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Sample records for imaging response criteria

  1. Evaluation of early imaging response criteria in glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millar Barbara-Ann

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early and accurate prediction of response to cancer treatment through imaging criteria is particularly important in rapidly progressive malignancies such as Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM. We sought to assess the predictive value of structural imaging response criteria one month after concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT in patients with GBM. Methods Thirty patients were enrolled from 2005 to 2007 (median follow-up 22 months. Tumor volumes were delineated at the boundary of abnormal contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images prior to and 1 month after RT. Clinical Progression [CP] occurred when clinical and/or radiological events led to a change in chemotherapy management. Early Radiologic Progression [ERP] was defined as the qualitative interpretation of radiological progression one month post-RT. Patients with ERP were determined pseudoprogressors if clinically stable for ≥6 months. Receiver-operator characteristics were calculated for RECIST and MacDonald criteria, along with alternative thresholds against 1 year CP-free survival and 2 year overall survival (OS. Results 13 patients (52% were found to have ERP, of whom 5 (38.5% were pseudoprogressors. Patients with ERP had a lower median OS (11.2 mo than those without (not reached (p 25% in volume or > 15% in area were most predictive of OS. Conclusions We show that while a subjective interpretation of early radiological progression from baseline is generally associated with poor outcome, true progressors cannot be distinguished from pseudoprogressors. In contrast, the magnitude of early imaging volumetric response may be a predictive and quantitative metric of favorable outcome.

  2. Revised response criteria for malignant lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheson, Bruce D; Pfistner, Beate; Juweid, Malik E

    2007-01-01

    Standardized response criteria are needed to interpret and compare clinical trials and for approval of new therapeutic agents by regulatory agencies.......Standardized response criteria are needed to interpret and compare clinical trials and for approval of new therapeutic agents by regulatory agencies....

  3. Multi-Criteria Optimization for Image Guidance

    CERN Document Server

    Winey, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a multi-criteria optimization framework for image guided radiotherapy. Methods: An algorithm is proposed for a multi-criteria framework for the purpose of patient setup verification decision processes. Optimal patient setup shifts and rotations are not always straightforward, particularly for deformable or moving targets of the spine, abdomen, thorax, breast, head and neck and limbs. The algorithm relies upon dosimetric constraints and objectives to aid in the patient setup such that the patient is setup to maximize tumor dose coverage and minimize dose to organs at risk while allowing for daily clinical changes. A simple 1D model and a lung lesion are presented. Results: The algorithm delivers a multi-criteria optimization framework allowing for clinical decisions to accommodate patient target variation make setup decisions less straightforward. With dosimetric considerations, optimal patient positions can be derived. Conclusions: A multi-criteria framework is demonstrated to aid in the p...

  4. Defining Clinical Response Criteria and Early Response Criteria for Precision Oncology: Current State-of-the-Art and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Subbiah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this era of precision oncology, there has been an exponential growth in the armamentarium of genomically targeted therapies and immunotherapies. Evaluating early responses to precision therapy is essential for “go” versus “no go” decisions for these molecularly targeted drugs and agents that arm the immune system. Many different response assessment criteria exist for use in solid tumors and lymphomas. We reviewed the literature using the Medline/PubMed database for keywords “response assessment” and various known response assessment criteria published up to 2016. In this article we review the commonly used response assessment criteria. We present a decision tree to facilitate selection of appropriate criteria. We also suggest methods for standardization of various response assessment criteria. The relevant response assessment criteria were further studied for rational of development, key features, proposed use and acceptance by various entities. We also discuss early response evaluation and provide specific case studies of early response to targeted therapy. With high-throughput, advanced computing programs and digital data-mining it is now possible to acquire vast amount of high quality imaging data opening up a new field of “omics in radiology”—radiomics that complements genomics for personalized medicine. Radiomics is rapidly evolving and is still in the research arena. This cutting-edge technology is poised to move soon to the mainstream clinical arena. Novel agents with new mechanisms of action require advanced molecular imaging as imaging biomarkers. There is an urgent need for development of standardized early response assessment criteria for evaluation of response to precision therapy.

  5. Revised response criteria for malignant lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheson, Bruce D; Pfistner, Beate; Juweid, Malik E

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Standardized response criteria are needed to interpret and compare clinical trials and for approval of new therapeutic agents by regulatory agencies. METHODS: The International Working Group response criteria (Cheson et al, J Clin Oncol 17:1244, 1999) were widely adopted, but required...... reassessment because of identified limitations and the increased use of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and flow cytometry. The International Harmonization Project was convened to provide updated recommendations. RESULTS: New guidelines are presented...... incorporating PET, IHC, and flow cytometry for definitions of response in non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Standardized definitions of end points are provided. CONCLUSION: We hope that these guidelines will be adopted widely by study groups, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, and regulatory...

  6. Introduction and clinical application of molecular imaging response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and bone metastases%分子影像学肿瘤疗效评价标准及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍晓; 程竞仪(综述); 章英剑(审校)

    2014-01-01

    基于肿瘤体积变化的实体瘤疗效评价标准--RECIST标准,具有一定的滞后性,难以满足对临床各种治疗手段的评价。18F-脱氧葡萄糖(18F-FDG)PET分子影像能反映细胞葡萄糖代谢,实现生物学水平早期评价肿瘤疗效,评价标准从EORTC、PERCIST到PREDIST,根据临床需求不断完善;更有针对骨转移瘤的MDA标准。该文详细概述以上4种分子影像学标准的评价方法及其临床应用。%With the development of diversification and individualization of therapy, it was found that the changes of tumor lesions are not consistent with the prognosis. RECIST criteria, which are based on the anatomical changes, always lag behind. Thus it is necessary to establish accurate, effective and feasible evaluation criteria. Molecular imaging can evaluate tumor response from glucose metabolism, including EORTC, PERCIST, PREDIST and MDA criteria. This paper introduces four evaluation criteria and their clinical application.

  7. Design Criteria For Networked Image Analysis System

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    Reader, Cliff; Nitteberg, Alan

    1982-01-01

    Image systems design is currently undergoing a metamorphosis from the conventional computing systems of the past into a new generation of special purpose designs. This change is motivated by several factors, notably among which is the increased opportunity for high performance with low cost offered by advances in semiconductor technology. Another key issue is a maturing in understanding of problems and the applicability of digital processing techniques. These factors allow the design of cost-effective systems that are functionally dedicated to specific applications and used in a utilitarian fashion. Following an overview of the above stated issues, the paper presents a top-down approach to the design of networked image analysis systems. The requirements for such a system are presented, with orientation toward the hospital environment. The three main areas are image data base management, viewing of image data and image data processing. This is followed by a survey of the current state of the art, covering image display systems, data base techniques, communications networks and software systems control. The paper concludes with a description of the functional subystems and architectural framework for networked image analysis in a production environment.

  8. On image segmentation using information theoretic criteria

    CERN Document Server

    Aue, Alexander; 10.1214/11-AOS925

    2012-01-01

    Image segmentation is a long-studied and important problem in image processing. Different solutions have been proposed, many of which follow the information theoretic paradigm. While these information theoretic segmentation methods often produce excellent empirical results, their theoretical properties are still largely unknown. The main goal of this paper is to conduct a rigorous theoretical study into the statistical consistency properties of such methods. To be more specific, this paper investigates if these methods can accurately recover the true number of segments together with their true boundaries in the image as the number of pixels tends to infinity. Our theoretical results show that both the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) and the minimum description length (MDL) principle can be applied to derive statistically consistent segmentation methods, while the same is not true for the Akaike information criterion (AIC). Numerical experiments were conducted to illustrate and support our theoretical fin...

  9. Response definition criteria for ELISPOT assays revisited.

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    Moodie, Z; Price, L; Gouttefangeas, C; Mander, A; Janetzki, S; Löwer, M; Welters, M J P; Ottensmeier, C; van der Burg, S H; Britten, Cedrik M

    2010-10-01

    No consensus has been reached on how to determine if an immune response has been detected based on raw data from an ELISPOT assay. The goal of this paper is to enable investigators to understand and readily implement currently available methods for response determination. We describe empirical and statistical approaches, identifying the strengths and limitations of each approach to allow readers to rationally select and apply a scientifically sound method appropriate to their specific laboratory setting. Five representative approaches were applied to data sets from the CIMT Immunoguiding Program and the response detection and false positive rates were compared. Simulation studies were also performed to compare empirical and statistical approaches. Based on these, we recommend the use of a non-parametric statistical test. Further, we recommend that six medium control wells or four wells each for both medium control and experimental conditions be performed to increase the sensitivity in detecting a response, that replicates with large variation in spot counts be filtered out, and that positive responses arising from experimental spot counts below the estimated limit of detection be interpreted with caution. Moreover, a web-based user interface was developed to allow easy access to the recommended statistical methods. This interface allows the user to upload data from an ELISPOT assay and obtain an output file of the binary responses.

  10. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging mismatch criteria to select patients for endovascular stroke therapy.

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    Mishra, Nishant K; Albers, Gregory W; Christensen, Søren; Marks, Michael; Hamilton, Scott; Straka, Matus; Liggins, John T P; Kemp, Stephanie; Mlynash, Michael; Bammer, Roland; Lansberg, Maarten G

    2014-05-01

    The Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging Evaluation for Understanding Stroke Evolution 2 (DEFUSE 2) study has shown that clinical response to endovascular reperfusion differs between patients with and without perfusion-diffusion (perfusion-weighted imaging-diffusion-weighted imaging, PWI-DWI) mismatch: patients with mismatch have a favorable clinical response to reperfusion, whereas patients without mismatch do not. This study examined whether alternative mismatch criteria can also differentiate patients according to their response to reperfusion. Patients from the DEFUSE 2 study were categorized according to vessel occlusion on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and DWI lesion volume criteria (MRA-DWI mismatch) and symptom severity and DWI criteria (clinical-DWI mismatch). Favorable clinical response was defined as an improvement of ≥8 points on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) by day 30 or an NIHSS score of ≤1 at day 30. We assessed, for each set of criteria, whether the association between reperfusion and favorable clinical response differed according to mismatch status. A differential response to reperfusion was observed between patients with and without MRA-DWI mismatch defined as an internal carotid artery or M1 occlusion and a DWI lesionfunctional outcome in patients who met these MRA-DWI mismatch criteria (odds ratio [OR], 8.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-31.3), whereas no association was observed in patients who did not meet these criteria (OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.08-3.1; P for difference between the odds, 0.01). No differential response to reperfusion was observed with other variations of the MRA-DWI or clinical-DWI mismatch criteria. The MRA-DWI mismatch is a promising alternative to DEFUSE 2's PWI-DWI mismatch for patient selection in endovascular stroke trials.

  11. Invited review--neuroimaging response assessment criteria for brain tumors in veterinary patients.

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    Rossmeisl, John H; Garcia, Paulo A; Daniel, Gregory B; Bourland, John Daniel; Debinski, Waldemar; Dervisis, Nikolaos; Klahn, Shawna

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of therapeutic response using cross-sectional imaging techniques, particularly gadolinium-enhanced MRI, is an integral part of the clinical management of brain tumors in veterinary patients. Spontaneous canine brain tumors are increasingly recognized and utilized as a translational model for the study of human brain tumors. However, no standardized neuroimaging response assessment criteria have been formulated for use in veterinary clinical trials. Previous studies have found that the pathophysiologic features inherent to brain tumors and the surrounding brain complicate the use of the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) assessment system. Objectives of this review are to describe strengths and limitations of published imaging-based brain tumor response criteria and propose a system for use in veterinary patients. The widely used human Macdonald and response assessment in neuro-oncology (RANO) criteria are reviewed and described as to how they can be applied to veterinary brain tumors. Discussion points will include current challenges associated with the interpretation of brain tumor therapeutic responses such as imaging pseudophenomena and treatment-induced necrosis, and how advancements in perfusion imaging, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown promise in differentiating tumor progression from therapy-induced changes. Finally, although objective endpoints such as MR imaging and survival estimates will likely continue to comprise the foundations for outcome measures in veterinary brain tumor clinical trials, we propose that in order to provide a more relevant therapeutic response metric for veterinary patients, composite response systems should be formulated and validated that combine imaging and clinical assessment criteria.

  12. The Disease Activity Score and the EULAR response criteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, J.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van

    2009-01-01

    The Disease Activity Score (DAS), its modified version the DAS28, and the DAS-based European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria are well-known measures of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The DAS is a clinical index of RA disease activity that combines information from

  13. The Disease Activity Score and the EULAR response criteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, J.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van

    2009-01-01

    The Disease Activity Score (DAS), its modified version the DAS28, and the DAS-based European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria are well-known measures of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The DAS is a clinical index of RA disease activity that combines information from

  14. Liposarcoma or lipoma: Does genetics change classic imaging criteria?

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    Bidault, F. [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France)], E-mail: bidault@igr.fr; Vanel, D. [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Musculoskeletal Oncology Research Center, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, 1/10 via di Barbiano, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Terrier, Ph.; Jalaguier, A. [Department of Pathology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Bonvalot, S. [Department of Surgery, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Pedeutour, F. [Laboratoire de Genetique, Centre hospitalier Universitaire de Nice (France); Couturier, J.M. [Service de Genetique Oncologique, Institut Curie, 26 rue d' Ulm, 75231 Paris (France); Dromain, C. [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France)

    2009-10-15

    Differentiating benign from malignant fatty tumours has always been very difficult for both radiologists and pathologists. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses provide complementary tools for differentiating soft tissue tumours. Our objective was to compare imaging criteria of malignancy with a new diagnostic gold standard, namely, pathological analysis combined with cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses. Nineteen patients with a fatty tumour were included. All had computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging examination before any biopsy or surgery. All had histopathological and cytogenetic and/or molecular genetic analyses. The imaging diagnosis of benign or malignant lesions was accurate in 15 cases, with 4 false positives for malignancy. Erroneous criteria were a large size (4 cases), and a mass that was not purely fatty. In conclusion, the main pitfall for a false positive radiological diagnosis of liposarcoma is certainly a large-sized tumour. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses contribute to the diagnosis and can be performed at the same time with a core biopsy.

  15. Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD): Development of Image Analysis Criteria and Examiner Reliability for Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mansur; Hollender, Lars; Odont; Anderson, Quentin; Kartha, Krishnan; Ohrbach, Richard K.; Truelove, Edmond L.; John, Mike T.; Schiffman, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction As a part of a multi-site RDC/TMD Validation Project, comprehensive TMJ diagnostic criteria were developed for image analysis using panoramic radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography (CT). Methods Inter-examiner reliability was estimated using the kappa (k) statistic, and agreement between rater pairs was characterized by overall, positive, and negative percent agreement. CT was the reference standard for assessing validity of other imaging modalities for detecting osteoarthritis (OA). Results For the radiological diagnosis of OA, reliability of the three examiners was poor for panoramic radiography (k = 0.16), fair for MRI (k = 0.46), and close to the threshold for excellent for CT (k = 0.71). Using MRI, reliability was excellent for diagnosing disc displacements (DD) with reduction (k = 0.78) and for DD without reduction (k = 0.94), and was good for effusion (k = 0.64). Overall percent agreement for pair-wise ratings was ≥ 82% for all conditions. Positive percent agreement for diagnosing OA was 19% for panoramic radiography, 59% for MRI, and 84% for CT. Using MRI, positive percent agreement for diagnoses of any DD was 95% and for effusion was 81%. Negative percent agreement was ≥ 88% for all conditions. Compared to CT, panoramic radiography and MRI had poor to marginal sensitivity, respectively, but excellent specificity, in detecting OA. Conclusion Comprehensive image analysis criteria for RDC/TMD Validation Project were developed, which can reliably be employed for assessing OA using CT, and for disc position and effusion using MRI. PMID:19464658

  16. Food choice criteria in adolescents according to body image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousana K. Papadopoulou

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Adolescent obesity has increased worldwide, while the percentage of adolescents who are dissatisfied with their body image has also increased. Disturbed body image is an important criterion for eating disturbances. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of body image on the food choice criteria of adolescents. The participants consisted of 1003 students (495 boys and 508 girls from High and Junior High schools in Thessaloniki, with mean age of 14.6±1.5 years. The sample for our study was chosen with stratified sampling plan. Data was collected with the use of a questionnaire regarding the food choice criteria, based on the studies of Lappalainen et al. (1998, Steptoe et al. (1995, Contento et al. (1995 and Worsley and Leitch (1981. Body image was assessed using Contento et al. (1995 questionnaire. The difference between desired and real body weight was used to estimate the desire of body weight change. The SPSS computer program was used for the statistical analysis. Chi square (X2 test was used to assess the differences between subgroups. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results showed that 35.9% of the adolescents (45% females and 26.6% males wanted to lose weight, while 14% (6.3% females and 22% males wished to gain weight. The remaining 50.1% (48.7% females and 51.4% males wanted to maintain their body weight. Food appearance constituted a more important criterion for the adolescents who wished to gain weight compared to those who wished to maintain their weight and the adolescents who wanted to lose weight. Dietary value was more important for the individuals who wanted to lose weight, than those who wished to maintain their weight and those who wished to gain weight. Overall, the majority of the girls was dissatisfied with their body image and wanted to lose weight. More boys wished to gain weight compared to girls. Adolescents who wished to lose weight seemed more concerned about food dietary value than

  17. Occupational safety and health criteria for responsible development of nanotechnology

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    Schulte, P. A.; Geraci, C. L.; Murashov, V.; Kuempel, E. D.; Zumwalde, R. D.; Castranova, V.; Hoover, M. D.; Hodson, L.; Martinez, K. F.

    2014-01-01

    Organizations around the world have called for the responsible development of nanotechnology. The goals of this approach are to emphasize the importance of considering and controlling the potential adverse impacts of nanotechnology in order to develop its capabilities and benefits. A primary area of concern is the potential adverse impact on workers, since they are the first people in society who are exposed to the potential hazards of nanotechnology. Occupational safety and health criteria for defining what constitutes responsible development of nanotechnology are needed. This article presents five criterion actions that should be practiced by decision-makers at the business and societal levels—if nanotechnology is to be developed responsibly. These include (1) anticipate, identify, and track potentially hazardous nanomaterials in the workplace; (2) assess workers' exposures to nanomaterials; (3) assess and communicate hazards and risks to workers; (4) manage occupational safety and health risks; and (5) foster the safe development of nanotechnology and realization of its societal and commercial benefits. All these criteria are necessary for responsible development to occur. Since it is early in the commercialization of nanotechnology, there are still many unknowns and concerns about nanomaterials. Therefore, it is prudent to treat them as potentially hazardous until sufficient toxicology, and exposure data are gathered for nanomaterial-specific hazard and risk assessments. In this emergent period, it is necessary to be clear about the extent of uncertainty and the need for prudent actions.

  18. Adaptive Response Criteria in Road Hazard Detection Among Older Drivers.

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    Feng, Jing; Choi, HeeSun; Craik, Fergus I M; Levine, Brian; Moreno, Sylvain; Naglie, Gary; Zhu, Motao

    2017-09-12

    The majority of existing investigations on attention, aging, and driving have focused on the negative impacts of age-related declines in attention on hazard detection and driver performance. However, driving skills and behavioral compensation may accommodate the negative effects that age-related attentional decline places on driving performance. In this study, we examined an important question that had been largely neglected in the literature linking attention, aging, and driving: can top-down factors such as behavioral compensation, specifically adaptive response criteria, accommodate the negative impacts from age-related attention declines on hazard detection during driving? In the experiment, we used the Drive Aware Task, a task combining the driving context with well-controlled laboratory procedures measuring attention. We compared younger (n = 16, age 21 - 30) and older (n = 21, age 65 - 79) drivers on their attentional processing of hazards in driving scenes, indexed by percentage of correct response and reaction time of hazard detection, as well as sensitivity and response criterion using the signal detection analysis. Older drivers, in general, were less accurate and slower on the task than younger drivers. However, results from this experiment revealed that older, but not younger, drivers adapted their response criteria when the traffic condition changed in the driving scenes. When there was more traffic in the driving scene, older drivers became more liberal in their responses, meaning that they were more likely to report that a driving hazard was detected. Older drivers adopt compensatory strategies on hazard detection during driving. Our findings showed that, in the driving context, even at an old age our attentional functions are still adaptive according to environmental conditions. This leads to considerations on potential training methods to promote adaptive strategies which may help older drivers maintain performance in road hazard detection.

  19. Translation in solid cancer: are size-based response criteria an anachronism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, M; Rosel, D; Brábek, J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of translation is the development of effective medicinal products based on validated science. A parallel objective is to obtain marketing authorization for the translated product. Unfortunately, in solid cancer, these two objectives are not mutually consistent as evidenced by the contrast between major advances in science and the continuing dismal record of pharmaceutical productivity. If the problem is unrelated to science, then the process of translation may require a closer examination, namely, the criteria for regulatory approval. This realization is important because, in this context, the objective of translation is regulatory approval, and science does not passively translate into useful medicinal products. Today, in solid cancer, response criteria related to tumor size are less useful than during the earlier cytotoxic drugs era; advanced imaging and biomarkers now allow for tracking of the natural history of the disease in the laboratory and the clinic. Also, it is difficult to infer clinical benefit from tumor shrinkage since it is rarely sustained. Accordingly, size-based response criteria may represent an anachronism relative to translation in solid cancer and it may be appropriate to align preclinical and clinical effort and shift the focus to local invasion and metastasis. The shift from a cancer cell-centric model to a stroma centric model offers novel opportunities not only to interupt the natural history of the disease, but also to rethink the relevance of outdated criteria of clinical response. Current evidence favors the opinion that, in solid cancer, a different, broader, and contextual approach may lead to interventions that could delay local invasion and metastasis. All elements supporting this shift, especially advanced imaging, are in place.

  20. Food selection criteria for disaster response planning in urban societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wien, Michelle; Sabaté, Joan

    2015-05-12

    Nutrition professionals that have menu planning and disaster management responsibilities should consider factors that have transcended from ancient to current times, in addition to recognizing societal trends that have led to our current increased vulnerability in the event of a disaster. Hence, we proceeded to develop a set of "Disaster Response Diets" (DRDs) for use in urban societies inclusive of the aforementioned considerations. A three-phase multidimensional approach was used to identify food groups suitable for creating a set of DRDs. Phase One consisted of calculating the percent daily nutrient intake and Drewnowski's naturally nutrient rich (NNR) score for an individual or mean composite for one serving of food from 11 specific food groups. In Phase Two, in addition to nutrient density, the 11 food groups were evaluated and scored based on the following DRD planning criteria: storage and handling properties, preparation ease and, cultural acceptance/individual tolerance. During Phase Three, three DRDs were developed based upon the data retrieved from Phases one and two. In Phase One, the NNR scores ranged from 2.1 for fresh fruits to 28.1 for dry cereals, a higher score indicating a higher nutrient density. During Phase Two, a maximum score of 12 was possible based on appropriateness for a disaster situation. Five plant-based food groups (dry cereals, nuts, dried fruits, grains and legumes) achieved a score ranging between 7 and 12, whereas the five fresh food groups were deemed ineligible due to sanitation and perishability concerns. During Phase Three, three DRDs (milk-inclusive, milk-free and Grab-and-Go) were developed as benchmarks for disaster response planning. Plant-based DRDs are universally acceptable and tolerated across cultures and religions. Therefore, we suggest nutrition professionals consider using a plant-based approach for creating DRDs for public health institutions and organizations.

  1. Recommendations for imaging tumor response in neurofibromatosis clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombi, Eva; Ardern-Holmes, Simone L; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barker, Fred G; Connor, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Fisher, Michael J; Goutagny, Stephane; Harris, Gordon J; Jaramillo, Diego; Karajannis, Matthias A; Korf, Bruce R; Mautner, Victor; Plotkin, Scott R; Poussaint, Tina Y; Robertson, Kent; Shih, Chie-Schin; Widemann, Brigitte C

    2013-11-19

    Neurofibromatosis (NF)-related benign tumors such as plexiform neurofibromas (PN) and vestibular schwannomas (VS) can cause substantial morbidity. Clinical trials directed at these tumors have become available. Due to differences in disease manifestations and the natural history of NF-related tumors, response criteria used for solid cancers (1-dimensional/RECIST [Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors] and bidimensional/World Health Organization) have limited applicability. No standardized response criteria for benign NF tumors exist. The goal of the Tumor Measurement Working Group of the REiNS (Response Evaluation in Neurofibromatosis and Schwannomatosis) committee is to propose consensus guidelines for the evaluation of imaging response in clinical trials for NF tumors. Currently used imaging endpoints, designs of NF clinical trials, and knowledge of the natural history of NF-related tumors, in particular PN and VS, were reviewed. Consensus recommendations for response evaluation for future studies were developed based on this review and the expertise of group members. MRI with volumetric analysis is recommended to sensitively and reproducibly evaluate changes in tumor size in clinical trials. Volumetric analysis requires adherence to specific imaging recommendations. A 20% volume change was chosen to indicate a decrease or increase in tumor size. Use of these criteria in future trials will enable meaningful comparison of results across studies. The proposed imaging response evaluation guidelines, along with validated clinical outcome measures, will maximize the ability to identify potentially active agents for patients with NF and benign tumors.

  2. Difference image analysis: Automatic kernel design using information criteria

    CERN Document Server

    Bramich, D M; Alsubai, K A; Bachelet, E; Mislis, D; Parley, N

    2015-01-01

    We present a selection of methods for automatically constructing an optimal kernel model for difference image analysis which require very few external parameters to control the kernel design. Each method consists of two components; namely, a kernel design algorithm to generate a set of candidate kernel models, and a model selection criterion to select the simplest kernel model from the candidate models that provides a sufficiently good fit to the target image. We restricted our attention to the case of solving for a spatially-invariant convolution kernel composed of delta basis functions, and we considered 19 different kernel solution methods including six employing kernel regularisation. We tested these kernel solution methods by performing a comprehensive set of image simulations and investigating how their performance in terms of model error, fit quality, and photometric accuracy depends on the properties of the reference and target images. We find that the irregular kernel design algorithm employing unreg...

  3. European guidelines on quality criteria for diagnostic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, D

    1998-03-01

    The quality control has an important part in hospitals services using ionizing radiations. This report deals with the radiation protection of patients, the aim being to reduce the exposure, as much as possible, insofar as the information stays optimal, considering the fact that, this time, children are concerned. Quality criteria are defined for different age groups: new-born, babies, five years old children, ten years old children. For every kind of examination are examined the characteristics allowing to give the maximal protection to the young patient. (N.C.)

  4. Resolution criteria in double-slit microscopic imaging experiments

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    You, Shangting; Kuang, Cuifang; Zhang, Baile

    2016-09-01

    Double-slit imaging is widely used for verifying the resolution of high-resolution and super-resolution microscopies. However, due to the fabrication limits, the slit width is generally non-negligible, which can affect the claimed resolution. In this paper we theoretically calculate the electromagnetic field distribution inside and near the metallic double slit using waveguide mode expansion method, and acquire the far-field image by vectorial Fourier optics. We find that the slit width has minimal influence when the illuminating light is polarized parallel to the slits. In this case, the claimed resolution should be based on the center-to-center distance of the double-slit.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging criteria for thrombolysis in acute cerebral infarct

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hjort, N; Butcher, K; Davis, SM; Kidwell, CS; Koroshetz, WJ; Rother, J; Schellinger, PD; Warach, S; Ostergaard, L

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose - Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) selection of stroke patients eligible for thrombolytic therapy is an emerging application. Although the efficacy of therapy within 3 hours after onset of symptoms with intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been proven for pa

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging criteria for thrombolysis in acute cerebral infarct

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hjort, N; Butcher, K; Davis, SM; Kidwell, CS; Koroshetz, WJ; Rother, J; Schellinger, PD; Warach, S; Ostergaard, L

    Background and Purpose - Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) selection of stroke patients eligible for thrombolytic therapy is an emerging application. Although the efficacy of therapy within 3 hours after onset of symptoms with intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been proven for

  7. Student Responses to Criteria-Referenced Self-Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Heidi; Du, Ying

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of undergraduate students' experiences with criteria-referenced self-assessment. Fourteen students who had taken a course involving self-assessment were interviewed in focus groups segregated by gender. The findings suggest that students had positive attitudes toward self-assessment after extended practice; felt they…

  8. Criteria of response of lawn grass to the environmental pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Y. V. Likholat

    2005-01-01

    Growth, physiological and biochemical criteria of reaction of the lawn grass on heavy metals influence are ascertained. Connection between levels of the heavy metals accumulation and changes of morphological parameters and activity of antioxidative protection enzymes of the plants is shown. Revealed specific features of lawn grasses stability to separate pollutants (heavy metals) action will be used for gardening industrial sites.

  9. Image interpretation criteria for FDG PET/CT in multiple myeloma: a new proposal from an Italian expert panel. IMPeTUs (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanni, Cristina; Rambaldi, Ilaria; Fanti, Stefano [AOU Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Zamagni, Elena; Cavo, Michele [AOU Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Hematology, Bologna (Italy); Versari, Annibale [IRCSS, Nuclear Medicine, S. Maria Nuova Hospital, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Chauvie, Stephane [Santa Croce e Carle Hospital, Medical Physics Unit, Cuneo (Italy); Bianchi, Andrea [Santa Croce e Carle Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Cuneo (Italy); Rensi, Marco [AOU S.Maria della Misericordia, Nuclear Medicine, Udine (Italy); Bello, Marilena [AO Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Nuclear Medicine, Torino (Italy); Gallamini, Andrea [A Lacassagne Cancer Center, Research and Innovation Department, Nice (France); Patriarca, Francesca [Udine University, Hematologic Clinic, Udine (Italy); Gay, Francesca [University of Torino, Myeloma Unit, Division of Hematology, Torino (Italy); Gamberi, Barbara [IRCCS, Hematology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera ASMN, Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    FDG PET/CT is able to detect active disease in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and can be helpful for staging and assessing therapy response, but no standard interpretation criteria have been proposed for the evaluation of FDG PET/CT in MM. A group of Italian nuclear medicine physicians and haematologists met to propose new visual interpretation criteria to standardize FDG PET/CT evaluation in MM patients (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe; IMPeTUs) and the reproducibility of these criteria was tested. This Italian multicentre protocol was set up as a subprotocol of EMN02, an international prospective multicentre trial of the European Myeloma Network. The criteria were agreed at multidisciplinary consensus meetings. They include a description of the metabolic state of the bone marrow (BM), number and site of focal PET-positive lesions, the number of osteolytic lesions, and the presence and site of extramedullary disease, paramedullary disease and fractures. A visual degree of uptake was defined for the target lesion and extramedullary lesions according to modified Deauville criteria. MM patients who had undergone FDG PET/CT at baseline (PET-0), after induction (PET-AI) and at the end of treatment (PET-EoT) were enrolled. The patients had been prospectively enrolled in EMN02 and their PET scans were a posteriori reinterpreted in a blinded independent central review process managed by WIDEN registered. Five expert nuclear medicine physicians scored the scans according to the new criteria. A case was considered read when four out of the five reviewers completed the report. Concordance among reviewers on different metrics was calculated using Krippendorff's alpha coefficient. A total of 17 consecutive patients were enrolled. On PET-0, the alpha coefficients for the BM score, the score for the hottest focal lesion, the number of focal lesions and the number of lytic lesions were 0.33 and 0.47, 0.40 and 0.32, respectively. On PET-AI, the alpha coefficients

  10. Resolution criteria in double-slit microscopic imaging experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shangting; Kuang, Cuifang; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    Double-slit imaging is widely used for verifying the resolution of high-resolution and super-resolution microscopies. However, due to the fabrication limits, the slit width is generally non-negligible, which can affect the claimed resolution. In this paper we theoretically calculate the electromagnetic field distribution inside and near the metallic double slit using waveguide mode expansion method, and acquire the far-field image by vectorial Fourier optics. We find that the slit width has minimal influence when the illuminating light is polarized parallel to the slits. In this case, the claimed resolution should be based on the center-to-center distance of the double-slit. PMID:27640808

  11. Algorithms and Array Design Criteria for Robust Imaging in Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    from the esteemed Harvard faculty. In particular, I would like to thank Prof. Yue Lu. I was very fortunate to be enrolled in the Statistical Inference... parents , Jean and Tom Kurien. xvi Introduction The use of optical interferometry as a multi-aperture imaging approach is attracting in- creasing...on the scene’s compactness, sparsity, or smoothness). In particular, a myriad of so-called self -calibration algorithms have been developed (see, e.g

  12. Leptomeningeal metastases: a RANO proposal for response criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Marc; Junck, Larry; Brandsma, Dieta; Soffietti, Riccardo; Rudà, Roberta; Raizer, Jeffrey; Boogerd, Willem; Taillibert, Sophie; Groves, Morris D; Rhun, Emilie Le; Walker, Julie; van den Bent, Martin; Wen, Patrick Y; Jaeckle, Kurt A

    2016-12-29

    Leptomeningeal metastases (LM) currently lack standardization with respect to response assessment. A Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) working group with expertise in LM developed a consensus proposal for evaluating patients treated for this disease. Three basic elements in assessing response in LM are proposed: a standardized neurological examination, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) cytology or flow cytometry, and radiographic evaluation. The group recommends that all patients enrolling in clinical trials undergo CSF analysis (cytology in all cancers; flow cytometry in hematologic cancers), complete contrast-enhanced neuraxis MRI, and in instances of planned intra-CSF therapy, radioisotope CSF flow studies. In conjunction with the RANO Neurological Assessment working group, a standardized instrument was created for assessing the neurological exam in patients with LM. Considering that most lesions in LM are nonmeasurable and that assessment of neuroimaging in LM is subjective, neuroimaging is graded as stable, progressive, or improved using a novel radiological LM response scorecard. Radiographic disease progression in isolation (ie, negative CSF cytology/flow cytometry and stable neurological assessment) would be defined as LM disease progression. The RANO LM working group has proposed a method of response evaluation for patients with LM that will require further testing, validation, and likely refinement with use.

  13. The skin conductance orienting response in neuroleptic-free schizophrenics: replication of the scoring criteria effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, D F; Edelberg, R; Maricq, H R

    1985-06-01

    It has been suggested that the use of invalid scoring criteria might be responsible for the finding of excessive nonhabituation of the skin conductance orienting response (SCOR) in schizophrenia. Certain criteria may confuse SCOR and spontaneous SC activity in subjects with high rates of the latter (Levinson et al. 1984). To replicate this finding, data were reanalyzed from a study of 25 neuroleptic-free schizophrenic patients and 23 normal male subjects. Analysis of response latency and amplitude during a habituation paradigm of 11 78.5-dB tones confirmed the predictions. Broad scoring criteria (SCOR onset 1-5 sec poststimulus, and a three-no-response-trials habituation criterion) produced significantly different habituation scores than more restrictive criteria (1.6-3.0 sec latency window and a two-trials habituation criterion). Nonhabituation was scored in five patients and six normals by the former criteria, but in no patient and one normal by the latter. Nonhabituators, defined by using the broad criteria, had higher rates of spontaneous activity. The narrow latency window contained significantly more responses than could be explained by the spontaneous activity rate, but this was not true for the added time permitted by the broad window. It is concluded that the use of more restrictive scoring criteria may help to clarify the validity of SCOR nonresponse or hyporesponse as a marker for a type of schizophrenic illness.

  14. Responsiveness of the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire : consequences of using different external criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijer, W; Brouwer, S; Dijkstra, PU; Jorritsma, W; Groothoff, JW; Geertzen, JHB

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the consequences of using different external criteria on responsiveness of the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) in patients with chronic low back pain. Design: Questionnaire measures before and after rehabilitation treatment. Setting: Rehabilitation centre. Subje

  15. Admission criteria to the Danish Brain Cancer Program are moderately associated with magnetic resonance imaging findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Mie Kiszka; Nepper-Rasmussen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Danish Brain Cancer Program by examining the criteria for admission to the program and the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in 359 patients referred to the program at the Odense University Hospital during one year. The admiss......The objective of this study was to evaluate the Danish Brain Cancer Program by examining the criteria for admission to the program and the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in 359 patients referred to the program at the Odense University Hospital during one year....... The admission criteria given by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority are as follows: 1. Prior computed tomography or MRI indicating tumour. 2. Progressive focal neurological deficits. 3. Epileptic seizure in adults. 4. Change in behaviour or cognition showing progression. 5. Headache with progression over...

  16. Determining ecoregional numeric nutrient criteria by stressor-response models in Yungui ecoregion lakes, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Shouliang; Ma, Chunzi; Xi, Beidou; Tong, Zhonghua; He, Zhuoshi; Su, Jing; Wu, Fengchang

    2014-01-01

    The importance of developing numeric nutrient criteria has been recognized to protect the designated uses of water bodies from nutrient enrichment that is associated with broadly occurring levels of nitrogen/phosphorus pollution. The identification and estimation of stressor-response models in aquatic ecosystems has been shown to be useful in the determination of nutrient criteria. In this study, three methods based on stressor-response relationships were applied to determine nutrient criteria for Yungui ecoregion lakes with respect to total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), and planktonic chlorophyll a (Chl a). Simple linear regression (SLR) models were established to provide an estimate of the relationship between a response variable and a stressor. Multiple linear regressions were used to simultaneously estimate the effect of TP and TN on Chl a. A morphoedaphic index (MEI) was applied to derive nutrient criteria using data from Yungui ecoregion lakes, which were considered as areas with less anthropogenic influences. Nutrient criteria, as determined by these three methods, showed broad agreement for all parameters. The ranges of numeric nutrient criteria for Yungui ecoregion lakes were determined as follows: TP 0.008-0.010 mg/L and TN 0.140-0.178 mg/L. The stressor-response analysis described will be of benefit to support countries in their numeric criteria development programs and to further the goal of reducing nitrogen/phosphorus pollution in China.

  17. Reliability and diagnostic performance of CT imaging criteria in the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Botha

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Abnormalities on CT imaging may contribute to the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM. Recently, an expert consensus case definition (CCD and set of imaging criteria for diagnosing basal meningeal enhancement (BME have been proposed. This study aimed to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and reliability of these in a prospective cohort of adult meningitis patients. METHODS: Initial diagnoses were based on the CCD, classifying patients into: 'Definite TBM' (microbiological confirmation, 'Probable TBM' (diagnostic score ≥10, 'Possible TBM' (diagnostic score 6-9, 'Not TBM' (confirmation of an alternative diagnosis or 'Uncertain' (diagnostic score of <6. CT images were evaluated independently on two occasions by four experienced reviewers. Intra-rater and inter-rater agreement were calculated using the kappa statistic. Sensitivities and specificities were calculated using both 'Definite TBM' and either 'Definite TBM' or 'Probable TBM' as gold standards. RESULTS: CT scan criteria for BME had good intra-rater agreement (κ range 0.35-0.78 and fair to moderate inter-rater agreement (κ range 0.20-0.52. Intra- and inter-rater agreement on the CCD components were good to fair (κ  =  ranges 0.47-0.81 and 0.21-0.63. Using 'Definite TBM' as a gold standard, the criteria for BME were very specific (61.5%-100%, but insensitive (5.9%-29.4%. Similarly, the imaging components of the CCD were highly specific (69.2-100% but lacked sensitivity (0-56.7%. Similar values were found when using 'Definite TBM' or 'Probable TBM' as a gold standard. DISCUSSION: The fair to moderate inter-rater agreement and poor sensitivities of the criteria for BME suggest that little reliance should be placed in these features in isolation. While the presence of the CCD criteria of acute infarction or tuberculoma(s appears useful as rule-in criteria, their absence is of little help in excluding TBM. The CCD and criteria for BME, as well as any new criteria

  18. Admission criteria to the Danish Brain Cancer Program are moderately associated with magnetic resonance imaging findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Mie Kiszka; Nepper-Rasmussen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Danish Brain Cancer Program by examining the criteria for admission to the program and the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in 359 patients referred to the program at the Odense University Hospital during one year....... The admission criteria given by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority are as follows: 1. Prior computed tomography or MRI indicating tumour. 2. Progressive focal neurological deficits. 3. Epileptic seizure in adults. 4. Change in behaviour or cognition showing progression. 5. Headache with progression over...

  19. Convex half-quadratic criteria and interacting auxiliary variables for image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idier, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with convex half-quadratic criteria and associated minimization algorithms for the purpose of image restoration. It brings a number of original elements within a unified mathematical presentation based on convex duality. Firstly, the Geman and Yang's and Geman and Reynolds's constructions are revisited, with a view to establishing the convexity properties of the resulting half-quadratic augmented criteria, when the original nonquadratic criterion is already convex. Secondly, a family of convex Gibbsian energies that incorporate interacting auxiliary variables is revealed as a potentially fruitful extension of the Geman and Reynolds's construction.

  20. NOAA/WEST COAST AND ALASKA TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER PACIFIC OCEAN RESPONSE CRITERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Rogers

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC response criteria for earthquakes occurring in the Pacific basin are presented. Initial warning decisions are based on earthquake location, magnitude, depth, and - dependent on magnitude - either distance from source or pre- computed threat estimates generated from tsunami models. The new criteria will help limit the geographical extent of warnings and advisories to threatened regions, and complement the new operational tsunami product suite.Changes to the previous criteria include: adding hypocentral depth dependence, reducing geographical warning extent for the lower magnitude ranges, setting special criteria for areas not well-connected to the open ocean, basing warning extent on pre-computed threat levels versus tsunami travel time for very large events, including the new advisory product, using the advisory product for far-offshore events in the lower magnitude ranges, and specifying distances from the coast for on-shore events which may be tsunamigenic.This report sets a baseline for response criteria used by the WCATWC considering its processing and observational data capabilities as well as its organizational requirements. Criteria are set for tsunamis generated by earthquakes, which are by far the main cause of tsunami generation (either directly through sea floor displacement or indirectly by triggering of slumps. As further research and development provides better tsunami source definition, observational data streams, and improved analysis tools, the criteria will continue to adjust. Future lines of research and development capable of providing operational tsunami warning centers with better tools are discussed.

  1. NOAA/West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center Pacific Ocean response criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, P.; Benz, H.; Bolton, M.; Crawford, G.; Dengler, L.; Fryer, G.; Goltz, J.; Hansen, R.; Kryzanowski, K.; Malone, S.; Oppenheimer, D.; Petty, E.; Rogers, G.; Wilson, Jim

    2008-01-01

    New West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC) response criteria for earthquakes occurring in the Pacific basin are presented. Initial warning decisions are based on earthquake location, magnitude, depth, and - dependent on magnitude - either distance from source or precomputed threat estimates generated from tsunami models. The new criteria will help limit the geographical extent of warnings and advisories to threatened regions, and complement the new operational tsunami product suite. Changes to the previous criteria include: adding hypocentral depth dependence, reducing geographical warning extent for the lower magnitude ranges, setting special criteria for areas not well-connected to the open ocean, basing warning extent on pre-computed threat levels versus tsunami travel time for very large events, including the new advisory product, using the advisory product for far-offshore events in the lower magnitude ranges, and specifying distances from the coast for on-shore events which may be tsunamigenic. This report sets a baseline for response criteria used by the WCATWC considering its processing and observational data capabilities as well as its organizational requirements. Criteria are set for tsunamis generated by earthquakes, which are by far the main cause of tsunami generation (either directly through sea floor displacement or indirectly by triggering of slumps). As further research and development provides better tsunami source definition, observational data streams, and improved analysis tools, the criteria will continue to adjust. Future lines of research and development capable of providing operational tsunami warning centers with better tools are discussed.

  2. 33 CFR 155.1230 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Response plan development and... § 155.1230 Response plan development and evaluation criteria. (a) Owners and operators of vessels that... continuous operation. (2) Resources must be capable of reaching the locations in which the vessel...

  3. 33 CFR 155.2230 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Response plan development and....2230 Response plan development and evaluation criteria. (a) Owners and operators of vessels that carry... offload the vessel's largest cargo tank in 24 hours of continuous operation. (2) Resources must be...

  4. International Myeloma Working Group consensus criteria for response and minimal residual disease assessment in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Shaji; Paiva, Bruno; Anderson, Kenneth C;

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of multiple myeloma has substantially changed over the past decade with the introduction of several classes of new effective drugs that have greatly improved the rates and depth of response. Response criteria in multiple myeloma were developed to use serum and urine assessment of monocl...

  5. ELN 2013 response status criteria: relevance for de novo imatinib chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Gabriel; Dulucq, Stéphanie; Lascaux, Axelle; Schmitt, Anna; Bidet, Audrey; Fort, Marie-Pierre; Lippert, Eric; Bureau, Caroline; Adiko, Didier; Hayette, Sandrine; Reiffers, Josy; Nicolini, Franck-Emmanuel; Mahon, François-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The response definitions proposed by the European Leukemia Net (ELN) have been recently modified. We evaluated the new criteria for de novo imatinib (400 mg/d) chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML) patients. Response status according to the 2009 and 2013 criteria were determined in 180 unselected patients. Outcome of the subgroups of patients were then compared. The 180 patients were classified as optimal responders (OR2009; n = 113, 62.7%), suboptimal responders (SOR2009; n = 47, 26.1%) and failures (FAIL2009; n = 20, 11.1%) according to the 2009 ELN criteria and optimal responders (OR2013; n = 77, 42.7%), warnings (WAR2013; n = 59, 32.7%), and failures (FAIL2013; n = 44, 24.4%) according to the 2013 ELN criteria. No difference in terms of outcome was observed between OR2009 patients who became WAR2013 when compared with OR2013 patients. When compared with FAIL2009 patients, SOR2009 patients who became WAR2013 had better EFS, FFS, PFS, and OS. No difference was observed in PFS or OS in SOR2009 patients who became FAIL2013. The 2013 ELN response status criteria have improved patients classification in terms of response status. However, in our patient population this improvement is related to a better definition of failure rather than that of optimal response for CP-CML patients treated with IM frontline therapy.

  6. Response criteria for myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia: results of an initiative of the European Myelofibrosis Network (EUMNET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barosi, Giovanni; Bordessoule, Dominique; Briere, Jean;

    2005-01-01

    The European Myelofibrosis Network (EUMNET), a European research network on myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia (MMM), has developed a definition of response for the disease by using clinicohematologic, histologic, and cytogenetic criteria. A core set of 5 clinicohematologic criteria was selected...

  7. NOAA/West coast and Alaska Tsunami warning center Atlantic Ocean response criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, P.; Refidaff, C.; Caropolo, M.; Huerfano-Moreno, V.; Knight, W.; Sammler, W.; Sandrik, A.

    2009-01-01

    West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC) response criteria for earthquakesoccurring in the Atlantic and Caribbean basins are presented. Initial warning center decisions are based on an earthquake's location, magnitude, depth, distance from coastal locations, and precomputed threat estimates based on tsunami models computed from similar events. The new criteria will help limit the geographical extent of warnings and advisories to threatened regions, and complement the new operational tsunami product suite. Criteria are set for tsunamis generated by earthquakes, which are by far the main cause of tsunami generation (either directly through sea floor displacement or indirectly by triggering of sub-sea landslides).The new criteria require development of a threat data base which sets warning or advisory zones based on location, magnitude, and pre-computed tsunami models. The models determine coastal tsunami amplitudes based on likely tsunami source parameters for a given event. Based on the computed amplitude, warning and advisory zones are pre-set.

  8. Appropriateness criteria for cardiovascular imaging use in clinical practice: a position statement of the ESC/EACVI taskforce.

    OpenAIRE

    Garbi, Madalina; Habib, Gilbert; Plein, Sven; Neglia, Danilo; Kitsiou, Anastasia; Donal, Erwan; Pinto, Fausto; Bax, Jeroen; Achenbach, Stephan; Popescu, Bogdan A; Edvardsen, Thor; Badano, Luigi P.; Stefanidis, Alexandros; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara; Derumeaux, Genevieve

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing interest from the scientific community in the appropriate use of cardiovascular imaging techniques for diagnosis and decision making in Europe. To develop appropriateness criteria for cardiovascular imaging use in clinical practice in Europe, a dedicated taskforce has been appointed by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI). The present paper describes the appropriateness criteria development process. Peer ...

  9. A Robust Image Tampering Detection Method Based on Maximum Entropy Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel image watermarking method based on local energy and maximum entropy aiming to improve the robustness. First, the image feature distribution is extracted by employing the local energy model and then it is transformed as a digital watermark by employing a Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT. An offset image is thus obtained according to the difference between the extracted digital watermarking and the feature distribution of the watermarked image. The entropy of the pixel value distribution is computed first. The Lorenz curve is used to measure the polarization degree of the pixel value distribution. In the pixel location distribution flow, the maximum entropy criteria is applied in segmenting the offset image into potentially tampered regions and unchanged regions. All-connected graph and 2-D Gaussian probability are utilized to obtain the probability distribution of the pixel location. Finally, the factitious tampering probability value of a pending detected image is computed through combining the weighting factors of pixel value and pixel location distribution. Experimental results show that the proposed method is more robust against the commonly used image processing operations, such as Gaussian noise, impulse noise, etc. Simultaneously, the proposed method achieves high sensitivity against factitious tampering.

  10. ACR Appropriateness Criteria(®) Imaging of Possible Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenel, James G; Chung, Jonathan H; Ackman, Jeanne B; de Groot, Patricia M; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Jokerst, Clinton; Maldonado, Fabien; McComb, Barbara L; Steiner, Robert M; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien

    2017-05-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis remains a major cause of disease worldwide and an important public health hazard in the United States. The imaging evaluation depends to a large degree on clinical symptoms and whether active disease is suspected or a subject is at high risk for developing active disease. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Standards and standardization in mastocytosis: Consensus statements on diagnostics, treatment recommendations and response criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valent, P.; Akin, C.; Escribano, L.; Fodinger, M.; Hartmann, K.; Brockow, K.; Castells, M.; Sperr, W.R.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke; Hamdy, N.A.T.; Lortholary, O.; Robyn, J.; van Doormaal, J.; Sotlar, K.; Hauswirth, A.W.; Arock, M.; Hermine, O.; Hellmann, A.; Triggiani, M.; Niedoszytko, M.; Schwartz, L.B.; Orfao, A.; Horny, H.P.; Metcalfe, D.D.

    2007-01-01

    Although a classification for mastocytosis and diagnostic criteria are available, there remains a need to define standards for the application of diagnostic tests, clinical evaluations, and treatment responses. To address these demands, leading experts discussed current issues and standards in masto

  12. Standards and standardization in mastocytosis : Consensus statements on diagnostics, treatment recommendations and response criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valent, P.; Akin, C.; Escribano, L.; Foedinger, M.; Hartmann, K.; Brockow, K.; Castells, M.; Sperr, W. R.; Kluin-Nelemans, H. C.; Hamdy, N. A. T.; Lortholary, O.; Robyn, J.; van Doormaal, J.; Sotlar, K.; Hauswirth, A. W.; Arock, M.; Hermine, O.; Hellmann, A.; Triggiani, M.; Niedoszytko, M.; Schwartz, L. B.; Orfao, A.; Horny, H.-P.; Metcalfe, D. D.

    2007-01-01

    Although a classification for mastocytosis and diagnostic criteria are available, there remains a need to define standards for the application of diagnostic tests, clinical evaluations, and treatment responses. To address these demands, leading experts discussed current issues and standards in masto

  13. Comparison of the RECIST and EORTC PET criteria in the tumor response assessment: a pooled analysis and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Bum Jun; Jang, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hyeong Su

    2017-08-05

    The EORTC PET criteria (EORTC criteria) are used to assess metabolic tumor response in patients with solid tumors. We conducted this pooled study to compare tumor responses according to the RECIST and EORTC criteria. Electronic databases were searched for eligible articles with the terms of "RECIST" or "EORTC criteria". We found seven articles with the data on the comparison of tumor responses by the RECIST and EORTC criteria. A total of 181 patients were recruited from the seven studies. Ninety-two patients (50.8%) received cytotoxic chemotherapy and 89 were treated with targeted agents. The agreement of tumor responses between the RECIST and EORTC criteria was moderate (k = 0.493). Of 181 patients, 66 (36.5%) showed disagreement in the tumor responses: tumor response was upgraded in 54 patients and downgraded in 12 when adopting the EORTC criteria. The estimated overall response rates were significantly different between the two criteria (52.5% by the EORTC vs. 29.8% by the RECIST, P EORTC criteria is not excellent. When adopting the EORTC criteria instead of the RECIST, the overall response rate was significantly increased.

  14. Response Classification Images in Vernier Acuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Beard, B. L.; Ellis, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Orientation selective and local sign mechanisms have been proposed as the basis for vernier acuity judgments. Linear image features contributing to discrimination can be determined for a two choice task by adding external noise to the images and then averaging the noises separately for the four types of stimulus/response trials. This method is applied to a vernier acuity task with different spatial separations to compare the predictions of the two theories. Three well-practiced observers were presented around 5000 trials of a vernier stimulus consisting of two dark horizontal lines (5 min by 0.3 min) within additive low-contrast white noise. Two spatial separations were tested, abutting and a 10 min horizontal separation. The task was to determine whether the target lines were aligned or vertically offset. The noises were averaged separately for the four stimulus/response trial types (e.g., stimulus = offset, response = aligned). The sum of the two 'not aligned' images was then subtracted from the sum of the 'aligned' images to obtain an overall image. Spatially smoothed images were quantized according to expected variability in the smoothed images to allow estimation of the statistical significance of image features. The response images from the 10 min separation condition are consistent with the local sign theory, having the appearance of two linear operators measuring vertical position with opposite sign. The images from the abutting stimulus have the same appearance with the two operators closer together. The image predicted by an oriented filter model is similar, but has its greatest weight in the abutting region, while the response images fall to nonsignificance there. The response correlation image method, previously demonstrated for letter discrimination, clarifies the features used in vernier acuity.

  15. Development of criteria for evaluating clinical response in thyroid eye disease using a modified Delphi technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglas, Raymond S; Tsirbas, Angelo; Gordon, Mark;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify components of a provisional clinical response index for thyroid eye disease using a modified Delphi technique. METHODS: The International Thyroid Eye Disease Society conducted a structured, 3-round Delphi exercise establishing consensus for a core set of measures for clinical...... exercise, we developed provisional core measures for assessing disease activity and severity in clinical trials of therapies for thyroid eye disease. These measures will be iteratively refined for use in multicenter clinical trials.......% of participants) rated 153 criteria in Delphi 3 (67 criteria were excluded because of redundancy). Criteria with a mean greater than 6 (1 = least appropriate to 9 = most appropriate) were further evaluated by the nominal group technique and provisional core measures were chosen. CONCLUSIONS: Using a Delphi...

  16. A multiple criteria-based spectral partitioning method for remotely sensed hyperspectral image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Li, Jun; Plaza, Antonio; Sun, Yanli

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing offers a powerful tool in many different application contexts. The imbalance between the high dimensionality of the data and the limited availability of training samples calls for the need to perform dimensionality reduction in practice. Among traditional dimensionality reduction techniques, feature extraction is one of the most widely used approaches due to its flexibility to transform the original spectral information into a subspace. In turn, band selection is important when the application requires preserving the original spectral information (especially the physically meaningful information) for the interpretation of the hyperspectral scene. In the case of hyperspectral image classification, both techniques need to discard most of the original features/bands in order to perform the classification using a feature set with much lower dimensionality. However, the discriminative information that allows a classifier to provide good performance is usually classdependent and the relevant information may live in weak features/bands that are usually discarded or lost through subspace transformation or band selection. As a result, in practice, it is challenging to use either feature extraction or band selection for classification purposes. Relevant lines of attack to address this problem have focused on multiple feature selection aiming at a suitable fusion of diverse features in order to provide relevant information to the classifier. In this paper, we present a new dimensionality reduction technique, called multiple criteria-based spectral partitioning, which is embedded in an ensemble learning framework to perform advanced hyperspectral image classification. Driven by the use of a multiple band priority criteria that is derived from classic band selection techniques, we obtain multiple spectral partitions from the original hyperspectral data that correspond to several band subgroups with much lower spectral dimensionality as compared with

  17. Criteria for evaluating response and outcome in clinical trials for children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare myeloproliferative disease in young children. While hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapeutic option for most patients, children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia increasingly receive novel agents in phase I-II clinical trials as pre-transplant therapy or therapy for relapse after transplantation. However, response criteria or definitions of outcome for standardized evaluation of treatment effect in patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia are currently lacking. Here we propose criteria to evaluate the response to the non-transplant therapy and definitions of remission status after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. For the evaluation of non-transplant therapy, we defined 6 clinical variables (white blood cell count, platelet count, hematopoietic precursors and blasts in peripheral blood, bone marrow blast percentage, spleen size and extramedullary disease) and 3 genetic variables (cytogenetic, molecular and chimerism response) which serve to describe the heterogeneous picture of response to therapy in each individual case. It is hoped that these criteria will facilitate the comparison of results between clinical trials in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

  18. Standardization of selection criteria for percutaneous image-guided cryoablation of recurrent soft-tissue sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippa, N; Sargos, P; Italiano, A; Kind, M; Dallaudière, B; Hauger, O; Cornelis, F

    2014-11-01

    Percutaneous image-guided cryoablation has not been validated for local management of recurrence of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) of the trunk or limbs. This study aims to identify selection criteria for cryoablation in order to standardize indications of this treatment. Between 2000 and 2010, 46 patients (57 tumors) presenting local recurrences of STS of the trunk or limbs and treated following standards of care were selected from our institutional database. Eligibility for cryoablation was assessed by two radiologists according to predefined criteria: maximal diameter size of the tumor ≤10cm, distance to skin >5mm, distance to neurovascular structures 3mm at least, absence of articular involvement and planned cryoablation covering the entire lesion volume. Characteristics and outcomes were compared. There was nearly perfect agreement for all criteria (k coefficient ranging from 0.83 to 0.98) between both readers. A subgroup of 13patients was identified as eligible for cryoablation. Locations to the trunk, pelvic girdle or shoulder were significantly more present in the cryoablation group (P=0.002). In this group, tumors were mainly located deeply (P=0.002) with great axes ≤5cm (P=0.044). High local tumor aggressiveness (P=0.016) and differentiated myxoid liposarcoma or myxofibrosarcoma (P=0.007) were more frequent in the eligible group. Based on these criteria, two groups of patients with local relapse of STS can be identified. These results may improve the standardization of selection of patients who could be candidates for cryoablation. Copyright © 2014 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Tuned Inhibitory Responses in Binocular Natural Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Goutcher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Binocular neurons in primary visual cortex are typically categorised as either Near, Far, Tuned Excitatory (TE or Tuned Inhibitory (TI cells (Poggio & Fischer, 1977, J. Neurophysiol., 40, 1392-1405. Both TI and TE responses may be approximated through differing arrangements of the binocular energy model (Ohzawa, De Angelis & Freeman, 1990, Science, 249, 1037-1041, with TE neurons responding to instances of binocular correlation, and TI neurons responding to a lack of correlation. Differences in the inter-ocular phase or position of receptive fields allow model TE cells to be used for the measurement of binocular disparity. Previous research (Hibbard, 2008, Vision Research, 48, 1427-1439 has examined the responses of these disparity tuned TE neurons to binocular natural images. However, the responses of TI neurons to such images are not clear. We examined these TI responses for a set of binocular natural images, and compared them to responses for random-dot stereograms (RDSs. TI neuron responses were modelled by placing left and right eye receptive fields in anti-phase arrangement. In addition, TI responses were normalised by monocular energy. This provides a response with a range of ±1, with a value of +1 indicating that two image regions are anti-correlated. TI responses were generally negative for both RDSs and natural images. For binocular natural images, positive TI responses were found for a small proportion of units. Typically, positive TI responses were found when monocular energy was low, occurred across all orientation channels, and increased in prevalence at lower spatial frequencies. Positive responses were clustered around object edges, suggesting a functional role for TI neurons in the detection of depth boundaries.

  20. Improvement and Extension of Shape Evaluation Criteria in Multi-Scale Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, M.; Honda, Y.; Kondo, A.

    2016-06-01

    From the last decade, the multi-scale image segmentation is getting a particular interest and practically being used for object-based image analysis. In this study, we have addressed the issues on multi-scale image segmentation, especially, in improving the performances for validity of merging and variety of derived region's shape. Firstly, we have introduced constraints on the application of spectral criterion which could suppress excessive merging between dissimilar regions. Secondly, we have extended the evaluation for smoothness criterion by modifying the definition on the extent of the object, which was brought for controlling the shape's diversity. Thirdly, we have developed new shape criterion called aspect ratio. This criterion helps to improve the reproducibility on the shape of object to be matched to the actual objectives of interest. This criterion provides constraint on the aspect ratio in the bounding box of object by keeping properties controlled with conventional shape criteria. These improvements and extensions lead to more accurate, flexible, and diverse segmentation results according to the shape characteristics of the target of interest. Furthermore, we also investigated a technique for quantitative and automatic parameterization in multi-scale image segmentation. This approach is achieved by comparing segmentation result with training area specified in advance by considering the maximization of the average area in derived objects or satisfying the evaluation index called F-measure. Thus, it has been possible to automate the parameterization that suited the objectives especially in the view point of shape's reproducibility.

  1. 33 CFR 154.1047 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group V petroleum oils. 154.1047 Section...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Oil Facilities § 154.1047 Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or...

  2. 33 CFR 154.1225 - Specific response plan development and evaluation criteria and other requirements for fixed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... development and evaluation criteria and other requirements for fixed facilities that handle, store, or... MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Animal Fats and Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1225 Specific response plan development and evaluation criteria and other requirements for fixed facilities that handle,...

  3. 33 CFR 155.1052 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for vessels carrying group V petroleum oil as a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....1052 Response plan development and evaluation criteria for vessels carrying group V petroleum oil as a... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Response plan development and evaluation criteria for vessels carrying group V petroleum oil as a primary cargo. 155.1052 Section...

  4. Simplified response monitoring criteria for multiple myeloma in patients undergoing therapy with novel agents using computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabel, Christoph; Horger, Marius; Kum, Sara; Weisel, Katja; Fritz, Jan; Ioanoviciu, Sorin D; Bier, Georg

    2016-12-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant hematological disorder of the mature B-cell lymphocytes originating in the bone marrow. While therapy monitoring is still mainly based on laboratory biomarkers, the additional use of imaging has been advocated due to inaccuracies of serological biomarkers or in a-secretory myelomas. Non-enhanced CT and MRI have similar sensitivities for lesions in yellow marrow-rich bone marrow cavities with a favourable risk and cost-effectiveness profile of CT. Nevertheless, these methods are still limited by frequently high numbers of medullary lesions and its time consumption for proper evaluation. To establish simplified response criteria by correlating size and CT attenuation changes of medullary multiple myeloma lesions in the appendicular skeleton with the course of lytic bone lesions in the entire skeleton. Furthermore to evaluate these criteria with respect to established hematological myeloma-specific parameters for the prediction of treatment response to bortezomib or lenalidomide. Non-enhanced reduced-dose whole-body CT examinations of 78 consecutive patients (43 male, 35 female, mean age 63.69±9.2years) with stage III multiple myeloma were retrospectively re-evaluated. On per patient basis, size and mean CT attenuation of 2-4 representative lesions in the limbs were measured at baseline and at a follow-up after a mean of 8 months. Results were compared with the course of lytical bone lesions as well with that of specific hematological biomarkers. Myeloma response was assessed according to the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) uniform response criteria. Testing for correlation between response of medullary lesions (Respmed) and response of all myeloma manifestations including osteolyses (Resptotal) was performed using the corrected contingency coefficient (Ccorr). The correlation between Respmed based on length diameter and transverse diameter and Resptotal was perfect (Ccorr=1.0; p0.05). Measurements of size of a minimum of

  5. Benign and Suspicious Ovarian Masses—MR Imaging Criteria for Characterization: Pictorial Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Valentini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian masses present a special diagnostic challenge when imaging findings cannot be categorized into benign or malignant pathology. Ultrasonography (US, Computed Tomography (CT, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI are currently used to evaluate ovarian tumors. US is the first-line imaging investigation for suspected adnexal masses. Color Doppler US helps the diagnosis identifying vascularized components within the mass. CT is commonly performed in preoperative evaluation of a suspected ovarian malignancy, but it exposes patients to radiation. When US findings are nondiagnostic or equivocal, MRI can be a valuable problem solving tool, useful to give also surgical planning information. MRI is well known to provide accurate information about hemorrhage, fat, and collagen. It is able to identify different types of tissue contained in pelvic masses, distinguishing benign from malignant ovarian tumors. The knowledge of clinical syndromes and MRI features of these conditions is crucial in establishing an accurate diagnosis and determining appropriate treatment. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate MRI findings in neoplastic and non-neoplastic ovarian masses, which were assessed into three groups: cystic, solid, and solid/cystic lesions. MRI criteria for the correct diagnosis and characteristics for differentiating benign from malignant conditions are shown in this paper.

  6. Modified criteria for the systemic inflammatory response syndrome improves their utility following cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Niall S; Finney, Simon J; Gordon, Sarah E; Quinlan, Gregory J; Evans, Timothy W

    2014-06-01

    Debate remains regarding whether the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) identifies patients with clinically important inflammation. Defining criteria may be disproportionately sensitive and lack specificity. We investigated the incidence and evolution of SIRS in a homogenous population (following cardiac surgery) over 7 days to establish the relationship between SIRS and outcome, modeling alternative permutations of the criteria to increase their discriminatory power for mortality, length of stay, and organ dysfunction. We conducted a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from a cardiothoracic ICU. Consecutive patients requiring ICU admission for the first time after cardiac surgery (N = 2,764) admitted over a 41-month period were studied. Concurrently, 96.2% of patients met the standard two criterion definition for SIRS within 24 h of ICU admission. Their mortality was 2.78%. By contrast, three or four criteria were more discriminatory of patients with higher mortality (4.21% and 10.2%, respectively). A test dataset suggested that meeting two criteria for at least 6 consecutive h may be the best model. This had a positive and negative predictive value of 7% and 99.5%, respectively, in a validation dataset. It performed well at predicting organ dysfunction and prolonged ICU admission. The concept of SIRS remains valid following cardiac surgery. With suitable modification, its specificity can be improved significantly. We propose that meeting two or more defining criteria for 6 h could be used to define better populations with more difficult clinical courses following cardiac surgery. This group may merit a different clinical approach.

  7. Spinal cord cavities; Differential-diagnostic criteria in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubeus, P.; Schoerner, W.; Hosten, N.; Felix, R. (Free University of Berlin, University Clinic Rudolf Virchow, Charlottenburg (Germany). Department of Radiology)

    MRI examinations of 30 patients with idiopathic syringomyelia and 10 patients with cavities associated with an intramedullary neoplasm were evaluated with respect to typical MRI features in both groups. Al tumor-associated cases resembled the idiopathic syringomyelias in some portions of the cavity. At the tumor site, however, tumor-associated cases demonstrated typical findings; the cavities showed abrupt changes of diameter (10/10) and position (8/10) and the surrounding spinal cord demonstrated an uneven thickness (10/10), an increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images (10/10) and pathological contrast enhancement (7/7). Displacement of cerebellar tonsils below the level of the foramen magnum (921/30) and enlargement of the spinal canal (97/29) were characteristic features of idiopathic cases. In conclusion, MRI provides valuable criteria to differentiate between idiopathic and tumor-associated cavities. (author). 19 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab.

  8. Multimodality Imaging of Tumor Response to Doxil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang, Lei Zhu, Gang Liu, Naoki Hida, Guangming Lu, Henry S. Eden, Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Early assessment of tumor responses to chemotherapy could enhance treatment outcomes by ensuring that, from the beginning, treatments meet the individualized needs of patients. In this study, we applied multiple modality molecular imaging techniques to pre-clinical monitoring of early tumor responses to Doxil, focusing on imaging of apoptosis.Methods: Mice bearing UM-SCC-22B human head and neck squamous cancer tumors received either PBS or 1 to 2 doses of Doxil® (doxorubicin HCl liposome injection (10 mg/kg/dose. Bioluminescence signals from an apoptosis-responsive reporter gene were captured for apoptosis evaluation. Tumor metabolism and proliferation were assessed by 18F-FDG and 3'-18F-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine (18F-FLT positron emission tomography. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI was performed to calculate averaged apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs for the whole tumor volume. After imaging, tumor samples were collected for histological evaluation, including terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL, anti-CD31, and Ki-67 immunostaining.Results: Two doses of Doxil significantly inhibited tumor growth. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI indicated apoptosis of tumor cells after just 1 dose of Doxil treatment, before apparent tumor shrinkage. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET imaging identified decreased tumor metabolism and proliferation at later time points than those at which BLI indicated apoptosis. MRI measurements of ADC altered in response to Doxil, but only after tumors were treated with 2 doses. Decreased tumor proliferation and increased apoptotic cells were confirmed by changes of Ki-67 index and apoptotic ratio.Conclusion: Our study of tumor responses to different doses of Doxil demonstrated that it is essential to combine apoptosis imaging strategies with imaging of other critical biological or pathological pathways, such as metabolism and proliferation, to improve clinical decision making

  9. Adapting the Computed Tomography Criteria of Hemorrhagic Transformation to Stroke Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Neeb

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main safety aspect in the use of stroke thrombolysis and in clinical trials of new pharmaceutical or interventional stroke therapies is the incidence of hemorrhagic transformation (HT after treatment. The computed tomography (CT-based classification of the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASS distinguishes four categories of HTs. An HT can range from a harmless spot of blood accumulation to a symptomatic space-occupying parenchymal bleeding associated with a massive deterioration of symptoms and clinical prognosis. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI HTs are often categorized using the ECASS criteria although this classification has not been validated in MRI. We developed MRI-specific criteria for the categorization of HT and sought to assess its diagnostic reliability in a retrospective study. Methods: Consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients, who had received a 3-tesla MRI before and 12-36 h after thrombolysis, were screened retrospectively for an HT of any kind in post-treatment MRI. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was given to all patients within 4.5 h. HT categorization was based on a simultaneous read of 3 different MRI sequences (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, diffusion-weighted imaging and T2* gradient-recalled echo. Categorization of HT in MRI accounted for the various aspects of the imaging pattern as the shape of the bleeding area and signal intensity on each sequence. All data sets were independently categorized in a blinded fashion by 3 expert and 3 resident observers. Interobserver reliability of this classification was determined for all observers together and for each group separately by calculating Kendall's coefficient of concordance (W. Results: Of the 186 patients screened, 39 patients (21% had an HT in post-treatment MRI and were included for the categorization of HT by experts and residents. The overall agreement of HT categorization according to the modified classification was

  10. Effect of dehydroepiandrosterone administration in patients with poor ovarian response according to the Bologna criteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA is now widely used as an adjuvant to IVF treatment protocols in poor responders. However, clinical evidence for DHEA on improvement of ovarian response and IVF outcome is still limited, the validity of the results of the earlier studies, especially the varied inclusion criteria, is a subject of debate. Recently, the ESHRE Working Group developed a new definition, the Bologna criteria. The aim of the current study was to investigate the potential effect of DHEA treatment on in vitro fertilization (IVF outcome of poor ovarian responders that fulfill the Bologna criteria. METHODS: This study investigated 386 poor ovarian responders that fulfill the Bologna criteria. Patients underwent IVF-ET treatment with the GnRH antagonist protocol. The study group contained 189 patients, who received 75 mg of DHEA daily (25 mg three times daily before the IVF cycle. The control group was composed of 197 patients who received infertility treatment, but did not receive DHEA. The IVF outcome parameters in each group were compared. RESULTS: The study and control groups did not show statistically significant differences in terms of patient demographics characteristics, mean numbers of oocytes retrieved, mature oocytes, fertilization rate, cleavage rate, or embryo availability. While the DHEA group demonstrated significantly higher implantation rates (18.7% vs. 10.1%; P<0.01 and ongoing PRs (26.7% vs. 15.8%; P<0.05 as compared with the control. CONCLUSIONS: DHEA pre-treatment does not significantly increase oocyte yield. However, the ongoing PRs in this subgroup of women are significantly higher after DHEA administration, suggesting that DHEA may increase IVF results by improving oocyte and embryo quality.

  11. Choice of external criteria in back pain research: Does it matter? Recommendations based on analysis of responsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik H; Hartvigsen, Jan; Korsholm, Lars

    2007-01-01

    scale evaluating the importance of the perceived change. Four external criteria were generated using both stringent and less stringent standards to dichotomise patients. Discrimination was determined using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC(auc)) and responsiveness using...

  12. Differentiating emotional responses to images and words

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Birgitte Falk; Petersen, Michael Kai; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    series responses in a single subject based on only a few trials. Comparing our results against previous findings we identify multiple early and late ICA components that are similarly modulated by neutral, pleasant and unpleasant content in both images and words. Suggesting that we might be able to model......The emergence of low cost electroencephalography (EEG) wireless neuroheadsets may potentially turn smartphones into pocketable labs [1], and enable design of personalized interfaces that adapt the selection of media to our emotional responses when viewing images and reading text. However such EEG...... responses are characterized by only small voltage changes that have typically been found in group studies involving multiple trials and large numbers of participants. Hypothesizing that spatial filtering might enhance retrieval, we apply independent component analysis (ICA) to cluster scalp maps and time...

  13. Evaluation of expert criteria for preoperative magnetic resonance imaging of newly diagnosed breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Carolyn E; Tumyan, Lusine; Gonser, Laura; Shaw, Sara L; Vora, Lalit; Paz, I Benjamin; Ellenhorn, Joshua D I; Yim, John H

    2014-08-01

    Despite 2 randomized trials reporting no reduction in operations or local recurrence at 1 year, preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in diagnostic workup of breast cancer. We evaluated 5 utilization criteria recently proposed by experts. Of women (n = 340) newly diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer who underwent bilateral MRI, most (69.4%) met at least 1 criterion before MRI: mammographic density (44.4%), under consideration for partial breast irradiation (PBI) (19.7%), genetic-familial risk (12.9%), invasive lobular carcinoma (11.8%), and multifocal/multicentric disease (10.6%). MRI detected occult malignant lesion or extension of index lesion in 21.2% of index, 3.3% of contralateral, breasts. No expert criterion was associated with MRI-detected malignant lesion, which associated instead with pre-MRI plan of lumpectomy without PBI (48.2% of subjects): Odds Ratio 3.05, 95% CI 1.57-5.91 (p adjusted for multiple hypothesis testing = 0.007, adjusted for index-vs-contralateral breast and covariates). The expert guidelines were not confirmed by clinical evidence.

  14. Multiple sclerosis: imaging, diagnostic criteria and differential diagnosis; Bildgebung, Diagnosekriterien und Differenzialdiagnose der Multiplen Sklerose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harting, I.; Sartor, K. [Abt. Neuroradiologie, Neurologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany); Sellner, J.; Meyding-Lamade, U. [Abt. Neurologie, Neurologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common demyelinating inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), presenting with multifocal, disseminated inflammatory lesions referred to as plaques. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically depicts multiple, round to oval, circumscript lesions predominantly involving periventricular and subcortical white matter, brainstem and cerebellum. More recent investigations have demonstrated that the macroscopically visible plaques only present the tip of the iceberg: Already early in its course, MS causes neuroaxonal damage and diffusely involves the entire brain parenchyma including normal appearing white matter. These changes are reflected by strongly T{sub 1}w hypointense lesions and atrophy of early onset, by reduction of the neuronal Marker N-acetylaspartate (NAA) on spectroscopy, by a decrease of the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), by an increased in diffusibility and decreased anisotropy on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). MRI imaging is an important tool in the diagnosis of MS by revealing the characteristic spatial and temporal dissemination of the cerebral and spinal manifestations of this disease. Diagnostic criteria increase the diagnostic specificity and allow better differentiation from other diseases with multifocal white matter abnormalities. (orig.) [German] Die multiple sklerose (MS) ist die haeufigste entzuendliche, demyelinisierende Erkrankung des zentralen Nervensystems (ZNS) Sie ist durch multifokale, disseminierte Entzuendungsherde, sogenannte Plaques, in den myelinhaltigen Strukturen des ZNS charakterisiert. In der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) sind multiple umschriebene, rundlich-ovale Laesionen der weissen Substanz charakteristisch, die bevorzugt im periventrikulaeren Marklager, an der Mark-Rindengrenze, im Hirnstamm und im Kleinhirn lokalisiert sind. Neuere Untersuchungen zeigen, dass die sichtbaren Entmarkungsherde nur die Spitze des Eisbergs sind: Bereits fruehzeitig verursacht die MS

  15. Imaging of non-Hodgkin lymphomas: diagnosis and response-adapted strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Hutchings, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Optimal lymphoma management requires accurate pretreatment staging and reliable assessment of response, both during and after therapy. Positron emission tomography with computerized tomography (PET/CT) combines functional and anatomical imaging and provides the most sensitive and accurate methods for lymphoma imaging. New guidelines for lymphoma imaging and recently revised criteria for lymphoma staging and response assessment recommend PET/CT staging, treatment monitoring, and response evaluation in all FDG-avid lymphomas, while CT remains the method of choice for non-FDG-avid histologies. Since interim PET imaging has high prognostic value in lymphoma, a number of trials investigate PET-based, response-adapted therapy for non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). PET response is the main determinant of response according to the new response criteria, but PET/CT has little or no role in routine surveillance imaging, the value which is itself questionable. This review presents from a clinical point of view the evidence for the use of imaging and primarily PET/CT in NHL before, during, and after therapy. The reader is given an overview of the current PET-based interventional NHL trials and an insight into possible future developments in the field, including new PET tracers.

  16. Theoretical foundation, methods, and criteria for calibrating human vibration models using frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-01-01

    While simulations of the measured biodynamic responses of the whole human body or body segments to vibration are conventionally interpreted as summaries of biodynamic measurements, and the resulting models are considered quantitative, this study looked at these simulations from a different angle: model calibration. The specific aims of this study are to review and clarify the theoretical basis for model calibration, to help formulate the criteria for calibration validation, and to help appropriately select and apply calibration methods. In addition to established vibration theory, a novel theorem of mechanical vibration is also used to enhance the understanding of the mathematical and physical principles of the calibration. Based on this enhanced understanding, a set of criteria was proposed and used to systematically examine the calibration methods. Besides theoretical analyses, a numerical testing method is also used in the examination. This study identified the basic requirements for each calibration method to obtain a unique calibration solution. This study also confirmed that the solution becomes more robust if more than sufficient calibration references are provided. Practically, however, as more references are used, more inconsistencies can arise among the measured data for representing the biodynamic properties. To help account for the relative reliabilities of the references, a baseline weighting scheme is proposed. The analyses suggest that the best choice of calibration method depends on the modeling purpose, the model structure, and the availability and reliability of representative reference data. PMID:26740726

  17. [Diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease. Which clinical and paraclinical criteria? Role of imaging and laparoscopy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquier, J; Fauconnier, A; Fraser, W; Dumont, A; Huchon, C

    2012-12-01

    Diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease is difficult. We focus on a systematic literature review to study diagnostic values of history-taking, clinical examination, laboratory tests and imagery. After this literature review, we build a diagnostic model for pelvic inflammatory disease. This diagnostic model is built on two major criteria: presence of adnexal tenderness or cervical motion tenderness. Additional minor criteria, increasing the likelihood of the diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease were added based on their specificity and their positive likelihood ratio. These minor criteria are supported by history-taking, clinical examination, laboratory tests and also on relevant ultrasonographic criteria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of stimulus size on stereoscopic fusion limits and response criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Philip M; Finlayson, Nonie J; Ono, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The stereoscopic fusion limit denotes the largest binocular disparity for which a single fused image is perceived. Several criteria can be employed when judging whether or not a stereoscopic display is fused, and this may be a factor contributing to a discrepancy in the literature. Schor, Wood, and Ogawa (1984 Vision Research, 24, 661-665) reported that fusion limits did not change as a function of bar width, while Roumes, Plantier, Menu, and Thorpe (1997 Human Factors, 39, 359-373) reported higher fusion limits for larger stimuli than for smaller stimuli. Our investigation suggests that differing criteria between the studies could contribute to this discrepancy. In experiment 1 we measured horizontal and vertical disparity fusion limits for thin bars and for the edge of an extended surface, allowing observers to use the criterion of either diplopia or rivalry when evaluating fusion for all stimuli. Fusion limits were equal for thin bars and extended surfaces in both horizontal and vertical disparity conditions. We next measured fusion limits for a range of bar widths and instructed observers to indicate which criterion they employed on each trial. Fusion limits were constant across all stimulus widths. However, there was a sharp change in criterion from diplopia to rivalry when the angular extent of the bar width exceeded about twice the fusion limit, expressed in angular terms. We conclude that stereoscopic fusion limits do not depend on stimulus size in this context, but the criterion for fusion does. Therefore, the criterion for fusion should be clearly defined in any study measuring stereoscopic fusion limits.

  19. Item Response Theory Analysis of DSM-IV Cannabis Abuse and Dependence Criteria in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Christie A.; Gelhorn, Heather; Crowley, Thomas J.; Sakai, Joseph T.; Stallings, Michael; Young, Susan E.; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Corley, Robin; Hewitt, John K.; Hopfer, Christian J.

    2008-01-01

    A study to examine the DSM-IV criteria for cannabis abuse and dependence among adolescents is conducted. Results conclude that abuse and dependence criteria were not found to affect the different levels of severity in cannabis use.

  20. Item Response Theory Analysis of DSM-IV Cannabis Abuse and Dependence Criteria in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Christie A.; Gelhorn, Heather; Crowley, Thomas J.; Sakai, Joseph T.; Stallings, Michael; Young, Susan E.; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Corley, Robin; Hewitt, John K.; Hopfer, Christian J.

    2008-01-01

    A study to examine the DSM-IV criteria for cannabis abuse and dependence among adolescents is conducted. Results conclude that abuse and dependence criteria were not found to affect the different levels of severity in cannabis use.

  1. An application of item response theory analysis to alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine criteria in DSM-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbucher, James W; Labouvie, Erich; Martin, Christopher S; Sanjuan, Pilar M; Bavly, Lawrence; Kirisci, Levent; Chung, Tammy

    2004-02-01

    Item response theory (IRT) is supplanting classical test theory as the basis for measures development. This study demonstrated the utility of IRT for evaluating DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Data on alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine symptoms from 372 adult clinical participants interviewed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview--Expanded Substance Abuse Module (CIDI-SAM) were analyzed with Mplus (B. Muthen & L. Muthen, 1998) and MULTILOG (D. Thissen, 1991) software. Tolerance and legal problems criteria were dropped because of poor fit with a unidimensional model. Item response curves, test information curves, and testing of variously constrained models suggested that DSM-IV criteria in the CIDI-SAM discriminate between only impaired and less impaired cases and may not be useful to scale case severity. IRT can be used to study the construct validity of DSM-IV diagnoses and to identify diagnostic criteria with poor performance.

  2. 33 CFR 155.1050 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for vessels carrying groups I through IV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., cost efficiency and practicality of increasing mechanical recovery capability requirements. This...; (4) Other applicable response technologies; and (5) Increases in the availability of private response... personnel trained in and capable of applying dispersants within the performance criteria in ASTM F1413-07...

  3. An Algorithm for Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Criteria-Based Prediction of Sepsis in a Polytrauma Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Holger A; Balaban, Ümniye; Sturm, Timo; Weiß, Christel; Thiel, Manfred; Schneider-Lindner, Verena

    2016-12-01

    Lifesaving early distinction of infectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome, known as "sepsis," from noninfectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome is challenging in the ICU because of high systemic inflammatory response syndrome prevalence and lack of specific biomarkers. The purpose of this study was to use an automatic algorithm to detect systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria (tachycardia, tachypnea, leukocytosis, and fever) in surgical ICU patients for ICU-wide systemic inflammatory response syndrome prevalence determination and evaluation of algorithm-derived systemic inflammatory response syndrome descriptors for sepsis prediction and diagnosis in a polytrauma cohort. Cross-sectional descriptive study and retrospective cohort study. Electronic medical records of a tertiary care center's surgical ICU, 2006-2011. All ICU admissions and consecutive polytrauma admissions. None. Average prevalence of conventional systemic inflammatory response syndrome (≥ 2 criteria met concomitantly) from cross-sectional application of the algorithm to all ICU patients and each minute of the study period was 43.3%. Of 256 validated polytrauma patients, 85 developed sepsis (33.2%). Three systemic inflammatory response syndrome descriptors summarized the 24 hours after admission and before therapy initiation: 1) systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria average for systemic inflammatory response syndrome quantification over time, 2) first-to-last minute difference for trend detection, and 3) change count reflecting systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria fluctuation. Conventional systemic inflammatory response syndrome for greater than or equal to 1 minute had 91% sensitivity and 19% specificity, whereas a systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria average cutoff value of 1.72 had 51% sensitivity and 77% specificity for sepsis prediction. For sepsis diagnosis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria average and first

  4. Role of imaging in the staging and response assessment of lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrington, Sally F; Mikhaeel, N George; Kostakoglu, Lale;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recent advances in imaging, use of prognostic indices, and molecular profiling techniques have the potential to improve disease characterization and outcomes in lymphoma. International trials are under way to test image-based response–adapted treatment guided by early interim positron...... emission tomography (PET)–computed tomography (CT). Progress in imaging is influencing trial design and affecting clinical practice. In particular, a five-point scale to grade response using PET-CT, which can be adapted to suit requirements for early- and late-response assessment with good interobserver...... agreement, is becoming widely used both in practice- and response-adapted trials. A workshop held at the 11th International Conference on Malignant Lymphomas (ICML) in 2011 concluded that revision to current staging and response criteria was timely. METHODS: An imaging working group composed...

  5. Bone metastases: assessment of therapeutic response through radiological and nuclear medicine imaging modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, V; Andreopoulos, D; Frangos, S; Tselis, N; Giannopoulou, E; Lutz, S

    2011-11-01

    Radiological and nuclear medicine imaging modalities used for assessing bone metastases treatment response include plain and digitalised radiography (XR), skeletal scintigraphy (SS), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET/CT. Here we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assessment modalities as evident through different clinical trials. Additionally, we present the more established response criteria of the International Union Against Cancer and the World Health Organization and compare them with newer MD Anderson criteria. Even though serial XR and SS have been used to assess the therapeutic response for decades, several months are required before changes are evident. Newer techniques, such as MRI or PET, may allow an earlier evaluation of response that may be quantified through monitoring changes in signal intensity and standard uptake value, respectively. Moreover, the application of PET/CT, which can follow both morphological and metabolic changes, has yielded interesting and promising results that give a new insight into the natural history of metastatic bone disease. However, only a few studies have investigated the application of these newer techniques and further clinical trials are needed to corroborate their promising results and establish the most suitable imaging parameters and evaluation time points. Last, but not least, there is an absolute need to adopt uniform response criteria for bone metastases through an international consensus in order to better assess treatment response in terms of accuracy and objectivity.

  6. The role of multi-parametric MR imaging in the detection of early inflammatory sacroiliitis according to ASAS criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boy, Fatma Nur, E-mail: nursoylu@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Kayhan, Arda, E-mail: arda_kayhan@yahoo.com [Health Services Vocational School, Esenyurt University, Dogan Arasli Bulvari No 120, Esenyurt, Istanbul (Turkey); Karakas, Hakki Muammer, E-mail: hakki.karakas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Unlu-Ozkan, Feyza, E-mail: feyzamd@yahoo.com [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Silte, Duygu, E-mail: drduygusilte@hotmail.com [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Aktas, İlknur, E-mail: iaktas@hotmail.com [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of multi-parametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging including fat saturated (FS) T2-weighted, short-tau inversion recovery (STIR), diffusion-weighted (DW-MR), and dynamic-contrast-enhanced MR (DCE-MR) imaging techniques in the diagnosis of early inflammatory sacroiliitis and determine the additional value of DW-MR and DCE-MR images according to recently defined ‘Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society’ criteria. Materials and methods: The study included 45 patients with back pain. Two radiologists estimated the likelihood of osteitis in 4 independent viewing sessions including FS T2-weighted, STIR, DW-MR and DCE-MR images. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) were calculated. Results: Of the 45 patients, 31 had inflammatory back pain. Of 31, 28 (90.3%) patients had inflammatory sacroiliitis diagnosed by clinical and laboratory analysis. FS T2-weighted MR images had the highest sensitivity (42.8% for both radiologists) for detecting osteitis in patients with inflammaory sacroiliitis when compared to other imaging sequences. For specificity, PPV, NPV, accuracy, and AUC levels there were no statistically significant difference between image viewing settings. However, adding STIR, DW-MR and DCE-MR images to the FS T2-weighted MR images did not improve the above stated indices. Conclusion: FS T2-weighted MR imaging had the highest sensitivity when compared to other imaging sequences. The addition of DW-MR and DCE-MR images did not significantly improve the diagnostic value of MR imaging in the diagnosis of osteitis for both experienced and less experienced radiologists.

  7. Early response to sibutramine in patients not meeting current label criteria: preliminary analysis of SCOUT lead-in period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caterson, Ian; Coutinho, Walmir; Finer, Nick;

    2010-01-01

    The Sibutramine Cardiovascular Outcomes (SCOUT) trial protocol defines a patient population predominantly outside current European Union label criteria. This article explores responses to sibutramine during the 6-week, single-blind, lead-in period between patients who conformed to the label......-in period. Initial responses were assessed post hoc in label conformers and nonconformers. Of that 8.1% patients met label criteria; 91.9%, the majority with cardiovascular disease and/or blood pressure >145/90 mm Hg, were nonconformers. Conformers and nonconformers had similar reductions in body weight...

  8. PET/CT Response Criteria (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) Predict Survival Better Than Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Won Jun; Nam, Eun Ji

    2016-09-01

    To investigate whether the ratio of SUVs measured with F-FDG PET/CT between pretreatment and posttreatment has prognostic value in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with primary chemoradiation therapy. Cases of locally advanced cervical cancer (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1 to IVA) treated with a nonsurgical curative modality (172 cases including chemoradiation or radiation therapy) were reviewed. F-FDG PET/CT parameters, including SUVmax and SUVmean, were evaluated by F-FDG PET/CT performed prior to treatment and 6 weeks after the end of treatment. Metabolic response was evaluated according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines and was compared with radiologic response measured according to the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumours (RECIST). In total, 142 patients receiving chemoradiation showed radiologic responses (median 56% decrease in maximal diameter), whereas 160 and 146 patients showed metabolic responses measured with SUVmax and SUVmean, respectively (73% decrease in SUVmax; 48% decrease in SUVmean). Radiologic response and metabolic response were significantly correlated for SUVmax and SUVmean (P = 0.0009; P = 0.0457, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed significant differences in overall survival and progression-free survival between the responder and nonresponder groups, based on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria (both P cervical cancer patients to concurrent chemoradiation therapy, as compared with the RECIST criteria.

  9. FDG PET/CT response assessment criteria for patients with Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at end of therapy: A multiparametric approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metser, Ur; Mohan, Ravi; Beckley, Vaughan; Murphy, Grainne [Mount Sinai Hospital and Women' s College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Hodgson, David [Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2016-03-15

    Based on the International Harmonization Project (IHP) criteria, positron emission tomography (PET) response assessment of residual nodal masses in patients with lymphoma after completion of therapy is performed visually using mediastinal blood pool as the reference. The primary objective of this study was to define the optimal reference for PET response assessment. Secondary aim was to assess if morphological criteria on computed tomography (CT) may improve performance of PET. This institutional review board approved retrospective study included 137 patients, with Hodgkin's (n = 43) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 94) assessed for residual masses (n = 180) after completion of therapy with pathology and clinical and imaging surveillance data (mean, 19 months) as the standard of reference. Two readers independently assessed response by IHP and Deauville criteria. The addition of morphological parameters on CT was assessed in relation to therapy response. Based on the standard of reference, 36 patients (26.3 %) had residual lymphoma. For IHP and Deauville criteria, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 97.2 %, 97.2 % (p = 1); 79.2 %, 92.1 % (p < 0.001); and 83.9 %, 93.4 % (p = 0.001), respectively. Of the morphological parameters assessed, only change in size over course of therapy was significant (p < 0.003) and improved specificity for IHP-based interpretation to 90.4 % (p = 0.008). Using liver as the visual reference to determine PET positivity for lymphoma patients being assessed for residual masses at the end of therapy improves specificity, yet maintains the high sensitivity of PET in identifying residual disease. The addition of change in size after therapy improves specificity of PET when using IHP-based but not Deauville-based interpretation.

  10. Leptomeningeal metastasis: A Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology critical review of endpoints and response criteria of published randomized clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Chamberlain (Marc C.); R. Soffietti; J. Raizer; R. Rudà (Roberta); D. Brandsma (Dieta); W. Boogerd (Willem); S. Taillibert; M.D. Groves (Morris D.); E. Le Rhun (Emilie); L. Junck (L.); M.J. van den Bent (Martin); P.Y. Wen (Patrick); K. Jaeckle (K.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPurpose. To date, response criteria and optimal methods for assessment of outcome have not been standardized in patients with leptomeningeal metastasis (LM). Methods. A Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology working group of experts in LM critically reviewed published literature regarding

  11. Leptomeningeal metastasis: A Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology critical review of endpoints and response criteria of published randomized clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Chamberlain (Marc C.); R. Soffietti; J. Raizer; R. Rudà (Roberta); D. Brandsma (Dieta); W. Boogerd (Willem); S. Taillibert; M.D. Groves (Morris D.); E. Le Rhun (Emilie); L. Junck (L.); M.J. van den Bent (Martin); P.Y. Wen (Patrick); K. Jaeckle (K.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPurpose. To date, response criteria and optimal methods for assessment of outcome have not been standardized in patients with leptomeningeal metastasis (LM). Methods. A Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology working group of experts in LM critically reviewed published literature regarding

  12. Terahertz Wide-Angle Imaging and Analysis on Plane-wave Criteria Based on Inverse Synthetic Aperture Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing Kun; Qin, Yu Liang; Deng, Bin; Wang, Hong Qiang; Li, Jin; Li, Xiang

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents two parts of work around terahertz imaging applications. The first part aims at solving the problems occurred with the increasing of the rotation angle. To compensate for the nonlinearity of terahertz radar systems, a calibration signal acquired from a bright target is always used. Generally, this compensation inserts an extra linear phase term in the intermediate frequency (IF) echo signal which is not expected in large-rotation angle imaging applications. We carried out a detailed theoretical analysis on this problem, and a minimum entropy criterion was employed to estimate and compensate for the linear-phase errors. In the second part, the effects of spherical wave on terahertz inverse synthetic aperture imaging are analyzed. Analytic criteria of plane-wave approximation were derived in the cases of different rotation angles. Experimental results of corner reflectors and an aircraft model based on a 330-GHz linear frequency-modulated continuous wave (LFMCW) radar system validated the necessity and effectiveness of the proposed compensation. By comparing the experimental images obtained under plane-wave assumption and spherical-wave correction, it also showed to be highly consistent with the analytic criteria we derived.

  13. Implications of imaging criteria for the management and treatment of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms - benign versus malignant findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Thula Cannon; Steffen, Ingo G.; Stelter, Lars H.; Hamm, Bernd; Denecke, Timm; Grieser, Christian [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Klinik fuer Radiologie, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Maurer, Martin H. [Universitaetsklinik Bern, Universitaetsinstitut fuer Radiologe, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Bahra, Marcus; Faber, Wladimir; Klein, Fritz [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Blaeker, Hendrik [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institut fuer Pathologie, Campus Charite Mitte, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Evaluation of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for differentiation of pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) subtypes based on objective imaging criteria. Fifty-eight patients with 60 histologically confirmed IPMNs were included in this retrospective study. Eighty-three imaging studies (CT,n = 42; MRI,n = 41) were analysed by three independent blinded observers (O1-O3), using established imaging criteria to assess likelihood of malignancy (-5, very likely benign; 5, very likely malignant) and histological subtype (i.e., low-grade (LGD), moderate-grade (MGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD), early invasive carcinoma (IPMC), solid carcinoma (CA) arising from IPMN). Forty-one benign (LGD IPMN,n = 20; MGD IPMN,n = 21) and 19 malignant (HGD IPMN,n = 3; IPMC,n = 6; solid CA,n = 10) IPMNs located in the main duct (n = 6), branch duct (n = 37), or both (n = 17) were evaluated. Overall accuracy of differentiation between benign and malignant IPMNs was 86/92 % (CT/MRI). Exclusion of overtly malignant cases (solid CA) resulted in overall accuracy of 83/90 % (CT/MRI). The presence of mural nodules and ductal lesion size ≥30 mm were significant indicators of malignancy (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001, respectively). Invasive IPMN can be identified with high confidence and sensitivity using CT and MRI. The diagnostic problem that remains is the accurate radiological differentiation of premalignant and non-invasive subtypes. (orig.)

  14. Images of a Hymnal : Criteria for selecting songs derived from constructed meaning of a hymnal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Andel, Nienke; Hoondert, M.J.M.; Barnard, Marcel; Bieritz, Karl-Heinrich; Kadelbach, Ada; Marti, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The focus when composing, evaluating or studying a hymn-book, usually lies on the hymns it contains and/or the criteria used for their incorporation. In this article we will add another point of view to the study of hymnals, seeking to show that the desired end result of the editorial work contribut

  15. 33 CFR 154.1045 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... must be achieved through the use of fixed-wing, aircraft-based application platforms. For dispersant... paragraph (i)(3) of this section. Any dispersants identified in a response plan must be of a type listed on... fire monitor-type applicators, adequacy of performance criteria must be documented by presentation...

  16. 33 CFR 154.1325 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. 154.1325...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Other Non-Petroleum..., store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that...

  17. Impact of response criteria (tibia ash weight vs. percent) on phytase relative non phytate phosphorus equivalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Angel, R; Kim, S-W; Jiménez-Moreno, E; Proszkowiec-Weglarz, M; Plumstead, P W

    2015-09-01

    The current study was conducted to evaluate the impacts of using tibia ash percentage or ash weight as the response criteria on estimated phytase relative equivalence. Straight run broilers were fed treatment (Trt) diets from 7 to 21 d age (6 birds/pen, 8 pens/Trt). The corn-soy based Trt were formulated to contain 0.80% Ca and 4 non-phytate phosphorus (nPP) concentrations (0.20, 0.27, 0.34, and 0.40%). Monocalcium phosphate was the inorganic phosphate source added to achieve 4 different dietary nPP concentrations and against which the nPP relative equivalence of phytase was determined. A 6-phytase (Danisco Animal Nutrition, DuPont Industrial Biosciences, Marlborough, UK) was added at 500 or 1,000 phytase unit ( FTU: )/kg to the 0.20% nPP diet resulting 6 total Trts. Tibia ash was determined at 21 d age. Phytase fed at 500 or 1,000 FTU/kg increased tibia ash weight and ash percentage compared to that of birds fed 0.20% nPP diet without phytase (Pphytase nPP relative equivalence. The R2 obtained from pen value regressions were 0.81 and 0.84, for tibia ash weight and percentage, respectively. Ash percentage from birds fed 500 and 1,000 FTU phytase/kg fell within the range obtained with the MCP additions. Ash weight (842 mg/tibia) from birds fed 1,000 FTU phytase/kg exceeded (Pphytase/kg Trt. The nPP relative equivalence in birds fed 500 FTU phytase/kg were 0.117 and 0.168% based on ash percentage and weight, respectively (Pphytase/kg was 0.166% for ash percentage. Results suggested that ash weight better reflects the amount of bone mineralization as compared to ash percentage and using ash percentage may lead to an underestimation of phytase efficacy.

  18. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine: PET/Computed Tomography and Therapy Response Assessment in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Mena, Esther; Pattanayak, Puskar; Taghipour, Mehdi; Solnes, Lilja B; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    A variety of methods have been developed to assess tumor response to therapy. Standardized qualitative criteria based on 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose PET/computed tomography have been proposed to evaluate the treatment effectiveness in specific cancers and these allow more accurate therapy response assessment and survival prognostication. Multiple studies have addressed the utility of the volumetric PET biomarkers as prognostic indicators but there is no consensus about the preferred segmentation methodology for these metrics. Heterogeneous intratumoral uptake was proposed as a novel PET metric for therapy response assessment. PET imaging techniques will be used to study the biological behavior of cancers during therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Discrimination of different brain metastases and primary CNS lymphomas using morphologic criteria and diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bette, S.; Wiestler, B.; Huber, T.; Boeckh-Behrens, T.; Zimmer, C.; Kirschke, J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Delbridge, C. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology; Meyer, B.; Gempt, J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2016-12-15

    Brain metastases are a common complication of cancer and occur in about 15-40% of patients with malignancies. The aim of this retrospective study was to differentiate between metastases from different primary tumors/CNS lymphyomas using morphologic criteria, fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Morphologic criteria such as hemorrhage, cysts, pattern of contrast enhancement and location were reported in 200 consecutive patients with brain metastases/primary CNS lymphomas. FA and ADC values were measured in regions of interest (ROIs) placed in the contrast-enhancing tumor part, the necrosis and the non-enhancing peritumoral region (NEPTR). Differences between histopathological subtypes of metastases were analyzed using non-parametric tests, decision trees and hierarchical clustering analysis. Significant differences were found in morphologic criteria such as hemorrhage or pattern of contrast enhancement. In diffusion measurements, significant differences between the different tumor entities were only found in ADC analyzed in the contrast-enhancing tumor part. Among single tumor entities, primary CNS lymphomas showed significantly lower median ADC values in the contrast-enhancing tumor part (ADC{sub lymphoma} 0.92 [0.83-1.07] vs. ADC{sub no} {sub lymphoma} 1.35 [1.10-1.64] P=0.001). Further differentiation between types of metastases was not possible using FA and ADC. There were morphologic differences among the main subtypes of brain metastases/CNS lymphomas. However, due to a high variability of common types of metastases and low specificity, prospective differentiation remained challenging. DTI including FA and ADC was not a reliable tool for differentiation between different histopathological subtypes of brain metastases except for CNS lymphomas showing lower ADC values. Biopsy, surgery and staging remain essential for diagnosis.

  20. The diagnostic performance of imaging methods in ARVC using the 2010 Task Force criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgquist, Rasmus; Haugaa, Kristina H; Gilljam, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: This study evaluates the agreement between echocardiographic and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging data, and the impact a discrepancy between the two may have on the clinical diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). METHODS AND RESULTS: From the Nordic ARVC...

  1. Micro-CT imaging: Developing criteria for examining fetal skeletons in regulatory developmental toxicology studies - A workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Howard M; Makris, Susan L; Alsaid, Hasan; Bermudez, Oscar; Beyer, Bruce K; Chen, Antong; Chen, Connie L; Chen, Zhou; Chmielewski, Gary; DeLise, Anthony M; de Schaepdrijver, Luc; Dogdas, Belma; French, Julian; Harrouk, Wafa; Helfgott, Jonathan; Henkelman, R Mark; Hesterman, Jacob; Hew, Kok-Wah; Hoberman, Alan; Lo, Cecilia W; McDougal, Andrew; Minck, Daniel R; Scott, Lelia; Stewart, Jane; Sutherland, Vicki; Tatiparthi, Arun K; Winkelmann, Christopher T; Wise, L David; Wood, Sandra L; Ying, Xiaoyou

    2016-06-01

    During the past two decades the use and refinements of imaging modalities have markedly increased making it possible to image embryos and fetuses used in pivotal nonclinical studies submitted to regulatory agencies. Implementing these technologies into the Good Laboratory Practice environment requires rigorous testing, validation, and documentation to ensure the reproducibility of data. A workshop on current practices and regulatory requirements was held with the goal of defining minimal criteria for the proper implementation of these technologies and subsequent submission to regulatory agencies. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is especially well suited for high-throughput evaluations, and is gaining popularity to evaluate fetal skeletons to assess the potential developmental toxicity of test agents. This workshop was convened to help scientists in the developmental toxicology field understand and apply micro-CT technology to nonclinical toxicology studies and facilitate the regulatory acceptance of imaging data. Presentations and workshop discussions covered: (1) principles of micro-CT fetal imaging; (2) concordance of findings with conventional skeletal evaluations; and (3) regulatory requirements for validating the system. Establishing these requirements for micro-CT examination can provide a path forward for laboratories considering implementing this technology and provide regulatory agencies with a basis to consider the acceptability of data generated via this technology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Comparison of EORTC criteria and PERCIST for PET/CT response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan and cetuximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skougaard, Kristin; Nielsen, Dorte; Jensen, Benny Vittrup

    2013-01-01

    The study aim was to compare European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria with PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) for response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with a combination of the chemotherapeutic drug irinotecan...

  3. Study on the Similarity Criteria of Aircraft Structure Temperature/Stress/Dynamic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Gui, Ye-Wei; Du, Yan-Xia; Geng, Xiang-Ren; Wang, An-Ling

    The performance parameters of thermal protection system are essential for the design and optimization of high-speed aircraft. The flight-ground conversion is a valid method to provide the effective support to the design of the thermal protection structure (TPS), because the performance data of TPS were generally obtained from wind tunnel test and should be conversed to the corresponding environment. In this paper, the similarity parameters of heat conduction and thermoelasticity equations are studied, the similarity criteria proposed, and the effectiveness of some of the similar parameters are calculated and analyzed. The research results indicated that wind tunnel test can be better designed using the proposed similarity criteria, and the data obtained from wind tunnel test can be modified more rational to accommodate the reality flight condition so as to improve the precision and the efficiency of wind tunnel experiment.

  4. Non-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation treatment of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia: a retrospective analysis and definition of response criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstraesser, Eva; Hasle, Henrik; Rogge, Tim

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare myeloproliferative disease of infancy. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently the only curative treatment modality, while the role of anti-leukemic therapy prior to HSCT is uncertain. A comparative...... responses in solid organs compared to peripheral blood (PB). PROCEDURE: We therefore defined separate response criteria for white blood count (WBC), platelet count, liver size, and spleen size. We then retrospectively evaluated the efficacy of 129 treatment courses other than HSCT administered to 63...

  5. Design criteria for a multiple input land use system. [digital image processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, F. C.; Bryant, N. A.

    1975-01-01

    A design is presented that proposes the use of digital image processing techniques to interface existing geocoded data sets and information management systems with thematic maps and remote sensed imagery. The basic premise is that geocoded data sets can be referenced to a raster scan that is equivalent to a grid cell data set, and that images taken of thematic maps or from remote sensing platforms can be converted to a raster scan. A major advantage of the raster format is that x, y coordinates are implicitly recognized by their position in the scan, and z values can be treated as Boolean layers in a three-dimensional data space. Such a system permits the rapid incorporation of data sets, rapid comparison of data sets, and adaptation to variable scales by resampling the raster scans.

  6. Abdominal CT enterography as an imaging tool for chronic diarrhea: Review of technique and diagnostic criteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mona El-Kalioubie; Rasha Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to evaluate the role of multi-slice CT enterography in chronic diarrhea and its degree of correlation with endoscopy and histopathology. Materials and methods: 50 patients with chronic diarrhea (23 Crohn’s disease, 3 ulcerative colitis, 5 Tuberculous enteritis, 1 Entamoeba infestation, 4 Celiac disease, 5 lymphoma and 10 miscellaneous) were evaluated by CT enterography. Quantitative image analysis included evaluation of bowel caliber and wall thickness. Qualitative ana...

  7. SU-E-J-27: Appropriateness Criteria for Deformable Image Registration and Dose Propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanikolaou, P; Tuohy, Rachel; Mavroidis, P; Eng, T; Gutierrez, A; Stathakis, S [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Several commercial software packages have been recently released that allow the user to apply deformable registration algorithms (DRA) for image fusion and dose propagation. Although the idea of anatomically tracking the daily patient dose in the context of adaptive radiotherapy or merely adding the dose from prior treatment to the current one is very intuitive, the accuracy and applicability of such algorithms needs to be investigated as it remains somewhat subjective. In our study, we used true anatomical data where we introduced changes in the density, volume and location of segmented structures to test the DRA for its sensitivity and accuracy. Methods: The CT scan of a prostate patient was selected for this study. The CT images were first segmented to define structure such as the PTV, bladder, rectum, intestines and pelvic bone anatomy. To perform our study, we introduced anatomical changes in the reference patient image set in three different ways: (i) we kept the segmented volumes constant and changed the density of rectum and bladder in increments of 5% (ii) we changed the volume of rectum and bladder in increments of 5% and (iii) we kept the segmented volumes constant but changed their location by moving their COM in increments of 3mm. Using the Velocity software, we evaluated the accuracy of the DRA for each incremental change in all three scenarios. Results: The DRA performs reasonably well when the differential density difference against the background is more than 5%. For the volume change study, the DRA results became unreliable for relative volume changes greater than 10%. Finally for the location study, the DRA performance was acceptable for shifts below 9mm. Conclusion: Site specific and patient specific QA for DRA is an important step to evaluate such algorithms prior to their use for dose propagation.

  8. A novel autofocus algorithm based on maximum total variation criteria for SAR images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Lun; LIAO Guisheng

    2007-01-01

    A novel autofocus algorithm for synthetic aperture radar (SAR)based on total variation is presented in this Paper.The method,which starts with a complex phase-degraded SAR image,after the phase errors model is introduced into the range-compressed phase-history domain,carries out phase errors correction by changing the focus till the total variation of the azimuth profile is maximized.Compared with the minimum entropy autofocus algorithm,the autofocus algorithm has less computational complexity and is easier to implement.The simulation and the processing results of the measured data show the validity of the proposed method.

  9. Monte Carlo-based adaptive EPID dose kernel accounting for different field size responses of imagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Gardner, Joseph K; Gordon, John J; Li, Weidong; Clews, Luke; Greer, Peter B; Siebers, Jeffrey V

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study is to present an efficient method to generate imager-specific Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose kernels for amorphous silicon-based electronic portal image device dose prediction and determine the effective backscattering thicknesses for such imagers. EPID field size-dependent responses were measured for five matched Varian accelerators from three institutions with 6 MV beams at the source to detector distance (SDD) of 105 cm. For two imagers, measurements were made with and without the imager mounted on the robotic supporting arm. Monoenergetic energy deposition kernels with 0-2.5 cm of water backscattering thicknesses were simultaneously computed by MC to a high precision. For each imager, the backscattering thickness required to match measured field size responses was determined. The monoenergetic kernel method was validated by comparing measured and predicted field size responses at 150 cm SDD, 10 x 10 cm2 multileaf collimator (MLC) sliding window fields created with 5, 10, 20, and 50 mm gaps, and a head-and-neck (H&N) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient field. Field size responses for the five different imagers deviated by up to 1.3%. When imagers were removed from the robotic arms, response deviations were reduced to 0.2%. All imager field size responses were captured by using between 1.0 and 1.6 cm backscatter. The predicted field size responses by the imager-specific kernels matched measurements for all involved imagers with the maximal deviation of 0.34%. The maximal deviation between the predicted and measured field size responses at 150 cm SDD is 0.39%. The maximal deviation between the predicted and measured MLC sliding window fields is 0.39%. For the patient field, gamma analysis yielded that 99.0% of the pixels have gamma < 1 by the 2%, 2 mm criteria with a 3% dose threshold. Tunable imager-specific kernels can be generated rapidly and accurately in a single MC simulation. The resultant kernels are imager position

  10. [MR imaging of the Achilles tendon: evaluation of criteria for the differentiation of asymptomatic and symptomatic tendons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C; Wedegärtner, U; Maas, L C; Buchert, R; Adam, G; Maas, R

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop quantitative and qualitative MRI criteria to differentiate between healthy and pathological Achilles tendons. 364 Achilles tendons were examined on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. 264 patients had Achilles tendon complaints, 100 asymptomatic Achilles tendons served as a control. T 1-weighted, T 2-weighted and a STIR sequence were performed in sagittal and axial orientation. Images were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists. Quantitative and qualitative criteria were assessed. A Mann-Whitney-U-Test and a regression analysis were used for statistical analysis. There were statistically significant differences between the patients with disorders and the control group concerning the depth (12.0 mm and 6.3 mm, p tendon, the area of the tendon cross section (1.60 mm (2) and 061 mm (2), p tendon depth (A4), length of bursa (A5) and area of tendon (F). The measurement of the Achilles tendon and the binary-logistic regression analysis allow differentiation between normal and pathological Achilles tendons. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. EVALUATION OF THE DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR THE LOCALIZATION OF ACQUIRED ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULAS BY COLOR DOPPLER FLOW IMAGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建初; 蔡胜; 姜玉新; 张缙熙; 王岩青

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the diagnostic criteria for the localization of acquired arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs)by color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI) based on the features of their hemodynamic changes.Methods. The shape and hemodynamic changes of involved vessels which could be helpful to localize thesites of fistulas were studied according to the observation of 10 cases of acquired AVFs.Results. The s tes of the fistulas could be shown by two-dimensional ultrasonography and color flow imagingin 40% and 80% tases, respectively. In all cases, turbulent high-velocity flow was present at the sites of thefistulas, low resistant flow was present in the arteries proximal to the fistulas, and artery-like flow was detected inthe veins.Conclusion. C OFt was accurate for the localization of acquired AVFs, which were mainly localized by theirhemodynamic changes shown by pulse Doppler ultrasound.``

  12. Response rates for CBT for anxiety disorders: Need for standardized criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerinc, Amanda G; Meuret, Alicia E; Twohig, Michael P; Rosenfield, David; Bluett, Ellen J; Craske, Michelle G

    2015-12-01

    Full appreciation of the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) requires both effect size data and individual rates of positive response. Response rates are particularly helpful for clinicians when choosing among treatment options. However, systematic reviews on cross-study response rates have not been conducted, possibly due to the absence of a standardized metric for calculating response rates. We conducted a systematic review of the treatment outcome literature to determine overall response rates to CBT for anxiety disorders and whether current methods of defining treatment response influence overall response rates. Our database search (2000-2014) resulted in 87 studies that reported response rates and included at least one CBT condition. Results showed that overall treatment response rates across anxiety disorders averaged 49.5% at post-treatment and 53.6% at follow-up. Response rates varied significantly as a function of the properties used to define them. Measures that incorporated more than one criterion, the combination of a reliable change index with a clinical cutoff (a clinically significant change), and intent-to-treat samples yielded lower response rates at post-treatment. Blinded independent assessors yielded higher response rates than unblinded assessors. Based on previous empirical and theoretical work, we recommend that future studies use a clinically significant change index, in an intent-to-treat analysis (using a mixed-model approach), reflecting multiple modalities, and assessed by independent blinded assessors. Our results indicate that such measures are likely to reduce response rates, but may result in a less biased and more accurate representation of improvement and achievement of normative functioning.

  13. Separability Filter for Localizing Abnormal Pupil: Identification Criteria of Input Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutik Ida Rosanti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Separability filter method is a reliable method for pupil detection. However, so far this method is implemented for detecting pupil of normal eye, while for abnormal eye such as cataract and glaucoma patients; they have different characteristics of pupil such as color, shape and radius size of pupil. In this paper we propose to use separability filter for detecting pupil of abnormal patients with different characteristics. We faced a problem about radius size, shape and color of pupil; therefore we implemented Hough Transform, Blob area and Brightness for identifying input images before applying separability filter. The experiment results show that we can increase performance of pupil detection for abnormal eye to be 95.65%.

  14. Does response distortion statistically affect the relations between self-report psychopathy measures and external criteria?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Watts; S.O. Lilienfeld; J.F. Edens; K.S. Douglas; J.L. Skeem; B. Verschuere; A.C. LoPilato

    2015-01-01

    Given that psychopathy is associated with narcissism, lack of insight, and pathological lying, the assumption that the validity of self-report psychopathy measures is compromised by response distortion has been widespread. We examined the statistical effects (moderation, suppression) of response dis

  15. Does response distortion statistically affect the relations between self-report psychopathy measures and external criteria?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watts, A.L.; Lilienfeld, S.O.; Edens, J.F.; Douglas, K.S.; Skeem, J.L.; Verschuere, B.; LoPilato, A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Given that psychopathy is associated with narcissism, lack of insight, and pathological lying, the assumption that the validity of self-report psychopathy measures is compromised by response distortion has been widespread. We examined the statistical effects (moderation, suppression) of response dis

  16. Does response distortion statistically affect the relations between self-report psychopathy measures and external criteria?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watts, A.L.; Lilienfeld, S.O.; Edens, J.F.; Douglas, K.S.; Skeem, J.L.; Verschuere, B.; LoPilato, A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Given that psychopathy is associated with narcissism, lack of insight, and pathological lying, the assumption that the validity of self-report psychopathy measures is compromised by response distortion has been widespread. We examined the statistical effects (moderation, suppression) of response dis

  17. Response evaluation criteria for solid tumours in dogs (v1.0): a Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S M; Thamm, D H; Vail, D M; London, C A

    2015-09-01

    In veterinary medical oncology, there is currently no standardized protocol for assessing response to therapy in solid tumours. The lack of such a formalized guideline makes it challenging to critically compare outcome measures across various treatment protocols. The Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) membership consensus document presented here is based on the recommendations of a subcommittee of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) board-certified veterinary oncologists. This consensus paper has used the human response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST v1.1) as a framework to establish standard procedures for response assessment in canine solid tumours that is meant to be easy to use, repeatable and applicable across a variety of clinical trial structures in veterinary oncology. It is hoped that this new canine RECIST (cRECIST v1.0) will be adopted within the veterinary oncology community and thereby facilitate the comparison of current and future treatment protocols used for companion animals with cancer.

  18. Criteria for Response Monotonicity Preserving in Approximation of Fractional Order Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Saleh Tavazoei

    2016-01-01

    In approximation of fractional order systems,a significant objective is to preserve the important properties of the original system.The monotonicity of time/frequency responses is one of these properties whose preservation is of great importance in approximation process.Considering this importance,the issues of monotonicity preservation of the step response and monotonicity preservation of the magnitude-frequency response are independently investigated in this paper.In these investigations,some conditions on approximating filters of fractional operators are found to guarantee the preservation of step/magnitude-frequency response monotonicity in approximation process.These conditions are also simplified in some special cases.In addition,numerical simulation results are presented to show the usefulness of the obtained conditions.

  19. Imaging response to systemic therapy for bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeuerle, Tobias; Semmler, Wolfhard [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    In patients with osteotropic primary tumours such as breast and prostate cancer, imaging treatment response of bone metastases is essential for the clinical management. After treatment of skeletal metastases, morphological changes, in particular of bone structure, occur relatively late and are difficult to quantify using conventional X-rays, CT or MRI. Early treatment response in these lesions can be assessed from functional imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced techniques by MRI or CT and by diffusion-weighted MRI, which are quantifiable. Among the techniques within nuclear medicine, PET offers the acquisition of quantifiable parameters for response evaluation. PET, therefore, especially in combination with CT and MRI using hybrid techniques, holds great promise for early and quantifiable assessment of treatment response in bone metastases. This review summarises the classification systems and the use of imaging techniques for evaluation of treatment response and suggests parameters for the early detection and quantification of response to systemic therapy. (orig.)

  20. Human Response to Air Movement - Evaluation of ASHRAE´s Draft Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Tynel, A.;

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the present ASHRAE Standard 55-92 draft criteria and to describe how air movement is perceived at thermal sensations slightly cooler and slightly warmer than neutral. At temperatures 18oC, 20oC, 23oC, 26oC, and 28oC (64.4oF, 68oF, 73.4oF, 78.8oF, and 82.4o......F), 40 subjects at slightly cool, neutral and slightly warm overall thermal sensation were exposed to air velocities that were increased step-by-step from less than 0.1 m/s to 0.8 m/s (19.7 fpm to 157.5 fpm). Subjects who felt cool or slightly cool perceived air movement as being uncomfortable at lower...... air velocities than did subjects feeling neutral or warmer. No difference in draft sensitivity between subjects feeling neutral, slightly warm or warm was observed. A smaller percentage of subjects were dissatisfied due to draft than prescribed by ASHRAE Standard 55 guidelines on air movement...

  1. Tumor response and clinical outcome in metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors under sunitinib therapy: Comparison of RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, N., E-mail: Nicolai.schramm@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Englhart, E., E-mail: Elisabeth.Englhart@gmx.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Schlemmer, M., E-mail: Marcus.Schlemmer@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Medicine III, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Hittinger, M., E-mail: Markus.Hittinger@uksh.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Übleis, C., E-mail: Christopher.Uebleis@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Becker, C.R., E-mail: Christoph.becker@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, M.F., E-mail: Maximilian.Reiser@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Berger, F., E-mail: Frank.Berger@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Purpose of the study was to compare radiological treatment response according to RECIST, Choi and volumetry in GIST-patients under 2nd-line-sunitinib-therapy and to correlate the results of treatment response assessment with disease-specific survival (DSS). Patients and methods: 20 patients (mean: 60.7 years; 12 male/8 female) with histologically proven GIST underwent baseline-CT of the abdomen under imatinib and follow-up-CTs 3 months and 1 year after change to sunitinib. 68 target lesions (50 hepatic, 18 extrahepatic) were investigated. Therapy response (partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD)) was evaluated according to RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria. Response according to the different assessment systems was compared and correlated to the DSS of the patients utilizing Kaplan–Meier statistics. Results: The mean DSS (in months) of the response groups 3 months after therapy change was: RECIST: PR (0/20); SD (17/20): 30.4 (months); PD (3/20) 11.6. Choi: PR (10/20) 28.6; SD (8/20) 28.1; PD (2/20) 13.5. Volumetry: PR (4/20) 29.6; SD (11/20) 29.7; PD (5/20) 17.2. Response groups after 1 year of sunitinib showed the following mean DSS: RECIST: PR (3/20) 33.6; SD (9/20) 29.7; PD (8/20) 20.3. Choi: PR (10/20) 21.5; SD (4/20) 42.9; PD (6/20) 23.9. Volumetry: PR (6/20) 27.3; SD (5/20) 38.5; PD (9/20) 19.3. Conclusion: One year after modification of therapy, only partial response according to RECIST indicated favorable survival in patients with GIST. The value of alternate response assessment strategies like Choi criteria for prediction of survival in molecular therapy still has to be demonstrated.

  2. 76 FR 72431 - Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants, NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Supplement 4 and FEMA... Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants,'' NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP- 1, Revision 1 (NUREG-0654), and the Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program Manual (the...

  3. 20 CFR 725.495 - Criteria for determining a responsible operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED CLAIMS FOR BENEFITS UNDER PART C OF TITLE IV OF THE FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT, AS AMENDED Responsible Coal Mine Operators § 725.495... sufficient assets to secure the payment of benefits, the provisions of paragraph (a)(3) shall be...

  4. Psychoneurometric operationalization of threat sensitivity: Relations with clinical symptom and physiological response criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, James R; Venables, Noah C; Patrick, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    The National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative calls for the incorporation of neurobiological approaches and findings into conceptions of mental health problems through a focus on biobehavioral constructs investigated across multiple domains of measurement (units of analysis). Although the constructs in the RDoC system are characterized in "process terms" (i.e., as functional concepts with brain and behavioral referents), these constructs can also be framed as dispositions (i.e., as dimensions of variation in biobehavioral functioning across individuals). Focusing on one key RDoC construct, acute threat or "fear," the current article illustrates a construct-oriented psychoneurometric strategy for operationalizing this construct in individual difference terms-as threat sensitivity (THT+). Utilizing data from 454 adult participants, we demonstrate empirically that (a) a scale measure of THT+ designed to tap general fear/fearlessness predicts effectively to relevant clinical problems (i.e., fear disorder symptoms), (b) this scale measure shows reliable associations with physiological indices of acute reactivity to aversive visual stimuli, and (c) a cross-domain factor reflecting the intersection of scale and physiological indicators of THT+ predicts effectively to both clinical and neurophysiological criterion measures. Results illustrate how the psychoneurometric approach can be used to create a dimensional index of a biobehavioral trait construct, in this case THT+, which can serve as a bridge between phenomena in domains of psychopathology and neurobiology. Implications and future directions are discussed with reference to the RDoC initiative and existing report-based conceptions of psychological traits.

  5. Comparison of EORTC criteria and PERCIST for PET/CT response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan and cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skougaard, Kristin; Nielsen, Dorte; Jensen, Benny Vittrup; Hendel, Helle Westergren

    2013-07-01

    The study aim was to compare European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria with PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) for response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with a combination of the chemotherapeutic drug irinotecan and the monoclonal antibody cetuximab. From 2006 to 2009, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were prospectively included in a phase II trial evaluating the combination of irinotecan and cetuximab every second week, as third-line treatment. (18)F-FDG PET/CT was performed between 1 and 14 d before the first treatment and after every fourth treatment cycle until progression was identified by CT with Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Response evaluation with (18)F-FDG PET/CT was retrospectively performed according to both EORTC criteria and PERCIST, classifying the patients into 4 response categories: complete metabolic response (CMR), partial metabolic response (PMR), stable metabolic disease (SMD), and progressive metabolic disease (PMD). Individual best overall metabolic response (BOmR) was registered with both sets of criteria, as well as survival within response categories, and compared. A total of 61 patients and 203 PET/CT scans were eligible for response evaluation. With EORTC criteria, 38 had PMR, 16 had SMD, and 7 had PMD as their BOmR. With PERCIST, 34 had PMR, 20 had SMD, and 7 had PMD as their BOmR. None of the patients had CMR. There was agreement between EORTC criteria and PERCIST in 87% of the patients, and the corresponding κ-coefficient was 0.76. Disagreements were confined to PMR and SMD. Median overall survival (OS) in months with EORTC criteria was 14.2 in the PMR group and 7.2 in the combined SMD + PMD group. With PERCIST, it was 14.5 in the PMR group and 7.9 in the SMD + PMD group. Response evaluation with EORTC criteria and PERCIST gave similar responses and OS outcomes with good agreement on BOmR (κ-coefficient, 0.76) and

  6. Prognostic Relevance of Objective Response According to EASL Criteria and mRECIST Criteria in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients Treated with Loco-Regional Therapies: A Literature-Based Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Vincenzi

    Full Text Available The European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL criteria and the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST are currently adopted to evaluate radiological response in patients affected by HCC and treated with loco-regional procedures. Several studies explored the validity of these measurements in predicting survival but definitive data are still lacking.To conduct a systematic review of studies exploring mRECIST and EASL criteria usefulness in predictive radiological response in HCC undergoing loco-regional therapies and their validity in predicting survival.A comprehensive search of the literature was performed in electronic databases EMBASE, MEDLINE, COCHRANE LIBRARY, ASCO conferences and EASL conferences up to June 10, 2014. Our overall search strategy included terms for HCC, mRECIST, and EASL. Loco-regional procedures included transarterial embolization (TAE, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE and cryoablation. Inter-method agreement between EASL and mRECIST was assessed using the k coefficient. For each criteria, overall survival was described in responders vs. non-responders patients, considering all target lesions response.Among 18 initially found publications, 7 reports including 1357 patients were considered eligible. All studies were published as full-text articles. Proportion of responders according to mRECIST and EASL criteria was 62.4% and 61.3%, respectively. In the pooled population, 1286 agreements were observed between the two methods (kappa statistics 0.928, 95% confidence interval 0.912-0.944. HR for overall survival (responders versus non responders according to mRECIST and EASL was 0.39 (95% confidence interval 0.26-0.61, p<0.0001 and 0.38 (95% confidence interval 0.24-0.61, p<0.0001, respectively.In this literature-based meta-analysis, mRECIST and EASL criteria showed very good concordance in HCC patients undergoing loco-regional treatments. Objective response according to both criteria

  7. Test and analysis of spectral response for UV image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yunsheng; Liu, Jian; Feng, Cheng; Lv, Yang; Zhang, Yijun

    2015-10-01

    The UV image intensifier is one kind of electric vacuum imaging device based on principle of photoelectronic imaging. To achieve solar-blind detection, its spectral response characteristic is extremely desirable. A broad spectrum response measurement system is developed. This instrument uses EQ-99 laser-driven light source to get broad spectrum in the range of 200 nm to 1700 nm. A special preamplifier as well as a test software is work out. The spectral response of the image intensifier can be tested in the range of 200~1700 nm. Using this spectrum response measuring instrument, the UV image intensifiers are tested. The spectral response at the spectral range of 200 nm to 600 nm are obtained. Because of the quantum efficiency of Te-Cs photocathode used in image intens ifier above 280nm wavelength still exists, especially at 280 nm to 320nm.Therefore, high-performance UV filters is required for solar blind UV detection. Based on two sets of UV filters, the influence of solar radiation on solar blind detection is calculated and analyzed.

  8. Image-Word Pairing-Congruity Effect on Affective Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria Z., Jorge C.; Cho, Youngil; Sambai, Ami; Yamanaka, Toshimasa

    The present study explores the effects of familiarity on affective responses (pleasure and arousal) to Japanese ad elements, based on the schema incongruity theory. Print ads showing natural scenes (landscapes) were used to create the stimuli (images and words). An empirical study was conducted to measure subjects' affective responses to image-word combinations that varied in terms of incongruity. The level of incongruity was based on familiarity levels, and was statistically determined by a variable called ‘pairing-congruity status’. The tested hypothesis proposed that even highly familiar image-word combinations, when combined incongruously, would elicit strong affective responses. Subjects assessed the stimuli using bipolar scales. The study was effective in tracing interactions between familiarity, pleasure and arousal, although the incongruous image-word combinations did not elicit the predicted strong effects on pleasure and arousal. The results suggest a need for further research incorporating kansei (i.e., creativity) into the process of stimuli selection.

  9. ESHRE consensus on the definition of 'poor response' to ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization: the Bologna criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraretti, A P; La Marca, A; Fauser, B C J M; Tarlatzis, B; Nargund, G; Gianaroli, L

    2011-07-01

    The definition presented here represents the first realistic attempt by the scientific community to standardize the definition of poor ovarian response (POR) in a simple and reproducible manner. POR to ovarian stimulation usually indicates a reduction in follicular response, resulting in a reduced number of retrieved oocytes. It has been recognized that, in order to define the poor response in IVF, at least two of the following three features must be present: (i) advanced maternal age or any other risk factor for POR; (ii) a previous POR; and (iii) an abnormal ovarian reserve test (ORT). Two episodes of POR after maximal stimulation are sufficient to define a patient as poor responder in the absence of advanced maternal age or abnormal ORT. By definition, the term POR refers to the ovarian response, and therefore, one stimulated cycle is considered essential for the diagnosis of POR. However, patients of advanced age with an abnormal ORT may be classified as poor responders since both advanced age and an abnormal ORT may indicate reduced ovarian reserve and act as a surrogate of ovarian stimulation cycle outcome. In this case, the patients should be more properly defined as 'expected poor responder'. If this definition of POR is uniformly adapted as the 'minimal' criteria needed to select patients for future clinical trials, more homogeneous populations will be tested for any new protocols. Finally, by reducing bias caused by spurious POR definitions, it will be possible to compare results and to draw reliable conclusions.

  10. Computer-aided breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin, E-mail: Bin.Zheng-1@ou.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Hollingsworth, Alan B. [Mercy Women’s Center, Mercy Health Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73120 (United States); Qian, Wei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To identify a new clinical marker based on quantitative kinetic image features analysis and assess its feasibility to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: The authors assembled a dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 68 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among them, 25 patients had complete response (CR) and 43 had partial and nonresponse (NR) to chemotherapy based on the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The authors developed a computer-aided detection scheme to segment breast areas and tumors depicted on the breast MR images and computed a total of 39 kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal enhancement regions. The authors then applied and tested two approaches to classify between CR and NR cases. The first one analyzed each individual feature and applied a simple feature fusion method that combines classification results from multiple features. The second approach tested an attribute selected classifier that integrates an artificial neural network (ANN) with a wrapper subset evaluator, which was optimized using a leave-one-case-out validation method. Results: In the pool of 39 features, 10 yielded relatively higher classification performance with the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.61 to 0.78 to classify between CR and NR cases. Using a feature fusion method, the maximum AUC = 0.85 ± 0.05. Using the ANN-based classifier, AUC value significantly increased to 0.96 ± 0.03 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired prechemotherapy has potential to generate a useful clinical marker in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy.

  11. Can Routine Imaging After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer Predict Pathologic Complete Response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefgen, B; Mati, M; Sinn, H P; Golatta, M; Stieber, A; Rauch, G; Hennigs, A; Richter, H; Domschke, C; Schuetz, F; Sohn, C; Schneeweiss, A; Heil, Joerg

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated breast imaging procedures for predicting pathologic complete response (pCR = ypT0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for breast cancer to challenge surgery as a diagnostic procedure after NACT. This retrospective, exploratory, monocenter study included 150 invasive breast cancers treated by NACT. The patients received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), mammography (MGR), and ultrasound (US). The results were classified in three response subgroups according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. To incorporate specific features of MRI and MGR, an additional category [clinical near complete response (near-cCR)] was defined. Residual cancer in imaging and pathology was defined as a positive result. Negative predictive values (NPVs), false-negative rates (FNRs), and false-positive rates (FPRs) of all imaging procedures were analyzed for the whole cohort and for triple-negative (TN), HER2-positive (HER2+), and HER2-negative/hormone-receptor-positive (HER2-/HR+) cancers, respectively. In 46 cases (31%), pCR (ypT0) was achieved. Clinical complete response (cCR) and near-cCR showed nearly the same NPVs and FNRs. The NPV was highest with 61% for near-cCR in MRI and lowest with 44% for near-cCR in MGR for the whole cohort. The FNRs ranged from 4 to 25% according to different imaging methods. The MRI performance seemed to be superior, especially in TN cancers (NPV 94%; FNR 5%). The lowest FPR was 10 % in MRI, and the highest FPR was 44% in US. Neither MRI nor MGR or US can diagnose a pCR (ypT0) with sufficient accuracy to replace pathologic diagnosis of the surgical excision specimen.

  12. Advantages of high b-value diffusion-weighted imaging to diagnose pseudo-responses in patients with recurrent glioma after bevacizumab treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Kurisu, Kaoru [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Aoki, Tomokazu [Department of Neurosurgery, National Hospital Organization, Kyoto Medical Center, Kyoto 612-8555 (Japan); Yamanaka, Masami [Department of Neurosurgery, Otagawa Hospital, Hiroshima 732-0009 (Japan); Kajiwara, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yosuke; Takayasu, Takeshi [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Akiyama, Yuji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Sugiyama, Kazuhiko, E-mail: sugiyama-hma@umin.ac.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    Background: The diagnosis of pseudo-responses after bevacizumab treatment is difficult. Because diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is associated with cell density, it may facilitate the differentiation between true- and pseudo-responses. Furthermore, as high b-value DWI is even more sensitive to diffusion, it has been reported to be diagnostically useful in various clinical settings. Materials and methods: Between September 2008 and May 2011, 10 patients (5 males, 5 females; age range 6–65 years) with recurrent glioma were treated with bevacizumab. All underwent pre- and post-treatment MRI including T2- or FLAIR imaging, post-gadolinium contrast T1-weighted imaging, and DWI with b-1000 and b-4000. Response rates were evaluated by MacDonald- and by response assessment in neuro-oncology working group (RANO) criteria. We also assessed the response rate by calculating the size of high intensity areas using high b-value diffusion-weighted criteria. Prognostic factors were evaluated using Kaplan–Meier survival curves (log-rank test). Results: It was easier to identify pseudo-responses with RANO- than MacDonald criteria, however the reduction of edema by bevacizumab rendered the early diagnosis of tumor progression difficult by RANO criteria. In some patients with recurrent glioma treated with bevacizumab, high b-value diffusion-weighted criteria did, while MacDonald- and RANO criteria did not identify pseudo-responses at an early point after the start of therapy. Discussion and conclusion: High b-value DWI reflects cell density more accurately than regular b-value DWI. Our findings suggest that in patients with recurrent glioma, high b-value diffusion-weighted criteria are useful for the differentiation between pseudo- and true responses to treatment with bevacizumab.

  13. Satellite image collection modeling for large area hazard emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shufan; Hodgson, Michael E.

    2016-08-01

    Timely collection of critical hazard information is the key to intelligent and effective hazard emergency response decisions. Satellite remote sensing imagery provides an effective way to collect critical information. Natural hazards, however, often have large impact areas - larger than a single satellite scene. Additionally, the hazard impact area may be discontinuous, particularly in flooding or tornado hazard events. In this paper, a spatial optimization model is proposed to solve the large area satellite image acquisition planning problem in the context of hazard emergency response. In the model, a large hazard impact area is represented as multiple polygons and image collection priorities for different portion of impact area are addressed. The optimization problem is solved with an exact algorithm. Application results demonstrate that the proposed method can address the satellite image acquisition planning problem. A spatial decision support system supporting the optimization model was developed. Several examples of image acquisition problems are used to demonstrate the complexity of the problem and derive optimized solutions.

  14. Monitoring human melanocytic cell responses to piperine using multispectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatham, Ravikant; Phillips, Kevin G.; Sonka, Julia; Yelma, Aznegashe; Reddy, Neha; Vanka, Meenakshi; Thuillier, Philippe; Soumyanath, Amala; Jacques, Steven

    2011-03-01

    Vitiligo is a depigmentary disease characterized by melanocyte loss attributed most commonly to autoimmune mechanisms. Currently vitiligo has a high incidence (1% worldwide) but a poor set of treatment options. Piperine, a compound found in black pepper, is a potential treatment for the depigmentary skin disease vitiligo, due to its ability to stimulate mouse epidermal melanocyte proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The present study investigates the use of multispectral imaging and an image processing technique based on local contrast to quantify the stimulatory effects of piperine on human melanocyte proliferation in reconstructed epidermis. We demonstrate the ability of the imaging method to quantify increased pigmentation in response to piperine treatment. The quantization of melanocyte stimulation by the proposed imaging technique illustrates the potential use of this technology to quickly assess therapeutic responses of vitiligo tissue culture models to treatment non-invasively.

  15. Lower-Dark-Current, Higher-Blue-Response CMOS Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas; Hancock, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Several improved designs for complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit image detectors have been developed, primarily to reduce dark currents (leakage currents) and secondarily to increase responses to blue light and increase signal-handling capacities, relative to those of prior CMOS imagers. The main conclusion that can be drawn from a study of the causes of dark currents in prior CMOS imagers is that dark currents could be reduced by relocating p/n junctions away from Si/SiO2 interfaces. In addition to reflecting this conclusion, the improved designs include several other features to counteract dark-current mechanisms and enhance performance.

  16. Rational imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma. The challenge of multimodal diagnostic criteria; Rationale Schnittbildgebung des hepatozellulaeren Karzinoms. Die Herausforderung multimodaler Diagnosekriterien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kircher, A.; Bongartz, G.; Merkle, E.M.; Zech, C.J. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) constitute the gold standard in radiological imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In cases of typical contrast behavior each modality as a single dynamic technique allows the diagnosis of HCC. There is still a challenge in detection of small HCCs < 2 cm, in differentiating HCC and high-grade dysplasia from other benign liver lesions as well as the evaluation of hypovascular liver lesions in the cirrhotic liver. Nowadays, both modalities achieve high detection rates of 90-100 % for lesions > 2 cm. Regarding lesions between 1 and 2 cm there is a higher sensitivity for MRI ranging between 80 and 90 % compared to 60-75 % with CT. Besides the multimodal diagnostic criteria, MRI provides significant benefits with the use of hepatobiliary contrast. Especially in combination with diffusion- weighted imaging (DWI) increased sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy compared to CT has been described for lesions sized < 2 cm. Regarding the differentiation from other hepatic nodules in the cirrhotic liver there is strong evidence that the coexistence of arterial enhancement and hypointensity on hepatobiliary imaging is specific for HCC. Moreover, hypointensity on hepatobiliary imaging is associated with a high positive predictive value (PPV) of up to 100 % for the presence of high-grade dysplasia and HCC. The use of MRI including hepatobiliary imaging and DWI has to be regarded as the best non-invasive imaging modality for the detection of HCC and for the characterization of nodules in patients with liver cirrhosis. In comparison to CT there are benefits regarding detection of small lesions < 2 cm and evaluation of hypovascular liver lesions in the context of the hepatocarcinogenesis including prognostic values of premalignant lesions. Both MRI and CT provide a high diagnostic performance in evaluation of HCC in liver cirrhosis. With MRI there are considerable advantages regarding the detection rate and

  17. Evaluation of chemotherapy response in ovarian cancer treatment using quantitative CT image biomarkers: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Tan, Maxine; McMeekin, Scott; Thai, Theresa; Moore, Kathleen; Ding, Kai; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and apply quantitative image biomarkers for early prediction of the tumor response to the chemotherapy among the ovarian cancer patients participated in the clinical trials of testing new drugs. In the experiment, we retrospectively selected 30 cases from the patients who participated in Phase I clinical trials of new drug or drug agents for ovarian cancer treatment. Each case is composed of two sets of CT images acquired pre- and post-treatment (4-6 weeks after starting treatment). A computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme was developed to extract and analyze the quantitative image features of the metastatic tumors previously tracked by the radiologists using the standard Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) guideline. The CAD scheme first segmented 3-D tumor volumes from the background using a hybrid tumor segmentation scheme. Then, for each segmented tumor, CAD computed three quantitative image features including the change of tumor volume, tumor CT number (density) and density variance. The feature changes were calculated between the matched tumors tracked on the CT images acquired pre- and post-treatments. Finally, CAD predicted patient's 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) using a decision-tree based classifier. The performance of the CAD scheme was compared with the RECIST category. The result shows that the CAD scheme achieved a prediction accuracy of 76.7% (23/30 cases) with a Kappa coefficient of 0.493, which is significantly higher than the performance of RECIST prediction with a prediction accuracy and Kappa coefficient of 60% (17/30) and 0.062, respectively. This study demonstrated the feasibility of analyzing quantitative image features to improve the early predicting accuracy of the tumor response to the new testing drugs or therapeutic methods for the ovarian cancer patients.

  18. Molecularly Targeted Therapy Using Bevacizumab for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: a Pilot Study for the New CT Response Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Yun; Lee, Kyung Soo; Hwang, Hye Sun; Lee, Ju Won; Ahn, Myung Ju; Park, Keun Chil; Kim, Tae Sung; Yi, Chin A; Chung, Myung Jin [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    We wanted to compare the efficacy of the new CT response evaluation criteria for predicting the tumor progression-free survival (PFS) with that of RECIST 1.1 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who were treated with bevacizumab. Sixteen patients (M:F = 11:5; median age, 57 years) treated with bevacizumab and combined cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents were selected for a retrospective analysis. The tumor response was assessed by four different methods, namely, by using RECIST 1.1 (RECIST), RECIST but measuring only the solid component of tumor (RECISTsolid), the alternative method reflecting tumor cavitation (the alternative method) and the combined criteria (the combined criteria) that evaluated both the changes of tumor size and attenuation. To evaluate the capabilities of the different measurement methods to predict the patient prognosis, the PFS were compared, using the log rank test, among the responder groups (complete response [CR], partial response [PR], stable disease [SD] and progressive disease [PD]) in terms of the four different methods. The overall (CR, PR or SD) response rates according to RECIST, RECISTsolid, the alternative method and the combined criteria were 81%, 88%, 81% and 85%, respectively. The confirmed response rates (CR or PR) were 19%, 19%, 50% and 54%, respectively. Although statistically not significant, the alternative method showed the biggest difference for predicting PFS among the three response groups (PR, SD and PD) (p = 0.07). RECIST and the alternative method showed a significant difference for predicting the prognosis between the good (PR or SD) and poor overall responders (p = 0.02). The response outcome evaluations using the three different CT response criteria that reflect tumor cavitation, the ground-glass opacity component and the attenuation changes in NSCLC patients treated with bevacizumab showed different results from that with using the traditional RECIST method

  19. mTOR-inhibitor treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma: contribution of Choi and modified Choi criteria assessed in 2D or 3D to evaluate tumor response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamuraglia, M. [Laboratoire d' Imagerie Biomedicale, Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Univ Paris 06, INSERM, CNRS, Paris (France); Raslan, S.; Penna, R.R.; Wagner, M. [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, APHP UPMC, Service de Radiologie Polyvalente et Oncologique, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Elaidi, R.; Oudard, S. [APHP, Oncology Unit, Georges-Pompidou Hospital, Paris (France); Escudier, B. [Gustave-Roussy Institute, Medical Oncology Department, Villejuif (France); Slimane, K. [Novartis Pharma, Rueil-Malmaison (France); Lucidarme, O. [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, APHP UPMC, Service de Radiologie Polyvalente et Oncologique, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Laboratoire d' Imagerie Biomedicale, Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Univ Paris 06, INSERM, CNRS, Paris (France)

    2016-01-15

    To determine whether 2D or 3D Choi and modified Choi (mChoi) criteria could assess the efficacy of everolimus against metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). RECIST-1.1, Choi, and mChoi criteria were applied retrospectively to analyse baseline and 2-month contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) images in 48 patients with mRCC enrolled in the everolimus arm of the French randomized double-blind multicentre phase III trial comparing everolimus versus placebo (RECORD-1). The primary endpoint was centrally reviewed progression-free survival (PFS) calculated from the initial RECORD-1 analysis. Mean attenuation was determined for 2D target lesion regions of interest drawn on CECT sections whose largest diameters had been measured, and for the 3D whole target lesion. The median PFS was 5.5 months. The median PFS for everolimus responders defined using 3D mChoi criteria was significantly longer than for non-responders (7.6 versus 5.4 months, respectively), corresponding to a hazard ratio for progression of 0.45 (95 % CI: 0.22-0.92), with respective 1-year survival rates of 31 % and 9 %. No other 2D or 3D imaging criteria at 2 months identified patients who would benefit from everolimus. At 2 months, only 3D mChoi criteria were able to identify mRCC patients with a PFS benefit from everolimus. (orig.)

  20. 2D magnetic nanoparticle imaging using magnetization response second harmonic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Saburo, E-mail: tanakas@ens.tut.ac.jp [Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Murata, Hayaki; Oishi, Tomoya; Suzuki, Toshifumi [Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Zhang, Yi [Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich D-52425 (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    A detection method and an imaging technique for magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated. In MNP detection and in magnetic particle imaging (MPI), the most commonly employed method is the detection of the odd harmonics of the magnetization response. We examined the advantage of using the second harmonic response when applying an AC magnetic modulation field and a DC bias field. If the magnetization response is detected by a Cu-wound-coil detection system, the output voltage from the coil is proportional to the change in the flux, dϕ/dt. Thus, the dependence of the derivative of the magnetization, M, on an AC magnetic modulation field and a DC bias field were calculated and investigated. The calculations were in good agreement with the experimental results. We demonstrated that the use of the second harmonic response for the detection of MNPs has an advantage compared with the usage of the third harmonic response, when the Cu-wound-coil detection system is employed and the amplitude of the ratio of the AC modulation field and a knee field H{sub ac}/H{sub k} is less than 2. We also constructed a 2D MPI scanner using a pair of permanent ring magnets with a bore of ϕ80 mm separated by 90 mm. The magnets generated a gradient of G{sub z}=3.17 T/m transverse to the imaging bore and G{sub x}=1.33 T/m along the longitudinal axis. An original concentrated 10 μl Resovist solution in a ϕ2×3 mm{sup 2} vessel was used as a sample, and it was imaged by the scanner. As a result, a 2D contour map image could be successfully generated using the method with a lock-in amplifier.

  1. Development of profession and quality in radiography with focus on evaluation criteria and image quality of chest x-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne; Thomsen, Henrik; Conradsen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Learning Objectives: Learning Objectives: To improve quality of chest xrays by Education Conferences for radiographers and evaluation of image quality. Background: Introduction of digital imaging technology and picture archiving and communication system (PACS) has changed the workflow in the x......-ray department including evaluation of image quality and feedback from radiologist to radiographer. Imaging Findings or Procedure Details: Procedure Details: Data for evaluation of image quality was collected by questionnaires aimed at: anatomy, image-focusing, image-collimation, exposure and body habitus...... collection were found. Evaluation results from anatomy, image-focusing, image-collimation and exposure from first data collection shows variations from 7 % to 37 % between evaluation at primary monitor by the radiographers and diagnostic monitor by the radiologist. In relation to anatomy, the quality...

  2. Viable tumor volume: Volume of interest within segmented metastatic lesions, a pilot study of proposed computed tomography response criteria for urothelial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folio, Les Roger, E-mail: Les.folio@nih.gov [Lead Radiologist for CT, NIH Radiology and Imaging Sciences, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Turkbey, Evrim B., E-mail: evrimbengi@yahoo.com [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Steinberg, Seth M., E-mail: steinbes@mail.nih.gov [Head, Biostatistics and Data Management Section, Office of the Clinical Director, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Room 2W334, MSC 9716, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Apolo, Andrea B. [Genitourinary Malignancies Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • It is clear that 2D axial measurements are incomplete assessments in metastatic disease; especially in light of evolving antiangiogenic therapies that can result in tumor necrosis. • Our pilot study demonstrates that taking volumetric density into account can better predict overall survival when compared to RECIST, volumetric size, MASS and Choi. • Although volumetric segmentation and further density analysis may not yet be feasible within routine workflows, the authors believe that technology advances may soon make this possible. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the ability of new computed tomography (CT) response criteria for solid tumors such as urothelial cancer (VTV; viable tumor volume) to predict overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic bladder cancer treated with cabozantinib. Materials and methods: We compared the relative capabilities of VTV, RECIST, MASS (morphology, attenuation, size, and structure), and Choi criteria, as well as volume measurements, to predict OS using serial follow-up contrast-enhanced CT exams in patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Kaplan–Meier curves and 2-tailed log-rank tests compared OS based on early RECIST 1.1 response against each of the other criteria. A Cox proportional hazards model assessed response at follow-up exams as a time-varying covariate for OS. Results: We assessed 141 lesions in 55CT scans from 17 patients with urothelial metastasis, comparing VTV, RECIST, MASS, and Choi criteria, and volumetric measurements, for response assessment. Median follow-up was 4.5 months, range was 2–14 months. Only the VTV criteria demonstrated a statistical association with OS (p = 0.019; median OS 9.7 vs. 3.5 months). Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that VTV is a promising tool for assessing tumor response and predicting OS, using criteria that incorporate tumor volume and density in patients receiving antiangiogenic therapy for urothelial cancer. Larger studies are warranted to

  3. Comparison of RECIST, EORTC criteria and PERCIST for evaluation of early response to chemotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jingjie; Ling, Xueying; Zhang, Linyue; Tang, Yongjin; Xiao, Zeyu; Cheng, Yong; Guo, Bin; Gong, Jian; Huang, Li; Xu, Hao

    2016-10-01

    To compare the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria and the Positron Emission Tomography Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) 1.0 using PET volume computer-assisted reading (PET VCAR) for response evaluation in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with chemotherapy. A total of 35 patients with NSCLC were included in this prospective study. All patients received standard chemotherapy and underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans before and after treatment. With the assistance of PET VCAR, the chemotherapeutic responses were evaluated according to the RECIST 1.1, EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0. Concordance among these protocols was assessed using Cohen's κ coefficient and Wilcoxon's signed-ranks test. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier test. RECIST 1.1 and EORTC response classifications were discordant in 20 patients (57.1 %; κ = 0.194, P EORTC and PERCIST 1.0 classifications were discordant in only 4 patients (11.4 %), resulting in better concordance (κ = 0.804, P > 0.05). Patients with a partial remission according to RECIST 1.1 had significantly longer PFS (P EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0, patients with a partial metabolic response had a significantly longer PFS than those with stable metabolic disease and those with progressive metabolic disease (P = 0.020 and P EORTC; both P EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0 are more sensitive and accurate than RECIST 1.1 for the detection of an early therapeutic response to chemotherapy in patients with NSCLC. Although EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0 showed similar results, PERCIST 1.0 is preferred because detailed and unambiguous definitions are given. We also found that response evaluations with PERCIST 1.0 using a single lesion and multiple lesions gave similar response classifications.

  4. Comparison of RECIST, EORTC criteria and PERCIST for evaluation of early response to chemotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Jingjie; Ling, Xueying; Zhang, Linyue; Tang, Yongjin; Xiao, Zeyu; Cheng, Yong; Guo, Bin; Gong, Jian; Huang, Li; Xu, Hao [The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT-MRI Centre, Guangzhou (China)

    2016-10-15

    To compare the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria and the Positron Emission Tomography Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) 1.0 using PET volume computer-assisted reading (PET VCAR) for response evaluation in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with chemotherapy. A total of 35 patients with NSCLC were included in this prospective study. All patients received standard chemotherapy and underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans before and after treatment. With the assistance of PET VCAR, the chemotherapeutic responses were evaluated according to the RECIST 1.1, EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0. Concordance among these protocols was assessed using Cohen's κ coefficient and Wilcoxon's signed-ranks test. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier test. RECIST 1.1 and EORTC response classifications were discordant in 20 patients (57.1 %; κ = 0.194, P < 0.05), and RECIST 1.1 and PERCIST 1.0 classifications were discordant in 22 patients (62.9 %; κ = 0.139, P < 0.05). EORTC and PERCIST 1.0 classifications were discordant in only 4 patients (11.4 %), resulting in better concordance (κ = 0.804, P > 0.05). Patients with a partial remission according to RECIST 1.1 had significantly longer PFS (P < 0.001) than patients with progressive disease, but not significantly longer than patients with stable disease (P = 0.855). According to both the EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0, patients with a partial metabolic response had a significantly longer PFS than those with stable metabolic disease and those with progressive metabolic disease (P = 0.020 and P < 0.001, respectively, for EORTC; both P < 0.001 for PERCIST 1.0). EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0 are more sensitive and accurate than RECIST 1.1 for the detection of an early therapeutic response to chemotherapy in patients with NSCLC. Although EORTC criteria and

  5. Prediction of Response to Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy Using Early-Time-Point (18)F-FDG PET/CT Imaging in Patients with Advanced Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Steve Y; Lipson, Evan J; Im, Hyung-Jun; Rowe, Steven P; Gonzalez, Esther Mena; Blackford, Amanda; Chirindel, Alin; Pardoll, Drew M; Topalian, Suzanne L; Wahl, Richard L

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate (18)F-FDG PET/CT scanning as an early predictor of response to immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) in patients with advanced melanoma. Methods: Twenty patients with advanced melanoma receiving ICI prospectively underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT at 3 scan intervals: before treatment initiation (SCAN-1), at days 21-28 (SCAN-2), and at 4 mo (SCAN-3). This study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was received from all patients who were enrolled between April 2012 and December 2013. Tumor response at each posttreatment time point was assessed according to RECIST 1.1, immune-related response criteria, PERCIST (PERCIST 1.0), and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria. Performance characteristics of each metric to predict best overall response (BOR) at ≥ 4 mo were assessed. Results: Twenty evaluable patients were treated with ipilimumab (n = 16), BMS-936559 (n = 3), or nivolumab (n = 1). BOR at ≥ 4 mo included complete response (n = 2), partial response (n = 2), stable disease (n = 1), and progressive disease (n = 15). Response evaluations at SCAN-2 using RECIST 1.1, immune-related response criteria, PERCIST, and EORTC criteria demonstrated accuracies of 75%, 70%, 70%, and 65%, respectively, to predict BOR at ≥ 4 mo. Interestingly, the optimal PERCIST and EORTC threshold values at SCAN-2 to predict BOR were >15.5% and >14.7%, respectively. By combining anatomic and functional imaging data collected at SCAN-2, we developed criteria to predict eventual response to ICI with 100% sensitivity, 93% specificity, and 95% accuracy. Conclusion: Combining functional and anatomic imaging parameters from (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans performed early in ICI appears predictive for eventual response in patients with advanced melanoma. These findings require validation in larger cohorts. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  6. Evaluation of the indications for performing magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis at a referral center for cancer, according to the American College of Radiology criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Camila Silva; Rodrigues, Daniel Padilha; Silva, Olimpio Antonio Cornehl; Beltrani, Fabrício Henrique; de Melo, Rayssa Araruna Bezerra; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Mendes, Gustavo Gomes; Chojniak, Rubens

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the indications for performing magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis at a referral center for cancer. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective, single-center study, conducted by reviewing medical records and imaging reports. We included 1060 female patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis at a cancer center between January 2013 and June 2014. The indications for performing the examination were classified according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria. Results The mean age of the patients was 52.6 ± 14.8 years, and 49.8% were perimenopausal or postmenopausal. The majority (63.9%) had a history of cancer, which was gynecologic in 29.5% and nongynecologic in 34.4%. Of the patients evaluated, 44.0% had clinical complaints, the most common being pelvic pain (in 11.5%) and bleeding (in 9.8%), and 34.7% of patients had previously had abnormal findings on ultrasound. Most (76.7%) of the patients met the criteria for undergoing magnetic resonance imaging, according to the ACR guidelines. The main indications were evaluation of tumor recurrence after surgical resection (in 25.9%); detection and staging of gynecologic neoplasms (in 23.3%); and evaluation of pelvic pain or of a mass (in 17.1%). Conclusion In the majority of the cases evaluated, magnetic resonance imaging was clearly indicated according to the ACR criteria. The main indication was local recurrence after surgical treatment of pelvic malignancies, which is consistent with the routine protocols at cancer centers. PMID:28298725

  7. Evaluation of the indications for performing magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis at a referral center for cancer, according to the American College of Radiology criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Camila Silva; Rodrigues, Daniel Padilha; Silva, Olimpio Antonio Cornehl; Beltrani, Fabrício Henrique; de Melo, Rayssa Araruna Bezerra; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Mendes, Gustavo Gomes; Chojniak, Rubens

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the indications for performing magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis at a referral center for cancer. This was a retrospective, single-center study, conducted by reviewing medical records and imaging reports. We included 1060 female patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis at a cancer center between January 2013 and June 2014. The indications for performing the examination were classified according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria. The mean age of the patients was 52.6 ± 14.8 years, and 49.8% were perimenopausal or postmenopausal. The majority (63.9%) had a history of cancer, which was gynecologic in 29.5% and nongynecologic in 34.4%. Of the patients evaluated, 44.0% had clinical complaints, the most common being pelvic pain (in 11.5%) and bleeding (in 9.8%), and 34.7% of patients had previously had abnormal findings on ultrasound. Most (76.7%) of the patients met the criteria for undergoing magnetic resonance imaging, according to the ACR guidelines. The main indications were evaluation of tumor recurrence after surgical resection (in 25.9%); detection and staging of gynecologic neoplasms (in 23.3%); and evaluation of pelvic pain or of a mass (in 17.1%). In the majority of the cases evaluated, magnetic resonance imaging was clearly indicated according to the ACR criteria. The main indication was local recurrence after surgical treatment of pelvic malignancies, which is consistent with the routine protocols at cancer centers.

  8. Stability of clinical outcome measures in rheumatoid arthritis patients with stable disease defined on the basis of the EULAR response criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Rintek

    2016-01-01

    Natural variation also known as measurement error is assessed in individuals in "steady state." The study aimed to examine inter-visit variations in clinical outcome measures in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with stable disease defined on the basis of the EULAR response criteria. Two hundred...

  9. Adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Mark William; Wick, David Victor

    2004-11-01

    The combination of phase diversity and adaptive optics offers great flexibility. Phase diverse images can be used to diagnose aberrations and then provide feedback control to the optics to correct the aberrations. Alternatively, phase diversity can be used to partially compensate for aberrations during post-detection image processing. The adaptive optic can produce simple defocus or more complex types of phase diversity. This report presents an analysis, based on numerical simulations, of the efficiency of different modes of phase diversity with respect to compensating for specific aberrations during post-processing. It also comments on the efficiency of post-processing versus direct aberration correction. The construction of a bench top optical system that uses a membrane mirror as an active optic is described. The results of characterization tests performed on the bench top optical system are presented. The work described in this report was conducted to explore the use of adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

  10. Study protocol: multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging for therapeutic response prediction in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Trang Thanh; Liney, Gary; Wong, Karen; Rai, Robba; Lee, Mark; Moses, Daniel; Henderson, Christopher; Lin, Michael; Shin, Joo-Shik; Barton, Michael Bernard

    2017-07-04

    Response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) of rectal cancer is variable. Accurate imaging for prediction and early assessment of response would enable appropriate stratification of management to reduce treatment morbidity and improve therapeutic outcomes. Use of either diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) or dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging alone currently lacks sufficient sensitivity and specificity for clinical use to guide individualized treatment in rectal cancer. Multi-parametric MRI and analysis combining DWI and DCE may have potential to improve the accuracy of therapeutic response prediction and assessment. This protocol describes a prospective non-interventional single-arm clinical study. Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing preoperative CRT will prospectively undergo multi-parametric MRI pre-CRT, week 3 CRT, and post-CRT. The protocol consists of DWI using a read-out segmented sequence (RESOLVE), and DCE with pre-contrast T1-weighted (VIBE) scans for T1 calculation, followed by 60 phases at high temporal resolution (TWIST) after gadoversetamide injection. A 3-dimensional voxel-by-voxel technique will be used to produce colour-coded ADC and K(trans) histograms, and data evaluated in combination using scatter plots. MRI parameters will be correlated with surgical histopathology. Histopathology analysis will be standardized, with chemoradiotherapy response defined according to AJCC 7th Edition Tumour Regression Grade (TRG) criteria. Good response will be defined as TRG 0-1, and poor response will be defined as TRG 2-3. The combination of DWI and DCE can provide information on physiological tumour factors such as cellularity and perfusion that may affect radiotherapy response. If validated, multi-parametric MRI combining DWI and DCE can be used to stratify management in rectal cancer patients. Accurate imaging prediction of patients with a complete response to CRT would enable a 'watch and wait' approach, avoiding surgical morbidity

  11. Idiopathic Chronic Parotitis: Imaging Findings and Sialendoscopic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineman, Thomas E; Kacker, Ashutosh; Kutler, David I

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate imaging and sialendoscopic findings to therapeutic response in patients with idiopathic chronic parotitis. We retrospectively reviewed 122 consecutive sialendoscopies performed in an academic medical center by two surgeons between 2008 and 2013. Forty-one (34%) and 54 (44%) patients were excluded on the basis of having parotid or submandibular sialolith, respectively. Nineteen cases were included in the study with idiopathic chronic parotitis. There was a median follow-up of 5 months. Computed tomography (CT) imaging had a sensitivity and specificity of 80.0 and 71.4%, respectively, for predicting abnormal findings on sialendoscopy, while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) had 100% accuracy in a small set of cases. In glands with noticeable pathology present on preoperative imaging or sialendoscopy, 11 out of 12 glands (92%) treated experienced symptomatic improvement, while 3 out of 7 glands (43%) without pathology on imaging or endoscopy experienced symptomatic improvement (p = 0.038). Sialendoscopy for the treatment of idiopathic chronic parotid disease can improve pain and swelling with a higher frequency of success in patients with abnormalities noted on endoscopy. CT and MRI have a moderate degree of accuracy in predicting which patients will benefit from therapeutic sialendoscopy. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rakesh, E-mail: rs05h@fsu.ed [Departments of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2010-07-21

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  13. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  14. The new 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria as predictor of clinical and radiographic response in patients with early arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R B; Schiff, M; Kaegi, T; Finckh, A; Haile, S R; Schulze-Koops, H; von Kempis, J

    2015-01-01

    New American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) criteria for the classification of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have recently been proposed. The aim of this cohort study was to examine whether fulfilling these 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria at the first visit has an impact on the clinical course and on the radiographic progression of the disease. For this observational cohort study, we included patients from the Swiss RA registry SCQM with early RA or undifferentiated arthritis (UA, disease duration ≤1 year), as defined by the treating rheumatologist, who had not received any previous disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Patients were categorized into two groups depending on whether or not they fulfilled the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria (≥6 points vs EULAR criteria at baseline, whereas 240 were not classifiable as definite RA. The ACR/EULAR criteria scores correlated with disease activity at disease onset (R (2) = 0.31). DMARD treatment was subsequently initiated in all patients, mostly with methotrexate (MTX). There were no significant differences in the therapeutic strategies between patients fulfilling or not fulfilling the classification criteria. Six months after inclusion, patients fulfilling the ACR/EULAR criteria developed a 39.1 % reduction of DAS 28 scores, as compared to a 33.6 % reduction in patients not fulfilling the ACR/EULAR criteria (p = 0.0002), independently of their respective treatment strategy. Importantly, the DAS 28 scores were higher in those patients fulfilling the ACR/EULAR criteria (ACR/EULAR positive patients) throughout the observation, as compared to patients not fulfilling those (ACR/EULAR negative patients). Average radiographic progression was higher among ACR/EULAR positive than negative patients (progression of Ratingen score/year 0.50 vs 0.32, resp., p = 0.03) after 3 years of follow-up. Among early RA/UA patients, a score of the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria sufficient to classify

  15. EORTC PET response criteria are more influenced by reconstruction inconsistencies than PERCIST but both benefit from the EARL harmonization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasnon, Charline; Quak, Elske; Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Robin, Philippe; Hofman, Michael S; Bourhis, David; Callahan, Jason; Binns, David S; Desmonts, Cédric; Salaun, Pierre-Yves; Hicks, Rodney J; Aide, Nicolas

    2017-12-01

    This study evaluates the consistency of PET evaluation response criteria in solid tumours (PERCIST) and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) classification across different reconstruction algorithms and whether aligning standardized uptake values (SUVs) to the European Association of Nuclear Medicine acquisition (EANM)/EARL standards provides more consistent response classification. Baseline (PET1) and response assessment (PET2) scans in 61 patients with non-small cell lung cancer were acquired in protocols compliant with the EANM guidelines and were reconstructed with point-spread function (PSF) or PSF + time-of-flight (TOF) reconstruction for optimal tumour detection and with a standardized ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction known to fulfil EANM harmonizing standards. Patients were recruited in three centres. Following reconstruction, EQ.PET, a proprietary software solution was applied to the PSF ± TOF data (PSF ± TOF.EQ) to harmonize SUVs to the EANM standards. The impact of differing reconstructions on PERCIST and EORTC classification was evaluated using standardized uptake values corrected for lean body mass (SUL). Using OSEMPET1/OSEMPET2 (standard scenario), responders displayed a reduction of -57.5% ± 23.4 and -63.9% ± 22.4 for SULmax and SULpeak, respectively, while progressing tumours had an increase of +63.4% ± 26.5 and +60.7% ± 19.6 for SULmax and SULpeak respectively. The use of PSF ± TOF reconstruction impacted the classification of tumour response. For example, taking the OSEMPET1/PSF ± TOFPET2 scenario reduced the apparent reduction in SUL in responding tumours (-39.7% ± 31.3 and -55.5% ± 26.3 for SULmax and SULpeak, respectively) but increased the apparent increase in SUL in progressing tumours (+130.0% ± 50.7 and +91.1% ± 39.6 for SULmax and SULpeak, respectively). Consequently, variation in reconstruction methodology (PSF ± TOFPET1

  16. Predicting treatment response in social anxiety disorder from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehrmann, Oliver; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Polli, Frida E; Reynolds, Gretchen O; Horn, Franziska; Keshavan, Anisha; Triantafyllou, Christina; Saygin, Zeynep M; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Hofmann, Stefan G; Pollack, Mark; Gabrieli, John D

    2013-01-01

    Current behavioral measures poorly predict treatment outcome in social anxiety disorder (SAD). To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine neuroimaging-based treatment prediction in SAD. To measure brain activation in patients with SAD as a biomarker to predict subsequent response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were collected prior to CBT intervention. Changes in clinical status were regressed on brain responses and tested for selectivity for social stimuli. Patients were treated with protocol-based CBT at anxiety disorder programs at Boston University or Massachusetts General Hospital and underwent neuroimaging data collection at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Thirty-nine medication-free patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for the generalized subtype of SAD. Brain responses to angry vs neutral faces or emotional vs neutral scenes were examined with fMRI prior to initiation of CBT. Whole-brain regression analyses with differential fMRI responses for angry vs neutral faces and changes in Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale score as the treatment outcome measure. Pretreatment responses significantly predicted subsequent treatment outcome of patients selectively for social stimuli and particularly in regions of higher-order visual cortex. Combining the brain measures with information on clinical severity accounted for more than 40% of the variance in treatment response and substantially exceeded predictions based on clinical measures at baseline. Prediction success was unaffected by testing for potential confounding factors such as depression severity at baseline. The results suggest that brain imaging can provide biomarkers that substantially improve predictions for the success of cognitive behavioral interventions and more generally suggest that such biomarkers may offer evidence-based, personalized medicine approaches for optimally selecting among treatment options for a patient.

  17. Assessing the performance of four different categories of histological criteria in brain tumours grading by means of a computer-aided diagnosis image analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostopoulos, S; Konstandinou, C; Sidiropoulos, K; Ravazoula, P; Kalatzis, I; Asvestas, P; Cavouras, D; Glotsos, D

    2015-10-01

    Brain tumours are considered one of the most lethal and difficult to treat forms of cancer, with unknown aetiology and lack of any realistic screening. In this study, we examine, whether the combination of descriptive criteria, used by expert histopathologists in assessing histologic tissue samples, and quantitative image analysis features may improve the diagnostic accuracy of brain tumour grading. Data comprised 61 cases of brain cancers (astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, meningiomas) collected from the archives of the University Hospital of Patras, Greece. Incorporating physician's descriptive criteria and image analysis's quantitative features into a discriminant function, a computer-aided diagnosis system was designed for discriminating low-grade from high-grade brain tumours. Physician's descriptive features, when solely used in the system, proved of high discrimination accuracy (93.4%). When verbal descriptive features were combined with quantitative image analysis features in the system, discrimination accuracy improved to 98.4%. The generalization of the proposed system to unseen data converged to an overall prediction accuracy of 86.7% ± 5.4%. Considering that histological grading affects treatment selection and diagnostic errors may be notable in clinical practice, the utilization of the proposed system may safeguard against diagnostic misinterpretations in every day clinical practice. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Classifying CT/MR findings in patients with suspicion of hepatocellular carcinoma: Comparison of liver imaging reporting and data system and criteria-free Likert scale reporting models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Dong; Zhu, Fei-Peng; Xu, Xun; Wang, Qing; Wu, Chen-Jiang; Liu, Xi-Sheng; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2016-02-01

    To compare the Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System (LI-RADS) and a criteria-free Likert scale (LS) reporting models for classifying computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MR) findings of suspicious hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Imaging data of 281 hepatic nodules in 203 patients were retrospectively included. Imaging characteristics including diameter, arterial hyperenhancement, washout, and capsule were reviewed independently by two groups of readers using LI-RADS and LS (range, score 1-5). LS is primarily based on the overall impression of image findings without using fixed criteria. Interreader agreement (IRA), intraclass agreement (ICA), and diagnostic performance were determined by Fleiss, Cohen's kappa (κ), and logistic regression, respectively. There were 167 contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) versus 114 MR data. Overall, IRA was moderate (κ = 0.47, 0.52); IRA was moderate-to-good for arterial hyperenhancement, washout, and capsule (κ = 0.56-0.69); excellent for diameter and tumor embolus (κ = 0.99). Overall, ICA between LI-RADS and LS was moderate (κ = 0.44-0.50); ICA was good for scores 1-2 (κ = 0.71-0.90), moderate for scores 3 and 5 (κ = 0.41-0.52), but very poor for score 4 (κ = 0.11-0.19). LI-RADS produced significantly lower accuracy (78.6% vs. 87.2%) and sensitivity (72.1% vs. 92.8%), higher specificity (97.3% vs. 71.2%) and positive likelihood ratio (+LR: 26.32 vs. 3.23) in diagnosis of HCC. CECT produced relatively low IRA, ICA, and diagnostic ability against MR. There were substantial variations in liver observations between LI-RADS and LS. Further study is needed to investigate ICA between CECT and MR. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Imaging the DNA damage response with PET and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, James C.; Koustoulidou, Sofia; Cornelissen, Bart [University of Oxford, CR-UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    DNA integrity is constantly challenged by endogenous and exogenous factors that can alter the DNA sequence, leading to mutagenesis, aberrant transcriptional activity, and cytotoxicity. Left unrepaired, damaged DNA can ultimately lead to the development of cancer. To overcome this threat, a series of complex mechanisms collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR) are able to detect the various types of DNA damage that can occur and stimulate the appropriate repair process. Each DNA damage repair pathway leads to the recruitment, upregulation, or activation of specific proteins within the nucleus, which, in some cases, can represent attractive targets for molecular imaging. Given the well-established involvement of DDR during tumorigenesis and cancer therapy, the ability to monitor these repair processes non-invasively using nuclear imaging techniques may facilitate the earlier detection of cancer and may also assist in monitoring response to DNA damaging treatment. This review article aims to provide an overview of recent efforts to develop PET and SPECT radiotracers for imaging of DNA damage repair proteins. (orig.)

  20. Acetabulum protrusio and center edge angle: new MR-imaging measurement criteria - a correlative study with measurement derived from conventional radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lina; Resnick, Donald [VASDHS-Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); UCSD Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Boonthathip, Mayura; Cardoso, Fabiano; Clopton, Paul [VASDHS-Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2009-02-15

    The goal of this study was to identify a method of measurement for acetabulum protrusio and center edge angle (CEA) using MR imaging of the pelvis that correlated with classic methods using radiographic landmarks. MR images and radiographs of the pelvis in 67 patients (132 hips) were used to identify reliable MR-imaging methods for measuring protrusio acetabulum and CEA that correlated strongly with established radiographic measurements. Protrusio acetabulum was determined using the radiographic criterion that the acetabular line projects medial to the ilioischial line by 3 mm or more in men and 6 mm or more in women. Pearson correlation factor was used to determine inter-observer variability and those methods that demonstrated the strongest correlation. The mean and standard deviation of MR-imaging and radiographic measurements for both the normal and protrusio hips were established. Several MR methods correlated strongly with radiographic measurements. The preferred method employed axial MR images at the level of the ischial spine with measurement of the distance between the medial most point of the acetabular fossa and a line perpendicular to the horizontal axis that passed through the lateral margin of the posterior inner pelvic wall. The Pearson's correlation factor between radiographic and MR measurements using this method was 0.84, and inter-observer correlation was 0.80. There were 126 hips in 63 patients (17 female and 44 male) that did not meet the radiographic criteria for protrusio acetabula. In this group of normal hips, the mean and standard deviation of radiographic measurements were 1.9 and 2.8 mm in male patients and -0.5 and 1.7 mm in female patients, and the mean and standard deviation for the preferred MR method was 1.3 and 2.5 mm in male patients and -0.8 and 1.9 mm in female patients. A total of six hips in four patients (two female and two male) met the radiographic criteria for protrusio acetabula. In this group of patients, the mean

  1. Accuracy of Computed Tomography Imaging Criteria in the Diagnosis of Adult Open Globe Injuries by Neuroradiology and Ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Eric L; Koduri, Vivek A; Supsupin, Emilio P; Klinglesmith, Robert E; Chuang, Alice Z; Kim, Gene; Baker, Laura A; Feldman, Robert M; Blieden, Lauren S

    2017-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of computed tomography (CT) diagnosis of open globes, determine which imaging factors are most predictive of open globe injuries, and evaluate the agreement between neuroradiologist and ophthalmologist readers for diagnosis of open and closed globes. This study was a retrospective cohort study. Patients who presented to Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center with suspicion for open globes were reviewed. One neuroradiologist and two ophthalmologists masked to clinical information reviewed CT images for signs concerning for open globe including change in globe contour, anterior chamber deformation, intraocular air, vitreous hemorrhage, subretinal fluid indicating retinal or choroidal detachment, dislocated or absent lens, intraocular foreign body, and orbital fracture. Using the clinically or surgically confirmed globe status as the true globe status, sensitivity, specificity, and agreement (kappa) were calculated and used to investigate which imaging factors are most predictive of open globe injuries. A total of 114 patients were included: 35 patients with open globes and 79 patients with closed globes. Specificity was greater than 97% for each reader, and sensitivity ranged from 51% to 77% among readers. The imaging characteristics most consistently used to predict an open globe injury were change in globe contour and vitreous hemorrhage (sensitivity = 43% to 57%, specificity > 98%). The agreement of impression of open globe between the neuroradiologist and ophthalmologists was good and excellent between ophthalmologists. Computed tomography imaging is not absolute, and the sensitivity is still inadequate to be fully relied upon. The CT imaging findings most predictive of an open globe injury were change in globe contour and vitreous hemorrhage. Clinical examination or surgical exploration remains the most important component in evaluating for a suspected open globe, with CT imaging as an adjunct.

  2. Cut-Offs and Response Criteria for the Hospital Universitario La Princesa Index (HUPI) and Their Comparison to Widely-Used Indices of Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Castrejón, Isabel; Ortiz, Ana M; Toledano, Esther; Castañeda, Santos; García-Vadillo, Alberto; Carmona, Loreto; ,

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate cut-off points and to establish response criteria for the Hospital Universitario La Princesa Index (HUPI) in patients with chronic polyarthritis. Methods Two cohorts, one of early arthritis (Princesa Early Arthritis Register Longitudinal [PEARL] study) and other of long-term rheumatoid arthritis (Estudio de la Morbilidad y Expresión Clínica de la Artritis Reumatoide [EMECAR]) including altogether 1200 patients were used to determine cut-off values for remission, and for ...

  3. The value of metabolic imaging to predict tumour response after chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Río Manuel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aim to investigate the possibility of using 18F-positron emission tomography/computer tomography (PET-CT to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC treated with preoperative chemoradiation (CRT. Methods The study included 50 patients with LARC treated with preoperative CRT. All patients were evaluated by PET-CT before and after CRT, and results were compared to histopathologic response quantified by tumour regression grade (patients with TRG 1-2 being defined as responders and patients with grade 3-5 as non-responders. Furthermore, the predictive value of metabolic imaging for pathologic complete response (ypCR was investigated. Results Responders and non-responders showed statistically significant differences according to Mandard's criteria for maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax before and after CRT with a specificity of 76,6% and a positive predictive value of 66,7%. Furthermore, SUVmax values after CRT were able to differentiate patients with ypCR with a sensitivity of 63% and a specificity of 74,4% (positive predictive value 41,2% and negative predictive value 87,9%; This rather low sensitivity and specificity determined that PET-CT was only able to distinguish 7 cases of ypCR from a total of 11 patients. Conclusions We conclude that 18-F PET-CT performed five to seven weeks after the end of CRT can visualise functional tumour response in LARC. In contrast, metabolic imaging with 18-F PET-CT is not able to predict patients with ypCR accurately.

  4. Physiological imaging of electrical trauma and therapeutic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Tu; Matthews, K.; Aarsvold, John N.; Mintzer, Robert A.; Yasillo, Nicholas J.; Hannig, Jurgen; Capelli-Schellpfefer, M.; Cooper, Malcolm; Lee, Raphael C.

    2000-04-01

    In victims of electrical trauma, electroporation of cell membrane, in which lipid bilayer is permeabilized by thermal and electrical forces, is thought to be a substantial cause of tissue damage. It has been suggested that certain mild surfactant in low concentration could induce sealing of permeabilized lipid bilayers, thus repairing cell membranes that had not been extensively damaged. With an animal model of electrically injured hind limb of rats, we have demonstrated and validated the use of radiotracer imaging technique to assess the physiology of the damaged tissues after electrical shock and of their repairs after applying surfactant as a therapeutic strategy. For example, using Tc-99m labeled pyrophosphate (PYP), which follows calcium in cellular function and is known to accumulate in damaged tissues, we have established a physiological imaging approach for assessment of the extent of tissue injury for diagnosis and surgical planning, as well as for evaluation of responses to therapy. With the use of a small, hand-held, miniature gamma camera, this physiological imaging method can be employed at patient's bedside and even in the field, for example, at accident site or during transfer for emergency care, rapid diagnosis, and prompt treatment in order to maximize the chance for tissue survival.

  5. OH* imager response to turbulence-induced temperature fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Chester S.; Vargas, Fabio A.

    2016-12-01

    The layer of the excited state hydroxyl radical (OH*) is formed in the mesopause region by the reaction of ozone (O3) and atomic hydrogen (H). We derive the theoretical expressions for the OH* brightness and rotational temperature (T*) responses to high-frequency atmospheric temperature perturbations. The theory is used to calculate the 1-D and 2-D horizontal wave number spectra of the OH* and T* image fluctuations induced by atmospheric turbulence. By applying the theory to images of a breaking gravity wave packet, acquired by the Utah State University Advanced Mesospheric Temperature Mapper, we show that existing infrared OH* imager technology can observe the evolution of gravity wave breakdown and characterize the resulting turbulent eddies in the source region and in the inertial subrange of the turbulence spectrum. For the example presented here, the RMS OH* brightness fluctuations induced by the gravity wave packet was 2.90% and by the associated turbulence was 1.07%. Unfortunately, the T* fluctuations induced by turbulence are usually too small to be observed in the OH* rotational temperature maps.

  6. Selecting the best responsive option to unexpected orders at the time of capacity-shortage using multi criteria decision models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud parsaei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The way orders are accepted or rejected is the most important factor in customer satisfaction and success of make-to-order systems. The incoming orders to such organizations have certain delivery date in which the customer expects the order to be fulfilled and delivered. In some cases, unexpectedly increased orders exceed the existing capacity for on time fulfillment. In addition to rejection of order, as a typical choice, other options like outsourcing and capacity expansion are available to compensate for capacity shortage and deliver incoming orders according to schedule. However, each of the proposed options is superior in one or more criteria and so selecting the best one is not simply possible. The main goal of this study is to provide managers with a comprehensive, systematic, and applicable approach to evaluate and select the best of the existing options. For this purpose, a model comprised of some multi-criteria techniques is delivered. Our proposed model is a blend of FAHP and FTOPSIS methods. In this model, FAHP is first used to determine the weight of criteria and then Fuzzy-TOPSIS (FTOPSIS is employed to rank the options. Finally, the proposed model is applied on an actual case to assess and examine its efficiency.

  7. The Role of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI in Locoregional Therapy Outcome Prediction and Response Assessment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC: The New Era of Functional Imaging Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes M. Ludwig

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reliable response criteria are critical for the evaluation of therapeutic response in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Current response assessment is mainly based on: (1 changes in size, which is at times unreliable and lag behind the result of therapy; and (2 contrast enhancement, which can be difficult to quantify in the presence of benign post-procedural changes and in tumors presenting with a heterogeneous pattern of enhancement. Given these challenges, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI have been recently investigated, aiding specificity to locoregional therapy response assessment and outcome prediction. Briefly, DWI quantifies diffusion of water occurring naturally at a cellular level (Brownian movement, which is restricted in multiple neoplasms because of high cellularity. Disruption of cellular integrity secondary to therapy results in increased water diffusion across the injured membranes. This review will provide an overview of the current literature on DWI therapy response assessment and outcome prediction in HCC following treatment with locoregional therapies.

  8. Color Doppler Imaging of the Appendix: Criteria to Improve Specificity for Appendicitis in the Borderline-Size Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingding; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Shin, Lewis K; DiMaio, Michael A; Olcott, Eric W

    2016-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that continuous intramural vascular signal measuring at least 3 mm on color Doppler imaging is highly specific for appendicitis in patients with diagnostically borderline-size appendices. Two blinded observers independently reviewed color Doppler images of the appendix in 94 consecutive patients who had undergone sonography for suspected appendicitis and whose appendices were of diagnostically borderline size (6-8 mm maximum outer diameter). Intramural vascular flow on color Doppler images was classified as absent, type 1 (only punctate and dispersed signal), or type 2 (continuous linear or curvilinear signal measuring at least 3.0 mm in long- or short-axis views). Histopathologic examination and clinical follow-up served as reference standards. Proportions were assessed by the exact binomial test. Of the 94 patients, 33 (35.1%) had type 1 flow (of whom 5 [15.2%] had appendicitis); 23 (24.5%) had type 2 flow (of whom 20 [87.0%] had appendicitis); and 38 (40.4%) had absent flow (of whom 10 [26.3%] had appendicitis). The sensitivity, specificity, and odds ratio of type 2 flow as an indicator of appendicitis were 57.1%, 94.9%, and 24.9 (Pappendicitis in noncompressible appendices of diagnostically borderline size (6-8 mm).

  9. Combined modalities of magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopy and computed tomography in the evaluation of tumor responses to definitive chemoradiotherapy in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bo; Wang, DeLing; Yang, Hong; Xie, WeiHao; Liang, Ying; Cai, Peiqiang; Chen, ZhaoLin; Liu, MengZhong; Fu, JianHua; Xie, ChuanMiao; Liu, Hui

    2016-11-01

    To explore the value of combined modalities, including anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopy and computed tomography (CT), for the assessment of tumor responses to definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Sixty-seven patients with locally advanced ESCC were enrolled. Tumor response (TR) was assessed two months after the completion of dCRT. Evaluation criteria according to combined modalities, including MRI, endoscopy and CT, were established and compared with traditional criteria based on CT and endoscopy. Progression-free survival (PFS)⩾12months was used as the reference standard, and the accuracy of the two criteria in response assessment was analyzed. Thirty-seven (55.2%) and 10 (14.9%) patients were considered to exhibit CR, as assessed by combined modalities and the traditional criteria, respectively. Using PFS⩾12months as a surrogate for CR, the sensitivity and specificity of the combined modalities were 82.4% and 88.9%, respectively, compared with 20.6% and 92.6% for the traditional criteria. TR assessed by combined modalities (CR vs. non-CR) was prognostic of PFS in univariate and multivariate analyses (Log-rank, P<0.0001; Cox regression, HR=0.114, 95% CI 0.048-0.272). Tumor responses assessed by the combined modalities of MR, endoscopy and CT seemed highly predictive of prognosis after dCRT in ESCC patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Vergence and accommodation to multiple-image-plane stereoscopic displays: 'Real world' responses with practical image-plane separations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, K. J.; Dickson, R. A.; Watt, S. J.

    2011-03-01

    Conventional stereoscopic displays present images on a single focal plane. The resulting mismatch between the stimuli to the eyes' focusing response (accommodation) and to convergence causes fatigue and poor stereo performance. One promising solution is to distribute image intensity across a number of relatively widely spaced image planes - a technique referred to as depth filtering. Previously, we found this elicits accurate, continuous monocular accommodation responses with image-plane separations as large as 1.1 Diopters, suggesting that a relatively small (i.e. practical) number of image planes is sufficient to eliminate vergence-accommodation conflicts over a large range of simulated distances. However, accommodation responses have been found to overshoot systematically when the same stimuli are viewed binocularly. Here, we examined the minimum image-plane spacing required for accurate accommodation to binocular depth-filtered images. We compared accommodation and vergence responses to step changes in depth for depth-filtered stimuli, using image-plane separations of 0.6-1.2 D, and equivalent real stimuli. Accommodation responses to real and depth-filtered stimuli were equivalent for image-plane separations of ~0.6-0.9 D, but inaccurate thereafter. We conclude that depth filtering can be used to precisely match accommodation and vergence demand in a practical stereoscopic display, using a relatively small number of image planes.

  11. An item response theory analysis of DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for personality disorders: findings from the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harford, Thomas C; Chen, Chiung M; Saha, Tulshi D; Smith, Sharon M; Hasin, Deborah S; Grant, Bridget F

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of DSM-IV symptom criteria for assessing personality disorders (PDs) in a national population and to compare variations in proposed symptom coding for social and/or occupational dysfunction. Data were obtained from a total sample of 34,653 respondents from Waves 1 and 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). For each personality disorder, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) established a 1-factor latent factor structure for the respective symptom criteria. A 2-parameter item response theory (IRT) model was applied to the symptom criteria for each PD to assess the probabilities of symptom item endorsements across different values of the underlying trait (latent factor). Findings were compared with a separate IRT model using an alternative coding of symptom criteria that requires distress/impairment to be related to each criterion. The CFAs yielded a good fit for a single underlying latent dimension for each PD. Findings from the IRT indicated that DSM-IV PD symptom criteria are clustered in the moderate to severe range of the underlying latent dimension for each PD and are peaked, indicating high measurement precision only within a narrow range of the underlying trait and lower measurement precision at lower and higher levels of severity. Compared with the NESARC symptom coding, the IRT results for the alternative symptom coding are shifted toward the more severe range of the latent trait but generally have lower measurement precision for each PD. The IRT findings provide support for a reliable assessment of each PD for both NESARC and alternative coding for distress/impairment. The use of symptom dysfunction for each criterion, however, raises a number of issues and implications for the DSM-5 revision currently proposed for Axis II disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 2010).

  12. Defining responses to therapy and study outcomes in clinical trials of invasive fungal diseases: Mycoses Study Group and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer consensus criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Brahm H; Herbrecht, Raoul; Stevens, David A; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Sobel, Jack; Viscoli, Claudio; Walsh, Thomas J; Maertens, Johan; Patterson, Thomas F; Perfect, John R; Dupont, Bertrand; Wingard, John R; Calandra, Thierry; Kauffman, Carol A; Graybill, John R; Baden, Lindsey R; Pappas, Peter G; Bennett, John E; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Cordonnier, Catherine; Viviani, Maria Anna; Bille, Jacques; Almyroudis, Nikolaos G; Wheat, L Joseph; Graninger, Wolfgang; Bow, Eric J; Holland, Steven M; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Dismukes, William E; De Pauw, Ben E

    2008-09-01

    Invasive fungal diseases (IFDs) have become major causes of morbidity and mortality among highly immunocompromised patients. Authoritative consensus criteria to diagnose IFD have been useful in establishing eligibility criteria for antifungal trials. There is an important need for generation of consensus definitions of outcomes of IFD that will form a standard for evaluating treatment success and failure in clinical trials. Therefore, an expert international panel consisting of the Mycoses Study Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer was convened to propose guidelines for assessing treatment responses in clinical trials of IFDs and for defining study outcomes. Major fungal diseases that are discussed include invasive disease due to Candida species, Aspergillus species and other molds, Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Coccidioides immitis. We also discuss potential pitfalls in assessing outcome, such as conflicting clinical, radiological, and/or mycological data and gaps in knowledge.

  13. Magnetoencephalographic Imaging of Auditory and Somatosensory Cortical Responses in Children with Autism and Sensory Processing Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demopoulos, Carly; Yu, Nina; Tripp, Jennifer; Mota, Nayara; Brandes-Aitken, Anne N.; Desai, Shivani S.; Hill, Susanna S.; Antovich, Ashley D.; Harris, Julia; Honma, Susanne; Mizuiri, Danielle; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.; Marco, Elysa J.

    2017-01-01

    This study compared magnetoencephalographic (MEG) imaging-derived indices of auditory and somatosensory cortical processing in children aged 8–12 years with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; N = 18), those with sensory processing dysfunction (SPD; N = 13) who do not meet ASD criteria, and typically developing control (TDC; N = 19) participants. The magnitude of responses to both auditory and tactile stimulation was comparable across all three groups; however, the M200 latency response from the left auditory cortex was significantly delayed in the ASD group relative to both the TDC and SPD groups, whereas the somatosensory response of the ASD group was only delayed relative to TDC participants. The SPD group did not significantly differ from either group in terms of somatosensory latency, suggesting that participants with SPD may have an intermediate phenotype between ASD and TDC with regard to somatosensory processing. For the ASD group, correlation analyses indicated that the left M200 latency delay was significantly associated with performance on the WISC-IV Verbal Comprehension Index as well as the DSTP Acoustic-Linguistic index. Further, these cortical auditory response delays were not associated with somatosensory cortical response delays or cognitive processing speed in the ASD group, suggesting that auditory delays in ASD are domain specific rather than associated with generalized processing delays. The specificity of these auditory delays to the ASD group, in addition to their correlation with verbal abilities, suggests that auditory sensory dysfunction may be implicated in communication symptoms in ASD, motivating further research aimed at understanding the impact of sensory dysfunction on the developing brain. PMID:28603492

  14. Magnetoencephalographic Imaging of Auditory and Somatosensory Cortical Responses in Children with Autism and Sensory Processing Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly Demopoulos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study compared magnetoencephalographic (MEG imaging-derived indices of auditory and somatosensory cortical processing in children aged 8–12 years with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; N = 18, those with sensory processing dysfunction (SPD; N = 13 who do not meet ASD criteria, and typically developing control (TDC; N = 19 participants. The magnitude of responses to both auditory and tactile stimulation was comparable across all three groups; however, the M200 latency response from the left auditory cortex was significantly delayed in the ASD group relative to both the TDC and SPD groups, whereas the somatosensory response of the ASD group was only delayed relative to TDC participants. The SPD group did not significantly differ from either group in terms of somatosensory latency, suggesting that participants with SPD may have an intermediate phenotype between ASD and TDC with regard to somatosensory processing. For the ASD group, correlation analyses indicated that the left M200 latency delay was significantly associated with performance on the WISC-IV Verbal Comprehension Index as well as the DSTP Acoustic-Linguistic index. Further, these cortical auditory response delays were not associated with somatosensory cortical response delays or cognitive processing speed in the ASD group, suggesting that auditory delays in ASD are domain specific rather than associated with generalized processing delays. The specificity of these auditory delays to the ASD group, in addition to their correlation with verbal abilities, suggests that auditory sensory dysfunction may be implicated in communication symptoms in ASD, motivating further research aimed at understanding the impact of sensory dysfunction on the developing brain.

  15. Image Formation Interactive Lecture Demonstrations Using Personal Response Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, David R.

    2010-07-01

    The results of physics education research and the availability of microcomputer-based tools have led to the development over a number of years of the activity-based Physics Suite. Most of the Suite materials are designed for hands-on learning, for example student-oriented laboratory curricula like Real Time Physics. One reason for the success of these materials is that they encourage students to take an active role in their learning. More recently, personal response systems (clickers) have become available at many schools and universities around the world, and are used by many educators. This paper describes Suite materials designed to promote active learning in lecture—Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs)—that have been adapted for implementation with clickers. Image formation ILDs will be presented. Results of studies on the effectiveness of this approach will also be presented.

  16. Detection of Melamine in Soybean Meal Using Near-Infrared Microscopy Imaging with Pure Component Spectra as the Evaluation Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengling Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean meal was adulterated with melamine with the purpose of boosting the protein content for unlawful interests. In recent years, the near-infrared (NIR spectroscopy technique has been widely used for guaranteeing food and feed security for its fast, nondestructive, and pollution-free characteristics. However, there are problems with using near-infrared (NIR spectroscopy for detecting samples with low contaminant concentration because of instrument noise and sampling issues. In addition, methods based on NIR are indirect and depend on calibration models. NIR microscopy imaging offers the opportunity to investigate the chemical species present in food and feed at the microscale level (the minimum spot size is a few micrometers, thus avoiding the problem of the spectral features of contaminants being diluted by scanning. The aim of this work was to investigate the feasibility of using NIR microscopy imaging to identify melamine particles in soybean meal using only the pure component spectrum. The results presented indicate that using the classical least squares (CLS algorithm with the nonnegative least squares (NNLS algorithm, without needing first to develop a calibration model, could identify soybean meal that is both uncontaminated and contaminated with melamine particles at as low a level as 50 mg kg−1.

  17. Binge drinking, depression, and electrocortical responses to emotional images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Arin M; Patton, Emily; McKillop, Hannah

    2015-09-01

    Binge drinking and depression are highly prevalent, associated with cognitive and affective impairments, and frequently co-occur. Yet little research has examined their joint relations with such processing impairment. The current study examines the relation between symptoms of depression, binge drinking, and the magnitude of early (early posterior negativity, EPN) and later (P3 and late positive potential, LPP) visual processing components of affectively negative, positive, and neutral visual stimuli. Participants included 42 undergraduate students recruited on the basis of depressive symptoms. Results of repeated measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs; Depression × Binge × Emotion × Laterality) showed that binge drinkers exhibited lower LPP amplitudes for negative images, compared with nonbinge drinkers, regardless of depression, consistent with motivational models of alcohol abuse. Otherwise, differences across depressed and nondepressed groups were largest among binge drinkers, including a pattern of stronger early attentional engagement (EPN) to negative and neutral images, but decreased later processing (P3 and LPP) across all emotional categories, consistent with a vigilance-avoidance response pattern. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Effect of virtual image projection distance on the accomodative response of the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisum, G T; Morway, P E

    1977-09-01

    Virtual image displays utilize either aircraft-mounted or helmet-mounted beam splitters, or combining screens. The effect on the accomodative response of the projection distance of the virtual image was measured by photographing the first and fourth Purkinje images of a source. The results indicate possible effect on the accomodation response. Further exploration of the problem is indicated.

  19. Posttreatment PET/CT Rather Than Interim PET/CT Using Deauville Criteria Predicts Outcome in Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Prospective Study Comparing PET/CT with Conventional Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Sameer; Bhethanabhotla, Sainath; Kumar, Rakesh; Agarwal, Krishankant; Sharma, Punit; Thulkar, Sanjay; Malhotra, Arun; Dhawan, Deepa; Vishnubhatla, Sreenivas

    2017-04-01

    Data about the significance of (18)F-FDG PET at interim assessment and end of treatment in pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are limited. Methods: Patients (≤18 y) with HL were prospectively evaluated with contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) and PET combined with low-dose CT (PET/CT) at baseline, after 2 cycles of chemotherapy, and after completion of treatment. Revised International Working Group (RIW) criteria and Deauville 5 point-scale for response assessment by PET/CT were used. All patients received doxorubicin (Adriamycin), bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine chemotherapy along with involved-field radiotherapy (25 Gy) for early stage (IA, IB, and IIA) and advanced stage (IIB-IV) with bulky disease. Results: Of the 57 enrolled patients, median follow-up was 81.6 mo (range, 11-97.5 mo). Treatment decisions were based on CECT. At baseline, PET/CT versus CECT identified 67 more disease sites; 23 patients (40.3%) were upstaged and of them in 9 patients (39%) upstaging would have affected treatment decision; notably none of these patients relapsed. The specificity of interim PET/CT based on RIW criteria (61.5%) and Deauville criteria (91.4%) for predicting relapse was higher than CECT (40.3%) (P = 0.03 and P interim PET/CT (RIW) response was 93.3 ± 4.1 versus 89.6 ± 3.8 (positive vs. negative scan, respectively; P = 0.44). The specificity of posttreatment PET/CT (Deauville) was 95.7% versus 76.4% by CECT (P = 0.006). Posttreatment PET/CT (Deauville) showed significantly inferior overall survival in patients with positive scan versus negative scan results (66.4 ± 22.5 vs. 94.5 ± 2.0, P = 0.029). Conclusion: Interim PET/CT has better specificity, and use of Deauville criteria further improves it. Escalation of therapy based on interim PET in pediatric HL needs further conclusive evidence to justify its use. Posttreatment PET/CT (Deauville) predicts overall survival and has better specificity in comparison to conventional imaging.

  20. Vergence and accommodation to multiple-image-plane stereoscopic displays: ``real world'' responses with practical image-plane separations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Kevin J.; Dickson, Ruth A.; Watt, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional stereoscopic displays present images on a single focal plane. The resulting mismatch between the stimuli to the eyes' focusing response (accommodation) and to convergence causes fatigue and poor stereo performance. One solution is to distribute image intensity across a number of widely spaced image planes--a technique referred to as depth filtering. Previously, we found this elicits accurate, continuous monocular accommodation responses with image-plane separations as large as 1.1 Diopters (D, the reciprocal of distance in meters), suggesting that a small number of image planes could eliminate vergence-accommodation conflicts over a large range of simulated distances. Evidence exists, however, of systematic differences between accommodation responses to binocular and monocular stimuli when the stimulus to accommodation is degraded, or at an incorrect distance. We examined the minimum image-plane spacing required for accurate accommodation to binocular depth-filtered images. We compared accommodation and vergence responses to changes in depth specified by depth filtering, using image-plane separations of 0.6 to 1.2 D, and equivalent real stimuli. Accommodation responses to real and depth-filtered stimuli were equivalent for image-plane separations of ~0.6 to 0.9 D, but differed thereafter. We conclude that depth filtering can be used to precisely match accommodation and vergence demand in a practical stereoscopic display.

  1. The Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation provisional criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables.......To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables....

  2. Utility of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria in predicting the onset of septic shock in hospitalized patients with hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mato, Anthony; Fuchs, Barry D; Heitjan, Daniel F; Mick, Rosemarie; Halpern, Scott D; Shah, Payal D; Jacobs, Samamtha; Olson, Erin M; Schuster, Stephen J; Ujjani, Chaitra; Chong, Elise A; Loren, Alison W; Miltiades, Andrea N; Luger, Selina

    2009-06-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria have not been validated in patients with hematologic malignancies (HM). To determine whether daily assessment of SIRS criteria allows early identification of HM patients who will develop septic shock (SS). Observational, single-center,nested case-control study. Oncology unit of a tertiary care center. 547 consecutive, hospitalized, HM subject were enrolled. Using incidence-density sampling, 184 controls were matched to 46 SS cases. The study exposure was the SIRS score. The study outcome was the development of SS during the hospitalization. 8.4% of subjects developed SS. SIRS scores measured 24 hours prior to SS were significantly higher in cases than in controls (2.1 vs. 1.4,pSIRS cutpoints, fever, tachypnea and tachycardia were each associated with the onset of SS. Population-specific SIRS criteria were empirically derived. Single-center study. Further validation is warranted. SIRS can identify HM patients at risk for SS at least 24 hours before SS onset. These data may lead to evidence-based guidelines using routine vital signs to risk-stratify HM patients for SS.

  3. CMOS Image Sensor and System for Imaging Hemodynamic Changes in Response to Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Noor, Muhammad S; McCracken, Clinton B; Kiss, Zelma H T; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Murari, Kartikeya

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a therapeutic intervention used for a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, but its mechanism of action is not well understood. It is known that DBS modulates neural activity which changes metabolic demands and thus the cerebral circulation state. However, it is unclear whether there are correlations between electrophysiological, hemodynamic and behavioral changes and whether they have any implications for clinical benefits. In order to investigate these questions, we present a miniaturized system for spectroscopic imaging of brain hemodynamics. The system consists of a 144 ×144, [Formula: see text] pixel pitch, high-sensitivity, analog-output CMOS imager fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process, along with a miniaturized imaging system comprising illumination, focusing, analog-to-digital conversion and μSD card based data storage. This enables stand alone operation without a computer, nor electrical or fiberoptic tethers. To achieve high sensitivity, the pixel uses a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA). The nMOS transistors are in the pixel while pMOS transistors are column-parallel, resulting in a fill factor (FF) of 26%. Running at 60 fps and exposed to 470 nm light, the CMOS imager has a minimum detectable intensity of 2.3 nW/cm(2) , a maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 49 dB at 2.45 μW/cm(2) leading to a dynamic range (DR) of 61 dB while consuming 167 μA from a 3.3 V supply. In anesthetized rats, the system was able to detect temporal, spatial and spectral hemodynamic changes in response to DBS.

  4. The Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation provisional criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables....

  5. Opportunities and challenges of expanded criteria organs in liver and kidney transplantation as a response to organ shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Harvey

    2011-01-01

    In 1989, there were 19,000 patients on the UNOS (United Network of Organ Sharing) wait list for organs compared to 110,000 today. Without an equivalent increase in donors, the patients awaiting these organs for transplant face increasing severity of illness and risk of dying without receiving a transplant. This disparity in supply and demand has led to acceptance of organs with lower than expected success rates compared to previous standard donors variously defined as extended criteria donors in order to increase transplantation. The reluctance to wider use of these types of organs is based on the less than expected transplant center graft and patient survival results associated with their use, as well as the increased resources required to care for the patients who receive these organs. The benefits need to be compared to the survival of not receiving a transplant and remaining on the waiting list rather than on outcomes of receiving a standard donor. A lack of a systematic risk outcomes adjustment is one of the most important factors preventing more extensive utilization as transplant centers are held to patient and graft survival statistics as a performance measure by multiple regulatory organizations and insurers. Newer classification systems of such donors may allow a more systematic approach to analyzing the specific risks to individualized patients. Due to changes in donor policies across the country, there has been an increase in Extended Criteria Donors (ECD) organs procured by organ procurement organizations (OPO) but their uneven acceptance by the transplant centers has contributed to an increase in discards and organs not being used. This is one of the reasons that wider sharing of organs is currently receiving much attention. Transplanting ECD organs presents unique challenges and innovative approaches to achieve satisfactory results. Improved logistics and information technology combined strategies for improving donor quality with may prevent discards

  6. Prognostic Value of FDG-PET, Based on the Revised Response Criteria, in Patients with Malignant Lymphoma: A Comparison with CT/MRI Evaluations, Based on the International Working Group/ Cotswolds Meeting Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayako Isohashi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Post-treatment evaluations by CT/MRI (based on the International Working Group/ Cotswolds meeting guidelines and PET (based on Revised Response Criteria, were examined in terms of progression-free survival (PFS in patients with malignant lymphoma (ML. Methods: 79 patients, undergoing CT/MRI for the examination of suspected lesions and whole-body PET/CT before and after therapy, were included in the study during April 2007-January 2013. The relationship between post-treatment evaluations (CT/MRI and PET and PFS during the follow-up period was examined, using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The patients were grouped according to the histological type into Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, and other histological types. The association between post-treatment evaluations (PET or PET combined with CT/ MRI and PFS was examined separately. Moreover, the relationship between disease recurrence and serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor, lactic dehydrogenase, and C-reactive protein levels was evaluated before and after the treatment. Results: Patients with incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET had a significantly shorter PFS, compared to patients with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET and those exhibiting incomplete remission on CT/MRI and complete remission on PET (P

  7. Calibration of the linear response range of x-ray imaging plates and their reader based on image grayscale values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kuan; Xu, Tao; Zheng, Jianhua; Dong, Jianjun; Wei, Minxi; Li, Chaoguang; Cao, Zhurong; Du, Huabing; Yan, Ji; Yang, Guohong; Yi, Rongqing; Zhang, Jiyan; Huang, Tianxuan; Liu, Shenye; Wang, Feng; Yang, Zhiwen; Li, Jin; Chen, Yaohua; Lan, Ke; Ren, Guoli; Liu, Jie; Ding, Yongkun; Jiang, Shaoen

    2017-08-01

    X-ray imaging plates are one of the most important X-ray imaging detectors and are widely used in inertial-confinement fusion experiments. However, their linear response range, which is the foundation of their quantitative data analysis, has not been sufficiently deeply investigated. In this work, we develop an X-ray fluorescer calibration system and carefully explore the linear response range of X-ray imaging plates. For the first time, nearly the entire grayscale range of the X-ray imaging plate linear response—7819-64 879 in the range of 0-65 535—has been observed. Further, we discuss the uncertainties involved in the calibration process. This work demonstrates the excellent linear response qualities of X-ray imaging plates and provides a significant foundation for expanding their quantitative applied range.

  8. Supermarkets in Portugal: corporate social responsibility image, attitude towards the brand and purchase intention

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Inês Veiga

    2010-01-01

    Recently, companies developed strategies which may influence their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) image. This paper discusses the image of four different supermarkets with stores in Portugal. The research compares CSR image and brand attitude of the four supermarkets. Empirical evidence shows that different supermarkets belonging to the same company have different CSR image and brand attitude. The research also confirms that there is positive correlation between CSR imag...

  9. Effects of reusing baseline volumes of interest by applying (non-rigid image registration on positron emission tomography response assessments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floris H P van Velden

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Reusing baseline volumes of interest (VOI by applying non-rigid and to some extent (local rigid image registration showed good test-retest variability similar to delineating VOI on both scans individually. The aim of the present study was to compare response assessments and classifications based on various types of image registration with those based on (semi-automatic tumour delineation. METHODS: Baseline (n = 13, early (n = 12 and late (n = 9 response (after one and three cycles of treatment, respectively whole body [(18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT scans were acquired in subjects with advanced gastrointestinal malignancies. Lesions were identified for early and late response scans. VOI were drawn independently on all scans using an adaptive 50% threshold method (A50. In addition, various types of (non-rigid image registration were applied to PET and/or CT images, after which baseline VOI were projected onto response scans. Response was classified using PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors for maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max, average SUV (SUV(mean, peak SUV (SUV(peak, metabolically active tumour volume (MATV, total lesion glycolysis (TLG and the area under a cumulative SUV-volume histogram curve (AUC. RESULTS: Non-rigid PET-based registration and non-rigid CT-based registration followed by non-rigid PET-based registration (CTPET did not show differences in response classifications compared to A50 for SUV(max and SUV(peak, however, differences were observed for MATV, SUV(mean, TLG and AUC. For the latter, these registrations demonstrated a poorer performance for small lung lesions (<2.8 ml, whereas A50 showed a poorer performance when another area with high uptake was close to the target lesion. All methods were affected by lesions with very heterogeneous tracer uptake. CONCLUSIONS: Non-rigid PET- and CTPET-based image registrations may be used to classify response

  10. Vascular Profile Characterization of Liver Tumors by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Hemodynamic Response Imaging in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifat Edrei

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we have demonstrated the feasibility of using hemodynamic response imaging (HRI, a functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI method combined with hypercapnia and hyperoxia, for monitoring vascular changes during liver pathologies without the need of contrast material. In this study, we evaluated HRI ability to assess changes in liver tumor vasculature during tumor establishment, progression, and antiangiogenic therapy. Colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were injected intrasplenically to model colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM and the Mdr2 knockout mice were used to model primary hepatic tumors. Hepatic perfusion parameters were evaluated using the HRI protocol and were compared with contrast-enhanced (CE MRI. The hypovascularity and the increased arterial blood supply in well-defined CRLM were demonstrated by HRI. In CRLM-bearing mice, the entire liver perfusion was attenuated as the HRI maps were significantly reduced by 35%. This study demonstrates that the HRI method showed enhanced sensitivity for small CRLM (1–2 mm detection compared with CE-MRI (82% versus 38%, respectively. In addition, HRI could demonstrate the vasculature alteration during CRLM progression (arborized vessels, which was further confirmed by histology. Moreover, HRI revealed the vascular changes induced by rapamycin treatment. Finally, HRI facilitates primary hepatic tumor characterization with good correlation to the pathologic differentiation. The HRI method is highly sensitive to subtle hemodynamic changes induced by CRLM and, hence, can function as an imaging tool for understanding the hemodynamic changes occurring during CRLM establishment, progression, and antiangiogenic treatment. In addition, this method facilitated the differentiation between different types of hepatic lesions based on their vascular profile noninvasively.

  11. An in vitro immune response model to determine tetanus toxoid antigen (vaccine) specific immunogenicity: Selection of sensitive assay criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersma, Sytse J; Leenaars, Marlies P P A M; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Summerfield, Artur; Hendriksen, Coenraad F M; McCullough, Ken C

    2006-04-12

    Many vaccines employed in childhood vaccination programmes are produced by conventional techniques, resulting in complex biological mixtures for which batch-related quality control requires in vivo potency testing. Monitoring consistency via in vitro tests during the vaccine production has the capacity to replace certain of the in vivo methods. In this respect, determining vaccine antigen immunogenicity through functional immunological tests has high potential. Advances in immunology have made it possible to analyse this biological activity by in vitro means. The present study established such an in vitro test system for tetanus toxoid (TT). This measured vaccine immunogenicity through an antigen-specific secondary (recall) response in vitro, using a porcine model growing in value for its closeness to human immune response characteristics. Discrimination between the specific recall TT antigen and diphtheria toxoid (DT) was possible using both peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures and monocyte-derived dendritic cells in co-culture with autologous specific lymphocytes. TT-specific activation was detected with highest discrimination capacity using proliferation assays, as well as IFN-gamma and TT-specific antibody ELISPOTS (measuring secreting T and B lymphocytes, respectively). These in vitro systems show a high potential for replacing animal experimentation to evaluate the immunogenicity of complex vaccines.

  12. The Influence of Corporate Image and Specificity of Candidate Qualifications on Response to Recruitment Advertisement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belt, John A.; Paolillo, Joseph G. P.

    1982-01-01

    Examined possible impact of corporate image and the degree of specificity of candidate qualifications, on likelihood of reader response to recruitment advertisement. Data indicated that corporate image of advertiser significantly influenced likelihood of reader response whereas degree of specificity of candidate qualifications did not influence…

  13. The Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation provisional criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo; Rider, Lisa G; Pilkington, Clarissa; Oliveira, Sheila; Wulffraat, Nico; Espada, Graciela; Garay, Stella; Cuttica, Ruben; Hofer, Michael; Quartier, Pierre; Melo-Gomes, Jose; Reed, Ann M; Wierzbowska, Malgorzata; Feldman, Brian M; Harjacek, Miroslav; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Nielsen, Susan; Flato, Berit; Lahdenne, Pekka; Michels, Harmut; Murray, Kevin J; Punaro, Lynn; Rennebohm, Robert; Russo, Ricardo; Balogh, Zsolt; Rooney, Madeleine; Pachman, Lauren M; Wallace, Carol; Hashkes, Philip; Lovell, Daniel J; Giannini, Edward H; Gare, Boel Andersson; Martini, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables. Thirty-seven experienced pediatric rheumatologists from 27 countries achieved consensus on 128 difficult patient profiles as clinically improved or not improved using a stepwise approach (patient's rating, statistical analysis, definition selection). Using the physicians' consensus ratings as the "gold standard measure," chi-square, sensitivity, specificity, false-positive and-negative rates, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and kappa agreement for candidate definitions of improvement were calculated. Definitions with kappa values >0.8 were multiplied by the face validity score to select the top definitions. The top definition of improvement was at least 20% improvement from baseline in 3 of 6 core set variables with no more than 1 of the remaining worsening by more than 30%, which cannot be muscle strength. The second-highest scoring definition was at least 20% improvement from baseline in 3 of 6 core set variables with no more than 2 of the remaining worsening by more than 25%, which cannot be muscle strength (definition P1 selected by the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies group). The third is similar to the second with the maximum amount of worsening set to 30%. This indicates convergent validity of the process. We propose a provisional data-driven definition of improvement that reflects well the consensus rating of experienced clinicians, which incorporates clinically meaningful change in core set variables in a composite end point for the evaluation of global response to therapy in juvenile DM. Copyright © 2010 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Can Physicians Identify Inappropriate Nuclear Stress Tests? An Examination of Inter-rater Reliability for the 2009 Appropriate Use Criteria for Radionuclide Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Siqin; Rabbani, LeRoy E.; Kelly, Christopher R.; Kelly, Maureen R.; Lewis, Matthew; Paz, Yehuda; Peck, Clara L.; Rao, Shaline; Bokhari, Sabahat; Weiner, Shepard D.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Background We sought to determine inter-rater reliability of the 2009 Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for radionuclide imaging (RNI) and whether physicians at various levels of training can effectively identify nuclear stress tests with inappropriate indications. Methods and Results Four hundred patients were randomly selected from a consecutive cohort of patients undergoing nuclear stress testing at an academic medical center. Raters with different levels of training (including cardiology attending physicians, cardiology fellows, internal medicine hospitalists, and internal medicine interns) classified individual nuclear stress tests using the 2009 AUC. Consensus classification by two cardiologists was considered the operational gold standard, and sensitivity and specificity of individual raters for identifying inappropriate tests was calculated. Inter-rater reliability of the AUC was assessed using Cohen’s kappa statistics for pairs of different raters. The mean age of patients was 61.5 years; 214 (54%) were female. The cardiologists rated 256 (64%) of 400 NSTs as appropriate, 68 (18%) as uncertain, 55 (14%) as inappropriate; 21 (5%) tests were unable to be classified. Inter-rater reliability for non-cardiologist raters was modest (unweighted Cohen’s kappa, 0.51, 95% confidence interval, 0.45 to 0.55). Sensitivity of individual raters for identifying inappropriate tests ranged from 47% to 82%, while specificity ranged from 85% to 97%. Conclusions Inter-rater reliability for the 2009 AUC for RNI is modest, and there is considerable variation in the ability of raters at different levels of training to identify inappropriate tests. PMID:25563660

  15. Overcoming the concentration-dependence of responsive probes for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekanger, Levi A.

    2015-01-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging, contrast agents are molecules that increase the contrast-to-noise ratio of non-invasively acquired images. The information gained from magnetic resonance imaging can be increased using responsive contrast agents that undergo chemical changes, and consequently changes to contrast enhancement, for example in response to specific biomarkers that are indicative of diseases. A major limitation with modern responsive contrast agents is concentration-dependence that requires the concentration of contrast agent to be known: an extremely challenging task in vivo. Here, we review advances in several strategies aimed at overcoming the concentration-dependent nature of responsive contrast agents. PMID:25579206

  16. Left ventricular 12 segmental strain imaging predicts response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Ying-xue; Jae K.Oh; YANG Yan-zong; Yong-mei Cha

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of non-responders to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) exposes the need for better patient selection criteria for CRT.This study aimed to identify echocardiographic parameters that would predict the response to CRT.Methods Forty-five consecutive patients receiving CRT-D implantation for heart failure (HF) were included in this prospective study.New York Heart Association (NYHA) class,6-minute walk distance,electrograph character,and multi echocardiographic parameters,especially in strain patterns,were measured and compared before and six months after CRT in the responder and non-responder groups.Response to CRT was defined as a decrease in left ventricular endsystolic volume (LVESV) of 15% or more at 6-month follow up.Results Twenty-two (48.9%) patients demonstrated a response to CRT at 6-month follow-up.Significant improvement in NYHA class (P <0.01),left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) (P <0.01),and 6-minute walk distance (P <0.01) was shown in this group.Although there was an interventricular mechanical delay determined by the difference between left and right ventricular pre-ejection intervals ((42.87±19.64) ms vs.(29.43±18.19) ms,P=0.02),the standard deviation of time to peak myocardial strain among 12 basal,mid and apical segments (Tε-SD) ((119.97±43.32) ms vs.(86.62±36.86) ms,P=0.01) and the non-ischemic etiology (P=0.03) were significantly higher in responders than non-responders,only the Tε-SD (OR=1.02,95% Cl=1.01-1.04,P=0.02) proved to be a favorable predictor of CRT response after multivariate Logistic regression analysis.Conclusion The left ventricular 12 segmental strain imaging is a promising echocardiographic parameter for predicting CRT response.

  17. Accelerated phase chronic myeloid leukemia: evaluation of clinical criteria as predictors of survival, major cytogenetic response and progression to blast phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Fiorini Furtado

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Published criteria defining the accelerated phase in chronic myeloid leukemia are heterogeneous and little is known about predictors of poor outcome.METHODS: This is a retrospective study of 139 subjects in the accelerated phase of chronic myeloid leukemia treated with imatinib at a single center in Brazil. The objective was to identify risk factors for survival, major cytogenetic response and progression to blast phase in this population. The factors analyzed were: blasts 10-29%, basophils ≥ 20%, platelets > 1 × 106/µL or 1 × 105/µL in the peripheral blood, as well as clonal evolution, splenomegaly, hemoglobin 12 months (p-value = 0.030.CONCLUSION: These data indicate that patients with the above risk factors have a worse prognosis. This information can guide the therapy to be used.

  18. Cut-Offs and Response Criteria for the Hospital Universitario La Princesa Index (HUPI) and Their Comparison to Widely-Used Indices of Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrejón, Isabel; Ortiz, Ana M.; Toledano, Esther; Castañeda, Santos; García-Vadillo, Alberto; Carmona, Loreto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate cut-off points and to establish response criteria for the Hospital Universitario La Princesa Index (HUPI) in patients with chronic polyarthritis. Methods Two cohorts, one of early arthritis (Princesa Early Arthritis Register Longitudinal [PEARL] study) and other of long-term rheumatoid arthritis (Estudio de la Morbilidad y Expresión Clínica de la Artritis Reumatoide [EMECAR]) including altogether 1200 patients were used to determine cut-off values for remission, and for low, moderate and high activity through receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. The areas under ROC (AUC) were compared to those of validated indexes (SDAI, CDAI, DAS28). ROC analysis was also applied to establish minimal and relevant clinical improvement for HUPI. Results The best cut-off points for HUPI are 2, 5 and 9, classifying RA activity as remission if ≤2, low disease activity if >2 and ≤5), moderate if >5 and <9 and high if ≥9. HUPI’s AUC to discriminate between low-moderate activity was 0.909 and between moderate-high activity 0.887. DAS28’s AUCs were 0.887 and 0.846, respectively; both indices had higher accuracy than SDAI (AUCs: 0.832 and 0.756) and CDAI (AUCs: 0.789 and 0.728). HUPI discriminates remission better than DAS28-ESR in early arthritis, but similarly to SDAI. The HUPI cut-off for minimal clinical improvement was established at 2 and for relevant clinical improvement at 4. Response criteria were established based on these cut-off values. Conclusions The cut-offs proposed for HUPI perform adequately in patients with either early or long term arthritis. PMID:27603313

  19. Cut-Offs and Response Criteria for the Hospital Universitario La Princesa Index (HUPI) and Their Comparison to Widely-Used Indices of Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Castrejón, Isabel; Ortiz, Ana M; Toledano, Esther; Castañeda, Santos; García-Vadillo, Alberto; Carmona, Loreto

    2016-01-01

    To estimate cut-off points and to establish response criteria for the Hospital Universitario La Princesa Index (HUPI) in patients with chronic polyarthritis. Two cohorts, one of early arthritis (Princesa Early Arthritis Register Longitudinal [PEARL] study) and other of long-term rheumatoid arthritis (Estudio de la Morbilidad y Expresión Clínica de la Artritis Reumatoide [EMECAR]) including altogether 1200 patients were used to determine cut-off values for remission, and for low, moderate and high activity through receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. The areas under ROC (AUC) were compared to those of validated indexes (SDAI, CDAI, DAS28). ROC analysis was also applied to establish minimal and relevant clinical improvement for HUPI. The best cut-off points for HUPI are 2, 5 and 9, classifying RA activity as remission if ≤2, low disease activity if >2 and ≤5), moderate if >5 and <9 and high if ≥9. HUPI's AUC to discriminate between low-moderate activity was 0.909 and between moderate-high activity 0.887. DAS28's AUCs were 0.887 and 0.846, respectively; both indices had higher accuracy than SDAI (AUCs: 0.832 and 0.756) and CDAI (AUCs: 0.789 and 0.728). HUPI discriminates remission better than DAS28-ESR in early arthritis, but similarly to SDAI. The HUPI cut-off for minimal clinical improvement was established at 2 and for relevant clinical improvement at 4. Response criteria were established based on these cut-off values. The cut-offs proposed for HUPI perform adequately in patients with either early or long term arthritis.

  20. Novel response function resolves by image deconvolution more details of surface nanomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2010-01-01

    A novel method of image processing is presented which relies on deconvolution of data using the response function of the apparatus. It is revealed that all the surface structures observed by digital imaging are generated by a convolution of the response function of the apparatus with the surfaces......’ nanomorphology, which provided images of convoluted physical structures rather than images of real physical structures. In order to restore the genuine physical information on surface structures, a deconvolution using a novel response function of the feedback circuitry is required. At the highest resolution......, that is, atomic resolution, the effect of deconvolution is at its maximum, whereas images at lower resolution are sharpened by eliminating smoothing effects and shadow effects. The method is applied to measurements of imaging by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (in situ STM) at atomic resolution...

  1. Study of Fish Response Using Particle Image Velocimetry and High-Speed, High-Resolution Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Mueller, Robert P.

    2004-10-23

    Existing literature of previous particle image velocimetry (PIV) studies of fish swimming has been reviewed. Historically, most of the studies focused on the performance evaluation of freely swimming fish. Technological advances over the last decade, especially the development of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) technique, make possible more accurate, quantitative descriptions of the flow patterns adjacent to the fish and in the wake behind the fins and tail, which are imperative to decode the mechanisms of drag reduction and propulsive efficiency. For flows generated by different organisms, the related scales and flow regimes vary significantly. For small Reynolds numbers, viscosity dominates; for very high Reynolds numbers, inertia dominates, and three-dimensional complexity occurs. The majority of previous investigations dealt with the lower end of Reynolds number range. The fish of our interest, such as rainbow trout and spring and fall chinook salmon, fall into the middle range, in which neither viscosity nor inertia is negligible, and three-dimensionality has yet to dominate. Feasibility tests have proven the applicability of PIV to flows around fish. These tests have shown unsteady vortex shedding in the wake, high vorticity region and high stress region, with the highest in the pectoral area. This evident supports the observations by Nietzel et al. (2000) and Deng et al. (2004) that the operculum are most vulnerable to damage from the turbulent shear flow, because they are easily pried open, and the large vorticity and shear stress can lift and tear off scales, rupture or dislodge eyes, and damage gills. In addition, the unsteady behavior of the vortex shedding in the wake implies that injury to fish by the instantaneous flow structures would likely be much higher than the injury level estimated using the average values of the dynamics parameters. Based on existing literature, our technological capability, and relevance and practicability to

  2. Validation of diagnostic criteria using gadoxetic acid-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MR imaging for small hepatocellular carcinoma ({<=}2.0 cm) in patients with hepatitis-induced liver cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min Jung; Kim, Young Kon [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: jmyr@dreamwiz.com; Lee, Mi Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul, National Univ. Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jiyoung Hwang Won Jae [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang Univ. and Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Background: Gadoxetic acid and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is increasingly used for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It is relevant to refine the diagnostic parameters for HCC, using state-of-the-art imaging techniques. Purpose: To validate usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI for diagnosis of small HCC by differentiation from dysplastic nodule (DN) or regenerative nodule (RN) in cirrhotic patients with strongly suspected small HCC. Material and Methods: One hundred and eight patients with 102 HCCs and 29 benign nodules including 21 DNs and two large RNs ({<=}2.0 cm), and 40 patients with no HCC underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI. All patients also underwent MDCT. Index MR criteria for HCC were: (i) arterial hyperenhancement and hypointensity on hepatobiliary phase (HBP) with hyperintensity on DWI; (ii) hypovascular nodule with hyperintensity on DWI; (iii) arterial hyperenhancement and hypointensity on HBP without hyperintensity on DWI; (iv) arterial hyperenhancement and either iso- or hyperintensity on HBP, with hyperintensity on DWI; and (v) hyperintensity only on DWI. According to these criteria, MRI findings for HCCs and benign nodules were independently classified by two reviewers. Results: On multidetector-row computed tomography, 64 HCCs (62.7%) showed typical features for HCC while 13 (12.8%) were not identified. On MRI, 84 HCCs (82.4%) showed arterial hyperenhancement and hypointensity on HBP, and hyperintensity on DWI. Eight HCCs were regarded as hypovascular HCCs with hyperintensity DWI (category 2). One HCC (0.6 cm in diameter) was demonstrated only by DWI. For each observer, 101 (99.0%) and 100 HCCs (98.0%) were discernible when applying all MRI criteria for HCC, respectively. Three DNs also fit the HCC criteria, thus the specificity was 90.9% for both observers. Conclusion: With the HCC criteria based on combined gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI, it is

  3. An assessment of the diagnostic criteria for sessile serrated adenoma/polyps: SSA/Ps using image processing software analysis for Ki67 immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimori Yukari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serrated polyps belong to a heterogeneous group of lesions that are generally characterized morphologically. This type of lesion is thought to be the precursor of sporadic carcinomas with microsatellite instability, and probably also the precursor for CpG island-methylated microsatellite-stable carcinomas. For practical purposes, according to the 2010 WHO classification, the diagnostic criteria for sessile serrated adenomas/polyps (SSA/Ps was established by the research project “Potential of Cancerization of Colorectal Serrated Lesions” led by the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity of the morphologic characteristics established in Japan by using immunohistochemical staining for Ki-67. Methods To calculate the target cells, 2 contiguous crypts which could be detected from the bottom of the crypt to the surface of the colorectal epithelium were selected. To validate the proliferative activity, we evaluated the percentage and the asymmetrical staining pattern of Ki67 positive cells in each individual crypt. To examine the immunoreactivity of Ki67, computer-assisted cytometrical analysis was performed. Results SSA/Ps had a higher proliferative activity as compared to hyperplastic polyps (HPs based on the difference in incidence of Ki67 positive cells, and the former also exhibited a significantly higher asymmetric distribution of these cells as compared to HPs, even in lesions with a diameter Conclusion We conclude that assessment of the pathological findings of SSA/Ps, including crypt dilation, irregularly branching crypts, and horizontally arranged basal crypts (inverted T- and/or L-shaped crypts is appropriate to show a significantly higher proliferative activity as compared to HPs. Further, the use of two-dimensional image analysis software is an objective and reproducible method for this type of histological examination. Virtual slides The virtual

  4. [A patient with thyroid cancer evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors during treatment for breast cancer recurrence in hepatic and cervical lymph nodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Keiko; Enomoto, Takumo; Oshida, Sayuri; Habiro, Takeyoshi; Hatate, Kazuhiko; Sengoku, Norihiko; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-11-01

    We describe a case of a 69-year-old woman who underwent left breast-preserving surgery and axillary dissection for left-sided breast cancer at 60 years of age. The histopathological diagnosis was papillotubular carcinoma, luminal A (pathological T1N0M0).In the eighth year after surgery, computed tomography (CT) revealed recurrence in the liver and cervical lymph node metastasis. The patient did not respond to 3 months of treatment with letrozole (progressive disease [PD]). Six courses of chemotherapy with epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC) were administered. Subsequently, the attending physician was replaced while the patient was receiving paclitaxel( PTX).After 4 courses of treatment with PTX, the liver metastasis disappeared (complete response [CR]).However, the cervical lymph nodes did not shrink (PD).The cytological diagnosis was papillary thyroid cancer with associated cervical lymph node metastasis. Total thyroidectomy and D3b cervical lymph node dissection were performed. The pathological diagnosis was pEx0T1bN1Mx, pStage IVA disease. Replacement of the attending physician is a critical turning point for patients. During chemotherapy or hormone therapy for breast cancer, each organ should be evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST).In the case of our patient, thyroid cancer was diagnosed according to RECIST. Cancer specialists should bear in mind that the treatment policy may change dramatically depending on the results of RECIST assessment.

  5. Acquisition and Analysis of Dynamic Responses of a Historic Pedestrian Bridge using Video Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Schoefs, Franck; O'Donnell, Deirdre; Wright, Robert; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2015-07-01

    Video based tracking is capable of analysing bridge vibrations that are characterised by large amplitudes and low frequencies. This paper presents the use of video images and associated image processing techniques to obtain the dynamic response of a pedestrian suspension bridge in Cork, Ireland. This historic structure is one of the four suspension bridges in Ireland and is notable for its dynamic nature. A video camera is mounted on the river-bank and the dynamic responses of the bridge have been measured from the video images. The dynamic response is assessed without the need of a reflector on the bridge and in the presence of various forms of luminous complexities in the video image scenes. Vertical deformations of the bridge were measured in this regard. The video image tracking for the measurement of dynamic responses of the bridge were based on correlating patches in time-lagged scenes in video images and utilisinga zero mean normalisedcross correlation (ZNCC) metric. The bridge was excited by designed pedestrian movement and by individual cyclists traversing the bridge. The time series data of dynamic displacement responses of the bridge were analysedto obtain the frequency domain response. Frequencies obtained from video analysis were checked against accelerometer data from the bridge obtained while carrying out the same set of experiments used for video image based recognition.

  6. Body enhancement : body images, vulnerability and moral responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dikken, A.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this explorative study is to show that it is highly relevant to integrate cultural and personal body images into the ethical debate on human enhancement. The current debate has little attention for the motivations to make use of technology to alter the human body, such as cultural

  7. Towards in vivo imaging of early Rhizobium Nod factor responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krogt, van der G.N.M.

    2006-01-01

    The goal in this thesis is to explore the possibility of live imaging of cellular events using fluorescence microscopy in combination with Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) based reporter constructs in root hairs during theRhizobium-legume interaction. Legumes have the abilit

  8. [Functional imaging of pain: from the somatic response to emotions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Functional brain imaging in subjects experiencing pain (real, observed or imagined) has led to considerable progress in our understanding of the role of the brain andpsyche in pain integration and control, as well as some forms of somatoform pain with no anatomical basis. This research is challenging not only the dichotomy between the soma and psyche, but also the concept of psychosomatic pain.

  9. Nuclear magnetic response imaging of sap flow in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, C.W.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) imaging of long distance transport in plants. Long distance transport in plants is an enigmatic process. The theoretical framework that describes its basic properties has been in place for almost a century, yet at the same time only little is

  10. Monitoring the response of bone metastases to treatment with Magnetic Resonance Imaging and nuclear medicine techniques: a review and position statement by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer imaging group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecouvet, F E; Talbot, J N; Messiou, C; Bourguet, P; Liu, Y; de Souza, N M

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of the response to treatment of metastases is crucial in daily oncological practice and clinical trials. For soft tissue metastases, this is done using computed tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) or Positron Emission Tomography (PET) using validated response evaluation criteria. Bone metastases, which frequently represent the only site of metastases, are an exception in response assessment systems, because of the nature of the fixed bony defects, their complexity, which ranges from sclerotic to osteolytic and because of the lack of sensitivity, specificity and spatial resolution of the previously available bone imaging methods, mainly bone scintigraphy. Techniques such as MRI and PET are able to detect the early infiltration of the bone marrow by cancer, and to quantify this infiltration using morphologic images, quantitative parameters and functional approaches. This paper highlights the most recent developments of MRI and PET, showing how they enable early detection of bone lesions and monitoring of their response. It reviews current knowledge, puts the different techniques into perspective, in terms of indications, strengths, weaknesses and complementarity, and finally proposes recommendations for the choice of the most adequate imaging technique.

  11. Use of image analysis to assess color response on plants caused by herbicide application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Ali; Streibig, Jens Carl; Duus, Joachim;

    2013-01-01

    In herbicide-selectivity experiments, response can be measured by visual inspection, stand counts, plant mortality, and biomass. Some response types are relative to nontreated control. We developed a nondestructive method by analyzing digital color images to quantify color changes in leaves caused......, cycloxydim, diquat dibromide, and fluazifop-p-butyl were described with a log-logistic dose–response model, and the relationship between visual inspection and image analysis was calculated at the effective doses that cause 50% and 90% response (ED50 and ED90, respectively). The ranges of HSB components...... for the green and nongreen parts of the plants and soil were different. The relative potencies were not significantly different from one, indicating that visual and image analysis estimations were about the same. The comparison results suggest that image analysis can be used to assess color changes of plants...

  12. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to predict response of hepatocellular carcinoma to chemoembolization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johnathan; C; Chung; Neel; K; Naik; Robert; J; Lewandowski; Mary; F; Mulcahy; Laura; M; Kulik; Kent; T; Sato; Robert; K; Ryu; Riad; Salem; Andrew; C; Larson; Reed; A; Omary

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether intra-procedural diffusion- weighted magnetic resonance imaging can predict response of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during trans- catheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). METHODS: Sixteen patients (15 male), aged 59 ±11 years (range: 42-81 years) underwent a total of 21 separate treatments for unresectable HCC in a hybrid magnetic resonance/interventional radiology suite. Ana- tomical imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (b = 0, 500 s/mm2) were performed on a 1.5-T unit. ...

  13. Use of intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted MR imaging for assessment of treatment response to invasive fungal infection in the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Chenggong; Xiong, Wei; Wu, Yuankui; Li, Caixia; Xu, Yikai [Southern Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging Center, Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Jun; Wei, Qi; Feng, Ru; Liu, Qifa [Southern Medical University, Department of Hematology, Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, New Territories, Hon Kong (China)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) -derived parameters and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) could act as imaging biomarkers for predicting antifungal treatment response. Forty-six consecutive patients (mean age, 33.9 ± 13.0 y) with newly diagnosed invasive fungal infection (IFI) in the lung according to EORTC/MSG criteria were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3.0 T using 11 b values (0-1000 sec/mm{sup 2}). ADC, pseudodiffusion coefficient D*, perfusion fraction f, and the diffusion coefficient D were compared between patients with favourable (n=32) and unfavourable response (n=14). f values were significantly lower in the unfavourable response group (12.6%±4.4%) than in the favourable response group (30.2%±8.6%) (Z=4.989, P<0.001). However, the ADC, D, and D* were not significantly different between the two groups (P>0.05). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed f to be a significant predictor for differentiation, with a sensitivity of 93.8% and a specificity of 92.9%. IVIM-MRI is potentially useful in the prediction of antifungal treatment response to patients with IFI in the lung. Our results indicate that a low perfusion fraction f may be a noninvasive imaging biomarker for unfavourable response. (orig.)

  14. Comparing Four Touch-Based Interaction Techniques for an Image-Based Audience Response System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Prins, Jonatan T.; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the most appropriate touch-based interaction technique for I2Vote, an image-based audience response system for radiology education in which users need to accurately mark a target on a medical image. Four plausible techniques were identified: land-on, take-off, zoom-poin

  15. University Social Responsibility and Brand Image of Private Universities in Bangkok

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plungpongpan, Jirawan; Tiangsoongnern, Leela; Speece, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of university social responsibility (USR) on the brand image of private universities in Thailand. Brand image is important for entry into the consideration set as prospective students evaluate options for university study. USR activities may be implicit or explicit, i.e., actively…

  16. University Social Responsibility and Brand Image of Private Universities in Bangkok

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plungpongpan, Jirawan; Tiangsoongnern, Leela; Speece, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of university social responsibility (USR) on the brand image of private universities in Thailand. Brand image is important for entry into the consideration set as prospective students evaluate options for university study. USR activities may be implicit or explicit, i.e., actively…

  17. Spatially pooled contrast responses predict neural and perceptual similarity of naturalistic image categories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris I A Groen

    Full Text Available The visual world is complex and continuously changing. Yet, our brain transforms patterns of light falling on our retina into a coherent percept within a few hundred milliseconds. Possibly, low-level neural responses already carry substantial information to facilitate rapid characterization of the visual input. Here, we computationally estimated low-level contrast responses to computer-generated naturalistic images, and tested whether spatial pooling of these responses could predict image similarity at the neural and behavioral level. Using EEG, we show that statistics derived from pooled responses explain a large amount of variance between single-image evoked potentials (ERPs in individual subjects. Dissimilarity analysis on multi-electrode ERPs demonstrated that large differences between images in pooled response statistics are predictive of more dissimilar patterns of evoked activity, whereas images with little difference in statistics give rise to highly similar evoked activity patterns. In a separate behavioral experiment, images with large differences in statistics were judged as different categories, whereas images with little differences were confused. These findings suggest that statistics derived from low-level contrast responses can be extracted in early visual processing and can be relevant for rapid judgment of visual similarity. We compared our results with two other, well- known contrast statistics: Fourier power spectra and higher-order properties of contrast distributions (skewness and kurtosis. Interestingly, whereas these statistics allow for accurate image categorization, they do not predict ERP response patterns or behavioral categorization confusions. These converging computational, neural and behavioral results suggest that statistics of pooled contrast responses contain information that corresponds with perceived visual similarity in a rapid, low-level categorization task.

  18. CMOS image sensor with lateral electric field modulation pixels for fluorescence lifetime imaging with sub-nanosecond time response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo; Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with a high-speed lateral electric field modulation (LEFM) gating structure for time domain fluorescence lifetime measurement. Time-windowed signal charge can be transferred from a pinned photodiode (PPD) to a pinned storage diode (PSD) by turning on a pair of transfer gates, which are situated beside the channel. Unwanted signal charge can be drained from the PPD to the drain by turning on another pair of gates. The pixel array contains 512 (V) × 310 (H) pixels with 5.6 × 5.6 µm2 pixel size. The imager chip was fabricated using 0.11 µm CMOS image sensor process technology. The prototype sensor has a time response of 150 ps at 374 nm. The fill factor of the pixels is 5.6%. The usefulness of the prototype sensor is demonstrated for fluorescence lifetime imaging through simulation and measurement results.

  19. Radiolabeled Apoptosis Imaging Agents for Early Detection of Response to Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Ogawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since apoptosis plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis and is associated with responses to therapy, molecular imaging of apoptotic cells could be useful for early detection of therapeutic effects, particularly in oncology. Radiolabeled annexin V compounds are the hallmark in apoptosis imaging in vivo. These compounds are reviewed from the genesis of apoptosis (cell death imaging agents up to recent years. They have some disadvantages, including slow clearance and immunogenicity, because they are protein-based imaging agents. For this reason, several studies have been conducted in recent years to develop low molecule apoptosis imaging agents. In this review, radiolabeled phosphatidylserine targeted peptides, radiolabeled bis(zinc(II-dipicolylamine complex, radiolabeled 5-fluoropentyl-2-methyl-malonic acid (ML-10, caspase-3 activity imaging agents, radiolabeled duramycin, and radiolabeled phosphonium cation are reviewed as promising low-molecular-weight apoptosis imaging agents.

  20. Gut Health of Pigs: Challenge Models and Response Criteria with a Critical Analysis of the Effectiveness of Selected Feed Additives — A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Adewole

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The gut is the largest organ that helps with the immune function. Gut health, especially in young pigs has a significant benefit to health and performance. In an attempt to maintain and enhance intestinal health in pigs and improve productivity in the absence of in-feed antibiotics, researchers have evaluated a wide range of feed additives. Some of these additives such as zinc oxide, copper sulphate, egg yolk antibodies, mannan-oligosaccharides and spray dried porcine plasma and their effectiveness are discussed in this review. One approach to evaluate the effectiveness of these additives in vivo is to use an appropriate disease challenge model. Over the years, researchers have used a number of challenge models which include the use of specific strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, bacteria lipopolysaccharide challenge, oral challenge with Salmonella enteric serotype Typhimurium, sanitation challenge, and Lawsonia intercellularis challenge. These challenge models together with the criteria used to evaluate the responses of the animals to them are also discussed in this review.

  1. Gut Health of Pigs: Challenge Models and Response Criteria with a Critical Analysis of the Effectiveness of Selected Feed Additives - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewole, D I; Kim, I H; Nyachoti, C M

    2016-07-01

    The gut is the largest organ that helps with the immune function. Gut health, especially in young pigs has a significant benefit to health and performance. In an attempt to maintain and enhance intestinal health in pigs and improve productivity in the absence of in-feed antibiotics, researchers have evaluated a wide range of feed additives. Some of these additives such as zinc oxide, copper sulphate, egg yolk antibodies, mannan-oligosaccharides and spray dried porcine plasma and their effectiveness are discussed in this review. One approach to evaluate the effectiveness of these additives in vivo is to use an appropriate disease challenge model. Over the years, researchers have used a number of challenge models which include the use of specific strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, bacteria lipopolysaccharide challenge, oral challenge with Salmonella enteric serotype Typhimurium, sanitation challenge, and Lawsonia intercellularis challenge. These challenge models together with the criteria used to evaluate the responses of the animals to them are also discussed in this review.

  2. The Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS)--number and type of positive criteria predict interventions and outcomes in acute surgical admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, James A; Gravante, Gianpiero; Butler, Nicholas A; Sorge, Roberto; Sayers, Rob D; Bown, Matt J

    2010-11-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a syndrome that reflects the widespread activation of inflammatory pathways. The goal of this study was to find whether the presence or absence of SIRS on emergency surgical admissions is related to the subsequent clinical outcome in terms of in-hospital interventions, length of stay, and mortality. The presence of SIRS at admission, final diagnosis of the underlying disease, treatments, and clinical outcomes were prospectively recorded for 1 month. Comparisons of interventions and outcomes were performed between SIRS+ vs. SIRS- patients. In patients with SIRS, the contribution of each positive criterion was evaluated with regards to mortality. A total of 179 patients were recruited. The prevalence of SIRS at admission was 35.2%. SIRS+ patients required less diagnostic procedures compared with SIRS- (28.6% vs. 34.5%) but had more therapeutic interventions (39.7% vs. 16.4%), surgical interventions (33.3% vs. 3.4%), intensive treatments (11.1% vs. 0.9%; p SIRS+ patients with four positive criteria had more surgical interventions, intensive treatments, and fatal outcomes compared with the others. Of importance the most influent factor was the respiratory rate followed by the white cell count and the heart rate/temperature. Patients with SIRS at admission apparently receive more interventions, have longer length of stay, and increased mortality than those patients without SIRS. These findings require separate validation in a larger cohort study.

  3. SU-E-J-04: A Data-Driven, Response-Based, Multi-Criteria Decision Support System for Personalized Lung Radiation Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y; McShan, D; Schipper, M; Matuszak, M; Ten Haken, R [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kong, F [Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Georgia)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a decision support tool to predict a patient's potential overall survival (OS) and radiation induced toxicity (RIT) based on clinical factors and responses during the course of radiotherapy, and suggest appropriate radiation dose adjustments to improve therapeutic effect. Methods: Important relationships between a patient's basic information and their clinical features before and during the radiation treatment are identified from historical clinical data by using statistical learning and data mining approaches. During each treatment period, a data analysis (DA) module predicts radiotherapy features such as time to local progression (TTLP), time to distant metastases (TTDM), radiation toxicity to different organs, etc., under possible future treatment plans based on patient specifics or responses. An information fusion (IF) module estimates intervals for a patient's OS and the probabilities of RIT from a treatment plan by integrating the outcomes of module DA. A decision making (DM) module calculates “satisfaction” with the predicted radiation outcome based on trade-offs between OS and RIT, and finds the best treatment plan for the next time period via multi-criteria optimization. Results: Using physical and biological data from 130 lung cancer patients as our test bed, we were able to train and implement the 3 modules of our decision support tool. Examples demonstrate how it can help predict a new patient's potential OS and RIT with different radiation dose plans along with how these combinations change with dose, thus presenting a range of satisfaction/utility for use in individualized decision support. Conclusion: Although the decision support tool is currently developed from a small patient sample size, it shows the potential for the improvement of each patient's satisfaction in personalized radiation therapy. The radiation treatment outcome prediction and decision making model needs to be evaluated with more

  4. Defining responses to therapy and study outcomes in clinical trials of invasive fungal diseases: Mycoses Study Group and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer consensus criteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segal, B.H.; Herbrecht, R.; Stevens, D.A.; Ostrosky-Zeichner, L.; Sobel, J.; Viscoli, C.; Walsh, T.J.; Maertens, J.; Patterson, T.F.; Perfect, J.R.; Dupont, B.; Wingard, J.R.; Calandra, T.; Kauffman, C.A.; Graybill, J.R.; Baden, L.R.; Pappas, P.G.; Bennett, J.E.; Kontoyiannis, D.P.; Cordonnier, C.; Viviani, M.A.; Bille, J.; Almyroudis, N.G.; Wheat, L.J.; Graninger, W.; Bow, E.J.; Holland, S.M.; Kullberg, B.J.; Dismukes, W.E.; Pauw, B.E. de

    2008-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases (IFDs) have become major causes of morbidity and mortality among highly immunocompromised patients. Authoritative consensus criteria to diagnose IFD have been useful in establishing eligibility criteria for antifungal trials. There is an important need for generation of cons

  5. Speed-accuracy trade-offs in computing spatial impulse responses for simulating medical ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    Medical ultrasound imaging can be simulated realistically using linear acoustics. One of the most powerful approaches is to employ spatial impulse responses. Hereby both emitted fields and pulse-echo responses from point scatterers can be determined. Also any kind of dynamic focusing...

  6. Response of SOI image sensor to therapeutic carbon ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumura, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy is known as a less invasive cancer treatment. The radiation quality is an important parameter to evaluate the biological effect and the clinical dose from the measured physical dose. The performance of SOPHIAS detector, which is the SOI image sensor having a wide dynamic range and large active area, was tested by using therapeutic carbon ion beam at Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC). It was shown that the primary carbon and secondary particles can be distinguishable by SOPHIAS detector. On the other hand, a LET dependence was observed especially at the high LET region. This phenomenon will be studied by using the device simulator together with Monte Carlo simulation.

  7. Mangrove vulnerability modelling in parts of Western Niger Delta, Nigeria using satellite images, GIS techniques and Spatial Multi-Criteria Analysis (SMCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omo-Irabor, Omo O; Olobaniyi, Samuel B; Akunna, Joe; Venus, Valentijn; Maina, Joseph M; Paradzayi, Charles

    2011-07-01

    Mangroves are known for their global environmental and socioeconomic value. Despite their importance, mangrove like other ecosystems is now being threatened by natural and human-induced processes that damage them at alarming rates, thereby diminishing the limited number of existing mangrove vegetation. The development of a spatial vulnerability assessment model that takes into consideration environmental and socioeconomic criteria, in spatial and non-spatial formats has been attempted in this study. According to the model, 11 different input parameters are required in modelling mangrove vulnerability. These parameters and their effects on mangrove vulnerability were selected and weighted by experts in the related fields. Criteria identification and selection were mainly based on effects of environmental and socioeconomic changes associated with mangrove survival. The results obtained revealed the dominance of socioeconomic criteria such as population pressure and deforestation, with high vulnerability index of 0.75. The environmental criteria was broadly dispersed in the study area and represents vulnerability indices ranging from 0.00-0.75. This category reflects the greater influence of pollutant input from oil wells and pipelines and minimal contribution from climatic factors. This project has integrated spatial management framework for mangrove vulnerability assessment that utilises information technology in conjunction with expert knowledge and multi-criteria analysis to aid planners and policy/ decision makers in the protection of this very fragile ecosystem.

  8. Study of fish response using particle image velocimetry and high-speed, high-resolution imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gruensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Fish swimming has fascinated both engineers and fish biologists for decades. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging are recently developed analysis tools that can help engineers and biologists better understand how fish respond to turbulent environments. This report details studies to evaluate DPIV. The studies included a review of existing literature on DPIV, preliminary studies to test the feasibility of using DPIV conducted at our Flow Biology Laboratory in Richland, Washington September through December 2003, and applications of high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging with advanced motion analysis to investigations of fish injury mechanisms in turbulent shear flows and bead trajectories in laboratory physical models. Several conclusions were drawn based on these studies, which are summarized as recommendations for proposed research at the end of this report.

  9. Effectiveness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating clinical responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yin-hua; YE Jing-ming; XU Ling; HUANG Qing-yun; ZHAO Jian-xin; DUAN Xue-ning; QIN Nai-shan; WANG Xiao-ying

    2011-01-01

    Background Use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy necessitates assessment of response to cytotoxic drugs.The aim of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating clinical responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.Methods We examined patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for primary breast cancer between October 2007and September 2008.Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was used to examine breast tumors prior to and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.The MRI examination assessed tumors using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST).The Miller-Payne grading system was used as a histopathological examination to assess the effect of the treatment.We examined the relationship between the results of RECIST and histopathological criteria.In addition,we used time-signal intensity curves (MRI T-SI) to further evaluate the effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on tumor response.Results MRI examination of patients completing four three-week anthracycline-taxanes chemotherapy treatment revealed that no patients had complete responses (CR),58 patients had partial responses (PR),29 patients had stable disease (SD),and four with progressive disease (PD).The effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CR + PR) was 63.7% (58/91).The postoperative histopathological evaluations revealed the following:seven G5 (pCR) cases (7.7%),39G4 cases (42.9%),16 G3 cases (17.6%),23 G2 cases (25.3%),and six G1 cases (6.6%).The effectiveness (G5 + G4 +G3) was 68.1% (62/91).MRI T-SI standards classified 53 responding cases,29 stable cases,and nine progressing cases.These results indicated that the treatment was 58.2% effective (53/91) overall.Conclusions Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and histopathological standards were highly correlated.Importantly,MRI T-SI evaluation was found to be useful in assessing the clinical effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  10. Psychological and Cortisol Responses to and Recovery From Exposure to a Body Image Threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larkin Lamarche

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of body image research has failed to measure what occurs beyond the immediate presentation of a body image threat, or after a body image threat is no longer present. This is particularly true for physiological outcomes. The present study examined psychological and cortisol responses to, and recovery from, a body composition assessment as a social-evaluative body image threat. Women (N = 64 were randomized into either a control or threat group. Participants completed a measure of social physique anxiety and provided a sample of saliva (to assess cortisol at baseline, and immediately following and 20 min following their condition. The threat group reported higher social physique anxiety following the threat in comparison with both baseline levels and recovery levels. Cortisol was higher immediately following the threat in comparison with baseline levels. Findings support the inclusion of a recovery time point in body image research to provide a more complete picture of the psychobiology of body image experiences.

  11. Multi-modality imaging of tumor phenotype and response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyflot, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    Imaging and radiation oncology have historically been closely linked. However, the vast majority of techniques used in the clinic involve anatomical imaging. Biological imaging offers the potential for innovation in the areas of cancer diagnosis and staging, radiotherapy target definition, and treatment response assessment. Some relevant imaging techniques are FDG PET (for imaging cellular metabolism), FLT PET (proliferation), CuATSM PET (hypoxia), and contrast-enhanced CT (vasculature and perfusion). Here, a technique for quantitative spatial correlation of tumor phenotype is presented for FDG PET, FLT PET, and CuATSM PET images. Additionally, multimodality imaging of treatment response with FLT PET, CuATSM, and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is presented, in a trial of patients receiving an antiangiogenic agent (Avastin) combined with cisplatin and radiotherapy. Results are also presented for translational applications in animal models, including quantitative assessment of proliferative response to cetuximab with FLT PET and quantification of vascular volume with a blood-pool contrast agent (Fenestra). These techniques have clear applications to radiobiological research and optimized treatment strategies, and may eventually be used for personalized therapy for patients.

  12. Nonlinear ultrasonic imaging method for closed cracks using subtraction of responses at different external loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Yoshikazu; Horinouchi, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Shintaku, Yohei; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2011-08-01

    To improve the selectivity of closed cracks for objects other than cracks in ultrasonic imaging, we propose an extension of a novel imaging method, namely, subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation (SPACE) as well as another approach using the subtraction of responses at different external loads. By applying external static or dynamic loads to closed cracks, the contact state in the cracks varies, resulting in an intensity change of responses at cracks. In contrast, objects other than cracks are independent of external load. Therefore, only cracks can be extracted by subtracting responses at different loads. In this study, we performed fundamental experiments on a closed fatigue crack formed in an aluminum alloy compact tension (CT) specimen using the proposed method. We examined the static load dependence of SPACE images and the dynamic load dependence of linear phased array (PA) images by simulating the external loads with a servohydraulic fatigue testing machine. By subtracting the images at different external loads, we show that this method is useful in extracting only the intensity change of responses related to closed cracks, while canceling the responses of objects other than cracks.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in assessment of treatment response of gamma knife for brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xiao; ZHANG Xue-ning; ZHANG Yun-ting; YU Chun-shui; XU De-sheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in assessing treatment response to gamma knife radiosurgery for brain tumors.Data sources Published articles about assessing treatment response to gamma knife radiosurgery for brain tumors were selected using PubMed. The search terms were "MRI", "gamma knife" and "brain tumors".Study selection Articles regarding the MRI techniques using for early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife were selected.Results MRI techniques, especially diffusion weighted imaging, perfusion weighted imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, are useful for early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife by detecting the hemodynamic, metabolic, and cellular alterations. Moreover, they can also provide important information on prognosis.Conclusions Diffusion weighted imaging, perfusion weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can provide early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife for brain tumors, and also information of tumor progression or recurrence earlier than conventional MRI. But there are still many questions to be answered which should be based on the development and advancement of MRI and related disciplines.

  14. An Approach to Developing Numeric Nutrient Criteria for the Coastal Waters of the Northeast Using the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clean Water Act requires states to identify designated uses of their waters and when necessary develop science-based water quality criteria to ensure protection of the designated uses. Designated uses include recreation, fish consumption, shellfish harvesting and drinking wat...

  15. Enlarging the linear response range of velocity with optimum imaging parameters and modified data processing in laser speckle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jianjun; Li, Pengcheng; Ul'yanov, Sergey S.; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2008-02-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI) technique is considered as a promising method of accessing cerebral blood flow (CBF) of animals for its high spatiotemporal resolution and simplicity. It is important in LSI that optimum imaging parameters and limited noises should be confirmed to promote the imaging precision. We investigated in this paper different factors which may affect the imaging results with a moving white plate model, and then proposed a method of enlarging the linear response range of velocity. Through experiment, we proposed in our LSI system the optimum imaging parameters, including the numerical aperture and magnification of microscopy, the integration time, the gain mode of CCD camera. The average intensity was found optimum at about 800 counts out of 4096 grey level, which permits the highest contrast in our experiment. To eliminate the influence of uneven illumination, a direct current weight of 27 counts was subtracted during data processing. The result indicated that the relationship between measured velocity and the real one remained linear with R2 equaling to 0.99 throughout the scale of 80 mm/s.

  16. Three-dimensional integral imaging displays using a quick-response encoded elemental image array: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markman, A.; Javidi, B.

    2016-06-01

    Quick-response (QR) codes are barcodes that can store information such as numeric data and hyperlinks. The QR code can be scanned using a QR code reader, such as those built into smartphone devices, revealing the information stored in the code. Moreover, the QR code is robust to noise, rotation, and illumination when scanning due to error correction built in the QR code design. Integral imaging is an imaging technique used to generate a three-dimensional (3D) scene by combining the information from two-dimensional (2D) elemental images (EIs) each with a different perspective of a scene. Transferring these 2D images in a secure manner can be difficult. In this work, we overview two methods to store and encrypt EIs in multiple QR codes. The first method uses run-length encoding with Huffman coding and the double-random-phase encryption (DRPE) to compress and encrypt an EI. This information is then stored in a QR code. An alternative compression scheme is to perform photon-counting on the EI prior to compression. Photon-counting is a non-linear transformation of data that creates redundant information thus improving image compression. The compressed data is encrypted using the DRPE. Once information is stored in the QR codes, it is scanned using a smartphone device. The information scanned is decompressed and decrypted and an EI is recovered. Once all EIs have been recovered, a 3D optical reconstruction is generated.

  17. Change in Tongue Morphology in Response to Expiratory Resistance Loading Investigated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of expiratory resistance load on the tongue area encompassing the suprahyoid and genioglossus muscles. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy individuals (15 males, 15 females, mean age: 28.9 years). [Methods] Magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate morphological changes in response to resistive expiratory pressure loading in the area encompassing the suprahyoid and genioglossus muscles. Images were taken when water...

  18. ROLE OF IMAGE IN MARKETING PERFORMANCE ODEL SUPPORTED BY MARKETING COMMUNICATION AND COMPANY SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Soeryanto Soegoto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBanking industries have not been effective yet in implementing marketing communication and company social responsibility programs. The establishment of image has not been done effectively yet; accordingly marketing performance cannot be implemented as it is expected. This research was done in the banking industries at Bandung City with sample as much as 42 banking industries drawn using a random sampling method. Thaanalysis procedure used Structural Equation Modeling based on Partial Least Square. This study generates anew model different with the previous researches where marketing communication and company social respon-sibility programs do not affect directly on the banking industries’ marketing performance. Nevertheless the image affect the marketing performance moderately. In conclusion, banking industries’ marketing perfor-mance can be maximal when the marketing communication is implemented effectively and the company social responsibility is implemented conducively in order to shape positive image.

  19. In vivo optical imaging to visualize photodynamic therapy-induced immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Soumya; Foster, Thomas H.

    2009-02-01

    Motivated by recent successes in growing intradermal tumors in the ears of mice and establishing the feasibility of in vivo confocal imaging of anatomic vessels in these tumors using fluorophore-conjugated antibodies to CD31, we are exploring a number of applications of optical fluorescence imaging in superficial murine tumor models in vivo. Immune responses induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT) are dynamic processes that occur in a spatially and temporally specific manner. To visualize these processes noninvasively, we have made progress in developing optical molecular imaging strategies that take advantage of intradermal injection of fluorophore-conjugated-antibodies against surface antigens on immune cells. This enables confocal imaging of the fluorescently labeled host cells to depths of at least 100 microns, and using this technique we have achieved in vivo imaging of granulocyte (GR-1)- and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-positive cell trafficking in tumors in response to PDT. The latter include macrophages and dendritic cells. Data from tumors that were subjected to PDT with the photosensitizer, HPPH, reveals a significantly enhanced level of GR-1+ cell infiltration compared to untreated control tumor. The temporal kinetics of GR-1+ and MHC-II+ cells at different time intervals post-PDT are being examined. The ability to image host responses in vivo without excising or perturbing the tissue has opened up opportunities to explore means of optimizing them to therapeutic advantage.

  20. Poisson noise reduction from X-ray images by region classification and response median filtering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    THAKUR KIRTI; KADAM JITENDRA; SAPKAL ASHOK

    2017-06-01

    Medical imaging is perturbed with inherent noise such as speckle noise in ultrasound, Poisson noise in X-ray and Rician noise in MRI imaging. This paper focuses on X-ray image denoising problem. X-ray image quality could be improved by increasing dose value; however, this may result in cell death or similar kinds of issues. Therefore, image processing techniques are developed to minimise noise instead of increasing dose value for patient safety. In this paper, usage of modified Harris corner point detector to predict noisy pixels and responsive median filtering in spatial domain is proposed. Experimentation proved that the proposed work performs better than simple median filter and moving average (MA) filter. The results are very close to non-local means Poisson noise filter which is one of the current state-of-the-art methods. Benefits of the proposed work are simple noise prediction mechanism, good visual quality and less execution time.

  1. Unsupervised feature learning improves prediction of human brain activity in response to natural images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Güçlü

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Encoding and decoding in functional magnetic resonance imaging has recently emerged as an area of research to noninvasively characterize the relationship between stimulus features and human brain activity. To overcome the challenge of formalizing what stimulus features should modulate single voxel responses, we introduce a general approach for making directly testable predictions of single voxel responses to statistically adapted representations of ecologically valid stimuli. These representations are learned from unlabeled data without supervision. Our approach is validated using a parsimonious computational model of (i how early visual cortical representations are adapted to statistical regularities in natural images and (ii how populations of these representations are pooled by single voxels. This computational model is used to predict single voxel responses to natural images and identify natural images from stimulus-evoked multiple voxel responses. We show that statistically adapted low-level sparse and invariant representations of natural images better span the space of early visual cortical representations and can be more effectively exploited in stimulus identification than hand-designed Gabor wavelets. Our results demonstrate the potential of our approach to better probe unknown cortical representations.

  2. Negative hemodynamic response without neuronal inhibition investigated by combining optical imaging and electrophysiological recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zengguang; Cao, Pengjia; Sun, Pengcheng; Lu, Zhuofan; Li, Liming; Chen, Yao; Chai, Xinyu

    2017-01-10

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying negative hemodynamic responses is critical for the interpretation of functional brain imaging signals. Negative imaging signals have been found in the visual, somatosensory and motor cortices in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and intrinsic signal optical imaging (ISOI) studies. However, the origin of negative imaging signals is still controversial. The present study investigated the visual cortical responses to peripheral grating stimuli using multi-wavelength ISOI and electrophysiological recording. We found an increased cerebral blood volume (CBV) in the stimulus-induced regions and a decreased CBV in the adjacent regions in the visual cortex. Nevertheless, there was no significant change in blood oxygenation in the negative CBV regions. Furthermore, by combining the planar and laminar electrophysiological recordings, we did not observe significantly decreased neuronal activity in the negative CBV regions. Our results suggest that the negative hemodynamic response does not necessarily originate in decreased neuronal activity. Therefore, caution should be taken when interpreting a negative hemodynamic response as neuronal inhibition.

  3. Comparing RECIST with EORTC criteria in metastatic bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    To compare RECIST and EORTC criteria in an evaluation of response to therapy in metastatic bladder cancer and to assess their influence on decisions to administer additional therapy. A total of 42 untreated patients (38 male, 4 female) with metastatic bladder cancer were included in the study, which took place between July 2007 and April 2013. The mean age was 66.1 ± 9.93 years (range 41-84 years). A total of 144 metastatic foci were evaluated using multislice CT and (18)FDG-PET/CT before and after first-line chemotherapy. The locations, sizes, numbers and SUV(max) of the metastatic foci before and after chemotherapy were recorded, and the response to therapy was evaluated separately using RECIST and EORTC criteria, after which a statistical comparison was made. According to the RECIST and EORTC criteria, the rate of complete remission (CR) was 9.5 and 16.6 %, the rate of partial remission (PR) was 28.6 and 40.5 %, the rate of stable disease (SD) was 23.8 and 14.3 %, and the rate of progressive disease (PD) was 31.0 and 28.6 %, respectively. The overall response rate (ORR) was 38.1 versus 57.1 %, respectively, and there were no differences between the two criteria in terms of their detection of progressive disease. The rate of SD was higher with RECIST criteria; however, the difference between the two criteria was not significant in terms of PR and CR. A group of patients that had been determined as having a SD according to RECIST criteria were grouped as PR and/or CR according to EORTC criteria. Additional chemotherapy protocols can be used in second-line chemotherapy and/or cisplatin-resistant patients, according to RECIST criteria. In evaluating the response to first-line chemotherapy for metastatic bladder cancer, EORTC criteria, using (18)FDG-PET/CT scans, can be considered as a more applicable and accurate diagnostic tool. The anatomical findings obtained through imaging methods and from functional/metabolic data obtained by PET/CT can be useful in the

  4. Characterizing response to elemental unit of acoustic imaging noise: an FMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamer, Gregory G; Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M

    2009-07-01

    Acoustic imaging noise produced during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies can hinder auditory fMRI research analysis by altering the properties of the acquired time-series data. Acoustic imaging noise can be especially confounding when estimating the time course of the hemodynamic response (HDR) in auditory event-related fMRI (fMRI) experiments. This study is motivated by the desire to establish a baseline function that can serve not only as a comparison to other quantities of acoustic imaging noise for determining how detrimental is one's experimental noise, but also as a foundation for a model that compensates for the response to acoustic imaging noise. Therefore, the amplitude and spatial extent of the HDR to the elemental unit of acoustic imaging noise (i.e., a single ping) associated with echoplanar acquisition were characterized and modeled. Results from this fMRI study at 1.5 T indicate that the group-averaged HDR in left and right auditory cortex to acoustic imaging noise (duration of 46 ms) has an estimated peak magnitude of 0.29% (right) to 0.48% (left) signal change from baseline, peaks between 3 and 5 s after stimulus presentation, and returns to baseline and remains within the noise range approximately 8 s after stimulus presentation.

  5. Estimation of Response Functions Based on Variational Bayes Algorithm in Dynamic Images Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowei Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a nonparametric Bayesian model based on variational Bayes algorithm to estimate the response functions in dynamic medical imaging. In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the impulse response or retention functions are rather complicated and finding a suitable parametric form is problematic. In this paper, we estimated the response functions using nonparametric Bayesian priors. These priors were designed to favor desirable properties of the functions, such as sparsity or smoothness. These assumptions were used within hierarchical priors of the variational Bayes algorithm. We performed our algorithm on the real online dataset of dynamic renal scintigraphy. The results demonstrated that this algorithm improved the estimation of response functions with nonparametric priors.

  6. Assessing paedophilia based on the haemodynamic brain response to face images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponseti, Jorge; Granert, Oliver; Van Eimeren, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    that human face processing is tuned to sexual age preferences. This observation prompted us to test whether paedophilia can be inferred based on the haemodynamic brain responses to adult and child faces. METHODS: Twenty-four men sexually attracted to prepubescent boys or girls (paedophiles) and 32 men...... sexually attracted to men or women (teleiophiles) were exposed to images of child and adult, male and female faces during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session. RESULTS: A cross-validated, automatic pattern classification algorithm of brain responses to facial stimuli yielded four...

  7. Reporter gene imaging of immune responses to cancer: progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Purnima

    2012-01-01

    Immune responses to cancer are dynamic processes which take place through the concerted activity of innate and adaptive cell populations. In order to fully understand the efficacy of immune therapies for cancer, it is critical to understand how the treatment modulates the function of each cell type involved in the anti-tumor immune response. Molecular imaging is a versatile method for longitudinal studies of cellular localization and function. The development of reporter genes for tracking cell movement and function was a powerful addition to the immunologist's toolbox. This review will highlight the advances and challenges in the use of reporter gene imaging to track immune cell localization and function in cancer.

  8. Protectiveness of water quality criteria for copper in western United States waters relative to predicted olfactory responses in juvenile Pacific salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, David K; Gensemer, Robert W; Van Genderen, Eric J; Gorsuch, Joseph W

    2011-07-01

    Copper (Cu) can impair olfaction in juvenile Pacific salmon (as well as other fishes), thus potentially inhibiting the ability of juveniles to avoid predators or to find food. Because Cu is commonly elevated in stormwater runoff in urban environments, storm events may result in elevated Cu concentrations in salmon-bearing streams. Accordingly, there is concern that existing Cu criteria, which were not derived using data for olfactory-related endpoints, may not be adequately protective of juvenile salmon. However, a modification of the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) biotic ligand model (BLM) for deriving site-specific Cu criteria was recently proposed, which accounted for the sensitivity of olfactory endpoints. The modification was based on olfactory inhibition in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) exposed to Cu in various combinations of pH, hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations. We used that olfactory-based BLM to derive 20% inhibition concentrations (IC20) values for Cu for 133 stream locations in the western United States. The olfactory BLM-based IC20 values were compared to the existing hardness-based Cu criteria and the USEPA's BLM-based Cu criteria for these representative natural waters of the western United States. Of the 133 sampling locations, mean hardness-dependent acute and chronic Cu criteria were below the mean olfactory-based BLM IC20 value in 122 (92%) and 129 (97%) of the waters, respectively (i.e., <20% olfactory impairment would have been predicted at the mean hardness-based Cu criteria concentrations). Waters characterized by a combination of high hardness and very low DOC were most likely to have hardness-based Cu criteria that were higher than the olfactory-based BLM IC20 values, because DOC strongly influences Cu bioavailability in the BLM. In all waters, the USEPA's current BLM-based criteria were below the mean olfactory-based BLM IC20 values, indicating that the USEPA's BLM

  9. Image segmentation techniques for improved processing of landmine responses in ground-penetrating radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrione, Peter A.; Collins, Leslie

    2007-04-01

    As ground penetrating radar sensor phenomenology improves, more advanced statistical processing approaches become applicable to the problem of landmine detection in GPR data. Most previous studies on landmine detection in GPR data have focused on the application of statistics and physics based prescreening algorithms, new feature extraction approaches, and improved feature classification techniques. In the typical framework, prescreening algorithms provide spatial location information of anomalous responses in down-track / cross-track coordinates, and feature extraction algorithms are then tasked with generating low-dimensional information-bearing feature sets from these spatial locations. However in time-domain GPR, a significant portion of the data collected at prescreener flagged locations may be unrelated to the true anomaly responses - e.g. ground bounce response, responses either temporally "before" or "after" the anomalous response, etc. The ability to segment the information-bearing region of the GPR image from the background of the image may thus provide improved performance for feature-based processing of anomaly responses. In this work we will explore the application of Markov random fields (MRFs) to the problem of anomaly/background segmentation in GPR data. Preliminary results suggest the potential for improved feature extraction and overall performance gains via application of image segmentation approaches prior to feature extraction.

  10. Differential neural responses to food images in women with bulimia versus anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Samantha J; O'Daly, Owen G; Uher, Rudolf; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael; Williams, Steven C R; Schiöth, Helgi B; Treasure, Janet; Campbell, Iain C

    2011-01-01

    Previous fMRI studies show that women with eating disorders (ED) have differential neural activation to viewing food images. However, despite clinical differences in their responses to food, differential neural activation to thinking about eating food, between women with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) is not known. We compare 50 women (8 with BN, 18 with AN and 24 age-matched healthy controls [HC]) while they view food images during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). In response to food (vs non-food) images, women with BN showed greater neural activation in the visual cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right insular cortex and precentral gyrus, women with AN showed greater activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and right precuneus. HC women activated the cerebellum, right insular cortex, right medial temporal lobe and left caudate. Direct comparisons revealed that compared to HC, the BN group showed relative deactivation in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus/insula, and visual cortex, and compared to AN had relative deactivation in the parietal lobe and dorsal posterior cingulate cortex, but greater activation in the caudate, superior temporal gyrus, right insula and supplementary motor area. Women with AN and BN activate top-down cognitive control in response to food images, yet women with BN have increased activation in reward and somatosensory regions, which might impinge on cognitive control over food consumption and binge eating.

  11. Differential Neural Responses to Food Images in Women with Bulimia versus Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Samantha J.; O′Daly, Owen G.; Uher, Rudolf; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael; Williams, Steven C. R.; Schiöth, Helgi B.; Treasure, Janet; Campbell, Iain C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous fMRI studies show that women with eating disorders (ED) have differential neural activation to viewing food images. However, despite clinical differences in their responses to food, differential neural activation to thinking about eating food, between women with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) is not known. Methods We compare 50 women (8 with BN, 18 with AN and 24 age-matched healthy controls [HC]) while they view food images during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Results In response to food (vs non-food) images, women with BN showed greater neural activation in the visual cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right insular cortex and precentral gyrus, women with AN showed greater activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and right precuneus. HC women activated the cerebellum, right insular cortex, right medial temporal lobe and left caudate. Direct comparisons revealed that compared to HC, the BN group showed relative deactivation in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus/insula, and visual cortex, and compared to AN had relative deactivation in the parietal lobe and dorsal posterior cingulate cortex, but greater activation in the caudate, superior temporal gyrus, right insula and supplementary motor area. Conclusions Women with AN and BN activate top-down cognitive control in response to food images, yet women with BN have increased activation in reward and somatosensory regions, which might impinge on cognitive control over food consumption and binge eating. PMID:21799807

  12. Evaluation of treatment response and resistance in metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) using integrated (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI); The REMAP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Morland, Christian; Rudman, Sarah; Nathan, Paul; Mallett, Susan; Montana, Giovanni; Cook, Gary; Goh, Vicky

    2017-06-02

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are the first line standard of care for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Accurate response assessment in the setting of antiangiogenic therapies remains suboptimal as standard size-related response criteria do not necessarily accurately reflect clinical benefit, as they may be less pronounced or occur later in therapy than devascularisation. The challenge for imaging is providing timely assessment of disease status allowing therapies to be tailored to ensure ongoing clinical benefit. We propose that combined assessment of morphological, physiological and metabolic imaging parameters using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging ((18)F-FDG PET/MRI) will better reflect disease behaviour, improving assessment of response/non-response/relapse. The REMAP study is a single-centre prospective observational study. Eligible patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, planned for systemic therapy, with at least 2 lesions will undergo an integrated (18)F-FDG PET and MRI whole body imaging with diffusion weighted and contrast-enhanced multiphasic as well as standard anatomical MRI sequences at baseline, 12 weeks and 24 weeks of systemic therapy allowing (18)F-FDG standardised uptake value (SUV), apparent diffusion co-efficient (ADC) and normalised signal intensity (SI) parameters to be obtained. Standard of care contrast-enhanced computed tomography CT scans will be performed at equivalent time-points. CT response categorisation will be performed using RECIST 1.1 and alternative (modified)Choi and MASS criteria. The reference standard for disease status will be by consensus panel taking into account clinical, biochemical and conventional imaging parameters. Intra- and inter-tumoural heterogeneity in vascular, diffusion and metabolic response/non-response will be assessed by image texture analysis. Imaging will also inform the development of computational methods for automated disease

  13. Hyperspectral Imaging for Determining Pigment Contents in Cucumber Leaves in Response to Angular Leaf Spot Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Ru; Li, Xiaoli; Yu, Ke-Qiang; Cheng, Fan; He, Yong

    2016-06-10

    Hyperspectral imaging technique was employed to determine spatial distributions of chlorophyll (Chl), and carotenoid (Car) contents in cucumber leaves in response to angular leaf spot (ALS). Altogether, 196 hyperspectral images of cucumber leaves with five infection severities of ALS were captured by a hyperspectral imaging system in the range of 380-1,030 nm covering 512 wavebands. Mean spectrum were extracted from regions of interest (ROIs) in the hyperspectral images. Partial least square regression (PLSR) models were used to develop quantitative analysis between the spectra and the pigment contents measured by biochemical analyses. In addition, regression coefficients (RCs) in PLSR models were employed to select important wavelengths (IWs) for modelling. It was found that the PLSR models developed by the IWs provided the optimal measurement results with correlation coefficient (R) of prediction of 0.871 and 0.876 for Chl and Car contents, respectively. Finally, Chl and Car distributions in cucumber leaves with the ALS infection were mapped by applying the optimal models pixel-wise to the hyperspectral images. The results proved the feasibility of hyperspectral imaging for visualizing the pigment distributions in cucumber leaves in response to ALS.

  14. Molecular targeted therapy in modern oncology: Imaging assessment of treatment response and toxicities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajewski, Katherine M.; Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; DiPiro, Pamela J.; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Shinagare, Atul B. [Dept. of of Imaging, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Oncology is a rapidly evolving field with a shift toward personalized cancer treatment. The use of therapies targeted to the molecular features of individual tumors and the tumor microenvironment has become much more common. In this review, anti-angiogenic and other molecular targeted therapies are discussed, with a focus on typical and atypical response patterns and imaging manifestations of drug toxicities.

  15. Esophageal Cancer: Role of Imaging in Primary Staging and Response Assessment Post Neoadjuvant Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Yvette

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the early detection and treatment of esophageal cancer have meant improved survival rates for patients with esophageal cancer. Accurate pretreatment and post-neoadjuvant treatment staging of esophageal cancer is essential for assessing operability and determining the optimum treatment plan. This article reviews the multimodality imaging approach in the diagnosis, staging, and assessment of treatment response in esophageal cancer.

  16. The longitudinal reliability and responsiveness of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring System (HOAMRIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugen, Ida K.; Eshed, Iris; Gandjbakhch, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the interreader reliability of change scores and the responsiveness of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis (OA) Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) Scoring System (HOAMRIS). Methods. Paired MRI (baseline and 5-yr followup) from 20 patients with hand OA were scored with known time se...

  17. Characterizing the Subharmonic Response of Phospholipid-Coated Microbubbles for Carotid Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faez, Telli; Emmer, Marcia; Docter, Margreet; Sijl, Jeroen; Versluis, Michel; Jong, de Nico

    2011-01-01

    The subharmonic vibration of BR14 (Bracco Research S.A., Geneva, Switzerland) contrast agent microbubbles is investigated within the preferable frequency range for carotid ultrasound imaging (8–12 MHz). The response of the bubbles was recorded optically with an ultra-fast recording camera (Brandaris

  18. Physical exercise and brain responses to images of high-calorie food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, William D S; Kipman, Maia; Schwab, Zachary J; Tkachenko, Olga; Preer, Lily; Gogel, Hannah; Bark, John S; Mundy, Elizabeth A; Olson, Elizabeth A; Weber, Mareen

    2013-12-04

    Physical exercise has many health benefits, including improved cardiovascular fitness, lean muscle development, increased metabolism, and weight loss, as well as positive effects on brain functioning and cognition. Recent evidence suggests that regular physical exercise may also affect the responsiveness of reward regions of the brain to food stimuli. We examined whether the total number of minutes of self-reported weekly physical exercise was related to the responsiveness of appetite and food reward-related brain regions to visual presentations of high-calorie and low-calorie food images during functional MRI. Second, we examined whether such responses would correlate with self-reported food preferences. While undergoing scanning, 37 healthy adults (22 men) viewed images of high-calorie and low-calorie foods and provided desirability ratings for each food image. The correlation between exercise minutes per week and brain responses to the primary condition contrast (high-calorie>low-calorie) was evaluated within the amygdala, insula, and medial orbitofrontal cortex, brain regions previously implicated in responses to food images. Higher levels of exercise were significantly correlated with lower responsiveness within the medial orbitofrontal cortex and left insula to high-calorie foods. Furthermore, activation of these regions was positively correlated with preference ratings for high-calorie foods, particularly those with a savory flavor. These findings suggest that physical exercise may be associated with reduced activation in food-responsive reward regions, which are in turn associated with reduced preferences for unhealthy high-calorie foods. Physical exercise may confer secondary health benefits beyond its primary effects on cardiovascular fitness and energy expenditure.

  19. MR imaging of the achilles tendon. Evaluation of criteria for the differentiation of asymptomatic and symptomatic tendons; MR-Tomografie der Achillessehne. Evaluation von Kriterien zur Differenzierung von asymptomatischen und symptomatischen Sehnen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.; Wedegaertner, U.; Maas, L.C.; Adam, G. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Buchert, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Maas, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Privatpraxis fuer Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop quantitative and qualitative MRI criteria to differentiate between healthy and pathological Achilles tendons. Materials and Methods: 364 Achilles tendons were examined on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. 264 patients had Achilles tendon complaints, 100 asymptomatic Achilles tendons served as a control. T1-weighted, T2-weighted and a STIR sequence were performed in sagittal and axial orientation. Images were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists. Quantitative and qualitative criteria were assessed. A Mann-Whitney-U-Test and a regression analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: There were statistically significant differences between the patients with disorders and the control group concerning the depth (12.0 mm and 6.3 mm, p < 0.001) and length (83.2 mm and 45.9 mm, p < 0.001) of the tendon, the area of the tendon cross section (1.60 mm{sup 2} and 061 mm{sup 2}, p < 0.001), as well as the length of the bursa retrocalcanea (8.3 mm and 5.3 mm, p < 0.001). There was a sensitivity of 97 % and a specificity of 91 % using a formula including the 3 criteria: tendon depth (A4), length of bursa (A5) and area of tendon (F). Conclusion: The measurement of the Achilles tendon and the binary-logistic regression analysis allow differentiation between normal and pathological Achilles tendons. (orig.)

  20. Digital imaging approaches for phenotyping whole plant nitrogen and phosphorus response in Brachypodium distachyon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard Poir; Vincent Chochois; Xavier R.R.Sirault; John P.Vogel; Michelle Watt; Robert T.Furbank

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluates the phenotypic response of the model grass (Brachypodium distachyon (L.) P. Beauv.) to nitrogen and phosphorus nutrition using a combination of imaging techniques and destructive harvest of shoots and roots. Reference line Bd21-3 was grown in pots using 11 phosphorus and 11 nitrogen concentrations to establish a dose-response curve. Shoot biovolume and biomass, root length and biomass, and tissue phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations increased with nutrient concentration. Shoot biovolume, estimated by imaging, was highly correlated with dry weight (R2>0.92) and both biovolume and growth rate responded strongly to nutrient availability. Higher nutrient supply increased nodal root length more than other root types. Photochemical efficiency was strongly reduced by low phosphorus concentrations as early as 1 week after germination, suggesting that this measurement may be suitable for high throughput screening of phosphorus response. In contrast, nitrogen concentration had little effect on photochemical efficiency. Changes in biovolume over time were used to compare growth rates of four accessions in response to nitrogen and phosphorus supply. We demonstrate that a time series image-based approach coupled with mathematical modeling provides higher resolution of genotypic response to nutrient supply than traditional destructive techniques and shows promise for high throughput screening and determina-tion of genomic regions associated with superior nutrient use efficiency.

  1. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Saqlain A; Ferguson, R M; Krishnan, K M

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ0 excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (Ho ) and frequency (ω). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2 kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52 mT/μ0. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (ωHo) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories.

  2. Imaging of non-hodgkin lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Hutchings, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Optimal lymphoma management requires accurate pretreatment staging and reliable assessment of response, both during and after therapy. Positron emission tomography with computerized tomography (PET/CT) combines functional and anatomical imaging and provides the most sensitive and accurate methods...... for lymphoma imaging. New guidelines for lymphoma imaging and recently revised criteria for lymphoma staging and response assessment recommend PET/CT staging, treatment monitoring, and response evaluation in all FDG-avid lymphomas, while CT remains the method of choice for non-FDG-avid histologies. Since...... interim PET imaging has high prognostic value in lymphoma, a number of trials investigate PET-based, response-adapted therapy for non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). PET response is the main determinant of response according to the new response criteria, but PET/CT has little or no role in routine surveillance...

  3. Image acquisition and interpretation criteria for {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labelled white blood cell scintigraphy: results of a multicentre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erba, Paola A. [University of Pisa Medical School (Italy). Regional Center of Nuclear Medicine; Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Veltman, Niels C. [Jeroen Bosch Hospital, ' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Sollini, Martina [Arcisprdale S. Maria Nuova - IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Unit; Pacilio, Marta; Galli, Filippo [Sapienza Univ., Rome (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Unit; Signore, Alberto [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Sapienza Univ., Rome (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Unit; Sapienza Univ., Rome (Italy). Ospedale S. Andrea Medicina Nucleare

    2014-04-15

    There is no consensus yet on the best protocol for planar image acquisition and interpretation of radiolabelled white blood cell (WBC) scintigraphy. This may account for differences in reported diagnostic accuracy amongst different centres. This was a multicentre retrospective study analysing 235 WBC scans divided into two groups. The first group of scans (105 patients) were acquired with a fixed-time acquisition protocol and the second group (130 patients) were acquired with a decay time-corrected acquisition protocol. Planar images were interpreted both qualitatively and semiquantitatively. Three blinded readers analysed the images. The most accurate imaging acquisition protocol comprised image acquisition at 3 - 4 h and at 20 - 24 h in time mode with acquisition times corrected for isotope decay. Using this protocol, visual analysis had high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of infection. Semiquantitative analysis could be used in doubtful cases, with no cut-off for the percentage increase in radiolabelled WBC over time, as a criterion to define a positive scan. (orig.)

  4. Pre-treatment differences and early response monitoring of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients using magnetic resonance imaging: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevos, R.; Wildberger, J.E. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Smidt, M.L. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.G. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Medical Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Goethem, M. van [University Hospital of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Beets-Tan, R.G.; Lobbes, M.B.I. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    To assess whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can identify pre-treatment differences or monitor early response in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PubMed, Cochrane library, Medline and Embase databases were searched for publications until January 1, 2012. After primary selection, studies were selected based on predefined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Two reviewers assessed study contents using an extraction form. In 15 studies, which were mainly underpowered and of heterogeneous study design, 31 different parameters were studied. Most frequently studied parameters were tumour diameter or volume, K{sup trans}, K{sub ep}, V{sub e}, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Other parameters were analysed in only two or less studies. Tumour diameter, volume, and kinetic parameters did not show any pre-treatment differences between responders and non-responders. In two studies, pre-treatment differences in ADC were observed between study groups. At early response monitoring significant and non-significant changes for all parameters were observed for most of the imaging parameters. Evidence on distinguishing responders and non-responders to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using pre-treatment MRI, as well as using MRI for early response monitoring, is weak and based on underpowered study results and heterogeneous study design. Thus, the value of breast MRI for response evaluation has not yet been established. (orig.)

  5. Role of Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Parameters in the Evaluation of Treatment Response in Malignant Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Gang Xu; Jun-Fang Xian

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To elaborate the role of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters in the evaluation of treatment response in malignant tumors.Data Sources:Data cited in this review were obtained mainly from PubMed in English from 1999 to 2014,with keywords "dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI," "diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)," "microcirculation," "apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)," "treatment response" and "oncology."Study Selection:Articles regarding principles of DCE-MRI,principles of DWI,clinical applications as well as opportunity and aspiration were identified,retrieved and reviewed.Results:A significant correlation between ADC values and treatment response was reported in most DWI studies.Most quantitative DCE-MRI studies showed a significant correlation between K~s values and treatment response.However,in different tumors and studies,both high and low pretreatment ADC or K~s values were found to be associated with response rate.Both DCE-MRI and DWI demonstrated changes in their parameters hours to days after treatment,showing a decrease in K~ns or an increase in ADC associated with response in most cases.Conclusions:Combinations of quantitative MRI play an important role in the evaluation of treatment response of malignant tumors and hold promise for use as a cancer treatment response biomarker.However,validation is hampered by the lack of reproducibility and standardization.MRI acquisition protocols and quantitative image analysis approaches should be properly addressed prior to further testing the clinical use of quantitative MRI parameters in the assessment of treatments.

  6. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear wasite: site performance criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-01

    This report states ten criteria governing the suitability of sites for mined geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Department of Energy will use these criteria in its search for sites and will reevaluate their use when the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues radioactive waste repository rules. These criteria encompass site geometry, geohydrology, geochemistry, geologic characteristics, tectonic environment, human intrusion, surface characteristics, environment, and potential socioeconomic impacts. The contents of this document include background discussion, site performance criteria, and appendices. The background section describes the waste disposal system, the application of the site criteria, and applicable criteria from NWTS-33(1) - Program Objectives, Functional Requirements and System Performance Criteria. Appendix A, entitled Comparison with Other Siting Criteria compares the NWTS criteria with those recommended by other agencies. Appendix B contains DOE responses to public comments received on the January 1980 draft of this document. Appendix C is a glossary.

  7. Linear response, multi-order grating interferometry using a reversal shearing imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhang; Tan, Jiubin; Cui, Jiwen

    2015-10-01

    Linear response, multi-order grating interferometry is proposed to measure grating displacement. The system, a combination of a reversal shearing interferometer and an imaging system, enables calculating multi-order, integrated intensity signals with a linear waveform response. A theoretical multi-order model for the linear response signal analysis is presented with a Fourier series expansion. The results of the experiment, which prove the validity of the theoretical model, indicate a linear response to displacement with a linearity of 98.7% and a resolution of 10 nm. We conclude that the proposed method enables the development of a new class of potent linear response grating interferometry for displacement metrology.

  8. Decoding brain responses to pixelized images in the primary visual cortex: implications for visual cortical prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bing-Bing; Zheng, Xiao-Lin; Lu, Zhen-Gang; Wang, Xing; Yin, Zheng-Qin; Hou, Wen-Sheng; Meng, Ming

    2015-10-01

    Visual cortical prostheses have the potential to restore partial vision. Still limited by the low-resolution visual percepts provided by visual cortical prostheses, implant wearers can currently only "see" pixelized images, and how to obtain the specific brain responses to different pixelized images in the primary visual cortex (the implant area) is still unknown. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment on normal human participants to investigate the brain activation patterns in response to 18 different pixelized images. There were 100 voxels in the brain activation pattern that were selected from the primary visual cortex, and voxel size was 4 mm × 4 mm × 4 mm. Multi-voxel pattern analysis was used to test if these 18 different brain activation patterns were specific. We chose a Linear Support Vector Machine (LSVM) as the classifier in this study. The results showed that the classification accuracies of different brain activation patterns were significantly above chance level, which suggests that the classifier can successfully distinguish the brain activation patterns. Our results suggest that the specific brain activation patterns to different pixelized images can be obtained in the primary visual cortex using a 4 mm × 4 mm × 4 mm voxel size and a 100-voxel pattern.

  9. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogami, M; Kulkarni, R; Wang, H; Reif, R; Wang, R K [University of Washington, Department of Bioengineering, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2014-08-31

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing. (laser biophotonics)

  10. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogami, M.; Kulkarni, R.; Wang, H.; Reif, R.; Wang, R. K.

    2014-08-01

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing.

  11. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Lisa G; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Huber, Adam M; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B; Pilkington, Clarissa A; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Magalhaes, Claudia Saad; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). We analyzed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) and were derived from natural history data and a conjoint analysis survey. They were further validated using data from the PRINTO trial of prednisone alone compared to prednisone with methotrexate or cyclosporine and the Rituximab in Myositis (RIM) trial. At a consensus conference, experts considered 14 top candidate criteria based on their performance characteristics and clinical face validity, using nominal group technique. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model with a total improvement score of 0-100, using absolute percent change in core set measures of minimal (≥30), moderate (≥45), and major (≥70) improvement. The same criteria were chosen for adult DM/polymyositis, with differing thresholds for improvement. The sensitivity and specificity were 89% and 91-98% for minimal improvement, 92-94% and 94-99% for moderate improvement, and 91-98% and 85-86% for major improvement, respectively, in juvenile DM patient cohorts using the IMACS and PRINTO core set measures. These criteria were validated in the PRINTO trial for differentiating between treatment arms for minimal and moderate improvement (P = 0.009-0.057) and in the RIM trial for significantly differentiating the physician's rating for improvement (P Rheumatology.

  12. Functional recognition imaging using artificial neural networks: applications to rapid cellular identification via broadband electromechanical response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, M P; Guo, S; Kalinin, S V; Jesse, S [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Reukov, V V; Thompson, G L; Vertegel, A A, E-mail: sergei2@ornl.go [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Functional recognition imaging in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) using artificial neural network identification is demonstrated. This approach utilizes statistical analysis of complex SPM responses at a single spatial location to identify the target behavior, which is reminiscent of associative thinking in the human brain, obviating the need for analytical models. We demonstrate, as an example of recognition imaging, rapid identification of cellular organisms using the difference in electromechanical activity over a broad frequency range. Single-pixel identification of model Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria is achieved, demonstrating the viability of the method.

  13. Diagnostic criteria for autoimmune chronic pancreatitis revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyu-Pyo Kim; Myung-Hwan Kim; Jong Cheol Kim; Sang Soo Lee; Dong Wan Seo; Sung Koo Lee

    2006-01-01

    Autoimmune chronic pancreatitis (AIP) is increasingly being recognized worldwidely, as knowledge of this entity builds up. Above all, AIP is a very attractive disease to clinicians in terms of its dramatic response to the oral steroid therapy in contrast to ordinary chronic pancreatitis. Although many characteristic findings of AIP have been described, definite diagnostic criteria have not been fully established. In the year 2002, the Japan Pancreas Society published the diagnostic criteria of AIP and many clinicians around the world use these criteria for the diagnosis of AIP. The diagnostic criteria proposed by the Japan Pancreas Society, however, are not completely satisfactory and some groups use their own criteria in reporting AIP. This review discusses several potential limitations of current diagnostic criteria for this increasingly recognized condition. The manuscript is organized to emphasize the need for convening a consensus to develop improved diagnostic criteria.

  14. Automated Formosat Image Processing System for Rapid Response to International Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, M. C.; Chou, S. C.; Chen, Y. C.; Chen, B.; Liu, C.; Yu, S. J.

    2016-06-01

    FORMOSAT-2, Taiwan's first remote sensing satellite, was successfully launched in May of 2004 into the Sun-synchronous orbit at 891 kilometers of altitude. With the daily revisit feature, the 2-m panchromatic, 8-m multi-spectral resolution images captured have been used for researches and operations in various societal benefit areas. This paper details the orchestration of various tasks conducted in different institutions in Taiwan in the efforts responding to international disasters. The institutes involved including its space agency-National Space Organization (NSPO), Center for Satellite Remote Sensing Research of National Central University, GIS Center of Feng-Chia University, and the National Center for High-performance Computing. Since each institution has its own mandate, the coordinated tasks ranged from receiving emergency observation requests, scheduling and tasking of satellite operation, downlink to ground stations, images processing including data injection, ortho-rectification, to delivery of image products. With the lessons learned from working with international partners, the FORMOSAT Image Processing System has been extensively automated and streamlined with a goal to shorten the time between request and delivery in an efficient manner. The integrated team has developed an Application Interface to its system platform that provides functions of search in archive catalogue, request of data services, mission planning, inquiry of services status, and image download. This automated system enables timely image acquisition and substantially increases the value of data product. Example outcome of these efforts in recent response to support Sentinel Asia in Nepal Earthquake is demonstrated herein.

  15. Comparison of response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST), European Association for the study of the liver (EASL) and modified RECIST criteria in evaluation of tumor response after transarteriai chemoembolization of primary liver cancer%实体瘤反应评价标准、欧洲肝病学会和改良实体瘤反应评价标准评价原发性肝癌化疗栓塞效果一致性的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余文昌; 张孔志; 陈示光; 林海澜; 魏伟

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较实体瘤反应评价标准(RECIST)、欧洲肝病学会(EASL)和改良的RECIST标准用于评价原发性肝癌化疗栓塞术后肿瘤缓解程度的一致性.方法 50例确诊为原发性肝癌患者接受两次化疗栓塞术.术前1周内、治疗后4周患者分别接受螺旋CT或MR三期扫描.据RECIST、EASL、改良RECIST标准评价肿瘤缓解程度.3种方法评价缓解率的比较采用x2检验,一致性检验采用kappa分析.结果 据RECIST、EASL、改良RECIST标准分别评价疗效时,达CR、PR、SD、PD患者例数分别为0、10、30、10例,6、21、14、9例,6、21、13、10例.据上述3种标准评价治疗的缓解率分别为20%、54%、54%,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).RECIST与EASL标准之间、RECIST与改良RECIST标准之间的kappa分析,kappa值分别为0.382、0.170(P=0.000);而EASL与改良RECIST标准之间的kappa值达0.857(P=0.000).结论 RECIST标准低估原发性肝癌化疗栓塞术局部治疗的效果.EASL和改良RECIST标准,对疗效评价一致性程度高;但改良RECIST标准在临床实践中更简便易行.%Objective To compare the concordance among RECIST, EASL and modified RECIST criteria for the evaluation of tumor response after transarterial chemoembolization of primary liver cancer.Methods Fifty patients with primary liver cancer underwent 2 TACE cycles separated by 30-40 days.Triphasic helical CT or MRI scans were performed at baseline, at 4 weeks after TACE procedure, and 2 independent radiologists evaluated tumor response according to above-mentioned three different criteria. Chisquare test was used to compare the response rate, and kappa coefficients were used to evaluate the coherence. Results When tumor responses were evaluated using the RECIST-EASL and modified RECIST criteria, the numbers of the patients achieved complete response, partial response, stable disease,progressive disease were 0, 10, 30, 10; 6,21,14,9; 6,21,13,10 respectively. The objective response rates for

  16. Subcutaneous fluid collection: An imaging marker for treatment response of infectious thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakigi, Takahide, E-mail: tkakigi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Okada, Tomohisa, E-mail: tomokada@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Sakai, Osamu, E-mail: osamu.sakai@bmc.org [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, 820 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Iwamoto, Yoshitaka, E-mail: iwacame@hotmail.co.jp [Department of General Internal Medicine, Rakuwakai Otowa Hospital, 2 Otowachoinji-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8062 (Japan); Kubo, Soichi, E-mail: kubo-s@mbox.kyoto-inet.or.jp [Department of Radiology, Rakuwakai Otowa Hospital, 2 Otowachoinji-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8062 (Japan); Yamamoto, Akira, E-mail: yakira@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Togashi, Kaori, E-mail: nmdioffice@kuhp.kyoto-ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • No imaging marker for treatment response of spondylodiscitis (SD) has been proposed. • Volume changes of subcutaneous fluid collection (SFC) had significant correlation with changes of C-reactive protein (CRP). • SFC can be used as an imaging marker for treatment response of SD on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate prevalence of subcutaneous fluid collection (SFC) in infectious thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis (SD) compared with control patients and to investigate correlation between volume changes of SFC and treatment response of SD. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board. From April 2011 to March 2012, 49 patients (24 SD and 25 non-SD patients) were enrolled. Prevalence of SFC was evaluated respectively for SD and non-SD patients using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the sagittal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) imaging or fat-saturated T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), and compared. In SD patients with SFC, correlation was investigated between SFC volume on the 1st MRI and initial clinical status. The same analysis was conducted also for SFC volume changes from the 1st to 2nd or last MRI. Results: SFC was found in 20 patients with SD (83.3%) and 3 non-SD patients (12%) with significant difference (p < .001). In 20 SD patients with SFC, 17 patients had follow-up MRI. For the 1st MRI, no significant correlation was found between volume of SFC and initial status of patients, including body weight, body mass index (BMI), white blood cell (WBC), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). However, significant positive correlations were found between changes of C-reactive protein (CRP) and SFC volume from the 1st to 2nd as well as from the 1st to the last MRI (each p < .05). Conclusion: SD patients had significantly higher prevalence of SFC than non-SD patients. Volume changes of SFC had significant correlation with changes of CRP, which can be used as an imaging

  17. Place of imaging in the evaluation of treatment response in breast cancer;Place de l'imagerie dans l'evaluation de l'efficacite des traitements dans le cancer du sein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunotte, F.; Berriolo-Riedinger, A.; Cochet, A.; Toubeau, M.; Dygai-Cochet, I.; Riedinger, J.M. [Centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, Service de medecine nucleaire, 21 - Dijon (France); Brunotte, F.; Cochet, A. [Universite de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS 5158, laboratoire electronique, informatique et image, 21 - Dijon (France)

    2010-01-15

    This paper describes, from the current literature, the role of various imaging methods to assess the response to therapy in breast cancer. Two different clinical situations are considered: neo-adjuvant chemotherapy of locally advanced breast cancer and the metastatic breast cancer. Significant clinical data are available for three criteria: the volume of the tumour, the uptake of fluorodeoxyglucose using PET and the perfusion of the tumor evaluated either by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (D.C.E.-MRI) or by PET using {sup 15}O water. {sup 18}F F.D.G. PET allows prediction of the response after one or two cycles of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. New approaches will offer opportunities to refine the role of imaging in monitoring the response to chemotherapy. PET using thymidine as bio marker is promising in assessing the tissular proliferation. Estrogen analogs could be used to predict hormonally responsive breast cancer. Many other approaches, although less developed, might offer new insights in the response to therapy of breast cancer like magnetic resonance spectroscopy or optical imaging of hemoglobin oxygenation. Imaging also offers potential of monitoring the down-regulation of specialized receptors of the cell membrane in response to treatment: the most studied receptor in preclinical model has been the human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2). Integrin, a family of cell adhesion receptor, is also an important target for imaging. Apoptosis, multidrug resistance and hypoxia can also be studied using appropriate bio markers. To allow reliable multicenter trials of new drugs, these different imaging approaches still require an improved standardization of image acquisition and processing. (authors)

  18. Treatment response classification of liver metastatic disease evaluated on imaging. Are RECIST unidimensional measurements accurate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantatzis, Michael; Kakolyris, Stylianos; Amarantidis, Kyriakos; Karayiannakis, Anastasios; Prassopoulos, Panos

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of unidimensional measurements (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors, RECIST) compared with volumetric measurements in patients with liver metastases undergoing chemotherapy. Forty-four patients with newly diagnosed liver lesions underwent three MRI examinations at treatment initiation, during chemotherapy, and immediately post-treatment. Measurements based on RECIST guidelines and volume calculations were performed on the "target" lesions (TLs). The two methods were in agreement in 64/77 of patients and 253/301 of individual lesions classification in response categories ("good" agreement, Cohen kappa = 0.735 and 0.741, respectively). In 16.88% of the comparisons the two methods stratified patients to a different response category; 27.6% of TLs did not follow the response category of the patient in whom lesions were located. The actual volume of TLs differs from the calculated volume of a sphere with the same diameter. Our study supports the use of volumetric techniques that may overcome certain disadvantages of unidimensional measurements.

  19. Laser Safety Inspection Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barat, K

    2005-06-13

    A responsibility of the Laser Safety Officer (LSO) is to perform laser audits. The American National Standard Z136.1 Safe Use of Lasers references this requirement through several sections. One such reference is Section 1.3.2.8, Safety Features Audits, ''The LSO shall ensure that the safety features of the laser installation facilities and laser equipment are audited periodically to assure proper operation''. The composition, frequency and rigor of that inspection/audit rests in the hands of the LSO. A common practice for institutions is to develop laser audit checklists or survey forms It is common for audit findings from one inspector or inspection to the next to vary even when reviewing the same material. How often has one heard a comment, ''well this area has been inspected several times over the years and no one ever said this or that was a problem before''. A great number of audit items, and therefore findings, are subjective because they are based on the experience and interest of the auditor to particular items on the checklist. Beam block usage, to one set of eyes might be completely adequate, while to another, inadequate. In order to provide consistency, the Laser Safety Office of the National Ignition Facility Directorate has established criteria for a number of items found on the typical laser safety audit form. The criteria are distributed to laser users. It serves two broad purposes; first, it gives the user an expectation of what will be reviewed by an auditor. Second, it is an opportunity to explain audit items to the laser user and thus the reasons for some of these items, such as labelling of beam blocks.

  20. Response functions of imaging plates to photons, electrons and 4He particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, T; Comet, M; Denis-Petit, D; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Tarisien, M; Versteegen, M; Aléonard, M M

    2013-10-01

    Imaging plates from Fuji (BAS-SR, MS, and TR types) are phosphor films routinely used in ultra high intensity laser experiments. However, few data are available on the absolute IP response functions to ionizing particles. We have previously measured and modeled the IP response functions to protons. We focus here on the determination of the responses to photons, electrons, and (4)He particles. The response functions are obtained on an energy range going from a few tens of keV to a few tens of MeV and are compared to available data. The IP sensitivities to the different ionizing particles demonstrate a quenching effect depending on the particle stopping power.

  1. Reliability and responsiveness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.B.; Poggenborg, R.P.; Stoltenberg, M.;

    2013-01-01

    ’. The smallest detectable difference (SDD), the smallest detectable change (SDC), and intra- and inter-reader intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to assess the reliability of DCE-MRI. Responsiveness to treatment was assessed by the standardized response mean (SRM). Results: In all patients......Objectives: To investigate the responsiveness to treatment and the reliability of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) knee joints. Methods: DCE-MRI was performed in 12 clinically active RA knee joints before and 1, 7, 30, and 180 days after......- and interreader ICCs were very high (0.96–1.00). The decrease in DCE-MRI parameters was larger than the SDC for all patients. SRM was large for all parameters, ranging from –1.04 to –2.40. When the Whole slice ROI method was used, no parameters were responsive to treatment. Conclusions: DCE-MRI analysed using...

  2. Corporate social responsibility in shaping the media image of the company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Andrejczuk

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Enterprises frequently employ Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR to create a positive brand image in the media. To further good relations with stakeholders, companies create an image before their customers by their participation in public campaigns and information in advertisements employing elements of CSR. Discussing this practice, I will highlight aspects of this phenomenon in the context of consumer opinion about advertisements. Some examples of companies show that Cause Related Marketing (CRM and public campaigns are becoming more significant in the strategies of cause related companies. Enterprises at all costs want to buy their way into the favour of stakeholders, and through various marketing actions they try to build a strong brand and position in this way. In spite of the low evaluation of advertisements and the decline in confidence in them, enterprises aim to convince everyone that they are socially responsible companies.

  3. Multimodality multiparametric imaging of early tumor response to a novel antiangiogenic therapy based on anticalins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Meier

    Full Text Available Anticalins are a novel class of targeted protein therapeutics. The PEGylated Anticalin Angiocal (PRS-050-PEG40 is directed against VEGF-A. The purpose of our study was to compare the performance of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and positron emission tomography with the tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET for monitoring early response to antiangiogenic therapy with PRS-050-PEG40. 31 mice were implanted subcutaneously with A673 rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts and underwent DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET before and 2 days after i.p. injection of PRS-050-PEG40 (n = 13, Avastin (n = 6 or PBS (n = 12. Tumor size was measured manually with a caliper. Imaging results were correlated with histopathology. In the results, the tumor size was not significantly different in the treatment groups when compared to the control group on day 2 after therapy onset (P = 0.09. In contrast the imaging modalities DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET showed significant differences between the therapeutic compared to the control group as early as 2 days after therapy onset (P<0.001. There was a strong correlation of the early changes in DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET at day 2 after therapy onset and the change in tumor size at the end of therapy (r = -0.58, 0.71 and 0.67 respectively. The imaging results were confirmed by histopathology, showing early necrosis and necroptosis in the tumors. Thus multimodality multiparametric imaging was able to predict therapeutic success of PRS-050-PEG40 and Avastin as early as 2 days after onset of therapy and thus promising for monitoring early response of antiangiogenic therapy.

  4. Ultrafast, high resolution, phase contrast imaging of impact response with synchrotron radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Jensen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamic response of materials at extreme conditions requires diagnostics that can provide real-time, in situ, spatially resolved measurements on the nanosecond timescale. The development of methods such as phase contrast imaging (PCI typically used at synchrotron sources offer unique opportunities to examine dynamic material response. In this work, we report ultrafast, high-resolution, dynamic PCI measurements of shock compressed materials with 3 μm spatial resolution using a single 60 ps synchrotron X-ray bunch. These results firmly establish the use of PCI to examine dynamic phenomena at ns to μs timescales.

  5. Microfluidic devices for imaging neurological response of Drosophila melanogaster larva to auditory stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Reza; Rezai, Pouya; Iyengar, Balaji G; Selvaganapathy, Ponnambalam Ravi

    2015-02-21

    Two microfluidic devices (pneumatic chip and FlexiChip) have been developed for immobilization and live-intact fluorescence functional imaging of Drosophila larva's Central Nervous System (CNS) in response to controlled acoustic stimulation. The pneumatic chip is suited for automated loading/unloading and potentially allows high throughput operation for studies with a large number of larvae while the FlexiChip provides a simple and quick manual option for animal loading and is suited for smaller studies. Both chips were capable of significantly reducing the endogenous CNS movement while still allowing the study of sound-stimulated CNS activities of Drosophila 3rd instar larvae using genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP5. Temporal effects of sound frequency (50-5000 Hz) and intensity (95-115 dB) on CNS activities were investigated and a peak neuronal response of 200 Hz was identified. Our lab-on-chip devices can not only aid further studies of Drosophila larva's auditory responses but can be also adopted for functional imaging of CNS activities in response to other sensory cues. Auditory stimuli and the corresponding response of the CNS can potentially be used as a tool to study the effect of chemicals on the neurophysiology of this model organism.

  6. Predictors of response to anti-TNF therapy according to ACR and EULAR criteria in patients with established RA: results from the South Swedish Arthritis Treatment Group Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, L E; Kapetanovic, M C; Gülfe, A; Söderlin, M; Saxne, T; Geborek, P

    2008-04-01

    To identify factors predicting response to first TNF blocking treatment course in patients with established RA with a special focus on gender differences. Patients with active RA initiating their first treatment course of TNF-blocking therapy were enrolled. The study period was March 1999 through September 2006. The prospective protocol included information on demographics, clinical characteristics of patients and response measures. Fulfilment of ACR 50-70% improvement and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) good response or remission [28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) EULAR remission, EULAR good response, ACR50 response and ACR70 response with odds ratios (ORs) 1.97, 2.13, 2.10 and 1.75, respectively. Concurrent treatment with other DMARDs was also significantly associated with EULAR remission, EULAR good response and ACR50 response (OR: 1.96, 2.24 and 1.94, respectively). Likewise, low HAQ at baseline consistently predicted good clinical outcome. Disease activity at baseline was directly associated with favourable response when measured by ACR50 and ACR70 (OR: 1.59 and 1.60, respectively), whereas DAS28 score at baseline was inversely associated with EULAR remission (OR: 0.78). In this observational study of patients with established RA, gender did not predict response to anti-TNF therapy, whereas treatment with concomitant DMARDs, especially MTX and low disability were associated with good response. Choice of outcome measures may influence the predictive value of baseline features.

  7. Concurrent OCT imaging of stimulus evoked retinal neural activation and hemodynamic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Taeyoon; Wang, Benquan; Lu, Yiming; Chen, Yanjun; Cao, Dingcai; Yao, Xincheng

    2017-02-01

    It is well established that major retinal diseases involve distortions of the retinal neural physiology and blood vascular structures. However, the details of distortions in retinal neurovascular coupling associated with major eye diseases are not well understood. In this study, a multi-modal optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging system was developed to enable concurrent imaging of retinal neural activity and vascular hemodynamics. Flicker light stimulation was applied to mouse retinas to evoke retinal neural responses and hemodynamic changes. The OCT images were acquired continuously during the pre-stimulation, light-stimulation, and post-stimulation phases. Stimulus-evoked intrinsic optical signals (IOSs) and hemodynamic changes were observed over time in blood-free and blood regions, respectively. Rapid IOSs change occurred almost immediately after stimulation. Both positive and negative signals were observed in adjacent retinal areas. The hemodynamic changes showed time delays after stimulation. The signal magnitudes induced by light stimulation were observed in blood regions and did not show significant changes in blood-free regions. These differences may arise from different mechanisms in blood vessels and neural tissues in response to light stimulation. These characteristics agreed well with our previous observations in mouse retinas. Further development of the multimodal OCT may provide a new imaging method for studying how retinal structures and metabolic and neural functions are affected by age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), and other diseases, which promises novel noninvasive biomarkers for early disease detection and reliable treatment evaluations of eye diseases.

  8. Studies of scintillator response to 60 MeV protons in a proton beam imaging system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rydygier Marzena

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A Proton Beam Imaging System (ProBImS is under development at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN. The ProBImS will be used to optimize beam delivery at IFJ PAN proton therapy facilities, delivering two-dimensional distributions of beam profiles. The system consists of a scintillator, optical tract and a sensitive CCD camera which digitally records the light emitted from the proton-irradiated scintillator. The optical system, imaging data transfer and control software have already been developed. Here, we report preliminary results of an evaluation of the DuPont Hi-speed thick back screen EJ 000128 scintillator to determine its applicability in our imaging system. In order to optimize the light conversion with respect to the dose locally deposited by the proton beam in the scintillation detector, we have studied the response of the DuPont scintillator in terms of linearity of dose response, uniformity of light emission and decay rate of background light after deposition of a high dose in the scintillator. We found a linear dependence of scintillator light output vs. beam intensity by showing the intensity of the recorded images to be proportional to the dose deposited in the scintillator volume.

  9. The ARIA project: Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis for Natural Hazard Monitoring and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. E.; Webb, F.; Simons, M.; Rosen, P. A.; Cruz, J.; Yun, S.; Fielding, E. J.; Moore, A. W.; Hua, H.; Agram, P.; Lundgren, P.

    2012-12-01

    ARIA is a joint JPL/Caltech coordinated effort to automate geodetic imaging capabilities for hazard response and societal benefit. Over the past decade, space-based geodetic measurements such as InSAR and GPS have provided new assessment capabilities and situational awareness on the size and location of earthquakes following seismic disasters and on volcanic eruptions following magmatic events. Geodetic imaging's unique ability to capture surface deformation in high spatial and temporal resolution allow us to resolve the fault geometry and distribution of slip associated with any given earthquake in correspondingly high spatial & temporal detail. In addition, remote sensing with radar provides change detection and damage assessment capabilities for earthquakes, floods and other disasters that can image even at night or through clouds. These data sets are still essentially hand-crafted, and thus are not generated rapidly and reliably enough for informing decision-making agencies and the public following an earthquake. We are building an end-to-end prototype geodetic imaging data system that would form the foundation for an envisioned operational hazard response center integrating InSAR, GPS, seismology, and modeling to deliver monitoring, actionable science, and situational awareness products. This prototype exploits state-of-the-art analysis algorithms from technologists and scientists, These algorithms enable the delivery of actionable products from larger data sets with enhanced modeling and interpretation, and the development of next generation techniques. We are collaborating with USGS scientists in both the earthquake and volcano science program for our initial data product infusion. We present our progress to date on development of prototype data system and demonstration data products, and example responses we have run such as generating products for the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-oki, M6.3 Christchurch earthquakes, the 2011 M7.1 Van earthquake, and several simulated

  10. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  11. Physiological Imaging-Defined, Response-Driven Subvolumes of a Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farjam, Reza [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Tsien, Christina I.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Gomez-Hassan, Diana [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hayman, James A.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cao, Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To develop an image analysis framework to delineate the physiological imaging-defined subvolumes of a tumor in relating to treatment response and outcome. Methods and Materials: Our proposed approach delineates the subvolumes of a tumor based on its heterogeneous distributions of physiological imaging parameters. The method assigns each voxel a probabilistic membership function belonging to the physiological parameter classes defined in a sample of tumors, and then calculates the related subvolumes in each tumor. We applied our approach to regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and Gd-DTPA transfer constant (K{sup trans}) images of patients who had brain metastases and were treated by whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). A total of 45 lesions were included in the analysis. Changes in the rCBV (or K{sup trans})–defined subvolumes of the tumors from pre-RT to 2 weeks after the start of WBRT (2W) were evaluated for differentiation of responsive, stable, and progressive tumors using the Mann-Whitney U test. Performance of the newly developed metrics for predicting tumor response to WBRT was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: The percentage decrease in the high-CBV-defined subvolumes of the tumors from pre-RT to 2W was significantly greater in the group of responsive tumors than in the group of stable and progressive tumors (P<.007). The change in the high-CBV-defined subvolumes of the tumors from pre-RT to 2W was a predictor for post-RT response significantly better than change in the gross tumor volume observed during the same time interval (P=.012), suggesting that the physiological change occurs before the volumetric change. Also, K{sup trans} did not add significant discriminatory information for assessing response with respect to rCBV. Conclusion: The physiological imaging-defined subvolumes of the tumors delineated by our method could be candidates for boost target, for which further development and evaluation

  12. Measuring Physiological Responses of Drosophila Sensory Neurons to Lipid Pheromones Using Live Calcium Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Shruti; Calvert, Meredith E K; Yew, Joanne Y

    2016-04-29

    Unlike mammals, insects such as Drosophila have multiple taste organs. The chemosensory neurons on the legs, proboscis, wings and ovipositor of Drosophila express gustatory receptors(1,2), ion channels(3-6), and ionotropic receptors(7) that are involved in the detection of volatile and non-volatile sensory cues. These neurons directly contact tastants such as food, noxious substances and pheromones and therefore influence many complex behaviors such as feeding, egg-laying and mating. Electrode recordings and calcium imaging have been widely used in insects to quantify the neuronal responses evoked by these tastants. However, electrophysiology requires specialized equipment and obtaining measurements from a single taste sensillum can be technically challenging depending on the cell-type, size, and position. In addition, single neuron resolution in Drosophila can be difficult to achieve since taste sensilla house more than one type of chemosensory neuron. The live calcium imaging method described here allows responses of single gustatory neurons in live flies to be measured. This method is especially suitable for imaging neuronal responses to lipid pheromones and other ligand types that have low solubility in water-based solvents.

  13. Rapid and Quantitative Assessment of Cancer Treatment Response Using In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Current assessment of orthotopic tumor models in animals utilizes survival as the primary therapeutic end point. In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating antineoplastic therapies [1 ]. Using human tumor cell lines constitutively expressing luciferase, the kinetics of tumor growth and response to therapy have been assessed in intraperitoneal [2], subcutaneous, and intravascular [3] cancer models. However, use of this approach for evaluating orthotopic tumor models has not been demonstrated. In this report, the ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth and therapeuticinduced cell kill of orthotopic rat brain tumors derived from 9L gliosarcoma cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase (9LLuc was investigated. Intracerebral tumor burden was monitored over time by quantitation of photon emission and tumor volume using a cryogenically cooled CCD camera and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, respectively. There was excellent correlation (r=0.91 between detected photons and tumor volume. A quantitative comparison of tumor cell kill determined from serial MRI volume measurements and BLI photon counts following 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU treatment revealed that both imaging modalities yielded statistically similar cell kill values (P=.951. These results provide direct validation of BLI imaging as a powerful and quantitative tool for the assessment of antineoplastic therapies in living animals.

  14. Dynamic contrast-enhanced photoacoustic imaging using photothermal stimuli-responsive composite nanomodulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Sheng; Yoon, Soon Joon; Frey, Wolfgang; Dockery, Mary; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2017-06-01

    Molecular photoacoustic imaging has shown great potential in medical applications; its sensitivity is normally in pico-to-micro-molar range, dependent on exogenous imaging agents. However, tissue can produce strong background signals, which mask the signals from the imaging agents, resulting in orders of magnitude sensitivity reduction. As such, an elaborate spectral scan is often required to spectrally un-mix the unwanted background signals. Here we show a new single-wavelength photoacoustic dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging technique by employing a stimuli-responsive contrast agent. Our technique can eliminate intrinsic background noises without significant hardware or computational resources. We show that this new contrast agent can generate up to 30 times stronger photoacoustic signals than the concentration-matched inorganic nanoparticle counterparts. By dynamically modulating signals from the contrast agents with an external near-infrared optical stimulus, we can further suppress the background signals leading to an additional increase of more than five-fold in imaging contrast in vivo.

  15. 46 CFR 349.3 - Certification criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification criteria. 349.3 Section 349.3 Shipping... RIGHTS OF CERTAIN MERCHANT SEAMEN § 349.3 Certification criteria. The Administrator shall apply the... ordered to active duty. It shall be the responsibility of each applicant for certification to...

  16. Magnetization transfer imaging to assess tumour response after chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Milou H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, GROW School of Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Maas, Monique [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Papanikolaou, Nickolas; Alefantinou, Styliani [N. Papanikolaou and Associates LLC, Heraklion (Greece); Manikis, Georgios C.; Marias, Kostantinos [Foundation for Research and Technology, Computational Medicine Laboratory, Institute of Computer Science, Hellas (Greece); Riedl, Robert G. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, GROW School of Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, GROW School of Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    Single-slice magnetization transfer (MT) imaging has shown promising results for evaluating post-radiation fibrosis. The study aim was to evaluate the value of multislice MT imaging to assess tumour response after chemoradiotherapy by comparing magnetization transfer ratios (MTR) with histopathological tumour regression grade (TRG). Thirty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3-4 and/or cN2) underwent routine restaging MRI 8 weeks post-chemoradiotherapy, including multislice MT-sequence, covering the entire tumour bed. Two independent readers delineated regions of interest on MTR maps, covering all potential remaining tumour and fibrotic areas. Mean MTR and histogram parameters (minimum, maximum, median, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, and 5-30-70-95th percentiles) were calculated. Reference standard was histological TRG1-2 (good response) and TRG3-5 (poor response). 24/30 patients were male; mean age was 67.7 ± 10.8 years. Mean MTR rendered AUCs of 0.65 (reader1) and 0.87 (reader2) to differentiate between TRG1-2 versus TRG3-5. Best results were obtained for 95{sup th} percentile (AUC 0.75- 0.88). Interobserver agreement was moderate (ICC 0.50) for mean MTR and good (ICC 0.80) for 95{sup th} percentile. MT imaging is a promising tool to assess tumour response post-chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer. Particularly, 95{sup th} percentile results in AUCs up to 0.88 to discriminate a good tumour response. (orig.)

  17. Malignant gliomas: current perspectives in diagnosis, treatment, and early response assessment using advanced quantitative imaging methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed R

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rafay Ahmed,1 Matthew J Oborski,2 Misun Hwang,1 Frank S Lieberman,3 James M Mountz11Department of Radiology, 2Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 3Department of Neurology and Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Malignant gliomas consist of glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and some less common tumors such as anaplastic ependymomas and anaplastic gangliogliomas. Malignant gliomas have high morbidity and mortality. Even with optimal treatment, median survival is only 12–15 months for glioblastomas and 2–5 years for anaplastic gliomas. However, recent advances in imaging and quantitative analysis of image data have led to earlier diagnosis of tumors and tumor response to therapy, providing oncologists with a greater time window for therapy management. In addition, improved understanding of tumor biology, genetics, and resistance mechanisms has enhanced surgical techniques, chemotherapy methods, and radiotherapy administration. After proper diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy, there is now a vital need for quantitative methods that can sensitively detect malignant glioma response to therapy at early follow-up times, when changes in management of nonresponders can have its greatest effect. Currently, response is largely evaluated by measuring magnetic resonance contrast and size change, but this approach does not take into account the key biologic steps that precede tumor size reduction. Molecular imaging is ideally suited to measuring early response by quantifying cellular metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, activities altered early in treatment. We expect that successful integration of quantitative imaging biomarker assessment into the early phase of clinical trials could provide a novel approach for testing new therapies

  18. TU-C-12A-02: Development of a Multiparametric Statistical Response Map for Quantitative Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosca, R [The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mahajan, A; Brown, PD; Stafford, RJ [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Johnson, VE [Texas A' M University, College Station, TX (United States); Dong, L [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Jackson, EF [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging biomarkers (QIB) are becoming increasingly utilized in early phase clinical trials as a means of non-invasively assessing treatment response and associated response heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to develop a flexible multiparametric statistical framework to predict voxel-by-voxel response of several potential MRI QIBs. Methods: Patients with histologically proven glioblastomas (n=11) were treated with chemoradiation (with/without bevacizumab) and underwent one baseline and two mid-treatment (3–4wks) MRIs. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (3D FSPGR, 6.3sec/phase, 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA), dynamic susceptibility contrast (2D GRE-EPI, 1.5sec/phase, 0.2mmol/kg Gd-DTPA), and diffusion tensor (2D DW-EPI, b=0, 1200 s/mm{sup 2}, 27 directions) imaging acquisitions were obtained during each study. Mid-treatment and pre-treatment images were rigidly aligned, and regions of partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), and progressive disease (PD) were contoured in consensus by two experienced radiation oncologists. Voxels in these categories were used to train ordinal (PRimaging biomarkers, as well as treatment type. Leave-one-out cross-validation was performed at the patient level to assess model prediction accuracy. Results: Ordinal regression resulted in model prediction accuracies of 60% (PR), 0% (SD), 81% (PD), and 69% (overall), with coefficients of variation (COV) of 9.4%, 9.6%, and 23.6%, respectively. Logistic regression resulted in accuracies of 82.0% (PR/SD), 46.2% (PD), and 76.2% (overall) with COVs of 22.4%, 45.7%, and 23.8%, respectively. Conclusion: Despite limited patient numbers, this feasibility pilot study demonstrates that ordinal and logistic regression models potentially provide a flexible statistical framework for incorporating longitudinal multiparametric

  19. Diffusion of responsibility attenuates altruistic punishment: A functional magnetic resonance imaging effective connectivity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunliang; Deshpande, Gopikrishna; Liu, Chao; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Yue-Jia; Krueger, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Humans altruistically punish violators of social norms to enforce cooperation and pro-social behaviors. However, such altruistic behaviors diminish when others are present, due to a diffusion of responsibility. We investigated the neural signatures underlying the modulations of diffusion of responsibility on altruistic punishment, conjoining a third-party punishment task with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and multivariate Granger causality mapping. In our study, participants acted as impartial third-party decision-makers and decided how to punish norm violations under two different social contexts: alone (i.e., full responsibility) or in the presence of putative other third-party decision makers (i.e., diffused responsibility). Our behavioral results demonstrated that the diffusion of responsibility served as a mediator of context-dependent punishment. In the presence of putative others, participants who felt less responsible also punished less severely in response to norm violations. Our neural results revealed that underlying this behavioral effect was a network of interconnected brain regions. For unfair relative to fair splits, the presence of others led to attenuated responses in brain regions implicated in signaling norm violations (e.g., AI) and to increased responses in brain regions implicated in calculating values of norm violations (e.g., vmPFC, precuneus) and mentalizing about others (dmPFC). The dmPFC acted as the driver of the punishment network, modulating target regions, such as AI, vmPFC, and precuneus, to adjust altruistic punishment behavior. Our results uncovered the neural basis of the influence of diffusion of responsibility on altruistic punishment and highlighted the role of the mentalizing network in this important phenomenon. Hum Brain Mapp 37:663-677, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. In vivo imaging using fluorescent antibodies to tumor necrosis factor predicts therapeutic response in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Raja; Neumann, Helmut; Neufert, Clemens; Waldner, Maximilian J; Billmeier, Ulrike; Zopf, Yurdagül; Willma, Marcus; App, Christine; Münster, Tino; Kessler, Hermann; Maas, Stefanie; Gebhardt, Bernd; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Reuter, Eva; Dörje, Frank; Rau, Tilman T; Uter, Wolfgang; Wang, Thomas D; Kiesslich, Ralf; Vieth, Michael; Hannappel, Ewald; Neurath, Markus F

    2014-03-01

    As antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) suppress immune responses in Crohn's disease by binding to membrane-bound TNF (mTNF), we created a fluorescent antibody for molecular mTNF imaging in this disease. Topical antibody administration in 25 patients with Crohn's disease led to detection of intestinal mTNF(+) immune cells during confocal laser endomicroscopy. Patients with high numbers of mTNF(+) cells showed significantly higher short-term response rates (92%) at week 12 upon subsequent anti-TNF therapy as compared to patients with low amounts of mTNF(+) cells (15%). This clinical response in the former patients was sustained over a follow-up period of 1 year and was associated with mucosal healing observed in follow-up endoscopy. These data indicate that molecular imaging with fluorescent antibodies has the potential to predict therapeutic responses to biological treatment and can be used for personalized medicine in Crohn's disease and autoimmune or inflammatory disorders.

  1. The brand image and performance of small and medium enterprises: How can social responsibility activities help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Rootman

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Business social responsibility (BSR activities may lead to benefits for small and medium enterprises (SMEs.Research purpose: To investigate how SMEs could use BSR activities to improve their brand image and business performance.Motivation for the study: In a competitive environment, SMEs face various challenges such as financial constraints, lack of resources or lack of managerial experience. BSR activities pave the way for an SME to make a positive contribution toward the environment in which it operates, as they indicate a level of care for the natural environment and show commitment toward the upliftment of communities. The benefits that accrue to SMEs that engage in BSR activities are yet to be determined and the need for research on SMEs’ BSR activities and results led to this study.Research design, approach and method: Structured questionnaires were distributed to 320 SMEs in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. A total of 200 usable questionnaires were received, obtaining a response rate of 62.5%, and these were analysed quantitatively.Main findings: Significant relationships were found between three BSR activities, namely stakeholder relations, community development and environmental awareness, and the SME’s brand image; as well as between the SME’s brand image and business performance.Practical and managerial implications: Implemented BSR recommendations may lead to improved brand images and business performance; and therefore an increased success rate amongst SMEs in South Africa.Contribution and value-add: BSR research has predominantly been in the sphere of larger and more established enterprises. The study suggests practical recommendations to SMEs to improve their brand image and business performance by employing BSR strategies relating to stakeholder relations, community development and environmental awareness.

  2. Predicting Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with PET Imaging Using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros-Pavlos Ypsilantis

    Full Text Available Imaging of cancer with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET has become a standard component of diagnosis and staging in oncology, and is becoming more important as a quantitative monitor of individual response to therapy. In this article we investigate the challenging problem of predicting a patient's response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy from a single 18F-FDG PET scan taken prior to treatment. We take a "radiomics" approach whereby a large amount of quantitative features is automatically extracted from pretherapy PET images in order to build a comprehensive quantification of the tumor phenotype. While the dominant methodology relies on hand-crafted texture features, we explore the potential of automatically learning low- to high-level features directly from PET scans. We report on a study that compares the performance of two competing radiomics strategies: an approach based on state-of-the-art statistical classifiers using over 100 quantitative imaging descriptors, including texture features as well as standardized uptake values, and a convolutional neural network, 3S-CNN, trained directly from PET scans by taking sets of adjacent intra-tumor slices. Our experimental results, based on a sample of 107 patients with esophageal cancer, provide initial evidence that convolutional neural networks have the potential to extract PET imaging representations that are highly predictive of response to therapy. On this dataset, 3S-CNN achieves an average 80.7% sensitivity and 81.6% specificity in predicting non-responders, and outperforms other competing predictive models.

  3. Predicting Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with PET Imaging Using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ypsilantis, Petros-Pavlos; Siddique, Musib; Sohn, Hyon-Mok; Davies, Andrew; Cook, Gary; Goh, Vicky; Montana, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of cancer with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) has become a standard component of diagnosis and staging in oncology, and is becoming more important as a quantitative monitor of individual response to therapy. In this article we investigate the challenging problem of predicting a patient's response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy from a single 18F-FDG PET scan taken prior to treatment. We take a "radiomics" approach whereby a large amount of quantitative features is automatically extracted from pretherapy PET images in order to build a comprehensive quantification of the tumor phenotype. While the dominant methodology relies on hand-crafted texture features, we explore the potential of automatically learning low- to high-level features directly from PET scans. We report on a study that compares the performance of two competing radiomics strategies: an approach based on state-of-the-art statistical classifiers using over 100 quantitative imaging descriptors, including texture features as well as standardized uptake values, and a convolutional neural network, 3S-CNN, trained directly from PET scans by taking sets of adjacent intra-tumor slices. Our experimental results, based on a sample of 107 patients with esophageal cancer, provide initial evidence that convolutional neural networks have the potential to extract PET imaging representations that are highly predictive of response to therapy. On this dataset, 3S-CNN achieves an average 80.7% sensitivity and 81.6% specificity in predicting non-responders, and outperforms other competing predictive models.

  4. Pilot test of a novel food response and attention training treatment for obesity: Brain imaging data suggest actions shape valuation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stice, E.; Yokum, S.; Veling, H.P.; Kemps, E.; Lawrence, N.S.

    2017-01-01

    Elevated brain reward and attention region response, and weaker inhibitory region response to high-calorie food images have been found to predict future weight gain. These findings suggest that an intervention that reduces reward and attention region response and increases inhibitory control region

  5. Optical metabolic imaging measures early drug response in an allograft murine breast cancer model (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharick, Joe T.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2017-02-01

    Previous work has shown that cellular-level Optical Metabolic Imaging (OMI) of organoids derived from human breast cancer cell-line xenografts accurately and rapidly predicts in vivo response to therapy. To validate OMI as a predictive measure of treatment response in an immune-competent model, we used the polyomavirus middle-T (PyVmT) transgenic mouse breast cancer model. The PyVmT model includes intra-tumoral heterogeneity and a complex tumor microenvironment that can influence treatment responses. Three-dimensional organoids generated from primary PyVmT tumor tissue were treated with a chemotherapy (paclitaxel) and a PI3K inhibitor (XL147), each alone or in combination. Cellular subpopulations of response were measured using the OMI Index, a composite endpoint of metabolic response comprised of the optical redox ratio (ratio of the fluorescence intensities of metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H to FAD) as well as the fluorescence lifetimes of NAD(P)H and FAD. Combination treatment significantly decreased the OMI Index of PyVmT tumor organoids (padaptive immunity. Thus, this method is promising for use in humans to predict long-term treatment responses accurately and rapidly, and could aid in clinical treatment planning.

  6. Criteria for performance evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Weiss

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Using a cognitive task (mental calculation and a perceptual-motor task (stylized golf putting, we examined differential proficiency using the CWS index and several other quantitative measures of performance. The CWS index (Weiss and Shanteau, 2003 is a coherence criterion that looks only at internal properties of the data without incorporating an external standard. In Experiment 1, college students (n = 20 carried out 2- and 3-digit addition and multiplication problems under time pressure. In Experiment 2, experienced golfers (n = 12, also college students, putted toward a target from nine different locations. Within each experiment, we analyzed the same responses using different methods. For the arithmetic tasks, accuracy information (mean absolute deviation from the correct answer, MAD using a coherence criterion was available; for golf, accuracy information using a correspondence criterion (mean deviation from the target, also MAD was available. We ranked the performances of the participants according to each measure, then compared the orders using Spearman's rextsubscript{s}. For mental calculation, the CWS order correlated moderately (rextsubscript{s} =.46 with that of MAD. However, a different coherence criterion, degree of model fit, did not correlate with either CWS or accuracy. For putting, the ranking generated by CWS correlated .68 with that generated by MAD. Consensual answers were also available for both experiments, and the rankings they generated correlated highly with those of MAD. The coherence vs. correspondence distinction did not map well onto criteria for performance evaluation.

  7. Digital holographic microscopy for imaging growth and treatment response in 3D tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyu; Petrovic, Ljubica; Celli, Jonathan P.; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.

    2014-03-01

    While three-dimensional tumor models have emerged as valuable tools in cancer research, the ability to longitudinally visualize the 3D tumor architecture restored by these systems is limited with microscopy techniques that provide only qualitative insight into sample depth, or which require terminal fixation for depth-resolved 3D imaging. Here we report the use of digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a viable microscopy approach for quantitative, non-destructive longitudinal imaging of in vitro 3D tumor models. Following established methods we prepared 3D cultures of pancreatic cancer cells in overlay geometry on extracellular matrix beds and obtained digital holograms at multiple timepoints throughout the duration of growth. The holograms were digitally processed and the unwrapped phase images were obtained to quantify nodule thickness over time under normal growth, and in cultures subject to chemotherapy treatment. In this manner total nodule volumes are rapidly estimated and demonstrated here to show contrasting time dependent changes during growth and in response to treatment. This work suggests the utility of DHM to quantify changes in 3D structure over time and suggests the further development of this approach for time-lapse monitoring of 3D morphological changes during growth and in response to treatment that would otherwise be impractical to visualize.

  8. Microfluidic chips for in vivo imaging of cellular responses to neural injury in Drosophila larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Ghannad-Rezaie

    Full Text Available With powerful genetics and a translucent cuticle, the Drosophila larva is an ideal model system for live imaging studies of neuronal cell biology and function. Here, we present an easy-to-use approach for high resolution live imaging in Drosophila using microfluidic chips. Two different designs allow for non-invasive and chemical-free immobilization of 3(rd instar larvae over short (up to 1 hour and long (up to 10 hours time periods. We utilized these 'larva chips' to characterize several sub-cellular responses to axotomy which occur over a range of time scales in intact, unanaesthetized animals. These include waves of calcium which are induced within seconds of axotomy, and the intracellular transport of vesicles whose rate and flux within axons changes dramatically within 3 hours of axotomy. Axonal transport halts throughout the entire distal stump, but increases in the proximal stump. These responses precede the degeneration of the distal stump and regenerative sprouting of the proximal stump, which is initiated after a 7 hour period of dormancy and is associated with a dramatic increase in F-actin dynamics. In addition to allowing for the study of axonal regeneration in vivo, the larva chips can be utilized for a wide variety of in vivo imaging applications in Drosophila.

  9. Change in Tongue Morphology in Response to Expiratory Resistance Loading Investigated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Yoshimi; Shuntoh, Hisato; Mitamura, Masaaki; Horiuchi, Noriaki

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of expiratory resistance load on the tongue area encompassing the suprahyoid and genioglossus muscles. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy individuals (15 males, 15 females, mean age: 28.9 years). [Methods] Magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate morphological changes in response to resistive expiratory pressure loading in the area encompassing the suprahyoid and genioglossus muscles. Images were taken when water pressure was sustained at 0%, 10%, 30%, and 50% of maximum resistive expiratory pressure. We then measured tongue area using image analysis software, and the morphological changes were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance followed by post hoc comparisons. [Results] A significant change in the tongue area was detected in both sexes upon loading. Multiple comparison analysis revealed further significant differences in tongue area as well as changes in tongue area in response to the different expiratory pressures. [Conclusion] The findings demonstrate that higher expiratory pressure facilitates greater reduction in tongue area. PMID:24259824

  10. Real-time fluorescence imaging of the DNA damage repair response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Yamamoto, Mako; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Toneri, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Efimova, Elena V; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    The response to DNA damage during mitosis was visualized using real-time fluorescence imaging of focus formation by the DNA-damage repair (DDR) response protein 53BP1 linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) (53BP1-GFP) in the MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) pancreatic cancer cell line. To observe 53BP1-GFP foci during mitosis, MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells were imaged every 30 min by confocal microscopy. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that 11.4 ± 2.1% of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells had increased focus formation over time. Non-mitotic cells did not have an increase in 53BP1-GFP focus formation over time. Some of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells with focus formation became apoptotic. The results of the present report suggest that DNA strand breaks occur during mitosis and undergo repair, which may cause some of the mitotic cells to enter apoptosis in a phenomenon possibly related to mitotic catastrophe.

  11. Modeling hemodynamic responses in auditory cortex at 1.5 T using variable duration imaging acoustic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuowen; Olulade, Olumide; Castillo, Javier Gonzalez; Santos, Joseph; Kim, Sungeun; Tamer, Gregory G; Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M

    2010-02-15

    A confound for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), especially for auditory studies, is the presence of imaging acoustic noise generated mainly as a byproduct of rapid gradient switching during volume acquisition and, to a lesser extent, the radiofrequency transmit. This work utilized a novel pulse sequence to present actual imaging acoustic noise for characterization of the induced hemodynamic responses and assessment of linearity in the primary auditory cortex with respect to noise duration. Results show that responses to brief duration (46 ms) imaging acoustic noise is highly nonlinear while responses to longer duration (>1 s) imaging acoustic noise becomes approximately linear, with the right primary auditory cortex exhibiting a higher degree of nonlinearity than the left for the investigated noise durations. This study also assessed the spatial extent of activation induced by imaging acoustic noise, showing that the use of modeled responses (specific to imaging acoustic noise) as the reference waveform revealed additional activations in the auditory cortex not observed with a canonical gamma variate reference waveform, suggesting an improvement in detection sensitivity for imaging acoustic noise-induced activity. Longer duration (1.5 s) imaging acoustic noise was observed to induce activity that expanded outwards from Heschl's gyrus to cover the superior temporal gyrus as well as parts of the middle temporal gyrus and insula, potentially affecting higher level acoustic processing.

  12. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Crohn Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, David H; Carucci, Laura R; Baker, Mark E; Cash, Brooks D; Dillman, Jonathan R; Feig, Barry W; Fowler, Kathryn J; Gage, Kenneth L; Noto, Richard B; Smith, Martin P; Yaghmai, Vahid; Yee, Judy; Lalani, Tasneem

    2015-10-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder involving the gastrointestinal tract, characterized by episodic flares and times of remission. Underlying structural damage occurs progressively, with recurrent bouts of inflammation. The diagnosis and management of this disease process is dependent on several clinical, laboratory, imaging, endoscopic, and histologic factors. In recent years, with the maturation of CT enterography, and MR enterography, imaging has played an increasingly important role in relation to Crohn Disease. In addition to these specialized examination modalities, ultrasound and routine CT have potential uses. Fluoroscopy, radiography, and nuclear medicine may be less beneficial depending on the clinical scenario. The imaging modality best suited to evaluating this disease may change, depending on the target population, severity of presentation, and specific clinical situation. This document presents seven clinical scenarios (variants) in both the adult and pediatric populations and rates the appropriateness of the available imaging options. They are summarized in a consolidated table, and the underlying rationale and supporting literature are presented in the accompanying narrative. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  13. Timing and position response of a block detector for fast neutron time-of-flight imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, M. A.; Hayward, J. P.; Zhang, X.; Cates, J. W.

    2014-11-01

    Our research effort seeks to improve the spatial and timing performance of a block detector made of a pixilated plastic scintillator (EJ-200), first demonstrated as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Advanced Portable Neutron Imaging System. Improvement of the position and time response is necessary to achieve better resolution and contrast in the images of shielded special nuclear material. Time-of-flight is used to differentiate between gamma and different sources of neutrons (e.g., transmission and fission neutrons). Factors limiting the timing and position performance of the neutron detector have been revealed through simulations and measurements. Simulations have suggested that the degradation in the ability to resolve pixels in the neutron detector is due to those interactions occurring near the light guide. The energy deposition within the neutron detector is shown to affect position performance and imaging efficiency. This examination details how energy cuts improve the position performance and degrade the imaging efficiency. Measurements have shown the neutron detector to have a timing resolution of σ=238 ps. The majority of this timing uncertainty is from the depth-of-interaction (DOI) of the neutron which is confirmed by simulations and analytical calculations.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of treatment response of lateral epicondylitis of the elbow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savnik, Anette [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000, Frederiksberg (Denmark); Department of Radiology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000, Frederiksberg (Denmark); Hovmarksvej 39, 2920, Charlottenlund (Denmark); Jensen, Bente; Noerregaard, Jesper; Danneskiold-Samsoee, Bente; Bliddal, Henning [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000, Frederiksberg (Denmark); Egund, Niels [Department of Radiology, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000, Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the treatment response in lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) by MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained in 30 patients with clinical symptoms of lateral epicondylitis of the elbow using T1-, T2- and T2-weighted fat-saturated (FS) sequences. The patients were randomised to either i.m. corticosteroid injection (n=16) or immobilisation in a wrist splint (n=14). Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow was performed on a 1.5-T MR system at baseline and after 6 weeks. The extensor carpi radialis (ECRB) tendon, the radial collateral ligament, lateral humerus epicondyle at tendon insertion site, joint fluid and signal intensity changes within brachio-radialis and anconeus muscles were evaluated on the MR unit's workstation before and after 6 weeks of treatment. The MRI was performed once in 22 healthy controls for comparison and all images evaluated by an investigator blinded to the clinical status of the subjects. The MR images showed thickening with separation of the ECRB tendon from the radial collateral ligament and abnormal signal change in 25 of the 30 patients on the T1-weighted sequences at inclusion. The signal intensity of the ECRB tendon was increased in 24 of the 30 patients with lateral epicondylitis of the elbow on the T2-weighted FS sequences. (orig.)

  15. Nonrigid registration algorithm for longitudinal breast MR images and the preliminary analysis of breast tumor response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Dawant, Benoit M.; Welch, E. Brian; Chakravarthy, A. Bapsi; Freehardt, Darla; Mayer, Ingrid; Kelley, Mark; Meszoely, Ingrid; Gore, John C.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2009-02-01

    Although useful for the detection of breast cancers, conventional imaging methods, including mammography and ultrasonography, do not provide adequate information regarding response to therapy. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has emerged as a promising technique to provide relevant information on tumor status. Consequently, accurate longitudinal registration of breast MR images is critical for the comparison of changes induced by treatment at the voxel level. In this study, a nonrigid registration algorithm is proposed to allow for longitudinal registration of breast MR images obtained throughout the course of treatment. We accomplish this by modifying the adaptive bases algorithm (ABA) through adding a tumor volume preserving constraint in the cost function. The registration results demonstrate the proposed algorithm can successfully register the longitudinal breast MR images and permit analysis of the parameter maps. We also propose a novel validation method to evaluate the proposed registration algorithm quantitatively. These validations also demonstrate that the proposed algorithm constrains tumor deformation well and performs better than the unconstrained ABA algorithm.

  16. An intelligent nanotheranostic agent for targeting, redox-responsive ultrasound imaging, and imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound synergistic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Chen, Hangrong; Zhang, Kun; Ma, Ming; Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; Zheng, Shuguang; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Lixin; Xu, Huixiong; Shi, Jianlin

    2014-04-09

    A novel multifunctional nanotheranostic agent with targeting, redox-responsive ultrasound imaging and ultrasound imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy (MSNC-PEG-HA(SS)-PFH, abbreviated as MPH(SS)-PFH) capabilities is developed. The redox-responsive guest molecule release and ultrasound imaging functions can be both integrated in such a "smart" theranostic agent, which is accomplished by the redox-triggered transition from the crosslinking state to retrocrosslinking state of the grafted polyethylene glycol-disulfide hyaluronic acid molecules on the particle surface when reaching a reducing environment in vitro. More importantly, under the tailored ultrasound imaging guiding, in vivo Hela tumor-bearing nude mice can be thoroughly and spatial-accurately ablated during HIFU therapy, due to the targeted accumulation, responsive ultrasound imaging guidance and the synergistic ablation functions of nanotheranostic agent MPH(SS)-PFH in the tumors. This novel multifunctional nano-platform can serve as a promising candidate for further studies on oncology therapy, due to its high stability, responsive and indicative ultrasound imaging of tumors, and enhanced HIFU therapeutic efficiency and spatial accuracy under ultrasound-guidance.

  17. Green Supplier Selection Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Izabela Ewa; Banaeian, Narges; Mobli, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Green supplier selection (GSS) criteria arise from an organization inclination to respond to any existing trends in environmental issues related to business management and processes, so GSS is integrating environmental thinking into conventional supplier selection. This research is designed...... to determine prevalent general and environmental supplier selection criteria and develop a framework which can help decision makers to determine and prioritize suitable green supplier selection criteria (general and environmental). In this research we considered several parameters (evaluation objectives......) to establish suitable criteria for GSS such as their production type, requirements, policy and objectives instead of applying common criteria. At first a comprehensive and deep review on prevalent and green supplier selection literatures performed. Then several evaluation objectives defined to assess the green...

  18. Plutonium storage criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, D. [Scientech, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States); Ascanio, X. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy has issued a technical standard for long-term (>50 years) storage and will soon issue a criteria document for interim (<20 years) storage of plutonium materials. The long-term technical standard, {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides,{close_quotes} addresses the requirements for storing metals and oxides with greater than 50 wt % plutonium. It calls for a standardized package that meets both off-site transportation requirements, as well as remote handling requirements from future storage facilities. The interim criteria document, {open_quotes}Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Solid Materials{close_quotes}, addresses requirements for storing materials with less than 50 wt% plutonium. The interim criteria document assumes the materials will be stored on existing sites, and existing facilities and equipment will be used for repackaging to improve the margin of safety.

  19. From protein-protein interaction to therapy response: Molecular imaging of heat shock proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu Gang [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Rd, P095, Stanford, CA 94305-5484 (United States); Chen Xiaoyuan [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Rd, P095, Stanford, CA 94305-5484 (United States)], E-mail: shawchen@stanford.edu

    2009-05-15

    HSP70 promoter-driven gene therapy and inhibition of HSP90 activity with small molecule inhibitors are two shining points in a newly developed cohort of cancer treatment. For HSP70 promoters, high efficiency and heat inducibility within a localized region make it very attractive to clinical translation. The HSP90 inhibitors exhibit a broad spectrum of anticancer activities due to the downstream effects of HSP90 inhibition, which interfere with a wide range of signaling processes that are crucial for the malignant properties of cancer cells. In this review article, we summarize exciting applications of newly emerged molecular imaging techniques as they relate to HSP, including protein-protein interactions of HSP90 complexes, therapeutic response of tumors to HSP90 inhibitors, and HSP70 promoters-controlled gene therapy. In the HSPs context, molecular imaging is expected to play a vital role in promoting drug development and advancing individualized medicine.

  20. Measuring the Contractile Response of Isolated Tissue Using an Image Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Díaz-Martín

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Isometric or isotonic transducers have traditionally been used to study the contractile/relaxation effects of drugs on isolated tissues. However, these mechanical sensors are expensive and delicate, and they are associated with certain disadvantages when performing experiments in the laboratory. In this paper, a method that uses an image sensor to measure the contractile effect of drugs on blood vessel rings and other luminal organs is presented. The new method is based on an image-processing algorithm, and it provides a fast, easy and non-expensive way to analyze the effects of such drugs. In our tests, we have obtained dose-response curves from rat aorta rings that are equivalent to those achieved with classical mechanic sensors.

  1. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly Response Functions: Solving the Fe VIII Problems with Hinode EIS Bright Point Data

    CERN Document Server

    Schmelz, Joan T; Kimble, Jason A; 10.1007/s11207-012-0208-1

    2013-01-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory is a state-of-the-art imager with the potential to do unprecedented time-dependent multi-thermal analysis at every pixel on scales short compared to the radiative and conductive cooling times. Recent results, however, have identified missing spectral lines in the CHIANTI atomic physics data base, which is used to construct the instrument response functions. We have done differential emission measure analysis using simultaneous AIA and Hinode/EIS observations of six X-ray bright points. Our results not only support the conclusion that CHIANTI is incomplete near 131 angstroms, but more importantly, suggest that the peak temperature of the Fe VIII emissivity/response is likely to be closer to log T = 5.8 than to the current value of log T = 5.7. Using a revised emissivity/response calculation for Fe VIII, we find that the observed AIA 131-angstrom flux can be underestimated by about 1.25, which is smaller than previous comparisons.

  2. In vivo optical imaging of tumor and microvascular response to ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Maeda

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is a widely used cancer treatment. However, understanding how ionizing radiation affects tumor cells and their vasculature, particularly at cellular, subcellular, genetic, and protein levels, has been limited by an inability to visualize the response of these interdependent components within solid tumors over time and in vivo. Here we describe a new preclinical experimental platform combining intravital multimodal optical microscopy for cellular-level longitudinal imaging, a small animal x-ray microirradiator for reproducible spatially-localized millimeter-scale irradiations, and laser-capture microdissection of ex vivo tissues for transcriptomic profiling. Using this platform, we have developed new methods that exploit the power of optically-enabled microscopic imaging techniques to reveal the important role of the tumor microvasculature in radiation response of tumors. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of this preclinical platform to study quantitatively--with cellular and sub-cellular details--the spatio-temporal dynamics of the biological response of solid tumors to ionizing radiation in vivo.

  3. In vivo optical imaging of tumor and microvascular response to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Azusa; Leung, Michael K K; Conroy, Leigh; Chen, Yonghong; Bu, Jiachuan; Lindsay, Patricia E; Mintzberg, Shani; Virtanen, Carl; Tsao, Julissa; Winegarden, Neil A; Wang, Yanchun; Morikawa, Lily; Vitkin, I Alex; Jaffray, David A; Hill, Richard P; DaCosta, Ralph S

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a widely used cancer treatment. However, understanding how ionizing radiation affects tumor cells and their vasculature, particularly at cellular, subcellular, genetic, and protein levels, has been limited by an inability to visualize the response of these interdependent components within solid tumors over time and in vivo. Here we describe a new preclinical experimental platform combining intravital multimodal optical microscopy for cellular-level longitudinal imaging, a small animal x-ray microirradiator for reproducible spatially-localized millimeter-scale irradiations, and laser-capture microdissection of ex vivo tissues for transcriptomic profiling. Using this platform, we have developed new methods that exploit the power of optically-enabled microscopic imaging techniques to reveal the important role of the tumor microvasculature in radiation response of tumors. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of this preclinical platform to study quantitatively--with cellular and sub-cellular details--the spatio-temporal dynamics of the biological response of solid tumors to ionizing radiation in vivo.

  4. Citicoline affects appetite and cortico-limbic responses to images of high-calorie foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, William D S; Ross, Amy J; Kamiya, Toshikazu; Kawada, Yoko; Renshaw, Perry F; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A

    2010-01-01

    Cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine (citicoline) has a variety of cognitive enhancing, neuroprotective, and neuroregenerative properties. In cocaine-addicted individuals, citicoline has been shown to increase brain dopamine levels and reduce cravings. The effects of this compound on appetite, food cravings, and brain responses to food are unknown. We compared the effects of treatment with Cognizin citicoline (500 mg/day versus 2,000 mg/day) for 6 weeks on changes in appetite ratings, weight, and cortico-limbic responses to images of high-calorie foods using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). After 6 weeks, there was no significant change in weight status, although significant declines in appetite ratings were observed for the 2,000 mg/day group. The higher dose group also showed significant increases in functional brain responses to food stimuli within the amygdala, insula, and lateral orbitofrontal cortex. Increased activation in these regions correlated with declines in appetite ratings. These preliminary findings suggest a potential usefulness of citicoline in modulating appetite, but further research is warranted.

  5. Citicoline Affects Appetite and Cortico-Limbic Responses to Images of High Calorie Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, William D. S.; Ross, Amy J.; Kamiya, Toshi; Kawada, Yoko; Renshaw, Perry F.; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Cytidine-5’-diphosphocholine (citicoline) has a variety of cognitive enhancing, neuroprotective, and neuroregenerative properties. In cocaine-addicted individuals, citicoline has been shown to increase brain dopamine levels and reduce cravings. The effects of this compound on appetite, food cravings, and brain responses to food are unknown. We compared the effects of treatment with citicoline (500 mg/day versus 2000 mg/day) for six weeks on changes in appetite ratings, weight, and cortico-limbic responses to images of high calorie foods using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). After six weeks, there was no significant change in weight status, although significant declines in appetite ratings were observed for the 2000 mg/day group. The higher dose group also showed significant increases in functional brain responses to food stimuli within the amygdala, insula, and lateral orbitofrontal cortex. Increased activation in these regions correlated with declines in appetite ratings. These preliminary findings suggest a potential usefulness of citicoline in modulating appetite, but further research is warranted. PMID:19260039

  6. Population response to natural images in the primary visual cortex encodes local stimulus attributes and perceptual processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Gilad, Ariel; Zurawel, Guy; Slovin, Hamutal

    2012-10-01

    The primary visual cortex (V1) is extensively studied with a large repertoire of stimuli, yet little is known about its encoding of natural images. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in behaving monkeys, we measured neural population response evoked in V1 by natural images presented during a face/scramble discrimination task. The population response showed two distinct phases of activity: an early phase that was spread over most of the imaged area, and a late phase that was spatially confined. To study the detailed relation between the stimulus and the population response, we used a simple encoding model to compute a continuous map of the expected neural response based on local attributes of the stimulus (luminance and contrast), followed by an analytical retinotopic transformation. Then, we computed the spatial correlation between the maps of the expected and observed response. We found that the early response was highly correlated with the local luminance of the stimulus and was sufficient to effectively discriminate between stimuli at the single trial level. The late response, on the other hand, showed a much lower correlation to the local luminance, was confined to central parts of the face images, and was highly correlated with the animal's perceptual report. Our study reveals a continuous spatial encoding of low- and high-level features of natural images in V1. The low level is directly linked to the stimulus basic local attributes and the high level is correlated with the perceptual outcome of the stimulus processing.

  7. In vivo hyperspectral imaging of microvessel response to trastuzumab treatment in breast cancer xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Devin R.; Walsh, Alex J.; Sit, Wesley; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Chen, Jin; Cook, Rebecca S.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    HER2-amplified (HER2 + ) breast cancers are treated with the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Although trastuzumab reduces production of the angiogenic factor VEGF in HER2 + tumors, the acute and sustained effects of trastuzumab on the tumor vasculature are not understood fully, particularly in trastuzumab-resistant tumors. We used mouse models of trastuzumab sensitive and trastuzumab-resistant HER2 + breast cancers to measure dynamic changes in tumor microvessel density and hemoglobin oxygenation (sO2) in vivo using quantitative hyperspectral imaging at 2, 5, 9, and 14 days after antibody treatment. Further analysis quantified the distribution of microvessels into low and high oxygenation groups, and monitored changes in these distributions with trastuzumab treatment. Gold standard immunohistochemistry was performed to validate complementary markers of tumor cell and vascular response to treatment. Trastuzumab treatment in both responsive and resistant tumors resulted in decreased sO2 5 days after initial treatment when compared to IgG-treated controls (p<0.05). Importantly, responsive tumors showed significantly higher vessel density and significantly lower sO2 than all other groups at 5 days post-treatment (p<0.05). Distribution analysis of vessel sO2 showed a significant (p<0.05) shift of highly oxygenated vessels towards lower oxygenation over the time-course in both trastuzumab-treated responsive and resistant tumors. This study suggests that longitudinal hyperspectral imaging of microvessel sO2 and density could distinguish trastuzumab-responsive from trastuzumab-resistant tumors, a finding that could be exploited in the post-neoadjuvant setting to guide post-surgical treatment decisions. PMID:25071962

  8. Sub-nanometer expansions of redox responsive polymer films monitored by imaging ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumurcu, Aysegul; Feng, Xueling; Ramos, Lionel Dos; Hempenius, Mark A; Schön, Peter; Vancso, G Julius

    2014-10-21

    We describe a novel approach to quantitatively visualize sub nm height changes occurring in thin films of redox active polymers upon reversible electrochemical oxidation/reduction in situ and in real-time with electrochemical imaging ellipsometry (EC-IE). Our approach is based on the utilization of a micro-patterned substrate containing circular patterns of passive (non-redox active) 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MCU) within a redox-responsive oligoethylene sulfide end-functionalized poly(ferrocenyldimethylsilane) (ES-PFS) film on a gold substrate. The non-redox responsive MCU layer was used as a molecular reference layer for the direct visualization of the minute thickness variations of the ES-PFS film. The ellipsometric microscopy images were recorded in aqueous electrolyte solutions at potentials of -0.1 V and 0.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl corresponding to the reduced and oxidized redox states of ES-PFS, respectively. The ellipsometric contrast images showed a 37 (±2)% intensity increase in the ES-PFS layer upon oxidation. The thickness of the ES-PFS layer reversibly changed between 4.0 (±0.1) nm and 3.4 (±0.1) nm upon oxidation and reduction, respectively, as determined by IE. Additionally, electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) was used to verify the redox controlled thickness variations. The proposed method opens novel avenues to optically visualize minute and rapid height changes occurring e.g. in redox active (and other stimulus responsive) polymer films in a fast and non-invasive manner.

  9. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in monitoring rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T(2)- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm(2)/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Low pretreatment ADCs (23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC ≥1.4 × 10(-3)mm(2)/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Correction: Stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for tumor-targeted bimodal imaging and photodynamic/hyperthermia combination therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Sub; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Joo Young; Matsuda, Shofu; Hideshima, Sho; Mori, Yasurou; Osaka, Tetsuya; Na, Kun

    2016-06-01

    Correction for `Stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for tumor-targeted bimodal imaging and photodynamic/hyperthermia combination therapy' by Kyoung Sub Kim, et al., Nanoscale, 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02273a.

  11. A meta-analysis to determine the effect of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments on fibromyalgia symptoms comprising OMERACT-10 response criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Despoina; Fassoulaki, Argyro; Tsoulas, Christos; Siafaka, Ioanna; Vadalouca, Athina

    2016-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread pain, sleep problems, fatigue, functional impairment, psychological distress, and cognitive dysfunction. The objective of this meta-analysis is to synthesize the available data on the effectiveness of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions across all domains included in the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT-10) fibromyalgia response definitions, and to examine response based on these definitions. We searched Cochrane, PubMed, Scopus, and the reference lists of articles for randomized controlled trials of any drug formulation or non-pharmacological intervention used for fibromyalgia treatment. We extracted efficacy data regarding pain, sleep, physical function, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and cognition. The available data were insufficient to draw definite conclusions regarding response. Indirect evidence indicates that it may be expected with the use of serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (NRIs), and multidisciplinary treatment.

  12. Revised criteria for suspicion of non-benign positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Varela, A; Rossi-Izquierdo, M; Sánchez-Sellero, I; Santos-Pérez, S

    2013-04-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most commonly diagnosed vestibular vertigo. BPPV can be diagnosed by clinical examination and its treatment is based on particle repositioning manoeuvres, and specialized equipment is not required. Therefore, most patients could be diagnosed and treated by their general practitioner. Unfortunately, not all positional vertigos are benign. Symptoms similar to those of BPPV can be caused by diseases that affect the central nervous system. It must be possible to define criteria that allow us to suspect, in a patient with symptoms of positional vertigo, the possibility of a cerebral origin ('non-benign PV'). Requests for magnetic resonance imaging must be justified by the fulfillment of these criteria. That is especially relevant in primary care, because these criteria should make possible to distinguish between patients with positional vertigo that could be treated by general practitioner and patients that need to be directed to especialized units. We propose the following revised criteria for suspected non-benign PV: (i) association with signs or symptoms of neurological disorder, (ii) nystagmus without dizziness in positional diagnostic tests, (iii) atypical nystagmus direction, (iv) poor response to therapeutic manoeuvres and (v) recurrence (confirmed by positional tests) on at least three occasions.

  13. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Adult Dermatomyositis and Polymyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Rohit; Rider, Lisa G; Ruperto, Nicolino; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Oddis, Chester V; Amato, Anthony A; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G; Dastmalchi, Maryam; Fiorentino, David; Isenberg, David; Katz, James D; Mammen, Andrew; de Visser, Marianne; Ytterberg, Steven R; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Chung, Lorinda; Danko, Katalin; García-De la Torre, Ignacio; Song, Yeong Wook; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for adult dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM). Expert surveys, logistic regression, and conjoint analysis were used to develop 287 definitions using core set measures. Myositis experts rated greater improvement among multiple pairwise scenarios in conjoint analysis surveys, where different levels of improvement in 2 core set measures were presented. The PAPRIKA (Potentially All Pairwise Rankings of All Possible Alternatives) method determined the relative weights of core set measures and conjoint analysis definitions. The performance characteristics of the definitions were evaluated on patient profiles using expert consensus (gold standard) and were validated using data from a clinical trial. The nominal group technique was used to reach consensus. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model using absolute percent change in core set measures (physician, patient, and extramuscular global activity, muscle strength, Health Assessment Questionnaire, and muscle enzyme levels). A total improvement score (range 0-100), determined by summing scores for each core set measure, was based on improvement in and relative weight of each core set measure. Thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement were ≥20, ≥40, and ≥60 points in the total improvement score. The same criteria were chosen for juvenile DM, with different improvement thresholds. Sensitivity and specificity in DM/PM patient cohorts were 85% and 92%, 90% and 96%, and 92% and 98% for minimal, moderate, and major improvement, respectively. Definitions were validated in the clinical trial analysis for differentiating the physician rating of improvement (P < 0.001). The response criteria for adult DM/PM consisted of the conjoint analysis model based on absolute percent change in 6 core set measures, with thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  14. IncucyteDRC: An R package for the dose response analysis of live cell imaging data

    OpenAIRE

    Philip J. Chapman; Dominic I. James; Amanda J. Watson; Hopkins, Gemma V.; Waddell, Ian D.; Ogilvie, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    We present IncucyteDRC, an R package for the analysis of data from live cell imaging cell proliferation experiments carried out on the Essen Biosciences IncuCyte ZOOM instrument. The package provides a simple workflow for summarising data into a form that can be used to calculate dose response curves and EC50 values for small molecule inhibitors. Data from different cell lines, or cell lines grown under different conditions, can be normalised as to their doubling time. A simple graphical web ...

  15. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject.

  16. Effects of low-spatial-frequency response of phase plates on TEM imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgcombe, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Images of simple objects produced by a perfect lens and a phase plate have been calculated by use of Abbe theory for Foucault, Hilbert and Zernike phase plates. The results show that with a Zernike plate, white outlines and ringing like those observed previously can be caused by the beam hole, which limits the low-spatial-frequency response of the system even when the lens behaves perfectly. When the change of phase added by the phase plate is distributed over a range of radius rather than a simple step, the unwanted effects are substantially reduced.

  17. 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging at 3 Tesla for Early Response Assessment of Glioblastoma Patients During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Smith, Brian J. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Anderson, Carryn M.; Morris, Ann [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Capizzano, Aristides A.; Magnotta, Vincent [Department of Radiology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); McGuire, Sarah M.; Smith, Mark C.; Bayouth, John E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Buatti, John M., E-mail: john-buatti@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium-enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17 to 20 fractions of radiation therapy. All patients received standard radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Imaging for response assessment consisted of MR scans every 2 months. Progression-free survival was defined by the criteria of MacDonald et al. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline/N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel-by-voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of RT. Changes in Cho/NAA between pretherapy and third-week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression-free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: After a median follow-up time of 8.6 months, 50% of patients had experienced progression based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (P<.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the third-week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (P<.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the third-week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.71; P=.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥2 volume, where recurrence most often occurred. Conclusion: Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of

  18. Impulse Response Estimation for Spatial Resolution Enhancement in Ultrasonic NDE Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G A

    2004-06-25

    This report describes a signal processing algorithm and MATLAB software for improving spatial resolution in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) imaging of materials. Given a measured reflection signal and an associated reference signal, the algorithm produces an optimal least-squares estimate of the impulse response of the material under test. This estimated impulse response, when used in place of the raw reflection signal, enhances the spatial resolution of the ultrasonic measurements by removing distortion caused by the limited-bandwidth transducers and the materials under test. The theory behind the processing algorithms is briefly presented, while the reader is referred to the bibliography for details. The main focus of the report is to describe how to use the MATLAB software. Two processing examples using actual ultrasonic measurements are provided for tutorial purposes.

  19. A compensating method of an imaging plate response to clinical proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kohno, R; Takada, Y; Terunuma, T; Sakae, T; Matsumoto, K

    2002-01-01

    For charged particle irradiations, the response of an imaging plate (IP) changes around the Bragg peak. Therefore, an appropriate compensation is necessary for the evaluation of dose distribution formed by charged particles such as protons. In this paper, the response of IPs to clinical proton beams is investigated. An experimentally-obtained depth-dose distribution (an ordinary Bragg curve) by a silicon semiconductor detector (SSD) is employed to evaluate the compensation factors as a function of proton penetrating depth, i.e. residual range. A typical dose distribution in a water phantom formed by an L-shaped bolus is measured by IPs and corrected by using the information of those compensation factors; the residual proton range is successfully calculated by the pencil beam algorithm at an arbitrary point. The results show a good agreement with the measurements by the SSD within the rms error of 3.0%.

  20. Characterizing the subharmonic response of phospholipid-coated microbubbles for carotid imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faez, Telli; Emmer, Marcia; Docter, Margreet; Sijl, Jeroen; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico

    2011-06-01

    The subharmonic vibration of BR14 (Bracco Research S.A., Geneva, Switzerland) contrast agent microbubbles is investigated within the preferable frequency range for carotid ultrasound imaging (8-12 MHz). The response of the bubbles was recorded optically with an ultra-fast recording camera (Brandaris 128) at three acoustic pressures (50, 100 and 120 kPa). The vibration of the microbubbles was measured as a function of the excitation frequency and its frequency content was determined. Among 390 recordings, 40% showed subharmonic oscillations. It was observed that for smaller microbubbles (diameter subharmonic response increases for increasing pressures (shell hardening) opposite to what has been reported for larger microbubbles (3 μm < diameter < 15 μm). These findings are well predicted by the model proposed by Marmottant et al. (2005) after including the dilatational shell viscosity of the microbubbles measured by Van der Meer et al. (2007), which indicates a marked shear-thinning behavior of the phospholipid shell.

  1. Polarization response of second-harmonic images for different collagen spatial distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Francisco J.; del Barco, Oscar; Bueno, Juan M.

    2016-06-01

    The response to polarization of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy images of samples with different collagen distributions (quasialigned, partially organized, and nonorganized) has been analyzed. A linear decay relationship between the external arrangement and polarization sensitivity was found. SHG signal from nonorganized samples presented a large structural dispersion and a weak dependence with incident polarization. Polarization dependence is also associated with the internal organization of the collagen fibers, directly related to the ratio of hyperpolarizabilities ρ. This parameter can experimentally be computed from the modulation of the SHG signal. The results show that both external and internal collagen structures are closely related. This provides a tool to obtain information of internal properties from the polarimetric response of the external spatial distribution of collagen, which might be useful in clinical diagnosis of pathologies related to changes in collagen structure.

  2. On the response of a europium doped phosphor-coated CMOS digital imaging detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seferis, I.E. [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Patras, 26500 Patras (Greece); Michail, C.M.; Valais, I.G.; Fountos, G.P.; Kalyvas, N.I. [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Athens, Agios Spyridonos, 12210 Athens (Greece); Stromatia, F. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, “IASO” General Hospital, Mesogion 264, 15562 Holargos (Greece); Oikonomou, G. [Department of Medical Radiological Technology, Faculty of Health and Caring Professions, Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Athens, Agios Spyridonos, 12210 Athens (Greece); Kandarakis, I.S., E-mail: kandarakis@teiath.gr [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Athens, Agios Spyridonos, 12210 Athens (Greece); Panayiotakis, G.S. [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Patras, 26500 Patras (Greece)

    2013-11-21

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to assess the information content of a high resolution active pixel CMOS imaging sensor coupled to Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu phosphor screens in terms of single index image quality metrics such as the information capacity (IC) and the noise equivalent passband (Ne). Methods: The CMOS sensor was coupled to two Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu scintillator screens with coating thicknesses of 33.3 and 65.1 mg/cm{sup 2}. IC and Ne were obtained by means of experimentally determined parameters such as the modulation transfer function (MTF), the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ). Measurements were performed using the standard IEC-RQA5 radiation beam quality (70 kVp) and a W/Rh beam quality (28 kVp). Results: It was found that the detector response function was linear for the exposure ranges under investigation. At 70 kVp, under the RQA 5 conditions IC values were found to range between 1730 and 1851 bits/mm{sup 2} and Ne values were found between 2.28 and 2.52 mm{sup −1}. At 28 kVp the corresponding IC values were found to range between 2535 and 2747 bits/mm{sup 2}, while the Ne values were found between 5.91 and 7.09 mm{sup −1}. Conclusion: IC and Ne of the red emitting phosphor/CMOS sensor combination were found with high values suggesting an acceptable imaging performance in terms of information content and sharpness, for X-ray digital imaging. -- Highlights: •Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu/CMOS combination has comparable image quality parameters to Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb/CMOS. •Information capacity was found with high values suggesting an acceptable imaging performance. •Red emitting phosphors coupled to silicon based optical sensors could be used in developing efficient imaging detectors.

  3. Fire protection design criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, national Fire Protection Association Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard, along with other delineated criteria, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  4. In vivo chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging allows early detection of a therapeutic response in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagiyama, Koji; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Togao, Osamu; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Maher, Elizabeth A; Mickey, Bruce E; Pan, Edward; Sherry, A Dean; Bachoo, Robert M; Takahashi, Masaya

    2014-03-25

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), which account for more than 50% of all gliomas, is among the deadliest of all human cancers. Given the dismal prognosis of GBM, it would be advantageous to identify early biomarkers of a response to therapy to avoid continuing ineffective treatments and to initiate other therapeutic strategies. The present in vivo longitudinal study in an orthotopic mouse model demonstrates quantitative assessment of early treatment response during short-term chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) by amide proton transfer (APT) imaging. In a GBM line, only one course of TMZ (3 d exposure and 4 d rest) at a dose of 80 mg/kg resulted in substantial reduction in APT signal compared with untreated control animals, in which the APT signal continued to increase. Although there were no detectable differences in tumor volume, cell density, or apoptosis rate between groups, levels of Ki67 (index of cell proliferation) were substantially reduced in treated tumors. In another TMZ-resistant GBM line, the APT signal and levels of Ki67 increased despite the same course of TMZ treatment. As metabolite changes are known to occur early in the time course of chemotherapy and precede morphologic changes, these results suggest that the APT signal in glioma may be a useful functional biomarker of treatment response or degree of tumor progression. Thus, APT imaging may serve as a sensitive biomarker of early treatment response and could potentially replace invasive biopsies to provide a definitive diagnosis. This would have a major impact on the clinical management of patients with glioma.

  5. Imaging the response of the retina to electrical stimulation with genetically encoded calcium indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Andrew C; Behrend, Matthew R; Lee, Nan Sook; Klein, Ronald L; Chiodo, Vince A; Hauswirth, William W; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D; Chow, Robert H

    2013-04-01

    Epiretinal implants for the blind are designed to stimulate surviving retinal neurons, thus bypassing the diseased photoreceptor layer. Single-unit or multielectrode recordings from isolated animal retina are commonly used to inform the design of these implants. However, such electrical recordings provide limited information about the spatial patterns of retinal activation. Calcium imaging overcomes this limitation, as imaging enables high spatial resolution mapping of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) activity as well as simultaneous recording from hundreds of RGCs. Prior experiments in amphibian retina have demonstrated proof of principle, yet experiments in mammalian retina have been hindered by the inability to load calcium indicators into mature mammalian RGCs. Here, we report a method for labeling the majority of ganglion cells in adult rat retina with genetically encoded calcium indicators, specifically GCaMP3 and GCaMP5G. Intravitreal injection of an adeno-associated viral vector targets ∼85% of ganglion cells with high specificity. Because of the large fluorescence signals provided by the GCaMP sensors, we can now for the first time visualize the response of the retina to electrical stimulation in real-time. Imaging transduced retinas mounted on multielectrode arrays reveals how stimulus pulse shape can dramatically affect the spatial extent of RGC activation, which has clear implications in prosthetic applications. Our method can be easily adapted to work with other fluorescent indicator proteins in both wild-type and transgenic mammals.

  6. The impact of changing night vision goggle spectral response on night vision imaging system lighting compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Task, Harry L.; Marasco, Peter L.

    2004-09-01

    The defining document outlining night-vision imaging system (NVIS) compatible lighting, MIL-L-85762A, was written in the mid 1980's, based on what was then the state of the art in night vision and image intensification. Since that time there have been changes in the photocathode sensitivity and the minus-blue coatings applied to the objective lenses. Specifically, many aviation night-vision goggles (NVGs) in the Air Force are equipped with so-called "leaky green" or Class C type objective lens coatings that provide a small amount of transmission around 545 nanometers so that the displays that use a P-43 phosphor can be seen through the NVGs. However, current NVIS compatibility requirements documents have not been updated to include these changes. Documents that followed and replaced MIL-L-85762A (ASC/ENFC-96-01 and MIL-STD-3009) addressed aspects of then current NVIS technology, but did little to change the actual content or NVIS radiance requirements set forth in the original MIL-L-85762A. This paper examines the impact of spectral response changes, introduced by changes in image tube parameters and objective lens minus-blue filters, on NVIS compatibility and NVIS radiance calculations. Possible impact on NVIS lighting requirements is also discussed. In addition, arguments are presented for revisiting NVIS radiometric unit conventions.

  7. Node-by-node correlation between MR and PET/CT in patients with uterine cervical cancer: diffusion-weighted imaging versus size-based criteria on T2WI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eugene K. [University of Ulsan, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kim, Jeong Kon; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Park, Seong Ho; Park, Bum-Woo; Kim, Namkug; Cho, Kyoung-Sik [University of Ulsan, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Jae Seung; Im, Ki Chun [University of Ulsan, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Cho, Gyunggoo [Korea Basic Science Institute, Bio-MR center, Chungcheongbuk-do (Korea)

    2009-08-15

    The purpose of the study was to perform a node-by-node comparison of an ADC-based diagnosis and various size-based criteria on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) with regard to their correlation with PET/CT findings in patients with uterine cervical cancer. In 163 patients with 339 pelvic lymph nodes (LNs) with short-axis diameter >5 mm, the minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), mean ADC, short- and long-axis diameters, and ratio of long- to short-axis diameters (L/S ratio) were compared in PET/CT-positive and -negative LNs. On PET/CT, 118 (35%) LNs in 58 patients were positive. The mean value of minimum and mean ADCs, short- and long-axis diameters, and L/S ratio were different in PET/CT-positive (0.6436 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, 0.756 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, 10.3 mm, 13.2 mm, 1.32, respectively) and PET/CT-negative LNs (0.8893 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, 1.019 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, 7.4 mm, 11.0 mm, 1.49, respectively) (P<0.05). The Az value of the minimum ADC (0.864) was greater than those of mean ADC (0.836), short-axis diameter (0.764), long-axis diameter (0.640) and L/S ratio (0.652) (P<0.05). The sensitivity and accuracy of the minimum ADC (86%, 82%) were greater than those of the short-axis diameter (55%, 74%), long-axis diameter (73%, 58%) and L/S ratio (52%, 66%) (P<0.05). ADC showed superior correlation with PET/CT compared with conventional size-based criteria on T2WI. (orig.)

  8. Aquatic Life Criteria - Atrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertaining to Acute and Chronic Ambient Water Quality Aquatic Life Criteria for Atrazine (Freshwater and Salt Water). This document contains the safe levels of Atrazine in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  9. Quantitative high content imaging of cellular adaptive stress response pathways in toxicity for chemical safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Steven; Hiemstra, Steven; Huppelschoten, Suzanna; Danen, Erik; Niemeijer, Marije; Hendriks, Giel; Vrieling, Harry; Herpers, Bram; van de Water, Bob

    2014-03-17

    Over the past decade, major leaps forward have been made on the mechanistic understanding and identification of adaptive stress response landscapes underlying toxic insult using transcriptomics approaches. However, for predictive purposes of adverse outcome several major limitations in these approaches exist. First, the limited number of samples that can be analyzed reduces the in depth analysis of concentration-time course relationships for toxic stress responses. Second these transcriptomics analysis have been based on the whole cell population, thereby inevitably preventing single cell analysis. Third, transcriptomics is based on the transcript level, totally ignoring (post)translational regulation. We believe these limitations are circumvented with the application of high content analysis of relevant toxicant-induced adaptive stress signaling pathways using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter cell-based assays. The goal is to establish a platform that incorporates all adaptive stress pathways that are relevant for toxicity, with a focus on drug-induced liver injury. In addition, cellular stress responses typically follow cell perturbations at the subcellular organelle level. Therefore, we complement our reporter line panel with reporters for specific organelle morphometry and function. Here, we review the approaches of high content imaging of cellular adaptive stress responses to chemicals and the application in the mechanistic understanding and prediction of chemical toxicity at a systems toxicology level.

  10. Acute Tumor Response to ZD6126 Assessed by Intrinsic Susceptibility Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon P. Robinson

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The effective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI transverse relaxation rate R2* was investigated as an early acute marker of the response of rat GH3 prolactinomas to the vascular-targeting agent, ZD6126. Multigradient echo (MGRE MRI was used to quantify R2*, which is sensitive to tissue deoxyhemoglobin levels. Tumor R2* was measured prior to, and either immediately for up to 35 minutes, or 24 hours following administration of 50 mg/kg ZD6126. Following MRI, tumor perfusion was assessed by Hoechst 33342 uptake. Tumor R2* significantly increased to 116 ± 4% of baseline 35 minutes after challenge, consistent with an ischemic insult induced by vascular collapse. A strong positive correlation between baseline R2* and the subsequent increase in R2* measured 35 minutes after treatment was obtained, suggesting that the baseline R2* is prognostic for the subsequent tumor response to ZD6126. In contrast, a significant decrease in tumor R2* was found 24 hours after administration of ZD6126. Both the 35-minute and 24-hour R2* responses to ZD6126 were associated with a decrease in Hoechst 33342 uptake. Interpretation of the R2* response is complex, yet changes in tumor R2* may provide a convenient and early MRI biomarker for detecting the antitumor activity of vascular-targeting agents.

  11. Semiautomated volumetric response evaluation as an imaging biomarker in superior sulcus tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, C.G.; Paul, M.A. [VU University Medical Center, Departments of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dahele, M.; Soernsen de Koste, J.R. van; Senan, S. [VU University Medical Center, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bahce, I.; Smit, E.F. [VU University Medical Center, Departments of Pulmonary Diseases, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Thunnissen, E. [VU University Medical Center, Departments of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hartemink, K.J. [VU University Medical Center, Departments of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    Volumetric response to therapy has been suggested as a biomarker for patient-centered outcomes. The primary aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether the volumetric response to induction chemoradiotherapy was associated with pathological complete response (pCR) or survival in patients with superior sulcus tumors managed with trimodality therapy. The secondary aim was to evaluate a semiautomated method for serial volume assessment. In this retrospective study, treatment outcomes were obtained from a departmental database. The tumor was delineated on the computed tomography (CT) scan used for radiotherapy planning, which was typically performed during the first cycle of chemotherapy. These contours were transferred to the post-chemoradiotherapy diagnostic CT scan using deformable image registration (DIR) with/without manual editing. CT scans from 30 eligible patients were analyzed. Median follow-up was 51 months. Neither absolute nor relative reduction in tumor volume following chemoradiotherapy correlated with pCR or 2-year survival. The tumor volumes determined by DIR alone and DIR + manual editing correlated to a high degree (R{sup 2} = 0.99, P < 0.01). Volumetric response to induction chemoradiotherapy was not correlated with pCR or survival in patients with superior sulcus tumors managed with trimodality therapy. DIR-based contour propagation merits further evaluation as a tool for serial volumetric assessment. (orig.)

  12. Effect of b value on monitoring therapeutic response by diffusion-weighted imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Xia Jiang; Wei-Jun Peng; Wen-Tao Li; Feng Tang; Shi-Yuan Liu; Xu-Dong Qu; Jian-Hua Wang; Hong-Feng Lu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the diffusion gradient b-factor that optimizes both apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement and contrast-to-noise (CNR) for assessing tumor response to transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in a rabbit model. METHODS: Twelve New Zealand white rabbits bearing VX2 tumors in the liver were treated withT ACE. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with various b values was performed using the same protocol before and 3 d after treatment with TACE. ADC values and CNR of each tumor pre- and post-treatment with different b factors were analyzed. Correlation between ADC values and extent of necrosis in histological specimens was analyzed by a Pearson's correlation test.RESULTS: The quality of diffusion-weighted images diminished as the b value increased. A substantial decrease in the mean lesion-to-liver CNR was observed on both pre- and post-treatment DW images, the largest difference in CNR pre- and post-treatment was manifested at a b value of 1000 s/mm2 (P = 0.036 ). The effect of therapy on diffusion early after treatment was shown by a significant increase in ADCs (P= 0.007), especially with large b factors (≥ 600 s/mm2). The mean percentage of necrotic cells present within the tumor was 76.3%-97.5%. A significant positive correlation was found between ADC values and the extent of necrosis with all b values except for b200, a higher relative coefficient between ADC values and percentage of necrosis was found on DWI with bl000 and b2000 (P=0.002 and 0.006, respectively).CONCLUSION: An increasing b value of up to 600 s/mm2 would increase ADC contrast pre-and post-treatment, but decrease image quality. Taking into account both CNR and ADC measurement, diffusion-weighted imaging obtained with a b value of 1000 s/mm2 is recommended for monitoring early hepatic tumor response to TACE.

  13. Pengaruh Penerapan Corporate Social Responsibility terhadap Persepsi Nasabah Bank dan Dampaknya terhadap Corporate Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhadjir Nasir

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of corporate social responsibility (CSR in Indonesia is regulated in UU No. 40 2007 about company liability on article 74 which mentions the social responsibility to be borne by any corporations. CSR is one of the government's efforts to balance the economic growth and equitability. This study aims to determine how much CSR influences customer’s perceptions and its impact on corporate image of BNI. This study uses descriptive-associative method with unit analysis of customers of Bank BNI Fatmawati branch and survey analysis. Data collection uses questionnaires, interviews and literature study of previous researches. Data process uses SPSS 16.0 through validity and reliability, normality test, path analysis, and comparison of the average score through descriptive analysis. The study states that CSR brings effect to corporate image both directly and indirectly through the customer’s perception. Therefore, it is expected to continue to maintain BNI social sharing through their CSR programs and enhance public communication, so that the CSR transfer to change the customer’s perception leads to a positive success.

  14. Multimodality imaging assessments of response to metformin therapy for breast cancer in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Yi; XIA Rui; WANG Lei; WANG Yu-qing; GAO Fa-bao

    2013-01-01

    Background Metformin is the most widely used anti-diabetic drug in the world.An increasing body of evidence shows metformin also blocks cell cycle progression and selectively induces apoptosis via caspase activation in some breast tumor cells.Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWl) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) have great potential in the evaluation of the early response to cancer therapies.We used DWl and BLI in evaluating the response of breast cancer to metformin.Methods The luciferase-engineered human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 was inoculated into the mammary fat pad of nude mice.Twelve female nude mice bearing tumors were divided into two groups.The mice in the treatment group received metformin (2 mg/ml in drinking water daily) after tumor inoculation,and the mice in the control group were offered drinking water without any drug added.We performed 7T magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging every week.Imaging included T1-and T2-weighted imaging,DWl,and BLI.After imaging.The tumors were collected and subjected to histological analysis.Results The mean photons/second of tumors in the treatment group was (3.00±0.43)×106 at day one,(1.01±0.14)×107 at 2 weeks,(5.79±1.42)×107 at 4 weeks,and (2.33±0.70)×107 at 8 weeks.The mean photons/second of tumors in the control group was (3.29±0.59)×106 at day one,(3.59±0.63)×107 at 2 weeks,(3.87±0.56)×108 at 4 weeks,and (4.12±1.72)x108 at 8 weeks.Compared to the control group,the treatment group showed an obvious decrease in the mean bioluminescence (photons/s) of the tumors and fewer metastases.Histological examination confirmed the presence of fewer metastases.DWI showed the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the tumors; the mean ADC value was (0.9287±0.04346)x10-3 mm2/s in the treated tumors and (0.7553±0.01804)x103 mm2/s in the untreated tumors.The ADC value of tumors in the treatment group was significantly higher than the control tumors (P=0.0013).Conclusions The growth and

  15. Efficacy of qualitative response assessment interpretation criteria at 18F-FDG PET-CT for predicting outcome in locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarsbrook, Andrew; Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Chowdhury, Fahmid; Swift, Sarah; Cooper, Rachel; Patel, Chirag

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the utility of a standardized qualitative scoring system for treatment response assessment at 18F-FDG PET-CT in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma and correlate this with subsequent patient outcome. Ninety-six consecutive patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated with radical chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in a single centre between 2011 and 2014 underwent 18F-FDG PET-CT approximately 3 months post-treatment. Tumour metabolic response was assessed qualitatively using a 5-point scale ranging from background level activity only through to progressive metabolic disease. Clinical and radiological (MRI pelvis) follow-up was performed in all patients. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method (Mantel-Cox log-rank) and correlated with qualitative score using Chi-squared test. Forty patients (41.7 %) demonstrated complete metabolic response (CMR) on post-treatment PET-CT (Score 1/2) with 38 patients (95.0 %) remaining disease free after a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. Twenty-four patients (25.0 %) had indeterminate residual uptake (ID, Score 3) at primary or nodal sites after treatment, of these eight patients (33.3 %) relapsed on follow-up, including all patients with residual nodal uptake (n = 4Eleven11 of 17 patients (64.7 %) with significant residual uptake (partial metabolic response, PMR, Score 4) subsequently relapsed. In 15 patients (15.6 %) PET-CT demonstrated progressive disease (PD, Score 5) following treatment. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a highly statistically significant difference in PFS and OS between patients with CMR, indeterminate uptake, PMR and PD (Log-rank, P < 0.0001). Chi-squared test demonstrated a highly statistically significant association between increasing qualitative score and risk of recurrence or death (P < 0.001). Use of a 5-point qualitative scoring system to assess metabolic response to CRT in locally

  16. Efficacy of qualitative response assessment interpretation criteria at 18F-FDG PET-CT for predicting outcome in locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarsbrook, Andrew [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Level 1, Bexley Wing, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); University of Leeds, Leeds Institute of Cancer and Pathology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Chowdhury, Fahmid; Patel, Chirag [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Level 1, Bexley Wing, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Swift, Sarah [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Cooper, Rachel [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Clinical Oncology, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the utility of a standardized qualitative scoring system for treatment response assessment at 18F-FDG PET-CT in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma and correlate this with subsequent patient outcome. Ninety-six consecutive patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated with radical chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in a single centre between 2011 and 2014 underwent 18F-FDG PET-CT approximately 3 months post-treatment. Tumour metabolic response was assessed qualitatively using a 5-point scale ranging from background level activity only through to progressive metabolic disease. Clinical and radiological (MRI pelvis) follow-up was performed in all patients. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method (Mantel-Cox log-rank) and correlated with qualitative score using Chi-squared test. Forty patients (41.7 %) demonstrated complete metabolic response (CMR) on post-treatment PET-CT (Score 1/2) with 38 patients (95.0 %) remaining disease free after a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. Twenty-four patients (25.0 %) had indeterminate residual uptake (ID, Score 3) at primary or nodal sites after treatment, of these eight patients (33.3 %) relapsed on follow-up, including all patients with residual nodal uptake (n = 4). 11 of 17 patients (64.7 %) with significant residual uptake (partial metabolic response, PMR, Score 4) subsequently relapsed. In 15 patients (15.6 %) PET-CT demonstrated progressive disease (PD, Score 5) following treatment. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a highly statistically significant difference in PFS and OS between patients with CMR, indeterminate uptake, PMR and PD (Log-rank, P < 0.0001). Chi-squared test demonstrated a highly statistically significant association between increasing qualitative score and risk of recurrence or death (P < 0.001). Use of a 5-point qualitative scoring system to assess metabolic response to CRT in locally advanced

  17. Clinical relevance of the ROC and free-response paradigms for comparing imaging system efficacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, D P

    2010-01-01

    Observer performance studies are widely used to assess medical imaging systems. Unlike technical/engineering measurements observer performance include the entire imaging chain and the radiologist. However, the widely used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method ignores lesion localisation information. The free-response ROC (FROC) method uses the location information to appropriately reward or penalise correct or incorrect localisations, respectively. This paper describes a method for improving the clinical relevance of FROC studies. The method consists of assigning appropriate risk values to the different lesions that may be present on a single image. A high-risk lesion is one that is critical to detect and act upon, and is assigned a higher risk value than a low-risk lesion, one that is relatively innocuous. Instead of simply counting the number of lesions that are detected, as is done in conventional FROC analysis, a risk-weighted count is used. This has the advantage of rewarding detections of high-risk lesions commensurately more than detections of lower risk lesions. Simulations were used to demonstrate that the new method, termed case-based analysis, results in a higher figure of merit for an expert who detects more high-risk lesions than a naive observer who detects more low-risk lesions, even though both detect the same total number of lesions. Conventional free-response analysis is unable to distinguish between the two types of observers. This paper also comments on the issue of clinical relevance of ROC analysis vs. FROC for tasks that involve lesion localisation.

  18. Optical metabolic imaging of treatment response in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy T Shah

    Full Text Available Optical metabolic imaging measures fluorescence intensity and lifetimes from metabolic cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD. These molecular level measurements provide unique biomarkers for early cellular responses to cancer treatments. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is an attractive target for optical imaging because of easy access to the site using fiber optic probes. Two HNSCC cell lines, SCC25 and SCC61, were treated with Cetuximab (anti-EGFR antibody, BGT226 (PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, or cisplatin (chemotherapy for 24 hours. Results show increased redox ratio, NADH α1 (contribution from free NADH, and FAD α1 (contribution from protein-bound FAD for malignant cells compared with the nonmalignant cell line OKF6 (p<0.05. In SCC25 and SCC61 cells, the redox ratio is unaffected by cetuximab treatment and decreases with BGT226 and cisplatin treatment (p<0.05, and these results agree with standard measurements of proliferation rates after treatment. For SCC25, NADH α1 is reduced with BGT226 and cisplatin treatment. For SCC61, NADH α1 is reduced with cetuximab, BGT226, and cisplatin treatment. Trends in NADH α1 are statistically similar to changes in standard measurements of glycolytic rates after treatment. FAD α1 is reduced with cisplatin treatment (p<0.05. These shifts in optical endpoints reflect early metabolic changes induced by drug treatment. Overall, these results indicate that optical metabolic imaging has potential to detect early response to cancer treatment in HNSCC, enabling optimal treatment regimens and improved patient outcomes.

  19. Psudeo-seismic Imaging on CSAMT Psudeo-pulse Response of Coal Bed Methane Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    zhao, Y.; wu, J.

    2012-12-01

    As a unique natural gas extracted from coal beds, coal bed methane (CBM) resources has become an important source of energy in China. For CBM exploration, it is still a challenge to improve the accuracy for locating and evaluating CBM deposits due to its complicated absorption characteristics. Considering the distinct change of electromagnetic parameters caused by CBM, it is possible to detect the electromagnetic anomalies using the controlled source audio-frequency magnetotellurics (CSAMT). Psudeo-pulse response of EM was re-constructed using the impendence measured on the ground surface by CSAMT, and psudeo-seismic images can be produced using linear programming inversion with stratum model restriction. An anticline structure model was built to verify the proposal of psudeo-seismic imaging using CSAMT data. Inversion results clearly revealed the electrical structure interfaces of the model. Meanwhile, a set of CSAMT data was collected from the test area located in Heshun coal field in China. The V8 CSAMT system was used for data acquisition and the frequency ranges from 0.2 to 7680 Hz. Inversed psudeo-seismic images exactly exhibited the stratum structure and the electrical property distribution. A comparison of inversion results with exploration borehole data revealed the approximate relationship between electrical property and the CBM content. The higher the value of resistivity, the more likely the coal bed is to contain CBM. Model and field test analysis demonstrated that the psudeo-seismic image improved the CSAMT interpretation results, and it can reveal the electrical property distribution, and be applied to approximately evaluate the CBM content.

  20. Quantitative correlational study of microbubble-enhanced ultrasound imaging and magnetic resonance imaging of glioma and early response to radiotherapy in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chen [Department of Ultrasound, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310022 (China); Lee, Dong-Hoon; Zhang, Kai; Li, Wenxiao; Zhou, Jinyuan [Division of MR Research, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Mangraviti, Antonella; Tyler, Betty [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Su, Lin; Zhang, Yin; Zhang, Bin; Wong, John; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Velarde, Esteban; Ding, Kai, E-mail: kding1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy remains a major treatment method for malignant tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard modality for assessing glioma treatment response in the clinic. Compared to MRI, ultrasound imaging is low-cost and portable and can be used during intraoperative procedures. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively compare contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging and MRI of irradiated gliomas in rats and to determine which quantitative ultrasound imaging parameters can be used for the assessment of early response to radiation in glioma. Methods: Thirteen nude rats with U87 glioma were used. A small thinned skull window preparation was performed to facilitate ultrasound imaging and mimic intraoperative procedures. Both CEUS and MRI with structural, functional, and molecular imaging parameters were performed at preradiation and at 1 day and 4 days postradiation. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the correlations between MRI and CEUS parameters and the changes between pre- and postradiation imaging. Results: Area under the curve (AUC) in CEUS showed significant difference between preradiation and 4 days postradiation, along with four MRI parameters, T{sub 2}, apparent diffusion coefficient, cerebral blood flow, and amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) (all p < 0.05). The APTw signal was correlated with three CEUS parameters, rise time (r = − 0.527, p < 0.05), time to peak (r = − 0.501, p < 0.05), and perfusion index (r = 458, p < 0.05). Cerebral blood flow was correlated with rise time (r = − 0.589, p < 0.01) and time to peak (r = − 0.543, p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI can be used for the assessment of radiotherapy treatment response and CEUS with AUC as a new technique and can also be one of the assessment methods for early response to radiation in glioma.

  1. Quantitative correlational study of microbubble-enhanced ultrasound imaging and magnetic resonance imaging of glioma and early response to radiotherapy in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Mangraviti, Antonella; Su, Lin; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Yin; Zhang, Bin; Li, Wenxiao; Tyler, Betty; Wong, John; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Velarde, Esteban; Zhou, Jinyuan; Ding, Kai

    2015-08-01

    Radiotherapy remains a major treatment method for malignant tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard modality for assessing glioma treatment response in the clinic. Compared to MRI, ultrasound imaging is low-cost and portable and can be used during intraoperative procedures. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively compare contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging and MRI of irradiated gliomas in rats and to determine which quantitative ultrasound imaging parameters can be used for the assessment of early response to radiation in glioma. Thirteen nude rats with U87 glioma were used. A small thinned skull window preparation was performed to facilitate ultrasound imaging and mimic intraoperative procedures. Both CEUS and MRI with structural, functional, and molecular imaging parameters were performed at preradiation and at 1 day and 4 days postradiation. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the correlations between MRI and CEUS parameters and the changes between pre- and postradiation imaging. Area under the curve (AUC) in CEUS showed significant difference between preradiation and 4 days postradiation, along with four MRI parameters, T2, apparent diffusion coefficient, cerebral blood flow, and amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) (all p correlated with three CEUS parameters, rise time (r = - 0.527, p correlated with rise time (r = - 0.589, p < 0.01) and time to peak (r = - 0.543, p < 0.05). MRI can be used for the assessment of radiotherapy treatment response and CEUS with AUC as a new technique and can also be one of the assessment methods for early response to radiation in glioma.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Identifies Differential Response to Pro-Oxidant Chemotherapy in a Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry H. Landowski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Induction of oxidative stress is a key component of cancer therapy. Pro-oxidant drugs have been demonstrated to enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. An emerging concept is that therapeutic outcomes are dictated by the differential redox buffering reserve in subpopulations of malignant cells, indicating the need for noninvasive biomarkers of tumor redox that can be used for dose identification and response assessment in a longitudinal setting. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI enhanced with the thiol-binding contrast agent Gd-LC6-SH, and hemodynamic response imaging (HRI in combination with hypercapnia and hyperoxia were investigated as biomarkers of the pharmacodynamics of the small molecule pro-oxidant imexon (IMX. Human multiple myeloma cell lines 8226/S and an IMX-resistant variant, 8226/IM10, were established as contralateral tumors in SCID mice. T1slope, an MRI measure of the washout rate of Gd-LC6-SH, was significantly lower post-IMX therapy in 8226/S tumors compared with vehicle controls, indicating treatment-related oxidization of the tumor microenvironment, which was confirmed by analysis of tumor tissue for thiols. T1slope and ex vivo assays for thiols both indicated a more reduced microenvironment in 8226/IM10 tumors following IMX therapy. HRI with hypercapnia challenge revealed IMX inhibition of vascular dilation in 8226/S tumors but not 8226/IM10 tumors, consistent with decreased immunohistochemical staining for smooth muscle actin in treated 8226/S tumors. MRI enhanced with Gd-LC6-SH, and HRI coupled with a hypercapnic challenge provide noninvasive biomarkers of tumor response to the redox modulator imexon.

  3. Neural Signatures of the Response to Emotional Distraction: A Review of Evidence from Brain Imaging Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru D Iordan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Prompt responses to emotional, potentially threatening, stimuli are supported by neural mechanisms that allow for privileged access of emotional information to processing resources. The existence of these mechanisms can also make emotional stimuli potent distracters, particularly when task-irrelevant. The ability to deploy cognitive control in order to cope with emotional distraction is essential for adaptive behavior, while reduced control may lead to enhanced emotional distractibility, which is often a hallmark of affective disorders. Evidence suggests that increased susceptibility to emotional distraction is linked to changes in the processing of emotional information that affect both the basic response to and coping with emotional distraction, but the neural correlates of these phenomena are not clear. The present review discusses emerging evidence from brain imaging studies addressing these issues, and highlights the following three aspects. First, the response to emotional distraction is associated with opposing patterns of activity in a ventral ‘hot’ affective system (HotEmo, showing increased activity and a dorsal ‘cold’ executive system (ColdEx, showing decreased activity. Second, coping with emotional distraction involves top-down control in order to counteract the bottom-up influence of emotional distraction, and involves interactions between the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex. Third, both the response to and coping with emotional distraction are influenced by individual differences affecting emotional sensitivity and distractibility, which are linked to alterations of both HotEmo and ColdEx neural systems. Collectively, the available evidence identifies specific neural signatures of the response to emotional challenge, which are fundamental to understanding the mechanisms of emotion-cognition interactions in healthy functioning, and the changes linked to individual variation in emotional distractibility and susceptibility

  4. Multiple damage identification and imaging in an aluminum plate using effective Lamb wave response automatic extraction technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Qinghua; Zhou, Li; Liu, Xiaotong

    2016-04-01

    In order to identify multiple damage in the structure, a method of multiple damage identification and imaging based on the effective Lamb wave response automatic extraction algorithm is proposed. In this method, the detected key area in the structure is divided into a number of subregions, and then, the effective response signals including the structural damage information are automatically extracted from the entire Lamb wave responses which are received by the piezoelectric sensors. Further, the damage index values of every subregion based on the correlation coefficient are calculated using the effective response signals. Finally, the damage identification and imaging are performed using the reconstruction algorithm for probabilistic inspection of damage (RAPID) technique. The experimental research was conducted using an aluminum plate. The experimental results show that the method proposed in this research can quickly and effectively identify the single damage or multiple damage and image the damages clearly in detected area.

  5. TLG-S criteria are superior to both EORTC and PERCIST for predicting outcomes in patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma treated with erlotinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Kung-Chu [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Center for Advanced Molecular Imaging and Translation, Taoyuan (China); Fang, Yu-Hua Dean [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tainan (China); Chung, Hsiao-Wen [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei (China); Liu, Yuan-Chang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Taoyuan (China); Chang, John Wen-Cheng; Hou, Ming-Mo [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Yang, Cheng-Ta [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Thoracic Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Cheng, Nai-Ming; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Center for Advanced Molecular Imaging and Translation, Taoyuan (China); Su, Tzu-Pei [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Keelung (China)

    2016-11-15

    In this retrospective review of prospectively collected data, we sought to investigate whether early FDG-PET assessment of treatment response based on total lesion glycolysis measured using a systemic approach (TLG-S) would be superior to either local assessment with EORTC (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) criteria or single-lesion assessment with PERCIST (PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors) for predicting clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma treated with erlotinib. We also examined the effect of bone flares on tumor response evaluation by single-lesion assessment with PERCIST in patients with metastatic bone lesions. We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data from 23 patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma treated with erlotinib. All participants underwent FDG-PET imaging at baseline and on days 14 and 56 after completion of erlotinib treatment. In addition, diagnostic CT scans were performed at baseline and on day 56. FDG-PET response was assessed with TLG-S, EORTC, and PERCIST criteria. Response assessment based on RECIST 1.1 (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) from diagnostic CT imaging was used as the reference standard. Two-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) served as the main outcome measures. We identified 13 patients with bone metastases. Of these, four (31 %) with persistent bone uptake due to bone flares on day 14 were erroneously classified as non-responders according to the PERCIST criteria, but they were correctly classified as responders according to both the EORTC and TLG-S criteria. Patients who were classified as responders on day 14 based on TLG-S criteria had higher rates of 2-year PFS (26.7 % vs. 0 %, P = 0.007) and OS (40.0 % vs. 7.7 %, P = 0.018). Similar rates were observed in patients who showed a response on day 56 based on CT imaging according to the RECIST criteria. Patients classified as responders on day 14

  6. A new image reconstruction method for 3-D PET based upon pairs of near-missing lines of response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawatsu, Shoji [Department of Radiology, Kyoritu General Hospital, 4-33 Go-bancho, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi 456-8611 (Japan) and Department of Brain Science and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, 36-3, Gengo Moriaka-cho, Obu-shi, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan)]. E-mail: b6rgw@fantasy.plala.or.jp; Ushiroya, Noboru [Department of General Education, Wakayama National College of Technology, 77 Noshima, Nada-cho, Gobo-shi, Wakayama 644-0023 (Japan)

    2007-02-01

    We formerly introduced a new image reconstruction method for three-dimensional positron emission tomography, which is based upon pairs of near-missing lines of response. This method uses an elementary geometric property of lines of response, namely that two lines of response which originate from radioactive isotopes located within a sufficiently small voxel, will lie within a few millimeters of each other. The effectiveness of this method was verified by performing a simulation using GATE software and a digital Hoffman phantom.

  7. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, Brunella, E-mail: bbarbaro@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vecchio, Fabio M. [Department of Pathology, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Rizzo, Gianluca [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising

  8. ACR appropriateness criteria: Permanent source brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian J; Taira, Al V; Nguyen, Paul L; Assimos, Dean G; D'Amico, Anthony V; Gottschalk, Alexander R; Gustafson, Gary S; Keole, Sameer R; Liauw, Stanley L; Lloyd, Shane; McLaughlin, Patrick W; Movsas, Benjamin; Prestidge, Bradley R; Showalter, Timothy N; Vapiwala, Neha

    To provide updated American College of Radiology (ACR) appropriateness criteria for transrectal ultrasound-guided transperineal interstitial permanent source brachytherapy. The ACR appropriateness criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) is a treatment option for appropriately selected patients with localized prostate cancer with low to very high risk disease. PPB monotherapy remains an appropriate and effective curative treatment for low-risk prostate cancer patients demonstrating excellent long-term cancer control and acceptable morbidity. PPB monotherapy can be considered for select intermediate-risk patients with multiparametric MRI useful in evaluation of such patients. High-risk patients treated with PPB should receive supplemental external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) along with androgen deprivation. Similarly, patients with involved pelvic lymph nodes may also be considered for such combined treatment but reported long-term outcomes are limited. Computed tomography-based postimplant dosimetry completed within 60 days of PPB is essential for quality assurance. PPB may be considered for treatment of local recurrence after EBRT but is associated with an increased risk of toxicity. Updated appropriateness criteria for patient evaluation, selection, treatment, and postimplant dosimetry are given. These criteria are intended to be advisory only with the final responsibility for patient care residing with the treating

  9. Long-term survival of patients with critical limb ischemia treated with iloprost: response rate and predictive criteria. A retrospective analysis of 102 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, E; Lucaccini, E; Berchiolli, R; Adami, D; Nuti, M; Dell'Omo, G; Farina, A; Panigada, G; Roberts, A T; Meini, S

    2016-12-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients have poor long-term prognosis. We showed that iloprost improves outcomes (major amputation and survival) up a 5-year follow-up, but it is not known if in this length of time the survival curves, of clinical responders and non-responders, differ. A retrospective study enrolling 102 consecutive patients between 2004-2008, with clinical and instrumental (ultrasound, angiography, transcutaneous tensiometry of oxygen TcpO2 and carbon dioxide TcpCO2 in the affected and contralateral limbs) diagnosis of critical ischemia. All patients received the best medical therapy. Iloprost was administered (0.5-2 ng/kg/min 6 hours/day for 2-4 weeks) in all patients initially considered unsuitable for revascularization, repeating it regularly in time every six-twelve months in the case of positive response. The minimum expected follow-up was 4 years. 71.5% of patients were treated with iloprost and the responder rate was 71.2%. Most of the patients were regularly retreated with repeated cycles. Initial median supine TcpCO2 in symptomatic limb was higher in untreated patients than those treated (58 vs. 49 mmHg; p < 0.05) and in non-responders compared to responders (60 vs. 49 mmHg; p < 0.05). TcpCO2 directly and significantly correlated with the highest risk of mortality and seems to represent a new accurate prognostic criterion of unfavourable short and long-term response to prostanoid. In iloprost group, major amputations were significantly reduced. Revascularization was significantly higher in non-responders (57.1% vs. 11.5%; p < 0.05). There was a significantly higher prevalence of subsequent myocardial infarction in the non-iloprost group (27.6% vs. 9.6%; p < 0.05). The survival rate of non-responders was higher than untreated up until the second year (76.2% vs. 62%; p < 0.05). At 4 years we found higher survival in patients treated with iloprost (64.3% vs. 41% in untreated; p < 0.05) and in responders (75% vs. 38.1% in non-responders; p < 0

  10. pH-responsive biocompatible fluorescent polymer nanoparticles based on phenylboronic acid for intracellular imaging and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengliang; Hu, Kelei; Cao, Weipeng; Sun, Yun; Sheng, Wang; Li, Feng; Wu, Yan; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-11-21

    To address current medical challenges, there is an urgent need to develop drug delivery systems with multiple functions, such as simultaneous stimuli-responsive drug release and real-time imaging. Biocompatible polymers have great potential for constructing smart multifunctional drug-delivery systems through grafting with other functional ligands. More importantly, novel biocompatible polymers with intrinsic fluorescence emission can work as theranostic nanomedicines for real-time imaging and drug delivery. Herein, we developed a highly fluorescent nanoparticle based on a phenylboronic acid-modified poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethyleneimine)(PLA-PEI) copolymer loaded with doxorubicin (Dox) for intracellular imaging and pH-responsive drug delivery. The nanoparticles exhibited superior fluorescence properties, such as fluorescence stability, no blinking and excitation-dependent fluorescence behavior. The Dox-loaded fluorescent nanoparticles showed pH-responsive drug release and were more effective in suppressing the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. In addition, the biocompatible fluorescent nanoparticles could be used as a tool for intracellular imaging and drug delivery, and the process of endosomal escape was traced by real-time imaging. These pH-responsive and biocompatible fluorescent polymer nanoparticles, based on phenylboronic acid, are promising tools for intracellular imaging and drug delivery.

  11. Dual Criteria Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten Igel;

    2014-01-01

    The most popular models of decision making use a single criterion to evaluate projects or lotteries. However, decision makers may actually consider multiple criteria when evaluating projects. We consider a dual criteria model from psychology. This model integrates the familiar tradeoffs between...... risk and utility that economists traditionally assume, allowance for rank-dependent decision weights, and consideration of income thresholds. We examine the issues involved in full maximum likelihood estimation of the model using observed choice data. We propose a general method for integrating...... the multiple criteria, using the logic of mixture models, which we believe is attractive from a decision-theoretic and statistical perspective. The model is applied to observed choices from a major natural experiment involving intrinsically dynamic choices over highly skewed outcomes. The evidence points...

  12. Meteor Stream Membership Criteria

    CERN Document Server

    Klacka, J

    2000-01-01

    Criteria for the membership of individual meteors in meteor streams are discussed from the point of view of their mathematical and also physical properties. Discussion is also devoted to the motivation. It is shown that standardly used criteria (mainly D-criterion of Southworth and Hawkins, 1963) have unusual mathematical properties in the sense of a term ``distance'', between points in a phase space, and, physical motivation and realization for the purpose of obtaining their final form is not natural and correct, and, moreover, they lead also to at least surprising astrophysical results. General properties of possible criteria are discussed. A new criterion for the membership in meteor streams is suggested. It is based on probability theory. Finally, a problem of meteor orbit determination for known parent body is discussed.

  13. Computer-aided global breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy: performance assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Zheng, Bin; Cheng, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used increasingly in breast cancer diagnosis and assessment of cancer treatment efficacy. In this study, we applied a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to automatically segment breast regions depicting on MR images and used the kinetic image features computed from the global breast MR images acquired before neoadjuvant chemotherapy to build a new quantitative model to predict response of the breast cancer patients to the chemotherapy. To assess performance and robustness of this new prediction model, an image dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 151 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy was retrospectively assembled and used. Among them, 63 patients had "complete response" (CR) to chemotherapy in which the enhanced contrast levels inside the tumor volume (pre-treatment) was reduced to the level as the normal enhanced background parenchymal tissues (post-treatment), while 88 patients had "partially response" (PR) in which the high contrast enhancement remain in the tumor regions after treatment. We performed the studies to analyze the correlation among the 22 global kinetic image features and then select a set of 4 optimal features. Applying an artificial neural network trained with the fusion of these 4 kinetic image features, the prediction model yielded an area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.83+/-0.04. This study demonstrated that by avoiding tumor segmentation, which is often difficult and unreliable, fusion of kinetic image features computed from global breast MR images without tumor segmentation can also generate a useful clinical marker in predicting efficacy of chemotherapy.

  14. Vibration-response imaging versus quantitative perfusion scintigraphy in the selection of patients for lung-resection surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comce, Fatma; Bingol, Zuleyha; Kiyan, Esen; Tanju, Serhan; Toker, Alper; Cagatay, Pembe; Ece, Turhan

    2011-12-01

    In patients being considered for lung-resection surgery, quantitative perfusion scintigraphy is used to predict postoperative lung function and guide the determination of lung-resection candidacy. Vibration-response imaging has been proposed as a noninvasive, radiation-free, and simpler method to predict postoperative lung function. We compared vibration-response imaging to quantitative perfusion scintigraphy for predicting postoperative FEV(1) and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (D(LCO)). We enrolled 35 candidates for lung resection. Twenty-five patients had preoperative FEV(1) and D(LCO) MEASUREMENTS: The vibration-response-imaging measurements showed strong correlation with the quantitative-perfusion-scintigraphy measurements of predicted postoperative FEV(1)% (r = 0.87, P scintigraphy and the actual postoperative FEV(1) (% and L) (r = 0.47, P = .048, r = 0.73, P scintigraphy. Neither the vibration-response imaging nor the quantitative perfusion scintigraphy predicted postoperative D(LCO)% values agreed with the actual postoperative D(LCO)% values. Vibration-response imaging may be a good alternative to quantitative perfusion scintigraphy in evaluating lung-resection candidacy.

  15. In vivo optical imaging of physiological responses to photostimulation in human photoreceptors

    CERN Document Server

    Hillmann, Dierck; Pfäffle, Clara; Sudkamp, Helge; Franke, Gesa; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive functional imaging of molecular and cellular processes of vision is expected to have immense impact on research and clinical diagnostics. Although suitable intrinsic optical signals (IOS) have been observed ex vivo and in immobilized animals in vivo, it was so far not possible to obtain convincing IOS of photoreceptor activity in humans in vivo. Here, we observed spatially and temporally clearly resolved changes in the optical path length of the photoreceptor outer segment as response to an optical stimulus in living human. To obtain these changes, we evaluated phase data of a parallelized and computationally aberration-corrected optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. The non-invasive detection of optical path length changes shows the neuronal photoreceptor activity of single cones in living human retina, and, more importantly, it provides a new diagnostic option in ophthalmology and neurology and could give new insights into visual phototransduction in humans.

  16. In vivo metabolic imaging of mouse tumor models in response to chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, Maria M.; Dudenkova, Varvara; Shumilova, Anastasia V.; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Shirmanova, Marina V.

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate energy metabolism in human cervical cancer cells HeLa Kyoto after chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo using two-photon fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM). Cellular metabolism was examined by monitoring of the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD. Cancer metabolism was analyzed in dynamics after treatment with cisplatin. Two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopies as well as standard histopathology with hematoxylin and eosin were used to characterize cancer tissue structure. We showed an increase of the optical redox ratio FAD/NAD(P)H in cancer cells in vitro and decrease of the relative contribution of free NAD(P)H (ɑ1) in vitro and in vivo, which presumably indicate a shift to more oxidative metabolism after chemotherapy. These data demonstrate the possibility to detect response of cancer cells to chemotherapy using optical metabolic imaging.

  17. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging predicts response to methylprednisolone in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Jensen, C.V.; Larsson, H.B.W.;

    2003-01-01

    Oral high-dose methylprednisolone treatment is efficacious in acute optic neuritis (ON) and attacks of multiple sclerosis (MS). The responses to treatment in subgroups of patients participating in two randomized, controlled trials were assessed. Fifty-eight patients with ON and 51 patients...... with attacks of MS were treated with placebo or oral methylprednisolone (500 mg daily for five days with a 10-day tapering period). A gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan was obtained at baseline in 66 patients, and 29 patients underwent repeated MRI studies. Seventy-four patients...... underwent lumbar puncture before treatment. The odds ratio (OR) of improvement after methylprednisolone treatment (a one point change in the visual function system score of the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) in ON or in the EDSS score in attacks of MS) was higher in patients with enhancing...

  18. Calcium imaging of odor-evoked responses in the Drosophila antennal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbering, Ana F; Bell, Rati; Galizia, C Giovanni; Benton, Richard

    2012-03-14

    The antennal lobe is the primary olfactory center in the insect brain and represents the anatomical and functional equivalent of the vertebrate olfactory bulb. Olfactory information in the external world is transmitted to the antennal lobe by olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), which segregate to distinct regions of neuropil called glomeruli according to the specific olfactory receptor they express. Here, OSN axons synapse with both local interneurons (LNs), whose processes can innervate many different glomeruli, and projection neurons (PNs), which convey olfactory information to higher olfactory brain regions. Optical imaging of the activity of OSNs, LNs and PNs in the antennal lobe - traditionally using synthetic calcium indicators (e.g. calcium green, FURA-2) or voltage-sensitive dyes (e.g. RH414) - has long been an important technique to understand how olfactory stimuli are represented as spatial and temporal patterns of glomerular activity in many species of insects. Development of genetically-encoded neural activity reporters, such as the fluorescent calcium indicators G-CaMP and Cameleon, the bioluminescent calcium indicator GFP-aequorin, or a reporter of synaptic transmission, synapto-pHluorin has made the olfactory system of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, particularly accessible to neurophysiological imaging, complementing its comprehensively-described molecular, electrophysiological and neuroanatomical properties. These reporters can be selectively expressed via binary transcriptional control systems (e.g. GAL4/UAS, LexA/LexAop, Q system) in defined populations of neurons within the olfactory circuitry to dissect with high spatial and temporal resolution how odor-evoked neural activity is represented, modulated and transformed. Here we describe the preparation and analysis methods to measure odor-evoked responses in the Drosophila antennal lobe using G-CaMP. The animal preparation is minimally invasive and can be adapted to imaging using wide

  19. In vivo, multimodal imaging of B cell distribution and response to antibody immunotherapy in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L J Thorek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: B cell depletion immunotherapy has been successfully employed to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In recent years, increasing attention has been directed towards also using B-cell depletion therapy as a treatment option in autoimmune disorders. However, it appears that the further development of these approaches will depend on a methodology to determine the relation of B-cell depletion to clinical response and how individual patients should be dosed. Thus far, patients have generally been followed by quantification of peripheral blood B cells, but it is not apparent that this measurement accurately reflects systemic B cell dynamics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cellular imaging of the targeted population in vivo may provide significant insight towards effective therapy and a greater understanding of underlying disease mechanics. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticles in concert with near infrared (NIR fluorescent dyes were used to label and track primary C57BL/6 B cells. Following antibody mediated B cell depletion (anti-CD79, NIR-only labeled cells were expeditiously cleared from the circulation and spleen. Interestingly, B cells labeled with both SPIO and NIR were not depleted in the spleen. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Whole body fluorescent tracking of B cells enabled noninvasive, longitudinal imaging of both the distribution and subsequent depletion of B lymphocytes in the spleen. Quantification of depletion revealed a greater than 40% decrease in splenic fluorescent signal-to-background ratio in antibody treated versus control mice. These data suggest that in vivo imaging can be used to follow B cell dynamics, but that the labeling method will need to be carefully chosen. SPIO labeling for tracking purposes, generally thought to be benign, appears to interfere with B cell functions and requires further examination.

  20. The Spectral Response of the Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Barsi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper discusses the pre-launch spectral characterization of the Operational Land Imager (OLI at the component, assembly and instrument levels and relates results of those measurements to artifacts observed in the on-orbit imagery. It concludes that the types of artifacts observed and their magnitudes are consistent with the results of the pre-launch characterizations. The OLI in-band response was characterized both at the integrated instrument level for a sampling of detectors and by an analytical stack-up of component measurements. The out-of-band response was characterized using a combination of Focal Plane Module (FPM level measurements and optical component level measurements due to better sensitivity. One of the challenges of a pushbroom design is to match the spectral responses for all detectors so that images can be flat-fielded regardless of the spectral nature of the targets in the imagery. Spectral variability can induce striping (detector-to-detector variation, banding (FPM-to-FPM variation and other artifacts in the final data products. Analyses of the measured spectral response showed that the maximum discontinuity between FPMs due to spectral filter differences is 0.35% for selected targets for all bands except for Cirrus, where there is almost no signal. The average discontinuity between FPMs is 0.12% for the same targets. These results were expected and are in accordance with the OLI requirements. Pre-launch testing identified low levels (within requirements of spectral crosstalk amongst the three HgCdTe (Cirrus, SWIR1 and SWIR2 bands of the OLI and on-orbit data confirms this crosstalk in the imagery. Further post-launch analyses and simulations revealed that the strongest crosstalk effect is from the SWIR1 band to the Cirrus band; about 0.2% of SWIR1 signal leaks into the Cirrus. Though the total crosstalk signal is only a few counts, it is evident in some scenes when the in-band cirrus signal is very weak. In

  1. Brain functional magnetic resonance imaging response to glucose and fructose infusions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, J Q; Klopfenstein, B A; Stevens, A A; Havel, P J; Adams, S H; Dunn, T N; Krisky, C; Rooney, W D

    2011-03-01

    In animals, intracerebroventricular glucose and fructose have opposing effects on appetite and weight regulation. In humans, functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies during glucose ingestion or infusion have demonstrated suppression of hypothalamic signalling, but no studies have compared the effects of glucose and fructose. We therefore sought to determine if the brain response differed to glucose vs. fructose in humans independently of the ingestive process. Nine healthy, normal weight subjects underwent blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI measurements during either intravenous (IV) glucose (0.3 mg/kg), fructose (0.3 mg/kg) or saline, administered over 2 min in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. Blood was sampled every 5 min during a baseline period and following infusion for 60 min in total for glucose, fructose, lactate and insulin levels. No significant brain BOLD signal changes were detected in response to IV saline. BOLD signal in the cortical control areas increased during glucose infusion (p = 0.002), corresponding with increased plasma glucose and insulin levels. In contrast, BOLD signal decreased in the cortical control areas during fructose infusion (p = 0.006), corresponding with increases of plasma fructose and lactate. Neither glucose nor fructose infusions significantly altered BOLD signal in the hypothalamus. In normal weight humans, cortical responses as assessed by BOLD fMRI to infused glucose are opposite to those of fructose. Differential brain responses to these sugars and their metabolites may provide insight into the neurologic basis for dysregulation of food intake during high dietary fructose intake. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Model System for Live Imaging of Neuronal Responses to Injury and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Gravel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Although it has been well established that induction of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43 during development coincides with axonal outgrowth and early synapse formation, the existence of neuronal plasticity and neurite outgrowth in the adult central nervous system after injuries is more controversial. To visualize the processes of neuronal injury and repair in living animals, we generated reporter mice for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging bearing the luc (luciferase and gfp (green fluorescent protein reporter genes under the control of the murine GAP-43 promoter. Reporter functionality was first observed during the development of transgenic embryos. Using in vivo bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging, we visualized induction of the GAP-43 signals from live embryos starting at E10.5, as well as neuronal responses to brain and peripheral nerve injuries (the signals peaked at 14 days postinjury. Moreover, three-dimensional analysis of the GAP-43 bioluminescent signal confirmed that it originated from brain structures affected by ischemic injury. The analysis of fluorescence signal at cellular level revealed colocalization between endogenous protein and the GAP-43-driven gfp transgene. Taken together, our results suggest that the GAP-43-luc/gfp reporter mouse represents a valid model system for real-time analysis of neurite outgrowth and the capacity of the adult nervous system to regenerate after injuries.

  3. Automated phenotyping of plant shoots using imaging methods for analysis of plant stress responses - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humplík, Jan F; Lazár, Dušan; Husičková, Alexandra; Spíchal, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Current methods of in-house plant phenotyping are providing a powerful new tool for plant biology studies. The self-constructed and commercial platforms established in the last few years, employ non-destructive methods and measurements on a large and high-throughput scale. The platforms offer to certain extent, automated measurements, using either simple single sensor analysis, or advanced integrative simultaneous analysis by multiple sensors. However, due to the complexity of the approaches used, it is not always clear what such forms of plant phenotyping can offer the potential end-user, i.e. plant biologist. This review focuses on imaging methods used in the phenotyping of plant shoots including a brief survey of the sensors used. To open up this topic to a broader audience, we provide here a simple introduction to the principles of automated non-destructive analysis, namely RGB, chlorophyll fluorescence, thermal and hyperspectral imaging. We further on present an overview on how and to which extent, the automated integrative in-house phenotyping platforms have been used recently to study the responses of plants to various changing environments.

  4. Challenge Brought by Brain Imaging Technology for the Judgment of Moral Responsibility%脑成像技术对道德责任判定的挑战

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛新志; 刘星

    2011-01-01

    The judgment of moral responsibility was based on the existence of free will and the consequence of the action.However, brain imaging technology indicates the real free will does not really exist.Emotions and memory play an important role in moral judgments, and sometimes a decisive role.Therefore, for the moral evaluation,free will is not a reasonable prerequisite and the consequence of the action not a reliable basis, all of which raise a great challenge for the traditional criteria of judging moral responsibility.%道德责任评判以自由意志的存在为前提,以行动的后果为依据.然而,脑成像技术的发展表明真正的自由意志是不存在的,情感以及记忆在道德判断中扮演了重要角色,有时甚至起决定性作用.因此,自由意志并非道德责任判定的合理前提,行动的直接后果也并非道德责任评判的可靠依据,这给传统道德责任判定提出了极大的挑战.

  5. PET image reconstruction with system matrix based on point spread function derived from single photon incidence response

    CERN Document Server

    Xin, Fan; Ming-Kai, Yun; Xiao-Li, Sun; Xue-Xiang, Cao; Shuang-Quanm, Liu; Pei, Chai; Dao-Wu, Li; Long, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, statistical iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques appear particularly promising since they can provide accurate physical model and geometric system description. The reconstructed image quality mainly depends on the system matrix model which describes the relationship between image space and projection space for the IR method. The system matrix can contain some physics factors of detection such as geometrical component and blurring component. Point spread function (PSF) is generally used to describe the blurring component. This paper proposes an IR method based on the PSF system matrix, which is derived from the single photon incidence response function. More specifically, the gamma photon incidence on a crystal array is simulated by the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and then the single photon incidence response functions are obtained. Subsequently, using the single photon incidence response functions, the coincidence blurring factor is acquired according to the...

  6. MO-DE-303-03: Session on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, S. [University of Washington, School of Medicine: PET/CT and SPECT/CT for Lung and Liver Radiation Therapy Response Assessment of Tumor and Normal Tissue (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This session will focus on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy. This is a technically challenging method to translate to practice in radiation therapy. In the new era of precision medicine, however, delivering the right treatment, to the right patient, and at the right time, can positively impact treatment choices and patient outcomes. Quantitative imaging provides the spatial sensitivity required by radiation therapy for precision medicine that is not available by other means. In this Joint ESTRO -AAPM Symposium, three leading-edge investigators will present specific motivations for quantitative imaging biomarkers in radiation therapy of esophageal, head and neck, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Experiences with the use of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI, diffusion- weighted (DW) MRI, PET/CT, and SPECT/CT will be presented. Issues covered will include: response prediction, dose-painting, timing between therapy and imaging, within-therapy biomarkers, confounding effects, normal tissue sparing, dose-response modeling, and association with clinical biomarkers and outcomes. Current information will be presented from investigational studies and clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Learn motivations for the use of quantitative imaging biomarkers for assessment of response to radiation therapy Review the potential areas of application in cancer therapy Examine the challenges for translation, including imaging confounds and paucity of evidence to date Compare exemplary examples of the current state of the art in DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, PET/CT and SPECT/CT imaging for assessment of response to radiation therapy Van der Heide: Research grants from the Dutch Cancer Society and the European Union (FP7) Bowen: RSNA Scholar grant.

  7. Monitoring the Response of Hyperbilirubinemia in the Mouse Brain by In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Manni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased levels of unconjugated bilirubin are neurotoxic, but the mechanism leading to neurological damage has not been completely elucidated. Innovative strategies of investigation are needed to more precisely define this pathological process. By longitudinal in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we noninvasively visualized the brain response to hyperbilirubinemia in the MITO-Luc mouse, in which light emission is restricted to the regions of active cell proliferation. We assessed that acute hyperbilirubinemia promotes bioluminescence in the brain region, indicating an increment in the cell proliferation rate. Immunohistochemical detection in brain sections of cells positive for both luciferase and the microglial marker allograft inflammatory factor 1 suggests proliferation of microglial cells. In addition, we demonstrated that brain induction of bioluminescence was altered by pharmacological displacement of bilirubin from its albumin binding sites and by modulation of the blood–brain barrier permeability, all pivotal factors in the development of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction. We also determined that treatment with minocycline, an antibiotic with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties, or administration of bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody, blunts bilirubin-induced bioluminescence. Overall the study supports the use of the MITO-Luc mouse as a valuable tool for the rapid response monitoring of drugs aiming at preventing acute bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction.

  8. Ultrasmall Nanoplatforms as Calcium-Responsive Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussaron, Albert; Vibhute, Sandip; Bianchi, Andrea; Gündüz, Serhat; Kotb, Shady; Sancey, Lucie; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Rizzitelli, Silvia; Crémillieux, Yannick; Lux, Francois; Logothetis, Nikos K; Tillement, Olivier; Angelovski, Goran

    2015-10-07

    The preparation of ultrasmall and rigid platforms (USRPs) that are covalently coupled to macrocycle-based, calcium-responsive/smart contrast agents (SCAs), and the initial in vitro and in vivo validation of the resulting nanosized probes (SCA-USRPs) by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is reported. The synthetic procedure is robust, allowing preparation of the SCA-USRPs on a multigram scale. The resulting platforms display the desired MRI activity—i.e., longitudinal relaxivity increases almost twice at 7 T magnetic field strength upon saturation with Ca(2+). Cell viability is probed with the MTT assay using HEK-293 cells, which show good tolerance for lower contrast agent concentrations over longer periods of time. On intravenous administration of SCA-USRPs in living mice, MRI studies indicate their rapid accumulation in the renal pelvis and parenchyma. Importantly, the MRI signal increases in both kidney compartments when CaCl2 is also administrated. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiments confirm accumulation of SCA-USRPs in the renal cortex. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first studies which demonstrate calcium-sensitive MRI signal changes in vivo. Continuing contrast agent and MRI protocol optimizations should lead to wider application of these responsive probes and development of superior functional methods for monitoring calcium-dependent physiological and pathological processes in a dynamic manner.

  9. Monitoring the Response of Hyperbilirubinemia in the Mouse Brain by In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manni, Isabella; Di Rocco, Giuliana; Fusco, Salvatore; Leone, Lucia; Barbati, Saviana Antonella; Carapella, Carmine Maria; Grassi, Claudio; Piaggio, Giulia; Toietta, Gabriele

    2016-12-28

    Increased levels of unconjugated bilirubin are neurotoxic, but the mechanism leading to neurological damage has not been completely elucidated. Innovative strategies of investigation are needed to more precisely define this pathological process. By longitudinal in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we noninvasively visualized the brain response to hyperbilirubinemia in the MITO-Luc mouse, in which light emission is restricted to the regions of active cell proliferation. We assessed that acute hyperbilirubinemia promotes bioluminescence in the brain region, indicating an increment in the cell proliferation rate. Immunohistochemical detection in brain sections of cells positive for both luciferase and the microglial marker allograft inflammatory factor 1 suggests proliferation of microglial cells. In addition, we demonstrated that brain induction of bioluminescence was altered by pharmacological displacement of bilirubin from its albumin binding sites and by modulation of the blood-brain barrier permeability, all pivotal factors in the development of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction. We also determined that treatment with minocycline, an antibiotic with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties, or administration of bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody, blunts bilirubin-induced bioluminescence. Overall the study supports the use of the MITO-Luc mouse as a valuable tool for the rapid response monitoring of drugs aiming at preventing acute bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction.

  10. Inducible ablation of melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells reveals their central role in non-image forming visual responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Hatori

    Full Text Available Rod/cone photoreceptors of the outer retina and the melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs of the inner retina mediate non-image forming visual responses including entrainment of the circadian clock to the ambient light, the pupillary light reflex (PLR, and light modulation of activity. Targeted deletion of the melanopsin gene attenuates these adaptive responses with no apparent change in the development and morphology of the mRGCs. Comprehensive identification of mRGCs and knowledge of their specific roles in image-forming and non-image forming photoresponses are currently lacking. We used a Cre-dependent GFP expression strategy in mice to genetically label the mRGCs. This revealed that only a subset of mRGCs express enough immunocytochemically detectable levels of melanopsin. We also used a Cre-inducible diphtheria toxin receptor (iDTR expression approach to express the DTR in mRGCs. mRGCs develop normally, but can be acutely ablated upon diphtheria toxin administration. The mRGC-ablated mice exhibited normal outer retinal function. However, they completely lacked non-image forming visual responses such as circadian photoentrainment, light modulation of activity, and PLR. These results point to the mRGCs as the site of functional integration of the rod/cone and melanopsin phototransduction pathways and as the primary anatomical site for the divergence of image-forming and non-image forming photoresponses in mammals.

  11. Functional brain response to food images in successful adolescent weight losers compared with normal-weight and overweight controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Chad D; Kirwan, C Brock

    2015-03-01

    Research conducted with adults suggests that successful weight losers demonstrate greater activation in brain regions associated with executive control in response to viewing high-energy foods. No previous studies have examined these associations in adolescents. Functional neuroimaging was used to assess brain response to food images among groups of overweight (OW), normal-weight (NW), and successful weight-losing (SWL) adolescents. Eleven SWL, 12 NW, and 11 OW participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while viewing images of high- and low-energy foods. When viewing high-energy food images, SWLs demonstrated greater activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) compared with OW and NW controls. Compared with NW and SWL groups, OW individuals demonstrated greater activation in the ventral striatum and anterior cingulate in response to food images. Adolescent SWLs demonstrated greater neural activation in the DLPFC compared with OW/NW controls when viewing high-energy food stimuli, which may indicate enhanced executive control. OW individuals' brain responses to food stimuli may indicate greater reward incentive processes than either SWL or NW groups. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  12. Defining response to radiotherapy in rectal cancer using magnetic resonance imaging and histopathological scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Muhammed R S; Bhoday, Jemma; Battersby, Nicholas J; Chand, Manish; West, Nicholas P; Abulafi, Al-Mutaz; Tekkis, Paris P; Brown, Gina

    2016-01-01

    AIM To define good and poor regression using pathology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) regression scales after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer. METHODS A systematic review was performed on all studies up to December 2015, without language restriction, that were identified from MEDLINE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (1960-2015), and EMBASE (1991-2015). Searches were performed of article bibliographies and conference abstracts. MeSH and text words used included “tumour regression”, “mrTRG”, “poor response” and “colorectal cancers”. Clinical studies using either MRI or histopathological tumour regression grade (TRG) scales to define good and poor responders were included in relation to outcomes [local recurrence (LR), distant recurrence (DR), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS)]. There was no age restriction or stage of cancer restriction for patient inclusion. Data were extracted by two authors working independently and using pre-defined outcome measures. RESULTS Quantitative data (prevalence) were extracted and analysed according to meta-analytical techniques using comprehensive meta-analysis. Qualitative data (LR, DR, DFS and OS) were presented as ranges. The overall proportion of poor responders after neo-adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) was 37.7% (95%CI: 30.1-45.8). There were 19 different reported histopathological scales and one MRI regression scale (mrTRG). Clinical studies used nine and six histopathological scales for poor and good responders, respectively. All studies using MRI to define good and poor response used one scale. The most common histopathological definition for good response was the Mandard grades 1 and 2 or Dworak grades 3 and 4; Mandard 3, 4 and 5 and Dworak 0, 1 and 2 were used for poor response. For histopathological grades, the 5-year outcomes for poor responders were LR 3.4%-4.3%, DR 14.3%-20.3%, DFS 61.7%-68.1% and OS 60.7-69.1. Good pathological response 5-year outcomes were LR

  13. Optimization of the matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) impulse response and modulation transfer function characteristics for chest imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Devon J; McAdams, H P; Dobbins, James T

    2006-03-01

    Matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) uses linear systems theory, along with a priori knowledge of the imaging geometry, to deterministically distinguish between true structure and overlying tomographic blur in a set of conventional tomosynthesis planes. In this paper we examine the effect of total scan angle (ANG), number of input projections (N), and plane separation/number of reconstructed planes (NP) on the MITS impulse response (IR) and modulation transfer function (MTF), with the purpose of optimizing MITS imaging of the chest. MITS IR and MTF data were generated by simulating the imaging of a very thin wire, using various combinations of ANG, N, and NP. Actual tomosynthesis data of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were acquired with a prototype experimental system, using the same imaging parameter combinations as those in the simulations. Thoracic projection data from two human subjects were collected for corroboration of the system response analysis in vivo. Results suggest that ANG=20 degrees, N=71, NP=69 is the optimal combination for MITS chest imaging given the inherent constraints of our prototype system. MITS chest data from human subjects demonstrates that the selected imaging strategy can effectively produce high-quality MITS thoracic images in vivo.

  14. Radio-adaptive Response in Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Induced by Technetium-99m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Mohammad Mehdi; Shabestani-Monfared, Ali; Shahidi, Maryam; Amiri, Mehrangiz; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Borzoueisileh, Sajad; Gorji, Kourosh Ebrahim Nejad

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Low dose radiation will induce adaptation and following exposure to an adaptive dose, the cells are more resistance to following challenging doses. This phenomenon is known as radio-adaptive response. The aim of this study was to investigate the percentage of apoptotic cells in the peripheral blood samples of the patients which undergo myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) before thallium scan to assess the induction of radio-adaptive response. Materials and Methods: In this study, 97 samples from 74 patients, referred to nuclear medicine center of Mazandaran Heart Hospital for MPI, which had no history of diagnostic, therapeutic, occupational, and radioactive exposures during past 2 years, were provided. The participants were classified into four groups including control, patients which were scanned solely with technetium, the patients which examined by thallium and the last group were the patients that examined by technetium followed by thallium. Then 2 ml Peripheral blood samples were obtained, and after 24 h incubating, the samples were studied by neutral comet assay. Statistical analysis was carried out using Student's t-test along with one-way analysis of variance. Results: The mean percentage of apoptotic cells in the exposed groups were higher than the control. Furthermore, among exposed groups, the apoptotic cells in thallium group were more than others and this index was significantly lower in the group which was undergone technetium administration before thallium scan. Conclusions: These findings suggest that exposure to Tc-99m could induce a radio-adaptive response against the exposure of thallium-201.

  15. Volumetric assessment of tumour response using functional MR imaging in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma treated with a combination of doxorubicin-eluting beads and sorafenib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona-Villalobos, Celia Pamela [Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Halappa, Vivek Gowdra; Bonekamp, Susanne; Kamel, Ihab R. [Johns Hopkins University, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Geschwind, Jean-Francois H.; Reyes, Diane [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cosgrove, David [Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Department of Surgical Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-09-17

    To prospectively assess treatment response using volumetric functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metrics in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with the combination of doxorubicin-eluting bead-transarterial chemoembolization (DEB TACE) and sorafenib. A single center study enrolled 41 patients treated with systemic sorafenib, 400 mg twice a day, combined with DEB TACE. All patients had a pre-treatment and 3-4 week post-treatment MRI. Anatomic response criteria (RECIST, mRECIST and EASL) and volumetric functional response (ADC, enhancement) were assessed. Statistical analyses included paired Student's t-test, Kaplan-Meier curves, Cohen's Kappa, and multivariate cox proportional hazard model. Median tumour size by RECIST remained unchanged post-treatment (8.3 ± 4.1 cm vs. 8.1 ± 4.3 cm, p = 0.44). There was no significant survival difference for early response by RECIST (p = 0.93). EASL and mRECIST could not be analyzed in 12 patients. Volumetric ADC increased significantly (1.32 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec to 1.60 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec, p < 0.001), and volumetric enhancement decreased significantly in HAP (38.2 % to 17.6 %, p < 0.001) and PVP (76.6 % to 41.2 %, p < 0.005). Patients who demonstrated ≥ 65 % decrease PVP enhancement had significantly improved overall survival compared to non-responders (p < 0.005). Volumetric PVP enhancement was demonstrated to be significantly correlated with survival in the combination of DEB TACE and sorafenib for patients with HCC, enabling precise stratification of responders and non-responders. (orig.)

  16. Neural Responses to Visual Food Cues According to Weight Status: A Systematic Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirrilly ePursey

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies suggests specific food related behaviours contribute to the development of obesity. The aim of this review was to report the neural responses to visual food cues, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, in humans of differing weight status. Published studies to 2014 were retrieved and included if they: used visual food cues, studied humans >18 years old, reported weight status, and included fMRI outcomes. Sixty studies were identified that investigated the neural responses of healthy weight participants (n=26, healthy weight compared to obese participants (n=17, and weight loss interventions (n=12. High calorie food images were used in the majority of studies (n=36, however, image selection justification was only provided in 19 studies. Obese individuals had increased activation of reward-related brain areas including the insula and orbitofrontal cortex in response to visual food cues compared to healthy weight individuals, and this was particularly evident in response to energy dense cues. Additionally, obese individuals were more responsive to food images when satiated. Meta-analysis of changes in neural activation post- weight loss revealed small areas of convergence of activation across studies in brain areas related to emotion, memory and learning such as the cingulate gyrus, lentiform nucleus and precuneus.Differential activation patterns to visual food cues were observed between obese, healthy weight and weight loss populations. Future studies require standardisation of dietetic variables and fMRI outcomes to enable more direct comparisons between studies.

  17. Dose response characteristics of a novel CCD camera-based electronic portal imaging device comparison with OCTAVIUS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvari, Akbar; Aghamiri, Seyed Mahmoud Reza; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabie; Alaei, Parham

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetric properties of a CCD camera-based Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for clinical dosimetric application have been evaluated. Characteristics obtained by EPID also compared with commercial 2D array of ion chambers. Portal images acquired in dosimetry mode then exported raw fluence or uncorrected images were investigated. Integration time of image acquisition mode has adjusted on 1 s per frame. As saturation of camera of the EPID, dose response does not have linear behavior. The slight nonlinearity of the camera response can be corrected by a logarithmic expression. A fourth order polynomial regression model with coefficient of determination of 0.998 predicts a response to absolute dose values at less than 50 cGy. A field size dependent response of up to 7% (0.99-1.06) relative OCTAVIUS detector measurement was found. The EPID response can be fitted by a cubic regression for field size changes, yielded coefficient of determination of 0.999. These results indicate that the EPID is well suited for accurate dosimetric purposes, the major limitation currently being due to integration time and dead-time in frame acquisition.

  18. Affective and Autonomic Responses to Erotic Images: Evidence of Disgust-Based Mechanisms in Female Sexual Interest/Arousal Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePesa, Natasha S; Cassisi, Jeffrey E

    2017-09-01

    Disgust has recently been implicated in the development and maintenance of female sexual dysfunction, yet most empirical studies have been conducted with a sexually healthy sample. The current study contributes to the literature by expanding the application of a disgust model of sexual functioning to a clinically relevant sample of women with low sexual desire/arousal and accompanying sexual distress. Young women (mean age = 19.12 years) with psychometrically defined sexual dysfunction (i.e., female sexual interest/arousal disorder [FSIAD] group) and a healthy control group were compared in their affective (i.e., facial electromyography [EMG] and self-report) and autonomic (i.e., heart rate and electrodermal activity) responses to disgusting, erotic, positive, and neutral images. Significant differences were predicted in responses to erotic images only. Specifically, it was hypothesized that the FSIAD group would display affective and autonomic responses consistent with a disgust response, while responses from the control group would align with a general appetitive response. Results largely supported study hypotheses. The FSIAD group displayed significantly greater negative facial affect, reported more subjective disgust, and recorded greater heart rate deceleration than the control group in response to erotic stimuli. Greater subjective disgust response corresponded with more sexual avoidance behavior. Planned follow-up analyses explored correlates of subjective disgust responses.

  19. Human Systems Design Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1982-01-01

    the necessary functional qualities but also the needed human qualities. The author's main argument is, that the design process should be a dialectical synthesis of the two points of view: Man as a System Component, and System as Man's Environment. Based on a man's presentation of the state of the art a set...... of design criteria is suggested and their relevance discussed. The point is to focus on the operator rather than on the computer. The crucial question is not to program the computer to work on its own conditions, but to “program” the operator to function on human conditions.......This paper deals with the problem of designing more humanised computer systems. This problem can be formally described as the need for defining human design criteria, which — if used in the design process - will secure that the systems designed get the relevant qualities. That is not only...

  20. Robustness - acceptance criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzuto, Enrico; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Kroon, Inger B.

    2010-01-01

    This factsheet describes the general framework on the bases of which acceptance criteria for requirements on the robustness of structures can be set. Such framework is based on the more general concept of risk-based assessment of engineering systems. The present factsheet is to be seen in conjunc......This factsheet describes the general framework on the bases of which acceptance criteria for requirements on the robustness of structures can be set. Such framework is based on the more general concept of risk-based assessment of engineering systems. The present factsheet is to be seen...... in conjunction with the one on the theoretical framework for robustness (Sørensen et al. 2009). In the present factsheet, the focus is on normative implications....

  1. History and Evolution of the Johnson Criteria.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjaardema, Tracy A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Smith, Collin S. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Birch, Gabriel Carisle [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The Johnson Criteria metric calculates probability of detection of an object imaged by an optical system, and was created in 1958 by John Johnson. As understanding of target detection has improved, detection models have evolved to better model additional factors such as weather, scene content, and object placement. The initial Johnson Criteria, while sufficient for technology and understanding at the time, does not accurately reflect current research into target acquisition and technology. Even though current research shows a dependence on human factors, there appears to be a lack of testing and modeling of human variability.

  2. Association between dynamic features of breast DCE-MR imaging and clinical response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy: a preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lijuan; Fan, Ming; Li, Lihua; Zhang, Juan; Shao, Guoliang; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is being used increasingly in the management of patients with breast cancer for systemically reducing the size of primary tumor before surgery in order to improve survival. The clinical response of patients to NACT is correlated with reduced or abolished of their primary tumor, which is important for treatment in the next stage. Recently, the dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is used for evaluation of the response of patients to NACT. To measure this correlation, we extracted the dynamic features from the DCE- MRI and performed association analysis between these features and the clinical response to NACT. In this study, 59 patients are screened before NATC, of which 47 are complete or partial response, and 12 are no response. We segmented the breast areas depicted on each MR image by a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme, registered images acquired from the sequential MR image scan series, and calculated eighteen features extracted from DCE-MRI. We performed SVM with the 18 features for classification between patients of response and no response. Furthermore, 6 of the 18 features are selected to refine the classification by using Genetic Algorithm. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are 87%, 95.74% and 50%, respectively. The calculated area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is 0.79+/-0.04. This study indicates that the features of DCE-MRI of breast cancer are associated with the response of NACT. Therefore, our method could be helpful for evaluation of NACT in treatment of breast cancer.

  3. Optimizing the Attitude Control of Small Satellite Constellations for Rapid Response Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, S.; Li, A.

    2016-12-01

    -off and minimum image distortion among the satellites, using Landsat's specifications. Attitude-specific constraints such as power consumption, response time, and stability were factored into the optimality computations. The algorithm can integrate cloud cover predictions, specific ground and air assets and angular constraints.

  4. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose-response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, C.; Thor, M.; Liu, M.; Moissenko, V.; Petersen, S. E.; Høyer, M.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2014-07-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose-response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ≥2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (≤18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (≤0.8 and ≤4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ≤1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose-response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice thickness

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juzhong; Fan, Ming; Zheng, Bin; Shao, Guoliang; Zhang, Juan; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of women death in the United States. Currently, Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy (NAC) has become standard treatment paradigms for breast cancer patients. Therefore, it is important to find a reliable non-invasive assessment and prediction method which can evaluate and predict the response of NAC on breast cancer. The Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) approach can reflect dynamic distribution of contrast agent in tumor vessels, providing important basis for clinical diagnosis. In this study, the efficacy of DCE-MRI on evaluation and prediction of response to NAC in breast cancer was investigated. To this end, fifty-seven cases of malignant breast cancers with MRI examination both before and after two cycle of NAC were analyzed. After pre-processing approach for segmenting breast lesions and background regions, 126-dimensional imaging features were extracted from DCE-MRI. Statistical analyses were then performed to evaluate the associations between the extracted DCE-MRI features and the response to NAC. Specifically, pairwise t test was used to calculate differences of imaging features between MRI examinations before-and-after NAC. Moreover, the associations of these image features with response to NAC were assessed using logistic regression. Significant association are found between response to NAC and the features of lesion morphology and background parenchymal enhancement, especially the feature of background enhancement in normal side of breast (P=0.011). Our study indicate that DCE-MRI features can provide candidate imaging markers to predict response of NAC in breast cancer.

  6. A ghost story: spatio-temporal response characteristics of an indirect-detection flat-panel imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, J H; Jaffray, D A

    1999-08-01

    Spatial and temporal imaging characteristics of an amorphous silicon flat-panel imager (FPI) were investigated in terms relevant to the application of such devices in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and other x-ray imaging modalities, including general radiography, fluoroscopy, mammography, radiotherapy portal imaging, and nondestructive testing. Specifically, issues of image lag (including the magnitude, spatial uniformity, temporal-frequency characteristics, and dependence upon exposure and frame time) and long-term image persistence ("ghosts") were investigated. As part of the basic characterization of the FPI, pixel dark signal and noise (magnitude, temporal stability, and spatial uniformity) as well as radiation response (signal size, linearity, gain, and reciprocity) were also measured. Image lag was analyzed as a function of frame time and incident exposure. First-frame lag (i.e., the relative residual signal in the first frame following readout of an exposure) was approximately 2-10%, depending upon incident exposure and was spatially nonuniform to a slight degree across the FPI; second-, third-, and fourth-frame lag were approximately 0.7%, 0.4%, and 0.3%, respectively (at 25% sensor saturation). Image lag was also analyzed in terms of the temporal-frequency-dependent transfer function derived from the radiation response, allowing a quantitative description of system components contributing to lag. Finally, the contrast of objects as a function of time following an exposure was measured in order to examine long-term image persistence ("ghosts"). Ghosts were found to persist up to 30 min or longer, depending upon the exposure and frame time. Two means of reducing the apparent contrast of ghost images were tested: (i) rapid scanning of the FPI at maximum frame rate, and (ii) flood-field exposure of the FPI; neither was entirely satisfactory. These results pose important considerations for application of FPIs in CBCT as well as other x-ray imaging

  7. SU-E-J-31: Biodynamic Imaging of Cancer Tissue and Response to Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte, D; Turek, J; Childress, M; An, R; Merrill, D [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Matei, D [Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure intracellular motions inside three-dimensional living cancer tissue samples to establish a novel set of biodynamic biomarkers that assess tissue proliferative activity and sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy. Methods: Biodynamic imaging (BDI) uses digital holography with low-coherence low-intensity light illumination to construct 3D holograms from depths up to a millimeter deep inside cancer tissue models that include multicellular tumor spheroids and ex vivo cancer biopsies from canine non-Hodgkins lymphoma and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) mouse explants. Intracellular motions modulate the holographic intensity with frequencies related to the Doppler effect caused by the motions of a wide variety of intracellular components. These motions are affected by applied therapeutic agents, and BDI produces unique fingerprints of the action of specific drugs on the motions in specific cell types. In this study, chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin for canine lymphoma and oxoplatin for ovarian) are applied to the living tissue models and monitored over 10 hours by BDI. Results: Multicellular spheroids and patient biopsies are categorized as either sensitive or insensitive to applied therapeutics depending on the intracellular Doppler signatures of chemotherapy response. For both lymphoma and EOC there is strong specificity to the two types of sensitivities, with sensitive cell lines and biopsies exhibiting a global cessation of proliferation and strong suppression of metabolic activity, while insensitive cell lines and biopsies show moderate activation of Doppler frequencies associated with membrane processes and possible membrane trafficking. Conclusion: This work supports the hypothesis that biodynamic biomarkers from three-dimensional living tumor tissue, that includes tissue heterogeneity and measured within 24 hours of surgery, is predictive of near-term patient response to therapy. Future work will correlate biodynamic biomarkers with

  8. Visualizing arthritic inflammation and therapeutic response by fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging (19F MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balducci Anthony

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive imaging of inflammation to measure the progression of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and to monitor responses to therapy is critically needed. V-Sense, a perfluorocarbon (PFC contrast agent that preferentially labels inflammatory cells, which are then recruited out of systemic circulation to sites of inflammation, enables detection by 19F MRI. With no 19F background in the host, detection is highly-specific and can act as a proxy biomarker of the degree of inflammation present. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis in rats, a model with many similarities to human RA, was used to study the ability of the PFC contrast agent to reveal the accumulation of inflammation over time using 19F MRI. Disease progression in the rat hind limbs was monitored by caliper measurements and 19F MRI on days 15, 22 and 29, including the height of clinically symptomatic disease. Naïve rats served as controls. The capacity of the PFC contrast agent and 19F MRI to assess the effectiveness of therapy was studied in a cohort of rats administered oral prednisolone on days 14 to 28. Results Quantification of 19F signal measured by MRI in affected limbs was linearly correlated with disease severity. In animals with progressive disease, increases in 19F signal reflected the ongoing recruitment of inflammatory cells to the site, while no increase in 19F signal was observed in animals receiving treatment which resulted in clinical resolution of disease. Conclusion These results indicate that 19F MRI may be used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate longitudinal responses to a therapeutic regimen, while additionally revealing the recruitment of monocytic cells involved in the inflammatory process to the anatomical site. This study may support the use of 19F MRI to clinically quantify and monitor the severity of inflammation, and to assess the effectiveness of treatments in RA and other diseases with an inflammatory

  9. Doppler laser imaging predicts response to topical minoxidil in the treatment of female pattern hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, J; Kovacevic, M; Situm, M; Stanimirovic, A; Bolanca, Z; Goren, A

    2016-01-01

    Topical minoxidil is the only drug approved by the US FDA for the treatment of female pattern hair loss. Unfortunately, following 16 weeks of daily application, less than 40% of patients regrow hair. Several studies have demonstrated that sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hair follicles predicts topical minoxidil response in female pattern hair loss patients. However, due to patients’ discomfort with the procedure, and the time required to perform the enzymatic assay it would be ideal to develop a rapid, non-invasive test for sulfotransferase enzyme activity. Minoxidil is a pro-drug converted to its active form, minoxidil sulfate, by sulfotransferase enzymes in the outer root sheath of hair. Minoxidil sulfate is the active form required for both the promotion of hair regrowth and the vasodilatory effects of minoxidil. We thus hypothesized that laser Doppler velocimetry measurement of scalp blood perfusion subsequent to the application of topical minoxidil would correlate with sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hair follicles. In this study, plucked hair follicles from female pattern hair loss patients were analyzed for sulfotransferase enzyme activity. Additionally, laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure the change in scalp perfusion at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes, after the application of minoxidil. In agreement with our hypothesis, we discovered a correlation (r=1.0) between the change in scalp perfusion within 60 minutes after topical minoxidil application and sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hairs. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the feasibility of using laser Doppler imaging as a rapid, non-invasive diagnostic test to predict topical minoxidil response in the treatment of female pattern hair loss.

  10. Retinal vascular calibre and response to light exposure and serial imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Hanno, T.; Sjølie, Anne K.; Mathiesen, E. B.

    2014-01-01

    and vein equivalents (CRAE and CRVE). Outcome measures were difference in calibres after prior light versus prior dark exposure and difference in calibre during each of the two imaging sequences. Results: CRVE was wider with prior light exposure (2.7%, p = 0.0001), comparing the first image in each image......Purpose: To investigate whether retinal vessel calibre measurements on optical retinal photography are affected by light and dark exposure prior to photography and whether the vessel calibre changes during an imaging sequence of several images. Methods: Digital optical retinal photographs were...... obtained from 32 healthy adults in two separate image sequences of six images during 1 min; one sequence with 10 min of dark exposure and one with 10 min of light exposure prior to imaging. Retinal arteriolar and venular calibres were measured computer-assisted and summarized as central retinal artery...

  11. No evidence for generalized increased postoperative responsiveness to pain: a combined behavioral and serial functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Schneider, Fabien C G; Christensen, Rune

    2009-01-01

    , in conjunction with serial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). METHODS: We studied brain and subjective pain responses to innocuous and noxious heat in seven patients before and after total knee arthroplasty. Noxious and innocuous thermal stimuli were applied to the upper leg, proximal to the surgical...

  12. Inferring Toxicological Responses of HepG2 Cells from ToxCast High Content Imaging Data (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the dynamic perturbation of cell states by chemicals can aid in for predicting their adverse effects. High-content imaging (HCI) was used to measure the state of HepG2 cells over three time points (1, 24, and 72 h) in response to 976 ToxCast chemicals for 10 differe...

  13. Implementation of acceptability criteria for dental radiology in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarijs, Tom

    2013-02-01

    The implementation of routine quality control (QC) tests in dental radiology in Belgium has been neglected for many years. In 2008, the (Belgian) Federal Agency for Nuclear Control determined acceptability criteria for X-ray equipment used for dentomaxillofacial imaging. An overview of the development of the criteria, together with implementation and the first results of dental QC in Belgium, is discussed.

  14. Magnetic Resonance imaging Assessment of Tumor Microvessels and Response to Antiangiogenesis Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Preda (Anda)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractMagnetic resonance Imaging (MRI) is a diagnostic modality with high inherent contrast resolution and multiplanar imaging capability. Advances in MR technology and image processing have increased the utility and availability of this technique in the past two decades. MRI has become one

  15. Design and synthesis of calcium responsive magnetic resonance imaging agent: Its relaxation and luminescence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanwar, Jyoti; Datta, Anupama; Chauhan, Kanchan; Kumaran, S Senthil; Tiwari, Anjani K; Kadiyala, K Ganesh; Pal, Sunil; Thirumal, M; Mishra, Anil K

    2014-07-23

    Calcium concentration modulation both inside and outside cell is of considerable interest for nervous system function in normal and pathological conditions. MRI has potential for very high spatial resolution at molecular/cellular level. Design, synthesis and evaluation of Gd-DO3A-AME-NPHE, a calcium responsive MRI contrast agent is presented. The probe is comprised of a Gd(3+)-DO3A core coupled to iminoacetate coordinating groups for calcium induced relaxivity switching. In the absence of Ca(2+) ions, inner sphere water binding to the Gd-DO3A-AME-NPHE is restricted with longitudinal relaxivity, r1 = 4.37 mM(-1) s(-1) at 4.7 T. However, addition of Ca(2+) triggers a marked enhancement in r1 = 6.99 mM(-1) s(-1) at 4.7 T (60% increase). The construct is highly selective for Ca(2+) over competitive metal ions at extracellular concentration. The r1 is modulated by changes in the hydration number (0.2 to 1.05), which was confirmed by luminescence emission lifetimes of the analogous Eu(3+) complex. T1 phantom images establish the capability of complex of visualizing changes in [Ca(2+)] by MRI.

  16. Multimodal Imaging in a Patient with Hemidystonia Responsive to GPi Deep Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Sidiropoulos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dystonia is a syndrome with varied phenomenology but our understanding of its mechanisms is deficient. With neuroimaging techniques, such as fiber tractography (FT and magnetoencephalography (MEG, pathway connectivity can be studied to that end. We present a hemidystonia patient treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS. Methods. After 10 years of left axial hemidystonia, a 45-year-old male underwent unilateral right globus pallidus internus (GPi DBS. Whole brain MEG before and after anticholinergic medication was performed prior to surgery. 26-direction diffusion tensor imaging (DTI was obtained in a 3 T MRI machine along with FT. The patient was assessed before and one year after surgery by using the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS. Results. In the eyes-closed MEG study there was an increase in brain coherence in the gamma band after medication in the middle and inferior frontal region. FT demonstrated over 50% more intense ipsilateral connectivity in the right hemisphere compared to the left. After DBS, BFMDRS motor and disability scores both dropped by 71%. Conclusion. Multimodal neuroimaging techniques can offer insights into the pathophysiology of dystonia and can direct choices for developing therapeutics. Unilateral pallidal DBS can provide significant symptom control in axial hemidystonia poorly responsive to medication.

  17. Evaluating the bending response of two osseointegrated transfemoral implant systems using 3D digital image correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Melanie L; Backman, David; Branemark, Rickard; Mechefske, Chris K

    2011-05-01

    Osseointegrated transfemoral implants have been introduced as a prosthetic solution for above knee amputees. They have shown great promise, providing an alternative for individuals who could not be accommodated by conventional, socket-based prostheses; however, the occurrence of device failures is of concern. In an effort to improve the strength and longevity of the device, a new design has been proposed. This study investigates the mechanical behavior of the new taper-based assembly in comparison to the current hex-based connection for osseointegrated transfemoral implant systems. This was done to better understand the behavior of components under loading, in order to optimize the assembly specifications and improve the useful life of the system. Digital image correlation was used to measure surface strains on two assemblies during static loading in bending. This provided a means to measure deformation over the entire sample and identify critical locations as the assembly was subjected to a series of loading conditions. It provided a means to determine the effects of tightening specifications and connection geometry on the material response and mechanical behavior of the assemblies. Both osseoinegrated assemblies exhibited improved strength and mechanical performance when tightened to a level beyond the current specified tightening torque of 12 N m. This was shown by decreased strain concentration values and improved distribution of tensile strain. Increased tightening torque provides an improved connection between components regardless of design, leading to increased torque retention, decreased peak tensile strain values, and a more gradual, primarily compressive distribution of strains throughout the assembly.

  18. Geant4 simulation of the response of phosphor screens for X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistrui-Maximean, S.A. [Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint Exupery, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: simona.pistrui@insa-lyon.fr; Freud, N. [Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint Exupery, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Letang, J.M. [Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint Exupery, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Koch, A. [Thales Electron Devices, 38430 Moirans (France); Munier, B. [Thales Electron Devices, 38430 Moirans (France); Walenta, A.H. [Department of Detectors and Electronics, FB Physik, University of Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Montarou, G. [Corpuscular Physics Laboratory, Blaise Pascal University, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France); Babot, D. [Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint Exupery, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    In order to predict and optimize the response of phosphor screens, it is important to understand the role played by the different physical processes inside the scintillator layer. A simulation model based on the Monte Carlo code Geant4 was developed to determine the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of phosphor screens for energies used in X-ray medical imaging and nondestructive testing applications. The visualization of the dose distribution inside the phosphor layer gives an insight into how the MTF is progressively degraded by X-ray and electron transport. The simulation model allows to study the influence of physical and technological parameters on the detector performances, as well as to design and optimize new detector configurations. Preliminary MTF measurements have been carried out and agreement with experimental data has been found in the case of a commercial screen (Kodak Lanex Fine) at an X-ray tube potential of 100 kV. Further validation with other screens (transparent or granular) at different energies is under way.

  19. Evaluation of lung tumor response to therapy: Current and emerging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coche, E

    2016-10-01

    Lung tumor response to therapy may be evaluated in most instances by morphological criteria such as RECIST 1.1 on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, those criteria are limited because they are based on tumoral dimensional changes and do not take into account other morphologic criteria such as density evaluation, functional or metabolic changes that may occur following conventional or targeted chemotherapy. New techniques such as dual-energy CT, PET-CT, MRI including diffusion-weighted MRI has to be considered into the new technical armamentarium for tumor response evaluation. Integration of all informations provided by the different imaging modalities has to be integrated and represents probably the future goal of tumor response evaluation. The aim of the present paper is to review the current and emerging imaging criteria used to evaluate the response of therapy in the field of lung cancer.

  20. Combining MRI and VEP imaging to isolate the temporal response of visual cortical areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Thom; Ales, Justin; Klein, Stanley A.

    2008-02-01

    The human brain has well over 30 cortical areas devoted to visual processing. Classical neuro-anatomical as well as fMRI studies have demonstrated that early visual areas have a retinotopic organization whereby adjacent locations in visual space are represented in adjacent areas of cortex within a visual area. At the 2006 Electronic Imaging meeting we presented a method using sprite graphics to obtain high resolution retinotopic visual evoked potential responses using multi-focal m-sequence technology (mfVEP). We have used this method to record mfVEPs from up to 192 non overlapping checkerboard stimulus patches scaled such that each patch activates about 12 mm2 of cortex in area V1 and even less in V2. This dense coverage enables us to incorporate cortical folding constraints, given by anatomical MRI and fMRI results from the same subject, to isolate the V1 and V2 temporal responses. Moreover, the method offers a simple means of validating the accuracy of the extracted V1 and V2 time functions by comparing the results between left and right hemispheres that have unique folding patterns and are processed independently. Previous VEP studies have been contradictory as to which area responds first to visual stimuli. This new method accurately separates the signals from the two areas and demonstrates that both respond with essentially the same latency. A new method is introduced which describes better ways to isolate cortical areas using an empirically determined forward model. The method includes a novel steady state mfVEP and complex SVD techniques. In addition, this evolving technology is put to use examining how stimulus attributes differentially impact the response in different cortical areas, in particular how fast nonlinear contrast processing occurs. This question is examined using both state triggered kernel estimation (STKE) and m-sequence "conditioned kernels". The analysis indicates different contrast gain control processes in areas V1 and V2. Finally we

  1. On materials destruction criteria

    OpenAIRE

    Kremnev, L. S.

    2015-01-01

    In terms of nonlinear material fracture mechanics, the real (discrete)-structure material fracture model has been developed. The model rests on the demonstration of the fact that crack resistance $K_{1c}=2\\sigma \\sqrt l$ and fracture toughness are $G_{1c}=J_{1c}=2\\sigma l$ obtained on the basis of energy conservation law and derived without linear material fracture mechanics assumptions can be respectively taken as force and energy criteria for non-linear fracture mechanics. It is shown that ...

  2. Web site Evaluation Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdgan binesh

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The ever-increasing evolution of the Internet and the growing number of the resources accessible through this medium, has turned the issue of resource evaluation of the internet-based information into a controversial and cogent issue. By nature, the internet milieu is uncontrollable. It concomitantly contains both verifiable and unverifiable information. Thus it behooves the internet users to develop resource evaluation and critical thinking skills in order to discern appropriate quality resources. Through review and comparison of the available checklists, the present paper endeavors to offer criteria for website evaluation

  3. Diffusion-weighted imaging in predicting and monitoring the response of uterine cervical cancer to combined chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y. [Department of Radiology, General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Bai, R., E-mail: tjbairenju@yahoo.com.c [Department of Radiology, General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Sun, H. [Department of Radiology, General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Liu, H. [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Central Hospital of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tianjin (China); Zhao, X.; Li, Y. [Department of Radiology, General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China)

    2009-11-15

    Aim: To investigate the ability of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to predict and monitor the response of uterine cervical cancer to combined chemoradiation using apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs). Materials and methods: Seventeen women (mean age 48.5 years) with uterine cervical cancer received conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DWI prior to chemoradiation and after 1 and 2 months of therapy. A subgroup of eight also had MRI and DWI repeated after 15 days of therapy. Treatment response was determined according to changes in tumour size after 2 months of therapy and was classified as complete response (CR), partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), or progressive disease (PD). Pretreatment ADCs were compared between the different disease response groups, and dynamic changes of ADCs in each group were observed. Pearson's correlation test was calculated between those ADC parameters and tumour response. Results: Pretreatment ADCs for CR were significantly lower than those of PR (p = 0.005). Negative correlation was found between pretreatment ADCs and percentage size reduction after 2 months of chemoradiation (p = 0.016). The percentage ADC change after 1 month correlated positively with percentage size reduction after 2 months of therapy (p = 0.021). ADCs after 15 days of therapy increased significantly compared with pretreatment ones (p = 0.001); however, the longest tumour diameter showed no statistically significant change (p = 0.078). Conclusion: ADCs may have the potential to be used to predict and monitor the response of uterine cervical cancer to therapy.

  4. {sup 99m}Tc-Annexin A5 quantification of apoptotic tumor response: a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical imaging trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhocine, Tarik Z. [Western University, Biomedical Imaging Research Centre (BIRC), London, Ontario (Canada); Blankenberg, Francis G. [Lucile Salter Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Kartachova, Marina S. [Medical Center Alkmaar, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Stitt, Larry W. [LW Stitt Statistical Services, London, Ontario (Canada); Vanderheyden, Jean-Luc [JLVMI Consulting LLC, Waukesha, WI (United States); Hoebers, Frank J.P. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Wiele, Christophe van de [University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-Annexin A5 has been used as a molecular imaging probe for the visualization, characterization and measurement of apoptosis. In an effort to define the quantitative {sup 99m}Tc-annexin A5 uptake criteria that best predict tumor response to treatment, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the results of all clinical imaging trials found in the literature or publicly available databases. Included in this review were 17 clinical trials investigating quantitative {sup 99m}Tc-annexin A5 (qAnx5) imaging using different parameters in cancer patients before and after the first course of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Qualitative assessment of the clinical studies for diagnostic accuracy was performed using the QUADAS-2 criteria. Of these studies, five prospective single-center clinical trials (92 patients in total) were included in the meta-analysis after exclusion of one multicenter clinical trial due to heterogeneity. Pooled positive predictive values (PPV) and pooled negative predictive values (NPV) (with 95 % CI) were calculated using Meta-Disc software version 1.4. Absolute quantification and/or relative quantification of {sup 99m}Tc-annexin A5 uptake were performed at baseline and after the start of treatment. Various quantitative parameters have been used for the calculation of {sup 99m}Tc-annexin A5 tumor uptake and delta (Δ) tumor changes post-treatment compared to baseline including: tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), ΔTBR, tumor-to-noise ratio, relative tumor ratio (TR), ΔTR, standardized tumor uptake ratio (STU), ΔSTU, maximum count per pixel within the tumor volume (Cmax), Cmax%, absolute ΔU and percentage (ΔU%), maximum ΔU counts, semiquantitative visual scoring, percent injected dose (%ID) and %ID/cm{sup 3}. Clinical trials investigating qAnx5 imaging have included patients with lung cancer, lymphoma, breast cancer, head and neck cancer and other less common tumor types. In two phase I/II single-center clinical trials

  5. PET Imaging in Head and Neck Cancer Patients to Monitor Treatment Response: A Future Role for EGFR-Targeted Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, L.K. van; Boerman, O.C.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Bussink, J.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 50,000 new cases of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are diagnosed worldwide each year and subsequently treated with surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and/or targeted therapy. The heterogeneity of the patient population in terms of treatment response drives the search f

  6. Linearisation of RGB camera responses for quantitative image analysis of visible and UV photography: a comparison of two techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair E Garcia

    Full Text Available Linear camera responses are required for recovering the total amount of incident irradiance, quantitative image analysis, spectral reconstruction from camera responses and characterisation of spectral sensitivity curves. Two commercially-available digital cameras equipped with Bayer filter arrays and sensitive to visible and near-UV radiation were characterised using biexponential and Bézier curves. Both methods successfully fitted the entire characteristic curve of the tested devices, allowing for an accurate recovery of linear camera responses, particularly those corresponding to the middle of the exposure range. Nevertheless the two methods differ in the nature of the required input parameters and the uncertainty associated with the recovered linear camera responses obtained at the extreme ends of the exposure range. Here we demonstrate the use of both methods for retrieving information about scene irradiance, describing and quantifying the uncertainty involved in the estimation of linear camera responses.

  7. [Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrot, A; Drapé, J L; Godefroy, D; Dupont, A M; Pessis, E; Sarazin, L; Minoui, A

    1997-01-01

    The panoply of imaging techniques useful in podology is essentially limited to X-rays. Standard "standing" and "lying" X-rays furnish most of the required information. Arthrography is sometimes performed, in particular for trauma or tumour of the ankle. CT scan and MRI make a decisive contribution in difficult cases, notably in fractures and in small fractures without displacement. The two latter techniques are useful in tendon, ligament and muscular disorders, where echography is also informative. Rigorous analysis of radiographies and a good knowledge of foot disorders make these imaging techniques efficacious.

  8. Study on the dose response characteristics of a scanning liquid ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device

    CERN Document Server

    Ma Shao Gang; Song Yi Xin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the dose response characteristics and the influence factors such as gantry angle, field size and acquisition mode on the dosimetric response curves, when using a scanning liquid ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for dose verification. Methods: All experiments were carried out on a Varian 600 C/D accelerator (6 MV X-ray) equipped with a Varian PortalVision sup T sup M MK2 type EPID. To obtain the dose response curve, the relationship between the incident radiation intensity to the detector and the pixel value output from the EPID were established. Firstly, the different dose rates of 6 MV X-rays were obtained by varying SSD. Secondly, three digital portal images were acquired for each dose rate using the EPID and averaged to avoid the influence of the dose rate fluctuations of the accelerator. The pixel values of all images were read using self-designed image analysis software, and and average for a region consisting of 11 x 11 pixels around the center was taken as the res...

  9. Optical noise-free image encryption based on quick response code and high dimension chaotic system in gyrator transform domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Liansheng; Xu, Minjie; Tian, Ailing

    2017-04-01

    A novel optical image encryption scheme is proposed based on quick response code and high dimension chaotic system, where only the intensity distribution of encoded information is recorded as ciphertext. Initially, the quick response code is engendered from the plain image and placed in the input plane of the double random phase encoding architecture. Then, the code is encrypted to the ciphertext with noise-like distribution by using two cascaded gyrator transforms. In the process of encryption, the parameters such as rotation angles and random phase masks are generated as interim variables and functions based on Chen system. A new phase retrieval algorithm is designed to reconstruct the initial quick response code in the process of decryption, in which a priori information such as three position detection patterns is used as the support constraint. The original image can be obtained without any energy loss by scanning the decrypted code with mobile devices. The ciphertext image is the real-valued function which is more convenient for storing and transmitting. Meanwhile, the security of the proposed scheme is enhanced greatly due to high sensitivity of initial values of Chen system. Extensive cryptanalysis and simulation have performed to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  10. Rapid, reliable geodetic data analysis for hazard response: Results from the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. E.; Simons, M.; Hua, H.; Yun, S.; Cruz, J.; Webb, F.; Rosen, P. A.; Fielding, E. J.; Moore, A. W.; Polet, J.; Liu, Z.; Agram, P. S.; Lundgren, P.

    2013-12-01

    ARIA is a joint JPL/Caltech coordinated project to automate InSAR and GPS imaging capabilities for scientific understanding, hazard response, and societal benefit. Geodetic imaging's unique ability to capture surface deformation in high spatial and temporal resolution allows us to resolve the fault geometry and distribution of slip associated with earthquakes in high spatial & temporal detail. In certain cases, it can be complementary to seismic data, providing constraints on location, geometry, or magnitude that is difficult to determine with seismic data alone. In addition, remote sensing with SAR provides change detection and damage assessment capabilities for earthquakes, floods and other disasters that can image even at night or through clouds. We have built an end-to-end prototype geodetic imaging data system that forms the foundation for a hazard response and science analysis capability that integrates InSAR, high-rate GPS, seismology, and modeling to deliver monitoring, science, and situational awareness products. This prototype incorporates state-of-the-art InSAR and GPS analysis algorithms from technologists and scientists. The products have been designed and a feasibility study conducted in collaboration with USGS scientists in the earthquake and volcano science programs. We will present results that show the capabilities of this data system in terms of latency, data processing capacity, quality of automated products, and feasibility of use for analysis of large SAR and GPS data sets and for earthquake response activities.

  11. Proton MR Spectroscopy and Diffusion MR Imaging Monitoring to Predict Tumor Response to Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy for Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Magali; Pinel, Sophie; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Thomassin, Magalie; Thomas, Eloise; Moussaron, Albert; Meng, Dominique; Plénat, François; Amouroux, Marine; Bastogne, Thierry; Frochot, Céline; Tillement, Olivier; Lux, François; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent progress in conventional therapeutic approaches, the vast majority of glioblastoma recur locally, indicating that a more aggressive local therapy is required. Interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT) appears as a very promising and complementary approach to conventional therapies. However, an optimal fractionation scheme for iPDT remains the indispensable requirement. To achieve that major goal, we suggested following iPDT tumor response by a non-invasive imaging monitoring. Nude rats bearing intracranial glioblastoma U87MG xenografts were treated by iPDT, just after intravenous injection of AGuIX® nanoparticles, encapsulating PDT and imaging agents. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) allowed us an original longitudinal follow-up of post-treatment effects to discriminate early predictive markers. We successfully used conventional MRI, T2 star (T2*), Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) and MRS to extract relevant profiles on tissue cytoarchitectural alterations, local vascular disruption and metabolic information on brain tumor biology, achieving earlier assessment of tumor response. From one day post-iPDT, DWI and MRS allowed us to identify promising markers such as the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) values, lipids, choline and myoInositol levels that led us to distinguish iPDT responders from non-responders. All these responses give us warning signs well before the tumor escapes and that the growth would be appreciated. PMID:28255341

  12. PERFORMANCE CRITERIA SLITTING-PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Starkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Criteria of efficiency the slitting process. For example double-line rolling of rebar No. 20 identified such criteria separation efficiency in non-dividing device as the size of the crossbar.

  13. National Recommended Water Quality Criteria

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Recommended Water Quality Criteria is a compilation of national recommended water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life and human health...

  14. The pupil's response to affective pictures: Role of image duration, habituation, and viewing mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Robert J; O'Farrell, Katherine R; Burley, Daniel; Erichsen, Jonathan T; Newton, Naomi V; Gray, Nicola S

    2016-08-01

    The pupil has been shown to be sensitive to the emotional content of stimuli. We examined this phenomenon by comparing fearful and neutral images carefully matched in the domains of luminance, image contrast, image color, and complexity of content. The pupil was more dilated after viewing affective pictures, and this effect was (a) shown to be independent of the presentation time of the images (from 100-3,000 ms), (b) not diminished by repeated presentations of the images, and (c) not affected by actively naming the emotion of the stimuli in comparison to passive viewing. Our results show that the emotional modulation of the pupil is present over a range of variables that typically vary from study to study (image duration, number of trials, free viewing vs. task), and encourages the use of pupillometry as a measure of emotional processing in populations where alternative techniques may not be appropriate.

  15. Quality metric in matched Laplacian of Gaussian response domain for blind adaptive optics image deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shiping; Zhang, Rongzhi; Yang, Yikang; Xu, Rong; Liu, Changhai; Li, Jisheng

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) in conjunction with subsequent postprocessing techniques have obviously improved the resolution of turbulence-degraded images in ground-based astronomical observations or artificial space objects detection and identification. However, important tasks involved in AO image postprocessing, such as frame selection, stopping iterative deconvolution, and algorithm comparison, commonly need manual intervention and cannot be performed automatically due to a lack of widely agreed on image quality metrics. In this work, based on the Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) local contrast feature detection operator, we propose a LoG domain matching operation to perceive effective and universal image quality statistics. Further, we extract two no-reference quality assessment indices in the matched LoG domain that can be used for a variety of postprocessing tasks. Three typical space object images with distinct structural features are tested to verify the consistency of the proposed metric with perceptual image quality through subjective evaluation.

  16. Highly sensitive quantitative imaging for monitoring single cancer cell growth kinetics and drug response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Mir

    Full Text Available The detection and treatment of cancer has advanced significantly in the past several decades, with important improvements in our understanding of the fundamental molecular and genetic basis of the disease. Despite these advancements, drug-screening methodologies have remained essentially unchanged since the introduction of the in vitro human cell line screen in 1990. Although the existing methods provide information on the overall effects of compounds on cell viability, they are restricted by bulk measurements, large sample sizes, and lack capability to measure proliferation kinetics at the individual cell level. To truly understand the nature of cancer cell proliferation and to develop personalized adjuvant therapies, there is a need for new methodologies that provide quantitative information to monitor the effect of drugs on cell growth as well as morphological and phenotypic changes at the single cell level. Here we show that a quantitative phase imaging modality known as spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM addresses these needs and provides additional advantages over existing proliferation assays. We demonstrate these capabilities through measurements on the effects of the hormone estradiol and the antiestrogen ICI182,780 (Faslodex on the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Along with providing information on changes in the overall growth, SLIM provides additional biologically relevant information. For example, we find that exposure to estradiol results in rapidly growing cells with lower dry mass than the control population. Subsequently blocking the estrogen receptor with ICI results in slower growing cells, with lower dry masses than the control. This ability to measure changes in growth kinetics in response to environmental conditions provides new insight on growth regulation mechanisms. Our results establish the capabilities of SLIM as an advanced drug screening technology that provides information on changes in proliferation

  17. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  18. Stimulus-responsive ultrasound contrast agents for clinical imaging: motivations, demonstrations, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Andrew P; Nakatsuka, Matthew A; Mattrey, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents allow imaging of the vasculature with excellent resolution and signal-to-noise ratios. Contrast in microbubbles derives from their interaction with an ultrasound wave to generate signal at harmonic frequencies of the stimulating pulse; subtracting the elastic echo caused by the surrounding tissue can enhance the specificity of these harmonic signals significantly. The nonlinear acoustic emission is caused by pressure-driven microbubble size fluctuations, which in both theoretical descriptions and empirical measurements was found to depend on the mechanical properties of the shell that encapsulates the microbubble as well as stabilizes it against the surrounding aqueous environment. Thus biochemically induced switching between a rigid 'off' state and a flexible 'on' state provides a mechanism for sensing chemical markers for disease. In our research, we coupled DNA oligonucleotides to a stabilizing lipid monolayer to modulate stiffness of the shell and thereby induce stimulus-responsive behavior. In initial proof-of-principle studies, it was found that signal modulation came primarily from DNA crosslinks preventing the microbubble size oscillations rather than merely damping the signal. Next, these microbubbles were redesigned to include an aptamer sequence in the crosslinking strand, which not only allowed the sensing of the clotting enzyme thrombin but also provided a general strategy for sensing other soluble biomarkers in the bloodstream. Finally, the thrombin-sensitive microbubbles were validated in a rabbit model, presenting the first example of an ultrasound contrast agent that could differentiate between active and inactive clots for the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Prognostication and response assessment in liver and pancreatic tumors: The new imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Riccardo; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Demozzi, Emanuele; Puntel, Gino; Ortolani, Silvia; Cingarlini, Sara; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bassi, Claudio; Pederzoli, Paolo; D’Onofrio, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and perfusion computed tomography (CT) are technical improvements of morphologic imaging that can evaluate functional properties of hepato-bilio-pancreatic tumors during conventional MRI or CT examinations. Nevertheless, the term “functional imaging” is commonly used to describe molecular imaging techniques, as positron emission tomography (PET) CT/MRI, which still represent the most widely used methods for the evaluation of functional properties of solid neoplasms; unlike PET or single photon emission computed tomography, functional imaging techniques applied to conventional MRI/CT examinations do not require the administration of radiolabeled drugs or specific equipments. Moreover, DWI and DCE-MRI can be performed during the same session, thus providing a comprehensive “one-step” morphological and functional evaluation of hepato-bilio-pancreatic tumors. Literature data reveal that functional imaging techniques could be proposed for the evaluation of these tumors before treatment, given that they may improve staging and predict prognosis or clinical outcome. Microscopic changes within neoplastic tissues induced by treatments can be detected and quantified with functional imaging, therefore these techniques could be used also for post-treatment assessment, even at an early stage. The aim of this editorial is to describe possible applications of new functional imaging techniques apart from molecular imaging to hepatic and pancreatic tumors through a review of up-to-date literature data, with a particular emphasis on pathological correlations, prognostic stratification and post-treatment monitoring. PMID:26078555

  20. Criteria for Assessing Naturalistic Inquiries as Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Yvonna S.; Guba, Egon G.

    Research on the assessment of naturalistic inquiries is reviewed, and criteria for assessment are outlined. Criteria reviewed include early foundational and non-foundational criteria, trustworthiness criteria, axiomatic criteria, rhetorical criteria, action criteria, and application/transferability criteria. Case studies that are reports of…

  1. Criteria for Restructuring Postsecondary Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Sheila

    1995-01-01

    Criteria most often used by higher education administrators in restructuring higher education in the 1980s and 1990s are outlined. A distinction is made between retrenchment and restructuring. Criteria recommended in the literature are compared with criteria actually used, and the results. Some alternatives are suggested. (MSE)

  2. Diagnostic Criteria for Pediatric MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago review the diagnostic criteria for pediatric multiple sclerosis, the differential diagnosis, the 2010 McDonald criteria, and Callen criteria.

  3. Neural Responses to Visual Food Cues According to Weight Status: A Systematic Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursey, Kirrilly M.; Stanwell, Peter; Callister, Robert J.; Brain, Katherine; Collins, Clare E.; Burrows, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies suggests that specific food-related behaviors contribute to the development of obesity. The aim of this review was to report the neural responses to visual food cues, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in humans of differing weight status. Published studies to 2014 were retrieved and included if they used visual food cues, studied humans >18 years old, reported weight status, and included fMRI outcomes. Sixty studies were identified that investigated the neural responses of healthy weight participants (n = 26), healthy weight compared to obese participants (n = 17), and weight-loss interventions (n = 12). High-calorie food images were used in the majority of studies (n = 36), however, image selection justification was only provided in 19 studies. Obese individuals had increased activation of reward-related brain areas including the insula and orbitofrontal cortex in response to visual food cues compared to healthy weight individuals, and this was particularly evident in response to energy dense cues. Additionally, obese individuals were more responsive to food images when satiated. Meta-analysis of changes in neural activation post-weight loss revealed small areas of convergence across studies in brain areas related to emotion, memory, and learning, including the cingulate gyrus, lentiform nucleus, and precuneus. Differential activation patterns to visual food cues were observed between obese, healthy weight, and weight-loss populations. Future studies require standardization of nutrition variables and fMRI outcomes to enable more direct comparisons between studies. PMID:25988110

  4. Neural responses to visual food cues according to weight status: a systematic review of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursey, Kirrilly M; Stanwell, Peter; Callister, Robert J; Brain, Katherine; Collins, Clare E; Burrows, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies suggests that specific food-related behaviors contribute to the development of obesity. The aim of this review was to report the neural responses to visual food cues, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in humans of differing weight status. Published studies to 2014 were retrieved and included if they used visual food cues, studied humans >18 years old, reported weight status, and included fMRI outcomes. Sixty studies were identified that investigated the neural responses of healthy weight participants (n = 26), healthy weight compared to obese participants (n = 17), and weight-loss interventions (n = 12). High-calorie food images were used in the majority of studies (n = 36), however, image selection justification was only provided in 19 studies. Obese individuals had increased activation of reward-related brain areas including the insula and orbitofrontal cortex in response to visual food cues compared to healthy weight individuals, and this was particularly evident in response to energy dense cues. Additionally, obese individuals were more responsive to food images when satiated. Meta-analysis of changes in neural activation post-weight loss revealed small areas of convergence across studies in brain areas related to emotion, memory, and learning, including the cingulate gyrus, lentiform nucleus, and precuneus. Differential activation patterns to visual food cues were observed between obese, healthy weight, and weight-loss populations. Future studies require standardization of nutrition variables and fMRI outcomes to enable more direct comparisons between studies.

  5. Quality Criteria Implementation for Brain Computed Tomography Examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calzado, A.; Rodriguez, R.; Munoz, A

    1998-07-01

    The main aim of this study was to implement the quality criteria proposed by the European Commission for brain computed tomography (CT) examinations. The proposed criteria were evaluated for 102 brain CT examinations, with a special emphasis on the diagnostic and radiation dose requirements. The examinations were selected at random from brain examinations performed over a period of a month at eight scanners of the CT Pace range. Achievement of image criteria was evaluated by two independent observers. The most important preliminary findings concerning image criteria fulfilment or lack of it and disagreements between observers are presented and discussed. The mean values of the proposed dosimetric quantities are compared to the reference values. The examinations performed with and without injection of a contrast agent are also analysed in relation to dosimetric quantities and criteria fulfilment. (author)

  6. Danger and disease: electrocortical responses to threat- and disgust-eliciting images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Michael G; Holman, Alexis; Rabinak, Christine A; Macnamara, Annmarie; Proudfit, Greg Hajcak; Phan, K Luan

    2013-11-01

    Previous research suggests facilitated processing of evolutionarily significant stimuli (e.g., depictions of erotica, mutilation, threat), as reflected by augmented event-related potentials (ERPs), including the early posterior negativity (EPN) and late positive potential (LPP). Evolutionary models suggest that images that evoke disgust should be high in motivational salience, but evidence that the EPN and LPP are enhanced by disgusting images is lacking. Prior studies have employed only a small number of disgusting images that were limited in the types of content depicted. In the current study, participants viewed larger sets of disgusting, threatening, and neutral images with more varied content while electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded. Results showed that disgusting and threatening images elicited equivalent LPPs, which were both significantly increased relative to LPPs elicited by neutral images. EPN amplitudes were augmented for both disgusting and threatening relative to neutral images, though significantly more for disgust. These findings offer initial evidence that the EPN and the LPP are sensitive to disgust-eliciting pictures and that these pictures may receive processing that is at least on par with that of threatening images. Limitations of the current study and implications for future research are discussed. © 2013.

  7. Physiologic Responses to Racial Rejection Images among Young Adults from African-American Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Lisa; Blumenthal, Terry D.; Carlson, Erika N.; Lawson, Yolanda N.; Shell, J. Clark

    2009-01-01

    Physiologic reactivity to racially rejecting images was assessed in 35 young adults (10 males, 25 female) from African-American backgrounds using the startle probe paradigm. In a laboratory setting, participants viewed 16 images depicting racial rejection, racial acceptance, nonracial negative, and nonracial positive themes. While viewing these…

  8. Gender related differences in response to "in favor of myself" wellness program to enhance positive self & body image among adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moria Golan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physical, neurological and psychological changes are often experienced differently by male and female adolescents. Positive self-esteem, emotional well-being, school achievements, and family connectedness are considered as protective factors against health-compromising behaviors. This study examines the gender differences in respect to the effect of a school-based interactive wellness program--"In Favor of Myself"--on self-image, body image, eating attitudes and behaviors of young adolescents. METHODS: Two hundred and ten adolescents (mean age 13.5 participated in the intervention group, 55% were girls and 45% boys. Program consisted of eight 90-minutes structured sessions integrated into a regular school coping skills curriculum. The program focused on self-esteem, self-image, body image, media literacy and cognitive dissonance. The overall impact of the program and the study protocol were previously published. RESULTS: Overall, there are gender related differences in respect to body image and self-image in young adolescents in response to "In Favor of Myself". Compared to boys, girls reported at baseline higher self-esteem, being more contingent by appearance, and their self-image was more influenced by popularity, appearance, interpersonal communication and admired people. Furthermore girls presented greater gap between current body figure and perceived ideal figure. Not only were girls more dissatisfied with their body, but they were more active in attempts to become and/or remain "thin". At program termination, gender × time effect was detected in reduction of self-worth contingent by others, change in importance given to achievements at schools, parents' perceptions, as well as the impact of comparisons to friends and family members on self-image. CONCLUSIONS: Girls exhibited more gains than boys from 'In Favor of Myself' which raise the questions about how effective would be the program when delivered in mixed gender groups

  9. Gender related differences in response to "in favor of myself" wellness program to enhance positive self & body image among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Moria; Hagay, Noa; Tamir, Snait

    2014-01-01

    Physical, neurological and psychological changes are often experienced differently by male and female adolescents. Positive self-esteem, emotional well-being, school achievements, and family connectedness are considered as protective factors against health-compromising behaviors. This study examines the gender differences in respect to the effect of a school-based interactive wellness program--"In Favor of Myself"--on self-image, body image, eating attitudes and behaviors of young adolescents. Two hundred and ten adolescents (mean age 13.5) participated in the intervention group, 55% were girls and 45% boys. Program consisted of eight 90-minutes structured sessions integrated into a regular school coping skills curriculum. The program focused on self-esteem, self-image, body image, media literacy and cognitive dissonance. The overall impact of the program and the study protocol were previously published. Overall, there are gender related differences in respect to body image and self-image in young adolescents in response to "In Favor of Myself". Compared to boys, girls reported at baseline higher self-esteem, being more contingent by appearance, and their self-image was more influenced by popularity, appearance, interpersonal communication and admired people. Furthermore girls presented greater gap between current body figure and perceived ideal figure. Not only were girls more dissatisfied with their body, but they were more active in attempts to become and/or remain "thin". At program termination, gender × time effect was detected in reduction of self-worth contingent by others, change in importance given to achievements at schools, parents' perceptions, as well as the impact of comparisons to friends and family members on self-image. Girls exhibited more gains than boys from 'In Favor of Myself' which raise the questions about how effective would be the program when delivered in mixed gender groups vs. mono-gender groups.

  10. Choline molecular imaging with small-animal PET for monitoring tumor cellular response to photodynamic therapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Baowei; Wang, Hesheng; Wu, Chunying; Meyers, Joseph; Xue, Liang-Yan; MacLennan, Gregory; Schluchter, Mark

    2009-02-01

    We are developing and evaluating choline molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) for monitoring tumor response to photodynamic therapy (PDT) in animal models. Human prostate cancer (PC-3) was studied in athymic nude mice. A second-generation photosensitizer Pc 4 was used for PDT in tumor-bearing mice. MicroPET images with 11C-choline were acquired before PDT and 48 h after PDT. Time-activity curves of 11C-choline uptake were analyzed before and after PDT. For treated tumors, normalized choline uptake decreased significantly 48 h after PDT, compared to the same tumors pre-PDT (p detect early tumor response to PDT in the animal model of human prostate cancer.

  11. The Impact of “Omic” and Imaging Technologies on Assessing the Host Immune Response to Biodefence Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Tree

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the interactions between host and pathogen is important for the development and assessment of medical countermeasures to infectious agents, including potential biodefence pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis, Ebola virus, and Francisella tularensis. This review focuses on technological advances which allow this interaction to be studied in much greater detail. Namely, the use of “omic” technologies (next generation sequencing, DNA, and protein microarrays for dissecting the underlying host response to infection at the molecular level; optical imaging techniques (flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy for assessing cellular responses to infection; and biophotonic imaging for visualising the infectious disease process. All of these technologies hold great promise for important breakthroughs in the rational development of vaccines and therapeutics for biodefence agents.

  12. Decision criteria in PSA applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, J.E.; Pulkkinen, U.; Rosqvist, T.; Simola, K. [VTT Automation (Finland)

    2001-11-01

    Along with the adoption of risk informed decision making principles, the need for formal probabilistic decision rule or criteria has been risen. However, there are many practical and theoretical problems in the application of probabilistic criteria. One has to think what is the proper way to apply probabilistic rules together with deterministic ones and how the criteria are weighted with respect to each other. In this report, we approach the above questions from the decision theoretic point of view. We give a short review of the most well known probabilistic criteria, and discuss examples of their use. We present a decision analytic framework for evaluating the criteria, and we analyse how the different criteria behave under incompleteness or uncertainty of the PSA model. As the conclusion of our analysis we give recommendations on the application of the criteria in different decision situations. (au)

  13. User perspectives on relevance criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maglaughlin, Kelly L.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2002-01-01

    matter, thought catalyst), full text (e.g., audience, novelty, type, possible content, utility), journal/publisher (e.g., novelty, main focus, perceived quality), and personal (e.g., competition, time requirements). Results further indicate that multiple criteria are used when making relevant, partially...... relevant, and not-relevant judgments, and that most criteria can have either a positive or negative contribution to the relevance of a document. The criteria most frequently mentioned by study participants were content, followed by criteria characterizing the full text document. These findings may have...... implications for relevance feedback in information retrieval systems, suggesting that systems accept and utilize multiple positive and negative relevance criteria from users. Systems designers may want to focus on supporting content criteria followed by full text criteria as these may provide the greatest cost...

  14. The Computer-Aided Design of a Servo System as a Multiple-Criteria Decision Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Udink ten Cate, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    The task of selecting the controller gains of a servo system is formulated as a multiple-criteria decision problem. The criteria are based on the unit step response of the system. The approach described here differs from the usual approach in that design constraints on the trajectories are included as additional criteria. Simulation runs are used to evaluate the criteria.

  15. Three-dimensional correlation of MR images to muscle tissue response for interventional MRI thermal ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Michael S.; Lazebnik, Roee S.; Lewin, Jonathan S.; Wilson, David L.

    2003-05-01

    Solid tumors and other pathologies are being treated using radio-frequency (RF) ablation under interventional magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) guidance. In animal experiments, we are investigating the ability of MR to monitor ablation treatments by comparing MR images of thermal lesions to histologically assayed cellular damage. We developed a new methodology using three-dimensional registration for making spatial correlations. A low-field, open MRI system was used to guide an ablation probe into the thigh muscle of 10 rabbits and acquire MR volumes post ablation. After the in vivo MR and histology images were aligned with a registration accuracy of 1.32 +/- 0.39 mm (mean +/- SD), a boundary of necrosis identified in histology images was compared with manually segmented boundaries of the elliptical hyperintense region in MR images. For 14 MR images, we determined that the outer boundary of the hyperintense region in MR closely corresponds to the region of cell death, with a mean absolute distance between boundaries of 0.97 mm. Since this distance may be less than our ability to measure such differences, boundaries may match perfectly. This is good evidence that MR lesion images can localize the region of cell death during RF ablation treatments.

  16. Neural Responses to Visual Food Cues According to Weight Status: A Systematic Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies suggests that specific food-related behaviors contribute to the development of obesity. The aim of this review was to report the neural responses to visual food cues, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in humans of differing weight status. Published studies to 2014 were retrieved and included if they used visual food cues, studied humans >18 years old, reported weight status, and included fMRI outcomes. Sixty studies...

  17. Multi-stimuli responsive Cu2S nanocrystals as trimodal imaging and synergistic chemo-photothermal therapy agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulose, Aby Cheruvathoor; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Mohamed, M. Sheikh; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Romero Aburto, Rebeca; Mitcham, Trevor; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Sakamoto, Yasushi; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D.

    2015-04-01

    A size and shape tuned, multifunctional metal chalcogenide, Cu2S-based nanotheranostic agent is developed for trimodal imaging and multimodal therapeutics against brain cancer cells. This theranostic agent was highly efficient in optical, photoacoustic and X-ray contrast imaging systems. The folate targeted NIR-responsive photothermal ablation in synergism with the chemotherapeutic action of doxorubicin proved to be a rapid precision guided cancer-killing module. The multi-stimuli, i.e., pH-, thermo- and photo-responsive drug release behavior of the nanoconjugates opens up a wider corridor for on-demand triggered drug administration. The simple synthesis protocol, combined with the multitudes of interesting features packed into a single nanoformulation, clearly demonstrates the competing role of this Cu2S nanosystem in future cancer treatment strategies.A size and shape tuned, multifunctional metal chalcogenide, Cu2S-based nanotheranostic agent is developed for trimodal imaging and multimodal therapeutics against brain cancer cells. This theranostic agent was highly efficient in optical, photoacoustic and X-ray contrast imaging systems. The folate targeted NIR-responsive photothermal ablation in synergism with the chemotherapeutic action of doxorubicin proved to be a rapid precision guided cancer-killing module. The multi-stimuli, i.e., pH-, thermo- and photo-responsive drug release behavior of the nanoconjugates opens up a wider corridor for on-demand triggered drug administration. The simple synthesis protocol, combined with the multitudes of interesting features packed into a single nanoformulation, clearly demonstrates the competing role of this Cu2S nanosystem in future cancer treatment strategies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Methodology and additional experimental results. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07139e

  18. Bioethics and conflicting ethical criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Some of the major problematic