impressed Current Design. Carbon steel ..... Research Analysis, Vol. 2, pp 2277 ...

  20. A Framework on Impression Management in Negotiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Ditte Dahl; Esbjerg, Lars

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we develop a dramaturgical framework to provide us with a new understanding of how negotiators use impression management behaviour during the negotiation process to position themselves in an endeavour to reach a desirable outcome.......In this paper we develop a dramaturgical framework to provide us with a new understanding of how negotiators use impression management behaviour during the negotiation process to position themselves in an endeavour to reach a desirable outcome....

  1. Ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, Geoffrey

    1975-01-01

    First, ion implantation in semiconductors is discussed: ion penetration, annealing of damage, gettering, ion implanted semiconductor devices, equipement requirements for ion implantation. The importance of channeling for ion implantation is studied. Then, some applications of ion implantation in metals are presented: study of the corrosion of metals and alloys; influence or ion implantation on the surface-friction and wear properties of metals; hyperfine interactions in implanted metals

  2. Evaluating the marginal fit of zirconia copings with digital impressions with an intraoral digital scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Shinyoung; Kim, Sungtae; Choi, Hyunmin; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Moon, Hong-Seok

    2014-11-01

    Digital impression systems have been developed to overcome the disadvantages associated with conventional impression methods. The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal fit of zirconia copings designed with the use of an iTero digital scanner with those designed by the conventional impression technique. Thirty identical cast, base-metal dies from 1 maxillary central incisor prepared for a ceramic crown restoration were fabricated. For the conventional impression group (CI), base metal dies (n=10) were replicated as stone dies by means of a conventional impression technique with polyvinyl siloxane material. For the iTero with polyurethane group (iP), base metal dies (n=10) were replicated as polyurethane dies with the iTero digital impression system. For the iTero with no dies group (iNo), base metal dies (n=10) were scanned with the iTero digital impression system, but no dies were fabricated. For each group, 10 zirconia copings were fabricated based on the stone dies (CI group), polyurethane dies (iP group), or stereolithography files (iNo group). The marginal gap of each specimen was measured with a light microscope at ×50 magnification. One-way analysis of variance and the Tukey honestly significant difference test were used for statistical analysis (α=.05). Statistically significant differences were found between the CI group and iP group (Pdigital impression method than in the group that used the conventional impression method. However, the marginal discrepancies of all of the groups were clinically acceptable. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Precision of digital impressions with TRIOS under simulated intraoral impression taking conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Sun, Yi-fei; Tian, Lei; Si, Wen-jie; Feng, Hai-lan; Liu, Yi-hong

    2015-02-18

    To evaluate the precision of digital impressions taken under simulated clinical impression taking conditions with TRIOS and to compare with the precision of extraoral digitalizations. Six #14-#17 epoxy resin dentitions with extracted #16 tooth preparations embedded were made. For each artificial dentition, (1)a silicone rubber impression was taken with individual tray, poured with type IV plaster,and digitalized with 3Shape D700 model scanner for 10 times; (2) fastened to a dental simulator, 10 digital impressions for each were taken with 3Shape TRIOS intraoral scanner. To assess the precision, best-fit algorithm and 3D comparison were conducted between repeated scan models pairwise by Geomagic Qualify 12.0, exported as averaged errors (AE) and color-coded diagrams. Non-parametric analysis was performed to compare the precisions of digital impressions and model images. The color-coded diagrams were used to show the deviations distributions. The mean of AE for digital impressions was 7.058 281 μm, which was greater than that of 4.092 363 μm for the model images (Pimpressions were no more than 10 μm, which meant that the consistency between the digital impressions was good. The deviations distribution was uniform in the model images,while nonuniform in the digital impressions with greater deviations lay mainly around the shoulders and interproximal surfaces. Digital impressions with TRIOS are of good precision and up to the clinical standard. Shoulders and interproximal surfaces scanning are more difficult.

  4. Two- and three-dimensional accuracy of dental impression materials: effects of storage time and moisture contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Deepa T; Jagger, Daryll C; Jagger, Robert G; Barbour, Michele E

    2010-01-01

    Dental impression materials are used to create an inverse replica of the dental hard and soft tissues, and are used in processes such as the fabrication of crowns and bridges. The accuracy and dimensional stability of impression materials are of paramount importance to the accuracy of fit of the resultant prosthesis. Conventional methods for assessing the dimensional stability of impression materials are two-dimensional (2D), and assess shrinkage or expansion between selected fixed points on the impression. In this study, dimensional changes in four impression materials were assessed using an established 2D and an experimental three-dimensional (3D) technique. The former involved measurement of the distance between reference points on the impression; the latter a contact scanning method for producing a computer map of the impression surface showing localised expansion, contraction and warpage. Dimensional changes were assessed as a function of storage times and moisture contamination comparable to that found in clinical situations. It was evident that dimensional changes observed using the 3D technique were not always apparent using the 2D technique, and that the former offers certain advantages in terms of assessing dimensional accuracy and predictability of impression methods. There are, however, drawbacks associated with 3D techniques such as the more time-consuming nature of the data acquisition and difficulty in statistically analysing the data.

  5. In-vitro evaluation of the accuracy of conventional and digital methods of obtaining full-arch dental impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ender, Andreas; Mehl, Albert

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the accuracy of conventional and digital impression methods used to obtain full-arch impressions by using an in-vitro reference model. Eight different conventional (polyether, POE; vinylsiloxanether, VSE; direct scannable vinylsiloxanether, VSES; and irreversible hydrocolloid, ALG) and digital (CEREC Bluecam, CER; CEREC Omnicam, OC; Cadent iTero, ITE; and Lava COS, LAV) full-arch impressions were obtained from a reference model with a known morphology, using a highly accurate reference scanner. The impressions obtained were then compared with the original geometry of the reference model and within each test group. A point-to-point measurement of the surface of the model using the signed nearest neighbour method resulted in a mean (10%-90%)/2 percentile value for the difference between the impression and original model (trueness) as well as the difference between impressions within a test group (precision). Trueness values ranged from 11.5 μm (VSE) to 60.2 μm (POE), and precision ranged from 12.3 μm (VSE) to 66.7 μm (POE). Among the test groups, VSE, VSES, and CER showed the highest trueness and precision. The deviation pattern varied with the impression method. Conventional impressions showed high accuracy across the full dental arch in all groups, except POE and ALG. Conventional and digital impression methods show differences regarding full-arch accuracy. Digital impression systems reveal higher local deviations of the full-arch model. Digital intraoral impression systems do not show superior accuracy compared to highly accurate conventional impression techniques. However, they provide excellent clinical results within their indications applying the correct scanning technique.

  6. Técnica de implante subpeitoral para tratamento de infecção de loja de marcapasso: estudo inicial Subpectoral pacemaker implantation technique for treatment of generator pocket infection: initial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acrisio Sales VALENTE

    2001-03-01

    tempo médio de antibioticoterapia foi de 7 dias. Não houve distúrbios do marcapasso que exigissem reabordagem. O seguimento é de 5 meses a 4 anos. Conclusão: A técnica avaliada mostra-se, a princípio, como uma alternativa viável no tratamento da infecção de loja de marcapasso, com baixa morbidade e grande eficácia.Introduction: Permanent pacing implantation is a very low risk procedure. However, infectious complications, specially in the pacemaker generator pocket, are the most common one with incidences (1 to 5%. These patients have been treated by many different therapeutic proceduros with controversial results. It has been well demonstrated that eradication of the infection is extremely difficult and the best results are reached through radical surgery consisting of removal of the pacemaker generator and electrode associated to antibiotic therapy. These procedures are related to high morbidity and expense. Muscle flaps are thought to have the ability to survive a bacterial inoculation and control infection. It also brings a rich network of blood supply to an infected and poorly vascularized area. Based in these facts we developed a new technique for the treatment of the generator pocket infection that is the subpectoral pacemaker implantationn. Material and Methods: Between January 1996 and March 2000, a total of 574 pacemakers were implanted or reimplanted at Santa Casa de São Paulo. Infection at the site of implantation developed in 6 instances (incidence of 1.11% and two extrusions of generator without apparent infection. Four patients had infection involving only the pacemaker pocket and two patients had sepsis. The organisms cultured were Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus epidermis and Pseudomonas. At pacemaker pocket infection instances and in the pacemaker extrusion the patients were treated by this new approach associated to antibiotic therapy. Results: There were no deaths, reinfection or failure of treatment. The mean hospital stay was 7

  7. Implant-supported titanium prostheses following augmentation procedures: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabe, C; Hoffmeister, B

    2003-03-01

    This report describes a novel technique for fabricating retrievable implant-supported titanium (Ti) prostheses in patients requiring a comprehensive treatment plan involving the combined efforts of maxillofacial surgery and implant prosthodontics. Following bone graft reconstructive surgery and implant placement prosthetic treatment was initiated by inserting ITI-Octa abutments. An impression was made, and a framework was fabricated by fusing Ti-cast frameworks to prefabricated titanium copings by laser-welding. This was followed by veneering or fabrication of a removable denture with Ti metal re-enforcement. Favourable clinical results have been achieved using these screw-retained Ti implant-supported restorations for patients treated with reconstructive bone graft-surgery, with clinical observation periods ranging from three to four years. The present observations suggest that these screw-retained implant-supported Ti prostheses may be a meaningful contribution to implant prosthodontics, facilitating retrievable restorations of optimum biocompatibility, good marginal precision and with a good esthetic result. However, controlled clinical studies are needed to establish the long-term serviceability of these Ti restorations.

  8. Voxel-based registration of simulated and real patient CBCT data for accurate dental implant pose estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, António H. J.; Queirós, Sandro; Morais, Pedro; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Correia, André Ricardo; Fernandes, Valter; Pinho, A. C. M.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2015-03-01

    The success of dental implant-supported prosthesis is directly linked to the accuracy obtained during implant's pose estimation (position and orientation). Although traditional impression techniques and recent digital acquisition methods are acceptably accurate, a simultaneously fast, accurate and operator-independent methodology is still lacking. Hereto, an image-based framework is proposed to estimate the patient-specific implant's pose using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and prior knowledge of implanted model. The pose estimation is accomplished in a threestep approach: (1) a region-of-interest is extracted from the CBCT data using 2 operator-defined points at the implant's main axis; (2) a simulated CBCT volume of the known implanted model is generated through Feldkamp-Davis-Kress reconstruction and coarsely aligned to the defined axis; and (3) a voxel-based rigid registration is performed to optimally align both patient and simulated CBCT data, extracting the implant's pose from the optimal transformation. Three experiments were performed to evaluate the framework: (1) an in silico study using 48 implants distributed through 12 tridimensional synthetic mandibular models; (2) an in vitro study using an artificial mandible with 2 dental implants acquired with an i-CAT system; and (3) two clinical case studies. The results shown positional errors of 67+/-34μm and 108μm, and angular misfits of 0.15+/-0.08° and 1.4°, for experiment 1 and 2, respectively. Moreover, in experiment 3, visual assessment of clinical data results shown a coherent alignment of the reference implant. Overall, a novel image-based framework for implants' pose estimation from CBCT data was proposed, showing accurate results in agreement with dental prosthesis modelling requirements.

  9. The establishment of implanted VX2 liver tumor model in rabbits and discussion on superselective left hepatic arterial catheterization with micro-catheter technique via femoral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xiongying; Luo Rongguang; Huang Jinhua; Miao Bijian; Wang Yan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To establish the implanted VX2 liver tumor model in rabbits and to discuss the feasibility and technical features of superselective left hepatic arterial catheterization by using micro-catheter through the femoral artery catheter sheath. Methods: Forty New Zealand white rabbits were inoculated with fragments of VX2 tumor into the medial left lobe of liver by using a 16G lumbar puncture needle through laparotomy route. Two weeks later, all the rabbits were proved to be successfully inoculated with liver neoplasm on CT scanning. Then, the catheter sheath was inserted into one of the femoral arteries, which was followed by celiac artery angiography and left hepatic artery catheterization with a micro-catheter under DSA guidance in order to evaluate the main branches of celiac artery and the imaging manifestations of VX2 liver tumor. After that, some scheduled interventional experiments were carried out. Results: Imaging examination and histopathologic study showed that the successful rate of implanted rabbit VX2 liver tumor was 100% (40/40). And the successful rate of the catheter sheath inserted to femoral artery was 97.5% (39/40). The successful rate of celiac artery, gastro-hepatic artery, common hepatic artery, proper hepatic artery and left hepatic artery catheterizations was 100% (39/39), 100% (39/39), 100% (39/39), 94.9% (37/39) and 71.2% (28/39) respectively. Conclusion: To implant tumor tissue mass through laparotomy is a stable and reliable method to establish rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. The insertion of micro-catheter through rabbit femoral catheter sheath approach is a convenient and simple technique to be carried out for the left hepatic artery catheterization and it can efficiently solve the technical difficulties when performing the interventional treatment of the rabbit VX2 hepatic tumor via left hepatic artery approach. (authors)

  10. Assessing the accuracy of elastomeric Impression materials in reline method

    OpenAIRE

    MH. Shahrodi; M. Emamie

    1995-01-01

    The accuracy of relined impressions is usually acceptable and in some cases is even more accurate than principal impression. Relined Polysulfide and condensational silicone impressions are more accurate than polyether impressions. The reline method compared to retaking them is more economic and needs less chair time.

  11. 21 CFR 872.6880 - Preformed impression tray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6880 Preformed impression tray. (a) Identification. A preformed impression tray is a metal or plastic device intended to hold impression material... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed impression tray. 872.6880 Section 872...

  12. Linear dimensional stability of elastomeric impression materials over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrofé, Analía B; Ferrari, Beatriz A; Picca, Mariana; Kaplan, Andrea E

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the linear dimensional stability of different elastomeric impression materials over time. A metal mold was designed with its custom trays, which were made of thermoplastic sheets (Sabilex sheets 0.125 mm thick). Three impressions were taken of it with each of the following: the polyvinylsiloxane Examix-GC-(AdEx), Aquasil-Dentsply-(AdAq) and Panasil-Kettenbach-(AdPa), and the polydimethylsiloxane Densell-Dental Medrano-(CoDe), Speedex-Coltene-(CoSp) and Lastic-Kettenbach-(CoLa). All impressions were taken with putty and light-body materials using a one-step technique. Standardized digital photographs were taken at different time intervals (0, 15, 30, 60, 120 minutes; 24 hours; 7 and 14 days), using an "ad-hoc" device, and analyzed using software (Image Tool) by measuring the distance between lines previously made at the top of the mold. The results were analyzed by ANOVA for repeated measures. The initial and final values for mean and SD were: AdEx: 1.32 (0.01) and 1.31 (0.00); AdAq: 1.32 (0.00) and 1.32 (0.00), AdPa: 1.327 (0.006) and 1.31 (0.00); CoDe: 1.32 (0.00) and 1.32 (0.01); CoSp: 1.327 (0.006) and 1.31 (0.00), CoLa: 1.327 (0.006) and 1.303 (0.006). Statistical evaluation showed that both material and time have significant effects. Under the conditions in this study we conclude that time would significantly affect the lineal dimensional stability of elastomeric impression materials.

  13. Giving the wrong impression: food and beverage brand impressions delivered to youth through popular movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skatrud-Mickelson, Monica; Adachi-Mejia, Anna M.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Sutherland, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Marketing on television showcases less-healthful options, with emerging research suggesting movies promote similar products. Given the obesity epidemic, understanding advertising to youth should be a public health imperative. The objective of this study was to estimate youth impressions to food and beverages delivered through movies. Methods Impressions were calculated by dividing US receipts annually into average movie ticket prices, then multiplying this by the number of brand appearances. Examination by ratings, product types and ages were conducted by Spearman rank correlation coefficient tests. Results Youth in the USA saw over 3 billion food, beverage or food–retail establishment (FRE) impressions on average, annually from 1996 to 2005. Those aged 12–18 viewed over half of all impressions, with PG-13-rated movies containing 61.5% of impressions. There were no significant trends in brand appearances by food, beverage or FRE impressions over the decade, although there was a decreasing trend in R-rated impressions for both foods (P< 0.01) and beverages (P< 0.01), but not FREs (P= 0.08). Conclusions Movies promote billions of food and beverage impressions annually to youth. Given the public health crisis of obesity, future research should further investigate these trends, as well as the potential association of these unhealthy exposures in youth. PMID:22076600

  14. Giving the wrong impression: food and beverage brand impressions delivered to youth through popular movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skatrud-Mickelson, Monica; Adachi-Mejia, Anna M; MacKenzie, Todd A; Sutherland, Lisa A

    2012-06-01

    Marketing on television showcases less-healthful options, with emerging research suggesting movies promote similar products. Given the obesity epidemic, understanding advertising to youth should be a public health imperative. The objective of this study was to estimate youth impressions to food and beverages delivered through movies. Impressions were calculated by dividing US receipts annually into average movie ticket prices, then multiplying this by the number of brand appearances. Examination by ratings, product types and ages were conducted by Spearman rank correlation coefficient tests. Youth in the USA saw over 3 billion food, beverage or food-retail establishment (FRE) impressions on average, annually from 1996 to 2005. Those aged 12-18 viewed over half of all impressions, with PG-13-rated movies containing 61.5% of impressions. There were no significant trends in brand appearances by food, beverage or FRE impressions over the decade, although there was a decreasing trend in R-rated impressions for both foods (Pbeverages (Pfood and beverage impressions annually to youth. Given the public health crisis of obesity, future research should further investigate these trends, as well as the potential association of these unhealthy exposures in youth.

  15. Antimicrobial Property of Hydrocolloid Impression Material Incorporated with Silver Nanoparticles Against Staphylococcus Aureus