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Sample records for ill trauma patients

  1. Hyperglycemia has a stronger relation trauma patients than in other critically with outcome in ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelzang, M; Nijboer, JMM; van der Horst, ICC; Zijlstra, F; ten Duis, HJ; Nijsten, MWN

    2006-01-01

    Background. Acute hyperglycemia is associated with adverse outcome in critically ill patients. Glucose control with insulin improves outcome in surgical intensive care unit (SICU) patients, but the effect in trauma patients is unknown. We investigated hyperglycemia and outcome in SICU patients with

  2. [Management of critically ill patients in the resuscitation room. Different than for trauma?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, M; Ramshorn-Zimmer, A; Hartwig, T; Mende, L; Helm, M; Pega, J; Gries, A

    2014-02-01

    The general approach to the initial resuscitation of non-trauma patients does not differ from the ABCDE approach used to evaluate severely injured patients. After initial stabilization of vital functions patients are evaluated based on the symptoms and critical care interventions are initiated as and when necessary. Adequate structural logistics and personnel organization are crucial for the treatment of non-trauma critically ill patients although there is currently a lack of clearly defined requirements. For severely injured patients there are recommendations in the S3 guidelines on treatment of multiple trauma and severely injured patients and these can be modeled according to the white paper of the German Society of Trauma Surgery (DGU). However, structured training programs similar to the advanced trauma life support (ATLS®)/European resuscitation course (ETC®) that go beyond the current scope of advanced cardiac life support training are needed. The development of an advanced critically ill life support (ACILS®) concept for non-trauma critically ill patients in the resuscitation room should be supported.

  3. Redox Changes Induced by General Anesthesia in Critically Ill Patients with Multiple Traumas

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    Marius Papurica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The critically ill polytrauma patient is a constant challenge for the trauma team due to the complexity of the complications presented. Intense inflammatory response and infections, as well as multiple organ dysfunctions, significantly increase the rate of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Moreover, due to the physiological and biochemical imbalances present in this type of patients, the bioproduction of free radicals is significantly accelerated, thus installing the oxidative stress. In the therapeutic management of such patients, multiple surgical interventions are required and therefore they are being subjected to repeated general anesthesia. In this paper, we want to present the pathophysiological implications of oxidative stress in critically ill patients with multiple traumas and the implications of general anesthesia on the redox mechanisms of the cell. We also want to summarize the antioxidant treatments able to reduce the intensity of oxidative stress by modulating the biochemical activity of some cellular mechanisms.

  4. Redox Changes Induced by General Anesthesia in Critically Ill Patients with Multiple Traumas

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    Papurica, Marius; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Sandesc, Dorel; Dumache, Raluca; Nartita, Radu; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Alina Carmen; Luca, Loredana; Vernic, Corina; Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea

    2015-01-01

    The critically ill polytrauma patient is a constant challenge for the trauma team due to the complexity of the complications presented. Intense inflammatory response and infections, as well as multiple organ dysfunctions, significantly increase the rate of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Moreover, due to the physiological and biochemical imbalances present in this type of patients, the bioproduction of free radicals is significantly accelerated, thus installing the oxidative stress. In the therapeutic management of such patients, multiple surgical interventions are required and therefore they are being subjected to repeated general anesthesia. In this paper, we want to present the pathophysiological implications of oxidative stress in critically ill patients with multiple traumas and the implications of general anesthesia on the redox mechanisms of the cell. We also want to summarize the antioxidant treatments able to reduce the intensity of oxidative stress by modulating the biochemical activity of some cellular mechanisms. PMID:26693352

  5. Nutritional management of critically ill trauma patients in the deployed military setting.

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    Jansen, J O; Turner, S; Johnston, A McD

    2011-09-01

    The role of nutritional support in critical illness is well established. This article reviews the nutritional management of military trauma patients in the deployed setting, which poses special challenges for the surgeon and intensivist. There is little direct evidence relating to the nutritional management of trauma patients in general, and military trauma patients in particular, but much of the evidence accrued in the civilian and non-trauma critical care setting can be extrapolated to military practice. There is strong consensus that feeding should be commenced as soon possible after injury. Enteral nutrition should be used in preference to parenteral nutrition whenever possible. If available, supplemental parenteral feeding can be considered if enteral delivery is insufficient. Gastrointestinal anastomoses and repairs, including those in the upper gastrointestinal tract, are not a contraindication to early enteral feeding. Intragastric delivery is more physiological and usually more convenient than postpyloric feeding, and thus the preferred route for the initiation of nutritional support. Feeding gastrostomies or jejunostomies should not be used for short-term nutritional support. Enteral feeding of patients with an open abdomen does not delay closure and may reduce the incidence of pneumonia, and enteral nutrition should be continued for scheduled relook surgery not involving hollow viscera or airway. Glutamine supplementation may improve outcome in trauma patients, but fish-oil containing feeds, while showing some promise, should be reserved for subgroups of patients with ARDS.

  6. Emergency team calls for critically ill non-trauma patients in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Marker; Do, Hien Quoc; Rasmussen, Søren W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Handling critically ill patients is a complex task for Emergency Department (ED) personnel. Initial treatment is of major importance and requires adequately experienced ED doctors to initiate and decide for the right medical or surgical treatment. Our aim was, with regard to clinical...... presentation, management and mortality to describe adult non-trauma patients that upon ED arrival elicited emergency team calls. METHODS: An observational study of adult patients (≥ 18 years) admitted to a regional ED with conditions that elicited acute team activation and additional emergency team.......004). Additionally, 115 adult patients were admitted to the ICU directly from the ED without eliciting an emergency team call during the study period. These patients mainly comprised patients who were intoxicated, were unconscious or had respiratory failure. CONCLUSION: The majority of emergency team call patients...

  7. Physical rehabilitation of the critically ill trauma patient in the ICU.

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    Engels, Paul T; Beckett, Andrew N; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Kreder, Hans; Finkelstein, Joel A; da Costa, Leodante; Papia, Giuseppe; Rizoli, Sandro B; Tien, Homer C

    2013-07-01

    To 1) review the existing evidence for early mobilization of the critically ill patients in the ICU with polytrauma; 2) provide intensivists with an introduction to the biomechanics, physiology, and nomenclature of injuries; 3) summarize the evidence for early mobilization in each anatomic area; and 4) provide recommendations for the mobilization of these patients. A literature search of the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases for articles published in English between 1980 and 2011. Studies pertaining to physical therapy and rehabilitation in trauma patients were selected. Articles were excluded if they dealt with pediatrics, geriatrics, burn injuries, isolated hand injuries, chronic (i.e., not acute) injuries, nontraumatic conditions, and pressure/decubitus ulcers, were in a language other than English, were published only in abstract form, were letters to the editor, were case reports, or were published prior to 1980. Reviewers extracted data and summarized results according to anatomical areas. Of 1,411 titles and abstracts, 103 met inclusion criteria. We found no articles specifically addressing the rehabilitation of polytrauma patients in the ICU setting or patients with polytrauma in general. We summarized the articles addressing the role of mobilization for specific injuries and treatments. We used this evidence, in combination with biologic rationale and physician and surgeon experience and expertise, to summarize the important considerations when providing physical therapy to these patients in the ICU setting. There is a paucity of evidence addressing the role of early mobilization of ICU patients with polytrauma and patients with polytrauma in general. Evidence for the beneficial role of early mobilization of specific injuries exists. Important considerations when applying a strategy of early physical therapy and mobilization to this distinctive patient group are summarized.

  8. Evaluation of acute kidney injury (AKI) with RIFLE, AKIN, CK, and KDIGO in critically ill trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ülger, F; Pehlivanlar Küçük, M; Küçük, A O; İlkaya, N K; Murat, N; Bilgiç, B; Abanoz, H

    2017-07-17

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of AKI development on mortality with four different classification systems (RIFLE, AKIN, CK, KDIGO) in critically ill trauma patients followed in the intensive care unit. A retrospective review of 2034 patients in our intensive care unit was conducted between July 2010 and August 2013. A total of 198 patients with primary trauma were included in the study to evaluate the development of AKI. When the presence of AKI was investigated according to the four criteria (RIFLE, AKIN, CK, and KDIGO), the highest incidence of AKI was found according to the KDIGO classification (74.2%), followed by AKIN (72.2%), RIFLE (69.7%), and CK (59.1%). It was observed that more AKI developed according to KDIGO in patients with multiple trauma and thoracic trauma (p = 0.031, p = 0.029). Sixty-two (31%) of the 198 trauma patients monitored in the intensive care unit died; mortality was frequently found high in AKI stage 2 and 3 patients. According to the CK classification, there was a significant increase in mortality in patients with AKI on the first day (p = 0.045). AKI classifications by RIFLE, AKIN, CK, and KDIGO were independently associated with the risk of in-hospital death. In this study, the presence of AKI was found to be an independent risk factor in the development of in-hospital mortality according to all classification systems (RIFLE, AKIN, CK, and KDIGO) in critically traumatic patients followed in ICU, and the compatibility between RIFLE, AKIN, and KDIGO was the highest among the classification systems.

  9. Bench-to-bedside review: Early tracheostomy in critically ill trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shirawi, Nehad; Arabi, Yaseen

    2005-01-01

    A significant proportion of trauma patients require tracheostomy during intensive care unit stay. The timing of this procedure remains a subject of debate. The decision for tracheostomy should take into consideration the risks and benefits of prolonged endotracheal intubation versus tracheostomy. Timing of tracheostomy is also influenced by the indications for the procedure, which include relief of upper airway obstruction, airway access in patients with cervical spine injury, management of r...

  10. Acute effects of physiotherapeutic respiratory maneuvers in critically ill patients with craniocerebral trauma

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    Manoel Luiz de Cerqueira Neto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of physiotherapeutic respiratory maneuvers on cerebral and cardiovascular hemodynamics and blood gas variables. METHOD: A descriptive, longitudinal, prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial that included 20 critical patients with severe craniocerebral trauma who were receiving mechanical ventilation and who were admitted to the intensive care unit. Each patient was subjected to the physiotherapeutic maneuvers of vibrocompression and increased manual expiratory flow (5 minutes on each hemithorax, along with subsequent airway suctioning with prior instillation of saline solution, hyperinflation and hyperoxygenation. Variables related to cardiovascular and cerebral hemodynamics and blood gas variables were recorded after each vibrocompression, increased manual expiratory flow and airway suctioning maneuver and 10 minutes after the end of airway suctioning. RESULTS: The hemodynamic and blood gas variables were maintained during vibrocompression and increased manual expiratory flow maneuvers; however, there were increases in mean arterial pressure, intracranial pressure, heart rate, pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary capillary pressure during airway suctioning. All of the values returned to baseline 10 minutes after the end of airway suctioning. CONCLUSION: Respiratory physiotherapy can be safely performed on patients with severe craniocerebral trauma. Additional caution must be taken when performing airway suctioning because this technique alters cerebral and cardiovascular hemodynamics, even in sedated and paralyzed patients.

  11. An economic evaluation of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis strategies in critically ill trauma patients at risk of bleeding.

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    T Carter Chiasson

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Critically ill trauma patients with severe injuries are at high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE and bleeding simultaneously. Currently, the optimal VTE prophylaxis strategy is unknown for trauma patients with a contraindication to pharmacological prophylaxis because of a risk of bleeding. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using decision analysis, we estimated the cost effectiveness of three VTE prophylaxis strategies-pneumatic compression devices (PCDs and expectant management alone, serial Doppler ultrasound (SDU screening, and prophylactic insertion of a vena cava filter (VCF -- in trauma patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU with severe injuries who were believed to have a contraindication to pharmacological prophylaxis for up to two weeks because of a risk of major bleeding. Data on the probability of deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE, and on the effectiveness of the prophylactic strategies, were taken from observational and randomized controlled studies. The probabilities of in-hospital death, ICU and hospital discharge rates, and resource use were taken from a population-based cohort of trauma patients with severe injuries (injury severity scores >12 admitted to the ICU of a regional trauma centre. The incidence of DVT at 12 weeks was similar for the PCD (14.9% and SDU (15.0% strategies, but higher for the VCF (25.7% strategy. Conversely, the incidence of PE at 12 weeks was highest in the PCD strategy (2.9%, followed by the SDU (1.5% and VCF (0.3% strategies. Expected mortality and quality-adjusted life years were nearly identical for all three management strategies. Expected health care costs at 12 weeks were Can$55,831 for the PCD strategy, Can$55,334 for the SDU screening strategy, and Can$57,377 for the VCF strategy, with similar trends noted over a lifetime analysis. CONCLUSIONS: The attributable mortality due to PE in trauma patients with severe injuries is low relative to other causes of mortality

  12. Meta-analysis of colloids versus crystalloids in critically ill, trauma and surgical patients.

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    Qureshi, S H; Rizvi, S I; Patel, N N; Murphy, G J

    2016-01-01

    There is uncertainty regarding the safety of different volume replacement solutions. The aim of this study was systematically to review evidence of crystalloid versus colloid solutions, and to determine whether these results are influenced by trial design or clinical setting. PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were used to identify randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that compared crystalloids with colloids as volume replacement solutions in patients with traumatic injuries, those undergoing surgery and in critically ill patients. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for mortality and major morbidity including renal injury were pooled using fixed-effect and random-effects models. Some 59 RCTs involving 16 889 patients were included in the analysis. Forty-one studies (69 per cent) were found to have selection, detection or performance bias. Colloid administration did not lead to increased mortality (32 trials, 16 647 patients; OR 0·99, 95 per cent c.i. 0·92 to 1·06), but did increase the risk of developing acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy (9 trials, 11 648 patients; OR 1·35, 1·17 to 1·57). Sensitivity analyses that excluded small and low-quality studies did not substantially alter these results. Subgroup analyses by type of colloid showed that increased mortality and renal replacement therapy were associated with use of pentastarch, and increased risk of renal injury and renal replacement therapy with use of tetrastarch. Subgroup analysis indicated that the risks of mortality and renal injury attributable to colloids were observed only in critically ill patients with sepsis. Current general restrictions on the use of colloid solutions are not supported by evidence. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. An analgesia-delirium-sedation protocol for critically ill trauma patients reduces ventilator days and hospital length of stay.

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    Robinson, Bryce R H; Mueller, Eric W; Henson, Kathyrn; Branson, Richard D; Barsoum, Samuel; Tsuei, Betty J

    2008-09-01

    Analgesics and sedatives are required to maintain a calm and comfortable mechanically ventilated injured patient. Continuous sedative infusions have been shown to lengthen mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay. Daily interruption of sedative infusions may reduce both of these variables. Implementation of an Analgesia-Delirium-Sedation (ADS) Protocol using objective assessments with a goal of maintaining an awake and comfortable patient may obviate the need for daily interruption of infusions in critically ill trauma patients. We examined the effects of such a protocol on ventilator duration, intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, hospital slength of stay, and medication requirements. A multidisciplinary team designed the protocol. Objective measures of pain (visual/objective pain assessment scale-VAS/OPAS), agitation (Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale-RASS), and delirium [Confusion Assessment Method {CAM-ICU}] were used. Medications were titrated to a RASS of -1 to +1 and VAS/OPAS CAM-ICU positive patients. Retrospective review of the local Project IMPACT database for a 6-month period in 2004 was compared with the same seasonal period in 2006 in which the ADS protocol was used. All mechanically ventilated trauma patients receiving infusions of narcotic, propofol, or benzodiazepine were included. Age, APACHE II score, Injury Severity Score, ventilator days, ventilator-free days at day 28, ICU length of stay, and hospital length of stay are reported as median values (interquartile range). Medication usage is reported as mean values (+/-SD). Differences in data were analyzed using Wilcoxon's rank-sum test or t test, as appropriate. Gender, mortality, and mechanism of injury were analyzed using chi analysis. A total of 143 patients were included. Patients who died during their hospitalization were excluded except in the analysis of ventilator-free days at day 28. After exclusions, 61 patients were in the control group and 58 in the protocol group. The

  14. Goal-directed diuresis: A case - control study of continuous furosemide infusion in critically ill trauma patients

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    Daniel Dante Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive crystalloid administration is common and associated with negative outcomes in critically ill trauma patients. Continuous furosemide infusion (CFI to remove excessive fluid has not been previously described in this population. We hypothesized that a goal-directed CFI is more effective for fluid removal than intermittent bolus injection (IBI diuresis without excess incidence of hypokalemia or renal failure. Materials and Methods: CFI cases were prospectively enrolled between November 2011 and August 2012, and matched to historic IBI controls by age, gender, Injury Severity Score (ISS, and net fluid balance (NFB at diuresis initiation. Paired and unpaired analyses were performed to compare groups. The primary endpoints were net fluid balance, potassium and creatinine levels. Secondary endpoints included intensive care unit (ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS, ventilator-free days (VFD, and mortality. Results: 55 patients were included, with 19 cases and 36 matched controls. Mean age was 54 years, mean ISS was 32.7, and mean initial NFB was +7.7 L. After one day of diuresis with CFI vs. IBI, net 24 h fluid balance was negative (−0.55 L vs. +0.43 L, P = 0.026 only for the CFI group, and there was no difference in potassium and creatinine levels. Cumulative furosemide dose (59.4mg vs. 25.4mg, P < 0.001 and urine output (4.2 L vs. 2.8 L, P < 0.001 were also significantly increased with CFI vs. IBI. There were no statistically significant differences in ICU LOS, hospital LOS, VFD, or mortality. Conclusions: Compared to IBI, goal-directed diuresis by CFI is more successful in achieving net negative fluid balance in patients with fluid overload with no detrimental side effects on renal function or patient outcome.

  15. Narrative exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder associated with repeated interpersonal trauma in patients with severe mental illness: a mixed methods design

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    Mauritz, Maria W.; Van Gaal, Betsie G. I.; Jongedijk, Ruud A.; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.; Goossens, Peter J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the Netherlands, most patients with severe mental illness (SMI) receive flexible assertive community treatment (FACT) provided by multidisciplinary community mental health teams. SMI patients with comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are sometimes offered evidence-based trauma-focused treatment like eye movement desensitization reprocessing or prolonged exposure. There is a large amount of evidence for the effectiveness of narrative exposure therapy (NET) within various vulnerable patient groups with repeated interpersonal trauma. Some FACT-teams provide NET for patients with comorbid PTSD, which is promising, but has not been specifically studied in SMI patients. Objectives The primary aim is to evaluate NET in SMI patients with comorbid PTSD associated with repeated interpersonal trauma to get insight into whether (1) PTSD and dissociative symptoms changes and (2) changes occur in the present SMI symptoms, care needs, quality of life, global functioning, and care consumption. The second aim is to gain insight into patients’ experiences with NET and to identify influencing factors on treatment results. Methods This study will have a mixed methods convergent design consisting of quantitative repeated measures and qualitative semi-structured in-depth interviews based on Grounded Theory. The study population will include adult SMI outpatients (n=25) with comorbid PTSD and receiving NET. The quantitative study parameters will be existence and severity of PTSD, dissociative, and SMI symptoms; care needs; quality of life; global functioning; and care consumption. In a longitudinal analysis, outcomes will be analyzed using mixed models to estimate the difference in means between baseline and repeated measurements. The qualitative study parameters will be experiences with NET and perceived factors for success or failure. Integration of quantitative and qualitative results will be focused on interpreting how qualitative results enhance the

  16. Narrative exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder associated with repeated interpersonal trauma in patients with severe mental illness: a mixed methods design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria W. Mauritz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the Netherlands, most patients with severe mental illness (SMI receive flexible assertive community treatment (FACT provided by multidisciplinary community mental health teams. SMI patients with comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD are sometimes offered evidence-based trauma-focused treatment like eye movement desensitization reprocessing or prolonged exposure. There is a large amount of evidence for the effectiveness of narrative exposure therapy (NET within various vulnerable patient groups with repeated interpersonal trauma. Some FACT-teams provide NET for patients with comorbid PTSD, which is promising, but has not been specifically studied in SMI patients. Objectives: The primary aim is to evaluate NET in SMI patients with comorbid PTSD associated with repeated interpersonal trauma to get insight into whether (1 PTSD and dissociative symptoms changes and (2 changes occur in the present SMI symptoms, care needs, quality of life, global functioning, and care consumption. The second aim is to gain insight into patients’ experiences with NET and to identify influencing factors on treatment results. Methods: This study will have a mixed methods convergent design consisting of quantitative repeated measures and qualitative semi-structured in-depth interviews based on Grounded Theory. The study population will include adult SMI outpatients (n=25 with comorbid PTSD and receiving NET. The quantitative study parameters will be existence and severity of PTSD, dissociative, and SMI symptoms; care needs; quality of life; global functioning; and care consumption. In a longitudinal analysis, outcomes will be analyzed using mixed models to estimate the difference in means between baseline and repeated measurements. The qualitative study parameters will be experiences with NET and perceived factors for success or failure. Integration of quantitative and qualitative results will be focused on interpreting how qualitative results

  17. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauritz, M.W.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Draijer, N.; Achterberg, T. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI) are often not recognized in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI. METHODS: We con

  18. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauritz, M.W.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Draijer, N.; Achterberg, T. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI) are often not recognized in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI. METHODS: We

  19. Mucormycosis in trauma patients.

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    Cocanour, C S; Miller-Crotchett, P; Reed, R L; Johnson, P C; Fischer, R P

    1992-01-01

    Cutaneous mucormycosis is a rare but often fatal infection in trauma patients. We retrospectively reviewed a 9-year experience with mucormycosis among injured patients. Eleven patients had biopsy- or culture-proven mucormycosis. Nine patients were victims of blunt trauma, two patients had burns measuring greater than 50% TBSA. No patient was at increased risk because of underlying disease or immunosuppression prior to injury. All 11 patients had open wounds on admission. Four patients died of mucormycosis. All nonsurvivors had phycomycotic gangrenous cellulitis of the head, the trunk, or both. In contrast, survivors had involvement of only the extremities. Because of underlying disease, contaminating wounds, antibiotic use, or immunocompromise secondary to shock and sepsis, trauma patients are at risk of developing mucormycosis. To successfully treat mucormycosis, diagnosis must be prompt and accompanied by aggressive debridement and parenteral administration of amphotericin B.

  20. Illness representations in patients with hand injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Jeffrey C Y

    2009-07-01

    Differences in illness perception about hand injury may partly explain the variation in health behaviours such as adherence to post-operative therapy, coping strategy, emotional response and eventual clinical outcome. This study examined the illness perception of patients with hand injuries in the acute trauma setting.

  1. Pharmacokinetic Study of Intravenous Acetaminophen Administered to Critically Ill Multiple-Trauma Patients at the Usual Dosage and a New Proposal for Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster-Lluch, Oscar; Zapater-Hernández, Pedro; Gerónimo-Pardo, Manuel

    2017-04-17

    The pharmacokinetic profile of intravenous acetaminophen administered to critically ill multiple-trauma patients was studied after 4 consecutive doses of 1 g every 6 hours. Eleven blood samples were taken (predose and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300, and 360 minutes postdose), and urine was collected (during 6-hour intervals between doses) to determine serum and urine acetaminophen concentrations. These were used to calculate the following pharmacokinetic parameters: maximum and minimum concentrations, terminal half-life, area under serum concentration-time curve from 0 to 6 hours, mean residence time, volume of distribution, and serum and renal clearance of acetaminophen. Daily doses of acetaminophen required to obtain steady-state minimum (bolus dosing) and average plasma concentrations (continuous infusion) of 10 μg/mL were calculated (10 μg/mL is the presumed lower limit of the analgesic range). Data are expressed as median [interquartile range]. Twenty-two patients were studied, mostly young (age 44 [34-64] years) males (68%), not obese (weight 78 [70-84] kg). Acetaminophen concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters were these: maximum concentration 33.6 [25.7-38.7] μg/mL and minimum concentration 0.5 [0.2-2.3] μg/mL, all values below 10 μg/mL and 8 below the detection limit; half-life 1.2 [1.0-1.9] hours; area under the curve for 6 hours 34.7 [29.7-52.7] μg·h/mL; mean residence time 1.8 [1.3-2.6] hours; steady-state volume of distribution 50.8 [42.5-66.5] L; and serum and renal clearance 28.8 [18.9-33.7] L/h and 15 [11-19] mL/min, respectively. Theoretically, daily doses for a steady-state minimum concentration of 10 μg/mL would be 12.2 [7.8-16.4] g/day (166 [112-202] mg/[kg·day]); for an average steady-state concentration of 10 μg/mL, they would be 6.9 [4.5-8.1] g/day (91 [59-111] mg/[kg·day]). In conclusion, administration of acetaminophen at the recommended dosage of 1 g per 6 hours to critically ill multiple-trauma patients yields

  2. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria W. Mauritz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI are often not recognized in clinical practice. Objective: To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of four databases (1980–2010 and then described and analysed 33 studies in terms of primary diagnosis and instruments used to measure trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders. Results: Population-weighted mean prevalence rates in SMI were physical abuse 47% (range 25–72%, sexual abuse 37% (range 24–49%, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD 30% (range 20–47%. Compared to men, women showed a higher prevalence of sexual abuse in schizophrenia spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, and mixed diagnosis groups labelled as having SMI. Conclusions: Prevalence rates of interpersonal trauma and trauma-related disorders were significantly higher in SMI than in the general population. Emotional abuse and neglect, physical neglect, complex PTSD, and dissociative disorders have been scarcely examined in SMI.

  3. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritz, Maria W.; Goossens, Peter J. J.; Draijer, Nel; van Achterberg, Theo

    2013-01-01

    Background Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI) are often not recognized in clinical practice. Objective To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI. Methods We conducted a systematic review of four databases (1980–2010) and then described and analysed 33 studies in terms of primary diagnosis and instruments used to measure trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders. Results Population-weighted mean prevalence rates in SMI were physical abuse 47% (range 25–72%), sexual abuse 37% (range 24–49%), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 30% (range 20–47%). Compared to men, women showed a higher prevalence of sexual abuse in schizophrenia spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, and mixed diagnosis groups labelled as having SMI. Conclusions Prevalence rates of interpersonal trauma and trauma-related disorders were significantly higher in SMI than in the general population. Emotional abuse and neglect, physical neglect, complex PTSD, and dissociative disorders have been scarcely examined in SMI. PMID:23577228

  4. A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of soft silicone multi-layered foam dressings in the prevention of sacral and heel pressure ulcers in trauma and critically ill patients: the border trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Nick; Gerdtz, Marie; Sage, Sarah; McCann, Jane; Freeman, Amy; Vassiliou, Theresa; De Vincentis, Stephanie; Ng, Ai Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Liu, Wei; Knott, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    The prevention of hospital acquired pressure ulcers in critically ill patients remains a significant clinical challenge. The aim of this trial was to investigate the effectiveness of multi-layered soft silicone foam dressings in preventing intensive care unit (ICU) pressure ulcers when applied in the emergency department to 440 trauma and critically ill patients. Intervention group patients (n = 219) had Mepilex(®) Border Sacrum and Mepilex(®) Heel dressings applied in the emergency department and maintained throughout their ICU stay. Results revealed that there were significantly fewer patients with pressure ulcers in the intervention group compared to the control group (5 versus 20, P = 0·001). This represented a 10% difference in incidence between the groups (3·1% versus 13·1%) and a number needed to treat of ten patients to prevent one pressure ulcer. Overall there were fewer sacral (2 versus 8, P = 0·05) and heel pressure ulcers (5 versus 19, P = 0·002) and pressure injuries overall (7 versus 27, P = 0·002) in interventions than in controls. The time to injury survival analysis indicated that intervention group patients had a hazard ratio of 0·19 (P = 0·002) compared to control group patients. We conclude that multi-layered soft silicone foam dressings are effective in preventing pressure ulcers in critically ill patients when applied in the emergency department prior to ICU transfer. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient: Update. Consensus SEMICYUC-SENPE: Multiple trauma patient Recomendaciones para el soporte nutricional y metabólico especializado del paciente crítico: Actualización. Consenso SEMICYUC-SENPE: Paciente politraumatizado

    OpenAIRE

    A. L. Blesa Malpica; A. García de Lorenzo y Mateos; A. Robles González

    2011-01-01

    Patients with polytrauma can be viewed as paradigmatic of the critically-ill patient. These previously healthy patients undergo a life-threatening aggression leading to an organic response that is no different from that in other types of patients. The profile of trauma patients has changed and currently corresponds to patients who are somewhat older, with a higher body mass index and greater comorbidity. Severe injuries lead to intense metabolic stress, posing a risk of malnutrition. Therefor...

  6. Anaesthesia for trauma patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... hypothermia. E. Figure 1: Advance Trauma Life Support® management priorities ... should determine their own algorithm, based on available skills and resources. ... the fastest onset (30 seconds) and shortest duration of action. Therefore ...

  7. Venous Thromboembolism in Critical Illness and Trauma: Pediatric Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chima, Ranjit S.; Hanson, Sheila J.

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill children and those sustaining severe traumatic injuries are at higher risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) than other hospitalized children. Multiple factors including the need for central venous catheters, immobility, surgical procedures, malignancy, and dysregulated inflammatory state confer this increased risk. As well as being at higher risk of VTE, this population is frequently at an increased risk of bleeding, making the decision of prophylactic anticoagulation even more nuanced. The use of pharmacologic and mechanical prophylaxis remains variable in this high-risk cohort. VTE pharmacologic prophylaxis is an accepted practice in adult trauma and intensive care to prevent VTE development and associated morbidity, but it is not standardized in critically ill or injured children. Given the lack of pediatric specific guidelines, prevention strategies are variably extrapolated from the successful use of mechanical and pharmacologic prophylaxis in adults, despite the differences in developmental hemostasis and thrombosis risk between children and adults. Whether the burden of VTE can be reduced in the pediatric critically ill or injured population is not known given the lack of robust data. There are no trials in children showing efficacy of mechanical compression devices or prophylactic anticoagulation in reducing the rate of VTE. Risk stratification using clinical factors has been shown to identify those at highest risk for VTE and allows targeted prophylaxis. It remains unproven if such a strategy will mitigate the risk of VTE and its potential sequelae. PMID:28349046

  8. Are trauma patients better off in a trauma ICU?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane Therese

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is very little data on the value of specialized intensive care unit (ICU care in the literature. To determine if specialize ICU care for the trauma patient improved outcomes in this patient population. Level I Trauma Center Compared outcomes of trauma patients treated in a surgical trauma ICU (STICU to those treated in non- trauma ICUs (non-STICU. Retrospective review of trauma registry data. Statistical Analysis: Wilcoxon Rank Test , Fischer′s Exact test, logistic regression. There were 1146 STICU patients compared to 1475 non-STICU. In all ISS groups there were more penetrating trauma patients in the STICU (32.54% STICU vs. 18.15% non-STICU, P < 0.0001 (ISS< 15, (21.03% STICU vs. 12.98% non-STICU, P =0.0074 (ISS between 15-25, and (19.42% STICU vs. 11.35% non-STICU, P =0.0026 (ISS> 25. All groups had similar lengths of stay. The blunt trauma patients were sicker in the STICU (20.8 ISS ± 12.2 STICU vs. 19.7 ISS ± 11.9 non-STICU, P =0.03 yet had similar outcomes to the non-STICU group. Logistic regression identified penetrating trauma and not ICU location as a predictor of mortality. Sicker STICU patients do as well as less injured non-STICU patients. Severely injured patients should be preferentially treated in a STICU where they are better equipped to care for the complex multi-trauma patient. All patients, regardless of location, do well when their management is guided by a surgical critical care team.

  9. Probiotics for severe trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rijkers, Ger T

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics are live micro-organisms with a health promoting effect. Because of their immunomodulating capacity as well as improvement of gut barrier function, probiotics have the capacity to prevent infectious complications in a variety of clinical settings. Now selected probiotics show potential for improving the clinical outcome of severe trauma patients.

  10. Risk factors for ventilator-associated pneumonia: among trauma patients with and without brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianakis, Anastasia; McNett, Molly; Belle, Josie; Moran, Cristina; Grimm, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rates remain highest among trauma and brain injured patients; yet, no research compares VAP risk factors between the 2 groups. This retrospective, case-controlled study identified risk factors for VAP among critically ill trauma patients with and without brain injury. Data were abstracted on trauma patients with (cases) and without (controls) brain injury. Data gathered on n = 157 subjects. Trauma patients with brain injury had more emergent and field intubations. Age was strongest predictor of VAP in cases, and ventilator days predicted VAP in controls. Trauma patients with brain injury may be at higher risk for VAP.

  11. Trauma patient outcome after the Prehospital Trauma Life Support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, J; Adam, R U; Gana, T J; Williams, J I

    1997-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated a significant improvement in trauma patient outcome after the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) program in Trinidad and Tobago. In January of 1992, a Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) program was also instituted. This study assessed trauma patient outcome after the PHTLS program. Morbidity (length of stay and degree of disability), mortality, injury severity score, mechanism of injury, age, and sex among all adult trauma patients transported by ambulance to the major trauma hospital were assessed between July of 1990 to December of 1991 (pre-PHTLS, n = 332) and January of 1994 to June of 1995 (post-PHTLS, n = 350). Age, sex distribution, percentage blunt injury, and injury severity score were similar for both groups. Mortality pre-PHTLS (15.7%) was greater than post-PHTLS (10.6%). Length of stay and disability were statistically significantly decreased post-PHTLS. Age, injury severity score, and mechanism of injury were positively correlated with mortality in both periods. The previously reported post-ATLS mortality was similar to the pre-PHTLS mortality. Post-PHTLS mortality and morbidity were significantly decreased, suggesting a positive impact of the PHTLS program on trauma patient outcome.

  12. Trauma Exposure and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Adults with Severe Mental Illness: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubaugh, Anouk L.; Zinzow, Heidi M.; Paul, Lisa; Egede, Leonard E.; Frueh, B. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    There is a great deal of research on the prevalence, correlates, and treatment of PTSD in the general population. However, we know very little about the manifestation and consequences of PTSD in more complicated patient populations. The purpose of the current paper is to provide a comprehensive review of PTSD within the context of severe mental illness (SMI; i.e., schizophrenia spectrum disorders, mood disorders). Extant data suggest that trauma and PTSD are highly prevalent among individuals with SMI relative to the general population, and both are associated with adverse clinical functioning and increased healthcare burden. However, trauma and PTSD remain overlooked in this population, with low recognition rates in public-sector settings. Additionally, there are few data on the clinical course and treatment of PTSD among individuals with SMI. Particularly lacking are longitudinal studies, randomized controlled treatment trials, and studies using ethno-racially diverse samples. Furthermore, there is a need to better understand the interplay between trauma, PTSD, and severe forms of mental illness and to further develop and disseminate evidence-based PTSD treatments in this population. The current state of the literature and future directions for practice are discussed. PMID:21596012

  13. Dependency in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumei Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available By necessity, critically ill patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs have a high level of dependency, which is linked to a variety of negative feelings, such as powerlessness. However, the term dependency is not well defined in the critically ill patients. The concept of “dependency” in critically ill patients was analyzed using a meta-synthesis approach. An inductive process described by Deborah Finfgeld-Connett was used to analyze the data. Overarching themes emerged that reflected critically ill patients’ experience and meaning of being in dependency were (a antecedents: dependency in critically ill patients was a powerless and vulnerable state, triggered by a life-threatening crisis; (b attributes: the characteristic of losing “self” was featured by dehumanization and disembodiment, which can be alleviated by a “self”-restoring process; and (c outcomes: living with dependency and coping with dependency. The conceptual model explicated here may provide a framework for understanding dependency in critically ill patients.

  14. Dependency in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumei Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available By necessity, critically ill patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs have a high level of dependency, which is linked to a variety of negative feelings, such as powerlessness. However, the term dependency is not well defined in the critically ill patients. The concept of “dependency” in critically ill patients was analyzed using a meta-synthesis approach. An inductive process described by Deborah Finfgeld-Connett was used to analyze the data. Overarching themes emerged that reflected critically ill patients’ experience and meaning of being in dependency were (a antecedents: dependency in critically ill patients was a powerless and vulnerable state, triggered by a life-threatening crisis; (b attributes: the characteristic of losing “self” was featured by dehumanization and disembodiment, which can be alleviated by a “self”-restoring process; and (c outcomes: living with dependency and coping with dependency. The conceptual model explicated here may provide a framework for understanding dependency in critically ill patients.

  15. Psychodynamics in medically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Sara Siris; Kent, Laura K; Muskin, Philip R

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the role of psychodynamics as it applies to the understanding and treatment of medically ill patients in the consultation-liaison psychiatry setting. It provides historical background that spans the eras from Antiquity (Hippocrates and Galen) to nineteenth-century studies of hysteria (Charcot, Janet, and Freud) and into the twentieth century (Flanders Dunbar, Alexander, Engle, and the DSM). The article then discusses the effects of personality on medical illness, treatment, and patients' ability to cope by reviewing the works of Bibring, Kahana, and others. The important contribution of attachment theory is reviewed as it pertains the patient-physician relationship and the health behavior of physically ill patients. A discussion of conversion disorder is offered as an example of psychodynamics in action. This article highlights the important impact of countertransference, especially in terms of how it relates to patients who are extremely difficult and "hateful," and explores the dynamics surrounding the topic of physician-assisted suicide, as it pertains to the understanding of a patient's request to die. Some attention is also given to the challenges surrounding the unique experience of residents learning how to treat medically ill patients on the consultation-liaison service. Ultimately, this article concludes that the use and understanding of psychodynamics and psychodynamic theory allows consultation-liaison psychiatrists the opportunity to interpret the life narratives of medically ill patients in a meaningful way that contributes importantly to treatment.

  16. Infectious Complications of Noncombat Trauma Patients Provided Care at a Military Trauma Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    the median age was 38 and 22C’f \\\\ere female. Pulmonary infections were present 1n.f.2cr of pallenh. 2 40(- had cellulitis and wound infections ... infection , and celluliti ’> (Table Ill ). Cumulative pneumonia rates in trauma and burned ventilated patients, respecti\\ ely, are presented with...hospiwllengths of ’ltay (lOS>. and to die (p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis reve~lled associations between infection and hospital LOS. pree·\\isting

  17. Is informed consent effective in trauma patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhangu, A; Hood, E; Datta, A; Mangaleshkar, S

    2008-11-01

    Informed consent in the modern era is a common and important topic both for the well-informed patient and to prevent unnecessary litigation. However, the effectiveness of informed consent in trauma patients is an under-researched area. This paper aims to assess the differences in patient recall of the consent process and desire for information by performing a comparative analysis between orthopaedic trauma and elective patients. Information from 41 consecutive elective operations and 40 consecutive trauma operations was collected on the first post-operative day. 100% of elective patients and 90% of trauma patients knew what operation they had received (p = 0.06). Overall recall of complications was poor, but was significantly lower in trauma patients compared with elective patients (62% vs 22%, p<0.001). 30% of trauma patients desired more information about their operation compared to 12% of elective patients (p = 0.049), although only 35% of trauma patients wanted written as well as verbal explanations, compared to 85% of elective patients p<0.001). Overall 100% of elective and 90% of trauma patients were happy with the consent process (p = 0.06). Subset analysis of neck of femur compared to other trauma patients showed that the above factors were not significantly different between the two groups. Recall of complications in the trauma patients is significantly lower than in elective patients, although both groups scored poorly overall. Repeated verbal explanations should be reinforced with the option of additional information leaflets for trauma operations. Further research into the usefulness of DVDs for commonly performed operations is warranted, although official internet resources may be more cost-effective.

  18. Psychosocial factors in trauma patients : studies on trauma recurrence and trauma recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Ponzer, Sari

    1999-01-01

    The present studies aimed to highlight the influence of psychosocial and psychiatric factors on trauma recurrence and trauma recovery. A subgroup of trauma patients, 820 victims of firearm injuries, were compared to an age- and sex-matched control group in a retrospective register study. The results showed that firearm victims were characterised by high mortality, morbidity and antisocial traits independent of the intention of the gunshot. Hospitalisation due to injuries as ...

  19. SEVERITY OF INJURIES IN TRAUMA PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KINGMA, J

    1995-01-01

    The present purpose was to illustrate the range of severity scores among trauma patients. A computerised conversion of ICD-9CM injury diagnoses into scores for severity of injury was processed on data of 36,178 trauma patients. More than 94% of the patients had injuries of minor severity. The probab

  20. Care of the trauma patient beyond the emergency department: a patient care standard to guide bedside nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaekel, Camilla; Paar, Cheryl; Schiltz, Jenifer; Peterson, Rose

    2009-01-01

    Injuries sustained from illicit drug use or alcohol intoxication are common in emergency departments. Ongoing assessments of psychosocial issues in trauma patients are imperative, even after the patient leaves the specialized area of the emergency department. Oftentimes, bedside nurses are ill prepared to identify the subtle clues of deeper psychosocial issues in complex patients such as trauma patients. This article focuses on the rationale for the development of a patient care standard to guide the bedside staff nurse in the care of the trauma patient. An example of a multiple trauma diagnosis-related patient care standard is presented.

  1. Triage and mortality in 2875 consecutive trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meisler, Rikke; Thomsen, A B; Abildstrøm, H

    2010-01-01

    Most studies on trauma and trauma systems have been conducted in the United States. We aimed to describe the factors predicting mortality in European trauma patients, with focus on triage.......Most studies on trauma and trauma systems have been conducted in the United States. We aimed to describe the factors predicting mortality in European trauma patients, with focus on triage....

  2. Delirium in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooter, A J C; Van De Leur, R R; Zaal, I J

    2017-01-01

    Delirium is common in critically ill patients and associated with increased length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and long-term cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology of delirium has been explained by neuroinflammation, an aberrant stress response, neurotransmitter imbalances, and

  3. Critically ill obstetric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Rajesh Bendre

    2015-04-01

    Methods: This is a retrospective study carried out in a medical college with tertiary hospital facility in Mumbai. The ICU admissions for a period of 5 years from October 2005 to October 2010 were reviewed. Results: Over 5 years, 48 out of 10800 obstetric patients were admitted in ICU (0.4%. Most common reasons for admissions were obstetric hemorrhage and preeclampsia. The most common intervention done was transfusion of blood and blood products. Conclusions: We need better information about high risk obstetrics in order to improve maternal care. The study identifies the risk factors for maternal mortality and severe maternal morbidity, most significant being obstetric hemorrhage. Lack of antenatal care and delay in referral to intensive care unit adversely affect the maternal outcome. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 370-372

  4. [Citomegalovirus reactivation in critical ill intensive care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo Esper, Raúl

    2011-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a β herpesvirus and a significant human pathogen. After primary infection establishes life long latency. In immunocompetent individuals cell-mediated host immune responses prevent the development of overt CMV disease. It has increasingly come to be recognized that critically ill patients are at risk for CMV reactivation from the latency. The risk factors associated to CMV reactivation in the critically ill are infection, sepsis, trauma, transfusions, major surgery, prolonged mechanical ventilation, steroids and vasopressors. In the pathogenesis are involved immunodysfunction and imbalance in immunomodulatory mediators principally tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). Several studies have shown an association between CMV reactivation in immunocompetent critically ill patients and poor clinical outcomes. Further studies are warranted to identify subsets of patients who are at risk of developing CMV reactivation and to determine the role of antiviral agents on clinically outcomes in critically ill patients.

  5. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome in admitted trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawa, Randeep S; Stothert, Joseph C; Shostrom, Valerie K; Yetter, Diane L; Templin, Heather R; Cemaj, Samuel K; Lander, Lina; Forse, Armour R; Young, David H

    2014-11-01

    As alcohol use is highly prevalent in trauma patients, we hypothesized that a significant proportion of hospitalized trauma patients would demonstrate alcohol withdrawal (AW). The trauma registries at a joint trauma center system from 1999 to 2008 were evaluated for patients aged at least 16 years. Of 19,369 trauma admissions, 159 patients had AW. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) testing was performed in 31.5% of the patients. BAC was significantly higher in AW patients versus other traumas (205.7 ± 130.1 vs 102.9 ± 121.7 mg/dL). BAC was 0 in 14.4% of AW patients. As compared with other trauma patients, patients with AW had a significantly greater age (50.2 vs 42.1 years), hospital length of stay (10 vs 3 days), intensive care unit length of stay (2 vs 0 days), need for mechanical ventilation (34% vs 12.7%), and pneumonia (12% vs 2.3%). AW patients were less frequently discharged to home (59.8% vs 69.9%). Mortality was not different. AW was diagnosed in few patients. Of note, it occurred in patients with an initial BAC of 0. AW is associated with adverse outcomes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Transfusion therapy in paediatric trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nystrup, Kristin Brønnum; Stensballe, Jakob; Bøttger, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Haemorrhage is a leading cause of death in paediatric trauma patients. Predefined massive transfusion protocols (MTP) have the potential to significantly reduce mortality by treating haemorrhagic shock and coagulopathy, in adhering to the principles of haemostatic resuscitation with rapid...... in paediatric trauma patients is challenging, and the optimal blood product ratio that will increase survival in massively bleeding paediatric trauma patients has yet to be determined. To date, only a few small descriptive studies and case reports have investigated the use of predefined MTP in paediatric trauma...... patients.MTP with increased FFP or PLT to RBC ratios combined with viscoelastic haemostatic assay (VHA) guided haemostatic resuscitation have not yet been tested in paediatric populations but based on results from adult trauma patients, this therapeutic approach seems promising.Considering the high...

  7. Impact of Late Fluid Balance on Clinical Outcomes in the Critically Ill Surgical and Trauma Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elofson, Kathryn A.; Eiferman, Daniel A.; Porter, Kyle; Murphy, Claire V.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Management of fluid status in critically ill patients poses a significant challenge due to limited literature. This study aimed to determine the impact of late fluid balance management following initial adequate fluid resuscitation on in-hospital mortality for critically ill surgical and trauma patients. Materials and Methods This single center retrospective cohort study included 197 patients who underwent surgical procedure within 24 hours of surgical intensive care unit (SICU) admission. Patients with high fluid balance on post-operative day 7 (>5L) were compared to those with a low fluid balance (≤5L) with a primary endpoint of in-hospital mortality. Subgroup analyses were performed based on diuretic administration, diuretic response and type of surgery. Results High fluid balance was associated with a significantly higher in-hospital mortality (30.2 vs 3%, p<0.001) compared to low fluid balance; this relationship remained after multivariable regression analysis. High fluid balance was associated with increased mortality, independent of diuretic administration, diuretic response and type of surgery. Conclusions Consistent with previous literature, high fluid balance on post-operative day 7 was associated with increased in-hospital mortality. Patients who received and responded to diuretic therapy did not demonstrate improved clinical outcomes which questions their use in the post-operative period. PMID:26341457

  8. Delirium in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slooter, A J C; Van De Leur, R R; Zaal, I J

    2017-01-01

    Delirium is common in critically ill patients and associated with increased length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and long-term cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology of delirium has been explained by neuroinflammation, an aberrant stress response, neurotransmitter imbalances, and neuronal network alterations. Delirium develops mostly in vulnerable patients (e.g., elderly and cognitively impaired) in the throes of a critical illness. Delirium is by definition due to an underlying condition and can be identified at ICU admission using prediction models. Treatment of delirium can be improved with frequent monitoring, as early detection and subsequent treatment of the underlying condition can improve outcome. Cautious use or avoidance of benzodiazepines may reduce the likelihood of developing delirium. Nonpharmacologic strategies with early mobilization, reducing causes for sleep deprivation, and reorientation measures may be effective in the prevention of delirium. Antipsychotics are effective in treating hallucinations and agitation, but do not reduce the duration of delirium. Combined pain, agitation, and delirium protocols seem to improve the outcome of critically ill patients and may reduce delirium incidence. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Regional analgesia in postsurgical critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moliner Velázquez, S; Rubio Haro, R; De Andrés Serrano, C; De Andrés Ibáñez, J

    2017-03-01

    Regional analgesia intrinsically, based on its physiological effects, is routinely used for the perioperative treatment of pain associated with surgical procedures. However, in other areas such as the non-surgical treatment of acute pain for patients in a critical condition, it has not been subjected to specific prospective studies. If we confine ourselves to the physiological effects of the nerve block, in a situation of stress, the indications for regional anaesthesia in this group of patients extend to the management of a wide variety of medical as well as postsurgical conditions, of trauma patients and of other painful procedures performed in the patient's bed. The critical patient certainly must be analyzed individually as their own primary conditions is of vital importance, as well as any associated conditions they have developed that can potentially increase the risk of systemic toxicity or morbidity, such as, coagulopathies, infection, immunosuppressive states, sedation and problems associated with mechanical ventilation. This review aims to assess the role of regional analgesia in critically ill patients, placing it within the algorithm decision tree of the professional responsible for patients in critical care units, all based on the evidence of potential benefits according to the published literature. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Toker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE are known collectively as venous thromboembolism (VTE. Venous thromboembolic events are common and potentially life-threatening complications following trauma with an incidence of\t5 to 63%. DVT prophylaxis is essential in the management of trauma patients. Currently, the optimal VTE prophylaxis strategy for trauma patients is unknown. Traditionally, pelvic and lower extremity fractures, head injury, and prolonged immobilization have been considered risk factors for VTE; however it is unclear which combination of risk factors defines a high-risk group. Modalities available for trauma patient thromboprophylaxis are classified into pharmacologic anticoagulation, mechanical prophylaxis, and inferior vena cava (IVC filters. The available pharmacologic agents include low-dose heparin (LDH, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH, and factor Xa inhibitors. Mechanical prophylaxis methods include graduated compression stockings (GCSs, pneumatic compression devices (PCDs, and A-V foot pumps. IVCs are traditionally used in high risk patients in whom pharmacological prophylaxis is contraindicated. Both EAST and ACCP guidelines recommend primary use of LMWHs in trauma patients; however there are still controversies regarding the definitive VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients. Large randomized prospective clinical studies would be required to provide level I evidence to define the optimal VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients.

  11. Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toker, Serdar; Hak, David J; Morgan, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are known collectively as venous thromboembolism (VTE). Venous thromboembolic events are common and potentially life-threatening complications following trauma with an incidence of 5 to 63%. DVT prophylaxis is essential in the management of trauma patients. Currently, the optimal VTE prophylaxis strategy for trauma patients is unknown. Traditionally, pelvic and lower extremity fractures, head injury, and prolonged immobilization have been considered risk factors for VTE; however it is unclear which combination of risk factors defines a high-risk group. Modalities available for trauma patient thromboprophylaxis are classified into pharmacologic anticoagulation, mechanical prophylaxis, and inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. The available pharmacologic agents include low-dose heparin (LDH), low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), and factor Xa inhibitors. Mechanical prophylaxis methods include graduated compression stockings (GCSs), pneumatic compression devices (PCDs), and A-V foot pumps. IVCs are traditionally used in high risk patients in whom pharmacological prophylaxis is contraindicated. Both EAST and ACCP guidelines recommend primary use of LMWHs in trauma patients; however there are still controversies regarding the definitive VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients. Large randomized prospective clinical studies would be required to provide level I evidence to define the optimal VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients.

  12. Vascular trauma in geriatric patients: a national trauma databank review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Agathoklis; Inaba, Kenji; Dubose, Joe; Barmparas, Galinos; Lam, Lydia; Plurad, David; Branco, Bernardino C; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2011-10-01

    The epidemiology of vascular injuries in the geriatric patient population has not been described. The purpose of this study was to examine nationwide data on vascular injuries in the geriatric patients and to compare this with the nongeriatric adult patients with respect to the incidence, injury mechanisms, and outcomes. Geriatric patients aged 65 or older with at least one traumatic vascular injury were compared with an adult cohort aged 16 years to 64 years with a vascular injury using the National Trauma Databank version 7.0. During the study period, 29,736 (1.6%) patients with a vascular injury were identified. Of those, geriatric patients accounted for 7.6% (2,268) and the nongeriatric adult patients accounted for 83.1% (n=24,703). Compared with the nongeriatric adult patients, the geriatric vascular patients had a significantly higher Injury Severity Score (26.6±17.0 vs. 21.3±16.7; pvascular injuries (adjusted odds ratio, 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 3.32-4.58; pVascular trauma is rare in the geriatric patient population. These injuries are predominantly blunt, with the thoracic aorta being the most commonly injured vessel. Although vascular injuries occur less frequently than in the nongeriatric cohort, in the geriatric patient, vascular injury is associated with a fourfold increase in adjusted mortality.

  13. Psychosocial Needs of Relatives of Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verharen, Lisbeth; Mintjes, Joke; Kaljouw, Marian; Melief, Willem; Schilder, Lies; van der Laan, Geert

    2015-08-01

    In trauma care, the patient is the primary focus of attention. However, patients' relatives also need attention, for two main reasons. First, the support of relatives is an important factor in the convalescence of patients. Second, the trauma means a serious disruption of not only the life of patients, but also that of their relatives. The purpose of this study was to explore the needs of relatives of trauma patients, to what extent these needs are met by the support of social workers, and how relatives benefit from this support. The study was conducted in hospitals in The Netherlands. Needs were measured using the Dutch version of the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory. Results of in-depth interviews were used to develop a questionnaire to explore the type of social worker support and to what extent relatives benefit from this support. Findings show that trauma patients' relatives have a need for information, access to the patient and hospital staff, and psychosocial assistance. In most cases social workers supported relatives and relatives benefited from the support. To ensure that trauma patients' relatives receive the support they need, social workers should be involved in trauma care as the standard of good care.

  14. Primary cutaneous mucormycosis in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P C; Satterwhite, T K; Monheit, J E; Parks, D

    1987-04-01

    Primary cutaneous mucormycosis in trauma patients has been rarely reported. We describe three cases occurring in noncompromised hosts and review the literature. Prompt diagnosis and aggressive treatment with vigorous local care and appropriate antibiotics are recommended.

  15. Psychoneuroimmunology in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKeyser, Freda

    2003-02-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is the study of the interactions among behavior, neural, and endocrine functions and the immune system. The purpose of this review is to briefly summarize the evidence concerning interactions among behavior, the neuroendocrine system, and the immune system, and to show how this evidence relates to critical care patients. It has been shown that the immune function of many patients in the intensive care unit is suppressed as a result of trauma, sepsis, or profound physiologic and psychological stress. Three of the most common stressors among patients in the intensive care unit are pain, sleep deprivation, and fear or anxiety. Findings have shown each of these stressors to be associated with decreased immune functioning. Nurses have an important responsibility to protect their patients from infection and promote their ability to heal. Several actions are suggested that can help the nurse achieve these goals. It is hoped that nurses would keep these interactions in mind while caring for their patients in the intensive care unit.

  16. Pressure Ulcers in Trauma Patients with Preventive Spinal Immobilization : Incidence, characteristics and risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Ham, H.W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To protect the (possibly) injured spine, trauma patients are immobilized on a backboard, with an extrication collar, lateral headblocks, and straps. Although pressure ulcers are typically associated with older adults and chronic illness, of all patients in a hospital environment, these trauma patients may be particularly at risk for developing (device-related) pressure ulcers. Pressure ulcers are a serious health complication that develop as a result of pressure alone or pressure...

  17. Trauma Center Staffing, Infrastructure, and Patient Characteristics that Influence Trauma Center Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faul, Mark; Sasser, Scott M.; Lairet, Julio; Mould-Millman, Nee-Kofi; Sugerman, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The most effective use of trauma center resources helps reduce morbidity and mortality, while saving costs. Identifying critical infrastructure characteristics, patient characteristics and staffing components of a trauma center associated with the proportion of patients needing major trauma care will help planners create better systems for patient care. Methods We used the 2009 National Trauma Data Bank-Research Dataset to determine the proportion of critically injured patients requiring the resources of a trauma center within each Level I–IV trauma center (n=443). The outcome variable was defined as the portion of treated patients who were critically injured. We defined the need for critical trauma resources and interventions (“trauma center need”) as death prior to hospital discharge, admission to the intensive care unit, or admission to the operating room from the emergency department as a result of acute traumatic injury. Generalized Linear Modeling (GLM) was used to determine how hospital infrastructure, staffing Levels, and patient characteristics contributed to trauma center need. Results Nonprofit Level I and II trauma centers were significantly associated with higher levels of trauma center need. Trauma centers that had a higher percentage of transferred patients or a lower percentage of insured patients were associated with a higher proportion of trauma center need. Hospital infrastructure characteristics, such as bed capacity and intensive care unit capacity, were not associated with trauma center need. A GLM for Level III and IV trauma centers showed that the number of trauma surgeons on staff was associated with trauma center need. Conclusion Because the proportion of trauma center need is predominantly influenced by hospital type, transfer frequency, and insurance status, it is important for administrators to consider patient population characteristics of the catchment area when planning the construction of new trauma centers or

  18. Trauma Center Staffing, Infrastructure, and Patient Characteristics that Influence Trauma Center Need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faul, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most effective use of trauma center resources helps reduce morbidity and mortality, while saving costs. Identifying critical infrastructure characteristics, patient characteristics and staffing components of a trauma center associated with the proportion of patients needing major trauma care will help planners create better systems for patient care.   Methods: We used the 2009 National Trauma Data Bank-Research Dataset to determine the proportion of critically injured patients requiring the resources of a trauma center within each Level I-IV trauma center (n=443. The outcome variable was defined as the portion of treated patients who were critically injured. We defined the need for critical trauma resources and interventions (“trauma center need” as death prior to hospital discharge, admission to the intensive care unit, or admission to the operating room from the emergency department as a result of acute traumatic injury. Generalized Linear Modeling (GLM was used to determine how hospital infrastructure, staffing Levels, and patient characteristics contributed to trauma center need.     Results: Nonprofit Level I and II trauma centers were significantly associated with higher levels of trauma center need. Trauma centers that had a higher percentage of transferred patients or a lower percentage of insured patients were associated with a higher proportion of trauma center need.  Hospital infrastructure characteristics, such as bed capacity and intensive care unit capacity, were not associated with trauma center need. A GLM for Level III and IV trauma centers showed that the number of trauma surgeons on staff was associated with trauma center need. Conclusion: Because the proportion of trauma center need is predominantly influenced by hospital type, transfer frequency, and insurance status, it is important for administrators to consider patient population characteristics of the catchment area when planning the

  19. Coagulation and complement system in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, H; Stephan, B; Pindur, G

    2015-01-01

    Activation of coagulation and inflammatory response including the complement system play a major role in the pathogenesis of critical illness. However, only limited data are available addressing the relationship of both pathways and its assessment of a predictive value for the clinical outcome in intense care medicine. Therefore, parameters of the coagulation and complement system were studied in patients with septicaemia and multiple trauma regarded as being exemplary for critical illness. 34 patients (mean age: 51.38 years (±16.57), 15 females, 19 males) were investigated at day 1 of admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU). Leukocytes, complement factors C3a and C5a were significantly (p complement system as part of the inflammatory response is a significant mechanism in septicaemia, whereas loss and consumption of blood components including parts of the coagulation and complement system is more characteristic for multiple trauma. Protein C in case of severe reduction might be of special concern for surviving in sepsis. Activation of haemostasis was occurring in both diseases, however, overt DIC was not confirmed in this study to be a leading mechanism in critically ill patients. MOF score, lactate, C1-inhibitor and prothrombin time have been the only statistically significant predictors for lethal outcome suggesting that organ function, microcirculation, haemostasis and inflammatory response are essential elements of the pathomechanism and clinical course of diseases among critically ill patients.

  20. Trauma patients: I can't get no (patient) satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley-Kumar, Karalyn; Jackson, Theresa; Holland, Danny; LeBlanc, Brian; Agrawal, Vaidehi; Truitt, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) provides financial incentives to hospitals based on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) patient satisfaction survey. This data is made publicly available on their website to be utilized by patients and insurers. Hospitals are profoundly interested in identifying patient populations that negatively contribute to overall patient satisfaction scores. Hospitals consider trauma patients "high risk" from a HCAHPS perspective, but there is no data to inform this opinion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate trauma patient satisfaction scores and their impact on overall patient satisfaction. Three different analyses were performed. Group 1 was composed of ALL patients admitted to our hospital over a 7-month period who were administered a validated patient satisfaction survey by a 3rd party and compared patient satisfaction of trauma vs. non-trauma patients (ALL). Group 2 compared admitted patients with a specific ICD-9 procedure code to non-trauma patients who underwent a procedure with the same ICD-9 code (ICD). Group 3 examines patient satisfaction between three Level I Trauma Centers within our geographic area (TC). Patient satisfaction data of trauma vs non-trauma patients (ALL), those with a specific ICD-9 procedure code (ICD), and the 3 Level I Trauma Centers in our area (TC) were analyzed with the appropriate statistical test. In the ALL group, no difference in satisfaction was noted in 18/21 questions for trauma patients when compared to non-trauma patients at our hospital. In the ICD group, 57 ICD-9 procedure codes were analyzed. Of these, only patients who required spinal fusion secondary to trauma reported lower overall patient satisfaction. No meaningful difference was found in HCAHPS associated satisfaction between the Level I Trauma Centers in our area (TC). In contrast to commonly held opinion, trauma patients do not negatively contribute to overall patient

  1. Plasma gelsolin is reduced in trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, B; Schiødt, F V; Ott, P

    1999-01-01

    in the circulation can lead to a condition resembling multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), and we have previously demonstrated that the level of Gc-globulin is decreased after severe trauma. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the plasma levels of gelsolin were altered in the early phase...... after trauma. Twenty-three consecutive trauma patients were studied. Plasma samples were assayed for gelsolin by immunonephelometry with polyclonal rabbit antihuman gelsolin prepared in our own laboratory. The median time from injury until the time the first blood sample was taken was 52 min (range 20......-110) and the median Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 20 (range 4-50). The gelsolin level on admission was reduced significantly in the trauma patients compared with normal controls. The median level was 51 mg/L (7-967) vs. 207 mg/L (151-621), P

  2. Plasma gelsolin is reduced in trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, B; Schiødt, F V; Ott, P

    1999-01-01

    in the circulation can lead to a condition resembling multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), and we have previously demonstrated that the level of Gc-globulin is decreased after severe trauma. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the plasma levels of gelsolin were altered in the early phase...... after trauma. Twenty-three consecutive trauma patients were studied. Plasma samples were assayed for gelsolin by immunonephelometry with polyclonal rabbit antihuman gelsolin prepared in our own laboratory. The median time from injury until the time the first blood sample was taken was 52 min (range 20......-110) and the median Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 20 (range 4-50). The gelsolin level on admission was reduced significantly in the trauma patients compared with normal controls. The median level was 51 mg/L (7-967) vs. 207 mg/L (151-621), P

  3. External Validation of the Emergency Trauma Score for Early Prediction of Mortality in Trauma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, Pieter; de Jong, Willem-Jan J.; Wendt, Klaus W.; Schep, Niels W.; Goslings, J. Carel; Reitsma, J.

    Objectives: The Emergency Trauma Score has been developed for early estimation of mortality risk in adult trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score of 16 or higher. Emergency Trauma Score combines four early predictors available at the trauma resuscitation room: age, Glasgow Coma Scale, base

  4. External Validation of the Emergency Trauma Score for Early Prediction of Mortality in Trauma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, Pieter; de Jong, Willem-Jan J.; Wendt, Klaus W.; Schep, Niels W.; Goslings, J. Carel; Reitsma, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The Emergency Trauma Score has been developed for early estimation of mortality risk in adult trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score of 16 or higher. Emergency Trauma Score combines four early predictors available at the trauma resuscitation room: age, Glasgow Coma Scale, base exc

  5. Survival probability in patients with liver trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buci, Skender; Kukeli, Agim

    2016-08-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to assess the survival probability among patients with liver trauma injury using the anatomical and psychological scores of conditions, characteristics and treatment modes. Design/methodology/approach - A logistic model is used to estimate 173 patients' survival probability. Data are taken from patient records. Only emergency room patients admitted to University Hospital of Trauma (former Military Hospital) in Tirana are included. Data are recorded anonymously, preserving the patients' privacy. Findings - When correctly predicted, the logistic models show that survival probability varies from 70.5 percent up to 95.4 percent. The degree of trauma injury, trauma with liver and other organs, total days the patient was hospitalized, and treatment method (conservative vs intervention) are statistically important in explaining survival probability. Practical implications - The study gives patients, their relatives and physicians ample and sound information they can use to predict survival chances, the best treatment and resource management. Originality/value - This study, which has not been done previously, explores survival probability, success probability for conservative and non-conservative treatment, and success probability for single vs multiple injuries from liver trauma.

  6. Glycemic control in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is common in critically ill patients and can be caused by various mechanisms, including nutrition, medications, and insufficient insulin. In the past, hyperglycemia was thought to be an adaptive response to stress, but hyperglycemia is no longer considered a benign condition in patients with critical illnesses. Indeed, hyperglycemia can increase morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Correction of hyperglycemia may improve clinical outcomes. To date, a definite answ...

  7. Trauma patients' rights during resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Bruce

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Doctors and nurses working in hospital emergency departments face ethical and moral conflicts more so than in other health care units. Traditional curricular approaches to health professional education have been embedded in a discriminatory societal context and as such have not prepared health professionals adequately for the ethical realities of their practice. Furthermore, the discourse on ethical theories and ethical principles do not provide clear-cut solutions to ethical dilemmas but rather serve as a guide to ethical decision- making. Within the arena of trauma and resuscitation, fundamental ethical principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice cannot be taken as absolutes as these may in themselves create moral conflict. Resuscitation room activities require a balance between what is “ ethically" correct and what is “pragmatically required” . Because of the urgent nature of a resuscitation event, this balance is often under threat, with resultant transgression of patients’ rights. This article explores the sources of ethical and moral issues in trauma care and proposes a culture of human rights to provide a context for preserving and protecting trauma patients’ rights during resuscitation. Recommendations for education and research are alluded to in concluding the article.

  8. Regional anesthesia for the trauma patient: improving patient outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Gadsden J; Warlick A

    2015-01-01

    Jeff Gadsden, Alicia Warlick Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Trauma is a significant health problem and a leading cause of death in all age groups. Pain related to trauma is frequently severe, but is often undertreated in the trauma population. Opioids are widely used to treat pain in injured patients but have a broad range of undesirable effects in a multitrauma patient such as neurologic and respiratory impairment and delirium. In contrast, regional...

  9. Nutrition in Patients with Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Totur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The need of energy increases by 40% in patients with a head trauma, when compared to people who are living a normal life. This ratio reaches to 200% in some cases. It is important to give a nutrition support which can satisfy the energy need resulted from the hypermetabolic and hypercatabolic states and that is enough to help to fix the immunologic state and achieve a better result in healing the injury. When oral nutrition is not possible in the patient with a head trauma, their energy need is satisfied through enteral and parenteral nutrition. Though parenteral nutrition had held an important role in feeding patients with head trauma, enteral nutrition is applied much more widely today. Enteral and parenteral nutrition both has their own advantages and disadvantages. In the clinical and laboratory studies that had been held, it was found that enteral nutrition improved the systemic immunity, decreased the incidence of the major infectious complications, decreased the metabolic response to trauma, protected the intestinal mucosa, and protected the ecologic balance of the microflora. In this article, it is investigated through the importance of the feeding in patients with a head trauma and reasons to chose enteral nutrition

  10. [Standardised primary care of multiple trauma patients. Prehospital Trauma Life Support und Advanced Trauma Life Support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfl, C G; Gliwitzky, B; Wentzensen, A

    2009-10-01

    Standardised management improves treatment results in seriously injured patients. For conditions like stroke or acute coronary syndrome (ACS) there are set treatment pathways which have been established for prehospital and primary hospital care. The treatment of critical trauma patients, however, follows varying procedures in both the prehospital and primary hospital phases. From an analysis of the trauma register of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU), we know that a seriously injured patient remains on the road for 70 min on average before transferral to hospital. This requires improvement. With the 2003 introduction of the ATLS programme in Germany, the initial clinical phase could be improved upon simply by means of standardised training. PHTLS und ATLS complement one another. PHTLS und ATLS represent training concepts which teach standardised, priority-based prehospital and hospital trauma management. The aim is to make an initial rapid and accurate assessment of the patient's condition, thereby identifying the"critical" patient. The concepts also make priority-based treatment possible and facilitate decision-making as to whether patients can receive further on-the-spot treatment or whether immediate transport is necessary. The procedure is identical in the shock room. The primary consideration is to prevent secondary damage, not to lose track of time and to ensure consistent quality of care. The courses teach systematic knowledge, techniques, skills and conduct in diagnosis and therapy. The courses are oriented to all medical specialities associated with trauma care. With the support of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU) and the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Medicine (DGAI), the German Professional Organisation of Rescue Services (DBRD) has adopted the PHTLS course system on licence from the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT) and the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and has been offering it in

  11. Aortic endograft sizing in trauma patients with hemodynamic instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Frederik H. W.; Verhagen, Hence J. M.; Mojibian, Hamid; Davis, Kimberly A.; Moll, Frans L.; Muhs, Bart E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate changes in aortic diameter in hemodynamically unstable trauma patients and the implications for sizing of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with traumatic thoracic aortic injury (TTAI). Methods: We retrospectively evaluated all trauma patients that we

  12. Cost of illness and illness perceptions in patients with fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, V.M.C.; Vriezekolk, J.E.; Olde Hartman, T.C.; Cats, H.A.; van Helmond, T.; Van der Laan, W.H.; Geenen, R.; Van den Ende, C.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The disease impact and economic burden of fibromyalgia (FM) are high for patients and society at large. Knowing potential determinants of economic costs may help in reducing this burden. Cognitive appraisals (perceptions) of the illness could affect costs. The present study estimated

  13. Pressure Ulcers in Trauma Patients with Preventive Spinal Immobilization : Incidence, characteristics and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, H.W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To protect the (possibly) injured spine, trauma patients are immobilized on a backboard, with an extrication collar, lateral headblocks, and straps. Although pressure ulcers are typically associated with older adults and chronic illness, of all patients in a hospital environment,

  14. Pressure Ulcers in Trauma Patients with Preventive Spinal Immobilization : Incidence, characteristics and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, H.W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To protect the (possibly) injured spine, trauma patients are immobilized on a backboard, with an extrication collar, lateral headblocks, and straps. Although pressure ulcers are typically associated with older adults and chronic illness, of all patients in a hospital environment, thes

  15. Enterocutaneous Fistulas in the Setting of Trauma and Critical Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    aortic aneurysm leads to increased intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal volume, visceral edema, abdominal wall edema, and may lead to ACS. The term...patients that had developed oliguria and abdominal distention after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.30 The advent of endovascular techni- ques for...fistula complicating electric burns a case report. J Pediatr Surg 2003;38(8):1232 1233 13. Prasad JK, Thomson PD, East MK. Faecal fistula as the

  16. Submental Intubation in Maxillofacial Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Rahpeyma

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To describe a modified technique for submental intubation in severely traumatized maxillofacial patients and to evaluate complications arising from the procedure.  Materials and Methods: Submental intubation was performed in twelve patients with maxillofacial trauma ,from 2007 – 2012, which were operated under general anesthesia for treatment of facial fractures. Results: The patients ranged in age from 14 to 39 years.  No complications due to submental intubation, such as infection, hypertrophic scarring, lingual nerve injury, hematoma, bleeding, ranula formation, or orocutaneous fistula, were observed following submental intubation.  Conclusion:  Submental intubation is a very useful technique in the management of maxillofacial trauma patients, with a low complication rate.

  17. Illness perceptions in patients with fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ittersum, M.W.; van Wilgen, C.P.; Hilberdink, W.K.; Groothoff, J.W.; van der Schans, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Former studies in chronic diseases showed the importance of patients' beliefs and perceptions. The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire was developed to assess these illness perceptions. Our goal was to investigate psychometric properties of the IPQ-R for Fibromyalgia Dutch language v

  18. Illness perceptions in patients with fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ittersum, M. W.; van Wilgen, C. P.; Hilberdink, W. K. H. A.; Groothoff, J. W.; van der Schans, C. P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Former studies in chronic diseases showed the importance of patients' beliefs and perceptions. The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire was developed to assess these illness perceptions. Our goal was to investigate psychometric properties of the IPQ-R for Fibromyalgia Dutch language v

  19. Evaluation of geriatric patients with trauma scores after motor vehicle trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Yunsur; Doğan, Nurettin Özgür; Daş, Murat; Karakayali, Onur; Delice, Orhan; Kavalci, Cemil

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factors affecting in-hospital mortality among geriatric trauma patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) following a motor vehicle collision. A retrospective cohort study was carried out in a high-volume tertiary care facility in the central Anatolian Region. Clinical data were extracted from hospital databases for all eligible geriatric patients (either driver, passenger or pedestrian) with entries dated between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the in-hospital mortality effects of variables including demographic characteristics, trauma mechanisms, injured body parts and various trauma scores. There were 395 geriatric motor vehicle trauma presentations to the ED during the 3-year period. Of these patients, 371 (93.9%) survived, and 24 (6.1%) died in the ED, operating room or intensive care unit. The multivariate logistic regression model included the following variables: heart failure, cranial trauma, abdominal trauma, thoracic trauma, pelvic trauma, Glasgow Coma Score and Injury Severity Score (ISS). These variables were chosen because univariate analysis indicated that they were potential predictors of mortality. The multivariate logistic regression showed that the presence of heart failure (OR: 20.2), cranial trauma (OR: 3.6), abdominal trauma (OR: 26.9), pelvic trauma (OR: 9.9) and ISS (OR: 1.2) were predictors of in-hospital mortality in the study population. In our study, heart failure, cranial trauma, abdominal trauma, pelvic trauma, and ISS were found to be the most important predictors of in-hospital mortality among geriatric motor vehicle trauma patients. © 2013.

  20. Enteral nutrition with simultaneous gastric decompression in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilello, L M; Cortes, V; Castro, M; Byers, P M

    1993-03-01

    Early enteral nutrition is an important adjunct in the care of critically ill patients. A double-lumen gastrostomy tube with a duodenal extension has been reported to enable early enteral feeding with simultaneous gastroduodenal decompression. We tested the ability of this device to achieve these goals in critically ill patients. Noncomparative, descriptive case series. Surgical intensive care unit in a university hospital. Fifteen consecutive critically ill patients, who, at the time of laparotomy, were assessed likely to need long-term nutritional support and gastric decompression, underwent tube placement. Mean age was 47 +/- 21 yrs. Mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) and Therapeutic Intervention Scores were 15 +/- 7.3 (SD) and 29 +/- 10.2, respectively, and the mean Injury Severity Score of 11 trauma patients in the group was 27 +/- 7.4. Correct tube positioning was verified by radiograph or endoscopy. Caloric and protein requirements, nutritional parameters, and problems encountered with the device were recorded. The correlation between the volume of feeding port input and suction port output was noted, and this correlation was considered significant if r2 was > or = .5. Only three (20%) of 15 patients reached full enteral nutritional support via the enteral route. None of these patients achieved this level of nutritional support within the first postoperative week. In 67% of the patients, large quantities of enteral feeding solution appeared in the gastroduodenal suction port effluent. When feeding port input was plotted against effluent volume, a correlation coefficient of > .71 (r2 = > or = .5) was found in 40% of the patients. Other complications included: a) excessive gastroduodenal drainage requiring fluid/electrolyte replacement in eight (53.3%) patients; and b) skin ulceration at the tube entrance site in seven (46.7%) patients. These data do not support the use of this device for early enteral feeding and simultaneous

  1. [Medicines reconciliation in critically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Martin, C; Aquerreta, I; Faus, V; Idoate, A

    2014-01-01

    Medicines reconciliation plays a key role in patient safety. However, there is limited data available on how this process affects critically ill patients. In this study, we evaluate a program of reconciliation in critically ill patients conducted by the Intensive Care Unit's (ICU) pharmacist. Prospective study about reconciliation medication errors observed in 50 patients. All ICU patients, excluding patients without regular treatment. Reconciliation process was carried out in the first 24h after ICU admission. Discrepancies were clarified with the doctor in charge of the patient. We analyzed the incidence of reconciliation errors, their characteristics and gravity, the interventions made by the pharmacist and their acceptance by physicians. A total of 48% of patients showed at least one reconciliation error. Omission of drugs accounted for 74% of the reconciliation errors, mainly involving antihypertensive drugs (33%). An amount of 58% of reconciliation errors detected corresponded to severity category D. Pharmacist made interventions in the 98% of patients with discrepancies. A total of 81% of interventions were accepted. The incidence and characteristics of reconciliation errors in ICU are similar to those published in non-critically ill patients, and they affect drugs with high clinical significance. Our data support the importance of the stablishment of medication reconciliation proceedings in critically ill patients. The ICU's pharmacist could carry out this procedure adequately. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  2. Perceived illness intrusion among patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bapat Usha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dialysis therapy is extremely stressful as it interferes with all spheres of daily acti-vities of the patients. This study is aimed at understanding the perceived illness intrusion among pa-tients on hemodialysis (HD and to find the association between illness intrusion and patient demo-graphics as well as duration of dialysis. A cross sectional study involving 90 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD stage V, on HD was performed during the period from 2005 to 2006. The subjects included were above 18 years of age, willing, stable and on dialysis for at least two months. Patients with psychiatric co-morbidity were excluded. A semi-structured interview schedule covering socio-demographics and a 13 item illness intrusion checklist covering the various aspects of life was ca-rried out. The study patients were asked to rate the illness intrusion and the extent. The data were ana-lyzed statistically. The mean age of the subjects was 50.28 ± 13.69 years, males were predominant (85%, 73% were married, 50% belonged to Hindu religion, 25% had pre-degree education, 25% were employed and 22% were housewives. About 40% and 38% of the study patients belonged to middle and upper socio-economic strata respectively; 86% had urban background and lived in nuclear fami-lies. The mean duration on dialysis was 24 ± 29.6 months. All the subjects reported illness intrusion to a lesser or greater extent in various areas including: health (44%, work (70% finance (55%, diet (50% sexual life (38% and psychological status (25%. Illness had not intruded in areas of rela-tionship with spouse (67%, friends (76%, family (79%, social (40% and religious functions (72%. Statistically significant association was noted between illness intrusion and occupation (P= 0.02.

  3. Impaired nutritional status in geriatric trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, F S; Meyer, O W; Chocano-Bedoya, P; Schietzel, S; Gagesch, M; Freystaetter, G; Neuhaus, V; Simmen, H-P; Langhans, W; Bischoff-Ferrari, H A

    2017-05-01

    Malnutrition is an established risk factor for adverse clinical outcomes. Our aim was to assess nutritional status among geriatric trauma patients. We enrolled 169 consecutive patients (⩾70 years) admitted to the Geriatric Traumatology Centre (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland). On admission to acute care, nutritional status was assessed with the mini nutritional assessment (score23.5=normal). At the same examination, we assessed mental (Geriatric Depression Scale; GDS) and cognitive function (Mini-Mental State Examination; MMSE), frailty status (Fried Scale), and number of comorbidities and medications. Further, discharge destination was documented. All analyses were adjusted for age and gender. A total of 7.1% of patients were malnourished and 49.1% were ARM. Patients with reduced mental health (GDS⩾5: 30.5 vs 11.5%; P=0.004), impaired cognitive function (MMSE⩽26: 23.6±0.5 vs 26.0±0.6; P=0.004), prevalent frailty (32.5 vs 8%; Pnutritional status (M+ARM). Further, M+ARM patients were twice as likely to be discharged to destinations different to home (odds ratio=2.08; confidence interval 1.07-4.05). In this consecutive sample of geriatric trauma patients, 56.2% had an M+ARM upon admission to acute care, which was associated with indicators of worse physical, mental and cognitive health and predicted a more than twofold greater odds of being discharged to a destination other than home.

  4. [Isolated chest trauma in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersin, Bertrand; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Pasquier, Mathieu; Zingg, Tobias

    2015-08-12

    In elderly patients, a blunt trauma of the chest is associated with a significant risk of complications and mortality. The number of ribs fractures (≥ 4), the presence of bilateral rib fractures, of a pulmonary contusion, of existent comorbidities or acute extra-thoracic traumatic lesions, and lastly the severity of thoracic pain, are indeed important risk factors of complications and mortality. Their presence may require hospitalization of the patient. When complications do occur, they are represented by alveolar hypoventilation, pulmonary atelectasia and broncho-pulmonary infections. When hospitalization is required, it may allow for the specific treatment of thoracic pain, including locoregional anesthesia techniques.

  5. Oral myiasis in a maxillofacial trauma patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral Myiasis is a rare disease that is mostly reported in developing countries. It is primarily caused by the invasion of the human body by fly larvae. The phenomenon is well-documented in the skin, especially among animals. This case report describes the presentation of Oral Myiasis caused by Musca Nebulo (common house fly, in a 28-year-old patient, with recent maxillofacial trauma. The patient was treated by manual removal of the larvae, after topical application of turpentine oil, followed by surgical debridement and oral therapy with Ivermectin.

  6. Illness perceptions of cancer patients: relationships with illness characteristics and effects on coping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, E.P.C.; Rijken, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Illness perceptions have proven to be predictive of coping and adjustment in many chronically ill patients. Insights into illness perceptions of cancer patients are however scarce. The purpose of the present study was to explore how people with cancer perceive their illness. Moreover, we

  7. Quality management for trauma patients in the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbert, P.H.W.

    2010-01-01

    The quality of care for trauma patients seems to have dramatically improved in the last decades. Both political and medical changes have influenced these changes. In the Netherlands the organization of a trauma system started in the eighties of last century with the foundation of the Dutch Trauma So

  8. Quality management for trauma patients in the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbert, P.H.W.

    2010-01-01

    The quality of care for trauma patients seems to have dramatically improved in the last decades. Both political and medical changes have influenced these changes. In the Netherlands the organization of a trauma system started in the eighties of last century with the foundation of the Dutch Trauma

  9. Pancreatic Involvement in Critically ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Agrawal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Elevation of pancreatic enzymes is often observed in patients admitted to intensive care units in the United States. Elevated pancreatic enzymes can occur due to acute pancreatitis or numerous non-specific reasons. Non-specific enzyme elevation can be seen in patients with head injury, acute renal failure, diabetic ketoacidosis or patients on hemodialysis. Patients with severe acute pancreatitis can be admitted to the intensive care units for intensive care or patients admitted to the intensive care units for other critical illness can develop acute pancreatitis due to a variety of reasons like ischemia, hypoperfusion, drugs or hypercalcemia. It can be a challenging task to distinguish between acute pancreatitis and non-specific enzyme elevation, especially in critically ill patients with multiple co-morbidities admitted to the intensive care units in whom historical information may not be always available. In addition, the clinical consequences of pancreatic enzyme elevation in the critically ill patients are also not very clear. This review attempts to describe the complex interplay of various factors that can lead to either pancreatic inflammation and/or pancreatic enzyme elevation in the critically ill patients along with the clinical consequences and approach to patient with pancreatic enzyme elevation in the intensive care units.

  10. Cardiac troponin elevations among critically ill patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Gunnewiek, J.M.T.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE REVIEW: Elevated levels of cardiac troponins, indicative of the presence of cardiac injury, have been reported in critically ill patients. In this review, the incidence, significance, and clinical relevance of elevated troponin levels among this group of patients will be discussed. RE

  11. Why critically ill patients are protein deprived.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, L John; Bistrian, Bruce R

    2013-01-01

    Critical illness dramatically increases muscle proteolysis and more than doubles the dietary protein requirement. Yet surprisingly, most critically ill patients receive less than half the recommended amount of protein during their stay in a modern intensive care unit. What could explain the wide gap between the recommendations in clinical care guidelines and actual clinical practice? We suggest that an important aspect of the problem is the failure of guidelines to explain the pathophysiology of protein-energy malnutrition and the ways critical illness modifies protein metabolism. The difficulty created by the lack of a framework for reasoning about appropriate protein provision in critical illness is compounded by the many ambiguous and often contradictory ways the word malnutrition is used in the critical care literature. Failing to elucidate these matters, the recommendations for protein provision in the guidelines are incoherent, unconvincing, and easy to ignore.

  12. Diastolic dysfunction in the critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, J C; López, P; Mancebo, J; Zapata, L

    2016-11-01

    Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is a common finding in critically ill patients. It is characterized by a progressive deterioration of the relaxation and the compliance of the left ventricle. Two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is a cornerstone in its diagnosis. Acute pulmonary edema associated with hypertensive crisis is the most frequent presentation of diastolic dysfunction critically ill patients. Myocardial ischemia, sepsis and weaning failure from mechanical ventilation also may be associated with diastolic dysfunction. The treatment is based on the reduction of pulmonary congestion and left ventricular filling pressures. Some studies have found a prognostic role of diastolic dysfunction in some diseases such as sepsis. The present review aims to analyze thoroughly the echocardiographic diagnosis and the most frequent scenarios in critically ill patients in whom diastolic dysfunction plays a key role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparison of severely injured trauma patients admitted to level 1 trauma centres in Queensland and Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Johanna M. M.; Wullschleger, Martin E.; Nielsen, Susan E.; McNamee, Anitia M.; Lefering, Rolf; ten Duis, Hendrik-Jan; Schuetz, Michael A.

    Background: The allocation of a trauma network in Queensland is still in the developmental phase. In a search for indicators to improve trauma care both locally as state-wide, a study was carried out comparing trauma patients in Queensland to trauma patients in Germany, a country with 82.4 million

  14. A comparison of severely injured trauma patients admitted to level 1 trauma centres in Queensland and Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Johanna M. M.; Wullschleger, Martin E.; Nielsen, Susan E.; McNamee, Anitia M.; Lefering, Rolf; ten Duis, Hendrik-Jan; Schuetz, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The allocation of a trauma network in Queensland is still in the developmental phase. In a search for indicators to improve trauma care both locally as state-wide, a study was carried out comparing trauma patients in Queensland to trauma patients in Germany, a country with 82.4 million i

  15. A comparison of severely injured trauma patients admitted to level 1 trauma centres in Queensland and Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Johanna M. M.; Wullschleger, Martin E.; Nielsen, Susan E.; McNamee, Anitia M.; Lefering, Rolf; ten Duis, Hendrik-Jan; Schuetz, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The allocation of a trauma network in Queensland is still in the developmental phase. In a search for indicators to improve trauma care both locally as state-wide, a study was carried out comparing trauma patients in Queensland to trauma patients in Germany, a country with 82.4 million i

  16. Platelet satellitism in a trauma patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcinovic, Lara Milevoj; Pavic, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Platelet satellitism (PS) is a rare phenomenon observed in blood smears obtained from blood anticoagulated with EDTA. It is characterised by platelet rosetting around polymorphonuclear neutrophils and in rare cases around other blood cells. PS is a rare cause of pseudothrombocytopenia. References about the phenomenon of PS in medical literature are few. In this report we describe a case of PS fortunately noticed in one trauma patient. Furthermore, we discuss the possible pathophysiological mechanisms of PS proposed in the literature. To our knowledge this is the first case of PS reported in Croatia. PMID:22384529

  17. Cardiac changes in hospitalized patients of trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawande, Ninad B; Tumram, Nilesh Keshav; Dongre, Anand Paikuji

    2014-09-01

    Modern clinical management of the patients sustaining traumatic injuries and thermal burns has resulted in their longer survival, but the clinical and pathological effects of these traumatic injuries over the myocardium have been largely neglected. It is speculated that certain factors such as the inflammatory and degenerative lesions of the heart, prolonged clinical course, and the subsequent stress and strain may play role in hastening the death. In the present study, 125 hospitalized cases of traumatic injuries and thermal burns brought for medicolegal autopsy were examined, with the purpose to find out the incidence, its significance, and the extent of the myocardial lesions due to stress and strain following trauma. About 20% patients had myocardial lesions recognized at gross and histological examination at autopsy. A myocardial lesion does develop in the cases of traumatic injuries and thermal burns. No significant sex difference is seen in the cases showing positive myocardial lesions. However, a relationship exists between these myocardial lesions and the after-effects developing in the cases of trauma. These myocardial lesions seen in the cases of traumatic injuries can be termed as early ischemic or anoxic lesions in the absence of any specific coronary pathology. The intensity of myocardial lesions increases with increase in the survival period of the patient. The findings in the study support the concept of human stress cardiomyopathy and demonstrate the potential significance of stress in precipitating death.

  18. Childhood trauma and chronic illness in adulthood: mental health and socioeconomic status as explanatory factors and buffers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Mock

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of traumatic events in childhood have been shown to have long-term consequences for health in adulthood. With data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey we take a life course perspective of cumulative disadvantage and examine the potential role of mental health and socioeconomic status in adulthood as multiple mediators of the link between childhood trauma and chronic illness in adulthood. Mental health and socioeconomic status are also tested as buffers against the typically adverse consequences of childhood trauma. The results suggest mental health and socioeconomic status partially explain the association of childhood trauma with chronic illness in adulthood, with mental health showing a stronger effect. In addition, an analysis of the interactions suggested higher socioeconomic status is a potential protective factor for those with a history of trauma. Results also suggest cumulative disadvantage following trauma may lead to chronic illness and suggest the need for public health expenditures on resources such as counseling and income supports to prevent or reduce psychological harm and chronic illness resulting from traumatic events.

  19. Pattern of trauma in a rural hospital and factors affecting mortality in trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshana Tote

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Age, sex, mechanism and type of injury affect the mortality in Trauma Patients. The mortality increased as the Revised Trauma Score decreased while mortality increased with increasing Injury Severity Score. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(2.000: 450-456

  20. Oral myiasis in a maxillofacial trauma patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grandim Balarama Gupta Vinit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a rare disease primarily caused by the invasion of tissue by larvae of certain dipteran flies. Oral myiasis is still more "rare" and "unique" owing to the fact that oral cavity rarely provides the necessary habitat conducive for a larval lifecycle. Common predisposing factors are poor oral hygiene, halitosis, trauma, senility, learning disabilities, physically and mentally challenged conditions. Oral myiasis can lead to rapid tissue destruction and disfigurement and requires immediate treatment. Treatment consists of manual removal of maggots from the oral cavity after application of chemical agents. Good sanitation, personal and environmental hygiene and cleanliness and special care for debilitated persons are the best methods to prevent oral myiasis. This case report describes the presentation of oral myiasis caused by musca nebulo (common house fly in a 40-year-old male patient, with recent maxillofacial trauma. The patient was treated by manual removal larvae by topical application of turpentine oil, followed by surgical debridement of the wound and open reduction and internal fixation of the fracture.

  1. Melatonin Secretion Pattern in Critically Ill Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Holst, René; Jennum, Poul

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients have abnormal circadian and sleep homeostasis. This may be associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The aims of this pilot study were (1) to describe melatonin secretion in conscious critically ill mechanically ventilated patients and (2) to describe whether melatonin...... secretion and sleep patterns differed in these patients with and without remifentanil infusion. Eight patients were included. Blood-melatonin was taken every 4th hour, and polysomnography was carried out continually during a 48-hour period. American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria were used for sleep...... scoring if sleep patterns were identified; otherwise, Watson's classification was applied. As remifentanil was periodically administered during the study, its effect on melatonin and sleep was assessed. Melatonin secretion in these patients followed a phase-delayed diurnal curve. We did not observe any...

  2. Illness perceptions of cancer patients: relationships with illness characteristics and coping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, P.; Rijken, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Illness perceptions have proven to be predictive of coping and adjustment in many chronically ill patients. However, insights into illness perceptions of cancer patients are scarce. The purpose of the present study was to explore how a heterogeneous sample of cancer patients perceive thei

  3. Illness behavior in patients with musculoskeletal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, A.G.J.

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis studies the influence of psychological factors in illness behavior in different hand and upper extremity conditions encountered in the practice of a hand surgeon. The importance of the language used by the patient and the amount of shared decision making in an orthopaedic practice is

  4. Pressure sore prevention in acutely ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, H

    1997-03-01

    A wide range of factors affect the skin's ability to withstand pressure, friction and shear. Clinically validated pressure-relieving equipment is essential to prevent pressure sores in acutely ill patients. A successful pressure sore prevention strategy depends on sufficient resource allocation, appropriate levels and types of preventive equipment and evaluation.

  5. Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient: Update. Consensus SEMICYUC-SENPE: Multiple trauma patient Recomendaciones para el soporte nutricional y metabólico especializado del paciente crítico: Actualización. Consenso SEMICYUC-SENPE: Paciente politraumatizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Blesa Malpica

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Patients with polytrauma can be viewed as paradigmatic of the critically-ill patient. These previously healthy patients undergo a life-threatening aggression leading to an organic response that is no different from that in other types of patients. The profile of trauma patients has changed and currently corresponds to patients who are somewhat older, with a higher body mass index and greater comorbidity. Severe injuries lead to intense metabolic stress, posing a risk of malnutrition. Therefore, early nutritional support, preferentially through the enteral route, with appropriate protein intake and glutamine supplementation, provides advantages over other routes and types of nutritional formula. To avoid overnutrition, reduced daily calorie intake can be considered in obese patients and in those with medullary lesions. However, little information on this topic is available in patients with medullary lesions.El paciente traumatizado puede considerarse el paradigma del paciente crítico que, previamente sano, sufre una agresión que pone su vida en riesgo y que determina una respuesta orgánica en nada diferente a la presente en otro tipo de pacientes. El perfil del paciente traumático ha cambiado, siendo en la actualidad algo más mayores, con índices de masa corporal más elevados y con una mayor comorbilidad. Cuando la agresión es grave, su respuesta metabólica es intensa y condiciona un riesgo nutricional. por ello, el soporte nutricional precoz, de preferencia enteral, con aporte proporcionado de proteínas y suplementado con glutamina, condiciona ventajas competitivas con otras vías y tipos de fórmulas nutricionales. La presencia de obesidad y/o lesión medular debe hacernos considerar una disminución proporcionada del aporte calórico diario, evitando la sobrenutrición, aunque en los pacientes con lesión medular es escasa la información disponible.

  6. Sarcopenia in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilarslanoglu, Muhammet C; Kuyumcu, Mehmet E; Yesil, Yusuf; Halil, Meltem

    2016-10-01

    Sarcopenia occurring as a primary consequence of aging and secondary due to certain medical problems including chronic disease, malnutrition and inactivity is a progressive generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass, strength and function. The prevalence of sarcopenia increases with aging (approximately 5-13 % in the sixth and seventh decades). However, data showing the prevalence and clinical outcomes of sarcopenia in intensive care units (ICUs) are limited. A similar condition to sarcopenia in the ICU, called ICU-acquired weakness (ICU-AW), has been reported more frequently. Here, we aim to examine the importance of sarcopenia, especially ICU-AW, in ICU patients via related articles in Medline.

  7. Regional anesthesia for the trauma patient: improving patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsden, Jeff; Warlick, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is a significant health problem and a leading cause of death in all age groups. Pain related to trauma is frequently severe, but is often undertreated in the trauma population. Opioids are widely used to treat pain in injured patients but have a broad range of undesirable effects in a multitrauma patient such as neurologic and respiratory impairment and delirium. In contrast, regional analgesia confers excellent site-specific pain relief that is free from major side effects, reduces opioid requirement in trauma patients, and is safe and easy to perform. Specific populations that have shown benefits (including morbidity and mortality advantages) with regional analgesic techniques include those with fractured ribs, femur and hip fractures, and patients undergoing digital replantation. Acute compartment syndrome is a potentially devastating sequela of soft-tissue injury that complicates high-energy injuries such as proximal tibia fractures. The use of regional anesthesia in patients at risk for compartment syndrome is controversial; although the data is sparse, there is no evidence that peripheral nerve blocks delay the diagnosis, and these techniques may in fact facilitate the recognition of pathologic breakthrough pain. The benefits of regional analgesia are likely most influential when it is initiated as early as possible, and the performance of nerve blocks both in the emergency room and in the field has been shown to provide quality pain relief with an excellent safety profile.

  8. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Rathachai Kaewlai; de Moya, Marc A.; Antonio Santos; Asrani, Ashwin V.; Avery, Laura L.; Robert A. Novelline

    2011-01-01

    Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI) suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI) at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG) and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an eleva...

  9. An unusual differential for a pulseless trauma patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic shock is the most common reason to explain the inability to feel pulse in a trauma patient. However, clinicians should always suspect atypical causes for differential pulses in this population and Takayasu′s arteritis (TA is one such example. We report a case of aorto-arteritis in a patient who presented with trauma and was later diagnosed with TA. She had blood pressure discrepancy between upper and lower limbs noted upon her initial trauma evaluation.

  10. Occult Pneumothoraces in Acute Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Berryman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many traumatic pneumothoraces (PTX are not seen on initial chest radiograph (CR(occult PTX but are detected only on computed tomography (CT. Although CR remains the first toolfor detecting PTX, most trauma patients with significant thoracoabdominal injuries will receive both CTand CR. The primary objective of this study was to retrospectively determine the effectiveness of CR fordetecting PTX in trauma patients. Our hypotheses were that CR is a sensitive indicator of PTX on CT,that chest pain and shortness of breath are good predictors of PTX on CR, and that we could determineother predictors of PTX on CR.Methods: All trauma patients presenting to our Level I trauma center with a CT-diagnosed PTX over a2-year period who had both a CR and a chest CT were included. The CT reading was considered thegold standard for PTX diagnosis. Electronic medical records were searched using key words fordiagnoses, symptoms, demographics, and radiologic results. We recorded the official radiologistreadings for both CR and CT (positive or negative and the size of the PTX on CT (large, moderate,small, or tiny. The outcome variable was dichotomized based on presence or absence of PTXdetected on CR. Descriptive statistics and v2 tests were used for univariate analysis. A regressionanalysis was performed to determine characteristics predictive of a PTX on CR, and 1 variable wasadded to the model for every 10 positive CRs. With equal-size groups, this study has the power of 80%to detect a 10% absolute difference in single predictors of PTX on CR with 45 subjects in each group.Results: There were 134 CT-documented PTXs included in the study. Mean age was 42, and 74%were men. For 66 (49% patients, PTX was detected on CR (sensitivity¼50%. The CR detected 30%of small PTX, 35% of moderate PTX, and 33% of large PTX. Comparing patients with and without PTXon CR, there were no significant differences in shortness of breath or chest pain. There no

  11. Energy expenditure of acutely ill hospitalised patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gariballa Salah

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To measure energy expenditure of acutely ill elderly patients in hospital and following discharge in the community. Design Sixty-three consecutive hospitalised acutely ill elderly patients were recruited. Eight patients were studied to assess the reliability of the Delta Tract Machine as a measure of energy expenditure; 35 patients had their energy expenditure studied in hospital on two occasions and 20 patients had their energy expenditure measured in hospital and at 6 weeks in the community Results Men had higher basal energy expenditure (BMR values compared to women however the difference was not statistically significant [Men, mean (SD 1405 (321 Kcal, women 1238 (322 kcal; mean difference (95% CI 166 kcal (-17 to 531, p = 0.075]. After adjusting for age, gender and body mass index both medication and C-reactive protein (CRP, concentrations showed significant correlation with measured energy expenditure in hospital, (r = -0.36, "p Conclusion Tissue inflammation and medications were associated with change in measured energy expenditure in acutely ill patients.

  12. Airway management in unconscious non-trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Klaus; Hansen, Christian Muff; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2012-01-01

    , however, there are no such firm recommendations regarding airway management and the GCS score may be less useful. The aim of this study was to describe the authors' experience with airway management in unconscious non-trauma patients in the prehospital setting with a physician-manned Mobile Emergency Care......BackgroundTracheal intubation is recommended in unconscious trauma patients to protect the airway from pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents and also to ensure ventilation and oxygenation. Unconsciousness is often defined as a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score below 9. In non-trauma patients......-trauma patients registered in the database during 2006 were included. The ambulance patient charts and medical records were scrutinised to assess outcome and the need for tracheal intubation during the first 24 h after admittance into hospital.ResultsA total of 557 unconscious non-trauma patients were examined...

  13. Reported Childhood Trauma and Suicide Attempts in Schizophrenic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Alec

    2005-01-01

    Childhood traumas are associated with suicidal behavior but this aspect has not been examined in relation to schizophrenia. In this study, 50 chronic schizophrenic patients who had attempted suicide were compared with 50 chronic schizophrenic patients who had never attempted suicide for their scores on the 34-item Childhood Trauma Questionnaire…

  14. Attitudes toward patient expertise in chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, S E; Ternulf Nyhlin, K; Paterson, B L

    2000-08-01

    Although it has become an accepted standard to acknowledge the patient as a full partner in health care decisions, replacing traditional authoritative relationships with those based on an emancipatory model, the experiences of persons living with chronic illness confirm that this paradigm shift is not yet apparent in many health care relationships. In this paper, the authors present a qualitative secondary analysis of combined data sets from their research into chronic illness experience with two quite different chronic diseases - Type I Diabetes (a socially legitimized chronic disease) and Environmental Sensitivities (a disease which is currently treated with considerable scepticism). Comparing the experiences of individuals with diseases that are quite differently socially constructed, it becomes possible to detect common underlying health professional values and attitudes that powerfully influence the experience of living with and negotiating health care for a chronic illness. In the discussion of findings from this study, the authors examine the implications of the spiral of behaviors that fuels mutual alienation in chronic illness care relationships if professionals are unable to value patient expertise.

  15. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in trauma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnani, Alfredo; Cezillo, Marcus Vinicius Boaretto; Oliveira, Andrea Fernandes; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased use of neuroleptic agents in the unit care in trauma patients. There is a lack of prospective data, and most of the information is obtained from related cases. It is needed to have a high index of suspicion with regard to excluding neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) in patients taking neuroleptics and presenting with hyperthermia, because of the potentially fatal consequences. It is a rare syndrome in the burn patient with a lack of proven treatments, and high morbidity and mortality are related. In the actual literature there are few related cases of NMS in the polytrauma patient, particularly in association with psychiatric conditions. In burn NMS is a rare complication with difficult diagnosis, because of the similar symptoms that can occur either in patients in the Burn Unit Care with other fatal conditions that are present in the acute phase response. Actually, there is no marker for the NMS, which difficult the early diagnosis and prognosis. The treatment still is based on case reports, with lack of clinical trials, but remain as standard and universally accepted. Besides that, the neural signaling of the NMS indicates possibilities for better understanding of the pathophysiology treatment protocol.

  16. Positive feelings among terminally ill cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Lee, M L; Swarte, N B; Van der Bom, J G; Van den Bout, J; Heintz, A P M

    2006-03-01

    For a realistic perspective on what it is like to have cancer and be in the last months of life, it is necessary to also study the positive feelings people may still experience. We set out to describe positive feelings experienced by terminally ill patients. The Depression Adjective Checklist was completed by 96 cancer patients with an estimated life expectancy of less than 3 months. On average patients endorsed 30% (3.6/12) of the positive mood items, and 25% (5.4/22) of the negative mood items. The larger part of terminally ill cancer patients with an estimated life expectancy of less than 3 months reported one or more positive mood states. A positive mood state such as 'being interested' was endorsed by more than half (65%) of the patients, other positive feelings were endorsed by a substantial proportion of patients, for example: 38% of patients endorsed feeling 'jovial' and 35% reported being 'optimistic'. Although having incurable cancer often leads to feelings of depression, mood is variable and many patients experience at least some positive feelings.

  17. Implementation and Evaluation of a Ward-Based eLearning Program for Trauma Patient Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Kate; Wiseman, Taneal; Kennedy, Belinda; Kourouche, Sarah; Goldsmith, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The majority of trauma nursing education is focused on the emergency phases of care. We describe the development and evaluation of a trauma eLearning module for the ward environment. The module was developed using adult learning principles and implemented in 2 surgical wards. There were 3 phases of evaluation: (1) self-efficacy of nurses; (2) relevance and usability of the module and; (3) application of knowledge learnt. The majority indicated they had applied new knowledge, particularly when performing a physical assessment (85.7%), communicating (91.4%), and identifying risk of serious illness (90.4%). Self-efficacy relating to confidence in caring for patients, communication, and escalating clinical deterioration improved (p = .023). An eLearning trauma patient assessment module for ward nursing staff improves nursing knowledge and self-efficacy.

  18. Drug abuse in hospitalized trauma patients in a university trauma care center: an explorative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Soroush

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug abuse has been known as a growing contributing factor to all types of trauma in the world. The goal of this article is to provide insight into demographic and substance use factors associated with trauma and to determine the prevalence of drug abuse in trauma patients. Methods: Evidence of substance abuse was assessed in trauma patients presenting to Sina trauma hospital over a 3-month period. They were interviewed and provided urine samples to detect the presence of drug/metabolites of opium, morphine, cannabis and heroin by “Morphine Check” kits. Demographic data, mechanisms of injury, history of smoking and drug abuse were recorded. Results: A total of 358 patients with a mean age of 28.4 years were studied. The Patients were predominantly male (94.7%. There was a history of smoking in 136 cases (38%. 58 cases (16.2% reported to abuse drugs (91.5% opium. The commonest route of administration was smoke inhalation (37.2%. Screening by Morphine Check test revealed 95 samples to be positive (26.5%. The preponderance of test-positive cases was among young people (of 20-30 years of age with a history of smoking. Victims of violence and those with penetrating injuries also showed a higher percentage of positive screens (P=0.038 and P<0.001, respectively. Conclusion: These results suggest that drug abuse is a contributing factor to trauma especially in violent injuries and among the young. Regarding the considerable prevalence of drug abuse among trauma patients, it’s highly recommended that all trauma patients be screened for illicit drugs

  19. Clinical use of lactate monitoring in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bakker (Jan); M.W.N. Nijsten (Maarten); T.C. Jansen (Tim)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIncreased blood lactate levels (hyperlactataemia) are common in critically ill patients. Although frequently used to diagnose inadequate tissue oxygenation, other processes not related to tissue oxygenation may increase lactate levels. Especially in critically ill patients, increased gly

  20. Mucormycosis of the Forehead and Sinuses in a Trauma Patient

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumbla, Pallavi A; Lee, Nathan; Kimbrough, Mary K

    2016-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare fungal infection in immunocompetent patients. It is not commonly seen in trauma patients who sustain multisystem injuries and are often exposed to numerous infectious sources...

  1. Effect of Advanced Trauma Life Support program on medical interns' performance in simulated trauma patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi Koorosh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Since appropriate and time-table methods in trauma care have an important impact on patients’ outcome, we evaluated the effect of Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS program on medical interns' performance in simulated trauma patient management. Methods: A descriptive and analytical study before and after the training was conducted on 24 randomly se-lected undergraduate medical interns from Imam Reza Hos-pital in Mashhad, Iran. On the first day, we assessed in-terns' clinical knowledge and their practical skill performance in confronting simulated trauma patients. After 2 days of ATLS training, we performed the same study and evaluated their score again on the fourth day. The two findings, pre-and post- ATLS periods, were compared through SPSS ver-sion 15.0 software. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Our findings showed that interns’ ability in all the three tasks improved after the training course. On the fourth day after training, there was a statistically significant increase in interns' clinical knowledge of ATLS procedures, the sequence of procedures and skill performance in trauma situations (P<0.001, P=0.016 and P=0.01 respectively. Conclusion: ATLS course has an important role in increasing clinical knowledge and practical skill performance of trauma care in medical interns. Key words: Advanced Trauma Life Support Care; Knowledge; Inservice training; Wounds and injuries

  2. [Illness behavior and depression in tinnitus patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönweiler, R; Neuschulte, C; Paar, G H

    1989-05-01

    Tinnitus patients often complain of psychosomatic disorders and of problems in social life. We intended to prove the modulation of tinnitus perception by psychosocial factors. We examined 48 tinnitus patients, 35 with and 13 without hearing loss. A control group of 48 patients without tinnitus, without hearing disorder and without tumor disease was adapted to correspond to the tinnitus group in respect of age, sex and social factors. A quantitative assessment of complaints as well as of the intensity of depression was made via questionaires (Giessener Beschwerdebogen and Beck Depression Inventory). In tinnitus patients, we found a statistically significantly higher degree of complaints even for non-otological symptoms. They were statistically more depressive than the controls, but less than patients with endogenic depression usually are. Nevertheless, in tinnitus patients it seems to be reasonable to inquire after general symptoms of illness to assess whether cooperation with a psychiatrist is required before initiating somatic treatment.

  3. Reduced clot strength upon admission, evaluated by thrombelastography (TEG, in trauma patients is independently associated with increased 30-day mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen Annemarie B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Exsanguination due to uncontrolled bleeding is the leading cause of potentially preventable deaths among trauma patients. About one third of trauma patients present with coagulopathy on admission, which is associated with increased mortality and will aggravate bleeding in a traumatized patient. Thrombelastographic (TEG clot strength has previously been shown to predict outcome in critically ill patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate this relation in the trauma setting. Methods A retrospective study of trauma patients with an injury severity qualifying them for inclusion in the European Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN and a TEG analysis performed upon arrival at the trauma centre. Results Eighty-nine patients were included. The mean Injury Severity Score (ISS was 21 with a 30-day mortality of 17%. Patients with a reduced clot strength (maximal amplitude Conclusion Low clot strength upon admission is independently associated with increased 30-day mortality in trauma patients and it could be speculated that targeted interventions based on the result of the TEG analysis may improve patient outcome. Prospective randomized trials investigating this potential are highly warranted.

  4. Medicolegal Evaluation of Elderly Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Durak

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: The results of our study indicate that most of the geriatric victims were admitted to the medical centers with traumatic causes. Thus, it is necessary to increase our social sensitivity to trauma and the ways in can be prevented in the geriatric age group. Key words: Trauma; Geriatric; Forensic case; Injury.

  5. Endocrine and metabolic considerations in critically ill patients 4: Thyroid function in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fliers, Eric; Bianco, Antonio C.; Langouche, Lies; Boelen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) typically present with decreased concentrations of plasma tri-iodothyronine, low thyroxine, and normal range or slightly decreased concentration of thyroid-stimulating hormone. This ensemble of changes is collectively known as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). The extent of NTIS is associated with prognosis, but no proof exists for causality of this association. Initially, NTIS is a consequence of the acute phase response to systemic illness and ...

  6. Glucose metabolism in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Møller, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    , stimulates insulin secretion and inhibits glucagon release both in healthy individuals and in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Compared to insulin, GLP-1 appears to be associated with a lower risk of severe hypoglycemia, probably because the magnitude of its insulinotropic action is dependent on blood...... characteristics and are, among other things, both characterized by different grades of systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. The GLP-1 might be a potential new treatment target in critically ill patients with stress-induced hyperglycemia....

  7. Supporting Muslim Patients During Advanced Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Nathan A; Siddiqui, Ejaz A; Koenig, Harold G

    2017-01-01

    Religion is an important part of many patients' cultural perspectives and value systems that influence them during advanced illness and toward the end of life when they directly face mortality. Worldwide violence perpetrated by people identifying as Muslim has been a growing fear for people living in the US and elsewhere. This fear has further increased by the tense rhetoric heard from the recent US presidential campaign and the new presidential administration. For many, this includes fear of all Muslims, the second-largest religious group in the world with 1.6 billion adherents and approximately 3.5 million in the US alone. Patient-centered care requires health professionals to look past news headlines and unchecked social media so they can deliver high-quality care to all patients. This article explores areas of importance in the context of advanced illness for practitioners of Islam. These include the conditions needed for prayer, the roles of medical treatment and religious authority, the importance of modesty, the religious concordance of clinicians, the role of family in medical decision making, advance care planning, and pain and symptom management. Initial recommendations to optimize care for Muslim patients and their families, informed by the described tenets of Muslim faith, are provided for clinicians and health systems administrators. These include Islamic cultural awareness training for staff, assessment of patients and families to determine needs, health education and decision-making outreach, and community health partnerships with local Islamic institutions.

  8. Effect of Advanced Trauma Life Support program on medical interns' performance in simulated trauma patient management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koorosh Ahmadi; Mohammad Sedaghat; Mahdi Safdarian; Amir Masoud Hashemian; Zahra Nezamdoust; Mohammad Vaseie; Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar

    2013-01-01

    Since appropriate and timetable methods in trauma care have an important impact on patients' outcome,we evaluated the effect of Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) program on medical interns'performance in simulated trauma patient management.Methods:A descriptive and analytical study before and after the training was conducted on 24 randomly selected undergraduate medical interns from Imam Reza Hospital in Mashhad,Iran.On the first day,we assessed interns' clinical knowledge and their practical skill performance in confronting simulated trauma patients.After 2 days of ATLS training,we performed the same study and evaluated their score again on the fourth day.The two findings,preand post-ATLS periods,were compared through SPSS version 15.0 software.P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant.Results:Our findings showed that interns' ability in all the three tasks improved after the training course.On the fourth day after training,there was a statistically significant increase in interns' clinical knowledge of ATLS procedures,the sequence of procedures and skill performance in trauma situations (P<0.001,P=0.016 and P=0.01 respectively).Conclusion:ATLS course has an important role in increasing clinical knowledge and practical skill performance of trauma care in medical interns.

  9. Management of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Prophylaxis in Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydar, Shahram; Sabetian, Golnar; Khalili, Hosseinali; Fallahi, Javad; Tahami, Mohammad; Ziaian, Bizhan; Abbasi, Hamid Reza; Bolandparvaz, Shahram; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz; Ghahramani, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PTE) are known as venous thromboembolism (VTE). DVT occurs when a thrombus (a blood clot) forms in deep veins of the body, usually in the lower extremities. It can cause swelling or leg pain, but sometimes may occur with no symptoms. Awareness of DVT is the best way to prevent the VTE. Patients with trauma are at increased risk of DVT and subsequent PE because of coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, DVT prophylaxis is essential but the VTE prophylaxis strategy is controversial for the trauma patients. The risk factors for VTE includes pelvic and lower extremity fractures, and head injury.

  10. Submandibular intubation in awake patient of panfacial trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Kamra, S. K.; H K Khandavilli; Banerjee, P.

    2016-01-01

    Maxillofacial trauma patients present with airway problems. Submandibular intubation is an effective means of intubation to avoid tracheostomy for operative procedures. Airway is secured with oral endotracheal intubation in paralyzed patient and tube is then transplaced in sub mental or submandibular region. However there may be instances when paralyzing such trauma patients is not safe and short term tracheostomy is the only airway channel available for conduction of anesthesia. We report a ...

  11. Ceruloplasmin and Hypoferremia: Studies in Burn and Non-Burn Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Dubick

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Normal iron handling appears to be disrupted in critically ill patients leading to hypoferremia that may contribute to systemic inflammation. Ceruloplasmin (Cp, an acute phase reactant protein that can convert ferrous iron to its less reactive ferric form facilitating binding to ferritin, has ferroxidase activity that is important to iron handling. Genetic absence of Cp decreases iron export resulting in iron accumulation in many organs. The objective of this study was to characterize iron metabolism and Cp activity in burn and non-burn trauma patients to determine if changes in Cp activity are a potential contributor to the observed hypoferremia. Material and Methods: Under Brooke Army Medical Center Institutional Review Board approved protocols, serum or plasma was collected from burn and non-burn trauma patients on admission to the ICU and at times up to 14 days and measured for indices of iron status, Cp protein and oxidase activity and cytokines. Results: Burn patients showed evidence of anemia and normal or elevated ferritin levels. Plasma Cp oxidase activity in burn and trauma patients were markedly lower than controls on admission and increased to control levels by day 3, particularly in burn patients. Plasma cytokines were elevated throughout the 14 days study along with evidence of an oxidative stress. No significant differences in soluble transferrin receptor were noted among groups on admission, but levels in burn patients were lower than controls for the first 5 days after injury. Conclusion: This study further established the hypoferremia and inflammation associated with burns and trauma. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show an early decrease in Cp oxidase activity in burn and non-burn trauma patients. The results support the hypothesis that transient loss of Cp activity contributes to hypoferremia and inflammation. Further studies are warranted to determine if decreased Cp activity increases the risk of

  12. Incidental findings in trauma patients during focused assessment with sonography for trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanitis, Sophocles; Zacharioudakis, Constantinos; Zafeiriadou, Paraskevi; Armoutides, Vasileios; Karaliotas, Charilaos; Sgourakis, George

    2012-03-01

    During the initial assessment of trauma patients they usually undergo a Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) in which there are occasionally incidental findings of other surgical conditions. In this audit we discuss the incidence, demographics, and implications of these findings and we propose a management algorithm. Within 2 years we managed 6041 trauma patients in the emergency department based on the Advanced Trauma Life Support protocols, 95 per cent of which underwent a FAST ultrasound. Incidental findings were reported in 468 patients (7.8%), whereas in a further 11.2 per cent of these patients there was a second finding. The mean age of these patients was 57.55 years (15-105), and most of them were men (51.1%). The vast majority of the findings were related to the liver and biliary tree (52.1%) followed by the urinary track (27.1% + 8%). In multivariate analysis only the age was a significant factor associated with incidental findings (P trauma (P FAST may lead to managerial and possible medico-legal issues rendering the development of a proper algorithm mandatory.

  13. Scoring systems of severity in patients with multiple trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapsang, Amy Grace; Shyam, Devajit Chowlek

    2015-04-01

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; hence severity scales are important adjuncts to trauma care in order to characterize the nature and extent of injury. Trauma scoring models can assist with triage and help in evaluation and prediction of prognosis in order to organise and improve trauma systems. Given the wide variety of scoring instruments available to assess the injured patient, it is imperative that the choice of the severity score accurately match the application. Even though trauma scores are not the key elements of trauma treatment, they are however, an essential part of improvement in triage decisions and in identifying patients with unexpected outcomes. This article provides the reader with a compendium of trauma severity scales along with their predicted death rate calculation, which can be adopted in order to improve decision making, trauma care, research and in comparative analyses in quality assessment. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotta, M O; Roberts, J A; Lipman, J

    2015-12-01

    The judicious use of existing antibiotics is essential for preserving their activity against infections. In the era of multi-drug resistance, this is of particular importance in clinical areas characterized by high antibiotic use, such as the ICU. Antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients requires sound knowledge not only of the altered physiology in serious infections - including severe sepsis, septic shock and ventilator-associated pneumonia - but also of the pathogen-drug exposure relationship (i.e. pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index). An important consideration is the fact that extreme shifts in organ function, such as those seen in hyperdynamic patients or those with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, can have an impact upon drug exposure, and constant vigilance is required when reviewing antibiotic dosing regimens in the critically ill. The use of continuous renal replacement therapy and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation remain important interventions in these patients; however, both of these treatments can have a profound effect on antibiotic exposure. We suggest placing emphasis on the use of therapeutic drug monitoring and dose individualization when optimizing therapy in these settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Should we mobilise critically ill patients? A review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Enda D

    2009-12-01

    Neuromuscular weakness, a frequent complication of prolonged bed rest and critical illness, is associated with morbidity and mortality. Mobilisation physiotherapy has widespread application in patients hospitalised with non-critical illness.

  16. Illness perception in Polish patients with chronic diseases: Psychometric properties of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka-Sauer, Katarzyna; Banaszkiewicz, Dorota; Staśkiewicz, Izabela; Kopczyński, Piotr; Hajduk, Adam; Czuszyńska, Zenobia; Ejdys, Mariola; Szostakiewicz, Małgorzata; Sablińska, Agnieszka; Kałużna, Anna; Tomaszewska, Magda; Siebert, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    The study evaluates the psychometric properties of a Polish translation of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. A total of 276 patients with chronic conditions (58.7% women) completed the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The internal consistency of the Polish Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire measured with Cronbach's alpha was satisfactory (α = 0.74). Structural validity was demonstrated by significant inter-correlations between the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire components. Discriminant validity was supported by the fact that the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire enables patients with various conditions to be differentiated. Significant correlations were found between Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and depression and anxiety levels. The Polish Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire thus evaluated is a reliable and valid tool.

  17. Advanced airway management is necessary in prehospital trauma patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lockey, D J; Healey, B; Crewdson, K; Chalk, G; Weaver, A E; Davies, G E

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of airway compromise in trauma patients is a priority. Basic airway management is provided by all emergency personnel, but the requirement for on-scene advanced airway management is controversial...

  18. Can ultrasound help to manage patients with scrotal trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlan, T; Freeman, S J

    2014-11-01

    Traumatic injuries to the scrotum are uncommon but, when they do occur, frequently lead to serious complications. Early complications include testicular infarction, necrosis and abscess formation; in the longer-term trauma may result in testicular atrophy and subfertility. Early surgical intervention in patients with testicular rupture can significantly improve the clinical outcome and reduce the need for delayed orchidectomy. However, clinical examination of the scrotum following trauma is difficult and frequently inaccurate; this may result in incorrect triage of patients for surgical exploration. Scrotal ultrasound can reliably assess scrotal injuries and diagnose testicular rupture with a high level of accuracy. Additionally, ultrasound can provide important information regarding testicular perfusion, which can further inform decisions on surgical management. This article reviews the sonographic findings that may be encountered in patients with scrotal trauma, with an emphasis on blunt trauma. It describes the pivotal role that ultrasound can play in the accurate triage of these patients to surgical or conservative management.

  19. Functional electrical stimulation improves brain perfusion in cranial trauma patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amorim, Bárbara Juarez; Santos, Allan de Oliveira; Oberg, Telma Dagmar; Romanato, Juliana; Anjos, Dalton A; Lima, Mariana da Cunha Lopes de; Ramos, Celso Darío; Honorato, Donizete Cesar; Camargo, Edwaldo Eduardo; Etchebehere, Elba Cristina de Sá Camargo

    2011-01-01

    ...: cranial trauma and major vascular insults. All SPECT images were analyzed using SPM. RESULTS: There was a significant statistical difference between the two groups related to patient's ages and extent of hypoperfusion in the SPECT...

  20. 多发性创伤患者发生急性肺水肿危险因素及治疗策略分析%Risk Factors and Therapy Strategies of Acute Pulmonary Edema in Critically Ill Patients with Multiple Trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓一芸; 康焰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the risk factors and therapy strategies of acute pulmonary edema (APE) in critically ill patients with multiple trauma.Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis with the clinical date of all the critically ill patients with multiple trauma treated in General ICU from Jan.2009 to Jan.2012.We compared the clinical characteristics of the patients with or without onset of APE.The patients with APE were divided into young group (≤55 yr.) or elderly group (>55 yr.),then the clinical data were analyzed between the two groups,includingthe level of hemoglobin (Hb),mean arterial pressure (MAP),central venous pressure (CVP),serum albumin (Alb),as well as complications,liquid balance during 1 week,3 d,1 d before the onset of APE.Results Among the 284 patients with multiple trauma,APE was detected in 47 patients (16.5%) for 68 times,29 (61.7%)in young group and 18 (38.3%) in elderly group.The ratio of acute renal failure (ARF) and systematic infection were significantly higher in the patients with APE (P<0.05).Hb,MAP,CVP,Alb and the ratio of ARF,severe infection,extremity lost were not statistically different (P>0.05) between young and elderly group,while the ratio of primary heart disease was significantly higher in elderly group (P<0.05).The net balance of liquid during 1 week,3 d and 1 d before the onset of APE was significantly higher in young group (P<0.05).Conclusion Mutiple Trauma patients with ARF are prone to encounter APE on the exist of infection and overburden of liquid; young patients tend to develop APE followed by liquid overburden,while elderly patients tend to develop APE because of poor primary heart condition even with more cautious fluid infusion.%目的 通过回顾性分析多发性创伤患者发生急性肺水肿(acute pulmonary edema,APE)的危险因素,为以后的临床实践提供一定参考.方法 对2009年1月至2012年1月间我院综合ICU收治的多发性创伤患者进行回顾性分析,比较未

  1. MAXILLOFACIAL TRAUMA MANAGEMENT IN POLYTRAUMATIZED PATIENTS – THE USE OF ADVANCED TRAUMA LIFE SUPPORT (ATLS PRINCIPLES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elitsa G. Deliverska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Management of the multiply injured patient requires a co-ordinated multi-disciplinary approach in order to optimise patients’ outcome. A working knowledge of the sort of problems these patients encounter is therefore vital to ensure that life-threatening injuries are recognised and treated in a timely pattern and that more minor associated injuries are not omitted. This article outlines the management of polytraumatized patients using the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS principles and highlights the areas of specific involvement of the engaged medical team. Advanced Trauma Life Support is generally regarded as the gold standard and is founded on a number of well known principles, but strict adherence to protocols may have its drawbacks when facial trauma co-exists. These can arise in the presence of either major or minor facial injuries, and oral and maxillofacial surgeons need to be aware of the potential problems.

  2. Illness denial questionnaire for patients and caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Ferrario S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Silvia Rossi Ferrario,1 Ines Giorgi,2 Paola Baiardi,3 Laura Giuntoli,4 Gianluigi Balestroni,1 Paola Cerutti,1 Marina Manera,2 Paola Gabanelli,2 Valentina Solara,5 Roberta Fornara,6 Michela Luisetti,1 Pierangela Omarini,1 Giovanna Omarini,1 Giulio Vidotto4 1Psychology Unit, Istituti Clinici Scientifici Maugeri SpA SB, Veruno, NO, Italy; 2Psychology Unit, 3Scientific Direction, Istituti Clinici Scientifici Maugeri SpA SB, Pavia, Italy; 4Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy; 5Department of Neurology, ALS Centre, “Maggiore della Carita`” University Hospital, Novara, Italy; 6Psychology Unit, SS Trinità Hospital, Borgomanero, NO, Italy Purpose: Interest in assessing denial is still present, despite the criticisms concerning its definition and measurement. We tried to develop a questionnaire (Illness Denial Questionnaire, IDQ assessing patients’ and caregivers’ denial in relation to their illness/disturbance. Patients and methods: After a preliminary study, a final version of 24 dichotomous items (true/false was selected. We hypothesized a theoretical model with three dimensions: denial of negative emotions, resistance to change, and conscious avoidance, the first two composing the actual Denial and the last representing an independent component of the illness denial behavior. The IDQ was administered to 400 subjects (219 patients and 181 caregivers together with the Anxiety–Depression Questionnaire – Reduced form (AD-R, in order to assess concurrent validity. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, internal consistency indices (Cronbach’s α and McDonald’s ω, and test–retest analysis were performed. Results: CFA and internal consistency indices (Cronbach’s α: 0.87–0.96 indicated a clear and meaningful three-factor structure of IDQ, for both patients and caregivers. Further analyses showed good concurrent validity, with Denial and its subscale negatively associated with anxiety and depression and

  3. Transient Unexplained Shock in 30-year-old Trauma Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmani, Farzad; Ebrahimi Bakhtavar, Hanieh; Shahsavari Nia, Kavous; Mohammadi, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Shock as an inadequate tissue perfusion is one of the frequent causes of death in trauma patients. In this context, there are various reasons for hemodynamic instability and shock including hypovolemic (hemorrhagic), obstructive (cardiac tamponade, tension pneumothorax), cardiogenic, neurogenic, and rarely septic. In the present report, a 30-year-old trauma patient with full clinical signs and symptoms of shock referred while had unknown origin; it was finally recognized as anaphylactic shock.

  4. Transient Unexplained Shock in 30-year-old Trauma Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Farzad; Ebrahimi Bakhtavar, Hanieh; Shahsavari Nia, Kavous; Mohammadi, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Shock as an inadequate tissue perfusion is one of the frequent causes of death in trauma patients. In this context, there are various reasons for hemodynamic instability and shock including hypovolemic (hemorrhagic), obstructive (cardiac tamponade, tension pneumothorax), cardiogenic, neurogenic, and rarely septic. In the present report, a 30-year-old trauma patient with full clinical signs and symptoms of shock referred while had unknown origin; it was finally recognized as anaphylactic shock.

  5. Fibrinogen concentrates for bleeding trauma patients: what is the evidence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Martin; Ostrowski, S R; Windeløv, N A

    2011-01-01

    A balanced transfusion of red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma and platelets are recommended for massively bleeding trauma patients. Fibrinogen concentrates could potentially lessen or replace the need for fresh frozen plasma and/or platelet transfusions.......A balanced transfusion of red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma and platelets are recommended for massively bleeding trauma patients. Fibrinogen concentrates could potentially lessen or replace the need for fresh frozen plasma and/or platelet transfusions....

  6. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland N. Dickerson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed.

  7. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Roland N

    2016-04-18

    Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed.

  8. Childhood Trauma and Chronic Illness in Adulthood: Mental Health and Socioeconomic Status as Explanatory Factors and Buffers

    OpenAIRE

    Mock, Steven E.; Susan M Arai

    2011-01-01

    Experiences of traumatic events in childhood have been shown to have long-term consequences for health in adulthood. With data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey we take a life course perspective of cumulative disadvantage and examine the potential role of mental health and socioeconomic status in adulthood as multiple mediators of the link between childhood trauma and chronic illness in adulthood. Mental health and socioeconomic status are also tested as buffers against the typic...

  9. Nutritional Assessment in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Hejazi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malnutrition is an important factor in the survival of critically ill patients. The purpose of the present study was to assess the nutritional status of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU on the days of admission and discharge via a detailed nutritional assessment. Methods: Totally, 125 patients were followed up from admission to discharge at 8ICUs in Shiraz, Iran. The patients’ nutritional status was assessed using subjective global assessment (SGA, anthropometric measurements, biochemical indices, and body composition indicators. Diet prescription and intake was also evaluated. Results: Malnutrition prevalence significantly increased on the day of discharge (58.62% compared to the day of admission (28.8% according to SGA (P<0.001. The patients’ weight, mid-upper-arm circumference, mid-arm muscle circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, and calf circumference decreased significantly as well (P<0.001. Lean mass weight and body cell mass also decreased significantly (P<0.001. Biochemical indices showed no notable changes except for magnesium, which decreased significantly (P=0.013. A negative significant correlation was observed between malnutrition on discharge day and anthropometric measurements. Positive and significant correlations were observed between the number of days without enteral feeding, days delayed from ICU admission to the commencement of enteral feeding, and the length of ICU stay and malnutrition on discharge day. Energy and protein intakes were significantly less than the prescribed diet (26.26% and 26.48%, respectively. Conclusion: Malnutrition on discharge day increased in the patients in the ICU according to SGA. Anthropometric measurements were better predictors of the nutritional outcome of our critically ill patients than were biochemical tests.

  10. Tranexamic Acid (TXA) in Trauma Patients: Barriers to Use among Trauma Surgeons and Emergency Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Tranexamic Acid (TXA) is currently the only drug with prospective clinical evidence supporting its use in bleeding trauma patients. We sought to better understand the barriers preventing its use and elicit suggestions to further its use in trauma patients in the state of Maryland. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study. Results. The overall response rate was 38%. Half of all participants reported being familiar with the CRASH-2 trial and MATTERs study. Half reported being aware of TXA as part of their institution's massive transfusion protocol. The majority of participants felt that TXA would have a significant positive impact on the survival of trauma patients. A majority also felt that the use of TXA would increase if its administration was the responsibility of both trauma surgeons and emergency physicians. Conclusion. Only half of responders reported being aware of TXA as being part of their institution's massive transfusion protocol. Lack of awareness of the clinical data supporting its use is a major barrier. However, most trauma providers and emergency physicians do have a favorable view of TXA and support its incorporation into massive transfusion protocols. We believe that more studies of this kind on both state and national level are needed.

  11. Prehospital care for multiple trauma patients in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maegele, Marc

    2015-01-01

    For the German speaking countries, Tscherne's definition of "polytrauma" which represents an injury of at least two body regions with one or a combination being life-threatening is still valid. The timely and adequate management including quick referral of the trauma patient into a designated trauma center may limit secondary injury and may thus improve outcomes already during the prehospital phase of care. The professional treatment of multiple injured trauma patients begins at the scene in the context of a well structured prehospital emergency medical system. The "Primary Survey" is performed by the emergency physician at the scene according to the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS)-concept. The overall aim is to rapidly assess and treat life-threatening conditions even in the absence of patient history and diagnosis ("treat-first-what-kills-first"). If no immediate treatment is necessary, a "Secondary Sur- vey" follows with careful and structured body examination and detailed assessment of the trauma mechanism. Massive and life-threatening states of hemorrhage should be addressed immediately even disregarding the ABCDE-scheme. Critical trauma patients should be referred without any delay ("work and go")toTR-DGU® certified trauma centers of the local trauma networks. Due to the difficult pre- hospital environment the number of quality studies in the field is low and, as consequence, the level of evidence for most recommendations is also low. Much information has been obtained from different care systems and the interchangeability of results is limited. The present article provides a synopsis of rec- ommendations for early prehospital care for the severely injured based upon the 2011 updated multi- disciplinary S3-Guideline "Polytrauma/Schwerstverletzten Behandlung", the most recently updated European Trauma guideline and the current PHTLS-algorithms including grades of recommendation whenever possible.

  12. Prehospital care for multiple trauma patients in Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marc Maegele

    2015-01-01

    For the German speaking countries,Tscherne's definition of "polytrauma" which represents an injury of at least two body regions with one or a combination being life-threatening is still valid.The timely and adequate management including quick referral of the trauma patient into a designated trauma center may limit secondary injury and may thus improve outcomes already during the prehospital phase of care.The professional treatment of multiple injured trauma patients begins at the scene in the context of a well structured prehospital emergency medical system.The "Primary Survey" is performed by the emergency physician at the scene according to the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS)-concept.The overall aim is to rapidly assess and treat life-threatening conditions even in the absence of patient history and diagnosis ("treat-first-what-kills-first").If no immediate treatment is necessary,a "Secondary Survey" follows with careful and structured body examination and detailed assessment of the trauma mechanism.Massive and life-threatening states of hemorrhage should be addressed immediately even disregarding the ABCDE-scheme.Critical trauma patients should be referred without any delay ("work and go") to TR-DGU(R) certified trauma centers of the local trauma networks.Due to the difficult prehospital environment the number of quality studies in the field is low and,as consequence,the level of evidence for most recommendations is also low.Much information has been obtained from different care systems and the interchangeability of results is limited.The present article provides a synopsis of recommendations for early prehospital care for the severely injured based upon the 2011 updated multidisciplinary S3-Guideline "Polytrauma/Schwerstverletzten Behandlung",the most recently updated European Trauma guideline and the current PHTLS-algorithms including grades of recommendation whenever possible.

  13. Trauma in patients with temporomandibular disorders: frequency and treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boever, J A; Keersmaekers, K

    1996-02-01

    Controversy exists on the aetiological importance and the effect of jaw macrotrauma (fractures excluded) on the occurrence of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of jaw injury in TMD patients and to compare the severity of the symptoms, the clinical characteristics and the treatment outcome in TMD patients with or without a history of trauma to the head and neck region directly linked to the onset of symptoms. The study sample included 400 consecutive TMD clinical patients. In 24.5% of patients the onset of the pain and dysfunction could be linked directly to the trauma, mainly whiplash accidents. No significant differences could be found between the two groups in daily recurrent headache, dizziness, neck pain, joint crepitation and pain in the joints. Maximal mouth opening was less than 20 mm in 14.3% of patients with a history of trauma and in 4.1% of those without such a history. According to the Helkimo dysfunction index (DI), more trauma than non-trauma TMD patients belonged to the severe dysfunction groups (DI 4 and 5) at first examination. The outcome of a conservative treatment procedure (counselling, occlusal splint, physiotherapy, occasionally occlusal therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs was not different between the two groups at the 1 year evaluation. The degree of maximal opening was similar: less than 20 mm in 3.7% and 2.2% in trauma and non-trauma patients respectively. Forty percent and 41% respectively were symptom free or had DI = 1. The results suggest that external trauma to the joint or to the jaw in general is an important initiating factor in the aetiology of TMD but also that the prognosis is favourable.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of Focused Abdominal Sonography for Trauma in blunt abdominal trauma patients in a trauma centre of Hong Kong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheung Kent Shek; Wong Hay Tai; Leung Ling Pong; Tsang Tat Chi; Leung Gilberto Ka Kit

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Focused Abdominal Sonography for Trauma (FAST) is widely used for the detection of intraperitoneal free fluids in patients suffering from blunt abdominal trauma (BAT).This study aimed at assessing the diagnostic accuracy of this investigation in a designated trauma centre.Methods: This was a retrospective study of BAT patients over a 6 year period seen in a trauma centre in Hong Kong.FAST findings were compared with laparotomy,abdominal computed tomography or autopsy findings,which served as the gold standard for presence of intrapcritoneal free fluids.The patients who did not have FAST or gold standard confirmatory test performed,had preexisting peritoneal fluid,died at resuscitation or had imcomplete documentation of FAST findings were excluded.The performance of FAST was expressed as sensitivity,specificity,predictive values (PV),likelihood ratios (LR) and accuracy.Results: FAST was performed in 302 patients and 153 of them were included in this analysis.The sensitivity,specificity,positive PV,negative PV,positive LR,negative LR and accuracy for FAST were respectively 50.0 %,97,3%,87.0%,84.6%,18.8,0.5 and 85.0%.FAST was found to be more sensitive in less severely injured patients and more specific in more severely injured patients.Conclusion: FAST is a reliable investigation iu the initial assessment of BAT patients.The diagnostic values of FAST could be affected by the severity of injury and staff training is needed to further enhance its effective use.

  15. Resuscitative goals and new strategies in severe trauma patient resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea-Guerrero, J J; Freire-Aragón, M D; Serrano-Lázaro, A; Quintana-Díaz, M

    2014-11-01

    Traumatic injuries represent a major health problem all over the world. In recent years we have witnessed profound changes in the paradigm of severe trauma patient resuscitation, new concepts regarding acute coagulopathy in trauma have been proposed, and there has been an expansion of specific commercial products related to hemostasis, among other aspects. New strategies in severe trauma management include the early identification of those injuries that are life threatening and require surgical hemostasis, tolerance of moderate hypotension, rational intravascular volume replacement, prevention of hypothermia, correction of acidosis, optimization of oxygen carriers, and identification of those factors required by the patient (fresh frozen plasma, platelets, tranexamic acid, fibrinogen, cryoprecipitates and prothrombin complex). However, despite such advances, further evidence is required to improve survival rates in severe trauma patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Pelvic and scrotal trauma: CT and triage of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezra, Navid; Afari, Arash; Wong, Jimmie

    2009-07-01

    Traumatic dislocation of the testicles was first reported during crush injury but is now more commonly related to motor vehicle accidents. Approximately 55 cases had been reported by 2003. Virtually no papers discuss the role of CT in the rapid diagnosis of penoscrotal trauma, although most polytrauma or "pelvic trauma" patients are rapidly evaluated by CT in the emergency room setting. As more patients with pelvic trauma are triaged and evaluated using CT scanners with greater multidetector capability, more patients will be seen with testicular injury. It is important for the emergency physicians, radiologists, and traumatologists not to overlook unsuspected cases of penoscrotal injury which are typically initially evaluated by history, physical exam, and ultrasound. We describe a recent case of initial diagnosis of bilateral testicular dislocation from blunt trauma using modern multidetector CT imaging technique.

  17. in Critically Ill Patients: Success and Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrate anticoagulation has risen in interest so it is now a real alternative to heparin in the ICUs practice. Citrate provides a regional anticoagulation virtually restricted to extracorporeal circuit, where it acts by chelating ionized calcium. This issue is particularly true in patients ongoing CRRT, when the “continuous” systemic anticoagulation treatment is per se a relevant risk of bleeding. When compared with heparin most of studies with citrate reported a longer circuit survival, a lower rate of bleeding complications, and transfused packed red cell requirements. As anticoagulant for CRRT, the infusion of citrate is prolonged and it could potentially have some adverse effects. When citrate is metabolized to bicarbonate, metabolic alkalosis may occur, or for impaired metabolism citrate accumulation leads to acidosis. However, large studies with dedicated machines have indeed demonstrated that citrate anticoagulation is well tolerated, safe, and an easy to handle even in septic shock critically ill patients.

  18. Remote psychotherapy for terminally ill cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluver, Jeffrey S; Schuyler, Dean; Frueh, B Christopher; Brescia, Frank; Arana, George W

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a feasibility study of remote psychotherapy in 10 terminally ill cancer patients with diagnoses of adjustment disorder or major depression. Subjects received six sessions of individual cognitive therapy with the same therapist. Sessions alternated between face-to-face sessions and remote sessions delivered by analogue videophone. After each therapy session, a brief questionnaire was used to evaluate the subjects' level of satisfaction with the session, sense of connectedness to the therapist and overall progress being made in the therapy. Nine patients completed the study. Of 53 completed therapy sessions, 21 were by videophone and 32 were conducted face to face. Participants reported strong positive perceptions and acceptance after almost all therapy sessions, regardless of service delivery mode. The study suggests that there may be a role for the delivery of psychotherapy using low-bandwidth videophones.

  19. Infections in critically ill burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, F; Mas, D; Rubio, M; Garcia-Hierro, P

    2016-04-01

    Severe burn patients are one subset of critically patients in which the burn injury increases the risk of infection, systemic inflammatory response and sepsis. The infections are usually related to devices and to the burn wound. Most infections, as in other critically ill patients, are preceded by colonization of the digestive tract and the preventative measures include selective digestive decontamination and hygienic measures. Early excision of deep burn wound and appropriate use of topical antimicrobials and dressings are considered of paramount importance in the treatment of burns. Severe burn patients usually have some level of systemic inflammation. The difficulty to differentiate inflammation from sepsis is relevant since therapy differs between patients with and those without sepsis. The delay in prescribing antimicrobials increases morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the widespread use of antibiotics for all such patients is likely to increase antibiotic resistance, and costs. Unfortunately the clinical usefulness of biomarkers for differential diagnosis between inflammation and sepsis has not been yet properly evaluated. Severe burn injury induces physiological response that significantly alters drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These alterations impact antimicrobials distribution and excretion. Nevertheless the current available literature shows that there is a paucity of information to support routine dose recommendations.

  20. Functional electrical stimulation improves brain perfusion in cranial trauma patients

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    Bárbara Juarez Amorim

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Demonstrate brain perfusion changes due to neuronal activation after functional electrical stimulation (FES. METHOD: It was studied 14 patients with hemiplegia who were submitted to a program with FES during fourteen weeks. Brain perfusion SPECT was performed before and after FES therapy. These patients were further separated into 2 groups according to the hemiplegia cause: cranial trauma and major vascular insults. All SPECT images were analyzed using SPM. RESULTS: There was a significant statistical difference between the two groups related to patient's ages and extent of hypoperfusion in the SPECT. Patients with cranial trauma had a reduction in the hypoperfused area and patients with major vascular insult had an increase in the hypoperfused area after FES therapy. CONCLUSION: FES therapy can result in brain perfusion improvement in patients with brain lesions due to cranial trauma but probably not in patients with major vascular insults with large infarct area.

  1. Thromboelastography-guided transfusion Therapy in the trauma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzel, Charice

    2013-04-01

    This article presents thromboelastography (TEG) as an important assay to incorporate into anesthesia practice for development of evidence-based therapy of trauma patients receiving blood transfusions. The leading cause of death worldwide results from trauma. Hemorrhage is responsible for 30% to 40% of trauma mortality and accounts for almost 50% of the deaths occurring in the initial 24 hours following the traumatic incident. On admission, 25% to 35% of trauma patients present with coagulopathy, which is associated with a sevenfold increase in morbidity and mortality. The literature supports that routine plasma-based routine coagulation tests, such as prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and international normalized ratio, are inadequate for monitoring coagulopathy and guided transfusion therapy in trauma patients. A potential solution is incorporating the use of the TEG assay into the care of trauma patients to render evidence-based therapy for patients requiring massive blood transfusions. Analysis with TEG provides a complete picture of hemostasis, which is far superior to isolated, static conventional tests. The result is a fast, well-designed, and precise diagnosis enabling more cost-effective treatment, improved clinical outcome, accurate use of blood products, and pharmaceutical therapies at the point of care.

  2. Disparities in oral cancer survival among mentally ill patients.

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    Ting-Shou Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many studies have reported excess cancer mortality in patients with mental illness. However, scant studies evaluated the differences in cancer treatment and its impact on survival rates among mentally ill patients. Oral cancer is one of the ten most common cancers in the world. We investigated differences in treatment type and survival rates between oral cancer patients with mental illness and without mental illness. METHODS: Using the National Health Insurance (NHI database, we compared the type of treatment and survival rates in 16687 oral cancer patients from 2002 to 2006. The utilization rate of surgery for oral cancer was compared between patients with mental illness and without mental illness using logistic regression. The Cox proportional hazards model was used for survival analysis. RESULTS: Oral cancer patients with mental disorder conferred a grave prognosis, compared with patients without mental illness (hazard ratios [HR] = 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.30-1.93; P<0.001. After adjusting for patients' characteristics and hospital characteristics, patients with mental illness were less likely to receive surgery with or without adjuvant therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 0.47; 95% CI = 0.34-0.65; P<0.001. In multivariate analysis, oral cancer patients with mental illness carried a 1.58-times risk of death (95% CI = 1.30-1.93; P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Oral cancer patients with mental illness were less likely to undergo surgery with or without adjuvant therapy than those without mental illness. Patients with mental illness have a poor prognosis compared to those without mental illness. To reduce disparities in physical health, public health strategies and welfare policies must continue to focus on this vulnerable group.

  3. Nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients

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    Dandagi Girish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The care of critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU is a primary component of modern medicine. ICUs create potential for recovery in patients who otherwise may not have survived. However, they may suffer from problems associated with of nosocomial infections. Nosocomial infections are those which manifest in patients 48 hours after admission to hospital. Nosocomial infections are directly related to diagnostic, interventional or therapeutic procedures a patient undergoes in hospital, and are also influenced by the bacteriological flora prevailing within a particular unit or hospital. Urinary tract infections are the most frequent nosocomial infection, accounting for more than 40% of all nosocomial infections. Critical care units increasingly use high technology medicine for patient care, hemodynamic monitoring, ventilator support, hemodialysis, parenteral nutrition, and a large battery of powerful drugs, particularly antibiotics to counter infection. It is indeed a paradox that the use of high-tech medicine has brought in its wake the dangerous and all too frequent complication of nosocomial infections

  4. Nutritional requirements of the critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Nuno André de Almeida; Marinho, Aníbal Defensor; Cançado, Luciana Ribeiro

    2012-09-01

    Given the inaccessibility of indirect calorimetry, intensive care units generally use predictive equations or recommendations that are established by international societies to determine energy expenditure. The aim of the present study was to compare the energy expenditure of critically ill patients, as determined using indirect calorimetry, to the values obtained using the Harris-Benedict equation. A retrospective observational study was conducted at the Intensive Care Unit 1 of the Centro Hospitalar do Porto. The energy requirements of hospitalized critically ill patients as determined using indirect calorimetry were assessed between January 2003 and April 2012. The accuracy (± 10% difference between the measured and estimated values), the mean differences and the limits of agreement were determined for the studied equations. Eighty-five patients were assessed using 288 indirect calorimetry measurements. The following energy requirement values were obtained for the different methods: 1,753.98±391.13 kcal/day (24.48 ± 5.95 kcal/kg/day) for indirect calorimetry and 1,504.11 ± 266.99 kcal/day (20.72±2.43 kcal/kg/day) for the Harris-Benedict equation. The equation had a precision of 31.76% with a mean difference of -259.86 kcal/day and limits of agreement between -858.84 and 339.12 kcal/day. Sex (p=0.023), temperature (p=0.009) and body mass index (p<0.001) were found to significantly affect energy expenditure. The Harris-Benedict equation is inaccurate and tends to underestimate energy expenditure. In addition, the Harris-Benedict equation is associated with significant differences between the predicted and true energy expenditure at an individual level.

  5. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients

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    Vitrat V

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Virginie Vitrat,1 Serge Hautefeuille,2 Cécile Janssen,1 David Bougon,2 Michel Sirodot,2 Leonardo Pagani1,3 1Antimicrobial Stewardship Program, Infectious Diseases Unit, 2Intensive Care Unit, Annecy-Genevois Hospital Center (CHANGE, Annecy, France; 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Bolzano Central Hospital, Bolzano, Italy Abstract: Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobial treatment. Diagnostic techniques have clearly improved in the last years and allow earlier identification of bacterial strains in some cases, but these techniques are still quite expensive and not readily available in all institutions. Moreover, the ever increasing rates of resistance to antimicrobials, especially in Gram-negative pathogens, are threatening the outcome for such patients because of the lack of effective medical treatment; ICU physicians are therefore resorting to combination therapies to overcome resistance, with the direct consequence of promoting further resistance. A more appropriate use of available antimicrobials in the ICU should be pursued, and adjustments in doses and dosing through pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have recently shown promising results in improving outcomes and reducing antimicrobial resistance. The aim of multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programs is to improve antimicrobial prescription, and in this review we analyze the available experiences of such programs carried out in ICUs, with emphasis on results, challenges, and pitfalls. Any effective intervention aimed at improving antibiotic usage in ICUs must be brought about at the present time; otherwise, we will face the challenge of intractable infections in critically ill patients in the near future. Keywords: ICU, antimicrobial therapies, antimicrobial stewardship, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, antimicrobial resistance, early diagnosis

  6. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in the pediatric trauma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, John K

    2017-02-01

    Although venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs in less than 1% of hospitalized pediatric trauma patients, care providers must make decisions about VTE prophylaxis on a daily basis. The consequences of VTE are significant; the risks of developing VTE are variable; and the effectiveness of prophylaxis against VTE is not conclusive in children. While the value of VTE prophylaxis is well defined in adult trauma care, it is unclear how this translates to the care of injured children. This review evaluates the incidence and risks of VTE in pediatric trauma and assesses the merits of prophylaxis in children. Pharmacologic prophylaxis against VTE is a reasonable strategy in critically injured adolescent trauma patients. Further study is needed to establish the risks and benefits of VTE prophylaxis across the spectrum of injured children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Childhood Trauma and Alexithymia in Patients with Conversion Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Anum; Yousaf, Aasma

    2016-07-01

    To determine the relationship between childhood trauma (physical, sexual, emotional abuse and neglect) and alexithymia in patients with conversion disorder, and to identify it as a predictor of alexithymia in conversion disorder. An analytical study. Multiple public sector hospitals in Lahore, from September 2012 to July 2013. Eighty women with conversion disorder were recruited on the basis of DSM IV-TR diagnostic criteria checklist to screen conversion disorder. Childhood abuse interview to measure childhood trauma and Bermond Vorst Alexithymia Questionnaire, DSM-IV TR Dianostic Criteria Checklist, and Childhood Abuse Interview to assess alexithymia were used, respectively. The mean age of the sample was 18 ±2.2 years. Thirty-six cases had a history of childhood trauma, physical abuse was the most reported trauma (f = 19, 23.8%) in their childhood. Patients with conversion disorder has a significant association with alexithymia (p conversion disorder. Strategies should be devised to reduce this disorder among women in Pakistani society.

  8. Extremes of shock index predicts death in trauma patients

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    Stephen R Odom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: We noted a bimodal relationship between mortality and shock index (SI, the ratio of heart rate to systolic blood pressure. Aims: To determine if extremes of SI can predict mortality in trauma patients. Settings and Designs: Retrospective evaluation of adult trauma patients at a tertiary care center from 2000 to 2012 in the United States. Materials and Methods: We examined the SI in trauma patients and determined the adjusted mortality for patients with and without head injuries. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression. Results: SI values demonstrated a U-shaped relationship with mortality. Compared with patients with a SI between 0.5 and 0.7, patients with a SI of 1.3 had an odds ratio of death of 3.1. (95% CI 1.6–5.9. Elevated SI is associated with increased mortality in patients with isolated torso injuries, and is associated with death at both low and high values in patients with head injury. Conclusion: Our data indicate a bimodal relationship between SI and mortality in head injured patients that persists after correction for various co-factors. The distribution of mortality is different between head injured patients and patients without head injuries. Elevated SI predicts death in all trauma patients, but low SI values only predict death in head injured patients.

  9. Prevalence of whiplash trauma in TMD patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggman-Henrikson, B; Rezvani, M; List, T

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to describe the prevalence of whiplash trauma in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and to describe clinical signs and symptoms in comorbid TMD/whiplash compared with TMD localised to the facial region. A systematic literature search of the PubMed, Cochrane Library and Bandolier databases was carried out for articles published from 1 January 1966 to 31 December 2012. The systematic search identified 129 articles. After the initial screening of abstracts, 32 articles were reviewed in full text applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Six studies on the prevalence of neck trauma in patients with TMD met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Two of the authors evaluated the methodological quality of the included studies. The reported prevalence of whiplash trauma ranged from 8·4% to 70% (median 35%) in TMD populations, compared with 1·7-13% in the non-TMD control groups. Compared with patients with TMD localised to the facial region, TMD patients with a history of whiplash trauma reported more TMD symptoms, such as limited jaw opening and more TMD pain, and also more headaches and stress symptoms. In conclusion, the prevalence of whiplash trauma is higher in patients with TMD compared with non-TMD controls. Furthermore, patients with comorbid TMD/whiplash present with more jaw pain and more severe jaw dysfunction compared with TMD patients without a history of head-neck trauma. These results suggest that whiplash trauma might be an initiating and/or aggravating factor as well as a comorbid condition for TMD.

  10. Analysis of Adult Trauma Patients Admitted to Emergency Department

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    Sema Puskulluoglu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Trauma is one of the most common reason of admissions to emergency departments. In this study, it was aimed to determine the demographic characteristics, etiology, morbidity and mortality rates and prognosis of adult trauma patients admitted to our emergency department (ED. Materials and Methods: Patients over the age of 18 years, who admitted to ED between 01 March 2011 and 31 August 2011 were included in this retrospective study. Patient examination cards, hospitalization files and records entered with ICD 10 codes to hospital automation system were analyzed. Patients with inaccessible data were excluded from the study. Results: During the study period, total number of 110495 patients admitted to ED, and 13585 (12,29% of them admitted with trauma. Simple extremity injuries (38,28% and falls (31,7% were most common etiological factors. Glasgow coma scales of 99,71% of the patients were between 13 and 15. Of the patients with trauma, 9,6% had a Computed Tomography (CT scan, and 84,5% of CT scans were evaluated as normal, and cranial CT was the most requested one. Only 6% of the patients were hospitalized, and 0,9% of the trauma patients died. Falls from height in females and traffic accidents in males were the leading causes of death. Conclusion: Most of the patients with simple traumas admitted to ED can be discharged from the hospital with a complete history and careful examination. The rate of unnecessary medical tests, loss of time and waste money should be reduced, and the time and labor allocated to severe patients can be increased by this way. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 569-579

  11. Geographic distribution of severely injured patients: implications for trauma system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesla, David J; Pracht, Etienne E; Cha, John Y; Langland-Orban, Barbara

    2012-09-01

    Despite decades of trauma system development, many severely injured patients fail to reach a trauma center for definitive care. The purpose of this study was to define the regions served by Florida's designated trauma centers and define the geographic distribution of severely injured patients who do not access the state's trauma system. Severely injured patients discharged from Florida hospitals were identified using the 2009 Florida Agency for Health Care Administration database. The home zip codes of patients discharged from trauma and nontrauma center hospitals were used as a surrogate for injury location and plotted on a map. A radial distance containing 75% of trauma center discharges defined trauma center catchment area. Only 52% of severely injured patients were discharged from trauma centers. The catchment areas varied from 204 square miles to 12,682 square miles and together encompassed 92% state's area. Although 93% of patients lived within a trauma center catchment area, the proportion treated at a trauma center in each catchment area varied from 13% to 58%. Mapping of patient residences identified regions of limited access to the trauma system despite proximity to trauma centers. The distribution of severely injured patients who do not reach trauma centers presents an opportunity for trauma system improvement. Those in proximity to trauma centers may benefit from improved and secondary triage guidelines and interfacility transfer agreements, whereas those distant from trauma centers may suggest a need for additional trauma system resources. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  12. The clinical role of glutamine supplementation in patients with multiple trauma: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Balushi, R M; Cohen, J; Banks, M; Paratz, J D

    2013-01-01

    Glutamine is considered an essential amino acid during stress and critical illness. Parenteral glutamine supplementation in critically ill patients has been shown to improve survival rate and minimise infectious complications, costs and hospital length-of-stay. However, glutamine supplementation in patients receiving enteral nutrition and the best method of administration are still controversial. The purpose of this article is to provide a narrative review of the current evidence and trials of enteral and parenteral glutamine supplementation in multiple trauma patients. A search in PubMed and EMBASE was conducted and relevant papers that investigated the effect of enteral or parenteral glutamine supplementation in patients with multiple trauma were reviewed. Although recent nutritional guidelines recommend that glutamine supplementation should be considered in these patients, further well-designed trials are required to provide a confirmed conclusion. Due to the inconclusive results of enteral glutamine supplementation trials in patients receiving enteral nutrition, future trials should focus on intravenous glutamine supplementation in patients requiring enteral nutrition and on major clinical outcome measures (e.g. mortality rate, infectious complications).

  13. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewlai, Rathachai; de Moya, Marc A.; Santos, Antonio; Asrani, Ashwin V.; Avery, Laura L.; Novelline, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI) suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI) at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG) and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an elevated CK-MB or abnormal echocardiography. There were 26 patients (19 men, mean age 45.1 years, mean ISS 34.4) in the study group; 20 had evidence of BCI. Of 52 patients in the control group (38 men, mean age 46.9 years, mean ISS 38.7), eighteen had evidence of BCI. There was a significantly higher rate of BCI in trauma patients with TAI versus those without TAI (77% versus 35%, P < 0.001). PMID:22046549

  14. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

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    Rathachai Kaewlai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an elevated CK-MB or abnormal echocardiography. There were 26 patients (19 men, mean age 45.1 years, mean ISS 34.4 in the study group; 20 had evidence of BCI. Of 52 patients in the control group (38 men, mean age 46.9 years, mean ISS 38.7, eighteen had evidence of BCI. There was a significantly higher rate of BCI in trauma patients with TAI versus those without TAI (77% versus 35%, P<0.001.

  15. Hypocaloric, high-protein nutrition therapy in older vs younger critically ill patients with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Roland N; Medling, Theresa L; Smith, Ashley C; Maish, George O; Croce, Martin A; Minard, Gayle; Brown, Rex O

    2013-01-01

    Older patients require more protein than younger patients to achieve anabolism, but age-associated renal dysfunction may limit the amount of protein that can be safely provided. This study examined whether older, critically ill trauma patients with obesity can safely achieve nitrogen equilibrium and have positive clinical outcomes similar to younger obese patients during hypocaloric, high-protein nutrition therapy. Adult patients with traumatic injury and obesity (body mass index [BMI] >30 kg/m(2)), admitted to the Presley Trauma Center from January 2009 to April 2011, were evaluated. Patients were targeted to receive hypocaloric, high-protein nutrition therapy (2 g/kg IBW/d of protein) for >10 days. Patients were stratified as older (≥60 years) or younger (18-59 years). Seventy-four patients (33 older, 41 younger) were studied. Older and younger patients were similar in BMI and injury severity. When given isonitrogenous regimens (2.3 ± 0.2 g/kg IBW/d), nitrogen balance was similar between older and younger patients (-3.2 ± 5.7 g/d vs -4.9 ± 9.0 g/d; P = .363). Older patients experienced a greater mean serum urea nitrogen concentration than younger patients (30 ± 14 mg/dL vs 20 ± 9 mg/dL; P = .001) during nutrition therapy. Clinical outcomes were not different between groups. Older critically ill trauma patients exhibited an equivalent net protein response as younger patients during hypocaloric, high-protein nutrition therapy. Older patients are at greater risk for developing azotemia. Close monitoring is warranted.

  16. Worthing Physiological Score vs Revised Trauma Score in Outcome Prediction of Trauma patients; a Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhjavan-Shahraki, Babak; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Hajighanbari, Mohammad Javad; Karimi, Parviz; Baikpour, Masoud; Mirzay Razaz, Jalaledin; Yaseri, Mehdi; Shahsavari, Kavous; Mahdizadeh, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Awareness about the outcome of trauma patients in the emergency department (ED) has become a topic of interest. Accordingly, the present study aimed to compare the rapid trauma score (RTS) and worthing physiological scoring system (WPSS) in predicting in-hospital mortality and poor outcome of trauma patients. Methods: In this comparative study trauma patients brought to five EDs in different cities of Iran during the year 2016 were included. After data collection, discriminatory power and calibration of the models were assessed and compared using STATA 11. Results: 2148 patients with the mean age of 39.50±17.27 years were included (75.56% males). The AUC of RTS and WPSS models for prediction of mortality were 0.86 (95% CI: 0.82-0.90) and 0.91 (95% CI: 0.87-0.94), respectively (p=0.006). RTS had a sensitivity of 71.54 (95% CI: 62.59-79.13) and a specificity of 97.38 (95% CI: 96.56-98.01) in prediction of mortality. These measures for the WPSS were 87.80 (95% CI: 80.38-92.78) and 83.45 (95% CI: 81.75-85.04), respectively. The AUC of RTS and WPSS in predicting poor outcome were 0.81 (95% CI: 0.77-0.85) and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85-0.92), respectively (p<0.0001). Conclusion: The findings showed a higher prognostic value for the WPSS model in predicting mortality and severe disabilities in trauma patients compared to the RTS model. Both models had good overall performance in prediction of mortality and poor outcome. PMID:28286838

  17. Adversarial growth in patients with multiple sclerosis and their partners: relationships with illness perceptions, disability and distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackroyd, Katie; Fortune, Dónal G; Price, Siân; Howell, Stephen; Sharrack, Basil; Isaac, Claire L

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and their partners show adversarial growth and to examine which psychological and disability variables contribute to this in patients and their partners. The study also investigated the relationship between growth and distress. Seventy-two patients with MS and their partners provided demographic information and completed measures of posttraumatic growth, illness perceptions, depression, cognitive function and disability. Both patients and partners showed adversarial growth, with patients reporting significantly higher growth than partners. The only significant predictor for patient growth was partner growth, and vice versa. Dissimilarity in illness representations between patients and their partners on the consequences of MS dimension, patient mood and patient growth accounted for significant variance in partner growth. The findings support the idea of a 'communal search for meaning' where patients and their partners experience the trauma of having a chronic illness and subsequently find positive aspects together.

  18. Intubated Trauma Patients Receiving Prolonged Antibiotics for Pneumonia despite Negative Cultures: Predictors and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Tyler J; Brakenridge, Scott C; Moore, Frederick A; Lemon, Stephen J; Nguyen, Linda L; Voils, Stacy A; Jordan, Janeen R; Croft, Chasen A; Smith, R Stephen; Efron, Phillip A; Mohr, Alicia M

    2016-12-01

    Despite the excellent negative predictive value of sterile respiratory cultures, antibiotics often are continued after negative endotracheal aspirate (ETA) or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for critically ill trauma patients. We hypothesized that persistent elevation of the Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score (CPIS) would predict continued antibiotic therapy after a negative respiratory culture for intubated trauma patients, and that prolonged antibiotics would provide no benefit. We performed a four-year retrospective cohort analysis (May 1, 2011-September 30, 2015), including patients from our trauma database with ETA or BAL, excluding patients with any infection other than pneumonia or bacteremia. Cultures with predictors of long-term antibiotic therapy. A series of 106 patients with negative cultures were included, of whom 61 had ≤5 d of antibiotics and 45 had >5 d of antibiotics. There were no differences in injury severity, head or chest trauma, initial CPIS, or subsequent culture results between the groups. Long-term antibiotic therapy did not affect intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS), ventilator days, hospital LOS, or death. Factors predicting long-term antibiotic therapy included development of a localized chest radiograph infiltrate (odds ratio [OR] 6.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7-28), CPIS >5 five days after culture (OR 6.1; 95% CI 1.2-32), and a colonized culture (OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.3-8.3). Long-term antibiotic therapy for intubated trauma patients with negative respiratory cultures provided no benefit and was predicted by development of a localized chest radiograph infiltrate, persistently elevated CPIS, and a contaminated/colonized culture. Although long-term antibiotic use did not worsen outcomes, better strategies are needed to diagnose pneumonia accurately and ensure timely discontinuation of antibiotics when appropriate.

  19. Neuropsychological assessment of patients with dementing illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Julie A; Ferman, Tanis J; Boeve, Bradley F; Smith, Glenn E

    2011-11-01

    Neuropsychological assessment has a distinct role in the detection and monitoring of cognitive and functional changes associated with dementing illness. Molecular, structural and functional neuroimaging studies have advanced our understanding of the anatomy and physiology underlying neurodegenerative disease; however, the overlap in pathological features of different dementia-associated diseases limits the information that can be obtained by these methods. Incorporation of information obtained from multiple sources can help to increase diagnostic and prognostic accuracy. Neuropsychological test findings provide unique value as biomarkers of dementia, as differentiators of disease topography and in the estimation of disease risk and trajectory. However, psychometric test properties--such as construct validity, stability and the use of appropriate norms--must be understood, because they influence both the application of neuropsychological tests and the interpretation of their results. Finally, measurement of cognitive strengths and weaknesses in patients at risk of dementia can be helpful to predict changes in functional abilities, design appropriate and effective interventions, and assist family and health-care providers in the planning of the patient's future care needs. This Review describes the key characteristics of neuropsychological testing in the assessment of patients at risk of dementia.

  20. US pediatric trauma patient unplanned 30-day readmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Krista K; Shi, Junxin; Xiang, Henry; Thakkar, Rajan K; Groner, Jonathan I

    2017-08-07

    We sought to determine readmission rates and risk factors for acutely injured pediatric trauma patients. We produced 30-day unplanned readmission rates for pediatric trauma patients using the 2013 National Readmission Database (NRD). In US pediatric trauma patients, 1.7% had unplanned readmissions within 30days. The readmission rate for patients with index operating room procedures was no higher at 1.8%. Higher readmission rates were seen in patients with injury severity scores (ISS)=16-24 (3.4%) and ISS ≥25 (4.9%). Higher rates were also seen in patients with LOS beyond a week, severe abdominal and pelvic region injuries (3.0%), crushing (2.8%) and firearm injuries (4.5%), and in patients with fluid and electrolyte disorders (3.9%). The most common readmission principal diagnoses were injury, musculoskeletal/integumentary diagnoses and infection. Nearly 39% of readmitted patients required readmission operative procedures. Most common were operations on the musculoskeletal system (23.9% of all readmitted patients), the integumentary system (8.6%), the nervous system (6.6%), and digestive system (2.5%). Overall, the readmission rate for pediatric trauma patients was low. Measures of injury severity, specifically length of stay, were most useful in identifying those who would benefit from targeted care coordination resources. This is a Level III retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Coping mediates the relationship between disease severity and illness intrusiveness among chronically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundt, Natalie E; Bensadon, Benjamin A; Stanley, Melinda A; Petersen, Nancy J; Kunik, Mark E; Kauth, Michael R; Cully, Jeffrey A

    2015-09-01

    Reducing perceptions of illness intrusiveness may improve quality of life and mental health among patients with cardiopulmonary disease. To better understand relationships between coping style, locus of control, perceived illness intrusiveness, and disease severity, we analyzed data from 227 older Veterans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or congestive heart failure. Regressions revealed illness intrusiveness to be associated with younger age and greater disease severity, less internal locus of control, and avoidant/emotion-focused coping. Avoidant/emotion-focused coping but not active coping mediated the relationship between illness severity and illness intrusiveness. Findings suggest that supportive psychological interventions may reduce illness intrusiveness by targeting an avoidant/emotion-focused coping style and associated behaviors. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Telehomecare for patients with multiple chronic illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Clare; Dusseault, Joanne J.; Dahrouge, Simone; Hogg, William; Lemelin, Jacques; Humber, Jennie

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the feasibility and efficacy of integrating home health monitoring into a primary care setting. DESIGN A mixed method was used for this pilot study. It included in-depth interviews, focus groups, and surveys. SETTING A semirural family health network in eastern Ontario comprising 8 physicians and 5 nurses caring for approximately 10 000 patients. PARTICIPANTS Purposeful sample of 22 patients chosen from the experimental group of 120 patients 50 years old or older in a larger randomized controlled trial (N = 240). These patients had chronic illnesses and were identified as being at risk based on objective criteria and physician assessment. INTERVENTIONS Between November 2004 and March 2006, 3 nurse practitioners and a pharmacist installed telehomecare units with 1 or more peripheral devices (eg, blood-pressure monitor, weight scale, glucometer) in patients’ homes. The nurse practitioners incorporated individualized instructions for using the unit into each patient’s care plan. Patients used the units every morning for collecting data, entering values into the system either manually or directly through supplied peripherals. The information was transferred to a secure server and was then uploaded to a secure Web-based application that allowed care providers to access and review it from any location with Internet access. The devices were monitored in the office on weekdays by the nurse practitioners. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Acceptance and use of the units, patients’ and care providers’ satisfaction with the system, and patients’ demographic and health characteristics. RESULTS All 22 patients, 12 men and 10 women with an average age of 73 years (range 60 to 88 years), agreed to participate. Most were retired, and a few were receiving community services. Common diagnoses included hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. All patients had blood pressure monitors installed, 11 had wired weight

  3. Visitation by physicians did not improve triage in trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm Burén, Lars Andreas; Daugaard, Morten; Larsen, Jens Rolighed

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: A formalized trauma response team is designed to optimize the quality and progress of patient care for severely injured patients in order to reduce mortality and morbidity. The goal of this study was to determine over- and undertriage and to evaluate if a physicianmanned pre......-hospital response (MD-EMS) would reduce overtriage. Overtriage was defined as the process of overestimating the level of injury sustained by an individual. Material and methods: This was a retrospective study. All patients admitted with trauma team activation (TTA) (n = 1,468) during a four-year period (2007......-2011) were included. Undertriage was estimated by assessing the fraction of major trauma patients (New Injury Severity Score (NISS) > 15) admitted to Viborg Regional Hospital in the project period without TTA. RESULTS : For each year, overtriage was 88.3% (2007), 89.9% (2008), 92.8% (2009) and 88.2% (2010...

  4. Visitation by physicians did not improve triage in trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm Burén, Lars Andreas; Daugaard, Morten; Larsen, Jens Rolighed

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: A formalized trauma response team is designed to optimize the quality and progress of patient care for severely injured patients in order to reduce mortality and morbidity. The goal of this study was to determine over- and undertriage and to evaluate if a physicianmanned pre......-hospital response (MD-EMS) would reduce overtriage. Overtriage was defined as the process of overestimating the level of injury sustained by an individual. Material and methods: This was a retrospective study. All patients admitted with trauma team activation (TTA) (n = 1,468) during a four-year period (2007......-2011) were included. Undertriage was estimated by assessing the fraction of major trauma patients (New Injury Severity Score (NISS) > 15) admitted to Viborg Regional Hospital in the project period without TTA. RESULTS : For each year, overtriage was 88.3% (2007), 89.9% (2008), 92.8% (2009) and 88.2% (2010...

  5. Traumatic testicular dislocation after minor trauma in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzek, Brett A; Linklater, Derek R

    2013-10-01

    Traumatic dislocation of the testicle is a rare injury that may result from blunt abdominopelvic trauma. The majority of cases reportedly occur in young adults secondary to severe scrotal trauma during high-speed motorcycle crashes. Our review of the available English medical literature revealed only one pediatric case. We present a case of pediatric testicular dislocation and torsion resulting from minor abdominopelvic trauma. The case report is followed by a brief review of the available literature. A 10-year-old boy presented to the Pediatric Emergency Department with abdominal pain. He had suffered a strike to the abdomen and groin during an attempt at flipping over a "monkey bar" at school. A tender mass was found in his right inguinal canal and the genital examination revealed an empty right hemiscrotum. Bedside ultrasonography was used to locate the testicle and it was noted by color-flow Doppler to lack demonstrable blood flow. The patient was taken emergently to the operating room, where he underwent orchiopexy and hernia repair after a viable testicle was found. He had a subsequently uneventful recovery. Although rare, testicular dislocation may be a serious result of abdominopelvic trauma. Emergency providers who care for trauma patients must include this condition in their differential diagnosis; to do otherwise risks a delay in diagnosis that may affect testicular viability. In this case, testicular dislocation may have resulted from the combination of trauma and a previously undiagnosed indirect inguinal hernia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Addressing the Impact of Trauma before Diagnosing Mental Illness in Child Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Gene; McClelland, Gary; Holzberg, Mark; Stolbach, Bradley; Maj, Nicole; Kisiel, Cassandra

    2011-01-01

    Congress set requirements for child welfare agencies to respond to emotional trauma associated with child maltreatment and removal. In meeting these requirements, agencies should develop policies that address child trauma. To assist in policy development, this study analyzes more than 14,000 clinical assessments from child welfare in Illinois.…

  7. Addressing the Impact of Trauma before Diagnosing Mental Illness in Child Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Gene; McClelland, Gary; Holzberg, Mark; Stolbach, Bradley; Maj, Nicole; Kisiel, Cassandra

    2011-01-01

    Congress set requirements for child welfare agencies to respond to emotional trauma associated with child maltreatment and removal. In meeting these requirements, agencies should develop policies that address child trauma. To assist in policy development, this study analyzes more than 14,000 clinical assessments from child welfare in Illinois.…

  8. Predictors of pneumonia in trauma patients with pulmonary contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Todd J; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary S; Baker, Larry J; Smith, Hayden L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to determine assessable risk levels for pneumonia in trauma patients with pulmonary contusion. A retrospective review and analysis of national trauma data of patients with pulmonary contusion were identified to develop a risk assessment model. Trauma data for 2007 were used to determine risk factors for subsequent complication of pneumonia in pulmonary contusion patients. Available patient comorbidities were considered in model development. Next, 2008 data were used to test and finalize model. Pneumonia risk was categorized into 3 ordinal levels, based on equal-sized proportions of pulmonary contusion patients. Significant risk factors for pneumonia included age, gender, pulse rate, systolic blood pressure, obesity, Glasgow Coma Scale motor score, and ventilation on admission. The final risk adjustment model had good fit and discrimination. Study analyses used more than 40 000 trauma patient data to devise assessable risk levels for pneumonia in pulmonary contusion diagnosed patients. Study data can assist in direction of care and triaging of urgent care patients at risk of pneumonia, possibly leading to mitigation and prevention of pneumonia in at risk patients. Further review of study outcomes should occur to fully understand applicability and usefulness in urgent settings.

  9. Anemia and Blood Transfusions in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kamran Athar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is common in critically ill patients. As a consequence packed red blood cell (PRBC transfusions are frequent in the critically ill. Over the past two decades a growing body of literature has emerged, linking PRBC transfusion to infections, immunosuppression, organ dysfunction, and a higher mortality rate. However, despite growing evidence that risk of PRBC transfusion outweighs its benefit, significant numbers of critically ill patients still receive PRBC transfusion during their intensive care unit (ICU stay. In this paper, we summarize the current literature concerning the impact of anemia on outcomes in critically ill patients and the potential complications of PRBC transfusions.

  10. Copeptin Predicts Mortality in Critically Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Honeder, Maria C.; Lenz, Max; Maurer, Gerald; Wojta, Johann; Heinz, Gottfried; Huber, Kurt; Speidl, Walter S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients admitted to a medical intensive care unit exhibit a high mortality rate irrespective of the cause of admission. Besides its role in fluid and electrolyte balance, vasopressin has been described as a stress hormone. Copeptin, the C-terminal portion of provasopressin mirrors vasopressin levels and has been described as a reliable biomarker for the individual’s stress level and was associated with outcome in various disease entities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission are associated with 30-day mortality. Methods In this single-center prospective observational study including 225 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary medical ICU at a university hospital, blood was taken at ICU admission and copeptin levels were measured using a commercially available automated sandwich immunofluorescent assay. Results Median acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score was 20 and 30-day mortality was 25%. Median copeptin admission levels were significantly higher in non-survivors as compared with survivors (77.6 IQR 30.7–179.3 pmol/L versus 45.6 IQR 19.6–109.6 pmol/L; p = 0.025). Patients with serum levels of copeptin in the third tertile at admission had a 2.4-fold (95% CI 1.2–4.6; p = 0.01) increased mortality risk as compared to patients in the first tertile. When analyzing patients according to cause of admission, copeptin was only predictive of 30-day mortality in patients admitted due to medical causes as opposed to those admitted after cardiac surgery, as medical patients with levels of copeptin in the highest tertile had a 3.3-fold (95% CI 1.66.8, p = 0.002) risk of dying independent from APACHE II score, primary diagnosis, vasopressor use and need for mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission independently predict 30-day mortality in patients admitted to a medical ICU. PMID:28118414

  11. Language barrier leads to the unnecessary intubation of trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Michael R; Goettler, Claudia E; Schenarts, Paul J; Collins, Beth A; Toschlog, Eric A; Sagraves, Scott G; Rotondo, Michael F

    2004-09-01

    Airway evaluation in trauma patients is performed immediately upon patient contact, with communication being a vital component to this exam. Language and communication barriers may lead to the unnecessary placement of an artificial airway with resultant patient risk and elevation of health care costs. The objective of our study was to evaluate potentially preventable intubations in Spanish-speaking patients. A 9-year retrospective review was performed using the National Trauma Registry for The American College of Surgeons (NTRACS) database. We evaluated patients intubated on arrival to the trauma center and remaining intubated for less than 48 hours. Deaths were excluded. Patients who typically speak English were compared with patients who typically speak Spanish. Mechanism of injury (MOI), hypotension during resuscitation (HDR), illicit substance use, alcohol use, mean Glasgow Coma Score (GCS), mean Injury Severity Score (ISS), payer source, and hospital cost were compared. Forty-nine per cent and 38 per cent of Spanish and English speaking individuals, respectively, were intubated for less than 48 hours (P = 0.072). MOI, HDR, ISS, illicit substance use, alcohol use, and payer source were similar. GCS was statistically higher in the Spanish-speaking group (14 vs 12; P = 0.004). Language and communication barriers lead to potentially preventable intubations in trauma patients.

  12. Evaluation of Wireless Vital Signs Monitor in Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    segment elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients). An additional 23 prehospital patients were excluded because of missing or incomplete data...or new algorithms based on non-invasively measured vital signs or other physiologic variables, that could aid in the triage and diagnosis of trauma

  13. Secondary sclerosing cholangitis in a critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Krista E; Willmann, Juergen K; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Desser, Terry S

    2016-04-01

    Critically ill patients are commonly imaged for liver dysfunction. An often fatal condition, secondary sclerosing cholangitis, is an important and likely under-recognized hepatic condition in these patients. In presenting this case report, we hope to raise awareness of this condition amongst radiologists as well as other physicians caring for the critically ill.

  14. Coagulopathy and plasma transfusion in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.A. Müller

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we studied the value of viscoelastic tests (TEG/ROTEM) to assess coagulation status in different critically ill patient populations. In addition, we investigated the effects of prophylactic fresh frozen plasma (FFP) transfusion in critically ill patients with a coagulopathy. Furtherm

  15. [Objective assessment of trauma severity in patients with spleen injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, V S; Ivanov, V A; Alekseev, S V; Vaniukov, V P

    2013-01-01

    The work presents an analysis of condition severity of 139 casualties with isolated and combined spleen injuries on admission to a surgical hospital. The assessment of condition severity was made using the traditional gradation and score scale VPH-SP. The degree of the severity of combined trauma of the spleen was determined by the scales ISS. The investigation showed that the scale ISS and VPH-SP allowed objective measurement of the condition severity of patients with spleen trauma. The score assessment facilitated early detection of the severe category of the patients, determined the diagnostic algorithm and the well-timed medical aid.

  16. Ketamine for analgosedation in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erstad, Brian L; Patanwala, Asad E

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this narrative review is to provide practical and useful guidance for clinicians considering the use of intravenous ketamine for its analgosedative properties in adult, critically ill patients. MEDLINE was searched from inception until January 2016. Articles related to the pharmacological properties of ketamine were retrieved. Information pertaining to pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, dosing regimens, adverse effects, and outcomes was obtained from relevant studies. Although the primary mechanism for ketamine's pharmacological effects is N-methyl-d-aspartate blockade, there are several potential mechanisms of action. It has a very large volume of distribution due to its lipophilicity, which can lead to drug accumulation with sustained infusions. Ketamine has several advantages compared with conventional sedatives such as preserving pharyngeal and laryngeal protective reflexes, lowering airway resistance, increasing lung compliance, and being less likely to produce respiratory depression. It causes sympathetic stimulation, which is also unlike other sedatives and analgesics. There are psychotomimetic effects, which are a concern in terms of delirium. Dosing and monitoring recommendations are provided. Ketamine has a unique pharmacological profile compared with more traditional agents such as opioids, which makes it an appealing alternative agent for analgosedation in the intensive care unit setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Maxillofacial intervention in trauma patients aged 60 years and older

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhashraj K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of trauma victims of age 60 years and older who required maxillofacial intervention. The study analyses the pattern of injuries and the various factors that predict the treatment plan of these patients. A retrospective study was carried out in 1820 trauma patients who reported to the Sri. Ramachandra Dental College and Hospital and required maxillofacial intervention, over a period of 5 years (October 2000 and September 2005. Of the total trauma victims, 185 patients were found to be aged 60 years more. In the majority of the patients, the injury was due to road traffic accidents (79.4%. Males (72.4% sustained more injuries than females (27.6%. Soft tissue injuries were seen in 49.1% of the patients, while 14% had mandibular fractures. People in their early 60s were injured more often than their older counterparts. The findings of this study highlight the present situation with regard to maxillofacial trauma in patients aged 60 years and older and its management in this part of the country.

  18. [Mental disorder and suicide prevention in patients with physical illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Masatoshi; Ohtsuki, Tsuyuka

    2012-01-01

    Suicide rate in Japan is 25/100,000 in a year. The rate is higher than those in other developed countries. Physical illness is a risk factor for suicide. To prevent suicide in patients with physical illness, identification of mental illness, such as depression, is important. In addition, palliative care for distressing physical and psychological symptoms is also important. In process of identification of mental illness and distressing physical symptoms, communications between medical staff and patients are essential. Enhancing communication skills of medical staff may be a key point to prevent suicide.

  19. Hemoperitoneum in cirrhotic patients without abdominal trauma or tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Ji Ma; En-Qiang Chen; Jia-Jie Lu; Ming-Zhen Tan; Hong Tang

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemoperitoneum is associated with several emergency conditions and is especially evident when it occurs in patients with liver cirrhosis. This study aimed to assess the clinical characteristics of cirrhotic patients who did not have abdominal trauma or tumor but who developed hemoperitoneum. METHODS: Wereviewedtheclinicalrecordsof1276consecutive cirrhotic patients with hemoperitoneum at our center between January 2007 and December 2009. Hemoperitoneum was confirmed by abdominal paracentesis. RESULTS: Of the 1276 cirrhotic patients, 19 were found to have hemoperitoneum, but only 6 did not have abdominal trauma or tumor. The occurrence of spontaneous hemoperitoneum in the cirrhotic patients was therefore 0.5%. Hemoperitoneum can occur spontaneously in severely decompensated cirrhotic patients with intra-abdominal collateral vessels and high scores on the model for end-stage liver disease and Child-Pugh-Turcotte test. Most patients presented with abdominal distension, abdominal pain, increased abdominal girth and hemodynamic instability with a significant drop in the hemoglobin level. Three patients died of hemorrhagic shock within 24 hours, and the other 3 died of hepatic encephalopathy or spontaneous bacterial peritonitis after 5 to 10 days because of further decompensation of the liver. CONCLUSIONS: Hemoperitoneum can occur in cirrhotic patients who do not have abdominal trauma or tumor. It mainly occurs in severely decompensated end-stage cirrhotic patients. Cirrhotic patients with hemoperitoneum have a poor prognosis.

  20. Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, A B

    1991-03-01

    The need for planning and development of statewide trauma prevention and trauma service systems is or should be a high priority--if one sets priorities on criteria that address important factors such as cost to benefits in reduction of life years lost and reduction of disability and costs of long-term rehab services, etc. Prevention of injury and first class trauma care will lessen our heavy human burdens (loss of life and disability) and reduce our long-term outlays for rehabilitation, etc. Obviously our first line of intervention should be prevention--all educational, regulatory and automatic protectors (seat belts, gun restrictions, air bags) that will lower injury rates. A state trauma system must be planned for the larger universe than individual institutions or communities. We must educate our public that the only practical way to provide services for major trauma is through regionalized systems that they somehow must help support. The recent emphasis on making the health services industry a "competitive market" has discouraged public interest and support for regionalized health systems. Our best chances for funding such systems are probably through user fees, sin taxes and surcharges on fines, etc. We need the elements or principles of a plan and present it to the public and to their representatives in the courthouses, city halls and state capital of our state. We need to generate public discussion and understanding on the problem, the potential for saving lives and preventing disability. To do any less would mean our failure to meet our duties as health professionals and public health officials.

  1. Illness Beliefs Predict Mortality in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedhara, Kavita; Dawe, Karen; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Wetherell, Mark A.; Cullum, Nicky; Dayan, Colin; Drake, Nicola; Price, Patricia; Tarlton, John; Weinman, John; Day, Andrew; Campbell, Rona; Reps, Jenna; Soria, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients’ illness beliefs have been associated with glycaemic control in diabetes and survival in other conditions. Objective We examined whether illness beliefs independently predicted survival in patients with diabetes and foot ulceration. Methods Patients (n = 169) were recruited between 2002 and 2007. Data on illness beliefs were collected at baseline. Data on survival were extracted on 1st November 2011. Number of days survived reflected the number of days from date of recruitment to 1st November 2011. Results Cox regressions examined the predictors of time to death and identified ischemia and identity beliefs (beliefs regarding symptoms associated with foot ulceration) as significant predictors of time to death. Conclusions Our data indicate that illness beliefs have a significant independent effect on survival in patients with diabetes and foot ulceration. These findings suggest that illness beliefs could improve our understanding of mortality risk in this patient group and could also be the basis for future therapeutic interventions to improve survival. PMID:27096609

  2. Impact of Beta-Blockers on Nonhead Injured Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, Leah E; Schroeppel, Thomas J; Sharpe, John P; Alsbrook, Diana; Magnotti, Louis J; Weinberg, Jordan A; Johnson, Benjamin P; Lewis, Richard H; Clement, L Paige; Croce, Martin A; Fabian, Timothy C

    2016-07-01

    Catecholamine surge after traumatic injury may lead to dysautonomia with increased morbidity. Small retrospective studies have shown potential benefit of beta-blockers (BB) in trauma patients with and without traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study evaluates a large multiply injured cohort without TBI that received BB. Patients were identified from the trauma registry from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2011. Patients who received >1 dose of BB were compared to controls. Patients with TBI, length of stay (LOS) ratio (OR) 0.952; confidence interval (CI) 0.620-1.461]. In conclusion, in this largest study to date, patients receiving BB were older, more severely injured, and had a higher mortality. Unlike TBI patients, multivariable regression showed no benefit from BB in this population.

  3. Management of paroxysmal atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia in the critically ill surgical patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, O C; Windsor, J; Wedderburn, R; Gomez, E; Shatz, D V; Hudson-Civetta, J; Komanduri, S; Civetta, J M

    1997-05-01

    Paroxysmal atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia is an infrequently encountered supraventricular arrhythmia that continues to present difficult management problems in the critically ill surgical patient. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new treatment algorithm involving the sequential administration of different classes of antiarrhythmic agents until conversion to sinus rhythm was achieved. Nonrandomized, consecutive, protocol-driven descriptive cohort. University hospital surgical and trauma intensive care unit (ICU). During an 11-month period, we prospectively evaluated all hemodynamically stable patients who sustained new-onset atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia. Vagal maneuver, followed by the rapid, sequential infusion of antiarrhythmic agents (i.e., adenosine, verapamil, and esmolol, respectively) until the arrhythmia was terminated. Twenty-seven patients (4% of all admissions) were evaluated, including 16 trauma patients (injury Severity Score of 20 +/- 8) and 11 general surgical patients (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 17 +/- 7). Time from ICU admission to onset of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia was 4.5 +/- 5 days (median 2.5). Arrhythmia termination was achieved in all patients within minutes (mean 13 +/- 10 [SD]). Incremental sequential adenosine administration alone, however, was successful in affecting conversion to sinus rhythm in only 44% of initial episodes of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (95% confidence interval 21% to 67%). A total of 14 (52%) patients developed 38 relapses of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia in the ICU after initial conversion to sinus rhythm. These relapses required additional antiarrhythmic therapy. Adenosine was only effective in 34% of the relapses (95% confidence interval 17% to 53%). Seven (50%) of these 14 patients developed multiple relapses. However, only two patients were receiving suppressive calcium-channel or

  4. Effect of a brief intervention for alcohol and illicit drug use on trauma recidivism in a cohort of trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordovilla-Guardia, Sergio; Fernández-Mondéjar, Enrique; Vilar-López, Raquel; Navas, Juan F; Portillo-Santamaría, Mónica; Rico-Martín, Sergio; Lardelli-Claret, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Estimate the effectiveness of brief interventions in reducing trauma recidivism in hospitalized trauma patients who screened positive for alcohol and/or illicit drug use. Dynamic cohort study based on registry data from 1818 patients included in a screening and brief intervention program for alcohol and illicit drug use for hospitalized trauma patients. Three subcohorts emerged from the data analysis: patients who screened negative, those who screened positive and were offered brief intervention, and those who screened positive and were not offered brief intervention. Follow-up lasted from 10 to 52 months. Trauma-free survival, adjusted hazard rate ratios (aHRR) and adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) were calculated, and complier average causal effect (CACE) analysis was used. We found a higher cumulative risk of trauma recidivism in the subcohort who screened positive. In this subcohort, an aHRR of 0.63 (95% CI: 0.41-0.95) was obtained for the group offered brief intervention compared to the group not offered intervention. CACE analysis yielded an estimated 52% reduction in trauma recidivism associated with the brief intervention. The brief intervention offered during hospitalization in trauma patients positive for alcohol and/or illicit drug use can halve the incidence of trauma recidivism.

  5. Effect of a brief intervention for alcohol and illicit drug use on trauma recidivism in a cohort of trauma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Mondéjar, Enrique; Vilar-López, Raquel; Navas, Juan F.; Portillo-Santamaría, Mónica; Rico-Martín, Sergio; Lardelli-Claret, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Objective Estimate the effectiveness of brief interventions in reducing trauma recidivism in hospitalized trauma patients who screened positive for alcohol and/or illicit drug use. Methods Dynamic cohort study based on registry data from 1818 patients included in a screening and brief intervention program for alcohol and illicit drug use for hospitalized trauma patients. Three subcohorts emerged from the data analysis: patients who screened negative, those who screened positive and were offered brief intervention, and those who screened positive and were not offered brief intervention. Follow-up lasted from 10 to 52 months. Trauma-free survival, adjusted hazard rate ratios (aHRR) and adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) were calculated, and complier average causal effect (CACE) analysis was used. Results We found a higher cumulative risk of trauma recidivism in the subcohort who screened positive. In this subcohort, an aHRR of 0.63 (95% CI: 0.41–0.95) was obtained for the group offered brief intervention compared to the group not offered intervention. CACE analysis yielded an estimated 52% reduction in trauma recidivism associated with the brief intervention. Conclusion The brief intervention offered during hospitalization in trauma patients positive for alcohol and/or illicit drug use can halve the incidence of trauma recidivism. PMID:28813444

  6. Predictors of assault among urban female trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Periyanayagam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assault is a common mechanism of injury among female trauma victims. This paper identifies risk factors for assault in female victims and explores the interplay between identified predictors of assault and their combined contribution to female violent victimization. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of all female trauma patients was performed using the Illinois Department of Public Health Trauma Registry from 1999-2003. Patients with assault listed as their mechanism of injury were compared to patients with other mechanisms of injury. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed using STATA statistical software to identify independent risk factors for assault. Finally, interaction affects were studied among these identified risk factors. Results: Female victims of assault were more likely to be African American (OR 1.32, P < 0.001, lack insurance (OR 1.79, P < 0.001, and to have tested positive for drugs (OR 1.32, P < 0.001 than women with other mechanisms of injury. In addition to the independent effects of these variables, patient drug use and lack of insurance demonstrated interaction effects (OR 1.67, P = 0.02. Conclusion: In this study, women of color, the uninsured, and those using drugs were disproportionately represented among assault victims, highlighting further evidence of trauma disparities. Most significantly, this study demonstrates that predictors of assault in women frequently coexist and both independently and in combination may increase the risk for female violent victimization.

  7. 'Blind' transfusion of blood products in exsanguinating trauma patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geeraedts, L.M.G.; Demiral, H.; Schaap, N.P.M.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Pompe, J.C.; Frolke, J.P.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In trauma, as interventions are carried out to stop bleeding, ongoing resuscitation with blood products is of vital importance. As transfusion policy in exsanguinating patients cannot be based on laboratory tests, transfusion of blood products is performed empirically or 'blindly'. The a

  8. Factors affecting mortality of critical care trauma patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... Intensive Care Unit, Al-Ain Hospital, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates. Abstract ... Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to compare patients who died and who did not. Gender, age ... AIS for the chest and head injuries and the ISS were studied. ... Trauma is a major health problem in the United Arab.

  9. Do illness perceptions predict health outcomes in primary care patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frostholm, Lisbeth; Oernboel, Eva; Christensen, Kaj S

    2007-01-01

    patients, (2) patients without chronic disorders presenting physical disease, and (3) patients presenting medically unexplained symptoms (MUS). RESULTS: Negative illness perceptions were associated with poor physical and mental health at baseline. They most strongly predicted changes in health status......OBJECTIVE: Little is known about whether illness perceptions affect health outcomes in primary care patients. The aim of this study was to examine if patients' illness perceptions were associated with their self-rated health in a 2-year follow-up period. METHODS: One thousand seven hundred eighty......-five primary care patients presenting a new or recurrent health problem completed an adapted version of the illness perception questionnaire and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) at baseline and 3, 12, and 24 months' follow-up. Linear regressions were performed for (1) all...

  10. Base deficit-based predictive modeling of outcome in trauma patients admitted to intensive care units in dutch trauma centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, Frank; Bijlsma, Taco S.; Liem, Mike S. L.; Meeuwis, J. Dik; Leenen, Luke P. H.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, the base deficit is available as an objective indicator of acid base status. We used the base deficit as a measure of physiologic derangement in a Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS)-like model as a predictor for outcome in trauma patients. Methods: We prospectively recor

  11. Nutrition support in traumatic and critically illed patients%创伤和危重症的营养支持

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏枭

    2001-01-01

    目的探讨创伤和危重症营养支持的规律。方法对240例创伤和危重症患者的临床资料进行回顾性的分析。创伤190例包括多发伤126例,复合伤35例;危重症(非外伤性)50例。结果 213例存活,27例死亡。创伤合并MODS 62例,56例予PN,死亡2例;EN 6例,死亡2例。结论创伤和危重症的救治中,营养支持(代谢支持、代谢调理)特别重要,直接影响患者的康复和预后。%Objective To study the law of nutrition support on trauma and critical illness,to prevent immunodysfunction,incurable infection and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome resulting from nutrition failure. Methods Retrospective analysis on 240 cases of trauma and critical illness.Trauma group included 126 polytrauma,35 compound injury;non-trauma group included 50 critical illness. Results 213 recovered,27 died.62 cases trauma complicated with MODS,52 were given TPN,12 died;6 were offered EN,2 died. Conclusions Nutrition support (metabolic support,metabolic intervention) was important for curing trauma and critical illness.TPN was given to provide enough substrate benificial to recovery.With patients' condition improved,early enteral feed should be taken to made better amelioration.

  12. Occult pneumothoraces in patients with penetrating trauma: Does mechanism matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Chad G.; Dente, Christopher J.; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Shah, Amit D.; Rajani, Ravi R.; Wyrzykowski, Amy D.; Vercruysse, Gary A.; Rozycki, Grace S.; Nicholas, Jeffrey M.; Salomone, Jeffrey P.; Feliciano, David V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Supine anteroposterior (AP) chest radiography is an insensitive test for detecting posttraumatic pneumothoraces (PTXs). Computed tomography (CT) often identifies occult pneumothoraces (OPTXs) not diagnosed by chest radiography. All previous literature describes the epidemiology of OPTX in patients with blunt polytrauma. Our goal was to identify the frequency of OPTXs in patients with penetrating trauma. Methods All patients with penetrating trauma admitted over a 10-year period to Grady Memorial Hospital with a PTX were identified. We reviewed patients’ thoracoabdominal CT scans and corresponding chest radiographs. Results Records for 1121 (20%) patients with a PTX (penetrating mechanism) were audited; CT imaging was available for 146 (13%) patients. Of these, 127 (87%) had undergone upright chest radiography. The remainder (19 patients) had a supine AP chest radiograph. Fifteen (79%) of the PTXs detected on supine AP chest radiographs were occult. Only 10 (8%) were occult when an upright chest radiograph was used (p thoracostomy, compared with 95% (115/121) of patients with overt PTXs (p thoracostomy use in patients with overt PTXs is significantly higher than for OPTXs in blunt and penetrating trauma. PMID:20646399

  13. Pediatric trauma BIG score: Predicting mortality in polytraumatized pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abd El-Aziz El-Gamasy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trauma is a worldwide health problem and the major cause of death and disability, particularly affecting the young population. It is important to remember that pediatric trauma care has made a significant improvement in the outcomes of these injured children. Aim of the Work: This study aimed at evaluation of pediatric trauma BIG score in comparison with New Injury Severity Score (NISS and Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS in Tanta University Emergency Hospital. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in Tanta University Emergency Hospital to all multiple trauma pediatric patients attended to the Emergency Department for 1 year. Pediatric trauma BIG score, PTS, and NISS scores were calculated and results compared to each other and to observed mortality. Results: BIG score ≥12.7 has sensitivity 86.7% and specificity 71.4%, whereas PTS at value ≤3.5 has sensitivity 63.3% and specificity 68.6% and NISS at value ≥39.5 has sensitivity 53.3% and specificity 54.3%. There was a significant positive correlation between BIG score value and mortality rate. Conclusion: The pediatric BIG score is a reliable mortality-prediction score for children with traumatic injuries; it uses international normalization ratio (INR, Base Excess (BE, and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS values that can be measured within a few minutes of sampling, so it can be readily applied in the Pediatric Emergency Department, but it cannot be applied on patients with chronic diseases that affect INR, BE, or GCS.

  14. Suicidal behaviour among terminally ill cancer patients in India

    OpenAIRE

    Latha, K. S.; Bhat, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Passive suicidal thoughts are relatively common in patients with terminal cancer. There is a need for more information about the factors that influence these patients to desire death. Aim: To examine the prevalence of suicidal ideation among terminally ill cancer patients. Methods: Fifty-four terminally ill inpatients (27 men and 27 women) from the palliative care unit of the Oncology department of Kasturba Hospital, Manipal were evaluated on various rating scales for depression, ...

  15. Advanced airway management is necessary in prehospital trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockey, D J; Healey, B; Crewdson, K; Chalk, G; Weaver, A E; Davies, G E

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of airway compromise in trauma patients is a priority. Basic airway management is provided by all emergency personnel, but the requirement for on-scene advanced airway management is controversial. We attempted to establish the demand for on-scene advanced airway interventions. Trauma patients managed with standard UK paramedic airway interventions were assessed to determine whether airway compromise had been effectively treated or whether more advanced airway management was required. A prospective observational study was conducted to identify trauma patients requiring prehospital advanced airway management attended by a doctor-paramedic team. The team assessed and documented airway compromise on arrival, interventions performed before and after their arrival, and their impact on airway compromise. Four hundred and seventy-two patients required advanced airway intervention and received 925 airway interventions by ground-based paramedics. Two hundred and sixty-nine patients (57%) still had airway compromise on arrival of the enhanced care team; no oxygen had been administered to 52 patients (11%). There were 45 attempted intubations by ground paramedics with a 64% success rate and 11% unrecognized oesophageal intubation rate. Doctor-paramedic teams delivering prehospital anaesthesia achieved definitive airway management for all patients. A significant proportion of severely injured trauma patients required advanced airway interventions to effectively treat airway compromise. Standard ambulance service interventions were only effective for a proportion of patients, but might not have always been applied appropriately. Complications of advanced airway management occurred in both provider groups, but failed intubation and unrecognized oesophageal intubation were a particular problem in the paramedic intubation group. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  16. Measuring trauma and stressful events in childhood and adolescence among patients with first-episode psychosis: initial factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Trauma Experiences Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofaro, Sarah L; Cleary, Sean D; Ramsay Wan, Claire; Broussard, Beth; Chapman, Colby; Haggard, Patrick J; Jananeh, Sara; Myers, Neely L; Compton, Michael T

    2013-12-15

    Past trauma and stressful events, especially in childhood and adolescence, are common among individuals with serious mental illnesses like schizophrenia. Traumatic experiences are thought to be a socio-environmental risk factor not only for poorer outcomes, but also potentially for the onset of these disorders. Because improved measurement tools are needed, we developed and studied, among 205 first-episode psychosis patients, the factor structure, internal consistency reliability, and initial validity of the Trauma Experiences Checklist (TEC), our measure of trauma and stressful events during childhood/adolescence. We assessed validity of subscales using correlations with Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form, Parental Harsh Discipline, Violence Exposure, and TEC-Informant Version scores. Exploratory factor analysis resulted in two internally consistent subscales (Cronbach's α=0.79 and 0.80, respectively), interpersonal abuse and family stress, and violence, death, and legal involvement. Scores from the former subscale were substantially associated with CTQ-SF physical, emotional, and sexual abuse (r=0.42-0.57, all p<0.001) and Violence Exposure (r=0.49, p<0.001). On the other hand, violence, death, and legal involvement scores were most highly correlated with Violence Exposure (r=0.49, p<0.001), and not with most CTQ-SF subscales. The TEC is a potentially useful tool in assessing diverse traumatic life events across various social contexts during childhood and adolescence.

  17. Maxillofacial trauma patient: coping with the difficult airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barak Michal

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Establishing a secure airway in a trauma patient is one of the primary essentials of treatment. Any flaw in airway management may lead to grave morbidity and mortality. Maxillofacial trauma presents a complex problem with regard to the patient's airway. By definition, the injury compromises the patient's airway and it is, therefore, must be protected. In most cases, the patient undergoes surgery for maxillofacial trauma or for other, more severe, life-threatening injuries, and securing the airway is the first step in the introduction of general anaesthesia. In such patients, we anticipate difficult endotracheal intubation and, often, also difficult mask ventilation. In addition, the patient is usually regarded as having a "full stomach" and has not been cleared of a C-spine injury, which may complicate airway management furthermore. The time available to accomplish the task is short and the patient's condition may deteriorate rapidly. Both decision-making and performance are impaired in such circumstances. In this review, we discuss the complexity of the situation and present a treatment approach.

  18. Thrombo-prophylaxis in acutely ill medical and critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Saigal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombo-prophylaxis has been shown to reduce the incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE and mortality in surgical patients. The purpose of this review is to find out the evidence-based clinical practice criteria of deep vein thrombosis (DVT prophylaxis in acutely ill medical and critically ill patients. English-language randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis were included if they provided clinical outcomes and evaluated therapy with low-dose heparin or related agents compared with placebo, no treatment, or other active prophylaxis in the critically ill and medically ill population. For the same, we searched MEDLINE, PUBMED, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar. In acutely ill medical patients on the basis of meta-analysis by Lederle et al. (40 trials and LIFENOX study, heparin prophylaxis had no significant effect on mortality. The prophylaxis may have reduced PE in acutely ill medical patients, but led to more bleeding events, thus resulting in no net benefit. In critically ill patients, results of meta-analysis by Alhazzani et al. and PROTECT Trial indicate that any heparin prophylaxis compared with placebo reduces the rate of DVT and PE, but not symptomatic DVT. Major bleeding risk and mortality rates were similar. On the basis of MAGELLAN trial and EINSTEIN program, rivaroxaban offers a single-drug approach to the short-term and continued treatment of venous thrombosis. Aspirin has been used as antiplatelet agent, but when the data from two trials the ASPIRE and WARFASA study were pooled, there was a 32% reduction in the rate of recurrence of venous thrombo-embolism and a 34% reduction in the rate of major vascular events.

  19. Outcome of severely injured trauma patients at a designated trauma centre in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEUNG Ka Kit Gilberto; HO Wendy; TONG King Hung Daniel; YUEN Wai Key

    2010-01-01

    Background The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) of the People's Republic of China (PRG) has seen significant changes in its trauma service over the last ten years including the implementation of a regional trauma system.The author's institution is one of the five trauma centres designated in 2003.This article reports our initial clinical experience.Methods A prospective single-centre trauma registry from January 2004 to December 2008 was reviewed.The primary clinical outcome measure was hospital mortality.The Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) methodology was used for bench-marking with the North America Major Trauma Outcome Study (MTOS) database.Results There were 1451 patients.The majority (83.9%) suffered from blunt injury.The overall mortality rate was 7.8%.Severe injury, defined as the Injury Severity Score >15, occurred in 22.5% of patients, and was associated with a mortality rate of 31.6%.A trend of progressive improvement was noted.The M-statistic was 0.99, indicating comparable case-mix with the MTOS.The Z- and W-statistics of each individual year revealed fewer, but not significantly so, number of survivors than expected.Conclusions Trauma centre designation was feasible in the HKSAR and was associated with a gradual improvement in patient care.Trauma system implementation may be considered in regions equipped with the necessary socio-economic and organizational set-up.

  20. Communication with older, seriously ill patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, L.M. van; Lindenberger, E.; Weert, J.C.M. van

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to provide more insight into effective communication with older people with serious illness and their surrogates/caregivers. To do so, if focusses on specific skills in three core functions of communication (i) empathic behavior, (ii) information provision and (iii) enabling decisi

  1. Colloids versus crystalloids for fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perel, Pablo; Roberts, Ian; Ker, Katharine

    2013-02-28

    Colloid solutions are widely used in fluid resuscitation of critically ill patients. There are several choices of colloid, and there is ongoing debate about the relative effectiveness of colloids compared to crystalloid fluids. To assess the effects of colloids compared to crystalloids for fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register (17 October 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library) (Issue 10, 2012), MEDLINE (Ovid) 1946 to October 2012, EMBASE (Ovid) 1980 to October 2012, ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (1970 to October 2012), ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (1990 to October 2012), PubMed (October 2012), www.clinical trials.gov and www.controlled-trials.com. We also searched the bibliographies of relevant studies and review articles. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of colloids compared to crystalloids, in patients requiring volume replacement. We excluded cross-over trials and trials involving pregnant women and neonates. Two review authors independently extracted data and rated quality of allocation concealment. We analysed trials with a 'double-intervention', such as those comparing colloid in hypertonic crystalloid to isotonic crystalloid, separately. We stratified the analysis according to colloid type and quality of allocation concealment. We identified 78 eligible trials; 70 of these presented mortality data.COLLOIDS COMPARED TO CRYSTALLOIDS: Albumin or plasma protein fraction - 24 trials reported data on mortality, including a total of 9920 patients. The pooled risk ratio (RR) from these trials was 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93 to 1.10). When we excluded the trial with poor-quality allocation concealment, pooled RR was 1.00 (95% CI 0.92 to 1.09). Hydroxyethyl starch - 25 trials compared hydroxyethyl starch with crystalloids and included 9147 patients. The pooled RR was 1.10 (95% CI 1

  2. Diversity in clinical management and protocols for the treatment of major bleeding trauma patients across European level I Trauma Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, Nadine; Driessen, Arne; Fröhlich, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uncontrolled haemorrhage is still the leading cause of preventable death after trauma and the primary focus of any treatment strategy should be related to early detection and control of blood loss including haemostasis. METHODS: For assessing management practices across six European...... level I trauma centres with academic interest and research in the field of coagulopathy an online survey was conducted addressing local management practice for bleeding trauma patients including algorithms for detection, management and monitoring coagulation disorders and immediate interventions. Each...... centre provided their locally applied massive transfusion protocol. RESULTS: All participating trauma centres have developed and implemented a local algorithm and protocol for the bleeding trauma patient. These are uniformly activated by clinical triggers and deactivated once the bleeding has stopped...

  3. Missed injuries and unplanned readmissions in pediatric trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Pamela M; Yu, Jennifer; Keller, Martin S

    2017-03-01

    We sought to determine the incidence and characteristics of missed injuries and unplanned readmissions at a Level-1 pediatric trauma center. We conducted a retrospective review of all trauma patients who presented to our ACS-verified Level-1 pediatric trauma center from 2009 to 2014. Overall, there were 27 readmissions and 27 missed injuries (0.38%). Patients who were unplanned readmissions had a greater Injury Severity Score (ISS) (8.6 vs 5.2, p=0.03), had longer hospitalizations (4.9 vs 2.5days, p=0.02), and were more likely to have required operative intervention (51.9% vs 32.3%, p=0.04). Similarly, patients identified with missed injuries had a higher ISS (15.2 vs 5.2, ptrauma (25.9%) and significantly altered their hospital course while 10 patients (37%) required operative intervention. On multivariate analysis, only ISS was found to be an independent risk factor for readmissions and missed injuries. Missed injuries and unplanned readmissions were rare occurrences among our pediatric patient population. These events, however, did result in longer hospitalizations and additional procedures. Patients with multisystem injuries and compromised physical exam are at higher risk. IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Illnesses in siblings of US patients with bipolar disorder relate to multigenerational family history and patients severity of illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Robert M.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Kupka, Ralph; McElroy, Susan L.; Frye, Mark A.; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Keck, Paul E.; Nolen, Willem A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patients with bipolar disorder from the US have more early-onset illness and a greater familial loading for psychiatric problems than those from the Netherlands or Germany (abbreviated here as Europe). We hypothesized that these regional differences in illness burden would extend to the

  5. Resting energy expenditure and nitrogen balance in critically ill pediatric patients on mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coss-Bu, J A; Jefferson, L S; Walding, D; David, Y; Smith, E O; Klish, W J

    1998-09-01

    Nutritional support is important in critically ill patients, with variable energy and nitrogen requirements (e.g., sepsis, trauma, postsurgical state) in this population. This study investigates how age, severity of illness, and mechanical ventilation are related to resting energy expenditure (REE) and nitrogen balance. Nineteen critically ill children (mean age, 8 +/- 6 [SD] y and range 0.4-17.0 y) receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) were enrolled. We used indirect calorimetry to measure REE. Expected energy requirements (EER) were obtained from Talbot tables. Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) and Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System (TISS) score were calculated. Total urinary nitrogen was measured using the Kjeldahl method. PRISM and TISS scores were 9 +/- 5 and 31 +/- 6 points, respectively. REE was 62 +/- 25 kcal.kg-1.d-1, EER was 42 +/- 11 kcal.kg-1. d-1, and caloric intake was 49 +/- 22 kcal.kg-1.d-1. Nitrogen intake was 279 +/- 125 mg.kg-1.d-1, total urinary nitrogen was 324 +/- 133 mg.kg-1.d-1, and nitrogen balance was -120 +/- 153 mg.kg-1.d-1. The protein requirement in this population was approximately 2.8 g.kg-1.d-1. These critically ill children were hypermetabolic, with REE 48% higher (20 kcal.kg-1.d-1) than expected. Nitrogen balance significantly correlated with caloric and protein intake, urinary nitrogen, and age, but not with severity of illness scores or ventilatory parameters.

  6. Attitudes and beliefs about mental illness among relatives of patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-08-03

    Aug 3, 2017 ... participants many had positive attitude towards letting the patients be part of ... Keywords: schizophrenia, mental illness, sfigma, attitudes, beliefs ... (CAMI) scale [8]. ..... Conflict of interest: All authors have declared that there.

  7. Delirium in Critically Ill Patients Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaal, Irene J.; Slooter, Arjen J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Delirium is commonly observed in critically ill patients and is associated with negative outcomes. The pathophysiology of delirium is not completely understood. However, alterations to neurotransmitters, especially acetylcholine and dopamine, inflammatory pathways and an aberrant stress response are

  8. Apixaban versus enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis in medically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Leizorovicz, Alain; Kakkar, Ajay K

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of prolonging prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism in medically ill patients beyond hospital discharge remain uncertain. We hypothesized that extended prophylaxis with apixaban would be safe and more effective than short-term prophylaxis with enoxaparin....

  9. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in critically ill adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijie; Liu, Yuhao; Lu, Zhifeng; Zhao, Li; Wang, Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is usually present in patients with pancreatic diseases. Surprisingly, recent studies indicated that patients with critical illness often suffer from pancreatic injury due to non-specific reasons other than pancreatic diseases, and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is also commonly observed in critically ill adult patients without preexisting pancreatic diseases. It is well known that malnutrition is the main clinical consequence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, thus, the high incidence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is most likely to be an important contributor of malnutrition which is a frequent problem associated with detrimental clinical outcomes in critically ill patients admitted into intensive care unit. In order to prevent pancreatic exocrine insufficiency due to primary pancreatic diseases, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is indispensable to treat indigestion, malabsorption and nutritional deficiency. Similarly, pancreatic enzyme supplementation has the potential to be an adjuvant therapy in critically ill patients with enteral nutrition therapy, which may be helpful to improve the nutritional status and the prognosis of critically ill patients by reducing the occurrence of malnutrition. Here, we reviewed the diagnostic methods of pancreatic exocrine function, the epidemiology and risk factors of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and potential treatment strategies for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in critically ill adult patients.

  10. [Thromboprophylaxis in multiple trauma and head injury patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomina, M J; Mora, L; Ciércoles, E

    2011-12-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease (VTD) is a frequent condition with serious clinical consequences and elevated mortality related to underdiagnosis or undertreatment, especially in patients with multiple trauma. The incidence of VTD in these patients ranges from 5% to 58% and thromboprophylaxis is considered essential for proper management. Traditionally, pelvic and lower extremity fractures, head injury, and prolonged immobilization have been cited as risk factors for VTD; however, how these factors combine with others to predict high risk is still unclear. The best way to approach VTD prophylaxis in multiple trauma patients is currently unclear. Both mechanical and pharmacologic means are available. The main clinical practice guidelines recommend thromboprophylaxis with low-molecular weight heparin, which can be started 48 hours after trauma, unless patients are still bleeding, in which case mechanical compression is recommended in spite of the limited effectiveness of that measure. Compression is maintained until the risk of hemorrhage has diminished. There is insufficient evidence to support routine use of ultrasound imaging or venography. In patients with head injury who are at risk for intracranial bleeding, the use of low-molecular weight heparin should be delayed until risk disappears but mechanical prophylaxis (compression) can be considered according to clinical status.

  11. Analysis of misdiagnosis in patients with multiple trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Fan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: To explore the features, treatment outcomes and reasons for misdiagnosis in patients with multiple trauma, so as to decrease the incidence of misdiagnosis. Methods: A total of 3 163 patients with multiple trauma who were admitted in our department from August 1997 to August 2008, were retrospectively studied to compare the features of diagnosis and treatment. There were 2 117 males (66.93% and 1 046 females (33.07% with the mean age of 36.46 years (range, 14-80 years. Parameters such as general status, traumatic condition, diagnosis and treatment situation, prognosis and mortality were analyzed. The differences between misdiagnosis group and correct diagnosis group were compared in terms of severity of injury, complications and treatment outcomes to elucidate the cause and prevention of misdiagnosis. Results: The misdiagnosis rate of multiple trauma in this study was 16.19%. The major anatomic sites misdiagnosed were limbs and pelvis (299 positions, 39.50%, abdominal region and pelvic organ (148 positions, 19.55%, and thoracic region (109 positions, 14.40%. In misdiagnosis group, ISS, length of hospital stay, rates of disturbance of consciousness, critical cases and shock cases were 33.78±19.64, (23.59±7.26 days, 49.22%, 33.01% and 47.46%, respectively, which were significantly higher than those of the correct diagnosis group (P<0.01. And the data showed that the more serious the injury was, the higher the rate of misdiagnosis would be. The rate of primary diagnosis by trauma surgeons in correct diagnosis group was 75.78%, significantly higher than that of the misdiagnosis group (χ2=382.01, P<0.01. The mortality rate of the misdiagnosis group was 2.93%, which was significantly higher than that for all patients (χ2=5.22, P<0.05. Conclusions: The results indicated that patients with severe multiple trauma are at high risk of misdiagnosis in early treatment. The mortality rate of misdiagnosed patients is higher than

  12. Outcomes of arterial vascular extremity trauma in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkilas, Mary; Notrica, David M; Langlais, Crystal S; Muenzer, Jared T; Zoldos, Jozef; Graziano, Kathleen

    2016-11-01

    Vascular trauma in children, although rare, carries significant risk for repair. Here we report outcomes from a single trauma center for children with extremity vascular trauma, proximal to the digits. Retrospective chart review of patients less than age 18years with an acute, non-iatrogenic traumatic arterial vascular injury of the upper and/or lower extremity between January 2008 and December 2013. Abstracted patient demographics, injury characteristics, surgical management, and disposition were summarized and compared with nonparametric methods. 23 children comprised the study cohort: median age of 8years (IQR: 4.6-12), 61% (n=14) males, 100% survival. Penetrating injuries were the predominate mechanism (n=17, 74%). The median time to presentation was 154min (IQR: 65-330). Acute operations for revascularization included a primary repair (n=15, 65%) or reversed vein graft (n=7, 30%). Fasciotomies were done for 3 (13%) patients. Three amputations were done for failed revascularization. Upper extremity vascular injury (n=15, 65%) was more common. The rate of associated extremity fracture was similar between upper (21%) and lower (33%) extremities (p=0.643). Eight (35%) patients required additional surgery most commonly for debridement, washouts and dressing changes. Three patients' hospital stays were complicated by infection. Impaired function was the most common short- and long-term complication (60%, 75%). Pediatric vascular injuries are commonly associated with penetrating injuries and male gender and occurred more frequently in the upper extremities. Overall patency rates after repair were 87%. Fasciotomies were done in 13% of patients, and the overall surgical amputation rate was 13%. There was no mortality in this cohort; however, multiple operations are commonly required, including the return to OR for washouts, debridements and dressing changes. The most common short- and long-term complication was impaired function. Overall good results are achievable in

  13. Endocrine and metabolic response to trauma in hypovolemic patients treated at a trauma center in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffer Paula H

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic changes in trauma patients with shock contribute directly to the survival of the patient. To understand these changes better, we made a rigorous analysis of the variations in the main examinations requested for seriously polytraumatized patients. Methods Prospective analysis of patients with blunt or penetrating trauma with hypovolemic shock, with systolic arterial pressure (SAP equal to or lower than 90 mmHg at any time during initial treatment in the emergency room and aged between 14 and 60 years old. The following exams were analyzed: sodium, potassium, blood test, glycemia and arterial gasometry. The tests were carried out at intervals: T0 (the first exam, collected on admission and followed by T24 (24 hours after admission, T48 (48 hours after admission, T72 (72 hours after admission. Results The test evaluations showed that there was a tendency towards hyperglycemia, which was more evident upon admission to hospital. The sodium in all the patients was found to be normal upon admission, with a later decline. However, no patient had significant hyponatremia; there was no significant variation in the potassium variable; the gasometry, low pH, BE (base excess and bicarbonate levels when the first sample was collected and increased later with PO2 and PCO2 showing only slight variations, which meant an acidotic state during the hemorrhagic shock followed by a response from the organism to reestablish the equilibrium, retaining bicarbonate. The red blood count, shown by the GB (globular volume and HB (hemoglobin was normal upon entry but later it dropped steadily until it fell below normal; the white blood count (leukocytes, neutrophils and band neutrophil remained high from the first moment of evaluation. Conclusion In this study we demonstrated the main alterations that took place in patients with serious trauma, emphasizing that even commonly requested laboratory tests can help to estimate metabolic

  14. [Illness Concepts of Patients with Schizophrenia: A Triangulation Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigand, Moritz E; Reichhardt, Lea; Lang, Fabian U; Krumm, Silvia; Jäger, Markus

    2017-04-03

    Objective Therapists' and patients' concepts of illness often show severe discrepancies. This study explores the illness concepts of patients with schizophrenic disorders (n = 40). Methods Two German scales were used, the "Causal Belief Questionnaire" and the "Illness Concept Scale for Schizophrenic Patients". We compared our data with data published previously. A semi structured interview was performed in a convenience sample (n = 7). Results The domains "trust in medication" and "trust in the treating physician" yielded high scores, yet in comparison with data published 30 years ago, trust in medication is unaltered, while trust in psychiatrists is even slightly lower. Recent psychosocial factors scored high as a possible cause of mental illness. Several patients felt responsible for being mentally ill. No patient in the interview mentioned the neurotransmitter hypothesis of schizophrenia. Conclusion Illness concepts of patients with schizophrenic disorders are a complex phenomenon. Triangulation of quantitative and qualitative methods proves to be a promising approach for future studies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Predictors of Death in Trauma Patients who are Alive on Arrival at Hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtveld, R.A.; Panhuizen, I.F.; Smit, R.B.J.; Holtslag, H.R.; Werken, C. van der

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine which factors predict death occurring in trauma patients who are alive on arrival at hospital Design Prospective cohort study Method Data were collected from 507 trauma patients with multiple injuries, with a Hospital Trauma Index–Injury Severity Score of 16 or more, who wer

  16. Quality in Trauma Care : Improving the Discharge Procedure of Patients by Means of Lean Six Sigma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, Gerard C.; Trip, Albert; Ahaus, Kees T. B.; Does, Ronald J. M. M.; Wendt, Klaus W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The University Medical Center Groningen is a level I trauma center in the northern part of the Netherlands. Sixty-three percent of all the patients admitted at the Trauma Nursing Department (TND) are acute patients who are admitted directly after trauma. In 2006 and 2007, the University

  17. Illness perception patterns in patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunschitz, E; Friedrich, O; Schöppl, Ch; Maitz, J; Sipötz, J

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify patterns of illness perception in patients with angiografically verified Coronary Artery Disease. A total of 166 patients (age: 64.4 ± 12.1, 80.7% male) were recruited after angiography. Cluster analysis on the items of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire was used to identify patterns of illness perception. The resulting groups were characterized with regard to Quality of Life (MacNew), anxiety and depression (GAD-7 and PHQ-9) and resilience (RS-13). The analysis revealed 4 distinct groups differing with regard to the items covering the perception of the physical and emotional impact of disease. Stronger perceptions in these domains were associated with lower Health Related Quality of Life and higher levels of emotional distress. Group 1 (33.1%) reported the strongest perceptions of the physical and emotional impact of disease and expressed low treatment control, high chronic timeline and significantly higher levels of depression than the other groups. Group 2 (27.7%) was characterized by more moderate perceptions of the emotional and physical impact of disease together with low scores on illness coherence and chronic timeline. Groups 3 (25.3%) and 4 (13.9%) reported smaller physical and emotional impact of illness but differed in chronic timeline. Our results correspond largely to recent findings in patients with other chronic diseases. Further research is needed to explore if stratification of patients according patterns of illness perception can help to inform patient-physician communication strategies.

  18. Mucormycosis of the Forehead and Sinuses in a Trauma Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nathan; Kimbrough, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Mucormycosis is a rare fungal infection in immunocompetent patients. It is not commonly seen in trauma patients who sustain multisystem injuries and are often exposed to numerous infectious sources. A multidisciplinary approach between medical and surgical specialties is crucial to ensuring timely diagnosis and treatment as morbidity and mortality can be high once acquired. In addition to antifungal therapy, radical debridement and reconstruction by plastic surgery is often necessary. Review of the literature shows that there is no definitive reconstructive technique for mucormycosis of the forehead and sinuses because the amount of tissue destruction may be varied in location and depth, therefore requiring varying extents of debridement. However, other reconstructive techniques commonly used for oncologic and trauma reconstructions can be used to achieve functionality and a satisfactory cosmetic result. Few facial reconstructions after infection with mucormycosis have been documented in the literature. PMID:27536497

  19. Mucormycosis of the Forehead and Sinuses in a Trauma Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbla, Pallavi A; Lee, Nathan; Kimbrough, Mary K

    2016-07-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare fungal infection in immunocompetent patients. It is not commonly seen in trauma patients who sustain multisystem injuries and are often exposed to numerous infectious sources. A multidisciplinary approach between medical and surgical specialties is crucial to ensuring timely diagnosis and treatment as morbidity and mortality can be high once acquired. In addition to antifungal therapy, radical debridement and reconstruction by plastic surgery is often necessary. Review of the literature shows that there is no definitive reconstructive technique for mucormycosis of the forehead and sinuses because the amount of tissue destruction may be varied in location and depth, therefore requiring varying extents of debridement. However, other reconstructive techniques commonly used for oncologic and trauma reconstructions can be used to achieve functionality and a satisfactory cosmetic result. Few facial reconstructions after infection with mucormycosis have been documented in the literature.

  20. [Enteral nutrition in the multiple trauma patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Izquierdo Riera, J A; Montejo González, J C

    1992-01-01

    The hypermetabolism that develops in patients with severe polytraumatism has led to the need for an aggressive metabolic-nutritional support from the start. Parenteral Nutrition is the preferred technique in many instances, due to the doubts on the effectiveness of enteral nutrition in the control of the metabolic response and to problems of gastrointestinal tolerance derived from its administration. However, the role of enteral nutrition as an important factor which limits the development of bacterial translocation and the chain of events leading to multiorganic failure appears to be more and more well-established and is an important argument for justifying the early administration of enteral nutrition in these patients. In accordance with the accumulated experience of several authors over the past few years, enteral nutrition may be administered early in polytraumatized patients. This is not only accompanied by the evidence of acceptable gastrointestinal tolerance to the diet, but also by additional advantages compared to parenteral nutrition, such as the maintenance of trophism and immunocompetence of the digestive mucosa, the reduction of septic complications and also greater nutritional effectiveness which can be evaluated by the behaviour of the seric proteins used as nutritional evolution markers. The interest of the different diet formulae which exist at present, for example diets enriched with branched-chain amino acids, diets with added fibre, peptidic diets, specific pulmonary diets or "euglycaemic diets" is evaluated in this review. All these diets may mean an increase in the effectiveness and/or tolerance of enteral nutrition in polytraumatized patients, and also contribute to the handling of specific problems such as "stress" hyperglycaemia or the withdrawal of mechanical ventilation support. The use of specific nutrients for the digestive mucosa, such as glutamine or short chain fatty acids seems to be an important factor in the reduction of

  1. Evaluation of SOCOM Wireless Monitor in Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Livingstone AS, Proctor KG: Operating room or angiography suite for hemodynamically unstable pelvic fractures? J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2012 Feb;72(2):364...patients with gallstone disease versus malignancy. Presented at 35th Annual Meeting Surgical Infection Society, Los Angeles, CA Apr 2015 15) Hsu A... Inflammatory Response After Burns? a. Presented at 47th Annual Meeting of American Burn Assoc, Chicago, IL Apr 2015 b. Presented at 26th Annual Fellow

  2. Why Do We Put Cervical Collars On Conscious Trauma Patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Blackham Julian; Benger Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In this commentary we argue that fully alert, stable and co-operative trauma patients do not require the application of a semi-rigid cervical collar, even if they are suspected of underlying cervical spine fracture, unless their conscious level deteriorates or they find the short-term support of a cervical collar helpful. Despite the historical and cultural barriers that exist, the potential benefits are such that this hypothesis merits rigorous testing in well-designed research trials.

  3. Analysis of misdiagnosis in patients with multiple trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Fan; BAI Xiang-jun; LI Zhan-fei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the features, treatment outcomes and reasons for misdiagnosis in patients with multiple trauma, so as to decrease the incidence of misdiagnosis.Methods: A total of 3 163 patients with multiple trauma who were admitted in our department from August 1997 to August 2008, were retrospectively studied to compare the features of diagnosis and treatment. There were 2 117 males (66.93%) and 1 046 females (33.07%) with the mean age of 36.46 years (range, 14-80 years). Parameters such as general status, traumatic condition, diagnosis and treatment situation, prognosis and mortality were analyzed. The differences between misdiagnosis group and correct diagnosis group were compared in terms of severity of injury, complications and treatment outcomes to elucidate the cause and prevention of misdiagnosis.Results: The misdiagnosis rate of multiple trauma in this study was 16.19%. The major anatomic sites misdiagnosed were limbs and pelvis (299 positions, 39.50%), abdominal region and pelvic organ (148 positions, 19.55%),and thoracic region (109 positions, 14.40%). In misdiagnosis group, ISS, length of hospital stay, rates of disturbance of consciousness, critical cases and shock cases were 33.78± 19.64, (23.59±7.26) days, 49.22%, 33.01% and 47.46%,respectively, which were significantly higher than those of the correct diagnosis group (P<0.01). And the data showed that the more serious the injury was, the higher the rate of misdiagnosis would be. The rate of primary diagnosis by trauma surgeons in correct diagnosis group was 75.78%, significantly higher than that of the misdiagnosis group ( x2=382.01,P<0.01). The mortality rate of the mi sdiagnosis group was 2.93%, which was significantly higher than that for all patients ( x2=5.22, P<0.05).Conclusions: The results indicated that patients with severe multiple trauma are at high risk of misdiagnosis in early treatment. The mortality rate of misdiagnosed patients is higher than the correctly

  4. [Assessment and treatment of hyperglycemia in critically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Marina Verçoza; Moraes, Rafael Barberena; Fabbrin, Amanda Rodrigues; Santos, Manoella Freitas; Gerchman, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a commonly encountered issue in critically ill patients in the intensive care setting. The presence of hyperglycemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, regardless of the reason for admission (e.g., acute myocardial infarction, status post-cardiovascular surgery, stroke, sepsis). However, the pathophysiology and, in particular, the treatment of hyperglycemia in the critically ill patient remain controversial. In clinical practice, several aspects must be taken into account in the management of these patients, including blood glucose targets, history of diabetes mellitus, the route of nutrition (enteral or parenteral), and available monitoring equipment, which substantially increases the workload of providers involved in the patients' care. This review describes the epidemiology, pathophysiology, management, and monitoring of hyperglycemia in the critically ill adult patient.

  5. PTSD in Latino patients: illness beliefs, treatment preferences, and implications for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, David P; Meredith, Lisa S; Rhodes, Hilary; Green, Bonnie L; Kaltman, Stacey; Cassells, Andrea; Tobin, Jonathan N

    2008-09-01

    Little is known about how Latinos with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) understand their illness and their preferences for mental health treatment. To understand the illness beliefs and treatment preferences of Latino immigrants with PTSD. Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. Sixty foreign-born, Latino adults recruited from five primary care centers in New York and New Jersey and screened for PTSD. Content analytic methods identified common themes, their range, and most frequent or typical responses. Participants identified their primary feelings as sadness, anxiety, nervousness, and fear. The most common feeling was "sad" (triste). Other words frequently volunteered were "angry" (enojada), "nervous" (nerviosa), and "scared" (miedo). Participants viewed their PTSD as impairing health and functioning. They ascribed their somatic symptoms and their general medical problems to the "stress" from the trauma and its consequences on their lives. The most common reason participants volunteered for their work and school functioning being impaired was their poor concentration, often due to intrusive thoughts. Most expressed their desire to receive mental health treatment, to receive it within their primary care center, and preferred psychotherapy over psychotropic medications. Among participants who did not report wanting treatment, most said it was because the trauma was "in the past." Clinicians may consider enquiring about PTSD in Latino patients who report feeling sad, anxious, nervous, or fearful. Our study suggests topics clinicians may include in the psychoeducation of patients with PTSD.

  6. Do pulmonary artery catheters alter outcome in trauma patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, O C; Civetta, J M

    1997-08-01

    To review the literature addressing the use of the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) in victims of blunt and penetrating trauma and examine the available evidence that supports or refutes the claim that PAC use alters outcome in this patient population. Furthermore, to determine what additional research should be done in this area. All pertinent English language articles dealing with pulmonary artery catheterization in trauma patients were retrieved from 1979 through 1996. Clinical studies were considered if PACs were used to establish a cardiopulmonary diagnosis, optimize or achieve endpoints of oxygen transport and utilization indices, or guide and/or determine response to therapy. Emphasis was placed on prospective, randomized, controlled trials. However, descriptive case series and retrospectively-analyzed, uncontrolled reviews comprise the majority of available literature. From these selective studies, information was obtained regarding patient demographics, therapeutic endpoints, and achieved outcome. Insufficient evidence exists to support a true survival benefit. However, recommendations for indications can be proposed where a reduction in morbidity or improvement in functional outcome is suggested. Hemodynamic data obtained from the PAC appear to be beneficial for the following indications: a) to ascertain the status of underlying cardiovascular performance and/or the need for improvement; b) to direct therapy when noninvasive monitoring may be inadequate, misleading, or the endpoints of resuscitation difficult to define; c) to assess response to resuscitation; d) to potentially decrease secondary injury when severe closed-head or acute spinal cord injuries are components of multisystem trauma; e) to augment clinical decision-making when major trauma is complicated by severe adult respiratory distress syndrome, progressive oliguria/anuria, myocardial ischemia, congestive heart failure, or major thermal injury; and f) to establish futility of care.

  7. The Diagnostic Value of Intra-abdominal Pressure in Patients with Blunt Acute Abdominal Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Narci

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:The objective of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of intra-abdominal pressure measurement in blunt abdominal trauma patients. Method: A prospective study was performed in 49 patients with blunt trauma in our university hospital for 1 years. Patients were randomly into two groups as intra-abdominal trauma (n=28 and extraabdominal trauma (n=21 groups. Intra-abdominal pressures was measured an classified as normal (10 cm H2O or less, elevated (more than 10 cm H2O determined indirectly. Results: No significant differences were found between abdominal trauma and extra-abdominal trauma groups from the point of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP. One the other hand, in abdominal trauma group; significant differences were observed between operated patients. Intra-abdominal bleeding was found in 10 patients and all of them elevated IAP values (exceeding 16 cm H2O. For determining the intra-abdominal injury, IAP had a sensitivity of 93%, specificity 38% in patients. Conclusion: IAP exceeding 16 cm H2O with blunt abdominal trauma patients abdominal trauma can be detected. It is thought that IAP, indirect monitoring of abdominal trauma patients is a reproducible, scientific guide and simple method.To determine the efficacy of the measurement of intra-abdominal pressure in blunt abdominal trauma patients, further studies should be done. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(3.000: 157-161

  8. Nonoperative management for patients with grade IV blunt hepatic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago Thiago

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The treatment of complex liver injuries remains a challenge. Nonoperative treatment for such injuries is increasingly being adopted as the initial management strategy. We reviewed our experience, at a University teaching hospital, in the nonoperative management of grade IV liver injuries with the intent to evaluate failure rates; need for angioembolization and blood transfusions; and in-hospital mortality and complications. Methods This is a retrospective analysis conducted at a single large trauma centre in Brazil. All consecutive, hemodynamically stable, blunt trauma patients with grade IV hepatic injury, between 1996 and 2011, were analyzed. Demographics and baseline characteristics were recorded. Failure of nonoperative management was defined by the need for surgical intervention. Need for angioembolization and transfusions, in-hospital death, and complications were also assessed Results Eighteen patients with grade IV hepatic injury treated nonoperatively during the study period were included. The nonoperative treatment failed in only one patient (5.5% who had refractory abdominal pain. However, no missed injuries and/or worsening of bleeding were observed during the operation. None of the patients died nor need angioembolization. No complications directly related to the liver were observed. Unrelated complications to the liver occurred in three patients (16.7%; one patient developed a tracheal stenosis (secondary to tracheal intubation; one had pleural effusion; and one developed an abscess in the pleural cavity. The hospital length of stay was on average 11.56 days. Conclusions In our experience, nonoperative management of grade IV liver injury for stable blunt trauma patients is associated with high success rates without significant complications.

  9. Renal profile in patients with orthopaedic trauma: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ashish; John, Bobby; Pawar, Basant; Sadiq, Shalinder

    2009-08-01

    This prospective study was undertaken to determine the incidence of acute renal failure (ARF) and to identify factors contributing to development of ARF in orthopaedic trauma patients. A total of 55 patients who presented over a period of one year with trauma to upper and lower limbs were studied. Patients with renal injury, chest or abdominal injury, isolated fractures of the hands, feet and axial skeleton involvement were excluded. Out of these, five developed acute renal failure, three recovered and two died. The overall incidence of ARF in this study was 9.1%. Patients with lower limb injuries are at higher risk of developing ARF. Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) > or = 7, higher age, patient presenting with shock, increased myoglobin levels in urine and serum have been correlated with a greater risk of patients developing ARF and a higher mortality. This study attempts to determine the magnitude of crush injury causing renal failure and the incidence of renal failure in patients with injuries affecting the appendicular skeleton exclusively.

  10. Outcome in patients with blunt chest trauma and pulmonary contusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignesh T

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Severe pulmonary contusions occur in blunt chest trauma, especially with high velocity injuries. Pulmonary contusions following trauma may result in significant hypoxemia and decreased compliance which may progress over several days. Extensive contusions may result in respiratory difficulty or progress to adult respiratory distress syndrome, which increases mortality. We decided to review the cases of polytrauma with associated pulmonary contusions to determine the factors which influence outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review of all cases of trauma with pulmonary contusions on X-ray or CT scan. The cases were examined for age, type of injuries, admission APACHE II, SAPS II and SOFA scores, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, presence or absence of rib fractures, average positive fluid balance, average sedation dose, pulmonary haemorrhage, ventilator days, ICU days and hospital outcome. RESULTS: There were 18 cases of pulmonary contusions. All had associated injuries. 6 patients died, 4 in the ICU and 2 patients died 1 week after transfer to a high dependency unit, one due to sepsis and the other due to massive haemothorax. There was a significant difference in PaO2/FiO2 ratio at admission and throughout the ICU course, fluid balance and sedation dose, but not in ventilator days and ICU days between survivors and nonsurvivors. The incidence, frequency and amount of pulmonary haemorrhage were higher in the nonsurvivors. CONCLUSIONS: Close attention to improving gas exchange, and early management of hemoptysis might improve outcome in pulmonary contusions

  11. [Role of voriconazole in critically ill patients with invasive mycoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Lerma, Francisco

    2007-09-30

    This observational study of the use of voriconazole conducted in Spain has identified reasons, characteristics, and forms of use of voriconazole in critically ill patients admitted to the ICU. Voriconale was used for directed treatment (63%), by the intravenous route (75%), as rescue treatment (41%) in severely ill patients (APACHE 21) with high need of resources and therapeutic interventions. Satisfactory clinical response was obtained in 50% of cases, related adverse events were scarce (16%), and withdrawal of voriconazole was not necessary. Clinical indications included empirical, etiologic, and rescue treatment of infections caused by Aspergillus, Candida albicans and most species different than C. albicans. Voriconazole can be used for preemptive therapy in patients at risk of invasive candidasis. When selecting voriconazole, liver function, renal function (i.v. formulation) and history of azoles use should be considered, although none of these circumstances is an absolute contraindication for the prescription of voriconazole in critically ill patients.

  12. DIFFERENCES IN ILLNESS REPRESENTATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagels, Agneta A; Söderquist, Birgitta Klang; Heiwe, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    To explore the impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on individual illness representations, including symptoms and causal attributions. Fifty-four patients responded to the Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) and a further seven patients undertook cognitive interviews regarding the IPQ-R. All respondents had CKD stage 2-5, not undergoing renal replacement therapy. Those in earlier CKD stages and those with fewer symptoms perceived a significantly different understanding of their condition than those in more advanced disease stages or with more symptoms. Behavioural and psychological attributions were commonly referred to as contributing causes to CKD. These attributions were associated to negative illness representations. An uncertainty assessing symptoms attributed to CKD was indicated, especially in earlier disease stages. Illness representations differ with CKD stages and symptom burden. The patients in earlier disease stages or with fewer symptoms did not hold as strong beliefs about their illness as being a threat as those in advanced stages or with more symptoms. Self-blame emerged as a common causal attribution. Patients did not always relate symptoms to CKD, therefore this study identifies a gap in patients' disease knowledge, especially in earlier stages of the condition. © 2015 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  13. Nutritional requirements of surgical and critically-ill patients: do we really know what they need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Clare L

    2004-08-01

    Malnutrition remains a problem in surgical and critically-ill patients. In surgical patients the incidence of malnutrition ranges from 9 to 44%. Despite this variability there is a consensus that malnutrition worsens during hospital stay. In the intensive care unit (ICU), 43% of the patients are malnourished. Although poor nutrition during hospitalisation may be attributable to many factors, not least inadequacies in hospital catering services, there must also be the question of whether those patients who receive nutritional support are being fed appropriately. Indirect calorimetry is the 'gold standard' for determining an individual's energy requirements, but limited time and financial resources preclude the use of this method in everyday clinical practice. Studies in surgical and ICU patient populations have been reviewed to determine the 'optimal' energy and protein requirements of these patients. There are only a small number of studies that have attempted to measure energy requirements in the various surgical patient groups. Uncomplicated surgery has been associated with energy requirements of 1.0-1.15 x BMR whilst complicated surgery requires 1.25-1.4 x BMR in order to meet the patient's needs. Identifying the optimal requirements of ICU patients is far more difficult because of the heterogeneous nature of this population. In general, 5.6 kJ (25 kcal)/kg per d is an acceptable and achievable target intake, but patients with sepsis or trauma may require almost twice as much energy during the acute phase of their illness. The implications of failing to meet and exceeding the requirements of critically-ill patients are also reviewed.

  14. Disparities in appendicitis rupture rate among mentally ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Ya-Mei

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have been carried out that focus on mental patients' access to care for their mental illness, but very few pay attention on these same patients' access to care for their physical diseases. Acute appendicitis is a common surgical emergency. Our population-based study was to test for any possible association between mental illness and perforated appendicitis. We hypothesized that there are significant disparities in access to timely surgical care between appendicitis patients with and without mental illness, and more specifically, between patients with schizophrenia and those with another major mental illness. Methods Using the National Health Insurance (NHI hospital-discharge data, we compared the likelihood of perforated appendix among 97,589 adults aged 15 and over who were hospitalized for acute appendicitis in Taiwan between the years 1997 to 2001. Among all the patients admitted for appendicitis, the outcome measure was the odds of appendiceal rupture vs. appendicitis that did not result in a ruptured appendix. Results After adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES and hospital characteristics, the presence of schizophrenia was associated with a 2.83 times higher risk of having a ruptured appendix (odds ratio [OR], 2.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.20–3.64. However, the presence of affective psychoses (OR, 1.15; 95% CI: 0.77–1.73 or other mental disorders (OR, 1.58; 95% CI: 0.89–2.81 was not a significant predictor for a ruptured appendix. Conclusion These findings suggest that given the fact that the NHI program reduces financial barriers to care for mentally ill patients, they are still at a disadvantage for obtaining timely treatment for their physical diseases. Of patients with a major mental illness, schizophrenic patients may be the most vulnerable ones for obtaining timely surgical care.

  15. The association of patient and trauma characteristics with the health-related quality of life in a Dutch trauma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Amy; van Heijl, Mark; van Wessem, Karlijn; Leenen, Luke

    2017-04-14

    It is suggested in literature to use the Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) as an outcome indicator for evaluating trauma centre performances. In order to predict HRQoL, characteristics that could be of influence on a predictive model should be identified. This study identifies patient and injury characteristics associated with the HRQoL in a general trauma population. Retrospective study of trauma patients admitted from 1st January 2007 through 31th December 2012. Patients were aged ≥18 years and discharged alive from the level I trauma centre. A combined health survey (SF-36 and EQ-5D) was sent to all traceable patients. The subdomain outcomes and EQ-5D index value (EQ-5Di) were compared with the reference population. A linear regression analysis was performed to identify parameters associated parameters with the HRQoL outcome. A total of 1870 patients were included for analyses. Compared to the eligible population, included patients were significantly older, more severely injured, more often admitted in the ICU and had a longer admission duration. The SF-36 and EQ-5Di were significantly lower compared to the Dutch reference population. The variables age, Injury Severity Score, hospital length of stay, ICU length of stay, Revised Trauma Score, probability of survival, and severe injury to the head and extremities were associated with the HRQoL in the majority of the subdomains. In order to use HRQoL as an indicator for trauma centre performances, there should be a consensus of the ideal timing for the measurement of HRQoL post-injury and the appropriate HRQoL instrument. Furthermore, standardised HRQoL outcomes must be developed. This study revealed eight factors (described above) which could be used to predict the HRQoL in trauma patients.

  16. Effect of Antiplatelet Therapy on Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Mortality in Critically Ill Patients: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Wang

    Full Text Available Antiplatelet agents are commonly used for cardiovascular diseases, but their pleiotropic effects in critically ill patients are controversial. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of cohort studies to investigate the effect of antiplatelet therapy in the critically ill.Nine cohort studies, retrieved from PubMed and Embase before November 2015, involving 14,612 critically ill patients and 4765 cases of antiplatelet users, were meta-analysed. The main outcome was hospital or 30-day mortality. Secondary outcome was acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS or acute lung injury (ALI. Random- or fixed-effect models were taken for quantitative synthesis of the data.Antiplatelet therapy was associated with decreased mortality (odds ratio (OR 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.52-0.71; I2 = 0%; P <0. 001 and ARDS/ALI (OR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.50-0.82; I2 = 0%; P <0. 001. In every stratum of subgroups, similar findings on mortality reduction were consistently observed in critically ill patients.Antiplatelet therapy is associated with reduced mortality and lower incidence of ARDS/ALI in critically ill patients, particularly those with predisposing conditions such as high-risk surgery, trauma, pneumonia, and sepsis. However, it remains unclear whether similar findings can be observed in the unselected and broad population with critical illness.

  17. Estudo da morbimortalidade em pacientes com trauma pancreático Morbimortality in patients with pancreatic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olival Cirilo Lucena da Fonseca Neto

    2007-03-01

    e apenas um foi E. Apenas três pacientes não foram reoperados (média de 1,7 cirurgias por paciente. Em 46,15%, ocorreu hipertensão intra-abdominal sendo necessário colocação de bolsa de Bogotá. O tempo de internamento variou de 30 à 365 dias (média = 53,4 dias. Ocorreu apenas um óbito. CONCLUSÃO: A pancreatite traumática é de elevada morbimortalidade, e uma das complicações mais importantes relacionada ao trauma pancreático, sendo o seu diagnóstico precoce junto com o acompanhamento multidisciplinar intensivo, o fator que poderá interferir favoravelmente na evolução desses pacientes.BACKGROUND: Pancreatic lesion is uncommon after closed or penetrating abdominal trauma, being related between 0,2 to 12% in severe closed abdominal traumas and in 5 to 7% of penetrating traumas. The majority of pancreatic lesions occur in young men and is associated with an increased incidence of trauma in adjacent organs and major vascular structures. AIM: To evaluate morbimortality rates, evolution and handling of patients with pancreatic trauma. METHODS: A prospective study of patients admitted to the trauma unit was made. Thirteen adults (>13 years-old were divided into two groups one composed of severe and the other composed of non-severe patients according to clinical criterion in the moment of identification of trauma using the Balthazars' criteria (A, B, C, D and E. The type of external trauma (opened or closed, classification of pancreatic trauma, number of organs reached by trauma, number of reoperations, type of nutritional support and period of time in the hospital were also analyzed. Presence of compartmental abdominal syndrome and necessity to close trauma temporarily were studied and compared to morbimortality in patients. RESULTS: All patients were male, with an average age of 28,6 years (13 to 60 years of age, presenting postoperatory traumatic pancreatitis. Seven patients, showed penetrating wounds due to firearms; three had closed abdomen; two had

  18. Thrombelastography and rotational thromboelastometry early amplitudes in 182 trauma patients with clinical suspicion of severe injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anna Sina P; Meyer, Martin A S; Sørensen, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Viscoelastic hemostatic assays may provide means for earlier detection of trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC). METHODS: This is a prospective observational study of 182 trauma patients admitted to a Level 1 trauma center. Clinical data, thrombelastography (TEG), and rotational thromboel...

  19. Utility of emergency cranial computed tomography in patients without trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Vignesh; Keniston, Angela; Albert, Richard K

    2012-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine, in patients admitted to the hospital from the emergency department (ED) without evidence of trauma, 1) the prevalence of clinically important abnormalities on cranial computed tomography (CCT) and 2) the frequency of emergent therapeutic interventions required because of these abnormalities. The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients from 2007 between the ages of 18 and 89 years who had CCT as part of their ED evaluations prior to hospitalization. Patients with any indication of trauma were excluded, as were those who had a lumbar puncture (LP). Chief complaint, results of the ED neurologic examination, tomogram findings, and whether patients had emergent interventions were recorded. Patients presenting with altered mental status (AMS) were analyzed separately. Of the 766 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 83 (11%) had focal neurologic findings, and 61 (8%) had clinically important abnormalities on computed tomography. Emergent interventions occurred in only 12 (1.6%), 11 (92%) of whom had focal neurologic findings. In the subgroup of 287 patients with AMS as their presenting problem, 14 (4.9%) had focal findings, six (2%) had clinically important abnormalities on tomography, and only two (0.7%) required emergent interventions, both of whom had focal findings. Patients presenting with AMS were less likely to have positive findings on tomography (odds ratio [OR] = 0.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07 to 0.39). Patients presenting with motor weakness or speech abnormalities, or who were unresponsive, were more likely to have positive findings on tomography (OR = 4.7, 95% CI = 2.6 to 8.6; OR = 4.4, 95% CI = 1.5 to 2.7; and OR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.6 to 7.1, respectively). Of patients without evidence of trauma who receive CCT in the ED, the prevalence of focal neurologic findings and clinically important abnormalities on tomography is low, the need for emergent intervention is very low, and the

  20. Nutrition intervention in the critically ill cardiothoracic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresci, Gail; Hummell, A Christine; Raheem, Sulieman Abdal; Cole, Denise

    2012-06-01

    Despite acute myocardial infarction and cardiac surgery accounting for 2 of the most common reasons patients are admitted to the intensive care unit, little attention and investigation have been directed specifically for these patients. This patient population therefore deserves special attention as they are often malnourished but require emergent interventions, making nutrition intervention challenging. This article reviews current medical interventions implemented in critically ill cardiothoracic patients and discusses evidence-based nutrition therapy, including enteral and parenteral feeding, glycemic control, and antioxidant provision.

  1. [Attitude to the illness of patients with malignant lymphomas on various stages of disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestereva, E V; Chulkova, V A; Vinogradova, Iu N; Il'in, N V

    2013-01-01

    In 138 patients with malignant lymphomas on different stages of the disease there were considered attitude to the illness and treatment, which included relation to the diagnosis, the subjective perception of the disease and attitude to treatment. Using a technique of studying psychological attitude to the disease there were studied details of personal response to the disease. Along with the general trends in relation to the disease, specific to cancer patients of different tumor sites, there have been identified particular features related to attitude of malignant lymphoma patients: a long period of denial of a malignant nature of the disease and their greatest psychological trauma during relapse. The necessity of professional psychological support was showed.

  2. Psychosis or temporal lobotomy: SPECT findings in a paraplegic patient with chronic mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, W; Thurber, S

    2006-08-01

    To ascertain if single proton emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging involving a patient with a history of head trauma, paraplegia, and chronic mental illness, would provide useful information regarding diagnosis and treatment. A case report. SPECT data indicated a convexity of the temporal lobe; it was significantly crumpled inward in the location of the traumatic blow suffered 18 years earlier. The center of hypoperfusion suggested a complete disruption of connections between the temporal lobe and Broca's area, and a practically ablated left temporal area. The patient was reclassified with an organic psychosis and as an individual who might benefit more from medications to treat temporal lobe irritability rather than antipsychotic medications. Despite these findings and recommendations, psychiatric personnel discharged the patient without implementation. He is currently in critical condition following a suicide attempt.

  3. Complications of Trauma Patients Admitted to the ICU in Level I Academic Trauma Centers in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Mondello

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aims of this study were to evaluate the complications that occur after trauma and the characteristics of individuals who develop complications, to identify potential risk factors that increase their incidence, and finally to investigate the relationship between complications and mortality. Methods. We did a population-based retrospective study of trauma patients admitted to ICUs of a level I trauma center. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine independent predictors for complications. Results. Of the 11,064 patients studied, 3,451 trauma patients developed complications (31.2%. Complications occurred significantly more in younger male patients. Length of stay was correlated with the number of complications (R=0.435,P<0.0001. The overall death rate did not differ between patients with or without complications. The adjusted odds ratio (OR of developing complication for patients over age 75 versus young adults was 0.7 (P<0.0001. Among males, traumatic central nervous system (CNS injury was an important predictor for complications (adjusted OR 1.24. Conclusions. Complications after trauma were found to be associated with age, gender, and traumatic CNS injury. Although these are not modifiable factors, they may identify subjects at high risk for the development of complications, allowing for preemptive strategies for prevention.

  4. A pilot study of transformation, attributed meanings to the illness, and spiritual well-being for terminally ill cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Michiyo; Morita, Tatsuya; Lee, Virginia; Okamoto, Takuya

    2008-12-01

    The present study investigated what types of transformation terminally ill cancer patients experienced from diagnosis until the terminal stage, what meanings terminally ill cancer patients attributed to their illness, and whether or not those who attributed positive meaning to their illness achieved high levels of spiritual well-being as a preliminary study. Ten terminally ill cancer patients in the hospice wards of two general hospitals participated. A clinical psychologist conducted a semistructured interview with the patients individually for about 60 min. Patients completed the FACIT-Sp and HADS before the interview and talked about the meanings of cancer experience. The contents of the interviews were analyzed qualitatively. Patients were separated into high and low levels of spiritual-well being by the median of FACIT-Sp scores. Three types of transformation were extracted: "group with peaceful mind," "group with both positive attitude and uneasy feeling," and "groups with uneasy feeling." As attributed meanings to the illness, five categories were extracted: "positive meaning," "natural acceptance," "negative acceptance," "search for meaning," and "regret and sorrow." Patients in the high level spiritual well-being group attributed the meaning of illness to "positive meaning" and "natural acceptance," and those in the low level spiritual well-being group attributed it to "regret and sorrow" and "search for meaning." Some Japanese terminally ill cancer patients experienced positive transformation, and patients who attributed "positive meaning" and "natural acceptance" to their illness experience achieved high levels of spiritual well-being.

  5. Early Mobilization and Rehabilitation of Patients Who Are Critically Ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Mohamed D; Parker, Ann M; Needham, Dale M

    2016-09-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are increasingly recognized as a cause of both short- and long-term physical morbidity in survivors of critical illness. This recognition has given rise to research aimed at better understanding the risk factors and mechanisms associated with neuromuscular dysfunction and physical impairment associated with critical illness, as well as possible interventions to prevent or treat these issues. Among potential risk factors, bed rest is an important modifiable risk factor. Early mobilization and rehabilitation of patients who are critically ill may help prevent or mitigate the sequelae of bed rest and improve patient outcomes. Research studies and quality improvement projects have demonstrated that early mobilization and rehabilitation are safe and feasible in patients who are critically ill, with potential benefits including improved physical functioning and decreased duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care, and hospital stay. Despite these findings, early mobilization and rehabilitation are still uncommon in routine clinical practice, with many perceived barriers. This review summarizes potential risk factors for neuromuscular dysfunction and physical impairment associated with critical illness, highlights the potential role of early mobilization and rehabilitation in improving patient outcomes, and discusses some of the commonly perceived barriers to early mobilization and strategies for overcoming them.

  6. Schizophrenia patients with a history of childhood trauma have a pro-inflammatory phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, U; McKernan, D; Cryan, J; Dinan, T

    2012-09-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that childhood trauma is a risk factor for schizophrenia and patients with this syndrome have a pro-inflammatory phenotype. We tested the hypothesis that the pro-inflammatory phenotype in schizophrenia is associated with childhood trauma and that patients without a history of such trauma have a similar immune profile to healthy controls. We recruited 40 schizophrenia patients and 40 controls, all of whom completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques, we measured peripheral levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. These immune parameters were compared in schizophrenia with childhood trauma, schizophrenia without childhood trauma and healthy controls. Patients with childhood trauma had higher levels of IL-6 and TNF-α than patients without trauma and healthy controls, and TNF-α levels correlated with the extent of the trauma. Patients with no trauma had similar immune profiles to controls. Childhood trauma drives changes, possibly epigenetic, that generate a pro-inflammatory phenotype.

  7. Relatives to Critically Ill Patients Have No Sense of Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jannie; Andresen, Kristoffer; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    shown that relatives do not always receive the attention they need from health professionals. There is a lack of studies that focus on relatives' satisfaction and involvement during their family members' hospitalization. Design. A mixed methods design was chosen. Methods. A quantitative study......Aims and Objective. To investigate the relatives' satisfaction and involvement on a general surgery ward regarding the critically ill patient. Introduction. Relatives to critically ill patients are affected both physically and mentally during the hospitalization of a family member. Research has...... was conducted with 27 relatives to critically ill patients. All participated in a questionnaire and out of the 27 relatives, six participated in qualitative in-depth interviews. Results. The questionnaire revealed that relatives were dissatisfied with care and involvement. For further exploration...

  8. Ketamine Patient Controlled Analgesia for Acute Pain in Trauma Patients: A Randomized, Active Comparator Controlled, Blinded, Pilot Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-11

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2017-0003 Ketamine Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Acute Pain in Trauma Patients: A Randomized, Active Comparator...June 2013 – December 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ketamine Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Acute Pain in Trauma Patients: A Randomized, Active...in trauma patients while reducing opioid consumption in the traumatically injured patient. The objective of this study was to compare differences in

  9. An audit of airway management in critically ill patients in a sub-Saharan tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyebola Olubodun Adekola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Critically ill patients have poor physiological reserves, and are at increased risk of cardiopulmonary complications such as hypoxia, hypotension, arrhythmias and cardiac arrest when undergoing airway management. This study audited airway management in critically ill patients. Patients Method: A Prospective observational study in 120 critically ill adult patients who required endotracheal intubation over a one year period. Induction was with IV midazolam (0.15mg/kg, and suxamethonium (1.5mg/kg. Data collected included immediate complications (complications during intubation, and early complications (complications on days one to seven of tube insertion. Results: The median age was 32 years, males constituted 68 (56.6% and female 52 (43.4%. One hundred and fifty-eight intubation attempts were recorded, one attempt to success in 93 (77.5%, and 2 attempts in 22 (18.33%. Difficult intubation occurred in 17 (10.49%, of whom 5 subjects had more than 3 intubation attempts, and 2 had surgical tracheostomy performed. The intubation aids used included stylet in 86.67%, bougie (3.33%, and laryngeal mask airway (1.67%. There was a significant association between the number of attempts at intubation, and trauma, bleeding, oesophageal intubation, aspiration or cardiac arrest, P<0.05. Tubal blockade occurred in 65 (36.31% subjects after a median duration of 38.5 hours. Conclusion: This study elicited the need to review the airway management of critically ill patients in our institution, provide different airway and intubating devices during difficult intubation, and ensure appropriate training in airway skills.

  10. Attitudes of acutely ill patients towards euthanasia in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, R C S; Chien, Wai-Tong

    2007-01-01

    The global euthanasia debate by health care professionals has raised important ethical issues concerning the professional duties and responsibilities of nurses caring for terminal patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of acutely ill patients towards the practice of euthanasia in Hong Kong. A modified form of the 23-item Questionnaire for General Household Survey scale was used. This cross-sectional survey study was conducted with a stratified sample of in-patients recruited from a wide variety of departments in a regional, acute general hospital. Seventy-seven out of 129 patients responded (59.7%) and a high proportion of patients agreed with the use of euthanasia in the following circumstances: 'where they were a third party', if 'someone they loved' was affected, or if 'they themselves were the patient'. Of the 77 patients, 54 agreed with active euthanasia (70.1%) and 65 with passive (84.4%). The results also indicated that a few socio-demographic characteristics (such as age, gender and household income) statistically significantly correlated with patients' attitudes towards euthanasia. These findings highlight that Chinese patients with acute illness generally accept the use of euthanasia. Further research on the attitudes and perceptions of patients towards the use of euthanasia is recommended, particularly in diverse groups of Chinese and Asian patients with acute or terminal illness.

  11. Clinical associations of host genetic variations in the genes of cytokines in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belopolskaya, O B; Smelaya, T V; Moroz, V V; Golubev, A M; Salnikova, L E

    2015-06-01

    Host genetic variations may influence a changing profile of biochemical markers and outcome in patients with trauma/injury. The objective of this study was to assess clinical associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes of cytokines in critically ill patients. A total of 430 patients were genotyped for SNPs in the genes of pro- (IL1B, IL6, IL8) and anti-inflammatory (IL4, IL10, IL13) cytokines. The main end-points were sepsis, mortality and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We evaluated the dynamic levels of bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, creatine kinase, creatinine and lactate dehydrogenase in five points of measurements (between 1 and 14 days after admission) and correlated them with SNPs. High-producing alleles of proinflammatory cytokines protected patients against sepsis (IL1B -511A and IL8 -251A) and mortality (IL1B -511A). High-producing alleles of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL4 -589T and IL13 431A (144Gln) were less frequent in ARDS patients. The carriers of IL6 -174C/C genotypes were prone to the increased levels of biochemical markers and acute kidney and liver insufficiency. Genotype-dependent differences in the levels of biochemical indicators gradually increased to a maximal value on the 14th day after admission. These findings suggest that genetic variability in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines may contribute to different clinical phenotypes in patients at high risk of critical illness.

  12. Nursing the critically ill surgical patient in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris; Snell, David

    2016-11-10

    Critical illness in the developing world is a substantial burden for individuals, families, communities and healthcare services. The management of these patients will depend on the resources available. Simple conditions such as a fractured leg or a strangulated hernia can have devastating effects on individuals, families and communities. The recent Lancet Commission on Global Surgery and the World Health Organization promise to strengthen emergency and essential care will increase the focus on surgical services within the developing world. This article provides an overview of nursing the critically ill surgical patient in Zambia, a lower middle income country (LMIC) in sub-Saharan Africa.

  13. Echocardiographic approach to cardiac tamponade in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCanny, Peter; Colreavy, Frances

    2016-12-24

    Cardiac tamponade should be considered in a critically ill patient in whom the cause of haemodynamic shock is unclear. When considering tamponade, transthoracic echocardiography plays an essential role and is the initial investigation of choice. Diagnostic sensitivity of transthoracic echocardiography is dependent on image quality, and in some cases a transoesophageal approach may be required to confirm the diagnosis. Knowledge of the pathophysiology and echocardiographic features of cardiac tamponade are essential for the practicing Intensivist. This review presents an approach to the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiac tamponade in critically ill patients.

  14. [Patient-caregiver relationship: when illness blogs step in].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondi, Céline; Berney, Alexandre

    2014-02-12

    The use of social media as a communication tool is rapidly growing in the community, and more specifically in patients, through illness blogs. This has been true for several years in North America, but is becoming a reality in Europe as well. We report here the first results of studies on the putative psychological benefits and risks of illness blogs for their authors. We also explore the possible impact of blogging on the patient-caregiver relationship. Social media are expected to have a growing influence in certain areas of health care. Physicians should therefore stay informed about them, take advantage of their benefits, and anticipate their risks.

  15. The critically ill obstetric patient - Recent concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjan Trikha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU present a challenge to an intensivist because of normal physiological changes associated with pregnancy and puerperium, the specific medical diseases peculiar to pregnancy and the need to take care of both the mother and the foetus. Most common causes of admission to an ICU for obstetric patients are eclampsia, severe preeclampsia, haemorrhage, congenital and valvular heart disease, septic abortions, severe anemia, cardiomyopathy and non-obstetric sepsis. The purpose of this review is to present the recent concepts in critical care management of obstetric patients with special focus mainly on ventilatory strategies, treatment of shock and nutrition. The details regarding management of individual diseases would not be discussed as these would be beyond the purview of this article. In addition, some specific issues of importance while managing such patients would also be highlighted.

  16. A case of thoracic splenosis in a post-splenectomy patient following abdominal trauma: Hello Howell-Jolly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviers, Petrus J

    2014-08-01

    Seeding of splenic tissue to extra-abdominal sites is a relatively infrequent consequence of open abdominal trauma. Immunological function of these small foci of ectopic splenic tissue is unknown and their use in determining the splenic function may be limited. In this case report, a patient is described who had previously undergone an emergency splenectomy. The absence of Howell-Jolly bodies on the blood smear in a patient who had previously undergone surgical splenectomy raised the suspicion of splenosis. The immunological features as well as non-invasive evaluation of these ill-defined splenic tissue sites are discussed.

  17. Initial ventilator settings for critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilickaya, Oguz; Gajic, Ognjen

    2013-03-12

    The lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategy has been standard practice for management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for more than a decade. Observational data, small randomized studies and two recent systematic reviews suggest that lung protective ventilation is both safe and potentially beneficial in patients who do not have ARDS at the onset of mechanical ventilation. Principles of lung-protective ventilation include: a) prevention of volutrauma (tidal volume 4 to 8 ml/kg predicted body weight with plateau pressurerespiratory rate 20 to 35 breaths per minute); and d) prevention of hyperoxia (titrate inspired oxygen concentration to peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels of 88 to 95%). Most patients tolerate lung protective mechanical ventilation well without the need for excessive sedation. Patients with a stiff chest wall may tolerate higher plateau pressure targets (approximately 35 cmH2O) while those with severe ARDS and ventilator asynchrony may require a short-term neuromuscular blockade. Given the difficulty in timely identification of patients with or at risk of ARDS and both the safety and potential benefit in patients without ARDS, lung-protective mechanical ventilation is recommended as an initial approach to mechanical ventilation in both perioperative and critical care settings.

  18. Why Do We Put Cervical Collars On Conscious Trauma Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackham Julian

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this commentary we argue that fully alert, stable and co-operative trauma patients do not require the application of a semi-rigid cervical collar, even if they are suspected of underlying cervical spine fracture, unless their conscious level deteriorates or they find the short-term support of a cervical collar helpful. Despite the historical and cultural barriers that exist, the potential benefits are such that this hypothesis merits rigorous testing in well-designed research trials.

  19. [Pulmonary mucormycosis in a multiple-trauma patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandin, W; Dessieux, T; Hounfodji, P; Viquesnel, G; Ouchikhe, A; Gérard, J-L

    2006-05-01

    Mucormycosis are opportunist infections occurring usually among predisposed patients. We report a case of an 18-year-old male with a severe thoracic trauma who developed an Absidia infection on his contused pulmonary parenchyma, without presenting the usual risk factors (diabetes mellitus, immunodeficiency). The early diagnosis using bronchoscopy has probably improved the outcome by allowing a faster treatment. After 18-months, the infectious process resolved thanks to a combination of a medical treatment composed of high-dose amphotericin B lipid formulation, itraconazole and a complementary surgical treatment.

  20. Coping with illness and subjective theories of illness in adult patients with haematological malignancies: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Michael; Koenigsmann, Michael; Frommer, Joerg

    2009-03-01

    In parallel to development of individualised antineoplastic treatment, scientific interest in patients' subjective theories of illness (STOI) has emerged in the oncological community. STOI depend decisively on patients' information about their disease. Coping with illness is dependent from the individual situation and context, and it is generally modulated by patients' STOI. The purpose is fivefold: (1) to provide a thorough literature review about coping and about STOI in adult haematological patients, (2) to survey through which indicators the topics were operationalized in studies, (3) to clarify the kind of coherence between these two topics, (4) to explicate the interaction between STOI and other variables, and (5) to verify the clinical relevance of both topics. We searched 19 electronic databanks for English biomedical literature manuscripts (1995-2008) on this subject. Twenty-six studies met our criteria and varied in haematological entity, treatment concept, sample size and methodological design. We conclude that a subjective-individual regulation of patient's mental stability during a cytotoxic chemotherapy is important. Successful coping strategies develop not only based on objective, but also subjective evaluation mechanisms. We deduce consequences for doctor-patient communication and psychosocial care in haematology. The newly developed process model of subjective regulation in cancer patients, in general, views the oncological treatment process as a procedural mental evaluation.

  1. The incretin effect in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Janum, Susanne; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke;

    2015-01-01

    with control subjects, proinflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor α and interleukin 6, were higher in patients than in control subjects. The endogenous response of GIP and glucagon, but not GLP-1, to the OGTT was greater in patients. The insulin response to the OGTT did not differ between groups......) followed by an intravenous glucose infusion (IVGI) on the next day to mimic the blood glucose profile from the OGTT. Blood glucose, serum insulin, serum C-peptide and plasma levels of GLP-1, GIP, glucagon and proinflammatory cytokines were measured intermittently. The incretin effect was calculated...

  2. Our Experiences with Chest Trauma Patients in Syrian Civil War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samil Gunay

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Thoracic surgery is a branch, the efficiency of which is unquestionable for war. And during the civil war in Syria, thoracic surgery specialists have been feeling this efficiency so closely. So we want to share our experiences on patients sent from this region. Material and Method: The cases comprised of 41 patients in total, 33 men and 8 women, between the ages of 16-75, who were brought from Syria between the dates of August 2012 %u2013 November 2013. The files of the patients were received from archive. Results: Except 11 isolated thorax trauma patients, it was determined thorax and abdomen injuries at 9 patients (21.9%, thorax and extremity injuries at 8 patients (19.5%, thorax and vertebra injuries at 3 patients (7.3%, thorax, abdomen and cranium injuries at 5 patients (12.1%, thorax, abdomen and eye injuries at one patient (2.4%, thorax, abdomen and vertebra injuries at 3 patients (7.3%, thorax, abdomen and extremity injuries at one patient (2.4%. Discussion: Thoracic surgery is a lifesaving branch in case of fast and effectual medical intervention to injuries during war.

  3. Developing a Mobility Protocol for Early Mobilization of Patients in a Surgical/Trauma ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meg Zomorodi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As technology and medications have improved and increased, survival rates are also increasing in intensive care units (ICUs, so it is now important to focus on improving the patient outcomes and recovery. To do this, ICU patients need to be assessed and started on an early mobility program, if stable. While the early mobilization of the ICU patients is not without risk, the current literature has demonstrated that patients can be safely and feasibly mobilized, even while requiring mechanical ventilation. These patients are at a high risk for muscle deconditioning due to limited mobility from numerous monitoring equipment and multiple medical conditions. Frequently, a critically ill patient only receives movement from nurses; such as, being turned side to side, pulled up in bed, or transferred from bed to a stretcher for a test. The implementation of an early mobility protocol that can be used by critical care nurses is important for positive patient outcomes minimizing the functional decline due to an ICU stay. This paper describes a pilot study to evaluate an early mobilization protocol to test the safety and feasibility for mechanically ventilated patients in a surgical trauma ICU in conjunction with the current unit standards.

  4. Adiponectin in pulmonary disease and critically ill patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Pablo; Sood, Akshay

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin is a predominantly anti-inflammatory protein produced by adipose tissue with possible signalling activity in the lung. It is increasingly associated with inflammatory pulmonary diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and in critical illness. Although mouse studies indicate causative associations between adiponectin and asthma and COPD, the human literature in this regard is inconclusive. Some, but not all, studies demonstrate that serum adiponectin concentrations are inversely associated with asthma prevalence among premenopausal women and peripubertal girls. On the other hand, serum adiponectin concentrations are associated with lower asthma severity among boys but greater severity among men. Further, case-control studies demonstrate higher systemic and airway adiponectin concentrations in primarily male COPD patients than controls. Systemic adiponectin is positively associated with lung function in healthy adults but inversely associated in studies of male subjects with COPD. Murine and human studies further show contradictory associations of systemic adiponectin with critical illness. Higher premorbid systemic adiponectin concentrations are associated with improved survival from sepsis in mice. On the other hand, higher systemic adiponectin concentrations on day 1 of critical illness are associated with lower survival in critically ill patients with respiratory failure. In the absence of adequate longitudinal data, it is not possible to determine whether the adiponectin derangements are the consequence or the cause of the disease studied. Future research will determine whether modulation of adiponectin, independent of BMI, may be helpful in the prevention or treatment of asthma, COPD or critical illness. PMID:22876927

  5. Günther Tulip and Celect IVC filters in multiple-trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, David; Kochupura, Paul V; Wellons, Eric D; Burkett, Allison B; Methodius-Rayford, Walaya C

    2009-08-01

    retrieve; they also had fewer cases of significant tilt (>20%) than the GT filters, but the difference was not statistically significant. GT and Celect IVCFs placed at the ICU bedside under IVUS guidance in multiple-trauma patients was simple, safe, and avoided transporting critically ill patients out of the ICU. Further investigation of the single sheath IVUS technique and the role of retrievable IVCFs in multi-trauma patients is warranted.

  6. Running out of gas but not trauma patients: the effect of the price of gas on trauma admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goettler, Claudia E; Schlitzkus, Lisa L; Waibel, Brett H; Edwards, Melinda; Wilhelmsen, Bruce; Rotondo, Michael F

    2010-01-01

    As fuel costs steadily rise and motor vehicle collisions continue to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, we examined the relationship between the price of gasoline and the rate of trauma admissions related to gasoline consumption (GRT). The National Trauma Registry of the American College of Surgeons data of a rural Level I trauma center were queried over 27 consecutive months to identify the rate of trauma admissions/month related to gas utilization compared with the number of nongasoline related trauma admissions, based on season and day of the week. The average price/gallon of regular gas in our region was obtained from the NorthCarolinaGasPrices. com database. A log linear model with a Poisson distribution was created. No significant association exists between the average price/gallon of gasoline and the GRT rate across the months, seasons, and weekday and weekend periods. As the price of gas continues to rise, the rate of rural GRT does not decrease. Over a longer period of time and with skyrocketing prices, this relationship may not hold true. These findings may also be explained by the rural area where limited alternative transportation opportunities exist and a trauma patient population participating in high risk behavior regardless of cost.

  7. The meaning of social support for the critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupcey, J E

    2001-08-01

    Social support has been shown to be important for the critically ill patient. However, what constitutes adequate support for these patients has not been investigated. Thus, the purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate patients' perceptions of their need for and adequacy of the social support received while they were critically ill. Thirty adult patients who were critical during some point of their stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) stay were interviewed, once stable. Interviews were tape-recorded and began with an open-ended question regarding the ICU experience. This was followed by open-ended focused questions regarding social support, such as 'Who were your greatest sources of social support while you were critically ill?' 'What did they do that was supportive or unsupportive?' Data were analyzed according to Miles and Huberman (1994). The categories that emerged were need for social support based on patient perceptions (not number of visitors), quality of support (based on perceptions of positive and negative behaviors of supporters) and lack of support. This study found that quality of support was more important than the actual number of visitors. Patients with few visitors may have felt supported, while those with numerous visitors felt unsupported. Patients who felt unsupported also were more critical of the staff and the care they received. Nurses need to individually assess patients regarding their need for support, and assist family/friends to meet these needs.

  8. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-02-04

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel "myths" about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of "near zero" PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting "near zero" catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of "near zero" PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition.

  9. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel “myths” about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of “near zero” PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting “near zero” catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of “near zero” PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition. PMID

  10. Is there a diurnal difference in mortality of severely injured trauma patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybdal, Bitten; Svane, Christian; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus;

    2015-01-01

    with daytime patients (20:00-07:59). An injury severity score (ISS) >15 defined severe injury. Patients with burns and patients who upon arrival were declared non-trauma patients were not included. The primary outcome measure was 30-day mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1985 patients were recorded, of whom 576......BACKGROUND: Mortality may be higher for admissions at odd hours than during daytime, although for trauma patients results are conflicting. The objective of this study was to assess whether diurnal differences in mortality among severely injured trauma patients in Denmark were present. METHODS......: This observational cohort study was conducted between 1 December 2009 and 30 April 2011 involving one level 1 trauma centre and seven local emergency departments in eastern Denmark. Patients were consecutively included if received by a designated trauma team. Night-time patients (20:00-07:59) were compared...

  11. Consent for Dental Therapy in Severely Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litch, C. Scott; Liggett, Martha L.

    1992-01-01

    Legal standards for informed consent are discussed in the context of dental care for the elderly and severely ill. Variations in state common law and legislation are analyzed, focusing on differences between practitioner-oriented and patient-oriented approaches to informed consent. Implications for educators and practitioners are examined.…

  12. Immune Effects of RBC Storage in Critically Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    serious thrombotic events and nosocomial infections , and ICU and hospital length of stay. Prospective clinical studies investigating the mechanisms...specifically at risk of adverse effects resulting from the use of RBCs of increased storage age. A large multicenter randomized controlled trial in 30...units will affect both inflammation and coagulation factors in critically ill patients and these parameters will be positively associated with

  13. The Additional value of microcirculatory imaging in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Klijn (Eva)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Hemodynamic monitoring is essential in the care of every critically ill patient. One of the main goals of hemodynamic support is to preserve tissue perfusion. It is however known that tissue perfusion is more related to microcirculatory perfusion than systemic hemodynamic p

  14. Transferring the critically ill patient : are we there yet?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogh, Joep M.; Smit, Marije; Absalom, Anthony R.; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.; Zijlstra, Jan G.

    2015-01-01

    During the past few decades the numbers of ICUs and beds has increased significantly, but so too has the demand for intensive care. Currently large, and increasing, numbers of critically ill patients require transfer between critical care units. Inter-unit transfer poses significant risks to critica

  15. Antithrombin III for critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Mikkel; Wetterslev, Jørn; Ravn, Frederikke B

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Antithrombin III (AT III) is an anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory properties. We assessed the benefits and harms of AT III in critically ill patients. METHODS: We searched from inception to 27 August 2015 in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CAB, BIOSIS and CINAHL. We included randomized cont...

  16. Inter-hospital transport of critically ill patients; expect surprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogh, Joep M.; Smit, Marije; Hut, Jakob; de Vos, Ronald; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.; Zijlstra, Jan G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Inter-hospital transport of critically ill patients is increasing. When performed by specialized retrieval teams there are less adverse events compared to transport by ambulance. These transports are performed with technical equipment also used in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). As a

  17. Computer-assisted glucose control in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelzang, Mathijs; Loef, Bert G.; Regtien, Joost G.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; van Assen, Hein; Zijlstra, Felix; Nijsten, Maarten W. N.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Intensive insulin therapy is associated with the risk of hypoglycemia and increased costs of material and personnel. We therefore evaluated the safety and efficiency of a computer-assisted glucose control protocol in a large population of critically ill patients. Design and setting: Obser

  18. Hyperglycaemia in critically ill patients : marker or mediator of mortality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corstjens, Anouk M.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan; Zijlstra, Felix; Tulleken, Jaap E.; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.; Zijlstra, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Acute hyperglycaemia has been associated with complications, prolonged intensive care unit and hospital stay, and increased mortality. We made an inventory of the prevalence and prognostic value of hyperglycaemia, and of the effects of glucose control in different groups of critically ill patients.

  19. Reducing Psychotropic Polypharmacy in patients with severe mental illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, P; Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Killian, R.;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients with mental illness receive psychotropic medicine in high dosages and from more than one drug. One of the consequences of this practice is obesity, which is a contributing factor to increased physical morbidity and premature death. METHODS: Our study was a cluster...

  20. Transferring the critically ill patient : are we there yet?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogh, Joep M.; Smit, Marije; Absalom, Anthony R.; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.; Zijlstra, Jan G.

    2015-01-01

    During the past few decades the numbers of ICUs and beds has increased significantly, but so too has the demand for intensive care. Currently large, and increasing, numbers of critically ill patients require transfer between critical care units. Inter-unit transfer poses significant risks to

  1. Human factors in the management of the critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bion, J F; Abrusci, T; Hibbert, P

    2010-07-01

    Unreliable delivery of best practice care is a major component of medical error. Critically ill patients are particularly susceptible to error and unreliable care. Human factors analysis, widely used in industry, provides insights into how interactions between organizations, tasks, and the individual worker impact on human behaviour and affect systems reliability. We adopt a human factors approach to examine determinants of clinical reliability in the management of critically ill patients. We conducted a narrative review based on a Medline search (1950-March 2010) combining intensive/critical care (units) with medical errors, patient safety, or delivery of healthcare; keyword and Internet search 'human factors' or 'ergonomics'. Critical illness represents a high-risk, complex system spanning speciality and geographical boundaries. Substantial opportunities exist for improving the safety and reliability of care of critically ill patients at the level of the task, the individual healthcare provider, and the organization or system. Task standardization (best practice guidelines) and simplification (bundling or checklists) should be implemented where scientific evidence is strong, or adopted subject to further research ('dynamic standardization'). Technical interventions should be embedded in everyday practice by the adjunctive use of non-technical (behavioural) interventions. These include executive 'adoption' of clinical areas, systematic methods for identifying hazards and reflective learning from error, and a range of techniques for improving teamworking and communication. Human factors analysis provides a useful framework for understanding and rectifying the causes of error and unreliability, particularly in complex systems such as critical care.

  2. Psychiatric morbidity among physically ill patients in a Ugandan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Methods: This was a cross sectional descriptive study. Psychiatric ... of all the psychiatrically diagnosed patients were recognized by their treating doctors as having mental illness. ... Previous studies conducted at Mulago national ... this relationship. ... parent wards. .... major depression, one had anxiety disorder, and two.

  3. Sleep disturbances in critically ill patients in ICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Ording, H; Jennum, P

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disturbances in the intensive care unit (ICU) seem to lead to development of delirium, prolonged ICU stay, and increased mortality. That is why sufficient sleep is important for good outcome and recovery in critically ill patients. A variety of small studies reveal pathological sleep patterns...

  4. Computer-assisted glucose control in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelzang, Mathijs; Loef, Bert G.; Regtien, Joost G.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; van Assen, Hein; Zijlstra, Felix; Nijsten, Maarten W. N.

    Objective: Intensive insulin therapy is associated with the risk of hypoglycemia and increased costs of material and personnel. We therefore evaluated the safety and efficiency of a computer-assisted glucose control protocol in a large population of critically ill patients. Design and setting:

  5. Predictors of reintubation in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miu, Timothy; Joffe, Aaron M; Yanez, N David; Khandelwal, Nita; Dagal, Armagan Hc; Deem, Steven; Treggiari, Miriam M

    2014-02-01

    Assessment of a patient's readiness for removal of the endotracheal tube in the ICU is based on respiratory, airway, and neurological measures. However, nearly 20% of patients require reintubation. We created a prediction model for the need for reintubation, which incorporates variables importantly contributing to extubation failure. This was a cohort study of 2,007 endotracheally intubated subjects who required ICU admission at a tertiary care center. Data collection included demographic, hemodynamic, respiratory, and neurological variables preceding extubation. Data were compared between subjects extubated successfully and those who required reintubation, using bivariate logistic regression models, with the binary outcome reintubation and the baseline characteristics as predictors. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with robust variance was used to build the prediction model. Of the 2,007 subjects analyzed, 376 (19%) required reintubation. In the bivariate analysis, admission Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, minute ventilation, breathing frequency, oxygenation, number of prior SBTs, rapid shallow breathing index, airway-secretions suctioning frequency and quantity, heart rate, and diastolic blood pressure differed significantly between the extubation success and failure groups. In the multivariable analysis, higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score II and suctioning frequency were associated with failed extubation. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.68 for failure at any time, and 0.71 for failure within 24 hours. However, prior failed SBT, minute ventilation, and diastolic blood pressure were additional independent predictors of failure at any time, whereas oxygenation predicted extubation failure within 24 hours. A small number of independent variables explains a substantial portion of the variability of extubation failure, and can help identify patients at high risk of needing reintubation. These characteristics

  6. Dissociative symptoms are associated with reduced neuropsychological performance in patients with recurrent depression and a history of trauma exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Parlar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although preliminary work suggests that dissociative symptoms may impact neuropsychological performance in trauma-exposed populations, the relation between dissociation and cognitive performance has not been explored in patients with depression. Objective: The present study examined dissociative symptoms in relation to neuropsychological performance in participants with a primary diagnosis of recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD and a history of trauma exposure. Method: Twenty-three participants with MDD and 20 healthy controls who did not differ in age, sex, education, or IQ were assessed. In addition to a standardized neuropsychological battery assessing frontotemporally mediated cognitive processes, participants completed clinical measures assessing dissociative symptoms, illness severity, and past history of trauma exposure. Results: Among participants with MDD, greater severity of derealization was associated with reduced performance on measures of delayed visuospatial recall and recognition on a task of verbal memory recognition. In addition, more severe depersonalization was associated with slower processing speed and a response style lending itself toward better performance in a less active environment. Conclusions: These findings point toward dissociative symptoms as a transdiagnostic factor associated with neuropsychological dysfunction in patients with depression and a history of trauma. Limitations and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  7. Adverse events and outcomes of procedural sedation and analgesia in major trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S Green

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Trauma patients requiring procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA may have increased risk of adverse events (AEs and poor outcomes. Aims: To determine the incidence of AEs in adult major trauma patients who received PSA and to evaluate their postprocedural outcomes. Settings and Design: Retrospective analysis of adult patients (age >16 who received PSA between 2006 and 2014 at a Canadian academic tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: We compared the incidence of PSA-related AEs in trauma patients with nontrauma patients. Postprocedural outcomes including Intensive Care Unit admission, length of hospital stay, and mortality were compared between trauma patients who did or did not receive PSA. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression. Results: Overall, 4324 patients received PSA during their procedure, of which 101 were trauma patients (107 procedures. The majority (77% of these 101 trauma patients were male, relatively healthy (78% with American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status [ASA-PS] 1, and most (85% of the 107 procedures were orthopedic manipulations. PSA-related AEs were experienced by 45.5% of the trauma group and 45.9% of the nontrauma group. In the trauma group, the most common AEs were tachypnea (23% and hypotension (20%. After controlling for age, gender, and ASA-PS, trauma patients were more likely than nontrauma patients to develop hypotension (odds ratio 1.79; 95% confidence interval 1.11-2.89. Conclusion: Although trauma patients were more likely than nontrauma patients to develop hypotension during PSA, their outcomes were not worse compared to trauma patients who did not have PSA.

  8. Risk factors for trauma-induced coagulopathy- and transfusion-associated multiple organ failure in severely injured trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten eBalvers

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Both trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC as well as transfusion strategies influence early outcome in hemorrhagic trauma patients. Their impact on late outcome is less well characterized. This study systematically reviews risk factors for TIC- and transfusion-associated multiple organ failure (MOF in severely injured trauma patients.Material and methods: A systematic search was conducted in PubMed and Embase. Studies published from 1986 to 2013 on adult trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS ≥16, investigating TIC or transfusion strategies with MOF as primary or secondary outcome, were eligible for inclusion. Results of the included studies were evaluated with meta-analyses of pooled data. Results: In total 50 studies were included with a total sample size of 63,586 patients. Due to heterogeneity of the study populations and outcome measures, results from 7 studies allowed for pooling of data. Risk factors for TIC-associated MOF were hypocoagulopathy, hemorrhagic shock, activated protein C, increased histone levels and increased levels of markers of fibrinolysis on admission. After at least 24 hours after admission, the occurrence of thromboembolic events was associated with MOF. Risk factors for transfusion-associated MOF were the administration of fluids and red blood cell units within 24 hours post-injury, the age of red blood cells (>14 days and a ratio of FFP:RBC ≥1:1 (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.04-1.19.Conclusion: Risk factors for TIC-associated MOF in severely injured trauma patients are early hypocoagulopathy and hemorrhagic shock, while a hypercoagulable state with the occurrence of thromboembolic events later in the course of trauma predisposes to MOF. Risk factors for transfusion-associated MOF include administration of crystalloids and red blood cells and a prolonged storage time of red blood cells. Future prospective studies investigating TIC- and transfusion- associated risk factors on late outcome are required.

  9. ATLS adherence in the transfer of rural trauma patients to a level I facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrum, Marta L; McKee, Jessica; Lai, Michael; Staples, John; Switzer, Noah; Widder, Sandy L

    2013-09-01

    Injury sustained in rural areas has been shown to carry higher mortality rates than trauma in urban settings. This disparity is partially attributed to increased distance from definitive care and underscores the importance of proper primary trauma management prior to transfer to a trauma facility. The purpose of this study was to assess Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guideline adherence in the management of adult trauma patients transferred from rural hospitals to a level I facility. We performed a retrospective analysis of all adult major trauma patients transferred ≥50km from an outlying hospital to a level I trauma centre from 2007 through 2009. Transfer practices were evaluated using ATLS guidelines. 646 patients were analyzed. Mean age was 40.5years and 94% sustained blunt injuries with a median Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 22. Median transport distance was 253km. Among all patients, there were notable deficiencies (Key aspects of ATLS resuscitation guidelines are frequently missed during transfer of trauma patients from the periphery to level I trauma centres. Comprehensive quality improvement initiatives, including targeted education, telemedicine and trauma team training programmes could improve quality of care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High mortality after emergency room laparotomy in haemodynamically unstable trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Helle; Kofoed, Steen Christian; Hillingsø, Jens Georg

    2011-01-01

    Hypovolaemic shock is a major course of death in trauma patients. The mortality in patients in profound shock at the time of arrival is extremely high and we wanted to investigate the outcome of patients undergoing laparotomy at the Trauma Care Unit (TCU)....

  11. The controversy of the treatment of critically ill patients with thyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathatos, N; Levetan, C; Burman, K D; Wartofsky, L

    2001-12-01

    There is currently a vast literature available on the changes in thyroid function tests that occur during non-thyroidal illness. The aetiology of these changes is, however, controversial, especially with respect to whether they play an adaptive role for the organism in order to cope with stress or whether they represent primary pathology of the pituitary-thyroid axis. This is particularly true for critically ill patients, in whom the most significant changes in thyroid function are observed. The changes include low levels of thyroxine and very low levels of tri-iodothyronine, which would, on the surface, appear to indicate hypothyroidism. Therapy with thyroid hormone, as either L-T4 or L-T3, has therefore been suggested because of these low values for thyroid hormones in the blood. It is, however, unclear whether treating these patients with thyroid hormone is beneficial or harmful. Multiple studies have addressed this issue with patients with cardiac disease, sepsis, pulmonary disease (e.g. acute respiratory distress syndrome) or severe infection, or with burn and trauma patients. In spite of a very large number of published studies, it is very difficult to form clear recommendations for treatment with thyroid hormone in the intensive care unit. Instead, we find the evidence far from compelling, and would advise withholding thyroid hormone therapy in the critical care setting in the absence of clear clinical or laboratory evidence for hypothyroidism.

  12. Milrinone for cardiac dysfunction in critically ill adult patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koster, Geert; Bekema, Hanneke J; Wetterslev, Jørn;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Milrinone is an inotrope widely used for treatment of cardiac failure. Because previous meta-analyses had methodological flaws, we decided to conduct a systematic review of the effect of milrinone in critically ill adult patients with cardiac dysfunction. METHODS: This systematic...... review was performed according to The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Searches were conducted until November 2015. Patients with cardiac dysfunction were included. The primary outcome was serious adverse events (SAE) including mortality at maximum follow-up. The risk of bias...... analyses displayed statistical and/or clinical heterogeneity of patients, interventions, comparators, outcomes, and/or settings and all featured missing data. DISCUSSION: The current evidence on the use of milrinone in critically ill adult patients with cardiac dysfunction suffers from considerable risks...

  13. [Meaning and spirituality in patients with chronic somatic illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnert, A

    2006-08-01

    Issues of the meaning of life and spirituality are particularly important subjects given the threat of a serious illness and the confrontation with the finiteness of one's own life. Thus, addressing questions of meaning and spiritual domains of supportive care has been identified as essential by patients as well as by health care professionals. In recent years more research has focussed on theoretical conceptualization, empirical examination as well as on the development of meaning-centred interventions in somatically ill patients. Theoretical models for the understanding, development and adaptation of concepts and interventions addressing meaning and spirituality in the chronically ill are offered by the philosophical tradition of existentialism, logotherapy as well as by cognitive and developmental psychology, in particular studies on autobiographical memory and life story. However, the current state of empirical research focussing on the association between meaning, spirituality and physical as well as mental health and underlying mechanisms is not sufficient to draw reliable conclusions. With regard to psychosocial care, meaning-centred interventions have been developed in recent years primarily within the context of palliative care. These interventions are intended to support patients to find meaning in life in the face of a serious illness and to experience their life as fulfilled.

  14. Optimizing nutrition therapy to enhance mobility in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill R

    2013-01-01

    Critically ill patients are at high risk of malnutrition and lean body mass loss. Screening for malnutrition and performing detailed assessment of energy needs should be routine for patients admitted to intensive care units. Providing adequate calorie and protein provisions can attenuate muscle loss in many at-risk patients. Enteral nutrition is associated with decreased risks of morbidity and infections and is therefore preferred to parenteral nutrition in hemodynamically stable patients with favorable anatomy. Judicious use of steroids and paralytics in combination with adequate glucose control may decrease the risk of developing critical illness polyneuromyopathy. There is growing evidence for the potential immune-enhancing benefits of many micronutrients and vitamins in the critically ill, but more research is needed to determine which nutrients are most effective in which disease processes and what dosing regimens are safe and effective. Elderly, obese, and very young patients pose unique challenges for nutrition therapy and early mobility programs. Pairing early mobility programs with optimal nutrition therapy can help reduce morbidity, limit muscle loss, and speed recovery in intensive care unit patients.

  15. Automated Prediction of Early Blood Transfusion and Mortality in Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-24

    have recently been reviewed.29 Advanced radiologic tools such as CT scan and Focused As- sessment with Sonography in Trauma ( FAST ) scans and labo- ratory... trauma patients 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Colin F. Mackenzie, MBChB, Yulei Wang, MS, Peter...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Prediction of blood transfusion needs and mortality for trauma patients in near real time is an unrealized goal

  16. Case Report: Perioperative management of a pregnant poly trauma patient for spine fixation surgery

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is estimated to complicate approximately one in twelve pregnancies, and is currently a leading non-obstetric cause of maternal death. Pregnant trauma patients requiring non-obstetric surgery pose a number of challenges for anesthesiologists. Here we present the successful perioperative management of a pregnant trauma patient with multiple injuries including occult pneumothorax who underwent T9 to L1 fusion in prone position, and address the pertinent perioperative anesthetic considerat...

  17. The illness trajectory experienced by patients having spine fusion surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Bastrup, Lene; Norlyk, Annelise

    system and healthcare professionals are often dismissed as irrelevant. It is also evident that spine fusion patients are denied the opportunity to verbalise what it feels like to, for example, be ”a person in constant pain” or someone who ”holds back” to avoid being an inconvenience. These feelings......The illness trajectory of spine fusion patients. A feeling of being (in)visible Background Research shows that being a back patient is associated with great personal cost, and that back patients who undergo so-called spine fusion often experience particularly long and uncoordinated trajectories...

  18. How music-inspired weeping can help terminally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Kay

    2011-09-01

    Music's power to improve the 'human condition' has been acknowledged since ancient times. Something as counter-intuitive as weeping in response to music can ameliorate suffering for a time even for terminally ill patients. Several benefits-including catharsis, communication, and experiencing vitality-can be associated with grieving in response to "sad" music. In addressing the potential rewards of such an activity for terminally ill patients, this author combines concepts from philosopher Jerrold R. Levinson's article, entitled "Music and Negative Emotion," an illustration from a major motion picture, and supporting research from medical reports and aesthetic writings. Carefully offering this experience is recommended for patients who retain the capacity to express preference.

  19. [Evaluation and treatment of the critically ill cirrhotic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Javier; Aracil, Carles; Solà, Elsa; Soriano, Germán; Cinta Cardona, Maria; Coll, Susanna; Genescà, Joan; Hombrados, Manoli; Morillas, Rosa; Martín-Llahí, Marta; Pardo, Albert; Sánchez, Jordi; Vargas, Victor; Xiol, Xavier; Ginès, Pere

    2016-11-01

    Cirrhotic patients often develop severe complications requiring ICU admission. Grade III-IV hepatic encephalopathy, septic shock, acute-on-chronic liver failure and variceal bleeding are clinical decompensations that need a specific therapeutic approach in cirrhosis. The increased effectiveness of the treatments currently used in this setting and the spread of liver transplantation programs have substantially improved the prognosis of critically ill cirrhotic patients, which has facilitated their admission to critical care units. However, gastroenterologists and intensivists have limited knowledge of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of these complications and of the prognostic evaluation of critically ill cirrhotic patients. Cirrhotic patients present alterations in systemic and splanchnic hemodynamics, coagulation and immune dysfunction what further increase the complexity of the treatment, the risk of developing new complications and mortality in comparison with the general population. These differential characteristics have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications that must be known by general intensivists. In this context, the Catalan Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology requested a group of experts to draft a position paper on the assessment and treatment of critically ill cirrhotic patients. This article describes the recommendations agreed upon at the consensus meetings and their main conclusions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of endocrine mechanisms in ventilator-associated lung injury in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penesova, A; Galusova, A; Vigas, M; Vlcek, M; Imrich, R; Majek, M

    2012-07-01

    The critically ill subjects are represented by a heterogeneous group of patients suffering from a life-threatening event of different origin, e.g. trauma, cardiopulmonary failure, surgery or sepsis. The majority of these patients are dependent on the artificial lung ventilation, which means a life-saving chance for them. However, the artificial lung ventilation may trigger ventilation-associated lung injury (VALI). The mechanical ventilation at higher volumes (volutrauma) and pressure (barotrauma) can cause histological changes in the lungs including impairments in the gap and adherens junctions and desmosomes. The injured lung epithelium may lead to an impairment of the surfactant production and function, and this may not only contribute to the pathophysiology of VALI but also to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Other components of VALI are atelectrauma and toxic effects of the oxygen. Collectively, all these effects may result in a lung inflammation associated with a subsequent profibrotic changes, endothelial dysfunction, and activation of the local and systemic endocrine responses such as the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The present review is aimed to describe some of the pathophysiologic aspects of VALI providing a basis for novel therapeutic strategies in the critically ill patients.

  1. Factors influencing antibiotic treatment cost and outcome in critically ill patients: A “real-life” study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Aneta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Critically ill patients are at very high risk of developing severe infections in intensive care units (ICUs. Procalcitonin (PCT levels are eleveted in the circulation in patients with bacterial sepsis and PCT might be useful in guiding antibiotic treatment. The aim of this study was to estimate factors influencing patients survival and treatment cost in ICU with special emphasis on the impact of PCT serum levels use in guiding antimicrobial therapy. Methods. The study was conducted from August 2010 to May 2012 in the Intensive Therapy Unit, Clinic of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Military Medical Academy (MMA, Belgrade, Serbia. All adult critically ill patients with sepsis and/or trauma admitted in the ICU were included in the study. This study included only the cost of antimicrobial therapy in the ICU and the cost for PCT analysis. We used prices valid in the MMA for the year 2012. PCT in serum was measured by homogeneous immunoassay on a Brahms Kryptor analyzer. Results. A total of 102 patients were enrolled. The mean patients age was 55 ± 19 years and 61.8% of patients were male. The mean length of stay (LOS in the ICU was 12 ± 21 days. There was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001 between the sepsis and trauma group regarding outcome (higher mortality rate was in the sepsis group, particularly in the patients with peritonitis who were mostly women. The patients younger than 70 years had better chance of survival. LOS, the use of carbapenems and PCT-measurement influenced the cost of therapy in the ICU. Conclusions. The obtained results show that age, the diagnosis and gender were the main predictors of survival of critically ill patients in the ICU. The cost of ICU stay was dependent on LOS, use of carbapenems and PCT measurement although the influence of these three factors on the outcome in the patients did not reach a statistical significance.

  2. Candida colonization and subsequent infections in critically ill surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittet, D; Monod, M; Suter, P M; Frenk, E; Auckenthaler, R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The authors determined the role of Candida colonization in the development of subsequent infection in critically ill patients. DESIGN. A 6-month prospective cohort study was given to patients admitted to the surgical and neonatal intensive care units in a 1600-bed university medical center. METHODS. Patients having predetermined criteria for significant Candida colonization revealed by routine microbiologic surveillance cultures at different body sites were eligible for the study. Risk factors for Candida infection were recorded. A Candida colonization index was determined daily as the ratio of the number of distinct body sites (dbs) colonized with identical strains over the total number of dbs tested; a mean of 5.3 dbs per patient was obtained. All isolates (n = 322) sequentially recovered were characterized by genotyping using contour-clamped homogeneous electrical field gel electrophoresis that allowed strain delineation among Candida species. RESULTS. Twenty-nine patients met the criteria for inclusion; all were at high risk for Candida infection; 11 patients (38%) developed severe infections (8 candidemia); the remaining 18 patients were heavily colonized, but never required intravenous antifungal therapy. Among the potential risk factors for candida infection, three discriminated the colonized from the infected patients--i.e., length of previous antibiotic therapy (p < 0.02), severity of illness assessed by APACHE II score (p < 0.01), and the intensity of Candida spp colonization (p < 0.01). By logistic regression analysis, the latter two who were the independent factors that predicted subsequent candidal infection. Candida colonization always preceded infection with genotypically identical Candida spp strain. The proposed colonization indexes reached threshold values a mean of 6 days before Candida infection and demonstrated high positive predictive values (66 to 100%). CONCLUSIONS. The intensity of Candida colonization assessed by systematic

  3. Searching for predictors of surgical complications in critically ill surgery patients in the intensive care unit: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Zainna C; Schreinemakers, Jennifer M J; de Waal, Ruud A L; van der Laan, Lijckle

    2015-09-01

    We reviewed the use of the levels of C-reactive protein, lactate and procalcitonin and/or the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score to determine their diagnostic accuracy for predicting surgical complications in critically ill general post-surgery patients. Included were all studies published in PubMed from inception to July 2013 that met the following inclusion criteria: evaluation of the above parameters, describing their diagnostic accuracy and the risk stratification for surgical complications in surgical patients admitted to an intensive care unit. No difference in the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores was seen between patients with or without complications. The D-lactate levels were significantly higher in those who developed colonic ischemic complications after a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. After gastro-intestinal surgery, contradictory data were reported, with both positive and negative use of C-reactive protein and procalcitonin in the diagnosis of septic complications. However, in trauma patients, the C-reactive protein levels may help to discriminate between those with and without infectious causes. We conclude that the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, lactate concentration and C-reactive protein level have no significant predictive value for early postoperative complications in critically ill post-surgery patients. However, procalcitonin seems to be a useful parameter for diagnosing complications in specific patient populations after surgery and/or after trauma.

  4. Experiences of critically ill patients in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofhuis, José G M; Spronk, Peter E; van Stel, Henk F; Schrijvers, Augustinus J P; Rommes, Johannes H; Bakker, Jan

    2008-10-01

    Experiences of critically ill patients are an important aspect of the quality of care in the intensive care (ICU). The aims of the study were firstly, to evaluate the perceptions of patients regarding nursing care in the ICU, and secondly, to explore patients' perceptions and experiences of ICU stay. A qualitative approach using a semi-structured focused interview in 11 patients was used (phase 1), followed by a quantitative approach using a self-reported questionnaire in 100 patients, 62 were returned and 50 could be evaluated (phase 2). A number of themes emerged from the interviews (phase 1), although support dominated as an important key theme. This was experienced as a continuum from the feeling being supported by the nurse to not being supported. This key theme was central to each of the three categories emerging from the data pertaining to: (1) providing the seriously ill patient with information and explanation, (2) placing the patient in a central position and (3) personal approach by the nurse. The responders to the subsequent questionnaire (phase 2) predominantly experienced sleeping disorders (48%), mostly related to the presence of noise (54%). Psychological problems after ICU stay were reported by 11% of the patients, i.e. fear, inability to concentrate, complaints of depression and hallucinations. Although the nurses' expertise and technical skills are considered important, caring behaviour, relieving the patient of fear and worries were experienced as most valuable in bedside critical care.

  5. Peritoneal lavage for the evaluation of patients with equivocal signs after abdominal trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, B R; Hauch, O; Damm, P

    1986-01-01

    The value of peritoneal lavage (PL) in the evaluation of 82 patients with equivocal signs after abdominal trauma was studied. The closed technique using an Intracatch (R) was employed. Fifty-four patients had blunt trauma, the predictive value of a positive PL was 86% and the predictive value...

  6. Trauma-focused treatment in PTSD patients with psychosis : symptom exacerbation, adverse events, and revictimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, D.P.G.; de Bont, P.A.J.M.; van der Vleugel, B.M.; de Roos, C.; de Jongh, A.; van Minnen, A.; van der Gaag, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Most clinicians refrain from trauma treatment for patients with psychosis because they fear symptom exacerbation and relapse. This study examined the negative side effects of trauma-focused (TF) treatment in patients with psychosis and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Methods: Analy

  7. Pain prevalence and pain relief in trauma patients in the Accident & Emergency department.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berben, S.A.; Meijs, T.H.; Dongen, R.T.M. van; Vugt, A.B. van; Vloet, L.C.M.; Mintjes-de Groot, J.J.; Achterberg, T. van

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute pain in the A&E department (ED) has been described as a problem, however insight into the problem for trauma patients is lacking. OBJECTIVE: This study describes the prevalence of pain, the pain intensity and the effect of conventional pain treatment in trauma patients in the ED. M

  8. Trauma-focused treatment in PTSD patients with psychosis: Symptom exacerbation, adverse events, and revictimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, D.P.G. van den; Bont, P.A.J.M. de; Vleugel, B.M. van der; Roos, C.J.A.M. de; Jongh, A. de; Minnen, A. van; Gaag, M. van der

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Most clinicians refrain from trauma treatment for patients with psychosis because they fear symptom exacerbation and relapse. This study examined the negative side effects of trauma-focused (TF) treatment in patients with psychosis and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Methods:

  9. Cervical collar-related pressure ulcers in trauma patients in intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, H.W.; Schoonhoven, L.; Galer, A.A.; Shortridge-Baggett, L.L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The application of a cervical collar (C-collar) in trauma patients can be life-saving. Previous studies, however, describe development of pressure ulcers related to C-collars. OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively compare collar-related pressure ulcers (CRPUs) occurring in trauma patients admi

  10. Cervical collar-related pressure ulcers in trauma patients in intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, H.W.; Schoonhoven, L.; Galer, A.A.; Shortridge-Baggett, L.L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The application of a cervical collar (C-collar) in trauma patients can be life-saving. Previous studies, however, describe development of pressure ulcers related to C-collars. OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively compare collar-related pressure ulcers (CRPUs) occurring in trauma patients

  11. Impact of early elective tracheotomy in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Araújo Marques Correia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Tracheotomy is one of the most frequent surgical procedures performed in critically ill patients hospitalized at intensive care units. The ideal timing for a tracheotomy is still controversial, despite decades of experience. OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of performing early tracheotomies in critically ill patients on duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit stay, overall hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality. METHODS: Retrospective and observational study of cases subjected to elective tracheotomy at one of the intensive care units of this hospital during five consecutive years. The patients were stratified into two groups: early tracheotomy group (tracheotomy performed from day one up to and including day seven of mechanical ventilation and late tracheotomy group (tracheotomy performed after day seven. The outcomes of the groups were compared. RESULTS: In the early tracheotomy group, there was a statistically significant reduction in duration of mechanical ventilation (6 days vs. 19 days; p < 0.001, duration of intensive care unit stay (10 days vs. 28 days; p = 0.001, and incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (1 case vs. 44 cases; p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: Early tracheotomy has a significant positive impact on critically ill patients hospitalized at this intensive care unit. These results support the tendency to balance the risk-benefit analysis in favor of early tracheotomy.

  12. [Impact of early elective tracheotomy in critically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Isabel Araújo Marques; Sousa, Vítor; Pinto, Luis Marques; Barros, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Tracheotomy is one of the most frequent surgical procedures performed in critically ill patients hospitalized at intensive care units. The ideal timing for a tracheotomy is still controversial, despite decades of experience. To determine the impact of performing early tracheotomies in critically ill patients on duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit stay, overall hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality. Retrospective and observational study of cases subjected to elective tracheotomy at one of the intensive care units of this hospital during five consecutive years. The patients were stratified into two groups: early tracheotomy group (tracheotomy performed from day one up to and including day seven of mechanical ventilation) and late tracheotomy group (tracheotomy performed after day seven). The outcomes of the groups were compared. In the early tracheotomy group, there was a statistically significant reduction in duration of mechanical ventilation (6 days vs. 19 days; p<0.001), duration of intensive care unit stay (10 days vs. 28 days; p=0.001), and incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (1 case vs. 44 cases; p=0.001). Early tracheotomy has a significant positive impact on critically ill patients hospitalized at this intensive care unit. These results support the tendency to balance the risk-benefit analysis in favor of early tracheotomy. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Precision of field triage in patients brought to a trauma centre after introducing trauma team activation guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehn Marius

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Field triage is important for regional trauma systems providing high sensitivity to avoid that severely injured are deprived access to trauma team resuscitation (undertriage, yet high specificity to avoid resource over-utilization (overtriage. Previous informal trauma team activation (TTA at Ulleval University Hospital (UUH caused imprecise triage. We have analyzed triage precision after introduction of TTA guidelines. Methods Retrospective analysis of 7 years (2001–07 of prospectively collected trauma registry data for all patients with TTA or severe injury, defined as at least one of the following: Injury Severity Score (ISS > 15, proximal penetrating injury, admitted ICU > 2 days, transferred intubated to another hospital within 2 days, dead from trauma within 30 days. Interhospital transfers to UUH and patients admitted by non-healthcare personnel were excluded. Overtriage is the fraction of TTA where patients are not severely injured (1-positive predictive value; undertriage is the fraction of severely injured admitted without TTA (1-sensitivity. Results Of the 4 659 patients included in the study, 2 221 (48% were severely injured. TTA occurred 4 440 times, only 2 002 of which for severely injured (overtriage 55%. Overall undertriage was 10%. Mechanism of injury was TTA criterion in 1 508 cases (34%, of which only 392 were severely injured (overtriage 74%. Paramedic-manned prehospital services provided 66% overtriage and 17% undertriage, anaesthetist-manned services 35% overtriage and 2% undertriage. Falls, high age and admittance by paramedics were significantly associated with undertriage. A Triage-Revised Trauma Score (RTS Patients subject to undertriage had an ISS-adjusted Odds Ratio for 30-day mortality of 2.34 (95% CI 1.6–3.4, p Conclusion Triage precision had not improved after TTA guideline introduction. Anaesthetists perform precise trauma triage, whereas paramedics have potential for improvement. Skewed

  14. Emergency diagnostic laparoscopy in abdominal trauma: a study of 41 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Félix Osorio Pagola

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: laparoscopy is a test used in the patients with abdominal trauma with suspicion of intra-abdominal organic damage and an imminent surgical behavior. Objectives: to expose the results of the urgency laparoscopic diagnosis in the traumatic acute abdomen. Methods: an descriptive and retrospective study in patient with diagnosis of abdominal trauma to which were carried out urgency laparoscopy at the Hospital Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima", from january 2001 to december 2008, when not being possible to define injury of intra-abdominal viscera performing other tests. Inclusion and exclusion criterion were applied. Results: we study 41 patients with average of 39, 2 ± 7, 7 years. Most of the studied patients were in the age range from 31 to 40 years with 21 patients (51, 2 % the open abdominal trauma with 26 patients prevailed (63, 4 %. The masculine sex prevailed with 38 patients (92,7 % and as much the open trauma as the closed one were more frequent in this sex with 25 patients (96,2 % and 13 patients (86,7 % respectively. They didn't show visceral damage during the laparoscopy 93, 3 % of the patients with closed abdominal trauma by what the surgical treatment was avoided, the same as in the patients with open abdominal trauma which had a non penetrating damage in abdominal cavity (80, 8 %. Conclusion: laparoscopic diagnosis is a useful test in patients with abdominal trauma and it avoids a considerable number of unnecessary conventional surgical treatment.

  15. Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma and Abdominal Computed Tomography Utilization in Adult Trauma Patients: Trends over the Last Decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Y. Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We sought to describe the trend in abdominal CT use in adult trauma patients after a point-of-care emergency ultrasound program was introduced. We hypothesized that abdominal CT use would decrease as FAST use increased. Methods. We performed a retrospective study of 19940 consecutive trauma patients over the age of 18 admitted to our level one trauma center from 2002 through 2011. Data was collected retrospectively and recorded in a trauma registry. We plotted the rate of FAST and abdominal CT utilization over time. Head CT was used as a surrogate for overall CT utilization rates during the study period. Results. Use of FAST increased by an average of 2.3% (95% CI 2.1 to 2.5, P<0.01 while abdominal CT use decreased by the same rate annually. The percentage of patients who received FAST as the sole imaging modality for the abdomen rose from 2.0% to 21.9% while those who only received an abdominal CT dropped from 21.7% to 2.3%. Conclusions. Abdominal CT use in our cohort declined while FAST utilization grew in the last decade. The rising use of FAST may have played a role in the reduction of abdominal CT performed as decline in CT utilization appears contrary to overall trends.

  16. Defining criteria to choose appropriate destination hospital for trauma patients: Piacenza Local Health Authority’s Piacenza trauma algorithm protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Mozzarelli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ambulance crew’s choosing of appropriate destination hospital for trauma patients can affect survival and morbidity outcomes. Aim of the present study is to devise a decision-making algorithm in order to allow the best choice of destination hospital for trauma patients and to apply it on an electronic device able to facilitate the decision made by ambulance staff. The method used was analysis of literature data, context and workload with a retrospective observational study. A comparison between the destination hospitals actually chosen and those that could have been chosen with the Piacenza trauma algorithm has been applied. The data shows a 9.5% (P>0.10 more advantageous change in appropriateness in the choice of medical facility and a 1.4% increase in admissions to the Emergency Department of the provincial hospital. The creation and use of a medical protocol and its consequent installation on an electronic device (tablet that can be shared over a computer platform could help medical staff make appropriate pre-hospital choices as regards the destination hospital for trauma patients.

  17. Patients' and partners' perspectives of chronic illness and its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checton, Maria G; Greene, Kathryn; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Venetis, Maria K

    2012-06-01

    are significant differences in (a) how patients and partners experience illness uncertainty and illness interference and (b) how appraisals of illness uncertainty and illness interference influence communication efficacy and health condition management. We discuss the findings and implications of the study.

  18. Airway Management of Two Patients with Penetrating Neck Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Bhattacharya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct trauma to the airway is a rare injury which can lead to disastrous consequences due to compounding effect of bleeding, aspiration of blood, airway obstruction and severe sympathetic stimulation. Here we are presenting two cases of open tracheal injury in two adult males following assault with sharp weapon. Two different techniques of securing the airways were employed depending upon the severity and urgency of the situation. In the first case, orotracheal intubation helped the surgeon to repair airway around the endotracheal tube whereas in the second patient this stenting effect was absent as he was intubated through the distal cut-end of trachea in the face of airway emergency.

  19. Echocardiographic Assessment of Preload Responsiveness in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Levitov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid challenges are considered the cornerstone of resuscitation in critically ill patients. However, clinical studies have demonstrated that only about 50% of hemodynamically unstable patients are volume responsive. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests that excess fluid resuscitation is associated with increased mortality. It therefore becomes vital to assess a patient's fluid responsiveness prior to embarking on fluid loading. Static pressure (CVP, PAOP and echocardiographic (IVC diameter, LVEDA parameters fails to predict volume responsiveness. However, a number of dynamic echocardiographic parameters which are based on changes in vena-caval dimensions or cardiac function induce by positive pressure ventilation or passive leg raising appear to be highly predictive of volume responsiveness.

  20. [Interdisciplinary treatment of severely injured patients in the trauma resuscitation room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurmb, Thomas; Müller, Thorben; Jansen, Hendrik; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Roewer, Norbert; Kühne, Christian A

    2010-06-01

    The trauma resuscitation room in emergency departments is an important link between preclinical treatment and clinical management of patients with multiple trauma. For the trauma team (Trauma Surgery, Anaesthesiology, Radiology) to respond adequately, a high degree of training and standardisation is required. With arrival of the patient, the trauma team starts with priority orientated resuscitation. After life-threatening problems have been resolved, the diagnostic work is started with plain films of the chest and the pelvis and FAST. Additional plain films are made depending on further suspected injuries. Reassessment of the patient is done and necessary emergency interventions are performed before the patient is transferred to the radiology department for organ focused computed tomography. CT has gained importance in the early diagnostic phase of trauma care. The development of Multislice Helical Computed Tomography (MSCT) has led to substantial refinement in the diagnostic work-up. For many institutions it has become an essential part of the imaging of the traumatized patient. Delayed and insufficient medical interventions have a high impact on negative patient outcome. Anticipating and dealing with critical situations might reduce preventable errors in the treatment process and can be achieved by implementation of an algorithm-based structured workflow. In that context some elements of quality management are well established in clinical practice. In the presented paper we describe the effort that needs to be done to provide optimal care for multiple trauma patients after admission to a designed trauma centre.

  1. Children and Facial Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Children and Facial Trauma Children and Facial Trauma Patient Health Information News ... staff at newsroom@entnet.org . What is facial trauma? The term facial trauma means any injury to ...

  2. Use of inotropes and vasopressor agents in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bangash, Mansoor N; Kong, Ming-Li; Pearse, Rupert M

    2012-01-01

    Inotropes and vasopressors are biologically and clinically important compounds that originate from different pharmacological groups and act at some of the most fundamental receptor and signal transduction systems in the body. More than 20 such agents are in common clinical use, yet few reviews of their pharmacology exist outside of physiology and pharmacology textbooks. Despite widespread use in critically ill patients, understanding of the clinical effects of these drugs in pathological stat...

  3. Illness perception differences between Russian- and Hebrew-speaking Israeli oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Nadia; Heruti, Irit; Levy, Sigal; Lulav-Grinwald, Doron; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2014-03-01

    Illness perception influences health and illness behaviors. This study was designed to estimate illness perception differences between Russian-speaking and Hebrew-speaking Israeli oncology patients. Changes in illness perception associated with time spent in Israel among Russian-speaking patients were also evaluated. Additionally, we evaluated differences in illness perception of patients exposed to Chernobyl's consequences. A total of 144 oncology patients (77 Hebrew-speaking, 67 Russian-speaking) completed personal data questionnaires and The illness perception questionnaire revised, translated into Russian for this study. Significantly more Russian-speaking oncology patients perceived their illness as chronic and having negative consequences on life (p speaking oncology patients tend to have a more negative perception of cancer compared to Hebrew-speaking patients. Time spent in Israel may create more positive perceptions of cancer among these patients. No illness perception differences were found concerning Chernobyl consequences.

  4. Endocrine and metabolic considerations in critically ill patients 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliers, Eric; Bianco, Antonio C; Langouche, Lies; Boelen, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) typically present with decreased concentrations of plasma tri-iodothyronine, low thyroxine, and normal range or slightly decreased concentration of thyroid-stimulating hormone. This ensemble of changes is collectively known as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). The extent of NTIS is associated with prognosis, but no proof exists for causality of this association. Initially, NTIS is a consequence of the acute phase response to systemic illness and macronutrient restriction, which might be beneficial. Pathogenesis of NTIS in long-term critical illness is more complex and includes suppression of hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone, accounting for persistently reduced secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone despite low plasma thyroid hormone. In some cases distinguishing between NTIS and severe hypothyroidism, which is a rare primary cause for admission to the ICU, can be difficult. Infusion of hypothalamic-releasing factors can reactivate the thyroid axis in patients with NTIS, inducing an anabolic response. Whether this approach has a clinical benefit in terms of outcome is unknown. In this Series paper, we discuss diagnostic aspects, pathogenesis, and implications of NTIS as well as its distinction from severe, primary thyroid disorders in patients in the ICU. PMID:26071885

  5. Cognitive therapy of trauma related guilt in patients with PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popiel, Agnieszka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Various aspects of guilt are frequent problems of patients suffering from PTSD, though they have been included into the diagnostic criteria for PTSD just in the present version DSM-5. Some studies indicate limitation of effectiveness of exposure therapy in PTSD patients with predominant emotions of anger or guilt. The aim of this paper is to present cognitive conceptualization of guilt in PTSD proposed by Kubany, and a treatment protocol resulting from this conceptualization. The clinical application of the protocol is illustrated with preliminary results of systematic observation of 8 patients with moderate to severe PTSD who were treated with cognitive therapy for guilt followed by a standard prolonged exposure protocol. The cognitive therapy of guilt can be a valuable supplement for treatment of PTSD. This protocol can also be an inspiration for therapists working with patients with dysfunctional guilt as a problem in other than PTSD disorders – like depression or adjustment disorders. In discussion the place of guilt in treatment according to different (PE-Foa et al.; CPT-Resick et al.; CT-Ehlers and Clark trauma focused therapy approaches is addressed, and the need for further studies is underlined.

  6. Selective digestive decontamination and empirical antimicrobial therapy of late-onset ventilator-associated pneumonia in trauma patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frédéric Garcin; Julien Textoris; Benoit Ragonnet; François Antonini; Claude Martin; Marc Leone

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the appropriateness of empirical antimicrobial therapy in trauma patients treated with selective digestive decontamination (SDD) who developed ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Methods: Retrospective study comparing 199 trauma patients receiving SDD and 99 non-trauma patients not receiving SDD hospitalized in a polyvalent intensive care unit (ICU) of a university hospital. Results: Early-onset VAP were recorded in 76 (35%) patients. Late-onset VAP occurred in 86 (72%) trauma patients receiving SDD and 56 (56%) non-trauma patients not receiving SDD (P = 0.02). The empirical antimicrobial therapy was appropriate in 108 (91%) trauma patients receiving SDD and 82 (83%) non-trauma patients not receiving SDD (P = 0.1). In the patients who developed late-onset VAP, the empirical antimicrobial therapy was appropriate in 77 (90%) trauma patients receiving SDD and 49 (88%) non-trauma patients not receiving SDD (P= 0.9). De-escalation was performed in 52 (44%) trauma patients receiving SDD and 37 (37%) non-trauma patients not receiving SDD (P = 0.4). Recurrences were observed in 26 (22%) trauma patients receiving SDD and 18 (18%) non-trauma patients not receiving SDD (P = 0.6). These episodes were due to easy-to-treat pathogens in 75 (63%) trauma patients and 33 (33%) non-trauma patients (P= 0.01). Conclusions: SDD is not associated with a rise in the rate of inappropriateness of the empirical antimicrobial therapy in trauma patients developing late-onset VAP.

  7. Reduced heart rate volatility: an early predictor of death in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Eric L; Morris, John A; Norris, Patrick R; France, Daniel J; Ozdas, Asli; Stiles, Renée A; Harris, Paul A; Dawant, Benoit M; Speroff, Theodore

    2004-09-01

    To determine if using dense data capture to measure heart rate volatility (standard deviation) measured in 5-minute intervals predicts death. Fundamental approaches to assessing vital signs in the critically ill have changed little since the early 1900s. Our prior work in this area has demonstrated the utility of densely sampled data and, in particular, heart rate volatility over the entire patient stay, for predicting death and prolonged ventilation. Approximately 120 million heart rate data points were prospectively collected and archived from 1316 trauma ICU patients over 30 months. Data were sampled every 1 to 4 seconds, stored in a relational database, linked to outcome data, and de-identified. HR standard deviation was continuously computed over 5-minute intervals (CVRD, cardiac volatility-related dysfunction). Logistic regression models incorporating age and injury severity score were developed on a test set of patients (N = 923), and prospectively analyzed in a distinct validation set (N = 393) for the first 24 hours of ICU data. Distribution of CVRD varied by survival in the test set. Prospective evaluation of the model in the validation set gave an area in the receiver operating curve of 0.81 with a sensitivity and specificity of 70.1 and 80.0, respectively. CVRD predict death as early as 24 hours in the validation set. CVRD identifies a subgroup of patients with a high probability of dying. Death is predicted within first 24 hours of stay. We hypothesize CVRD is a surrogate for autonomic nervous system dysfunction.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin in critically ill immunocompromised patients

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    Legriel Stéphane

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognizing infection is crucial in immunocompromised patients with organ dysfunction. Our objective was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin (PCT in critically ill immunocompromised patients. Methods This prospective, observational study included patients with suspected sepsis. Patients were classified into one of three diagnostic groups: no infection, bacterial sepsis, and nonbacterial sepsis. Results We included 119 patients with a median age of 54 years (interquartile range [IQR], 42-68 years. The general severity (SAPSII and organ dysfunction (LOD scores on day 1 were 45 (35-62.7 and 4 (2-6, respectively, and overall hospital mortality was 32.8%. Causes of immunodepression were hematological disorders (64 patients, 53.8%, HIV infection (31 patients, 26%, and solid cancers (26 patients, 21.8%. Bacterial sepsis was diagnosed in 58 patients and nonbacterial infections in nine patients (7.6%; 52 patients (43.7% had no infection. PCT concentrations on the first ICU day were higher in the group with bacterial sepsis (4.42 [1.60-22.14] vs. 0.26 [0.09-1.26] ng/ml in patients without bacterial infection, P 0.5 ng/ml had 100% sensitivity but only 63% specificity for diagnosing bacterial sepsis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was 0.851 (0.78-0.92. In multivariate analyses, PCT concentrations > 0.5 ng/ml on day 1 independently predicted bacterial sepsis (odds ratio, 8.6; 95% confidence interval, 2.53-29.3; P = 0.0006. PCT concentrations were not significantly correlated with hospital mortality. Conclusion Despite limited specificity in critically ill immunocompromised patients, PCT concentrations may help to rule out bacterial infection.

  9. Airway Management of the Patient with Maxillofacial Trauma: Review of the Literature and Suggested Clinical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Michal; Bahouth, Hany; Leiser, Yoav; Abu El-Naaj, Imad

    2015-01-01

    According to the Advanced Trauma Life Support recommendations for managing patients with life-threatening injuries, securing the airway is the first task of a primary caregiver. Airway management of patients with maxillofacial trauma is complex and crucial because it can dictate a patient's survival. Securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma is often extremely difficult because the trauma involves the patient's airway and their breathing is compromised. In these patients, mask ventilation and endotracheal intubation are anticipated to be difficult. Additionally, some of these patients may not yet have been cleared of a cervical spine injury, and all are regarded as having a full stomach and having an increased risk of regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration. The requirements of the intended maxillofacial operation may often preclude the use of an oral intubation tube, and alternative methods for securing the airway should be considered before the start of the surgery. In order to improve the clinical outcome of patients with maxillofacial trauma, cooperation between maxillofacial surgeons, anesthesiologists, and trauma specialists is needed. In this review, we discuss the complexity and difficulties of securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma and present our approach for airway management of such patients.

  10. 807: melatonin secretion pattern in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Holst, René; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Learning Objectives: It is well recognized that delirium screening in the intensive care unit (ICU) is an essential component of care. The use of standardized delirium assessment tools have been validated for use in ICU patients. However, these tools, such as the Confusion Assessment Method...... for the ICU (CAM-ICU) have not been validated for use in neurocritically ill patients. Baseline daily screening rates in four adult ICUs at a single center identified a need to improve delirium assessments for all ICU patients, including Neuroscience ICU patients. Methods: A pilot project implementing CAM....... However, use of the CAM-ICU with Neuroscience ICU patients presented a challenge due to the need to the difficulty in differentiating delirium and clinical neurological deterioration. Currently, the results of this pilot project indicate that the CAM-ICU can be used in Neuroscience ICU patients...

  11. Predictors of poor outcomes after significant chest trauma in multiply injured patients: a retrospective analysis from the German Trauma Registry (Trauma Register DGU®)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Blunt thoracic trauma is one of the critical injury mechanisms in multiply injured trauma victims. Although these patients present a plethora of potential structural damages to vital organs, it remains debated which injuries actually influence outcome and thereby should be addressed initially. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify the influence of critical structural damages on mortality. Methods All patients in the database of the TraumaRegister DGU® (TR-DGU) from 2002–2011 with AIS Chest ≥ 2, blunt trauma, age of 16 or older and an ISS ≥ 16 were analyzed. Outcome parameters were in-hospital mortality as well as ventilation time in patients surviving the initial 14 days after trauma. Results 22613 Patients were included (mean ISS 30.5 ± 12.6; 74.7% male; Mean Age 46.1 ± 197 years; mortality 17.5%; mean duration of ventilation 7.3 ± 11.5; mean ICU stay 11.7 ± 14.1 days). Only a limited number of specific injuries had a significant impact on survival. Major thoracic vessel injuries (AIS ≥5), bilateral lung contusion, bilateral flail chest, structural heart injury (AIS ≥3) significantly influence mortality in study patients. Several extrathoracic factors (age, blood transfusion, systolic blood pressure and extrathoracic severe injuries) were also predictive of increased mortality. Most injuries of the thoracic wall had no or only a moderate effect on the duration of ventilation. Injuries to the lung (laceration, contusion or pneumothoraces) had a moderate prolonging effect. Cardiac injuries and severe injuries to the thoracic vessels induced a substantially prolonged ventilation interval. Conclusions We demonstrate quantitatively the influence of specific structural damages of the chest on critical outcome parameters. While most injuries of the chest wall have no or only limited impact in the study collective, injuries to the lung overall show adverse outcome. Injuries to the heart or thoracic vessels have a

  12. Hospital management of abdominal trauma in Tehran, Iran: a review of 228 patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javad Salimi; Mohammad Ghodsi; Maryam Nassaji Zavvarh; Ali Khaji

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Today, trauma is a major public health problem in some countries. Abdominal trauma is the source of significant mortality and morbidity with both blunt and penetrating injuries. We performed an epidemiological study of abdominal trauma (AT) in Tehran, Iran. We used all our sources to describe the epidemiology and outcome of patients with AT.Methods: This study was done in Tehran. The study population included trauma patients admitted to the emergency department of six general hospitals in Tehran during one year. The data were collected through a questionnaire that was completed by a trained physician at the trauma center. The statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software (version 11.5 for Windows). The statistical analysis was conducted using the chi-square and P<0.05 was accepted as being statistically significant.Results: Two hundred and twenty-eight (2.8%) out of 8 000 patients were referred to the above mentioned centers with abdominal trauma. One hundred and twenty-five (54.9%)of the patients were in their 2nd and 3rd decades of life and 189 (83%) of our patients were male. Road traffic accidents (RTA) were the leading cause of AT with 119 (52.2%) patients. Spleen was the commonly injured organ with 51 cases. Following the analysis of injury severity, 159 (69.7%) patients had mild injuries (ISS<16) and 69 (30.3%) patients had severe injuries (ISS= 16). The overall mortality rate was 46 (20.2%).Conclusions: Blunt abdominal trauma is more common than penetrating abdominal trauma. Road traffic accidents and stab wound are the most common causes of blunt and penetrating trauma, respectively. Spleen is the most commonly injured organ in these patients. The mortality rate is higher in blunt trauma than penetrating one.

  13. The development of a model of dignity in illness based on qualitative interviews with seriously ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gennip, Isis E; Pasman, H Roeline W; Oosterveld-Vlug, Mariska G; Willems, Dick L; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2013-08-01

    While knowledge on factors affecting personal dignity of patients nearing death is quite substantial, far less is known about how patients living with a serious disease understand dignity. To develop a conceptual model of dignity that illuminates the process by which serious illness can undermine patients' dignity, and that is applicable to a wide patient population. Qualitative interview study. 34 patients with either cancer, early stage dementia, or a severe chronic illness were selected from an extensive cohort study into advance directives. In-depth interviews were carried out exploring the experiences of seriously ill patients with regard to their personal dignity. The interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis and a conceptual model was constructed based on the resulting themes. We developed a two-step dignity model of illness. According to this model, illness related conditions do not affect patients' dignity directly but indirectly by affecting the way patients perceive themselves. We identified three components shaping self-perception: (a) the individual self: the subjective experiences and internally held qualities of the patient; (b) the relational self: the self within reciprocal interaction with others; and, (c) the societal self: the self as a social object in the eyes of others. The merits of the model are two-folded. First, it offers an organizing framework for further research into patients' dignity. Secondly, the model can serve to facilitate care for seriously ill patients in practice by providing insight into illness and dignity at the level of the individual patient where intervention can be effectively targeted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Semiology of subtle motor phenomena in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Bogdan; Beniczky, Simona Alexandra; Demény, Helga; Beniczky, Sándor

    2017-05-01

    to investigate the semiology of subtle motor phenomena in critically ill patients, with- versus without nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). 60 consecutive comatose patients, in whom subtle motor phenomena were observed in the intensive care unit (ICU), were analysed prospectively. The semiology of the subtle phenomena was described from video-recordings, blinded to all other data. For each patient, the type, location and occurrence-pattern/duration were described. EEGs recorded in the ICU were classified using the Salzburg criteria for NCSE. only 23% (14/60) of the patients had NCSE confirmed by EEG. None of the semiological features could distinguish between patients with NCSE and those without. In both groups, the following phenomena were most common: discrete myoclonic muscle twitching and discrete tonic muscle activation. Besides these, automatisms and eye deviation were observed in both groups. subtle motor phenomena in critically ill patients can raise the suspicion of NCSE. Nevertheless, EEG is needed to confirm the diagnosis, since none of the semiological features are specific. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Heavy metal in the intensive care unit: a review of current literature on trace element supplementation in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Megan; To, Long; Tovbin, Alina; Smoot, Thomas; Mlynarek, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Trace elements are essential for many physiologic processes. In recent years, supplementation has been studied for a variety of indications, including glycemic control, wound healing, antioxidant effect, and anemia. Critical illness, especially states such as burns, traumas, and septic shock, is associated with inflammatory and oxidative stress, immune dysfunction, and malnutrition. In these patients, enteral and parenteral nutrition or pharmaceutical supplementation is used to provide essential macronutrients, including trace elements. The purpose of this review is to describe trace element supplementation, including iron, copper, chromium, manganese, selenium, and zinc, and highlight their mechanism, pharmacology, outcome data, and adverse effects.

  16. Coping with Trauma and Stressful Events As a Patient with an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Page Coping With Trauma and Stressful Events as a Patient With an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Jessica Ford , ... plan for developing effective coping responses. Is There a Difference Between a Stressful Event and a Traumatic ...

  17. Hypnotizability, dissociation and trauma in patients with a conversion disorder: An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moene, F.C.; Spinhoven, P.; Hoogduin, C.A.L.; Sandyck, P.; Roelofs, K.

    2001-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on the assumed high hypnotizability of conversion patients and on their dissociative experiences. Moreover, a relation is described between trauma, dissociation, somatization, psychopathology and conversion disorder. One hundred and two patients with motor

  18. [First aid for multiple trauma patients: investigative survey in the Firenze-Bologna area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescioli, G L; Donati, D; Federici, A; Rasero, L

    1999-01-01

    Overall mortality ascribable to multiple traumas, that in Italy is responsible for about 8,000 death/year, is strictly dependent on the function of the so called Trauma Care System. This study reports on an epidemiological survey conducted in the urban area of Florence along a 23-month period (from Jan 97 to Nov 99), with the aim to identify the typology of traumas and the first aid care delivered to the person until hospital admission. These data were compared to those collected in the urban area of Bologna because the composition of the first-aid team is different, being nurses, in Bologna, an integral component of the first aid system. On a total of 118 multiple traumas, 17% was represented by isolated head trauma, while in 72% involvement of other organs was present in addition to the head; 11% of cases were abdominal or thoracic traumas, 1% of lower extremities. In 46% the cause of trauma was a car accident. The complexity of care delivered to the person with trauma was less in the Florence survey, as indicated by the immobilization of patients, performed in only 11% of cases as compared to 47% in Bologna, by the application of the cervical collar, applied in 12% versus 62% of traumas. Although the two samples are not strictly comparable, these data suggest that the presence of nurses in the Trauma Care System can be one of the elements of improvement of the quality of delivered care.

  19. The effect of introducing a Trauma Network on patient flow, hospital finances and trainee operating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipps, Daniel; Jameson, Simon; Murty, An; Gregory, Rob; Large, David; Gregson, Jackie; Refaie, Ramsay; Reed, Mike

    2015-02-01

    In April 2012 the National Health Service in England introduced the Trauma Network system with the aim of improving the quality of trauma care. In this study we wished to determine how the introduction of the Trauma network has affected patient flow, hospital finances and orthopaedic trauma training across our region. The overall pattern of trauma distribution was not greatly affected, reflecting the relative rarity of major trauma in the UK. A small decrease in the total number of operations performed by trainees was noted in our region. Trainees at units designated as Major Trauma Centres gained slightly more operative experience in trauma procedures overall, and specifically in those associated with high energy, such as long bone nail insertion and external fixation procedures. However, there have been no significant changes in this pattern since the introduction of the Trauma Networks. Falling operative numbers presents a challenge for delivering high quality training within a surgical training programme, and each case should be seen as a vital educational opportunity. Best practice tariff targets for trauma were delivered for 99% of cases at our MTCs. Future audit and review to analyse the evolving role of the MTCs is desirable.

  20. Dissimilary in patients' and spouses' representations of chronic illness: exploration of relations to patient adaptation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.; Ridder, D. de; Bensing, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, the illness representations of patients suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (n=49) and Addison's Disease (n=52) and those of their spouses were compared. Couples generally held similar views with regard to the dimensions of illness identity and cause but disagreed

  1. Dissimilary in patients' and spouses' representations of chronic illness: exploration of relations to patient adaptation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.; Ridder, D. de; Bensing, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, the illness representations of patients suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (n=49) and Addison's Disease (n=52) and those of their spouses were compared. Couples generally held similar views with regard to the dimensions of illness identity and cause but disagreed

  2. Net protein utilization during total parenteral nutrition of injured critically ill patients: an original approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iapichino, G; Solca, M; Radrizzani, D; Zucchetti, M; Damia, G

    1981-01-01

    Traumatized critically ill patients with either a moderate or severe catabolic response were studied. Patients were randomly allocated to receive an intravenous solution which was either protein-free or contained protein and hypertonic glucose. The overall energy intake in both groups was equivalent to each patient's daily requirement. In both the moderately catabolic and severely catabolic patients the urinary nitrogen loss with the protein-free solution was negatively correlated to the energy intake/energy need ratio (p less than 0.01, moderate catabolism; p less than 0.001, severe catabolism). The ratio of energy intake/energy need was correlated with the nitrogen loss. From the resultant straight line, the obligatory nitrogen loss was determined for those patients receiving the protein containing solution (test diet). The net protein utilization was subsequently calculated using this value of the obligatory nitrogen loss. The net protein utilization was inversely correlated with the severity of trauma. It was significantly (p less than 0.005) greater in the patients with a moderate catabolic response. In the acute postinjury phase, the net protein utilization of infused amino acids was similar to that for protein fed orally to normal healthy subjects.

  3. Enteral nutrition intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentieva, Athina; Kontakiotis, Theodore; Bitzani, Militsa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of enteral feeding intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients, the effect of enteral feeding intolerance on the efficacy of feeding, the correlation between the infection marker (procalcitonin [PCT]) and the nutrition status marker (prealbumin) and the impact of feeding intolerance on the outcome of septic burn patients. From January 2009 to December 2012 the data of all burn patients with the diagnosis of sepsis who were placed on enteral nutrition were analyzed. Septic patients were divided into two groups: group A, septic patients who developed feeding intolerance; group B, septic patients who did not develop feeding intolerance. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were analyzed and compared. The diagnosis of sepsis was applied to 29% of all patients. Of these patients 35% developed intolerance to enteral feeding throughout the septic period. A statistically significant increase in mean PCT level and a decrease in prealbumin level was observed during the sepsis period. Group A patients had statistically significant lower mean caloric intake, higher PCT:prealbumin ratio, higher pneumonia incidence, higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Maximum Score, a longer duration of mechanical ventilation, and a higher mortality rate in comparison with the septic patients without gastric feeding intolerance. The authors concluded that a high percentage of septic burn patients developed enteral feeding intolerance. Enteral feeding intolerance seems to have a negative impact on the patients' nutritional status, morbidity, and mortality.

  4. Patients beyond salvation? Various categories of trauma patients with a minimal Glasgow Coma Score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Johanna M. M.; van der Naalt, Joukje; ten Duis, Hendrik-Jan

    Introduction: Trauma patients in an unresponsive state upon presentation to the Emergency Department have a poor prognosis. Rapid assessment of injuries combined with life-preserving therapy is required but de. ning the optimal strategy can be complicated when multiple organ systems are involved.

  5. Patients beyond salvation? Various categories of trauma patients with a minimal Glasgow Coma Score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Johanna M. M.; van der Naalt, Joukje; ten Duis, Hendrik-Jan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Trauma patients in an unresponsive state upon presentation to the Emergency Department have a poor prognosis. Rapid assessment of injuries combined with life-preserving therapy is required but de. ning the optimal strategy can be complicated when multiple organ systems are involved. Th

  6. Mental Representations of Illness in Patients with Gestational Trophoblastic Disease: How Do Patients Perceive Their Condition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mattei, Valentina E; Carnelli, Letizia; Mazzetti, Martina; Bernardi, Martina; Di Pierro, Rossella; Bergamini, Alice; Mangili, Giorgia; Candiani, Massimo; Sarno, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Gestational Trophoblastic Disease comprises a group of benign and malignant disorders that derive from the placenta. Using Leventhal's Common-Sense Model as a theoretical framework, this paper examines illness perception in women who have been diagnosed with this disease. Thirty-one women diagnosed with Gestational Trophoblastic Disease in a hospital in Italy were asked to complete the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised to measure the following: illness Identity, illness opinions and causes of Gestational Trophoblastic Disease. High mean scores were observed in the Emotional representations and Treatment control subscales. A significant difference emerged between hydatidiform mole patients and those with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia on the Identity subscale. A significant correlation emerged between "time since diagnosis" and the Treatment control subscale. This study is the first to investigate illness perception in Gestational Trophoblastic Disease. From a clinical perspective the results highlight the need for multidisciplinary support programs to promote a more realistic illness perception.

  7. Interpretation of illness in patients with chronic diseases from Shanghai and their associations with life satisfaction, escape from illness, and ability to reflect the implications of illness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arndt Bssing; Ariane von Bergh; Xiao-feng Zhai; Chang-quan Ling

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:The aim of this study is to analyze how patients with chronic diseases from Shanghai interpret their disease, and how these interpretations inlfuence patients’ life satisfaction, intention to escape from their illness and their ability to relfect on the implications of their illness. METHODS:A cross-sectional study enrolling 142 patients (mean age (50 ± 16) years;63%men, 37%women) with chronic diseases (60%cancer) was recruited in the Changhai Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China and surveyed using standardized questionnaires. RESULTS: Patients with chronic diseases from Shanghai interpreted their illness mostly as an Adverse Interruption of Life (55%), as a Threat/Enemy (50%), but also as a Challenge (49%), and only rarely as a Call for Help (18%) or as a Punishment (13%). Particularly fatalistic negative (i.e., Threat/Enemy, Adverse Interruption of Life) and strategy-associated disease interpretations (i.e., Relieving Break, Call for Help) were moderately associated with patients’ intention to escape from illness. In contrast, positive interpretations (i.e., something of Value, Challenge) and also the guilt-associated negative interpretation Failure were moderately related with patients’ ability to relfect on their illness. However, life satisfaction was weakly associated only with the view that il ness might be a Chal enge. Interestingly, 58%of those who would see their il ness as an Adverse Interruption (AI+) could see it also as a Challenge (Ch+). Detailed analyses showed that AI+Ch+patients differ from their AI+Ch- counterparts signiifcantly with respect to their ability to relfect life and implications of illness (F=9.1;P=0.004). CONCLUSION: The observed interpretations of illness, particularly the negative perceptions, could be used as indicators that patients require further psychological assistance to cope with their burden. Helping AI+patients see their illness also as a Challenge, and thus develop a higher

  8. Sociodrama in the rehabilitation of chronic mentally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickling, F W

    1989-04-01

    Sociodrama, a synthesis of group psychotherapy and theatrical presentation, was used from 1978 to 1981 to promote rehabilitation of chronic mentally ill patients at Bellevue Mental Hospital in Jamaica. Staff and patients collectively analyzed their recollections of the hospital's history, then wrote and staged dramatic productions based on the insights derived from those analyses. Changes in the major themes that emerged from the process reflected improvement in therapeutic attitudes and practices and in patient-staff communication over the four-year period. Patients who participated in the sociodramas had greater decreases in medication dosage and psychosocial disability scores and higher rates of improvement and discharge than a matched group of patients who did not participate.

  9. Airway Management of the Patient with Maxillofacial Trauma: Review of the Literature and Suggested Clinical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Barak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the Advanced Trauma Life Support recommendations for managing patients with life-threatening injuries, securing the airway is the first task of a primary caregiver. Airway management of patients with maxillofacial trauma is complex and crucial because it can dictate a patient’s survival. Securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma is often extremely difficult because the trauma involves the patient’s airway and their breathing is compromised. In these patients, mask ventilation and endotracheal intubation are anticipated to be difficult. Additionally, some of these patients may not yet have been cleared of a cervical spine injury, and all are regarded as having a full stomach and having an increased risk of regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration. The requirements of the intended maxillofacial operation may often preclude the use of an oral intubation tube, and alternative methods for securing the airway should be considered before the start of the surgery. In order to improve the clinical outcome of patients with maxillofacial trauma, cooperation between maxillofacial surgeons, anesthesiologists, and trauma specialists is needed. In this review, we discuss the complexity and difficulties of securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma and present our approach for airway management of such patients.

  10. Organization and development of surgical rehabilitation of patients with traumas and their effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barabash А.P.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To improve the efficiency of surgical rehabilitation of patients with traumas, their effects. Materials and methods: Short-term and follow-up results of the surgical treatment of patients with traumas and their effects have been analyzed. Statistical research methods have been used. Results: the efficiency of medical technologies during the early rehabilitation of patients has been demonstrated. Conclusion: Adoption of the most efficient medical technologies of general surgical treatment and postoperative rehabilitation of patients with traumas and their effects in daily practice provides high-grade restoration of the extremity's function, shortening of treatment period, decrease in number of complications and invalidism

  11. The Phosphate Levels of Critically ill Patients with Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Turan İnal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The incidence of hypophosphatemia is higher in critically ill patients and prolonged the length of ICU stay and duration of mechanical ventilation. This study evaluated the prognostic value of phosphate levels in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: All patients admitted to the general and surgical intensive care unit (ICU of Trakya University Medical Faculty, with respiratory failure during 1 year period (from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2009, were retrospectively enrolled. The phosphate levels, age, gender, length of ICU stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, APACHE II scores, medical drug usage and prognosis were recorded. Hypophosphataemia was defined as a level under 2.5 mg/dL and normophosphatemia was defined as a level between 2.5-4.7 mg/dL. Results: 139 patients were retrospectively enrolled into the study, of these, 41% had hypophosphataemia. There was no statistically significant difference in age, gender and APACHE II scores. The length of ICU stay was 20.16±16.31 days in hypophosphatemic patients and 12.62±12.43 days in normophosphatemic patients (p<0.05. The duration of mechanical ventilation was 17.54±16.27 days in hypophosphatemic patients and 9.94±11.55 days in normophosphatemic patients (p<0.05. The usage of catecholamines, beta adrenergic receptor agonists, diuretics and glucocorticoids were higher in hypophosphatemic patients (p<0.05. Conclusion: The duration of mechanical ventilation and the length of ICU stay was prolonged in hypophosphatemic patients with respiratory failure. We suggested to follow the phosphate levels tightly for early diagnosis and treatment of phosphate deficiency. (Journal of the Turkish Society of Intensive Care 2011; 9: 19-22

  12. Care fragmentation, quality, and costs among chronically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Brigham R; Joynt, Karen E; Rebitzer, James B; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-05-01

    To assess the relationship between care fragmentation and both quality and costs of care for commercially insured, chronically ill patients. We used claims data from 2004 to 2008 for 506,376 chronically ill, privately insured enrollees of a large commercial insurance company to construct measures of fragmentation. We included patients in the sample if they had chronic conditions in any of the following categories: cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma, arthritis, or migraine. We assigned each patient a fragmentation index based on the patterns of care of their primary care provider (PCP), with care patterns spread across a higher number of providers considered to be more fragmented. We used regression analysis to examine the relationship between fragmentation and both quality and cost outcomes. Patients of PCPs in the highest quartile of fragmentation had a higher chance of having a departure from clinical best practice (32.8%, vs 25.9% among patients of PCPs in the lowest quartile of fragmentation; P fragmentation had higher rates of preventable hospitalizations (9.1% in highest quartile vs 7.1% in lowest quartile; P fragmentation was associated with $4542 higher healthcare spending ($10,396 in the highest quartile vs $5854 in the lowest quartile; P fragmented care more often experience lapses in care quality and incur greater healthcare costs.

  13. The impact of antioxidant and splanchnic-directed therapy on persistent uncorrected gastric mucosal pH in the critically injured trauma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquist, E; Kirton, O; Windsor, J; Hudson-Civetta, J; Lynn, M; Herman, M; Civetta, J

    1998-02-01

    Critically ill trauma patients with gastric intramucosal acidosis, as measured by gastric tonometry, have an increased incidence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome despite supranormal O2 delivery. We altered our resuscitation protocol to maximize splanchnic blood flow and decrease oxygen-derived free radical damage. Prospective clinical trial with historical controls. The protocol differed from control by including administration of folate, mannitol, and low-dose isoproterenol. All patients had gastric tonometers and pulmonary artery catheters. If the intramucosal pH (pHi) was less than 7.25, splanchnic-sparing inotropic and vasodilatory agents were used to optimize systemic cardiac output. Two groups of trauma patients with persistent intramucosal acidosis at 24 hours (pHi < 7.25) were compared: a control group (n = 7), and patients who received the splanchnic/antioxidant protocol (n = 13). The two groups were similar based on Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, Injury Severity Score, age, cardiac index, oxygen delivery, and oxygen consumption. The "splanchnic therapy" group had fewer organ system failures as well as shortened length of intensive care unit and hospital stay. Three of 7 patients in the control group and 2 of 13 patients in the splanchnic therapy group had a final pHi < 7.25. Gastric tonometry-guided resuscitation and antioxidant/splanchnic therapy in critically ill trauma patients with persistent gastric mucosal acidosis may decrease multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

  14. The experience of childhood trauma and its influence on the course of illness in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Jens Einar; Pedersen, Marlene Buch; Trauelsen, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Persons with schizophrenia spectrum disorders often report high levels of childhood trauma, which often exacerbates symptoms and impede the process of recovery. However, little is known about how these traumas are experienced by service users and how they are integrated in their life stories. To ...

  15. Feeding the critically ill obese patient: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secombe, Paul; Harley, Simon; Chapman, Marianne; Aromataris, Edoardo

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this review is to identify effective enteral nutritional regimens targeting protein and calorie delivery for the critically ill obese patient on morbidity and mortality.More specifically, the review question is:In the critically ill obese patient, what is the optimal enteral protein and calorie target that improves mortality and morbidity? The World Health Organization (WHO) defines obesity as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair health, or, empirically, as a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m. Twenty-eight percent of the Australian population is obese with the prevalence rising to 44% in rural areas, and there is evidence that rates of obesity are increasing. The prevalence of obese patients in intensive care largely mirrors that of the general population. There is concern, however, that this may also be rising. A recently published multi-center nutritional study of critically ill patients reported a mean BMI of 29 in their sample, suggesting that just under 50% of their intensive care population is obese. It is inevitable, therefore, that the intensivist will care for the critically ill obese patient.Managing the critically ill obese patient is challenging, not least due to the co-morbid diseases frequently associated with obesity, including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, dyslipidaemia, sleep disordered breathing and respiratory insufficiency, hepatic steatohepatitis, chronic kidney disease and hypertension. There is also evidence that metabolic processes differ in the obese patient, particularly those with underlying insulin resistance, itself a marker of the metabolic syndrome, which may predispose to futile cycling, altered fuel utilization and protein catabolism. These issues are compounded by altered drug pharmacokinetics, and the additional logistical issues associated with prophylactic, therapeutic and diagnostic interventions.It is entirely plausible that the altered metabolic processes observed in the obese

  16. Circulating iFABP Levels as a marker of intestinal damage in trauma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, K.; Sir, O.; Kox, M.; Vaneker, M.; Jong, C. de; Gerretsen, J.; Edwards, M.J.; Scheffer, G.J.; Pickkers, P.

    2015-01-01

    Both the initial trauma and the subsequent hemodynamic instability may contribute to intestinal damage, which is of great importance in (immunological) posttrauma complications. This study assesses intestinal damage using the biomarker intestinal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (iFABP) in trauma patients

  17. Optimising diagnosis and treatment of coagulopathy in severely injured trauma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balvers, K.

    2016-01-01

    Trauma has a profound impact on public health around the world. Yearly approximately 5 million people die due to traumatic injury, which is 1 out of every 3 severely injured patients. Therefore, improving survival after trauma is a major challenge in which timely therapy is of great importance. In t

  18. Subacute posttraumatic complaints and psychological distress in trauma patients with or without mild traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, M.E.; Gareb, Barzi; El Moumni, M.; Scheenen, M. E.; van der Horn, H. J.; Timmerman, M. E.; Spikman, J. M.; van der Naalt, J.

    Objective: To identify the frequency, nature and profile of complaints for trauma patients with and without mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), and to assess their relation to anxiety and depression. Methods: A prospective cohort study in a level-one trauma centre was conducted. Mild traumatic brain

  19. Subacute posttraumatic complaints and psychological distress in trauma patients with or without mild traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, M. E.; Gareb, Barzi; El Moumni, M.; Scheenen, M. E.; van der Horn, H. J.; Timmerman, M. E.; Spikman, J. M.; van der Naalt, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the frequency, nature and profile of complaints for trauma patients with and without mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), and to assess their relation to anxiety and depression. Methods: A prospective cohort study in a level-one trauma centre was conducted. Mild traumatic brain

  20. Circulating levels of platelet α-granule cytokines in trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Nis Agerlin; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Johansson, Per Ingemar

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: To elucidate whether platelets differentiate cytokine release following trauma, we prospectively measured three major platelet-derived cytokines in 213 trauma patients on hospital arrival. METHODS: We measured plasma levels of the anti-inflammatory β-thromboglobulins (β...

  1. Post-traumatic stress disorder in somatic disease: lessons from critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelling, Gustav

    2008-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a well-recognized complication of severe illness. PTSD has been described in patients after multiple trauma, burns, or myocardial infarction with a particularly high incidence in survivors of acute pulmonary failure (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome) or septic shock. Many patients with evidence of PTSD after critical illness have been treated in intensive care units (ICUs). Studies in long-term survivors of ICU treatment demonstrated a clear and vivid recall of different categories of traumatic memory such as nightmares, anxiety, respiratory distress, or pain with little or no recall of factual events. A high number of these traumatic memories from the ICU has been shown to be a significant risk factor for the later development of PTSD in long-term survivors. In addition, patients in the ICU are often treated with stress hormones like epinephrine, norepinephrine, or cortisol. The number of the above-mentioned categories of traumatic memory increased with the totally administered dosages of catecholamines and cortisol, and the evaluation of these categories at different time points after discharge from the ICU showed better memory consolidation with higher dosages of stress hormones administered. Conversely, the prolonged administration of beta-adrenergic antagonists during the recovery phase after cardiac surgery resulted in a lower number of traumatic memories and a lower incidence of stress symptoms at 6 months after surgery. Findings with regard to the administration of the stress hormone cortisol were more complex, however. Several studies from our group have demonstrated that the administration of stress doses of cortisol to critically ill patients resulted in a significant reduction of PTSD symptoms measured after recovery without influencing the number of categories of traumatic memory. This can possibly be explained by a cortisol-induced temporary impairment in traumatic memory retrieval that has previously been

  2. Beta-lactam dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulldemolins, Marta; Vaquer, Sergi; Llauradó-Serra, Mireia; Pontes, Caridad; Calvo, Gonzalo; Soy, Dolors; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio

    2014-06-23

    Although early and appropriate antibiotic therapy remains the most important intervention for successful treatment of septic shock, data guiding optimization of beta-lactam prescription in critically ill patients prescribed with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) are still limited. Being small hydrophilic molecules, beta-lactams are likely to be cleared by CRRT to a significant extent. As a result, additional variability may be introduced to the per se variable antibiotic concentrations in critically ill patients. This article aims to describe the current clinical scenario for beta-lactam dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and CRRT, to highlight the sources of variability among the different studies that reduce extrapolation to clinical practice, and to identify the opportunities for future research and improvement in this field. Three frequently prescribed beta-lactams (meropenem, piperacillin and ceftriaxone) were chosen for review. Our findings showed that present dosing recommendations are based on studies with drawbacks limiting their applicability in the clinical setting. In general, current antibiotic dosing regimens for CRRT follow a one-size-fits-all fashion despite emerging clinical data suggesting that drug clearance is partially dependent on CRRT modality and intensity. Moreover, some studies pool data from heterogeneous populations with CRRT that may exhibit different pharmacokinetics (for example, admission diagnoses different to septic shock, such as trauma), which also limit their extrapolation to critically ill patients with septic shock. Finally, there is still no consensus regarding the %T>MIC (percentage of dosing interval when concentration of the antibiotic is above the minimum inhibitory concentration of the pathogen) value that should be chosen as the pharmacodynamic target for antibiotic therapy in patients with septic shock and CRRT. For empirically optimized dosing, during the first day a loading dose is required

  3. Patient Outcomes at Urban and Suburban Level I Versus Level II Trauma Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Amy H; Bosson, Nichole; Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Dawes, Aaron J; Putnam, Brant; Shepherd, Tchaka; Lewis, Roger J

    2017-08-01

    Regionalized systems of trauma care and level verification are promulgated by the American College of Surgeons. Whether patient outcomes differ between the 2 highest verifications, Levels I and II, is unknown. In contrast to Level II centers, Level I centers are required to care for a minimum number of severely injured patients, have immediate availability of subspecialty services and equipment, and demonstrate research, substance abuse screening, and injury prevention. We compare risk-adjusted mortality outcomes at Levels I and II centers. This was an analysis of data from the 2012 to 2014 Los Angeles County Trauma and Emergency Medical Information System. The system includes 14 trauma centers: 5 Level I and 9 Level II centers. Patients meeting criteria for transport to a trauma center are routed to the closest center, regardless of verification level. All adult patients (≥15 years) treated at any of the trauma centers were included. Outcomes of patients treated at Level I versus Level II centers were compared with 2 validated risk-adjusted models: Trauma Score-Injury Severity Score (TRISS) and the Haider model. Adult subjects (33,890) were treated at a Level I center; 29,724, at a Level II center. We found lower overall mortality at Level II centers compared with Level I, using TRISS (odds ratio 0.68; 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 0.78) and Haider (odds ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval 0.73 to 0.97). In this cohort of patients treated at urban and suburban trauma centers, treatment at a Level II trauma center was associated with overall risk-adjusted reduced mortality relative to that at a Level I center. In the subset of penetrating trauma, no differences in mortality were found. Further study is warranted to determine optimal trauma system configuration and allocation of resources. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lower LINE-1 methylation in first-episode schizophrenia patients with the history of childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Błażej; Szmida, Elżbieta; Karpiński, Paweł; Loska, Olga; Sąsiadek, Maria M; Frydecka, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    We investigated methylation of DNA repetitive sequences (LINE-1 and BAGE) in peripheral blood leukocytes from first-episode schizophrenia (FES) patients and healthy controls (HCs) with respect to childhood adversities. Patients were divided into two subgroups based on the history of childhood trauma - FES(+) and FES(-) subjects. The majority of HCs had a negative history of childhood trauma - HCs(-) subjects. FES(+) patients had significantly lower LINE-1 methylation in comparison with FES(-) patients or HC(-) subjects. Emotional abuse and total trauma score predicted lower LINE-1 methylation in FES patients, while general trauma score was associated with lower BAGE methylation in HCs. Childhood adversities might be associated with global DNA hypomethylation in adult FES patients.

  5. Nutritional risk assessment in critically ill cancer patients: systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchtenicht, Ana Valéria Gonçalves; Poziomyck, Aline Kirjner; Kabke, Geórgia Brum; Loss, Sérgio Henrique; Antoniazzi, Jorge Luiz; Steemburgo, Thais; Moreira, Luis Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the main methods for nutritional risk assessment used in critically ill cancer patients and present the methods that better assess risks and predict relevant clinical outcomes in this group of patients, as well as to discuss the pros and cons of these methods according to the current literature. Methods The study consisted of a systematic review based on analysis of manuscripts retrieved from the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases by searching for the key words “nutritional risk assessment”, “critically ill” and “cancer”. Results Only 6 (17.7%) of 34 initially retrieved papers met the inclusion criteria and were selected for the review. The main outcomes of these studies were that resting energy expenditure was associated with undernourishment and overfeeding. The high Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment score was significantly associated with low food intake, weight loss and malnutrition. In terms of biochemical markers, higher levels of creatinine, albumin and urea were significantly associated with lower mortality. The worst survival was found for patients with worse Eastern Cooperative Oncologic Group - performance status, high Glasgow Prognostic Score, low albumin, high Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment score and high alkaline phosphatase levels. Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index values Nutritional Index score was associated with abnormal nutritional status in critically ill cancer patients. Among the reviewed studies that examined weight and body mass index alone, no significant clinical outcome was found. Conclusion None of the methods reviewed helped to define risk among these patients. Therefore, assessment by a combination of weight loss and serum measurements, preferably in combination with other methods using scores such as Eastern Cooperative Oncologic Group - performance status, Glasgow Prognostic Score and Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment, is suggested given that

  6. Clostridium Difficile and Fecal Microbial Transplant in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvin Sanaie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Critically-ill patients constitute majority of the patients hospitalized in ICU wards (1, 2. This group of patients demands special considerations and measures of care (3-6. Clostridium difficile infection causes dangerous, painful and persistent diarrhea in critically ill patients. Its treatment consists of enteral metronidazol or vancomycin in combination with IV antibiotics cessation. Recently, probiotics have been considered as an alternative treatment for pseudomembranous colitis. In 1958, fecal microbial transplant was first described from healthy individuals to sick patients to displace pathogenic microbes from the intestine by re-establishing a healthy microbial community. Since then, it has gained value as “express stool treatment” or currently known as “fecal transplant”. Last year, FDA classified stool as drug, which typically requires an Investigational New Drug application (IND. However, in July 2013, the FDA issued guidance stating that it would exercise enforcement discretion for physicians administering FMT to treat patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Accordingly, considering stool as a tissue product or giving it its own classification, as FDA approved for blood, would keep patients safe, ensure broad access and facilitate research (7. It should be taken into consideration that some complications might accompany fecal microbial transplant such as making patients susceptible for conditions like obesity or autoimmune disorders. Safety and quality assurance starts from pre-enrollment donor screening, donor testing (17 serological and stool-based assays, donor monitoring and process control. The composition of the bacterial community has been shown to change when stored at -80oC compared to the samples stored at -20oC and it has been recommended to store the samples of intestinal content at -20oC before use for bacterial community analysis, instead of the current practice at -80oC (7, 8. However, if

  7. Effectiveness of trauma-focused treatment for patients with psychosis with and without the dissociative subtype of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Minnen, A; van der Vleugel, B M; van den Berg, D P G; de Bont, P A J M; de Roos, C; van der Gaag, M; de Jongh, A

    2016-10-01

    This study presents secondary analyses of a recently published trial in which post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients with psychosis (n = 108) underwent 8 sessions of trauma-focused treatment, either prolonged exposure (PE) or eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy. 24.1% fulfilled the criteria for the dissociative subtype, a newly introduced PTSD subtype in DSM-5. Treatment outcome was compared for patients with and without the dissociative subtype of PTSD. Patients with the dissociative subtype of PTSD showed large reductions in clinician-administered PTSD scale (CAPS) score, comparable with patients without the dissociative subtype of PTSD. It is concluded that even in a population with severe mental illness, patients with the dissociative subtype of PTSD do benefit from trauma-focused treatments without a pre-phase of emotion regulation skill training and should not be excluded from these treatments. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  8. Trauma-Informed Medical Care: Patient Response to a Primary Care Provider Communication Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bonnie L; Saunders, Pamela A; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado de Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2016-01-01

    Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders and health outcomes; yet there is little training of primary care providers about trauma's effects, and how to better interact with trauma survivors. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), to evaluate its feasibility and preliminary efficacy. We randomized four primary care sites to training or wait-list conditions; PCPs at wait-list sites were trained after reassessment. Primary care providers (PCPs) were Family Medicine residents (n = 17; 2 sites) or community physicians (n = 13; 2 sites). Outcomes reported here comprised a survey of 400 actual patients seen by the PCPs in the study. Patients, mostly minority, completed surveys before or after their provider received training. Patients rated PCPs significantly higher after training on a scale encompassing partnership issues. Breakdowns showed lower partnership scores for those with trauma or posttraumatic stress symptoms. Future studies will need to include more specific trauma-related outcomes. Nevertheless, this training is a promising initial approach to teaching trauma-informed communication skills to PCPs.

  9. The prevalence and impact of trauma history in eating disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klas Backholm

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early experiences of traumatic events (TEs may be associated with subsequent eating disturbance. However, few studies have investigated overall exposure and trauma-type frequency in various types of eating disorders (EDs. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and type of TEs in a nationally representative sample of Swedish ED patients. Method: Data from a database (Stepwise for specialized ED care were used. Trauma history was assessed as a part of the routine, initial assessment. Participants over the age of 18 with a diagnosed DSM-IV ED were included (N=4,524. Results: The number of patients having experienced at least one TE was 843 (18.6%, and 204 (24.2% reported at least one additional trauma. Sexual trauma was the most common form of TE (6.3%. There was no difference in overall traumatic exposure or in type of experienced trauma between the ED diagnostic subgroups (AN, BN, EDNOS, and BED. Overall traumatic exposure was linked to self-reported severity of ED symptoms, more secondary psychosocial impairment, psychiatric comorbidity, and negative self-image. Conclusions: Trauma history in ED patients merits attention. Results are partly in line with and partly in contrast to previous research. Measurement of trauma history has varied substantially in research on EDs, and this study adds to the indistinct literature on trauma history in ED.

  10. Magnitude of enterococcal bacteremia in trauma patients admitted for intensive trauma care: A tertiary care experience from South Asian country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonika Rajkumari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bloodstream infection (BSI and bacteremias due to Enterococcus spp. are increasing worldwide with the current need to understand its causes among hospitalized trauma patients. Hence, the study was conducted. Methodology: A 3-year retrospective laboratory cum clinical based study was performed at a level I trauma center in India. Patients with health care associated enterococcal bacteremia were identified using the hospital database, their episodes of BSI/bacteremia calculated and their clinical records and treatment were noted. Results: A total of 104 nonrepetitive Enterococcus spp. was isolated of which Enterococcus faecium was the most common (52%. High-level resistance to gentamicin high-level aminoglycoside resistance was seen in all the Enterococcus spp. causing bacteremia, whereas a low resistance to vancomycin and teichoplanin was observed. Overall mortality was more in patients infected with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (5/11, 46% compared to those with vancomycin sensitive Enterococcus (9/93, 10%; though no significant association of mortality with Enterococcus spp. bacteremia ( P > 0.05 was seen. The rate of bacteremia due to Enterococcus spp. was 25.4 episodes/1,000 admissions (104/4,094 during the study period. Conclusion: Enterococcal bacteremia is much prevalent in trauma care facilities. Here, a microbiologist can act as a sentinel and help in preventing such infections.

  11. Use of video-assisted intubation devices in the management of patients with trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Patients with trauma may have airways that are difficult to manage. Patients with blunt trauma are at increased risk of unrecognized cervical spine injury, especially patients with head trauma. Manual in-line stabilization reduces cervical motion and should be applied whenever a cervical collar is removed. All airway interventions cause some degree of cervical spine motion. Flexible fiberoptic intubation causes the least cervical motion of all intubation approaches, and rigid video laryngoscopy provides a good laryngeal view and eases intubation difficulty. In emergency medicine departments, video laryngoscopy use is growing and observational data suggest an improved success rate compared with direct laryngoscopy.

  12. Increased plasma carnitine in trauma patients given lipid-supplemented total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A T; Albrecht, R M; Scholten, D J; Morgan, R E

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of altering the fuel substrate mix of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) on plasma and urinary carnitine in trauma patients. TPN solutions were either 100% carbohydrate (CHO) based or lipid based (70% CHO, 30% lipid). There were statistically significant (p less than 0.05) increases in plasma levels of free carnitine, short-chain acyl carnitine, and total carnitine in trauma patients receiving lipid-based TPN. No significant differences in urinary carnitine excretion were noted between groups. We conclude that the use of lipids in the TPN of trauma patients leads to an alteration in plasma carnitine metabolism.

  13. Caregivers' Illness Perceptions Contribute to Quality of Life in Head and Neck Cancer Patients at Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Amy E; Morton, Randall; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the contribution of patient and caregiver illness perceptions to the quality of life of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Ninety-eight patients and their caregivers (n = 80) completed questionnaires at diagnosis. Caregivers' illness perceptions were significantly more negative than patients with respect to consequences, timeline, treatment, concern, and the emotional impact of HNC. The interaction between some patient and caregiver illness perceptions explained additional variance in patient quality of life, above and beyond patients' own illness perceptions. These findings suggest that caregivers should be included in psychological interventions to improve HNC patient quality of life.

  14. Effect of acidified enteral feedings on gastric colonization in the critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyland, D; Bradley, C; Mandell, L A

    1992-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of acidified enteral nutritional formulas (feedings) on gastric colonization and pH in critically ill patients. Randomized, double-blind trial of three groups: a) regular feedings into the stomach; b) regular feedings into the duodenum; and c) acidified feedings into the stomach. Nasogastric aspirates for gastric pH and microbiological determinations were obtained daily for a mean of 5 days after feeding began. ICU at a tertiary care hospital. Thirty-one patients indicated to receive enteral feedings before day 4 in the ICU were randomized. Seven patients had their feedings discontinued because of intolerance, accidental extubation, or tolerance of oral supplementation. One patient received the wrong feedings and was dropped from the study. A total of 23 patients finished the study. They were mostly trauma (n = 15) or neurosurgical (n = 6) patients. The average age was 40 yrs (range 15 to 71). An enteral formula with a pH of 6.5 was used as the control feeding. Hydrochloric acid was added to the control feeding to titrate the pH to 3.5 and this acidified enteral formula was given to the experimental group. All patients received continuous enteral feedings via an 8-Fr feeding tube. Seven of eight patients receiving the acidified feedings were sterile (no microbial growth) on receiving feedings compared with five of 15 of those patients receiving regular feedings (p = .027). For those patients initially colonized, four of four patients receiving acidified feedings immediately became sterile and remained so. Only two of ten patients receiving regular feedings remained sterile (p = .021). The mean gastric pH of the acidified group was 3.2 compared with the group receiving regular feedings into the stomach (pH = 4.7) and the group receiving regular feedings into the duodenum (pH = 3.8) (p < .01). There was no evidence of gastrointestinal bleeding in any patient. Acidified enteral feedings are effective in eliminating and preventing gastric

  15. Ear trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagles, Kylee; Fralich, Laura; Stevenson, J Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Understanding basic ear anatomy and function allows an examiner to quickly and accurately identify at-risk structures in patients with head and ear trauma. External ear trauma (ie, hematoma or laceration) should be promptly treated with appropriate injury-specific techniques. Tympanic membrane injuries have multiple mechanisms and can often be conservatively treated. Temporal bone fractures are a common cause of ear trauma and can be life threatening. Facial nerve injuries and hearing loss can occur in ear trauma.

  16. [Subjective feeling of patient on his illness and his treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca, P-M

    2013-09-01

    Subjective feeling of schizophrenic patients has been underestimated in the study of this illness. Subjective experience associated with the onset of the disease is of interest in a clinical point of view but also in the study of the underlying mechanisms. The fields of cognitive psychology, but also neuroscientific inputs, provide new paradigms to understand schizophrenia. In a more global perspective, subjective experience has an important impact on quality of life and is highly related to symptomatology and treatments. Identification of these subjective dimensions is needed to develop more efficacious strategies. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  17. Severe hypercapnia in critically ill adult cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Hassan S; Tiangco, Noel Dexter; Harrell, Christopher; Vender, Robert L

    2011-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenetic autosomal recessive multi-organ disease affecting approximately 50,000 patients worldwide. Overall median survival is continually increasing but pulmonary disease remains the most common cause of death. Guidelines have been published in relation to the outpatient maintenance of lung health for CF patients and treatment of acute lung exacerbations but little information exists about the management of the critically ill CF patient. Invasive mechanical ventilation in CF patients with acute respiratory failure is associated with poor outcome and high mortality. Retrospective analysis of adult patients with CF who required endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation in the Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU). Between the years 2003 - 2009, 14 adult patients with CF required endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation in the Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) of the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA. Eleven patients died in the MICU because of progressive respiratory failure and inability to liberate from mechanical ventilation. Seven individuals consistently manifested arterial partial pressures of carbon dioxide (PaCO(2)) greater than 20.00 kPa despite high levels of conventional modes of mechanical ventilation. Intubated CF patients with respiratory failure have a high mortality rate. Based on our experience, multiple factors contribute to severe hypercapnia and the effectiveness of conventional modes of mechanical ventilation in many of these patients is limited. Cystic fibrosis; Mechanical ventilation; Critical care; Hypercapnia; Respiratory failure.

  18. Incidence and outcome of tube thoracostomy positioning in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybauer, Marc O; Geisser, Wolfgang; Wolff, Holger; Maybauer, Dirk M

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency of use, placement site, success and misplacement rates, and need for intervention for tube thoracostomies (TTs), and the complications with endotracheal intubation associated with TT in the prehospital setting. We performed a five-year, retrospective study using the records of 1,065 patients who were admitted to the trauma emergency room at a university hospital and who had received chest radiographs or computed tomography (CT) scans within 30 minutes after admission. Seven percent of all patients received a TT (5% unilateral, 2% bilateral). Ninety-seven percent of all patients with a TT were endotracheally intubated. The success rate for correctly placed chest tubes was 78%. Twenty-two percent of the chest tubes were misplaced (i.e., too far in the chest, twisted, or bent); half of those had to be corrected, with one needing to be replaced. There were no statistical differences in the frequency of Monaldi or Bülau positions, or the frequency of left or right chest TT. In addition, the two positions did not differ in misplacement rates or the need for intervention. Helicopter emergency medical services physicians used the Monaldi position significantly more frequently than the Bülau position. In-hospital physicians performing interhospital transfer used the Bülau position significantly more frequently, whereas ground emergency medical physicians had a more balanced relationship between the two positions. Tube thoracostomy had no influence on endotracheal tube misplacement rates, and vice versa. Tube thoracostomy positioning mostly depends on the discretion of the physician on scene. The Monaldi and Bülau positions do not differ in misplacement or complication rates.

  19. Fever in trauma patients: evaluation of risk factors, including traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengualid, Victoria; Talari, Goutham; Rubin, David; Albaeni, Aiham; Ciubotaru, Ronald L; Berger, Judith

    2015-03-01

    The role of fever in trauma patients remains unclear. Fever occurs as a response to release of cytokines and prostaglandins by white blood cells. Many factors, including trauma, can trigger release of these factors. To determine whether (1) fever in the first 48 hours is related to a favorable outcome in trauma patients and (2) fever is more common in patients with head trauma. Retrospective study of trauma patients admitted to the intensive care unit for at least 2 days. Data were analyzed by using multivariate analysis. Of 162 patients studied, 40% had fever during the first 48 hours. Febrile patients had higher mortality rates than did afebrile patients. When adjusted for severity of injuries, fever did not correlate with mortality. Neither the incidence of fever in the first 48 hours after admission to the intensive care unit nor the number of days febrile in the unit differed between patients with and patients without head trauma (traumatic brain injury). About 70% of febrile patients did not have a source found for their fever. Febrile patients without an identified source of infection had lower peak white blood cell counts, lower maximum body temperature, and higher minimum platelet counts than did febrile patients who had an infectious source identified. The most common infection was pneumonia. No relationship was found between the presence of fever during the first 48 hours and mortality. Patients with traumatic brain injury did not have a higher incidence of fever than did patients without traumatic brain injury. About 30% of febrile patients had an identifiable source of infection. Further studies are needed to understand the origin and role of fever in trauma patients. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  20. Imaging algorithms and CT protocols in trauma patients: survey of Swiss emergency centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzpeter, R; Boehm, T; Boll, D; Constantin, C; Del Grande, F; Fretz, V; Leschka, S; Ohletz, T; Brönnimann, M; Schmidt, S; Treumann, T; Poletti, P-A; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2017-05-01

    To identify imaging algorithms and indications, CT protocols, and radiation doses in polytrauma patients in Swiss trauma centres. An online survey with multiple choice questions and free-text responses was sent to authorized level-I trauma centres in Switzerland. All centres responded and indicated that they have internal standardized imaging algorithms for polytrauma patients. Nine of 12 centres (75 %) perform whole-body CT (WBCT) after focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) and conventional radiography; 3/12 (25 %) use WBCT for initial imaging. Indications for WBCT were similar across centres being based on trauma mechanisms, vital signs, and presence of multiple injuries. Seven of 12 centres (58 %) perform an arterial and venous phase of the abdomen in split-bolus technique. Six of 12 centres (50 %) use multiphase protocols of the head (n = 3) and abdomen (n = 4), whereas 6/12 (50 %) use single-phase protocols for WBCT. Arm position was on the patient`s body during scanning (3/12, 25 %), alongside the body (2/12, 17 %), above the head (2/12, 17 %), or was changed during scanning (5/12, 42 %). Radiation doses showed large variations across centres ranging from 1268-3988 mGy*cm (DLP) per WBCT. Imaging algorithms in polytrauma patients are standardized within, but vary across Swiss trauma centres, similar to the individual WBCT protocols, resulting in large variations in associated radiation doses. • Swiss trauma centres have internal standardized imaging algorithms for trauma patients • Whole-body CT is most commonly used for imaging of trauma patients • CT protocols and radiation doses vary greatly across Swiss trauma centres.

  1. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with trauma psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Simone; Kapczinski, Flávio; Roesler, Rafael; de Moura Silveira, Erico; Magalhães, Pedro V; Kruel, Letícia Rosito Pinto; Schestatsky, Sidnei Samuel; Ceitlin, Lúcia Helena Freitas

    2010-04-16

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has an important role in learning, motivation and regulation of mood. The aim of this study was to investigate levels of serum BDNF in patients with trauma psychopathology (acute and post-traumatic stress disorder) when compared to age and gender matched controls. A consecutive sample of 34 patients was evaluated regarding socio-demographic and clinical variables by means of a standard protocol, Davidson Trauma Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Clinical Global Impression and the Global Assessment of Functioning. BDNF serum levels were measured right after the intake interview. Patients had higher BDNF levels than controls. Those levels, however, were higher right after the traumatic event, decreasing over time. When two groups of patients (recent and remote trauma) were investigated in separate, the recent trauma group (less than 1year since the traumatic event) had higher BDNF than controls, but this effect was not detected in the remote trauma group. The recent and remote trauma groups had different BDNF levels. Those findings persisted, even controlling for symptom severity, use of psychotropic medication, and history of psychiatric disease. As far as we know this is the first report of elevated serum BDNF levels in patients with recent trauma. Based in animal models that implicate BDNF in memory formation and consolidation, higher BDNF in recent PTSD could be related to memory and learning disruption central in PTSD psychopathology. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of patients' illness representations in coping and functioning with Addison's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between illness representations, coping behaviour and adaptive outcome in patients with Addison's disease (AD). Design: Cross-sectional. Following Leventhal's self-regulation model (Leventhal, Meyer & Nerenz, 1980), it was hypothesized that illness representati

  3. The role of patients' illness representations in coping and functioning with Addison's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between illness representations, coping behaviour and adaptive outcome in patients with Addison's disease (AD). Design: Cross-sectional. Following Leventhal's self-regulation model (Leventhal, Meyer & Nerenz, 1980), it was hypothesized that illness

  4. The role of patients' illness representations in coping and functioning with Addison's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between illness representations, coping behaviour and adaptive outcome in patients with Addison's disease (AD). Design: Cross-sectional. Following Leventhal's self-regulation model (Leventhal, Meyer & Nerenz, 1980), it was hypothesized that illness representati

  5. Relationship between uncertainty in illness, mood state and coping style in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-ye Yang

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Both uncertainty in illness and mood state were related to coping style. These data suggest that nurses should be trained to offer appropriate guidance to help decrease patients' uncertainty in illness and relieve their negative emotions.

  6. Concept analysis of good death in terminally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granda-Cameron, Clara; Houldin, Arlene

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this concept analysis of good death was to examine the attributes of a good death and explore the changes of the concept over time and its impact on terminally ill patients. The method used for this analysis was the Rodgers' evolutionary method. A literature search was completed using Medline Ovid and Journal Storage (JSTOR).The findings describe the evolution of the good death concept over time from the prehistoric era followed by premodern, modern, and postmodern times. In addition, information is presented about surrogate terms, attributes, antecedents, and consequences associated with good death followed by analysis and discussion of the findings. General attributes of a good death include pain and symptom management, awareness of death, patient's dignity, family presence, family support, and communication among patient, family, and health care providers.

  7. An assessment tool for acutely ill medical patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, Margaret

    2012-01-31

    This article reports the implementation and impact of a standardized systematic evidence-based predictive score for the initial assessment of acutely ill medical patients. The Simple Clinical Score (SCS) was introduced in the A&E department and the medical floor of the authors\\' hospital between June 2007 and July 2008. The SCS was well received by the staff - 67% felt it greatly improved patient assessment and was very valuable for ensuring appropriate placement of the patient after admission and improved the quality of care. This article describes the change process, the pilot evaluation and the training programme undertaken during the implementation of the SCS. It is hoped that this experience will be of value to other project teams who are undertaking similar initiatives.

  8. An assessment tool for acutely ill medical patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, Margaret

    2012-01-26

    This article reports the implementation and impact of a standardized systematic evidence-based predictive score for the initial assessment of acutely ill medical patients. The Simple Clinical Score (SCS) was introduced in the A&E department and the medical floor of the authors\\' hospital between June 2007 and July 2008. The SCS was well received by the staff - 67% felt it greatly improved patient assessment and was very valuable for ensuring appropriate placement of the patient after admission and improved the quality of care. This article describes the change process, the pilot evaluation and the training programme undertaken during the implementation of the SCS. It is hoped that this experience will be of value to other project teams who are undertaking similar initiatives.

  9. Epidemiological trends of pediatric trauma: A single-center study of 791 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the various epidemiological parameters that influence the causation of trauma as well as the consequent morbidity and mortality in the pediatric age group. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of 791 patients of less than 12 years age, was carried out over a period of 1 year (August 2009 to July 2010, and pediatric trauma trends, with regards to the following parameters were assessed: Age group, sex, mode of trauma, type of injury, place where the trauma occurred and the overall mortality as well as mortality. Results: Overall trauma was most common in the school-going age group (6-12 years, with male children outnumbering females in the ratio of 1.9:1. It was observed that orthopedic injuries were the most frequent (37.8% type of injuries, whereas fall from height (39.4%, road traffic accident (27.8% and burns (15.2% were the next most common modes of trauma. Home was found out to be the place where maximum trauma occurred (51.8%. Maximum injuries happened unintentionally (98.4%. Overall mortality was found out to be 6.4% (n = 51. Conclusions: By knowing the epidemiology of pediatric trauma, we conclude that majority of pediatric injuries are preventable and pediatric epidemiological trends differ from those in adults. Therefore, preventive strategies should be made in pediatric patients on the basis of these epidemiological trends.

  10. Optimal deployment of trauma personnel in the 80-hour work week era based on peak times of trauma patient arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoubian, Arezou; De Virgilio, Christian; Destro, Laura; Kaji, Amy H; Putnam, Brant; Neville, Angela L

    2010-10-01

    In the 80-hour work week era, optimal distribution of the residency workforce is critical. Little data exist as to whether current hours of hospital staffing parallel trends in trauma activity. The purpose of this study was to determine peak periods of trauma volume, severity, need for operative intervention, and mortality and determine if there are differences in mortality based on time period of arrival. We performed a retrospective analysis of the 17,167 patients admitted to our academic Level I trauma center between 2000 and 2007. Each admission was plotted against time of arrival and trends noted. A significant increase in activity occurred between 1700 and 0100 hours. Compared with other shifts, this shift had a disproportionately higher number of patients with penetrating injuries, need for operative intervention, Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 15, and death (P hours. In an era of optimizing resident training within the constraints of an 80-hour work week, strong consideration should be made for deploying personnel to match these findings.

  11. PAIN INTENSITY AND PAIN INTERFERENCE AMONG TRAUMA PATIENTS: A LITERATURE REVIEW

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    Deya Prastika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of trauma has been high and has gained attention worldwide. The energy involved in trauma results in specific tissue damage. Such tissue damage generally leads to pain. The high pain intensity possibly is consequence of trauma due to transfer energy to the body from external force and absorbed in wide area. This pain affected patients’ physical and psychological function, in which well known as pain interference. Objective: The aim of this review is to describe the pain intensity and pain interference among trauma patients. Method: A systematic search of electronic databases (CINHAL, ProQuest, Science Direct, and Google scholar was conducted for quantitative and qualitative studies measuring pain intensity and pain interference. The search limited to hospitalized trauma patients in adult age. Results: The search revealed 678 studies. A total of 10 descriptive studies examined pain intensity and pain interference and met inclusion criteria. The pain intensity and pain interference was assessed using Brief Pain Inventory (BPI. Pain intensity of hospitalized trauma patients were moderate to severe. These including 6 studies in orthopedic trauma, one study in musculoskeletal, two in studies in combinational between orthopedic and musculoskeletal, and two studies in burn injury. Moreover, the patients also reported pain was relentless & unbearable. In accordance, data showed that pain interference was moderate to severe from six studies. These studies result in vary of functional interference. However, those studies examined pain interference on sleep, enjoyment of life, mood, relationship with other, walking, general activity, and walking. Conclusion: The evidence from 10 studies included in this review indicates that hospitalized trauma patients perceived moderate to severe pain intensity and pain interference. Further research is needed to better evaluate the pain of hospitalized trauma patients.

  12. Association between illness severity and timing of initial enteral feeding in critically ill patients: a retrospective observational study

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    Huang Hsiu-Hua

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early enteral nutrition is recommended in cases of critical illness. It is unclear whether this recommendation is of most benefit to extremely ill patients. We aim to determine the association between illness severity and commencement of enteral feeding. Methods One hundred and eight critically ill patients were grouped as “less severe” and “more severe” for this cross-sectional, retrospective observational study. The cut off value was based on Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score 20. Patients who received enteral feeding within 48 h of medical intensive care unit (ICU admission were considered early feeding cases otherwise they were assessed as late feeding cases. Feeding complications (gastric retention/vomiting/diarrhea/gastrointestinal bleeding, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, ventilator-associated pneumonia, hospital mortality, nutritional intake, serum albumin, serum prealbumin, nitrogen balance (NB, and 24-h urinary urea nitrogen data were collected over 21 days. Results There were no differences in measured outcomes between early and late feedings for less severely ill patients. Among more severely ill patients, however, the early feeding group showed improved serum albumin (p = 0.036 and prealbumin (p = 0.014 but worsened NB (p = 0.01, more feeding complications (p = 0.005, and prolonged ICU stays (p = 0.005 compared to their late feeding counterparts. Conclusions There is a significant association between severity of illness and timing of enteral feeding initiation. In more severe illness, early feeding was associated with improved nutritional outcomes, while late feeding was associated with reduced feeding complications and length of ICU stay. However, the feeding complications of more severely ill early feeders can be handled without significantly affecting nutritional intake and there is no eventual difference in length of hospital stay or mortality

  13. A novel evaluation of microvascular damage in critically ill polytrauma patients by using circulating microRNAs

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    Bedreag Ovidiu Horea

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The management of the critically ill polytrauma patient is complex due to the multiple complications and biochemical and physiopathological imbalances. This happened due to the direct traumatic injury, or due to the post-traumatic events. One of the most complex physiopathology associated to the multiple traumas is represented by microvascular damage, subsequently responsible for a series of complications induced through the imbalance of the redox status, severe molecular damage, reduction of the oxygen delivery to the cell and tissues, cell and mitochondrial dead, augmentation of the inflammatory response and finally the installation of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in this type of patients. A gold goal in the intensive care units is represented by the evaluation and intense monitoring of the molecular and physiopathological dysfunctions of the critically ill patients. Recently, it was intensely researched the use of microRNAs as biomarkers for the specific physiopathological dysfunctions. In this paper we wish to present a series of microRNAs that can serve as biomarkers for the evaluation of microvascular damage, as well as for the evaluation of other specific physiopathology for the critically ill polytrauma patient.

  14. Altered hippocampal morphology in unmedicated patients with major depressive illness

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    Carrie E Bearden

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite converging evidence that major depressive illness is associated with both memory impairment and hippocampal pathology, findings vary widely across studies and it is not known whether these changes are regionally specific. In the present study we acquired brain MRIs (magnetic resonance images from 31 unmedicated patients with MDD (major depressive disorder; mean age 39.2±11.9 years; 77% female and 31 demographically comparable controls. Three-dimensional parametric mesh models were created to examine localized alterations of hippocampal morphology. Although global volumes did not differ between groups, statistical mapping results revealed that in MDD patients, more severe depressive symptoms were associated with greater left hippocampal atrophy, particularly in CA1 (cornu ammonis 1 subfields and the subiculum. However, previous treatment with atypical antipsychotics was associated with a trend towards larger left hippocampal volume. Our findings suggest effects of illness severity on hippocampal size, as well as a possible effect of past history of atypical antipsychotic treatment, which may reflect prolonged neuroprotective effects. This possibility awaits confirmation in longitudinal studies.

  15. Practice of strict glycemic control in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Marcus J; de Graaff, Mart J; Royakkers, Annic A N M; van Braam Houckgeest, Floris; van der Sluijs, Johannes P; Kieft, Hans; Spronk, Peter E

    2008-11-01

    Blood glucose control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as "strict glycemic control", decreases mortality and morbidity of critically ill patients. We searched the medical literature for export opinions, surveys, and clinical reports on blood glucose control in intensive care medicine. While strict glycemic control has been recommended standard of care for critically ill patients, the risk of severe hypoglycemia with strict glycemic control is frequently mentioned by experts. Some rationalize this risk, though others strongly point out the high incidence of hypoglycemia to be (one) reason not to perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete in intensive care units across the world. Frequently local guidelines accept higher blood glucose levels than those with strict glycemic control. Only a minority of retrieved manuscripts are on blood glucose regimens with the lower targets as with strict glycemic control. Hypoglycemia certainly is encountered with blood glucose control, in particular with strict glycemic control. Reports show intensive care-nurses can adequately and safely perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete, at least in part because of the feared risks of hypoglycemia. The preference for hyperglycemia over intermittent hypoglycemia is irrational, however, because there is causal evidence of harm for the former but only associative evidence of harm for the latter. For several reasons it is wise to have strict glycemic control being a nurse-based strategy.

  16. Family needs of critically ill patients in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ping-Ru; Redley, Bernice; Hsiao, Ya-Chu; Lin, Chun-Chih; Han, Chin-Yen; Lin, Hung-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Family members' experience a range of physiological, psychological and emotional impacts when accompanying a critically ill relative in the emergency department. Family needs are influenced by their culture and the context of care, and accurate clinician understanding of these needs is essential for patient- and family-centered care delivery. The aim of this study was to describe the needs of Taiwanese family members accompanying critically ill patients in the emergency department while waiting for an inpatient bed and compare these to the perceptions of emergency nurses. A prospective cross-sectional survey was conducted in a large medical center in Taiwan. Data were collected from 150 family members and 150 emergency nurses who completed a Chinese version of the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory. Family members ranked needs related to 'communication with family members,' as most important, followed by 'family member participation in emergency department care', 'family member support' and 'organizational comfort'; rankings were similar to those of emergency nurses. Compared to nurses, family members reported higher scores for the importance of needs related to 'communication with family members' and 'family members' participation in emergency department care'. Family members place greater importance than emergency nurses on the need for effective communication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Intravenous pyelogram results in association with renal pathology and therapy in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergren, C T; Chan, F N; Bodzin, J H

    1987-05-01

    The charts of 127 consecutive patients who sustained renal trauma between December 1977 and January 1984 were reviewed in order to relate the results of intravenous pyelogram (IVP) to the magnitude of renal pathology. Eighty-eight cases resulted from blunt trauma and 39 cases had penetrating injuries. There were 34 gunshot wounds and five stab wounds. An IVP was performed in 116 patients. All cases of blunt trauma with an IVP reported as normal had no renal pathology greater than contusion. Intravenous pyelogram results in penetrating injuries had a 75% false negative rate. Findings of nonvisualization or extravasation were significant for fractures, perforation, or pedicle injuries in all trauma. Eight of the patients with nonpenetrating wounds and 37 of the patients with penetrating injury underwent exploratory laparotomy. Sixteen nephrectomies were performed for a nephrectomy rate of 12.6% of the total series. This nephrectomy rate is comparable to similar studies which are reviewed.

  18. Collecting core data in severely injured patients using a consensus trauma template: an international multicentre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringdal, Kjetil G; Lossius, Hans Morten; Jones, J Mary

    2011-01-01

    : Trauma centres from three different continents were invited to submit Utstein Trauma Template core data during a defined period, for up to 50 consecutive trauma patients. Directly admitted patients with a New Injury Severity Score (NISS) equal to or above 16 were included. Main outcome variables were...... data completeness, data differences, and data collection difficulty. RESULTS: Centres from Europe (n=20), North America (n=3), and Australia (n=1) submitted data on 965 patients, of which 783 were included. Median age was 41 years (interquartile range [IQR] 24-60), and 73.1% were male. Median NISS...... the recommended version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). Three variables (age, gender, and AIS) were documented in all patients. Completeness >80% was achieved for 28 variables, and 20 variables were >90% complete. CONCLUSIONS: The Utstein Template was feasible across international trauma centres...

  19. Unusual case of life threatening subcutaneous hemorrhage in a blunt trauma patient

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    Ashraf F. Hefny

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Bleeding into the subcutaneous plane in closed degloving injury can cause severe hypovolemic shock. It is important for the clinicians managing trauma patients to be aware this serious injury.

  20. Unfinished Business in Families of Terminally Ill with Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Ryoko; Arao, Harue; Takao, Ayumi; Masutani, Eiko; Morita, Tatsuya; Shima, Yasuo; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Aoyama, Maho; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2017-08-11

    Unfinished business often causes psychological issues after bereavement. Providing care for families of terminally ill patients with cancer to prevent unfinished business is important. To clarify the prevalence and types of unfinished business in families of end-of-life patients with cancer admitted to palliative care units (PCUs), explore depression and grief associated with unfinished business, and explore the factors affecting unfinished business. We conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous, self-report questionnaire survey with 967 bereaved families of patients with cancer admitted to PCUs. The questionnaire assessed the presence/absence of unfinished business, content of unfinished business, depression, grief, process of preparedness, condition of the family and patient, and the degree of involvement of healthcare professionals. Questionnaires were sent to 967 families and 73.0% responded. In total, 26% of families had some unfinished business, with improvement of the patient-family relationship being a common type of unfinished business. Families with unfinished business had significantly higher depression and grief scores after bereavement compared with those without. Factors that influenced the presence/absence of unfinished business were preparedness for the patient's death (p=.001); discussion between the patient and family about the disease trajectory and way to spend daily life (pbusiness. Healthcare professionals should coordinate the appropriate timing for what the family wishes to do, with consideration of family dynamics including the family's preparedness, communication pattern, and relationships. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Risk of symptomatic heterotopic ossification following plate osteosynthesis in multiple trauma patients: an analysis in a level-1 trauma centre

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    Pape Hans-Christoph

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptomatic heterotopic ossification (HO in multiple trauma patients may lead to follow up surgery, furthermore the long-term outcome can be restricted. Knowledge of the effect of surgical treatment on formation of symptomatic heterotopic ossification in polytrauma is sparse. Therefore, we test the effects of surgical treatment (plate osteosynthesis or intramedullary nailing on the formation of heterotopic ossification in the multiple trauma patient. Methods We retrospectively analysed prospectively documented data of blunt multiple trauma patients with long bone fractures which were treated at our level-1 trauma centre between 1997 and 2005. Patients were distributed to 2 groups: Patients treated by intramedullary nails (group IMN or plate osteosynthesis (group PLATE were compared. The expression and extension of symptomatic heterotopic ossifications on 3-6 months follow-up x-rays in antero-posterior (ap and lateral views were classified radiologically and the maximum expansion was measured in millimeter (mm. Additionally, ventilation time, prophylactic medication like indomethacine and incidence and correlation of head injuries were analysed. Results 101 patients were included in our study, 79 men and 22 women. The fractures were treated by intramedullary nails (group IMN n = 50 or plate osteosynthesis (group PLATE n = 51. Significantly higher radiologic ossification classes were detected in group PLATE (2.9 ± 1.3 as compared to IMN (2.2 ± 1.1; p = 0.013. HO size in mm ap and lateral showed a tendency towards larger HOs in the PLATE group. Additionally PLATE group showed a higher rate of articular fractures (63% vs. 28% in IMN while IMN demonstrated a higher rate of diaphyseal fractures (72% vs. 37% in PLATE; p = 0.003. Ventilation time, indomethacine and incidence of head injuries showed no significant difference between groups. Conclusion Fracture care with plate osteosynthesis in polytrauma patients is associated with

  2. Illness perceptions in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and proliferative lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daleboudt, G M N; Broadbent, E; Berger, S P; Kaptein, A A

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the illness perceptions of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and whether perceptions are influenced by type of treatment for proliferative lupus nephritis. In addition, the illness perceptions of SLE patients were compared with those of patients with other chronic illnesses. Thirty-two patients who had experienced at least one episode of proliferative lupus nephritis were included. Patients were treated with either a high or low-dose cyclophosphamide (CYC) regimen (National Institutes of Health [NIH] vs. Euro-Lupus protocol). Illness perceptions were measured with the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and a drawing assignment. The low-dose CYC group perceived their treatment as more helpful than the high-dose CYC group. In comparison with patients with asthma, SLE patients showed more negative illness perceptions on five of the eight illness perception domains. Drawings of the kidney provided additional information about perceptions of treatment effectiveness, kidney function and patients' understanding of their illness. Drawing characteristics showed associations with perceptions of consequences, identity, concern and personal control. These findings suggest that the type of treatment SLE patients with proliferative lupus nephritis receive may influence perceptions of treatment effectiveness. In addition, patients' drawings reveal perceptions of damage caused by lupus nephritis to the kidneys and the extent of relief provided by treatment. The finding that SLE is experienced as a more severe illness than other chronic illnesses supports the need to more frequently assess and aim to improve psychological functioning in SLE patients.

  3. Childhood trauma and cortisol awakening response in symptomatic patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Monteleone, Palmiero; Serino, Ismene; Scognamiglio, Pasquale; Di Genio, Monica; Maj, Mario

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to trauma during childhood is a risk factor for eating disorders (EDs) in adulthood. The biological mechanisms underlying such increased risk seem to involve the endogenous stress response system (i.e., the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [HPA] axis), which undergoes trauma-induced functional changes that may persist later in life. In the present study, we examined the effects of childhood trauma experiences on HPA-axis activity, comparing saliva cortisol awakening response (CAR) in adult patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN) with CAR in adult healthy controls. Twenty-three patients with symptomatic AN, 21 patients with symptomatic BN, and 29 healthy women collected saliva samples at awakening and again after 15, 30, and 60 min. Participants also completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and eating-related psychopathological rating scales. According to the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, 13 individuals with AN and 12 individuals with BN, but none of the healthy women, reported childhood maltreatment. Compared with the control group, the non-maltreated AN patient group exhibited an enhanced CAR, whereas the group of non-maltreated BN patients showed a normal CAR. Moreover, both AN and BN patient groups with childhood maltreatment exhibited statistically significant blunting of CAR compared with non-maltreated groups. The present findings add to the evidence supporting the concept that there is a dysregulation of HPA-axis activity in symptomatic patients with EDs and suggest that childhood trauma exposure may contribute to such dysregulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Pre-hospital transport times and survival for Hypotensive patients with penetrating thoracic trauma

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    Mamta Swaroop

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achieving definitive care within the "Golden Hour" by minimizing response times is a consistent goal of regional trauma systems . This study hypothesizes that in urban Level I Trauma Centers, shorter pre-hospital times would predict outcomes in penetrating thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed using a statewide trauma registry for the years 1999-2003 . Total pre-hospital times were measured for urban victims of penetrating thoracic trauma. Crude and adjusted mortality rates were compared by pre-hospital time using STATA statistical software. Results: During the study period, 908 patients presented to the hospital after penetrating thoracic trauma, with 79% surviving . Patients with higher injury severity scores (ISS were transported more quickly. Injury severity scores (ISS ≥16 and emergency department (ED hypotension (systolic blood pressure, SBP <90 strongly predicted mortality (P < 0.05 for each . In a logistic regression model including age, race, and ISS, longer transport times for hypotensive patients were associated with higher mortality rates (all P values <0.05. This was seen most significantly when comparing patient transport times 0-15 min and 46-60 min (P < 0.001. Conclusion: In victims of penetrating thoracic trauma, more severely injured patients arrive at urban trauma centers sooner . Mortality is strongly predicted by injury severity, although shorter pre-hospital times are associated with improved survival . These results suggest that careful planning to optimize transport time-encompassing hospital capacity and existing resources, traffic patterns, and trauma incident densities may be beneficial in areas with a high burden of penetrating trauma.

  5. Cranial computed tomography scan findings in head trauma patients in Enugu, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ohaegbulam, Samuel C; Wilfred C Mezue; Ndubuisi, Chika A.; Erechukwu, Uwadiegwu A.; Ani, Chinenye O.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The choice of radiological investigations in head trauma in Africa is influenced by factors such as cost. Some patients who require computed tomography (CT) scan elsewhere are either managed blindly or do not present for it at the appropriate time. This paper evaluates the CT scan findings as they are obtained in cases of head trauma in a region of Nigeria. Methods: Prospectively recorded data of all head injury patients who presented for CT scan between January 2009 and April 201...

  6. Oral and maxillofacial trauma in patients with epilepsy: prospective study based on an outpatient population

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Ruocco Nonato; Moacir Alves Borges

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate oral and maxillofacial trauma caused by falls during epileptic seizures. METHOD: A prospective case-control study was carried out among patients recruited from both the Epileptic Outpatient Clinic and the Emergency Room of Hospital de Base during 2006. The study group was composed of patients with epilepsy that had been diagnosed by a specialist. Oral and maxillofacial trauma was diagnosed using a questionnaire together with physical and radiographic ex...

  7. [Tissue oxygen saturation in the critically ill patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruartmoner, G; Mesquida, J; Baigorri, F

    2014-05-01

    Hemodynamic resuscitation seeks to correct global macrocirculatory parameters of pressure and flow. However, current evidence has shown that despite the normalization of these global parameters, microcirculatory and regional perfusion alterations can persist, and these alterations have been independently associated with a poorer patient prognosis. This in turn has lead to growing interest in new technologies for exploring regional circulation and microcirculation. Near infra-red spectroscopy allows us to monitor tissue oxygen saturation, and has been proposed as a noninvasive, continuous and easy-to-obtain measure of regional circulation. The present review aims to summarize the existing evidence on near infra-red spectroscopy and its potential clinical role in the resuscitation of critically ill patients in shock. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  8. Screening for depression in terminally ill cancer patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akechi, Tatsuo; Okuyama, Toru; Sugawara, Yuriko; Shima, Yasuo; Furukawa, Toshiaki A; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2006-01-01

    This study attempted to assess the performance of several screening instruments for adjustment disorders (ADs) and major depression (MD) among terminally ill Japanese cancer patients. Two hundred and nine consecutive patients were assessed for ADs and MD using a structured clinical interview at the time of their registration with a palliative care unit, and two single-item interviews ("Are you depressed?" and "Have you lost interest?") and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were administered. Screening performance was investigated by calculating sensitivity, specificity, the positive predictive value, negative predictive value, likelihood ratio, and stratum-specific likelihood ratios. When the screening target included both an AD and MD, the HADS is a more useful screening method than the single-item interviews. Regarding screening for MD, both single-item interviews and the HADS possess useful screening performance. Different screening instruments may be recommended depending on the depressive disorders and specific populations.

  9. Comparison of sedation strategies for critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutton, Brian; Burry, Lisa D; Kanji, Salmaan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sedatives and analgesics are administered to provide sedation and manage agitation and pain in most critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. Various sedation administration strategies including protocolized sedation and daily sedation interruption are used to mitigate drug...... of interest include duration of mechanical ventilation, time to first extubation, ICU and hospital length of stay, re-intubation, tracheostomy, mortality, total sedative and opioid exposure, health-related quality of life, and adverse events. To inform our NMA, we will first conduct conventional pair......-wise meta-analyses using random-effects models. Where appropriate, we will perform Bayesian NMA using WinBUGS software. DISCUSSION: There are multiple strategies to optimize sedation for mechanically ventilated patients. Current ICU guidelines recommend protocolized sedation or daily sedation interruption...

  10. Acute pain from the perspective of minor trauma patients treated at the emergency unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Regina Martin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the factors that influence the perception of acute pain and the consequences of this experience in patients suffering from mild trauma. METHOD: Descriptive qualitative study conducted in an emergency service in southern Brazil. Data was collected in October 2013, through semi-structured interviews with 29 individuals who reported pain after physical trauma, regardless of the triggering factor. To process the data, we used a Content Analysis technique, subject modality. RESULTS: Two categories emerged: Factors that influence the perception of pain resulting from trauma and, Consequences of acute pain due to trauma. The acute pain sensation was influenced by biological, emotional, spiritual and socio-cultural factors and induced biological and emotional consequences for individuals. CONCLUSION: The health professionals need to consider the factors that influence soreness and its consequences for the proper assessment and management of pain resulting from trauma.

  11. Comparison of the RTS and ISS scores on prediction of survival chances in multiple trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan Akbari, G; Mohammadian, A

    2012-01-01

    Trauma represents the third cause of death after cardio vascular disease and tumors. Also in Iran, road accidents are one of the leading causes of death. Rapid evaluation of trauma severity and prediction of prognosis and mortality rate and probability of survival and rapid treatment of patients is necessary. One of the useful instruments for this is ISS and RTS scoring systems. This study evaluated 70 multi trauma patients in Fatemi trauma center affiliated to Ardabil University of medical science. This study was prospective study populations were 70 trauma patients admitted in Fatemi trauma center. During the II month, and patients data was collected by clinical evaluating of patients and follow up them and arranged as a questionnaire then related findings were evaluated by SPSS software. The average age of patients was 37.6±23.5 years and minimum and maximum age was 1 and 85 years. The most common involved group was 10-19 years (13 men and 1 woman). 81.4% of patients (57 cases were male) and 18.6% were female (13 cases). The most common causes of trauma was car accident with 64.2% frequency (43 cases) and then motorcycle accident with 16.4% frequency (11 cases) and all injured patient due to motorcycle accident compose the age group less than 40 years old. Also car accident had the highest frequency in both gender. Other causes of trauma were fall down with 13.5% frequency (9 cases) and under debris 5.9% (4 cases). Also from 70 studied patients, 67 cases (95.7%) had blunt trauma and 3 cases (4.3%) had penetrating trauma. The most penetrating trauma occurs in ages less than 50 years and was in the range of 30-50 years. The average RTS and ISS was 10.67±1.45 and 18.11±8.64, high and low scores of ISS existed in all age groups but a low score of RTS was highest in the children age group. The average length of ICU stay was 12.14±11.11 days. Overall mortality was 15.7 (11 cases). In this study, by the ISS increasing, the mortality rate also increased. But there

  12. Developing risk factors for post traumatic empyema in patients with chest trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mara del Pilar Quiroga; Jos Daniel Charry; Nicols Becerra; Juan Camilo Garcia; Eliana Karina Muoz; Rodrigo Lara

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To establish the risk factors associated to development of empyema posttraumatic in patients with chest trauma managed with closed thoracostomy. Methods: It was a descriptive and observational study of patients with chest trauma who were admitted between January 2013 and May 2014. The variables were evaluated and the results according to management with closed thoracostomy in patients with thoracic trauma was determined. Univariate analysis was performed and measures of central tendency were calculated. Results: In total 240 patients were analyzed. Among them, 10.4% (25) developed posttraumatic empyema. In patients who developed empyema, the mean age was 34.2 years, and the mean injury severity score was 20.6. It was identified as a risk factor closed chest trauma in 68%(17) and 84%coagulated hemothorax trauma. Empyema management thoracoscopy was in 100%of cases. Conclusions: The posttraumatic empyema is a complication that occurs in patients with thoracic trauma. One of the most important risk factors is coagulated hemothorax which could be identified and treated in time to avoid comorbidities during hospital stay.

  13. A 10-year restrospective evaluation of ultrasound in pregnant abdominal trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, Quinn C; Brown, Michele A; Dehqanzada, Zia A; Doucet, Jay; Coimbra, Raul; Casola, Giovanna

    2016-04-01

    The pregnant abdominal trauma patient presents a unique diagnostic challenge. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of abdominal sonography for the detection of clinically important injuries in pregnant abdominal trauma patients. A retrospective review was performed of a trauma center database from 2001 to 2011. Medical records were reviewed to determine initial abdominal imaging test results and clinical course. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of ultrasound for detection of traumatic injury were calculated. Of 19,128 patients with suspected abdominal trauma, 385 (2 %) were pregnant. Of these, 372 (97 %) received ultrasound as the initial abdominal imaging test. All 13 pregnant patients who did not receive ultrasound received abdominal CT. Seven pregnant patients underwent both ultrasound and CT. Seven ultrasound examinations were positive, leading to one therapeutic Cesarean section and one laparotomy. One ultrasound was considered false positive (no injury was seen on subsequent CT). There were 365 negative ultrasound examinations. Of these, 364 were true negative (no abdominal injury subsequently found). One ultrasound was considered false negative (a large fetal subchorionic hemorrhage seen on subsequent dedicated obstetrical ultrasound). Sensitivity and positive predictive value were 85.7 %. Specificity and negative predictive value were 99.7 %. Abdominal sonography is an effective and sufficient imaging examination in pregnant abdominal trauma patients. When performed as part of the initial assessment using an abbreviated trauma protocol with brief modifications for pregnancy, ultrasound minimizes diagnostic delay, obviates radiation risk, and provides high sensitivity for injury in the pregnant population.

  14. Trauma patients who present in a delayed fashion: a unique and challenging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Mary J; Nunez, Hector; Monaghan, Sean F; Heffernan, Daithi S; Adams, Charles A; Lueckel, Stephanie N; Stephen, Andrew H

    2017-02-01

    A proportion of trauma patients present for evaluation in a delayed fashion after injury, likely due to a variety of medical and nonmedical reasons. There has been little investigation into the characteristics and outcomes of trauma patients who present delayed. We hypothesize that trauma patients who present in a delayed fashion are a unique population at risk of increased trauma-related complications. This was a retrospective review from 2010-2015 at a Level I trauma center. Patients were termed delayed if they presented >24 hours after injury. Patients admitted within 24 hours of their injury were the comparison group. Charts were reviewed for demographics, mechanism, comorbidities, complications and outcomes. A subgroup analysis was done on patients who suffered falls. During the 5-y period, 11,705 patients were admitted. A total of 588 patients (5%) presented >24 h after their injury. Patients in the delayed group were older (65 versus 55 y, P fashion have unique characteristics and are more likely to suffer negative outcomes including substance withdrawal. Future goals will include exploring strategies for early intervention, such as automatic withdrawal monitoring and social work referral for all patients who present in a delayed fashion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of Sexual Trauma on HIV Care Engagement: Perspectives of Female Patients with Trauma Histories in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Melissa H; Dennis, Alexis C; Choi, Karmel W; Ciya, Nonceba; Joska, John A; Robertson, Corne; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2016-11-19

    South African women have disproportionately high rates of both sexual trauma and HIV. To understand how sexual trauma impacts HIV care engagement, we conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 15 HIV-infected women with sexual trauma histories, recruited from a public clinic in Cape Town. Interviews explored trauma narratives, coping behaviors and care engagement, and transcripts were analyzed using a constant comparison method. Participants reported multiple and complex traumas across their lifetimes. Sexual trauma hindered HIV care engagement, especially immediately following HIV diagnosis, and there were indications that sexual trauma may interfere with future care engagement, via traumatic stress symptoms including avoidance. Disclosure of sexual trauma was limited; no women had disclosed to an HIV provider. Routine screening for sexual trauma in HIV care settings may help to identify individuals at risk of poor care engagement. Efficacious treatments are needed to address the psychological and behavioral sequelae of trauma.

  16. Prospective Analysis of Geriatric Patients Admitted to Emergency Department With Trauma

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    Abdulkadir Akturk

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to reveal the demographic characteristics, causes of trauma, physical examination findings, the presence of fractures and the status of the outcome of the geriatric trauma patients admitted to the emergency department of an educational research hospital. Material and Methods: This study covers all the cases over 65 years who were admitted to emergency department with trauma between September 1 2011-31 August 2012. The demographic characteristics of the patients such as, age, gender, date of application and as well as the causes of trauma, physical examination findings and outcome situation in the emergency department were evaluated. The study was performed prospectively. SPSS V.20 was used for statistical analysis of the data obtained. Results: Total 175 patients were included to the study, 74 were male (42.28% and 101 were female (57.72%. The mean age of male patients were 75.01 ± 6.557 while the mean age of female patients were 76.10 ± 7.353. The most common cause of trauma in both gender was falls. This rate was 91.1% in female and 8.9% in male patients. 40.6% of the female patients and 27% of the male patients were admitted to the hospital before because of any trauma. The most common form of trauma according to exposed body localization in both gender was extremity traumas. It was seen in 51.5% of the females and 56.8% of the males. 30 female patients (29.7% and 13 male patients (17.6% had fracture in limbs. 78.3% of all patients were discharged from the emergency department and 21.7% of the patients were hospitalised. None of the patients were died in emergency department and none of the patients were referred to another institution from the emergency department. Total 38 patients were hospitalised, 32 of them were discharged, 2 of them were referred to another institution, and 4 of them were died. 26 of 38 hospitalised patients had undergone surgery while 20 of them were orthopedic surgeries

  17. Caring for Acutely Ill Patients in General Wards: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeddian, Ali Reza; Lindenmeyer, Antje; Marshall, Tom; Rashidian, Arash; Sayadi, Leila; Jafari, Nazila

    2016-09-01

    The number of acutely ill patients has risen in general wards due to the aging population, more advanced and complicated therapeutic methods, economic changes in the health system, therapeutic choices and shortage of intensive care unit beds. This may lead to adverse events and outcomes with catastrophic results. The purpose of this study was to describe the conditions of acutely ill patients, from the perspective of caregivers. The study was conducted in Tehran University of Medical Sciences and its two affiliated general teaching hospitals. Ten nurses and physicians participated in interviews, which were analyzed using qualitative content analysis methods. Four main categories of difficulties in caring for acutely ill patients in general wards were described: problems in identifying acutely ill patients, problems in clinical management of acutely ill patients, inappropriate use of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, and poor structure for mortality control. The staff do not appropriately diagnose the signs of deterioration. There are problems with the appropriate management of acutely ill patients, even if they are considered to be acutely ill and in need of special attention in general wards. Many shortcomings exist caring for acutely ill patients, ranging from identification to clinical management; there are also structural and contextual problems. An immediate plan is necessary to circumvent the challenges and to improve the care for acutely ill patients. These challenges highlight the need for changes in current levels of care for acutely ill patients, as well as the need for appropriate support systems.

  18. Relating illness complexity to reimbursement in CKD patients

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    Bessette RW

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Russell W Bessette1, Randy L Carter2,3 1Department of Health Sciences, Institute for Healthcare Informatics, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Population Health Observatory, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA Background: Despite significant investments of federal and state dollars to transition patient medical records to an all-electronic system, a chasm still exists between health care quality and payment for it. A major reason for this gap is the difficulty in evaluating health care outcomes based on claims data. Since both payers and patients may not appreciate how illness complexity impacts treatment outcomes, it is difficult to determine fair provider compensation. Objectives: Chronic kidney disease (CKD typifies these problems and is often associated with comorbidities that impact cost, health, and work productivity. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate an illness complexity score (ICS based on a linear regression of select blood values that might assist in predicting average monthly reimbursements in CKD patients. A second objective was to compare the results of this ICS prediction to results obtained by prediction of average monthly reimbursement using CKD stage. A third objective was to analyze the relationship between the change in ICS, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, and CKD stage over time to average monthly reimbursement. Methods: We calculated parsimonious values for select variables associated with CKD patients and compared the ICS to ordinal staging of renal disease. Data from 177 de-identified patients over 13 months was collected, which included 15 blood chemistry observations along with complete claims data for all medical expenses. To test for the relationship between average blood chemistry values, stages of CKD, age, and average monthly reimbursement, we modeled an association through a linear regression function of age, eGFR, and the Z-scores calculated from average

  19. Adaptation to different noninvasive ventilation masks in critically ill patients

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    Renata Matos da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify which noninvasive ventilation (NIV masks are most commonly used and the problems related to the adaptation to such masks in critically ill patients admitted to a hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: An observational study involving patients ≥ 18 years of age admitted to intensive care units and submitted to NIV. The reason for NIV use, type of mask, NIV regimen, adaptation to the mask, and reasons for non-adaptation to the mask were investigated. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients, with a median age of 82 years. Acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use (in 71.3%. Total face masks were the most commonly used (in 74.7%, followed by full face masks and near-total face masks (in 24.5% and 0.8%, respectively. Intermittent NIV was used in 82.4% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to the mask was found in 76% of the patients. Masks had to be replaced by another type of mask in 24% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to total face masks and full face masks was found in 75.5% and 80.0% of the patients, respectively. Non-adaptation occurred in the 2 patients using near-total facial masks. The most common reason for non-adaptation was the shape of the face, in 30.5% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use, and total face masks were the most commonly used. The most common reason for non-adaptation to the mask was the shape of the face, which was resolved by changing the type of mask employed.

  20. Should blood cultures be performed in terminally Ill cancer patients?

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    Nobuhiro Asai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: No evidence-based guidelines or protocols to treat the infection-related symptoms in cancer patients with terminal stages have been established. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed all the patients with terminal stage cancer who died between April 2009 and March 2010. The patients' background, the prevalence of infection and clinical outcomes, pathogens isolated, antibiotics used, and whether blood cultures and some of examinations were performed or not were evaluated. Results: A total of 62 (44 males and 18 females patients were included in this study. The median age was 73 years (35-98 years. The most common cancer was that of the lung (n =59, 95.2%. A total of 32 patients were diagnosed with the following infections: Infection of respiratory tract in 27 (84.4%, of urinary tract in 4 (12.5%, and cholangitis in 1 (3.1%. Two cases (6.3% had pneumonia complicated with urinary tract infection. Blood cultures and antibiotic therapies were performed in 28 and 30 cases, respectively. Four (14.3% positive cultures were isolated from the blood obtained from 28 individual patients. As for clinical course, 3 (10% of them experienced improved symptoms after antibiotic therapy. Twenty-seven (90% patients were not confirmed as having any symptom improvement. Conclusions: Blood cultures and antibiotic therapy were limited, and might not be effective in terminally ill cancer patients with lung cancer. We suggest that administering an antibiotic therapy without performing a blood culture would be one of choices in those with respiratory tract infections if patients' life expectancy is short.

  1. Recurrent brain tumour: the impact of illness on patient's life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamperti, Elena; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Finocchiaro, Claudia Yvonne; Silvani, Antonio; Botturi, Andrea; Gaviani, Paola; Sarno, Lucio; Salmaggi, Andrea

    2012-06-01

    Despite advances in therapies that offer improved survival rates, clinical course of brain tumours leads to a progressive functional deterioration in patients with modifications in their psychological reaction to the disease. Patients with brain tumours are rarely assessed for quality of life and psychological variables, and even fewer studies have assessed patients who have experienced a recurrence of brain tumours. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the patients with recurrent brain tumours and their reaction to the illness. We enrolled 81 patients with recurrent CNS tumours. Karnofsky Performance Status scale (KPS) was used to evaluate functional status of patients; the multidimensional aspect of quality of life was assessed through "Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain" (FACT-Br), "Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale" and "Psychological Distress Inventory". These were all used as tests of psychological well-being. Distress and almost all mean FACT-Br subscale scores seemed to be significantly lower in patients, in comparison with normative data. Surprisingly, the emotional well-being mean score was significantly higher in our recurrence sample than in patients with brain tumours at first diagnosis. Anxiety seemed not to be influenced by a relapse diagnosis; instead, depression was higher and differed significantly from normative data. Low correlation between KPS and FACT-Br total and some sub-scores was found. Apparent dissociation between patients' judgment on their quality of life (bad except for emotional) and their reported distress (low) is the most intriguing finding, suggesting highly preserved coping strategies in the emotional sphere, despite intact judgment and disease awareness.

  2. Continuous infusion of antibiotics in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuszkiewicz, Piotr; Szałek, Edyta; Tomczak, Hanna; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2013-02-01

    Antibiotics are the most commonly used drugs in intensive care unit patients and their supply should be based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic rules. The changes that occur in septic patients who are critically ill may be responsible for subtherapeutic antibiotic concentrations leading to poorer clinical outcomes. Evolving in time the disturbed pathophysiology in severe sepsis (high cardiac output, glomerular hyperfiltration) and therapeutic interventions (e.g. haemodynamically active drugs, mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy) alters antibiotic pharmacokinetics mainly through an increase in the volume of distribution and altered drug clearance. The lack of new and efficacious drugs and increased bacterial resistance are current problems of contemporary antibiotic therapy. Although intermittent administration is a standard clinical practice, alternative methods of antibiotic administration are sought, which may potentialise effects and reduce toxicity as well as contribute to inhibition of bacterial resistance. A wide range of studies prove that the application of continuous infusion of time-dependent antibiotics (beta-lactams, glycopeptides) is more rational than standard intermittent administration. However, there are also studies which do not confirm the advantage of one method over the other. In spite of controversy the continuous administration of this group of antibiotics is common practice, because the results of both studies point to the higher efficacy of this method in critically ill patients. Authors reviewed the literature to determine whether any clinical benefits exist for administration of time-dependent antibiotics by continuous infusion. Definite specification of the clinical advantage of administration this way over standard dosage requires a large-scale multi-centre randomised controlled trial.

  3. Is routine thromboprophylaxis justified among Indian patients sustaining major orthopedic trauma? A systematic review

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    Ramesh K Sen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE is one of the most common preventable cause of morbidity and mortality after trauma. Though most of the western countries have their guidelines for thromboprophylaxis in these patients, India still does not have these. The increasing detection of VTE among Indian population, lack of awareness, underestimation of the risk, and fear of bleeding complications after chemical prophylaxis have made deep vein thrombosis (DVT a serious problem, hence a standard guideline for thromboprophylaxis after trauma is essential. The present review article discusses the incidence of DVT and role of thromboprophylaxis in Indian patients who have sustained major orthopedic trauma. A thorough search of ′PubMed′ and ′Google Scholar′ revealed 10 studies regarding venous thromboembolism in Indian patients after major orthopedic trauma surgery (hip or proximal femur fracture and spine injury. Most of these studies have evaluated venous thromboembolism in patients of arthroplasty and trauma. The incidence, risk factors, diagnosis and management of VTE in the subgroup of trauma patients (1049 patients were separately evaluated after segregating them from the arthroplasty patients. Except two studies, which were based on spinal injury, all other studies recommended screening/ thromboprophylaxis in posttraumatic conditions in the Indian population. Color Doppler was used as common diagnostic or screening tool in most of the studies (eight studies, 722 patients. The incidence of VTE among thromboprophylaxis-receiving group was found to be 8% (10/125, whereas it was much higher (14.49%, 40/276 in patients not receiving any form of prophylaxis. Indian patients have definite risk of venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic trauma (except spinal injury, and thromboprophylaxis either by chemical or mechanical methods seems to be justified in them.

  4. Prehospital management and fluid resuscitation in hypotensive trauma patients admitted to Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talving, Peep; Pålstedt, Joakim; Riddez, Louis

    2005-01-01

    Few previous studies have been conducted on the prehospital management of hypotensive trauma patients in Stockholm County. The aim of this study was to describe the prehospital management of hypotensive trauma patients admitted to the largest trauma center in Sweden, and to assess whether prehospital trauma life support (PHTLS) guidelines have been implemented regarding prehospital time intervals and fluid therapy. In addition, the effects of the age, type of injury, injury severity, prehospital time interval, blood pressure, and fluid therapy on outcome were investigated. This is a retrospective, descriptive study on consecutive, hypotensive trauma patients (systolic blood pressure or = 15 years) recruited, the median age was 35.5 years (range: 27-55 years) and 77 patients (75%) had suffered blunt injury. The predominant trauma mechanisms were falls between levels (24%) and motor vehicle crashes (22%) with an ISS of 28.5 (range: 16-50). The on-scene time interval was 19 minutes (range: 12-24 minutes). Fluid therapy was initiated at the scene of injury in the majority of patients (73%) regardless of the type of injury (77 blunt [75%] / 25 penetrating [25%]) or injury severity (ISS: 0-20; 21-40; 41-75). Age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.04), male gender (OR = 3.2), ISS 21-40 (OR = 13.6), and ISS >40 (OR = 43.6) were the significant factors affecting outcome in the exact logistic regression analysis. The time interval at the scene of injury exceeded PHTLS guidelines. The vast majority of the hypotensive trauma patients were fluid-resuscitated on-scene regardless of the type, mechanism, or severity of injury. A predefined fluid resuscitation regimen is not employed in hypotensive trauma victims with different types of injuries. The outcome was worsened by male gender, progressive age, and ISS > 20 in the exact multiple regression analysis.

  5. Pattern of maxillofacial fractures in severe multiple trauma patients: a 7-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, La-Salete; Aragão, Irene; Sousa, Maria-José Carneiro; Gomes, Ernestina

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of facial trauma is high. This study has the primary objective of documenting and cataloging maxillofacial fractures in polytrauma patients. From a total of 1229 multiple trauma cases treated at the Emergency Room of the Santo Antonio Hospital - Oporto Hospital Center, Portugal, between August 2001 and December 2007, 251 patients had facial wounds and 209 had maxillofacial fractures. Aged ranged form 13 to 86 years. The applied selective method was based on the presence of facial wound with Abbreviated Injury Scale ≥1. Men had a higher incidence of maxillofacial fractures among multiple trauma patients (86.6%) and road traffic accidents were the primary cause of injuries (69.38%). Nasoorbitoethmoid complex was the most affected region (67.46%) followed by the maxilla (57.42%). The pattern and presentation of maxillofacial fractures had been studied in many parts of the world with varying results. Severe multiple trauma patients had different patterns of maxillofacial injuries. The number of maxillofacial trauma is on the rise worldwide as well as the incidence of associated sequelae. Maxillofacial fractures on multiple trauma patients were more frequent among males and in road traffic crashes. Knowing such data is elementary. The society should have a key role in the awareness of individuals and in prevention of road traffic accidents.

  6. Sepsis prediction in critically ill patients by platelet activation markers on ICU admission: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layios, Nathalie; Delierneux, Céline; Hego, Alexandre; Huart, Justine; Gosset, Christian; Lecut, Christelle; Maes, Nathalie; Geurts, Pierre; Joly, Arnaud; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Albert, Adelin; Damas, Pierre; Gothot, André; Oury, Cécile

    2017-12-01

    Platelets have been involved in both immune surveillance and host defense against severe infection. To date, whether platelet phenotype or other hemostasis components could be associated with predisposition to sepsis in critical illness remains unknown. The aim of this work was to identify platelet markers that could predict sepsis occurrence in critically ill injured patients. This single-center, prospective, observational, 7-month study was based on a cohort of 99 non-infected adult patients admitted to ICUs for elective cardiac surgery, trauma, acute brain injury, and post-operative prolonged ventilation and followed up during ICU stay. Clinical characteristics and severity score (SOFA) were recorded on admission. Platelet activation markers, including fibrinogen binding to platelets, platelet membrane P-selectin expression, plasma soluble CD40L, and platelet-leukocytes aggregates were assayed by flow cytometry at admission and 48 h later, and then at the time of sepsis diagnosis (Sepsis-3 criteria) and 7 days later for sepsis patients. Hospitalization data and outcomes were also recorded. Of the 99 patients, 19 developed sepsis after a median time of 5 days. These patients had a higher SOFA score at admission; levels of fibrinogen binding to platelets (platelet-Fg) and of D-dimers were also significantly increased compared to the other patients. Levels 48 h after ICU admission no longer differed between the two patient groups. Platelet-Fg % was an independent predictor of sepsis (P = 0.0031). By ROC curve analysis, cutoff point for Platelet-Fg (AUC = 0.75) was 50%. In patients with a SOFA cutoff of 8, the risk of sepsis reached 87% when Platelet-Fg levels were above 50%. Patients with sepsis had longer ICU and hospital stays and higher death rate. Platelet-bound fibrinogen levels assayed by flow cytometry within 24 h of ICU admission help identifying critically ill patients at risk of developing sepsis.

  7. Metabolic effects of intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, M B; Jackson, N C; Shojaee-Moradie, F; Treacher, D F; Beale, R J; Jones, R H; Umpleby, A M

    2010-03-01

    Our aim was to investigate the effects of glycemic control and insulin concentration on lipolysis, glucose, and protein metabolism in critically ill medical patients. For our methods, the patients were studied twice. In study 1, blood glucose (BG) concentrations were maintained between 7 and 9 mmol/l with intravenous insulin. After study 1, patients entered one of four protocols for 48 h until study 2: low-insulin high-glucose (LIHG; variable insulin, BG of 7-9 mmol/l), low-insulin low-glucose (LILG; variable insulin of BG 4-6 mmol/l), high-insulin high-glucose [HIHG; insulin (2.0 mU . kg(-1).min(-1) plus insulin requirement from study 1), BG of 7-9 mmol/l], or high-insulin low-glucose [HILG; insulin (2.0 mU.kg(-1).min(-1) plus insulin requirement from study 1), BG of 4-6 mmol/l]. Age-matched healthy control subjects received two-step euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps achieving insulin levels similar to the LI and HI groups. In our results, whole body proteolysis was higher in patients in study 1 (P patients. Endogenous glucose production rate (R(a)), glucose disposal, and lipolysis were not different in all patients in study 1 compared with control subjects at comparable insulin concentrations. Glucose R(a) and lipolysis did not change in any of the study 2 patient groups. HI increased glucose disposal in the patients (HIHG, P = 0.001; HILG, P = 0.07 vs. study 1), but this was less than in controls receiving HI (P protein-sparing effect.

  8. Trauma in elderly patients evaluated in a hospital emergency department in Konya, Turkey: a retrospective study

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    Kara H

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hasan Kara,1 Aysegul Bayir,1 Ahmet Ak,1 Murat Akinci,1 Necmettin Tufekci,1 Selim Degirmenci,1 Melih Azap21Department of Emergency Medicine, Selçuk University, Konya, Turkey; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Konya Numune Hospital, Konya, TurkeyPurpose: Trauma is a common cause of admission to the hospital emergency department. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cause of admission, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients aged ≥65 years admitted to an emergency department in Turkey because of blunt trauma.Materials and methods: Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 568 patients (314 women and 254 men aged ≥65 years who were admitted to an emergency department of a tertiary care hospital.Results: Trauma was caused by low-energy fall in 379 patients (67%, traffic accident in 79 patients (14%, high-energy fall in 69 patients (12%, and other causes in 41 patients (7%. The most frequent sites of injury were the lower extremity, thorax, upper extremity, and head. The femur was the most frequent fracture site. After evaluation in the emergency department, 377 patients (66% were hospitalized. There were 31 patients (5% who died. Risk of hospitalization after trauma was significantly associated with trauma to the lower extremity, thorax, and spine; fractures of the femur and rib; and intracranial injury.Conclusion: Emergency department admission after trauma in patients aged $65 years is common after low-energy falls, and most injuries occur to the extremities. It is important to focus on prevention of falls to decrease the frequency of trauma in the elderly.Keywords: fall, femur, fracture, injury

  9. Epidemiology of injuries and outcomes among trauma patients receiving prehospital care at a tertiary teaching hospital in Kigali, Rwanda

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    Gabin Mbanjumucyo

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: A linked prehospital and hospital database provided critical epidemiological information describing trauma patients in a low-resource setting. Blunt trauma from motor vehicle collisions involving young males constituted the majority of traumatic injury. Among this cohort, hospital resource utilisation was high as was mortality. This data can help guide the implementation of interventions to improve trauma care in the Rwandan setting.

  10. Emergency treatment of dentoalveolar trauma: essential tips for treating active patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honsik, Kenneth A

    2004-09-01

    Dentoalveolar trauma in sports is common. One third of dental injuries in the United States occur in sports-related activities, so team physicians should be able to recognize and properly treat dental injuries on the field. Tooth fracture, luxation, avulsion, and socket injury are the main types of dentoalveolar trauma. In many cases, other maxillofacial trauma can be associated with dental injuries, so physicians who examine these patients should be aware of additional associated injuries. Tooth injury is often preventable with the appropriate use of properly fitted mouth guards. Physicians should be familiar with different types and be able to suggest the correct mouth guard for a given activity.

  11. Alcohol consumption and interpersonal injury in a pediatric oral and maxillofacial trauma population: a retrospective review of 1,192 trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Peter; Laverick, Sean; Makubate, Boikanyo; Jones, David Carl

    2015-06-01

    The social, financial, and health implications of adult alcohol-related oral and maxillofacial trauma have been recognized for several years. Affordability and widespread accessibility of alcohol and issues of misuse in the pediatric trauma population have fostered concerns alcohol may be similarly implicated in young patients with orofacial trauma. The aim of this study was to review data of pediatric facial injuries at a regional maxillofacial unit, assess the prevalence of alcohol use, and review data of patients sustaining injury secondary to interpersonal violence. This study is a retrospective, 3-year review of a Regional Maxillofacial Unit (RMU) trauma database. Inclusion criterion was consecutive facial trauma patients under 16 years of age, referred to RMU for further assessment and/or management. Alcohol use and injuries sustained were reviewed. Of 1,192 pediatric facial trauma patients, 35 (2.9%) were associated with alcohol intake. A total of 145 (12.2%) alleged assault as the mechanism of injury, with older (12-15 years) (n = 129; 88.9%), male (n = 124; 85.5%) (p role of alcohol in the pediatric trauma population is essential.

  12. Original article Rehabilitation model program for seriously ill patients

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    Adrienne Kegye

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients receiving cancer treatment start lifestyle changes mostly at the end of the treatment during the rehabilitation period. Most often, the first step is a dietary change and physical exercises built into the daily routine. Patients who do this in groups led by qualified therapists and based on professional counseling can build more effective and more permanent changes into their life. To develop a complex rehabilitation program which, in the short term, aims to familiarize patients with a lifestyle which harmonizes the physical, mental, spiritual and social spheres of life and, in the long term, to build it into their everyday life in order to ameliorate the physical and mental state and reduce the psychological symptoms and the isolation of patients. The physical component focuses on diet and exercise. The psycho-social-spiritual support focuses on discovering inner sources of strength, developing active coping mechanisms and helping to achieve more open communication. Participants and procedure In February and March 2011, 8 patients treated for malignant tumors participated in the model program. The components of the model program were psychotherapy, physiotherapy, cancer consultation, nutrition counseling, creative activities and walking. Results During the period of the model program the isolation of the patients decreased and their social support and ability of coping with the illness ameliorated. They reported an ease in anxiety and depression in their everyday activities. According to feedback, their communication with each other, with the staff and with their relatives became more open. Altogether this had advantageous effects on the functioning of the ward and the mood of the staff. Conclusions The rehabilitation program confirmed that beside individual psycho-social support, beneficial and economic psycho-social support can be provided for the patients in group form along with the most effective assignment of the

  13. Selective digestive decontamination and empirical antimicrobial therapy of late–onset ventilator–associated pneumonia in trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Frédéric Garcin; Julien Textoris; Benoit Ragonnet; François Antonini; Claude Martin; Marc Leone

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the appropriateness of empirical antimicrobial therapy in trauma patients treated with selective digestive decontamination (SDD) who developed ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Methods: Retrospective study comparing 199 trauma patients receiving SDD and 99 non-trauma patients not receiving SDD hospitalized in a polyvalent intensive care unit (ICU) of a university hospital. Results: Early-onset VAP were recorded in 76 (35%) patients. Late-onset VAP occurred in 8...

  14. [Direct total body CT scan in multi-trauma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierink, J.C.; Saltzherr, T.P.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Beuker, B.J.; Patka, P.; Goslings, J.C.; studiegroep, R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immediate total body computed tomography (CT) scanning has become important in the early diagnostic phase of trauma care because of its high diagnostic accuracy. However, literature provides limited evidence whether immediate total body CT leads to better clinical outcome then convention

  15. Difficult nasoendotracheal intubation in a patient with severe maxillofacial trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hossein Mesgarzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental occlusion is key point for proper maxillofacial reconstruction. In this way nasal airway management is extremely important for both oral and maxillofacial surgeons and anesthesiologists. We report a challenging case with severe maxillofacial trauma and nasal obstruction that it managed with a novel anesthetic - surgical procedure.

  16. Psychiatric diagnoses and psychoactive medication use among nonsurgical critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunsch, Hannah; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Johansen, Martin B

    2014-01-01

    in 2006-2008 with follow-up through 2009, and 2 matched comparison cohorts from hospitalized patients and from the general population. EXPOSURES: Critical illness defined as intensive care unit admission with mechanical ventilation. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs......IMPORTANCE: The relationship between critical illness and psychiatric illness is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To assess psychiatric diagnoses and medication prescriptions before and after critical illness. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Population-based cohort study in Denmark of critically ill patients......) of psychiatrist-diagnosed psychiatric illnesses and prescriptions for psychoactive medications in the 5 years before critical illness. For patients with no psychiatric history, quarterly cumulative incidence (risk) and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for diagnoses and medications in the following year, using Cox...

  17. Ingestion and Pharyngeal Trauma Causing Secondary Retropharyngeal Abscess in Five Adult Patients

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    Sudhir B. Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Retropharyngeal abscess most commonly occurs in children. When present in adults the clinical features may not be typical, and associated immunosuppression or local trauma can be part of the presentation. We present a case series of five adult patients who developed foreign body ingestion trauma associated retropharyngeal abscess. The unusual pearls of each case, along with their outcomes, are discussed. Pertinent information for the emergency medicine physician regarding retropharyngeal abscess is presented as well.

  18. Comparison between two mobile pre-hospital care services for trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonsaga Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Pre-hospital care (PH in Brazil is currently in the phase of implementation and expansion, and there are few studies on the impacts of this public health service. The purpose of this study is to assess the quality of care and severity of trauma among the population served, using trauma scores, attendance response times, and mortality rates. This work compares two pre-hospital systems: the Mobile Emergency Care Service, or SAMU 192, and the Fire Brigade Group, or CB. Method Descriptive study evaluating all patients transported by both systems in Catanduva, SP, admitted to a single hospital. Results 850 patients were included, most of whom were men (67.5%; the mean age was 38.5 ± 18.5 years. Regarding the use of PH systems, most patients were transported by SAMU (62.1%. The trauma mechanisms involved motorcycle accidents in 32.7% of cases, transferred predominantly by SAMU, followed by falls (25.8%. Regarding the response time, CB showed the lowest rates. In relation to patient outcome, only 15.5% required hospitalization. The average score on the Glasgow Coma Scale was 14.7 ± 1.3; average RTS was 7.7 ± 0.7; ISS 3.8 ± 5.9; and average TRISS 97.6 ± 9.3. The data analysis showed no statistical differences in mortality between the groups studied (SAMU - 1.5%; CB - 2.5%. The trauma scores showed a higher severity of trauma among the fatal victims. Conclusion Trauma victims are predominantly young and male; the trauma mechanism that accounted for the majority of PH cases was motorcycle accidents; CB responded more quickly than SAMU; and there was no statistical difference between the services of SAMU and CB in terms of severity of the trauma and mortality rates.

  19. Prevalence of deep vein thrombosis in patients with paraplegia caused by traumas

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    Nelson Mesquita Junior

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Deep vein thrombosis is a common disease among people who are immobilized. Immobility is inherent to paraplegia and leads to venous stasis, which is one of the factors covered by Virchow's triad describing its development. Trauma is the primary cause of paraplegia and is currently increasing at a rate of 4% per year. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of deep vein thrombosis in paraplegic patients whose paraplegia was caused by traumas, using color Doppler ultrasonography for diagnosis. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional observational study of 30 trauma-induced paraplegia patients, selected after analysis of medical records at the neurosurgery department of a University Hospital in Curitiba, Brazil, and by a proactive survey of associations that care for the physically disabled. The prevalence of deep vein thrombosis was analyzed using 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Spinal cord trauma was the cause of paraplegia in 29 patients. The most common cause of trauma was gunshot wounding, reported by 17 patients. Deep vein thrombosis was diagnosed by color Doppler ultrasonography in 14 patients in the sample. The most often affected vein was the posterior tibial, in 11 patients. The left lower limb was involved three times more often than the right. Edema was observed in 25 individuals, cyanosis in 14, ulcers in 8 and localized increase in temperature in 13. CONCLUSIONS: Deep vein thrombosis was prevalent, occurring in 46.7% of the patients.

  20. High Mobility Group Box-1 Protein and Outcomes in Critically Ill Surgical Patients Requiring Open Abdominal Management

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    Michelle S. Malig

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies assessing various cytokines in the critically ill/injured have been uninformative in terms of translating to clinical care management. Animal abdominal sepsis work suggests that enhanced intraperitoneal (IP clearance of Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs improves outcome. Thus measuring the responses of DAMPs offers alternate potential insights and a representative DAMP, High Mobility Group Box-1 protein (HMGB-1, was considered. While IP biomediators are being recognized in critical illness/trauma, HMGB-1 behaviour has not been examined in open abdomen (OA management. Methods. A modified protocol for HMGB-1 detection was used to examine plasma/IP fluid samples from 44 critically ill/injured OA patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial comparing two negative pressure peritoneal therapies (NPPT: Active NPPT (ANPPT and Barker’s Vacuum Pack NPPT (BVP. Samples were collected and analyzed at the time of laparotomy and at 24 and 48 hours after. Results. There were no statistically significant differences in survivor versus nonsurvivor HMGB-1 plasma or IP concentrations at baseline, 24 hours, or 48 hours. However, plasma HMGB-1 levels tended to increase continuously in the BVP cohort. Conclusions. HMGB-1 appeared to behave differently between NPPT cohorts. Further studies are needed to elucidate the relationship of HMGB-1 and outcomes in septic/injured patients.

  1. Maternal outcomes in critically ill obstetrics patients: A unique challenge

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    Rakesh Bhadade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A pregnant woman is usually young and in good health until she suffers from some acute injury. Her prognosis will hopefully be better if she receives timely intensive care. Materials and Methods: The aims of this study were to study the indications of medical intensive care unit (MICU transfers for critically ill pregnant and postpartum females, biochemical and hematological profile, organ failure, ICU interventions, outcome of mother/fetus, APACHE II score and its correlation with mortality. Study Design and Setting: It is a prospective observational study, carried out in the MICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital over a period of 18 months. One hundred and twenty-two pregnant and postpartum females (up to 42 days after delivery were studied. Results and Conclusion: Maternal age >30 years was associated with high mortality (68.2%. Majority of the females were admitted in the third trimester (50 patients and postpartum period (41 patients, and mortality was highest in the postpartum period (39%. Increasing parity and gravida was associated with significantly high mortality (59.5%. Acute viral hepatitis E (45 patients was most common indication for MICU transfer, followed by malaria and pregnancy-induced hypertension. The mortality rate was 30.3%. The most common cause of death was acute viral hepatitis E (24 patients, with hepatic failure (53 patients being the most common organ failure. Majority of the females (88 patients were ANC registered. Low Glasgow coma score and high APACHE II score on admission were associated with significantly high mortality (85.2%. Prompt treatment with oseltamivir in H1N1 infection was associated with good maternal and fetal outcomes.

  2. Associations between perceived chronic care quality, perceived patient centeredness, and illness representations among persons with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joseph; Iyer, Neeraj N; Collins, William B

    2014-01-01

    Patient beliefs about their illness can motivate behaviors consistent with good disease management. Perceived high-quality chronic care would be expected to increase likelihood of having such beliefs. Associations between perceived quality of chronic care and illness representations, and associations between patient centeredness and illness representations were assessed among persons with diabetes. A mail survey of diabetic patients visiting a multispecialty physician network serving urban and suburban populations in a large midwestern city was conducted. The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care-5A questionnaire was used to assess perceived chronic care quality and patient centeredness. The Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire was used to assess illness representations. Of 500 mailed surveys, 89 completed surveys were returned. The sample consisted mostly of retirees (61%), Whites (81%), and women (60%). Higher perceived chronic care quality was associated with better disease understanding of diabetes (0.24, p = .05). Patients reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) indicated better disease understanding (-0.26, p = .04) and those reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) perceived less impact of illness (0.29, p = .02). Chronic care quality as defined in the Chronic Care Model and consistency of chronic care with patient expectations (patient centeredness) was associated with illness representations favorable for good self-care management.

  3. Early Whole Blood for Patients Requiring Massive Transfusion after Major Trauma. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    and 3 obese . Of these, six patients (17.6%) are sarcopenic, despite no patient being underweight. Analysis of adiposity is more complicated as... Australia in a mixed population of patients (trauma, cardiac, ob- stetrics) receiving WB and COMP therapy. They noted that despite improved coagulation

  4. Does Mental Illness Stigma Contribute to Adolescent Standardized Patients' Discomfort With Simulations of Mental Illness and Adverse Psychosocial Experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark D.; Johnson, Samantha; Niec, Anne; Pietrantonio, Anna Marie; High, Bradley; MacMillan, Harriet; Eva, Kevin W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Adolescent mental illness stigma-related factors may contribute to adolescent standardized patients' (ASP) discomfort with simulations of psychiatric conditions/adverse psychosocial experiences. Paradoxically, however, ASP involvement may provide a stigma-reduction strategy. This article reports an investigation of this hypothetical…

  5. Does Mental Illness Stigma Contribute to Adolescent Standardized Patients' Discomfort With Simulations of Mental Illness and Adverse Psychosocial Experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark D.; Johnson, Samantha; Niec, Anne; Pietrantonio, Anna Marie; High, Bradley; MacMillan, Harriet; Eva, Kevin W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Adolescent mental illness stigma-related factors may contribute to adolescent standardized patients' (ASP) discomfort with simulations of psychiatric conditions/adverse psychosocial experiences. Paradoxically, however, ASP involvement may provide a stigma-reduction strategy. This article reports an investigation of this hypothetical…

  6. Utility of esophageal gastroduodenoscopy at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in trauma patients

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    Scalea Thomas M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The utility of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD performed at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG is unclear. We examined whether EGD at time of PEG yielded clinically useful information important in patient care. We also reviewed the outcome and complication rates of EGD-PEG performed by trauma surgeons. Methods Retrospective review of all trauma patients undergoing EGD with PEG at a level I trauma center from 1/01–6/03. Results 210 patients underwent combined EGD with PEG by the trauma team. A total of 37% of patients had unsuspected upper gastrointestinal lesions seen on EGD. Of these, 35% had traumatic brain injury, 10% suffered multisystem injury, and 47% had spinal cord injury. These included 15 esophageal, 61 gastric, and six duodenal lesions, mucosal or hemorrhagic findings on EGD. This finding led to a change in therapy in 90% of patients; either resumption/continuation of H2 -blockers or conversion to proton-pump inhibitors. One patient suffered an upper gastrointestinal bleed while on H2-blocker. It was treated endoscopically. Complication rates were low. There were no iatrogenic visceral perforations seen. Three PEGs were inadvertently removed by the patient (1.5%; one was replaced with a Foley, one replaced endoscopically, and one patient underwent gastric repair and open jejunostomy tube. One PEG leak was repaired during exploration for unrelated hemorrhage. Six patients had significant site infections (3%; four treated with local drainage and antibiotics, one requiring operative debridement and later closure, and one with antibiotics alone. Conclusion EGD at the time of PEG may add clinically useful data in the management of trauma patients. Only one patient treated with acid suppression therapy for EGD diagnosed lesions suffered delayed gastrointestinal bleeding. Trauma surgeons can perform EGD and PEG with acceptable outcomes and complication rates.

  7. Fluid resuscitation of trauma patients: how fast is the optimal rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Yasuaki; Tohira, Hideo; Mizobata, Yasumitsu; Matsuoka, Tetsuya; Yokota, Junichiro

    2005-11-01

    The Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines recommend an initial rapid infusion of fluid (1-2 L) in trauma and hemorrhage victims as a diagnostic procedure to aid treatment decisions. Although patient response to initial fluid resuscitation is the key to determining therapeutic strategies, the appropriate rate of infusion is not clearly defined. Ninety-nine adult (age >16 years) blunt trauma victims with hypotension were enrolled. Patients were classified into 3 groups according to hemodynamic state after initial fluid resuscitation and requirement of surgical intervention. Total volume and rate of infusion differed significantly between the groups (P < .05). Patients requiring fluid administration at higher rate were all hemodynamically unstable and required immediate surgical intervention. Moreover, rate of infusion was the best predictor of the patients who required immediate surgical intervention. Moderate fluid infusion rate should be considered to allow identification of the patient's response to initial fluid resuscitation.

  8. Consequences of Transfusing Blood Components in Patients With Trauma: A Conceptual Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Allison R; Frazier, Susan K

    2017-04-01

    Transfusion of blood components is often required in resuscitation of patients with major trauma. Packed red blood cells and platelets break down and undergo chemical changes during storage (known as the storage lesion) that lead to an inflammatory response once the blood components are transfused to patients. Although some evidence supports a detrimental association between transfusion and a patient's outcome, the mechanisms connecting transfusion of stored components to outcomes remain unclear. The purpose of this review is to provide critical care nurses with a conceptual model to facilitate understanding of the relationship between the storage lesion and patients' outcomes after trauma; outcomes related to trauma, hemorrhage, and blood component transfusion are grouped according to those occurring in the short-term (≤30 days) and the long-term (>30 days). Complete understanding of these clinical implications is critical for practitioners in evaluating and treating patients given transfusions after traumatic injury.

  9. Subclavian central venous catheter-related thrombosis in trauma patients: incidence, risk factors and influence of polyurethane type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Ariane; Petit, Laurent; Masson, Françoise; Cottenceau, Vincent; Bertrand-Barat, Josseline; Freyburger, Geneviève; Pinaquy, Catherine; Léger, Alain; Cochard, Jean-François; Sztark, François

    2013-05-29

    The incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) related to a central venous catheter varies considerably in ICUs depending on the population included. The aim of this study was to determine subclavian central venous catheter (SCVC)-related DVT risk factors in severely traumatized patients with regard to two kinds of polyurethane catheters. Critically ill trauma patients needing a SCVC for their usual care were prospectively included in an observational study. Depending on the month of inclusion, patients received one of the two available products in the emergency unit: either an aromatic polyurethane SCVC or an aliphatic polyurethane SCVC. Patients were screened weekly by ultrasound for SCVC-related DVT. Potential risk factors were collected, including history-related, trauma-related and SCVC-related characteristics. A total of 186 patients were included with a median Injury Severity Sore of 30 and a high rate of severe brain injuries (21% of high intracranial pressure). Incidence of SCVC-related DVT was 37% (95% confidence interval: 26 to 40) in patients or 20/1,000 catheter-days. SCVC-related DVT occurred within 8 days in 65% of cases. There was no significant difference in DVT rates between the aromatic polyurethane and aliphatic polyurethane SCVC groups (38% vs. 36%). SCVC-related DVT independent risk factors were age>30 years, intracranial hypertension, massive transfusion (>10 packed red blood cell units), SCVC tip position in the internal jugular or in the innominate vein, and ipsilateral jugular catheter. SCVC-related DVT concerned one-third of these severely traumatized patients and was mostly clinically silent. Incidence did not depend on the type of polyurethane but was related to age>30 years, intracranial hypertension or misplacement of the SCVC. Further studies are needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of routine screening in these patients in whom thromboprophylaxis may be hazardous.

  10. Single induction dose of etomidate versus other induction agents for endotracheal intubation in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Eric A; Ball, Ian M; Ridi, Stacy; Pickett, William; Hohl, Corinne

    2015-01-08

    trials in patients undergoing emergency endotracheal intubation for critical illness, including but not limited to trauma, stroke, myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, septic shock, hypovolaemic or haemorrhagic shock, and undifferentiated shock states. We included single (bolus) dose etomidate for emergency airway intervention compared to any other rapid-acting intravenous bolus single-dose induction agent. Refinement of our initial search results by title review, and then by abstract review was carried out by three review authors. Full-text review of potential studies was based on their adherence to our inclusion and exclusion criteria. This was decided by three independent review authors. We reported the decisions regarding inclusion and exclusion in accordance with the PRISMA statement.Electronic database searching yielded 1635 potential titles, and our grey literature search yielded an additional 31 potential titles. Duplicate titles were filtered leaving 1395 titles which underwent review of their titles and abstracts by three review authors. Sixty seven titles were judged to be relevant to our review, however only eight met our inclusion criteria and seven were included in our analysis. We included eight studies in the review and seven in the meta-analysis. Of those seven studies, only two were judged to be at low risk of bias. Overall, no strong evidence exists that etomidate increases mortality in critically ill patients when compared to other bolus dose induction agents (odds ratio (OR) 1.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.86 to 1.60, 6 studies, 772 participants, moderate quality evidence). Due to a large number of participants lost to follow-up, we performed a post hoc sensitivity analysis. This gave a similar result (OR 1.15; 95% CI 0.86 to 1.53). There was evidence that the use of etomidate in critically ill patients was associated with a positive adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test, and this difference was more pronounced at between 4 to 6

  11. Prophylactic use of laxative for constipation in critically ill patients

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    Masri Yasser

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : This study was designed to evaluate the use of laxative prophylaxis for constipation in intensive care unit (ICU and the impact of early versus late bowel movement on patient′s outcome. Methods : The study was a prospective, randomized controlled trial in critically ill ventilated adult patients, who were expected to stay on ventilator for >72 h. Control group did not receive any intervention for bowel movement for the first 72 h, whereas interventional group received prophylactic dose of lactulose 20 cc enterally every 12 h for the first 72 h. The parameters measured during the study were admission diagnosis, age, gender, comorbid conditions, admission Simplified Acute Physiologic Score (SAPS II, sedative and narcotic agents with doses and duration, timing and tolerance of nutrition, daily assessment of bowel movement, total use of prokinetic, doses of suppositories, and enema for first bowel movement, total number of days on ventilator, weaning failures, extubation or tracheostomy, ICU length of stay, and death or discharge. Results : A total of 100 patients were enrolled, 50 patients in each control and interventional group. Mean age was 38.8 years, and both groups had male predominance. Mean SAPS II score for both was 35. Mean dose of Fentanyl (323.8 ± 108.89 mcg/h in control and 345.83 ± 94.43 mcg/h in interventional group and mean dose of Midazolam (11.1 ± 4.04 mg/h in control and 12.4 ± 3.19 mg/h in interventional group. There were only two (4% patients in control, while nine (18% patients in interventional group who had bowel movement in <72 h (P < 0.05. Mean ventilator days were 16.19, and 17.36 days in control and interventional groups, respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that the patients who moved bowel in <5 days in both groups had mean ventilator days of 18.5, whereas it was 15.88 days for the patients who moved bowel after 5 days in both groups (P< 0.05. Mean ICU days for control was 21.15 ± 10.44 and 20

  12. Experience of road and other trauma by the opiate dependent patient: a survey report

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    Reece Albert S

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trauma plays an important role in the experience of many patients with substance use disorder, but is relatively under-studied particularly in Australia. The present survey examined the lifetime prevalence of various forms of trauma including driving careers in the context of relevant medical conditions. Methods A survey was undertaken in a family medicine practice with a special interest in addiction medicine in Brisbane, Australia. Results Of 350 patients surveyed, 220 were substance dependent, and 130 were general medical patients. Addicted patients were younger (mean ± S.D. 33.72 ± 8.14 vs. 44.24 ± 16.91 years, P Conclusion This study shows that despite shorter driving histories, addicted patients have worse driving careers and general trauma experience than the comparison group which is not explained by associated medical conditions. Trauma is relevant to addiction management at both the patient and policy levels. Substance dependence policies which focus largely on prevention of virus transmission likely have too narrow a public health focus, and tend to engender an unrealistically simplistic and trivialized view of the addiction syndrome. Reduction of drug driving and drug related trauma likely require policies which reduce drug use per se, and are not limited to harm reduction measures alone.

  13. Impact of trauma and surgical treatment on the quality of life of patients with facial fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforte, J J; Alves, C P; Sánchez, M del P R; Ponzoni, D

    2016-05-01

    This study assessed the impact of oral and maxillofacial trauma and surgical treatment on the quality of life of patients. The study included 66 patients (age range 18-65 years) with facial fractures; 33 required surgical treatment and 33 required conservative (non-surgical) treatment. Quality of life was evaluated by applying the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14) immediately after diagnosis of the trauma (T1), 30 days after surgery or trauma (T2), and 90 days after surgery or trauma (T3). For the control group (conservative treatment), there was a change in quality of life at T1 and T2. A change in quality of life was found for all of the surgical patients, regardless of the type of fracture and the observation period analyzed. There was no statistical difference when T1, T2, and T3 were compared in cases of zygomatic, Le Fort I, and nasal fractures, however there was an improvement in the quality of life of patients with mandibular fractures (P=0.0102) and multiple facial fractures (P=0.0097) at T3. Facial trauma caused the greatest impact on the quality of life of surgical patients at T1. The surgical treatment significantly improved quality of life for patients with mandibular and multiple facial fractures.

  14. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mojtaba Chardoli; Toktam Hasan-Ghaliaee; Hesam Akbari; Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Thoracic injuries are responsible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas.Chest X-ray (CXR) is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma.The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT) in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma.Methods:Study was conducted at the emergency department of S ina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012.Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included.All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination,CXR and CT scan respectively.Results:Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female) were included with a mean age of(37.9±13.7) years.Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5%) and CT scan (25.5%).The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax,thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%,49% and 49%,respectively.Pneumothorax,foreign body,emphysema,pulmonary contusion,liver hematoma and sternum fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone.Conclusion:Applying CT scan as the first-line diagnostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome.

  15. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chardoli Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Thoracic injuries are respon- sible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas. Chest X-ray (CXR is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma. The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT in hemodynami- cally stable patients with blunt chest trauma. Methods: Study was conducted at the emergency department of Sina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012. Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included. All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination, CXR and CT scan respectively. Results: Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female were included with a mean age of (37.9±13.7 years. Chin J Traumatol 2013;16(6:351-354 Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5% and CT scan (25.5%. The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax, thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%, 49% and 49%, respectively. Pneumothorax, foreign body, emphysema, pulmonary contusion, liver hematoma and ster- num fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone. Conclusion: Applying CT scan as the first-line diag- nostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome. Key words: Radiography; Thoracic injuries; Tomography, X-ray computed

  16. Intraoperative Tension Pneumothorax in a Patient With Remote Trauma and Previous Tracheostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mavarez-Martinez MD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many trauma patients present with a combination of cranial and thoracic injury. Anesthesia for these patients carries the risk of intraoperative hemodynamic instability and respiratory complications during mechanical ventilation. Massive air leakage through a lacerated lung will result in inadequate ventilation and hypoxemia and, if left undiagnosed, may significantly compromise the hemodynamic function and create a life-threatening situation. Even though these complications are more characteristic for the early phase of trauma management, in some cases, such a scenario may develop even months after the initial trauma. We report a case of a 25-year-old patient with remote thoracic trauma, who developed an intraoperative tension pneumothorax and hemodynamic instability while undergoing an elective cranioplasty. The intraoperative patient assessment was made even more challenging by unexpected massive blood loss from the surgical site. Timely recognition and management of intraoperative pneumothorax along with adequate blood replacement stabilized the patient and helped avoid an unfavorable outcome. This case highlights the risks of intraoperative pneumothorax in trauma patients, which may develop even months after injury. A high index of suspicion and timely decompression can be life saving in this type of situation.

  17. The incidence of fever in US Critical Care Air Transport Team combat trauma patients evacuated from the theater between March 2009 and March 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnick, Joanne M; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Stanton, Marietta; Lairet, Julio R; King, James; Torres, Pedro; Aden, James; Ramirez, Rosemarie

    2013-11-01

    Most critically ill injured patients are transported out of the theater by Critical Care Air Transport Teams (CCATTs). Fever after trauma is correlated with surgical complications and infection. The purposes of this study are to identify the incidence of elevated temperature in patients managed in the CCATT environment and to describe the complications reported and the treatments used in these patients. We performed a retrospective review of available records of trauma patients from the combat theater between March 1, 2009, and March 31, 2010, who were transported by the US Air Force CCATT and had an incidence of hyperthermia. We then divided the cohort into 2 groups, patients transported with an elevation in temperature greater than 100.4°F and patients with no documented elevation in temperature. We used a standardized, secure electronic data collection form to abstract the outcomes. Descriptive data collected included injury type, temperature, use of a mechanical ventilator, cooling treatment modalities, antipyretics, intravenous fluid administration, and use of blood products. We also evaluated the incidence of complications during the transport in patients who had a recorded elevation in temperature greater than 100.4°F. A total of 248 trauma patients met the inclusion criteria, and 101 trauma patients (40%) had fever. The mean age was 28 years, and 98% of patients were men. The mechanism of injury was an explosion in 156 patients (63%), blunt injury in 11 (4%), and penetrating injury in 45 (18%), whereas other trauma-related injuries accounted for 36 patients (15%). Of the patients, 209 (84%) had battle-related injuries and 39 (16%) had non-battle-related injuries. Traumatic brain injury was found in 24 patients (24%) with an incidence of elevated temperature. The mean temperature was 101.6°F (range, 100.5°F-103.9°F). After evaluation of therapies and treatments, 80 trauma patients (51%) were intubated on a mechanical ventilator (P trauma patients with

  18. Mortality Analysis of Trauma Patients in General Intensive Care Unit of a State Hospital

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    İskender Kara

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the mortality rate and factors affecting the mortality of trauma patients in general intensive care unit (ICU of a state hospital. Material and Method: Data of trauma patients hospitalized between January 2012 and March 2013 in ICU of Konya Numune Hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic characteristics and clinical data of patients were recorded. Patients were divided into two groups as survivors and dead. Mortality rate and factors affectin mortality were examined. Results: A total of 108 trauma patients were included in the study. The mortality rate of overall group was 19.4%. Median age of the patients was 44.5 years and 75.9% of them were males. Median Glasgow Coma Scale of death group was lower (5 (3-8 vs. 15 (13-15, p<0.0001, median APACHE II score was higher (20 (15-26 vs. 10 (8-13, p<0.0001 and median duration of ICU stay was longer (27 (5-62,5 vs. 2 (1-5, p<0.0001 than those in the survival group. The most common etiology of trauma was traffic accidents (47.2% and 52.7% of patients had head trauma. The rate of patients with any fracture was significantly higher in the survival group (66.7% vs. 33.3%, p=0.007. The rate of erythrocyte suspension, fresh frozen plasma, trombocyte suspension and albumin were 38.9%, 27.8%, 0.9% and 8.3%, respectively in all group. The number of patients invasive mechanically ventilated was 27.8% and median length of stay of these patients were 5 (1.75-33.5 days. The rate of operated patients was 42.6%. The rate of tracheostomy, renal replacement therapy, bronchoscopy and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy enforcements were higher in the death group. The advanced age (p=0.016, OR: 1.054; 95% CI: 1.010-1100 and low GCS (p<0.0001, OR: 0.583; 95% CI: 0.456-0.745 were found to be independent risk factors the ICU mortality of trauma patients in logistic regression analysis. Conclusion: We believe that the determination of these risk factors affecting

  19. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  20. Mental Representations of Illness in Patients with Gestational Trophoblastic Disease: How Do Patients Perceive Their Condition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mattei, Valentina E.; Carnelli, Letizia; Mazzetti, Martina; Bernardi, Martina; Di Pierro, Rossella; Bergamini, Alice; Mangili, Giorgia; Candiani, Massimo; Sarno, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Background Gestational Trophoblastic Disease comprises a group of benign and malignant disorders that derive from the placenta. Using Leventhal’s Common-Sense Model as a theoretical framework, this paper examines illness perception in women who have been diagnosed with this disease. Methods Thirty-one women diagnosed with Gestational Trophoblastic Disease in a hospital in Italy were asked to complete the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised to measure the following: illness Identity, illness opinions and causes of Gestational Trophoblastic Disease. Results High mean scores were observed in the Emotional representations and Treatment control subscales. A significant difference emerged between hydatidiform mole patients and those with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia on the Identity subscale. A significant correlation emerged between “time since diagnosis” and the Treatment control subscale. Discussion This study is the first to investigate illness perception in Gestational Trophoblastic Disease. From a clinical perspective the results highlight the need for multidisciplinary support programs to promote a more realistic illness perception. PMID:27101144

  1. Restorative rehabilitation in a patient with sports trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Haroon; Vohra, Fahim; Lillywhite, Graeme R.

    2016-01-01

    Sports trauma frequently involves insult to oral soft and hard tissues resulting in loss of tooth structure and tooth loss. Multiple sporting equipment's are employed to prevent irreversible damage to oro-facial structures, and to reduce the overall cost of treatment. However in the undesired consequence of loss of oral structures, multiple treatment options are utilized to restore, esthetics, comfort and function. Osseointegrated implant supported rehabilitation of oral structures in trauma cases provides highly predictable treatment outcomes along with preservation of remaining tissues. This case report presents the management of avulsed teeth caused by hockey stick injury, with osseointegrated dental implant supported fixed partial dentures in esthetic zone using contemporary restorative techniques. PMID:28042278

  2. Illness perceptions, mood and health-related quality of life in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglioretti, Massimo; Mazzini, Letizia; Oggioni, Gaia D; Testa, Lucia; Monaco, Francesco

    2008-12-01

    To divide amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients in two clusters according to their illness representation, and to identify, between the two clusters, the differences in functional state, mood, and quality of life. Seventy-four patients with ALS were recruited at our ALS Centre from different Italian regions, having been for multidisciplinary consultations. The patients' functional impairment was evaluated by the ALS Functional Rating Scale as well as the Bulbar Score and Forced Vital Capacity. Psychological Characteristics and quality of life of ALS patients were evaluated by Profile of Mood State, Illness Perception Questionnaire, and 36-item Short Form Health Survey. Only few of the ALS patients studied showed critical mood ratings. On the whole, the perceived quality of life, mood state, and the dimensions relating to their illness representation seem to be correlated to the functional state and respiratory capacity. The clustering of patients according to their illness representations allowed to highlight that ALS patients can be divided into two groups: adaptors and nonadaptors. The patients of the two groups, adaptors and nonadaptors, differed in respiratory capacity as well as in their mood and health-related quality of life. This study supports the Common Sense Model (CSM) of illness representation when considering ALS patients. Their psychological reactions to illness and quality of life depend not only on the severity of the illness but also on the way the illness is represented. Therefore, CSM could become the theoretical framework for psychological interventions in ALS patients.

  3. Air versus ground transport of the major trauma patient: a natural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Jennifer; Petrie, David A; Tallon, John M

    2010-01-01

    1) To compare the outcomes of adult trauma patients transported to a level I trauma center by helicopter vs. ground ambulance. 2) To determine whether using a unique "natural experiment" design to obtain the ground comparison group will reduce potential confounders. Outcomes in adult trauma patients transported to a tertiary care trauma center by air were compared with outcomes in a group of patients who were accepted by the online medical control physician for air transport, but whose air missions were aborted for aviation reasons (weather, maintenance, out on a mission); these patients were subsequently transported by ground ambulance instead. Outcomes were also analyzed for a third ground control group composed of all other adult trauma patients transported by ground during this time period. Data were collected by retrospective database review of trauma patients transferred between July 1, 1997, and June 30, 2003. Outcomes were measured by Trauma Injury Severity Score (TRISS) analysis. Z and W scores were calculated. Three hundred ninety-seven missions were flown by LifeFlight during the study period vs. 57 in the clinical accept-aviation abort ground transport group. The mean ages, gender distributions, mechanisms of injury, and Injury Severity Scores (ISSs) were similar in the two groups. Per 100 patients transported, 5.61 more lives were saved in the air group vs. the clinical accept-aviation abort ground transport group (Z = 3.37). As per TRISS analysis, this is relative to the expected mortality seen with a similar group in the Major Trauma Outcomes Study (MTOS). The Z score for the clinical accept-aviation abort ground transport group was 0.4. The 1,195 patients in the third all-other ground control group had a higher mean age, lower mean ISS, and worse outcomes according to TRISS analysis (W = -2.02). This unique natural experiment led to better matched air vs. ground cohorts for comparison. As per TRISS analysis, air transport of the adult major trauma

  4. Effects of the Emergency Trauma Training Course on the confidence of final-year medical students dealing with trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsing-Lin; Chen, Chao-Wen; Lee, Wei-Che; Kuo, Liang-Chi; Cheng, Yuan-Chia; Lin, Yen-Ko; Lin, Jiun-Nong; Chan, Hon-Man

    2009-01-01

    Trauma is an important issue that has been neglected in the training of medical students. This study evaluated the effects of the Emergency Trauma Training Course (ETTC), after completion of standard medical training, on seventh-year medical students. The ETTC was designed in Taiwan by the Taiwan Society of Emergency Medicine to train physicians and registered nurses who care for trauma patients in the emergency department (ED). We implemented the course for our medical students' internship. One hundred and fifty-one participants were divided into three groups: Group A included 36 medical students before they entered their internship in hospital; Group B included 41 medical students who had received 6 months of internship training in hospital; and Group C included 74 ED nurses. Group C was used to test Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the questionnaire. After the training course, the participants had a final examination and filled out a questionnaire about the training course and their levels of self-confidence. There were no differences in scores between the medical students in Groups A and B (p = 0.064). Using repeated measures analysis of variance, we found that confidence before training was low, with no difference between Groups A and B. Confidence improved after training, but there was still no significant difference between the groups (p = 0.875). However, there were significant differences between confidence levels before and after the training course (p confidence, the confidence of final year medical students after completion of their training was improved by the ETTC. This indicates that the ETTC could increase the confidence of participants. This is the first evaluation of the implementation of the ETTC for final-year medical students in Taiwan. Based on our results, we highly recommend that this training course be taught to final-year medical students before they practice in hospital.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of a step-up imaging strategy in pediatric patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuppen, J. van [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olthof, D.C. [Trauma Unit Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wilde, J.C.H. [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Emma' s Children Hospital/Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beenen, L.F.M.; Rijn, R.R. van [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goslings, J.C., E-mail: j.c.goslings@amc.nl [Trauma Unit Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-01-15

    Introduction: Blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is an important but often unrecognized cause of death in children. Imaging plays a vital role in the early detection of abdominal trauma. The exact role of imaging in the management of BAT in children is still under research. The aim of this study was to assess diagnostic accuracy of a step-up imaging strategy, where the decision to observe or to perform an intervention depends on the vital parameters of the patient, in combination with the presence or absence of free fluid at Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) and the findings on CT (performed selectively), for pediatric patients presenting to the ED with a blunt abdominal trauma. Methods: Consecutive patients aged ≤16 years admitted between January 2008 and December 2012 to a Dutch level 1 trauma centre were included in this retrospective study. Sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV) and the negative likelihood ratio (LR−) of the imaging strategy were calculated. Results: The cohort consisted of 122 patients; 66 (54%) patients were discharged home after primary survey, 51 (41%) patients were admitted and observed, 3 (2%) patients underwent transarterial embolization and 2 (2%) patients underwent surgery. Treatment failed in 1 patient, initially selected for observation. The sensitivity of the imaging strategy was 0.833 (0.446–0.990). The NPV and LR− were 0.991 (0.963–1.000) and 0.167 (0.028–0.997), respectively. Conclusion: The step-up imaging strategy that is applied in our academic level 1 trauma centre has a high sensitivity and a high negative predictive value. No clinically relevant injuries were missed without doing unnecessary harm, e.g. radiation or an intervention.

  6. Low HDL levels in sepsis versus trauma patients in intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Sébastien; Labreuche, Julien; Drumez, Elodie; Harrois, Anatole; Hamada, Sophie; Vigué, Bernard; Couret, David; Duranteau, Jacques; Meilhac, Olivier

    2017-12-01

    The protective cardiovascular effect of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) is considered to chiefly rely on reverse cholesterol transport from peripheral tissues back to the liver. However, HDL particles display pleiotropic properties, including anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic or antioxidant functions. Some studies suggest that HDL concentration decreases during sepsis, and an association was reported between low HDL levels and a poor outcome. Like sepsis, trauma is also associated with a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. However, no study has yet explored changes in lipid profiles during trauma. We sought to compare lipid profiles between sepsis and trauma patients in intensive care unit (ICU). In septic patients, we analyzed the association between lipid profile, severity and prognosis. A prospective, observational, single-centered study was conducted in a surgical ICU. For each patient, total cholesterol, HDL, triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were assessed at admission. Short-term prognosis outcome was prospectively assessed. Seventy-five consecutive patients were admitted (50 sepsis and 25 trauma). There was no difference in SOFA and SAPSII scores between the two groups. Patients with sepsis had lower total cholesterol levels than patients with trauma. Regarding the lipoprotein profile, only HDLs differed significantly between the two groups (median [IQR] = 0.33 mmol/l [0.17-0.78] in sepsis patients versus median [IQR] = 0.99 mmol/l [0.74-1.28] in trauma patients; P HDL concentration and the length of ICU stay (r = -0.35; P = 0.03) in the group of survivor septic patients at ICU discharge. In addition, poor outcome defined as death or a SOFA score >6 at day 3 was associated with lower HDL levels (median [IQR] = 0.20 mmol/l [0.11-0.41] vs. 0.35 mmol/l [0.19-0.86] in patients with poor outcome versus others; P = 0.03). Lipid profile was totally different between sepsis and trauma in ICU patients: HDL levels were

  7. Controversies in the temperature management of critically ill patients.

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