WorldWideScience

Sample records for imaging response criteria

  1. Evaluation of early imaging response criteria in glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladwish, Adam; Koh, Eng-Siew; Hoisak, Jeremy; Lockwood, Gina; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Mason, Warren; Yu, Eugene; Laperriere, Normand J; Ménard, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Early and accurate prediction of response to cancer treatment through imaging criteria is particularly important in rapidly progressive malignancies such as Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM). We sought to assess the predictive value of structural imaging response criteria one month after concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) in patients with GBM. Thirty patients were enrolled from 2005 to 2007 (median follow-up 22 months). Tumor volumes were delineated at the boundary of abnormal contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images prior to and 1 month after RT. Clinical Progression [CP] occurred when clinical and/or radiological events led to a change in chemotherapy management. Early Radiologic Progression [ERP] was defined as the qualitative interpretation of radiological progression one month post-RT. Patients with ERP were determined pseudoprogressors if clinically stable for ≥6 months. Receiver-operator characteristics were calculated for RECIST and MacDonald criteria, along with alternative thresholds against 1 year CP-free survival and 2 year overall survival (OS). 13 patients (52%) were found to have ERP, of whom 5 (38.5%) were pseudoprogressors. Patients with ERP had a lower median OS (11.2 mo) than those without (not reached) (p < 0.001). True progressors fared worse than pseudoprogressors (median survival 7.2 mo vs. 19.0 mo, p < 0.001). Volume thresholds performed slightly better compared to area and diameter thresholds in ROC analysis. Responses of > 25% in volume or > 15% in area were most predictive of OS. We show that while a subjective interpretation of early radiological progression from baseline is generally associated with poor outcome, true progressors cannot be distinguished from pseudoprogressors. In contrast, the magnitude of early imaging volumetric response may be a predictive and quantitative metric of favorable outcome

  2. Quality criteria for cardiac images: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, G.; Bar, O.; Jezewski, T.; Vano, E.; Maccia, C.; Trianni, A.; Padovani, R.

    2008-01-01

    The DIMOND II and III Cardiology Groups have agreed on quality criteria for cardiac images and developed a scoring system, to provide a tool to test quality of coronary angiograms, which was demonstrated to be of value in clinical practice. In the last years, digital flat panel technology has been introduced in cardiac angiographic systems and the radiological technique may have been influenced by the better performance of these new detectors. This advance in digital imaging, together with the lesson learned from previous studies, warranted the revision of the quality criteria for cardiac angiographic images as formerly defined. DIMOND criteria were reassessed to allow a simpler evaluation of angiograms. Clinical criteria were simplified and separated from technical criteria. Furthermore, the characteristics of an optimised angiographic technique have been outlined. (authors)

  3. Predictive and prognostic value of FDG-PET/CT imaging and different response evaluation criteria after primary systemic therapy of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tőkés, Tímea; Kajáry, Kornélia; Szentmártoni, Gyöngyvér; Lengyel, Zsolt; Györke, Tamás; Torgyík, László; Somlai, Krisztián; Tőkés, Anna-Mária; Kulka, Janina; Dank, Magdolna

    2017-01-01

    (1) To predict pathological complete remission (pCR) and survival after primary systemic therapy (PST) in patients diagnosed with breast cancer by using two different PET/CT based scores: a simplified PERCIST-based PET/CT score (Method 1) and a combined PET/CT score supplemented with the morphological results of the RECIST system (Method 2) and (2) to assess the effect of different breast carcinoma subtypes on tumor response and its evaluation. Eighty-eight patients were enrolled in the study who underwent PET/CT imaging before and after PST. PET/CTs were evaluated by changes in maximum Standardized Uptake Value (SUVmax) and tumor size. Method 1 and 2 were applied to predict pathological complete remission (pCR). Kaplan-Meier analyses for survival were performed. Classification into biological subtypes was performed based on the pre-therapeutic tumor characteristics. A total of 30/88 patients showed pCR (34.1 %). Comparing pCR/non-pCR patient groups, significant differences were detected by changes in SUVmax (p evaluation with Method 2 and not with Method 1. In our study, neither clinical nor pathological CR were predictors of longer progression-free survival. Our results suggest that combined PET/CT criteria are more predictive of pCR. The effect of biological subtypes is significant on pCR rate as well as on the changes in FDG-uptake and morphological tumor response. Response evaluation with combined criteria was also able to reflect the differences between the biological behavior of breast tumor subtypes.

  4. Selection of response criteria for clinical trials of sarcoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetze, Scott M; Baker, Laurence H; Benjamin, Robert S; Canetta, Renzo

    2008-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of malignancies arising from mesenchymal tissues. A large number of new therapies are being evaluated in patients with sarcomas, and consensus criteria defining treatment responses are essential for comparison of results from studies completed by different research groups. The 1979 World Health Organization (WHO) handbook set forth operationally defined criteria for response evaluation in solid tumors that were updated in 2000 with the publication of the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). There have been significant advances in tumor imaging, however, that are not reflected in the RECIST. For example, computed tomography (CT) slice thickness has been reduced from 10 mm to < or =2.5 mm, allowing for more reproducible and accurate measurement of smaller lesions. Combination of imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG-PET) and CT can provide investigators and clinicians with both anatomical and functional information regarding tumors, and there is now a large body of evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of PET/CT and other newer imaging methods for the detection and staging of tumors as well as early determination of responses to therapy. The application of newer imaging methods has the potential to decrease both the sample sizes required for, and duration of, clinical trials by providing an early indication of therapeutic response that is well correlated with clinical outcomes, such as time to tumor progression or overall survival. The results summarized in this review support the conclusion that the RECIST and the WHO criteria for evaluation of response in solid tumors need to be modernized. In addition, there is a current need for prospective trials to compare new response criteria with established endpoints and to validate imaging-based response rates as surrogate endpoints for clinical trials of new agents for sarcoma and other solid

  5. NSSS supplier's response to differing safety criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremades, J; Filkin, R; Franke, T [Westinghouse Electric Nuclear Energy Systems Europe (WENESE), Brussels (Belgium)

    1980-11-01

    The limited progress achieved to date in harmonizing national criteria has led to the development of designs which include the most common national requirements. Progress towards harmonization of safety criteria can be accelerated by expanding the IAEA leadership and co-ordination activities, and implementing an integrated approach to criteria development. National and International safety criteria are examined.

  6. Revised response criteria for malignant lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheson, Bruce D; Pfistner, Beate; Juweid, Malik E

    2007-01-01

    incorporating PET, IHC, and flow cytometry for definitions of response in non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Standardized definitions of end points are provided. CONCLUSION: We hope that these guidelines will be adopted widely by study groups, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, and regulatory...... agencies to facilitate the development of new and more effective therapies to improve the outcome of patients with lymphoma....

  7. Evaluation criteria for emergency response plans in radiological transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, M.K.; Perry, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper identifies a set of general criteria which can be used as guides for evaluating emergency response plans prepared in connection with the transportation of radiological materials. The development of criteria takes the form of examining the meaning and role of emergency plans in general, reviewing the process as it is used in connection with natural disasters and other nonnuclear disasters, and explicitly considering unique aspects of the radiological transportation setting. Eight areas of critical importance for such response plans are isolated: notification procedures; accident assessment; public information; protection of the public at risk; other protective responses; radiological exposure control; responsibility for planning and operations; and emergency response training and exercises. (Auth.)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging criteria for thrombolysis in hyperacute cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmetgjekaj, Ilir; Kabashi-Muçaj, Serbeze; Lascu, Luana Corina; Kabashi, Antigona; Bondari, A; Bondari, Simona; Dedushi-Hoti, Kreshnike; Biçaku, Ardian; Shatri, Jeton

    2014-01-01

    Selection of patients with cerebral infarction for MRI that is suitable for thrombolytic therapy as an emerging application. Although the efficiency of the therapy with i.v. tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 3 hours after onset of symptoms has been proven in selected patients with CT, now these criteria are determined by MRI, as the data we gather are fast and accurate in the first hours. MRI screening in patients with acute cerebral infarction before application of thrombolytic therapy was done in a UCC Mannheim in Germany. Unlike trials with CT, MRI studies demonstrated the benefits of therapy up to 6 hours after the onset of symptoms. We studied 21 patients hospitalized in Clinic of Neuroradiology at University Clinical Centre in Mannheim-Germany. They all undergo brain MRI evaluation for stroke. This article reviews literature that has followed application of thrombolysis in patients with cerebral infarction based on MRI. We have analyzed the MRI criteria for i.v. application of tPA at this University Centre. Alongside the personal viewpoints of clinicians, survey reveals a variety of clinical aspects and MRI features that are opened for further more exploration: therapeutic effects, the use of the MRI angiography, dynamics, and other. MRI is a tested imaging method for rapid evaluation of patients with hyperacute cerebral infarction, replacing the use of CT imaging and clinical features. MRI criteria for thrombolytic therapy are being applied in some cerebral vascular centres. In Kosovo, the application of thrombolytic therapy has not started yet.

  9. Liposarcoma or lipoma: Does genetics change classic imaging criteria?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidault, F.; Vanel, D.; Terrier, Ph.; Jalaguier, A.; Bonvalot, S.; Pedeutour, F.; Couturier, J.M.; Dromain, C.

    2009-01-01

    Differentiating benign from malignant fatty tumours has always been very difficult for both radiologists and pathologists. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses provide complementary tools for differentiating soft tissue tumours. Our objective was to compare imaging criteria of malignancy with a new diagnostic gold standard, namely, pathological analysis combined with cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses. Nineteen patients with a fatty tumour were included. All had computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging examination before any biopsy or surgery. All had histopathological and cytogenetic and/or molecular genetic analyses. The imaging diagnosis of benign or malignant lesions was accurate in 15 cases, with 4 false positives for malignancy. Erroneous criteria were a large size (4 cases), and a mass that was not purely fatty. In conclusion, the main pitfall for a false positive radiological diagnosis of liposarcoma is certainly a large-sized tumour. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses contribute to the diagnosis and can be performed at the same time with a core biopsy.

  10. Can imaging criteria distinguish enchondroma from grade 1 chondrosarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crim, Julia; Schmidt, Robert; Layfield, Lester; Hanrahan, Christopher; Manaster, Betty Jean

    2015-11-01

    To minimize systematic bias and optimize agreement on imaging criteria in order to better define the accuracy of imaging criteria in the diagnosis of grade 1 chondrosarcoma. Study was IRB-approved and HIPAA compliant; informed consent was waived. Records were reviewed and disclosed 53 cases (38 women, 15 men ages 21-76) which were diagnosed as enchondroma or grade 1 chondrosarcoma and had available radiographs, contrast-enhanced MRI, and definitive diagnosis by histology or 5-year follow-up. 2 MSK radiologists read the studies independently after a session where they agreed on criteria for malignancy. Interobserver variability was determined as raw variability and with the kappa statistic. Accuracy was determined compared to final diagnosis. Reliability of imaging features of chondrosarcoma was determined using regression analysis. The correct diagnosis of enchondroma was made on radiographs in 43 (67.2%) of readings, and on MRI in 37/64 (57.8%). The correct diagnosis of chondrosarcoma was made on radiographs in 5/24 (20.8%) of readings, and on MRI in 14/24 (57.8%). A diagnosis of borderline lesion was made in 19/64 (29.7%) of enchondromas on radiographs and 18/64 (28.1%) on MRI. The false positive rate of radiographs for chondrosarcoma was 2/64 (3.1%) and the false positive rate of MRI was 9/64 (14.1%). There was substantial interobserver variability. Cortical thickening and bone expansion were rare but specific signs of chondrosarcoma. Both radiographs and MRI have limitations in the evaluation of low-grade cartilage lesions. MRI has an increased rate of both true-positive and false-positive diagnosis compared to radiographs. Differences in the findings of this study compared to previous literature may reflect the influence of systematic biases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical evaluation of a new set of image quality criteria for mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahn, A.; Hemdal, B.; Andersson, I.; Ruschin, M.; Thilander-Klang, A.; Boerjesson, S.; Tingberg, A.; Mattsson, S.; Haakansson, M.; Baath, M.; Maansson, L. G.; Medin, J.; Wanninger, F.; Panzer, W.

    2005-01-01

    The European Commission (EC) quality criteria for screen-film mammography are used as a tool to asses image quality. A new set of criteria was developed and initially tested in a previous study. In the present study, these criteria are further evaluated using screen-film mammograms that have been digitised, manipulated to simulated different image quality level and reprinted on film. Expert radiologists have evaluated these manipulated to simulate different image quality levels and reprinted on film. Expert radiologists have evaluated these manipulated images using both the original (EC) and the new criteria. A comparison of three different simulated dose levels that the new criteria yield a larger separation of image criteria scores than the old ones. These results indicated that the new set of image quality criteria has a higher discriminative power than the old set and thus seems to be more suitable for evaluation of image quality in mammography. (authors)

  12. Occupational safety and health criteria for responsible development of nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, P. A.; Geraci, C. L.; Murashov, V.; Kuempel, E. D.; Zumwalde, R. D.; Castranova, V.; Hoover, M. D.; Hodson, L.; Martinez, K. F.

    2014-01-01

    Organizations around the world have called for the responsible development of nanotechnology. The goals of this approach are to emphasize the importance of considering and controlling the potential adverse impacts of nanotechnology in order to develop its capabilities and benefits. A primary area of concern is the potential adverse impact on workers, since they are the first people in society who are exposed to the potential hazards of nanotechnology. Occupational safety and health criteria for defining what constitutes responsible development of nanotechnology are needed. This article presents five criterion actions that should be practiced by decision-makers at the business and societal levels—if nanotechnology is to be developed responsibly. These include (1) anticipate, identify, and track potentially hazardous nanomaterials in the workplace; (2) assess workers' exposures to nanomaterials; (3) assess and communicate hazards and risks to workers; (4) manage occupational safety and health risks; and (5) foster the safe development of nanotechnology and realization of its societal and commercial benefits. All these criteria are necessary for responsible development to occur. Since it is early in the commercialization of nanotechnology, there are still many unknowns and concerns about nanomaterials. Therefore, it is prudent to treat them as potentially hazardous until sufficient toxicology, and exposure data are gathered for nanomaterial-specific hazard and risk assessments. In this emergent period, it is necessary to be clear about the extent of uncertainty and the need for prudent actions.

  13. Qualification criteria for persons responsible for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehner, G

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the qualification criteria included in the German atomic law (Atomic Energy Act, Radiological Protection Ordinance and X-ray Protection Ordinance) for persons responsible for radiation protection is given. Especially the various activities for which a health physics officer is required, the range of qualification in each case and the way the qualification has to be proved, are pointed out. Also the different guides that are issued to complete the legal requirements are mentioned. The definitions of the term qualification for health physics given in the different guides are cited and it is shown, that the qualification of a healt physics officer has to be based on the three criteria (I) vocational training. (II) professional experience and (III) the necessary knowledge in radiation protection. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Corporate social responsibility in the mining industry: Criteria and indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vintro, Carla; Comajuncosa, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) includes economic, social and environmental aspects, and it has particular significance in mining. This paper explores the subject of CSR in the mining industry and the main synergies between CSR and environmental, safety and quality management systems, whose adoption has increased during recent decades. It proposes the establishment of a set of criteria for sustainability, ethics and human capital (to be called CSR criteria). Whilst various international bodies have proposed CSR guides and indicators (commonly used as references for Stock Market investments), there is evidence that the size of the company can act as a moderator factor to the adoption of those systems. The paper offers an easy-to-use CSR performance chart (composed of 31 indicators and a global index), intended as an internal measure for companies of CSR continuous improvement.

  15. Osteosarcoma subtypes: Magnetic resonance and quantitative diffusion weighted imaging criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitoun, Rania; Shokry, Ahmed M; Ahmed Khaleel, Sahar; Mogahed, Shaimaa M

    2018-03-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a primary bone malignancy, characterized by spindle cells producing osteoid. The objective of this study is to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of different OS subtypes, record their attenuation diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and to point to the relation of their pathologic base and their corresponding ADC value. We performed a retrospective observational lesion-based analysis for 31 pathologically proven osteosarcoma subtypes: osteoblastic (n = 9), fibroblastic (n = 8), chondroblastic (n = 6), para-osteal (n = 3), periosteal (n = 1), telangiectatic (n = 2), small cell (n = 1) and extra-skeletal (n = 1). On conventional images we recorded: bone of origin, epicenter, intra-articular extension, and invasion of articulating bones, skip lesions, distant metastases, pathological fractures, ossified matrix, hemorrhage and necrosis. We measured the mean ADC value for each lesion. Among the included OS lesions, 51.6% originated at the femur, 29% showed intra-articular extension, 16% invaded neighboring bone, 9% were associated with pathological fracture and 25.8% were associated with distant metastases. On MRI, all lesions showed ossified matrix, 35.5% showed hemorrhage and 58% showed necrosis. The mean ADC values for OS lesions ranged from 0.74 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s (recorded for conventional osteoblastic OS) to 1.50 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s (recorded for telangiectatic OS) with an average value of 1.16 ± 0.18 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s. Conventional chondroblastic OS recorded higher values compared to the other two conventional subtypes. Osteosarcoma has different pathologic subtypes which correspondingly vary in their imaging criteria and their ADC values. Copyright © 2018. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria in defining severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Bailey, Michael; Pilcher, David; Cooper, D Jamie; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2015-04-23

    The consensus definition of severe sepsis requires suspected or proven infection, organ failure, and signs that meet two or more criteria for the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). We aimed to test the sensitivity, face validity, and construct validity of this approach. We studied data from patients from 172 intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand from 2000 through 2013. We identified patients with infection and organ failure and categorized them according to whether they had signs meeting two or more SIRS criteria (SIRS-positive severe sepsis) or less than two SIRS criteria (SIRS-negative severe sepsis). We compared their characteristics and outcomes and assessed them for the presence of a step increase in the risk of death at a threshold of two SIRS criteria. Of 1,171,797 patients, a total of 109,663 had infection and organ failure. Among these, 96,385 patients (87.9%) had SIRS-positive severe sepsis and 13,278 (12.1%) had SIRS-negative severe sepsis. Over a period of 14 years, these groups had similar characteristics and changes in mortality (SIRS-positive group: from 36.1% [829 of 2296 patients] to 18.3% [2037 of 11,119], P<0.001; SIRS-negative group: from 27.7% [100 of 361] to 9.3% [122 of 1315], P<0.001). Moreover, this pattern remained similar after adjustment for baseline characteristics (odds ratio in the SIRS-positive group, 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.96 to 0.97; odds ratio in the SIRS-negative group, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94 to 0.98; P=0.12 for between-group difference). In the adjusted analysis, mortality increased linearly with each additional SIRS criterion (odds ratio for each additional criterion, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.15; P<0.001) without any transitional increase in risk at a threshold of two SIRS criteria. The need for two or more SIRS criteria to define severe sepsis excluded one in eight otherwise similar patients with infection, organ failure, and substantial mortality and failed to define a transition point in

  17. Quality criteria for chest X-ray image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.

    1985-01-01

    A distinction has to be made between invariable and variable criteria in the determination of chest X-ray picture quality criteria. The invariable criteria are defined by the properties of the object and the psychophysiological laws of perception and cognition, and the variable criteria are determined by the prevailing state of the art of technology. An agreement on these criteria is based on the knowledge of the nature and the technical conditions of X-ray picture production and reproduction. The slogan 'the best picture at the lowest dose' dominates, too, the discussion centering around the X-ray picture of the chest, its quality and criteria. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Resolution of coherent and incoherent imaging systems reconsidered : Classical criteria and a statistical alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Aert, S.; Van Dyck, D.; Den Dekker, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    The resolution of coherent and incoherent imaging systems is usually evaluated in terms of classical resolution criteria, such as Rayleigh’s. Based on these criteria, incoherent imaging is generally concluded to be ‘better’ than coherent imaging. However, this paper reveals some misconceptions in

  19. A NSSS supplier's response to differing safety criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremades, J.; Filkin, R.; Franke, Th.

    1980-01-01

    The limited progress achieved to date in harmonizing national criteria has led to the development of designs which include the most common national requirements. Progress towards harmonization of safety criteria can be accelerated by expanding the IAEA leadership and co-ordination activities, and implementing an integrated approach to criteria development. National and International safety criteria are examined. (author)

  20. Food selection criteria for disaster response planning in urban societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wien, Michelle; Sabaté, Joan

    2015-05-12

    Nutrition professionals that have menu planning and disaster management responsibilities should consider factors that have transcended from ancient to current times, in addition to recognizing societal trends that have led to our current increased vulnerability in the event of a disaster. Hence, we proceeded to develop a set of "Disaster Response Diets" (DRDs) for use in urban societies inclusive of the aforementioned considerations. A three-phase multidimensional approach was used to identify food groups suitable for creating a set of DRDs. Phase One consisted of calculating the percent daily nutrient intake and Drewnowski's naturally nutrient rich (NNR) score for an individual or mean composite for one serving of food from 11 specific food groups. In Phase Two, in addition to nutrient density, the 11 food groups were evaluated and scored based on the following DRD planning criteria: storage and handling properties, preparation ease and, cultural acceptance/individual tolerance. During Phase Three, three DRDs were developed based upon the data retrieved from Phases one and two. In Phase One, the NNR scores ranged from 2.1 for fresh fruits to 28.1 for dry cereals, a higher score indicating a higher nutrient density. During Phase Two, a maximum score of 12 was possible based on appropriateness for a disaster situation. Five plant-based food groups (dry cereals, nuts, dried fruits, grains and legumes) achieved a score ranging between 7 and 12, whereas the five fresh food groups were deemed ineligible due to sanitation and perishability concerns. During Phase Three, three DRDs (milk-inclusive, milk-free and Grab-and-Go) were developed as benchmarks for disaster response planning. Plant-based DRDs are universally acceptable and tolerated across cultures and religions. Therefore, we suggest nutrition professionals consider using a plant-based approach for creating DRDs for public health institutions and organizations.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging criteria for thrombolysis in acute cerebral infarct

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hjort, N; Butcher, K; Davis, SM; Kidwell, CS; Koroshetz, WJ; Rother, J; Schellinger, PD; Warach, S; Ostergaard, L

    Background and Purpose - Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) selection of stroke patients eligible for thrombolytic therapy is an emerging application. Although the efficacy of therapy within 3 hours after onset of symptoms with intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been proven for

  2. Algorithms and Array Design Criteria for Robust Imaging in Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Binoy George

    Optical interferometry is a technique for obtaining high-resolution imagery of a distant target by interfering light from multiple telescopes. Image restoration from interferometric measurements poses a unique set of challenges. The first challenge is that the measurement set provides only a sparse-sampling of the object's Fourier Transform and hence image formation from these measurements is an inherently ill-posed inverse problem. Secondly, atmospheric turbulence causes severe distortion of the phase of the Fourier samples. We develop array design conditions for unique Fourier phase recovery, as well as a comprehensive algorithmic framework based on the notion of redundant-spaced-calibration (RSC), which together achieve reliable image reconstruction in spite of these challenges. Within this framework, we see that classical interferometric observables such as the bispectrum and closure phase can limit sensitivity, and that generalized notions of these observables can improve both theoretical and empirical performance. Our framework leverages techniques from lattice theory to resolve integer phase ambiguities in the interferometric phase measurements, and from graph theory, to select a reliable set of generalized observables. We analyze the expected shot-noise-limited performance of our algorithm for both pairwise and Fizeau interferometric architectures and corroborate this analysis with simulation results. We apply techniques from the field of compressed sensing to perform image reconstruction from the estimates of the object's Fourier coefficients. The end result is a comprehensive strategy to achieve well-posed and easily-predictable reconstruction performance in optical interferometry.

  3. Imaging and diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis: are we there yet?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josey, Lawrence; Curley, Michael; Mousavi, Foroogh Jafari; Taylor, Bruce V.; Lucas, Robyn; Coulthard, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Excluding post traumatic injury, Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common disabling neurological disorder of young adults. Although the effect on mortality is limited, the association of a young demographic and significant morbidity combine to make MS a devastating disease. Since MS was given its first detailed description in 1868, diagnostic criteria continue to evolve. Recently, there has been an international commitment to combine both clinical and paraclinical tests to arrive at an earlier diagnosis. Widespread acceptance of the use of MRI in diagnosis, monitoring and research has made the role of the radiologist more critical than ever in this disease. The primary diagnostic criteria for MS are the International Panel criteria, commonly referred to as the McDonald criteria and it is essential that the radiology community is aware of the work preceding these criteria, so that they are understood in the correct context and the importance acknowledged. Literature review utilising key word search to obtain the historical and current context of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of MS. A succinct description of the evolution of criteria for the diagnosis of MS. Radiologists must recognise that there are specific diagnostic criteria for MS that continue to evolve as a result of new research, improved technology and clinical experience and it is crucial that these criteria be applied in daily practice. It should be evident that diagnostic imaging criteria for MS will be most effective when combined with standardised MRI protocols such as those published by the international Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centres.

  4. Image interpretation criteria for FDG PET/CT in multiple myeloma: a new proposal from an Italian expert panel. IMPeTUs (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanni, Cristina; Rambaldi, Ilaria; Fanti, Stefano; Zamagni, Elena; Cavo, Michele; Versari, Annibale; Chauvie, Stephane; Bianchi, Andrea; Rensi, Marco; Bello, Marilena; Gallamini, Andrea; Patriarca, Francesca; Gay, Francesca; Gamberi, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    FDG PET/CT is able to detect active disease in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and can be helpful for staging and assessing therapy response, but no standard interpretation criteria have been proposed for the evaluation of FDG PET/CT in MM. A group of Italian nuclear medicine physicians and haematologists met to propose new visual interpretation criteria to standardize FDG PET/CT evaluation in MM patients (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe; IMPeTUs) and the reproducibility of these criteria was tested. This Italian multicentre protocol was set up as a subprotocol of EMN02, an international prospective multicentre trial of the European Myeloma Network. The criteria were agreed at multidisciplinary consensus meetings. They include a description of the metabolic state of the bone marrow (BM), number and site of focal PET-positive lesions, the number of osteolytic lesions, and the presence and site of extramedullary disease, paramedullary disease and fractures. A visual degree of uptake was defined for the target lesion and extramedullary lesions according to modified Deauville criteria. MM patients who had undergone FDG PET/CT at baseline (PET-0), after induction (PET-AI) and at the end of treatment (PET-EoT) were enrolled. The patients had been prospectively enrolled in EMN02 and their PET scans were a posteriori reinterpreted in a blinded independent central review process managed by WIDEN registered. Five expert nuclear medicine physicians scored the scans according to the new criteria. A case was considered read when four out of the five reviewers completed the report. Concordance among reviewers on different metrics was calculated using Krippendorff's alpha coefficient. A total of 17 consecutive patients were enrolled. On PET-0, the alpha coefficients for the BM score, the score for the hottest focal lesion, the number of focal lesions and the number of lytic lesions were 0.33 and 0.47, 0.40 and 0.32, respectively. On PET-AI, the alpha coefficients

  5. Image interpretation criteria for FDG PET/CT in multiple myeloma: a new proposal from an Italian expert panel. IMPeTUs (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanni, Cristina; Rambaldi, Ilaria; Fanti, Stefano [AOU Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Zamagni, Elena; Cavo, Michele [AOU Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Hematology, Bologna (Italy); Versari, Annibale [IRCSS, Nuclear Medicine, S. Maria Nuova Hospital, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Chauvie, Stephane [Santa Croce e Carle Hospital, Medical Physics Unit, Cuneo (Italy); Bianchi, Andrea [Santa Croce e Carle Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Cuneo (Italy); Rensi, Marco [AOU S.Maria della Misericordia, Nuclear Medicine, Udine (Italy); Bello, Marilena [AO Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Nuclear Medicine, Torino (Italy); Gallamini, Andrea [A Lacassagne Cancer Center, Research and Innovation Department, Nice (France); Patriarca, Francesca [Udine University, Hematologic Clinic, Udine (Italy); Gay, Francesca [University of Torino, Myeloma Unit, Division of Hematology, Torino (Italy); Gamberi, Barbara [IRCCS, Hematology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera ASMN, Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    FDG PET/CT is able to detect active disease in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and can be helpful for staging and assessing therapy response, but no standard interpretation criteria have been proposed for the evaluation of FDG PET/CT in MM. A group of Italian nuclear medicine physicians and haematologists met to propose new visual interpretation criteria to standardize FDG PET/CT evaluation in MM patients (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe; IMPeTUs) and the reproducibility of these criteria was tested. This Italian multicentre protocol was set up as a subprotocol of EMN02, an international prospective multicentre trial of the European Myeloma Network. The criteria were agreed at multidisciplinary consensus meetings. They include a description of the metabolic state of the bone marrow (BM), number and site of focal PET-positive lesions, the number of osteolytic lesions, and the presence and site of extramedullary disease, paramedullary disease and fractures. A visual degree of uptake was defined for the target lesion and extramedullary lesions according to modified Deauville criteria. MM patients who had undergone FDG PET/CT at baseline (PET-0), after induction (PET-AI) and at the end of treatment (PET-EoT) were enrolled. The patients had been prospectively enrolled in EMN02 and their PET scans were a posteriori reinterpreted in a blinded independent central review process managed by WIDEN registered. Five expert nuclear medicine physicians scored the scans according to the new criteria. A case was considered read when four out of the five reviewers completed the report. Concordance among reviewers on different metrics was calculated using Krippendorff's alpha coefficient. A total of 17 consecutive patients were enrolled. On PET-0, the alpha coefficients for the BM score, the score for the hottest focal lesion, the number of focal lesions and the number of lytic lesions were 0.33 and 0.47, 0.40 and 0.32, respectively. On PET-AI, the alpha coefficients

  6. Molecular Imaging and Updated Diagnostic Criteria in Lewy Body Dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnen, Nicolaas I; Müller, Martijn L T M; Frey, Kirk A

    2017-08-14

    The aims of the study were to review recent advances in molecular imaging in the Lewy body dementias (LBD) and determine if these may support the clinical but contested temporal profile distinction between Parkinson disease (PD) with dementia (PDD) versus dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). There do not appear to be major regional cerebral metabolic or neurotransmitter distinctions between PDD and DLB. However, recent studies highlight the relative discriminating roles of Alzheimer proteinopathies. PDD patients have lower cortical β-amyloid deposition than DLB. Preliminary tau PET studies suggest a gradient of increasing tau binding from cognitively normal PD (absent to lowest) to cognitively impaired PD (low) to DLB (intermediate) to Alzheimer disease (AD; highest). However, tau binding in DLB, including the medial temporal lobe, is substantially lower than in AD. Alzheimer-type proteinopathies appear to be more common in DLB compared to PDD with relative but no absolute differences. Given the spectrum of overlapping pathologies, future α-synuclein ligands are expected to have the best potential to distinguish the LBD from pure AD.

  7. Functional criteria for emergency response facilities. Technical report (final)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    This report describes the facilities and systems to be used by nuclear power plant licensees to improve responses to emergency situations. The facilities include the Technical Support Center (TSC), Onsite Operational Support Center (OSC), and Nearsite Emergency Operations Facility (EOF), as well as a brief discussion of the emergency response function of the control room. The data systems described are the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS) and Nuclear Data Link (NDL). Together, these facilities and systems make up the total Emergency Response Facilities (ERFs). Licensees should follow the guidance provided both in this report and in NUREG-0654 (FEMA-REP-1), Revision 1, for design and implementation of the ERFs

  8. Comparison between the implementation of quality criteria of radiographic image in conventional and digital mammography equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara, M.C.; Sordi, G.M.A.A.; Caldas, L.V.E.; Furquim, T.A.C.

    2008-01-01

    The mammographic examination needs a strict quality control. A publication of the European Commission provides guidelines on quality criteria for the images of the breast, quantifying the quality obtained in the image. Following the recommendations of the European Commission, two kinds of mammographic equipments, at a same institution, were evaluated to compare the quality of the conventional and digital images. Besides of that, the Average Glandular Dose (AGD) and the Entrance Surface Dose (ESD) were measured by using an ionization chamber (Radcal, 6M) in the radiation beams of each equipment. The digital equipment fulfills more quality criteria than the conventional equipment, provided ESD values, AGD values and a rejection index lower than the conventional equipment. Therefore, the digital mammography can be considered more adequate than the conventional one, both for criteria analyses and for dose optimization. (author)

  9. Timing criteria for supplemental BWR emergency response equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickel, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The Great Tohuku Earthquake and subsequent Tsunami represented a double failure event which destroyed offsite power connections to Fukushima-Daiichi site and then destroyed on-site electrical systems needed to run decay heat removal systems. The accident could have been mitigated had there been supplemental portable battery chargers, supplemental pumps, and in-place piping connections to provide alternate decay heat removal. In response to this event in the USA, two national response centers, one in Memphis, Tennessee, and another in Phoenix, Arizona, will begin operation. They will be able to dispatch supplemental emergency response equipment to any nuclear plant in the U.S. within 24 hours. In order to define requirements for supplemental nuclear power plant emergency response equipment maintained onsite vs. in a regional support center it is necessary to confirm: (a) the earliest time such equipment might be needed depending on the specific scenario, (b) the nominal time to move the equipment from a storage location either on-site or within the region of a nuclear power plant, and (c) the time required to connect in the supplemental equipment to use it. This paper describes an evaluation process for a BWR-4 with a Mark I Containment starting with: (a) severe accident simulation to define best estimate times available for recovery based on the specific scenario, (b) identify the key supplemental response equipment needed at specific times to accomplish recovery of key safety functions, and (c) evaluate what types of equipment should be warehoused on-site vs. in regional response centers. (authors)

  10. The new criteria of clinical response for the primary tumor based on the findings of histological response after chemoradiation therapy in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Hiroshi; Natsugoe, Shoji; Yokomakura, Naoya; Matsumoto, Masataka; Aikou, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) increased in order to improve the surgical resectabilty and clinical outcome. It is important to accurately assess the effect of CRT for selecting further treatment and predicting prognosis. We tried to make the new criteria for imaging diagnosis after we reevaluated the discrepancy between clinical and histological effect of CRT. Subjects were 36 patients with advanced esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy with lymphadenectomy after CRT that consisted of 5-fluorouracil plus cisplatin and 40 Gy of radiation. The clinical and histological response was firstly evaluated based on esophageal disease guidelines for clinical and pathologic studies on carcinoma of the esophagus by the Japanese Society of Clinical response in imaging was reassessed based on the histological response. The number of tumors judged as clinical complete response/partial response/no change (CR/PR/NC) was 0/26/10, and the histological grading 1/2/3 was 17/11/8, respectively. Imaging for Grade 1 tumors showed the existence of viable cancer cells in biopsy specimen. Of 16 patients with such finding, 14 (88%) were histologically judged as Grade 1. Imaging characteristics for grade 3 tumors was more than a 75% reduction in esophagography, and the existence of scar formation by esophagoscopy. All five (100%) patients with these findings were histologically judged as Grade 3. The findings of grade 1 and 3 based on new criteria were independent predictive factors for CRT effect. According to new criteria, it was possible to predict the histological effect by the combination of esophagography and endoscopy in more than 80% of patients after CRT. Our new criteria may offer important information on the selection of further treatment or the prediction of prognosis after CRT in patients with esophageal cancer. (author)

  11. Developing priority criteria for magnetic resonance imaging: results from the Western Canada Waiting List project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadorn, D.C.

    2002-01-01

    The Western Canada Waiting List (WCWL) Project is a federally funded partnership of 19 organizations, including medical associations, health authorities, ministries of health and research organizations, that was created to develop tools to assist in assessing the relative urgency and priority of patients on waiting lists. The WCWL panel on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was 1 of 5 panels constituted under this project. The panel developed and tested a set of standardized clinical criteria for setting priorities among patients awaiting MRI. The criteria were applied to 407 patients in the 4 western provinces. Regression analysis was used to determine the set of criteria weights that collectively best predicted clinicians' overall ratings of patients' urgency for MRI. Reliability was assessed using clinicians' ratings of 6 hypothetical paper cases. The resulting weighted criteria accounted for about two-fifths of the observed variance in overall urgency ratings (R 2 = 39.9%). The panel then modified the criteria on the basis of regression results and clinical judgment. Most of the revised criteria items showed poor inter-rater reliability, but test-retest reliability (over a 2-month interval) was relatively good. Criteria items requiring probability judgments were a challenge for clinicians. Further development and testing of the tool appears warranted, although considerable question remains concerning the utility of priority criteria for MRI and other diagnostic services. (author)

  12. Evaluation of ECG criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy before and after aortic valve replacement using magnetic resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyerbacht, Hugo P.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Lamb, Hildo J.; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Vliegen, Hubert W.; de Roos, Albert; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; van der Wall, Ernst E.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Evaluation of different electrocardiographic criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy (ECG-LVH criteria) using left ventricular mass index (LVMI) determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, the relation between LVMI regression after aortic valve replacement and

  13. 20 CFR 725.495 - Criteria for determining a responsible operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the responsible operator if no more recent employer may be considered a potentially liable operator... designated responsible operator must demonstrate that the more recent employer possesses sufficient assets to... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Criteria for determining a responsible...

  14. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Monitoring Response to Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slanetz, Priscilla J; Moy, Linda; Baron, Paul; diFlorio, Roberta M; Green, Edward D; Heller, Samantha L; Holbrook, Anna I; Lee, Su-Ju; Lewin, Alana A; Lourenco, Ana P; Niell, Bethany; Stuckey, Ashley R; Trikha, Sunita; Vincoff, Nina S; Weinstein, Susan P; Yepes, Monica M; Newell, Mary S

    2017-11-01

    Patients with locally advanced invasive breast cancers are often treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive surgical intervention. The primary aims of this approach are to: 1) reduce tumor burden thereby permitting breast conservation rather than mastectomy; 2) promptly treat possible metastatic disease, whether or not it is detectable on preoperative staging; and 3) potentially tailor future chemotherapeutic decisions by monitoring in-vivo tumor response. Accurate radiological assessment permits optimal management and planning in this population. However, assessment of tumor size and response to treatment can vary depending on the modality used, the measurement technique (such as single longest diameter, 3-D measurements, or calculated tumor volume), and varied response of different tumor subtypes to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (such as concentric shrinkage or tumor fragmentation). As discussed in further detail, digital mammography, digital breast tomosynthesis, US and MRI represent the key modalities with potential to help guide patient management. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Determining ecoregional numeric nutrient criteria by stressor-response models in Yungui ecoregion lakes, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Shouliang; Ma, Chunzi; Xi, Beidou; Tong, Zhonghua; He, Zhuoshi; Su, Jing; Wu, Fengchang

    2014-01-01

    The importance of developing numeric nutrient criteria has been recognized to protect the designated uses of water bodies from nutrient enrichment that is associated with broadly occurring levels of nitrogen/phosphorus pollution. The identification and estimation of stressor-response models in aquatic ecosystems has been shown to be useful in the determination of nutrient criteria. In this study, three methods based on stressor-response relationships were applied to determine nutrient criteria for Yungui ecoregion lakes with respect to total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), and planktonic chlorophyll a (Chl a). Simple linear regression (SLR) models were established to provide an estimate of the relationship between a response variable and a stressor. Multiple linear regressions were used to simultaneously estimate the effect of TP and TN on Chl a. A morphoedaphic index (MEI) was applied to derive nutrient criteria using data from Yungui ecoregion lakes, which were considered as areas with less anthropogenic influences. Nutrient criteria, as determined by these three methods, showed broad agreement for all parameters. The ranges of numeric nutrient criteria for Yungui ecoregion lakes were determined as follows: TP 0.008-0.010 mg/L and TN 0.140-0.178 mg/L. The stressor-response analysis described will be of benefit to support countries in their numeric criteria development programs and to further the goal of reducing nitrogen/phosphorus pollution in China.

  16. Facial motion parameter estimation and error criteria in model-based image coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunhai; Yu, Lu; Yao, Qingdong

    2000-04-01

    Model-based image coding has been given extensive attention due to its high subject image quality and low bit-rates. But the estimation of object motion parameter is still a difficult problem, and there is not a proper error criteria for the quality assessment that are consistent with visual properties. This paper presents an algorithm of the facial motion parameter estimation based on feature point correspondence and gives the motion parameter error criteria. The facial motion model comprises of three parts. The first part is the global 3-D rigid motion of the head, the second part is non-rigid translation motion in jaw area, and the third part consists of local non-rigid expression motion in eyes and mouth areas. The feature points are automatically selected by a function of edges, brightness and end-node outside the blocks of eyes and mouth. The numbers of feature point are adjusted adaptively. The jaw translation motion is tracked by the changes of the feature point position of jaw. The areas of non-rigid expression motion can be rebuilt by using block-pasting method. The estimation approach of motion parameter error based on the quality of reconstructed image is suggested, and area error function and the error function of contour transition-turn rate are used to be quality criteria. The criteria reflect the image geometric distortion caused by the error of estimated motion parameters properly.

  17. Establishing physical criteria to stop the losing compression of digital medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Diaz, M

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A key to store and/or transmit digital medical images obtained from modern technologies is the size in bytes they occupy difficulty. One way to solve the above is the implementation of compression algorithms (codecs) with or without losses. Particularly the latter do allow significant reductions in the size of the images, but if not applied on solid scientific criteria can lead to useful diagnostic information is lost. This talk takes a description and assessment of the quality of image obtained after the application of current compression codecs from analysis of physical parameters such as: Spatial resolution, random noise , contrast and image generation devices. Open for Medical Physics and Image Processing, directed toward establishing objective criteria to stop losing compression, based on the implementation of Univariate and bivariate traditional metrics such as mean square error introduced by each issue focuses rate compression, Signal to Noise peak to peak noise and contrast ratio , and other metrics, more modern, such as Structural Similarity Index and, Measures Distance , singular value decomposition of the image matrix and Correlation and Spectral Measurements. It also makes a review of physical approaches for predicting image quality from use mathematical observers as the Hotelling and Hotelling Pipeline with Gabor functions or Laguerre - Gauss polynomials . Finally the correlation of these objective methods with subjective assessment of image quality made ​​from ROC analysis based on Diagnostic Performance Curves is analyzed. (author)

  18. Fuel safety criteria in NEA member countries - Compilation of responses received from member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    In 2001 the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) issued a report on Fuel Safety Criteria Technical Review. The objective was to review the present fuel safety criteria and judge to which extent they are affected by the 'new' design elements, such as different cladding materials, higher burnup, the use of MOX fuels, etc. The report stated that the current framework of fuel safety criteria remains generally applicable, being largely unaffected by the 'new' or modern design elements. The levels (numbers) in the individual safety criteria may, however, change in accordance with the particular fuel and core design features. Some of these levels have already been - or are continuously being - adjusted. The level adjustments of several other criteria (RIA, LOCA) also appears to be needed, on the basis of experimental data and the analysis thereof. As a follow-up, among its first tasks, the CSNI Special Expert Group on Fuel Safety Margins (SEG FSM) initiated the collection of information on the present fuel safety criteria used in NEA member states with the objective to solicit national practices in the use of fuel safety criteria, in particular to get information on their specific national levels/values, including their recent adjustments, and to identify the differences and commonalties between the different countries. Two sources of information were used to produce this report: a compilation of responses to a questionnaire prepared for the June 2000 CNRA meeting, and individual responses from the SEGFSM members to the new revised questionnaire issued by the task Force preparing this report. In accordance with the latter, the fuel safety criteria discussed in this report were divided into three categories: (A) safety criteria - criteria imposed by the regulator; (B) operational criteria - specific to the fuel design and provided by the fuel vendor as part of the licensing basis; (C) design criteria - limits employed by vendors and/or utilities for fuel

  19. Positron emission tomography response criteria in solid tumours criteria for quantitative analysis of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography for treatment response assessment in metastasised solid tumours: All that glitters is not gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Annelieke E C A B; Vlenterie, Myrella; van Herpen, Carla M L; van Erp, Nielka P; van der Graaf, Winette T A; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Oyen, Wim J G

    2016-03-01

    For solid tumours, quantitative analysis of [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography potentially can have significant value in early response assessment and thereby discrimination between responders and non-responders at an early stage of treatment. Standardised strategies for this analysis have been proposed, and the positron emission tomography response criteria in solid tumours (PERCIST) criteria can be regarded as the current standard to perform quantitative analysis in a research setting, yet is not implemented in daily practice. However, several exceptions and limitations limit the feasibility of PERCIST criteria. In this article, we point out dilemmas that arise when applying proposed criteria like PERCIST on an expansive set of patients with metastasised solid tumours. Clinicians and scientists should be aware of these limitations to prevent that methodological issues impede successful introduction of research data into clinical practice. Therefore, to deliver on the high potential of quantitative imaging, consensus should be reached on a standardised, feasible and clinically useful analysis methodology. This methodology should be applicable in the majority of patients, tumour types and treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. PET/CT evaluation of response to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer: PET response criteria in solid tumors (PERCIST) versus response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qiyong; Cheng, Xu; Yang, Lu; Zhang, Qingbo; Chen, Jianwei; Li, Tiannv; Shi, Haibin

    2014-06-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT is increasingly used in evaluation of treatment response for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). There is a need for an accurate criterion to evaluate the effect and predict the prognosis. The aim of this study is to evaluate therapeutic response in NSCLC with comparing PET response criteria in solid tumors (PERCIST) to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) criteria on PET/CT. Forty-four NSCLC patients who received chemotherapy but no surgery were studied. Chemotherapeutic responses were evaluated using (18)F-FDG PET and CT according to the RECIST and PERCIST methodologies. PET/CT scans were obtained before chemotherapy and after 2 or 4-6 cycles' chemotherapy. The percentage changes of tumor longest diameters and standardized uptake value (SUV) (corrected for lean body mass, SUL) before and after treatment were compared using paired t-test. The response was categorized into 4 levels according to RECIST and PERCIST: CR (CMR) =1, PR (PMR) =2, SD (SMD) =3, PD (PMD) =4. Pearson chi-square test was used to compare the proportion of four levels in RECIST and PERCIST. Finally the relationship between progression-free survival (PFS) and clinicopathologic parameters (such as TNM staging, percentage changes in diameters and SUL, RECIST and PERCIST results etc.) were evaluated using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression method. The difference of percentage changes between diameters and SUL was not significant using paired t-test (t=-1.69, P=0.098). However the difference was statistically significant in the 40 cases without increasing SUL (t=-3.31, P=0.002). The difference of evaluation results between RECIST and PERCIST was not significant by chi-square test (χ(2)=5.008, P=0.171). If RECIST evaluation excluded the new lesions which could not be found or identified on CT images the difference between RECIST and PERCIST was significant (χ(2)=11.759, P=0.007). Reduction rate of SULpeak (%), RECIST and

  1. Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria, contrast enhancement and perfusion MRI for assessing progression in glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tensaouti, Fatima [Universite de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Toulouse (France); Khalifa, Jonathan [Claudius Regaud Institute / Toulouse University Cancer Institute - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (France); Lusque, Amelie [Claudius Regaud Institute / Toulouse University Cancer Institute - Oncopole, Department of Biostatistics, Toulouse (France); Plas, Benjamin [CHU Toulouse, Department of Neurosurgery, Toulouse (France); Lotterie, Jean Albert; Berry, Isabelle [Universite de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Toulouse (France); CHU Toulouse, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Toulouse (France); Laprie, Anne [Universite de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Toulouse (France); Claudius Regaud Institute / Toulouse University Cancer Institute - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (France); Cohen-Jonathan Moyal, Elizabeth [Claudius Regaud Institute / Toulouse University Cancer Institute - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (France); Toulouse Center for Cancer Research (U1037), Inserm, Toulouse (France); Lubrano, Vincent [Universite de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Toulouse (France); CHU Toulouse, Department of Neurosurgery, Toulouse (France)

    2017-10-15

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) criteria in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), with respect to the Macdonald criteria and changes in contrast-enhancement (CE) volume. Related variations in relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were investigated. Forty-three patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2010 were included. All underwent surgical resection, followed by temozolomide-based chemoradiation. MR images were retrospectively reviewed. Times to progression (TTPs) according to RANO criteria, Macdonald criteria and increased CE volume (CE-3D) were compared, and the percentage change in the 75th percentile of rCBV (rCBV75) was evaluated. After a median follow-up of 22.7 months, a total of 39 patients had progressed according to RANO criteria, 32 according to CE-3D, and 42 according to Macdonald. Median TTPs were 6.4, 9.3, and 6.6 months, respectively. Overall agreement was 79.07% between RANO and CE-3D and 93.02% between RANO and Macdonald. The mean percentage change in rCBV75 at RANO progression onset was over 73% in 87.5% of patients. In conclusion, our findings suggest that CE-3D criterion is not yet suitable to assess progression in routine clinical practice. Indeed, the accurate threshold is still not well defined. To date, in our opinion, early detection of disease progression by RANO combined with advanced MRI imaging techniques like MRI perfusion and diffusion remains the best way to assess disease progression. Further investigations that would examine the impact of treatment modifications after progression determined by different criteria on overall survival would be of great value. (orig.)

  2. Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria, contrast enhancement and perfusion MRI for assessing progression in glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tensaouti, Fatima; Khalifa, Jonathan; Lusque, Amelie; Plas, Benjamin; Lotterie, Jean Albert; Berry, Isabelle; Laprie, Anne; Cohen-Jonathan Moyal, Elizabeth; Lubrano, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) criteria in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), with respect to the Macdonald criteria and changes in contrast-enhancement (CE) volume. Related variations in relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were investigated. Forty-three patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2010 were included. All underwent surgical resection, followed by temozolomide-based chemoradiation. MR images were retrospectively reviewed. Times to progression (TTPs) according to RANO criteria, Macdonald criteria and increased CE volume (CE-3D) were compared, and the percentage change in the 75th percentile of rCBV (rCBV75) was evaluated. After a median follow-up of 22.7 months, a total of 39 patients had progressed according to RANO criteria, 32 according to CE-3D, and 42 according to Macdonald. Median TTPs were 6.4, 9.3, and 6.6 months, respectively. Overall agreement was 79.07% between RANO and CE-3D and 93.02% between RANO and Macdonald. The mean percentage change in rCBV75 at RANO progression onset was over 73% in 87.5% of patients. In conclusion, our findings suggest that CE-3D criterion is not yet suitable to assess progression in routine clinical practice. Indeed, the accurate threshold is still not well defined. To date, in our opinion, early detection of disease progression by RANO combined with advanced MRI imaging techniques like MRI perfusion and diffusion remains the best way to assess disease progression. Further investigations that would examine the impact of treatment modifications after progression determined by different criteria on overall survival would be of great value. (orig.)

  3. NOAA/WEST COAST AND ALASKA TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER PACIFIC OCEAN RESPONSE CRITERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Rogers

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC response criteria for earthquakes occurring in the Pacific basin are presented. Initial warning decisions are based on earthquake location, magnitude, depth, and - dependent on magnitude - either distance from source or pre- computed threat estimates generated from tsunami models. The new criteria will help limit the geographical extent of warnings and advisories to threatened regions, and complement the new operational tsunami product suite.Changes to the previous criteria include: adding hypocentral depth dependence, reducing geographical warning extent for the lower magnitude ranges, setting special criteria for areas not well-connected to the open ocean, basing warning extent on pre-computed threat levels versus tsunami travel time for very large events, including the new advisory product, using the advisory product for far-offshore events in the lower magnitude ranges, and specifying distances from the coast for on-shore events which may be tsunamigenic.This report sets a baseline for response criteria used by the WCATWC considering its processing and observational data capabilities as well as its organizational requirements. Criteria are set for tsunamis generated by earthquakes, which are by far the main cause of tsunami generation (either directly through sea floor displacement or indirectly by triggering of slumps. As further research and development provides better tsunami source definition, observational data streams, and improved analysis tools, the criteria will continue to adjust. Future lines of research and development capable of providing operational tsunami warning centers with better tools are discussed.

  4. Evaluation of the image quality criteria and study of doses in a mammography department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara, Marcela Costa

    2009-01-01

    The mammographic image quality criteria published by European Commission were implemented in three mammography equipment of a same radiology department in a hospital of Sao Paulo city. Among the mammography equipment, two use the screen-film system and one of them uses the indirect digital system. During the data collection, it was noted the need to conduct a study about image rejection in each mammography equipment. Therefore, this study was realized and, after that, the results in each mammography equipment of image rejection and image percentage that present each quality criterion it were compared. At the same time of this studies, it was realized other study about surface entrance dose and average glandular dose. These doses it was estimated based on different methods published by different groups of researcher, for all combinations anode filter available in the equipment. To estimate the surface entrance dose following the methodology published in Avenue's' guide and the average glandular dose following the Wu' methodology, it was developed a phantom, in different thicknesses of acrylic, to simulate a breast. Finally, the image quality it was associated with the dose received by patient. The digital equipment shows better results in the evaluation of quality criteria, lower rate of image rejection and lower values of average glandular dose and surface entrance dose in all methods studied. But it is not sufficient, because is not adequate for patients with great breast. (author)

  5. Diagnostic criteria for chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, W Oliver; Guo, Yong; Krecke, Karl N; Parisi, Joseph E; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Pittock, Sean J; Mandrekar, Jay; Dubey, Divyanshu; Debruyne, Jan; Keegan, B Mark

    2017-09-01

    Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is a central nervous system inflammatory syndrome predominantly affecting the brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cord. Following its initial description, the salient features of CLIPPERS have been confirmed and expanded upon, but the lack of formalized diagnostic criteria has led to reports of patients with dissimilar features purported to have CLIPPERS. We evaluated clinical, radiological and pathological features of patients referred for suspected CLIPPERS and propose diagnostic criteria to discriminate CLIPPERS from non-CLIPPERS aetiologies. Thirty-five patients were evaluated for suspected CLIPPERS. Clinical and neuroimaging data were reviewed by three neurologists to confirm CLIPPERS by consensus agreement. Neuroimaging and neuropathology were reviewed by experienced neuroradiologists and neuropathologists, respectively, both of whom were blinded to the clinical data. CLIPPERS was diagnosed in 23 patients (18 male and five female) and 12 patients had a non-CLIPPERS diagnosis. CLIPPERS patients' median age of onset was 58 years (interquartile range, 24-72) and were followed a median of 44 months (interquartile range 38-63). Non-CLIPPERS patients' median age of onset was 52 years (interquartile range, 39-59) and were followed a median of 27 months (interquartile range, 14-47). Clinical symptoms of gait ataxia, diplopia, cognitive impairment, and facial paraesthesia did not discriminate CLIPPERS from non-CLIPPERS. Marked clinical and radiological corticosteroid responsiveness was observed in CLIPPERS (23/23), and clinical worsening occurred in all 12 CLIPPERS cases when corticosteroids were discontinued. Corticosteroid responsiveness was common but not universal in non-CLIPPERS [clinical improvement (8/12); radiological improvement (2/12); clinical worsening on discontinuation (3/8)]. CLIPPERS patients had brainstem predominant perivascular gadolinium enhancing

  6. Response evaluation in nuclear medicine. Criteria, results and pitfalls; Nuklearmedizinische Responsebeurteilung. Kriterien, Ergebnisse und Pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffend, J. [Klinikum der Stadt Ludwigshafen am Rhein gGmbH, Onkologische Diagnostik/PET-CT, Zentralinstitut fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Sachpekidis, C. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg, Klinische Kooperationseinheit Nuklearmedizin, Forschungsschwerpunkt Bildgebung und Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie, Forschungsschwerpunkt Bildgebung und Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg, Klinische Kooperationseinheit Nuklearmedizin, Forschungsschwerpunkt Bildgebung und Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Established criteria to categorize metabolic tumor response to cytotoxic chemotherapies may not be suited to capture the effects of therapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) or with kinase inhibitors (KI), such as BRAF or MEK inhibitors. To assess the metabolic response to cytotoxic chemotherapy by positron emission tomography (PET) with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), the criteria of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the positron emission tomography response criteria in solid tumors (PERCIST) were conceived. The salient features of both criteria are detailed in a comparative way. To date only retrospective data exist for the evaluation of therapies with either ICI or KI. They show that response to ICI cannot be reliably determined using the established criteria. Employing the EORTC criteria the responses to KI can be adequately ascertained so that the metabolic tumor response in FDG-PET is regarded as a surrogate marker for the efficacy of these drugs. Tumor response to therapy with ICI cannot at present be assessed with FDG-PET. Responses to BRAF and MEK inhibitors are, however, assessable using the criteria that were originally developed to evaluate responses to cytotoxic chemotherapy. (orig.) [German] Bisherige Kriterien, welche das metabolische Ansprechen von Tumoren auf zytotoxische Chemotherapien klassifizieren, lassen sich moeglicherweise nur bedingt verwenden, um ein Ansprechen auf Immuncheckpointinhibitoren (ICI) und Kinasehemmer (KI) wie BRAF- und MEK-Inhibitoren zu erfassen. Um das Ansprechen unter Chemotherapie durch die Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) mit {sup 18}F-Fluordesoxyglukose (FDG) zu erfassen, wurden Kriterien der European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) und die Positron Emission Tomography Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) entwickelt. Die wesentlichen Merkmale beider Kriterien werden vergleichend beschrieben. Bisher liegen sowohl fuer ICI als auch KI

  7. Diagnostic Performance of Three Phase Bone Scan for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1 with Optimally Modified Image Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyun Woo; Paeng, Jin Chul; Nahm, Francins Sahngun; Kim, Seog Gyun; Zehra, Tanzeel; Oh, So Won; Lee, Hyo Sang; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Although the three phase bone scan (TBPS) is one of the widely used imaging studies for diagnosing complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS 1), there is some controversy regarding the TPBS image criteria for CRPS 1. In this study, we modified the image criteria using image pattern and quantitative analysis in the patients diagnosed using the most recent consensus clinical diagnostic criteria. The study included 140 patients with suspected CRPS 1 (CRPS 1, n=79; non CRPS, n=61; mean age 39{+-}15 years) who underwent TPBS. The clinical diagnostic criteria for CRPS 1 revised by the Budapest consensus group were used for confirmative diagnosis. Patients were classified according to flow/pool and delayed uptake (DU) image patterns, and the time interval between the initiating event and TPBS (TI{sup eventscan)}. Quantitative analysis for lesion to contralateral ratio (LCR) was performed. Modified TPBS image criteria were created and evaluated for optimal diagnostic performance. Both increased and decreased periarticular DU were significant image findings for CRPS 1 (CRPS 1 positive rate=73% in the increased DU group, 75% in the decreased DU group). The TI{sup eventscand}id not differ significantly between the different image pattern groups. Quantitative analysis revealed an LCR of 1.43 was the optimal cutoff value for CRPS 1 and diagnostic performance was significantly improved in the increased DU group (area under the curve=0.732). Given the modified image criteria, the sensitivity and specificity of TPBS for diagnosing CRPS 1 were 80% and 72%, respectively. Optimally modified TPBS image criteria for CRPS 1 were suggested using image pattern and quantitative analysis. With the criteria, TPBS is an effective imaging study for CRPS 1 even with the most recent consensus clinical diagnostic criteria.

  8. Diagnostic Performance of Three Phase Bone Scan for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1 with Optimally Modified Image Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hyun Woo; Paeng, Jin Chul; Nahm, Francins Sahngun; Kim, Seog Gyun; Zehra, Tanzeel; Oh, So Won; Lee, Hyo Sang; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Lee, Dong Soo

    2011-01-01

    Although the three phase bone scan (TBPS) is one of the widely used imaging studies for diagnosing complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS 1), there is some controversy regarding the TPBS image criteria for CRPS 1. In this study, we modified the image criteria using image pattern and quantitative analysis in the patients diagnosed using the most recent consensus clinical diagnostic criteria. The study included 140 patients with suspected CRPS 1 (CRPS 1, n=79; non CRPS, n=61; mean age 39±15 years) who underwent TPBS. The clinical diagnostic criteria for CRPS 1 revised by the Budapest consensus group were used for confirmative diagnosis. Patients were classified according to flow/pool and delayed uptake (DU) image patterns, and the time interval between the initiating event and TPBS (TI eventscan) . Quantitative analysis for lesion to contralateral ratio (LCR) was performed. Modified TPBS image criteria were created and evaluated for optimal diagnostic performance. Both increased and decreased periarticular DU were significant image findings for CRPS 1 (CRPS 1 positive rate=73% in the increased DU group, 75% in the decreased DU group). The TI eventscand id not differ significantly between the different image pattern groups. Quantitative analysis revealed an LCR of 1.43 was the optimal cutoff value for CRPS 1 and diagnostic performance was significantly improved in the increased DU group (area under the curve=0.732). Given the modified image criteria, the sensitivity and specificity of TPBS for diagnosing CRPS 1 were 80% and 72%, respectively. Optimally modified TPBS image criteria for CRPS 1 were suggested using image pattern and quantitative analysis. With the criteria, TPBS is an effective imaging study for CRPS 1 even with the most recent consensus clinical diagnostic criteria.

  9. Clinical diagnostic criteria of multiple sclerosis: the role of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belair, M.; Girard, M.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this article is to summarize the diagnostic criteria recommended by the International Panel on the Diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis in 2001. The recommendations of another working group, the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers Consensus Meeting, which met in Vancouver in 2001, concerning the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with multiple sclerosis are also presented in an effort to standardize the protocols for magnetic resonance imaging of these patients. (author)

  10. MR imaging findings and MR criteria for instability in osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jans, Lennart B.O.; Ditchfield, Michael; Anna, Gomez; Jaremko, Jacob L.; Verstraete, Koenraad L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the elbow is an uncommon cause of elbow pain in adolescents and occurs at different locations in the elbow joint. Early diagnosis and treatment may prevent surgery. The aim of the study is to describe the MR imaging features of OCD at initial imaging, and to correlate these findings with surgical findings of stability and instability with arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Methods: Patients were identified through a keyword search of the radiology information system from 2000 to 2009. Twenty-five patients (26 elbows) with OCD of the elbow were identified (age 10.4–18 years, mean age 14 years). MR studies were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists in consensus to define MR imaging findings and to determine the presence of previously described MR imaging criteria for OCD instability (i.e., high T2 signal rim, surrounding cysts, high T2 signal fracture line, fluid-filled osteochondral defect). Sensitivity of the individual and combined criteria was calculated. Results: OCD occurred in the capitellum in 24 patients (92%), in the trochlea in 2 patients (8%) and radial head in 1 patient (4%). Loose bodies were identified in 11 (42%) patients. Eighteen patients demonstrated MRI findings in keeping with unstable lesions. In all 11 patients who had surgery the surgical findings of instability correlated with the MRI findings. When combined, the MR criteria were 100% sensitive for instability of OCD lesions of the elbow. Conclusion: The vast majority of OCD of the elbow occurs in the capitellum. When used together, the MR criteria for instability were 100% sensitive for evaluation OCD lesions of the elbow.

  11. International Working Group consensus response evaluation criteria in lymphoma (RECIL 2017)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younes, A; Hilden, P; Coiffier, B

    2017-01-01

    of malignancies, including solid tumors and lymphoma. Furthermore, with the advances in genome sequencing, new "basket" clinical trial designs have emerged that select patients based on the presence of specific genetic alterations across different types of solid tumors and lymphoma. The standard response criteria...... enrolled on 10 multicenter clinical trials and developed new lymphoma response criteria (RECIL 2017). We demonstrate that assessment of tumor burden in lymphoma clinical trials can use the sum of longest diameters of a maximum of three target lesions. Furthermore, we introduced a new provisional category...

  12. Criteria for applying imaging diagnosis and initial management for pediatric head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiomi, Naoto; Okada, Michiko; Echigo, Tadashi; Oka, Hideki; Hino, Akihiko

    2010-01-01

    It may be difficult to perform CT for pediatric head trauma because of body movement and radiation exposure. Imaging application criteria were established, in which patients diagnosed as less likely to have an intracranial lesion meeting the criteria were not indicated for imaging and subjected to course observation at home, and this policy was explained to the parents. When consent was obtained, patients were followed up at home, and we checked on the condition by making a phone call 4-8 hours after injury. The patients were 103 infants aged 15 years or younger brought to the emergency medical care center of our hospital between May and August 2008. Imaging was basically indicated for cases of traffic accidents, falls from a high level, those brought in by ambulance, referred cases, and cases with disturbance of consciousness, neurologically abnormal findings, vomiting on examination, and trauma requiring X-ray examination in addition to that for the head. However, apart from these cases, imaging was not required. Imaging was not necessary for 94% of infant cases. The parents were convinced by the explanation and selected course observation at home in 94% of cases for which imaging was judged as unnecessary. None of the patients required re-examination based on the conditions reported in phone calls to homes. Imaging diagnosis for pediatric head trauma is not always necessary, and its application should be decided on after consultation. When no imaging is performed, this should be fully explained at the initial treatment before selecting course observation at home. Checking on the child's condition by making a phone call several hours after injury is useful for both patients and physicians. (author)

  13. NOAA/West coast and Alaska Tsunami warning center Atlantic Ocean response criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, P.; Refidaff, C.; Caropolo, M.; Huerfano-Moreno, V.; Knight, W.; Sammler, W.; Sandrik, A.

    2009-01-01

    West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC) response criteria for earthquakesoccurring in the Atlantic and Caribbean basins are presented. Initial warning center decisions are based on an earthquake's location, magnitude, depth, distance from coastal locations, and precomputed threat estimates based on tsunami models computed from similar events. The new criteria will help limit the geographical extent of warnings and advisories to threatened regions, and complement the new operational tsunami product suite. Criteria are set for tsunamis generated by earthquakes, which are by far the main cause of tsunami generation (either directly through sea floor displacement or indirectly by triggering of sub-sea landslides).The new criteria require development of a threat data base which sets warning or advisory zones based on location, magnitude, and pre-computed tsunami models. The models determine coastal tsunami amplitudes based on likely tsunami source parameters for a given event. Based on the computed amplitude, warning and advisory zones are pre-set.

  14. Image recognition and consistency of response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haygood, Tamara M.; Ryan, John; Liu, Qing Mary A.; Bassett, Roland; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the connection between conscious recognition of an image previously encountered in an experimental setting and consistency of response to the experimental question. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four radiologists viewed 40 frontal chest radiographs and gave their opinion as to the position of a central venous catheter. One-to-three days later they again viewed 40 frontal chest radiographs and again gave their opinion as to the position of the central venous catheter. Half of the radiographs in the second set were repeated images from the first set and half were new. The radiologists were asked of each image whether it had been included in the first set. For this study, we are evaluating only the 20 repeated images. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test and Fisher's exact test to determine the relationship between conscious recognition of a previously interpreted image and consistency in interpretation of the image. Results. There was no significant correlation between recognition of the image and consistency in response regarding the position of the central venous catheter. In fact, there was a trend in the opposite direction, with radiologists being slightly more likely to give a consistent response with respect to images they did not recognize than with respect to those they did recognize. Conclusion: Radiologists' recognition of previously-encountered images in an observer-performance study does not noticeably color their interpretation on the second encounter.

  15. 2017 multimodality appropriate use criteria for noninvasive cardiac imaging: Export consensus of the Asian society of cardiovascular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Kyong Min Sarah [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong A [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Yeon Hyeon [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-11-15

    In 2010, the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (ASCI) provided recommendations for cardiac CT and MRI, and this document reflects an update of the 2010 ASCI appropriate use criteria (AUC). In 2016, the ASCI formed a new working group for revision of AUC for noninvasive cardiac imaging. A major change that we made in this document is the rating of various noninvasive tests (exercise electrocardiogram, echocardiography, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, radionuclide imaging, cardiac magnetic resonance, and cardiac computed tomography/angiography), compared side by side for their applications in various clinical scenarios. Ninety-five clinical scenarios were developed from eight selected pre-existing guidelines and classified into four sections as follows: 1) detection of coronary artery disease, symptomatic or asymptomatic; 2) cardiac evaluation in various clinical scenarios; 3) use of imaging modality according to prior testing; and 4) evaluation of cardiac structure and function. The clinical scenarios were scored by a separate rating committee on a scale of 1–9 to designate appropriate use, uncertain use, or inappropriate use according to a modified Delphi method. Overall, the AUC ratings for CT were higher than those of previous guidelines. These new AUC provide guidance for clinicians choosing among available testing modalities for various cardiac diseases and are also unique, given that most previous AUC for noninvasive imaging include only one imaging technique. As cardiac imaging is multimodal in nature, we believe that these AUC will be more useful for clinical decision making.

  16. Acceptance criteria for determining armed response force size at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    This guidance document contains acceptance criteria to be used in the NRC license review process. It consists of a scored worksheet and guidelines for interpreting the worksheet score that can be used in determining the adequacy of the armed response force size at a nuclear power reactor facility

  17. 2016 ACR-EULAR adult dermatomyositis and polymyositis and juvenile dermatomyositis response criteria-methodological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rider, Lisa G.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Erman, Brian; Bayat, Nastaran; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Rockette, Howard; Feldman, Brian M.; Huber, Adam M.; Hansen, Paul; Oddis, Chester V.; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Amato, Anthony A; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G.; Chung, Lorinda; Danko, Katalin; Fiorentino, David; García-De la Torre, Ignacio; Reed, Ann M.; Wook Song, Yeong; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J.; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Martini, Alberto; van der Net, Janjaap; Maillard, Susan; Miller, Frederick W.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Aggarwal, Rohit

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to describe the methodology used to develop new response criteria for adult DM/PM and JDM. Methods: Patient profiles from prospective natural history data and clinical trials were rated by myositis specialists to develop consensus gold-standard ratings of minimal,

  18. Response criteria for myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia: results of an initiative of the European Myelofibrosis Network (EUMNET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barosi, Giovanni; Bordessoule, Dominique; Briere, Jean

    2005-01-01

    , minor, or no response according to changes of the clinicohematologic criteria. Using the experts' consensus as the gold standard, the performance of 100 possible definitions of response was evaluated. Criteria for major or moderate clinicohematologic response were determined to be changes in hemoglobin...

  19. Development of criteria for evaluating clinical response in thyroid eye disease using a modified Delphi technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglas, Raymond S; Tsirbas, Angelo; Gordon, Mark

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify components of a provisional clinical response index for thyroid eye disease using a modified Delphi technique. METHODS: The International Thyroid Eye Disease Society conducted a structured, 3-round Delphi exercise establishing consensus for a core set of measures for clinical...... parsed into 11 domains for the Delphi surveys. Eighty-four respondents participated in the Delphi 1 survey, providing 220 unique items. Ninety-two members (100% of the respondents from Delphi 1 plus 8 new participants) responded in Delphi 2 and rated the same 220 items. Sixty-four members (76......% of participants) rated 153 criteria in Delphi 3 (67 criteria were excluded because of redundancy). Criteria with a mean greater than 6 (1 = least appropriate to 9 = most appropriate) were further evaluated by the nominal group technique and provisional core measures were chosen. CONCLUSIONS: Using a Delphi...

  20. Criteria for evaluating response and outcome in clinical trials for children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare myeloproliferative disease in young children. While hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapeutic option for most patients, children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia increasingly receive novel agents in phase I-II clinical trials as pre-transplant therapy or therapy for relapse after transplantation. However, response criteria or definitions of outcome for standardized evaluation of treatment effect in patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia are currently lacking. Here we propose criteria to evaluate the response to the non-transplant therapy and definitions of remission status after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. For the evaluation of non-transplant therapy, we defined 6 clinical variables (white blood cell count, platelet count, hematopoietic precursors and blasts in peripheral blood, bone marrow blast percentage, spleen size and extramedullary disease) and 3 genetic variables (cytogenetic, molecular and chimerism response) which serve to describe the heterogeneous picture of response to therapy in each individual case. It is hoped that these criteria will facilitate the comparison of results between clinical trials in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

  1. Should CA-125 response criteria be preferred to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) for prognostication during second-line chemotherapy of ovarian carcinoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronlund, Bo; Høgdall, Claus; Hilden, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    -line chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From a single-institution registry of 527 consecutive patients with primary ovarian carcinoma, 131 records satisfied the inclusion criteria: ovarian carcinoma of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IC to IV, first-line chemotherapy with paclitaxel...... and a platinum compound, refractory or recurrent disease, and second-line chemotherapy consisting of topotecan or paclitaxel plus carboplatin. Univariate and multivariate analyses of survival were performed using the landmark method. RESULTS: In patients with measurable disease by RECIST and with assessable...... sites (solitary v multiple; hazard ratio, 0.47; P = .020) were identified as contributory prognostic factors for survival, whereas the parameters of RECIST (responders v nonresponders), as well as the remaining variables, had nonsignificant prognostic impact. CONCLUSION: The GCIG CA-125 response...

  2. Development of an extended framework for emergency response criteria. Interim report for comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Experience from response to recent nuclear and radiological emergencies has clearly demonstrated the importance of an efficient response system that includes, among other components, emergency plans, procedures, and internally consistent operational criteria. An analysis of lessons identified from recent responses has shown that a lack of crucial components in the emergency response system could result in major radiological and nonradiological consequences at the national level. One of the reasons for the overwhelming psychological consequences of the Chernobyl and Goiania emergencies was public mistrust of decision-makers, who lost their credibility by frequently changing the criteria for taking action. Moreover, national response arrangements that are incompatible among countries can result in major mistrust by the public. It is considered important to have internationally agreed criteria and guidance for emergency response established in advance of an emergency. Currently there are several IAEA safety standards that contain recommendations for response to radiation emergencies, addressing principles and response criteria. Mindful of the lessons identified from recent emergencies, the IAEA convened in November 2001 a technical committee meeting (TCM) to develop aspects of the technical basis for emergency response to radiation emergencies. At this meeting, the lessons from response to the Chernobyl, Goiania and other emergencies over the past years were examined to identify where revisions were needed to the existing international guidance for response. In particular, the existing international criteria and guidance for taking protective and other actions were examined in the light of these lessons. The objectives of this document are: (1) to propose an extension of existing criteria for undertaking protective and other actions during or following a nuclear or radiological emergency that: addresses the lessons from past emergencies, addresses the recently

  3. Biaxial failure criteria and stress-strain response for concrete of containment structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. K.; Woo, S. K.; Song, Y. C.; Kweon, Y. K.; Cho, C. H.

    2001-01-01

    Biaxial failure criteria and stress-strain response for plain concrete of containment structure on nuclear power plants are studied under uniaxial and biaxial stress(compression-compression, compression-tension, and tension-tension combined stress). The concrete specimens of a square plate type are used for uniaxial and biaxial loading. The experimental data indicate that the strength of concrete under biaxial compression, f 2 /f 1 =-1/-1, is 17 percent larger than under uniaxial compression and the poisson's ratio of concrete is 0.1745. On the base of the results, a biaxial failure envelope for plain concrete that the uniaxial strength is 5660 psi are provided, and the biaxial failure behaviors for three biaxial loading areas are plotted respectively. And, various analytical equations having the reliability are proposed for representations of the biaxial failure criteria and stress-strain response curves of concrete

  4. Evaluation of Immune-Related Response Criteria and RECIST v1.1 in Patients With Advanced Melanoma Treated With Pembrolizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodi, F Stephen; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Kefford, Richard; Weber, Jeffrey S; Daud, Adil; Hamid, Omid; Patnaik, Amita; Ribas, Antoni; Robert, Caroline; Gangadhar, Tara C; Joshua, Anthony M; Hersey, Peter; Dronca, Roxana; Joseph, Richard; Hille, Darcy; Xue, Dahai; Li, Xiaoyun Nicole; Kang, S Peter; Ebbinghaus, Scot; Perrone, Andrea; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated atypical response patterns and the relationship between overall survival and best overall response measured per immune-related response criteria (irRC) and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.1 (RECIST v1.1) in patients with advanced melanoma treated with pembrolizumab in the phase Ib KEYNOTE-001 study (clinical trial information: NCT01295827). Patients received pembrolizumab 2 or 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks or every 3 weeks. Atypical responses were identified by using centrally assessed irRC data in patients with ≥ 28 weeks of imaging. Pseudoprogression was defined as ≥ 25% increase in tumor burden at week 12 (early) or any assessment after week 12 (delayed) that was not confirmed as progressive disease at next assessment. Response was assessed centrally per irRC and RECIST v1.1. Of the 655 patients with melanoma enrolled, 327 had ≥ 28 weeks of imaging follow-up. Twenty-four (7%) of these 327 patients had atypical responses (15 [5%] with early pseudoprogression and nine [3%] with delayed pseudoprogression). Of the 592 patients who survived ≥ 12 weeks, 84 (14%) experienced progressive disease per RECIST v1.1 but nonprogressive disease per irRC. Two-year overall survival rates were 77.6% in patients with nonprogressive disease per both criteria (n = 331), 37.5% in patients with progressive disease per RECIST v1.1 but nonprogressive disease per irRC (n = 84), and 17.3% in patients with progressive disease per both criteria (n = 177). Atypical responses were observed in patients with melanoma treated with pembrolizumab. Based on survival analysis, conventional RECIST might underestimate the benefit of pembrolizumab in approximately 15% of patients; modified criteria that permit treatment beyond initial progression per RECIST v1.1 might prevent premature cessation of treatment. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. A Study on the Basic Criteria for Selecting Heterogeneity Parameters of F18-FDG PET Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgacs, Attila; Pall Jonsson, Hermann; Dahlbom, Magnus; Daver, Freddie; D. DiFranco, Matthew; Opposits, Gabor; K. Krizsan, Aron; Garai, Ildiko; Czernin, Johannes; Varga, Jozsef; Tron, Lajos; Balkay, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Textural analysis might give new insights into the quantitative characterization of metabolically active tumors. More than thirty textural parameters have been investigated in former F18-FDG studies already. The purpose of the paper is to declare basic requirements as a selection strategy to identify the most appropriate heterogeneity parameters to measure textural features. Our predefined requirements were: a reliable heterogeneity parameter has to be volume independent, reproducible, and suitable for expressing quantitatively the degree of heterogeneity. Based on this criteria, we compared various suggested measures of homogeneity. A homogeneous cylindrical phantom was measured on three different PET/CT scanners using the commonly used protocol. In addition, a custom-made inhomogeneous tumor insert placed into the NEMA image quality phantom was imaged with a set of acquisition times and several different reconstruction protocols. PET data of 65 patients with proven lung lesions were retrospectively analyzed as well. Four heterogeneity parameters out of 27 were found as the most attractive ones to characterize the textural properties of metabolically active tumors in FDG PET images. These four parameters included Entropy, Contrast, Correlation, and Coefficient of Variation. These parameters were independent of delineated tumor volume (bigger than 25–30 ml), provided reproducible values (relative standard deviation< 10%), and showed high sensitivity to changes in heterogeneity. Phantom measurements are a viable way to test the reliability of heterogeneity parameters that would be of interest to nuclear imaging clinicians. PMID:27736888

  6. Improvement and Extension of Shape Evaluation Criteria in Multi-Scale Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, M.; Honda, Y.; Kondo, A.

    2016-06-01

    From the last decade, the multi-scale image segmentation is getting a particular interest and practically being used for object-based image analysis. In this study, we have addressed the issues on multi-scale image segmentation, especially, in improving the performances for validity of merging and variety of derived region's shape. Firstly, we have introduced constraints on the application of spectral criterion which could suppress excessive merging between dissimilar regions. Secondly, we have extended the evaluation for smoothness criterion by modifying the definition on the extent of the object, which was brought for controlling the shape's diversity. Thirdly, we have developed new shape criterion called aspect ratio. This criterion helps to improve the reproducibility on the shape of object to be matched to the actual objectives of interest. This criterion provides constraint on the aspect ratio in the bounding box of object by keeping properties controlled with conventional shape criteria. These improvements and extensions lead to more accurate, flexible, and diverse segmentation results according to the shape characteristics of the target of interest. Furthermore, we also investigated a technique for quantitative and automatic parameterization in multi-scale image segmentation. This approach is achieved by comparing segmentation result with training area specified in advance by considering the maximization of the average area in derived objects or satisfying the evaluation index called F-measure. Thus, it has been possible to automate the parameterization that suited the objectives especially in the view point of shape's reproducibility.

  7. A Study on the Basic Criteria for Selecting Heterogeneity Parameters of F18-FDG PET Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Forgacs

    Full Text Available Textural analysis might give new insights into the quantitative characterization of metabolically active tumors. More than thirty textural parameters have been investigated in former F18-FDG studies already. The purpose of the paper is to declare basic requirements as a selection strategy to identify the most appropriate heterogeneity parameters to measure textural features. Our predefined requirements were: a reliable heterogeneity parameter has to be volume independent, reproducible, and suitable for expressing quantitatively the degree of heterogeneity. Based on this criteria, we compared various suggested measures of homogeneity. A homogeneous cylindrical phantom was measured on three different PET/CT scanners using the commonly used protocol. In addition, a custom-made inhomogeneous tumor insert placed into the NEMA image quality phantom was imaged with a set of acquisition times and several different reconstruction protocols. PET data of 65 patients with proven lung lesions were retrospectively analyzed as well. Four heterogeneity parameters out of 27 were found as the most attractive ones to characterize the textural properties of metabolically active tumors in FDG PET images. These four parameters included Entropy, Contrast, Correlation, and Coefficient of Variation. These parameters were independent of delineated tumor volume (bigger than 25-30 ml, provided reproducible values (relative standard deviation< 10%, and showed high sensitivity to changes in heterogeneity. Phantom measurements are a viable way to test the reliability of heterogeneity parameters that would be of interest to nuclear imaging clinicians.

  8. Severe deterministic effects of external exposure and intake of radioactive material: basis for emergency response criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutkov, V; Buglova, E; McKenna, T

    2011-01-01

    Lessons learned from responses to past events have shown that more guidance is needed for the response to radiation emergencies (in this context, a 'radiation emergency' means the same as a 'nuclear or radiological emergency') which could lead to severe deterministic effects. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) requirements for preparedness and response for a radiation emergency, inter alia, require that arrangements shall be made to prevent, to a practicable extent, severe deterministic effects and to provide the appropriate specialised treatment for these effects. These requirements apply to all exposure pathways, both internal and external, and all reasonable scenarios, to include those resulting from malicious acts (e.g. dirty bombs). This paper briefly describes the approach used to develop the basis for emergency response criteria for protective actions to prevent severe deterministic effects in the case of external exposure and intake of radioactive material.

  9. Principles for Developing Benchmark Criteria for Staff Training in Responsible Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Stefan; Banzer, Raphaela; Gruenerbl, Agnes; Malischnig, Doris; Griffiths, Mark D; Haring, Christian

    2017-03-01

    One approach to minimizing the negative consequences of excessive gambling is staff training to reduce the rate of the development of new cases of harm or disorder within their customers. The primary goal of the present study was to assess suitable benchmark criteria for the training of gambling employees at casinos and lottery retailers. The study utilised the Delphi Method, a survey with one qualitative and two quantitative phases. A total of 21 invited international experts in the responsible gambling field participated in all three phases. A total of 75 performance indicators were outlined and assigned to six categories: (1) criteria of content, (2) modelling, (3) qualification of trainer, (4) framework conditions, (5) sustainability and (6) statistical indicators. Nine of the 75 indicators were rated as very important by 90 % or more of the experts. Unanimous support for importance was given to indicators such as (1) comprehensibility and (2) concrete action-guidance for handling with problem gamblers, Additionally, the study examined the implementation of benchmarking, when it should be conducted, and who should be responsible. Results indicated that benchmarking should be conducted every 1-2 years regularly and that one institution should be clearly defined and primarily responsible for benchmarking. The results of the present study provide the basis for developing a benchmarking for staff training in responsible gambling.

  10. Pros and cons of conjoint analysis of discrete choice experiments to define classification and response criteria in rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, William J

    2016-03-01

    Conjoint analysis of choice or preference data has been used in marketing for over 40 years but has appeared in healthcare settings much more recently. It may be a useful technique for applications within the rheumatology field. Conjoint analysis in rheumatology contexts has mainly used the approaches implemented in 1000Minds Ltd, Dunedin, New Zealand, Sawtooth Software, Orem UT, USA. Examples include classification criteria, composite response criteria, service prioritization tools and utilities assessment. Limitations imposed by very many attributes can be managed using new techniques. Conjoint analysis studies of classification and response criteria suggest that the assumption of equal weighting of attributes cannot be met, which challenges traditional approaches to composite criteria construction. Weights elicited through choice experiments with experts can derive more accurate classification criteria, than unweighted criteria. Studies that find significant variation in attribute weights for composite response criteria for gout make construction of such criteria problematic. Better understanding of various multiattribute phenomena is likely to increase with increased use of conjoint analysis, especially when the attributes concern individual perceptions or opinions. In addition to classification criteria, some applications for conjoint analysis that are emerging in rheumatology include prioritization tools, remission criteria, and utilities for life areas.

  11. IMPROVEMENT AND EXTENSION OF SHAPE EVALUATION CRITERIA IN MULTI-SCALE IMAGE SEGMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sakamoto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available From the last decade, the multi-scale image segmentation is getting a particular interest and practically being used for object-based image analysis. In this study, we have addressed the issues on multi-scale image segmentation, especially, in improving the performances for validity of merging and variety of derived region’s shape. Firstly, we have introduced constraints on the application of spectral criterion which could suppress excessive merging between dissimilar regions. Secondly, we have extended the evaluation for smoothness criterion by modifying the definition on the extent of the object, which was brought for controlling the shape’s diversity. Thirdly, we have developed new shape criterion called aspect ratio. This criterion helps to improve the reproducibility on the shape of object to be matched to the actual objectives of interest. This criterion provides constraint on the aspect ratio in the bounding box of object by keeping properties controlled with conventional shape criteria. These improvements and extensions lead to more accurate, flexible, and diverse segmentation results according to the shape characteristics of the target of interest. Furthermore, we also investigated a technique for quantitative and automatic parameterization in multi-scale image segmentation. This approach is achieved by comparing segmentation result with training area specified in advance by considering the maximization of the average area in derived objects or satisfying the evaluation index called F-measure. Thus, it has been possible to automate the parameterization that suited the objectives especially in the view point of shape’s reproducibility.

  12. Differentiating emotional responses to images and words

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Birgitte Falk; Petersen, Michael Kai; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    responses are characterized by only small voltage changes that have typically been found in group studies involving multiple trials and large numbers of participants. Hypothesizing that spatial filtering might enhance retrieval, we apply independent component analysis (ICA) to cluster scalp maps and time...... series responses in a single subject based on only a few trials. Comparing our results against previous findings we identify multiple early and late ICA components that are similarly modulated by neutral, pleasant and unpleasant content in both images and words. Suggesting that we might be able to model...

  13. Simplified response monitoring criteria for multiple myeloma in patients undergoing therapy with novel agents using computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabel, Christoph; Horger, Marius; Kum, Sara [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Weisel, Katja [Department of Internal Medicine II – Hematology & Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Otfried-Müller-Str. 5, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Fritz, Jan [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe St., Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Ioanoviciu, Sorin D. [Department of Internal Medicine, Clinical Municipal Hospital Timisoara, Gheorghe Dima Str. 5, 300079 Timisoara (Romania); Bier, Georg, E-mail: georg.bier@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A simplified method for response monitoring of multiple myeloma is proposed. • Medullary bone lesions of all limbs were included and analysed. • Diameters of ≥2 medullary bone lesions are sufficient for therapy monitoring. - Abstract: Introduction: Multiple myeloma is a malignant hematological disorder of the mature B-cell lymphocytes originating in the bone marrow. While therapy monitoring is still mainly based on laboratory biomarkers, the additional use of imaging has been advocated due to inaccuracies of serological biomarkers or in a-secretory myelomas. Non-enhanced CT and MRI have similar sensitivities for lesions in yellow marrow-rich bone marrow cavities with a favourable risk and cost-effectiveness profile of CT. Nevertheless, these methods are still limited by frequently high numbers of medullary lesions and its time consumption for proper evaluation. Objective: To establish simplified response criteria by correlating size and CT attenuation changes of medullary multiple myeloma lesions in the appendicular skeleton with the course of lytic bone lesions in the entire skeleton. Furthermore to evaluate these criteria with respect to established hematological myeloma-specific parameters for the prediction of treatment response to bortezomib or lenalidomide. Materials and methods: Non-enhanced reduced-dose whole-body CT examinations of 78 consecutive patients (43 male, 35 female, mean age 63.69 ± 9.2 years) with stage III multiple myeloma were retrospectively re-evaluated. On per patient basis, size and mean CT attenuation of 2–4 representative lesions in the limbs were measured at baseline and at a follow-up after a mean of 8 months. Results were compared with the course of lytical bone lesions as well with that of specific hematological biomarkers. Myeloma response was assessed according to the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) uniform response criteria. Testing for correlation between response of medullary lesions (Resp

  14. High resolution MR imaging of bladder cancer: new criteria for determining depth of wall invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Chang Hae; Kressel, Herbert Y

    1993-01-01

    To establish new criteria to determine the depth of bladder cancer as well as to obtain the findings of each stage of bladder cancer we reviewed high resolution MR images of 18 bladder cancer patients including seven cases (26%) with superficial bladder wall invasion. All MR scans were done before biopsy or surgery. Multiple layers of the bladder wall (inner black, middle white, outer black) were demonstrated in 11 cases out of a total 18 cases. Thickening of the middle layer caused by tumor infiltration or edema of lamina propria was seen in 8 of 12 patients with stage T2 or greater, and was suggestive of superficial muscle invasion when multiple layers were demonstrated. Disruption of outer layer (as well as inner layer) and external protrusion of tumor itself were indicative of perivesical invasion. When multiple layers were not demonstrated, the depth of tumor invasion could not be judged. High resolution MR imaging can depict submucosal invasion, muscle invasion, and perivesical invasion secondary to bladder cancer

  15. CEC quality criteria for diagnostic radiographic images and patient exposure trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahrstedt, U.; Wall, B.; Maccia, C.; Moores, B.M.; Padovani, R.

    1990-01-01

    The intention of this report has been to present the results of a multinational trial set up by a study group of the radiation protection programme of the CEC. In view of proceeding towards the harmonization and the optimization of the radiological techniques commonly used in different European countries, the relevance of quality criteria for radiographic images together with dose requirements were checked on about 900 examined patients. Due to the type of X-ray projections considered, more than 1 200 questionnaires concerning the real X-ray films were therefore collected and evaluated through a scoring system. Such an approach was relevant and contributed to providing practical considerations on how to reduce and optimize patient received dose while keeping the essential medical information imaged on the film. Indeed the results obtained allowed identification of technical modalities corresponding to that objective. Furthermore, analysis of results revealed two main areas which should be further taken into consideration: - personnel training in radiation protection (radiologists and radiographers), establishment of quality assurance programmes in diagnostic radiology (good usage of radiological equipment and reduction of wasted films)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging criteria of successful core decompression in avascular necrosis of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radke, S.; Kirschner, S.; Seipel, V.; Rader, C.; Eulert, J. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Koenig-Ludwig-Haus, Julius-Maximilians University, Wuerzburg, Brettreichstr.11, 97074, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    To identify imaging criteria that determine the outcome of core decompression (CD) in femoral-head avascular necrosis (AVN). Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 65 hips with early stage AVN treated by core decompression between January 1990 and December 2000 for AVN were reviewed. All hips were categorized into two groups according to the result of CD using total hip arthroplasty (THA) as an end point. Hips that had no THA at follow-up were allocated to group I; those treated with a THA were allocated to group II. CD results were calculated for each group using THA as an end point. The parameters analyzed were the presence or absence of edema associated with the double-line sign on the preoperative MRI, the type of epiphyseal scar (ES) according to Jing, and the type of necrosis according to Mitchell. On follow-up, 45 hips had no THA (group I); 20 patients had a THA (group II). Patients with a radiographic crescent sign and those with edema associated with the double-line sign progressed to THA significantly more frequently. The extent of the necrosis had less discriminatory effect between the two groups. ES and necrotic tissue types had no prognostic value. In regard to the success of CD, it is important to differentiate on MRI between a double line sign plus bone marrow edema and a double-line sign only. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging criteria of successful core decompression in avascular necrosis of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radke, S.; Kirschner, S.; Seipel, V.; Rader, C.; Eulert, J.

    2004-01-01

    To identify imaging criteria that determine the outcome of core decompression (CD) in femoral-head avascular necrosis (AVN). Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 65 hips with early stage AVN treated by core decompression between January 1990 and December 2000 for AVN were reviewed. All hips were categorized into two groups according to the result of CD using total hip arthroplasty (THA) as an end point. Hips that had no THA at follow-up were allocated to group I; those treated with a THA were allocated to group II. CD results were calculated for each group using THA as an end point. The parameters analyzed were the presence or absence of edema associated with the double-line sign on the preoperative MRI, the type of epiphyseal scar (ES) according to Jing, and the type of necrosis according to Mitchell. On follow-up, 45 hips had no THA (group I); 20 patients had a THA (group II). Patients with a radiographic crescent sign and those with edema associated with the double-line sign progressed to THA significantly more frequently. The extent of the necrosis had less discriminatory effect between the two groups. ES and necrotic tissue types had no prognostic value. In regard to the success of CD, it is important to differentiate on MRI between a double line sign plus bone marrow edema and a double-line sign only. (orig.)

  18. Adapting the Computed Tomography Criteria of Hemorrhagic Transformation to Stroke Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Neeb

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main safety aspect in the use of stroke thrombolysis and in clinical trials of new pharmaceutical or interventional stroke therapies is the incidence of hemorrhagic transformation (HT after treatment. The computed tomography (CT-based classification of the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASS distinguishes four categories of HTs. An HT can range from a harmless spot of blood accumulation to a symptomatic space-occupying parenchymal bleeding associated with a massive deterioration of symptoms and clinical prognosis. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI HTs are often categorized using the ECASS criteria although this classification has not been validated in MRI. We developed MRI-specific criteria for the categorization of HT and sought to assess its diagnostic reliability in a retrospective study. Methods: Consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients, who had received a 3-tesla MRI before and 12-36 h after thrombolysis, were screened retrospectively for an HT of any kind in post-treatment MRI. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was given to all patients within 4.5 h. HT categorization was based on a simultaneous read of 3 different MRI sequences (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, diffusion-weighted imaging and T2* gradient-recalled echo. Categorization of HT in MRI accounted for the various aspects of the imaging pattern as the shape of the bleeding area and signal intensity on each sequence. All data sets were independently categorized in a blinded fashion by 3 expert and 3 resident observers. Interobserver reliability of this classification was determined for all observers together and for each group separately by calculating Kendall's coefficient of concordance (W. Results: Of the 186 patients screened, 39 patients (21% had an HT in post-treatment MRI and were included for the categorization of HT by experts and residents. The overall agreement of HT categorization according to the modified classification was

  19. CCR 20th Anniversary Commentary: Immune-Related Response Criteria--Capturing Clinical Activity in Immuno-Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoos, Axel; Wolchok, Jedd D; Humphrey, Rachel W; Hodi, F Stephen

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate antitumor responses to chemotherapeutic agents, investigators would typically rely upon Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) or modified WHO criteria, which do not comprehensively capture responses with immunotherapeutic agents. In the December 1, 2009, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, Wolchok and colleagues reported their development of novel criteria, designated "Immune-related Response Criteria" (irRC), designed to better capture the response patterns observed with immunotherapies. Broad use of the irRC since then has allowed for a more comprehensive evaluation of immunotherapies in clinical trials, indicating that their concepts can be used in conjunction with either RECIST or WHO, and has shown irRC to be a powerful tool for improved clinical investigation. See related article by Wolchok et al., Clin Cancer Res 2009;15(23) December 1, 2009;7412-20. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. 33 CFR 155.1052 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for vessels carrying group V petroleum oil as a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for vessels carrying group V petroleum oil as a primary cargo. 155.1052 Section 155.1052....1052 Response plan development and evaluation criteria for vessels carrying group V petroleum oil as a primary cargo. (a) Owners and operators of vessels that carry group V petroleum oil as a primary cargo...

  1. Evaluation of low-energy contrast-enhanced spectral mammography images by comparing them to full-field digital mammography using EUREF image quality criteria

    OpenAIRE

    Lalji, U. C.; Jeukens, C. R. L. P. N.; Houben, I.; Nelemans, P. J.; van Engen, R. E.; van Wylick, E.; Beets-Tan, R. G. H.; Wildberger, J. E.; Paulis, L. E.; Lobbes, M. B. I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) examination results in a low-energy (LE) and contrast-enhanced image. The LE appears similar to a full-field digital mammogram (FFDM). Our aim was to evaluate LE CESM image quality by comparing it to FFDM using criteria defined by the European Reference Organization for Quality Assured Breast Screening and Diagnostic Services (EUREF). Methods A total of 147 cases with both FFDM and LE images were independently scored by two experienced r...

  2. Soft Tissue Sarcoma Response to Two Cycles of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: A Multireader Analysis of MRI Findings and Agreement with RECIST Criteria and Change in SUVmax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favinger, Jennifer L; Hippe, Daniel S; Davidson, Darin J; Elojeimy, Saeed; Roth, Eira S; Lindberg, Antoinette W; Ha, Alice S

    2018-04-01

    When soft tissue sarcomas are treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the number of cycles of chemotherapy is usually dependent on the tumor's initial response. Popular methods to assess tumor response include Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria, which rely solely on tumor size, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) reduction in positron emission tomography (PET), which requires an expensive and high radiation test. We hypothesized that contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may offer a good alternative by providing additional information beyond tumor size. Following IRB approval, a retrospective review identified patients with soft tissue sarcomas who underwent both PET and MRI before and after two cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Five readers independently examined the MRI exams for: changes in size, T2 or T1 signal, necrosis and degree of enhancement. Readers then made a subjective binary assessment of tumor response to therapy. Each reader repeated the anonymized randomized reading at least 2 weeks apart. 18 F-FDG PET exams were interpreted by a nuclear medicine specialist. The maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) for pre and post-chemotherapy exams were compared. Intra- and inter-reader agreement was assessed using Cohen's kappa and Light's kappa, respectively. . Twenty cases were selected for this multireader study, of which 9 (45%) were responders and 11 were nonresponders by SUVmax. Using all MRI criteria, 43% were classified as responders based on MRI and 1.5% were classified as responders by RECIST criteria. Using PET as the reference, the sensitivity and the specificity of the MRI diagnosis for response using all findings were 50% and 63%, respectively. There was fair to moderate intrareader (kappa = 0.37) and inter-reader (kappa = 0.48) agreement for the MRI diagnosis of response. None of the individual MRI signal characteristics were significantly different between the PET responders and

  3. Applicability of McDonald 2010 and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis (MAGNIMS) 2016 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Criteria for the Diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Sujani Madhurika Kodagoda; Wijeweera, Indunil; Wijesinghe, Priyangi; Adikari, Sanjaya Bandara; Fink, Katharina; Sominanda, Herath Mudiyanselage Ajith

    2018-05-31

    The magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis (MAGNIMS) group recently proposed guidelines to replace the existing dissemination-in-space criteria in McDonald 2010 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria for diagnosing multiple sclerosis. There has been insufficient research regarding their applicability in Asians. Objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of McDonald 2010 and MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria with the aim of verifying their applicability in Sri Lankan patients. Patients with clinically isolated syndrome diagnosed by consultant neurologists were recruited from five major neurology centers. Baseline and follow-up MRI scans were performed within 3 months from the initial presentation and at one year after baseline MRI, respectively. McDonald 2010 and MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria were applied to all MRI scans. Patients were followed-up for 2 years to assess the conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV, and NPV for predicting the conversion to CDMS were calculated. Forty-two of 66 patients converted to CDMS. Thirty-seven fulfilled the McDonald 2010 MRI criteria, and 33 converted to CDMS. MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria were fulfilled by 29, with 28 converting to CDMS. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV, and NPV were 78%, 83%, 64%, 89%, and 69%, respectively, for the McDonald 2010 criteria, and 67%, 96%, 77%, 96%, and 62% for the MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria. MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria were superior to McDonald 2010 MRI criteria in specificity, accuracy, and PPV, but inferior in sensitivity and NPV. Copyright © 2018 Korean Neurological Association.

  4. Evaluation of low-energy contrast-enhanced spectral mammography images by comparing them to full-field digital mammography using EUREF image quality criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalji, U C; Jeukens, C R L P N; Houben, I; Nelemans, P J; van Engen, R E; van Wylick, E; Beets-Tan, R G H; Wildberger, J E; Paulis, L E; Lobbes, M B I

    2015-10-01

    Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) examination results in a low-energy (LE) and contrast-enhanced image. The LE appears similar to a full-field digital mammogram (FFDM). Our aim was to evaluate LE CESM image quality by comparing it to FFDM using criteria defined by the European Reference Organization for Quality Assured Breast Screening and Diagnostic Services (EUREF). A total of 147 cases with both FFDM and LE images were independently scored by two experienced radiologists using these (20) EUREF criteria. Contrast detail measurements were performed using a dedicated phantom. Differences in image quality scores, average glandular dose, and contrast detail measurements between LE and FFDM were tested for statistical significance. No significant differences in image quality scores were observed between LE and FFDM images for 17 out of 20 criteria. LE scored significantly lower on one criterion regarding the sharpness of the pectoral muscle (p < 0.001), and significantly better on two criteria on the visualization of micro-calcifications (p = 0.02 and p = 0.034). Dose and contrast detail measurements did not reveal any physical explanation for these observed differences. Low-energy CESM images are non-inferior to FFDM images. From this perspective FFDM can be omitted in patients with an indication for CESM. • Low-energy CESM images are non-inferior to FFDM images. • Micro-calcifications are significantly more visible on LE CESM than on FFDM. • There is no physical explanation for this improved visibility of micro-calcifications. • There is no need for an extra FFDM when CESM is indicated.

  5. Comparison of performance of various tumour response criteria in assessment of regorafenib activity in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours after failure of imatinib and sunitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinagare, Atul B; Jagannathan, Jyothi P; Kurra, Vikram; Urban, Trinity; Manola, Judith; Choy, Edwin; Demetri, George D; George, Suzanne; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2014-03-01

    To compare performance of various tumour response criteria (TRCs) in assessment of regorafenib activity in patients with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) with prior failure of imatinib and sunitinib. Twenty participants in a phase II trial received oral regorafenib (median duration 47 weeks; interquartile range (IQR) 24-88) with computed tomography (CT) imaging at baseline and every two months thereafter. Tumour response was prospectively determined on using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) 1.1, and retrospectively reassessed for comparison per RECIST 1.0, World Health Organization (WHO) and Choi criteria, using the same target lesions. Clinical benefit rate [CBR; complete or partial response (CR or PR) or stable disease (SD)≥16 weeks] and progression-free survival (PFS) were compared between various TRCs using kappa statistics. Performance of TRCs in predicting overall survival (OS) was compared by comparing OS in groups with progression-free intervals less than or greater than 20 weeks by each TRC using c-statistics. PR was more frequent by Choi (90%) than RECIST 1.1, RECIST 1.0 and WHO (20% each), however, CBR was similar between various TRCs (overall CBR 85-90%, 95-100% agreement between all TRC pairs). PFS per RECIST 1.0 was similar to RECIST 1.1 (median 44 weeks versus 58 weeks), and shorter for WHO (median 34 weeks) and Choi (median 24 weeks). With RECIST 1.1, RECIST 1.0 and WHO, there was moderate concordance between PFS and OS (c-statistics 0.596-0.679). Choi criteria had less favourable concordance (c-statistic 0.506). RECIST 1.1 and WHO performed somewhat better than Choi criteria as TRC for response evaluation in patients with advanced GIST after prior failure on imatinib and sunitinib. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Can state-of-the-art HVS-based objective image quality criteria be used for image reconstruction techniques based on ROI analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostal, P.; Krasula, L.; Klima, M.

    2012-06-01

    Various image processing techniques in multimedia technology are optimized using visual attention feature of the human visual system. Spatial non-uniformity causes that different locations in an image are of different importance in terms of perception of the image. In other words, the perceived image quality depends mainly on the quality of important locations known as regions of interest. The performance of such techniques is measured by subjective evaluation or objective image quality criteria. Many state-of-the-art objective metrics are based on HVS properties; SSIM, MS-SSIM based on image structural information, VIF based on the information that human brain can ideally gain from the reference image or FSIM utilizing the low-level features to assign the different importance to each location in the image. But still none of these objective metrics utilize the analysis of regions of interest. We solve the question if these objective metrics can be used for effective evaluation of images reconstructed by processing techniques based on ROI analysis utilizing high-level features. In this paper authors show that the state-of-the-art objective metrics do not correlate well with subjective evaluation while the demosaicing based on ROI analysis is used for reconstruction. The ROI were computed from "ground truth" visual attention data. The algorithm combining two known demosaicing techniques on the basis of ROI location is proposed to reconstruct the ROI in fine quality while the rest of image is reconstructed with low quality. The color image reconstructed by this ROI approach was compared with selected demosaicing techniques by objective criteria and subjective testing. The qualitative comparison of the objective and subjective results indicates that the state-of-the-art objective metrics are still not suitable for evaluation image processing techniques based on ROI analysis and new criteria is demanded.

  7. Caffeine use disorder: An item-response theory analysis of proposed DSM-5 criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ágoston, Csilla; Urbán, Róbert; Richman, Mara J; Demetrovics, Zsolt

    2018-06-01

    Caffeine is a common psychoactive substance with a documented addictive potential. Caffeine withdrawal has been included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), but caffeine use disorder (CUD) is considered to be a condition for further study. The aim of the current study is (1) to test the psychometric properties of the Caffeine Use Disorder Questionnaire (CUDQ) by using a confirmatory factor analysis and an item response theory (IRT) approach, (2) to compare IRT models with varying numbers of parameters and models with or without caffeine consumption criteria, and (3) to examine if the total daily caffeine consumption and the use of different caffeinated products can predict the magnitude of CUD symptomatology. A cross-sectional study was conducted on an adult sample (N = 2259). Participants answered several questions regarding their caffeine consumption habits and completed the CUDQ, which incorporates the nine proposed criteria of the DSM-5 as well as one additional item regarding the suffering caused by the symptoms. Factor analyses demonstrated the unidimensionality of the CUDQ. The suffering criterion had the highest discriminative value at a higher degree of latent trait. The criterion of failure to fulfill obligations and social/interpersonal problems discriminate only at the higher value of CUD latent factor, while endorsement the consumption of more caffeine or longer than intended and craving criteria were discriminative at a lower level of CUD. Total daily caffeine intake was related to a higher level of CUD. Daily coffee, energy drink, and cola intake as dummy variables were associated with the presence of more CUD symptoms, while daily tea consumption as a dummy variable was related to less CUD symptoms. Regular smoking was associated with more CUD symptoms, which was explained by a larger caffeine consumption. The IRT approach helped to determine which CUD symptoms indicate more severity and have a greater

  8. Criteria for Use in Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. General Safety Guide (Arabic Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    This Safety Guide presents a coherent set of generic criteria (expressed numerically in terms of radiation dose) that form a basis for developing the operational levels needed for decision making concerning protective and response actions. The set of generic criteria addresses the requirements established in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 for emergency preparedness and response, including lessons learned from responses to past emergencies, and provides an internally consistent foundation for the application of principles of radiation protection. The publication also provides a basis for a plain language explanation of the criteria for the public and for public officials. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Basic considerations; 3. Framework for emergency response criteria; 4. Guidance values for emergency workers; 5. Operational criteria; Appendix I: Dose concepts and dosimetric quantities; Appendix II: Examples of default OILs for deposition, individual contamination and contamination of food, milk and water; Appendix III: Development of EALs and example EALs for light water reactors; Appendix IV: Observables on the scene of a radiological emergency.

  9. Criteria for Use in Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. General Safety Guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This Safety Guide presents a coherent set of generic criteria (expressed numerically in terms of radiation dose) that form a basis for developing the operational levels needed for decision making concerning protective and response actions. The set of generic criteria addresses the requirements established in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 for emergency preparedness and response, including lessons learned from responses to past emergencies, and provides an internally consistent foundation for the application of radiation protection. The publication also proposes a basis for a plain language explanation of the criteria for the public and for public officials. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Basic considerations; 3. Framework for emergency response criteria; 4. Guidance values for emergency workers; 5. Operational criteria; Appendix I: Dose concepts and dosimetric quantities; Appendix II: Examples of default oils for deposition, individual monitoring and contamination of food, milk and water; Appendix III: Development of EALs and example EALs for light water reactors; Appendix IV: Observables at the scene of a nuclear or radiological emergency

  10. Criteria for Use in Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. General Safety Guide (Russian Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This Safety Guide presents a coherent set of generic criteria (expressed numerically in terms of radiation dose) that form a basis for developing the operational levels needed for decision making concerning protective and response actions. The set of generic criteria addresses the requirements established in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 for emergency preparedness and response, including lessons learned from responses to past emergencies, and provides an internally consistent foundation for the application of radiation protection. The publication also proposes a basis for a plain language explanation of the criteria for the public and for public officials. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Basic considerations; 3. Framework for emergency response criteria; 4. Guidance values for emergency workers; 5. Operational criteria; Appendix I: Dose concepts and dosimetric quantities; Appendix II: Examples of default oils for deposition, individual monitoring and contamination of food, milk and water; Appendix III: Development of EALs and example EALs for light water reactors; Appendix IV: Observables at the scene of a nuclear or radiological emergency.

  11. The role of multi-parametric MR imaging in the detection of early inflammatory sacroiliitis according to ASAS criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boy, Fatma Nur, E-mail: nursoylu@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Kayhan, Arda, E-mail: arda_kayhan@yahoo.com [Health Services Vocational School, Esenyurt University, Dogan Arasli Bulvari No 120, Esenyurt, Istanbul (Turkey); Karakas, Hakki Muammer, E-mail: hakki.karakas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Unlu-Ozkan, Feyza, E-mail: feyzamd@yahoo.com [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Silte, Duygu, E-mail: drduygusilte@hotmail.com [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Aktas, İlknur, E-mail: iaktas@hotmail.com [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of multi-parametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging including fat saturated (FS) T2-weighted, short-tau inversion recovery (STIR), diffusion-weighted (DW-MR), and dynamic-contrast-enhanced MR (DCE-MR) imaging techniques in the diagnosis of early inflammatory sacroiliitis and determine the additional value of DW-MR and DCE-MR images according to recently defined ‘Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society’ criteria. Materials and methods: The study included 45 patients with back pain. Two radiologists estimated the likelihood of osteitis in 4 independent viewing sessions including FS T2-weighted, STIR, DW-MR and DCE-MR images. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) were calculated. Results: Of the 45 patients, 31 had inflammatory back pain. Of 31, 28 (90.3%) patients had inflammatory sacroiliitis diagnosed by clinical and laboratory analysis. FS T2-weighted MR images had the highest sensitivity (42.8% for both radiologists) for detecting osteitis in patients with inflammaory sacroiliitis when compared to other imaging sequences. For specificity, PPV, NPV, accuracy, and AUC levels there were no statistically significant difference between image viewing settings. However, adding STIR, DW-MR and DCE-MR images to the FS T2-weighted MR images did not improve the above stated indices. Conclusion: FS T2-weighted MR imaging had the highest sensitivity when compared to other imaging sequences. The addition of DW-MR and DCE-MR images did not significantly improve the diagnostic value of MR imaging in the diagnosis of osteitis for both experienced and less experienced radiologists.

  12. The role of multi-parametric MR imaging in the detection of early inflammatory sacroiliitis according to ASAS criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boy, Fatma Nur; Kayhan, Arda; Karakas, Hakki Muammer; Unlu-Ozkan, Feyza; Silte, Duygu; Aktas, İlknur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of multi-parametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging including fat saturated (FS) T2-weighted, short-tau inversion recovery (STIR), diffusion-weighted (DW-MR), and dynamic-contrast-enhanced MR (DCE-MR) imaging techniques in the diagnosis of early inflammatory sacroiliitis and determine the additional value of DW-MR and DCE-MR images according to recently defined ‘Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society’ criteria. Materials and methods: The study included 45 patients with back pain. Two radiologists estimated the likelihood of osteitis in 4 independent viewing sessions including FS T2-weighted, STIR, DW-MR and DCE-MR images. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) were calculated. Results: Of the 45 patients, 31 had inflammatory back pain. Of 31, 28 (90.3%) patients had inflammatory sacroiliitis diagnosed by clinical and laboratory analysis. FS T2-weighted MR images had the highest sensitivity (42.8% for both radiologists) for detecting osteitis in patients with inflammaory sacroiliitis when compared to other imaging sequences. For specificity, PPV, NPV, accuracy, and AUC levels there were no statistically significant difference between image viewing settings. However, adding STIR, DW-MR and DCE-MR images to the FS T2-weighted MR images did not improve the above stated indices. Conclusion: FS T2-weighted MR imaging had the highest sensitivity when compared to other imaging sequences. The addition of DW-MR and DCE-MR images did not significantly improve the diagnostic value of MR imaging in the diagnosis of osteitis for both experienced and less experienced radiologists

  13. National variation in preoperative imaging, carotid duplex ultrasound criteria, and threshold for surgery for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arous, Edward J; Simons, Jessica P; Flahive, Julie M; Beck, Adam W; Stone, David H; Hoel, Andrew W; Messina, Louis M; Schanzer, Andres

    2015-10-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis is among the most common procedures performed in the United States. However, consensus is lacking regarding optimal preoperative imaging, carotid duplex ultrasound criteria, and ultimately, the threshold for surgery. We sought to characterize national variation in preoperative imaging, carotid duplex ultrasound criteria, and threshold for surgery for asymptomatic CEA. The Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) database was used to identify all CEA procedures performed for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis between 2003 and 2014. VQI currently captures 100% of CEA procedures performed at >300 centers by >2000 physicians nationwide. Three analyses were performed to quantify the variation in (1) preoperative imaging, (2) carotid duplex ultrasound criteria, and (3) threshold for surgery. Of 35,695 CEA procedures in 33,488 patients, the study cohort was limited to 19,610 CEA procedures (55%) performed for asymptomatic disease. The preoperative imaging modality used before CEA varied widely, with 57% of patients receiving a single preoperative imaging study (duplex ultrasound imaging, 46%; computed tomography angiography, 7.5%; magnetic resonance angiography, 2.0%; cerebral angiography, 1.3%) and 43% of patients receiving multiple preoperative imaging studies. Of the 16,452 asymptomatic patients (89%) who underwent preoperative duplex ultrasound imaging, there was significant variability between centers in the degree of stenosis (50%-69%, 70%-79%, 80%-99%) designated for a given peak systolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, and internal carotid artery-to-common carotid artery ratio. Although 68% of CEA procedures in asymptomatic patients were performed for an 80% to 99% stenosis, 26% were performed for a 70% to 79% stenosis, and 4.1% were performed for a 50% to 69% stenosis. At the surgeon level, the range in the percentage of CEA procedures performed for a duplex ultrasound

  14. Pilot program: NRC severe reactor accident incident response training manual: Public protective actions: Predetermined criteria and initial actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.A. Jr.; McKenna, T.J.; Miller, C.W.; Hively, L.M.; Sharpe, R.W.; Giitter, J.G.; Watkins, R.M.

    1987-02-01

    This pilot training manual has been written to fill the need for a general text on NRC response to reactor accidents. The manual is intended to be the foundation for a course for all NRC response personnel. Public Protective Actions - Predetermined Criteria and Initial Actions is the fourth in a series of volumes that collectively summarize the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) emergency response during severe power reactor accidents and provide necessary background information. This volume reviews public protective action criteria and objectives, their bases and implementation, and the expected public response. Each volume serves, respectively, as the text for a course of instruction in a series of courses for NRC response personnel. These materials do not provide guidance or license requirements for NRC licensees. Each volume is accompanied by an appendix of slides that can be used to present this material. The slides are called out in the text

  15. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine: PET/Computed Tomography and Therapy Response Assessment in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Mena, Esther; Pattanayak, Puskar; Taghipour, Mehdi; Solnes, Lilja B; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    A variety of methods have been developed to assess tumor response to therapy. Standardized qualitative criteria based on 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose PET/computed tomography have been proposed to evaluate the treatment effectiveness in specific cancers and these allow more accurate therapy response assessment and survival prognostication. Multiple studies have addressed the utility of the volumetric PET biomarkers as prognostic indicators but there is no consensus about the preferred segmentation methodology for these metrics. Heterogeneous intratumoral uptake was proposed as a novel PET metric for therapy response assessment. PET imaging techniques will be used to study the biological behavior of cancers during therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Implications of imaging criteria for the management and treatment of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms - benign versus malignant findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Thula Cannon; Steffen, Ingo G.; Stelter, Lars H.; Hamm, Bernd; Denecke, Timm; Grieser, Christian [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Klinik fuer Radiologie, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Maurer, Martin H. [Universitaetsklinik Bern, Universitaetsinstitut fuer Radiologe, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Bahra, Marcus; Faber, Wladimir; Klein, Fritz [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Blaeker, Hendrik [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institut fuer Pathologie, Campus Charite Mitte, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Evaluation of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for differentiation of pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) subtypes based on objective imaging criteria. Fifty-eight patients with 60 histologically confirmed IPMNs were included in this retrospective study. Eighty-three imaging studies (CT,n = 42; MRI,n = 41) were analysed by three independent blinded observers (O1-O3), using established imaging criteria to assess likelihood of malignancy (-5, very likely benign; 5, very likely malignant) and histological subtype (i.e., low-grade (LGD), moderate-grade (MGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD), early invasive carcinoma (IPMC), solid carcinoma (CA) arising from IPMN). Forty-one benign (LGD IPMN,n = 20; MGD IPMN,n = 21) and 19 malignant (HGD IPMN,n = 3; IPMC,n = 6; solid CA,n = 10) IPMNs located in the main duct (n = 6), branch duct (n = 37), or both (n = 17) were evaluated. Overall accuracy of differentiation between benign and malignant IPMNs was 86/92 % (CT/MRI). Exclusion of overtly malignant cases (solid CA) resulted in overall accuracy of 83/90 % (CT/MRI). The presence of mural nodules and ductal lesion size ≥30 mm were significant indicators of malignancy (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001, respectively). Invasive IPMN can be identified with high confidence and sensitivity using CT and MRI. The diagnostic problem that remains is the accurate radiological differentiation of premalignant and non-invasive subtypes. (orig.)

  17. Staging Evaluation and Response Criteria Harmonization (SEARCH) for Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma (CAYAHL): Methodology statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flerlage, Jamie E; Kelly, Kara M; Beishuizen, Auke; Cho, Steve; De Alarcon, Pedro A; Dieckmann, Ute; Drachtman, Richard A; Hoppe, Bradford S; Howard, Scott C; Kaste, Sue C; Kluge, Regine; Kurch, Lars; Landman-Parker, Judith; Lewis, Jocelyn; Link, Michael P; McCarten, Kathleen; Punnett, Angela; Stoevesandt, Dietrich; Voss, Stephan D; Wallace, William Hamish; Mauz-Körholz, Christine; Metzger, Monika L

    2017-07-01

    International harmonization of staging evaluation and response criteria is needed for childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood Hodgkin lymphoma. Two Hodgkin lymphoma protocols from cooperative trials in Europe and North America were compared for areas in need of harmonization, and an evidence-based approach is currently underway to harmonize staging and response evaluations with a goal to enhance comparisons, expedite identification of effective therapies, and aid in the approval process for new agents by regulatory agencies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Diagnosing ARVC in Pediatric Patients Applying the Revised Task Force Criteria: Importance of Imaging, 12-Lead ECG, and Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Michael; Krause, Ulrich; Lauerer, Peter; Konietschke, Frank; Aguayo, Randolph; Ritter, Christian Oliver; Schuster, Andreas; Lotz, Joachim; Paul, Thomas; Staab, Wieland

    2018-05-12

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a potentially lethal disease that is well described in adults. In pediatric patients, however, identification of patients at risk of adverse events of ARVC remains a challenge. We aimed to determine which criteria of the revised Task Force Criteria (rTFC), alone or combined, have an impact on diagnosis of ARVC when compared to disease-specific genetic mutations in pediatric patients ≤ 18 years. Between September 2010 and December 2013, 48 consecutive young patients ≤ 18 years of age (mean 14, range of 12.9-15.1 years) underwent contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), genetic testing, and comprehensive clinical work-up for ARVC criteria to test for clinically suspected ARVC. As specified by the rTFC, patients were grouped into four categories: "definite," "borderline," "possible," and "none" ARVC. Of the 48 patients, 12 were found to have gene mutations of either the desmoplakin (9/12) or plakophilin (3/12) locus. According to rTFC 12/48 patients were considered as "definite" ARVC (25%), while 10/12 (83.3%) had an ARVC-specific gene mutation. Of the remaining 36 patients, 6 (12.5%) were grouped as "borderline" ARVC, 7 (14.6%) as "possible" ARVC (including the remaining two genetic mutations), and 22 (45.8%) as "none" ARVC, respectively. Statistical analysis of ARVC criteria in patients diagnosed with "definite" ARVC revealed high prevalence of positive findings by imaging (CMR and echocardiography) and positive genetics. The positive predictive value to detect "definite" ARVC by genotyping was 83.3%, while the negative predictive value was 94%. Logistic regression analyses for different criteria combinations revealed that imaging modalities (echo and CMR combined) and abnormalities of 12-lead ECG were significant markers (p < 0.01). Positive results of endomyocardial biopsies or arrhythmia on ECG or Holter as defined by the rTFC were not significant in this analysis. The rTFC for

  19. The use of reference image criteria in X-ray diagnostics: an application for the optimisation of lumbar spine radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, A.; Tingberg, A.; Mattsson, S.; Besjakov, J.

    2004-01-01

    To ensure that sufficient image quality is obtained in diagnostic radiology, the image quality of clinical radiographs has to be evaluated. We present two methods herein for evaluating antero-posterior (AP) radiographs of the lumbar spine. One was using image criteria, including six anatomical details (absolute method). In the other, the visibility of anatomical details relative to a reference radiograph was evaluated (visual grading analysis). In total, 14 technique groups were evaluated. The technique groups differed in tube voltage and detector system characteristics. Six different gradients of the H and D curves were simulated. The visual grading analysis showed larger differences in image quality compared with the absolute method. The influence on the image quality due to a variation in tube voltage was easier to detect than the influence on the image quality from the detector characteristics. The visibility of the anatomical details was significantly dependent on the location in the spine. The visual grading analysis was found to be the preferable evaluation method in studies such as the present; however, it is necessary to guide and train the observer before the evaluation is performed. (orig.)

  20. Criteria CSR

    OpenAIRE

    Vovk, V.; Zateyshikova, O.

    2014-01-01

    In the article the theoretical aspects regarding criteria for assessing CSR proposed by A. Carroll, including: economic, legal, ethical, philanthropic. Based on this, it is proposed to characterize these criteria with respect to the interested parties (stakeholders), including: investors, shareholders suppliers, customers, employees, society and the state. This will make a qualitative assessment of the presence and depth using social responsibility in the company, as well as determine the ext...

  1. Criteria for the optimal selection of remote sensing optical images to map event landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Federica; Giordan, Daniele; Santangelo, Michele; Dutto, Furio; Rossi, Mauro; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2018-01-01

    Landslides leave discernible signs on the land surface, most of which can be captured in remote sensing images. Trained geomorphologists analyse remote sensing images and map landslides through heuristic interpretation of photographic and morphological characteristics. Despite a wide use of remote sensing images for landslide mapping, no attempt to evaluate how the image characteristics influence landslide identification and mapping exists. This paper presents an experiment to determine the effects of optical image characteristics, such as spatial resolution, spectral content and image type (monoscopic or stereoscopic), on landslide mapping. We considered eight maps of the same landslide in central Italy: (i) six maps obtained through expert heuristic visual interpretation of remote sensing images, (ii) one map through a reconnaissance field survey, and (iii) one map obtained through a real-time kinematic (RTK) differential global positioning system (dGPS) survey, which served as a benchmark. The eight maps were compared pairwise and to a benchmark. The mismatch between each map pair was quantified by the error index, E. Results show that the map closest to the benchmark delineation of the landslide was obtained using the higher resolution image, where the landslide signature was primarily photographical (in the landslide source and transport area). Conversely, where the landslide signature was mainly morphological (in the landslide deposit) the best mapping result was obtained using the stereoscopic images. Albeit conducted on a single landslide, the experiment results are general, and provide useful information to decide on the optimal imagery for the production of event, seasonal and multi-temporal landslide inventory maps.

  2. Impact of response criteria (tibia ash weight vs. percent) on phytase relative non phytate phosphorus equivalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Angel, R; Kim, S-W; Jiménez-Moreno, E; Proszkowiec-Weglarz, M; Plumstead, P W

    2015-09-01

    The current study was conducted to evaluate the impacts of using tibia ash percentage or ash weight as the response criteria on estimated phytase relative equivalence. Straight run broilers were fed treatment (Trt) diets from 7 to 21 d age (6 birds/pen, 8 pens/Trt). The corn-soy based Trt were formulated to contain 0.80% Ca and 4 non-phytate phosphorus (nPP) concentrations (0.20, 0.27, 0.34, and 0.40%). Monocalcium phosphate was the inorganic phosphate source added to achieve 4 different dietary nPP concentrations and against which the nPP relative equivalence of phytase was determined. A 6-phytase (Danisco Animal Nutrition, DuPont Industrial Biosciences, Marlborough, UK) was added at 500 or 1,000 phytase unit ( FTU: )/kg to the 0.20% nPP diet resulting 6 total Trts. Tibia ash was determined at 21 d age. Phytase fed at 500 or 1,000 FTU/kg increased tibia ash weight and ash percentage compared to that of birds fed 0.20% nPP diet without phytase (Pphytase nPP relative equivalence. The R2 obtained from pen value regressions were 0.81 and 0.84, for tibia ash weight and percentage, respectively. Ash percentage from birds fed 500 and 1,000 FTU phytase/kg fell within the range obtained with the MCP additions. Ash weight (842 mg/tibia) from birds fed 1,000 FTU phytase/kg exceeded (Pphytase/kg Trt. The nPP relative equivalence in birds fed 500 FTU phytase/kg were 0.117 and 0.168% based on ash percentage and weight, respectively (Pphytase/kg was 0.166% for ash percentage. Results suggested that ash weight better reflects the amount of bone mineralization as compared to ash percentage and using ash percentage may lead to an underestimation of phytase efficacy. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  3. Acceptance criteria for reprocessed AcuNav catheters: comparison between functionality testing and clinical image assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Alan J; Berry, James M; Wilson, Robert F; Lester, Bruce R

    2009-03-01

    The AcuNav-catheter is a vector-phased array ultrasound catheter that has shown great utility for both diagnosis and electrophysiological interventions. To test the feasibility of limited catheter reuse and to ensure that reprocessed catheters would produce acceptable clinical images, the present study compared the 2-D and Doppler image quality, as determined by clinical assessment, with the catheter's functional status as determined by the FirstCall 2000 transducer tester. Reprocessed catheters from four functional categories, two acceptable and two unacceptable, were used to collect images, 2-D and Doppler, from a porcine heart. The images were blinded and then rated by clinical evaluation. The study found that catheter images from all functional categories were found to be clinically acceptable except for those from the lowest unacceptable category. In addition, examination of tip deflection characteristics showed no significant difference between new and reprocessed catheters. We conclude that reprocessed AcuNav catheters that pass functional tests are able to produce clinical images, 2-D and Doppler, which are equivalent to their new counterparts.

  4. Discordance Between Appropriate Use Criteria for Nuclear Myocardial Perfusion Imaging From Different Specialty Societies: A Potential Concern for Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, David E; Wolinsky, David; Beyth, Rebecca J; Shaw, Leslee J

    2016-05-01

    Appropriate use criteria (AUC) assist health care professionals in making decisions about procedures and diagnostic testing. In some cases, multiple AUC exist for a single procedure or test. To date, the extent of agreement between multiple AUC has not been evaluated. To measure discordance between the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) AUC and the American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria for gauging the appropriateness of nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging. Retrospective cohort study at an academically affiliated Veterans Affairs medical center. Participants were Veteran patients who underwent nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging between December 2010 and July 2011 with rating of appropriateness by the ACCF and ACR criteria. Analysis was performed in March 2015. The primary outcome was the agreement of appropriateness category as measured by κ statistic. The secondary outcome was a comparison of nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging results and frequency of ischemia across appropriateness categories for the 2 rating methods. Of 67 indications in the ACCF AUC, 35 (52.2%) could not be matched to an ACR rating, 18 (26.9%) had the same appropriateness category, and 14 (20.9%) disagreed on appropriateness. The study cohort comprised 592 individuals. Their mean (SD) age was 62.6 (9.4) years, and 570 of 592 (96.2%) were male. When applied to the patient cohort, 111 patients (18.8%) could not be matched to an ACR rating, 349 patients (59.0%) had the same appropriateness category for the ACR and ACCF methods, and 132 patients (22.3%) were discordant. Overall, the agreement of appropriateness between the 2 methods was poor (κ = 0.34, P < .001). Ischemia was rare among patients rated as "inappropriate" by the ACCF AUC (1 of 39 patients [2.6%]), while ischemia was more common among patients rated as "usually not appropriate" by the ACR Appropriateness Criteria (14 of 80 patients [17.5%]). Substantial discordance may exist between

  5. Discrimination of different brain metastases and primary CNS lymphomas using morphologic criteria and diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bette, S.; Wiestler, B.; Huber, T.; Boeckh-Behrens, T.; Zimmer, C.; Kirschke, J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Delbridge, C. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology; Meyer, B.; Gempt, J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2016-12-15

    Brain metastases are a common complication of cancer and occur in about 15-40% of patients with malignancies. The aim of this retrospective study was to differentiate between metastases from different primary tumors/CNS lymphyomas using morphologic criteria, fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Morphologic criteria such as hemorrhage, cysts, pattern of contrast enhancement and location were reported in 200 consecutive patients with brain metastases/primary CNS lymphomas. FA and ADC values were measured in regions of interest (ROIs) placed in the contrast-enhancing tumor part, the necrosis and the non-enhancing peritumoral region (NEPTR). Differences between histopathological subtypes of metastases were analyzed using non-parametric tests, decision trees and hierarchical clustering analysis. Significant differences were found in morphologic criteria such as hemorrhage or pattern of contrast enhancement. In diffusion measurements, significant differences between the different tumor entities were only found in ADC analyzed in the contrast-enhancing tumor part. Among single tumor entities, primary CNS lymphomas showed significantly lower median ADC values in the contrast-enhancing tumor part (ADC{sub lymphoma} 0.92 [0.83-1.07] vs. ADC{sub no} {sub lymphoma} 1.35 [1.10-1.64] P=0.001). Further differentiation between types of metastases was not possible using FA and ADC. There were morphologic differences among the main subtypes of brain metastases/CNS lymphomas. However, due to a high variability of common types of metastases and low specificity, prospective differentiation remained challenging. DTI including FA and ADC was not a reliable tool for differentiation between different histopathological subtypes of brain metastases except for CNS lymphomas showing lower ADC values. Biopsy, surgery and staging remain essential for diagnosis.

  6. Can axial-based nodal size criteria be used in other imaging planes to accurately determine "enlarged" head and neck lymph nodes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Eric S; Walters, Thomas D; Yu, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We evaluate if axial-based lymph node size criteria can be applied to coronal and sagittal planes. Methods. Fifty pretreatment computed tomographic (CT) neck exams were evaluated in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCCa) and neck lymphadenopathy. Axial-based size criteria were applied to all 3 imaging planes, measured, and classified as "enlarged" if equal to or exceeding size criteria. Results. 222 lymph nodes were "enlarged" in one imaging plane; however, 53.2% (118/222) of these were "enlarged" in all 3 planes. Classification concordance between axial versus coronal/sagittal planes was poor (kappa = -0.09 and -0.07, resp., P planes. Conclusion. Classification of "enlarged" lymph nodes differs between axial versus coronal/sagittal imaging planes when axial-based nodal size criteria are applied independently to all three imaging planes, and exclusively used without other morphologic nodal data.

  7. 76 FR 72431 - Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... national preparedness terms and concepts found in the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/ Incident... many of the REP Program's operative guidance and policy documents into one location, and [[Page 72432... for alert and notification systems. In addition, Supplement 4 revises and adds evaluation criteria and...

  8. An evaluation of the 'criteria for tumor response after radiotherapy in esophageal cancer' of the Japanese Society for Esophageal Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo; Yamada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Iwao

    1991-01-01

    The criteria covering tumor response after radiotherapy for an esophageal cancer proposed by the Japanese Society for Esophageal Diseases in March, 1989, has been evaluated in a study of 300 patients who were irradiated preoperatively or radically for an esophageal cancer. Results have revealed that the appearance that of EF-3, meaning no or few residual tumor cells in the esophageal specimen after resection, in the CR, PR, and NC Groups were 88.9%, 58.5%, and 30.3%, respectively, these differences among the groups considered highly significant (p<0.001). Thus, it has been concluded that this criteria can be clinically applied to evaluate the tumor response after radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Comparison of imaging selection criteria for intra-arterial thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke with advanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eung Yeop; Goh, Byeong Ho; Shin, Dong Hoon; Noh, Young; Lee, Yeong-Bae

    2016-01-01

    To compare two selection criteria (noncontrast CT [NCCT] with multi-phase CT Angiography [MPCTA] and CT perfusion [CTP]) for the determination of eligibility for thrombectomy. We retrospectively enrolled 71 patients who underwent head NCCT, 9.6-cm CTP, and craniocervical single-phase CTA (SPCTA) within 6 hours of onset. The simulated MPCTA was reconstructed from 1-mm CTP images for assessment of collateral circulation. Infarct core (relative CBF < 30 %) and penumbra (Tmax > 6 seconds) volumes were measured. The infarct core < 70 mL with a mismatch ratio > 1.2 (CTP-A), infarct core ≤ 40 mL with a mismatch ratio > 1.8 (CTP-B), and ASPECTS > 5 with good collaterals (50 % ≥ MCA territory) were used to determine eligibility for thrombectomy. SPCTA was compared with the simulated MPCTA for assessment of collaterals. CTP-B determined that 11 patients were ineligible for thrombectomy, of which three were eligible by NCCT with MPCTA and 6 by CTP-A. CTP-A and CTP-B showed discrepancy in determining eligibility for thrombectomy between NCCT with MPCTA in three patients each, rendering no significant statistical difference (P > 0.05). The number of patients with poor collaterals was significantly higher on SPCTA than MPCTA (n = 22 and 6 respectively; P < 0.0001). The two imaging selection criteria (NCCT with MPCTA and CTP) were statistically comparable for determining eligibility for thrombectomy. (orig.)

  10. Non-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation treatment of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia: a retrospective analysis and definition of response criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstraesser, Eva; Hasle, Henrik; Rogge, Tim

    2007-01-01

    children with JMML. Treatment consisted of intensive therapy according to AML-type chemotherapy, maintenance-type combination therapy, and single agent therapy. To account for the variability observed in the natural course of disease, we also evaluated 32 episodes of "no therapy." RESULTS: Best responses......, and cytarabine as single agents or for maintenance-type combination therapy. CONCLUSION: To rigorously test future therapeutic strategies in this rare disease an international consensus on the definition of response criteria will be helpful. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Oct-15...

  11. Comparison of EORTC criteria and PERCIST for PET/CT response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan and cetuximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skougaard, Kristin; Nielsen, Dorte; Jensen, Benny Vittrup

    2013-01-01

    The study aim was to compare European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria with PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) for response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with a combination of the chemotherapeutic drug irinotecan an...... and the monoclonal antibody cetuximab....

  12. Development of criteria for evaluating clinical response in thyroid eye disease (CRI-TED) using a modified Delphi technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Raymond S.; Tsirbas, Angelo; Gordon, Mark; Lee, Diana; Khadavi, Nicole; Garneau, Helene Chokron; Goldberg, Robert A.; Cahill, Kenneth; Dolman, Peter J.; Elner, Victor; Feldon, Steve; Lucarelli, Mark; Uddin, Jimmy; Kazim, Michael; Smith, Terry J.; Khanna, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    To identify components of a provisional clinical response index for thyroid eye disease (CRI-TED) using a modified Delphi technique. The International Thyroid Eye Disease Society (ITEDS) conducted a structured, 3-round Delphi exercise establishing consensus for a core set of measures for clinical trials in TED. The steering committee discussed the results in a face-to-face meeting (nominal group technique) and evaluated each criterion with respect to its feasibility, reliability, redundancy, and validity. Redundant measures were consolidated or excluded. Criteria were parsed into 11 domains for the Delphi surveys. Eighty four respondents participated in the Delphi-1 survey, providing 220 unique items. Ninety- two members (100% of the respondents from Delphi 1 plus eight new participants) responded in Delphi-2 and rated the same 220 items. Sixty-four members (76% of participants) rated 153 criteria in Delphi-3 (67 criteria were excluded due to redundancy). Criteria with a mean greater than 6 (1 least appropriate to 9 most appropriate) were further evaluated by the nominal group technique and provisional core measures were chosen. Using a Delphi exercise, we developed provisional core measures for assessing disease activity and severity in clinical trials of therapies for TED. These measures will be iteratively refined for use in multicenter clinical trials. PMID:19752424

  13. Human Response to Air Movement - Evaluation of ASHRAE´s Draft Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Tynel, A.

    2003-01-01

    cooler than neutral or occupants who are occupied mostly with sedentary work. To accommodate all occupants in a given indoor environment, it is therefore recommended that air movement generated by the HVAC system be designed according to the criteria in the current Standard 55 to minimize complaints......The aim of this study was to evaluate the present ASHRAE Standard 55-92 draft criteria and to describe how air movement is perceived at thermal sensations slightly cooler and slightly warmer than neutral. At temperatures 18oC, 20oC, 23oC, 26oC, and 28oC (64.4oF, 68oF, 73.4oF, 78.8oF, and 82.4o......F), 40 subjects at slightly cool, neutral and slightly warm overall thermal sensation were exposed to air velocities that were increased step-by-step from less than 0.1 m/s to 0.8 m/s (19.7 fpm to 157.5 fpm). Subjects who felt cool or slightly cool perceived air movement as being uncomfortable at lower...

  14. Imaging-based enrichment criteria using deep learning algorithms for efficient clinical trials in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ithapu, Vamsi K; Singh, Vikas; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Chappell, Richard J; Dowling, N Maritza; Johnson, Sterling C

    2015-12-01

    The mild cognitive impairment (MCI) stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) may be optimal for clinical trials to test potential treatments for preventing or delaying decline to dementia. However, MCI is heterogeneous in that not all cases progress to dementia within the time frame of a trial and some may not have underlying AD pathology. Identifying those MCIs who are most likely to decline during a trial and thus most likely to benefit from treatment will improve trial efficiency and power to detect treatment effects. To this end, using multimodal, imaging-derived, inclusion criteria may be especially beneficial. Here, we present a novel multimodal imaging marker that predicts future cognitive and neural decline from [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET), amyloid florbetapir PET, and structural magnetic resonance imaging, based on a new deep learning algorithm (randomized denoising autoencoder marker, rDAm). Using ADNI2 MCI data, we show that using rDAm as a trial enrichment criterion reduces the required sample estimates by at least five times compared with the no-enrichment regime and leads to smaller trials with high statistical power, compared with existing methods. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Response Surface Approximation for Fatigue Life Prediction and Its Application to Multi-Criteria Optimization With a Priori Preference Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seok Heum; Joo, Won Sik; Cho, Seok Swoo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a versatile multi-criteria optimization concept for fatigue life prediction is introduced. Multi-criteria decision making in engineering design refers to obtaining a preferred optimal solution in the context of conflicting design objectives. Compromise decision support problems are used to model engineering decisions involving multiple trade-offs. These methods typically rely on a summation of weighted attributes to accomplish trade-offs among competing objectives. This paper gives an interpretation of the decision parameters as governing both the relative importance of the attributes and the degree of compensation between them. The approach utilizes a response surface model, the compromise decision support problem, which is a multi-objective formulation based on goal programming. Examples illustrate the concepts and demonstrate their applicability

  16. Early response to sibutramine in patients not meeting current label criteria: preliminary analysis of SCOUT lead-in period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caterson, Ian; Coutinho, Walmir; Finer, Nick

    2010-01-01

    The Sibutramine Cardiovascular Outcomes (SCOUT) trial protocol defines a patient population predominantly outside current European Union label criteria. This article explores responses to sibutramine during the 6-week, single-blind, lead-in period between patients who conformed to the label...... requirements ("conformers") and those who did not ("nonconformers"). SCOUT is an ongoing, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled outcome trial in overweight/obese patients at high risk of a cardiovascular event. In total, 10,742 patients received sibutramine and weight management during the lead...... with sibutramine confirms its good tolerability and efficacy in patients who meet current label criteria. Preliminary data from high-risk patients for whom sibutramine is currently contraindicated suggest a low discontinuation rate and few serious adverse events but confirmation from the SCOUT outcome data...

  17. Does response distortion statistically affect the relations between self-report psychopathy measures and external criteria?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watts, A.L.; Lilienfeld, S.O.; Edens, J.F.; Douglas, K.S.; Skeem, J.L.; Verschuere, B.; LoPilato, A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Given that psychopathy is associated with narcissism, lack of insight, and pathological lying, the assumption that the validity of self-report psychopathy measures is compromised by response distortion has been widespread. We examined the statistical effects (moderation, suppression) of response

  18. Image-Word Pairing-Congruity Effect on Affective Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria Z., Jorge C.; Cho, Youngil; Sambai, Ami; Yamanaka, Toshimasa

    The present study explores the effects of familiarity on affective responses (pleasure and arousal) to Japanese ad elements, based on the schema incongruity theory. Print ads showing natural scenes (landscapes) were used to create the stimuli (images and words). An empirical study was conducted to measure subjects' affective responses to image-word combinations that varied in terms of incongruity. The level of incongruity was based on familiarity levels, and was statistically determined by a variable called ‘pairing-congruity status’. The tested hypothesis proposed that even highly familiar image-word combinations, when combined incongruously, would elicit strong affective responses. Subjects assessed the stimuli using bipolar scales. The study was effective in tracing interactions between familiarity, pleasure and arousal, although the incongruous image-word combinations did not elicit the predicted strong effects on pleasure and arousal. The results suggest a need for further research incorporating kansei (i.e., creativity) into the process of stimuli selection.

  19. Imaging tools to measure treatment response in gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Doyle, Anthony J

    2018-01-01

    Imaging tests are in clinical use for diagnosis, assessment of disease severity and as a marker of treatment response in people with gout. Various imaging tests have differing properties for assessing the three key disease domains in gout: urate deposition (including tophus burden), joint inflammation and structural joint damage. Dual-energy CT allows measurement of urate deposition and bone damage, and ultrasonography allows assessment of all three domains. Scoring systems have been described that allow radiological quantification of disease severity and these scoring systems may play a role in assessing the response to treatment in gout. This article reviews the properties of imaging tests, describes the available scoring systems for quantification of disease severity and discusses the challenges and controversies regarding the use of imaging tools to measure treatment response in gout. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Reflective and Non-conscious Responses to Exercise Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Kathryn; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Short, Camille E; Conroy, David E; Rhodes, Ryan E; Jackson, Ben; Dimmock, James A; Rebar, Amanda L

    2017-01-01

    Images portraying exercise are commonly used to promote exercise behavior and to measure automatic associations of exercise (e.g., via implicit association tests). The effectiveness of these promotion efforts and the validity of measurement techniques partially rely on the untested assumption that the images being used are perceived by the general public as portrayals of exercise that is pleasant and motivating. The aim of this study was to investigate how content of images impacted people's automatic and reflective evaluations of exercise images. Participants ( N = 90) completed a response time categorization task (similar to the implicit association test) to capture how automatically people perceived each image as relevant to Exercise or Not exercise . Participants also self-reported their evaluations of the images using visual analog scales with the anchors: Exercise / Not exercise, Does not motivate me to exercise / Motivates me to exercise, Pleasant / Unpleasant , and Energizing/Deactivating . People tended to more strongly automatically associate images with exercise if the images were of an outdoor setting, presented sport (as opposed to active labor or gym-based) activities, and included young (as opposed to middle-aged) adults. People tended to reflectively find images of young adults more motivating and relevant to exercise than images of older adults. The content of exercise images is an often overlooked source of systematic variability that may impact measurement validity and intervention effectiveness.

  1. Reflective and Non-conscious Responses to Exercise Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Cope

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Images portraying exercise are commonly used to promote exercise behavior and to measure automatic associations of exercise (e.g., via implicit association tests. The effectiveness of these promotion efforts and the validity of measurement techniques partially rely on the untested assumption that the images being used are perceived by the general public as portrayals of exercise that is pleasant and motivating. The aim of this study was to investigate how content of images impacted people's automatic and reflective evaluations of exercise images. Participants (N = 90 completed a response time categorization task (similar to the implicit association test to capture how automatically people perceived each image as relevant to Exercise or Not exercise. Participants also self-reported their evaluations of the images using visual analog scales with the anchors: Exercise/Not exercise, Does not motivate me to exercise/Motivates me to exercise, Pleasant/Unpleasant, and Energizing/Deactivating. People tended to more strongly automatically associate images with exercise if the images were of an outdoor setting, presented sport (as opposed to active labor or gym-based activities, and included young (as opposed to middle-aged adults. People tended to reflectively find images of young adults more motivating and relevant to exercise than images of older adults. The content of exercise images is an often overlooked source of systematic variability that may impact measurement validity and intervention effectiveness.

  2. Energy R and D: Changes in Federal funding criteria and industry response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Energy R and D policy has been reoriented to emphasize long-term, high-risk, ower payoff technologies in their early stages of development. The civilian nuclear reactor R and D budget has been an exception with Department of Energy support for these technologies insulating them from major reductions in the early 1980's. Civilian reactor programs sustained substantial reductions beginning in FY 1984, but these reductions were based on other considerations, such as safety issues, as well as the long-term, high-risk, high-payoff criteria. There is little indicate that the private sector has compensated for cutbacks in DOE R and D. Among the reasons are (1) market factors have reduced the potential profitability of technology development and (2) many activities curtailed by DOE are viewed as too risky to finance without government support. This has contributed to delays in technology development and, in some cases, to an erosion of American technological leadership

  3. HDR Image Quality Enhancement Based on Spatially Variant Retinal Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horiuchi Takahiko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing demand for being able to display high dynamic range (HDR images on low dynamic range (LDR devices. Tone mapping is a process for enhancing HDR image quality on an LDR device by converting the tonal values of the original image from HDR to LDR. This paper proposes a new tone mapping algorithm for enhancing image quality by deriving a spatially-variant operator for imitating S-potential response in human retina, which efficiently improves local contrasts while conserving good global appearance. The proposed tone mapping operator is studied from a system construction point of view. It is found that the operator is regarded as a natural extension of the Retinex algorithm by adding a global adaptation process to the local adaptation. The feasibility of the proposed algorithm is examined in detail on experiments using standard HDR images and real HDR scene images, comparing with conventional tone mapping algorithms.

  4. iRECIST : Guidelines for response criteria for use in trials testing immunotherapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seymour, Lesley; Bogaerts, Jan; Perrone, Andrea; Ford, Robert; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Mandrekar, Sumithra; Lin, Nancy U.; Litiere, Saskia; Dancey, Janet; Chen, Alice; Hodi, F. Stephen; Therasse, Patrick; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Shankar, Lalitha K.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Ballinger, Marcus; Caramella, Caroline; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.

    Tumours respond differently to immunotherapies compared with chemotherapeutic drugs, raising questions about the assessment of changes in tumour burden-a mainstay of evaluation of cancer therapeutics that provides key information about objective response and disease progression. A consensus

  5. Developing Criteria for Lumbar Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Using RAND Appropriateness Method (RAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshtkaran, Ali; Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Ostovar, Rahim; Salari, Hedayat; Farokhi, Majid Reza; Esfandiari, Atefeh; Yousefimanesh, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Studies show that a large proportion of healthcare offered may be inappropriate or unnecessary. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and expensive diagnostic technology which has been increasingly used all over the world. Moreover, this trend has been more rapidly increasing in Iran. Low back pain is a common disorder all over the world and MRI technique is one of the several ways to assess its cause. The present study aims to develop scenarios for lumbar spine MRI. In the present study, the RAND Appropriateness Method (RAM) was used in order to reach consensus regarding developing scenarios for lumbar spine MRI. We generated scenarios from valid clinical guidelines as well as the experts’ opinion. The panel members included nine specialists from various medical specialties that had scored scenarios in two rounds, the first of which was without interaction, while the second one was with interaction. We extracted 97 scenarios for the lumbar spine MRI in the scenario extracting phase of the study and the panel members added 18 scenarios. After implementation of two rounds, the scenarios were categorized into three ranges. Sixty seven (58%) of the scenarios were considered as appropriate, 45 (39%) as uncertain, and three (2.6%) as inappropriate. RAM is useful for identifying stakeholder views in settings with limited resources. Since RAM has precise instructions for consensus developing, a large number of scenarios were considered as uncertain. Therefore, more research has to be conducted on the issue

  6. Inadequacy of manual measurements compared to automated CT volumetry in assessment of treatment response of pulmonary metastases using RECIST criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, Katharina; Auer, Florian; Schmidt, Stefan; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Engelke, Christoph; Kohl, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare relative values of manual unidimensional measurements (MD) and automated volumetry (AV) for longitudinal treatment response assessment in patients with pulmonary metastases. Fifty consecutive patients with pulmonary metastases and repeat chest multidetector-row CT (median interval=2 months) were independently assessed by two radiologists for treatment response using Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumours (RECIST). Statistics included relative measurement errors (RME), intra-/interobserver correlations, limits of agreement (95% LoA), and kappa. A total of 202 metastases (median volume=182.22 mm 3 ; range=3.16-5,195.13 mm 3 ) were evaluated. RMEs were significantly higher for MD than for AV (intraobserver RME=2.34-3.73% and 0.15-0.22% for MD and AV respectively; P 3 for AV. The interobserver 95% LoA were -1.46 to 1.92 mm for MD and -11.17 to 9.33 mm 3 for AV. There was total intra-/interobserver agreement on response using AV (κ=1). MD intra- and interobserver agreements were 0.73-0.84 and 0.77-0.80 respectively. Of the 200 MD response ratings, 28 (14/50 patients) were discordant. Agreement using MD dropped significantly from total remission to progressive disease (P<0.05). We therefore conclude that AV allows for better reproducibility of response evaluation in pulmonary metastases and should be preferred to MD in these patients. (orig.)

  7. Prospective evaluation of the International Neuroblastoma Staging System (INSS) and the International Neuroblastoma Response Criteria (INRC) in a multicentre setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, V; García-Miguel, P; Cañete, A; Melero, C; Navajas, A; Ruíz-Jiménez, J I; Navarro, S; Badal, M D

    1999-04-01

    The aim of this study was to classify prospectively a series of neuroblastoma tumours according to the International Neuroblastoma Staging System (INSS) and the International Neuroblastoma Response Criteria (INRC) and to evaluate the difficulties and pitfalls involved in a multicentre setting. Each hospital provided their data for central review. The surgical procedures and their complications were reported. Kaplan-Meier estimates of survival and event-free survival were calculated according to stage and response to therapy. From June 1992 to December 1996, 194 patients were included in the study, with a mean age of 2 years. Initial studies were performed according to INSS recommendations without major problems. INSS stage was correctly applied to all patients except for 9 (95%). Post-operative complications were observed in 15 patients (8.3%). Response to therapy (INRC) was studied in 63 stage 4 patients, 11 of whom were not classified correctly (17%). Differences in survival according to stage (INSS) and group of response to therapy (INRC) were statistically significant (P INSS was easy to use and separated different prognostic groups. Surgical complications and mortality did not increase in this series because of using the INSS. The feasibility of INRC was evaluated in a small series of stage 4 patients and the designation of response was problematic in a relatively high proportion of cases. The prognostic value of the different responses was highly significant, but less informative than had been hoped for.

  8. 33 CFR 155.1230 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... impact; (2) Oil recovery devices appropriate for the type of animal fats or vegetable oils carried; and (3) Other appropriate equipment necessary to respond to a discharge involving the type of animal fats... VESSELS Response plan requirements for vessels carrying animal fats and vegetable oils as a primary cargo...

  9. Improving behavioral performance under full attention by adjusting response criteria to changes in stimulus predictability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzner, Steffen; Treue, Stefan; Busse, Laura

    2012-09-04

    One of the key features of active perception is the ability to predict critical sensory events. Humans and animals can implicitly learn statistical regularities in the timing of events and use them to improve behavioral performance. Here, we used a signal detection approach to investigate whether such improvements in performance result from changes of perceptual sensitivity or rather from adjustments of a response criterion. In a regular sequence of briefly presented stimuli, human observers performed a noise-limited motion detection task by monitoring the stimulus stream for the appearance of a designated target direction. We manipulated target predictability through the hazard rate, which specifies the likelihood that a target is about to occur, given it has not occurred so far. Analyses of response accuracy revealed that improvements in performance could be accounted for by adjustments of the response criterion; a growing hazard rate was paralleled by an increasing tendency to report the presence of a target. In contrast, the hazard rate did not affect perceptual sensitivity. Consistent with previous research, we also found that reaction time decreases as the hazard rate grows. A simple rise-to-threshold model could well describe this decrease and attribute predictability effects to threshold adjustments rather than changes in information supply. We conclude that, even under conditions of full attention and constant perceptual sensitivity, behavioral performance can be optimized by dynamically adjusting the response criterion to meet ongoing changes in the likelihood of a target.

  10. Functional design criteria for the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    Within the United States, there are few hands-on training centers capable of providing integrated technical training within a practical application environment. Currently, there are no training facilities that offer both radioactive and chemical hazardous response training. There are no hands-on training centers that provide training for both hazardous material operations and emergency response that also operate as a partnership between organized labor, state agencies, tribes, and local emergency responders within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Available facilities appear grossly inadequate for training the thousands of people at Hanford, and throughout the Pacific Northwest, who are required to qualify under nationally-mandated requirements. It is estimated that 4,000 workers at the Hanford Site alone need hands-on training. Throughout the Pacific Northwest, the potential target audience would be over 30,000 public sector emergency response personnel, as well as another 10,000 clean-up workers represented by organized labor. The HAMMER Training Center will be an interagency-sponsored training center. It will be designed, built, and operated to ensure that clean-up workers, fire fighters, and public sector management and emergency response personnel are trained to handle accidental spills of hazardous materials. Training will cover wastes at clean-up sites, and in jurisdictions along the transportation corridors, to effectively protect human life, property, and the environment

  11. Tumor response and clinical outcome in metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors under sunitinib therapy: Comparison of RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, N., E-mail: Nicolai.schramm@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Englhart, E., E-mail: Elisabeth.Englhart@gmx.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Schlemmer, M., E-mail: Marcus.Schlemmer@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Medicine III, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Hittinger, M., E-mail: Markus.Hittinger@uksh.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Übleis, C., E-mail: Christopher.Uebleis@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Becker, C.R., E-mail: Christoph.becker@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, M.F., E-mail: Maximilian.Reiser@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Berger, F., E-mail: Frank.Berger@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Purpose of the study was to compare radiological treatment response according to RECIST, Choi and volumetry in GIST-patients under 2nd-line-sunitinib-therapy and to correlate the results of treatment response assessment with disease-specific survival (DSS). Patients and methods: 20 patients (mean: 60.7 years; 12 male/8 female) with histologically proven GIST underwent baseline-CT of the abdomen under imatinib and follow-up-CTs 3 months and 1 year after change to sunitinib. 68 target lesions (50 hepatic, 18 extrahepatic) were investigated. Therapy response (partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD)) was evaluated according to RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria. Response according to the different assessment systems was compared and correlated to the DSS of the patients utilizing Kaplan–Meier statistics. Results: The mean DSS (in months) of the response groups 3 months after therapy change was: RECIST: PR (0/20); SD (17/20): 30.4 (months); PD (3/20) 11.6. Choi: PR (10/20) 28.6; SD (8/20) 28.1; PD (2/20) 13.5. Volumetry: PR (4/20) 29.6; SD (11/20) 29.7; PD (5/20) 17.2. Response groups after 1 year of sunitinib showed the following mean DSS: RECIST: PR (3/20) 33.6; SD (9/20) 29.7; PD (8/20) 20.3. Choi: PR (10/20) 21.5; SD (4/20) 42.9; PD (6/20) 23.9. Volumetry: PR (6/20) 27.3; SD (5/20) 38.5; PD (9/20) 19.3. Conclusion: One year after modification of therapy, only partial response according to RECIST indicated favorable survival in patients with GIST. The value of alternate response assessment strategies like Choi criteria for prediction of survival in molecular therapy still has to be demonstrated.

  12. Tumor response and clinical outcome in metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors under sunitinib therapy: Comparison of RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, N.; Englhart, E.; Schlemmer, M.; Hittinger, M.; Übleis, C.; Becker, C.R.; Reiser, M.F.; Berger, F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Purpose of the study was to compare radiological treatment response according to RECIST, Choi and volumetry in GIST-patients under 2nd-line-sunitinib-therapy and to correlate the results of treatment response assessment with disease-specific survival (DSS). Patients and methods: 20 patients (mean: 60.7 years; 12 male/8 female) with histologically proven GIST underwent baseline-CT of the abdomen under imatinib and follow-up-CTs 3 months and 1 year after change to sunitinib. 68 target lesions (50 hepatic, 18 extrahepatic) were investigated. Therapy response (partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD)) was evaluated according to RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria. Response according to the different assessment systems was compared and correlated to the DSS of the patients utilizing Kaplan–Meier statistics. Results: The mean DSS (in months) of the response groups 3 months after therapy change was: RECIST: PR (0/20); SD (17/20): 30.4 (months); PD (3/20) 11.6. Choi: PR (10/20) 28.6; SD (8/20) 28.1; PD (2/20) 13.5. Volumetry: PR (4/20) 29.6; SD (11/20) 29.7; PD (5/20) 17.2. Response groups after 1 year of sunitinib showed the following mean DSS: RECIST: PR (3/20) 33.6; SD (9/20) 29.7; PD (8/20) 20.3. Choi: PR (10/20) 21.5; SD (4/20) 42.9; PD (6/20) 23.9. Volumetry: PR (6/20) 27.3; SD (5/20) 38.5; PD (9/20) 19.3. Conclusion: One year after modification of therapy, only partial response according to RECIST indicated favorable survival in patients with GIST. The value of alternate response assessment strategies like Choi criteria for prediction of survival in molecular therapy still has to be demonstrated

  13. Validation of organ procurement and transplant network (OPTN)/united network for organ sharing (UNOS) criteria for imaging diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathryn J; Karimova, E Jane; Arauz, Anthony R; Saad, Nael E; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Chapman, William C; Heiken, Jay P

    2013-06-27

    Imaging diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) presents an important pathway for transplant exception points and priority for cirrhotic patients. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the validity of the new Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (OPTN) classification system on patients undergoing transplantation for HCC. One hundred twenty-nine patients underwent transplantation for HCC from April 14, 2006 to April 18, 2011; a total of 263 lesions were reported as suspicious for HCC on pretransplantation magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging examinations were reviewed independently by two experienced radiologists, blinded to final pathology. Reviewers identified major imaging features and an OPTN classification was assigned to each lesion. Final proof of diagnosis was pathology on explant or necrosis along with imaging findings of ablation after transarterial chemoembolization. Application of OPTN imaging criteria in our population resulted in high specificity for the diagnosis of HCC. Sensitivity in diagnosis of small lesions (≥1 and based on preoperative imaging but would not have met criteria under the new system. Eleven percent of the patients not meeting OPTN criteria were found to have T2 stage tumor burden on pathology. The OPTN imaging policy introduces a high level of specificity for HCC but may decrease sensitivity for small lesions. Management may be impacted in a number of patients, potentially requiring longer surveillance periods or biopsy to confirm diagnosis.

  14. Psychoneurometric operationalization of threat sensitivity: Relations with clinical symptom and physiological response criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, James R; Venables, Noah C; Patrick, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    The National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative calls for the incorporation of neurobiological approaches and findings into conceptions of mental health problems through a focus on biobehavioral constructs investigated across multiple domains of measurement (units of analysis). Although the constructs in the RDoC system are characterized in "process terms" (i.e., as functional concepts with brain and behavioral referents), these constructs can also be framed as dispositions (i.e., as dimensions of variation in biobehavioral functioning across individuals). Focusing on one key RDoC construct, acute threat or "fear," the current article illustrates a construct-oriented psychoneurometric strategy for operationalizing this construct in individual difference terms-as threat sensitivity (THT+). Utilizing data from 454 adult participants, we demonstrate empirically that (a) a scale measure of THT+ designed to tap general fear/fearlessness predicts effectively to relevant clinical problems (i.e., fear disorder symptoms), (b) this scale measure shows reliable associations with physiological indices of acute reactivity to aversive visual stimuli, and (c) a cross-domain factor reflecting the intersection of scale and physiological indicators of THT+ predicts effectively to both clinical and neurophysiological criterion measures. Results illustrate how the psychoneurometric approach can be used to create a dimensional index of a biobehavioral trait construct, in this case THT+, which can serve as a bridge between phenomena in domains of psychopathology and neurobiology. Implications and future directions are discussed with reference to the RDoC initiative and existing report-based conceptions of psychological traits. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  15. An international consortium proposal of uniform response criteria for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savona, Michael R; Malcovati, Luca; Komrokji, Rami; Tiu, Ramon V; Mughal, Tariq I; Orazi, Attilio; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Padron, Eric; Solary, Eric; Tibes, Raoul; Itzykson, Raphael; Cazzola, Mario; Mesa, Ruben; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Fenaux, Pierre; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Gerds, Aaron; Sanz, Guillermo; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Cervantes, Francisco; Germing, Ulrich; Cross, Nicholas C P; List, Alan F

    2015-03-19

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are hematologically diverse stem cell malignancies sharing phenotypic features of both myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative neoplasms. There are currently no standard treatment recommendations for most adult patients with MDS/MPN. To optimize efforts to improve the management and disease outcomes, it is essential to identify meaningful clinical and biologic end points and standardized response criteria for clinical trials. The dual dysplastic and proliferative features in these stem cell malignancies define their uniqueness and challenges. We propose response assessment guidelines to harmonize future clinical trials with the principal objective of establishing suitable treatment algorithms. An international panel comprising laboratory and clinical experts in MDS/MPN was established involving 3 independent academic MDS/MPN workshops (March 2013, December 2013, and June 2014). These recommendations are the result of this collaborative project sponsored by the MDS Foundation. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Diagnosis, management and response criteria of iron overload in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS): updated recommendations of the Austrian MDS platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Peter; Stauder, Reinhard; Theurl, Igor; Geissler, Klaus; Sliwa, Thamer; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Bettelheim, Peter; Sill, Heinz; Pfeilstöcker, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Despite the availability of effective iron chelators, transfusion-related morbidity is still a challenge in chronically transfused patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In these patients, transfusion-induced iron overload may lead to organ dysfunction or even organ failure. In addition, iron overload is associated with reduced overall survival in MDS. Areas covered: During the past 10 years, various guidelines for the management of MDS patients with iron overload have been proposed. In the present article, we provide our updated recommendations for the diagnosis, prevention and therapy of iron overload in MDS. In addition, we propose refined treatment response criteria. As in 2006 and 2007, recommendations were discussed and formulated by participants of our Austrian MDS platform in a series of meetings in 2016 and 2017. Expert commentary: Our updated recommendations should support early recognition of iron overload, optimal patient management and the measurement of clinical responses to chelation treatment in daily practice.

  17. "Broader impacts" or "responsible research and innovation"? A comparison of two criteria for funding research in science and engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael; Laas, Kelly

    2014-12-01

    Our subject is how the experience of Americans with a certain funding criterion, "broader impacts" (and some similar criteria) may help in efforts to turn the European concept of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) into a useful guide to funding Europe's scientific and technical research. We believe this comparison may also be as enlightening for Americans concerned with revising research policy. We have organized our report around René Von Schomberg's definition of RRI, since it seems both to cover what the European research group to which we belong is interested in and to be the only widely accepted definition of RRI. According to Von Schomberg, RRI: "… is a transparent, interactive process by which societal actors and innovators become mutually responsive to each other with a view to the (ethical) acceptability, sustainability and societal desirability of the innovation process and its marketable products (in order to allow a proper embedding of scientific and technological advances in our society)." While RRI seeks fundamental changes in the way research is conducted, Broader Impacts is more concerned with more peripheral aspects of research: widening participation of disadvantaged groups, recruiting the next generation of scientists, increasing the speed with which results are used, and so on. Nevertheless, an examination of the broadening of funding criteria over the last four decades suggests that National Science Foundation has been moving in the direction of RRI.

  18. PIRATE: pediatric imaging response assessment and targeting environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Russell; Zhang, Yong; Krasin, Matthew; Hua, Chiaho

    2010-02-01

    By combining the strengths of various imaging modalities, the multimodality imaging approach has potential to improve tumor staging, delineation of tumor boundaries, chemo-radiotherapy regime design, and treatment response assessment in cancer management. To address the urgent needs for efficient tools to analyze large-scale clinical trial data, we have developed an integrated multimodality, functional and anatomical imaging analysis software package for target definition and therapy response assessment in pediatric radiotherapy (RT) patients. Our software provides quantitative tools for automated image segmentation, region-of-interest (ROI) histogram analysis, spatial volume-of-interest (VOI) analysis, and voxel-wise correlation across modalities. To demonstrate the clinical applicability of this software, histogram analyses were performed on baseline and follow-up 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET images of nine patients with rhabdomyosarcoma enrolled in an institutional clinical trial at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. In addition, we combined 18F-FDG PET, dynamic-contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR, and anatomical MR data to visualize the heterogeneity in tumor pathophysiology with the ultimate goal of adaptive targeting of regions with high tumor burden. Our software is able to simultaneously analyze multimodality images across multiple time points, which could greatly speed up the analysis of large-scale clinical trial data and validation of potential imaging biomarkers.

  19. Computer-aided breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Qian, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify a new clinical marker based on quantitative kinetic image features analysis and assess its feasibility to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: The authors assembled a dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 68 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among them, 25 patients had complete response (CR) and 43 had partial and nonresponse (NR) to chemotherapy based on the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The authors developed a computer-aided detection scheme to segment breast areas and tumors depicted on the breast MR images and computed a total of 39 kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal enhancement regions. The authors then applied and tested two approaches to classify between CR and NR cases. The first one analyzed each individual feature and applied a simple feature fusion method that combines classification results from multiple features. The second approach tested an attribute selected classifier that integrates an artificial neural network (ANN) with a wrapper subset evaluator, which was optimized using a leave-one-case-out validation method. Results: In the pool of 39 features, 10 yielded relatively higher classification performance with the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.61 to 0.78 to classify between CR and NR cases. Using a feature fusion method, the maximum AUC = 0.85 ± 0.05. Using the ANN-based classifier, AUC value significantly increased to 0.96 ± 0.03 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired prechemotherapy has potential to generate a useful clinical marker in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy

  20. Computer-aided breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin, E-mail: Bin.Zheng-1@ou.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Hollingsworth, Alan B. [Mercy Women’s Center, Mercy Health Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73120 (United States); Qian, Wei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To identify a new clinical marker based on quantitative kinetic image features analysis and assess its feasibility to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: The authors assembled a dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 68 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among them, 25 patients had complete response (CR) and 43 had partial and nonresponse (NR) to chemotherapy based on the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The authors developed a computer-aided detection scheme to segment breast areas and tumors depicted on the breast MR images and computed a total of 39 kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal enhancement regions. The authors then applied and tested two approaches to classify between CR and NR cases. The first one analyzed each individual feature and applied a simple feature fusion method that combines classification results from multiple features. The second approach tested an attribute selected classifier that integrates an artificial neural network (ANN) with a wrapper subset evaluator, which was optimized using a leave-one-case-out validation method. Results: In the pool of 39 features, 10 yielded relatively higher classification performance with the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.61 to 0.78 to classify between CR and NR cases. Using a feature fusion method, the maximum AUC = 0.85 ± 0.05. Using the ANN-based classifier, AUC value significantly increased to 0.96 ± 0.03 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired prechemotherapy has potential to generate a useful clinical marker in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy.

  1. Prediction of Early Response to Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer by Using Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether change of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC value could predict early response to chemotherapy in lung cancer. Materials and Methods. Twenty-five patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer underwent chest MR imaging including DWI before and at the end of the first cycle of chemotherapy. The tumor’s mean ADC value and diameters on MR images were calculated and compared. The grouping reference was based on serial CT scans according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Logistic regression was applied to assess treatment response prediction ability of ADC value and diameters. Results. The change of ADC value in partial response group was higher than that in stable disease group (P=0.004. ROC curve showed that ADC value could predict treatment response with 100% sensitivity, 64.71% specificity, 57.14% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value, and 82.7% accuracy. The area under the curve for combination of ADC value and longest diameter change was higher than any parameter alone (P≤0.01. Conclusions. The change of ADC value may be a sensitive indicator to predict early response to chemotherapy in lung cancer. Prediction ability could be improved by combining the change of ADC value and longest diameter.

  2. CT perfusion imaging in response assessment of pulmonary metastases undergoing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, Brooke; Pun, Emma; Tay, Huilee; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Ball, David; Siva, Shankar; Samuel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is an emerging treatment technique for pulmonary metastases in which conventional Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) may be inadequate. This study aims to assess the utility of CT perfusion imaging in response assessment of pulmonary metastases after SABR. In this ethics board-approved prospective study, 11 patients underwent a 26-Gy single fraction of SABR to pulmonary metastases. CT perfusion imaging occurred prior to and at 14 and 70 days post-SABR. Blood flow (mL/100 mL/min), blood volume (mL/100 mL), time to peak (seconds) and surface permeability (mL/100 mL/min), perfusion parameters of pulmonary metastases undergoing SABR, were independently assessed by two radiologists. Inter-observer variability was analysed. CT perfusion results were analysed for early response assessment comparing day 14 with baseline scans and for late response by comparing day 70 with baseline scans. The largest diameter of the pulmonary metastases undergoing SABR was recorded. Ten patients completed all three scans and one patient had baseline and early response assessment CT perfusion scans only. There was strong level of inter-observer agreement of CT perfusion interpretation with a median intraclass coefficient of 0.87 (range 0.20–0.98). Changes in all four perfusion parameters and tumour sizes were not statistically significant. CT perfusion imaging of pulmonary metastases is a highly reproducible imaging technique that may provide additional response assessment information above that of conventional RECIST, and it warrants further study in a larger cohort of patients undergoing SABR.

  3. SU-E-J-275: Review - Computerized PET/CT Image Analysis in the Evaluation of Tumor Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, W; Wang, J; Zhang, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To review the literature in using computerized PET/CT image analysis for the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than 100 papers that used computerized image analysis techniques for the evaluation of tumor response with PET/CT. This review mainly covered four aspects: image registration, tumor segmentation, image feature extraction, and response evaluation. Results: Although rigid image registration is straightforward, it has been shown to achieve good alignment between baseline and evaluation scans. Deformable image registration has been shown to improve the alignment when complex deformable distortions occur due to tumor shrinkage, weight loss or gain, and motion. Many semi-automatic tumor segmentation methods have been developed on PET. A comparative study revealed benefits of high levels of user interaction with simultaneous visualization of CT images and PET gradients. On CT, semi-automatic methods have been developed for only tumors that show marked difference in CT attenuation between the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. Quite a few multi-modality segmentation methods have been shown to improve accuracy compared to single-modality algorithms. Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Predictive models based on machine learning technique have been constructed for correlating selected image features to response. These models showed improved performance compared to current methods using cutoff value of a single measurement for tumor response. Conclusion: This review showed that

  4. SU-E-J-275: Review - Computerized PET/CT Image Analysis in the Evaluation of Tumor Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, W; Wang, J; Zhang, H [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To review the literature in using computerized PET/CT image analysis for the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than 100 papers that used computerized image analysis techniques for the evaluation of tumor response with PET/CT. This review mainly covered four aspects: image registration, tumor segmentation, image feature extraction, and response evaluation. Results: Although rigid image registration is straightforward, it has been shown to achieve good alignment between baseline and evaluation scans. Deformable image registration has been shown to improve the alignment when complex deformable distortions occur due to tumor shrinkage, weight loss or gain, and motion. Many semi-automatic tumor segmentation methods have been developed on PET. A comparative study revealed benefits of high levels of user interaction with simultaneous visualization of CT images and PET gradients. On CT, semi-automatic methods have been developed for only tumors that show marked difference in CT attenuation between the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. Quite a few multi-modality segmentation methods have been shown to improve accuracy compared to single-modality algorithms. Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Predictive models based on machine learning technique have been constructed for correlating selected image features to response. These models showed improved performance compared to current methods using cutoff value of a single measurement for tumor response. Conclusion: This review showed that

  5. Hair cortisol and cortisol awakening response are associated with criteria of the metabolic syndrome in opposite directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Linn K; Hinkelmann, Kim; Muhtz, Christoph; Dettenborn, Lucia; Wingenfeld, Katja; Spitzer, Carsten; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Wiedemann, Klaus; Otte, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Findings on the association between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and metabolic risk are equivocal. Different methods of measuring HPA activity might indicate adverse vs. beneficial effects of HPA activity on metabolic risk thus contributing to heterogenous findings. In this study, we aimed to determine whether (1) the salivary cortisol awakening response (CAR) as a marker of awakening-induced activation of the HPA axis and (2) hair cortisol as a marker of long-term cortisol secretion are associated with criteria of the metabolic syndrome. Therefore, we recruited 41 healthy individuals (26 women, mean age: 41.2 years) and 44 patients with major depression (28 women, 41.4 years) and assessed CAR and hair cortisol values as well as all criteria of the metabolic syndrome (abdominal obesity, blood pressure, plasma glucose, triglycerides and high-density cholesterol levels) according to the International Diabetes Federation. CAR and hair cortisol values were divided into tertiles. Across groups, participants with hair cortisol or hair cortisone in the highest tertile showed significantly more criteria of the metabolic syndrome compared to participants in the medium or low tertile (F2,64=3.37, p=.04). These results were corroborated by significant positive correlations between mean hair cortisol values with waist circumference (r=.29, p=.03), triglycerides (r=.34, p=.01) and systolic blood pressure (r=.29, p=.04) and between mean hair cortisone and triglycerides (r=.46, pcortisol and hair cortisone levels but lower CAR values are associated with an unfavorable metabolic and cardiovascular risk profile. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. ASCI 2010 appropriateness criteria for cardiac computed tomography: a report of the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging Cardiac Computed Tomography and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guideline Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, I-Chen; Choi, Byoung Wook; Chan, Carmen; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Yong, Hwan Seok; Yu, Wei

    2010-02-01

    In Asia, the healthcare system, populations and patterns of disease differ from Western countries. The current reports on the criteria for cardiac CT scans, provided by Western professional societies, are not appropriate for Asian cultures. The Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, the only society dedicated to cardiovascular imaging in Asia, formed a Working Group and invited 23 Technical Panel members representing a variety of Asian countries to rate the 51 indications for cardiac CT in clinical practice in Asia. The indications were rated as 'appropriate' (7-9), 'uncertain' (4-6), or 'inappropriate' (1-3) on a scale of 1-9. The median score was used for the final result if there was no disagreement. The final ratings for indications were 33 appropriate, 14 uncertain and 4 inappropriate. And 20 of them are highly agreed (19 appropriate and 1 inappropriate). Specifically, the Asian representatives considered cardiac CT as an appropriate modality for Kawasaki disease and congenital heart diseases in follow up and in symptomatic patients. In addition, except for some specified conditions, cardiac CT was considered to be an appropriate modality for one-stop shop ischemic heart disease evaluation due to its general appropriateness in coronary, structure and function evaluation. This report is expected to have a significant impact on the clinical practice, research and reimbursement policy in Asia.

  7. Advantages of high b-value diffusion-weighted imaging to diagnose pseudo-responses in patients with recurrent glioma after bevacizumab treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Kurisu, Kaoru; Aoki, Tomokazu; Yamanaka, Masami; Kajiwara, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yosuke; Takayasu, Takeshi; Akiyama, Yuji; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko

    2012-10-01

    The diagnosis of pseudo-responses after bevacizumab treatment is difficult. Because diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is associated with cell density, it may facilitate the differentiation between true- and pseudo-responses. Furthermore, as high b-value DWI is even more sensitive to diffusion, it has been reported to be diagnostically useful in various clinical settings. Between September 2008 and May 2011, 10 patients (5 males, 5 females; age range 6-65 years) with recurrent glioma were treated with bevacizumab. All underwent pre- and post-treatment MRI including T2- or FLAIR imaging, post-gadolinium contrast T1-weighted imaging, and DWI with b-1000 and b-4000. Response rates were evaluated by MacDonald- and by response assessment in neuro-oncology working group (RANO) criteria. We also assessed the response rate by calculating the size of high intensity areas using high b-value diffusion-weighted criteria. Prognostic factors were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves (log-rank test). It was easier to identify pseudo-responses with RANO- than MacDonald criteria, however the reduction of edema by bevacizumab rendered the early diagnosis of tumor progression difficult by RANO criteria. In some patients with recurrent glioma treated with bevacizumab, high b-value diffusion-weighted criteria did, while MacDonald- and RANO criteria did not identify pseudo-responses at an early point after the start of therapy. High b-value DWI reflects cell density more accurately than regular b-value DWI. Our findings suggest that in patients with recurrent glioma, high b-value diffusion-weighted criteria are useful for the differentiation between pseudo- and true responses to treatment with bevacizumab. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Advantages of high b-value diffusion-weighted imaging to diagnose pseudo-responses in patients with recurrent glioma after bevacizumab treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Kurisu, Kaoru; Aoki, Tomokazu; Yamanaka, Masami; Kajiwara, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yosuke; Takayasu, Takeshi; Akiyama, Yuji; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of pseudo-responses after bevacizumab treatment is difficult. Because diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is associated with cell density, it may facilitate the differentiation between true- and pseudo-responses. Furthermore, as high b-value DWI is even more sensitive to diffusion, it has been reported to be diagnostically useful in various clinical settings. Materials and methods: Between September 2008 and May 2011, 10 patients (5 males, 5 females; age range 6–65 years) with recurrent glioma were treated with bevacizumab. All underwent pre- and post-treatment MRI including T2- or FLAIR imaging, post-gadolinium contrast T1-weighted imaging, and DWI with b-1000 and b-4000. Response rates were evaluated by MacDonald- and by response assessment in neuro-oncology working group (RANO) criteria. We also assessed the response rate by calculating the size of high intensity areas using high b-value diffusion-weighted criteria. Prognostic factors were evaluated using Kaplan–Meier survival curves (log-rank test). Results: It was easier to identify pseudo-responses with RANO- than MacDonald criteria, however the reduction of edema by bevacizumab rendered the early diagnosis of tumor progression difficult by RANO criteria. In some patients with recurrent glioma treated with bevacizumab, high b-value diffusion-weighted criteria did, while MacDonald- and RANO criteria did not identify pseudo-responses at an early point after the start of therapy. Discussion and conclusion: High b-value DWI reflects cell density more accurately than regular b-value DWI. Our findings suggest that in patients with recurrent glioma, high b-value diffusion-weighted criteria are useful for the differentiation between pseudo- and true responses to treatment with bevacizumab

  9. Inter-observer variability of visual analysis of "stress"-only adenosine first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging in relation to clinical experience and reading criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, D. D.; Kuijpers, D.; Bodewes, R.; Kappert, P.; Kerkhof, M.; van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Oudkerk, M.

    To assess the inter-observer agreement of adenosine "stress"-only visual analysis of perfusion MR images in relation to experience and reading criteria. 106 adenosine perfusion MR examinations out of 350, 46 consecutive positive examinations and 60 randomly selected negative examinations were

  10. Can Axial-Based Nodal Size Criteria Be Used in Other Imaging Planes to Accurately Determine “Enlarged” Head and Neck Lymph Nodes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Eric S.; Walters, Thomas D.; Yu, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We evaluate if axial-based lymph node size criteria can be applied to coronal and sagittal planes. Methods. Fifty pretreatment computed tomographic (CT) neck exams were evaluated in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCCa) and neck lymphadenopathy. Axial-based size criteria were applied to all 3 imaging planes, measured, and classified as “enlarged” if equal to or exceeding size criteria. Results. 222 lymph nodes were “enlarged” in one imaging plane; however, 53.2% (118/222) of these were “enlarged” in all 3 planes. Classification concordance between axial versus coronal/sagittal planes was poor (kappa = −0.09 and −0.07, resp., P planes. Conclusion. Classification of “enlarged” lymph nodes differs between axial versus coronal/sagittal imaging planes when axial-based nodal size criteria are applied independently to all three imaging planes, and exclusively used without other morphologic nodal data. PMID:23984099

  11. Response evaluation criteria for solid tumours in dogs (v1.0): a Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S M; Thamm, D H; Vail, D M; London, C A

    2015-09-01

    In veterinary medical oncology, there is currently no standardized protocol for assessing response to therapy in solid tumours. The lack of such a formalized guideline makes it challenging to critically compare outcome measures across various treatment protocols. The Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) membership consensus document presented here is based on the recommendations of a subcommittee of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) board-certified veterinary oncologists. This consensus paper has used the human response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST v1.1) as a framework to establish standard procedures for response assessment in canine solid tumours that is meant to be easy to use, repeatable and applicable across a variety of clinical trial structures in veterinary oncology. It is hoped that this new canine RECIST (cRECIST v1.0) will be adopted within the veterinary oncology community and thereby facilitate the comparison of current and future treatment protocols used for companion animals with cancer. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Gallium 67 imaging in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel, O.; Front, D.; Lam, M.; Ben-Haim, S.; Kleinhaus, U.; Ben-Shachar, M.; Robinson, E.; Kolodny, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    The value of gallium 67 (Ga) imaging in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment was assessed in 25 patients with Ga-avid tumors and compared to body computed tomography (CT), chest radiographs, and palpation of tumor infiltrated peripheral lymph nodes. Ga imaging was negative in 95% (20/21) of the patients who were clinically considered to be in remission and in whom treatment was stopped. The disease did not recur during a follow-up of 12 to 26 months in 15 patients. Six patients developed recurrence of the disease 3 to 12 months after treatment was stopped. In all six patients Ga imaging became positive again at the time of the appearance of active disease. In the group of patients in remission, CT was negative in 57% (11/19), chest x-rays in 55% (6/11) and peripheral lymph nodes were palpated in none of the patients (13/13). In four patients that did not achieve remission after treatment, Ga scans were positive. Ga imaging appears useful in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment. This is probably because Ga imaging monitors tumor cell viability, whereas body CT and chest radiographs show the tumor mass, which may consist of fibrotic or necrotic tissue

  13. Functional Store Image and Corporate Social Responsibility Image: A Congruity Analysis on Store Loyalty

    OpenAIRE

    Jamaliah Mohd. Yusof; Rosidah Musa; Sofiah Abd. Rahman

    2011-01-01

    With previous studies that examined the importance of functional store image and CSR, this study is aimed at examining their effects in the self-congruity model in influencing store loyalty. In particular, this study developed and tested a structural model in the context of retailing industry on the self-congruity theory. Whilst much of the self-congruity studies have incorporated functional store image, there has been lack of studies that examined social responsibility i...

  14. Predicting Outcomes After Chemo-Embolization in Patients with Advanced-Stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma: An Evaluation of Different Radiologic Response Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, Andrew J.; Sheth, Rahul A.; Luber, Brandon; Huynh, Minh-Huy; Rachamreddy, Niranjan R.; Kalva, Sanjeeva P.

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThe purpse of this study was to evaluate the ability of various radiologic response criteria to predict patient outcomes after trans-arterial chemo-embolization with drug-eluting beads (DEB-TACE) in patients with advanced-stage (BCLC C) hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Materials and methodsHospital records from 2005 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Non-infiltrative lesions were measured at baseline and on follow-up scans after DEB-TACE according to various common radiologic response criteria, including guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO), Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL), and modified RECIST (mRECIST). Statistical analysis was performed to see which, if any, of the response criteria could be used as a predictor of overall survival (OS) or time-to-progression (TTP).Results75 patients met inclusion criteria. Median OS and TTP were 22.6 months (95 % CI 11.6–24.8) and 9.8 months (95 % CI 7.1–21.6), respectively. Univariate and multivariate Cox analyses revealed that none of the evaluated criteria had the ability to be used as a predictor for OS or TTP. Analysis of the C index in both univariate and multivariate models showed that the evaluated criteria were not accurate predictors of either OS (C-statistic range: 0.51–0.58 in the univariate model; range: 0.54–0.58 in the multivariate model) or TTP (C-statistic range: 0.55–0.59 in the univariate model; range: 0.57–0.61 in the multivariate model).ConclusionCurrent response criteria are not accurate predictors of OS or TTP in patients with advanced-stage HCC after DEB-TACE.

  15. Predicting Outcomes After Chemo-Embolization in Patients with Advanced-Stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma: An Evaluation of Different Radiologic Response Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunn, Andrew J., E-mail: agunn@uabmc.edu [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States); Sheth, Rahul A. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Luber, Brandon [Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University, Divison of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics (United States); Huynh, Minh-Huy [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Rachamreddy, Niranjan R. [Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology (United States); Kalva, Sanjeeva P. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-01-15

    PurposeThe purpse of this study was to evaluate the ability of various radiologic response criteria to predict patient outcomes after trans-arterial chemo-embolization with drug-eluting beads (DEB-TACE) in patients with advanced-stage (BCLC C) hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Materials and methodsHospital records from 2005 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Non-infiltrative lesions were measured at baseline and on follow-up scans after DEB-TACE according to various common radiologic response criteria, including guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO), Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL), and modified RECIST (mRECIST). Statistical analysis was performed to see which, if any, of the response criteria could be used as a predictor of overall survival (OS) or time-to-progression (TTP).Results75 patients met inclusion criteria. Median OS and TTP were 22.6 months (95 % CI 11.6–24.8) and 9.8 months (95 % CI 7.1–21.6), respectively. Univariate and multivariate Cox analyses revealed that none of the evaluated criteria had the ability to be used as a predictor for OS or TTP. Analysis of the C index in both univariate and multivariate models showed that the evaluated criteria were not accurate predictors of either OS (C-statistic range: 0.51–0.58 in the univariate model; range: 0.54–0.58 in the multivariate model) or TTP (C-statistic range: 0.55–0.59 in the univariate model; range: 0.57–0.61 in the multivariate model).ConclusionCurrent response criteria are not accurate predictors of OS or TTP in patients with advanced-stage HCC after DEB-TACE.

  16. Hierarchical Feature Extraction With Local Neural Response for Image Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Wei, Yantao; Li, Luoqing; Chen, C L P

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a hierarchical feature extraction method is proposed for image recognition. The key idea of the proposed method is to extract an effective feature, called local neural response (LNR), of the input image with nontrivial discrimination and invariance properties by alternating between local coding and maximum pooling operation. The local coding, which is carried out on the locally linear manifold, can extract the salient feature of image patches and leads to a sparse measure matrix on which maximum pooling is carried out. The maximum pooling operation builds the translation invariance into the model. We also show that other invariant properties, such as rotation and scaling, can be induced by the proposed model. In addition, a template selection algorithm is presented to reduce computational complexity and to improve the discrimination ability of the LNR. Experimental results show that our method is robust to local distortion and clutter compared with state-of-the-art algorithms.

  17. Rational imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma. The challenge of multimodal diagnostic criteria; Rationale Schnittbildgebung des hepatozellulaeren Karzinoms. Die Herausforderung multimodaler Diagnosekriterien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kircher, A.; Bongartz, G.; Merkle, E.M.; Zech, C.J. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) constitute the gold standard in radiological imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In cases of typical contrast behavior each modality as a single dynamic technique allows the diagnosis of HCC. There is still a challenge in detection of small HCCs < 2 cm, in differentiating HCC and high-grade dysplasia from other benign liver lesions as well as the evaluation of hypovascular liver lesions in the cirrhotic liver. Nowadays, both modalities achieve high detection rates of 90-100 % for lesions > 2 cm. Regarding lesions between 1 and 2 cm there is a higher sensitivity for MRI ranging between 80 and 90 % compared to 60-75 % with CT. Besides the multimodal diagnostic criteria, MRI provides significant benefits with the use of hepatobiliary contrast. Especially in combination with diffusion- weighted imaging (DWI) increased sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy compared to CT has been described for lesions sized < 2 cm. Regarding the differentiation from other hepatic nodules in the cirrhotic liver there is strong evidence that the coexistence of arterial enhancement and hypointensity on hepatobiliary imaging is specific for HCC. Moreover, hypointensity on hepatobiliary imaging is associated with a high positive predictive value (PPV) of up to 100 % for the presence of high-grade dysplasia and HCC. The use of MRI including hepatobiliary imaging and DWI has to be regarded as the best non-invasive imaging modality for the detection of HCC and for the characterization of nodules in patients with liver cirrhosis. In comparison to CT there are benefits regarding detection of small lesions < 2 cm and evaluation of hypovascular liver lesions in the context of the hepatocarcinogenesis including prognostic values of premalignant lesions. Both MRI and CT provide a high diagnostic performance in evaluation of HCC in liver cirrhosis. With MRI there are considerable advantages regarding the detection rate and

  18. The use of Deauville criteria in follow-up assessment of response to therapy in extra-nodal Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manar Hussein Abdel-Sattar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim was evaluate the role the PET/CT in the assessment of response to therapy in patients with Non-Hodgkin extra-nodal lymphoma: in particular, a five-point scale (Deauville criteria, which can be employed for early- and late-therapeutic response assessment. Methods: Sixty patients with pathologically confirmed Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent the following PET/CT examinations: initial PET/CT for staging, interim PET/CT and end of treatment PET/CT. Response assessment was done using new Cheson’s guidelines and five-point scale (Deauville criteria. Results: All patients were evaluated for response to therapy in the early interim, followed by late interim, as well as end treatment assessment for the overall response. We found good concordance of response assessment according to the Deauville criteria classification with International Harmonization Project (IHP classification. After early interim 48/60 patients had concordant designations (91.7%, 83.3%, 70%, and 33.3% and 12 patients had discordant designations. After late interim, 56/60 patients had concordant designations (100%, 100%, 80%, and 50% and four patients had discordant designations. After end of treatment, 54/60 patients had concordant designations (100%, 100% and 71.4% and six patients has discordant designations. Conclusion: Response assessment according to the Deauville criteria classification showed good concordance with IHP classification. According to our findings, we recommend the use of Deauville criteria in reporting of PET/CT for staging and assessment of response to treatment. Keywords: PET/CT, Extranodal non-hodgkin lymphoma, Deauville criteria, IHP (International Harmonizing Project

  19. Quantitative SPECT brain imaging: Effects of attenuation and detector response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilland, D.R.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Bowsher, J.E.; Turkington, T.G.; Liang, Z.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Two physical factors that substantially degrade quantitative accuracy in SPECT imaging of the brain are attenuation and detector response. In addition to the physical factors, random noise in the reconstructed image can greatly affect the quantitative measurement. The purpose of this work was to implement two reconstruction methods that compensate for attenuation and detector response, a 3D maximum likelihood-EM method (ML) and a filtered backprojection method (FB) with Metz filter and Chang attenuation compensation, and compare the methods in terms of quantitative accuracy and image noise. The methods were tested on simulated data of the 3D Hoffman brain phantom. The simulation incorporated attenuation and distance-dependent detector response. Bias and standard deviation of reconstructed voxel intensities were measured in the gray and white matter regions. The results with ML showed that in both the gray and white matter regions as the number of iterations increased, bias decreased and standard deviation increased. Similar results were observed with FB as the Metz filter power increased. In both regions, ML had smaller standard deviation than FB for a given bias. Reconstruction times for the ML method have been greatly reduced through efficient coding, limited source support, and by computing attenuation factors only along rays perpendicular to the detector

  20. Agreement between magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography in the classification of Schistosomal periportal fibrosis, according to Niamey's criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scortegagna Junior, Eduardo; Leao, Alberto Ribeiro de Souza; Sales, Danilo Moulin; Shigueoka, David Carlos; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis]. E-mail: E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br; Santos, Jose Eduardo Mourao; Colleoni Neto, Ramiro [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Aguiar, Luciane Aparecida Kopke de; Brant, Paulo Eugenio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Gastroenterology; Borges, Durval Rosa [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Medicine

    2008-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the reproducibility of magnetic resonance imaging and the agreement between ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the classification of periportal fibrosis in patients with schistosomiasis based on Niamey's qualitative criteria. Materials and methods: A prospective, double-blinded study was conducted between February 2005 and June 2006 with 20 patients (10 men and 10 women, with ages ranging between 24 and 60 years, mean age 42.7 years) diagnosed with schistosomiasis mansoni. Both ultrasound and magnetic resonance images were independently evaluated by two experienced observers. Interobserver agreement was evaluated for findings of periportal fibrosis on magnetic resonance images and in a comparison between magnetic resonance and ultrasound images. Results: The analysis of magnetic resonance images showed total interobserver agreement in 14 patients (70%). The comparison between ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging showed agreement between images in only six cases (30%) by observer 1, and in eight cases (40%) by observer 2. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging presents a good reproducibility in the evaluation of periportal fibrosis in later stages of schistosomiasis, however, the correlation between magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound is poor. (author)

  1. Idiopathic Chronic Parotitis: Imaging Findings and Sialendoscopic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineman, Thomas E; Kacker, Ashutosh; Kutler, David I

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate imaging and sialendoscopic findings to therapeutic response in patients with idiopathic chronic parotitis. We retrospectively reviewed 122 consecutive sialendoscopies performed in an academic medical center by two surgeons between 2008 and 2013. Forty-one (34%) and 54 (44%) patients were excluded on the basis of having parotid or submandibular sialolith, respectively. Nineteen cases were included in the study with idiopathic chronic parotitis. There was a median follow-up of 5 months. Computed tomography (CT) imaging had a sensitivity and specificity of 80.0 and 71.4%, respectively, for predicting abnormal findings on sialendoscopy, while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) had 100% accuracy in a small set of cases. In glands with noticeable pathology present on preoperative imaging or sialendoscopy, 11 out of 12 glands (92%) treated experienced symptomatic improvement, while 3 out of 7 glands (43%) without pathology on imaging or endoscopy experienced symptomatic improvement (p = 0.038). Sialendoscopy for the treatment of idiopathic chronic parotid disease can improve pain and swelling with a higher frequency of success in patients with abnormalities noted on endoscopy. CT and MRI have a moderate degree of accuracy in predicting which patients will benefit from therapeutic sialendoscopy. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. mTOR-inhibitor treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma: contribution of Choi and modified Choi criteria assessed in 2D or 3D to evaluate tumor response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamuraglia, M. [Laboratoire d' Imagerie Biomedicale, Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Univ Paris 06, INSERM, CNRS, Paris (France); Raslan, S.; Penna, R.R.; Wagner, M. [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, APHP UPMC, Service de Radiologie Polyvalente et Oncologique, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Elaidi, R.; Oudard, S. [APHP, Oncology Unit, Georges-Pompidou Hospital, Paris (France); Escudier, B. [Gustave-Roussy Institute, Medical Oncology Department, Villejuif (France); Slimane, K. [Novartis Pharma, Rueil-Malmaison (France); Lucidarme, O. [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, APHP UPMC, Service de Radiologie Polyvalente et Oncologique, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Laboratoire d' Imagerie Biomedicale, Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Univ Paris 06, INSERM, CNRS, Paris (France)

    2016-01-15

    To determine whether 2D or 3D Choi and modified Choi (mChoi) criteria could assess the efficacy of everolimus against metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). RECIST-1.1, Choi, and mChoi criteria were applied retrospectively to analyse baseline and 2-month contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) images in 48 patients with mRCC enrolled in the everolimus arm of the French randomized double-blind multicentre phase III trial comparing everolimus versus placebo (RECORD-1). The primary endpoint was centrally reviewed progression-free survival (PFS) calculated from the initial RECORD-1 analysis. Mean attenuation was determined for 2D target lesion regions of interest drawn on CECT sections whose largest diameters had been measured, and for the 3D whole target lesion. The median PFS was 5.5 months. The median PFS for everolimus responders defined using 3D mChoi criteria was significantly longer than for non-responders (7.6 versus 5.4 months, respectively), corresponding to a hazard ratio for progression of 0.45 (95 % CI: 0.22-0.92), with respective 1-year survival rates of 31 % and 9 %. No other 2D or 3D imaging criteria at 2 months identified patients who would benefit from everolimus. At 2 months, only 3D mChoi criteria were able to identify mRCC patients with a PFS benefit from everolimus. (orig.)

  3. Imaging the DNA damage response with PET and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, James C.; Koustoulidou, Sofia; Cornelissen, Bart [University of Oxford, CR-UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    DNA integrity is constantly challenged by endogenous and exogenous factors that can alter the DNA sequence, leading to mutagenesis, aberrant transcriptional activity, and cytotoxicity. Left unrepaired, damaged DNA can ultimately lead to the development of cancer. To overcome this threat, a series of complex mechanisms collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR) are able to detect the various types of DNA damage that can occur and stimulate the appropriate repair process. Each DNA damage repair pathway leads to the recruitment, upregulation, or activation of specific proteins within the nucleus, which, in some cases, can represent attractive targets for molecular imaging. Given the well-established involvement of DDR during tumorigenesis and cancer therapy, the ability to monitor these repair processes non-invasively using nuclear imaging techniques may facilitate the earlier detection of cancer and may also assist in monitoring response to DNA damaging treatment. This review article aims to provide an overview of recent efforts to develop PET and SPECT radiotracers for imaging of DNA damage repair proteins. (orig.)

  4. Criteria for preparation and evaluation of radiological emergency response plans and preparedness in support of nuclear power plants: Criteria for utility offsite planning and preparedness: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podolak, E.M. Jr.; Sanders, M.E.; Wingert, V.L.; Donovan, R.W.

    1988-09-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have added a supplement to NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1 that provides guidance for the development, review, and evaluation of utility offsite radiological emergency response planning and preparedness for those situations in which state and/or local governments decline to participate in emergency planning. While this guidance primarily applies to plants that do not have full-power operating licenses, it does have relevance to operating nuclear power plants

  5. Single-energy non-contrast hepatic steatosis criteria applied to virtual non-contrast images: is it still highly specific and positively predictive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Momenian, S; Parkinson, W; Khati, N; Brindle, K; Earls, J; Zeman, R K

    2018-06-01

    To determine the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of single-energy non-contrast hepatic steatosis criteria on dual-energy virtual non-contrast (VNC) images. Forty-eight computed tomography (CT) examinations, which included single-energy non-contrast (TNC) and contrast-enhanced dual-energy CT angiography (CTA) of the abdomen, were enrolled. VNC images were reconstructed from the CTA. Region of interest (ROI) attenuations were measured in the right and left hepatic lobes, spleen, and aorta on TNC and VNC images. The right and left hepatic lobes were treated as separate samples. Steatosis was diagnosed based on TNC liver attenuation of ≤40 HU or liver attenuation index (LAI) of ≤-10 HU, which are extremely specific and predictive for moderate to severe steatosis. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of VNC images for steatosis were calculated. VNC-TNC deviations were correlated with aortic enhancement and patient water equivalent diameter (PWED). Thirty-two liver ROIs met steatosis criteria based on TNC attenuation; VNC attenuation had sensitivity, specificity, and a positive predictive value of 66.7%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Twenty-one liver ROIs met steatosis criteria based on TNC LAI. VNC LAI had sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values of 61.9%, 90.7%, and 65%, respectively. Hepatic and splenic VNC-TNC deviations did not correlate with one another (R 2 =0.08), aortic enhancement (R 2 predictive for moderate to severe steatosis on VNC reconstructions from the arterial phase. Hepatic attenuation performs better than LAI criteria. VNC deviations are independent of aortic enhancement and PWED. Copyright © 2018 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nuclear medicine imaging to predict response to radiotherapy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiele, Christophe van de; Lahorte, Christophe; Oyen, Wim; Boerman, Otto; Goethals, Ingeborg; Slegers, Guido; Dierckx, Rudi Andre

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To review available literature on positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) for the measurement of tumor metabolism, hypoxia, growth factor receptor expression, and apoptosis as predictors of response to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Medical literature databases (Pubmed, Medline) were screened for available literature and critically analyzed as to their scientific relevance. Results: Studies on 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET as a predictor of response to radiotherapy in head-and-neck carcinoma are promising but need confirmation in larger series. 18 F-fluorothymine is stable in human plasma, and preliminary clinical data obtained with this marker of tumor cell proliferation are promising. For imaging tumor hypoxia, novel, more widely available radiopharmaceuticals with faster pharmacokinetics are mandatory. Imaging of ongoing apoptosis and growth factor expression is at a very early stage, but results obtained in other domains with radiolabeled peptides appear promising. Finally, for most of the tracers discussed, validation against a gold standard is needed. Conclusion: Optimization of the pharmacokinetics of relevant radiopharmaceuticals as well as validation against gold-standard tests in large patient series are mandatory if PET and SPECT are to be implemented in routine clinical practice for the purpose of predicting response to radiotherapy

  7. Viable tumor volume: Volume of interest within segmented metastatic lesions, a pilot study of proposed computed tomography response criteria for urothelial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folio, Les Roger; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Apolo, Andrea B.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • It is clear that 2D axial measurements are incomplete assessments in metastatic disease; especially in light of evolving antiangiogenic therapies that can result in tumor necrosis. • Our pilot study demonstrates that taking volumetric density into account can better predict overall survival when compared to RECIST, volumetric size, MASS and Choi. • Although volumetric segmentation and further density analysis may not yet be feasible within routine workflows, the authors believe that technology advances may soon make this possible. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the ability of new computed tomography (CT) response criteria for solid tumors such as urothelial cancer (VTV; viable tumor volume) to predict overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic bladder cancer treated with cabozantinib. Materials and methods: We compared the relative capabilities of VTV, RECIST, MASS (morphology, attenuation, size, and structure), and Choi criteria, as well as volume measurements, to predict OS using serial follow-up contrast-enhanced CT exams in patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Kaplan–Meier curves and 2-tailed log-rank tests compared OS based on early RECIST 1.1 response against each of the other criteria. A Cox proportional hazards model assessed response at follow-up exams as a time-varying covariate for OS. Results: We assessed 141 lesions in 55CT scans from 17 patients with urothelial metastasis, comparing VTV, RECIST, MASS, and Choi criteria, and volumetric measurements, for response assessment. Median follow-up was 4.5 months, range was 2–14 months. Only the VTV criteria demonstrated a statistical association with OS (p = 0.019; median OS 9.7 vs. 3.5 months). Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that VTV is a promising tool for assessing tumor response and predicting OS, using criteria that incorporate tumor volume and density in patients receiving antiangiogenic therapy for urothelial cancer. Larger studies are warranted to

  8. Comparison of RECIST, EORTC criteria and PERCIST for evaluation of early response to chemotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Jingjie; Ling, Xueying; Zhang, Linyue; Tang, Yongjin; Xiao, Zeyu; Cheng, Yong; Guo, Bin; Gong, Jian; Huang, Li; Xu, Hao [The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT-MRI Centre, Guangzhou (China)

    2016-10-15

    To compare the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria and the Positron Emission Tomography Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) 1.0 using PET volume computer-assisted reading (PET VCAR) for response evaluation in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with chemotherapy. A total of 35 patients with NSCLC were included in this prospective study. All patients received standard chemotherapy and underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans before and after treatment. With the assistance of PET VCAR, the chemotherapeutic responses were evaluated according to the RECIST 1.1, EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0. Concordance among these protocols was assessed using Cohen's κ coefficient and Wilcoxon's signed-ranks test. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier test. RECIST 1.1 and EORTC response classifications were discordant in 20 patients (57.1 %; κ = 0.194, P < 0.05), and RECIST 1.1 and PERCIST 1.0 classifications were discordant in 22 patients (62.9 %; κ = 0.139, P < 0.05). EORTC and PERCIST 1.0 classifications were discordant in only 4 patients (11.4 %), resulting in better concordance (κ = 0.804, P > 0.05). Patients with a partial remission according to RECIST 1.1 had significantly longer PFS (P < 0.001) than patients with progressive disease, but not significantly longer than patients with stable disease (P = 0.855). According to both the EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0, patients with a partial metabolic response had a significantly longer PFS than those with stable metabolic disease and those with progressive metabolic disease (P = 0.020 and P < 0.001, respectively, for EORTC; both P < 0.001 for PERCIST 1.0). EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0 are more sensitive and accurate than RECIST 1.1 for the detection of an early therapeutic response to chemotherapy in patients with NSCLC. Although EORTC criteria and

  9. Comparison of RECIST, EORTC criteria and PERCIST for evaluation of early response to chemotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Jingjie; Ling, Xueying; Zhang, Linyue; Tang, Yongjin; Xiao, Zeyu; Cheng, Yong; Guo, Bin; Gong, Jian; Huang, Li; Xu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    To compare the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria and the Positron Emission Tomography Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) 1.0 using PET volume computer-assisted reading (PET VCAR) for response evaluation in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with chemotherapy. A total of 35 patients with NSCLC were included in this prospective study. All patients received standard chemotherapy and underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans before and after treatment. With the assistance of PET VCAR, the chemotherapeutic responses were evaluated according to the RECIST 1.1, EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0. Concordance among these protocols was assessed using Cohen's κ coefficient and Wilcoxon's signed-ranks test. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier test. RECIST 1.1 and EORTC response classifications were discordant in 20 patients (57.1 %; κ = 0.194, P < 0.05), and RECIST 1.1 and PERCIST 1.0 classifications were discordant in 22 patients (62.9 %; κ = 0.139, P < 0.05). EORTC and PERCIST 1.0 classifications were discordant in only 4 patients (11.4 %), resulting in better concordance (κ = 0.804, P > 0.05). Patients with a partial remission according to RECIST 1.1 had significantly longer PFS (P < 0.001) than patients with progressive disease, but not significantly longer than patients with stable disease (P = 0.855). According to both the EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0, patients with a partial metabolic response had a significantly longer PFS than those with stable metabolic disease and those with progressive metabolic disease (P = 0.020 and P < 0.001, respectively, for EORTC; both P < 0.001 for PERCIST 1.0). EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0 are more sensitive and accurate than RECIST 1.1 for the detection of an early therapeutic response to chemotherapy in patients with NSCLC. Although EORTC criteria and

  10. Standard practice for determining relative image quality response of industrial radiographic imaging systems

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This standard provides a practice whereby industrial radiographic imaging systems may be comparatively assessed using the concept of relative image quality response (RIQR). The RIQR method presented within this practice is based upon the use of equivalent penetrameter sensitivity (EPS) described within Practice E 1025 and subsection 5.2 of this practice. Figure 1 illustrates a relative image quality indicator (RIQI) that has four different steel plaque thicknesses (.015, .010, .008, and .005 in.) sequentially positioned (from top to bottom) on a ¾-in. thick steel plate. The four plaques contain a total of 14 different arrays of penetrameter-type hole sizes designed to render varied conditions of threshold visibility ranging from 1.92 % EPS (at the top) to .94 % EPS (at the bottom) when exposed to nominal 200 keV X-ray radiation. Each “EPS” array consists of 30 identical holes; thus, providing the user with a quantity of threshold sensitivity levels suitable for relative image qualitative response com...

  11. Evaluating bronchodilator response in pediatric patients with post-infectious bronchiolitis obliterans: use of different criteria for identifying airway reversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiello, Rita; Vidal, Paula Cristina; Sarria, Edgar Enrique; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio; Stein, Renato Tetelbom; Mocelin, Helena Teresinha; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Pinto, Leonardo Araújo

    2016-01-01

    Post-infectious bronchiolitis obliterans (PIBO) is a clinical entity that has been classified as constrictive, fixed obstruction of the lumen by fibrotic tissue. However, recent studies using impulse oscillometry have reported bronchodilator responses in PIBO patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate bronchodilator responses in pediatric PIBO patients, comparing different criteria to define the response. We evaluated pediatric patients diagnosed with PIBO and treated at one of two pediatric pulmonology outpatient clinics in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Spirometric parameters were measured in accordance with international recommendations. We included a total of 72 pediatric PIBO patients. The mean pre- and post-bronchodilator values were clearly lower than the reference values for all parameters, especially FEF25-75%. There were post-bronchodilator improvements. When measured as mean percent increases, FEV1 and FEF25-75%, improved by 11% and 20%, respectively. However, when the absolute values were calculated, the mean FEV1 and FEF25-75% both increased by only 0.1 L. We found that age at viral aggression, a family history of asthma, and allergy had no significant effects on bronchodilator responses. Pediatric patients with PIBO have peripheral airway obstruction that is responsive to treatment but is not completely reversible with a bronchodilator. The concept of PIBO as fixed, irreversible obstruction does not seem to apply to this population. Our data suggest that airway obstruction is variable in PIBO patients, a finding that could have major clinical implications. A bronquiolite obliterante pós-infecciosa (BOPI) é uma entidade clínica que tem sido classificada como obstrução fixa e constritiva do lúmen por tecido fibrótico. Entretanto, estudos recentes utilizando oscilometria de impulso relataram resposta ao broncodilatador em pacientes com BOPI. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a resposta broncodilatadora em pacientes pediátricos com

  12. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  13. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rakesh, E-mail: rs05h@fsu.ed [Departments of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2010-07-21

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  14. FDG-PET response of skeletal (bone marrow and bone) involvement after induction chemotherapy in pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma - Are specific response criteria required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgi, Thomas Walter; Kluge, Regine; Kurch, Lars; Chavdarova, Lidia; Hasenclever, Dirk; Stoevesandt, Dietrich; Pelz, Tanja; Landman-Parker, Judith; Wallace, Hamish; Karlen, Jonas; Fernandez-Teijeiro, Ana; Cepelova, Michaela; Fossa, Alexander; Balwierz, Walentyna; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Ammann, Roland A; Pears, Jane; Hraskova, Andrea; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Beishuizen, Auke; Dieckmann, Karin; Leblanc, Thierry; Daw, Stephen; Baumann, Julia; Körholz, Dieter; Sabri, Osama; Mauz-Körholz, Christine

    2018-04-13

    skeletal lesions were predictive for the PET-2 result. Higher values for both parameters were associated with a worse PET-2 response. Copyright © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  15. The Role of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI in Locoregional Therapy Outcome Prediction and Response Assessment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC: The New Era of Functional Imaging Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes M. Ludwig

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reliable response criteria are critical for the evaluation of therapeutic response in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Current response assessment is mainly based on: (1 changes in size, which is at times unreliable and lag behind the result of therapy; and (2 contrast enhancement, which can be difficult to quantify in the presence of benign post-procedural changes and in tumors presenting with a heterogeneous pattern of enhancement. Given these challenges, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI have been recently investigated, aiding specificity to locoregional therapy response assessment and outcome prediction. Briefly, DWI quantifies diffusion of water occurring naturally at a cellular level (Brownian movement, which is restricted in multiple neoplasms because of high cellularity. Disruption of cellular integrity secondary to therapy results in increased water diffusion across the injured membranes. This review will provide an overview of the current literature on DWI therapy response assessment and outcome prediction in HCC following treatment with locoregional therapies.

  16. Vibration response imaging in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Xia; Guan, Wei-Jie; Xie, Yan-Qing; An, Jia-Ying; Jiang, Mei; Zhu, Zheng; Guo, E; Yu, Xin-Xin; Liu, Wen-Ting; Gao, Yi; Zheng, Jin-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Vibration response imaging (VRI) is a novel imaging technique and little is known about its characteristics and diagnostic value in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The aim of this study was to investigate the features of VRI in subjects with IPF. We enrolled 23 subjects with IPF (42-74 y old) and 28 healthy subjects (42-72 y old). Subjects with IPF were diagnosed by lung biopsy and underwent VRI, spirometry, lung diffusion testing, and chest x-ray or computed tomography, which entailed assessment of the value of VRI indices. The total VRI score correlated statistically with single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity percent predicted (r = -0.30, P = .04), but not with FVC percent predicted, FEV1 percent predicted, and FEV1/FVC (r = -0.27, -0.22, and 0.19; all P > .05). Compared with healthy subjects (17.9%), 20 subjects with IPF (86.96%, P .05), except for the upper right and lower left lobes (P diagnostic value (sensitivity, 1.00; specificity, 0.82), followed by presence of abundant crackles (sensitivity, 0.70; specificity, 0.96). Total VRI score was not a sensitive indicator of IPF, owing to low assay sensitivity (0.70) and specificity (0.64). VRI may be helpful to discriminate between IPF subjects and healthy individuals. Maximum energy frame and abundant crackles might serve as a diagnostic tool for IPF. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  17. Evaluating Emergency Response Solutions for Sustainable Community Development by Using Fuzzy Multi-Criteria Group Decision Making Approaches: IVDHF-TOPSIS and IVDHF-VIKOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junling Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Emergency management is vital in implementing sustainable community development, for which community planning must include emergency response solutions to potential natural and manmade hazards. To help maintain such solution repository, we investigate effective fuzzy multi-criteria group decision making (FMCGDM approaches for the complex problems of evaluating alternative emergency response solutions, where weights for decision makers and criteria are unknown due to problem complexity. We employ interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy (IVDHF set to address decision hesitancy more effectively. Based on IVDHF assessments, we develop a deviation maximizing model to compute criteria weights and another compatibility maximizing model to calculate weights for decision makers. Then, two ideal-solution-based FMCGDM approaches are proposed: (i by introducing a synthesized IVDHF group decision matrix into TOPSIS, we develop an IVDHF-TOPSIS approach for fuzzy group settings; (ii when emphasizing both maximum group utility and minimum individual regret, we extend VIKOR to develop an IVDHF-VIKOR approach, where the derived decision makers’ weights are utilized to obtain group decision matrix and the determined criteria weights are integrated to reflect the relative importance of distances from the compromised ideal solution. Compared with aggregation-operators-based approach, IVDHF-TOPSIS and IVDHF-VIKOR can alleviate information loss and computational complexity. Numerical examples have validated the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  18. Magnetoencephalographic Imaging of Auditory and Somatosensory Cortical Responses in Children with Autism and Sensory Processing Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly Demopoulos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study compared magnetoencephalographic (MEG imaging-derived indices of auditory and somatosensory cortical processing in children aged 8–12 years with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; N = 18, those with sensory processing dysfunction (SPD; N = 13 who do not meet ASD criteria, and typically developing control (TDC; N = 19 participants. The magnitude of responses to both auditory and tactile stimulation was comparable across all three groups; however, the M200 latency response from the left auditory cortex was significantly delayed in the ASD group relative to both the TDC and SPD groups, whereas the somatosensory response of the ASD group was only delayed relative to TDC participants. The SPD group did not significantly differ from either group in terms of somatosensory latency, suggesting that participants with SPD may have an intermediate phenotype between ASD and TDC with regard to somatosensory processing. For the ASD group, correlation analyses indicated that the left M200 latency delay was significantly associated with performance on the WISC-IV Verbal Comprehension Index as well as the DSTP Acoustic-Linguistic index. Further, these cortical auditory response delays were not associated with somatosensory cortical response delays or cognitive processing speed in the ASD group, suggesting that auditory delays in ASD are domain specific rather than associated with generalized processing delays. The specificity of these auditory delays to the ASD group, in addition to their correlation with verbal abilities, suggests that auditory sensory dysfunction may be implicated in communication symptoms in ASD, motivating further research aimed at understanding the impact of sensory dysfunction on the developing brain.

  19. Appearance of the minority dz2 surface state and disappearance of the image-potential state: Criteria for clean Fe(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Christian; Schmidt, Anke B.; Donath, Markus

    2012-10-01

    The unoccupied surface electronic structure of clean and oxidized Fe(001) was studied with spin-resolved inverse photoemission and target current spectroscopy. For the clean surface, we detected a dz2 surface state with minority spin character just above the Fermi level, while the image-potential surface state disappears. The opposite is observed for the ordered p(1×1)O/Fe(001) surface: the dz2-type surface state is quenched, while the image-potential state shows up as a pronounced feature. This behavior indicates enhanced surface reflectivity at the oxidized surface. The appearance and disappearance of specific unoccupied surface states prove to be decisive criteria for a clean Fe(001) surface. In addition, enhanced spin asymmetry in the unoccupied states is observed for the oxidized surface. Our results have implications for the use of clean and oxidized Fe(001) films as spin-polarization detectors.

  20. CMOS Image Sensor and System for Imaging Hemodynamic Changes in Response to Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Noor, Muhammad S; McCracken, Clinton B; Kiss, Zelma H T; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Murari, Kartikeya

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a therapeutic intervention used for a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, but its mechanism of action is not well understood. It is known that DBS modulates neural activity which changes metabolic demands and thus the cerebral circulation state. However, it is unclear whether there are correlations between electrophysiological, hemodynamic and behavioral changes and whether they have any implications for clinical benefits. In order to investigate these questions, we present a miniaturized system for spectroscopic imaging of brain hemodynamics. The system consists of a 144 ×144, [Formula: see text] pixel pitch, high-sensitivity, analog-output CMOS imager fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process, along with a miniaturized imaging system comprising illumination, focusing, analog-to-digital conversion and μSD card based data storage. This enables stand alone operation without a computer, nor electrical or fiberoptic tethers. To achieve high sensitivity, the pixel uses a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA). The nMOS transistors are in the pixel while pMOS transistors are column-parallel, resulting in a fill factor (FF) of 26%. Running at 60 fps and exposed to 470 nm light, the CMOS imager has a minimum detectable intensity of 2.3 nW/cm(2) , a maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 49 dB at 2.45 μW/cm(2) leading to a dynamic range (DR) of 61 dB while consuming 167 μA from a 3.3 V supply. In anesthetized rats, the system was able to detect temporal, spatial and spectral hemodynamic changes in response to DBS.

  1. Automated microscopic characterization of metallic ores with image analysis: a key to improve ore processing. II: metallogenetic discriminating criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castroviejo, R.; Berrezueta, E.

    2009-01-01

    ore microscopy may furnish very important information for geo metallurgists, but todays needs for automation are difficult to meet with the optical microscope unless and adequate methodology is developed. Some limitations of the routine procedure, related to risks of mis identification caused by the spectral similarity of some ores, ask for complementary criteria. Defining ore deposit typologies and the corresponding assemblages guides the choice of species and limits the number. Comparison of the reflectance values of the ores in each mineral association defined shows that their automated identification is possible in most of the common occurrence. The number of species to be actually considered being greatly limited, performance is increased. The system is not intended to substitute for a mineralogist, but to enhance enormously his performance, while offering the industry an economic procedure to procedure a wealth of information which would not be possible with traditional methods, as the point counter. (Author) 33 refs.

  2. Imaging response during therapy with radium-223 for castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keizman, D; Fosboel, M O; Reichegger, H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The imaging response to radium-223 therapy is at present poorly described. We aimed to describe the imaging response to radium-223 treatment. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the computed tomography (CT) and bone scintigraphy response of metastatic castration-resistant prostate c....../or radiological) may be noted during the first 3 months, and should not be confused with progression. Imaging by CT scan should be considered after three and six doses of radium-223 to rule out extraskeletal disease progression....

  3. A proposal for the inclusion of accessibility criteria in the authoring workflow of images for scientific articles

    OpenAIRE

    Splendiani, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigates the problem of how to provide accessible images in academic articles in the research fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and in particular in biomedicine. Currently, graphics in scientific articles are a critical information source and often provide essential information for a thorough understanding of scientific articles. People with visual and other impairments experience specific barriers that prevent them from accessing the informatio...

  4. Detection of Melamine in Soybean Meal Using Near-Infrared Microscopy Imaging with Pure Component Spectra as the Evaluation Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengling Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean meal was adulterated with melamine with the purpose of boosting the protein content for unlawful interests. In recent years, the near-infrared (NIR spectroscopy technique has been widely used for guaranteeing food and feed security for its fast, nondestructive, and pollution-free characteristics. However, there are problems with using near-infrared (NIR spectroscopy for detecting samples with low contaminant concentration because of instrument noise and sampling issues. In addition, methods based on NIR are indirect and depend on calibration models. NIR microscopy imaging offers the opportunity to investigate the chemical species present in food and feed at the microscale level (the minimum spot size is a few micrometers, thus avoiding the problem of the spectral features of contaminants being diluted by scanning. The aim of this work was to investigate the feasibility of using NIR microscopy imaging to identify melamine particles in soybean meal using only the pure component spectrum. The results presented indicate that using the classical least squares (CLS algorithm with the nonnegative least squares (NNLS algorithm, without needing first to develop a calibration model, could identify soybean meal that is both uncontaminated and contaminated with melamine particles at as low a level as 50 mg kg−1.

  5. 33 CFR 155.1050 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for vessels carrying groups I through IV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... qualified individual; and (2) Within 30 minutes of a discovery of a discharge or substantial threat of... a discharge in advance of the arrival of response resources identified in the plan for tiers 1, 2... shoreline protection operations. (1) The response resources must include the quantities of boom listed in...

  6. 33 CFR 154.1045 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... contained in 40 CFR part 300, and available online from the U.S. Government Printing Office). (ii... February 18, 1993, and February 18, 1998. Depending on the quantity and type of petroleum oil handled by... response capability across the full spectrum of response modes. As best available technology demonstrates a...

  7. ST segment/heart rate slope as a predictor of coronary artery disease: comparison with quantitative thallium imaging and conventional ST segment criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelhor, R.S.; Newhouse, K.E.; Vrobel, T.R.; Miron, S.D.; Bahler, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The ST segment shift relative to exercise-induced increments in heart rate, the ST/heart rate slope (ST/HR slope), has been proposed as a more accurate ECG criterion for diagnosing significant coronary artery disease (CAD). Its clinical utility, with the use of a standard treadmill protocol, was compared with quantitative stress thallium (TI) and standard treadmill criteria in 64 unselected patients who underwent coronary angiography. The overall diagnostic accuracy of the ST/HR slope was an improvement over TI and conventional ST criteria (81%, 67%, and 69%). For patients failing to reach 85% of their age-predicted maximal heart rate, its diagnostic accuracy was comparable with TI (77% and 74%). Its sensitivity in patients without prior myocardial infarctions was equivalent to that of thallium (91% and 95%). The ST/HR slope was directly related to the angiographic severity (Gensini score) of CAD in patients without a prior infarction (r = 0.61, p less than 0.001). The ST/HR slope was an improved ECG criterion for diagnosing CAD and compared favorably with TI imaging

  8. The Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation provisional criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables....

  9. Tackling Complex Emergency Response Solutions Evaluation Problems in Sustainable Development by Fuzzy Group Decision Making Approaches with Considering Decision Hesitancy and Prioritization among Assessing Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Jun-Ling; Zhao, Shu-Ping; Liang, Chang-Yong

    2017-10-02

    In order to be prepared against potential balance-breaking risks affecting economic development, more and more countries have recognized emergency response solutions evaluation (ERSE) as an indispensable activity in their governance of sustainable development. Traditional multiple criteria group decision making (MCGDM) approaches to ERSE have been facing simultaneous challenging characteristics of decision hesitancy and prioritization relations among assessing criteria, due to the complexity in practical ERSE problems. Therefore, aiming at the special type of ERSE problems that hold the two characteristics, we investigate effective MCGDM approaches by hiring interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy set (IVDHFS) to comprehensively depict decision hesitancy. To exploit decision information embedded in prioritization relations among criteria, we firstly define an fuzzy entropy measure for IVDHFS so that its derivative decision models can avoid potential information distortion in models based on classic IVDHFS distance measures with subjective supplementing mechanism; further, based on defined entropy measure, we develop two fundamental prioritized operators for IVDHFS by extending Yager's prioritized operators. Furthermore, on the strength of above methods, we construct two hesitant fuzzy MCGDM approaches to tackle complex scenarios with or without known weights for decision makers, respectively. Finally, case studies have been conducted to show effectiveness and practicality of our proposed approaches.

  10. Tackling Complex Emergency Response Solutions Evaluation Problems in Sustainable Development by Fuzzy Group Decision Making Approaches with Considering Decision Hesitancy and Prioritization among Assessing Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wen Qi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to be prepared against potential balance-breaking risks affecting economic development, more and more countries have recognized emergency response solutions evaluation (ERSE as an indispensable activity in their governance of sustainable development. Traditional multiple criteria group decision making (MCGDM approaches to ERSE have been facing simultaneous challenging characteristics of decision hesitancy and prioritization relations among assessing criteria, due to the complexity in practical ERSE problems. Therefore, aiming at the special type of ERSE problems that hold the two characteristics, we investigate effective MCGDM approaches by hiring interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy set (IVDHFS to comprehensively depict decision hesitancy. To exploit decision information embedded in prioritization relations among criteria, we firstly define an fuzzy entropy measure for IVDHFS so that its derivative decision models can avoid potential information distortion in models based on classic IVDHFS distance measures with subjective supplementing mechanism; further, based on defined entropy measure, we develop two fundamental prioritized operators for IVDHFS by extending Yager’s prioritized operators. Furthermore, on the strength of above methods, we construct two hesitant fuzzy MCGDM approaches to tackle complex scenarios with or without known weights for decision makers, respectively. Finally, case studies have been conducted to show effectiveness and practicality of our proposed approaches.

  11. Laparoscopic splenectomy for medically refractory immune thrombocytopenia (ITP): a retrospective cohort study on longtime response predicting factors based on consensus criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijcken, Emile; Mees, Soeren Torge; Bisping, Guido; Krueger, Kristin; Bruewer, Matthias; Senninger, Norbert; Mennigen, Rudolf

    2014-12-01

    Laparoscopic splenectomy has been proposed to be the standard therapy for adult patients with medically refractory immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). However, due to inconsistent definitions of response, variable rates of long term response have been reported. Furthermore, new medical treatment options are currently challenging the role of splenectomy. The aims of this study were to (1) analyze long term response after splenectomy according to recently defined consensus criteria, (2) identify possible predictive response factors. A case series of 72 consecutive patients with ITP undergoing laparoscopic splenectomy was retrospectively studied using univariate and multivariate analysis as well as logrank tests. Median follow-up was 32 (2-110) months. Mortality was 0% and morbidity was 8.2%. Response to splenectomy was achieved in of 63/72 patients (87.5%). Loss of response occurred in 19/63 (30.2%) in median after 3 (range 2-42) months. Preoperative platelet counts after boosting with steroids and immunoglobulins as well as the postoperative rise in platelet counts were statistically significant factors for response upon both univariate and multivariate analysis, whereas age, gender, body mass index, ASA classification, disease duration, accessory spleens, splenic weight, conversion to open surgery, or perioperative complications were not. Patients with a postoperative rise in platelet counts >150,000/μL had a significant better chance on stable long term response than those with a smaller increment (P splenectomy is an effective and safe treatment option in order to obtain stable long term response in patients with ITP. Perioperative platelet counts are predictive factors of long term response. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prognostic Value of FDG-PET, Based on the Revised Response Criteria, in Patients with Malignant Lymphoma: A Comparison with CT/MRI Evaluations, Based on the International Working Group/ Cotswolds Meeting Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayako Isohashi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Post-treatment evaluations by CT/MRI (based on the International Working Group/ Cotswolds meeting guidelines and PET (based on Revised Response Criteria, were examined in terms of progression-free survival (PFS in patients with malignant lymphoma (ML. Methods: 79 patients, undergoing CT/MRI for the examination of suspected lesions and whole-body PET/CT before and after therapy, were included in the study during April 2007-January 2013. The relationship between post-treatment evaluations (CT/MRI and PET and PFS during the follow-up period was examined, using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The patients were grouped according to the histological type into Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, and other histological types. The association between post-treatment evaluations (PET or PET combined with CT/ MRI and PFS was examined separately. Moreover, the relationship between disease recurrence and serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor, lactic dehydrogenase, and C-reactive protein levels was evaluated before and after the treatment. Results: Patients with incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET had a significantly shorter PFS, compared to patients with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET and those exhibiting incomplete remission on CT/MRI and complete remission on PET (P

  13. Information retrieval based on single-pixel optical imaging with quick-response code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yin; Chen, Wen

    2018-04-01

    Quick-response (QR) code technique is combined with ghost imaging (GI) to recover original information with high quality. An image is first transformed into a QR code. Then the QR code is treated as an input image in the input plane of a ghost imaging setup. After measurements, traditional correlation algorithm of ghost imaging is utilized to reconstruct an image (QR code form) with low quality. With this low-quality image as an initial guess, a Gerchberg-Saxton-like algorithm is used to improve its contrast, which is actually a post processing. Taking advantage of high error correction capability of QR code, original information can be recovered with high quality. Compared to the previous method, our method can obtain a high-quality image with comparatively fewer measurements, which means that the time-consuming postprocessing procedure can be avoided to some extent. In addition, for conventional ghost imaging, the larger the image size is, the more measurements are needed. However, for our method, images with different sizes can be converted into QR code with the same small size by using a QR generator. Hence, for the larger-size images, the time required to recover original information with high quality will be dramatically reduced. Our method makes it easy to recover a color image in a ghost imaging setup, because it is not necessary to divide the color image into three channels and respectively recover them.

  14. Criteria for preparation and evaluation of radiological emergency response plans and preparedness in support of nuclear power plants. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a common reference and interim guidance source for: state and local governments and nuclear facility operators in the development of radiological emergency response plans and preparedness in support of nuclear power plants; and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other Federal agency personnel engaged in the review of state, local government, and licensee plans and preparedness

  15. Study of Fish Response Using Particle Image Velocimetry and High-Speed, High-Resolution Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Mueller, Robert P.

    2004-10-23

    Existing literature of previous particle image velocimetry (PIV) studies of fish swimming has been reviewed. Historically, most of the studies focused on the performance evaluation of freely swimming fish. Technological advances over the last decade, especially the development of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) technique, make possible more accurate, quantitative descriptions of the flow patterns adjacent to the fish and in the wake behind the fins and tail, which are imperative to decode the mechanisms of drag reduction and propulsive efficiency. For flows generated by different organisms, the related scales and flow regimes vary significantly. For small Reynolds numbers, viscosity dominates; for very high Reynolds numbers, inertia dominates, and three-dimensional complexity occurs. The majority of previous investigations dealt with the lower end of Reynolds number range. The fish of our interest, such as rainbow trout and spring and fall chinook salmon, fall into the middle range, in which neither viscosity nor inertia is negligible, and three-dimensionality has yet to dominate. Feasibility tests have proven the applicability of PIV to flows around fish. These tests have shown unsteady vortex shedding in the wake, high vorticity region and high stress region, with the highest in the pectoral area. This evident supports the observations by Nietzel et al. (2000) and Deng et al. (2004) that the operculum are most vulnerable to damage from the turbulent shear flow, because they are easily pried open, and the large vorticity and shear stress can lift and tear off scales, rupture or dislodge eyes, and damage gills. In addition, the unsteady behavior of the vortex shedding in the wake implies that injury to fish by the instantaneous flow structures would likely be much higher than the injury level estimated using the average values of the dynamics parameters. Based on existing literature, our technological capability, and relevance and practicability to

  16. Osteoblastic flare in a patient with advanced gastric cancer after treatment with pemetrexed and oxaliplatin: implications for response assessment with RECIST criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoncini Edda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RECIST guidelines are commonly used in phase II and III clinical trials. The correct definition of response can be controversial in some situations, as in the case we describe. Case presentation A 43 year-old man with advanced gastric cancer was enrolled in a phase II trial where he was treated with pemetrexed 500 mg/m2 plus oxaliplatin 120 mg/m2 every 3 weeks. At baseline, the target lesions were lymph-nodes, and the non-target lesions were small pulmonary nodules. At first re-evaluation, the target lesions showed partial response and the non-target lesions showed complete response, but new diffuse osteoblastic lesions appeared. The investigator decided to continue treatment until the second re-evaluation. CT scan confirmed the response of the target and non-target lesions, while the osteoblastic lesions did not change. Conclusion The appearance of osteoblastic lesions after an active antitumor treatment, a phenomenon known as flare, can complicate the definition of the best overall response using RECIST criteria. This possibility should be considered by oncologists involved in clinical trials.

  17. MR imaging of metabolic white matter diseases: Therapeutic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebarski, S.S.; Allen, R.

    1987-01-01

    In metabolic diseases affecting the brain, MR imaging abnormalities include white-matter signal aberrations suggesting myelination delay, dysmyelination and demyelination, pathologic iron storage, and finally, loss of substance usually in a nonspecific pattern. The authors suggest that MR imaging may have therapeutic implications: (1) classic galactosemia - white-matter signal aberration became normal after dietary therapy; (2) phenylketonuria - age- and sex-matched treated and nontreated adolescents showed marked differences in brain volume, with the treated patient's volume nearly normal; (3) maple syrup urine disease - gross white-matter signal aberration became nearly normal after dietary therapy; and (4) hyperglycinemia - relentless progression of white-matter signal aberration and loss of brain substance despite therapy. These data suggest that brain MR imaging may provide a therapeutic index in certain metabolic diseases

  18. Negative Stimulus-Response Compatibility Observed with a Briefly Displayed Image of a Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainio, Lari

    2011-01-01

    Manual responses can be primed by viewing an image of a hand. The left-right identity of the viewed hand reflexively facilitates responses of the hand that corresponds to the identity. Previous research also suggests that when the response activation is triggered by an arrow, which is backward-masked and presented briefly, the activation manifests…

  19. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rider, Lisa G.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M.; Huber, Adam M.; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J.; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B.; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Magalhaes, Claudia Saad; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E.; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Miller, Frederick W.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino; Hansen, Paul; Apaz, Maria; Bowyer, Suzanne; Curran, Megan; Davidson, Joyce; Griffin, Thomas; Huber, Adam H.; Jones, Olcay; Kim, Susan; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Lovell, Daniel; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Pachman, Lauren M.; Pilkington, Clarissa; Ponyi, Andrea; Quartier, Pierre; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V.; Reed, Ann; Rennebohm, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). Methods. We analyzed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials

  20. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis : An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rider, Lisa G.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M.; Huber, Adam M.; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J.; De Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B.; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Magalhaes, Claudia Saad; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E.; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Miller, Frederick W.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino; Rider, Lisa G.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Miller, Frederick W.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Erman, Brian; Bayat, Nastaran; Pistorio, Angela; Huber, Adam M.; Feldman, Brian M.; Hansen, Paul; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Rider, Lisa G.; Apaz, Maria T; Bowyer, Suzanne; Cimaz, Rolando; Constantin, Tamás; Curran, Megan; Davidson, Joyce E.; Feldman, Brian M.; Griffin, Thomas; Huber, Adam H.; Jones, Olcay; Kim, Susan; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Lovell, Daniel J.; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Pachman, Lauren M.; Pilkington, Clarissa; Ponyi, Andrea; Punaro, Marilynn; Quartier, Pierre; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rennebohm, Robert; Sherry, David D.; Silva, Clovis A.; Stringer, Elizabeth; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Wallace, Carol; Miller, Frederick W.; Oddis, Chester V.; Reed, Ann M.; Rider, Lisa G.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Apaz, Maria T; Avcin, Tadej; Becker, Mara; Beresford, Michael W.; Cimaz, Rolando; Constantin, Tamás; Curran, Megan; Cuttica, Ruben; Davidson, Joyce E.; Dressler, Frank; Dvergsten, Jeffrey; Feitosa de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Feldman, Brian M.; Leme Ferriani, Virginia Paes; Flato, Berit; Gerloni, Valeria; Griffin, Thomas; Henrickson, Michael; Hinze, Claas; Hoeltzel, Mark; Huber, Adam M.; Ibarra, Maria; Ilowite, Norman T; Imundo, Lisa; Jones, Olcay; Kim, Susan; Kingsbury, Daniel; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Lovell, Daniel J.; Martini, Alberto; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Magnusson, Bo; Maguiness, Sheilagh; Maillard, Susan; Mathiesen, Pernille; McCann, Liza J.; Nielsen, Susan; Pachman, Lauren M.; Passo, Murray; Pilkington, Clarissa; Punaro, Marilynn; Quartier, Pierre; Rabinovich, Egla; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rennebohm, Robert; Rider, Lisa G.; Rivas-Chacon, Rafael; Byun Robinson, Angela; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Russo, Ricardo; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia; Sallum, Adriana; Sanner, Helga; Schmeling, Heinrike; Selcen, Duygu; Shaham, Bracha; Sherry, David D.; Silva, Clovis A.; Spencer, Charles H.; Sundel, Robert; Tardieu, Marc; Thatayatikom, Akaluck; van der Net, Janjaap; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Wahezi, Dawn; Wallace, Carol; Zulian, Francesco; analysis, Conjoint; Cimaz, Rolando; Constantin, Tamás; Cuttica, Ruben; Davidson, Joyce E.; Dressler, Frank; Knupp Feitosa de Oliveira, Sheila; Feldman, Brian M.; Griffin, Thomas; Henrickson, Michael; Huber, Adam M.; Imundo, Lisa; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Magnusson, Bo; Maillard, Susan; Pachman, Lauren M.; Passo, Murray; Pilkington, Clarissa; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rider, Lisa G.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Russo, Ricardo; Shaham, Bracha; Sundel, Robert; van der Net, Janjaap; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J.; Knupp Feitosa de Oliveira, Sheila; Feldman, Brian M.; Huber, Adam M.; Lindsley, Carol B.; Pilkington, Clarissa; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Amato, Anthony A; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G.; Dastmalchi, Maryam; de Visser, Marianne; Fiorentino, David; Isenberg, David; Katz, James; Mammen, Andrew; Oddis, Chester V.; Ytterberg, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). Methods: We analyzed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials

  1. Body enhancement : body images, vulnerability and moral responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dikken, A.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this explorative study is to show that it is highly relevant to integrate cultural and personal body images into the ethical debate on human enhancement. The current debate has little attention for the motivations to make use of technology to alter the human body, such as cultural

  2. Generating color terrain images in an emergency response system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belles, R.D.

    1985-08-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) provides real-time assessments of the consequences resulting from an atmospheric release of radioactive material. In support of this operation, a system has been created which integrates numerical models, data acquisition systems, data analysis techniques, and professional staff. Of particular importance is the rapid generation of graphical images of the terrain surface in the vicinity of the accident site. A terrain data base and an associated acquisition system have been developed that provide the required terrain data. This data is then used as input to a collection of graphics programs which create and display realistic color images of the terrain. The graphics system currently has the capability of generating color shaded relief images from both overhead and perspective viewpoints within minutes. These images serve to quickly familiarize ARAC assessors with the terrain near the release location, and thus permit them to make better informed decisions in modeling the behavior of the released material. 7 refs., 8 figs

  3. Nuclear Safety: Our Overriding Priority. EDF Group Report 2015 in response to FTSE4Good Nuclear Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillart, H.

    2015-01-01

    EDF is the world's leading nuclear operator with 74.8 GW of installed capacity in France, the United Kingdom and the United States, an EPR under construction in France, and 2 EPRs under construction in China through TNPJVC (EDF 30%), a joint venture with CGNPC. As such, EDF acts at all stages in the life of its power plants (design, construction, operation, decommissioning) to: - ensure rigorous operation of facilities; - prevent all incidents and accidents; - reduce the impact of any incidents or accidents that might nevertheless occur. The main safety measures were published in a single document in 2015 setting out the Group's nuclear safety policy. Each nuclear operating company inside the Group acts in compliance with the legal obligations and regulations specific to its host country. Each company works to ensure and continuously improve its safety performance with its own methods, skills and values. The EDF Group respects national differences. At the same time it frames common principles to deliver the highest level of incident prevention and protection of the public, workers and the environment. This policy applies to new projects (overall architecture, design and construction) and all existing plants (operation, maintenance, waste management, decommissioning and engineering). The Group works closely with its industrial partners to deliver these objectives. Each company is responsible for the proper operation of its nuclear activities, and delegates responsibilities appropriately to each level of management or operation. The Group guarantees the allocation of resources needed to ensure nuclear safety. An in-house independent nuclear safety function is in place at power plant level, company level and Group level. Each has a duty to alert senior management of inappropriate or inadequate line management response. Nuclear safety is the absolute priority for the EDF Group at every stage of the plant life-cycle. Each company is responsible for ensuring that its

  4. The Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation provisional criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo; Rider, Lisa G; Pilkington, Clarissa; Oliveira, Sheila; Wulffraat, Nico; Espada, Graciela; Garay, Stella; Cuttica, Ruben; Hofer, Michael; Quartier, Pierre; Melo-Gomes, Jose; Reed, Ann M; Wierzbowska, Malgorzata; Feldman, Brian M; Harjacek, Miroslav; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Nielsen, Susan; Flato, Berit; Lahdenne, Pekka; Michels, Harmut; Murray, Kevin J; Punaro, Lynn; Rennebohm, Robert; Russo, Ricardo; Balogh, Zsolt; Rooney, Madeleine; Pachman, Lauren M; Wallace, Carol; Hashkes, Philip; Lovell, Daniel J; Giannini, Edward H; Gare, Boel Andersson; Martini, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables. Thirty-seven experienced pediatric rheumatologists from 27 countries achieved consensus on 128 difficult patient profiles as clinically improved or not improved using a stepwise approach (patient's rating, statistical analysis, definition selection). Using the physicians' consensus ratings as the "gold standard measure," chi-square, sensitivity, specificity, false-positive and-negative rates, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and kappa agreement for candidate definitions of improvement were calculated. Definitions with kappa values >0.8 were multiplied by the face validity score to select the top definitions. The top definition of improvement was at least 20% improvement from baseline in 3 of 6 core set variables with no more than 1 of the remaining worsening by more than 30%, which cannot be muscle strength. The second-highest scoring definition was at least 20% improvement from baseline in 3 of 6 core set variables with no more than 2 of the remaining worsening by more than 25%, which cannot be muscle strength (definition P1 selected by the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies group). The third is similar to the second with the maximum amount of worsening set to 30%. This indicates convergent validity of the process. We propose a provisional data-driven definition of improvement that reflects well the consensus rating of experienced clinicians, which incorporates clinically meaningful change in core set variables in a composite end point for the evaluation of global response to therapy in juvenile DM. Copyright © 2010 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. NEAR REAL-TIME GEOREFERENCE OF UMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE IMAGES FOR POST-EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, S.; Wang, X.; Dou, A.; Yuan, X.; Ding, L.; Ding, X.

    2018-01-01

    The rapid collection of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) remote sensing images plays an important role in the fast submitting disaster information and the monitored serious damaged objects after the earthquake. However, for hundreds of UAV images collected in one flight sortie, the traditional data processing methods are image stitching and three-dimensional reconstruction, which take one to several hours, and affect the speed of disaster response. If the manual searching method is employed, we ...

  6. University Social Responsibility and Brand Image of Private Universities in Bangkok

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plungpongpan, Jirawan; Tiangsoongnern, Leela; Speece, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of university social responsibility (USR) on the brand image of private universities in Thailand. Brand image is important for entry into the consideration set as prospective students evaluate options for university study. USR activities may be implicit or explicit, i.e., actively…

  7. Comparing Four Touch-Based Interaction Techniques for an Image-Based Audience Response System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Prins, Jonatan T.; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the most appropriate touch-based interaction technique for I2Vote, an image-based audience response system for radiology education in which users need to accurately mark a target on a medical image. Four plausible techniques were identified: land-on, take-off,

  8. Spatially pooled contrast responses predict neural and perceptual similarity of naturalistic image categories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris I A Groen

    Full Text Available The visual world is complex and continuously changing. Yet, our brain transforms patterns of light falling on our retina into a coherent percept within a few hundred milliseconds. Possibly, low-level neural responses already carry substantial information to facilitate rapid characterization of the visual input. Here, we computationally estimated low-level contrast responses to computer-generated naturalistic images, and tested whether spatial pooling of these responses could predict image similarity at the neural and behavioral level. Using EEG, we show that statistics derived from pooled responses explain a large amount of variance between single-image evoked potentials (ERPs in individual subjects. Dissimilarity analysis on multi-electrode ERPs demonstrated that large differences between images in pooled response statistics are predictive of more dissimilar patterns of evoked activity, whereas images with little difference in statistics give rise to highly similar evoked activity patterns. In a separate behavioral experiment, images with large differences in statistics were judged as different categories, whereas images with little differences were confused. These findings suggest that statistics derived from low-level contrast responses can be extracted in early visual processing and can be relevant for rapid judgment of visual similarity. We compared our results with two other, well- known contrast statistics: Fourier power spectra and higher-order properties of contrast distributions (skewness and kurtosis. Interestingly, whereas these statistics allow for accurate image categorization, they do not predict ERP response patterns or behavioral categorization confusions. These converging computational, neural and behavioral results suggest that statistics of pooled contrast responses contain information that corresponds with perceived visual similarity in a rapid, low-level categorization task.

  9. Spatially Pooled Contrast Responses Predict Neural and Perceptual Similarity of Naturalistic Image Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Iris I. A.; Ghebreab, Sennay; Lamme, Victor A. F.; Scholte, H. Steven

    2012-01-01

    The visual world is complex and continuously changing. Yet, our brain transforms patterns of light falling on our retina into a coherent percept within a few hundred milliseconds. Possibly, low-level neural responses already carry substantial information to facilitate rapid characterization of the visual input. Here, we computationally estimated low-level contrast responses to computer-generated naturalistic images, and tested whether spatial pooling of these responses could predict image similarity at the neural and behavioral level. Using EEG, we show that statistics derived from pooled responses explain a large amount of variance between single-image evoked potentials (ERPs) in individual subjects. Dissimilarity analysis on multi-electrode ERPs demonstrated that large differences between images in pooled response statistics are predictive of more dissimilar patterns of evoked activity, whereas images with little difference in statistics give rise to highly similar evoked activity patterns. In a separate behavioral experiment, images with large differences in statistics were judged as different categories, whereas images with little differences were confused. These findings suggest that statistics derived from low-level contrast responses can be extracted in early visual processing and can be relevant for rapid judgment of visual similarity. We compared our results with two other, well- known contrast statistics: Fourier power spectra and higher-order properties of contrast distributions (skewness and kurtosis). Interestingly, whereas these statistics allow for accurate image categorization, they do not predict ERP response patterns or behavioral categorization confusions. These converging computational, neural and behavioral results suggest that statistics of pooled contrast responses contain information that corresponds with perceived visual similarity in a rapid, low-level categorization task. PMID:23093921

  10. Contextual analysis of immunological response through whole-organ fluorescent imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Matthew C; Herndon, Caroline N; Heesters, B A; Carroll, Michael C

    2013-09-01

    As fluorescent microscopy has developed, significant insights have been gained into the establishment of immune response within secondary lymphoid organs, particularly in draining lymph nodes. While established techniques such as confocal imaging and intravital multi-photon microscopy have proven invaluable, they provide limited insight into the architectural and structural context in which these responses occur. To interrogate the role of the lymph node environment in immune response effectively, a new set of imaging tools taking into account broader architectural context must be implemented into emerging immunological questions. Using two different methods of whole-organ imaging, optical clearing and three-dimensional reconstruction of serially sectioned lymph nodes, fluorescent representations of whole lymph nodes can be acquired at cellular resolution. Using freely available post-processing tools, images of unlimited size and depth can be assembled into cohesive, contextual snapshots of immunological response. Through the implementation of robust iterative analysis techniques, these highly complex three-dimensional images can be objectified into sortable object data sets. These data can then be used to interrogate complex questions at the cellular level within the broader context of lymph node biology. By combining existing imaging technology with complex methods of sample preparation and capture, we have developed efficient systems for contextualizing immunological phenomena within lymphatic architecture. In combination with robust approaches to image analysis, these advances provide a path to integrating scientific understanding of basic lymphatic biology into the complex nature of immunological response.

  11. Analysis of image heterogeneity using 2D Minkowski functionals detects tumor responses to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Timothy J; Canuto, Holly C; Kettunen, Mikko I; Booth, Thomas C; Hu, De-En; Krishnan, Anant S; Bohndiek, Sarah E; Neves, André A; McLachlan, Charles; Hobson, Michael P; Brindle, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of ever increasing volumes of high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has created an urgent need to develop automated and objective image analysis algorithms that can assist in determining tumor margins, diagnosing tumor stage, and detecting treatment response. We have shown previously that Minkowski functionals, which are precise morphological and structural descriptors of image heterogeneity, can be used to enhance the detection, in T1 -weighted images, of a targeted Gd(3+) -chelate-based contrast agent for detecting tumor cell death. We have used Minkowski functionals here to characterize heterogeneity in T2 -weighted images acquired before and after drug treatment, and obtained without contrast agent administration. We show that Minkowski functionals can be used to characterize the changes in image heterogeneity that accompany treatment of tumors with a vascular disrupting agent, combretastatin A4-phosphate, and with a cytotoxic drug, etoposide. Parameterizing changes in the heterogeneity of T2 -weighted images can be used to detect early responses of tumors to drug treatment, even when there is no change in tumor size. The approach provides a quantitative and therefore objective assessment of treatment response that could be used with other types of MR image and also with other imaging modalities. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Can Physicians Identify Inappropriate Nuclear Stress Tests? An Examination of Inter-rater Reliability for the 2009 Appropriate Use Criteria for Radionuclide Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Siqin; Rabbani, LeRoy E.; Kelly, Christopher R.; Kelly, Maureen R.; Lewis, Matthew; Paz, Yehuda; Peck, Clara L.; Rao, Shaline; Bokhari, Sabahat; Weiner, Shepard D.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Background We sought to determine inter-rater reliability of the 2009 Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for radionuclide imaging (RNI) and whether physicians at various levels of training can effectively identify nuclear stress tests with inappropriate indications. Methods and Results Four hundred patients were randomly selected from a consecutive cohort of patients undergoing nuclear stress testing at an academic medical center. Raters with different levels of training (including cardiology attending physicians, cardiology fellows, internal medicine hospitalists, and internal medicine interns) classified individual nuclear stress tests using the 2009 AUC. Consensus classification by two cardiologists was considered the operational gold standard, and sensitivity and specificity of individual raters for identifying inappropriate tests was calculated. Inter-rater reliability of the AUC was assessed using Cohen’s kappa statistics for pairs of different raters. The mean age of patients was 61.5 years; 214 (54%) were female. The cardiologists rated 256 (64%) of 400 NSTs as appropriate, 68 (18%) as uncertain, 55 (14%) as inappropriate; 21 (5%) tests were unable to be classified. Inter-rater reliability for non-cardiologist raters was modest (unweighted Cohen’s kappa, 0.51, 95% confidence interval, 0.45 to 0.55). Sensitivity of individual raters for identifying inappropriate tests ranged from 47% to 82%, while specificity ranged from 85% to 97%. Conclusions Inter-rater reliability for the 2009 AUC for RNI is modest, and there is considerable variation in the ability of raters at different levels of training to identify inappropriate tests. PMID:25563660

  13. Accelerated phase chronic myeloid leukemia: evaluation of clinical criteria as predictors of survival, major cytogenetic response and progression to blast phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Fiorini Furtado

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Published criteria defining the accelerated phase in chronic myeloid leukemia are heterogeneous and little is known about predictors of poor outcome.METHODS: This is a retrospective study of 139 subjects in the accelerated phase of chronic myeloid leukemia treated with imatinib at a single center in Brazil. The objective was to identify risk factors for survival, major cytogenetic response and progression to blast phase in this population. The factors analyzed were: blasts 10-29%, basophils ≥ 20%, platelets > 1 × 106/µL or 1 × 105/µL in the peripheral blood, as well as clonal evolution, splenomegaly, hemoglobin 12 months (p-value = 0.030.CONCLUSION: These data indicate that patients with the above risk factors have a worse prognosis. This information can guide the therapy to be used.

  14. Image-Guided Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases: Is There a Dose Response Relationship?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vautravers-Dewas, Claire; Dewas, Sylvain; Bonodeau, Francois; Adenis, Antoine; Lacornerie, Thomas; Penel, Nicolas; Lartigau, Eric; Mirabel, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome, tolerance, and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy, using image-guided robotic radiation delivery, for the treatment of patients with unresectable liver metastases. Methods and Material: Patients were treated with real-time respiratory tracking between July 2007 and April 2009. Their records were retrospectively reviewed. Metastases from colorectal carcinoma and other primaries were not necessarily confined to liver. Toxicity was evaluated using National Cancer Institute Common Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Forty-two patients with 62 metastases were treated with two dose levels of 40 Gy in four Dose per Fraction (23) and 45 Gy in three Dose per Fraction (13). Median follow-up was 14.3 months (range, 3-23 months). Actuarial local control for 1 and 2 years was 90% and 86%, respectively. At last follow-up, 41 (66%) complete responses and eight (13%) partial responses were observed. Five lesions were stable. Nine lesions (13%) were locally progressed. Overall survival was 94% at 1 year and 48% at 2 years. The most common toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 nausea. One patient experienced Grade 3 epidermitis. The dose level did not significantly contribute to the outcome, toxicity, or survival. Conclusion: Image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy is feasible, safe, and effective, with encouraging local control. It provides a strong alternative for patients who cannot undergo surgery.

  15. Effects of oxycodone on brain responses to emotional images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Margaret C; Fitzgerald, Daniel A; Angstadt, Michael; Rabinak, Christine A; de Wit, Harriet; Phan, K Luan

    2014-11-01

    Evidence from animal and human studies suggests that opiate drugs decrease emotional responses to negative stimuli and increase responses to positive stimuli. Such emotional effects may motivate misuse of oxycodone (OXY), a widely abused opiate. Yet, we know little about how OXY affects neural circuits underlying emotional processing in humans. We examined effects of OXY on brain activity during presentation of positive and negative visual emotional stimuli. We predicted that OXY would decrease amygdala activity to negative stimuli and increase ventral striatum (VS) activity to positive stimuli. Secondarily, we examined the effects of OXY on other emotional network regions on an exploratory basis. In a three-session study, healthy adults (N = 17) received placebo, 10 and 20 mg OXY under counterbalanced, double-blind conditions. At each session, participants completed subjective and cardiovascular measures and underwent functional MRI (fMRI) scanning while completing two emotional response tasks. Our emotional tasks reliably activated emotional network areas. OXY produced subjective effects but did not alter either behavioral responses to emotional stimuli or activity in our primary areas of interest. OXY did decrease right medial orbitofrontal cortex (MOFC) responses to happy faces. Contrary to our expectations, OXY did not affect behavioral or neural responses to emotional stimuli in our primary areas of interest. Further, the effects of OXY in the MOFC would be more consistent with a decrease in value for happy faces. This may indicate that healthy adults do not receive emotional benefits from opiates, or the pharmacological actions of OXY differ from other opiates.

  16. Cut-Offs and Response Criteria for the Hospital Universitario La Princesa Index (HUPI and Their Comparison to Widely-Used Indices of Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidoro González-Álvaro

    Full Text Available To estimate cut-off points and to establish response criteria for the Hospital Universitario La Princesa Index (HUPI in patients with chronic polyarthritis.Two cohorts, one of early arthritis (Princesa Early Arthritis Register Longitudinal [PEARL] study and other of long-term rheumatoid arthritis (Estudio de la Morbilidad y Expresión Clínica de la Artritis Reumatoide [EMECAR] including altogether 1200 patients were used to determine cut-off values for remission, and for low, moderate and high activity through receiver operating curve (ROC analysis. The areas under ROC (AUC were compared to those of validated indexes (SDAI, CDAI, DAS28. ROC analysis was also applied to establish minimal and relevant clinical improvement for HUPI.The best cut-off points for HUPI are 2, 5 and 9, classifying RA activity as remission if ≤2, low disease activity if >2 and ≤5, moderate if >5 and <9 and high if ≥9. HUPI's AUC to discriminate between low-moderate activity was 0.909 and between moderate-high activity 0.887. DAS28's AUCs were 0.887 and 0.846, respectively; both indices had higher accuracy than SDAI (AUCs: 0.832 and 0.756 and CDAI (AUCs: 0.789 and 0.728. HUPI discriminates remission better than DAS28-ESR in early arthritis, but similarly to SDAI. The HUPI cut-off for minimal clinical improvement was established at 2 and for relevant clinical improvement at 4. Response criteria were established based on these cut-off values.The cut-offs proposed for HUPI perform adequately in patients with either early or long term arthritis.

  17. Cut-Offs and Response Criteria for the Hospital Universitario La Princesa Index (HUPI) and Their Comparison to Widely-Used Indices of Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Castrejón, Isabel; Ortiz, Ana M; Toledano, Esther; Castañeda, Santos; García-Vadillo, Alberto; Carmona, Loreto

    2016-01-01

    To estimate cut-off points and to establish response criteria for the Hospital Universitario La Princesa Index (HUPI) in patients with chronic polyarthritis. Two cohorts, one of early arthritis (Princesa Early Arthritis Register Longitudinal [PEARL] study) and other of long-term rheumatoid arthritis (Estudio de la Morbilidad y Expresión Clínica de la Artritis Reumatoide [EMECAR]) including altogether 1200 patients were used to determine cut-off values for remission, and for low, moderate and high activity through receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. The areas under ROC (AUC) were compared to those of validated indexes (SDAI, CDAI, DAS28). ROC analysis was also applied to establish minimal and relevant clinical improvement for HUPI. The best cut-off points for HUPI are 2, 5 and 9, classifying RA activity as remission if ≤2, low disease activity if >2 and ≤5), moderate if >5 and <9 and high if ≥9. HUPI's AUC to discriminate between low-moderate activity was 0.909 and between moderate-high activity 0.887. DAS28's AUCs were 0.887 and 0.846, respectively; both indices had higher accuracy than SDAI (AUCs: 0.832 and 0.756) and CDAI (AUCs: 0.789 and 0.728). HUPI discriminates remission better than DAS28-ESR in early arthritis, but similarly to SDAI. The HUPI cut-off for minimal clinical improvement was established at 2 and for relevant clinical improvement at 4. Response criteria were established based on these cut-off values. The cut-offs proposed for HUPI perform adequately in patients with either early or long term arthritis.

  18. Imaging the inflammatory response to acute myocardial infarction in man using indium-111-labeled autologous platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, R.A.; Thakur, M.L.; Berger, H.J.; Wackers, F.J.T.; Gottschalk, A.; Zaret, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of imaging the inflammatory response to acute transmural myocardial infarction in man using indium-111 ( 111 In)-labeled autologous leukocytes was assessed in 36 patients. Indium-111 leukocytes were injected i.v. 18 to 112 hs after the onset of chest pain. Cardiac imaging was performed 24 hs later with a mobile gamma camera. Twenty-one patients had positive images and 15 had negative images. The percent of positive images increased as the interval between infarction and 111 In-leukocyte injection shortened; all patients injected within 24 hs of infarction had positive images. Patients with positive images were injected with 111 In leukocytes earlier after infarction and were younger than those with negative images. Several other parameters that could possibly have affected the imaging results were examined and were not significantly different in patients with positive and negative images. These included peak serum creatine kinase, location of infarction, incidence of pericarditis, use of antiinflammatory drugs or membrane-active antiarrhythmic drugs, peripheral leukocyte count, and cell labeling efficiency. The function of the labeled cells was similar in patients with positive and negative images. Six patients with acute infarction serving as controls and given free 111 In-oxine and six patients with stable coronary artery disease given 111 In-leukocytes all had negative cardiac images

  19. Metabolic imaging of tumor for diagnosis and response for therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaynova, Elena; Shirmanova, Marina; Lukina, Maria; Dudenkova, Varvara; Ignatova, Nadezgda; Elagin, Vadim; Shlivko, Irena; Scheslavsky, Vladislav; Orlinskay, Natalia

    2018-02-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging is a non-invasive imaging technique, based on the study of fluorescence decay times of naturally occurring fluorescent molecules, enabling a noninvasive investigation of the biological tissue with subcellular resolution. Cancer exhibits altered cellular metabolism, which affects the autofluorescence of metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD. In this study features of tumor metabolism in different systems of organization (from cell culture to patient lesion) was showed. The observed differences in the relative contributions of free NAD(P)H and FAD testify to an increased a glycolytic metabolism in cancer cells compare to fibroblasts. In 3D spheroids, the cells of the proliferating zone had greater a1 and lower tm values than the cells of the quiescent zone, which likely is a consequence of their higher glycolytic rate. During the growth of colorectal cancer in the experimental mouse model, the contribution of the free component of NAD(P)H was increased. Dysplastic nevus and melanoma is characterized by raised contribution of free NADH compare to healthy skin. Therefore, melanoma cells had very short value of τ1.

  20. Use of intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted MR imaging for assessment of treatment response to invasive fungal infection in the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Chenggong; Xiong, Wei; Wu, Yuankui; Li, Caixia; Xu, Yikai [Southern Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging Center, Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Jun; Wei, Qi; Feng, Ru; Liu, Qifa [Southern Medical University, Department of Hematology, Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, New Territories, Hon Kong (China)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) -derived parameters and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) could act as imaging biomarkers for predicting antifungal treatment response. Forty-six consecutive patients (mean age, 33.9 ± 13.0 y) with newly diagnosed invasive fungal infection (IFI) in the lung according to EORTC/MSG criteria were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3.0 T using 11 b values (0-1000 sec/mm{sup 2}). ADC, pseudodiffusion coefficient D*, perfusion fraction f, and the diffusion coefficient D were compared between patients with favourable (n=32) and unfavourable response (n=14). f values were significantly lower in the unfavourable response group (12.6%±4.4%) than in the favourable response group (30.2%±8.6%) (Z=4.989, P<0.001). However, the ADC, D, and D* were not significantly different between the two groups (P>0.05). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed f to be a significant predictor for differentiation, with a sensitivity of 93.8% and a specificity of 92.9%. IVIM-MRI is potentially useful in the prediction of antifungal treatment response to patients with IFI in the lung. Our results indicate that a low perfusion fraction f may be a noninvasive imaging biomarker for unfavourable response. (orig.)

  1. Prognostic Value of FDG-PET, Based on the Revised Response Criteria, in Patients with Malignant Lymphoma: A Comparison with CT/MRI Evaluations, Based on the International Working Group/Cotswolds Meeting Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isohashi, Kayako; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Kato, Hiroki; Fukushima, Kentaro; Maeda, Tetsuo; Watabe, Tadashi; Shimosegawa, Eku; Kanakura, Yuzuru; Hatazawa, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Post-treatment evaluations by CT/MRI (based on the International Working Group/Cotswolds meeting guidelines) and PET (based on Revised Response Criteria), were examined in terms of progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with malignant lymphoma (ML). 79 patients, undergoing CT/MRI for the examination of suspected lesions and whole-body PET/CT before and after therapy, were included in the study during April 2007-January 2013. The relationship between post-treatment evaluations (CT/MRI and PET) and PFS during the follow-up period was examined, using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The patients were grouped according to the histological type into Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and other histological types. The association between post-treatment evaluations (PET or PET combined with CT/MRI) and PFS was examined separately. Moreover, the relationship between disease recurrence and serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor, lactic dehydrogenase, and C-reactive protein levels was evaluated before and after the treatment. Patients with incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET had a significantly shorter PFS, compared to patients with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET and those exhibiting incomplete remission on CT/MRI and complete remission on PET (P<0.001). Post-treatment PET evaluations were strongly correlated with patient outcomes in cases with HL or DLBCL (P<0.01) and other histological types (P<0.001). In patients with HL or DLBCL, incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET was associated with a significantly shorter PFS, compared to patients with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET (P<0.05) and those showing incomplete remission on CT/MRI and complete remission on PET (P<0.01). In patients with other histological types, incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET was associated with a significantly shorter PFS, compared to cases with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET (P<0.001). None of the serum parameters

  2. Lost criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Egorovich Manoylov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians have been found to be inadequately aware of the structure of the causes of headache, vertigo, and their clinical importance in patients with essential hypertension. Incorrect ideas lead to the unfounded application of diagnostic techniques for imaging the great arteries of the head and to extremely simplified approaches to treating cerebrovascular diseases as short-term courses of therapy with vasoactive and metabolic agents.

  3. Evaluation of a HDR image sensor with logarithmic response for mobile video-based applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tektonidis, Marco; Pietrzak, Mateusz; Monnin, David

    2017-10-01

    The performance of mobile video-based applications using conventional LDR (Low Dynamic Range) image sensors highly depends on the illumination conditions. As an alternative, HDR (High Dynamic Range) image sensors with logarithmic response are capable to acquire illumination-invariant HDR images in a single shot. We have implemented a complete image processing framework for a HDR sensor, including preprocessing methods (nonuniformity correction (NUC), cross-talk correction (CTC), and demosaicing) as well as tone mapping (TM). We have evaluated the HDR sensor for video-based applications w.r.t. the display of images and w.r.t. image analysis techniques. Regarding the display we have investigated the image intensity statistics over time, and regarding image analysis we assessed the number of feature correspondences between consecutive frames of temporal image sequences. For the evaluation we used HDR image data recorded from a vehicle on outdoor or combined outdoor/indoor itineraries, and we performed a comparison with corresponding conventional LDR image data.

  4. Near Real-Time Georeference of Umanned Aerial Vehicle Images for Post-Earthquake Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Wang, X.; Dou, A.; Yuan, X.; Ding, L.; Ding, X.

    2018-04-01

    The rapid collection of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) remote sensing images plays an important role in the fast submitting disaster information and the monitored serious damaged objects after the earthquake. However, for hundreds of UAV images collected in one flight sortie, the traditional data processing methods are image stitching and three-dimensional reconstruction, which take one to several hours, and affect the speed of disaster response. If the manual searching method is employed, we will spend much more time to select the images and the find images do not have spatial reference. Therefore, a near-real-time rapid georeference method for UAV remote sensing disaster data is proposed in this paper. The UAV images are achieved georeference combined with the position and attitude data collected by UAV flight control system, and the georeferenced data is organized by means of world file which is developed by ESRI. The C # language is adopted to compile the UAV images rapid georeference software, combined with Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). The result shows that it can realize rapid georeference of remote sensing disaster images for up to one thousand UAV images within one minute, and meets the demand of rapid disaster response, which is of great value in disaster emergency application.

  5. NEAR REAL-TIME GEOREFERENCE OF UMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE IMAGES FOR POST-EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The rapid collection of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV remote sensing images plays an important role in the fast submitting disaster information and the monitored serious damaged objects after the earthquake. However, for hundreds of UAV images collected in one flight sortie, the traditional data processing methods are image stitching and three-dimensional reconstruction, which take one to several hours, and affect the speed of disaster response. If the manual searching method is employed, we will spend much more time to select the images and the find images do not have spatial reference. Therefore, a near-real-time rapid georeference method for UAV remote sensing disaster data is proposed in this paper. The UAV images are achieved georeference combined with the position and attitude data collected by UAV flight control system, and the georeferenced data is organized by means of world file which is developed by ESRI. The C # language is adopted to compile the UAV images rapid georeference software, combined with Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL. The result shows that it can realize rapid georeference of remote sensing disaster images for up to one thousand UAV images within one minute, and meets the demand of rapid disaster response, which is of great value in disaster emergency application.

  6. Study of fish response using particle image velocimetry and high-speed, high-resolution imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gruensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Fish swimming has fascinated both engineers and fish biologists for decades. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging are recently developed analysis tools that can help engineers and biologists better understand how fish respond to turbulent environments. This report details studies to evaluate DPIV. The studies included a review of existing literature on DPIV, preliminary studies to test the feasibility of using DPIV conducted at our Flow Biology Laboratory in Richland, Washington September through December 2003, and applications of high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging with advanced motion analysis to investigations of fish injury mechanisms in turbulent shear flows and bead trajectories in laboratory physical models. Several conclusions were drawn based on these studies, which are summarized as recommendations for proposed research at the end of this report.

  7. Criteria for demand response systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lampropoulos, I.; Kling, W.L.; Bosch, van den P.P.J.; Ribeiro, P.F.; Berg, van den J.

    2013-01-01

    The topic of demand side management is currently becoming more important than ever, in parallel with the further deregulation of the electricity sector, and the increasing integration of renewable energy sources. A historical review of automation integration in power system control assists in

  8. Differences in Normal Tissue Response in the Esophagus Between Proton and Photon Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using In Vivo Imaging Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, Joshua S; Yang, Jinzhong; Mohan, Radhe; Titt, Uwe; Mirkovic, Dragan; Stingo, Francesco; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel R; Martel, Mary K; Briere, Tina M; Court, Laurence E

    2017-11-15

    To determine whether there exists any significant difference in normal tissue toxicity between intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton therapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. A total of 134 study patients (n=49 treated with proton therapy, n=85 with IMRT) treated in a randomized trial had a previously validated esophageal toxicity imaging biomarker, esophageal expansion, quantified during radiation therapy, as well as esophagitis grade (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0), on a weekly basis during treatment. Differences between the 2 modalities were statically analyzed using the imaging biomarker metric value (Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance), as well as the incidence and severity of esophagitis grade (χ 2 and Fisher exact tests, respectively). The dose-response of the imaging biomarker was also compared between modalities using esophageal equivalent uniform dose, as well as delivered dose to an isotropic esophageal subvolume. No statistically significant difference in the distribution of esophagitis grade, the incidence of grade ≥3 esophagitis (15 and 11 patients treated with IMRT and proton therapy, respectively), or the esophageal expansion imaging biomarker between cohorts (P>.05) was found. The distribution of imaging biomarker metric values had similar distributions between treatment arms, despite a slightly higher dose volume in the proton arm (P>.05). Imaging biomarker dose-response was similar between modalities for dose quantified as esophageal equivalent uniform dose and delivered esophageal subvolume dose. Regardless of treatment modality, there was high variability in imaging biomarker response, as well as esophagitis grade, for similar esophageal doses between patients. There was no significant difference in esophageal toxicity from either proton- or photon-based radiation therapy as quantified by esophagitis grade or the esophageal expansion imaging biomarker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  9. Multi-modality imaging of tumor phenotype and response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyflot, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    Imaging and radiation oncology have historically been closely linked. However, the vast majority of techniques used in the clinic involve anatomical imaging. Biological imaging offers the potential for innovation in the areas of cancer diagnosis and staging, radiotherapy target definition, and treatment response assessment. Some relevant imaging techniques are FDG PET (for imaging cellular metabolism), FLT PET (proliferation), CuATSM PET (hypoxia), and contrast-enhanced CT (vasculature and perfusion). Here, a technique for quantitative spatial correlation of tumor phenotype is presented for FDG PET, FLT PET, and CuATSM PET images. Additionally, multimodality imaging of treatment response with FLT PET, CuATSM, and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is presented, in a trial of patients receiving an antiangiogenic agent (Avastin) combined with cisplatin and radiotherapy. Results are also presented for translational applications in animal models, including quantitative assessment of proliferative response to cetuximab with FLT PET and quantification of vascular volume with a blood-pool contrast agent (Fenestra). These techniques have clear applications to radiobiological research and optimized treatment strategies, and may eventually be used for personalized therapy for patients.

  10. Research of the system response of neutron double scatter imaging for MLEM reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M., E-mail: wyj2013@163.com [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi’an 710024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation-Simulation and Effect, Xi’an 710024 (China); Peng, B.D.; Sheng, L.; Li, K.N.; Zhang, X.P.; Li, Y.; Li, B.K.; Yuan, Y.; Wang, P.W.; Zhang, X.D.; Li, C.H. [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi’an 710024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation-Simulation and Effect, Xi’an 710024 (China)

    2015-03-01

    A Maximum Likelihood image reconstruction technique has been applied to neutron scatter imaging. The response function of the imaging system can be obtained by Monte Carlo simulation, which is very time-consuming if the number of image pixels and particles is large. In this work, to improve time efficiency, an analytical approach based on the probability of neutron interaction and transport in the detector is developed to calculate the system response function. The response function was applied to calculate the relative efficiency of the neutron scatter imaging system as a function of the incident neutron energy. The calculated results agreed with simulations by the MCNP5 software. Then the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction method with the system response function was used to reconstruct data simulated by Monte Carlo method. The results showed that there was good consistency between the reconstruction position and true position. Compared with back-projection reconstruction, the improvement in image quality was obvious, and the locations could be discerned easily for multiple radiation point sources.

  11. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer: correlation between the baseline MR imaging findings and responses to therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Takayoshi; Yuen, Sachiko; Kasami, Masako

    2010-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of breast cancer before neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and to compare findings of chemosensitive breast cancer with those of chemoresistant breast cancer. The MR imaging findings before NAC in 120 women undergoing NAC were reviewed. The MR imaging findings were compared with the pathological findings and responses. A complete response (pCR) and marked response were achieved in 12 and 35% of 120 breast cancers in 120 women respectively. Breast cancers with a pCR or marked response were classified as chemosensitive breast cancer. The remaining 64 breast cancers (53%) were classified as chemoresistant breast cancer. Large tumour size, a lesion without mass effect, and very high intratumoural signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images were significantly associated with chemoresistant breast cancer. Lesions with mass effect and washout enhancement pattern were significantly associated with chemosensitive breast cancer. Areas with very high intratumoural signal intensity on T2-weighted images corresponded pathologically to areas of intratumoural necrosis. Several MR imaging features of breast cancer before NAC can help predict the efficacy of NAC. (orig.)

  12. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer: correlation between the baseline MR imaging findings and responses to therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, Takayoshi; Yuen, Sachiko [Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Breast Imaging and Breast Intervention Section, Naga-izumi, Shizuoka (Japan); Kasami, Masako [Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Pathology, Naga-izumi, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of breast cancer before neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and to compare findings of chemosensitive breast cancer with those of chemoresistant breast cancer. The MR imaging findings before NAC in 120 women undergoing NAC were reviewed. The MR imaging findings were compared with the pathological findings and responses. A complete response (pCR) and marked response were achieved in 12 and 35% of 120 breast cancers in 120 women respectively. Breast cancers with a pCR or marked response were classified as chemosensitive breast cancer. The remaining 64 breast cancers (53%) were classified as chemoresistant breast cancer. Large tumour size, a lesion without mass effect, and very high intratumoural signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images were significantly associated with chemoresistant breast cancer. Lesions with mass effect and washout enhancement pattern were significantly associated with chemosensitive breast cancer. Areas with very high intratumoural signal intensity on T2-weighted images corresponded pathologically to areas of intratumoural necrosis. Several MR imaging features of breast cancer before NAC can help predict the efficacy of NAC. (orig.)

  13. Correction method and software for image distortion and nonuniform response in charge-coupled device-based x-ray detectors utilizing x-ray image intensifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kazuki; Kamikubo, Hironari; Yagi, Naoto; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    An on-site method of correcting the image distortion and nonuniform response of a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based X-ray detector was developed using the response of the imaging plate as a reference. The CCD-based X-ray detector consists of a beryllium-windowed X-ray image intensifier (Be-XRII) and a CCD as the image sensor. An image distortion of 29% was improved to less than 1% after the correction. In the correction of nonuniform response due to image distortion, subpixel approximation was performed for the redistribution of pixel values. The optimal number of subpixels was also discussed. In an experiment with polystyrene (PS) latex, it was verified that the correction of both image distortion and nonuniform response worked properly. The correction for the 'contrast reduction' problem was also demonstrated for an isotropic X-ray scattering pattern from the PS latex. (author)

  14. Nonlinear ultrasonic imaging method for closed cracks using subtraction of responses at different external loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Yoshikazu; Horinouchi, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Shintaku, Yohei; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2011-08-01

    To improve the selectivity of closed cracks for objects other than cracks in ultrasonic imaging, we propose an extension of a novel imaging method, namely, subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation (SPACE) as well as another approach using the subtraction of responses at different external loads. By applying external static or dynamic loads to closed cracks, the contact state in the cracks varies, resulting in an intensity change of responses at cracks. In contrast, objects other than cracks are independent of external load. Therefore, only cracks can be extracted by subtracting responses at different loads. In this study, we performed fundamental experiments on a closed fatigue crack formed in an aluminum alloy compact tension (CT) specimen using the proposed method. We examined the static load dependence of SPACE images and the dynamic load dependence of linear phased array (PA) images by simulating the external loads with a servohydraulic fatigue testing machine. By subtracting the images at different external loads, we show that this method is useful in extracting only the intensity change of responses related to closed cracks, while canceling the responses of objects other than cracks. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Disparity between General Symptom Relief and Remission Criteria in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS): A Post-treatment Bifactor Item Response Theory Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ariana E; Reise, Steven P; Marder, Stephen R; Mansolf, Maxwell; Han, Carol; Bilder, Robert M

    2017-12-01

    Objective: Total scale scores derived by summing ratings from the 30-item PANSS are commonly used in clinical trial research to measure overall symptom severity, and percentage reductions in the total scores are sometimes used to document the efficacy of treatment. Acknowledging that some patients may have substantial changes in PANSS total scores but still be sufficiently symptomatic to warrant diagnosis, ratings on a subset of 8 items, referred to here as the "Remission set," are sometimes used to determine if patients' symptoms no longer satisfy diagnostic criteria. An unanswered question remains: is the goal of treatment better conceptualized as reduction in overall symptom severity, or reduction in symptoms below the threshold for diagnosis? We evaluated the psychometric properties of PANSS total scores, to assess whether having low symptom severity post-treatment is equivalent to attaining Remission. Design: We applied a bifactor item response theory (IRT) model to post-treatment PANSS ratings of 3,647 subjects diagnosed with schizophrenia assessed at the termination of 11 clinical trials. The bifactor model specified one general dimension to reflect overall symptom severity, and five domain-specific dimensions. We assessed how PANSS item discrimination and information parameters varied across the range of overall symptom severity (θ), with a special focus on low levels of symptoms (i.e., θexpected PANSS item score of 1.83, a rating between "Absent" and "Minimal" for a PANSS symptom. Results: The application of the bifactor IRT model revealed: (1) 88% of total score variation was attributable to variation in general symptom severity, and only 8% reflected secondary domain factors. This implies that a general factor may provide a good indicator of symptom severity, and that interpretation is not overly complicated by multidimensionality; (2) Post-treatment, 534 individuals (about 15% of the whole sample) scored in the "Relief" range of general symptom

  16. CMOS image sensor-based implantable glucose sensor using glucose-responsive fluorescent hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Takashi; Takahashi, Masayuki; Uejima, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Keita; Kawamura, Toshikazu; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Okitsu, Teru; Takeuchi, Shoji; Ohta, Jun

    2014-11-01

    A CMOS image sensor-based implantable glucose sensor based on an optical-sensing scheme is proposed and experimentally verified. A glucose-responsive fluorescent hydrogel is used as the mediator in the measurement scheme. The wired implantable glucose sensor was realized by integrating a CMOS image sensor, hydrogel, UV light emitting diodes, and an optical filter on a flexible polyimide substrate. Feasibility of the glucose sensor was verified by both in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  17. ROLE OF IMAGE IN MARKETING PERFORMANCE ODEL SUPPORTED BY MARKETING COMMUNICATION AND COMPANY SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Soeryanto Soegoto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBanking industries have not been effective yet in implementing marketing communication and company social responsibility programs. The establishment of image has not been done effectively yet; accordingly marketing performance cannot be implemented as it is expected. This research was done in the banking industries at Bandung City with sample as much as 42 banking industries drawn using a random sampling method. Thaanalysis procedure used Structural Equation Modeling based on Partial Least Square. This study generates anew model different with the previous researches where marketing communication and company social respon-sibility programs do not affect directly on the banking industries’ marketing performance. Nevertheless the image affect the marketing performance moderately. In conclusion, banking industries’ marketing perfor-mance can be maximal when the marketing communication is implemented effectively and the company social responsibility is implemented conducively in order to shape positive image.

  18. Assessing paedophilia based on the haemodynamic brain response to face images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponseti, Jorge; Granert, Oliver; Van Eimeren, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    that human face processing is tuned to sexual age preferences. This observation prompted us to test whether paedophilia can be inferred based on the haemodynamic brain responses to adult and child faces. METHODS: Twenty-four men sexually attracted to prepubescent boys or girls (paedophiles) and 32 men......OBJECTIVES: Objective assessment of sexual preferences may be of relevance in the treatment and prognosis of child sexual offenders. Previous research has indicated that this can be achieved by pattern classification of brain responses to sexual child and adult images. Our recent research showed...... sexually attracted to men or women (teleiophiles) were exposed to images of child and adult, male and female faces during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session. RESULTS: A cross-validated, automatic pattern classification algorithm of brain responses to facial stimuli yielded four...

  19. Imaging response is highly predictive of survival of malignant glioma patients treated with standard or hyperfractionated RT and carmustine in RTOG 9006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curran, Walter J.; Scott, Charles B.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Scarantino, Charles; Urtasun, Raul; Movsas, Benjamin; Jones, Christopher; Simpson, Joseph; Fischbach, A. Jennifer; Petito, Carol; Nelson, James

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: Limited information is available correlating response to initial therapy and survival outcome among malignant glioma patients. This analysis was conducted to determine the response rate of malignant glioma patients to either standard (STN) or hyperfractionated (HFX) RT and carmustine and to correlate the tumor response status with survival. Patients and Methods: From (11(90)) to (3(94)), 712 newly diagnosed malignant glioma patients were registered on RTOG 9006 and randomized between hyperfractionated RT of 72.0 Gy in 1.2 Gy twice-daily fractions and 60.0 Gy in 2.0 Gy daily fractions. All patients received 80 mg/m-2 of carmustine D 1-3 q 8 wks. As reported in the 1996 Proceedings of the Amer Soc Clin Oncol (Abstr no. 280), there was no survival benefit observed for the HFX regimen. 529 of the 686 eligible patients had pre-operative, post-operative, and post-RT contrast-enhanced MR and/or CT scans available for central review of tumor and peritumoral edema measurements. Response status was judged by applying standard response criteria to a comparison of tumor measurements on follow-up and post-operative films. Results: Of the 529 patients evaluated for imaging response, the complete and partial response rates were 14% and 20%, respectively. A significant correlation between response and survival was observed (P<0.0001). Variables which predicted for a better tumor response were anaplastic astrocytoma vs glioblastoma multiforme histology, better performance status, more extensive resection, and a more favorable Recursive Partitioning and Amalgamation class assignment (JNCI 85:704-710, 1993). Conclusion: The objective response rate for malignant glioma patients to RTOG 9006 therapy was 34%, and survival outcome is strongly correlated with tumor response status. These observations justify the testing of aggressive salvage strategies for patients without imaging evidence of response following initial therapy

  20. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging monitoring of acute tumor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranney, D.F.; Cohen, J.M.; Antich, P.P.; Endman, W.A.; Kulkarni, P.; Weinreb, J.C.; Giovanella, B.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment responses of human malignant melanomas were monitored at millimeter resolution in athymic mice by injecting a new polymeric contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-dextran (0.1 mmol Gd/kg, intravenously). Proton MR imaging (0.35 T, spin-echo, repetition time = 0.5 second, echo time = 50 msec) was performed 30 hours after administering diphtheria toxin. Pre-contrast medium images revealed only homogeneous intermediate-intensity tumor masses. Post-contrast medium images of untreated (viable) tumors demonstrated 32% enhancement throughout the entire mass. Post-contrast medium images of toxin-treated tumors revealed marked enhancement (65%) of the histologically viable outer rims, lesser enhancement (38%) of heavily damaged subregions, and no enhancement of dead tumor. These acute, contrast medium-enhanced MR images accurately identified tumor subregions that survived for longer than one week

  1. MR Imaging in Monitoring and Predicting Treatment Response in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Río, Jordi; Auger, Cristina; Rovira, Àlex

    2017-05-01

    MR imaging is the most sensitive tool for identifying lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). MR imaging has also acquired an essential role in the detection of complications arising from these treatments and in the assessment and prediction of efficacy. In the future, other radiological measures that have shown prognostic value may be incorporated within the models for predicting treatment response. This article examines the role of MR imaging as a prognostic tool in patients with MS and the recommendations that have been proposed in recent years to monitor patients who are treated with disease-modifying drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Viewing sexual images is associated with reduced physiological arousal response to gambling loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Ming; Hsu, Ming

    2018-01-01

    Erotic imagery is one highly salient emotional signal that exists everywhere in daily life. The impact of sexual stimuli on human decision-making, however, has rarely been investigated. This study examines the impact of sexual stimuli on financial decision-making under risk. In each trial, either a sexual or neutral image was presented in a picture categorization task before a gambling task. Thirty-four men made gambling decisions while their physiological arousal, measured by skin conductance responses (SCRs), was recorded. Behaviorally, the proportion of gambling decisions did not differ between the sexual and neutral image trials. Physiologically, participants had smaller arousal differences, measured in micro-siemen per dollar, between losses and gains in the sexual rather than in the neutral image trials. Moreover, participants' SCRs to losses relative to gains predicted the proportion of gambling decisions in the neutral image trials but not in the sexual image trials. The results were consistent with the hypothesis that the presence of emotionally salient sexual images reduces attentional and arousal-related responses to gambling losses. Our results are consistent with the theory of loss attention involving increased cognitive investment in losses compared to gains. The findings also have potential practical implications for our understanding of the specific roles of sexual images in human financial decision making in everyday life, such as gambling behaviors in the casino.

  3. Gut Health of Pigs: Challenge Models and Response Criteria with a Critical Analysis of the Effectiveness of Selected Feed Additives - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewole, D I; Kim, I H; Nyachoti, C M

    2016-07-01

    The gut is the largest organ that helps with the immune function. Gut health, especially in young pigs has a significant benefit to health and performance. In an attempt to maintain and enhance intestinal health in pigs and improve productivity in the absence of in-feed antibiotics, researchers have evaluated a wide range of feed additives. Some of these additives such as zinc oxide, copper sulphate, egg yolk antibodies, mannan-oligosaccharides and spray dried porcine plasma and their effectiveness are discussed in this review. One approach to evaluate the effectiveness of these additives in vivo is to use an appropriate disease challenge model. Over the years, researchers have used a number of challenge models which include the use of specific strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, bacteria lipopolysaccharide challenge, oral challenge with Salmonella enteric serotype Typhimurium, sanitation challenge, and Lawsonia intercellularis challenge. These challenge models together with the criteria used to evaluate the responses of the animals to them are also discussed in this review.

  4. Gut Health of Pigs: Challenge Models and Response Criteria with a Critical Analysis of the Effectiveness of Selected Feed Additives — A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewole, D. I.; Kim, I. H.; Nyachoti, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The gut is the largest organ that helps with the immune function. Gut health, especially in young pigs has a significant benefit to health and performance. In an attempt to maintain and enhance intestinal health in pigs and improve productivity in the absence of in-feed antibiotics, researchers have evaluated a wide range of feed additives. Some of these additives such as zinc oxide, copper sulphate, egg yolk antibodies, mannan-oligosaccharides and spray dried porcine plasma and their effectiveness are discussed in this review. One approach to evaluate the effectiveness of these additives in vivo is to use an appropriate disease challenge model. Over the years, researchers have used a number of challenge models which include the use of specific strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, bacteria lipopolysaccharide challenge, oral challenge with Salmonella enteric serotype Typhimurium, sanitation challenge, and Lawsonia intercellularis challenge. These challenge models together with the criteria used to evaluate the responses of the animals to them are also discussed in this review. PMID:26954144

  5. SU-E-J-04: A Data-Driven, Response-Based, Multi-Criteria Decision Support System for Personalized Lung Radiation Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y; McShan, D; Schipper, M; Matuszak, M; Ten Haken, R; Kong, F

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a decision support tool to predict a patient's potential overall survival (OS) and radiation induced toxicity (RIT) based on clinical factors and responses during the course of radiotherapy, and suggest appropriate radiation dose adjustments to improve therapeutic effect. Methods: Important relationships between a patient's basic information and their clinical features before and during the radiation treatment are identified from historical clinical data by using statistical learning and data mining approaches. During each treatment period, a data analysis (DA) module predicts radiotherapy features such as time to local progression (TTLP), time to distant metastases (TTDM), radiation toxicity to different organs, etc., under possible future treatment plans based on patient specifics or responses. An information fusion (IF) module estimates intervals for a patient's OS and the probabilities of RIT from a treatment plan by integrating the outcomes of module DA. A decision making (DM) module calculates “satisfaction” with the predicted radiation outcome based on trade-offs between OS and RIT, and finds the best treatment plan for the next time period via multi-criteria optimization. Results: Using physical and biological data from 130 lung cancer patients as our test bed, we were able to train and implement the 3 modules of our decision support tool. Examples demonstrate how it can help predict a new patient's potential OS and RIT with different radiation dose plans along with how these combinations change with dose, thus presenting a range of satisfaction/utility for use in individualized decision support. Conclusion: Although the decision support tool is currently developed from a small patient sample size, it shows the potential for the improvement of each patient's satisfaction in personalized radiation therapy. The radiation treatment outcome prediction and decision making model needs to be evaluated with more patients and demonstrated for

  6. SU-E-J-04: A Data-Driven, Response-Based, Multi-Criteria Decision Support System for Personalized Lung Radiation Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y; McShan, D; Schipper, M; Matuszak, M; Ten Haken, R [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kong, F [Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Georgia)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a decision support tool to predict a patient's potential overall survival (OS) and radiation induced toxicity (RIT) based on clinical factors and responses during the course of radiotherapy, and suggest appropriate radiation dose adjustments to improve therapeutic effect. Methods: Important relationships between a patient's basic information and their clinical features before and during the radiation treatment are identified from historical clinical data by using statistical learning and data mining approaches. During each treatment period, a data analysis (DA) module predicts radiotherapy features such as time to local progression (TTLP), time to distant metastases (TTDM), radiation toxicity to different organs, etc., under possible future treatment plans based on patient specifics or responses. An information fusion (IF) module estimates intervals for a patient's OS and the probabilities of RIT from a treatment plan by integrating the outcomes of module DA. A decision making (DM) module calculates “satisfaction” with the predicted radiation outcome based on trade-offs between OS and RIT, and finds the best treatment plan for the next time period via multi-criteria optimization. Results: Using physical and biological data from 130 lung cancer patients as our test bed, we were able to train and implement the 3 modules of our decision support tool. Examples demonstrate how it can help predict a new patient's potential OS and RIT with different radiation dose plans along with how these combinations change with dose, thus presenting a range of satisfaction/utility for use in individualized decision support. Conclusion: Although the decision support tool is currently developed from a small patient sample size, it shows the potential for the improvement of each patient's satisfaction in personalized radiation therapy. The radiation treatment outcome prediction and decision making model needs to be evaluated with more

  7. Statistics of Visual Responses to Image Object Stimuli from Primate AIT Neurons to DNN Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qiulei; Wang, Hong; Hu, Zhanyi

    2018-02-01

    Under the goal-driven paradigm, Yamins et al. ( 2014 ; Yamins & DiCarlo, 2016 ) have shown that by optimizing only the final eight-way categorization performance of a four-layer hierarchical network, not only can its top output layer quantitatively predict IT neuron responses but its penultimate layer can also automatically predict V4 neuron responses. Currently, deep neural networks (DNNs) in the field of computer vision have reached image object categorization performance comparable to that of human beings on ImageNet, a data set that contains 1.3 million training images of 1000 categories. We explore whether the DNN neurons (units in DNNs) possess image object representational statistics similar to monkey IT neurons, particularly when the network becomes deeper and the number of image categories becomes larger, using VGG19, a typical and widely used deep network of 19 layers in the computer vision field. Following Lehky, Kiani, Esteky, and Tanaka ( 2011 , 2014 ), where the response statistics of 674 IT neurons to 806 image stimuli are analyzed using three measures (kurtosis, Pareto tail index, and intrinsic dimensionality), we investigate the three issues in this letter using the same three measures: (1) the similarities and differences of the neural response statistics between VGG19 and primate IT cortex, (2) the variation trends of the response statistics of VGG19 neurons at different layers from low to high, and (3) the variation trends of the response statistics of VGG19 neurons when the numbers of stimuli and neurons increase. We find that the response statistics on both single-neuron selectivity and population sparseness of VGG19 neurons are fundamentally different from those of IT neurons in most cases; by increasing the number of neurons in different layers and the number of stimuli, the response statistics of neurons at different layers from low to high do not substantially change; and the estimated intrinsic dimensionality values at the low

  8. ACR appropriateness criteria jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Tasneem; Couto, Corey A; Rosen, Max P; Baker, Mark E; Blake, Michael A; Cash, Brooks D; Fidler, Jeff L; Greene, Frederick L; Hindman, Nicole M; Katz, Douglas S; Kaur, Harmeet; Miller, Frank H; Qayyum, Aliya; Small, William C; Sudakoff, Gary S; Yaghmai, Vahid; Yarmish, Gail M; Yee, Judy

    2013-06-01

    A fundamental consideration in the workup of a jaundiced patient is the pretest probability of mechanical obstruction. Ultrasound is the first-line modality to exclude biliary tract obstruction. When mechanical obstruction is present, additional imaging with CT or MRI can clarify etiology, define level of obstruction, stage disease, and guide intervention. When mechanical obstruction is absent, additional imaging can evaluate liver parenchyma for fat and iron deposition and help direct biopsy in cases where underlying parenchymal disease or mass is found. Imaging techniques are reviewed for the following clinical scenarios: (1) the patient with painful jaundice, (2) the patient with painless jaundice, and (3) the patient with a nonmechanical cause for jaundice. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. ACCF/ACR/SCCT/SCMR/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SIR 2006 appropriateness criteria for cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Quality Strategic Directions Committee Appropriateness Criteria Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Under the auspices of the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) together with key specialty and subspecialty societies, appropriateness reviews were conducted for 2 relatively new clinical cardiac imaging modalities, cardiac computed tomography (CCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. The reviews assessed the risks and benefits of the imaging tests for several indications or clinical scenarios and scored them based on a scale of 1 to 9, where the upper range (7 to 9) implies that the test is generally acceptable and is a reasonable approach, and the lower range (1 to 3) implies that the test is generally not acceptable and is not a reasonable approach. The mid-range (4 to 6) indicates an uncertain clinical scenario. The indications for these reviews were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as few clinical practice guidelines currently exist for these techniques. These indications were reviewed by an independent group of clinicians and modified by the Working Group, and then panelists rated the indications based on the ACCF Methodology for Evaluating the Appropriateness of Cardiovascular Imaging, which blends scientific evidence and practice experience. A modified Delphi technique was used to obtain first and second round ratings of clinical indications after the panelists were provided with a set of literature reviews, evidence tables, and seminal references. The final ratings were evenly distributed among the 3 categories of appropriateness for both CCT and CMR. Use of tests for structure and function and for diagnosis in symptomatic, intermediate coronary artery disease (CAD) risk patients was deemed appropriate, while repeat testing and general screening uses were viewed less favorably. It is anticipated that these results will have a significant impact on physician decision making and performance, reimbursement policy, and future research directions.

  10. Differential Neural Responses to Food Images in Women with Bulimia versus Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Samantha J.; O′Daly, Owen G.; Uher, Rudolf; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael; Williams, Steven C. R.; Schiöth, Helgi B.; Treasure, Janet; Campbell, Iain C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous fMRI studies show that women with eating disorders (ED) have differential neural activation to viewing food images. However, despite clinical differences in their responses to food, differential neural activation to thinking about eating food, between women with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) is not known. Methods We compare 50 women (8 with BN, 18 with AN and 24 age-matched healthy controls [HC]) while they view food images during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Results In response to food (vs non-food) images, women with BN showed greater neural activation in the visual cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right insular cortex and precentral gyrus, women with AN showed greater activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and right precuneus. HC women activated the cerebellum, right insular cortex, right medial temporal lobe and left caudate. Direct comparisons revealed that compared to HC, the BN group showed relative deactivation in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus/insula, and visual cortex, and compared to AN had relative deactivation in the parietal lobe and dorsal posterior cingulate cortex, but greater activation in the caudate, superior temporal gyrus, right insula and supplementary motor area. Conclusions Women with AN and BN activate top-down cognitive control in response to food images, yet women with BN have increased activation in reward and somatosensory regions, which might impinge on cognitive control over food consumption and binge eating. PMID:21799807

  11. Differential neural responses to food images in women with bulimia versus anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Samantha J; O'Daly, Owen G; Uher, Rudolf; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael; Williams, Steven C R; Schiöth, Helgi B; Treasure, Janet; Campbell, Iain C

    2011-01-01

    Previous fMRI studies show that women with eating disorders (ED) have differential neural activation to viewing food images. However, despite clinical differences in their responses to food, differential neural activation to thinking about eating food, between women with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) is not known. We compare 50 women (8 with BN, 18 with AN and 24 age-matched healthy controls [HC]) while they view food images during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). In response to food (vs non-food) images, women with BN showed greater neural activation in the visual cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right insular cortex and precentral gyrus, women with AN showed greater activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and right precuneus. HC women activated the cerebellum, right insular cortex, right medial temporal lobe and left caudate. Direct comparisons revealed that compared to HC, the BN group showed relative deactivation in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus/insula, and visual cortex, and compared to AN had relative deactivation in the parietal lobe and dorsal posterior cingulate cortex, but greater activation in the caudate, superior temporal gyrus, right insula and supplementary motor area. Women with AN and BN activate top-down cognitive control in response to food images, yet women with BN have increased activation in reward and somatosensory regions, which might impinge on cognitive control over food consumption and binge eating.

  12. Intraoperative brain hemodynamic response assessment with real-time hyperspectral optical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, Audrey; Pichette, Julien; Angulo-Rodríguez, Leticia M.; Saint Pierre, Catherine; Lesage, Frédéric; Bouthillier, Alain; Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Leblond, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Following normal neuronal activity, there is an increase in cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume to provide oxygenated hemoglobin to active neurons. For abnormal activity such as epileptiform discharges, this hemodynamic response may be inadequate to meet the high metabolic demands. To verify this hypothesis, we developed a novel hyperspectral imaging system able to monitor real-time cortical hemodynamic changes during brain surgery. The imaging system is directly integrated into a surgical microscope, using the white-light source for illumination. A snapshot hyperspectral camera is used for detection (4x4 mosaic filter array detecting 16 wavelengths simultaneously). We present calibration experiments where phantoms made of intralipid and food dyes were imaged. Relative concentrations of three dyes were recovered at a video rate of 30 frames per second. We also present hyperspectral recordings during brain surgery of epileptic patients with concurrent electrocorticography recordings. Relative concentration maps of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin were extracted from the data, allowing real-time studies of hemodynamic changes with a good spatial resolution. Finally, we present preliminary results on phantoms obtained with an integrated spatial frequency domain imaging system to recover tissue optical properties. This additional module, used together with the hyperspectral imaging system, will allow quantification of hemoglobin concentrations maps. Our hyperspectral imaging system offers a new tool to analyze hemodynamic changes, especially in the case of epileptiform discharges. It also offers an opportunity to study brain connectivity by analyzing correlations between hemodynamic responses of different tissue regions.

  13. Evaluation criteria for spectral design of camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škerlind, Christina; Fagerström, Jan; Hallberg, Tomas; Kariis, Hans

    2015-10-01

    , when intended for a specific environment. The chosen spectral response should give a low detection probability (DP). How detection probability connects to image analysis tools and implementation of the six criteria is part of this work.

  14. Imaging Tumor Response and Tumoral Heterogeneity in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Antiangiogenic Therapy: Comparison of the Prognostic Ability of RECIST 1.1, an Alternate Method (Crabb), and Image Heterogeneity Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Connie; Tacelli, Nunzia; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Cortot, Alexis; Lafitte, Jean-Jacques; Wallyn, Frederic; Remy, Jacques; Bassett, Paul; Siddique, Musib; Cook, Gary J R; Landau, David B; Goh, Vicky

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to assess computed tomography (CT) intratumoral heterogeneity changes, and compared the prognostic ability of the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1, an alternate response method (Crabb), and CT heterogeneity in non-small cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy with and without bevacizumab. Forty patients treated with chemotherapy (group C) or chemotherapy and bevacizumab (group BC) underwent contrast-enhanced CT at baseline and after 1, 3, and 6 cycles of chemotherapy. Radiologic response was assessed using RECIST 1.1 and an alternate method. CT heterogeneity analysis generating global and locoregional parameters depicting tumor image spatial intensity characteristics was performed. Heterogeneity parameters between the 2 groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Associations between heterogeneity parameters and radiologic response with overall survival were assessed using Cox regression. Global and locoregional heterogeneity parameters changed with treatment, with increased tumor heterogeneity in group BC. Entropy [group C: median -0.2% (interquartile range -2.2, 1.7) vs. group BC: 0.7% (-0.7, 3.5), P=0.10] and busyness [-27.7% (-62.2, -5.0) vs. -11.5% (-29.1, 92.4), P=0.10] showed a greater reduction in group C, whereas uniformity [1.9% (-8.0, 9.8) vs. -5.0% (-13.9, 5.6), P=0.10] showed a relative increase after 1 cycle but did not reach statistical significance. Two (9%) and 1 (6%) additional responders were identified using the alternate method compared with RECIST in group C and group BC, respectively. Heterogeneity parameters were not significant prognostic factors. The alternate response method described by Crabb identified more responders compared with RECIST. However, both criteria and baseline imaging heterogeneity parameters were not prognostic of survival.

  15. The longitudinal reliability and responsiveness of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring System (HOAMRIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugen, Ida K.; Eshed, Iris; Gandjbakhch, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the interreader reliability of change scores and the responsiveness of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis (OA) Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) Scoring System (HOAMRIS). Methods. Paired MRI (baseline and 5-yr followup) from 20 patients with hand OA were scored with known time se...

  16. Use of image analysis to assess color response on plants caused by herbicide application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Ali; Streibig, Jens Carl; Duus, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    by herbicides. The range of color components of green and nongreen parts of the plants and soil in Hue, Saturation, and Brightness (HSB) color space were used for segmentation. The canopy color changes of barley, winter wheat, red fescue, and brome fescue caused by doses of a glyphosate and diflufenican mixture...... for the green and nongreen parts of the plants and soil were different. The relative potencies were not significantly different from one, indicating that visual and image analysis estimations were about the same. The comparison results suggest that image analysis can be used to assess color changes of plants......In herbicide-selectivity experiments, response can be measured by visual inspection, stand counts, plant mortality, and biomass. Some response types are relative to nontreated control. We developed a nondestructive method by analyzing digital color images to quantify color changes in leaves caused...

  17. Ion beam induced charge and cathodoluminescence imaging of response uniformity of CVD diamond radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sellin, P J; Galbiati, A; Maghrabi, M; Townsend, P D

    2002-01-01

    The uniformity of response of CVD diamond radiation detectors produced from high quality diamond film, with crystallite dimensions of >100 mu m, has been studied using ion beam induced charge imaging. A micron-resolution scanning alpha particle beam was used to produce maps of pulse height response across the device. The detectors were fabricated with a single-sided coplanar electrode geometry to maximise their sensitivity to the surface region of the diamond film where the diamond crystallites are highly ordered. High resolution ion beam induced charge images of single crystallites were acquired that demonstrate variations in intra-crystallite charge transport and the termination of charge transport at the crystallite boundaries. Cathodoluminescence imaging of the same crystallites shows an inverse correlation between the density of radiative centres and regions of good charge transport.

  18. Radiographic and metabolic response rates following image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin; Grills, Inga S.; Wong, Ching-Yee Oliver; Galerani, Ana Paula; Chao, Kenneth; Welsh, Robert; Chmielewski, Gary; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate radiographic and metabolic response after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early lung tumors. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine tumors were treated prospectively with SBRT (dose = 48-60 Gy, 4-5 Fx). Thirty-six cases were primary NSCLC (T1N0 = 67%; T2N0 = 25%); three cases were solitary metastases. Patients were followed using CT and PET at 6, 16, and 52 weeks post-SBRT, with CT follow-up thereafter. RECIST and EORTC criteria were used to evaluate CT and PET responses. Results: At median follow-up of 9 months (0.4-26), RECIST complete response (CR), partial response (PR), and stable disease (SD) rates were 3%, 43%, 54% at 6 weeks; 15%, 38%, 46% at 16 weeks; 27%, 64%, 9% at 52 weeks. Mean baseline tumor volume was reduced by 46%, 70%, 87%, and 96%, respectively at 6, 16, 52, and 72 weeks. Mean baseline maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) was 8.3 (1.1-20.3) and reduced to 3.4, 3.0, and 3.7 at 6, 16, and 52 weeks after SBRT. EORTC metabolic CR/PR, SD, and progressive disease rates were 67%, 22%, 11% at 6 weeks; 86%, 10%, 3% at 16 weeks; 95%, 5%, 0% at 52 weeks. Conclusions: SBRT yields excellent RECIST and EORTC based response. Metabolic response is rapid however radiographic response occurs even after 1-year post treatment.

  19. Automated Detection of Buildings from Heterogeneous VHR Satellite Images for Rapid Response to Natural Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaodan Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a novel approach for automatically detecting buildings from multiple heterogeneous and uncalibrated very high-resolution (VHR satellite images for a rapid response to natural disasters. In the proposed method, a simple and efficient visual attention method is first used to extract built-up area candidates (BACs from each multispectral (MS satellite image. After this, morphological building indices (MBIs are extracted from all the masked panchromatic (PAN and MS images with BACs to characterize the structural features of buildings. Finally, buildings are automatically detected in a hierarchical probabilistic model by fusing the MBI and masked PAN images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is comparable to supervised classification methods in terms of recall, precision and F-value.

  20. Speed-accuracy trade-offs in computing spatial impulse responses for simulating medical ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    sampling frequency is unnecessary in the final signals, since the transducers used in medical ultrasound are band limited. Approaches to reduce the sampling frequency are, thus, needed to make efficient simulation programs. Field II uses time integration of the spatial impulse responses using a continuous......Medical ultrasound imaging can be simulated realistically using linear acoustics. One of the most powerful approaches is to employ spatial impulse responses. Hereby both emitted fields and pulse-echo responses from point scatterers can be determined. Also any kind of dynamic focusing...

  1. Role of imaging in the staging and response assessment of lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrington, Sally F; Mikhaeel, N George; Kostakoglu, Lale

    2014-01-01

    emission tomography (PET)–computed tomography (CT). Progress in imaging is influencing trial design and affecting clinical practice. In particular, a five-point scale to grade response using PET-CT, which can be adapted to suit requirements for early- and late-response assessment with good interobserver....... CONCLUSION: This article comprises the consensus reached to update guidance on the use of PET-CT for staging and response assessment for [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-avid lymphomas in clinical practice and late-phase trials....

  2. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Ferguson, R. M.; Krishnan, K. M.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ0 excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (Ho) and frequency (ω). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2 kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52 mT/μ0. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (ωHo) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories.

  3. Reliability and responsiveness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.B.; Poggenborg, R.P.; Stoltenberg, M.

    2013-01-01

    intraarticular injection with 80 mg methylprednisolone. Using semi-automated image processing software, DCE-MRI parameters, including the initial rate of enhancement (IRE) and maximal enhancement (ME), were generated for three regions of interest (ROIs): ‘Whole slice’, ‘Quick ROI’, and ‘Precise ROI......Objectives: To investigate the responsiveness to treatment and the reliability of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) knee joints. Methods: DCE-MRI was performed in 12 clinically active RA knee joints before and 1, 7, 30, and 180 days after......’. The smallest detectable difference (SDD), the smallest detectable change (SDC), and intra- and inter-reader intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to assess the reliability of DCE-MRI. Responsiveness to treatment was assessed by the standardized response mean (SRM). Results: In all patients...

  4. Intratumor heterogeneity characterized by textural features on baseline 18F-FDG PET images predicts response to concomitant radiochemotherapy in esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tixier, Florent; Le Rest, Catherine Cheze; Hatt, Mathieu; Albarghach, Nidal; Pradier, Olivier; Metges, Jean-Philippe; Corcos, Laurent; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2011-03-01

    (18)F-FDG PET is often used in clinical routine for diagnosis, staging, and response to therapy assessment or prediction. The standardized uptake value (SUV) in the primary or regional area is the most common quantitative measurement derived from PET images used for those purposes. The aim of this study was to propose and evaluate new parameters obtained by textural analysis of baseline PET scans for the prediction of therapy response in esophageal cancer. Forty-one patients with newly diagnosed esophageal cancer treated with combined radiochemotherapy were included in this study. All patients underwent pretreatment whole-body (18)F-FDG PET. Patients were treated with radiotherapy and alkylatinlike agents (5-fluorouracil-cisplatin or 5-fluorouracil-carboplatin). Patients were classified as nonresponders (progressive or stable disease), partial responders, or complete responders according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Different image-derived indices obtained from the pretreatment PET tumor images were considered. These included usual indices such as maximum SUV, peak SUV, and mean SUV and a total of 38 features (such as entropy, size, and magnitude of local and global heterogeneous and homogeneous tumor regions) extracted from the 5 different textures considered. The capacity of each parameter to classify patients with respect to response to therapy was assessed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (P textural analysis can provide nonresponder, partial-responder, and complete-responder patient identification with higher sensitivity (76%-92%) than any SUV measurement. Textural features of tumor metabolic distribution extracted from baseline (18)F-FDG PET images allow for the best stratification of esophageal carcinoma patients in the context of therapy-response prediction.

  5. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogami, M; Kulkarni, R; Wang, H; Reif, R; Wang, R K [University of Washington, Department of Bioengineering, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2014-08-31

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing. (laser biophotonics)

  6. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogami, M.; Kulkarni, R.; Wang, H.; Reif, R.; Wang, R. K.

    2014-08-01

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing.

  7. Internal representations for face detection: an application of noise-based image classification to BOLD responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Adrian; Vettel, Jean M; Tarr, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    What basic visual structures underlie human face detection and how can we extract such structures directly from the amplitude of neural responses elicited by face processing? Here, we address these issues by investigating an extension of noise-based image classification to BOLD responses recorded in high-level visual areas. First, we assess the applicability of this classification method to such data and, second, we explore its results in connection with the neural processing of faces. To this end, we construct luminance templates from white noise fields based on the response of face-selective areas in the human ventral cortex. Using behaviorally and neurally-derived classification images, our results reveal a family of simple but robust image structures subserving face representation and detection. Thus, we confirm the role played by classical face selective regions in face detection and we help clarify the representational basis of this perceptual function. From a theory standpoint, our findings support the idea of simple but highly diagnostic neurally-coded features for face detection. At the same time, from a methodological perspective, our work demonstrates the ability of noise-based image classification in conjunction with fMRI to help uncover the structure of high-level perceptual representations. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Modelling the perceptual similarity of facial expressions from image statistics and neural responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sormaz, Mladen; Watson, David M; Smith, William A P; Young, Andrew W; Andrews, Timothy J

    2016-04-01

    The ability to perceive facial expressions of emotion is essential for effective social communication. We investigated how the perception of facial expression emerges from the image properties that convey this important social signal, and how neural responses in face-selective brain regions might track these properties. To do this, we measured the perceptual similarity between expressions of basic emotions, and investigated how this is reflected in image measures and in the neural response of different face-selective regions. We show that the perceptual similarity of different facial expressions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, happiness) can be predicted by both surface and feature shape information in the image. Using block design fMRI, we found that the perceptual similarity of expressions could also be predicted from the patterns of neural response in the face-selective posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS), but not in the fusiform face area (FFA). These results show that the perception of facial expression is dependent on the shape and surface properties of the image and on the activity of specific face-selective regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. MUSIC-type imaging of a thin penetrable inclusion from its multi-static response matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won-Kwang; Lesselier, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    The imaging of a thin inclusion, with dielectric and/or magnetic contrasts with respect to the embedding homogeneous medium, is investigated. A MUSIC-type algorithm operating at a single time-harmonic frequency is developed in order to map the inclusion (that is, to retrieve its supporting curve) from scattered field data collected within the multi-static response matrix. Numerical experiments carried out for several types of inclusions (dielectric and/or magnetic ones, straight or curved ones), mostly single inclusions and also two of them close by as a straightforward extension, illustrate the pros and cons of the proposed imaging method

  10. MUSIC-type imaging of a thin penetrable inclusion from its multi-static response matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Kwang; Lesselier, Dominique

    2009-07-01

    The imaging of a thin inclusion, with dielectric and/or magnetic contrasts with respect to the embedding homogeneous medium, is investigated. A MUSIC-type algorithm operating at a single time-harmonic frequency is developed in order to map the inclusion (that is, to retrieve its supporting curve) from scattered field data collected within the multi-static response matrix. Numerical experiments carried out for several types of inclusions (dielectric and/or magnetic ones, straight or curved ones), mostly single inclusions and also two of them close by as a straightforward extension, illustrate the pros and cons of the proposed imaging method.

  11. Diagnosis of response and non-response to dry eye treatment using infrared thermography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, U. Rajendra; Tan, Jen Hong; Vidya, S.; Yeo, Sharon; Too, Cheah Loon; Lim, Wei Jie Eugene; Chua, Kuang Chua; Tong, Louis

    2014-11-01

    The dry eye treatment outcome depends on the assessment of clinical relevance of the treatment effect. The potential approach to assess the clinical relevance of the treatment is to identify the symptoms responders and non-responders to the given treatments using the responder analysis. In our work, we have performed the responder analysis to assess the clinical relevance effect of the dry eye treatments namely, hot towel, EyeGiene®, and Blephasteam® twice daily and 12 min session of Lipiflow®. Thermography is performed at week 0 (baseline), at weeks 4 and 12 after treatment. The clinical parameters such as, change in the clinical irritations scores, tear break up time (TBUT), corneal staining and Schirmer's symptoms tests values are used to obtain the responders and non-responders groups. We have obtained the infrared thermography images of dry eye symptoms responders and non-responders to the three types of warming treatments. The energy, kurtosis, skewness, mean, standard deviation, and various entropies namely Shannon, Renyi and Kapoor are extracted from responders and non-responders thermograms. The extracted features are ranked based on t-values. These ranked features are fed to the various classifiers to get the highest performance using minimum features. We have used decision tree (DT), K nearest neighbour (KNN), Naves Bayesian (NB) and support vector machine (SVM) to classify the features into responder and non-responder classes. We have obtained an average accuracy of 99.88%, sensitivity of 99.7% and specificity of 100% using KNN classifier using ten-fold cross validation.

  12. Pharmacogenetics and Imaging-Pharmacogenetics of Antidepressant Response: Towards Translational Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, Tristram A; Walter, Henrik; Brandl, Eva J

    2016-12-01

    Genetic variation underlies both the response to antidepressant treatment and the occurrence of side effects. Over the past two decades, a number of pharmacogenetic variants, among these the SCL6A4, BDNF, FKBP5, GNB3, GRIK4, and ABCB1 genes, have come to the forefront in this regard. However, small effects sizes, mixed results in independent samples, and conflicting meta-analyses results led to inherent difficulties in the field of pharmacogenetics translating these findings into clinical practice. Nearly all antidepressant pharmacogenetic variants have potentially pleiotropic effects in which they are associated with major depressive disorder, intermediate phenotypes involved in emotional processes, and brain areas affected by antidepressant treatment. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the advances made in the field of pharmacogenetics of antidepressant efficacy and side effects, imaging findings of antidepressant response, and the latest results in the expanding field of imaging-pharmacogenetics studies. We suggest there is mounting evidence that genetic factors exert their impact on treatment response by influencing brain structural and functional changes during antidepressant treatment, and combining neuroimaging and genetic methods may be a more powerful way to detect biological mechanisms of response than either method alone. The most promising imaging-pharmacogenetics findings exist for the SCL6A4 gene, with converging associations with antidepressant response, frontolimbic predictors of affective symptoms, and normalization of frontolimbic activity following antidepressant treatment. More research is required before imaging-pharmacogenetics informed personalized medicine can be applied to antidepressant treatment; nevertheless, inroads have been made towards assessing genetic and neuroanatomical liability and potential clinical application.

  13. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer: prediction of pathologic response with PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging--prospective assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Ukihide; Miyake, Mototaka; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Terauchi, Takashi; Kubota, Kazunori; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Macapinlac, Homer A

    2012-04-01

    To clarify whether fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed after two cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) can be used to predict pathologic response in breast cancer. Institutional human research committee approval and written informed consent were obtained. Accuracy after two cycles of NAC for predicting pathologic complete response (pCR) was examined in 142 women (mean age, 57 years: range, 43-72 years) with histologically proved breast cancer between December 2005 and February 2009. Quantitative PET/CT and DCE MR imaging were performed at baseline and after two cycles of NAC. Parameters of PET/CT and of blood flow and microvascular permeability at DCE MR were compared with pathologic response. Patients were also evaluated after NAC by using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 based on DCE MR measurements and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria and PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) 1.0 based on PET/CT measurements. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to examine continuous variables at PET/CT and DCE MR to predict pCR, and diagnostic accuracies were compared with the McNemar test. Significant decrease from baseline of all parameters at PET/CT and DCE MR was observed after NAC. Therapeutic response was obtained in 24 patients (17%) with pCR and 118 (83%) without pCR. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to predict pCR were 45.5%, 85.5%, and 82.4%, respectively, with RECIST and 70.4%, 95.7%, and 90.8%, respectively, with EORTC and PERCIST. Multiple logistic regression revealed three significant independent predictors of pCR: percentage maximum standardized uptake value (%SUV(max)) (odds ratio [OR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11, 1.34; P PET/CT is superior to DCE MR for the prediction of pCR (%SUV(max) [90.1%] vs %κ

  14. Subcutaneous fluid collection: An imaging marker for treatment response of infectious thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakigi, Takahide, E-mail: tkakigi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Okada, Tomohisa, E-mail: tomokada@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Sakai, Osamu, E-mail: osamu.sakai@bmc.org [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, 820 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Iwamoto, Yoshitaka, E-mail: iwacame@hotmail.co.jp [Department of General Internal Medicine, Rakuwakai Otowa Hospital, 2 Otowachoinji-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8062 (Japan); Kubo, Soichi, E-mail: kubo-s@mbox.kyoto-inet.or.jp [Department of Radiology, Rakuwakai Otowa Hospital, 2 Otowachoinji-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8062 (Japan); Yamamoto, Akira, E-mail: yakira@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Togashi, Kaori, E-mail: nmdioffice@kuhp.kyoto-ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • No imaging marker for treatment response of spondylodiscitis (SD) has been proposed. • Volume changes of subcutaneous fluid collection (SFC) had significant correlation with changes of C-reactive protein (CRP). • SFC can be used as an imaging marker for treatment response of SD on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate prevalence of subcutaneous fluid collection (SFC) in infectious thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis (SD) compared with control patients and to investigate correlation between volume changes of SFC and treatment response of SD. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board. From April 2011 to March 2012, 49 patients (24 SD and 25 non-SD patients) were enrolled. Prevalence of SFC was evaluated respectively for SD and non-SD patients using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the sagittal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) imaging or fat-saturated T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), and compared. In SD patients with SFC, correlation was investigated between SFC volume on the 1st MRI and initial clinical status. The same analysis was conducted also for SFC volume changes from the 1st to 2nd or last MRI. Results: SFC was found in 20 patients with SD (83.3%) and 3 non-SD patients (12%) with significant difference (p < .001). In 20 SD patients with SFC, 17 patients had follow-up MRI. For the 1st MRI, no significant correlation was found between volume of SFC and initial status of patients, including body weight, body mass index (BMI), white blood cell (WBC), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). However, significant positive correlations were found between changes of C-reactive protein (CRP) and SFC volume from the 1st to 2nd as well as from the 1st to the last MRI (each p < .05). Conclusion: SD patients had significantly higher prevalence of SFC than non-SD patients. Volume changes of SFC had significant correlation with changes of CRP, which can be used as an imaging

  15. Subcutaneous fluid collection: An imaging marker for treatment response of infectious thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakigi, Takahide; Okada, Tomohisa; Sakai, Osamu; Iwamoto, Yoshitaka; Kubo, Soichi; Yamamoto, Akira; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • No imaging marker for treatment response of spondylodiscitis (SD) has been proposed. • Volume changes of subcutaneous fluid collection (SFC) had significant correlation with changes of C-reactive protein (CRP). • SFC can be used as an imaging marker for treatment response of SD on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate prevalence of subcutaneous fluid collection (SFC) in infectious thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis (SD) compared with control patients and to investigate correlation between volume changes of SFC and treatment response of SD. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board. From April 2011 to March 2012, 49 patients (24 SD and 25 non-SD patients) were enrolled. Prevalence of SFC was evaluated respectively for SD and non-SD patients using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the sagittal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) imaging or fat-saturated T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), and compared. In SD patients with SFC, correlation was investigated between SFC volume on the 1st MRI and initial clinical status. The same analysis was conducted also for SFC volume changes from the 1st to 2nd or last MRI. Results: SFC was found in 20 patients with SD (83.3%) and 3 non-SD patients (12%) with significant difference (p < .001). In 20 SD patients with SFC, 17 patients had follow-up MRI. For the 1st MRI, no significant correlation was found between volume of SFC and initial status of patients, including body weight, body mass index (BMI), white blood cell (WBC), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). However, significant positive correlations were found between changes of C-reactive protein (CRP) and SFC volume from the 1st to 2nd as well as from the 1st to the last MRI (each p < .05). Conclusion: SD patients had significantly higher prevalence of SFC than non-SD patients. Volume changes of SFC had significant correlation with changes of CRP, which can be used as an imaging

  16. Redox-responsive manganese dioxide nanoparticles for enhanced MR imaging and radiotherapy of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mi Hyeon; Choi, Eun-Seok; Kim, Sehee; Goh, Sung-Ho; Choi, Yongdoo

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we synthesized manganese dioxide nanoparticles (MnO2 NPs) stabilized with biocompatible polymers (polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyacrylic acid) and analyzed their effect on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells with or without gefitinib resistance in vitro. MnO2 NPs showed glutathione (GSH)-responsive dissolution and subsequent enhancement in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Of note, treatment with MnO2 NPs induced significant cytotoxic effects on NSCLC cells, and additional dose-dependent therapeutic effects were obtained upon X-ray irradiation. Normal cells treated with MnO2 NPs were viable at the tested concentrations. In addition, increased therapeutic efficacy could be achieved when the cells were treated with MnO2 NPs in hypoxic conditions. Therefore, we conclude that the use of MnO2 NPs in MR imaging and combination radiotherapy may be an efficient strategy for the imaging and therapy of NSCLC.

  17. Assessing mesoscale material response under shock & isentropic compression via high-resolution line-imaging VISAR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Clint Allen; Furnish, Michael David; Podsednik, Jason W.; Reinhart, William Dodd; Trott, Wayne Merle; Mason, Joshua

    2003-10-01

    Of special promise for providing dynamic mesoscale response data is the line-imaging VISAR, an instrument for providing spatially resolved velocity histories in dynamic experiments. We have prepared two line-imaging VISAR systems capable of spatial resolution in the 10-20 micron range, at the Z and STAR facilities. We have applied this instrument to selected experiments on a compressed gas gun, chosen to provide initial data for several problems of interest, including: (1) pore-collapse in copper (two variations: 70 micron diameter hole in single-crystal copper) and (2) response of a welded joint in dissimilar materials (Ta, Nb) to ramp loading relative to that of a compression joint. The instrument is capable of resolving details such as the volume and collapse history of a collapsing isolated pore.

  18. Corporate social responsibility in shaping the media image of the company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Andrejczuk

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Enterprises frequently employ Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR to create a positive brand image in the media. To further good relations with stakeholders, companies create an image before their customers by their participation in public campaigns and information in advertisements employing elements of CSR. Discussing this practice, I will highlight aspects of this phenomenon in the context of consumer opinion about advertisements. Some examples of companies show that Cause Related Marketing (CRM and public campaigns are becoming more significant in the strategies of cause related companies. Enterprises at all costs want to buy their way into the favour of stakeholders, and through various marketing actions they try to build a strong brand and position in this way. In spite of the low evaluation of advertisements and the decline in confidence in them, enterprises aim to convince everyone that they are socially responsible companies.

  19. Multimodality multiparametric imaging of early tumor response to a novel antiangiogenic therapy based on anticalins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Meier

    Full Text Available Anticalins are a novel class of targeted protein therapeutics. The PEGylated Anticalin Angiocal (PRS-050-PEG40 is directed against VEGF-A. The purpose of our study was to compare the performance of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and positron emission tomography with the tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET for monitoring early response to antiangiogenic therapy with PRS-050-PEG40. 31 mice were implanted subcutaneously with A673 rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts and underwent DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET before and 2 days after i.p. injection of PRS-050-PEG40 (n = 13, Avastin (n = 6 or PBS (n = 12. Tumor size was measured manually with a caliper. Imaging results were correlated with histopathology. In the results, the tumor size was not significantly different in the treatment groups when compared to the control group on day 2 after therapy onset (P = 0.09. In contrast the imaging modalities DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET showed significant differences between the therapeutic compared to the control group as early as 2 days after therapy onset (P<0.001. There was a strong correlation of the early changes in DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET at day 2 after therapy onset and the change in tumor size at the end of therapy (r = -0.58, 0.71 and 0.67 respectively. The imaging results were confirmed by histopathology, showing early necrosis and necroptosis in the tumors. Thus multimodality multiparametric imaging was able to predict therapeutic success of PRS-050-PEG40 and Avastin as early as 2 days after onset of therapy and thus promising for monitoring early response of antiangiogenic therapy.

  20. A case of timely satellite image acquisitions in support of coastal emergency environmental response management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Werle, Dirk; Lu, Zhong; Rangoonwala, Amina; Suzuoki, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    The synergistic application of optical and radar satellite imagery improves emergency response and advance coastal monitoring from the realm of “opportunistic” to that of “strategic.” As illustrated by the Hurricane Ike example, synthetic aperture radar imaging capabilities are clearly applicable for emergency response operations, but they are also relevant to emergency environmental management. Integrated with optical monitoring, the nearly real-time availability of synthetic aperture radar provides superior consistency in status and trends monitoring and enhanced information concerning causal forces of change that are critical to coastal resource sustainability, including flooding extent, depth, and frequency.

  1. Concurrent OCT imaging of stimulus evoked retinal neural activation and hemodynamic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Taeyoon; Wang, Benquan; Lu, Yiming; Chen, Yanjun; Cao, Dingcai; Yao, Xincheng

    2017-02-01

    It is well established that major retinal diseases involve distortions of the retinal neural physiology and blood vascular structures. However, the details of distortions in retinal neurovascular coupling associated with major eye diseases are not well understood. In this study, a multi-modal optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging system was developed to enable concurrent imaging of retinal neural activity and vascular hemodynamics. Flicker light stimulation was applied to mouse retinas to evoke retinal neural responses and hemodynamic changes. The OCT images were acquired continuously during the pre-stimulation, light-stimulation, and post-stimulation phases. Stimulus-evoked intrinsic optical signals (IOSs) and hemodynamic changes were observed over time in blood-free and blood regions, respectively. Rapid IOSs change occurred almost immediately after stimulation. Both positive and negative signals were observed in adjacent retinal areas. The hemodynamic changes showed time delays after stimulation. The signal magnitudes induced by light stimulation were observed in blood regions and did not show significant changes in blood-free regions. These differences may arise from different mechanisms in blood vessels and neural tissues in response to light stimulation. These characteristics agreed well with our previous observations in mouse retinas. Further development of the multimodal OCT may provide a new imaging method for studying how retinal structures and metabolic and neural functions are affected by age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), and other diseases, which promises novel noninvasive biomarkers for early disease detection and reliable treatment evaluations of eye diseases.

  2. Studies of scintillator response to 60 MeV protons in a proton beam imaging system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rydygier Marzena

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A Proton Beam Imaging System (ProBImS is under development at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN. The ProBImS will be used to optimize beam delivery at IFJ PAN proton therapy facilities, delivering two-dimensional distributions of beam profiles. The system consists of a scintillator, optical tract and a sensitive CCD camera which digitally records the light emitted from the proton-irradiated scintillator. The optical system, imaging data transfer and control software have already been developed. Here, we report preliminary results of an evaluation of the DuPont Hi-speed thick back screen EJ 000128 scintillator to determine its applicability in our imaging system. In order to optimize the light conversion with respect to the dose locally deposited by the proton beam in the scintillation detector, we have studied the response of the DuPont scintillator in terms of linearity of dose response, uniformity of light emission and decay rate of background light after deposition of a high dose in the scintillator. We found a linear dependence of scintillator light output vs. beam intensity by showing the intensity of the recorded images to be proportional to the dose deposited in the scintillator volume.

  3. Non-parametric Bayesian models of response function in dynamic image sequences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichý, Ondřej; Šmídl, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 151, č. 1 (2016), s. 90-100 ISSN 1077-3142 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29225S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Response function * Blind source separation * Dynamic medical imaging * Probabilistic models * Bayesian methods Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 2.498, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/AS/tichy-0456983.pdf

  4. Phenotyping of Arabidopsis Drought Stress Response Using Kinetic Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Multicolor Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieni Yao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant responses to drought stress are complex due to various mechanisms of drought avoidance and tolerance to maintain growth. Traditional plant phenotyping methods are labor-intensive, time-consuming, and subjective. Plant phenotyping by integrating kinetic chlorophyll fluorescence with multicolor fluorescence imaging can acquire plant morphological, physiological, and pathological traits related to photosynthesis as well as its secondary metabolites, which will provide a new means to promote the progress of breeding for drought tolerant accessions and gain economic benefit for global agriculture production. Combination of kinetic chlorophyll fluorescence and multicolor fluorescence imaging proved to be efficient for the early detection of drought stress responses in the Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0 and one of its most affected mutants called reduced hyperosmolality-induced [Ca2+]i increase 1. Kinetic chlorophyll fluorescence curves were useful for understanding the drought tolerance mechanism of Arabidopsis. Conventional fluorescence parameters provided qualitative information related to drought stress responses in different genotypes, and the corresponding images showed spatial heterogeneities of drought stress responses within the leaf and the canopy levels. Fluorescence parameters selected by sequential forward selection presented high correlations with physiological traits but not morphological traits. The optimal fluorescence traits combined with the support vector machine resulted in good classification accuracies of 93.3 and 99.1% for classifying the control plants from the drought-stressed ones with 3 and 7 days treatments, respectively. The results demonstrated that the combination of kinetic chlorophyll fluorescence and multicolor fluorescence imaging with the machine learning technique was capable of providing comprehensive information of drought stress effects on the photosynthesis and the secondary metabolisms. It is a promising

  5. Crisis strategies in BP's Deepwater Horizon response : An image repair and situational crisis communication study

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Mikael

    2017-01-01

    The BP Deepwater Horizon crisis in 2010 was one the largest catastrophes in the history of the oil industry. BP was sued over the disaster, and lost several billion dollars. This study examines the crisis response strategies and/or image repair strategies, which can be found in BP's press releases following the Deepwater Horizon crisis. In particular, the study looks closer at what established crisis communication strategies could be discerned in the material, and how they are used discursive...

  6. Role of Image in Marketing Performance Odel Supported by Marketing Communication and Company Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Soegoto, Eddy Soeryanto

    2016-01-01

    AbstractBanking industries have not been effective yet in implementing marketing communication and company social responsibility programs. The establishment of image has not been done effectively yet; accordingly marketing performance cannot be implemented as it is expected. This research was done in the banking industries at Bandung City with sample as much as 42 banking industries drawn using a random sampling method. Thaanalysis procedure used Structural Equation Modeling based on Partial ...

  7. Rapid and Quantitative Assessment of Cancer Treatment Response Using In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Current assessment of orthotopic tumor models in animals utilizes survival as the primary therapeutic end point. In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating antineoplastic therapies [1 ]. Using human tumor cell lines constitutively expressing luciferase, the kinetics of tumor growth and response to therapy have been assessed in intraperitoneal [2], subcutaneous, and intravascular [3] cancer models. However, use of this approach for evaluating orthotopic tumor models has not been demonstrated. In this report, the ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth and therapeuticinduced cell kill of orthotopic rat brain tumors derived from 9L gliosarcoma cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase (9LLuc was investigated. Intracerebral tumor burden was monitored over time by quantitation of photon emission and tumor volume using a cryogenically cooled CCD camera and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, respectively. There was excellent correlation (r=0.91 between detected photons and tumor volume. A quantitative comparison of tumor cell kill determined from serial MRI volume measurements and BLI photon counts following 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU treatment revealed that both imaging modalities yielded statistically similar cell kill values (P=.951. These results provide direct validation of BLI imaging as a powerful and quantitative tool for the assessment of antineoplastic therapies in living animals.

  8. Imaging immune response of skin mast cells in vivo with two-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunqiang; Pastila, Riikka K.; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided insightful information of the dynamic process of immune cells in vivo. However, the use of exogenous labeling agents limits its applications. There is no method to perform functional imaging of mast cells, a population of innate tissue-resident immune cells. Mast cells are widely recognized as the effector cells in allergy. Recently their roles as immunoregulatory cells in certain innate and adaptive immune responses are being actively investigated. Here we report in vivo mouse skin mast cells imaging with two-photon microscopy using endogenous tryptophan as the fluorophore. We studied the following processes. 1) Mast cells degranulation, the first step in the mast cell activation process in which the granules are released into peripheral tissue to trigger downstream reactions. 2) Mast cell reconstitution, a procedure commonly used to study mast cells functioning by comparing the data from wild type mice, mast cell-deficient mice, and mast-cell deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Imaging the BMMCs engraftment in tissue reveals the mast cells development and the efficiency of BMMCs reconstitution. We observed the reconstitution process for 6 weeks in the ear skin of mast cell-deficient Kit wsh/ w-sh mice by two-photon imaging. Our finding is the first instance of imaging mast cells in vivo with endogenous contrast.

  9. PET imaging of early response to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor ZD4190

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Min; Gao, Haokao; Yan, Yongjun; Sun, Xilin; Chen, Kai; Quan, Qimeng; Lang, Lixin; Kiesewetter, Dale; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for monitoring tumor response to the VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitor ZD4190 during cancer therapy. Orthotopic MDA-MB-435 tumor-bearing mice were treated with ZD4190 (100 mg/kg orally per day for three consecutive days). Tumor growth was monitored by caliper measurement. During the therapeutic period, longitudinal PET scans were acquired using 18 F-FDG, 18 F-FLT and 18 F-FPPRGD2 as imaging tracers to evaluate tumor glucose metabolism, tumor cell proliferation, and angiogenesis, respectively. Imaging metrics were validated by immunohistochemical analysis of Ki67, GLUT-1, F4/80, CD31, murine integrin β3, and human integrin αvβ3. Three consecutive daily oral administrations of 100 mg/kg of ZD4190 were effective in delaying MDA-MB-435 tumor growth. A significant difference in tumor volume was observed on day 7 between the treatment group and the control group (p 18 F-FPPRGD2 uptake was stable between days 0 and 7. In ZD4190-treated tumors, 18 F-FPPRGD2 uptake had decreased significantly relative to baseline by 26.74±8.12% (p 18 F-FLT had also decreased on both day 1 and day 3 after initiation of ZD4190 treatment. No significant change in 18 F-FDG uptake in ZD4190-treated tumors was observed, however, compared with the control group. All of the imaging findings were supported by ex vivo analysis of related biomarkers. The longitudinal imaging results demonstrated the usefulness of quantitative 18 F-FLT and 18 F-FPPRGD2 PET imaging in evaluating the early antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects of ZD4190. The quantification data from the PET imaging were consistent with the pattern of initial growth inhibition with treatment, followed by tumor relapse after treatment cessation. (orig.)

  10. Imaging of non-hodgkin lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Hutchings, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Optimal lymphoma management requires accurate pretreatment staging and reliable assessment of response, both during and after therapy. Positron emission tomography with computerized tomography (PET/CT) combines functional and anatomical imaging and provides the most sensitive and accurate methods...... for lymphoma imaging. New guidelines for lymphoma imaging and recently revised criteria for lymphoma staging and response assessment recommend PET/CT staging, treatment monitoring, and response evaluation in all FDG-avid lymphomas, while CT remains the method of choice for non-FDG-avid histologies. Since...... interim PET imaging has high prognostic value in lymphoma, a number of trials investigate PET-based, response-adapted therapy for non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). PET response is the main determinant of response according to the new response criteria, but PET/CT has little or no role in routine surveillance...

  11. TU-C-12A-02: Development of a Multiparametric Statistical Response Map for Quantitative Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosca, R [The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mahajan, A; Brown, PD; Stafford, RJ [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Johnson, VE [Texas A' M University, College Station, TX (United States); Dong, L [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Jackson, EF [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging biomarkers (QIB) are becoming increasingly utilized in early phase clinical trials as a means of non-invasively assessing treatment response and associated response heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to develop a flexible multiparametric statistical framework to predict voxel-by-voxel response of several potential MRI QIBs. Methods: Patients with histologically proven glioblastomas (n=11) were treated with chemoradiation (with/without bevacizumab) and underwent one baseline and two mid-treatment (3–4wks) MRIs. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (3D FSPGR, 6.3sec/phase, 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA), dynamic susceptibility contrast (2D GRE-EPI, 1.5sec/phase, 0.2mmol/kg Gd-DTPA), and diffusion tensor (2D DW-EPI, b=0, 1200 s/mm{sup 2}, 27 directions) imaging acquisitions were obtained during each study. Mid-treatment and pre-treatment images were rigidly aligned, and regions of partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), and progressive disease (PD) were contoured in consensus by two experienced radiation oncologists. Voxels in these categories were used to train ordinal (PRimaging biomarkers, as well as treatment type. Leave-one-out cross-validation was performed at the patient level to assess model prediction accuracy. Results: Ordinal regression resulted in model prediction accuracies of 60% (PR), 0% (SD), 81% (PD), and 69% (overall), with coefficients of variation (COV) of 9.4%, 9.6%, and 23.6%, respectively. Logistic regression resulted in accuracies of 82.0% (PR/SD), 46.2% (PD), and 76.2% (overall) with COVs of 22.4%, 45.7%, and 23.8%, respectively. Conclusion: Despite limited patient numbers, this feasibility pilot study demonstrates that ordinal and logistic regression models potentially provide a flexible statistical framework for incorporating longitudinal multiparametric

  12. TU-C-12A-02: Development of a Multiparametric Statistical Response Map for Quantitative Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosca, R; Mahajan, A; Brown, PD; Stafford, RJ; Johnson, VE; Dong, L; Jackson, EF

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging biomarkers (QIB) are becoming increasingly utilized in early phase clinical trials as a means of non-invasively assessing treatment response and associated response heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to develop a flexible multiparametric statistical framework to predict voxel-by-voxel response of several potential MRI QIBs. Methods: Patients with histologically proven glioblastomas (n=11) were treated with chemoradiation (with/without bevacizumab) and underwent one baseline and two mid-treatment (3–4wks) MRIs. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (3D FSPGR, 6.3sec/phase, 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA), dynamic susceptibility contrast (2D GRE-EPI, 1.5sec/phase, 0.2mmol/kg Gd-DTPA), and diffusion tensor (2D DW-EPI, b=0, 1200 s/mm 2 , 27 directions) imaging acquisitions were obtained during each study. Mid-treatment and pre-treatment images were rigidly aligned, and regions of partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), and progressive disease (PD) were contoured in consensus by two experienced radiation oncologists. Voxels in these categories were used to train ordinal (PRimaging biomarkers, as well as treatment type. Leave-one-out cross-validation was performed at the patient level to assess model prediction accuracy. Results: Ordinal regression resulted in model prediction accuracies of 60% (PR), 0% (SD), 81% (PD), and 69% (overall), with coefficients of variation (COV) of 9.4%, 9.6%, and 23.6%, respectively. Logistic regression resulted in accuracies of 82.0% (PR/SD), 46.2% (PD), and 76.2% (overall) with COVs of 22.4%, 45.7%, and 23.8%, respectively. Conclusion: Despite limited patient numbers, this feasibility pilot study demonstrates that ordinal and logistic regression models potentially provide a flexible statistical framework for incorporating longitudinal multiparametric

  13. Malignant gliomas: current perspectives in diagnosis, treatment, and early response assessment using advanced quantitative imaging methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed R

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rafay Ahmed,1 Matthew J Oborski,2 Misun Hwang,1 Frank S Lieberman,3 James M Mountz11Department of Radiology, 2Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 3Department of Neurology and Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Malignant gliomas consist of glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and some less common tumors such as anaplastic ependymomas and anaplastic gangliogliomas. Malignant gliomas have high morbidity and mortality. Even with optimal treatment, median survival is only 12–15 months for glioblastomas and 2–5 years for anaplastic gliomas. However, recent advances in imaging and quantitative analysis of image data have led to earlier diagnosis of tumors and tumor response to therapy, providing oncologists with a greater time window for therapy management. In addition, improved understanding of tumor biology, genetics, and resistance mechanisms has enhanced surgical techniques, chemotherapy methods, and radiotherapy administration. After proper diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy, there is now a vital need for quantitative methods that can sensitively detect malignant glioma response to therapy at early follow-up times, when changes in management of nonresponders can have its greatest effect. Currently, response is largely evaluated by measuring magnetic resonance contrast and size change, but this approach does not take into account the key biologic steps that precede tumor size reduction. Molecular imaging is ideally suited to measuring early response by quantifying cellular metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, activities altered early in treatment. We expect that successful integration of quantitative imaging biomarker assessment into the early phase of clinical trials could provide a novel approach for testing new therapies

  14. Diffusion of responsibility attenuates altruistic punishment: A functional magnetic resonance imaging effective connectivity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunliang; Deshpande, Gopikrishna; Liu, Chao; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Yue-Jia; Krueger, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Humans altruistically punish violators of social norms to enforce cooperation and pro-social behaviors. However, such altruistic behaviors diminish when others are present, due to a diffusion of responsibility. We investigated the neural signatures underlying the modulations of diffusion of responsibility on altruistic punishment, conjoining a third-party punishment task with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and multivariate Granger causality mapping. In our study, participants acted as impartial third-party decision-makers and decided how to punish norm violations under two different social contexts: alone (i.e., full responsibility) or in the presence of putative other third-party decision makers (i.e., diffused responsibility). Our behavioral results demonstrated that the diffusion of responsibility served as a mediator of context-dependent punishment. In the presence of putative others, participants who felt less responsible also punished less severely in response to norm violations. Our neural results revealed that underlying this behavioral effect was a network of interconnected brain regions. For unfair relative to fair splits, the presence of others led to attenuated responses in brain regions implicated in signaling norm violations (e.g., AI) and to increased responses in brain regions implicated in calculating values of norm violations (e.g., vmPFC, precuneus) and mentalizing about others (dmPFC). The dmPFC acted as the driver of the punishment network, modulating target regions, such as AI, vmPFC, and precuneus, to adjust altruistic punishment behavior. Our results uncovered the neural basis of the influence of diffusion of responsibility on altruistic punishment and highlighted the role of the mentalizing network in this important phenomenon. Hum Brain Mapp 37:663-677, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Energy response of an imaging plate exposed to standard beta sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.L.; Li, H.; Mitch, M.; Tolk, N.; Duggan, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    Imaging plates (IPs) are a reusable media, which when exposed to ionizing radiation, store a latent image that can be read out with a red laser as photostimulated luminescence (PSL). They are widely used as a substitute for X-ray films for diagnostic studies. In diagnostic radiology this technology is known as computed radiography. In this work, the energy response of a commercial IP to beta-particle reference radiation fields used for calibrations at the National Institute of Standards and Technology was investigated. The absorbed dose in the active storage phosphor layer was calculated following the scaling procedure for depth dose for high Z materials with reference to water. It was found that the beta particles from Pm-147 and Kr-85 gave 68% and 24% higher PSL responses than that induced by Sr-90, respectively, which was caused by the different PSL detection efficiencies. In addition, normalized response curves of the IPs as a function of depth in polystyrene were measured and compared with the data measured using extrapolation chamber techniques. The difference between both sets of data resulted from the continuous energy change as the beta particle travels across the material, which leads to a different PSL response

  16. Predicted accommodative response from image quality in young eyes fitted with different dual-focus designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel; Amorim-de-Sousa, Ana; González-Méijome, José M

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the separated and combined influences of inner zone (IZ) diameter and effective add power of dual-focus contact lenses (CL) in the image quality at distance and near viewing, in a functional accommodating model eye. Computational wave-optics methods were used to define zonal bifocal pupil functions, representing the optic zones of nine dual-focus centre-distance CLs. The dual-focus pupil functions were defined having IZ diameters of 2.10 mm, 3.36 mm and 4.00 mm, with add powers of 1.5 D, 2.0 D and 2.5 D (dioptres), for each design, that resulted in a ratio of 64%/36% between the distance and treatment zone areas, bounded by a 6 mm entrance pupil. A through-focus routine was implemented in MATLAB to simulate the changes in image quality, calculated from the Visual Strehl ratio, as the eye with the dual-focus accommodates, from 0 to -3.00 D target vergences. Accommodative responses were defined as the changes in the defocus coefficient, combined with a change in fourth and sixth order spherical aberration, which produced a peak in image quality at each target vergence. Distance viewing image quality was marginally affected by IZ diameter but not by add power. Near image quality obtained when focussing the image formed by the near optics was only higher by a small amount compared to the other two IZ diameters. The mean ± standard deviation values obtained with the three adds were 0.28 ± 0.02, 0.23 ± 0.02 and 0.22 ± 0.02, for the small, medium and larger IZ diameters, respectively. On the other hand, near image quality predicted by focussing the image formed by the distance optics was considerably lower relatively to the other two IZ diameters. The mean ± standard deviation values obtained with the three adds were 0.15 ± 0.01, 0.38 ± 0.00 and 0.54 ± 0.01, for the small, medium and larger IZ diameters, respectively. During near viewing through dual-focus CLs, image quality depends on the diameter of the most inner zone of the CL, while add power

  17. Predicting Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with PET Imaging Using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros-Pavlos Ypsilantis

    Full Text Available Imaging of cancer with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET has become a standard component of diagnosis and staging in oncology, and is becoming more important as a quantitative monitor of individual response to therapy. In this article we investigate the challenging problem of predicting a patient's response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy from a single 18F-FDG PET scan taken prior to treatment. We take a "radiomics" approach whereby a large amount of quantitative features is automatically extracted from pretherapy PET images in order to build a comprehensive quantification of the tumor phenotype. While the dominant methodology relies on hand-crafted texture features, we explore the potential of automatically learning low- to high-level features directly from PET scans. We report on a study that compares the performance of two competing radiomics strategies: an approach based on state-of-the-art statistical classifiers using over 100 quantitative imaging descriptors, including texture features as well as standardized uptake values, and a convolutional neural network, 3S-CNN, trained directly from PET scans by taking sets of adjacent intra-tumor slices. Our experimental results, based on a sample of 107 patients with esophageal cancer, provide initial evidence that convolutional neural networks have the potential to extract PET imaging representations that are highly predictive of response to therapy. On this dataset, 3S-CNN achieves an average 80.7% sensitivity and 81.6% specificity in predicting non-responders, and outperforms other competing predictive models.

  18. Image acquisition and interpretation criteria for {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labelled white blood cell scintigraphy: results of a multicentre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erba, Paola A. [University of Pisa Medical School (Italy). Regional Center of Nuclear Medicine; Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Veltman, Niels C. [Jeroen Bosch Hospital, ' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Sollini, Martina [Arcisprdale S. Maria Nuova - IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Unit; Pacilio, Marta; Galli, Filippo [Sapienza Univ., Rome (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Unit; Signore, Alberto [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Sapienza Univ., Rome (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Unit; Sapienza Univ., Rome (Italy). Ospedale S. Andrea Medicina Nucleare

    2014-04-15

    There is no consensus yet on the best protocol for planar image acquisition and interpretation of radiolabelled white blood cell (WBC) scintigraphy. This may account for differences in reported diagnostic accuracy amongst different centres. This was a multicentre retrospective study analysing 235 WBC scans divided into two groups. The first group of scans (105 patients) were acquired with a fixed-time acquisition protocol and the second group (130 patients) were acquired with a decay time-corrected acquisition protocol. Planar images were interpreted both qualitatively and semiquantitatively. Three blinded readers analysed the images. The most accurate imaging acquisition protocol comprised image acquisition at 3 - 4 h and at 20 - 24 h in time mode with acquisition times corrected for isotope decay. Using this protocol, visual analysis had high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of infection. Semiquantitative analysis could be used in doubtful cases, with no cut-off for the percentage increase in radiolabelled WBC over time, as a criterion to define a positive scan. (orig.)

  19. Image acquisition and interpretation criteria for 99mTc-HMPAO-labelled white blood cell scintigraphy: results of a multicentre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erba, Paola A.; Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Veltman, Niels C.; Sollini, Martina; Pacilio, Marta; Galli, Filippo; Signore, Alberto; Sapienza Univ., Rome; Sapienza Univ., Rome

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus yet on the best protocol for planar image acquisition and interpretation of radiolabelled white blood cell (WBC) scintigraphy. This may account for differences in reported diagnostic accuracy amongst different centres. This was a multicentre retrospective study analysing 235 WBC scans divided into two groups. The first group of scans (105 patients) were acquired with a fixed-time acquisition protocol and the second group (130 patients) were acquired with a decay time-corrected acquisition protocol. Planar images were interpreted both qualitatively and semiquantitatively. Three blinded readers analysed the images. The most accurate imaging acquisition protocol comprised image acquisition at 3 - 4 h and at 20 - 24 h in time mode with acquisition times corrected for isotope decay. Using this protocol, visual analysis had high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of infection. Semiquantitative analysis could be used in doubtful cases, with no cut-off for the percentage increase in radiolabelled WBC over time, as a criterion to define a positive scan. (orig.)

  20. Heterogenous migraine aura symptoms correlate with visual cortex functional magnetic resonance imaging responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Hougaard, Anders; Ahmadi, Khazar

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Migraine aura is sparsely studied due to the highly challenging task of capturing patients during aura. Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is likely the underlying phenomenon of aura. The possible correlation between the multifaceted phenomenology of aura symptoms and the effects of CSD...... on the brain has not been ascertained. Methods: Five migraine patients were studied during various forms of aura symptoms induced by hypoxia, sham hypoxia, or physical exercise with concurrent photostimulation. The blood oxygenation level–dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal...... response to visual stimulation was measured in retinotopic mapping–defined visual cortex areas V1 to V4. Results: We found reduced BOLD response in patients reporting scotoma and increased response in patients who only experienced positive symptoms. Furthermore, patients with bilateral visual symptoms had...

  1. Evaluation of the optimal diagnostic criteria for regional lymph node metastases of lung cancer on MR imaging by receiver operating characteristic curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Naomichi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka

    1991-01-01

    MRI was performed in 78 primary lung cancer cases to evaluate the optimal diagnostic criteria for regional lymph node metastases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis for 262 lymph nodes of the hilar and mediastinal regions showed that the optimal size criterion is 10 mm in the mean axis of nodal diameter. Employing this criterion, the diagnostic rates for hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes had a sensitivity of 75%, a specificity of 82%, and an overall accuracy of 79%. However, the diagnostic rates for subaortic, paraaortic, and hilar lymph nodes using the same criterion showed lower specificities than those for other nodes. It was suggested that evaluation by coronal section made the diagnosis for subaortic lymph nodes more precise. In the ROC curve analysis for each histologic type, it was thought that the optimal criterion for adenocarcinoma was 10 mm in the mean axis, and that the criteria for squamous cell carcinoma were 11 mm in the mean axis and 10 mm in the sort axis. (author)

  2. Pilot test of a novel food response and attention training treatment for obesity: Brain imaging data suggest actions shape valuation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stice, E.; Yokum, S.; Veling, H.P.; Kemps, E.; Lawrence, N.S.

    2017-01-01

    Elevated brain reward and attention region response, and weaker inhibitory region response to high-calorie food images have been found to predict future weight gain. These findings suggest that an intervention that reduces reward and attention region response and increases inhibitory control region

  3. Autonomic and subjective responsivity to emotional images in people with dissociative seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Susannah; Mellers, John D C; Goldstein, Laura H

    2018-06-01

    People with dissociative seizures (DS) report a range of difficulties in emotional functioning and exhibit altered responding to emotional facial expressions in experimental tasks. We extended this research by investigating subjective and autonomic reactivity (ratings of emotional valence, arousal and skin conductance responses [SCRs]) to general emotional images in 39 people with DS relative to 42 healthy control participants, whilst controlling for anxiety, depression, cognitive functioning and, where relevant, medication use. It was predicted that greater subjective negativity and arousal and increased SCRs in response to the affective pictures would be observed in the DS group. The DS group as a whole did not differ from controls in their subjective responses of valence and arousal. However, SCR amplitudes were greater in 'autonomic responders' with DS relative to 'autonomic responders' in the control group. A positive correlation was also observed between SCRs for highly arousing negative pictures and self-reported ictal autonomic arousal, in DS 'autonomic responders'. In the DS subgroup of autonomic 'non-responders', differences in subjective responses were observed for some conditions, compared to control 'non-responders'. The findings indicate unaffected subjective responses to emotional images in people with DS overall. However, within the group of people with DS, there may be subgroups characterized by differences in emotional responding. One subgroup (i.e., 'autonomic responders') exhibit heightened autonomic responses but intact subjective emotional experience, whilst another subgroup (i.e., 'autonomic non-responders') seem to experience greater subjective negativity and arousal for some emotional stimuli, despite less frequent autonomic reactions. The current results suggest that therapeutic interventions targeting awareness and regulation of physiological arousal and subjective emotional experience could be of value in some people with this disorder

  4. Altered functional magnetic resonance imaging responses to nonpainful sensory stimulation in fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Solà, Marina; Pujol, Jesus; Wager, Tor D; Garcia-Fontanals, Alba; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; Garcia-Blanco, Susana; Poca-Dias, Violant; Harrison, Ben J; Contreras-Rodríguez, Oren; Monfort, Jordi; Garcia-Fructuoso, Ferran; Deus, Joan

    2014-11-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder characterized by chronic pain and enhanced responses to acute noxious events. However, the sensory systems affected in FM may extend beyond pain itself, as FM patients show reduced tolerance to non-nociceptive sensory stimulation. Characterizing the neural substrates of multisensory hypersensitivity in FM may thus provide important clues about the underlying pathophysiology of the disorder. The aim of this study was to characterize brain responses to non-nociceptive sensory stimulation in FM patients and their relationship to subjective sensory sensitivity and clinical pain severity. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to assess brain response to auditory, visual, and tactile motor stimulation in 35 women with FM and 25 matched controls. Correlation and mediation analyses were performed to establish the relationship between brain responses and 3 types of outcomes: subjective hypersensitivity to daily sensory stimulation, spontaneous pain, and functional disability. Patients reported increased subjective sensitivity (increased unpleasantness) in response to multisensory stimulation in daily life. Functional MRI revealed that patients showed reduced task-evoked activation in primary/secondary visual and auditory areas and augmented responses in the insula and anterior lingual gyrus. Reduced responses in visual and auditory areas were correlated with subjective sensory hypersensitivity and clinical severity measures. FM patients showed strong attenuation of brain responses to nonpainful events in early sensory cortices, accompanied by an amplified response at later stages of sensory integration in the insula. These abnormalities are associated with core FM symptoms, suggesting that they may be part of the pathophysiology of the disease. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. ACCF/ASNC appropriateness criteria for single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT MPI): a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Quality Strategic Directions Committee Appropriateness Criteria Working Group and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology endorsed by the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindis, Ralph G; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Peterson, Eric D; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M; Patel, Manesh R; Raskin, Ira E; Hendel, Robert C; Bateman, Timothy M; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Gibbons, Raymond J; Gillam, Linda D; Gillespie, John A; Hendel, Robert C; Iskandrian, Ami E; Jerome, Scott D; Krumholz, Harlan M; Messer, Joseph V; Spertus, John A; Stowers, Stephen A

    2005-10-18

    Under the auspices of the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), an appropriateness review was conducted for radionuclide cardiovascular imaging (RNI), specifically gated single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT MPI). The review assessed the risks and benefits of the imaging test for several indications or clinical scenarios and scored them based on a scale of 1 to 9, where the upper range (7 to 9) implies that the test is generally acceptable and is a reasonable approach, and the lower range (1 to 3) implies that the test is generally not acceptable and is not a reasonable approach. The mid range (4 to 6) implies that the test may be generally acceptable and may be a reasonable approach for the indication. The indications for this review were primarily drawn from existing clinical practice guidelines and modified based on discussion by the ACCF Appropriateness Criteria Working Group and the Technical Panel members who rated the indications. The method for this review was based on the RAND/UCLA approach for evaluating appropriateness, which blends scientific evidence and practice experience. A modified Delphi technique was used to obtain first- and second-round ratings of 52 clinical indications. The ratings were done by a Technical Panel with diverse membership, including nuclear cardiologists, referring physicians (including an echocardiographer), health services researchers, and a payer (chief medical officer). These results are expected to have a significant impact on physician decision making and performance, reimbursement policy, and future research directions. Periodic assessment and updating of criteria will be undertaken as needed.

  6. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Lisa G; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Huber, Adam M; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B; Pilkington, Clarissa A; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). We analysed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) and were derived from natural history data and a conjoint analysis survey. They were further validated using data from the PRINTO trial of prednisone alone compared to prednisone with methotrexate or cyclosporine and the Rituximab in Myositis (RIM) trial. At a consensus conference, experts considered 14 top candidate criteria based on their performance characteristics and clinical face validity, using nominal group technique. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model with a total improvement score of 0-100, using absolute per cent change in core set measures of minimal (≥30), moderate (≥45), and major (≥70) improvement. The same criteria were chosen for adult DM/polymyositis, with differing thresholds for improvement. The sensitivity and specificity were 89% and 91-98% for minimal improvement, 92-94% and 94-99% for moderate improvement, and 91-98% and 85-86% for major improvement, respectively, in juvenile DM patient cohorts using the IMACS and PRINTO core set measures. These criteria were validated in the PRINTO trial for differentiating between treatment arms for minimal and moderate improvement (p=0.009-0.057) and in the RIM trial for significantly differentiating the physician's rating for improvement (p<0.006). The response criteria for juvenile DM consisted of a conjoint analysis-based model using a continuous improvement score based on absolute per cent change in core set measures, with thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Real-time fluorescence imaging of the DNA damage repair response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Yamamoto, Mako; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Toneri, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Efimova, Elena V; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    The response to DNA damage during mitosis was visualized using real-time fluorescence imaging of focus formation by the DNA-damage repair (DDR) response protein 53BP1 linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) (53BP1-GFP) in the MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) pancreatic cancer cell line. To observe 53BP1-GFP foci during mitosis, MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells were imaged every 30 min by confocal microscopy. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that 11.4 ± 2.1% of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells had increased focus formation over time. Non-mitotic cells did not have an increase in 53BP1-GFP focus formation over time. Some of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells with focus formation became apoptotic. The results of the present report suggest that DNA strand breaks occur during mitosis and undergo repair, which may cause some of the mitotic cells to enter apoptosis in a phenomenon possibly related to mitotic catastrophe. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Quantification of sterol-specific response in human macrophages using automated imaged-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gater, Deborah L; Widatalla, Namareq; Islam, Kinza; AlRaeesi, Maryam; Teo, Jeremy C M; Pearson, Yanthe E

    2017-12-13

    The transformation of normal macrophage cells into lipid-laden foam cells is an important step in the progression of atherosclerosis. One major contributor to foam cell formation in vivo is the intracellular accumulation of cholesterol. Here, we report the effects of various combinations of low-density lipoprotein, sterols, lipids and other factors on human macrophages, using an automated image analysis program to quantitatively compare single cell properties, such as cell size and lipid content, in different conditions. We observed that the addition of cholesterol caused an increase in average cell lipid content across a range of conditions. All of the sterol-lipid mixtures examined were capable of inducing increases in average cell lipid content, with variations in the distribution of the response, in cytotoxicity and in how the sterol-lipid combination interacted with other activating factors. For example, cholesterol and lipopolysaccharide acted synergistically to increase cell lipid content while also increasing cell survival compared with the addition of lipopolysaccharide alone. Additionally, ergosterol and cholesteryl hemisuccinate caused similar increases in lipid content but also exhibited considerably greater cytotoxicity than cholesterol. The use of automated image analysis enables us to assess not only changes in average cell size and content, but also to rapidly and automatically compare population distributions based on simple fluorescence images. Our observations add to increasing understanding of the complex and multifactorial nature of foam-cell formation and provide a novel approach to assessing the heterogeneity of macrophage response to a variety of factors.

  9. Online detector response calculations for high-resolution PET image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratx, Guillem [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Levin, Craig, E-mail: cslevin@stanford.edu [Departments of Radiology, Physics and Electrical Engineering, and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2011-07-07

    Positron emission tomography systems are best described by a linear shift-varying model. However, image reconstruction often assumes simplified shift-invariant models to the detriment of image quality and quantitative accuracy. We investigated a shift-varying model of the geometrical system response based on an analytical formulation. The model was incorporated within a list-mode, fully 3D iterative reconstruction process in which the system response coefficients are calculated online on a graphics processing unit (GPU). The implementation requires less than 512 Mb of GPU memory and can process two million events per minute (forward and backprojection). For small detector volume elements, the analytical model compared well to reference calculations. Images reconstructed with the shift-varying model achieved higher quality and quantitative accuracy than those that used a simpler shift-invariant model. For an 8 mm sphere in a warm background, the contrast recovery was 95.8% for the shift-varying model versus 85.9% for the shift-invariant model. In addition, the spatial resolution was more uniform across the field-of-view: for an array of 1.75 mm hot spheres in air, the variation in reconstructed sphere size was 0.5 mm RMS for the shift-invariant model, compared to 0.07 mm RMS for the shift-varying model.

  10. Quality guarantee of images as a way for obtained lower levels of radiation doses in diagnostic x-ray rooms: criteria for licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    This work constitutes a criticism to the present system for licensing in diagnostic x-ray installations in Guatemala. A series of recommendations are made with the aim of obtaining the best diagnostic imaging. This procedure leads to obtain lower doses of radiation for patients and workers

  11. Image acquisition and interpretation criteria for Tc-99m-HMPAO-labelled white blood cell scintigraphy : results of a multicentre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erba, Paola A.; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Veltman, Niels C.; Sollini, Martina; Pacilio, Marta; Galli, Filippo; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Signore, Alberto

    Purpose There is no consensus yet on the best protocol for planar image acquisition and interpretation of radiolabelled white blood cell (WBC) scintigraphy. This may account for differences in reported diagnostic accuracy amongst different centres. Methods This was a multicentre retrospective study

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of treatment response of lateral epicondylitis of the elbow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savnik, Anette; Jensen, Bente; Noerregaard, Jesper; Danneskiold-Samsoee, Bente; Bliddal, Henning; Egund, Niels

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the treatment response in lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) by MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained in 30 patients with clinical symptoms of lateral epicondylitis of the elbow using T1-, T2- and T2-weighted fat-saturated (FS) sequences. The patients were randomised to either i.m. corticosteroid injection (n=16) or immobilisation in a wrist splint (n=14). Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow was performed on a 1.5-T MR system at baseline and after 6 weeks. The extensor carpi radialis (ECRB) tendon, the radial collateral ligament, lateral humerus epicondyle at tendon insertion site, joint fluid and signal intensity changes within brachio-radialis and anconeus muscles were evaluated on the MR unit's workstation before and after 6 weeks of treatment. The MRI was performed once in 22 healthy controls for comparison and all images evaluated by an investigator blinded to the clinical status of the subjects. The MR images showed thickening with separation of the ECRB tendon from the radial collateral ligament and abnormal signal change in 25 of the 30 patients on the T1-weighted sequences at inclusion. The signal intensity of the ECRB tendon was increased in 24 of the 30 patients with lateral epicondylitis of the elbow on the T2-weighted FS sequences. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of treatment response of lateral epicondylitis of the elbow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savnik, Anette [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000, Frederiksberg (Denmark); Department of Radiology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000, Frederiksberg (Denmark); Hovmarksvej 39, 2920, Charlottenlund (Denmark); Jensen, Bente; Noerregaard, Jesper; Danneskiold-Samsoee, Bente; Bliddal, Henning [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000, Frederiksberg (Denmark); Egund, Niels [Department of Radiology, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000, Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the treatment response in lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) by MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained in 30 patients with clinical symptoms of lateral epicondylitis of the elbow using T1-, T2- and T2-weighted fat-saturated (FS) sequences. The patients were randomised to either i.m. corticosteroid injection (n=16) or immobilisation in a wrist splint (n=14). Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow was performed on a 1.5-T MR system at baseline and after 6 weeks. The extensor carpi radialis (ECRB) tendon, the radial collateral ligament, lateral humerus epicondyle at tendon insertion site, joint fluid and signal intensity changes within brachio-radialis and anconeus muscles were evaluated on the MR unit's workstation before and after 6 weeks of treatment. The MRI was performed once in 22 healthy controls for comparison and all images evaluated by an investigator blinded to the clinical status of the subjects. The MR images showed thickening with separation of the ECRB tendon from the radial collateral ligament and abnormal signal change in 25 of the 30 patients on the T1-weighted sequences at inclusion. The signal intensity of the ECRB tendon was increased in 24 of the 30 patients with lateral epicondylitis of the elbow on the T2-weighted FS sequences. (orig.)

  14. IMAGE-GUIDED EVALUATION AND MONITORING OF TREATMENT RESPONSE IN PATIENTS WITH DRY EYE DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is one of the most common ocular disorders worldwide. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of DED are not well understood and thus treating DED has been a significant challenge for ophthalmologists. Most of the currently available diagnostic tests demonstrate low correlation to patient symptoms and have low reproducibility. Recently, sophisticated in vivo imaging modalities have become available for patient care, namely, in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). These emerging modalities are powerful and non-invasive, allowing real-time visualization of cellular and anatomical structures of the cornea and ocular surface. Here we discuss how, by providing both qualitative and quantitative assessment, these techniques can be used to demonstrate early subclinical disease, grade layer-by-layer severity, and allow monitoring of disease severity by cellular alterations. Imaging-guided stratification of patients may also be possible in conjunction with clinical examination methods. Visualization of subclinical changes and stratification of patients in vivo, allows objective image-guided evaluation of tailored treatment response based on cellular morphological alterations specific to each patient. This image-guided approach to DED may ultimately improve patient outcomes and allow studying the efficacy of novel therapies in clinical trials. PMID:24696045

  15. Timing and position response of a block detector for fast neutron time-of-flight imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laubach, M.A., E-mail: mlaubach@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Hayward, J.P., E-mail: jhayward@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zhang, X., E-mail: xzhang39@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Cates, J.W., E-mail: jcates7@vols.utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Our research effort seeks to improve the spatial and timing performance of a block detector made of a pixilated plastic scintillator (EJ-200), first demonstrated as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Advanced Portable Neutron Imaging System. Improvement of the position and time response is necessary to achieve better resolution and contrast in the images of shielded special nuclear material. Time-of-flight is used to differentiate between gamma and different sources of neutrons (e.g., transmission and fission neutrons). Factors limiting the timing and position performance of the neutron detector have been revealed through simulations and measurements. Simulations have suggested that the degradation in the ability to resolve pixels in the neutron detector is due to those interactions occurring near the light guide. The energy deposition within the neutron detector is shown to affect position performance and imaging efficiency. This examination details how energy cuts improve the position performance and degrade the imaging efficiency. Measurements have shown the neutron detector to have a timing resolution of σ=238 ps. The majority of this timing uncertainty is from the depth-of-interaction (DOI) of the neutron which is confirmed by simulations and analytical calculations.

  16. Imaging intratumor heterogeneity: role in therapy response, resistance, and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, James P B; Rose, Chris J; Waterton, John C; Carano, Richard A D; Parker, Geoff J M; Jackson, Alan

    2015-01-15

    Tumors exhibit genomic and phenotypic heterogeneity, which has prognostic significance and may influence response to therapy. Imaging can quantify the spatial variation in architecture and function of individual tumors through quantifying basic biophysical parameters such as CT density or MRI signal relaxation rate; through measurements of blood flow, hypoxia, metabolism, cell death, and other phenotypic features; and through mapping the spatial distribution of biochemical pathways and cell signaling networks using PET, MRI, and other emerging molecular imaging techniques. These methods can establish whether one tumor is more or less heterogeneous than another and can identify subregions with differing biology. In this article, we review the image analysis methods currently used to quantify spatial heterogeneity within tumors. We discuss how analysis of intratumor heterogeneity can provide benefit over more simple biomarkers such as tumor size and average function. We consider how imaging methods can be integrated with genomic and pathology data, instead of being developed in isolation. Finally, we identify the challenges that must be overcome before measurements of intratumoral heterogeneity can be used routinely to guide patient care. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Laser Safety Inspection Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, K

    2005-01-01

    A responsibility of the Laser Safety Officer (LSO) is to perform laser safety audits. The American National Standard Z136.1 Safe use of Lasers references this requirement in several sections: (1) Section 1.3.2 LSO Specific Responsibilities states under Hazard Evaluation, ''The LSO shall be responsible for hazards evaluation of laser work areas''; (2) Section 1.3.2.8, Safety Features Audits, ''The LSO shall ensure that the safety features of the laser installation facilities and laser equipment are audited periodically to assure proper operation''; and (3) Appendix D, under Survey and Inspections, it states, ''the LSO will survey by inspection, as considered necessary, all areas where laser equipment is used''. Therefore, for facilities using Class 3B and or Class 4 lasers, audits for laser safety compliance are expected to be conducted. The composition, frequency and rigueur of that inspection/audit rests in the hands of the LSO. A common practice for institutions is to develop laser audit checklists or survey forms. In many institutions, a sole Laser Safety Officer (LSO) or a number of Deputy LSO's perform these audits. For that matter, there are institutions that request users to perform a self-assessment audit. Many items on the common audit list and the associated findings are subjective because they are based on the experience and interest of the LSO or auditor in particular items on the checklist. Beam block usage is an example; to one set of eyes a particular arrangement might be completely adequate, while to another the installation may be inadequate. In order to provide more consistency, the National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (NIF-LLNL) has established criteria for a number of items found on the typical laser safety audit form. These criteria are distributed to laser users, and they serve two broad purposes: first, it gives the user an expectation of what will be reviewed by an auditor, and second, it is an

  18. The fMRI analysis of brain activation in response to face image affected by background images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Takamasa; Fukami, Tadanori; Saito, Yoichi

    2011-01-01

    The stimuli of a face images expressing fear induce the activation in the medial temporal lobe was reported in previous studies. In particular, it was reported that face image expressing fear activated the amygdala and hippo-campus area of brain. In these studies, no background images were used with facial stimuli. However, normal day-to-day images always have a background. We investigated the effect of combining face images expressing fear and different background images. As a result, strong activation was detected in the amygdala and hippocampus area when the lightning background image was used. But strong activation was not detected when the fire background image was used. From the results of questionnaire rating the impression of possibility of experiencing the situation of shown images, it is thought that this difference of impression of possibility made the difference of empathy and caused the difference of brain activation. (author)

  19. Measuring the Contractile Response of Isolated Tissue Using an Image Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Díaz-Martín

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Isometric or isotonic transducers have traditionally been used to study the contractile/relaxation effects of drugs on isolated tissues. However, these mechanical sensors are expensive and delicate, and they are associated with certain disadvantages when performing experiments in the laboratory. In this paper, a method that uses an image sensor to measure the contractile effect of drugs on blood vessel rings and other luminal organs is presented. The new method is based on an image-processing algorithm, and it provides a fast, easy and non-expensive way to analyze the effects of such drugs. In our tests, we have obtained dose-response curves from rat aorta rings that are equivalent to those achieved with classical mechanic sensors.

  20. Detector response restoration in image reconstruction of high resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Z.

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical method was studied to model the detector response of high spatial-resolution positron emission tomography systems consisting of close-packed small crystals, and to restore the resolution deteriorated due to crystal penetration and/or nonuniform sampling across the field-of-view (FOV). The simulated detector system had 600 bismuth germanate crystals of 3.14 mm width and 30 mm length packed on a single ring of 60 cm diameter. The space between crystal was filled up with lead. Each crystal was in coincidence with 200 opposite crystals so that the FOV had a radius of 30 cm. The detector response was modeled based on the attenuating properties of the crystals and the septa, as well as the geometry of the detector system. The modeled detector-response function was used to restore the projections from the sinogram of the ring-detector system. The restored projections had a uniform sampling of 1.57 mm across the FOV. The crystal penetration and/or the nonuniform sampling were compensated in the projections. A penalized maximum-likelihood algorithm was employed to accomplish the restoration. The restored projections were then filtered and backprojected to reconstruct the image. A chest phantom with a few small circular ''cold'' objects located at the center and near the periphery of FOV was computer generated and used to test the restoration. The reconstructed images from the restored projections demonstrated resolution improvement off the FOV center, while preserving the resolution near the center

  1. Quantitative proteomics and dynamic imaging of the nucleolus reveal distinct responses to UV and ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Henna M; Bai, Baoyan; Boisvert, François-Michel; Latonen, Leena; Rantanen, Ville; Simpson, Jeremy C; Pepperkok, Rainer; Lamond, Angus I; Laiho, Marikki

    2011-10-01

    The nucleolus is a nuclear organelle that coordinates rRNA transcription and ribosome subunit biogenesis. Recent proteomic analyses have shown that the nucleolus contains proteins involved in cell cycle control, DNA processing and DNA damage response and repair, in addition to the many proteins connected with ribosome subunit production. Here we study the dynamics of nucleolar protein responses in cells exposed to stress and DNA damage caused by ionizing and ultraviolet (UV) radiation in diploid human fibroblasts. We show using a combination of imaging and quantitative proteomics methods that nucleolar substructure and the nucleolar proteome undergo selective reorganization in response to UV damage. The proteomic responses to UV include alterations of functional protein complexes such as the SSU processome and exosome, and paraspeckle proteins, involving both decreases and increases in steady state protein ratios, respectively. Several nonhomologous end-joining proteins (NHEJ), such as Ku70/80, display similar fast responses to UV. In contrast, nucleolar proteomic responses to IR are both temporally and spatially distinct from those caused by UV, and more limited in terms of magnitude. With the exception of the NHEJ and paraspeckle proteins, where IR induces rapid and transient changes within 15 min of the damage, IR does not alter the ratios of most other functional nucleolar protein complexes. The rapid transient decrease of NHEJ proteins in the nucleolus indicates that it may reflect a response to DNA damage. Our results underline that the nucleolus is a specific stress response organelle that responds to different damage and stress agents in a unique, damage-specific manner.

  2. No-reference stereoscopic image quality measurement based on generalized local ternary patterns of binocular energy response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Wujie; Yu, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual no-reference (NR) quality measurement of stereoscopic images has become a challenging issue in three-dimensional (3D) imaging fields. In this article, we propose an efficient binocular quality-aware features extraction scheme, namely generalized local ternary patterns (GLTP) of binocular energy response, for general-purpose NR stereoscopic image quality measurement (SIQM). More specifically, we first construct the binocular energy response of a distorted stereoscopic image with different stimuli of amplitude and phase shifts. Then, the binocular quality-aware features are generated from the GLTP of the binocular energy response. Finally, these features are mapped to the subjective quality score of the distorted stereoscopic image by using support vector regression. Experiments on two publicly available 3D databases confirm the effectiveness of the proposed metric compared with the state-of-the-art full reference and NR metrics. (paper)

  3. Imaging HER2 in response to T-DM1 therapy in breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massicano, Adriana Vidal; Aweda, Tolulope; Marqueznostra, Bernadette; El Sayed, Reeta; Beacham, Rebecca; Lapi, Suzanne [University Of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become broadly used for the treatment of cancer because they can be engineered to bind specifically to the target and therefore typically have less toxicity compared to broad spectrum chemotherapies (Jauw YWS, Menke-van der Houven van Oordt CW, Hoekstra OS, et al. Front Pharmacol 2016, 7:1-15). Ado-trastuzumab emtansine (TDM1) is a newly approved HER2 targeted therapy which consists of a cytotoxic agent (DM1) linked to trastuzumab and has shown promising results in patients with HER2 positive metastatic breast cancer (Barok MT, Köninki M, Isola K et al. Breast Cancer Res 2011, 13:1465-5411). Although {sup 18}F-FDG is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis and staging of various types of cancer, it is a relatively non-specific marker (Janjigian YY, Viola-Villegas N, Holland JP, Divilov V, Carlin SD et al. J Nucl Med 2013;54:936-43). Alternatively, {sup 89}Zr-Pertuzumab which binds to a different epitope than trastuzumab on the HER2 receptor has shown high selectively in imaging variations in HER2 expression in breast cancer xenograft models (Marquez BV, Ikotun OF, Zheleznyak A, Wright B et al. Mol Pharm 2014;11:3988-95). Therefore, in this work, we investigated the specificity of {sup 89}Zr-Pertuzumab compared to {sup 18}F-FDG to identify early response to ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) in a breast cancer xenograft model. Methods: Pertuzumab was conjugated top-NCS-Bz-DFO at varying molar ratios and labeled with {sup 89}Zr in different conditions. The optimal conditions were used in further in vitro and in vivo studies. In vivo PET imaging was conducted in nude female mice implanted with 17β-estradiol pellets and inoculated with 1 x 107 BT-474 HER2 positive breast cancer cells. In order to acquire baseline images, mice were injected via tail-vein with 200 μCi of 18F-FDG and imaged after 1 hour. The following day, they were injected with 100 μCi of {sup 89}Zr-Pertuzumab (20 μCi/μg) imaged 5

  4. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M.; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28–83) provided informed consent. T 2 - and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm 2 /s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6–8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs ( −3 mm 2 /s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p 23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC ≥1.4 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2–4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT.

  5. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in monitoring rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T(2)- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm(2)/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Low pretreatment ADCs (23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC ≥1.4 × 10(-3)mm(2)/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Leptin is associated with exaggerated brain reward and emotion responses to food images in adolescent obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastreboff, Ania M; Lacadie, Cheryl; Seo, Dongju; Kubat, Jessica; Van Name, Michelle A; Giannini, Cosimo; Savoye, Mary; Constable, R Todd; Sherwin, Robert S; Caprio, Sonia; Sinha, Rajita

    2014-11-01

    In the U.S., an astonishing 12.5 million children and adolescents are now obese, predisposing 17% of our nation's youth to metabolic complications of obesity, such as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Adolescent obesity has tripled over the last three decades in the setting of food advertising directed at children. Obese adults exhibit increased brain responses to food images in motivation-reward pathways. These neural alterations may be attributed to obesity-related metabolic changes, which promote food craving and high-calorie food (HCF) consumption. It is not known whether these metabolic changes affect neural responses in the adolescent brain during a crucial period for establishing healthy eating behaviors. Twenty-five obese (BMI 34.4 kg/m2, age 15.7 years) and fifteen lean (BMI 20.96 kg/m2, age 15.5 years) adolescents underwent functional MRI during exposure to HCF, low-calorie food (LCF), and nonfood (NF) visual stimuli 2 h after isocaloric meal consumption. Brain responses to HCF relative to NF cues increased in obese versus lean adolescents in striatal-limbic regions (i.e., putamen/caudate, insula, amygdala) (P < 0.05, family-wise error [FWE]), involved in motivation-reward and emotion processing. Higher endogenous leptin levels correlated with increased neural activation to HCF images in all subjects (P < 0.05, FWE). This significant association between higher circulating leptin and hyperresponsiveness of brain motivation-reward regions to HCF images suggests that dysfunctional leptin signaling may contribute to the risk of overconsumption of these foods, thus further predisposing adolescents to the development of obesity and T2D. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  7. Vibration Response Imaging: evaluation of rater agreement in healthy subjects and subjects with pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartziokas, Konstantinos; Daenas, Christos; Preau, Sebastien; Zygoulis, Paris; Triantaris, Apostolos; Kerenidi, Theodora; Makris, Demosthenes; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Daniil, Zoe

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated pulmonologists variability in the interpretation of Vibration response imaging (VRI) obtained from healthy subjects and patients hospitalized for community acquired pneumonia. The present is a prospective study conducted in a tertiary university hospital. Twenty healthy subjects and twenty three pneumonia cases were included in this study. Six pulmonologists blindly analyzed images of normal subjects and pneumonia cases and evaluated different aspects of VRI images related to the quality of data aquisition, synchronization of the progression of breath sound distribution and agreement between the maximal energy frame (MEF) of VRI (which is the maximal geographical area of lung vibrations produced at maximal inspiration) and chest radiography. For qualitative assessment of VRI images, the raters' evaluations were analyzed by degree of consistency and agreement. The average value for overall identical evaluations of twelve features of the VRI image evaluation, ranged from 87% to 95% per rater (94% to 97% in control cases and from 79% to 93% per rater in pneumonia cases). Inter-rater median (IQR) agreement was 91% (82-96). The level of agreement according to VRI feature evaluated was in most cases over 80%; intra-class correlation (ICC) obtained by using a model of subject/rater for the averaged features was overall 0.86 (0.92 in normal and 0.73 in pneumonia cases). Our findings suggest good agreement in the interpretation of VRI data between different raters. In this respect, VRI might be helpful as a radiation free diagnostic tool for the management of pneumonia

  8. Vibration Response Imaging: evaluation of rater agreement in healthy subjects and subjects with pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makris Demosthenes

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We evaluated pulmonologists variability in the interpretation of Vibration response imaging (VRI obtained from healthy subjects and patients hospitalized for community acquired pneumonia. Methods The present is a prospective study conducted in a tertiary university hospital. Twenty healthy subjects and twenty three pneumonia cases were included in this study. Six pulmonologists blindly analyzed images of normal subjects and pneumonia cases and evaluated different aspects of VRI images related to the quality of data aquisition, synchronization of the progression of breath sound distribution and agreement between the maximal energy frame (MEF of VRI (which is the maximal geographical area of lung vibrations produced at maximal inspiration and chest radiography. For qualitative assessment of VRI images, the raters' evaluations were analyzed by degree of consistency and agreement. Results The average value for overall identical evaluations of twelve features of the VRI image evaluation, ranged from 87% to 95% per rater (94% to 97% in control cases and from 79% to 93% per rater in pneumonia cases. Inter-rater median (IQR agreement was 91% (82-96. The level of agreement according to VRI feature evaluated was in most cases over 80%; intra-class correlation (ICC obtained by using a model of subject/rater for the averaged features was overall 0.86 (0.92 in normal and 0.73 in pneumonia cases. Conclusions Our findings suggest good agreement in the interpretation of VRI data between different raters. In this respect, VRI might be helpful as a radiation free diagnostic tool for the management of pneumonia.

  9. The Role of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Treatment Response Evaluation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Choi, Yunseon; Jung, Sang Hoon; Paik, Seung Woon; Kim, Seong Hyun; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Kim, Young Kon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) as a response evaluation indicator for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria of this retrospective study were DW MRI acquisition within 1 month before and 3 to 5 months after RT. In total, 48 patients were enrolled. Two radiation oncologists measured the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Possible predictive factors, including alteration of the ADC value before and 3 to 5 month after RT, in relation to local progression-free survival (LPFS) were analyzed and compared. Results: Three months after RT, 6 patients (12.5%) showed a complete response, and 27 patients (56.3%) showed a partial response when evaluated using the modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). The average ADC ± SD values were 1.21 ± 0.27 ( × 10 −3  mm 2 /s) before and 1.41 ± 0.36 ( × 10 −3  mm 2 /s) after RT (P<.001). The most significant prognostic factor related to LPFS was mRECIST (P<.001). The increment of ADC value (≥20%) was also a significant factor (P=.02), but RECIST (version 1.1; P=.11) was not. When RECIST was combined with the increment of ADC value (≥20%), the LPFS rates were significantly different between the groups (P=.004), and the area under the curve value (0.745) was comparable with that of mRECIST (0.765). Conclusions: ADC value change before and after RT in HCC was closely related to LPFS. ADC value and RECIST may substitute for mRECIST in patients who cannot receive contrast agents

  10. Characterizing the inflammatory tissue response to acute myocardial infarction by clinical multimodality noninvasive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenweber, Tim; Roentgen, Philipp; Schäfer, Andreas; Schatka, Imke; Zwadlo, Caroline; Brunkhorst, Thomas; Berding, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann; Bengel, Frank M

    2014-09-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) triggers a systemic inflammatory response which determines subsequent healing. Experimentally, cardiac positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have been used successfully to obtain mechanistic insights. We explored the translational potential in patients early after MI. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance were performed in 15 patients sources of inflammatory cells. Positron emission tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance multimodality characterization of the acutely infarcted, inflamed myocardium may provide multiparametric end points for clinical studies aiming at support of infarct healing. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Position paper: Seismic design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnworth, S.K.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document the seismic design criteria to be used on the Title 11 design of the underground double-shell waste storage tanks and appurtenant facilities of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) project, and to provide the history and methodologies for determining the recommended Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) anchors for site-specific seismic response spectra curves. Response spectra curves for use in design are provided in Appendix A

  12. Toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, D.K.; Davis, J.; Lee, L.; Lein, P.; Omberg, S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents recommendations of a subcommittee of the Westinghouse M ampersand 0 Nuclear Facility Safety Committee concerning toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria. Two sets of criteria have been developed, one for use in the hazard classification of facilities, and the second for use in comparing risks in DOE non-reactor nuclear facility Safety Analysis Reports. The Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) values are intended to provide estimates of concentration ranges for specific chemicals above which exposure would be expected to lead to adverse heath effects of increasing severity for ERPG-1, -2, and -3s. The subcommittee recommends that criteria for hazard class or risk range be based on ERPGs for all chemicals. Probability-based Incremental Cancer Risk (ICR) criteria are recommended for additional analyses of risks from all known or suspected human carcinogens. Criteria are given for both on-site and off-site exposure. The subcommittee also recommends that the 5-minute peak concentration be compared with the relevant criterion with no adjustment for exposure time. Since ERPGs are available for only a limited number of chemicals, the subcommittee has developed a proposed hierarchy of concentration limit parameters for the different criteria

  13. The effect of animated images on persuasion: The mediator role of hedonic responses and the moderator role of product category

    OpenAIRE

    Hussant-Zebian, Rola

    2004-01-01

    This paper aims to highlight the mediator role of hedonic responses in the relation between animated images and attitudinal responses. It has another objective which is to show off the moderator role of product category. To this purpose, we have manipulated two categories of advertising opposing computer animated to non-computer animated images. We have also seetwo product categories : a high involvement product and a low involvement one.

  14. (99m)Tc-Annexin A5 quantification of apoptotic tumor response: a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical imaging trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhocine, Tarik Z; Blankenberg, Francis G; Kartachova, Marina S; Stitt, Larry W; Vanderheyden, Jean-Luc; Hoebers, Frank J P; Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    (99m)Tc-Annexin A5 has been used as a molecular imaging probe for the visualization, characterization and measurement of apoptosis. In an effort to define the quantitative (99m)Tc-annexin A5 uptake criteria that best predict tumor response to treatment, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the results of all clinical imaging trials found in the literature or publicly available databases. Included in this review were 17 clinical trials investigating quantitative (99m)Tc-annexin A5 (qAnx5) imaging using different parameters in cancer patients before and after the first course of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Qualitative assessment of the clinical studies for diagnostic accuracy was performed using the QUADAS-2 criteria. Of these studies, five prospective single-center clinical trials (92 patients in total) were included in the meta-analysis after exclusion of one multicenter clinical trial due to heterogeneity. Pooled positive predictive values (PPV) and pooled negative predictive values (NPV) (with 95% CI) were calculated using Meta-Disc software version 1.4. Absolute quantification and/or relative quantification of (99m)Tc-annexin A5 uptake were performed at baseline and after the start of treatment. Various quantitative parameters have been used for the calculation of (99m)Tc-annexin A5 tumor uptake and delta (Δ) tumor changes post-treatment compared to baseline including: tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), ΔTBR, tumor-to-noise ratio, relative tumor ratio (TR), ΔTR, standardized tumor uptake ratio (STU), ΔSTU, maximum count per pixel within the tumor volume (Cmax), Cmax%, absolute ΔU and percentage (ΔU%), maximum ΔU counts, semiquantitative visual scoring, percent injected dose (%ID) and %ID/cm(3). Clinical trials investigating qAnx5 imaging have included patients with lung cancer, lymphoma, breast cancer, head and neck cancer and other less common tumor types. In two phase I/II single-center clinical trials, an increase of ≥25% in

  15. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Early After Chemoradiotherapy to Monitor Treatment Response in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandecaveye, Vincent, E-mail: Vincent.Vandecaveye@uzleuven.be [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium); Dirix, Piet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium); De Keyzer, Frederik; Op de Beeck, Katya [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium); Vander Poorten, Vincent [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium); Hauben, Esther [Department of Pathology, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium); Lambrecht, Maarten; Nuyts, Sandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium); Hermans, Robert [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for assessment of treatment response in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) three weeks after the end of chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients with HNSCC underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to and 3 weeks after CRT, including T{sub 2}-weighted and pre- and postcontrast T{sub 1}-weighted sequences and an echo-planar DWI sequence with six b values (0 to 1,000 s/mm{sup 2}), from which the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was calculated. ADC changes 3 weeks posttreatment compared to baseline ( Increment ADC) between responding and nonresponding primary lesions and adenopathies were correlated with 2 years locoregional control and compared with a Mann-Whitney test. In a blinded manner, the Increment ADC was compared to conventional MRI 3 weeks post-CRT and the routinely implemented CT, on average 3 months post-CRT, which used size-related and morphological criteria. Positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) were compared between the Increment ADC and anatomical imaging. Results: The Increment ADC of lesions with later tumor recurrence was significantly lower than lesions with complete remission for both primary lesions (-2.3% {+-} 0.3% vs. 80% {+-} 41%; p < 0.0001) and adenopathies (19.9% {+-} 32% vs. 63% {+-} 36%; p = 0.003). The Increment ADC showed a PPV of 89% and an NPV of 100% for primary lesions and a PPV of 70% and an NPV of 96% for adenopathies per neck side. DWI improved PPV and NPV compared to anatomical imaging. Conclusion: DWI with the Increment ADC 3 weeks after concluding CRT for HNSCC allows for early assessment of treatment response.

  16. Assessment of treatment response in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis using advanced magnetic resonance imaging measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven C.; Heba, Elhamy; Bettencourt, Ricki; Lin, Grace Y.; Valasek, Mark A.; Lunde, Ottar; Hamilton, Gavin; Sirlin, Claude B.; Loomba, Rohit

    2017-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging derived measures of liver fat and volume are emerging as accurate, non-invasive imaging biomarkers in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Little is known about these measures in relation to histology longitudinally. Aims This study examines this relationship between MRI-derived proton-density fat-fraction (PDFF), total liver volume (TLV), total liver fat index (TLFI), vs. histology in a NASH trial. Methods This is a secondary analysis of a 24-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 50 patients with biopsy-proven NASH randomized to oral ezetimibe 10mg daily (n=25) vs. placebo (n=25). Baseline and post-treatment anthropometrics, biochemical profiling, MRI, and biopsies were obtained. Results Baseline mean PDFF correlated strongly with TLFI (Spearman’s ρ=0.94, n=45, PMRI-PDFF vs. TLV indicates that 10% reduction in MRI-PDFF predicts 257 mL reduction in TLV. Conclusions MRI-PDFF and TLV strongly correlated with TLFI. Decreases in steatosis were associated with an improvement in hepatomegaly. Lower values of these measures reflect lower histologic-steatosis grades. MRI-derived measures of liver fat and volume may be used as dynamic and more responsive imaging biomarkers in a NASH trial than histology. ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01766713. PMID:28116801

  17. Semiautomated volumetric response evaluation as an imaging biomarker in superior sulcus tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, C.G.; Paul, M.A.; Dahele, M.; Soernsen de Koste, J.R. van; Senan, S.; Bahce, I.; Smit, E.F.; Thunnissen, E.; Hartemink, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric response to therapy has been suggested as a biomarker for patient-centered outcomes. The primary aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether the volumetric response to induction chemoradiotherapy was associated with pathological complete response (pCR) or survival in patients with superior sulcus tumors managed with trimodality therapy. The secondary aim was to evaluate a semiautomated method for serial volume assessment. In this retrospective study, treatment outcomes were obtained from a departmental database. The tumor was delineated on the computed tomography (CT) scan used for radiotherapy planning, which was typically performed during the first cycle of chemotherapy. These contours were transferred to the post-chemoradiotherapy diagnostic CT scan using deformable image registration (DIR) with/without manual editing. CT scans from 30 eligible patients were analyzed. Median follow-up was 51 months. Neither absolute nor relative reduction in tumor volume following chemoradiotherapy correlated with pCR or 2-year survival. The tumor volumes determined by DIR alone and DIR + manual editing correlated to a high degree (R 2 = 0.99, P < 0.01). Volumetric response to induction chemoradiotherapy was not correlated with pCR or survival in patients with superior sulcus tumors managed with trimodality therapy. DIR-based contour propagation merits further evaluation as a tool for serial volumetric assessment. (orig.)

  18. High-Speed imaging of the plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations in HBT-EP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, Sarah M; Levesque, Jeffrey P; Mauel, Michael E; Navratil, Gerald A

    2015-01-01

    A Phantom v7.3 fast digital camera was used to study visible light fluctuations in the High Beta Tokamak–Extended Pulse (HBT–EP). This video data is the first to be used to analyze and understand the behavior of long wavelength kink perturbations in a wall-stabilized tokamak. The light was mostly comprised of Dα 656 nm light. Profiles of the plasma light at the midplane were hollow with a radial scale length of approximately 4 cm at the plasma edge. The fast camera was also used to measure the plasma’s response to applied helical magnetic perturbations. The programmed toroidal phase angle of the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) was directly inferred from the resulting images of the plasma response. The plasma response and the intensity of the RMP were compared under different conditions. The resulting amplitude correlations are consistent with previous measurements of the static response using an array of magnetic sensors. (paper)

  19. Imaging Tumor Variation in Response to Photodynamic Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Rizvi, Imran; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pereira, Stephen P.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A treatment monitoring study investigated the differential effects of orthotopic pancreatic cancer models in response to interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT), and the validity of using magnetic resonance imaging as a surrogate measure of response was assessed. Methods and Materials: Different orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenograft models (AsPC-1 and Panc-1) were used to represent the range of pathophysiology observed in human beings. Identical dose escalation studies (10, 20, and 40J/cm) using interstitial verteporfin PDT were performed, and magnetic resonance imaging with T2-weighted and T1-weighted contrast were used to monitor the total tumor volume and the vascular perfusion volume, respectively. Results: There was a significant amount of necrosis in the slower-growing Panc-1 tumor using high light dose, although complete necrosis was not observed. Lower doses were required for the same level of tumor kill in the faster-growing AsPC-1 cell line. Conclusions: The tumor growth rate and vascular pattern of the tumor affect the optimal PDT treatment regimen, with faster-growing tumors being relatively easier to treat. This highlights the fact that therapy in human beings shows a heterogeneous range of outcomes, and suggests a need for careful individualized treatment outcomes assessment in clinical work.

  20. Proton magnetic spectroscopic imaging of the child's brain: the response of tumors to treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzika, A.A.; Young Poussaint, T.; Astrakas, L.G.; Barnes, P.D.; Goumnerova, L.; Scott, R.M.; Black, P.McL.; Anthony, D.C.; Billett, A.L.; Tarbell, N.J.

    2001-01-01

    Our aim was to determine and/or predict response to treatment of brain tumors in children using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). We studied 24 patients aged 10 months to 24 years, using MRI and point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS; TR 2000 TE 65 ms) with volume preselection and phase-encoding in two dimensions on a 1.5 T imager. Multiple logistic regression was used to establish independent predictors of active tumor growth. Biologically vital cell metabolites, such as N-acetyl aspartate and choline-containing compounds (Cho), were significantly different between tumor and control tissues (P<0.001). The eight brain tumors which responded to radiation or chemotherapy, exhibited lower Cho (P=0.05), higher total creatine (tCr) (P=0.02) and lower lactate and lipid (L) (P=0.04) than16 tumors which were not treated (except by surgery) or did not respond to treatment. The only significant independent predictor of active tumor growth was tCr (P<0.01). We suggest that tCr is useful in assessing response of brain tumors to treatment. (orig.)

  1. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear wasite: site performance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    This report states ten criteria governing the suitability of sites for mined geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Department of Energy will use these criteria in its search for sites and will reevaluate their use when the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues radioactive waste repository rules. These criteria encompass site geometry, geohydrology, geochemistry, geologic characteristics, tectonic environment, human intrusion, surface characteristics, environment, and potential socioeconomic impacts. The contents of this document include background discussion, site performance criteria, and appendices. The background section describes the waste disposal system, the application of the site criteria, and applicable criteria from NWTS-33(1) - Program Objectives, Functional Requirements and System Performance Criteria. Appendix A, entitled Comparison with Other Siting Criteria compares the NWTS criteria with those recommended by other agencies. Appendix B contains DOE responses to public comments received on the January 1980 draft of this document. Appendix C is a glossary

  2. Clinical relevance of the ROC and free-response paradigms for comparing imaging system efficacies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, D. P.

    2010-01-01

    Observer performance studies are widely used to assess medical imaging systems. Unlike technical/engineering measurements observer performance include the entire imaging chain and the radiologist. However, the widely used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method ignores lesion localisation information. The free-response ROC (FROC) method uses the location information to appropriately reward or penalise correct or incorrect localizations, respectively. This paper describes a method for improving the clinical relevance of FROC studies. The method consists of assigning appropriate risk values to the different lesions that may be present on a single image. A high-risk lesion is one that is critical to detect and act upon, and is assigned a higher risk value than a low-risk lesion, one that is relatively innocuous. Instead of simply counting the number of lesions that are detected, as is done in conventional FROC analysis, a risk-weighted count is used. This has the advantage of rewarding detections of high-risk lesions commensurately more than detections of lower risk lesions. Simulations were used to demonstrate that the new method, termed case-based analysis, results in a higher figure of merit for an expert who detects more high-risk lesions than a naive observer who detects more low-risk lesions, even though both detect the same total number of lesions. Conventional free-response analysis is unable to distinguish between the two types of observers. This paper also comments on the issue of clinical relevance of ROC analysis vs. FROC for tasks that involve lesion localisation. (authors)

  3. 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging at 3 Tesla for Early Response Assessment of Glioblastoma Patients During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P.; Smith, Brian J.; Anderson, Carryn M.; Morris, Ann; Capizzano, Aristides A.; Magnotta, Vincent; McGuire, Sarah M.; Smith, Mark C.; Bayouth, John E.; Buatti, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium-enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17 to 20 fractions of radiation therapy. All patients received standard radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Imaging for response assessment consisted of MR scans every 2 months. Progression-free survival was defined by the criteria of MacDonald et al. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline/N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel-by-voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of RT. Changes in Cho/NAA between pretherapy and third-week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression-free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: After a median follow-up time of 8.6 months, 50% of patients had experienced progression based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (P<.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the third-week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (P<.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the third-week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.71; P=.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥2 volume, where recurrence most often occurred. Conclusion: Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of

  4. 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging at 3 Tesla for Early Response Assessment of Glioblastoma Patients During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Smith, Brian J. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Anderson, Carryn M.; Morris, Ann [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Capizzano, Aristides A.; Magnotta, Vincent [Department of Radiology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); McGuire, Sarah M.; Smith, Mark C.; Bayouth, John E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Buatti, John M., E-mail: john-buatti@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium-enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17 to 20 fractions of radiation therapy. All patients received standard radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Imaging for response assessment consisted of MR scans every 2 months. Progression-free survival was defined by the criteria of MacDonald et al. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline/N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel-by-voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of RT. Changes in Cho/NAA between pretherapy and third-week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression-free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: After a median follow-up time of 8.6 months, 50% of patients had experienced progression based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (P<.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the third-week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (P<.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the third-week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.71; P=.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥2 volume, where recurrence most often occurred. Conclusion: Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of

  5. 3-Dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging at 3 Tesla for early response assessment of glioblastoma patients during external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P; Smith, Brian J; Anderson, Carryn M; Morris, Ann; Capizzano, Aristides A; Magnotta, Vincent; McGuire, Sarah M; Smith, Mark C; Bayouth, John E; Buatti, John M

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the utility of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium-enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17 to 20 fractions of radiation therapy. All patients received standard radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Imaging for response assessment consisted of MR scans every 2 months. Progression-free survival was defined by the criteria of MacDonald et al. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline/N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel-by-voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of RT. Changes in Cho/NAA between pretherapy and third-week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression-free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. After a median follow-up time of 8.6 months, 50% of patients had experienced progression based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (P<.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the third-week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (P<.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the third-week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.71; P=.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥2 volume, where recurrence most often occurred. Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of early progression. The potential impact for risk

  6. Presence of a predator image in potential breeding sites and oviposition responses of a dengue vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieng, Hamady; Satho, Tomomitsu; Suradi, Nur Farrahana Binti; Hakim, Hafijah; Abang, Fatimah; Aliasan, Nur Ezzati; Miake, Fumio; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Kassim, Nur Faeza A; Majid, Abdul Hafiz A; Fadzly, Nik; Vargas, Ronald E Morales; Morales, Noppawan P; Noweg, Gabriel Tonga

    2017-12-01

    In dengue vector control, attempts to minimize or replace the use of pesticides have mostly involved use of predators, but success has been severely impeded by difficulties associated with financial and environmental costs, predator mass production, and persistence in target habitats. Visual deterrents have been used successfully to control animal pests, in some cases in an effort to replace pesticide use. Despite evidence that visual signals are crucial in site choice for egg deposition by dengue vectors, and that female mosquitoes respond to artificial predation, the role of predator intimidation as it affects the oviposition behavior of dengue vectors remains largely unexplored. Here, we examined the oviposition responses of Aedes aegypti exposed to various mosquito predator pictures. Gravid females were presented with equal opportunities to oviposit in two cups with predator images [Toxorhynchites splendens-TXI, Goldfish (Carassius auratus)-small (SFI) and large (LFI) and Tx. splendens+Goldfish-TXFI] and two others without pictures. Differences in egg deposition were examined between sites with and without these images. When given a chance to oviposit in cups with and without TXI, Ae. aegypti females were similarly attracted to both sites. When provided an opportunity to oviposit in cups displaying pictures of fish (SFI or LFI) and blank cups, egg deposition rates were much lower in the fish picture sites. Females showed a preference for blank cups over TXFI for egg deposition. They also equally avoided cups with pictures of fish, regardless of the size of the picture. Our results indicate that the presence of images of goldfish and their association with Tx. larvae significantly reduced egg deposition by Ae. aegypti, and this was not the case with the predatory larvae alone. The observations that the images of natural predators can repel gravid females of a dengue vector provide novel possibilities to develop effective and inexpensive alternative tools to

  7. Quantitative correlational study of microbubble-enhanced ultrasound imaging and magnetic resonance imaging of glioma and early response to radiotherapy in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chen [Department of Ultrasound, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310022 (China); Lee, Dong-Hoon; Zhang, Kai; Li, Wenxiao; Zhou, Jinyuan [Division of MR Research, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Mangraviti, Antonella; Tyler, Betty [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Su, Lin; Zhang, Yin; Zhang, Bin; Wong, John; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Velarde, Esteban; Ding, Kai, E-mail: kding1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy remains a major treatment method for malignant tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard modality for assessing glioma treatment response in the clinic. Compared to MRI, ultrasound imaging is low-cost and portable and can be used during intraoperative procedures. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively compare contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging and MRI of irradiated gliomas in rats and to determine which quantitative ultrasound imaging parameters can be used for the assessment of early response to radiation in glioma. Methods: Thirteen nude rats with U87 glioma were used. A small thinned skull window preparation was performed to facilitate ultrasound imaging and mimic intraoperative procedures. Both CEUS and MRI with structural, functional, and molecular imaging parameters were performed at preradiation and at 1 day and 4 days postradiation. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the correlations between MRI and CEUS parameters and the changes between pre- and postradiation imaging. Results: Area under the curve (AUC) in CEUS showed significant difference between preradiation and 4 days postradiation, along with four MRI parameters, T{sub 2}, apparent diffusion coefficient, cerebral blood flow, and amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) (all p < 0.05). The APTw signal was correlated with three CEUS parameters, rise time (r = − 0.527, p < 0.05), time to peak (r = − 0.501, p < 0.05), and perfusion index (r = 458, p < 0.05). Cerebral blood flow was correlated with rise time (r = − 0.589, p < 0.01) and time to peak (r = − 0.543, p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI can be used for the assessment of radiotherapy treatment response and CEUS with AUC as a new technique and can also be one of the assessment methods for early response to radiation in glioma.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Identifies Differential Response to Pro-Oxidant Chemotherapy in a Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry H. Landowski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Induction of oxidative stress is a key component of cancer therapy. Pro-oxidant drugs have been demonstrated to enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. An emerging concept is that therapeutic outcomes are dictated by the differential redox buffering reserve in subpopulations of malignant cells, indicating the need for noninvasive biomarkers of tumor redox that can be used for dose identification and response assessment in a longitudinal setting. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI enhanced with the thiol-binding contrast agent Gd-LC6-SH, and hemodynamic response imaging (HRI in combination with hypercapnia and hyperoxia were investigated as biomarkers of the pharmacodynamics of the small molecule pro-oxidant imexon (IMX. Human multiple myeloma cell lines 8226/S and an IMX-resistant variant, 8226/IM10, were established as contralateral tumors in SCID mice. T1slope, an MRI measure of the washout rate of Gd-LC6-SH, was significantly lower post-IMX therapy in 8226/S tumors compared with vehicle controls, indicating treatment-related oxidization of the tumor microenvironment, which was confirmed by analysis of tumor tissue for thiols. T1slope and ex vivo assays for thiols both indicated a more reduced microenvironment in 8226/IM10 tumors following IMX therapy. HRI with hypercapnia challenge revealed IMX inhibition of vascular dilation in 8226/S tumors but not 8226/IM10 tumors, consistent with decreased immunohistochemical staining for smooth muscle actin in treated 8226/S tumors. MRI enhanced with Gd-LC6-SH, and HRI coupled with a hypercapnic challenge provide noninvasive biomarkers of tumor response to the redox modulator imexon.

  9. Laser Safety Inspection Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, K.

    2005-01-01

    A responsibility of the Laser Safety Officer (LSO) is to perform laser audits. The American National Standard Z136.1 Safe Use of Lasers references this requirement through several sections. One such reference is Section 1.3.2.8, Safety Features Audits, ''The LSO shall ensure that the safety features of the laser installation facilities and laser equipment are audited periodically to assure proper operation''. The composition, frequency and rigor of that inspection/audit rests in the hands of the LSO. A common practice for institutions is to develop laser audit checklists or survey forms It is common for audit findings from one inspector or inspection to the next to vary even when reviewing the same material. How often has one heard a comment, ''well this area has been inspected several times over the years and no one ever said this or that was a problem before''. A great number of audit items, and therefore findings, are subjective because they are based on the experience and interest of the auditor to particular items on the checklist. Beam block usage, to one set of eyes might be completely adequate, while to another, inadequate. In order to provide consistency, the Laser Safety Office of the National Ignition Facility Directorate has established criteria for a number of items found on the typical laser safety audit form. The criteria are distributed to laser users. It serves two broad purposes; first, it gives the user an expectation of what will be reviewed by an auditor. Second, it is an opportunity to explain audit items to the laser user and thus the reasons for some of these items, such as labelling of beam blocks

  10. Calibration of BAS-TR image plate response to high energy (3-300 MeV) carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, D.; Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Fernandez, J.; Cerchez, M.; Gray, R. J.; Hanton, F.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Neely, D.; Romagnani, L.; Ruiz, J. A.; Sarri, G.; Scullion, C.; Streeter, M.; Swantusch, M.; Willi, O.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the calibration of Fuji BAS-TR image plate (IP) response to high energy carbon ions of different charge states by employing an intense laser-driven ion source, which allowed access to carbon energies up to 270 MeV. The calibration method consists of employing a Thomson parabola spectrometer to separate and spectrally resolve different ion species, and a slotted CR-39 solid state detector overlayed onto an image plate for an absolute calibration of the IP signal. An empirical response function was obtained which can be reasonably extrapolated to higher ion energies. The experimental data also show that the IP response is independent of ion charge states.

  11. Regional Ventilation Changes in the Lung: Treatment Response Mapping by Using Hyperpolarized Gas MR Imaging as a Quantitative Biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Felix C; Marshall, Helen; Collier, Guilhem J; Kay, Richard; Siddiqui, Salman; Brightling, Christopher E; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M

    2017-09-01

    Purpose To assess the magnitude of regional response to respiratory therapeutic agents in the lungs by using treatment response mapping (TRM) with hyperpolarized gas magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. TRM was used to quantify regional physiologic response in adults with asthma who underwent a bronchodilator challenge. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the national research ethics committee and was performed with informed consent. Imaging was performed in 20 adult patients with asthma by using hyperpolarized helium 3 ( 3 He) ventilation MR imaging. Two sets of baseline images were acquired before inhalation of a bronchodilating agent (salbutamol 400 μg), and one set was acquired after. All images were registered for voxelwise comparison. Regional treatment response, ΔR(r), was calculated as the difference in regional gas distribution (R[r] = ratio of inhaled gas to total volume of a voxel when normalized for lung inflation volume) before and after intervention. A voxelwise activation threshold from the variability of the baseline images was applied to ΔR(r) maps. The summed global treatment response map (ΔR net ) was then used as a global lung index for comparison with metrics of bronchodilator response measured by using spirometry and the global imaging metric percentage ventilated volume (%VV). Results ΔR net showed significant correlation (P treatment effect was detected with all metrics; however, ΔR net showed a lower intersubject coefficient of variation (64%) than all of the other tests (coefficient of variation, ≥99%). Conclusion TRM provides regional quantitative information on changes in inhaled gas ventilation in response to therapy. This method could be used as a sensitive regional outcome metric for novel respiratory interventions. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  12. Tumor dose-volume response in image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeron, Renaud; Castelnau-Marchand, Pauline; Escande, Alexandre; Rivin Del Campo, Eleonor; Maroun, Pierre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Chargari, Cyrus; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided adaptive brachytherapy is a high precision technique that allows dose escalation and adaptation to tumor response. Two monocentric studies reported continuous dose-volume response relationships, however, burdened by large confidence intervals. The aim was to refine these estimations by performing a meta-regression analysis based on published series. Eligibility was limited to series reporting dosimetric parameters according to the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European SocieTy for Radiation Oncology recommendations. The local control rates reported at 2-3 years were confronted to the mean D90 clinical target volume (CTV) in 2-Gy equivalent using the probit model. The impact of each series on the relationships was pondered according to the number of patients reported. An exhaustive literature search retrieved 13 series reporting on 1299 patients. D90 high-risk CTV ranged from 70.9 to 93.1 Gy. The probit model showed a significant correlation between the D90 and the probability of achieving local control (p < 0.0001). The D90 associated to a 90% probability of achieving local control was 81.4 Gy (78.3-83.8 Gy). The planning aim of 90 Gy corresponded to a 95.0% probability (92.8-96.3%). For the intermediate-risk CTV, less data were available, with 873 patients from eight institutions. Reported mean D90 intermediate-risk CTV ranged from 61.7 to 69.1 Gy. A significant dose-volume effect was observed (p = 0.009). The D90 of 60 Gy was associated to a 79.4% (60.2-86.0%) local control probability. Based on published data from a high number of patients, significant dose-volume effect relationships were confirmed and refined between the D90 of both CTV and the probability of achieving local control. Further studies based on individual data are required to develop nomograms including nondosimetric prognostic criteria. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Basic dose response of fluorescent screen-based portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, In Hwan; Yonannes, Yonas; Zhu, Yunping

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate fundamental aspects of the dose response of fluorescent screen-based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). We acquired scanned signal across portal planes as we varied the radiation that entered the EPID by changing the thickness and anatomy of the phantom as well as the air gap between the phantom and the EPID. In addition, we simulated the relative contribution of the scintillation light signal in the EPID system. We have shown that the dose profile across portal planes is a function of the air gap and phantom thickness. We have also found that depending on the density change within the phantom geometry, errors associated with dose response based on the EPID scan can be as high as 7%. We also found that scintillation light scattering within the EPID system is an important source of error. This study revealed and demonstrated fundamental characteristics of dose response of EPID, as relative to that of ion chambers. This study showed that EPID based on fluorescent screen cannot be an accurate dosimetry system

  14. ASTER and USGS EROS disaster response: emergency imaging after Hurricane Katrina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Kenneth A.; Abrams, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The value of remotely sensed imagery during times of crisis is well established, and the increasing spatial and spectral resolution in newer systems provides ever greater utility and ability to discriminate features of interest (International Charter, Space and Major Disasters, 2005). The existing suite of sensors provides an abundance of data, and enables warning alerts to be broadcast for many situations in advance. In addition, imagery acquired soon after an event occurs can be used to assist response and remediation teams in identifying the extent of the affected area and the degree of damage. The data characteristics of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Refl ection Radiometer (ASTER) are well-suited for monitoring natural hazards and providing local and regional views after disaster strikes. For this reason, and because of the system fl exibility in scheduling high-priority observations, ASTER is often tasked to support emergency situations. The Emergency Response coordinators at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) work closely with staff at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) at EROS and the ASTER Science Team as they fulfi ll their mission to acquire and distribute data during critical situations. This article summarizes the role of the USGS/EROS Emergency Response coordinators, and provides further discussion of ASTER data and the images portrayed on the cover of this issue

  15. Response-driven imaging biomarkers for predicting radiation necrosis of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Chapman, Christopher H; Lawrence, Theodore S; Ten Haken, Randall K; Tsien, Christina I; Cao, Yue; Chenevert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Radiation necrosis is an uncommon but severe adverse effect of brain radiation therapy (RT). Current predictive models based on radiation dose have limited accuracy. We aimed to identify early individual response biomarkers based upon diffusion tensor (DT) imaging and incorporated them into a response model for prediction of radiation necrosis. Twenty-nine patients with glioblastoma received six weeks of intensity modulated RT and concurrent temozolomide. Patients underwent DT-MRI scans before treatment, at three weeks during RT, and one, three, and six months after RT. Cases with radiation necrosis were classified based on generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) of whole brain and DT index early changes in the corpus callosum and its substructures. Significant covariates were used to develop normal tissue complication probability models using binary logistic regression. Seven patients developed radiation necrosis. Percentage changes of radial diffusivity (RD) in the splenium at three weeks during RT and at six months after RT differed significantly between the patients with and without necrosis (p = 0.05 and p = 0.01). Percentage change of RD at three weeks during RT in the 30 Gy dose–volume of the splenium and brain gEUD combined yielded the best-fit logistic regression model. Our findings indicate that early individual response during the course of RT, assessed by radial diffusivity, has the potential to aid the prediction of delayed radiation necrosis, which could provide guidance in dose-escalation trials. (paper)

  16. Texture analysis on MR images helps predicting non-response to NAC in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michoux, N.; Van den Broeck, S.; Lacoste, L.; Fellah, L.; Galant, C.; Berlière, M.; Leconte, I.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the performance of a predictive model of non-response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in patients with breast cancer based on texture, kinetic, and BI-RADS parameters measured from dynamic MRI. Sixty-nine patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast who underwent pre-treatment MRI were studied. Morphological parameters and biological markers were measured. Pathological complete response was defined as the absence of invasive and in situ cancer in breast and nodes. Pathological non-responders, partial and complete responders were identified. Dynamic imaging was performed at 1.5 T with a 3D axial T1W GRE fat-suppressed sequence. Visual texture, kinetic and BI-RADS parameters were measured in each lesion. ROC analysis and leave-one-out cross-validation were used to assess the performance of individual parameters, then the performance of multi-parametric models in predicting non-response to NAC. A model based on four pre-NAC parameters (inverse difference moment, GLN, LRHGE, wash-in) and k-means clustering as statistical classifier identified non-responders with 84 % sensitivity. BI-RADS mass/non-mass enhancement, biological markers and histological grade did not contribute significantly to the prediction. Pre-NAC texture and kinetic parameters help predicting non-benefit to NAC. Further testing including larger groups of patients with different tumor subtypes is needed to improve the generalization properties and validate the performance of the predictive model

  17. Amygdala response to negative images in postpartum vs nulliparous women and intranasal oxytocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Heather A; James, Thomas W; Ketterson, Ellen D; Sengelaub, Dale R; Ditzen, Beate; Heiman, Julia R

    2014-01-01

    The neuroendocrine state of new mothers may alter their neural processing of stressors in the environment through modulatory actions of oxytocin on the limbic system. We predicted that amygdala sensitivity to negatively arousing stimuli would be suppressed in postpartum compared to nulliparous women and that this suppression would be modulated by administration of oxytocin nasal spray. We measured brain activation (fMRI) and subjective arousal in response to negatively arousing pictures in 29 postpartum and 30 nulliparous women who received either oxytocin nasal spray or placebo before scanning. Pre- and post-exposure urinary cortisol levels were also measured. Postpartum women (placebo) demonstrated lower right amygdala activation in response to negative images, lower cortisol and lower negative photo arousal ratings to nulliparous women. Nulliparous women receiving oxytocin had lower right amygdala activation compared to placebo. Cortisol levels in the placebo group, and ratings of arousal across all women, were positively associated with right amygdala activation. Together, these findings demonstrate reductions in both amygdala activation and subjective negative arousal in untreated postpartum vs nulliparous women, supporting the hypothesis of an attenuated neural response to arousing stimuli in postpartum women. A causal role of oxytocin and the timing of potential effects require future investigation.

  18. Strengthening DiD in Emergency Preparedness and Response by Pre-Establishing Tools and Criteria for the Effective Protection of the Public During a Severe Emergency at a Light Water Reactor or its Spent Fuel Pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mckenna, T.; Welter, P. Vilar; Callen, J.; Buglova, E., E-mail: T.Mckenna@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-10-15

    Defence in depth can be divided into two parts: first, to prevent accidents and, second, if prevention fails, to limit their consequences and prevent any evolution to more serious conditions. This paper will cover the second part, by providing tools and criteria to be used during a severe emergency to limit the consequences to the public from a severe accident. Severe radiation-induced consequences among the public off-site are only possible if there is significant damage to fuel in the reactor core or spent fuel pools. Consequently, the tools and criteria have been specifically developed for individuals responsible for making and for acting on decisions to protect the public in the event of an emergency involving actual or projected severe damage to the fuel in the reactor core or spent fuel pool of a light water reactor (LWR). These tools and criteria, developed by the IAEA’s Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC), will facilitate the implementation of the ‘Emergency Response’ defence in depth concept. (author)

  19. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, Brunella, E-mail: bbarbaro@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vecchio, Fabio M. [Department of Pathology, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Rizzo, Gianluca [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising

  20. A new image reconstruction method for 3-D PET based upon pairs of near-missing lines of response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawatsu, Shoji [Department of Radiology, Kyoritu General Hospital, 4-33 Go-bancho, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi 456-8611 (Japan) and Department of Brain Science and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, 36-3, Gengo Moriaka-cho, Obu-shi, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan)]. E-mail: b6rgw@fantasy.plala.or.jp; Ushiroya, Noboru [Department of General Education, Wakayama National College of Technology, 77 Noshima, Nada-cho, Gobo-shi, Wakayama 644-0023 (Japan)

    2007-02-01

    We formerly introduced a new image reconstruction method for three-dimensional positron emission tomography, which is based upon pairs of near-missing lines of response. This method uses an elementary geometric property of lines of response, namely that two lines of response which originate from radioactive isotopes located within a sufficiently small voxel, will lie within a few millimeters of each other. The effectiveness of this method was verified by performing a simulation using GATE software and a digital Hoffman phantom.

  1. Subcategorization of Suspicious Breast Lesions (BI-RADS Category 4) According to MRI Criteria: Role of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltez de Almeida, João Ricardo; Gomes, André Boechat; Barros, Thomas Pitangueira; Fahel, Paulo Eduardo; de Seixas Rocha, Mário

    2015-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate whether dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is adequate for subcategorization of suspicious lesions (BI-RADS category 4) and to evaluate whether use of DWI improves diagnostic performance. The study group was composed of 103 suspicious lesions found in 83 subjects. Patient ages and lesion sizes were compiled, and two radiologists reanalyzed the images; subcategorized the findings as BI-RADS 4A, 4B, or 4C; and calculated apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. The stratified variables were tested by univariate analysis and inserted in two multivariate predictive models, which were used to generate ROC curves and compare AUCs. Positive predictive values (PPVs) for each subcategory and ADC level were calculated, and interobserver agreement was tested. Forty-four (42.7%) suspicious findings proved malignant. Except for age (p = 0.08), all stratified predictor variables were significant in univariate analyses (p BI-RADS 4 subcategory (4A, 0.15; 4B, 0.37; 4C, 0.84). ADC values of 1.10 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s or less had the second highest PPV (0.77). Interobserver agreement was substantial at a kappa value of 0.80 (95% CI, 0.70-0.90; p BI-RADS category 4) can be satisfactorily performed with DCE-MRI and slightly improved when DWI is introduced.

  2. Syntectonic Mississippi River Channel Response: Integrating River Morphology and Seismic Imaging to Detect Active Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    Alluvial rivers, even great rivers such as the Mississippi, respond to hydrologic and geologic controls. Temporal variations of valley gradient can significantly alter channel morphology, as the river responds syntectonically to attain equilibrium. The river will alter its sinuosity, in an attempt to maintain a constant gradient on a surface that changes slope through time. Therefore, changes of river pattern can be the first clue that active tectonics is affecting an area of pattern change. Here I present geomorphological and seismic imaging evidence of a previously unknown fault crossing the Mississippi river south of the New Madrid seismic zone, between Caruthersville, Missouri and Osceola, Arkansas, and show that both datasets support Holocene fault movement, with the latest slip occurring in the last 200 years. High resolution marine seismic reflection data acquired along the Mississippi river imaged a NW-SE striking north-dipping fault displacing the base of the Quaternary alluvium by 15 m with reverse sense of movement. The fault consistently deforms the Tertiary, Cretaceous and Paleozoic formations. Historical river channel planforms dating back to 1765 reveal that the section of the river channel across the fault has been characterized by high sinuosity and steep projected-channel slope compared to adjacent river reaches. In particular, the reach across the fault experienced a cutoff in 1821, resulting in a temporary lowering of sinuosity followed by an increase between the survey of 1880 and 1915. Under the assumption that the change in sinuosity reflects river response to a valley slope change to maintain constant gradient, I use sinuosity through time to calculate the change in valley slope since 1880 and therefore to estimate the vertical displacement of the imaged fault in the past 200 years. Based on calculations so performed, the vertical offset of the fault is estimated to be 0.4 m, accrued since at least 1880. If the base of the river alluvium

  3. A meta-analysis to determine the effect of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments on fibromyalgia symptoms comprising OMERACT-10 response criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Despoina; Fassoulaki, Argyro; Tsoulas, Christos; Siafaka, Ioanna; Vadalouca, Athina

    2016-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread pain, sleep problems, fatigue, functional impairment, psychological distress, and cognitive dysfunction. The objective of this meta-analysis is to synthesize the available data on the effectiveness of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions across all domains included in the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT-10) fibromyalgia response definitions, and to examine response based on these definitions. We searched Cochrane, PubMed, Scopus, and the reference lists of articles for randomized controlled trials of any drug formulation or non-pharmacological intervention used for fibromyalgia treatment. We extracted efficacy data regarding pain, sleep, physical function, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and cognition. The available data were insufficient to draw definite conclusions regarding response. Indirect evidence indicates that it may be expected with the use of serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (NRIs), and multidisciplinary treatment.

  4. "Smart" gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging: an imaging contrast agent responsive to the cancer microenvironment and signal amplification via pH-induced aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jaejung; Kim, Jeesu; Hwang, Sekyu; Jeon, Mansik; Jeong, Sanghwa; Kim, Chulhong; Kim, Sungjee

    2016-07-07

    'Smart' gold nanoparticles can respond to mild acidic environments, rapidly form aggregates, and shift the absorption to red and near-infrared. They were used as a photoacoustic imaging agent responsive to the cancer microenvironment, and have demonstrated the cancer-specific accumulation at the cellular level and an amplified signal which is twice higher than the control in vivo.

  5. Who and Racist criteria on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servente, L.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about Who and Recist criteria on CT.These are rules to the evaluation of the solid tumors treatment response as well as different concepts of measurability criteria of blastic changes, target /non target lesions, adenopathies, lytic, cystic , non-measurable disease and progressive lesions

  6. Summary, analysis, and response to public comments on proposed amendments to 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 50, 51, 70, and 72: Decommissioning criteria for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    On February 11, 1985, the NRC issued for public comment proposed rules on decommissioning of nuclear facilities (50 FR 5600). Comment letters were received from 143 organizations and individuals. This report provides a summary and analysis and response to the public comments received

  7. Responses of rice to salinity and exogenous glycinebetaine by using positron emitting tracer imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Xuan Tham; Vo Huy Dang; Noriko, S.

    2002-01-01

    Effect of salinity stress (NaCl) and glycinebetaine on typical non-halophyte plants - rice (Oryza sativa L.) was examined for the growth, net photosynthesis and transpiration functions of seedlings. Using 22 Na, the inhibition of net uptake and translocation of sodium of seedlings stressed at 0.15% NaCl in solution and previously treated with exogenous glycinebetaine was observed by positron-emitting tracer imaging system, namely PETIS for diagnosis of early responses of plants to salt stress. Effects of exogenous glycinebetaine on rice plants stressed with salinity via osmotic protection and particularly stabilization of membrane permeability to inhibit Na uptake and translocation were discussed in connection with promising potentials of PETIS for researches on plants. (Author)

  8. Computer-aided global breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy: performance assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Zheng, Bin; Cheng, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used increasingly in breast cancer diagnosis and assessment of cancer treatment efficacy. In this study, we applied a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to automatically segment breast regions depicting on MR images and used the kinetic image features computed from the global breast MR images acquired before neoadjuvant chemotherapy to build a new quantitative model to predict response of the breast cancer patients to the chemotherapy. To assess performance and robustness of this new prediction model, an image dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 151 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy was retrospectively assembled and used. Among them, 63 patients had "complete response" (CR) to chemotherapy in which the enhanced contrast levels inside the tumor volume (pre-treatment) was reduced to the level as the normal enhanced background parenchymal tissues (post-treatment), while 88 patients had "partially response" (PR) in which the high contrast enhancement remain in the tumor regions after treatment. We performed the studies to analyze the correlation among the 22 global kinetic image features and then select a set of 4 optimal features. Applying an artificial neural network trained with the fusion of these 4 kinetic image features, the prediction model yielded an area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.83+/-0.04. This study demonstrated that by avoiding tumor segmentation, which is often difficult and unreliable, fusion of kinetic image features computed from global breast MR images without tumor segmentation can also generate a useful clinical marker in predicting efficacy of chemotherapy.

  9. Rectal Cancer: Mucinous Carcinoma on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indicates Poor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberholzer, Katja; Menig, Matthias; Kreft, Andreas; Schneider, Astrid; Junginger, Theodor; Heintz, Achim; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Hötker, Andreas M.; Hansen, Torsten; Düber, Christoph; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess response of locally advanced rectal carcinoma to chemoradiation with regard to mucinous status and local tumor invasion found at pretherapeutic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients were included in this prospective study of patients with advanced mrT3 and mrT4 carcinomas. Carcinomas were categorized by MRI as mucinous (mucin proportion >50% within the tumor volume), and as nonmucinous. Patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation consisting of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and 5-fluorouracil on Days 1 to 5 and Days 29 to 33. Therapy response was assessed by comparing pretherapeutic MRI with histopathology of surgical specimens (minimum distance between outer tumor edge and circumferential resection margin = CRM, T, and N category). Results: A mucinous carcinoma was found in 21 of 88 patients. Pretherapeutic mrCRM was 0 mm (median) in the mucinous and nonmucinous group. Of the 88 patients, 83 underwent surgery with tumor resection. The ypCRM (mm) at histopathology was significantly lower in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (p ≤ 0.001). Positive resection margins (ypCRM ≤ 1 mm) were found more frequently in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous ones (p ≤ 0.001). Treatment had less effect on local tumor stage in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (for T downsizing, p = 0.012; for N downstaging, p = 0.007). Disease progression was observed only in patients with mucinous carcinomas (n = 5). Conclusion: Mucinous status at pretherapeutic MRI was associated with a noticeably worse response to chemoradiation and should be assessed by MRI in addition to local tumor staging to estimate response to treatment before it is initiated.

  10. Pilot test of a novel food response and attention training treatment for obesity: Brain imaging data suggest actions shape valuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Yokum, Sonja; Veling, Harm; Kemps, Eva; Lawrence, Natalia S

    2017-07-01

    Elevated brain reward and attention region response, and weaker inhibitory region response to high-calorie food images have been found to predict future weight gain. These findings suggest that an intervention that reduces reward and attention region response and increases inhibitory control region response to such foods might reduce overeating. We conducted a randomized pilot experiment that tested the hypothesis that a multi-faceted food response and attention training with personalized high- and low-calorie food images would produce changes in behavioral and neural responses to food images and body fat compared to a control training with non-food images among community-recruited overweight/obese adults. Compared to changes observed in controls, completing the intervention was associated with significant reductions in reward and attention region response to high-calorie food images (Mean Cohen's d = 1.54), behavioral evidence of learning, reductions in palatability ratings and monetary valuation of high-calorie foods (p = 0.009, d's = 0.92), and greater body fat loss over a 4-week period (p = 0.009, d = 0.90), though body fat effects were not significant by 6-month follow-up. Results suggest that this multifaceted response and attention training intervention was associated with reduced reward and attention region responsivity to food cues, and a reduction in body fat. Because this implicit training treatment is both easy and inexpensive to deliver, and does not require top-down executive control that is necessary for negative energy balance obesity treatment, it may prove useful in treating obesity if future studies can determine how to create more enduring effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Combining TerraSAR-X and Landsat Images for Emergency Response in Urban Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiran Havivi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Rapid damage mapping following a disaster event, especially in an urban environment, is critical to ensure that the emergency response in the affected area is rapid and efficient. This work presents a new method for mapping damage assessment in urban environments. Based on combining SAR and optical data, the method is applicable as support during initial emergency planning and rescue operations. The study focuses on the urban areas affected by the Tohoku earthquake and subsequent tsunami event in Japan that occurred on 11 March 2011. High-resolution TerraSAR-X (TSX images of before and after the event, and a Landsat 5 image before the event were acquired. The affected areas were analyzed with the SAR data using only one interferometric SAR (InSAR coherence map. To increase the damage mapping accuracy, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI was applied. The generated map, with a grid size of 50 m, provides a quantitative assessment of the nature and distribution of the damage. The damage mapping shows detailed information about the affected area, with high overall accuracy (89%, and high Kappa coefficient (82% and, as expected, it shows total destruction along the coastline compared to the inland region.

  12. Analysis of physiological responses associated with emotional changes induced by viewing video images of dental treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Taki; Miwa, Zenzo; Tsuchihashi, Natsumi; Uehara, Naoko; Sugimoto, Kumiko

    2015-03-30

    Since the understanding of emotional changes induced by dental treatments is important for dentists to provide a safe and comfortable dental treatment, we analyzed physiological responses during watching video images of dental treatments to search for the appropriate objective indices reflecting emotional changes. Fifteen healthy young adult subjects voluntarily participated in the present study. Electrocardiogram (ECG), electroencephalogram (EEG) and corrugator muscle electromyogram (EMG) were recorded and changes of them by viewing videos of dental treatments were analyzed. The subjective discomfort level was acquired by Visual Analog Scale method. Analyses of autonomic nervous activities from ECG and four emotional factors (anger/stress, joy/satisfaction, sadness/depression and relaxation) from EEG demonstrated that increases in sympathetic nervous activity reflecting stress increase and decreases in relaxation level were induced by the videos of infiltration anesthesia and cavity excavation, but not intraoral examination. The corrugator muscle activity was increased by all three images regardless of video contents. The subjective discomfort during watching infiltration anesthesia and cavity excavation was higher than intraoral examination, showing that sympathetic activities and relaxation factor of emotion changed in a manner consistent with subjective emotional changes. These results suggest that measurement of autonomic nervous activities estimated from ECG and emotional factors analyzed from EEG is useful for objective evaluation of subjective emotion.

  13. Model System for Live Imaging of Neuronal Responses to Injury and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Gravel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Although it has been well established that induction of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43 during development coincides with axonal outgrowth and early synapse formation, the existence of neuronal plasticity and neurite outgrowth in the adult central nervous system after injuries is more controversial. To visualize the processes of neuronal injury and repair in living animals, we generated reporter mice for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging bearing the luc (luciferase and gfp (green fluorescent protein reporter genes under the control of the murine GAP-43 promoter. Reporter functionality was first observed during the development of transgenic embryos. Using in vivo bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging, we visualized induction of the GAP-43 signals from live embryos starting at E10.5, as well as neuronal responses to brain and peripheral nerve injuries (the signals peaked at 14 days postinjury. Moreover, three-dimensional analysis of the GAP-43 bioluminescent signal confirmed that it originated from brain structures affected by ischemic injury. The analysis of fluorescence signal at cellular level revealed colocalization between endogenous protein and the GAP-43-driven gfp transgene. Taken together, our results suggest that the GAP-43-luc/gfp reporter mouse represents a valid model system for real-time analysis of neurite outgrowth and the capacity of the adult nervous system to regenerate after injuries.

  14. MALDI MS imaging investigation of the host response to visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaegger, C F; Negrão, F; Assis, D M; Belaz, K R A; Angolini, C F F; Fernandes, A M A P; Santos, V G; Pimentel, A; Abánades, D R; Giorgio, S; Eberlin, M N; Rocha, D F O

    2017-09-26

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of animal tissues has become an important tool for in situ molecular analyses and biomarker studies in several clinical areas, but there are few applications in parasitological studies. Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease, and experimental mouse models have been essential to evaluate pathological and immunological processes and to develop diagnostic methods. Herein we have employed MALDI MSI to examine peptides and low molecular weight proteins (2 to 20 kDa) differentially expressed in the liver during visceral leishmaniasis in mice models. We analyzed liver sections of Balb/c mice infected with Leishmania infantum using the SCiLS Lab software for statistical analysis, which facilitated data interpretation and thus highlighted several key proteins and/or peptides. We proposed a decision tree classification for visceral leishmaniasis with distinct phases of the disease, which are named here as healthy, acute infection and chronic infection. Among others, the ion of m/z 4963 was the most important to identify acute infection and was tentatively identified as Thymosin β4. This peptide was previously established as a recovery factor in the human liver and might participate in the response of mice to Leishmania infection. This preliminary investigation shows the potential of MALDI MSI to complement classical compound selective imaging techniques and to explore new features not yet recognized by these approaches.

  15. Role of magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging in evaluating response after chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zheng; Ye Xiaodan; Dong Sheng; Xu Lichao; Xu Xueyuan; Liu Shiyuan; Xiao Xiangsheng

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of hepatocellular carcinoma pretreatment apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) and its ADCs changes after treatment in predicting and early monitoring the response after chemoembolization. Materials and methods: Twenty-five responding and nine nonresponding hepatocellular carcinoma lesions were prospectively evaluated with magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging in 24 h before and in 48 h after chemoembolization. Quantitative ADC maps were calculated with images with b values of 0 and 500 s/mm 2 . Results: Nonresponding lesions had a significantly higher pretreatment mean ADC than did responding lesions (1.726 ± 0.323 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s vs.1.294 ± 0.185 10 -3 mm 2 /s, P ≤ 0.001). The results of receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis for identification of nonresponding lesions showed that threshold ADC value of 1.618 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s had 96.0% sensitivity and 77.8% specificity. After transarterial chemoembolization, responding lesions had a significant increase in %ADC values than did nonresponding lesions (32.63% vs. 5.24%, P = 0.025). The results of ROC analysis for identification of responding lesions showed that threshold %ADC value of 16.21% had 72% sensitivity and 100% specificity. No significant change was observed in normal liver parenchyma (P = 0.862) and spleen (P = 0.052). Conclusion: High pretreatment mean ADC value of hepatocellular carcinoma was predictive of poor response to chemoembolization. A significant increase in %ADC value was observed in lesions that responded to chemoembolization.

  16. Role of magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging in evaluating response after chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Zheng, E-mail: yuanzheng0404@163.co [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Feng Yang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China); Ye Xiaodan [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Feng Yang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China); Department of Radiology, Affiliated Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 241 West Huai Hai Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Dong Sheng, E-mail: dongsheng2828@hotmail.co [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Feng Yang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China); Xu Lichao; Xu Xueyuan; Liu Shiyuan; Xiao Xiangsheng [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Feng Yang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China)

    2010-07-15

    Objective: To investigate the value of hepatocellular carcinoma pretreatment apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) and its ADCs changes after treatment in predicting and early monitoring the response after chemoembolization. Materials and methods: Twenty-five responding and nine nonresponding hepatocellular carcinoma lesions were prospectively evaluated with magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging in 24 h before and in 48 h after chemoembolization. Quantitative ADC maps were calculated with images with b values of 0 and 500 s/mm{sup 2}. Results: Nonresponding lesions had a significantly higher pretreatment mean ADC than did responding lesions (1.726 {+-} 0.323 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s vs.1.294 {+-} 0.185 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, P {<=} 0.001). The results of receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis for identification of nonresponding lesions showed that threshold ADC value of 1.618 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s had 96.0% sensitivity and 77.8% specificity. After transarterial chemoembolization, responding lesions had a significant increase in %ADC values than did nonresponding lesions (32.63% vs. 5.24%, P = 0.025). The results of ROC analysis for identification of responding lesions showed that threshold %ADC value of 16.21% had 72% sensitivity and 100% specificity. No significant change was observed in normal liver parenchyma (P = 0.862) and spleen (P = 0.052). Conclusion: High pretreatment mean ADC value of hepatocellular carcinoma was predictive of poor response to chemoembolization. A significant increase in %ADC value was observed in lesions that responded to chemoembolization.

  17. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism criteria for minimal, moderate, and major clinical response in adult dermatomyositis and polymyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Rohit; Rider, Lisa G; Ruperto, Nicolino; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Oddis, Chester V; Amato, Anthony A; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G; Dastmalchi, Maryam; Fiorentino, David; Isenberg, David; Katz, James D; Mammen, Andrew; de Visser, Marianne; Ytterberg, Steven R; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Chung, Lorinda; Danko, Katalin; García-De la Torre, Ignacio; Song, Yeong Wook; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for adult dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM). Expert surveys, logistic regression, and conjoint analysis were used to develop 287 definitions using core set measures. Myositis experts rated greater improvement among multiple pairwise scenarios in conjoint analysis surveys, where different levels of improvement in 2 core set measures were presented. The PAPRIKA (Potentially All Pairwise Rankings of All Possible Alternatives) method determined the relative weights of core set measures and conjoint analysis definitions. The performance characteristics of the definitions were evaluated on patient profiles using expert consensus (gold standard) and were validated using data from a clinical trial. The nominal group technique was used to reach consensus. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model using absolute per cent change in core set measures (physician, patient, and extramuscular global activity, muscle strength, Health Assessment Questionnaire, and muscle enzyme levels). A total improvement score (range 0-100), determined by summing scores for each core set measure, was based on improvement in and relative weight of each core set measure. Thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement were ≥20, ≥40, and ≥60 points in the total improvement score. The same criteria were chosen for juvenile DM, with different improvement thresholds. Sensitivity and specificity in DM/PM patient cohorts were 85% and 92%, 90% and 96%, and 92% and 98% for minimal, moderate, and major improvement, respectively. Definitions were validated in the clinical trial analysis for differentiating the physician rating of improvement (p<0.001). The response criteria for adult DM/PM consisted of the conjoint analysis model based on absolute per cent change in 6 core set measures, with thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  18. Biological Water Quality Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page contains links to Technical Documents pertaining to Biological Water Quality Criteria, including, technical assistance documents for states, tribes and territories, program overviews, and case studies.

  19. Criteria for performance evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Weiss

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Using a cognitive task (mental calculation and a perceptual-motor task (stylized golf putting, we examined differential proficiency using the CWS index and several other quantitative measures of performance. The CWS index (Weiss and Shanteau, 2003 is a coherence criterion that looks only at internal properties of the data without incorporating an external standard. In Experiment 1, college students (n = 20 carried out 2- and 3-digit addition and multiplication problems under time pressure. In Experiment 2, experienced golfers (n = 12, also college students, putted toward a target from nine different locations. Within each experiment, we analyzed the same responses using different methods. For the arithmetic tasks, accuracy information (mean absolute deviation from the correct answer, MAD using a coherence criterion was available; for golf, accuracy information using a correspondence criterion (mean deviation from the target, also MAD was available. We ranked the performances of the participants according to each measure, then compared the orders using Spearman's rextsubscript{s}. For mental calculation, the CWS order correlated moderately (rextsubscript{s} =.46 with that of MAD. However, a different coherence criterion, degree of model fit, did not correlate with either CWS or accuracy. For putting, the ranking generated by CWS correlated .68 with that generated by MAD. Consensual answers were also available for both experiments, and the rankings they generated correlated highly with those of MAD. The coherence vs. correspondence distinction did not map well onto criteria for performance evaluation.

  20. Efficacy of qualitative response assessment interpretation criteria at 18F-FDG PET-CT for predicting outcome in locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, Andrew; Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Chowdhury, Fahmid; Patel, Chirag; Swift, Sarah; Cooper, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of a standardized qualitative scoring system for treatment response assessment at 18F-FDG PET-CT in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma and correlate this with subsequent patient outcome. Ninety-six consecutive patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated with radical chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in a single centre between 2011 and 2014 underwent 18F-FDG PET-CT approximately 3 months post-treatment. Tumour metabolic response was assessed qualitatively using a 5-point scale ranging from background level activity only through to progressive metabolic disease. Clinical and radiological (MRI pelvis) follow-up was performed in all patients. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method (Mantel-Cox log-rank) and correlated with qualitative score using Chi-squared test. Forty patients (41.7 %) demonstrated complete metabolic response (CMR) on post-treatment PET-CT (Score 1/2) with 38 patients (95.0 %) remaining disease free after a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. Twenty-four patients (25.0 %) had indeterminate residual uptake (ID, Score 3) at primary or nodal sites after treatment, of these eight patients (33.3 %) relapsed on follow-up, including all patients with residual nodal uptake (n = 4). 11 of 17 patients (64.7 %) with significant residual uptake (partial metabolic response, PMR, Score 4) subsequently relapsed. In 15 patients (15.6 %) PET-CT demonstrated progressive disease (PD, Score 5) following treatment. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a highly statistically significant difference in PFS and OS between patients with CMR, indeterminate uptake, PMR and PD (Log-rank, P < 0.0001). Chi-squared test demonstrated a highly statistically significant association between increasing qualitative score and risk of recurrence or death (P < 0.001). Use of a 5-point qualitative scoring system to assess metabolic response to CRT in locally advanced

  1. Efficacy of qualitative response assessment interpretation criteria at 18F-FDG PET-CT for predicting outcome in locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarsbrook, Andrew [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Level 1, Bexley Wing, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); University of Leeds, Leeds Institute of Cancer and Pathology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Chowdhury, Fahmid; Patel, Chirag [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Level 1, Bexley Wing, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Swift, Sarah [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Cooper, Rachel [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Clinical Oncology, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the utility of a standardized qualitative scoring system for treatment response assessment at 18F-FDG PET-CT in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma and correlate this with subsequent patient outcome. Ninety-six consecutive patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated with radical chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in a single centre between 2011 and 2014 underwent 18F-FDG PET-CT approximately 3 months post-treatment. Tumour metabolic response was assessed qualitatively using a 5-point scale ranging from background level activity only through to progressive metabolic disease. Clinical and radiological (MRI pelvis) follow-up was performed in all patients. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method (Mantel-Cox log-rank) and correlated with qualitative score using Chi-squared test. Forty patients (41.7 %) demonstrated complete metabolic response (CMR) on post-treatment PET-CT (Score 1/2) with 38 patients (95.0 %) remaining disease free after a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. Twenty-four patients (25.0 %) had indeterminate residual uptake (ID, Score 3) at primary or nodal sites after treatment, of these eight patients (33.3 %) relapsed on follow-up, including all patients with residual nodal uptake (n = 4). 11 of 17 patients (64.7 %) with significant residual uptake (partial metabolic response, PMR, Score 4) subsequently relapsed. In 15 patients (15.6 %) PET-CT demonstrated progressive disease (PD, Score 5) following treatment. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a highly statistically significant difference in PFS and OS between patients with CMR, indeterminate uptake, PMR and PD (Log-rank, P < 0.0001). Chi-squared test demonstrated a highly statistically significant association between increasing qualitative score and risk of recurrence or death (P < 0.001). Use of a 5-point qualitative scoring system to assess metabolic response to CRT in locally advanced

  2. Radiological criteria in nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, D.; Diaz de la Cruz, F.

    1985-01-01

    It is pretended to enlighten the way to adopt the recommendations, from supranational organizations or the practices followed in other countries, to the peculiarities existing in Spain for the specific case of Nuclear Emergency Response Planning. The adaptation has been focalized in the criteria given by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council and has taken into account the radiological protection levels, which have been considered adequate for Spanish population in case of nuclear accidents. (author)

  3. MO-DE-303-03: Session on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, S.

    2015-01-01

    This session will focus on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy. This is a technically challenging method to translate to practice in radiation therapy. In the new era of precision medicine, however, delivering the right treatment, to the right patient, and at the right time, can positively impact treatment choices and patient outcomes. Quantitative imaging provides the spatial sensitivity required by radiation therapy for precision medicine that is not available by other means. In this Joint ESTRO -AAPM Symposium, three leading-edge investigators will present specific motivations for quantitative imaging biomarkers in radiation therapy of esophageal, head and neck, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Experiences with the use of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI, diffusion- weighted (DW) MRI, PET/CT, and SPECT/CT will be presented. Issues covered will include: response prediction, dose-painting, timing between therapy and imaging, within-therapy biomarkers, confounding effects, normal tissue sparing, dose-response modeling, and association with clinical biomarkers and outcomes. Current information will be presented from investigational studies and clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Learn motivations for the use of quantitative imaging biomarkers for assessment of response to radiation therapy Review the potential areas of application in cancer therapy Examine the challenges for translation, including imaging confounds and paucity of evidence to date Compare exemplary examples of the current state of the art in DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, PET/CT and SPECT/CT imaging for assessment of response to radiation therapy Van der Heide: Research grants from the Dutch Cancer Society and the European Union (FP7) Bowen: RSNA Scholar grant

  4. MO-DE-303-03: Session on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, S. [University of Washington, School of Medicine: PET/CT and SPECT/CT for Lung and Liver Radiation Therapy Response Assessment of Tumor and Normal Tissue (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This session will focus on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy. This is a technically challenging method to translate to practice in radiation therapy. In the new era of precision medicine, however, delivering the right treatment, to the right patient, and at the right time, can positively impact treatment choices and patient outcomes. Quantitative imaging provides the spatial sensitivity required by radiation therapy for precision medicine that is not available by other means. In this Joint ESTRO -AAPM Symposium, three leading-edge investigators will present specific motivations for quantitative imaging biomarkers in radiation therapy of esophageal, head and neck, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Experiences with the use of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI, diffusion- weighted (DW) MRI, PET/CT, and SPECT/CT will be presented. Issues covered will include: response prediction, dose-painting, timing between therapy and imaging, within-therapy biomarkers, confounding effects, normal tissue sparing, dose-response modeling, and association with clinical biomarkers and outcomes. Current information will be presented from investigational studies and clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Learn motivations for the use of quantitative imaging biomarkers for assessment of response to radiation therapy Review the potential areas of application in cancer therapy Examine the challenges for translation, including imaging confounds and paucity of evidence to date Compare exemplary examples of the current state of the art in DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, PET/CT and SPECT/CT imaging for assessment of response to radiation therapy Van der Heide: Research grants from the Dutch Cancer Society and the European Union (FP7) Bowen: RSNA Scholar grant.

  5. SU-F-J-86: Method to Include Tissue Dose Response Effect in Deformable Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J; Liang, J; Chen, S; Qin, A; Yan, D [Beaumont Health Systeml, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Organ changes shape and size during radiation treatment due to both mechanical stress and radiation dose response. However, the dose response induced deformation has not been considered in conventional deformable image registration (DIR). A novel DIR approach is proposed to include both tissue elasticity and radiation dose induced organ deformation. Methods: Assuming that organ sub-volume shrinkage was proportional to the radiation dose induced cell killing/absorption, the dose induced organ volume change was simulated applying virtual temperature on each sub-volume. Hence, both stress and heterogeneity temperature induced organ deformation. Thermal stress finite element method with organ surface boundary condition was used to solve deformation. Initial boundary correspondence on organ surface was created from conventional DIR. Boundary condition was updated by an iterative optimization scheme to minimize elastic deformation energy. The registration was validated on a numerical phantom. Treatment dose was constructed applying both the conventional DIR and the proposed method using daily CBCT image obtained from HN treatment. Results: Phantom study showed 2.7% maximal discrepancy with respect to the actual displacement. Compared with conventional DIR, subvolume displacement difference in a right parotid had the mean±SD (Min, Max) to be 1.1±0.9(−0.4∼4.8), −0.1±0.9(−2.9∼2.4) and −0.1±0.9(−3.4∼1.9)mm in RL/PA/SI directions respectively. Mean parotid dose and V30 constructed including the dose response induced shrinkage were 6.3% and 12.0% higher than those from the conventional DIR. Conclusion: Heterogeneous dose distribution in normal organ causes non-uniform sub-volume shrinkage. Sub-volume in high dose region has a larger shrinkage than the one in low dose region, therefore causing more sub-volumes to move into the high dose area during the treatment course. This leads to an unfavorable dose-volume relationship for the normal organ

  6. Functional brain response to food images in successful adolescent weight losers compared with normal-weight and overweight controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Chad D; Kirwan, C Brock

    2015-03-01

    Research conducted with adults suggests that successful weight losers demonstrate greater activation in brain regions associated with executive control in response to viewing high-energy foods. No previous studies have examined these associations in adolescents. Functional neuroimaging was used to assess brain response to food images among groups of overweight (OW), normal-weight (NW), and successful weight-losing (SWL) adolescents. Eleven SWL, 12 NW, and 11 OW participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while viewing images of high- and low-energy foods. When viewing high-energy food images, SWLs demonstrated greater activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) compared with OW and NW controls. Compared with NW and SWL groups, OW individuals demonstrated greater activation in the ventral striatum and anterior cingulate in response to food images. Adolescent SWLs demonstrated greater neural activation in the DLPFC compared with OW/NW controls when viewing high-energy food stimuli, which may indicate enhanced executive control. OW individuals' brain responses to food stimuli may indicate greater reward incentive processes than either SWL or NW groups. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  7. Prediction of Individual Response to Electroconvulsive Therapy via Machine Learning on Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, Ronny; Opel, Nils; Grotegerd, Dominik; Dohm, Katharina; Zaremba, Dario; Bürger, Christian; Münker, Sandra; Mühlmann, Lisa; Wahl, Patricia; Heindel, Walter; Arolt, Volker; Alferink, Judith; Zwanzger, Peter; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Kugel, Harald; Dannlowski, Udo

    2016-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe depression. However, biomarkers that accurately predict a response to ECT remain unidentified. To investigate whether certain factors identified by structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are able to predict ECT response. In this nonrandomized prospective study, gray matter structure was assessed twice at approximately 6 weeks apart using 3-T MRI and voxel-based morphometry. Patients were recruited through the inpatient service of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Muenster, from March 11, 2010, to March 27, 2015. Two patient groups with acute major depressive disorder were included. One group received an ECT series in addition to antidepressants (n = 24); a comparison sample was treated solely with antidepressants (n = 23). Both groups were compared with a sample of healthy control participants (n = 21). Binary pattern classification was used to predict ECT response by structural MRI that was performed before treatment. In addition, univariate analysis was conducted to predict reduction of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score by pretreatment gray matter volumes and to investigate ECT-related structural changes. One participant in the ECT sample was excluded from the analysis, leaving 67 participants (27 men and 40 women; mean [SD] age, 43.7 [10.6] years). The binary pattern classification yielded a successful prediction of ECT response, with accuracy rates of 78.3% (18 of 23 patients in the ECT sample) and sensitivity rates of 100% (13 of 13 who responded to ECT). Furthermore, a support vector regression yielded a significant prediction of relative reduction in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score. The principal findings of the univariate model indicated a positive association between pretreatment subgenual cingulate volume and individual ECT response (Montreal Neurological Institute [MNI] coordinates x = 8, y = 21, z = -18

  8. Repository operational criteria analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hageman, J.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of the ''Repository Operational Criteria (ROC) Feasibility Studies'' (or ROC task) was to conduct comprehensive and integrated analyses of repository design, construction, and operations criteria in 10 CFR Part 60 regulations, considering the interfaces and impacts of any potential changes to those regulations. The study addresses regulatory criteria related to the preclosure aspects of the geologic repository. The study task developed regulatory concepts or potential repository operational criteria (PROC) based on analysis of a repository's safety functions and other regulations for similar facilities. These regulatory concepts or PROC were used as a basis to assess the sufficiency and adequacy of the current criteria in 10 CFR Part 60. Where the regulatory concepts were same as current operational criteria, these criteria were referenced. The operations criteria referenced or the PROC developed are given in this report. Detailed analyses used to develop the regulatory concepts and any necessary PROC for those regulations that may require a minor change are also presented. The results of the ROC task showed a need for further analysis and possible major rule change related to the design bases of a geologic repository operations area, siting, and radiological emergency planning

  9. CCS site characterisation criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachu, S.; Hawkes, C.; Lawton, D.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Perkins, E.

    2009-12-15

    IEA GHG recently commissioned the Alberta Research Counil in Canada to conduct a review of storage site selection criteria and site characterisation methods in order to produce a synthesis report. This report reviews the literature on the subject on the site seleciton and characterisation since the publication of the IPCC Special Report on CCS, and provides a synthesis and classification of criteria. 161 refs.

  10. Green Supplier Selection Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Izabela Ewa; Banaeian, Narges; Golinska, Paulina

    2014-01-01

    Green supplier selection (GSS) criteria arise from an organization inclination to respond to any existing trends in environmental issues related to business management and processes, so GSS is integrating environmental thinking into conventional supplier selection. This research is designed...... to determine prevalent general and environmental supplier selection criteria and develop a framework which can help decision makers to determine and prioritize suitable green supplier selection criteria (general and environmental). In this research we considered several parameters (evaluation objectives......) to establish suitable criteria for GSS such as their production type, requirements, policy and objectives instead of applying common criteria. At first a comprehensive and deep review on prevalent and green supplier selection literatures performed. Then several evaluation objectives defined to assess the green...

  11. Plutonium storage criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, D. [Scientech, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States); Ascanio, X. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy has issued a technical standard for long-term (>50 years) storage and will soon issue a criteria document for interim (<20 years) storage of plutonium materials. The long-term technical standard, {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides,{close_quotes} addresses the requirements for storing metals and oxides with greater than 50 wt % plutonium. It calls for a standardized package that meets both off-site transportation requirements, as well as remote handling requirements from future storage facilities. The interim criteria document, {open_quotes}Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Solid Materials{close_quotes}, addresses requirements for storing materials with less than 50 wt% plutonium. The interim criteria document assumes the materials will be stored on existing sites, and existing facilities and equipment will be used for repackaging to improve the margin of safety.

  12. Choice Criteria of Cosmetics among Chinese Consumers

    OpenAIRE

    LI, ZHU

    2014-01-01

    Becoming familiar with consumers’ choice criteria towards a certain kind of product can help marketers tailor more efficient market strategies. Cosmetics play a very important part in the lives of women. Plautus asserted, “A woman without paint is like food without salt”. In recent years, the Chinese cosmetic market has flourished. The aim of this dissertation is to understand the choice criteria of cosmetics in the context of the Chinese market. Country-of-origin, brand image and quality are...

  13. Risk based seismic design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.P.

    1999-01-01

    In order to develop a risk based seismic design criteria the following four issues must be addressed: (1) What target annual probability of seismic induced unacceptable performance is acceptable? (2) What minimum seismic margin is acceptable? (3) Given the decisions made under Issues 1 and 2, at what annual frequency of exceedance should the safe-shutdown-earthquake (SSE) ground motion be defined? (4) What seismic design criteria should be established to reasonably achieve the seismic margin defined under Issue 2? The first issue is purely a policy decision and is not addressed in this paper. Each of the other three issues are addressed. Issues 2 and 3 are integrally tied together so that a very large number of possible combinations of responses to these two issues can be used to achieve the target goal defined under Issue 1. Section 2 lays out a combined approach to these two issues and presents three potentially attractive combined resolutions of these two issues which reasonably achieves the target goal. The remainder of the paper discusses an approach which can be used to develop seismic design criteria aimed at achieving the desired seismic margin defined in resolution of Issue 2. Suggestions for revising existing seismic design criteria to more consistently achieve the desired seismic margin are presented. (orig.)

  14. Affective and Autonomic Responses to Erotic Images: Evidence of Disgust-Based Mechanisms in Female Sexual Interest/Arousal Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePesa, Natasha S; Cassisi, Jeffrey E

    2017-09-01

    Disgust has recently been implicated in the development and maintenance of female sexual dysfunction, yet most empirical studies have been conducted with a sexually healthy sample. The current study contributes to the literature by expanding the application of a disgust model of sexual functioning to a clinically relevant sample of women with low sexual desire/arousal and accompanying sexual distress. Young women (mean age = 19.12 years) with psychometrically defined sexual dysfunction (i.e., female sexual interest/arousal disorder [FSIAD] group) and a healthy control group were compared in their affective (i.e., facial electromyography [EMG] and self-report) and autonomic (i.e., heart rate and electrodermal activity) responses to disgusting, erotic, positive, and neutral images. Significant differences were predicted in responses to erotic images only. Specifically, it was hypothesized that the FSIAD group would display affective and autonomic responses consistent with a disgust response, while responses from the control group would align with a general appetitive response. Results largely supported study hypotheses. The FSIAD group displayed significantly greater negative facial affect, reported more subjective disgust, and recorded greater heart rate deceleration than the control group in response to erotic stimuli. Greater subjective disgust response corresponded with more sexual avoidance behavior. Planned follow-up analyses explored correlates of subjective disgust responses.

  15. Machine learning approaches for integrating clinical and imaging features in late-life depression classification and response prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Meenal J; Andreescu, Carmen; Price, Julie C; Edelman, Kathryn L; Reynolds, Charles F; Aizenstein, Howard J

    2015-10-01

    Currently, depression diagnosis relies primarily on behavioral symptoms and signs, and treatment is guided by trial and error instead of evaluating associated underlying brain characteristics. Unlike past studies, we attempted to estimate accurate prediction models for late-life depression diagnosis and treatment response using multiple machine learning methods with inputs of multi-modal imaging and non-imaging whole brain and network-based features. Late-life depression patients (medicated post-recruitment) (n = 33) and older non-depressed individuals (n = 35) were recruited. Their demographics and cognitive ability scores were recorded, and brain characteristics were acquired using multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging pretreatment. Linear and nonlinear learning methods were tested for estimating accurate prediction models. A learning method called alternating decision trees estimated the most accurate prediction models for late-life depression diagnosis (87.27% accuracy) and treatment response (89.47% accuracy). The diagnosis model included measures of age, Mini-mental state examination score, and structural imaging (e.g. whole brain atrophy and global white mater hyperintensity burden). The treatment response model included measures of structural and functional connectivity. Combinations of multi-modal imaging and/or non-imaging measures may help better predict late-life depression diagnosis and treatment response. As a preliminary observation, we speculate that the results may also suggest that different underlying brain characteristics defined by multi-modal imaging measures-rather than region-based differences-are associated with depression versus depression recovery because to our knowledge this is the first depression study to accurately predict both using the same approach. These findings may help better understand late-life depression and identify preliminary steps toward personalized late-life depression treatment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley

  16. Optimizing the Attitude Control of Small Satellite Constellations for Rapid Response Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, S.; Li, A.

    2016-12-01

    -off and minimum image distortion among the satellites, using Landsat's specifications. Attitude-specific constraints such as power consumption, response time, and stability were factored into the optimality computations. The algorithm can integrate cloud cover predictions, specific ground and air assets and angular constraints.

  17. 3D-MR Spectroscopic Imaging at 3Tesla for Early Response Assessment of Glioblastoma Patients during External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P; Smith, Brian J; Anderson, Carryn M; Morris, Ann; Capizzano, Aristides A; Magnotta, Vincent; McGuire, Sarah M; Smith, Mark C; Bayouth, John E; Buatti, John M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the utility of 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17-20 fractions of radiotherapy. All patients received standard radiotherapy with temozolomide and follow-up with every two month MR scans. Progression free survival was defined using MacDonald criteria. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline / N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel by voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥ 2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of radiotherapy. Changes in Cho/NAA between pre-therapy and 3rd week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results After 8.6 months (median follow-up), 50% of patients had progressed based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (p< 0.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the 3rd week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (p <0.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the 3rd week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval 1.10-6.71, p= 0.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥ 2 volume, which was where recurrence most often occurred. Conclusion Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of early progression. The potential impact for risk-adaptive therapy based on early spectroscopic findings is suggested. PMID:24986746

  18. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose–response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, C; Thor, M; Apte, A; Deasy, J O; Liu, M; Moissenko, V; Petersen, S E; Høyer, M

    2014-01-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose–response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ≥2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman–Kutcher–Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (≤18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (≤0.8 and ≤4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ≤1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose–response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice

  19. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose-response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, C.; Thor, M.; Liu, M.; Moissenko, V.; Petersen, S. E.; Høyer, M.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2014-07-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose-response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ≥2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (≤18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (≤0.8 and ≤4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ≤1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose-response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice thickness

  20. Anatomic, functional and molecular imaging in lung cancer precision radiation therapy: treatment response assessment and radiation therapy personalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, Sarah; Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Li, X. Allen; Nestle, Ursula; Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring)

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews key imaging modalities for lung cancer patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) and considers their actual or potential contributions to critical decision-making. An international group of researchers with expertise in imaging in lung cancer patients treated with RT considered the relevant literature on modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). These perspectives were coordinated to summarize the current status of imaging in lung cancer and flag developments with future implications. Although there are no useful randomized trials of different imaging modalities in lung cancer, multiple prospective studies indicate that management decisions are frequently impacted by the use of complementary imaging modalities, leading both to more appropriate treatments and better outcomes. This is especially true of 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT which is widely accepted to be the standard imaging modality for staging of lung cancer patients, for selection for potentially curative RT and for treatment planning. PET is also more accurate than CT for predicting survival after RT. PET imaging during RT is also correlated with survival and makes response-adapted therapies possible. PET tracers other than FDG have potential for imaging important biological process in tumors, including hypoxia and proliferation. MRI has superior accuracy in soft tissue imaging and the MRI Linac is a rapidly developing technology with great potential for online monitoring and modification of treatment. The role of imaging in RT-treated lung cancer patients is evolving rapidly and will allow increasing personalization of therapy according to the biology of both the tumor and dose limiting normal tissues. PMID:29218270

  1. Multi-criteria optimization for ultrasonic-assisted extraction of antioxidants from Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae using response surface methodology, an activity-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shanshan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Lei; Qu, Haibin; Gong, Xingchu

    2013-06-01

    An activity-based approach to optimize the ultrasonic-assisted extraction of antioxidants from Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae (Chenpi in Chinese) was developed. Response surface optimization based on a quantitative composition-activity relationship model showed the relationships among product chemical composition, antioxidant activity of extract, and parameters of extraction process. Three parameters of ultrasonic-assisted extraction, including the ethanol/water ratio, Chenpi amount, and alkaline amount, were investigated to give optimum extraction conditions for antioxidants of Chenpi: ethanol/water 70:30 v/v, Chenpi amount of 10 g, and alkaline amount of 28 mg. The experimental antioxidant yield under the optimum conditions was found to be 196.5 mg/g Chenpi, and the antioxidant activity was 2023.8 μmol Trolox equivalents/g of the Chenpi powder. The results agreed well with the second-order polynomial regression model. This presented approach promised great application potentials in both food and pharmaceutical industries. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. SU-E-J-31: Biodynamic Imaging of Cancer Tissue and Response to Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolte, D; Turek, J; Childress, M; An, R; Merrill, D; Matei, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To measure intracellular motions inside three-dimensional living cancer tissue samples to establish a novel set of biodynamic biomarkers that assess tissue proliferative activity and sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy. Methods: Biodynamic imaging (BDI) uses digital holography with low-coherence low-intensity light illumination to construct 3D holograms from depths up to a millimeter deep inside cancer tissue models that include multicellular tumor spheroids and ex vivo cancer biopsies from canine non-Hodgkins lymphoma and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) mouse explants. Intracellular motions modulate the holographic intensity with frequencies related to the Doppler effect caused by the motions of a wide variety of intracellular components. These motions are affected by applied therapeutic agents, and BDI produces unique fingerprints of the action of specific drugs on the motions in specific cell types. In this study, chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin for canine lymphoma and oxoplatin for ovarian) are applied to the living tissue models and monitored over 10 hours by BDI. Results: Multicellular spheroids and patient biopsies are categorized as either sensitive or insensitive to applied therapeutics depending on the intracellular Doppler signatures of chemotherapy response. For both lymphoma and EOC there is strong specificity to the two types of sensitivities, with sensitive cell lines and biopsies exhibiting a global cessation of proliferation and strong suppression of metabolic activity, while insensitive cell lines and biopsies show moderate activation of Doppler frequencies associated with membrane processes and possible membrane trafficking. Conclusion: This work supports the hypothesis that biodynamic biomarkers from three-dimensional living tumor tissue, that includes tissue heterogeneity and measured within 24 hours of surgery, is predictive of near-term patient response to therapy. Future work will correlate biodynamic biomarkers with

  3. SU-E-J-31: Biodynamic Imaging of Cancer Tissue and Response to Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte, D; Turek, J; Childress, M; An, R; Merrill, D [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Matei, D [Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure intracellular motions inside three-dimensional living cancer tissue samples to establish a novel set of biodynamic biomarkers that assess tissue proliferative activity and sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy. Methods: Biodynamic imaging (BDI) uses digital holography with low-coherence low-intensity light illumination to construct 3D holograms from depths up to a millimeter deep inside cancer tissue models that include multicellular tumor spheroids and ex vivo cancer biopsies from canine non-Hodgkins lymphoma and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) mouse explants. Intracellular motions modulate the holographic intensity with frequencies related to the Doppler effect caused by the motions of a wide variety of intracellular components. These motions are affected by applied therapeutic agents, and BDI produces unique fingerprints of the action of specific drugs on the motions in specific cell types. In this study, chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin for canine lymphoma and oxoplatin for ovarian) are applied to the living tissue models and monitored over 10 hours by BDI. Results: Multicellular spheroids and patient biopsies are categorized as either sensitive or insensitive to applied therapeutics depending on the intracellular Doppler signatures of chemotherapy response. For both lymphoma and EOC there is strong specificity to the two types of sensitivities, with sensitive cell lines and biopsies exhibiting a global cessation of proliferation and strong suppression of metabolic activity, while insensitive cell lines and biopsies show moderate activation of Doppler frequencies associated with membrane processes and possible membrane trafficking. Conclusion: This work supports the hypothesis that biodynamic biomarkers from three-dimensional living tumor tissue, that includes tissue heterogeneity and measured within 24 hours of surgery, is predictive of near-term patient response to therapy. Future work will correlate biodynamic biomarkers with

  4. Doppler laser imaging predicts response to topical minoxidil in the treatment of female pattern hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, J; Kovacevic, M; Situm, M; Stanimirovic, A; Bolanca, Z; Goren, A

    2016-01-01

    Topical minoxidil is the only drug approved by the US FDA for the treatment of female pattern hair loss. Unfortunately, following 16 weeks of daily application, less than 40% of patients regrow hair. Several studies have demonstrated that sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hair follicles predicts topical minoxidil response in female pattern hair loss patients. However, due to patients’ discomfort with the procedure, and the time required to perform the enzymatic assay it would be ideal to develop a rapid, non-invasive test for sulfotransferase enzyme activity. Minoxidil is a pro-drug converted to its active form, minoxidil sulfate, by sulfotransferase enzymes in the outer root sheath of hair. Minoxidil sulfate is the active form required for both the promotion of hair regrowth and the vasodilatory effects of minoxidil. We thus hypothesized that laser Doppler velocimetry measurement of scalp blood perfusion subsequent to the application of topical minoxidil would correlate with sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hair follicles. In this study, plucked hair follicles from female pattern hair loss patients were analyzed for sulfotransferase enzyme activity. Additionally, laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure the change in scalp perfusion at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes, after the application of minoxidil. In agreement with our hypothesis, we discovered a correlation (r=1.0) between the change in scalp perfusion within 60 minutes after topical minoxidil application and sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hairs. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the feasibility of using laser Doppler imaging as a rapid, non-invasive diagnostic test to predict topical minoxidil response in the treatment of female pattern hair loss.

  5. Visualizing arthritic inflammation and therapeutic response by fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging (19F MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balducci Anthony

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive imaging of inflammation to measure the progression of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and to monitor responses to therapy is critically needed. V-Sense, a perfluorocarbon (PFC contrast agent that preferentially labels inflammatory cells, which are then recruited out of systemic circulation to sites of inflammation, enables detection by 19F MRI. With no 19F background in the host, detection is highly-specific and can act as a proxy biomarker of the degree of inflammation present. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis in rats, a model with many similarities to human RA, was used to study the ability of the PFC contrast agent to reveal the accumulation of inflammation over time using 19F MRI. Disease progression in the rat hind limbs was monitored by caliper measurements and 19F MRI on days 15, 22 and 29, including the height of clinically symptomatic disease. Naïve rats served as controls. The capacity of the PFC contrast agent and 19F MRI to assess the effectiveness of therapy was studied in a cohort of rats administered oral prednisolone on days 14 to 28. Results Quantification of 19F signal measured by MRI in affected limbs was linearly correlated with disease severity. In animals with progressive disease, increases in 19F signal reflected the ongoing recruitment of inflammatory cells to the site, while no increase in 19F signal was observed in animals receiving treatment which resulted in clinical resolution of disease. Conclusion These results indicate that 19F MRI may be used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate longitudinal responses to a therapeutic regimen, while additionally revealing the recruitment of monocytic cells involved in the inflammatory process to the anatomical site. This study may support the use of 19F MRI to clinically quantify and monitor the severity of inflammation, and to assess the effectiveness of treatments in RA and other diseases with an inflammatory

  6. GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: spectral response functions and radiometric biases with the NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite evaluated for desert calibration sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Aaron; Pogorzala, David; Cao, Changyong

    2013-11-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), which will be launched in late 2015 on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-series satellite, will be evaluated in terms of its data quality postlaunch through comparisons with other satellite sensors such as the recently launched Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite. The ABI has completed much of its prelaunch characterization and its developers have generated and released its channel spectral response functions (response versus wavelength). Using these responses and constraining a radiative transfer model with ground reflectance, aerosol, and water vapor measurements, we simulate observed top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectances for analogous visible and near infrared channels of the VIIRS and ABI sensors at the Sonoran Desert and White Sands National Monument sites and calculate the radiometric biases and their uncertainties. We also calculate sensor TOA reflectances using aircraft hyperspectral data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer to validate the uncertainties in several of the ABI and VIIRS channels and discuss the potential for validating the others. Once on-orbit, calibration scientists can use these biases to ensure ABI data quality and consistency to support the numerical weather prediction community and other data users. They can also use the results for ABI or VIIRS anomaly detection and resolution.

  7. Development of the assessment method for the idealized images of teams. Investigation on the teamwork in emergency response situation (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misawa, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    Since the occurrence of the Tohoku Pacific Earthquake and the nuclear disaster in 2011, the strengthening of emergency response training has been emphasized in Japanese electric industries. When disasters and accidents occur in a nuclear power plant, workers should collaborate with each other to mitigate possible hazards and to recovery from emergencies, as self-effort is not sufficient in these times. Effective teamwork is essential for the success of emergency response. However, the aspects of teamwork that are required in emergencies remain unclear. This study developed a questionnaire instrument to assess the idealized image of effective power plant operator teams in three different levels of emergencies. A pilot test of the instrument was conducted with 21 training instructors who are subject-matter experts in nuclear power plant operation. In the questionnaire, three hypothetical situations of differing emergency levels were presented: 'normal' (routine operation), 'abnormal' (trouble shooting and malfunction correction), 'emergency' (severe accident and disaster response). The idealized image of teams in each situation was also assessed in four aspects: 'decision-making', 'coordination', 'adaptation and adjustment', and 'command and control'. Questionnaire responses were summarized in a profile form to picture the idealized images, ant the profile scores in each situation were compared. Results suggested that, the idealized image of effective teams is different depending on the level of emergency. The Implications of results for training and future research directions are discussed. (author)

  8. Novel response function resolves by image deconvolution more details of surface nanomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2010-01-01

    and to imaging by in situ STM of electrocrystallization of copper on gold in electrolytes containing copper sulfate and sulfuric acid. It is suggested that the observed peaks of the recorded image do not represent atoms, but the atomic structure may be recovered by image deconvolution followed by calibration...

  9. FDG-PET imaging for the assessment of physiologic volume response during radiotherapy in cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Lilie L.; Yang Zhiyun; Mutic, Sasa; Miller, Tom R.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the physiologic tumor volume response during treatment in cervical cancer using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Patients and Methods: This was a prospective study of 32 patients. Physiologic tumor volume in cubic centimeters was determined from the FDG-PET images using the 40% threshold method. Results: The mean pretreatment tumor volume was 102 cm 3 . The mean volume by clinical Stages I, II, and III were 54, 79, and 176 cm 3 , respectively. After 19.8 Gy external irradiation to the pelvis, the reduction in tumor volume was 29% (72 cm 3 ). An additional 13 Gy from high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy reduced the mean volume to 15.4 cm 3 , and this was subsequently reduced to 8.6 cm 3 with 13 Gy additional HDR brachytherapy (26 Gy, HDR). Four patients had physiologic FDG uptake in the cervix at 3 months after the completion of therapy. The mean time to the 50% reduction in physiologic tumor volume was 19.9 days and after combined external irradiation and HDR to 24.9 Gy. Conclusion: These results indicate that physiologic tumor volume determination by FDG-PET is feasible and that a 50% physiologic tumor volume reduction occurs within 20 days of starting therapy

  10. Molecular Imaging to Predict Response to Targeted Therapies in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Leguerney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular magnetic resonance imaging targeted to an endothelial integrin involved in neoangiogenesis was compared to DCE-US and immunochemistry to assess the early response of three different therapeutic agents in renal cell carcinoma. Human A498 renal cells carcinoma was subcutaneously inoculated into 24 nude mice. Mice received either phosphate-buffered saline solution, sunitinib, everolimus, or bevacizumab during 4 days. DCE-US and molecular MRI targeting αvβ3 were performed at baseline and 4 days after treatment initiation. PI, AUC, relaxation rate variations ΔR2⁎, and percentage of vessels area quantified on CD31-stained microvessels were compared. Significant decreases were observed for PI and AUC parameters measured by DCE-US for bevacizumab group as early as 4 days, whereas molecular αvβ3-targeted MRI was able to detect significant changes in both bevacizumab and everolimus groups. Percentage of CD31-stained microvessels was significantly correlated with DCE-US parameters, PI (R=0.87, p=0.0003 and AUC (R=0.81, p=0.0013. The percentage of vessel tissue area was significantly reduced (p<0.01 in both sunitinib and bevacizumab groups. We report an early detection of neoangiogenesis modification after induction of targeted therapies, using DCE-US or αvβ3-targeted MRI. We consider these outcomes should encourage clinical trial developments to further evaluate the potential of this molecular MRI technique.

  11. Geant4 simulation of the response of phosphor screens for X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistrui-Maximean, S.A.; Freud, N.; Letang, J.M.; Koch, A.; Munier, B.; Walenta, A.H.; Montarou, G.; Babot, D.

    2006-01-01

    In order to predict and optimize the response of phosphor screens, it is important to understand the role played by the different physical processes inside the scintillator layer. A simulation model based on the Monte Carlo code Geant4 was developed to determine the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of phosphor screens for energies used in X-ray medical imaging and nondestructive testing applications. The visualization of the dose distribution inside the phosphor layer gives an insight into how the MTF is progressively degraded by X-ray and electron transport. The simulation model allows to study the influence of physical and technological parameters on the detector performances, as well as to design and optimize new detector configurations. Preliminary MTF measurements have been carried out and agreement with experimental data has been found in the case of a commercial screen (Kodak Lanex Fine) at an X-ray tube potential of 100 kV. Further validation with other screens (transparent or granular) at different energies is under way

  12. Geant4 simulation of the response of phosphor screens for X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistrui-Maximean, S.A. [Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint Exupery, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: simona.pistrui@insa-lyon.fr; Freud, N. [Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint Exupery, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Letang, J.M. [Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint Exupery, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Koch, A. [Thales Electron Devices, 38430 Moirans (France); Munier, B. [Thales Electron Devices, 38430 Moirans (France); Walenta, A.H. [Department of Detectors and Electronics, FB Physik, University of Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Montarou, G. [Corpuscular Physics Laboratory, Blaise Pascal University, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France); Babot, D. [Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint Exupery, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    In order to predict and optimize the response of phosphor screens, it is important to understand the role played by the different physical processes inside the scintillator layer. A simulation model based on the Monte Carlo code Geant4 was developed to determine the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of phosphor screens for energies used in X-ray medical imaging and nondestructive testing applications. The visualization of the dose distribution inside the phosphor layer gives an insight into how the MTF is progressively degraded by X-ray and electron transport. The simulation model allows to study the influence of physical and technological parameters on the detector performances, as well as to design and optimize new detector configurations. Preliminary MTF measurements have been carried out and agreement with experimental data has been found in the case of a commercial screen (Kodak Lanex Fine) at an X-ray tube potential of 100 kV. Further validation with other screens (transparent or granular) at different energies is under way.

  13. Assessment of regional ventilation distribution: comparison of vibration response imaging (VRI) with electrical impedance tomography (EIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chang; Boehme, Stefan; Bentley, Alexander H; Hartmann, Erik K; Klein, Klaus U; Bodenstein, Marc; Baumgardner, James E; David, Matthias; Ullrich, Roman; Markstaller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Vibration response imaging (VRI) is a bedside technology to monitor ventilation by detecting lung sound vibrations. It is currently unknown whether VRI is able to accurately monitor the local distribution of ventilation within the lungs. We therefore compared VRI to electrical impedance tomography (EIT), an established technique used for the assessment of regional ventilation. Simultaneous EIT and VRI measurements were performed in the healthy and injured lungs (ALI; induced by saline lavage) at different PEEP levels (0, 5, 10, 15 mbar) in nine piglets. Vibration energy amplitude (VEA) by VRI, and amplitudes of relative impedance changes (rel.ΔZ) by EIT, were evaluated in seven regions of interest (ROIs). To assess the distribution of tidal volume (VT) by VRI and EIT, absolute values were normalized to the VT obtained by simultaneous spirometry measurements. Redistribution of ventilation by ALI and PEEP was detected by VRI and EIT. The linear correlation between pooled VT by VEA and rel.ΔZ was R(2) = 0.96. Bland-Altman analysis showed a bias of -1.07±24.71 ml and limits of agreement of -49.05 to +47.36 ml. Within the different ROIs, correlations of VT-distribution by EIT and VRI ranged between R(2) values of 0.29 and 0.96. ALI and PEEP did not alter the agreement of VT between VRI and EIT. Measurements of regional ventilation distribution by VRI are comparable to those obtained by EIT.

  14. Variation in the human ribs geometrical properties and mechanical response based on X-ray computed tomography images resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perz, Rafał; Toczyski, Jacek; Subit, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Computational models of the human body are commonly used for injury prediction in automobile safety research. To create these models, the geometry of the human body is typically obtained from segmentation of medical images such as computed tomography (CT) images that have a resolution between 0.2 and 1mm/pixel. While the accuracy of the geometrical and structural information obtained from these images depend greatly on their resolution, the effect of image resolution on the estimation of the ribs geometrical properties has yet to be established. To do so, each of the thirty-four sections of ribs obtained from a Post Mortem Human Surrogate (PMHS) was imaged using three different CT modalities: standard clinical CT (clinCT), high resolution clinical CT (HRclinCT), and microCT. The images were processed to estimate the rib cross-section geometry and mechanical properties, and the results were compared to those obtained from the microCT images by computing the 'deviation factor', a metric that quantifies the relative difference between results obtained from clinCT and HRclinCT to those obtained from microCT. Overall, clinCT images gave a deviation greater than 100%, and were therefore deemed inadequate for the purpose of this study. HRclinCT overestimated the rib cross-sectional area by 7.6%, the moments of inertia by about 50%, and the cortical shell area by 40.2%, while underestimating the trabecular area by 14.7%. Next, a parametric analysis was performed to quantify how the variations in the estimate of the geometrical properties affected the rib predicted mechanical response under antero-posterior loading. A variation of up to 45% for the predicted peak force and up to 50% for the predicted stiffness was observed. These results provide a quantitative estimate of the sensitivity of the response of the FE model to the resolution of the images used to generate it. They also suggest that a correction factor could be derived from the comparison between microCT and

  15. Multimodal freight investment criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Literature was reviewed on multi-modal investment criteria for freight projects, examining measures and techniques for quantifying project benefits and costs, as well as ways to describe the economic importance of freight transportation. : A limited ...

  16. Water Quality Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA develops water quality criteria based on the latest scientific knowledge to protect human health and aquatic life. This information serves as guidance to states and tribes in adopting water quality standards.

  17. Aquatic Life Criteria - Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents related to EPA's final 2013 Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Ammonia (Freshwater). These documents pertain to the safe levels of Ammonia in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  18. Aquatic Life Criteria - Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertain to Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality criteria for Copper (2007 Freshwater, 2016 Estuarine/marine). These documents contain the safe levels of Copper in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  19. Integrated Criteria Document Chromium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooff W; Cleven RFMJ; Janus JA; van der Poel P; van Beelen P; Boumans LJM; Canton JH; Eerens HC; Krajnc EI; de Leeuw FAAM; Matthijsen AJCM; van de Meent D; van der Meulen A; Mohn GR; Wijland GC; de Bruijn PJ; van Keulen A; Verburgh JJ; van der Woerd KF

    1990-01-01

    Betreft de engelse versie van rapport 758701001
    Bij dit rapport behoort een appendix onder hetzelfde nummer getiteld: "Integrated Criteria Document Chromium: Effects" Auteurs: Janus JA; Krajnc EI
    (appendix: see 710401002A)

  20. Comparison of computerized digital and film-screen radiography: response to variation in imaging kVp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broderick, N J; Long, B; Dreesen, R G; Cohen, M D; Cory, D A [Riley Hospital for Children, Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Katz, B P; Kalasinski, L A [Regenstreif Inst., Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States). Dept. of Medicine

    1992-09-01

    A controlled prospective study, in an animal model chosen to simulate portable neonatal radiography, was performed to compare the response of the Philips Computed Radiography (CR) system and conventional 200 speed film-screen (FS) to variation in imaging kVp. Acceptable images were obtained on the CR system over a very wide kVp range. In contrast the FS system produced acceptable images over a narrow kVp range. This ability suggests that the CR system should eliminate the need for repeat examinations in cases where a suboptimal kVp setting would have resulted in an unacceptable FS image. CR technology should therefore be ideally suited to portable radiography especially in situations where selection of correct exposure factors is difficult as in the neonatal nursery. (orig.).

  1. Comparison of computerized digital and film-screen radiography: response to variation in imaging kVp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broderick, N.J.; Long, B.; Dreesen, R.G.; Cohen, M.D.; Cory, D.A.; Katz, B.P.; Kalasinski, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    A controlled prospective study, in an animal model chosen to simulate portable neonatal radiography, was performed to compare the response of the Philips Computed Radiography (CR) system and conventional 200 speed film-screen (FS) to variation in imaging kVp. Acceptable images were obtained on the CR system over a very wide kVp range. In contrast the FS system produced acceptable images over a narrow kVp range. This ability suggests that the CR system should eliminate the need for repeat examinations in cases where a suboptimal kVp setting would have resulted in an unacceptable FS image. CR technology should therefore be ideally suited to portable radiography especially in situations where selection of correct exposure factors is difficult as in the neonatal nursery. (orig.)

  2. Dual Criteria Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten Igel

    2014-01-01

    The most popular models of decision making use a single criterion to evaluate projects or lotteries. However, decision makers may actually consider multiple criteria when evaluating projects. We consider a dual criteria model from psychology. This model integrates the familiar tradeoffs between...... to the clear role that income thresholds play in such decision making, but does not rule out a role for tradeoffs between risk and utility or probability weighting....

  3. Rating of environmental criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glueck, K; Krasser, G

    1980-01-01

    After a general theoretical discussion on the question of rating within a framework of cost-benefit studies, first trials as to the quantification and standardisation of twelve selected environmental criteria by means of an indicator system are worked out and compiled. The selection includes the criteria exhaust gas, dust, micro climate, water pollution, water regime, land requirement, vibrations, traffic noise, landscape scene, urban scene, effect of separation and safety risks. An insight is given of the rating practice using an evaluation of the available literature, of a household interview and of an interview of experts. The interviewing of 156 experts as to their rating conception of ten criteria in the second round has provided contributions to the general problem of the evaluation estimate based on multi criteria analysis as well as differentiation of the twelve or ten environmental criteria. The following criteria ratings given by the experts and which are averaged and smoothed are: traffic noise 20,0% +- 8,5; air pollution 15,0% +- 7,0; safety risk 13,0% +- 7,0; soil and water pollution 8,5% +- 5,0; landscape scene 8,0% +- 4,5; urban scene 8,0% +- 4,5; water regime 6,5% +- 3,5 and vibrations 4,5% +- 2,5.

  4. The evolution of colour polymorphism in British winter-active Lepidoptera in response to search image use by avian predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Jamie Conor

    2018-05-10

    Phenotypic polymorphism in cryptic species is widespread. This may evolve in response to search image use by predators exerting negative frequency-dependent selection on intraspecific colour morphs, "apostatic selection". Evidence exists to indicate search image formation by predators and apostatic selection operating on wild prey populations, though not to demonstrate search image use directly resulting in apostatic selection. The present study attempted to address this deficiency, using British Lepidoptera active in winter as a model system. It has been proposed that the typically polymorphic wing colouration of these species represents an anti-search image adaptation against birds. To test (a) for search image driven apostatic selection, dimorphic populations of artificial moth-like models were established in woodland at varying relative morph frequencies and exposed to predation by natural populations of birds. In addition, to test (b) whether abundance and degree of polymorphism are correlated across British winter-active moths, as predicted where search image use drives apostatic selection, a series of phylogenetic comparative analyses were conducted. There was a positive relationship between artificial morph frequency and probability of predation, consistent with birds utilising search images and exerting apostatic selection. Abundance and degree of polymorphism were found to be positively correlated across British Lepidoptera active in winter, though not across all taxonomic groups analysed. This evidence is consistent with polymorphism in this group having evolved in response to search image driven apostatic selection and supports the viability of this mechanism as a means by which phenotypic and genetic variation may be maintained in natural populations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Nuclear Molecular Imaging Strategies in Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandsen, Kasper F; Hendel, Helle W; Langer, Seppo W

    2017-01-01

    this, new response criteria for evaluating these patients with morphologic imaging have been proposed. The aim of this paper is to review and discuss the current evidence for the use of molecular imaging, e.g., PET/CT (Positron Emission Tomography/Computer Tomography) with18F-Fluorodeoxyglucoes (FDG...

  6. Water level response measurement in a steel cylindrical liquid storage tank using image filter processing under seismic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Wan; Choi, Hyoung-Suk; Park, Dong-Uk; Baek, Eun-Rim; Kim, Jae-Min

    2018-02-01

    Sloshing refers to the movement of fluid that occurs when the kinetic energy of various storage tanks containing fluid (e.g., excitation and vibration) is continuously applied to the fluid inside the tanks. As the movement induced by an external force gets closer to the resonance frequency of the fluid, the effect of sloshing increases, and this can lead to a serious problem with the structural stability of the system. Thus, it is important to accurately understand the physics of sloshing, and to effectively suppress and reduce the sloshing. Also, a method for the economical measurement of the water level response of a liquid storage tank is needed for the exact analysis of sloshing. In this study, a method using images was employed among the methods for measuring the water level response of a liquid storage tank, and the water level response was measured using an image filter processing algorithm for the reduction of the noise of the fluid induced by light, and for the sharpening of the structure installed at the liquid storage tank. A shaking table test was performed to verify the validity of the method of measuring the water level response of a liquid storage tank using images, and the result was analyzed and compared with the response measured using a water level gauge.

  7. Molecular imaging of the transcription factor NF-κB, a primary regulator of stress response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, Harald; Alexander, George; Austenaa, Liv M.I.; Ebihara, Kanae; Blomhoff, Rune

    2004-01-01

    A wide range of environmental stress and human disorders involves inappropriate regulation of NF-κB, including cancers and numerous inflammatory conditions. We have developed transgenic mice that express luciferase under the control of NF-κB, enabling real-time non-invasive imaging of NF-κB activity in intact animals. We show that, in the absence of stimulation, strong, intrinsic luminescence is evident in lymph nodes in the neck region, thymus, and Peyer's patches. Treating mice with stressors, such as TNF-α, IL-1α, or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increases the luminescence in a tissue-specific manner, with the strongest activity observable in the skin, lungs, spleen, Peyer's patches, and the wall of the small intestine. Liver, kidney, heart, muscle, and adipose tissue exhibit less intense activities. Exposure of the skin to a low dose of UV-B radiation increases luminescence in the exposed areas. In ocular experiments, LPS- and TNF-α injected NF-κB-luciferase transgenic mice exhibit a 20-40-fold increase in lens NF-κB activity, similar to other LPS- and TNF-α-responsive organs. Peak NF-κB activity occurs 6 h after injection of TNF-α and 12 h after injection of LPS. Peak activities occur, respectively, 3 and 6 h later than that in other tissues. Mice exposed to 360 J/m 2 of UV-B exhibit a 16-fold increase in NF-κB activity 6 h after exposure, characteristically similar to TNF-α-exposed mice. Thus, in NF-κB-luciferase transgenic mice, NF-κB activity also occurs in lens epithelial tissue and is activated when the intact mouse is exposed to classical stressors. Furthermore, as revealed by real-time non-invasive imaging, induction of chronic inflammation resembling rheumatoid arthritis produces strong NF-κB activity in the affected joints. Finally, we have used the model to demonstrate NF-κB regulation by manipulating the Vitamin A status in mice. NF-κB activity is elevated in mice fed a Vitamin A deficient (VAD) diet, and suppressed by surplus doses of

  8. TLG-S criteria are superior to both EORTC and PERCIST for predicting outcomes in patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma treated with erlotinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Kung-Chu [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Center for Advanced Molecular Imaging and Translation, Taoyuan (China); Fang, Yu-Hua Dean [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tainan (China); Chung, Hsiao-Wen [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei (China); Liu, Yuan-Chang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Taoyuan (China); Chang, John Wen-Cheng; Hou, Ming-Mo [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Yang, Cheng-Ta [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Thoracic Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Cheng, Nai-Ming; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Center for Advanced Molecular Imaging and Translation, Taoyuan (China); Su, Tzu-Pei [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Keelung (China)

    2016-11-15

    In this retrospective review of prospectively collected data, we sought to investigate whether early FDG-PET assessment of treatment response based on total lesion glycolysis measured using a systemic approach (TLG-S) would be superior to either local assessment with EORTC (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) criteria or single-lesion assessment with PERCIST (PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors) for predicting clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma treated with erlotinib. We also examined the effect of bone flares on tumor response evaluation by single-lesion assessment with PERCIST in patients with metastatic bone lesions. We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data from 23 patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma treated with erlotinib. All participants underwent FDG-PET imaging at baseline and on days 14 and 56 after completion of erlotinib treatment. In addition, diagnostic CT scans were performed at baseline and on day 56. FDG-PET response was assessed with TLG-S, EORTC, and PERCIST criteria. Response assessment based on RECIST 1.1 (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) from diagnostic CT imaging was used as the reference standard. Two-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) served as the main outcome measures. We identified 13 patients with bone metastases. Of these, four (31 %) with persistent bone uptake due to bone flares on day 14 were erroneously classified as non-responders according to the PERCIST criteria, but they were correctly classified as responders according to both the EORTC and TLG-S criteria. Patients who were classified as responders on day 14 based on TLG-S criteria had higher rates of 2-year PFS (26.7 % vs. 0 %, P = 0.007) and OS (40.0 % vs. 7.7 %, P = 0.018). Similar rates were observed in patients who showed a response on day 56 based on CT imaging according to the RECIST criteria. Patients classified as responders on day 14

  9. Modeling a color-rendering operator for high dynamic range images using a cone-response function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ho-Hyoung; Kim, Gi-Seok; Yun, Byoung-Ju

    2015-09-01

    Tone-mapping operators are the typical algorithms designed to produce visibility and the overall impression of brightness, contrast, and color of high dynamic range (HDR) images on low dynamic range (LDR) display devices. Although several new tone-mapping operators have been proposed in recent years, the results of these operators have not matched those of the psychophysical experiments based on the human visual system. A color-rendering model that is a combination of tone-mapping and cone-response functions using an XYZ tristimulus color space is presented. In the proposed method, the tone-mapping operator produces visibility and the overall impression of brightness, contrast, and color in HDR images when mapped onto relatively LDR devices. The tone-mapping resultant image is obtained using chromatic and achromatic colors to avoid well-known color distortions shown in the conventional methods. The resulting image is then processed with a cone-response function wherein emphasis is placed on human visual perception (HVP). The proposed method covers the mismatch between the actual scene and the rendered image based on HVP. The experimental results show that the proposed method yields an improved color-rendering performance compared to conventional methods.

  10. Novel ultrasound-responsive chitosan/perfluorohexane nanodroplets for image-guided smart delivery of an anticancer agent: Curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghbani, Fatemeh; Chegeni, Mahdieh; Moztarzadeh, Fathollah; Hadian-Ghazvini, Samaneh; Raz, Majid

    2017-05-01

    Ultrasound-responsive nanodroplets are a class of new emerging smart drug delivery systems which provide image-guided nano-therapy of various diseases, especially cancers. Here, we developed multifunctional smart curcumin-loaded chitosan/perfluorohexane nanodroplets for contrast-ultrasound imaging and on-demand drug delivery. The nanodroplets were synthesized via nanoemulsion process. The optimal formulation with the size of 101.2nm and 77.8% curcumin entrapment was chosen for release study and cytotoxicity evaluation. Sonication at the frequency of 1MHz, 2W/cm 2 for 4min triggered the release of 63.5% of curcumin from optimal formulation (Cur-NDs-2). Ultrasound aided release study indicated that the concentration of perfluorohexane and the degree of acoustic droplet vaporization play important role in ultrasound-active drug release. B-mode ultrasound imaging confirmed strong ultrasound contrast of chitosan nanodroplets even at low concentrations via droplet to bubble transition. Finally, cytotoxicity of the ultrasound-responsive nanodroplets in the presence of ultrasound was evaluated in-vitro on 4T1 human breast cancer cells. Cell growth inhibitory effects of curcumin-loaded nanodroplets significantly increased by ultrasound exposure. According to the obtained results, these ultrasound responsive curcumin-loaded chitosan/perfluorohexane nanodroplets have a great potential for imaged-guided cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Study on the dose response characteristics of a scanning liquid ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device

    CERN Document Server

    Ma Shao Gang; Song Yi Xin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the dose response characteristics and the influence factors such as gantry angle, field size and acquisition mode on the dosimetric response curves, when using a scanning liquid ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for dose verification. Methods: All experiments were carried out on a Varian 600 C/D accelerator (6 MV X-ray) equipped with a Varian PortalVision sup T sup M MK2 type EPID. To obtain the dose response curve, the relationship between the incident radiation intensity to the detector and the pixel value output from the EPID were established. Firstly, the different dose rates of 6 MV X-rays were obtained by varying SSD. Secondly, three digital portal images were acquired for each dose rate using the EPID and averaged to avoid the influence of the dose rate fluctuations of the accelerator. The pixel values of all images were read using self-designed image analysis software, and and average for a region consisting of 11 x 11 pixels around the center was taken as the res...

  12. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  13. Functional imaging to monitor vascular and metabolic response in canine head and neck tumors during fractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rødal, Jan; Rusten, Espen; Søvik, Åste; Skogmo, Hege Kippenes; Malinen, Eirik

    2013-10-01

    Radiotherapy causes alterations in tumor biology, and non-invasive early assessment of such alterations may become useful for identifying treatment resistant disease. The purpose of the current work is to assess changes in vascular and metabolic features derived from functional imaging of canine head and neck tumors during fractionated radiotherapy. Material and methods. Three dogs with spontaneous head and neck tumors received intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Contrast-enhanced cone beam computed tomography (CE-CBCT) at the treatment unit was performed at five treatment fractions. Dynamic (18)FDG-PET (D-PET) was performed prior to the start of radiotherapy, at mid-treatment and at 3-12 weeks after the completion of treatment. Tumor contrast enhancement in the CE-CBCT images was used as a surrogate for tumor vasculature. Vascular and metabolic tumor parameters were further obtained from the D-PET images. Changes in these tumor parameters were assessed, with emphasis on intra-tumoral distributions. Results. For all three patients, metabolic imaging parameters obtained from D-PET decreased from the pre- to the inter-therapy session. Correspondingly, for two of three patients, vascular imaging parameters obtained from both CE-CBCT and D-PET increased. Only one of the tumors showed a clear metabolic response after therapy. No systematic changes in the intra-tumor heterogeneity in the imaging parameters were found. Conclusion. Changes in vascular and metabolic parameters could be detected by the current functional imaging methods. Vascular tumor features from CE-CBCT and D-PET corresponded well. CE-CBCT is a potential method for easy response assessment when the patient is at the treatment unit.

  14. Summarized water quality criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempster, P.L.; Hattingh, W.H.J.; Van Vliet, H.R.

    1980-08-01

    The available world literature from 27 sources on existing water quality criteria are summarized for the 15 main uses of water. The minimum, median and maximum specified values for 96 different determinands are included. Under each water use the criteria are grouped according to the functional significance of the determinands e.g. aesthetic/physical effects, high toxic potential, low toxic potential etc. A synopsis is included summarizing salient facts for each determinand such as the conditions under which it is toxic and its relationship to other determinands. The significance of the criteria is briefly discussed and the importance of considering functional interactions between determinands emphasized in evaluating the potential for toxic or beneficial effects. From the source literature it appears that the toxic potential, in addition to being determined by concentration, is also affected by the origin of the substance concerned, i.e. whether from natural sources or from anthropogenic pollution

  15. Neural responses to visual food cues according to weight status: a systematic review of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursey, Kirrilly M; Stanwell, Peter; Callister, Robert J; Brain, Katherine; Collins, Clare E; Burrows, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies suggests that specific food-related behaviors contribute to the development of obesity. The aim of this review was to report the neural responses to visual food cues, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in humans of differing weight status. Published studies to 2014 were retrieved and included if they used visual food cues, studied humans >18 years old, reported weight status, and included fMRI outcomes. Sixty studies were identified that investigated the neural responses of healthy weight participants (n = 26), healthy weight compared to obese participants (n = 17), and weight-loss interventions (n = 12). High-calorie food images were used in the majority of studies (n = 36), however, image selection justification was only provided in 19 studies. Obese individuals had increased activation of reward-related brain areas including the insula and orbitofrontal cortex in response to visual food cues compared to healthy weight individuals, and this was particularly evident in response to energy dense cues. Additionally, obese individuals were more responsive to food images when satiated. Meta-analysis of changes in neural activation post-weight loss revealed small areas of convergence across studies in brain areas related to emotion, memory, and learning, including the cingulate gyrus, lentiform nucleus, and precuneus. Differential activation patterns to visual food cues were observed between obese, healthy weight, and weight-loss populations. Future studies require standardization of nutrition variables and fMRI outcomes to enable more direct comparisons between studies.

  16. {sup 99m}Tc-Annexin A5 quantification of apoptotic tumor response: a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical imaging trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhocine, Tarik Z. [Western University, Biomedical Imaging Research Centre (BIRC), London, Ontario (Canada); Blankenberg, Francis G. [Lucile Salter Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Kartachova, Marina S. [Medical Center Alkmaar, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Stitt, Larry W. [LW Stitt Statistical Services, London, Ontario (Canada); Vanderheyden, Jean-Luc [JLVMI Consulting LLC, Waukesha, WI (United States); Hoebers, Frank J.P. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Wiele, Christophe van de [University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-Annexin A5 has been used as a molecular imaging probe for the visualization, characterization and measurement of apoptosis. In an effort to define the quantitative {sup 99m}Tc-annexin A5 uptake criteria that best predict tumor response to treatment, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the results of all clinical imaging trials found in the literature or publicly available databases. Included in this review were 17 clinical trials investigating quantitative {sup 99m}Tc-annexin A5 (qAnx5) imaging using different parameters in cancer patients before and after the first course of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Qualitative assessment of the clinical studies for diagnostic accuracy was performed using the QUADAS-2 criteria. Of these studies, five prospective single-center clinical trials (92 patients in total) were included in the meta-analysis after exclusion of one multicenter clinical trial due to heterogeneity. Pooled positive predictive values (PPV) and pooled negative predictive values (NPV) (with 95 % CI) were calculated using Meta-Disc software version 1.4. Absolute quantification and/or relative quantification of {sup 99m}Tc-annexin A5 uptake were performed at baseline and after the start of treatment. Various quantitative parameters have been used for the calculation of {sup 99m}Tc-annexin A5 tumor uptake and delta (Δ) tumor changes post-treatment compared to baseline including: tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), ΔTBR, tumor-to-noise ratio, relative tumor ratio (TR), ΔTR, standardized tumor uptake ratio (STU), ΔSTU, maximum count per pixel within the tumor volume (Cmax), Cmax%, absolute ΔU and percentage (ΔU%), maximum ΔU counts, semiquantitative visual scoring, percent injected dose (%ID) and %ID/cm{sup 3}. Clinical trials investigating qAnx5 imaging have included patients with lung cancer, lymphoma, breast cancer, head and neck cancer and other less common tumor types. In two phase I/II single-center clinical trials

  17. Prediction of response to first-line chemotherapy with steamboat's imaging in lymphoma patients. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spyridonidis, T.; Apostolopoulos, D.; Giannakenas, C.; Xourgia, X.; Vasilakosa, P.; Frangos, S.; Matsouka, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Sestamibi is a transport substrate for both Pgp and MRP, which are closely related to MDR (multidrug resistance), a significant factor for chemotherapy treatment failure in many cancer patients. Imaging with Tc99m-Sestamibi has been studied for predicting chemotherapy response mainly in breast and lung cancer. A few studies exist regarding lymphoma patients. In our study we included 24 consecutive lymphoma patients that were referred to our department for initial (before treatment) Ga-67 scan. All these patients were also imaged with Tc99m-Sestamibi in order to evaluate its prognostic value in predicting response to first-line chemotherapy. 20 mCi of Tc99m-Sestamibi was injected intravenously and planar images of the whole body were obtained at 15 min and 2 hours later. In 21/24 patients SPECT was performed in area of interest (most commonly in thorax) both in early and late imaging. Ratios of tumor average counts to background in early and late planar and SPECT images were calculated, also ratios of max tumor counts to background were calculated, as well as tumor washout rate. In all the estimations time decay correction was applied. A visual interpretation score was introduced for early uptake and another for Sestamibi retention in late images. Early uptake score was considered 0 in no or nearly no uptake, 1 in low uptake, 2 in moderate uptake, and 3 in high uptake. Tumor retention score was considered 0 in no retention (not or nearly not visible on late images), 1 in slight/moderate uptake (tumor better seen on early images), 2 in moderate uptake (tumor seen similar/somehow better in late images), 3 high retention (tumor definitely seen better on late images). Finally a total prognostic score (TPS) was derived by the sum of the two above-mentioned scores (uptake score plus retention score). The mean age of our patients was 48.8 ±13.9 years (range 17-80 years). 12 patients were men, and 12 women. There were 8 patients with HD and 16 with NHL. Three of