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Sample records for identify proteome alterations

  1. Label-Free LC-MS/MS Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Identifies Protein/Pathway Alterations and Candidate Biomarkers for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Mahlon A; An, Jiyan; Hood, Brian L; Conrads, Thomas P; Bowser, Robert P

    2015-11-06

    Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome has proven valuable to the study of neurodegenerative disorders. To identify new protein/pathway alterations and candidate biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we performed comparative proteomic profiling of CSF from sporadic ALS (sALS), healthy control (HC), and other neurological disease (OND) subjects using label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 1712 CSF proteins were detected and relatively quantified by spectral counting. Levels of several proteins with diverse biological functions were significantly altered in sALS samples. Enrichment analysis was used to link these alterations to biological pathways, which were predominantly related to inflammation, neuronal activity, and extracellular matrix regulation. We then used our CSF proteomic profiles to create a support vector machines classifier capable of discriminating training set ALS from non-ALS (HC and OND) samples. Four classifier proteins, WD repeat-containing protein 63, amyloid-like protein 1, SPARC-like protein 1, and cell adhesion molecule 3, were identified by feature selection and externally validated. The resultant classifier distinguished ALS from non-ALS samples with 83% sensitivity and 100% specificity in an independent test set. Collectively, our results illustrate the utility of CSF proteomic profiling for identifying ALS protein/pathway alterations and candidate disease biomarkers.

  2. Comparative proteomics as a tool for identifying specific alterations within interferon response pathways in human glioblastoma multiforme cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarasova, Irina A; Tereshkova, Alesya V; Lobas, Anna A

    2018-01-01

    An acquisition of increased sensitivity of cancer cells to viruses is a common outcome of malignant progression that justifies the development of oncolytic viruses as anticancer therapeutics. Studying molecular changes that underlie the sensitivity to viruses would help to identify cases where on...

  3. Oxidative proteome alterations during skeletal muscle ageing

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    Sofia Lourenço dos Santos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia corresponds to the degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass, quality, and strength associated with ageing and leads to a progressive impairment of mobility and quality of life. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are not completely understood. A hallmark of cellular and tissular ageing is the accumulation of oxidatively modified (carbonylated proteins, leading to a decreased quality of the cellular proteome that could directly impact on normal cellular functions. Although increased oxidative stress has been reported during skeletal muscle ageing, the oxidized protein targets, also referred as to the ‘oxi-proteome’ or ‘carbonylome’, have not been characterized yet. To better understand the mechanisms by which these damaged proteins build up and potentially affect muscle function, proteins targeted by these modifications have been identified in human rectus abdominis muscle obtained from young and old healthy donors using a bi-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomic approach coupled with immunodetection of carbonylated proteins. Among evidenced protein spots, 17 were found as increased carbonylated in biopsies from old donors comparing to young counterparts. These proteins are involved in key cellular functions such as cellular morphology and transport, muscle contraction and energy metabolism. Importantly, impairment of these pathways has been described in skeletal muscle during ageing. Functional decline of these proteins due to irreversible oxidation may therefore impact directly on the above-mentioned pathways, hence contributing to the generation of the sarcopenic phenotype.

  4. Quantitative proteomics identifies altered O-GlcNAcylation of structural, synaptic and memory-associated proteins in Alzheimer's disease: Brain protein O-GlcNAcylation in Alzheimer's disease

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    Wang, Sheng [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Yang, Feng [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Petyuk, Vladislav A. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Shukla, Anil K. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Monroe, Matthew E. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Gritsenko, Marina A. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Rodland, Karin D. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Smith, Richard D. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Qian, Wei-Jun [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Gong, Cheng-Xin [New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, New York USA; Liu, Tao [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA

    2017-07-28

    Protein modification by O-linked beta-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is emerging as an important factor in the pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease. Herein we report the most comprehensive, quantitative proteomics analysis for protein O-GlcNAcylation in post-mortem human brains with and without Alzheimer’s using isobaric tandem mass tags labeling, chemoenzymatic photocleavage enrichment and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. A total of 1,850 O-GlcNAc peptides covering 1,094 O-GlcNAcylation sites were identified from 530 proteins in the human brain. 128 O-GlcNAc peptides covering 78 proteins were altered significantly in Alzheimer’s brain as compared to controls (q<0.05). Moreover, alteration of the O-GlcNAc peptide abundance could be attributed more to O-GlcNAcylation level than to protein level changes. The altered O-GlcNAcylated proteins belong to several structural and functional categories, including synaptic proteins, cytoskeleton proteins, and memory-associated proteins. These findings suggest that dysregulation of O-GlcNAcylation of multiple brain proteins may be involved in the development of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease.

  5. Hepatic Proteomic Analysis Revealed Altered Metabolic Pathways in Insulin Resistant Akt1+/-/Akt2-/-Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Brian A; Wang, Weiwen; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Edwards, Robert A; Yazdi, Puya G; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify liver proteome changes in a mouse model of severe insulin resistance and markedly decreased leptin levels. Methods Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis was utilized to identify liver proteome changes in AKT1+/-/AKT2-/- mice. Proteins with altered levels were identified with tandem mass spectrometry. Ingenuity Pathway analysis was performed for the interpretation of the biological significance of the observed proteomic changes. Results 11 proteins were identified from 2 biological replicates to be differentially expressed by a ratio of at least 1.3 between age-matched insulin resistant (Akt1+/-/Akt2-/-) and wild type mice. Albumin and mitochondrial ornithine aminotransferase were detected from multiple spots, which suggest post-translational modifications. Enzymes of the urea cycle were common members of top regulated pathways. Conclusion Our results help to unveil the regulation of the liver proteome underlying altered metabolism in an animal model of severe insulin resistance. PMID:26455965

  6. Proteomic alterations in early stage cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Güzel, Coşkun; Govorukhina, Natalia; Wisman, G.B.A.; Stingl, Christoph; Dekker, Lennard; Hollema, Harry; Guryev, Victor; Horvatovich, Peter; van der Zee, Ate; Bischoff, Rainer; Luider, Theo

    2018-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) allows the capture of cell types or well-defined structures in tissue. We compared in a semi-quantitative way the proteomes from an equivalent of 8,000 tumor cells from patients with squamous cell cervical cancer (SCC, n = 22) with healthy epithelial and stromal cells obtained from normal cervical tissue (n = 13). Proteins were enzymatically digested into peptides which were measured by high-resolution mass spectrometry and analyzed by “all-or-nothing” anal...

  7. Stressor-induced proteome alterations in zebrafish: A meta-analysis of response patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, Ksenia J., E-mail: ksenia.groh@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Suter, Marc J.-F. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department of Environmental Systems Science, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We compared reported proteome changes induced by various stressors in zebrafish. • Several proteins groups frequently responding to diverse stressors were identified. • These included energy metabolism enzymes, heat shock and cytoskeletal proteins. • Insufficient proteome coverage impedes identification of more specific responses. • Further research needs for proteomics in ecotoxicology are discussed. - Abstract: Proteomics approaches are being increasingly applied in ecotoxicology on the premise that the identification of specific protein expression changes in response to a particular chemical would allow elucidation of the underlying molecular pathways leading to an adverse effect. This in turn is expected to promote the development of focused testing strategies for specific groups of toxicants. Although both gel-based and gel-free global characterization techniques provide limited proteome coverage, the conclusions regarding the cellular processes affected are still being drawn based on the few changes detected. To investigate how specific the detected responses are, we analyzed a set of studies that characterized proteome alterations induced by various physiological, chemical and biological stressors in zebrafish, a popular model organism. Our analysis highlights several proteins and protein groups, including heat shock and oxidative stress defense proteins, energy metabolism enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, to be most frequently identified as responding to diverse stressors. In contrast, other potentially more specifically responding protein groups are detected much less frequently. Thus, zebrafish proteome responses to stress reported by different studies appear to depend mostly on the level of stress rather than on the specific stressor itself. This suggests that the most broadly used current proteomics technologies do not provide sufficient proteome coverage to allow in-depth investigation of specific mechanisms of toxicant action

  8. Stressor-induced proteome alterations in zebrafish: A meta-analysis of response patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groh, Ksenia J.; Suter, Marc J.-F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We compared reported proteome changes induced by various stressors in zebrafish. • Several proteins groups frequently responding to diverse stressors were identified. • These included energy metabolism enzymes, heat shock and cytoskeletal proteins. • Insufficient proteome coverage impedes identification of more specific responses. • Further research needs for proteomics in ecotoxicology are discussed. - Abstract: Proteomics approaches are being increasingly applied in ecotoxicology on the premise that the identification of specific protein expression changes in response to a particular chemical would allow elucidation of the underlying molecular pathways leading to an adverse effect. This in turn is expected to promote the development of focused testing strategies for specific groups of toxicants. Although both gel-based and gel-free global characterization techniques provide limited proteome coverage, the conclusions regarding the cellular processes affected are still being drawn based on the few changes detected. To investigate how specific the detected responses are, we analyzed a set of studies that characterized proteome alterations induced by various physiological, chemical and biological stressors in zebrafish, a popular model organism. Our analysis highlights several proteins and protein groups, including heat shock and oxidative stress defense proteins, energy metabolism enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, to be most frequently identified as responding to diverse stressors. In contrast, other potentially more specifically responding protein groups are detected much less frequently. Thus, zebrafish proteome responses to stress reported by different studies appear to depend mostly on the level of stress rather than on the specific stressor itself. This suggests that the most broadly used current proteomics technologies do not provide sufficient proteome coverage to allow in-depth investigation of specific mechanisms of toxicant action

  9. Plasma proteomics to identify biomarkers - Application to cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Overgaard, Martin; Melholt Rasmussen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    There is an unmet need for new cardiovascular biomarkers. Despite this only few biomarkers for the diagnosis or screening of cardiovascular diseases have been implemented in the clinic. Thousands of proteins can be analysed in plasma by mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies. Therefore......, this technology may therefore identify new biomarkers that previously have not been associated with cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the key challenges and considerations, including strategies, recent discoveries and clinical applications in cardiovascular proteomics that may lead...

  10. Plant Abiotic Stress Proteomics: The Major Factors Determining Alterations in Cellular Proteome

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    Kosová, Klára; Vítámvás, Pavel; Urban, Milan O.; Prášil, Ilja T.; Renaut, Jenny

    2018-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS: Major environmental and genetic factors determining stress-related protein abundance are discussed.Major aspects of protein biological function including protein isoforms and PTMs, cellular localization and protein interactions are discussed.Functional diversity of protein isoforms and PTMs is discussed. Abiotic stresses reveal profound impacts on plant proteomes including alterations in protein relative abundance, cellular localization, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications (PTMs), protein interactions with other protein partners, and, finally, protein biological functions. The main aim of the present review is to discuss the major factors determining stress-related protein accumulation and their final biological functions. A dynamics of stress response including stress acclimation to altered ambient conditions and recovery after the stress treatment is discussed. The results of proteomic studies aimed at a comparison of stress response in plant genotypes differing in stress adaptability reveal constitutively enhanced levels of several stress-related proteins (protective proteins, chaperones, ROS scavenging- and detoxification-related enzymes) in the tolerant genotypes with respect to the susceptible ones. Tolerant genotypes can efficiently adjust energy metabolism to enhanced needs during stress acclimation. Stress tolerance vs. stress susceptibility are relative terms which can reflect different stress-coping strategies depending on the given stress treatment. The role of differential protein isoforms and PTMs with respect to their biological functions in different physiological constraints (cellular compartments and interacting partners) is discussed. The importance of protein functional studies following high-throughput proteome analyses is presented in a broader context of plant biology. In summary, the manuscript tries to provide an overview of the major factors which have to be considered when interpreting data from proteomic

  11. Proteome alteration induced by hTERT transfection of human fibroblast cells.

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    Mazzucchelli, Gabriel D; Gabelica, Valérie; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Fléron, Maximilien; Ashimwe, Wilson; Rosu, Frédéric; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire; Riou, Jean-François; De Pauw, Edwin

    2008-04-17

    Telomerase confers cellular immortality by elongating telomeres, thereby circumventing the Hayflick limit. Extended-life-span cells have been generated by transfection with the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene. hTERT transfected cell lines may be of outstanding interest to monitor the effect of drugs targeting the telomerase activity. The incidence of hTERT gene transfection at the proteome level is a prerequisite to that purpose. The effect of the transfection has been studied on the proteome of human fibroblast (WI38). Cytosolic and nuclear fractions of WI38 cells, empty vector transfected WI38 (WI38-HPV) and hTERT WI38 cells were submitted to a 2D-DIGE (Two-Dimensional Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis) analysis. Only spots that had a similar abundance in WI38 and WI38-HPV, but were differentially expressed in WI38 hTERT were selected for MS identification. This method directly points to the proteins linked with the hTERT expression. Number of false positive differentially expressed proteins has been excluded by using control WI38-HPV cells. The proteome alteration induced by hTERT WI38 transfection should be taken into account in subsequent use of the cell line for anti-telomerase drugs evaluation. 2D-DIGE experiment shows that 57 spots out of 2246 are significantly differentially expressed in the cytosolic fraction due to hTERT transfection, and 38 were confidently identified. In the nuclear fraction, 44 spots out of 2172 were selected in the differential proteome analysis, and 14 were identified. The results show that, in addition to elongating telomeres, hTERT gene transfection has other physiological roles, among which an enhanced ER capacity and a potent cell protection against apoptosis. We show that the methodology reduces the complexity of the proteome analysis and highlights proteins implicated in other processes than telomere elongation. hTERT induced proteome changes suggest that telomerase expression enhances natural cell repair

  12. Proteome alteration induced by hTERT transfection of human fibroblast cells

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    Riou Jean-François

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomerase confers cellular immortality by elongating telomeres, thereby circumventing the Hayflick limit. Extended-life-span cells have been generated by transfection with the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene. hTERT transfected cell lines may be of outstanding interest to monitor the effect of drugs targeting the telomerase activity. The incidence of hTERT gene transfection at the proteome level is a prerequisite to that purpose. The effect of the transfection has been studied on the proteome of human fibroblast (WI38. Cytosolic and nuclear fractions of WI38 cells, empty vector transfected WI38 (WI38-HPV and hTERT WI38 cells were submitted to a 2D-DIGE (Two-Dimensional Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis analysis. Only spots that had a similar abundance in WI38 and WI38-HPV, but were differentially expressed in WI38 hTERT were selected for MS identification. This method directly points to the proteins linked with the hTERT expression. Number of false positive differentially expressed proteins has been excluded by using control WI38-HPV cells. The proteome alteration induced by hTERT WI38 transfection should be taken into account in subsequent use of the cell line for anti-telomerase drugs evaluation. Results 2D-DIGE experiment shows that 57 spots out of 2246 are significantly differentially expressed in the cytosolic fraction due to hTERT transfection, and 38 were confidently identified. In the nuclear fraction, 44 spots out of 2172 were selected in the differential proteome analysis, and 14 were identified. The results show that, in addition to elongating telomeres, hTERT gene transfection has other physiological roles, among which an enhanced ER capacity and a potent cell protection against apoptosis. Conclusion We show that the methodology reduces the complexity of the proteome analysis and highlights proteins implicated in other processes than telomere elongation. hTERT induced proteome changes suggest

  13. Novel TIA biomarkers identified by mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

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    George, Paul M; Mlynash, Michael; Adams, Christopher M; Kuo, Calvin J; Albers, Gregory W; Olivot, Jean-Marc

    2015-12-01

    Transient ischemic attacks remain a clinical diagnosis with significant variability between physicians. Finding reliable biomarkers to identify transient ischemic attacks would improve patient care and optimize treatment. Our aim is to identify novel serum TIA biomarkers through the use of mass spectroscopy-based proteomics. Patients with transient neurologic symptoms were prospectively enrolled. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics, an unbiased method to identify candidate proteins, was used to test the serum of the patients for biomarkers of cerebral ischemia. Three candidate proteins were found, and serum concentrations of these proteins were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in a second cohort of prospectively enrolled patients. The Student's t-test was used for comparison. The Benjamini-Hochberg false discovery rate controlling procedure for multiple comparison adjustments determined significance for the proteomic screen. Patients with transient ischemic attacks (n = 20), minor strokes (n = 15), and controls (i.e. migraine, seizure, n = 12) were enrolled in the first cohort. Ceruloplasmin, complement component C8 gamma (C8γ), and platelet basic protein were significantly different between the ischemic group (transient ischemic attack and minor stroke) and the controls (P = 0·0001, P = 0·00027, P = 0·00105, respectively). A second cohort of patients with transient ischemic attack (n = 22), minor stroke (n = 20), and controls' (n = 12) serum was enrolled. Platelet basic protein serum concentrations were increased in the ischemic samples compared with control (for transient ischemic attack alone, P = 0·019, for the ischemic group, P = 0·046). Ceruloplasmin trended towards increased concentrations in the ischemic group (P = 0·127); no significant difference in C8γ (P = 0·44) was found. Utilizing mass spectrometry-based proteomics, platelet basic protein has been identified as a candidate serum

  14. Proteomic Characterization of Armillaria mellea Reveals Oxidative Stress Response Mechanisms and Altered Secondary Metabolism Profiles

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    Cassandra Collins

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Armillaria mellea is a major plant pathogen. Yet, the strategies the organism uses to infect susceptible species, degrade lignocellulose and other plant material and protect itself against plant defences and its own glycodegradative arsenal are largely unknown. Here, we use a combination of gel and MS-based proteomics to profile A. mellea under conditions of oxidative stress and changes in growth matrix. 2-DE and LC-MS/MS were used to investigate the response of A. mellea to H2O2 and menadione/FeCl3 exposure, respectively. Several proteins were detected with altered abundance in response to H2O2, but not menadione/FeCl3 (i.e., valosin-containing protein, indicating distinct responses to these different forms of oxidative stress. One protein, cobalamin-independent methionine synthase, demonstrated a common response in both conditions, which may be a marker for a more general stress response mechanism. Further changes to the A. mellea proteome were investigated using MS-based proteomics, which identified changes to putative secondary metabolism (SM enzymes upon growth in agar compared to liquid cultures. Metabolomic analyses revealed distinct profiles, highlighting the effect of growth matrix on SM production. This establishes robust methods by which to utilize comparative proteomics to characterize this important phytopathogen.

  15. Alterations in the proteome of the Euprymna scolopes light organ in response to symbiotic Vibrio fischeri.

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    Doino Lemus, J; McFall-Ngai, M J

    2000-09-01

    During the onset of the cooperative association between the Hawaiian sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes and the marine luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri, the anatomy and morphology of the host's symbiotic organ undergo dramatic changes that require interaction with the bacteria. This morphogenetic process involves an array of tissues, including those in direct contact with, as well as those remote from, the symbiotic bacteria. The bacteria induce the developmental program soon after colonization of the organ, although complete morphogenesis requires 96 h. In this study, to determine critical time points, we examined the biochemistry underlying bacterium-induced host development using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Specifically, V. fischeri-induced changes in the soluble proteome of the symbiotic organ during the first 96 h of symbiosis were identified by comparing the protein profiles of symbiont-colonized and uncolonized organs. Both symbiosis-related changes and age-related changes were analyzed to determine what proportion of the differences in the proteomes was the result of specific responses to interaction with bacteria. Although no differences were detected over the first 24 h, numerous symbiosis-related changes became apparent at 48 and 96 h and were more abundant than age-related changes. In addition, many age-related protein changes occurred 48 h sooner in symbiotic animals, suggesting that the interaction of squid tissue with V. fischeri cells accelerates certain developmental processes of the symbiotic organ. These data suggest that V. fischeri-induced modifications in host tissues that occur in the first 24 h of the symbiosis are independent of marked alterations in the patterns of abundant proteins but that the full 4-day morphogenetic program requires significant alteration of the host soluble proteome.

  16. Global Proteome Analysis Identifies Active Immunoproteasome Subunits in Human Platelets*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockenbusch, Cordula; Walsh, Geraldine M.; Brown, Lyda M.; Hoffman, Michael D.; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Kislinger, Thomas; Kast, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of new functions for platelets, particularly in inflammation and immunity, has expanded the role of these anucleate cell fragments beyond their primary hemostatic function. Here, four in-depth human platelet proteomic data sets were generated to explore potential new functions for platelets based on their protein content and this led to the identification of 2559 high confidence proteins. During a more detailed analysis, consistently high expression of the proteasome was discovered, and the composition and function of this complex, whose role in platelets has not been thoroughly investigated, was examined. Data set mining resulted in identification of nearly all members of the 26S proteasome in one or more data sets, except the β5 subunit. However, β5i, a component of the immunoproteasome, was identified. Biochemical analyses confirmed the presence of all catalytically active subunits of the standard 20S proteasome and immunoproteasome in human platelets, including β5, which was predominantly found in its precursor form. It was demonstrated that these components were assembled into the proteasome complex and that standard proteasome as well as immunoproteasome subunits were constitutively active in platelets. These findings suggest potential new roles for platelets in the immune system. For example, the immunoproteasome may be involved in major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I) peptide generation, as the MHC I machinery was also identified in our data sets. PMID:25146974

  17. Global proteome analysis identifies active immunoproteasome subunits in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockenbusch, Cordula; Walsh, Geraldine M; Brown, Lyda M; Hoffman, Michael D; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Kislinger, Thomas; Kast, Juergen

    2014-12-01

    The discovery of new functions for platelets, particularly in inflammation and immunity, has expanded the role of these anucleate cell fragments beyond their primary hemostatic function. Here, four in-depth human platelet proteomic data sets were generated to explore potential new functions for platelets based on their protein content and this led to the identification of 2559 high confidence proteins. During a more detailed analysis, consistently high expression of the proteasome was discovered, and the composition and function of this complex, whose role in platelets has not been thoroughly investigated, was examined. Data set mining resulted in identification of nearly all members of the 26S proteasome in one or more data sets, except the β5 subunit. However, β5i, a component of the immunoproteasome, was identified. Biochemical analyses confirmed the presence of all catalytically active subunits of the standard 20S proteasome and immunoproteasome in human platelets, including β5, which was predominantly found in its precursor form. It was demonstrated that these components were assembled into the proteasome complex and that standard proteasome as well as immunoproteasome subunits were constitutively active in platelets. These findings suggest potential new roles for platelets in the immune system. For example, the immunoproteasome may be involved in major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I) peptide generation, as the MHC I machinery was also identified in our data sets. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Low temperature conditioning of garlic (Allium sativum L. "seed" cloves induces alterations in sprouts proteome

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    Miguel David Dufoo-Hurtado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature conditioning of garlic seed cloves substitutes the initial climatic requirements of the crop and accelerates the cycle. We have reported that seed bulbs from ‘Coreano’ variety conditioned at 5 °C for five weeks reduces growth and plant weight as well as the crop yields and increases the synthesis of phenolic compounds and anthocyanins. Therefore, this treatment suggests a cold stress. Plant acclimation to stress is associated with deep changes in proteome composition. Since proteins are directly involved in plant stress response, proteomics studies can significantly contribute to unravel the possible relationships between protein abundance and plant stress acclimation. The aim of this work was to study the changes in the protein profiles of garlic seed cloves subjected to conditioning at low-temperature using proteomics approach. Two sets of garlic bulbs were used, one set was stored at room temperature (23 °C, and the other was conditioned at low temperature (5 °C for five weeks. Total soluble proteins were extracted from sprouts of cloves and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein spots showing statistically significant changes in abundance were analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS and identified by database search analysis using the Mascot search engine. The results revealed that low-temperature conditioning of garlic seed cloves causes alterations in the accumulation of proteins involved in different physiological processes such as cellular growth, antioxidative/oxidative state, macromolecules transport, protein folding and transcription regulation process. The metabolic pathways affected include protein biosynthesis and quality control system, photosynthesis, photorespiration, energy production, and carbohydrate and nucleotide metabolism. These processes can work cooperatively to establish a new cellular homeostasis that might be related with the physiological and biochemical changes observed in previous

  19. Proteomic analysis of cell lines to identify the irinotecan resistance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MADHU

    was selected from the wild-type LoVo cell line by chronic exposure to irinotecan ... dose–effect curves of anticancer drugs were drawn on semilogarithm .... alcohol metabolites daunorubicinol (Forrest and Gonzalez. 2000; Mordente et al. ..... Chen L, Huang C and Wei Y 2007 Proteomic analysis of liver cancer cells treated ...

  20. Domain altering SNPs in the human proteome and their impact on signaling pathways.

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    Yichuan Liu

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs constitute an important mode of genetic variations observed in the human genome. A small fraction of SNPs, about four thousand out of the ten million, has been associated with genetic disorders and complex diseases. The present study focuses on SNPs that fall on protein domains, 3D structures that facilitate connectivity of proteins in cell signaling and metabolic pathways. We scanned the human proteome using the PROSITE web tool and identified proteins with SNP containing domains. We showed that SNPs that fall on protein domains are highly statistically enriched among SNPs linked to hereditary disorders and complex diseases. Proteins whose domains are dramatically altered by the presence of an SNP are even more likely to be present among proteins linked to hereditary disorders. Proteins with domain-altering SNPs comprise highly connected nodes in cellular pathways such as the focal adhesion, the axon guidance pathway and the autoimmune disease pathways. Statistical enrichment of domain/motif signatures in interacting protein pairs indicates extensive loss of connectivity of cell signaling pathways due to domain-altering SNPs, potentially leading to hereditary disorders.

  1. Data in support of quantitative proteomics to identify potential virulence regulators in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis isolates

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    Alexandre Keiji Tashima

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides genus are the etiologic agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, a systemic mycosis endemic in Latin America. Few virulence factors have been identified in these fungi. This paper describes support data from the quantitative proteomics of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis attenuated and virulent isolates [1]. The protein compositions of two isolates of the Pb18 strain showing distinct infection profiles were quantitatively assessed by stable isotopic dimethyl labeling and proteomic analysis. The mass spectrometry and the analysis dataset have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with identifier PXD000804.

  2. Differential membrane proteomics using 18O-labeling to identify biomarkers for cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias; Harsha, H C; Grønborg, Mads

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative proteomic methodologies allow profiling of hundreds to thousands of proteins in a high-throughput fashion. This approach is increasingly applied to cancer biomarker discovery to identify proteins that are differentially regulated in cancers. Fractionation of protein samples based...

  3. Data set of Aspergillus flavus induced alterations in tear proteome: Understanding the pathogen-induced host response to fungal infection

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    Jeyalakshmi Kandhavelu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal keratitis is one of the leading causes of blindness in the tropical countries affecting individuals in their most productive age. The host immune response during this infection is poorly understood. We carried out comparative tear proteome analysis of Aspergillus flavus keratitis patients and uninfected controls. Proteome was separated into glycosylated and non-glycosylated fractions using lectin column chromatography before mass spectrometry. The data revealed the major processes activated in the human host in response to fungal infection and reflected in the tear. Extended analysis of this dataset presented here complements the research article entitled “Aspergillus flavus induced alterations in tear protein profile reveal pathogen-induced host response to fungal infection [1]” (Jeyalakhsmi Kandhavelu, Naveen Luke Demonte, Venkatesh Prajna Namperumalsamy, Lalitha Prajna, Chitra Thangavel, Jeya Maheshwari Jayapal, Dharmalingam Kuppamuthu, 2016. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE:PXD003825.

  4. Proteomic analysis revealed alterations of the Plasmodium falciparum metabolism following salicylhydroxamic acid exposure

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    Torrentino-Madamet M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Marylin Torrentino-Madamet1, Lionel Almeras2, Christelle Travaillé1, Véronique Sinou1, Matthieu Pophillat3, Maya Belghazi4, Patrick Fourquet3, Yves Jammes5, Daniel Parzy11UMR-MD3, Université de la Méditerranée, Antenne IRBA de Marseille (IMTSSA, Le Pharo, 2Unité de Recherche en Biologie et Epidémiologie Parasitaires, Antenne IRBA de Marseille (IMTSSA, Le Pharo, 3Centre d'Immunologie de Marseille Luminy, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université de la Méditerranée, 4Centre d'Analyse Protéomique de Marseille, Institut Fédératif de Recherche Jean Roche, Faculté de Médecine Nord, 5UMR-MD2, Physiologie et Physiopathologie en Conditions d'Oxygénations Extrêmes, Institut Fédératif de Recherche Jean Roche, Faculté de Médecine Nord, Marseille, FranceObjectives: Although human respiratory metabolism is characterized by the mitochondrial electron transport chain, some organisms present a “branched respiratory chain.” This branched pathway includes both a classical and an alternative respiratory chain. The latter involves an alternative oxidase. Though the Plasmodium falciparum alternative oxidase is not yet identified, a specific inhibitor of this enzyme, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, showed a drug effect on P. falciparum respiratory function using oxygen consumption measurements. The present study aimed to highlight the metabolic pathways that are affected in P. falciparum following SHAM exposure.Design: A proteomic approach was used to analyze the P. falciparum proteome and determine the metabolic pathways altered following SHAM treatment. To evaluate the SHAM effect on parasite growth, the phenotypic alterations of P. falciparum after SHAM or/and hyperoxia exposure were observed.Results: After SHAM exposure, 26 proteins were significantly deregulated using a fluorescent two dimensional-differential gel electrophoresis. Among these deregulated proteins

  5. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Niehage

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2% or high (10% serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention.

  6. f-divergence cutoff index to simultaneously identify differential expression in the integrated transcriptome and proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Shaojun; Hemberg, Martin; Cansizoglu, Ertugrul; Belin, Stephane; Kosik, Kenneth; Kreiman, Gabriel; Steen, Hanno; Steen, Judith

    2016-01-01

    The ability to integrate 'omics' (i.e., transcriptomics and proteomics) is becoming increasingly important to the understanding of regulatory mechanisms. There are currently no tools available to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs)across different 'omics'data types or multi-dimensional data including time courses. We present a model capable of simultaneously identifying DEGs from continuous and discrete transcriptomic, proteomic and integrated proteogenomic data. We show that...

  7. ALTERATIONS IN BARLEY PROTEOME UPON FUNGAL INFECTION AND TRICYCLAZOLE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar a,b

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The barley proteome was investigated upon fungal infection and subsequent treatment by tricyclazole (TCZ, which is known to have applications in spot blotch disease management in barley.Significantly enhanced chlorophyll content was recorded in TCZ treated plants. The disease severity was significantly reduced after TCZ application in pathogen inoculated plants by reducing the appressoria formation at infection site in barley leaves. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE revealed the expression profile of proteins from (I control plants (healthy barley leaves; application with sterile water,(II plants after foliar application of TCZ (100 µg/ml, (III plants inoculated with B. sorokiniana and (IV plants treated with TCZ (72 h after B. sorokiniana inoculation. A set of 33 proteins expressed differentially after TCZ treatment. Out of this 19 had known functions, while others were unknown or hypothetical proteins. These differentially expressed proteins were related to redox-activity and gene expression, electron transfer,cell division and chromosome partitioning, cell envelop biogenesis, energy metabolism and conversion, respiration and pathogenesis related functions in the barley plants. The study provides a platform and documents the proteins that might be involved in disease management in barley following TCZ application. It is expected that the study will provide boost in understanding proteome regulation upon fungal infection and subsequent anti-fungal treatment and will attract researchers for further validation leading to better pest management.

  8. Proteomic Alterations in Response to Hypoxia Inducible Factor 2α in Normoxic Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimmino, Flora; Pezone, Lucia; Avitabile, Marianna; Persano, Luca; Vitale, Monica; Sassi, Mauro; Bresolin, Silvia; Serafin, Valentina; Zambrano, Nicola; Scaloni, Andrea; Basso, Giuseppe; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-10-07

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-2α protein expression in solid tumors promotes stem-like phenotype in cancer stem cells and increases tumorigenic potential in nonstem cancer cells. Recently, we have shown that HIF-1/2α gene expression is correlated to neuroblastoma (NB) poor survival and to undifferentiated tumor state; HIF-2α protein was demonstrated to enhance aggressive features of the disease. In this study, we used proteomic experiments on NB cells to investigate HIF-2α downstream-regulated proteins or pathways with the aim of providing novel therapeutic targets or bad prognosis markers. We verified that pathways mostly altered by HIF-2α perturbation are involved in tumor progression. In particular, HIF-2α induces alteration of central metabolism and splicing control pathways. Simultaneously, WNT, RAS/MAPK, and PI3K/AKT activity or expression are affected and may impact the sensitivity and the intensity of HIF-2α-regulated pathways. Furthermore, genes coding the identified HIF-2α-related markers built a signature able to stratify NB patients with unfavorable outcome. Taken together, our findings underline the relevance of dissecting the downstream effects of a poor survival marker in developing targeted therapy and improving patient stratification. Future prospective studies are needed to translate the use of these data into the clinical practice.

  9. Phenobarbital Induces Alterations in the Proteome of Hepatocytes and Mesenchymal Cells of Rat Livers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepeisz, Philip; Sagmeister, Sandra; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Pichlbauer, Melanie; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Gerner, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs) have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs). A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs) in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB) which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme. PMID:24204595

  10. Phenobarbital induces alterations in the proteome of hepatocytes and mesenchymal cells of rat livers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Klepeisz

    Full Text Available Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs. A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme.

  11. Comprehensive analysis of temporal alterations in cellular proteome of Bacillus subtilis under curcumin treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panga Jaipal Reddy

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a natural dietary compound with antimicrobial activity against various gram positive and negative bacteria. This study aims to investigate the proteome level alterations in Bacillus subtilis due to curcumin treatment and identification of its molecular/cellular targets to understand the mechanism of action. We have performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis of B. subtilis AH75 strain at different time intervals of curcumin treatment (20, 60 and 120 min after the drug exposure, three replicates to compare the protein expression profiles using two complementary quantitative proteomic techniques, 2D-DIGE and iTRAQ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive longitudinal investigation describing the effect of curcumin treatment on B. subtilis proteome. The proteomics analysis revealed several interesting targets such UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase 1, putative septation protein SpoVG and ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit. Further, in silico pathway analysis using DAVID and KOBAS has revealed modulation of pathways related to the fatty acid metabolism and cell wall synthesis, which are crucial for cell viability. Our findings revealed that curcumin treatment lead to inhibition of the cell wall and fatty acid synthesis in addition to differential expression of many crucial proteins involved in modulation of bacterial metabolism. Findings obtained from proteomics analysis were further validated using 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC assay for respiratory activity, resazurin assay for metabolic activity and membrane integrity assay by potassium and inorganic phosphate leakage measurement. The gene expression analysis of selected cell wall biosynthesis enzymes has strengthened the proteomics findings and indicated the major effect of curcumin on cell division.

  12. Bioinformatical Analysis of Organ-Related (Heart, Brain, Liver, and Kidney and Serum Proteomic Data to Identify Protein Regulation Patterns and Potential Sepsis Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hohn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, proteomic studies have revealed several interesting findings in experimental sepsis models and septic patients. However, most studies investigated protein alterations only in single organs or in whole blood. To identify possible sepsis biomarkers and to evaluate the relationship between protein alteration in sepsis affected organs and blood, proteomics data from the heart, brain, liver, kidney, and serum were analysed. Using functional network analyses in combination with hierarchical cluster analysis, we found that protein regulation patterns in organ tissues as well as in serum are highly dynamic. In the tissue proteome, the main functions and pathways affected were the oxidoreductive activity, cell energy generation, or metabolism, whereas in the serum proteome, functions were associated with lipoproteins metabolism and, to a minor extent, with coagulation, inflammatory response, and organ regeneration. Proteins from network analyses of organ tissue did not correlate with statistically significantly regulated serum proteins or with predicted proteins of serum functions. In this study, the combination of proteomic network analyses with cluster analyses is introduced as an approach to deal with high-throughput proteomics data to evaluate the dynamics of protein regulation during sepsis.

  13. Proteomic profiling identifies markers for inflammation-related tumor-fibroblast interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drev, Daniel; Bileck, Andrea; Erdem, Zeynep N; Mohr, Thomas; Timelthaler, Gerald; Beer, Andrea; Gerner, Christopher; Marian, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Cancer associated fibroblasts are activated in the tumor microenvironment and contribute to tumor progression, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix remodeling, and inflammation. To identify proteins characteristic for fibroblasts in colorectal cancer we used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to derive protein abundance from whole-tissue homogenates of human colorectal cancer/normal mucosa pairs. Alterations of protein levels were determined by two-sided t test with greater than threefold difference and an FDR of matrix organization, TGFβ receptor signaling and angiogenesis mainly originating from the stroma. Most prominent were increased abundance of SerpinB5 in the parenchyme and latent transforming growth factor β-binding protein, thrombospondin-B2, and secreted protein acidic-and-cysteine-rich in the stroma. Extracellular matrix remodeling involved collagens type VIII, XII, XIV, and VI as well as lysyl-oxidase-2. In silico analysis of mRNA levels demonstrated altered expression in the tumor and the adjacent normal tissue as compared to mucosa of healthy individuals indicating that inflammatory activation affected the surrounding tissue. Immunohistochemistry of 26 tumor specimen confirmed upregulation of SerpinB5, thrombospondin B2 and secreted protein acidic-and-cysteine-rich. This study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting tumor- and compartment-specific protein-signatures that are functionally meaningful by proteomic profiling of whole-tissue extracts together with mining of RNA expression datasets. The results provide the basis for further exploration of inflammation-related stromal markers in larger patient cohorts and experimental models.

  14. Proteomic analysis identifies differentially expressed proteins after red propolis treatment in Hep-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frozza, Caroline Olivieri da Silva; Ribeiro, Tanara da Silva; Gambato, Gabriela; Menti, Caroline; Moura, Sidnei; Pinto, Paulo Marcos; Staats, Charley Christian; Padilha, Francine Ferreira; Begnini, Karine Rech; de Leon, Priscila Marques Moura; Borsuk, Sibele; Savegnago, Lucielli; Dellagostin, Odir; Collares, Tiago; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas; Roesch-Ely, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Here we investigated alterations in the protein profile of Hep-2 treated with red propolis using two-dimensional electrophoresis associated to mass spectrometry and apoptotic rates of cells treated with and without red propolis extracts through TUNEL and Annexin-V assays. A total of 325 spots were manually excised from the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and 177 proteins were identified using LC-MS-MS. Among all proteins identified that presented differential expression, most were down-regulated in presence of red propolis extract at a concentration of 120 μg/mL (IC50): GRP78, PRDX2, LDHB, VIM and TUBA1A. Only two up-regulated proteins were identified in this study in the non-cytotoxic (6 μg/mL) red propolis treated group: RPLP0 and RAD23B. TUNEL staining assay showed a markedly increase in the mid- to late-stage apoptosis of Hep-2 cells induced by red propolis at concentrations of 60 and 120 μg/mL when compared with non-treated cells. The increase of late apoptosis was confirmed by in situ Annexin-V analysis in which red propolis extract induced late apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The differences in tumor cell protein profiles warrant further investigations including isolation of major bioactive compounds of red propolis in different cell lines using proteomics and molecular tests to validate the protein expression here observed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hippocampal transcriptomic and proteomic alterations in the BTBR mouse model of autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin M Daimon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are complex heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders of an unclear etiology, and no cure currently exists. Prior studies have demonstrated that the black and tan, brachyury (BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J mouse strain displays a behavioral phenotype with ASD-like features. BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J mice (referred to simply as BTBR display deficits in social functioning, lack of communication ability, and engagement in stereotyped behavior. Despite extensive behavioral phenotypic characterization, little is known about the genes and proteins responsible for the presentation of the ASD-like phenotype in the BTBR mouse model. In this study, we employed bioinformatics techniques to gain a wide-scale understanding of the transcriptomic and proteomic changes associated with the ASD-like phenotype in BTBR mice. We found a number of genes and proteins to be significantly altered in BTBR mice compared to C57BL/6J (B6 control mice controls such as BDNF, Shank3, and ERK1, which are highly relevant to prior investigations of ASD. Furthermore, we identified distinct functional pathways altered in BTBR mice compared to B6 controls that have been previously shown to be altered in both mouse models of ASD, some human clinical populations, and have been suggested as a possible etiological mechanism of ASD, including axon guidance and regulation of actin cytoskeleton. In addition, our wide-scale bioinformatics approach also discovered several previously unidentified genes and proteins associated with the ASD phenotype in BTBR mice, such as Caskin1, suggesting that bioinformatics could be an avenue by which novel therapeutic targets for ASD are uncovered. As a result, we believe that informed use of synergistic bioinformatics applications represents an invaluable tool for elucidating the etiology of complex disorders like ASD.

  16. Biomarkers of systemic lupus erythematosus identified using mass spectrometry-based proteomics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Orthodoxia; Kousios, Andreas; Hadjisavvas, Andreas; Lauwerys, Bernard; Sokratous, Kleitos; Kyriacou, Kyriacos

    2017-05-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry technologies have created new opportunities for discovering novel protein biomarkers in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We performed a systematic review of published reports on proteomic biomarkers identified in SLE patients using mass spectrometry-based proteomics and highlight their potential disease association and clinical utility. Two electronic databases, MEDLINE and EMBASE, were systematically searched up to July 2015. The methodological quality of studies included in the review was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Twenty-five studies were included in the review, identifying 241 SLE candidate proteomic biomarkers related to various aspects of the disease including disease diagnosis and activity or pinpointing specific organ involvement. Furthermore, 13 of the 25 studies validated their results for a selected number of biomarkers in an independent cohort, resulting in the validation of 28 candidate biomarkers. It is noteworthy that 11 candidate biomarkers were identified in more than one study. A significant number of potential proteomic biomarkers that are related to a number of aspects of SLE have been identified using mass spectrometry proteomic approaches. However, further studies are required to assess the utility of these biomarkers in routine clinical practice. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  17. Altered Proteomic Polymorphisms in the Caterpillar Body and Stroma of Natural Cordyceps sinensis during Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zi-Mei; Gao, Ling; Yao, Yi-Sang; Tan, Ning-Zhi; Wu, Jian-Yong; Ni, Luqun; Zhu, Jia-Shi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the maturational changes in proteomic polymorphisms resulting from differential expression by multiple intrinsic fungi in the caterpillar body and stroma of natural Cordyceps sinensis (Cs), an integrated micro-ecosystem. Methods The surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) biochip technique was used to profile the altered protein compositions in the caterpillar body and stroma of Cs during its maturation. The MS chromatograms were analyzed using density-weighted algorithms to examine the similarities and cluster relationships among the proteomic polymorphisms of the Cs compartments and the mycelial products Hirsutella sinensis (Hs) and Paecilomyces hepiali (Ph). Results: SELDI-TOF MS chromatograms displayed dynamic proteomic polymorphism alterations among samples from the different Cs compartments during maturation. More than 1,900 protein bands were analyzed using density-weighted ZUNIX similarity equations and clustering methods, revealing integral polymorphism similarities of 57.4% between the premature and mature stromata and 42.8% between the premature and mature caterpillar bodies. The across-compartment similarity was low, ranging from 10.0% to 18.4%. Consequently, each Cs compartment (i.e., the stroma and caterpillar body) formed a clustering clade, and the 2 clades formed a Cs cluster. The polymorphic similarities ranged from 0.51% to 1.04% between Hs and the Cs compartments and were 2.8- to 4.8-fold higher (1.92%–4.34%) between Ph and the Cs compartments. The Hs and Ph mycelial samples formed isolated clades outside of the Cs cluster. Conclusion Proteomic polymorphisms in the caterpillar body and stroma of Cs change dynamically during maturation. The proteomic polymorphisms in Hs and Ph differ from those in Cs, suggesting the presence of multiple Cs-associated fungi and multiple Ophiocordyceps sinensis genotypes with altered differential protein expression in the Cs compartments

  18. Differential proteomics study of platelets in asymptomatic constitutional macrothrombocytopenia: altered levels of cytoskeletal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Shilpita; Saha, Sutapa; Banerjee, Debasis; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    Harris platelet syndrome (HPS), also known as asymptomatic constitutional macrothrombocytopenia (ACMT), is an autosomal dominant platelet disorder characterized by mild-to-severe thrombocytopenia and giant platelets with normal platelet aggregation and absence of bleeding symptoms. We have attempted a comparative proteomics study for profiling of platelet proteins in healthy vs. pathological states to discover characteristic protein expression changes in macrothrombocytes and decipher the factors responsible for the functionally active yet morphologically distinct platelets. We have used 2-D gel-based protein separation techniques coupled with MALDI-ToF/ToF-based mass spectrometric identification and characterization of the proteins to investigate the differential proteome profiling of platelet proteins isolated from the peripheral blood samples of patients and normal volunteers. Our study revealed altered levels of actin-binding proteins such as myosin light chain, coactosin-like protein, actin-related protein 2/3 complex, and transgelin2 that hint toward the cytoskeletal changes necessary to maintain the structural and functional integrity of macrothrombocytes. We have also observed over expressed levels of peroxiredoxin2 that signifies the prevailing oxidative stress in these cells. Additionally, altered levels of protein disulfide isomerase and transthyretin provide insights into the measures adapted by the macrothrombocytes to maintain their normal functional activity. This first proteomics study of platelets from ACMT may provide an understanding of the structural stability and normal functioning of these platelets in spite of their large size. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Mistimed food intake and sleep alters 24-hour time-of-day patterns of the human plasma proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depner, Christopher M; Melanson, Edward L; McHill, Andrew W; Wright, Kenneth P

    2018-06-05

    Proteomics holds great promise for understanding human physiology, developing health biomarkers, and precision medicine. However, how much the plasma proteome varies with time of day and is regulated by the master circadian suprachiasmatic nucleus brain clock, assessed here by the melatonin rhythm, is largely unknown. Here, we assessed 24-h time-of-day patterns of human plasma proteins in six healthy men during daytime food intake and nighttime sleep in phase with the endogenous circadian clock (i.e., circadian alignment) versus daytime sleep and nighttime food intake out of phase with the endogenous circadian clock (i.e., circadian misalignment induced by simulated nightshift work). We identified 24-h time-of-day patterns in 573 of 1,129 proteins analyzed, with 30 proteins showing strong regulation by the circadian cycle. Relative to circadian alignment, the average abundance and/or 24-h time-of-day patterns of 127 proteins were altered during circadian misalignment. Altered proteins were associated with biological pathways involved in immune function, metabolism, and cancer. Of the 30 circadian-regulated proteins, the majority peaked between 1400 hours and 2100 hours, and these 30 proteins were associated with basic pathways involved in extracellular matrix organization, tyrosine kinase signaling, and signaling by receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2. Furthermore, circadian misalignment altered multiple proteins known to regulate glucose homeostasis and/or energy metabolism, with implications for altered metabolic physiology. Our findings demonstrate the circadian clock, the behavioral wake-sleep/food intake-fasting cycle, and interactions between these processes regulate 24-h time-of-day patterns of human plasma proteins and help identify mechanisms of circadian misalignment that may contribute to metabolic dysregulation.

  20. Combining affinity proteomics and network context to identify new phosphatase substrates and adapters in growth pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca eSacco

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation homoeostasis is tightly controlled and pathological conditions are caused by subtle alterations of the cell phosphorylation profile. Altered levels of kinase activities have already been associated to specific diseases. Less is known about the impact of phosphatases, the enzymes that down-regulate phosphorylation by removing the phosphate groups. This is partly due to our poor understanding of the phosphatase-substrate network. Much of phosphatase substrate specificity is not based on intrinsic enzyme specificity with the catalytic pocket recognizing the sequence/structure context of the phosphorylated residue. In addition many phosphatase catalytic subunits do not form a stable complex with their substrates. This makes the inference and validation of phosphatase substrates a non-trivial task. Here, we present a novel approach that builds on the observation that much of phosphatase substrate selection is based on the network of physical interactions linking the phosphatase to the substrate. We first used affinity proteomics coupled to quantitative mass spectrometry to saturate the interactome of eight phosphatases whose down regulations was shown to affect the activation of the RAS-PI#K pathway. By integrating information from functional siRNA with protein interaction information, we develop a strategy that aims at inferring phosphatase physiological substrates. Graph analysis is used to identify protein scaffolds that may link the catalytic subunits to their substrates. By this approach we rediscover several previously described phosphatase substrate interactions and characterize two new protein scaffolds that promote the dephosphorylation of PTPN11 and ERK by DUSP18 and DUSP26 respectively.

  1. Identifying cytotoxic T cell epitopes from genomic and proteomic information: "The human MHC project."

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauemøller, S L; Kesmir, C; Corbet, S L

    2000-01-01

    discrimination, even at the peptide level. It is not surprising that peptides are key targets of the immune system. It follows that proteomes can be translated into immunogens once it is known how the immune system generates and handles peptides. Recent advances have identified many of the basic principles...

  2. Proteome analysis of Aspergillus fumigatus identifies glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins associated to the cell wall biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, J M; Magnin, T; Tagat, E; Legrand, R; Bernard, M; Diaquin, M; Fudali, C; Latgé, J P

    2001-08-01

    Previous studies in Aspergillus fumigatus (Mouyna I., Fontaine T., Vai M., Monod M., Fonzi W. A., Diaquin M., Popolo L., Hartland R. P., Latgé J.-P, J. Biol. Chem. 2000, 275, 14882-14889) have shown that a glucanosyltransferase playing an important role in fungal cell wall biosynthesis is glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored to the membrane. To identify other GPI-anchored proteins putatively involved in cell wall biogenesis, a proteomic analysis has been undertaken in A. fumigatus and the protein data were matched with the yeast genomic data. GPI-anchored proteins of A. fumigatus were released from membrane preparation by an endogenous GPI-phospholipase C, purified by liquid chromatography and separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. They were characterized by their peptide mass fingerprint through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-(MALDI-TOF)-mass spectrometry and by internal amino acid sequencing. Nine GPI-anchored proteins were identified in A. fumigatus. Five of them were homologs of putatively GPI-anchored yeast proteins (Csa1p, Crh1p, Crh2p, Ecm33p, Gas1p) of unknown function but shown by gene disruption analysis to play a role in cell wall morphogenesis. In addition, a comparative study performed with chitin synthase and glucanosyl transferase mutants of A. fumigatus showed that a modification of the growth phenotype seen in these mutants was associated to an alteration of the pattern of GPI-anchored proteins. These results suggest that GPI-anchored proteins identified in this study are involved in A. fumigatus cell wall organization.

  3. Proteomic analysis of exosomes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell identifies intercellular transfer of angiogenic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Yuk-kit

    2015-04-01

    Exosomes, a group of secreted extracellular nanovesicles containing genetic materials and signaling molecules, play a critical role in intercellular communication. During tumorigenesis, exosomes have been demonstrated to promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis while their biological functions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the role of NPC-derived exosomes on angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from the NPC C666-1 cells and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69 and NP460) were isolated using ultracentrifugation. The molecular profile and biophysical characteristics of exosomes were verified by Western blotting, sucrose density gradient, and electron microscopy. We showed that the C666-1 exosomes (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly increase the tubulogenesis, migration and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequently, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in C666-1 exosomes. Among the 640 identified proteins, 51 and 89 proteins were considered as up- and down-regulated (≥ 1.5-fold variations) in C666-1 exosomes compared to the normal counterparts, respectively. As expected, pro-angiogenic proteins including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44 variant isoform 5 (CD44v5) are among the up-regulated proteins, whereas angio-suppressive protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) was down-regulated in C666-1 exosomes. Further confocal microscopic study and Western blotting clearly demonstrated that the alteration of ICAM-1, and TSP-1 expressions in recipient HUVECs are due to internalization of exosomes. Taken together, these data strongly indicated the critical roles of identified angiogenic proteins in the involvement of exosomes-induced angiogenesis, which could potentially be developed as therapeutic targets in future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Proteomic analysis of exosomes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell identifies intercellular transfer of angiogenic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Yuk-kit; Zhang, Huoming; Liu, Pei; Tsao, George Sai-wah; Li Lung, Maria; Mak, Nai-ki; Ngok-shun Wong, Ricky; Ying-kit Yue, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes, a group of secreted extracellular nanovesicles containing genetic materials and signaling molecules, play a critical role in intercellular communication. During tumorigenesis, exosomes have been demonstrated to promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis while their biological functions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the role of NPC-derived exosomes on angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from the NPC C666-1 cells and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69 and NP460) were isolated using ultracentrifugation. The molecular profile and biophysical characteristics of exosomes were verified by Western blotting, sucrose density gradient, and electron microscopy. We showed that the C666-1 exosomes (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly increase the tubulogenesis, migration and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequently, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in C666-1 exosomes. Among the 640 identified proteins, 51 and 89 proteins were considered as up- and down-regulated (≥ 1.5-fold variations) in C666-1 exosomes compared to the normal counterparts, respectively. As expected, pro-angiogenic proteins including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44 variant isoform 5 (CD44v5) are among the up-regulated proteins, whereas angio-suppressive protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) was down-regulated in C666-1 exosomes. Further confocal microscopic study and Western blotting clearly demonstrated that the alteration of ICAM-1, and TSP-1 expressions in recipient HUVECs are due to internalization of exosomes. Taken together, these data strongly indicated the critical roles of identified angiogenic proteins in the involvement of exosomes-induced angiogenesis, which could potentially be developed as therapeutic targets in future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. ARID1B alterations identify aggressive tumors in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Jung-Sun; Zheng, Siyuan; Huse, Jason T; Bae, Joon Seol; Lee, Ji Won; Yoo, Keon Hee; Koo, Hong Hoe; Kyung, Sungkyu; Park, Woong-Yang; Sung, Ki W

    2017-07-11

    Targeted panel sequencing was performed to determine molecular targets and biomarkers in 72 children with neuroblastoma. Frequent genetic alterations were detected in ALK (16.7%), BRCA1 (13.9%), ATM (12.5%), and PTCH1 (11.1%) in an 83-gene panel. Molecular targets for targeted therapy were identified in 16 of 72 patients (22.2%). Two-thirds of ALK mutations were known to increase sensitivity to ALK inhibitors. Sequence alterations in ARID1B were identified in 5 of 72 patients (6.9%). Four of five ARID1B alterations were detected in tumors of high-risk patients. Two of five patients with ARID1B alterations died of disease progression. Relapse-free survival was lower in patients with ARID1B alterations than in those without (p = 0.01). In analysis confined to high-risk patients, 3-year overall survival was lower in patients with an ARID1B alteration (33.3 ± 27.2%) or MYCN amplification (30.0 ± 23.9%) than in those with neither ARID1B alteration nor MYCN amplification (90.5 ± 6.4%, p = 0.05). These results provide possibilities for targeted therapy and a new biomarker identifying a subgroup of neuroblastoma patients with poor prognosis.

  6. High-throughput sperm differential proteomics suggests that epigenetic alterations contribute to failed assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpiazu, Rubén; Amaral, Alexandra; Castillo, Judit; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Guimerà, Marta; Ballescà, Josep Lluís; Balasch, Juan; Oliva, Rafael

    2014-06-01

    Are there quantitative alterations in the proteome of normozoospermic sperm samples that are able to complete IVF but whose female partner does not achieve pregnancy? Normozoospermic sperm samples with different IVF outcomes (pregnancy versus no pregnancy) differed in the levels of at least 66 proteins. The analysis of the proteome of sperm samples with distinct fertilization capacity using low-throughput proteomic techniques resulted in the detection of a few differential proteins. Current high-throughput mass spectrometry approaches allow the identification and quantification of a substantially higher number of proteins. This was a case-control study including 31 men with normozoospermic sperm and their partners who underwent IVF with successful fertilization recruited between 2007 and 2008. Normozoospermic sperm samples from 15 men whose female partners did not achieve pregnancy after IVF (no pregnancy) and 16 men from couples that did achieve pregnancy after IVF (pregnancy) were included in this study. To perform the differential proteomic experiments, 10 no pregnancy samples and 10 pregnancy samples were separately pooled and subsequently used for tandem mass tags (TMT) protein labelling, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identification and peak intensity relative protein quantification. Bioinformatic analyses were performed using UniProt Knowledgebase, DAVID and Reactome. Individual samples (n = 5 no pregnancy samples; n = 6 pregnancy samples) and aliquots from the above TMT pools were used for western blotting. By using TMT labelling and LC-MS/MS, we have detected 31 proteins present at lower abundance (ratio no pregnancy/pregnancy 1.5) in the no pregnancy group. Bioinformatic analyses showed that the proteins with differing abundance are involved in chromatin assembly and lipoprotein metabolism (P values Economia y Competividad; FEDER BFU 2009-07118 and PI13/00699) and

  7. Evening and morning alterations in Obstructive Sleep Apnea red blood cell proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélia Feliciano

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents proteomics data referenced in [1] Using proteomics-based evaluation of red blood cells (RBCs, we have identified differentially abundant proteins associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSA. RBCs were collected from peripheral blood of patients with moderate/severe OSA or snoring at pre- (evening and post-night (morning polysomnography, so that proteome variations between these time points could be assessed. RBC cytoplasmic fraction depleted of hemoglobin, using Hemovoid™ system, were analyzed by two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE, the 2D image software-based analyzed and relevant differentially abundant proteins identified by mass spectrometry (MS. MS identified 31 protein spots differentially abundant corresponding to 21 unique proteins possibly due to the existence of post-translational modification regulations. Functional analysis by bioinformatics tools indicated that most proteins are associated with catalytic, oxidoreductase, peroxidase, hydrolase, ATPase and anti-oxidant activity. At morning a larger numbers of differential proteins including response to chemical stimulus, oxidation reduction, regulation of catalytic activity and response to stress were observed in OSA. The data might support further research in OSA biomarker discovery and validation.

  8. A proteomic study to identify soya allergens--the human response to transgenic versus non-transgenic soya samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Rita; Martins, Isabel; Jeno, Paul; Ricardo, Cândido Pinto; Oliveira, Maria Margarida

    2007-01-01

    In spite of being among the main foods responsible for allergic reactions worldwide, soybean (Glycine max)-derived products continue to be increasingly widespread in a variety of food products due to their well-documented health benefits. Soybean also continues to be one of the elected target crops for genetic modification. The aim of this study was to characterize the soya proteome and, specifically, IgE-reactive proteins as well as to compare the IgE response in soya-allergic individuals to genetically modified Roundup Ready soya versus its non-transgenic control. We performed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of protein extracts from a 5% genetically modified Roundup Ready flour sample and its non-transgenic control followed by Western blotting with plasma from 5 soya-sensitive individuals. We used peptide tandem mass spectrometry to identify soya proteins (55 protein matches), specifically IgE-binding ones, and to evaluate differences between transgenic and non-transgenic samples. We identified 2 new potential soybean allergens--one is maturation associated and seems to be part of the late embryogenesis abundant proteins group and the other is a cysteine proteinase inhibitor. None of the individuals tested reacted differentially to the transgenic versus non-transgenic samples under study. Soybean endogenous allergen expression does not seem to be altered after genetic modification. Proteomics should be considered a powerful tool for functional characterization of plants and for food safety assessment. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Proteomics approach to identify dehydration responsive nuclear proteins from chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Aarti; Chakraborty, Subhra; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2008-01-01

    Dehydration or water-deficit is one of the most important environmental stress factors that greatly influences plant growth and development and limits crop productivity. Plants respond and adapt to such stress by altering their cellular metabolism and activating various defense machineries. Mechanisms that operate signal perception, transduction, and downstream regulatory events provide valuable information about the underlying pathways involved in environmental stress responses. The nuclear proteins constitute a highly organized, complex network that plays diverse roles during cellular development and other physiological processes. To gain a better understanding of dehydration response in plants, we have developed a comparative nuclear proteome in a food legume, chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). Three-week-old chickpea seedlings were subjected to progressive dehydration by withdrawing water and the changes in the nuclear proteome were examined using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Approximately 205 protein spots were found to be differentially regulated under dehydration. Mass spectrometry analysis allowed the identification of 147 differentially expressed proteins, presumably involved in a variety of functions including gene transcription and replication, molecular chaperones, cell signaling, and chromatin remodeling. The dehydration responsive nuclear proteome of chickpea revealed a coordinated response, which involves both the regulatory as well as the functional proteins. This study, for the first time, provides an insight into the complex metabolic network operating in the nucleus during dehydration.

  10. Low temperature conditioning of garlic (Allium sativum L.) “seed” cloves induces alterations in sprouts proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufoo-Hurtado, Miguel D.; Huerta-Ocampo, José Á.; Barrera-Pacheco, Alberto; Barba de la Rosa, Ana P.; Mercado-Silva, Edmundo M.

    2015-01-01

    Low-temperature conditioning of garlic “seed” cloves substitutes the initial climatic requirements of the crop and accelerates the cycle. We have reported that “seed” bulbs from “Coreano” variety conditioned at 5°C for 5 weeks reduces growth and plant weight as well as the crop yields and increases the synthesis of phenolic compounds and anthocyanins. Therefore, this treatment suggests a cold stress. Plant acclimation to stress is associated with deep changes in proteome composition. Since proteins are directly involved in plant stress response, proteomics studies can significantly contribute to unravel the possible relationships between protein abundance and plant stress acclimation. The aim of this work was to study the changes in the protein profiles of garlic “seed” cloves subjected to conditioning at low-temperature using proteomics approach. Two sets of garlic bulbs were used, one set was stored at room temperature (23°C), and the other was conditioned at low temperature (5°C) for 5 weeks. Total soluble proteins were extracted from sprouts of cloves and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein spots showing statistically significant changes in abundance were analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS and identified by database search analysis using the Mascot search engine. The results revealed that low-temperature conditioning of garlic “seed” cloves causes alterations in the accumulation of proteins involved in different physiological processes such as cellular growth, antioxidative/oxidative state, macromolecules transport, protein folding and transcription regulation process. The metabolic pathways affected include protein biosynthesis and quality control system, photosynthesis, photorespiration, energy production, and carbohydrate and nucleotide metabolism. These processes can work cooperatively to establish a new cellular homeostasis that might be related with the physiological and biochemical changes observed in previous studies

  11. Proteomic profiling of Plasmodium sporozoite maturation identifies new proteins essential for parasite development and infectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasonder, Edwin; Janse, Chris J; van Gemert, Geert-Jan

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites that develop and mature inside an Anopheles mosquito initiate a malaria infection in humans. Here we report the first proteomic comparison of different parasite stages from the mosquito -- early and late oocysts containing midgut sporozoites, and the mature...... whose annotation suggest an involvement in sporozoite maturation, motility, infection of the human host and associated metabolic adjustments. Analyses of proteins identified in the P. falciparum sporozoite proteomes by orthologous gene disruption in the rodent malaria parasite, P. berghei, revealed...... three previously uncharacterized Plasmodium proteins that appear to be essential for sporozoite development at distinct points of maturation in the mosquito. This study sheds light on the development and maturation of the malaria parasite in an Anopheles mosquito and also identifies proteins that may...

  12. Novel asymmetrically localizing components of human centrosomes identified by complementary proteomics methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lis; Vanselow, Katja; Skogs, Marie

    2011-01-01

    by identifying a novel set of five proteins preferentially associated with mother or daughter centrioles, comprising genes implicated in cell polarity. Pulsed labelling demonstrates a remarkable variation in the stability of centrosomal protein complexes. These spatiotemporal proteomics data provide leads......Centrosomes in animal cells are dynamic organelles with a proteinaceous matrix of pericentriolar material assembled around a pair of centrioles. They organize the microtubule cytoskeleton and the mitotic spindle apparatus. Mature centrioles are essential for biogenesis of primary cilia that mediate...

  13. Proteomic investigations of lysine acetylation identify diverse substrates of mitochondrial deacetylase sirt3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sol, E-ri Maria; Wagner, Sebastian A; Weinert, Brian T

    2012-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a posttranslational modification that is dynamically regulated by the activity of acetyltransferases and deacetylases. The human and mouse genomes encode 18 different lysine deacetylases (KDACs) which are key regulators of many cellular processes. Identifying substrates...... of KDACs and pinpointing the regulated acetylation sites on target proteins may provide important information about the molecular basis of their functions. Here we apply quantitative proteomics to identify endogenous substrates of the mitochondrial deacetylase Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) by comparing site...... by modulating acetylation on diverse substrates. The experimental strategy described here is generic and can be applied to identify endogenous substrates of other lysine deacetylases....

  14. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Activation of Hallmark Pathways of Cancer in Patient Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrum, Stephanie D; Larson, Signe K; Avaritt, Nathan L; Moreland, Linley E; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Cheung, Wang L; Tackett, Alan J

    2013-03-01

    Molecular pathways regulating melanoma initiation and progression are potential targets of therapeutic development for this aggressive cancer. Identification and molecular analysis of these pathways in patients has been primarily restricted to targeted studies on individual proteins. Here, we report the most comprehensive analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human melanoma tissues using quantitative proteomics. From 61 patient samples, we identified 171 proteins varying in abundance among benign nevi, primary melanoma, and metastatic melanoma. Seventy-three percent of these proteins were validated by immunohistochemistry staining of malignant melanoma tissues from the Human Protein Atlas database. Our results reveal that molecular pathways involved with tumor cell proliferation, motility, and apoptosis are mis-regulated in melanoma. These data provide the most comprehensive proteome resource on patient melanoma and reveal insight into the molecular mechanisms driving melanoma progression.

  15. Proteomic identification of altered cerebral proteins in the complex regional pain syndrome animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Park, Zee-Yong; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Pyung Bok

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder. Although the exact pathophysiology of CRPS is not fully understood, central and peripheral mechanisms might be involved in the development of this disorder. To reveal the central mechanism of CRPS, we conducted a proteomic analysis of rat cerebrum using the chronic postischemia pain (CPIP) model, a novel experimental model of CRPS. After generating the CPIP animal model, we performed a proteomic analysis of the rat cerebrum using a multidimensional protein identification technology, and screened the proteins differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups. Results. A total of 155 proteins were differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups: 125 increased and 30 decreased; expressions of proteins related to cell signaling, synaptic plasticity, regulation of cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal formation were increased in the CPIP group. However, proenkephalin A, cereblon, and neuroserpin were decreased in CPIP group. Altered expression of cerebral proteins in the CPIP model indicates cerebral involvement in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Further study is required to elucidate the roles of these proteins in the development and maintenance of CRPS.

  16. Proteomic Identification of Altered Cerebral Proteins in the Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Sahngun Nahm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a rare but debilitating pain disorder. Although the exact pathophysiology of CRPS is not fully understood, central and peripheral mechanisms might be involved in the development of this disorder. To reveal the central mechanism of CRPS, we conducted a proteomic analysis of rat cerebrum using the chronic postischemia pain (CPIP model, a novel experimental model of CRPS. Materials and Methods. After generating the CPIP animal model, we performed a proteomic analysis of the rat cerebrum using a multidimensional protein identification technology, and screened the proteins differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups. Results. A total of 155 proteins were differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups: 125 increased and 30 decreased; expressions of proteins related to cell signaling, synaptic plasticity, regulation of cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal formation were increased in the CPIP group. However, proenkephalin A, cereblon, and neuroserpin were decreased in CPIP group. Conclusion. Altered expression of cerebral proteins in the CPIP model indicates cerebral involvement in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Further study is required to elucidate the roles of these proteins in the development and maintenance of CRPS.

  17. Time-dependent leaf proteome alterations of Brachypodium distachyon in response to drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatli, Ozge; Sogutmaz Ozdemir, Bahar; Dinler Doganay, Gizem

    2017-08-01

    For the first time, a comprehensive proteome analysis was conducted on Brachypodium leaves under drought stress. Gradual changes in response to drought stress were monitored. Drought is one of the major stress factors that dramatically affect the agricultural productivity worldwide. Improving the yield under drought is an urgent challenge in agriculture. Brachypodium distachyon is a model species for monocot plants such as wheat, barley and several potential biofuel grasses. In the current study, a comprehensive proteome analysis was conducted on Brachypodium leaves under different levels of drought application. To screen gradual changes upon drought, Brachypodium leaves subjected to drought for 4, 8 and 12 days were collected for each treatment day and relative water content of the leaves was measured for each time point. Cellular responses of Brachypodium were investigated through a proteomic approach involving two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). Among 497 distinct spots in Brachypodium protein repertoire, a total of 13 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were identified as responsive to drought by mass spectrometry and classified according to their functions using bioinformatics tools. The biological functions of DEPs included roles in photosynthesis, protein folding, antioxidant mechanism and metabolic processes, which responded differentially at each time point of drought treatment. To examine further transcriptional expression of the genes that code identified protein, quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed. Identified proteins will contribute to the studies involving development of drought-resistant crop species and lead to the delineation of molecular mechanisms in drought response.

  18. Global phosphotyrosine proteomics identifies PKCδ as a marker of responsiveness to Src inhibition in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliot T McKinley

    Full Text Available Sensitive and specific biomarkers of protein kinase inhibition can be leveraged to accelerate drug development studies in oncology by associating early molecular responses with target inhibition. In this study, we utilized unbiased shotgun phosphotyrosine (pY proteomics to discover novel biomarkers of response to dasatinib, a small molecule Src-selective inhibitor, in preclinical models of colorectal cancer (CRC. We performed unbiased mass spectrometry shotgun pY proteomics to reveal the pY proteome of cultured HCT-116 colonic carcinoma cells, and then extended this analysis to HCT-116 xenograft tumors to identify pY biomarkers of dasatinib-responsiveness in vivo. Major dasatinib-responsive pY sites in xenograft tumors included sites on delta-type protein kinase C (PKCδ, CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1, Type-II SH2-domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP2, and receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPα. The pY313 site PKCδ was further supported as a relevant biomarker of dasatinib-mediated Src inhibition in HCT-116 xenografts by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting with a phosphospecific antibody. Reduction of PKCδ pY313 was further correlated with dasatinib-mediated inhibition of Src and diminished growth as spheroids of a panel of human CRC cell lines. These studies reveal PKCδ pY313 as a promising readout of Src inhibition in CRC and potentially other solid tumors and may reflect responsiveness to dasatinib in a subset of colorectal cancers.

  19. Chronic β2 -adrenoceptor agonist treatment alters muscle proteome and functional adaptations induced by high intensity training in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostrup, Morten; Onslev, Johan; Jacobson, Glenn A; Wilson, Richard; Bangsbo, Jens

    2018-01-15

    While several studies have investigated the effects of exercise training in human skeletal muscle and the chronic effect of β 2 -agonist treatment in rodent muscle, their effects on muscle proteome signature with related functional measures in humans are still incompletely understood. Herein we show that daily β 2 -agonist treatment attenuates training-induced enhancements in exercise performance and maximal oxygen consumption, and alters muscle proteome signature and phenotype in trained young men. Daily β 2 -agonist treatment abolished several of the training-induced enhancements in muscle oxidative capacity and caused a repression of muscle metabolic pathways; furthermore, β 2 -agonist treatment induced a slow-to-fast twitch muscle phenotype transition. The present study indicates that chronic β 2 -agonist treatment confounds the positive effect of high intensity training on exercise performance and oxidative capacity, which is of interest for the large proportion of persons using inhaled β 2 -agonists on a daily basis, including athletes. Although the effects of training have been studied for decades, data on muscle proteome signature remodelling induced by high intensity training in relation to functional changes in humans remains incomplete. Likewise, β 2 -agonists are frequently used to counteract exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, but the effects β 2 -agonist treatment on muscle remodelling and adaptations to training are unknown. In a placebo-controlled parallel study, we randomly assigned 21 trained men to 4 weeks of high intensity training with (HIT+β 2 A) or without (HIT) daily inhalation of β 2 -agonist (terbutaline, 4 mg dose -1 ). Of 486 proteins identified by mass-spectrometry proteomics of muscle biopsies sampled before and after the intervention, 32 and 85 were changing (false discovery rate (FDR) ≤5%) with the intervention in HIT and HIT+β 2 A, respectively. Proteome signature changes were different in HIT and HIT+β 2 A (P

  20. Proteomic analysis identifies mitochondrial metabolic enzymes as major discriminators between different stages of the failing human myocardium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Wiggers, Henrik; Bøtker, Hans Erik

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to identify patterns in differentially regulated proteins associated with the progression of chronic heart failure. We specifically studied proteomics in chronic reversibly (RDM) and irreversibly dysfunctional myocardium (IRDM), as well as end-stage failing myocardium (ESFM).......Our aim was to identify patterns in differentially regulated proteins associated with the progression of chronic heart failure. We specifically studied proteomics in chronic reversibly (RDM) and irreversibly dysfunctional myocardium (IRDM), as well as end-stage failing myocardium (ESFM)....

  1. Growth in spaceflight hardware results in alterations to the transcriptome and proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Proma; Kruse, Colin P. S.; Luesse, Darron R.; Wyatt, Sarah E.

    2017-11-01

    The Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware has been used to house many biology experiments on both the Space Transport System (STS, commonly known as the space shuttle) and the International Space Station (ISS). However, microscopic examination of Arabidopsis seedlings by Johnson et al. (2015) indicated the hardware itself may affect cell morphology. The experiment herein was designed to assess the effects of the BRIC-Petri Dish Fixation Units (BRIC-PDFU) hardware on the transcriptome and proteome of Arabidopsis seedlings. To our knowledge, this is the first transcriptomic and proteomic comparison of Arabidopsis seedlings grown with and without hardware. Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type Columbia (Col-0) seeds were sterilized and bulk plated on forty-four 60 mm Petri plates, of which 22 were integrated into the BRIC-PDFU hardware and 22 were maintained in closed containers at Ohio University. Seedlings were grown for approximately 3 days, fixed with RNAlater® and stored at -80 °C prior to RNA and protein extraction, with proteins separated into membrane and soluble fractions prior to analysis. The RNAseq analysis identified 1651 differentially expressed genes; MS/MS analysis identified 598 soluble and 589 membrane proteins differentially abundant both at p < .05. Fold enrichment analysis of gene ontology terms related to differentially expressed transcripts and proteins highlighted a variety of stress responses. Some of these genes and proteins have been previously identified in spaceflight experiments, indicating that these genes and proteins may be perturbed by both conditions.

  2. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers do not affect metamorphosis but alter the proteome of the invasive slipper limpet Crepidula onyx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Joy; Po, Beverly H K; Chiu, Jill M Y; Wu, Rudolf S S; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen

    2013-08-15

    Man-made polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) used as flame retardants in various consumer products may be harmful to marine organisms. Larvae of some marine invertebrates, especially invasive species, can develop resistance to PBDEs through altered protein expression patterns or proteome plasticity. This is the first report of a proteomics approach to study BDE-47 induced molecular changes in the invasive limpet Crepidula onyx. Larvae of C. onyx were cultured for 5 days (hatching to metamorphosis) in the presence of BDE-47 (1 μg L(-1)). Using a 2-DE proteomics approach with triple quadrupole and high-resolution TOF-MS, we showed that BDE-47 altered the proteome structure but not the growth or metamorphosis of C. onyx larvae. We found eight significant differentially expressed proteins in response to BDE-47, deemed the protein expression signature, consisting of cytoskeletal, stress tolerance, metabolism and energy production related proteins. Our data suggest C. onyx larvae have adequate proteome plasticity to tolerate BDE-47 toxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Integration of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data identifies two biologically distinct subtypes of invasive lobular breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaut, Magali; Chin, Suet-Feung; Majewski, Ian; Severson, Tesa M; Bismeijer, Tycho; de Koning, Leanne; Peeters, Justine K; Schouten, Philip C; Rueda, Oscar M; Bosma, Astrid J; Tarrant, Finbarr; Fan, Yue; He, Beilei; Xue, Zheng; Mittempergher, Lorenza; Kluin, Roelof J C; Heijmans, Jeroen; Snel, Mireille; Pereira, Bernard; Schlicker, Andreas; Provenzano, Elena; Ali, Hamid Raza; Gaber, Alexander; O'Hurley, Gillian; Lehn, Sophie; Muris, Jettie J F; Wesseling, Jelle; Kay, Elaine; Sammut, Stephen John; Bardwell, Helen A; Barbet, Aurélie S; Bard, Floriane; Lecerf, Caroline; O'Connor, Darran P; Vis, Daniël J; Benes, Cyril H; McDermott, Ultan; Garnett, Mathew J; Simon, Iris M; Jirström, Karin; Dubois, Thierry; Linn, Sabine C; Gallagher, William M; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Caldas, Carlos; Bernards, Rene

    2016-01-05

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most frequently occurring histological breast cancer subtype after invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), accounting for around 10% of all breast cancers. The molecular processes that drive the development of ILC are still largely unknown. We have performed a comprehensive genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of a large ILC patient cohort and present here an integrated molecular portrait of ILC. Mutations in CDH1 and in the PI3K pathway are the most frequent molecular alterations in ILC. We identified two main subtypes of ILCs: (i) an immune related subtype with mRNA up-regulation of PD-L1, PD-1 and CTLA-4 and greater sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in representative cell line models; (ii) a hormone related subtype, associated with Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), and gain of chromosomes 1q and 8q and loss of chromosome 11q. Using the somatic mutation rate and eIF4B protein level, we identified three groups with different clinical outcomes, including a group with extremely good prognosis. We provide a comprehensive overview of the molecular alterations driving ILC and have explored links with therapy response. This molecular characterization may help to tailor treatment of ILC through the application of specific targeted, chemo- and/or immune-therapies.

  4. Maternal micronutrient deficiency leads to alteration in the kidney proteome in rat pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shadab; Basak, Trayambak; Anand Kumar, K; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Lalitha, A; Yadav, Dilip K; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Raghunath, Manchala; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2015-09-08

    Maternal nutritional deficiency significantly perturbs the offspring's physiology predisposing them to metabolic diseases during adulthood. Vitamin B12 and folate are two such micronutrients, whose deficiency leads to elevated homocysteine levels. We earlier generated B12 and/or folate deficient rat models and using high-throughput proteomic approach, showed that maternal vitamin B12 deficiency modulates carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in the liver of pups through regulation of PPAR signaling pathway. In this study, using similar approach, we identified 26 differentially expressed proteins in the kidney of pups born to mothers fed with vitamin B12 deficient diet while only four proteins were identified in the folate deficient group. Importantly, proteins like calreticulin, cofilin 1 and nucleoside diphosphate kinase B that are involved in the functioning of the kidney were upregulated in B12 deficient group. Our results hint towards a larger effect of vitamin B12 deficiency compared to that of folate presumably due to greater elevation of homocysteine in vitamin B12 deficient group. In view of widespread vitamin B12 and folate deficiency and its association with several diseases like anemia, cardiovascular and renal diseases, our results may have large implications for kidney diseases in populations deficient in vitamin B12 especially in vegetarians and the elderly people.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrative analyses of miRNA and proteomics identify potential biological pathways associated with onset of pulmonary fibrosis in the bleomycin rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunaga, Satoki; Kakehashi, Anna; Sumida, Kayo; Kushida, Masahiko; Asano, Hiroyuki; Gi, Min; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    To determine miRNAs and their predicted target proteins regulatory networks which are potentially involved in onset of pulmonary fibrosis in the bleomycin rat model, we conducted integrative miRNA microarray and iTRAQ-coupled LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses, and evaluated the significance of altered biological functions and pathways. We observed that alterations of miRNAs and proteins are associated with the early phase of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and identified potential target pairs by using ingenuity pathway analysis. Using the data set of these alterations, it was demonstrated that those miRNAs, in association with their predicted target proteins, are potentially involved in canonical pathways reflective of initial epithelial injury and fibrogenic processes, and biofunctions related to induction of cellular development, movement, growth, and proliferation. Prediction of activated functions suggested that lung cells acquire proliferative, migratory, and invasive capabilities, and resistance to cell death especially in the very early phase of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The present study will provide new insights for understanding the molecular pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. - Highlights: • We analyzed bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in the rat. • Integrative analyses of miRNA microarray and proteomics were conducted. • We determined the alterations of miRNAs and their potential target proteins. • The alterations may control biological functions and pathways in pulmonary fibrosis. • Our result may provide new insights of pulmonary fibrosis

  6. Integrative analyses of miRNA and proteomics identify potential biological pathways associated with onset of pulmonary fibrosis in the bleomycin rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukunaga, Satoki [Department of Molecular Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Environmental Health Science Laboratory, Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd., 3-1-98 Kasugade-Naka, Konohana-ku, Osaka 554-8558 (Japan); Kakehashi, Anna [Department of Molecular Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Sumida, Kayo; Kushida, Masahiko; Asano, Hiroyuki [Environmental Health Science Laboratory, Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd., 3-1-98 Kasugade-Naka, Konohana-ku, Osaka 554-8558 (Japan); Gi, Min [Department of Molecular Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Wanibuchi, Hideki, E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan)

    2015-08-01

    To determine miRNAs and their predicted target proteins regulatory networks which are potentially involved in onset of pulmonary fibrosis in the bleomycin rat model, we conducted integrative miRNA microarray and iTRAQ-coupled LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses, and evaluated the significance of altered biological functions and pathways. We observed that alterations of miRNAs and proteins are associated with the early phase of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and identified potential target pairs by using ingenuity pathway analysis. Using the data set of these alterations, it was demonstrated that those miRNAs, in association with their predicted target proteins, are potentially involved in canonical pathways reflective of initial epithelial injury and fibrogenic processes, and biofunctions related to induction of cellular development, movement, growth, and proliferation. Prediction of activated functions suggested that lung cells acquire proliferative, migratory, and invasive capabilities, and resistance to cell death especially in the very early phase of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The present study will provide new insights for understanding the molecular pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. - Highlights: • We analyzed bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in the rat. • Integrative analyses of miRNA microarray and proteomics were conducted. • We determined the alterations of miRNAs and their potential target proteins. • The alterations may control biological functions and pathways in pulmonary fibrosis. • Our result may provide new insights of pulmonary fibrosis.

  7. Proteomic profiling of human plasma exosomes identifies PPARγ as an exosome-associated protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looze, Christopher; Yui, David; Leung, Lester; Ingham, Matthew; Kaler, Maryann; Yao, Xianglan; Wu, Wells W.; Shen Rongfong; Daniels, Mathew P.; Levine, Stewart J.

    2009-01-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles that are released from cells as a mechanism of cell-free intercellular communication. Only a limited number of proteins have been identified from the plasma exosome proteome. Here, we developed a multi-step fractionation scheme incorporating gel exclusion chromatography, rate zonal centrifugation through continuous sucrose gradients, and high-speed centrifugation to purify exosomes from human plasma. Exosome-associated proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and 66 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS, which included both cellular and extracellular proteins. Furthermore, we identified and characterized peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and proliferation, as well as immune and inflammatory cell functions, as a novel component of plasma-derived exosomes. Given the important role of exosomes as intercellular messengers, the discovery of PPARγ as a component of human plasma exosomes identifies a potential new pathway for the paracrine transfer of nuclear receptors.

  8. Proteomic analysis of lipid droplets from Caco-2/TC7 enterocytes identifies novel modulators of lipid secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauke Beilstein

    Full Text Available In enterocytes, the dynamic accumulation and depletion of triacylglycerol (TAG in lipid droplets (LD during fat absorption suggests that cytosolic LD-associated TAG contribute to TAG-rich lipoprotein (TRL production. To get insight into the mechanisms controlling the storage/secretion balance of TAG, we used as a tool hepatitis C virus core protein, which localizes onto LDs, and thus may modify their protein coat and decrease TRL secretion. We compared the proteome of LD fractions isolated from Caco-2/TC7 enterocytes expressing or not hepatitis C virus core protein by a differential proteomic approach (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ labeling coupled with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 42 proteins, 21 being involved in lipid metabolism. Perilipin-2/ADRP, which is suggested to stabilize long term-stored TAG, was enriched in LD fractions isolated from Caco-2/TC7 expressing core protein while perilipin-3/TIP47, which is involved in LD synthesis from newly synthesized TAG, was decreased. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated proteins were strongly decreased, suggesting reduced interactions between LD and endoplasmic reticulum, where TRL assembly occurs. For the first time, we show that 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (DHB2, which catalyzes the conversion of 17-keto to 17 β-hydroxysteroids and which was the most highly enriched protein in core expressing cells, is localized to LD and interferes with TAG secretion, probably through its capacity to inactivate testosterone. Overall, we identified potential new players of lipid droplet dynamics, which may be involved in the balance between lipid storage and secretion, and may be altered in enterocytes in pathological conditions such as insulin resistance, type II diabetes and obesity.

  9. Proteomic alterations induced by ionic liquids in Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Isabel; Hartmann, Diego O; Alves, Paula C; Planchon, Sébastien; Renaut, Jenny; Leitão, M Cristina; Rebelo, Luís P N; Silva Pereira, Cristina

    2013-12-06

    This study constitutes the first attempt to understand at the proteomic level the fungal response to ionic liquid stress. Ascomycota are able to grow in media supplemented with high concentrations of an ionic liquid, which, in turn, lead to major alterations in the fungal metabolic footprint. Herein, we analysed the differential accumulation of mycelial proteins in Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa after their exposure to two of the most commonly used ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride or cholinium chloride. Data obtained showed that numerous stress-responsive proteins (e.g. anti-ROS defence proteins) as well as several critical biological processes and/or pathways were affected by either ionic liquid. Amongst other changes, these compounds altered developmental programmes in both fungi (e.g. promoting the development of Hülle cells or conidiation) and led to accumulation of osmolytes, some of which may play an important role in multiple stress responses. In particular, in N. crassa, both ionic liquids increased the levels of proteins which are likely involved in the biosynthesis of unusual metabolites. These data potentially open new perspectives on ionic liquid research, furthering their conscious design and their use to trigger production of targeted metabolites. The present study emphasises the importance of understanding ionic liquid's stress responses, crucial to further their safe large-scale usage. Knowledge of the alterations prompted at a cellular and biochemical level gives also fresh perspectives on how to employ these "novel" compounds to manipulate proteins or pathways of biotechnological value. The results presented here provide meaningful insights into the understanding of fungi stress and adaptation responses to anthropogenic chemicals used in industry. © 2013.

  10. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis Identifies Mitochondria as Therapeutic Targets of Multidrug-Resistance in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiulan; Wei, Shasha; Ma, Ying; Lu, Jie; Niu, Gang; Xue, Yanhong; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Fuquan

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of a variety of solid tumors. However, resistance to this anticancer drug is a major obstacle to the effective treatment of tumors. As mitochondria play important roles in cell life and death, we anticipate that mitochondria may be related to drug resistance. Here, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomic strategy was applied to compare mitochondrial protein expression in doxorubicin sensitive OVCAR8 cells and its doxorubicin-resistant variant NCI_ADR/RES cells. A total of 2085 proteins were quantified, of which 122 proteins displayed significant changes in the NCI_ADR/RES cells. These proteins participated in a variety of cell processes including cell apoptosis, substance metabolism, transport, detoxification and drug metabolism. Then qRT-PCR and western blot were applied to validate the differentially expressed proteins quantified by SILAC. Further functional studies with RNAi demonstrated TOP1MT, a mitochondrial protein participated in DNA repair, was involved in doxorubicin resistance in NCI_ADR/RES cells. Besides the proteomic study, electron microscopy and fluorescence analysis also observed that mitochondrial morphology and localization were greatly altered in NCI_ADR/RES cells. Mitochondrial membrane potential was also decreased in NCI_ADR/RES cells. All these results indicate that mitochondrial function is impaired in doxorubicin-resistant cells and mitochondria play an important role in doxorubicin resistance. This research provides some new information about doxorubicin resistance, indicating that mitochondria could be therapeutic targets of doxorubicin resistance in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:25285166

  11. Modern uses of proteome to identify the biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology, genetics, and clinical research are transforming the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of human diseases and in particular of endocrine disorders. It is now clear, more than ever, that disease is a function of genes, whether they are involved directly or indirectly through the environment. The significant advances have occurred through the completion of the sequencing of human genome. Proteomics have gained much attention as a drug development platform because disease processes and treatments are often manifested at the protein level. Protein expression profiles are used in cancer research to identify tumor subtypes and to achieve a more reliable and objective classification. Molecular analysis allows for subgrouping based on genomic or proteomic profiles together with histopathology evaluation in colorectal cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, lymphomas and others. The identification of markers for bladder cancer was reported that defines the degree of differentiation. It could be a new field for studying and detecting irradiation induced physiological changes on protein expressions rather than on the chromosome as a whole. (author)

  12. Proteomics of Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia-containing Phagolysosomes Identifies Processes Governing Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hella; Vlaic, Sebastian; Krüger, Thomas; Schmidt, Franziska; Balkenhol, Johannes; Dandekar, Thomas; Guthke, Reinhard; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Brakhage, Axel A

    2018-06-01

    Invasive infections by the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus start with the outgrowth of asexual, airborne spores (conidia) into the lung tissue of immunocompromised patients. The resident alveolar macrophages phagocytose conidia, which end up in phagolysosomes. However, A. fumigatus conidia resist phagocytic degradation to a certain degree. This is mainly attributable to the pigment 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin located in the cell wall of conidia, which manipulates the phagolysosomal maturation and prevents their intracellular killing. To get insight in the underlying molecular mechanisms, we comparatively analyzed proteins of mouse macrophage phagolysosomes containing melanized wild-type (wt) or nonmelanized pksP mutant conidia. For this purpose, a protocol to isolate conidia-containing phagolysosomes was established and a reference protein map of phagolysosomes was generated. We identified 637 host and 22 A. fumigatus proteins that were differentially abundant in the phagolysosome. 472 of the host proteins were overrepresented in the pksP mutant and 165 in the wt conidia-containing phagolysosome. Eight of the fungal proteins were produced only in pksP mutant and 14 proteins in wt conidia-containing phagolysosomes. Bioinformatical analysis compiled a regulatory module, which indicates host processes affected by the fungus. These processes include vATPase-driven phagolysosomal acidification, Rab5 and Vamp8-dependent endocytic trafficking, signaling pathways, as well as recruitment of the Lamp1 phagolysosomal maturation marker and the lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin Z. Western blotting and immunofluorescence analyses confirmed the proteome data and moreover showed differential abundance of the major metabolic regulator mTOR. Taken together, with the help of a protocol optimized to isolate A. fumigatus conidia-containing phagolysosomes and a potent bioinformatics algorithm, we were able to confirm A. fumigatus conidia

  13. Altered nucleocytoplasmic proteome and transcriptome distributions in an in vitro model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee-Eun Kim

    Full Text Available Aberrant nucleocytoplasmic localization of proteins has been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. Evidence suggests that cytoplasmic mislocalization of nuclear proteins such as transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43 and fused in sarcoma (FUS may be associated with neurotoxicity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. This study investigated the changes in nucleocytoplasmic distributions of the proteome and transcriptome in an in vitro model of ALS. After subcellular fractionation of motor neuron-like cell lines expressing wild-type or G93A mutant hSOD1, quantitative mass spectrometry and next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq were performed for the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. A subset of the results was validated via immunoblotting. A total of 1,925 proteins were identified in either the nuclear or cytoplasmic fractions, and 32% of these proteins were quantified in both fractions. The nucleocytoplasmic distribution of 37 proteins was significantly changed in mutant cells with nuclear and cytoplasmic shifts in 13 and 24 proteins, respectively (p<0.05. The proteins shifted towards the nucleus were enriched regarding pathways of RNA transport and processing (Dhx9, Fmr1, Srsf3, Srsf6, Tra2b, whereas protein folding (Cct5, Cct7, Cct8, aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis (Farsb, Nars, Txnrd1, synaptic vesicle cycle (Cltc, Nsf, Wnt signalling (Cltc, Plcb3, Plec, Psmd3, Ruvbl1 and Hippo signalling (Camk2d, Plcb3, Ruvbl1 pathways were over-represented in the proteins shifted to the cytoplasm. A weak correlation between the changes in protein and mRNA levels was found only in the nucleus, where mRNA was relatively abundant in mutant cells. This study provides a comprehensive dataset of the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of the proteome and transcriptome in an in vitro model of ALS. An integrated analysis of the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of the proteome and transcriptome demonstrated

  14. Identifying Predictors of Taxane-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Using Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily I Chen

    Full Text Available Major advances in early detection and therapy have significantly increased the survival of breast cancer patients. Unfortunately, most cancer therapies are known to carry a substantial risk of adverse long-term treatment-related effects. Little is known about patient susceptibility to severe side effects after chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN is a common side effect of taxanes. Recent advances in genome-wide genotyping and sequencing technologies have supported the discoveries of a number of pharmacogenetic markers that predict response to chemotherapy. However, effectively implementing these pharmacogenetic markers in the clinic remains a major challenge. On the other hand, recent advances in proteomic technologies incorporating mass spectrometry (MS for biomarker discovery show great promise to provide clinically relevant protein biomarkers. In this study, we evaluated the association between protein content in serum exosomes and severity of CIPN. Women with early stage breast cancer receiving adjuvant taxane chemotherapy were assessed with the FACT-Ntx score and serum was collected before and after the taxane treatment. Based on the change in FACT-Ntx score from baseline to 12 month follow-up, we separated patients into two groups: those who had no change (Group 1, N = 9 and those who had a ≥20% worsening (Group 1, N = 8. MS-based proteomics technology was used to identify proteins present in serum exosomes to determine potential biomarkers. Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon analysis was applied and maximum FDR was controlled at 20%. From the serum exosomes derived from this cohort, we identified over 700 proteins known to be in different subcellular locations and have different functions. Statistical analysis revealed a 12-protein signature that resulted in a distinct separation between baseline serum samples of both groups (q<0.2 suggesting that the baseline samples can predict subsequent neurotoxicity. These toxicity

  15. Severe riboflavin deficiency induces alterations in the hepatic proteome of starter Pekin ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Hegeman, Maria A; Hu, Jian; Xie, Ming; Shi, Wenbiao; Jiang, Yong; de Boer, Vincent; Guo, Yuming; Hou, Shuisheng; Keijer, Jaap

    2017-11-01

    Suboptimal vitamin B2 status is encountered globally. Riboflavin deficiency depresses growth and results in a fatty liver. The underlying mechanisms remain to be established and an overview of molecular alterations is lacking. We investigated hepatic proteome changes induced by riboflavin deficiency to explain its effects on growth and hepatic lipid metabolism. In all, 360 1-d-old Pekin ducks were divided into three groups of 120 birds each, with twelve replicates and ten birds per replicate. For 21 d, the ducks were fed ad libitum a control diet (CAL), a riboflavin-deficient diet (RD) or were pair-fed with the control diet to the mean daily intake of the RD group (CPF). When comparing RD with CAL and CPF, growth depression, liver enlargement, liver lipid accumulation and enhanced liver SFA (C6 : 0, C12 : 0, C16 : 0, C18 : 0) were observed. In RD, thirty-two proteins were enhanced and thirty-one diminished (>1·5-fold) compared with CAL and CPF. Selected proteins were confirmed by Western blotting. The diminished proteins are mainly involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), whereas the enhanced proteins are mainly involved in TAG and cholesterol biosynthesis. RD causes liver lipid accumulation and growth depression probably by impairing fatty acid β-oxidation and ETC. These findings contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of liver lipid metabolic disorders due to RD.

  16. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølbøll, Trine Højgaard; Danscher, Anne Mette; Andersen, Pia Haubro

    2012-01-01

    to current research strategies there is a need to develop novel approaches and methods that expand understanding of the disease mechanisms involved in CHD. The objectives of the present study were to explore the potential of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) in mapping protein...... expression in three different bovine claw tissues, and to provide a relevant functional annotation of the proteins characterized in these tissues. LC–MS/MS was used to characterize protein expression in coronary band skin (C), claw dermal (D) and lamellar (L) tissues from two heifers. A total of 388...... different proteins were identified, with 146 proteins available for identification in C, 279 proteins in D and 269 proteins in L. A functional annotation of the identified proteins was obtained using the on-line Blast2GO tool. Three hundred and sixteen of the identified proteins could be subsequently...

  17. Identification of altered plasma proteins by proteomic study in valvular heart diseases and the potential clinical significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about genetic basis and proteomics in valvular heart disease (VHD including rheumatic (RVD and degenerative (DVD valvular disease. The present proteomic study examined the hypothesis that certain proteins may be associated with the pathological changes in the plasma of VHD patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Differential protein analysis in the plasma identified 18 differentially expressed protein spots and 14 corresponding proteins or polypeptides by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry in 120 subjects. Two up-regulated (complement C4A and carbonic anhydrase 1 and three down-regulated proteins (serotransferrin, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, and vitronectin were validated by ELISA in enlarging samples. The plasma levels (n = 40 for each of complement C4A in RVD (715.8±35.6 vs. 594.7±28.2 ng/ml, P = 0.009 and carbonic anhydrase 1 (237.70±15.7 vs. 184.7±10.8 U/L, P = 0.007 in DVD patients were significantly higher and that of serotransferrin (2.36±0.20 vs. 2.93±0.16 mg/ml, P = 0.025 and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (370.0±13.7 vs. 413.0±11.6 µg/ml, P = 0.019 in RVD patients were significantly lower than those in controls. The plasma vitronectin level in both RVD (281.3±11.0 vs. 323.2±10.0 µg/ml, P = 0.006 and DVD (283.6±11.4 vs. 323.2±10.0 µg/ml, P = 0.011 was significantly lower than those in normal controls. CONCLUSIONS: We have for the first time identified alterations of 14 differential proteins or polypeptides in the plasma of patients with various VHD. The elevation of plasma complement C4A in RVD and carbonic anhydrase 1 in DVD and the decrease of serotransferrin and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin in RVD patients may be useful biomarkers for these valvular diseases. The decreased plasma level of vitronectin - a protein related to the formation of valvular structure - in both RVD and DVD patients might indicate the possible genetic deficiency in these patients.

  18. Analysis of the Protein Kinase A-Regulated Proteome of Cryptococcus neoformans Identifies a Role for the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Capsule Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. H. Geddes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. The expression of virulence factors, including capsule and melanin, is in part regulated by the cyclic-AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway. In this study, we investigated the influence of PKA on the composition of the intracellular proteome to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the regulation that underpins virulence. Through quantitative proteomics, enrichment and bioinformatic analyses, and an interactome study, we uncovered a pattern of PKA regulation for proteins associated with translation, the proteasome, metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and virulence-related functions. PKA regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in C. neoformans showed a striking parallel with connections between PKA and protein degradation in chronic neurodegenerative disorders and other human diseases. Further investigation of proteasome function with the inhibitor bortezomib revealed an impact on capsule production as well as hypersusceptibility for strains with altered expression or activity of PKA. Parallel studies with tunicamycin also linked endoplasmic reticulum stress with capsule production and PKA. Taken together, the data suggest a model whereby expression of PKA regulatory and catalytic subunits and the activation of PKA influence proteostasis and the function of the endoplasmic reticulum to control the elaboration of the polysaccharide capsule. Overall, this study revealed both broad and conserved influences of the cAMP/PKA pathway on the proteome and identified proteostasis as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cryptococcosis.

  19. Proteomic analysis reveals APC-dependent post-translational modifications and identifies a novel regulator of β-catenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundon, Malachi A; Schlesinger, Danielle R; Parthasarathy, Amritha; Smith, Samantha L; Kolev, Hannah M; Vinson, David A; Kunttas-Tatli, Ezgi; McCartney, Brooke M; Minden, Jonathan S

    2016-07-15

    Wnt signaling generates patterns in all embryos, from flies to humans, and controls cell fate, proliferation and metabolic homeostasis. Inappropriate Wnt pathway activation results in diseases, including colorectal cancer. The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene encodes a multifunctional protein that is an essential regulator of Wnt signaling and cytoskeletal organization. Although progress has been made in defining the role of APC in a normal cellular context, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of APC-dependent cellular function and dysfunction. We expanded the APC-associated protein network using a combination of genetics and a proteomic technique called two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). We show that loss of Drosophila Apc2 causes protein isoform changes reflecting misregulation of post-translational modifications (PTMs), which are not dependent on β-catenin transcriptional activity. Mass spectrometry revealed that proteins involved in metabolic and biosynthetic pathways, protein synthesis and degradation, and cell signaling are affected by Apc2 loss. We demonstrate that changes in phosphorylation partially account for the altered PTMs in APC mutants, suggesting that APC mutants affect other types of PTM. Finally, through this approach Aminopeptidase P was identified as a new regulator of β-catenin abundance in Drosophila embryos. This study provides new perspectives on the cellular effects of APC that might lead to a deeper understanding of its role in development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Evaluation of proteome alterations induced by cadmium stress in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Júnior, Cícero Alves; Barbosa, Herbert de Sousa; Moretto Galazzi, Rodrigo; Ferreira Koolen, Hector Henrique; Gozzo, Fábio Cesar; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2015-09-01

    The present study evaluates, at a proteomic level, changes in protein abundance in sunflower leaves in the absence or presence (at 50 or 700mg) of cadmium (as CdCl2). At the end of the cultivation period (45 days), proteins are extracted from leaves with phenol, separated by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE), and excised from the gels. The differential protein abundances (for proteins differing by more than 1.8 fold, which corresponds to 90% variation) are characterized using nESI-LC-MS/MS. The protein content decreases by approximately 41% in plants treated with 700mg Cd compared with control plants. By comparing all groups of plants evaluated in this study (Control vs. Cd-lower, Control vs. Cd-higher and Cd-lower vs. Cd-higher), 39 proteins are found differential and 18 accurately identified; the control vs. Cd-higher treatment is that presenting the most differential proteins. From identified proteins, those involved in energy and disease/defense (including stress), are the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase large chain, transketolase, and heat shock proteins are the most differential abundant proteins. Thus, at the present study, photosynthesis is the main process affected by Cd in sunflowers, although these plants are highly tolerant to Cd. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative proteomics identify molecular targets that are crucial in larval settlement and metamorphosis of bugula neritina

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Huoming

    2011-01-07

    The marine invertebrate Bugula neritina has a biphasic life cycle that consists of a swimming larval stage and a sessile juvenile and adult stage. The attachment of larvae to the substratum and their subsequent metamorphosis have crucial ecological consequences. Despite many studies on this species, little is known about the molecular mechanism of these processes. Here, we report a comparative study of swimming larvae and metamorphosing individuals at 4 and 24 h postattachment using label-free quantitative proteomics. We identified more than 1100 proteins at each stage, 61 of which were differentially expressed. Specifically, proteins involved in energy metabolism and structural molecules were generally down-regulated, whereas proteins involved in transcription and translation, the extracellular matrix, and calcification were strongly up-regulated during metamorphosis. Many tightly regulated novel proteins were also identified. Subsequent analysis of the temporal and spatial expressions of some of the proteins and an assay of their functions indicated that they may have key roles in metamorphosis of B. neritina. These findings not only provide molecular evidence with which to elucidate the substantial changes in morphology and physiology that occur during larval attachment and metamorphosis but also identify potential targets for antifouling treatment. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  2. Proteomics strategy for identifying candidate bioactive proteins in complex mixtures: application to the platelet releasate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Roisin

    2010-01-01

    Proteomic approaches have proven powerful at identifying large numbers of proteins, but there are fewer reports of functional characterization of proteins in biological tissues. Here, we describe an experimental approach that fractionates proteins released from human platelets, linking bioassay activity to identity. We used consecutive orthogonal separation platforms to ensure sensitive detection: (a) ion-exchange of intact proteins, (b) SDS-PAGE separation of ion-exchange fractions and (c) HPLC separation of tryptic digests coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Migration of THP-1 monocytes in response to complete or fractionated platelet releasate was assessed and located to just one of the forty-nine ion-exchange fractions. Over 300 proteins were identified in the releasate, with a wide range of annotated biophysical and biochemical properties, in particular platelet activation, adhesion, and wound healing. The presence of PEDF and involucrin, two proteins not previously reported in platelet releasate, was confirmed by western blotting. Proteins identified within the fraction with monocyte promigratory activity and not in other inactive fractions included vimentin, PEDF, and TIMP-1. We conclude that this analytical platform is effective for the characterization of complex bioactive samples.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Saliva Identifies Potential Biomarkers for Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellias, Mohd Faiz; Zainal Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Abdul Rahman, Mariati; Senafi, Shahidan; Megat Abdul Wahab, Rohaya

    2012-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment has been shown to induce inflammation, followed by bone remodelling in the periodontium. These processes trigger the secretion of various proteins and enzymes into the saliva. This study aims to identify salivary proteins that change in expression during orthodontic tooth movement. These differentially expressed proteins can potentially serve as protein biomarkers for the monitoring of orthodontic treatment and tooth movement. Whole saliva from three healthy female subjects were collected before force application using fixed appliance and at 14 days after 0.014′′ Niti wire was applied. Salivary proteins were resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) over a pH range of 3–10, and the resulting proteome profiles were compared. Differentially expressed protein spots were then identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. Nine proteins were found to be differentially expressed; however, only eight were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. Four of these proteins—Protein S100-A9, immunoglobulin J chain, Ig alpha-1 chain C region, and CRISP-3—have known roles in inflammation and bone resorption. PMID:22919344

  4. SILAC Proteomics of Planarians Identifies Ncoa5 as a Conserved Component of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Böser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Planarian regeneration depends on the presence of pluripotent stem cells in the adult. We developed an in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC protocol in planarians to identify proteins that are enriched in planarian stem cells. Through a comparison of SILAC proteomes of normal and stem cell-depleted planarians and of a stem cell-enriched population of sorted cells, we identified hundreds of stem cell proteins. One of these is an ortholog of nuclear receptor coactivator-5 (Ncoa5/CIA, which is known to regulate estrogen-receptor-mediated transcription in human cells. We show that Ncoa5 is essential for the maintenance of the pluripotent stem cell population in planarians and that a putative mouse ortholog is expressed in pluripotent cells of the embryo. Our study thus identifies a conserved component of pluripotent stem cells, demonstrating that planarians, in particular, when combined with in vivo SILAC, are a powerful model in stem cell research.

  5. Identifying Key Proteins in Hg Methylation Pathways of Desulfovibrio by Global Proteomics, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, Anne O. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Microbiology; Miller, Susan M. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Chemistry; Wall, Judy [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; Lipton, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-18

    Elemental mercury, Hg(0) is a contaminant at many DOE sites, especially at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) where the spread of spilled Hg and its effects on microbial populations have been monitored for decades. To explore the microbial interactions with Hg, we have devised a global proteomic approach capable of directly detecting Hg-adducts of proteins. This technique developed in the facultative anaerobe, Escherichia coli, allows us to identify the proteins most vulnerable to acute exposure to organomercurials phenyl- and ethyl-mercury (as surrogates for the highly neurotoxic methyl-Hg) (Polacco, et al, 2011). We have found >300 such proteins in all metabolic functional groups and cellular compartments; most are highly conserved and can serve as markers for acute Hg exposure (Zink, et al. 2016, in preparation). We have also discovered that acute Hg exposure severely disrupts thiol, iron and redox homeostases, and electrolyte balance (LaVoie, et al., 2015) Thus, we proposed to bring these techniques to bear on the central problem of identifying the cellular proteins involved in bacterial uptake and methylation of mercury and its release from the cell.

  6. Identifying changes in the synaptic proteome of cirrhotic alcoholic superior frontal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheridge, N; Mayfield, R D; Harris, R A; Dodd, P R

    2011-03-01

    Hepatic complications are a common side-effect of alcoholism. Without the detoxification capabilities of the liver, alcohol misuse induces changes in gene and protein expression throughout the body. A global proteomics approach was used to identify these protein changes in the brain. We utilised human autopsy tissue from the superior frontal gyrus (SFG) of six cirrhotic alcoholics, six alcoholics without comorbid disease, and six non-alcoholic non-cirrhotic controls. Synaptic proteins were isolated and used in two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. Many expression differences were confined to one or other alcoholic sub-group. Cirrhotic alcoholics showed 99 differences in protein expression levels from controls, of which half also differed from non-comorbid alcoholics. This may reflect differences in disease severity between the sub-groups of alcoholics, or differences in patterns of harmful drinking. Alternatively, the protein profiles may result from differences between cirrhotic and non-comorbid alcoholics in subjects' responses to alcohol misuse. Ten proteins were identified in at least two spots on the 2D gel; they were involved in basal energy metabolism, synaptic vesicle recycling, and chaperoning. These post-translationally modified isoforms were differentially regulated in cirrhotic alcoholics, indicating a level of epigenetic control not previously observed in this disorder.

  7. Non-biased enrichment does not improve quantitative proteomic delineation of reovirus T3D-infected HeLa cell protein alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieyuan eJiang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry-based methods have allowed elucidation of alterations in complex proteomes, such as eukaryotic cells. Such studies have identified and measured relative abundances of thousands of host proteins after cells are infected with a virus. One of the potential limitations in such studies is that generally only the most abundant proteins are identified, leaving the deep richness of the cellular proteome largely unexplored. We differentially labeled HeLa cells with light and heavy stable isotopic forms of lysine and arginine (SILAC and infected cells with reovirus strain T3D. Cells were harvested at 24 hours post-infection. Heavy-labeled infected and light-labeled mock-infected cells were mixed together 1:1. Cells were then divided into cytosol and nuclear fractions and each fraction analyzed, both by standard 2D-HPLC/MS, and also after each fraction had been reacted with a random hexapeptide library (Proteominer® beads to attempt to enrich for low-abundance cellular proteins. A total of 2736 proteins were identified by 2 or more peptides at >99% confidence, of which 66 were significantly up-regulated and 67 were significantly down-regulated. Up-regulated proteins included those involved in antimicrobial and antiviral responses, GTPase activity, nucleotide binding, interferon signaling, and enzymes associated with energy generation. Down-regulated proteins included those involved in cell and biological adhesion, regulation of cell proliferation, structural molecule activity, and numerous molecular binding activities. Comparisons of the r2 correlations, degree of dataset overlap, and numbers of peptides detected suggest that non-biased enrichment approaches may not provide additional data to allow deeper quantitative and comparative mining of complex proteomes.

  8. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J.; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Ba...

  9. In Silico Functional Networks Identified in Fish Nucleated Red Blood Cells by Means of Transcriptomic and Proteomic Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente-Marin, Sara; Nombela, Iván; Ciordia, Sergio; Mena, María Carmen; Chico, Verónica; Coll, Julio; Ortega-Villaizan, María Del Mar

    2018-04-09

    Nucleated red blood cells (RBCs) of fish have, in the last decade, been implicated in several immune-related functions, such as antiviral response, phagocytosis or cytokine-mediated signaling. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) and label-free shotgun proteomic analyses were carried out for in silico functional pathway profiling of rainbow trout RBCs. For RNA-seq, a de novo assembly was conducted, in order to create a transcriptome database for RBCs. For proteome profiling, we developed a proteomic method that combined: (a) fractionation into cytosolic and membrane fractions, (b) hemoglobin removal of the cytosolic fraction, (c) protein digestion, and (d) a novel step with pH reversed-phase peptide fractionation and final Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometric (LC ESI-MS/MS) analysis of each fraction. Combined transcriptome- and proteome- sequencing data identified, in silico, novel and striking immune functional networks for rainbow trout nucleated RBCs, which are mainly linked to innate and adaptive immunity. Functional pathways related to regulation of hematopoietic cell differentiation, antigen presentation via major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII), leukocyte differentiation and regulation of leukocyte activation were identified. These preliminary findings further implicate nucleated RBCs in immune function, such as antigen presentation and leukocyte activation.

  10. In Silico Functional Networks Identified in Fish Nucleated Red Blood Cells by Means of Transcriptomic and Proteomic Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Puente-Marin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nucleated red blood cells (RBCs of fish have, in the last decade, been implicated in several immune-related functions, such as antiviral response, phagocytosis or cytokine-mediated signaling. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq and label-free shotgun proteomic analyses were carried out for in silico functional pathway profiling of rainbow trout RBCs. For RNA-seq, a de novo assembly was conducted, in order to create a transcriptome database for RBCs. For proteome profiling, we developed a proteomic method that combined: (a fractionation into cytosolic and membrane fractions, (b hemoglobin removal of the cytosolic fraction, (c protein digestion, and (d a novel step with pH reversed-phase peptide fractionation and final Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometric (LC ESI-MS/MS analysis of each fraction. Combined transcriptome- and proteome- sequencing data identified, in silico, novel and striking immune functional networks for rainbow trout nucleated RBCs, which are mainly linked to innate and adaptive immunity. Functional pathways related to regulation of hematopoietic cell differentiation, antigen presentation via major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII, leukocyte differentiation and regulation of leukocyte activation were identified. These preliminary findings further implicate nucleated RBCs in immune function, such as antigen presentation and leukocyte activation.

  11. Long-term in vivo polychlorinated biphenyl 126 exposure induces oxidative stress and alters proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiola, Rodrigo Azevedo; Dos Anjos, Fabyana Maria; Shimada, Ana Lúcia; Cruz, Wesley Soares; Drewes, Carine Cristiane; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes; Cardozo, Karina Helena Morais; Carvalho, Valdemir Melechco; Pinto, Ernani; Farsky, Sandra Helena

    2016-06-01

    It has been recently proposed that exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a risk factor to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). We investigated this hypothesis using long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure to rats addressing metabolic, cellular and proteomic parameters. Male Wistar rats were exposed to PCB126 (0.1, 1 or 10 μg/kg of body weight/day; for 15 days) or vehicle by intranasal instillation. Systemic alterations were quantified by body weight, insulin and glucose tolerance, and blood biochemical profile. Pancreatic toxicity was measured by inflammatory parameters, cell viability and cycle, free radical generation, and proteomic profile on islets of Langerhans. In vivo PCB126 exposure enhanced the body weight gain, impaired insulin sensitivity, reduced adipose tissue deposit, and elevated serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and insulin levels. Inflammatory parameters in the pancreas and cell morphology, viability and cycle were not altered in islets of Langerhans. Nevertheless, in vivo PCB126 exposure increased free radical generation and modified the expression of proteins related to oxidative stress on islets of Langerhans, which are indicative of early β-cell failure. Data herein obtained show that long-term in vivo PCB126 exposure through intranasal route induced alterations on islets of Langerhans related to early end points of DM2.

  12. Proteomic analysis of polyribosomes identifies splicing factors as potential regulators of translation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviner, Ranen; Hofmann, Sarah; Elman, Tamar; Shenoy, Anjana; Geiger, Tamar; Elkon, Ran; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2017-06-02

    Precise regulation of mRNA translation is critical for proper cell division, but little is known about the factors that mediate it. To identify mRNA-binding proteins that regulate translation during mitosis, we analyzed the composition of polysomes from interphase and mitotic cells using unbiased quantitative mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We found that mitotic polysomes are enriched with a subset of proteins involved in RNA processing, including alternative splicing and RNA export. To demonstrate that these may indeed be regulators of translation, we focused on heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP C) as a test case and confirmed that it is recruited to elongating ribosomes during mitosis. Then, using a combination of pulsed SILAC, metabolic labeling and ribosome profiling, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP C affects both global and transcript-specific translation rates and found that hnRNP C is specifically important for translation of mRNAs that encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. Taken together, our results demonstrate how proteomic analysis of polysomes can provide insight into translation regulation under various cellular conditions of interest and suggest that hnRNP C facilitates production of translation machinery components during mitosis to provide daughter cells with the ability to efficiently synthesize proteins as they enter G1 phase. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Identifying specific protein interaction partners using quantitative mass spectrometry and bead proteomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Boulon, Séverine; Lam, Yun Wah; Urcia, Roby; Boisvert, François-Michel; Vandermoere, Franck; Morrice, Nick A.; Swift, Sam; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Lamond, Angus

    2008-01-01

    The identification of interaction partners in protein complexes is a major goal in cell biology. Here we present a reliable affinity purification strategy to identify specific interactors that combines quantitative SILAC-based mass spectrometry with characterization of common contaminants binding to affinity matrices (bead proteomes). This strategy can be applied to affinity purification of either tagged fusion protein complexes or endogenous protein complexes, illustrated here using the well-characterized SMN complex as a model. GFP is used as the tag of choice because it shows minimal nonspecific binding to mammalian cell proteins, can be quantitatively depleted from cell extracts, and allows the integration of biochemical protein interaction data with in vivo measurements using fluorescence microscopy. Proteins binding nonspecifically to the most commonly used affinity matrices were determined using quantitative mass spectrometry, revealing important differences that affect experimental design. These data provide a specificity filter to distinguish specific protein binding partners in both quantitative and nonquantitative pull-down and immunoprecipitation experiments. PMID:18936248

  14. Genomes2Drugs: identifies target proteins and lead drugs from proteome data.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, David

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome sequencing and bioinformatics have provided the full hypothetical proteome of many pathogenic organisms. Advances in microarray and mass spectrometry have also yielded large output datasets of possible target proteins\\/genes. However, the challenge remains to identify new targets for drug discovery from this wealth of information. Further analysis includes bioinformatics and\\/or molecular biology tools to validate the findings. This is time consuming and expensive, and could fail to yield novel drugs if protein purification and crystallography is impossible. To pre-empt this, a researcher may want to rapidly filter the output datasets for proteins that show good homology to proteins that have already been structurally characterised or proteins that are already targets for known drugs. Critically, those researchers developing novel antibiotics need to select out the proteins that show close homology to any human proteins, as future inhibitors are likely to cross-react with the host protein, causing off-target toxicity effects later in clinical trials. METHODOLOGY\\/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To solve many of these issues, we have developed a free online resource called Genomes2Drugs which ranks sequences to identify proteins that are (i) homologous to previously crystallized proteins or (ii) targets of known drugs, but are (iii) not homologous to human proteins. When tested using the Plasmodium falciparum malarial genome the program correctly enriched the ranked list of proteins with known drug target proteins. CONCLUSIONS\\/SIGNIFICANCE: Genomes2Drugs rapidly identifies proteins that are likely to succeed in drug discovery pipelines. This free online resource helps in the identification of potential drug targets. Importantly, the program further highlights proteins that are likely to be inhibited by FDA-approved drugs. These drugs can then be rapidly moved into Phase IV clinical studies under \\'change-of-application\\' patents.

  15. Differential proteomic and tissue expression analyses identify valuable diagnostic biomarkers of hepatocellular differentiation and hepatoid adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Henning; Padden, Juliet; Ahrens, Maike; Pütter, Carolin; Bertram, Stefanie; Pott, Leona L; Reis, Anna-Carinna; Weber, Frank; Juntermanns, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Andreas-C; Eisenacher, Martin; Schlaak, Joörg F; Canbay, Ali; Meyer, Helmut E; Sitek, Barbara; Baba, Hideo A

    2015-10-01

    The exact discrimination of lesions with true hepatocellular differentiation from secondary tumours and neoplasms with hepatocellular histomorphology like hepatoid adenocarcinomas (HAC) is crucial. Therefore, we aimed to identify ancillary protein biomarkers by using complementary proteomic techniques (2D-DIGE, label-free MS). The identified candidates were immunohistochemically validated in 14 paired samples of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and non-tumourous liver tissue (NT). The candidates and HepPar1/Arginase1 were afterwards tested for consistency in a large cohort of hepatocellular lesions and NT (n = 290), non-hepatocellular malignancies (n = 383) and HAC (n = 13). Eight non-redundant, differentially expressed proteins were suitable for further immunohistochemical validation and four (ABAT, BHMT, FABP1, HAOX1) for further evaluation. Sensitivity and specificity rates for HCC/HAC were as follows: HepPar1 80.2%, 94.3% / 80.2%, 46.2%; Arginase1 82%, 99.4% / 82%, 69.2%; BHMT 61.4%, 93.8% / 61.4%, 100%; ABAT 84.4%, 33.7% / 84.4%, 30.8%; FABP1 87.2%, 95% / 87.2%, 69.2%; HAOX1 95.5%, 36.3% / 95.5%, 46.2%. The best 2×/3× biomarker panels for the diagnosis of HCC consisted of Arginase1/HAOX1 and BHMT/Arginase1/HAOX1 and for HAC consisted of Arginase1/FABP1 and BHMT/Arginase1/FABP1. In summary, we successfully identified, validated and benchmarked protein biomarker candidates of hepatocellular differentiation. BHMT in particular exhibited superior diagnostic characteristics in hepatocellular lesions and specifically in HAC. BHMT is therefore a promising (panel based) biomarker candidate in the differential diagnostic process of lesions with hepatocellular aspect.

  16. Genomes2Drugs: identifies target proteins and lead drugs from proteome data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Toomey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome sequencing and bioinformatics have provided the full hypothetical proteome of many pathogenic organisms. Advances in microarray and mass spectrometry have also yielded large output datasets of possible target proteins/genes. However, the challenge remains to identify new targets for drug discovery from this wealth of information. Further analysis includes bioinformatics and/or molecular biology tools to validate the findings. This is time consuming and expensive, and could fail to yield novel drugs if protein purification and crystallography is impossible. To pre-empt this, a researcher may want to rapidly filter the output datasets for proteins that show good homology to proteins that have already been structurally characterised or proteins that are already targets for known drugs. Critically, those researchers developing novel antibiotics need to select out the proteins that show close homology to any human proteins, as future inhibitors are likely to cross-react with the host protein, causing off-target toxicity effects later in clinical trials. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To solve many of these issues, we have developed a free online resource called Genomes2Drugs which ranks sequences to identify proteins that are (i homologous to previously crystallized proteins or (ii targets of known drugs, but are (iii not homologous to human proteins. When tested using the Plasmodium falciparum malarial genome the program correctly enriched the ranked list of proteins with known drug target proteins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Genomes2Drugs rapidly identifies proteins that are likely to succeed in drug discovery pipelines. This free online resource helps in the identification of potential drug targets. Importantly, the program further highlights proteins that are likely to be inhibited by FDA-approved drugs. These drugs can then be rapidly moved into Phase IV clinical studies under 'change-of-application' patents.

  17. Proteome screening of pleural effusions identifies galectin 1 as a diagnostic biomarker and highlights several prognostic biomarkers for malignant mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Filip; Johansson, Henrik J; Forshed, Jenny; Arslan, Sertaç; Metintas, Muzaffer; Dobra, Katalin; Lehtiö, Janne; Hjerpe, Anders

    2014-03-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive asbestos-induced cancer, and affected patients have a median survival of approximately one year after diagnosis. It is often difficult to reach a conclusive diagnosis, and ancillary measurements of soluble biomarkers could increase diagnostic accuracy. Unfortunately, few soluble mesothelioma biomarkers are suitable for clinical application. Here we screened the effusion proteomes of mesothelioma and lung adenocarcinoma patients to identify novel soluble mesothelioma biomarkers. We performed quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomics using isobaric tags for quantification and used narrow-range immobilized pH gradient/high-resolution isoelectric focusing (pH 4-4.25) prior to analysis by means of nano liquid chromatography coupled to MS/MS. More than 1,300 proteins were identified in pleural effusions from patients with malignant mesothelioma (n = 6), lung adenocarcinoma (n = 6), or benign mesotheliosis (n = 7). Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000531. The identified proteins included a set of known mesothelioma markers and proteins that regulate hallmarks of cancer such as invasion, angiogenesis, and immune evasion, plus several new candidate proteins. Seven candidates (aldo-keto reductase 1B10, apolipoprotein C-I, galectin 1, myosin-VIIb, superoxide dismutase 2, tenascin C, and thrombospondin 1) were validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in a larger group of patients with mesothelioma (n = 37) or metastatic carcinomas (n = 25) and in effusions from patients with benign, reactive conditions (n = 16). Galectin 1 was identified as overexpressed in effusions from lung adenocarcinoma relative to mesothelioma and was validated as an excellent predictor for metastatic carcinomas against malignant mesothelioma. Galectin 1, aldo-keto reductase 1B10, and apolipoprotein C-I were all identified as potential prognostic biomarkers for malignant mesothelioma. This analysis of the effusion proteome

  18. Combining RNA-seq and proteomic profiling to identify seminal fluid proteins in the migratory grasshopper Melanoplus sanguinipes (F).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Martha L; Todd, Christopher; Erlandson, Martin; Andres, Jose

    2015-12-22

    Seminal fluid proteins control many aspects of fertilization and in turn, they play a key role in post-mating sexual selection and possibly reproductive isolation. Because effective proteome profiling relies on the availability of high-quality DNA reference databases, our knowledge of these proteins is still largely limited to model organisms with ample genetic resources. New advances in sequencing technology allow for the rapid characterization of transcriptomes at low cost. By combining high throughput RNA-seq and shotgun proteomic profiling, we have characterized the seminal fluid proteins secreted by the primary male accessory gland of the migratory grasshopper (Melanoplus sanguinipes), one of the main agricultural pests in central North America. Using RNA sequencing, we characterized the transcripts of ~ 8,100 genes expressed in the long hyaline tubules (LHT) of the accessory glands. Proteomic profiling identified 353 proteins expressed in the long hyaline tubules (LHT). Of special interest are seminal fluid proteins (SFPs), such as EJAC-SP, ACE and prostaglandin synthetases, which are known to regulate female oviposition in insects. Our study provides new insights into the proteomic components of male ejaculate in Orthopterans, and highlights several important patterns. First, the presence of proteins that lack predicted classical secretory tags in accessory gland proteomes is common in male accessory glands. Second, the products of a few highly expressed genes dominate the accessory gland secretions. Third, accessory gland transcriptomes are enriched for novel transcripts. Fourth, there is conservation of SFPs' functional classes across distantly related taxonomic groups with very different life histories, mating systems and sperm transferring mechanisms. The identified SFPs may serve as targets of future efforts to develop species- specific genetic control strategies.

  19. Serum proteome profiling identifies novel and powerful markers of cystic fibrosis liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Rath

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Cystic Fibrosis associated liver disease (CFLD develops in approximately 30% of CF patients. However, routine sensitive diagnostic tools for CFLD are lacking. Within this study, we aimed to identify new experimental biomarkers for the detection of CFLD. METHODS: 45 CF patients were included in the study and received transient elastography. Differential regulation of 220 different serum proteins was assessed in a subgroup of patients with and without CFLD. Most interesting candidate proteins were further quantified and validated by ELISA in the whole patient cohort. To assess a potential relation of biomarker expression to the degree of hepatic fibrosis, serum biomarkers were further determined in 18 HCV patients where liver histology was available. RESULTS: 43 serum proteins differed at least 2-fold in patients with CFLD compared to those without liver disease as identified in proteome profiling. In ELISA quantifications, TIMP-4 and Endoglin were significantly up-regulated in patients with CFLD as diagnosed by clinical guidelines or increased liver stiffness. Pentraxin-3 was significantly decreased in patients with CFLD. Serum TIMP-4 and Endoglin showed highest values in HCV patients with liver cirrhosis compared to those with fibrosis but without cirrhosis. At a cut-off value of 6.3 kPa, transient elastography compassed a very high diagnostic accuracy and specificity for the detection of CFLD. Among the biomarkers, TIMP-4 and Endoglin exhibited a high diagnostic accuracy for CFLD. Diagnostic sensitivities and negative predictive values were increased when elastography and TIMP-4 and Endoglin were combined for the detection of CFLD. CONCLUSIONS: Serum TIMP-4 and Endoglin are increased in CFLD and their expression correlates with hepatic staging. Determination of TIMP-4 and Endoglin together with transient elastography can increase the sensitivity for the non-invasive diagnosis of CFLD.

  20. Serum amyloid A as a prognostic marker in melanoma identified by proteomic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Peter; Zapatka, Marc; Peccerella, Teresa; Matzk, Heike; Neumaier, Michael; Schadendorf, Dirk; Ugurel, Selma

    2009-05-01

    Currently known prognostic serum biomarkers of melanoma are powerful in metastatic disease, but weak in early-stage patients. This study was aimed to identify new prognostic biomarkers of melanoma by serum mass spectrometry (MS) proteomic profiling, and to validate candidates compared with established markers. Two independent sets of serum samples from 596 melanoma patients were investigated. The first set (stage I = 102; stage IV = 95) was analyzed by matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization time of flight (MALDI TOF) MS for biomarkers differentiating between stage I and IV. In the second set (stage I = 98; stage II = 91; stage III = 87; stage IV = 103), the serum concentrations of the candidate marker serum amyloid A (SAA) and the known biomarkers S100B, lactate dehydrogenase, and C reactive protein (CRP) were measured using immunoassays. MALDI TOF MS revealed a peak at m/z 11.680 differentiating between stage I and IV, which could be identified as SAA. High peak intensities at m/z 11.680 correlated with poor survival. In univariate analysis, SAA was a strong prognostic marker in stage I to III (P = .043) and stage IV (P = .000083) patients. Combination of SAA and CRP increased the prognostic impact to P = .011 in early-stage (I to III) patients. Multivariate analysis revealed sex, stage, tumor load, S100B, SAA, and CRP as independent prognostic factors, with an interaction between SAA and CRP. In stage I to III patients, SAA combined with CRP was superior to S100B in predicting patients' progression-free and overall survival. SAA combined with CRP might be used as prognostic serological biomarkers in early-stage melanoma patients, helping to discriminate low-risk patients from high-risk patients needing adjuvant treatment.

  1. Transcriptomic and proteomic approach to identify differentially expressed genes and proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking chloroplastic 1 and cytosolic FBPases reveals several levels of metabolic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Suárez, Mauricio; Serrato, Antonio J; Rojas-González, José A; Bautista, Rocío; Sahrawy, Mariam

    2016-12-01

    During the photosynthesis, two isoforms of the fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), the chloroplastidial (cFBP1) and the cytosolic (cyFBP), catalyse the first irreversible step during the conversion of triose phosphates (TP) to starch or sucrose, respectively. Deficiency in cyFBP and cFBP1 isoforms provokes an imbalance of the starch/sucrose ratio, causing a dramatic effect on plant development when the plastidial enzyme is lacking. We study the correlation between the transcriptome and proteome profile in rosettes and roots when cFBP1 or cyFBP genes are disrupted in Arabidopsis thaliana knock-out mutants. By using a 70-mer oligonucleotide microarray representing the genome of Arabidopsis we were able to identify 1067 and 1243 genes whose expressions are altered in the rosettes and roots of the cfbp1 mutant respectively; whilst in rosettes and roots of cyfbp mutant 1068 and 1079 genes are being up- or down-regulated respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR validated 100% of a set of 14 selected genes differentially expressed according to our microarray analysis. Two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis-based proteomic analysis revealed quantitative differences in 36 and 26 proteins regulated in rosettes and roots of cfbp1, respectively, whereas the 18 and 48 others were regulated in rosettes and roots of cyfbp mutant, respectively. The genes differentially expressed and the proteins more or less abundant revealed changes in protein metabolism, RNA regulation, cell signalling and organization, carbon metabolism, redox regulation, and transport together with biotic and abiotic stress. Notably, a significant set (25%) of the proteins identified were also found to be regulated at a transcriptional level. This transcriptomic and proteomic analysis is the first comprehensive and comparative study of the gene/protein re-adjustment that occurs in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organs of Arabidopsis mutants lacking FBPase isoforms.

  2. In-Depth, Label-Free Analysis of the Erythrocyte Cytoplasmic Proteome in Diamond Blackfan Anemia Identifies a Unique Inflammatory Signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther N Pesciotta

    Full Text Available Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA is a rare, congenital erythrocyte aplasia that is usually caused by haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins due to diverse mutations in one of several ribosomal genes. A striking feature of this disease is that a range of different mutations in ribosomal proteins results in similar disease phenotypes primarily characterized by erythrocyte abnormalities and macrocytic anemia, while most other cell types in the body are minimally affected. Previously, we analyzed the erythrocyte membrane proteomes of several DBA patients and identified several proteins that are not typically associated with this cell type and that suggested inflammatory mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis of DBA. In this study, we evaluated the erythrocyte cytosolic proteome of DBA patients through in-depth analysis of hemoglobin-depleted erythrocyte cytosols. Simple, reproducible, hemoglobin depletion using nickel columns enabled in-depth analysis of over 1000 cytosolic erythrocyte proteins with only moderate total analysis time per proteome. Label-free quantitation and statistical analysis identified 29 proteins with significantly altered abundance levels in DBA patients compared to matched healthy control donors. Proteins that were significantly increased in DBA erythrocyte cytoplasms included three proteasome subunit beta proteins that make up the immunoproteasome and proteins induced by interferon-γ such as n-myc interactor and interferon-induced 35 kDa protein [NMI and IFI35 respectively]. Pathway analysis confirmed the presence of an inflammatory signature in erythrocytes of DBA patients and predicted key upstream regulators including mitogen activated kinase 1, interferon-γ, tumor suppressor p53, and tumor necrosis factor. These results show that erythrocytes in DBA patients are intrinsically different from those in healthy controls which may be due to an inflammatory response resulting from the inherent molecular defect of ribosomal

  3. Alterations in the Cerebral Microvascular Proteome Expression Profile After Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spray, Stine; Johansson, Sara E; Edwards, Alistair V G

    2017-01-01

    . The proteomic profile of the isolated cerebral microvasculature 72 h after GCI (compared to sham) indicated that the main expressional changes could be divided into nine categories: (1) cellular respiration, (2) remodelling of the extracellular matrix, (3) decreased contractile phenotype, (4) clathrin...

  4. Development of a sandwich ELISA for the thrombin light chain identified by serum proteome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyuki Sogawa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We previously identified novel biomarker candidates in biliary tract cancer (BTC using serum proteome analysis. Among several candidates, we focused on thrombin light chain which is a 4204 Da peptide as the most promising biomarker for BTC. To move thrombin light chain toward potential diagnostic use, we developed an enzyme immunoassay that enables to measure serum thrombin light chain levels.Both one monoclonal antibody specific to the N-termini and one polyclonal antibody were used to develop a sandwich ELISA for thrombin light chain. The assay was evaluated by comparing the results with those obtained by the ClinProt™ system. Serum samples were obtained from 20 patients with BTC, 20 patients with BBTDs and 20 HVs using the ClinProt™ system and ELISA.The results of the established ELISA showed a positive correlation with the findings by ClinProt™ system (slope=0.3386, intercept=34.901, r2=0.9641. The performance of the ELISA was satisfactory in terms of recovery (97.9–102.5% and within-run (1.5–4.8% and between-day (1.9–6.7% reproducibility. Serum thrombin light chain levels were significantly greater in BTC (176.5±47.2 ng/mL than in BBTDs (128.6±17.4 ng/mL and HVs (127.6±16.0 ng/mL (p<0.001.The sandwich ELISA developed in this study will be useful for validation of the diagnostic significance of serum thrombin light chain levels in various cancers. Keywords: Thrombin light chain, Biliary tract cancer, Sandwich ELISA, Serum biomarker

  5. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir López

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB. In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB- and M. bovis-infected young (TB+ and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+ or affecting multiple organs (TB++]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to

  6. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  7. A Proteomic Screen Identified Stress-Induced Chaperone Proteins as Targets of Akt Phosphorylation in Mesangial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Barati, Michelle T.; Rane, Madhavi J.; Klein, Jon B.; McLeish, Kenneth R.

    2006-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase Akt regulates mesangial cell apoptosis, proliferation, and hypertrophy. To define Akt signaling pathways in mesangial cells, we performed a functional proteomic screen for rat mesangial cell proteins phosphorylated by Akt. A group of chaperone proteins, heat shock protein (Hsp) 70, Hsp90α, Hsp90β, Glucose-regulated protein (Grp) Grp78, Grp94, and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) were identified as potential Akt substrates by two techniques: (a) in vitro phosphoryl...

  8. Alterations in the nuclear proteome of HIV-1 infected T-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeBoer, Jason [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Jagadish, Teena; Haverland, Nicole A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Madson, Christian J. [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Ciborowski, Pawel [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68583 (United States); Belshan, Michael, E-mail: michaelbelshan@creighton.edu [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68583 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Virus infection of a cell involves the appropriation of host factors and the innate defensive response of the cell. The identification of proteins critical for virus replication may lead to the development of novel, cell-based inhibitors. In this study we mapped the changes in T-cell nuclei during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at 20 hpi. Using a stringent data threshold, a total of 13 and 38 unique proteins were identified in infected and uninfected cells, respectively, across all biological replicates. An additional 15 proteins were found to be differentially regulated between infected and control nuclei. STRING analysis identified four clusters of protein–protein interactions in the data set related to nuclear architecture, RNA regulation, cell division, and cell homeostasis. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the differential expression of several proteins in both C8166-45 and Jurkat E6-1 T-cells. These data provide a map of the response in host cell nuclei upon HIV-1 infection. - Highlights: • We identify changes in the expression of nuclear proteins during HIV-1 infection. • 163 nuclear proteins were found differentially regulated during HIV-1 infection. • Bioinformatic analysis identified several nuclear pathways altered by HIV infection. • Candidate factors were validated in two independent cell lines.

  9. Alterations in the nuclear proteome of HIV-1 infected T-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBoer, Jason; Jagadish, Teena; Haverland, Nicole A.; Madson, Christian J.; Ciborowski, Pawel; Belshan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Virus infection of a cell involves the appropriation of host factors and the innate defensive response of the cell. The identification of proteins critical for virus replication may lead to the development of novel, cell-based inhibitors. In this study we mapped the changes in T-cell nuclei during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at 20 hpi. Using a stringent data threshold, a total of 13 and 38 unique proteins were identified in infected and uninfected cells, respectively, across all biological replicates. An additional 15 proteins were found to be differentially regulated between infected and control nuclei. STRING analysis identified four clusters of protein–protein interactions in the data set related to nuclear architecture, RNA regulation, cell division, and cell homeostasis. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the differential expression of several proteins in both C8166-45 and Jurkat E6-1 T-cells. These data provide a map of the response in host cell nuclei upon HIV-1 infection. - Highlights: • We identify changes in the expression of nuclear proteins during HIV-1 infection. • 163 nuclear proteins were found differentially regulated during HIV-1 infection. • Bioinformatic analysis identified several nuclear pathways altered by HIV infection. • Candidate factors were validated in two independent cell lines

  10. Proteomic profiling of Plasmodium sporozoite maturation identifies new proteins essential for parasite development and infectivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lasonder, E.; Janse, C.J.; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Mair, G.R.; Vermunt, A.M.W.; Douradinha, B.G.; Noort, V. van; Huynen, M.A.; Luty, A.J.F.; Kroeze, H.; Khan, S.M.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Waters, A.P.; Mann, M.; Stunnenberg, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites that develop and mature inside an Anopheles mosquito initiate a malaria infection in humans. Here we report the first proteomic comparison of different parasite stages from the mosquito -- early and late oocysts containing midgut sporozoites, and the mature,

  11. Exploring the phenotypic expression of a regulatory proteome- altering gene by spectroscopy and chemometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, L.; Nielsen, J.P.; Møller, B.

    2001-01-01

    electrophoresis, resulting in a radically changed amino acid and chemical composition. A synergy interval partial least squares regression model (si-PLSR) is tested to select combinations of spectral segments which have a high correlation to defined chemical components indicative of the lys3a gene, such as direct...... effects of the changed proteome, for example, the amide content, or indirect effects due to changes in carbohydrate and fat composition. It is concluded that the redundancy of biological information on the DNA sequence level is also represented at the phenotypic level in the dataset read by the NIR...... spectroscopic sensor from the chemical physical fingerprint. The PLS algorithm chooses spectral intervals: which combine both direct and indirect proteome effects. This explains the robustness of NIR spectral predictions by PLSR for a wide range of chemical components. The new option of using spectroscopy...

  12. Proteomics dataset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Ellingsen, Torkell

    2017-01-01

    The datasets presented in this article are related to the research articles entitled “Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Ulcerative Colitis: A Proteome Analysis of Intestinal Biopsies” (Bennike et al., 2015 [1]), and “Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa” (Bennike et al., 2017 [2])...... been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PXD001608 for ulcerative colitis and control samples, and PXD003082 for rheumatoid arthritis samples....

  13. Proteomics identifies Bacillus cereus EntD as a pivotal protein for the production of numerous virulence factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène eOmer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a gram-positive pathogen that causes a wide variety of diseases in humans. It secretes into the extracellular milieu proteins that may contribute directly or indirectly to its virulence. EntD is a novel exoprotein identified by proteogenomics of B. cereus ATCC 14579. We constructed a ΔentD mutant and analyzed the impact of entD disruption on the cellular proteome and exoproteome isolated from early, late and stationary-phase cultures. We identified 308 and 79 proteins regulated by EntD in the cellular proteome and the exoproteome, respectively. The contribution of these proteins to important virulence-associated functions, including central metabolism, cell structure, antioxidative ability, cell motility and toxin production, are presented. The proteomic data were correlated with the growth defect, cell morphology change, reduced motility and reduced cytotoxicity of the ΔentD mutant strain. We conclude that EntD is an important player in B. cereus virulence. The function of EntD and the putative EntD-dependent regulatory network are discussed. To our knowledge, this study is the first characterization of an Ent family protein in a species of the B. cereus group.

  14. High throughput sequencing and proteomics to identify immunogenic proteins of a new pathogen: the dirty genome approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greub, Gilbert; Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Bertelli, Claire; Collyn, François; Riederer, Beat M; Yersin, Camille; Croxatto, Antony; Raoult, Didier

    2009-12-23

    With the availability of new generation sequencing technologies, bacterial genome projects have undergone a major boost. Still, chromosome completion needs a costly and time-consuming gap closure, especially when containing highly repetitive elements. However, incomplete genome data may be sufficiently informative to derive the pursued information. For emerging pathogens, i.e. newly identified pathogens, lack of release of genome data during gap closure stage is clearly medically counterproductive. We thus investigated the feasibility of a dirty genome approach, i.e. the release of unfinished genome sequences to develop serological diagnostic tools. We showed that almost the whole genome sequence of the emerging pathogen Parachlamydia acanthamoebae was retrieved even with relatively short reads from Genome Sequencer 20 and Solexa. The bacterial proteome was analyzed to select immunogenic proteins, which were then expressed and used to elaborate the first steps of an ELISA. This work constitutes the proof of principle for a dirty genome approach, i.e. the use of unfinished genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria, coupled with proteomics to rapidly identify new immunogenic proteins useful to develop in the future specific diagnostic tests such as ELISA, immunohistochemistry and direct antigen detection. Although applied here to an emerging pathogen, this combined dirty genome sequencing/proteomic approach may be used for any pathogen for which better diagnostics are needed. These genome sequences may also be very useful to develop DNA based diagnostic tests. All these diagnostic tools will allow further evaluations of the pathogenic potential of this obligate intracellular bacterium.

  15. Comparative proteomic analysis of normal and collagen IX null mouse cartilage reveals altered extracellular matrix composition and novel components of the collagen IX interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachvogel, Bent; Zaucke, Frank; Dave, Keyur; Norris, Emma L; Stermann, Jacek; Dayakli, Münire; Koch, Manuel; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Bateman, John F; Wilson, Richard

    2013-05-10

    Collagen IX is an integral cartilage extracellular matrix component important in skeletal development and joint function. Proteomic analysis and validation studies revealed novel alterations in collagen IX null cartilage. Matrilin-4, collagen XII, thrombospondin-4, fibronectin, βig-h3, and epiphycan are components of the in vivo collagen IX interactome. We applied a proteomics approach to advance our understanding of collagen IX ablation in cartilage. The cartilage extracellular matrix is essential for endochondral bone development and joint function. In addition to the major aggrecan/collagen II framework, the interacting complex of collagen IX, matrilin-3, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is essential for cartilage matrix stability, as mutations in Col9a1, Col9a2, Col9a3, Comp, and Matn3 genes cause multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, in which patients develop early onset osteoarthritis. In mice, collagen IX ablation results in severely disturbed growth plate organization, hypocellular regions, and abnormal chondrocyte shape. This abnormal differentiation is likely to involve altered cell-matrix interactions but the mechanism is not known. To investigate the molecular basis of the collagen IX null phenotype we analyzed global differences in protein abundance between wild-type and knock-out femoral head cartilage by capillary HPLC tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 297 proteins in 3-day cartilage and 397 proteins in 21-day cartilage. Components that were differentially abundant between wild-type and collagen IX-deficient cartilage included 15 extracellular matrix proteins. Collagen IX ablation was associated with dramatically reduced COMP and matrilin-3, consistent with known interactions. Matrilin-1, matrilin-4, epiphycan, and thrombospondin-4 levels were reduced in collagen IX null cartilage, providing the first in vivo evidence for these proteins belonging to the collagen IX interactome. Thrombospondin-4 expression was reduced at the mRNA level

  16. Proteomic analysis identifies galectin-1 as a predictive biomarker for relapsed/refractory disease in classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Peter; Ludvigsen, Maja; Bendix, Knud

    2011-01-01

    Considerable effort has been spent identifying prognostic biomarkers in classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). The aim of our study was to search for possible prognostic parameters in advanced-stage cHL using a proteomics-based strategy. A total of 14 cHL pretreatment tissue samples from younger, advanced......-stage patients were included. Patients were grouped according to treatment response. Proteins that were differentially expressed between the groups were analyzed using 2D-PAGE and identified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Selected proteins were validated using Western blot analysis. One...

  17. Proteomic profiling of Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies nutrient-starvation-responsive toxin-antitoxin systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Agner, Jeppe; Piersma, Sander R

    2013-01-01

    In order to successfully enter the latent stage, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must adapt to conditions such as nutrient limitation and hypoxia. In vitro models that mimic latent infection are valuable tools for describing the changes in metabolism that occur when the bacterium exists in a non......-growing form. We used two complementary proteomic approaches, label-free LC-MS/MS analysis and two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, to determine the proteome profile of extracellular proteins from M. tuberculosis cultured under nutrient starvation. Through the label-free LC-MS/MS analysis......, significant differences in the overall metabolism during nutrient starvation were detected. Notably, members of the toxin-antitoxin systems were present in larger quantities in nutrient-starved cultures, supporting a role for these global modules as M. tuberculosis switches its metabolism into dormancy...

  18. Proteome screening of pleural effusions identifies IL1A as a diagnostic biomarker for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Lian, Hengning; Jia, Qingzhu; Wan, Ying

    2015-02-06

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a common malignant disease, and in ~10-20% of patients, pleural effusion is the first symptom. The pleural effusion proteome contains information on pulmonary disease that directly or indirectly reflects pathophysiological status. However, the proteome of pleural effusion in NSCLC patients is not well understood, nor is the variability in protein composition between malignant and benign pleural effusions. Here, we investigated the different proteins in pleural effusions from NSCLC and tuberculosis (TB) patients by using nano-scale liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) analysis. In total, 363 proteins were identified in the NSCLC pleural effusion proteome with a low false discovery rate (pleural effusion were involved in cell adhesion, proteolysis, and cell migration. Furthermore, interleukin 1 alpha (IL1A), a protein that regulates tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis, was significantly more abundant in the NSCLC group compared to the TB group, a finding that was validated with an ELISA assay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Proteomic analysis identifies insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-related protein-1 as a podocyte product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takayuki; Hess, Sonja; Kajiyama, Hiroshi; Sakairi, Toru; Saleem, Moin A; Mathieson, Peter W; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2010-10-01

    The podocyte secretory proteome may influence the phenotype of adjacent podocytes, endothelial cells, parietal epithelial cells, and tubular epithelial cells but has not been systematically characterized. We have initiated studies to characterize this proteome, with the goal of further understanding the podocyte cell biology. We cultured differentiated conditionally immortalized human podocytes and subjected the proteins in conditioned medium to mass spectrometry. At a false discovery rate of factor-binding protein-related protein-1 (IGFBP-rP1), was expressed in mRNA and protein of cultured podocytes. In addition, transforming growth factor-β1 stimulation increased IGFBP-rP1 in conditioned medium. We analyzed IGFBP-rP1 glomerular expression in a mouse model of human immunodeficiency virus-associated nephropathy. IGFBP-rP1 was absent from podocytes of normal mice and was expressed in podocytes and pseudocrescents of transgenic mice, where it was coexpressed with desmin, a podocyte injury marker. We conclude that IGFBP-rP1 may be a product of injured podocytes. Further analysis of the podocyte secretory proteome may identify biomarkers of podocyte injury.

  20. Déjà vu in proteomics. A hit parade of repeatedly identified differentially expressed proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrák, J.; Ivánek, Robert; Toman, O.; Čmejla, R.; Čmejlová, J.; Vyoral, D.; Živný, J.; Vulpe, D. Ch.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 9 (2008), s. 1744-1749 ISSN 1615-9853 Grant - others:NIH(US) R01-DK056376; GA MZd(CZ) NR8930; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/0830; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : proteomics * differential expression Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.586, year: 2008

  1. Lipid remodeling and an altered membrane-associated proteome may drive the differential effects of EPA and DHA treatment on skeletal muscle glucose uptake and protein accretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeromson, Stewart; Mackenzie, Ivor; Doherty, Mary K; Whitfield, Phillip D; Bell, Gordon; Dick, James; Shaw, Andy; Rao, Francesco V; Ashcroft, Stephen P; Philp, Andrew; Galloway, Stuart D R; Gallagher, Iain; Hamilton, D Lee

    2018-06-01

    In striated muscle, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have differential effects on the metabolism of glucose and differential effects on the metabolism of protein. We have shown that, despite similar incorporation, treatment of C 2 C 12 myotubes (CM) with EPA but not DHA improves glucose uptake and protein accretion. We hypothesized that these differential effects of EPA and DHA may be due to divergent shifts in lipidomic profiles leading to altered proteomic profiles. We therefore carried out an assessment of the impact of treating CM with EPA and DHA on lipidomic and proteomic profiles. Fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) analysis revealed that both EPA and DHA led to similar but substantials changes in fatty acid profiles with the exception of arachidonic acid, which was decreased only by DHA, and docosapentanoic acid (DPA), which was increased only by EPA treatment. Global lipidomic analysis showed that EPA and DHA induced large alterations in the cellular lipid profiles and in particular, the phospholipid classes. Subsequent targeted analysis confirmed that the most differentially regulated species were phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines containing long-chain fatty acids with five (EPA treatment) or six (DHA treatment) double bonds. As these are typically membrane-associated lipid species we hypothesized that these treatments differentially altered the membrane-associated proteome. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics of the membrane fraction revealed significant divergence in the effects of EPA and DHA on the membrane-associated proteome. We conclude that the EPA-specific increase in polyunsaturated long-chain fatty acids in the phospholipid fraction is associated with an altered membrane-associated proteome and these may be critical events in the metabolic remodeling induced by EPA treatment.

  2. Evaluation Of Proteome Alterations Induced By Cadmium Stress In Sunflower (helianthus Annuus L.) Cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes Júnior, Cícero Alves; Barbosa, Herbert de Sousa; Moretto Galazzi, Rodrigo; Ferreira Koolen, Hector Henrique; Gozzo, Fábio Cesar; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluates, at a proteomic level, changes in protein abundance in sunflower leaves in the absence or presence (at 50 or 700 mg) of cadmium (as CdCl2). At the end of the cultivation period (45 days), proteins are extracted from leaves with phenol, separated by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE), and excised from the gels. The differential protein abundances (for proteins differing by more than 1.8 fold, which corresponds to 90% variation) are characteriz...

  3. Spinal Cord Stimulation Alters Protein Levels in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Neuropathic Pain Patients: A Proteomic Mass Spectrometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Anne-Li; Emami Khoonsari, Payam; Sjödin, Marcus; Katila, Lenka; Wetterhall, Magnus; Gordh, Torsten; Kultima, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Electrical neuromodulation by spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a well-established method for treatment of neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism behind the pain relieving effect in patients remains largely unknown. In this study, we target the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome, a little investigated aspect of SCS mechanism of action. Two different proteomic mass spectrometry protocols were used to analyze the CSF of 14 SCS responsive neuropathic pain patients. Each patient acted as his or her own control and protein content was compared when the stimulator was turned off for 48 hours, and after the stimulator had been used as normal for three weeks. Eighty-six proteins were statistically significantly altered in the CSF of neuropathic pain patients using SCS, when comparing the stimulator off condition to the stimulator on condition. The top 12 of the altered proteins are involved in neuroprotection (clusterin, gelsolin, mimecan, angiotensinogen, secretogranin-1, amyloid beta A4 protein), synaptic plasticity/learning/memory (gelsolin, apolipoprotein C1, apolipoprotein E, contactin-1, neural cell adhesion molecule L1-like protein), nociceptive signaling (neurosecretory protein VGF), and immune regulation (dickkopf-related protein 3). Previously unknown effects of SCS on levels of proteins involved in neuroprotection, nociceptive signaling, immune regulation, and synaptic plasticity are demonstrated. These findings, in the CSF of neuropathic pain patients, expand the picture of SCS effects on the neurochemical environment of the human spinal cord. An improved understanding of SCS mechanism may lead to new tracks of investigation and improved treatment strategies for neuropathic pain. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  4. Quantitative proteomic analysis of cabernet sauvignon grape cells exposed to thermal stresses reveals alterations in sugar and phenylpropanoid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Iniga S; Pascovici, Dana; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Haynes, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Grapes (Vitis vinifera) are a valuable fruit crop and wine production is a major industry. Global warming and expanded range of cultivation will expose grapes to more temperature stresses in future. Our study investigated protein level responses to abiotic stresses, with particular reference to proteomic changes induced by the impact of four different temperature stress regimes, including both hot and cold temperatures, on cultured grape cells. Cabernet Sauvignon cell suspension cultures grown at 26°C were subjected to 14 h of exposure to 34 and 42°C for heat stress, and 18 and 10°C for cold stress. Cells from the five temperatures were harvested in biological triplicates and label-free quantitative shotgun proteomic analysis was performed. A total of 2042 non-redundant proteins were identified from the five temperature points. Fifty-five proteins were only detected in extreme heat stress conditions (42°C) and 53 proteins were only detected at extreme cold stress conditions (10°C). Gene Ontology (GO) annotations of differentially expressed proteins provided insights into the metabolic pathways that are involved in temperature stress in grape cells. Sugar metabolism displayed switching between alternative and classical pathways during temperature stresses. Additionally, nine proteins involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway were greatly increased in abundance at extreme cold stress, and were thus found to be cold-responsive proteins. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000977 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000977). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Integrated proteomic and genomic analysis of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators who analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples are expressed at the protein level. The integration of proteomic and genomic data, or proteogenomics, pro

  6. A Proteomics Approach to Identify New Putative Cardiac Intercalated Disk Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddarth Soni

    Full Text Available Synchronous beating of the heart is dependent on the efficient functioning of the cardiac intercalated disk (ID. The ID is composed of a complex protein network enabling electrical continuity and chemical communication between individual cardiomyocytes. Recently, several different studies have shed light on increasingly prevalent cardiac diseases involving the ID. Insufficient knowledge of its composition makes it difficult to study these disease mechanisms in more detail and therefore here we aim expand the ID proteome. Here, using a combination of general membrane enrichment, in-depth quantitative proteomics and an intracellular location driven bioinformatics approach, we aim to discover new putative ID proteins in rat ventricular tissue.General membrane isolation, enriched amongst others also with ID proteins as based on presence of the established markers connexin-43 and n-cadherin, was performed using centrifugation. By mass spectrometry, we quantitatively evaluated the level of 3455 proteins in the enriched membrane fraction (EMF and its counterpart, the soluble cytoplasmic fraction. These data were stringently filtered to generate a final set of 97 enriched, putative ID proteins. These included Cx43 and n-cadherin, but also many interesting novel candidates. We selected 4 candidates (Flotillin-2 (FLOT2, Nexilin (NEXN, Popeye-domain-containg-protein 2 (POPDC2 and thioredoxin-related-transmembrane-protein 2 (TMX2 and confirmed their co-localization with n-cadherin in the ID of human and rat heart cryo-sections, and isolated dog cardiomyocytes.The presented proteomics dataset of putative new ID proteins is a valuable resource for future research into this important molecular intersection of the heart.

  7. Combined Quantification of the Global Proteome, Phosphoproteome, and Proteolytic Cleavage to Characterize Altered Platelet Functions in the Human Scott Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, Fiorella A; Mattheij, Nadine J A; Burkhart, Julia M; Swieringa, Frauke; Collins, Peter W; Cosemans, Judith M E M; Sickmann, Albert; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Zahedi, René P

    2016-10-01

    The Scott syndrome is a very rare and likely underdiagnosed bleeding disorder associated with mutations in the gene encoding anoctamin-6. Platelets from Scott patients are impaired in various Ca 2+ -dependent responses, including phosphatidylserine exposure, integrin closure, intracellular protein cleavage, and cytoskeleton-dependent morphological changes. Given the central role of anoctamin-6 in the platelet procoagulant response, we used quantitative proteomics to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms and the complex phenotypic changes in Scott platelets compared with control platelets. Therefore, we applied an iTRAQ-based multi-pronged strategy to quantify changes in (1) the global proteome, (2) the phosphoproteome, and (3) proteolytic events between resting and stimulated Scott and control platelets. Our data indicate a limited number of proteins with decreased (70) or increased (64) expression in Scott platelets, among those we confirmed the absence of anoctamin-6 and the strong up-regulation of aquaporin-1 by parallel reaction monitoring. The quantification of 1566 phosphopeptides revealed major differences between Scott and control platelets after stimulation with thrombin/convulxin or ionomycin. In Scott platelets, phosphorylation levels of proteins regulating cytoskeletal or signaling events were increased. Finally, we quantified 1596 N-terminal peptides in activated Scott and control platelets, 180 of which we identified as calpain-regulated, whereas a distinct set of 23 neo-N termini was caspase-regulated. In Scott platelets, calpain-induced cleavage of cytoskeleton-linked and signaling proteins was downregulated, in accordance with an increased phosphorylation state. Thus, multipronged proteomic profiling of Scott platelets provides detailed insight into their protection against detrimental Ca 2+ -dependent changes that are normally associated with phosphatidylserine exposure. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular

  8. The Proteome of Biologically Active Membrane Vesicles from Piscirickettsia salmonis LF-89 Type Strain Identifies Plasmid-Encoded Putative Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Oliver

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Piscirickettsia salmonis is the predominant bacterial pathogen affecting the Chilean salmonid industry. This bacterium is the etiological agent of piscirickettsiosis, a significant fish disease. Membrane vesicles (MVs released by P. salmonis deliver several virulence factors to host cells. To improve on existing knowledge for the pathogenicity-associated functions of P. salmonis MVs, we studied the proteome of purified MVs from the P. salmonis LF-89 type strain using multidimensional protein identification technology. Initially, the cytotoxicity of different MV concentration purified from P. salmonis LF-89 was confirmed in an in vivo adult zebrafish infection model. The cumulative mortality of zebrafish injected with MVs showed a dose-dependent pattern. Analyses identified 452 proteins of different subcellular origins; most of them were associated with the cytoplasmic compartment and were mainly related to key functions for pathogen survival. Interestingly, previously unidentified putative virulence-related proteins were identified in P. salmonis MVs, such as outer membrane porin F and hemolysin. Additionally, five amino acid sequences corresponding to the Bordetella pertussis toxin subunit 1 and two amino acid sequences corresponding to the heat-labile enterotoxin alpha chain of Escherichia coli were located in the P. salmonis MV proteome. Curiously, these putative toxins were located in a plasmid region of P. salmonis LF-89. Based on the identified proteins, we propose that the protein composition of P. salmonis LF-89 MVs could reflect total protein characteristics of this P. salmonis type strain.

  9. The Proteome of Biologically Active Membrane Vesicles from Piscirickettsia salmonis LF-89 Type Strain Identifies Plasmid-Encoded Putative Toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Cristian; Hernández, Mauricio A; Tandberg, Julia I; Valenzuela, Karla N; Lagos, Leidy X; Haro, Ronie E; Sánchez, Patricio; Ruiz, Pamela A; Sanhueza-Oyarzún, Constanza; Cortés, Marcos A; Villar, María T; Artigues, Antonio; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C; Avendaño-Herrera, Ruben; Yáñez, Alejandro J

    2017-01-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is the predominant bacterial pathogen affecting the Chilean salmonid industry. This bacterium is the etiological agent of piscirickettsiosis, a significant fish disease. Membrane vesicles (MVs) released by P. salmonis deliver several virulence factors to host cells. To improve on existing knowledge for the pathogenicity-associated functions of P. salmonis MVs, we studied the proteome of purified MVs from the P. salmonis LF-89 type strain using multidimensional protein identification technology. Initially, the cytotoxicity of different MV concentration purified from P. salmonis LF-89 was confirmed in an in vivo adult zebrafish infection model. The cumulative mortality of zebrafish injected with MVs showed a dose-dependent pattern. Analyses identified 452 proteins of different subcellular origins; most of them were associated with the cytoplasmic compartment and were mainly related to key functions for pathogen survival. Interestingly, previously unidentified putative virulence-related proteins were identified in P. salmonis MVs, such as outer membrane porin F and hemolysin. Additionally, five amino acid sequences corresponding to the Bordetella pertussis toxin subunit 1 and two amino acid sequences corresponding to the heat-labile enterotoxin alpha chain of Escherichia coli were located in the P. salmonis MV proteome. Curiously, these putative toxins were located in a plasmid region of P. salmonis LF-89. Based on the identified proteins, we propose that the protein composition of P. salmonis LF-89 MVs could reflect total protein characteristics of this P. salmonis type strain.

  10. High throughput sequencing and proteomics to identify immunogenic proteins of a new pathogen: the dirty genome approach.

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    Gilbert Greub

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the availability of new generation sequencing technologies, bacterial genome projects have undergone a major boost. Still, chromosome completion needs a costly and time-consuming gap closure, especially when containing highly repetitive elements. However, incomplete genome data may be sufficiently informative to derive the pursued information. For emerging pathogens, i.e. newly identified pathogens, lack of release of genome data during gap closure stage is clearly medically counterproductive. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We thus investigated the feasibility of a dirty genome approach, i.e. the release of unfinished genome sequences to develop serological diagnostic tools. We showed that almost the whole genome sequence of the emerging pathogen Parachlamydia acanthamoebae was retrieved even with relatively short reads from Genome Sequencer 20 and Solexa. The bacterial proteome was analyzed to select immunogenic proteins, which were then expressed and used to elaborate the first steps of an ELISA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work constitutes the proof of principle for a dirty genome approach, i.e. the use of unfinished genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria, coupled with proteomics to rapidly identify new immunogenic proteins useful to develop in the future specific diagnostic tests such as ELISA, immunohistochemistry and direct antigen detection. Although applied here to an emerging pathogen, this combined dirty genome sequencing/proteomic approach may be used for any pathogen for which better diagnostics are needed. These genome sequences may also be very useful to develop DNA based diagnostic tests. All these diagnostic tools will allow further evaluations of the pathogenic potential of this obligate intracellular bacterium.

  11. Nascent chromatin capture proteomics determines chromatin dynamics during DNA replication and identifies unknown fork components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Po

    2014-01-01

    To maintain genome function and stability, DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin must be duplicated during cell division. Understanding how entire chromosomes are copied remains a major challenge. Here, we use nascent chromatin capture (NCC) to profile chromatin proteome dynamics during...... replication in human cells. NCC relies on biotin-dUTP labelling of replicating DNA, affinity purification and quantitative proteomics. Comparing nascent chromatin with mature post-replicative chromatin, we provide association dynamics for 3,995 proteins. The replication machinery and 485 chromatin factors...... such as CAF-1, DNMT1 and SUV39h1 are enriched in nascent chromatin, whereas 170 factors including histone H1, DNMT3, MBD1-3 and PRC1 show delayed association. This correlates with H4K5K12diAc removal and H3K9me1 accumulation, whereas H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 remain unchanged. Finally, we combine NCC enrichment...

  12. Inhibition of glutathione biosynthesis alters compartmental redox status and the thiol proteome in organogenesis-stage rat conceptuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Craig; Shuster, Daniel Z; Roman Gomez, Rosaicela; Sant, Karilyn E; Reed, Matthew S; Pohl, Jan; Hansen, Jason M

    2013-10-01

    Developmental signals that control growth and differentiation are regulated by environmental factors that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and alter steady-state redox environments in tissues and fluids. Protein thiols are selectively oxidized and reduced in distinct spatial and temporal patterns in conjunction with changes in glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) and cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) redox potentials (E(h)) to regulate developmental signaling. The purpose of this study was to measure compartment-specific thiol redox status in cultured organogenesis-stage rat conceptuses and to evaluate the impact of thiol oxidation on the redox proteome. The visceral yolk sac (VYS) has the highest initial (0 h) total intracellular GSH (GSH+2GSSG) concentration (5.5 mM) and the lowest Eh (-223 mV) as determined by HPLC analysis. Total embryo (EMB) GSH concentrations ranged lower (3.2 mM) and were only slightly more oxidized than the VYS. Total GSH concentrations in yolk sac fluid (YSF) and amniotic fluid (AF) are >500-fold lower than in tissues and are highly oxidized (YSF E(h)=-121 mV and AF E(h)=-49 mV). Steady-state total Cys concentrations (Cys+2CySS) were significantly lower than GSH in tissues but were otherwise equal in VYS and EMB near 0.5 mM. On gestational day 11, total GSH and Cys concentrations in EMB and VYS increase significantly over the 6h time course while E(h) remains relatively constant. The Eh (GSH/GSSG) in YSF and AF become more reduced over time while E(h) (Cys/CySS) become more oxidized. Addition of L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BS0) to selectively inhibit GSH synthesis and mimic the effects of some GSH-depleting environmental chemicals significantly decreased VYS and EMB GSH and Cys concentrations and increased Eh over the 6h exposure period, showing a greater overall oxidation. In the YSF, BSO caused a significant increase in total Cys concentrations to 1.7 mM but did not significantly change the E(h) for Cys/CySS. A significant net

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani Identifies Infection-specific, Redox Associated Proteins and Insight into Adaptation to Different Plant Hosts*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jonathan P.; Hane, James K.; Stoll, Thomas; Pain, Nicholas; Hastie, Marcus L.; Kaur, Parwinder; Hoogland, Christine; Gorman, Jeffrey J.; Singh, Karam B.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about how R. solani causes disease. This study capitalizes on recent genomic studies by applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Many of the proteins found in the culture filtrate had predicted functions relating to modification of the plant cell wall, a major activity required for pathogenesis on the plant host, including a number found only under infection conditions. Other infection related proteins included a high proportion of proteins with redox associated functions and many novel proteins without functional classification. The majority of infection only proteins tested were confirmed to show transcript up-regulation during infection including a thaumatin which increased susceptibility to R. solani when expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. In addition, analysis of expression during infection of different plant hosts highlighted how the infection strategy of this broad host range pathogen can be adapted to the particular host being encountered. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002806. PMID:26811357

  14. Coupling genetics and proteomics to identify aphid proteins associated with vector-specific transmission of polerovirus (luteoviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Thannhauser, T W; Burrows, Mary; Cox-Foster, Diana; Gildow, Fred E; Gray, Stewart M

    2008-01-01

    Cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV (CYDV-RPV) is transmitted specifically by the aphids Rhopalosiphum padi and Schizaphis graminum in a circulative nonpropagative manner. The high level of vector specificity results from the vector aphids having the functional components of the receptor-mediated endocytotic pathways to allow virus to transverse the gut and salivary tissues. Studies of F(2) progeny from crosses of vector and nonvector genotypes of S. graminum showed that virus transmission efficiency is a heritable trait regulated by multiple genes acting in an additive fashion and that gut- and salivary gland-associated factors are not genetically linked. Utilizing two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis to compare the proteomes of vector and nonvector parental and F(2) genotypes, four aphid proteins (S4, S8, S29, and S405) were specifically associated with the ability of S. graminum to transmit CYDV-RPV. The four proteins were coimmunoprecipitated with purified RPV, indicating that the aphid proteins are capable of binding to virus. Analysis by mass spectrometry identified S4 as a luciferase and S29 as a cyclophilin, both of which have been implicated in macromolecular transport. Proteins S8 and S405 were not identified from available databases. Study of this unique genetic system coupled with proteomic analysis indicated that these four virus-binding aphid proteins were specifically inherited and conserved in different generations of vector genotypes and suggests that they play a major role in regulating polerovirus transmission.

  15. Coupling Genetics and Proteomics To Identify Aphid Proteins Associated with Vector-Specific Transmission of Polerovirus (Luteoviridae)▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Thannhauser, T. W.; Burrows, Mary; Cox-Foster, Diana; Gildow, Fred E.; Gray, Stewart M.

    2008-01-01

    Cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV (CYDV-RPV) is transmitted specifically by the aphids Rhopalosiphum padi and Schizaphis graminum in a circulative nonpropagative manner. The high level of vector specificity results from the vector aphids having the functional components of the receptor-mediated endocytotic pathways to allow virus to transverse the gut and salivary tissues. Studies of F2 progeny from crosses of vector and nonvector genotypes of S. graminum showed that virus transmission efficiency is a heritable trait regulated by multiple genes acting in an additive fashion and that gut- and salivary gland-associated factors are not genetically linked. Utilizing two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis to compare the proteomes of vector and nonvector parental and F2 genotypes, four aphid proteins (S4, S8, S29, and S405) were specifically associated with the ability of S. graminum to transmit CYDV-RPV. The four proteins were coimmunoprecipitated with purified RPV, indicating that the aphid proteins are capable of binding to virus. Analysis by mass spectrometry identified S4 as a luciferase and S29 as a cyclophilin, both of which have been implicated in macromolecular transport. Proteins S8 and S405 were not identified from available databases. Study of this unique genetic system coupled with proteomic analysis indicated that these four virus-binding aphid proteins were specifically inherited and conserved in different generations of vector genotypes and suggests that they play a major role in regulating polerovirus transmission. PMID:17959668

  16. Evaluation of bentonite alteration due to interactions with iron. Sensitivity analyses to identify the important factors for the bentonite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Wilson, James; Sato, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Performance assessment of geological disposal systems for high-level radioactive waste requires a consideration of long-term systems behaviour. It is possible that the alteration of swelling clay present in bentonite buffers might have an impact on buffer functions. In the present study, iron (as a candidate overpack material)-bentonite (I-B) interactions were evaluated as the main buffer alteration scenario. Existing knowledge on alteration of bentonite during I-B interactions was first reviewed, then the evaluation methodology was developed considering modeling techniques previously used overseas. A conceptual model for smectite alteration during I-B interactions was produced. The following reactions and processes were selected: 1) release of Fe 2+ due to overpack corrosion; 2) diffusion of Fe 2+ in compacted bentonite; 3) sorption of Fe 2+ on smectite edge and ion exchange in interlayers; 4) dissolution of primary phases and formation of alteration products. Sensitivity analyses were performed to identify the most important factors for the alteration of bentonite by I-B interactions. (author)

  17. Proteomics identifies molecular networks affected by tetradecylthioacetic acid and fish oil supplemented diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; León, Ileana R.; Kulej, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    - high fat diet that is thought to contribute to the development of metabolic syndrome - a condition that is strongly associated with diabetes, obesity and heart failure. Fish oil and TTA are known to have beneficial effects for the fatty acid metabolism and have been shown to alleviate some...... expression in a long-term study (50weeks) in male Wistar rats fed 5 different diets. The diets were as follows: low fat diet; high fat diet; and three diets that combined high fat diet with fish oil, TTA or combination of those two as food supplements. We used two different proteomics techniques: a protein...... antioxidant properties of TTA. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This study for the first time explores the effect of fish oil and TTA - tetradecyl-thioacetic acid and the combination of those two as diet supplements on mitochondria metabolism in a comprehensive and systematic manner. We show that fish oil and TTA...

  18. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Potential Regulatory Proteins Involved in Chicken Eggshell Brownness.

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    Guangqi Li

    Full Text Available Brown eggs are popular in many countries and consumers regard eggshell brownness as an important indicator of egg quality. However, the potential regulatory proteins and detailed molecular mechanisms regulating eggshell brownness have yet to be clearly defined. In the present study, we performed quantitative proteomics analysis with iTRAQ technology in the shell gland epithelium of hens laying dark and light brown eggs to investigate the candidate proteins and molecular mechanisms underlying variation in chicken eggshell brownness. The results indicated 147 differentially expressed proteins between these two groups, among which 65 and 82 proteins were significantly up-regulated in the light and dark groups, respectively. Functional analysis indicated that in the light group, the down-regulated iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein (Iba57 would decrease the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX; furthermore, the up-regulated protein solute carrier family 25 (mitochondrial carrier; adenine nucleotide translocator, member 5 (SLC25A5 and down-regulated translocator protein (TSPO would lead to increased amounts of protoporphyrin IX transported into the mitochondria matrix to form heme with iron, which is supplied by ovotransferrin protein (TF. In other words, chickens from the light group produce less protoporphyrin IX, which is mainly used for heme synthesis. Therefore, the exported protoporphyrin IX available for eggshell deposition and brownness is reduced in the light group. The current study provides valuable information to elucidate variation of chicken eggshell brownness, and demonstrates the feasibility and sensitivity of iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis in providing useful insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying brown eggshell pigmentation.

  19. A proteomic analysis identifies candidate early biomarkers to predict ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in polycystic ovarian syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lan; Sun, Yazhou; Wan, Jun; Luan, Ting; Cheng, Qing; Tan, Yong

    2017-07-01

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is a potentially life‑threatening, iatrogenic complication that occurs during assisted reproduction. Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) significantly increases the risk of OHSS during controlled ovarian stimulation. Therefore, a more effective early prediction technique is required in PCOS patients. Quantitative proteomic analysis of serum proteins indicates the potential diagnostic value for disease. In the present study, the authors revealed the differentially expressed proteins in OHSS patients with PCOS as new diagnostic biomarkers. The promising proteins obtained from liquid chromatography‑mass spectrometry were subjected to ELISA and western blotting assay for further confirmation. A total of 57 proteins were identified with significant difference, of which 29 proteins were upregulated and 28 proteins were downregulated in OHSS patients. Haptoglobin, fibrinogen and lipoprotein lipase were selected as candidate biomarkers. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated all three proteins may have potential as biomarkers to discriminate OHSS in PCOS patients. Haptoglobin, fibrinogen and lipoprotein lipase have never been reported as a predictive marker of OHSS in PCOS patients, and their potential roles in OHSS occurrence deserve further studies. The proteomic results reported in the present study may gain deeper insights into the pathophysiology of OHSS.

  20. A proteomic strategy to identify novel serum biomarkers for liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer in individuals with fatty liver disease

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    Stewart Stephen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has a prevalence of over 20% in Western societies. Affected individuals are at risk of developing both cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer (HCC. Presently there is no cost effective population based means of identifying cirrhotic individuals and even if there were, our ability to perform HCC surveillance in the at risk group is inadequate. We have performed a pilot proteomic study to assess this as a strategy for serum biomarker detection. Methods 2D Gel electrophoresis was performed on immune depleted sera from 3 groups of patients, namely those with (1 pre-cirrhotic NAFLD (2 cirrhotic NAFLD and (3 cirrhotic NAFLD with co-existing HCC. Five spots differentiating at least one of these three groups were characterised by mass spectroscopy. An ELISA assay was optimised and a cross sectional study assessing one of these serum spots was performed on serum from 45 patients with steatohepatitis related cirrhosis and HCC and compared to 77 patients with histologically staged steatohepatitis. Results Four of the spots identified were apolipoprotein isoforms, the pattern of which was able to differentiate the three groups. The 5th spot, seen in the serum of cirrhotic individuals and more markedly in those with HCC, was identified as CD5 antigen like (CD5L. By ELISA assay, although CD5L was markedly elevated in a number of cirrhotic individuals with HCC, its overall ability to distinguish non-cancer from cancer individuals as determined by AUC ROC analysis was poor. However, serum CD5L was dramatically increased, independently of age, sex, and the presence of necroinflammation, in the serum of individuals with NAFLD cirrhosis relative to those with pre-cirrhotic disease. Conclusion This novel proteomic strategy has identified a number of candidate biomarkers which may have benefit in the surveillance and diagnosis of individuals with chronic liver disease and/or HCC.

  1. Alteration of cystatin C in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with sciatica revealed by a proteomical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X; Zeng, B.; Xu, J.

    2005-01-01

    To better understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying sciatica induced by lumbar intervertebral disk herniation and to ascertain the protein that presents with the most observable changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with sciatica. We conducted the study in the Key Laboratory of Shanghai 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, Peoples Republic of China, during the period June 2004 to March 2005. In 2 separate experiments, we carried out the study involving the CSF of sciatica patients (the case group) and the CSF of otherwise, healthy volunteers (the control group). We utilized a proteomical analysis to compare the samples of 10 patients with sciatica with 10 volunteers in the control group. We individually separated each of the groups' CSF by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We analyzed the harvested gel images with PD Quest 2D-gel software (Bio-Rad) to ascertain the differential proteins between the 2 groups. We based the enzyme linked immuno- absorbent assay (ELISA) experiment, which followed, on the results of the first experiment. We found 15 of the protein spots in the CSF differed appreciably in varying degrees between the 2 groups, and identification made by LC-MS/MS revealed that the most significant disparity was with cystatin C. The result of ELISA experiment confirmed a considerable decrease in the level of cystatin C (p<0.01) in the patients with sciatica. In the CSF of patients with sciatica, the volume of cystatin C increased markedly indicating that it may play an important role in the pathophysiological processes of sciatica. (author)

  2. Integrative microRNA and proteomic approaches identify novel osteoarthritis genes and their collaborative metabolic and inflammatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Iliopoulos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis is a multifactorial disease characterized by destruction of the articular cartilage due to genetic, mechanical and environmental components affecting more than 100 million individuals all over the world. Despite the high prevalence of the disease, the absence of large-scale molecular studies limits our ability to understand the molecular pathobiology of osteoathritis and identify targets for drug development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we integrated genetic, bioinformatic and proteomic approaches in order to identify new genes and their collaborative networks involved in osteoarthritis pathogenesis. MicroRNA profiling of patient-derived osteoarthritic cartilage in comparison to normal cartilage, revealed a 16 microRNA osteoarthritis gene signature. Using reverse-phase protein arrays in the same tissues we detected 76 differentially expressed proteins between osteoarthritic and normal chondrocytes. Proteins such as SOX11, FGF23, KLF6, WWOX and GDF15 not implicated previously in the genesis of osteoarthritis were identified. Integration of microRNA and proteomic data with microRNA gene-target prediction algorithms, generated a potential "interactome" network consisting of 11 microRNAs and 58 proteins linked by 414 potential functional associations. Comparison of the molecular and clinical data, revealed specific microRNAs (miR-22, miR-103 and proteins (PPARA, BMP7, IL1B to be highly correlated with Body Mass Index (BMI. Experimental validation revealed that miR-22 regulated PPARA and BMP7 expression and its inhibition blocked inflammatory and catabolic changes in osteoarthritic chondrocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that obesity and inflammation are related to osteoarthritis, a metabolic disease affected by microRNA deregulation. Gene network approaches provide new insights for elucidating the complexity of diseases such as osteoarthritis. The integration of microRNA, proteomic

  3. miR-155, identified as anti-metastatic by global miRNA profiling of a metastasis model, inhibits cancer cell extravasation and colonization in vivo and causes significant signaling alterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravgaard, Karina Hedelund; Terp, Mikkel G; Lund, Rikke R

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into miRNA regulation in metastasis formation, we used a metastasis cell line model that allows investigation of extravasation and colonization of circulating cancer cells to lungs in mice. Using global miRNA profiling, 28 miRNAs were found to exhibit significantly altered...... proliferation or apoptosis in established lung tumors. To identify proteins regulated by miR-155 and thus delineate its function in our cell model, we compared the proteome of xenograft tumors derived from miR-155-overexpressing CL16 cells and CL16 control cells using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. >4......,000 proteins were identified, of which 92 were consistently differentially expressed. Network analysis revealed that the altered proteins were associated with cellular functions such as movement, growth and survival as well as cell-to-cell signaling and interaction. Downregulation of the three metastasis...

  4. CSF Proteomics Identifies Specific and Shared Pathways for Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Subtypes.

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    Timucin Avsar

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an immune-mediated, neuro-inflammatory, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS with a heterogeneous clinical presentation and course. There is a remarkable phenotypic heterogeneity in MS, and the molecular mechanisms underlying it remain unknown. We aimed to investigate further the etiopathogenesis related molecular pathways in subclinical types of MS using proteomic and bioinformatics approaches in cerebrospinal fluids of patients with clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing remitting MS and progressive MS (n=179. Comparison of disease groups with controls revealed a total of 151 proteins that are differentially expressed in clinically different MS subtypes. KEGG analysis using PANOGA tool revealed the disease related pathways including aldosterone-regulated sodium reabsorption (p=8.02x10-5 which is important in the immune cell migration, renin-angiotensin (p=6.88x10-5 system that induces Th17 dependent immunity, notch signaling (p=1.83x10-10 pathway indicating the activated remyelination and vitamin digestion and absorption pathways (p=1.73x10-5. An emerging theme from our studies is that whilst all MS clinical forms share common biological pathways, there are also clinical subtypes specific and pathophysiology related pathways which may have further therapeutic implications.

  5. Altered lipid metabolism in the aging kidney identified by three layered omic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Fabian; Rinschen, Markus M; Bartels, Valerie; Frommolt, Peter; Habermann, Bianca; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Schumacher, Björn; Dollé, Martijn E T; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Kurschat, Christine E

    2016-03-01

    Aging-associated diseases and their comorbidities affect the life of a constantly growing proportion of the population in developed countries. At the center of these comorbidities are changes of kidney structure and function as age-related chronic kidney disease predisposes to the development of cardiovascular diseases such as stroke, myocardial infarction or heart failure. To detect molecular mechanisms involved in kidney aging, we analyzed gene expression profiles of kidneys from adult and aged wild-type mice by transcriptomic, proteomic and targeted lipidomic methodologies. Interestingly, transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed differential expression of genes primarily involved in lipid metabolism and immune response. Additional lipidomic analyses uncovered significant age-related differences in the total amount of phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins as well as in subspecies of phosphatidylserines and ceramides with age. By integration of these datasets we identified Aldh1a1, a key enzyme in vitamin A metabolism specifically expressed in the medullary ascending limb, as one of the most prominent upregulated proteins in old kidneys. Moreover, ceramidase Asah1 was highly expressed in aged kidneys, consistent with a decrease in ceramide C16. In summary, our data suggest that changes in lipid metabolism are involved in the process of kidney aging and in the development of chronic kidney disease.

  6. Alterations to proteome and tissue recovery responses in fish liver caused by a short-term combination treatment with cadmium and benzo[a]pyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, P.M.; Chicano-Galvez, E.; Lopez Barea, J.; DelValls, T.A.; Costa, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    The livers of soles (Solea senegalensis) injected with subacute doses of cadmium (Cd), benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), or their combination, were screened for alterations to cytosolic protein expression patterns, complemented by cytological and histological analyses. Cadmium and B[a]P, but not combined, induced hepatocyte apoptosis and Kupfer cell hyperplasia. Proteomics, however, suggested that apoptosis was triggered through distinct pathways. Cadmium and B[a]P caused upregulation of different anti-oxidative enzymes (peroxiredoxin and glutathione peroxidase, respectively) although co-exposure impaired induction. Similarly, apoptosis was inhibited by co-exposure, to which may have contributed a synergistic upregulation of tissue metalloproteinase inhibitor, β-actin and a lipid transport protein. The regulation factors of nine out of eleven identified proteins of different types revealed antagonistic or synergistic effects between Cd and B[a]P at the prospected doses after 24 h of exposure. The results indicate that co-exposure to Cd and B[a]P may enhance toxicity by impairing specific responses and not through cumulative damage. - The interaction between cadmium and benzo[a]pyrene impairs specific responses to toxicity and tissue repair mechanisms.

  7. Differential proteomics analysis to identify proteins and pathways associated with male sterility of soybean using iTRAQ-based strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Ding, Xianlong; Han, Shaohuai; He, Tingting; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Longshu; Yang, Shouping; Gai, Junyi

    2016-04-14

    To further elucidate the molecular mechanism of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in soybean, a differential proteomic analysis was completed between the CMS line NJCMS1A and its maintainer NJCMS1B using iTRAQ-based strategy. As a result, 180 differential abundance proteins (DAPs) were identified, of which, 60 were down-regulated and 120 were up-regulated in NJCMS1A compared with NJCMS1B. Bioinformatic analysis showed that 167 DAPs were annotated in 41 Gene Ontology functional groups, 106 DAPs were classified into 20 clusters of orthologous groups of protein categories, and 128 DAPs were enrichment in 53 KEGG pathways. Fifteen differential level proteins/genes with the same expression pattern were identified in the further conjoint analysis of DAPs and the previously reported differential expression genes. Moreover, multiple reaction monitoring test, qRT-PCR analysis and enzyme activity assay validated that the iTRAQ results were reliable. Based on functional analysis of DAPs, we concluded that male sterility in NJCMS1A might be related to insufficiencies in energy supply, unbalance of protein synthesis and degradation, disruption of flavonoid synthesis, programmed cell death, abnormalities of substance metabolism, etc. These results might facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind CMS in soybean. Soybean is an important global crop that provides protein and oil. Heterosis is a significantly potential approach to increase the yield of soybean. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) plays a vital role in the production of hybrid seeds. However, the genetic and molecular mechanisms of male sterility in soybean still need to be further elucidated. In the present paper, a differential proteomic analysis was carried out and the results showed that several key proteins involved in key pathways were associated with male sterility in soybean. This work provides a new insight to understand the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying CMS in soybean

  8. Proteomics dataset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Ellingsen, Torkell

    2017-01-01

    patients (Morgan et al., 2012; Abraham and Medzhitov, 2011; Bennike, 2014) [8–10. Therefore, we characterized the proteome of colon mucosa biopsies from 10 inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, 11 gastrointestinal healthy rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and 10 controls. We...... been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PXD001608 for ulcerative colitis and control samples, and PXD003082 for rheumatoid arthritis samples....

  9. Mining the granule proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Goetze, Jens P; Johnsen, Anders H

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics of secretory granules is an emerging strategy for identifying secreted proteins, including potentially novel candidate biomarkers and peptide hormones. In addition, proteomics can provide information about the abundance, localization and structure (post-translational modification) of g...

  10. Membrane-associated proteomics of chickpea identifies Sad1/UNC-84 protein (CaSUN1), a novel component of dehydration signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Mishra, Poonam; Subba, Pratigya; Rathi, Divya; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2014-02-01

    Dehydration affects almost all the physiological processes including those that result in the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which in turn elicits a highly conserved signaling, the unfolded protein response (UPR). We investigated the dehydration-responsive membrane-associated proteome of a legume, chickpea, by 2-DE coupled with mass spectrometry. A total of 184 protein spots were significantly altered over a dehydration treatment of 120 h. Among the differentially expressed proteins, a non-canonical SUN domain protein, designated CaSUN1 (Cicer arietinum Sad1/UNC-84), was identified. CaSUN1 localized to the nuclear membrane and ER, besides small vacuolar vesicles. The transcripts were downregulated by both abiotic and biotic stresses, but not by abscisic acid treatment. Overexpression of CaSUN1 conferred stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Furthermore, functional complementation of the yeast mutant, slp1, could rescue its growth defects. We propose that the function of CaSUN1 in stress response might be regulated via UPR signaling.

  11. Combining phenotypic and proteomic approaches to identify membrane targets in a ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rust Steven

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The continued discovery of therapeutic antibodies, which address unmet medical needs, requires the continued discovery of tractable antibody targets. Multiple protein-level target discovery approaches are available and these can be used in combination to extensively survey relevant cell membranomes. In this study, the MDA-MB-231 cell line was selected for membranome survey as it is a ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell line, which represents a cancer subtype that is aggressive and has few treatment options. Methods The MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cell line was used to explore three membranome target discovery approaches, which were used in parallel to cross-validate the significance of identified antigens. A proteomic approach, which used membrane protein enrichment followed by protein identification by mass spectrometry, was used alongside two phenotypic antibody screening approaches. The first phenotypic screening approach was based on hybridoma technology and the second was based on phage display technology. Antibodies isolated by the phenotypic approaches were tested for cell specificity as well as internalisation and the targets identified were compared to each other as well as those identified by the proteomic approach. An anti-CD73 antibody derived from the phage display-based phenotypic approach was tested for binding to other ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell lines and tested for tumour growth inhibitory activity in a MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. Results All of the approaches identified multiple cell surface markers, including integrins, CD44, EGFR, CD71, galectin-3, CD73 and BCAM, some of which had been previously confirmed as being tractable to antibody therapy. In total, 40 cell surface markers were identified for further study. In addition to cell surface marker identification, the phenotypic antibody screening approaches provided reagent antibodies for target validation studies. This is illustrated

  12. Proteomic-based detection of a protein cluster dysregulated during cardiovascular development identifies biomarkers of congenital heart defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali K Nath

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular development is vital for embryonic survival and growth. Early gestation embryo loss or malformation has been linked to yolk sac vasculopathy and congenital heart defects (CHDs. However, the molecular pathways that underlie these structural defects in humans remain largely unknown hindering the development of molecular-based diagnostic tools and novel therapies.Murine embryos were exposed to high glucose, a condition known to induce cardiovascular defects in both animal models and humans. We further employed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in embryos with defects from those with normal cardiovascular development. The proteins detected by mass spectrometry (WNT16, ST14, Pcsk1, Jumonji, Morca2a, TRPC5, and others were validated by Western blotting and immunoflorescent staining of the yolk sac and heart. The proteins within the proteomic dataset clustered to adhesion/migration, differentiation, transport, and insulin signaling pathways. A functional role for several proteins (WNT16, ADAM15 and NOGO-A/B was demonstrated in an ex vivo model of heart development. Additionally, a successful application of a cluster of protein biomarkers (WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 as a prenatal screen for CHDs was confirmed in a study of human amniotic fluid (AF samples from women carrying normal fetuses and those with CHDs.The novel finding that WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 protein levels increase in fetuses with CHDs suggests that these proteins may play a role in the etiology of human CHDs. The information gained through this bed-side to bench translational approach contributes to a more complete understanding of the protein pathways dysregulated during cardiovascular development and provides novel avenues for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, beneficial to fetuses at risk for CHDs.

  13. Proteomic profiling identifies PTK2/FAK as a driver of radioresistance in HPV-negative head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Heath D.; Giri, Uma; Yang, Liang P.; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Story, Michael; Pickering, Curtis; Byers, Lauren; Williams, Michelle; El Naggar, Adel; Wang, Jing; Diao, Lixia; Shen, Li; Fan, You Hong; Molkentine, David; Beadle, Beth; Meyn, Raymond; Myers, Jeffrey; Heymach, John

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is commonly treated with radiotherapy, and local failure after treatment remains the major cause of disease-related mortality. To date human papillomavirus (HPV) is the only known clinically validated, targetable biomarkers of response to radiation in HNSCC. Experimental Design We performed proteomic and transcriptomic analysis of targetable biomarkers of radioresistance in HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines in vitro, and tested whether pharmacologic blockade of candidate biomarkers sensitized cells to radiotherapy. Candidate biomarkers were then investigated in several independent cohorts of patients with HNSCC. Results Increased expression of several targets was associated with radioresistance, including FGFR, ERK1, EGFR, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK), also known as PTK2. Chemical inhibition of PTK2/FAK, but not FGFR, led to significant radiosensitization with increased G2/M arrest and potentiated DNA damage. PTK2/FAK overexpression was associated with gene amplification in HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines and clinical tumors. In two independent cohorts of patients with locally advanced HPV-negative HNSCC, PTK2/FAK amplification was highly associated with poorer disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.012 and P=0.034). PTK2/FAK mRNA expression was also associated with worse DFS (P=0.03). Moreover, both PTK2/FAK mRNA (P=0.021) and copy number (P=0.063) were associated with DFS in the Head and Neck Cancer subgroup of The Cancer Genome Atlas. Conclusion Proteomic analysis identified PTK2/FAK overexpression is a biomarker of radioresistance in locally advanced HNSCC, and PTK2/FAK inhibition radiosensitized HNSCC cells. Combinations of PTK2/FAK inhibition with radiotherapy merit further evaluation as a therapeutic strategy for improving local control in HPV-negative HNSCC. PMID:27036135

  14. High confidence proteomic analysis of yeast LDs identifies additional droplet proteins and reveals connections to dolichol synthesis and sterol acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Erin; Guo, Xiuling; Christiano, Romain; Chitraju, Chandramohan; Kory, Nora; Harrison, Kenneth; Haas, Joel; Walther, Tobias C; Farese, Robert V

    2014-07-01

    Accurate protein inventories are essential for understanding an organelle's functions. The lipid droplet (LD) is a ubiquitous intracellular organelle with major functions in lipid storage and metabolism. LDs differ from other organelles because they are bounded by a surface monolayer, presenting unique features for protein targeting to LDs. Many proteins of varied functions have been found in purified LD fractions by proteomics. While these studies have become increasingly sensitive, it is often unclear which of the identified proteins are specific to LDs. Here we used protein correlation profiling to identify 35 proteins that specifically enrich with LD fractions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Of these candidates, 30 fluorophore-tagged proteins localize to LDs by microscopy, including six proteins, several with human orthologs linked to diseases, which we newly identify as LD proteins (Cab5, Rer2, Say1, Tsc10, YKL047W, and YPR147C). Two of these proteins, Say1, a sterol deacetylase, and Rer2, a cis-isoprenyl transferase, are enzymes involved in sterol and polyprenol metabolism, respectively, and we show their activities are present in LD fractions. Our results provide a highly specific list of yeast LD proteins and reveal that the vast majority of these proteins are involved in lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Proteome analysis identifies L1CAM/CD171 and DPP4/CD26 as novel markers of human skin mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwandtner, M; Paulitschke, V; Mildner, M; Brunner, P M; Hacker, S; Eisenwort, G; Sperr, W R; Valent, P; Gerner, C; Tschachler, E

    2017-01-01

    The function of skin mast cells has been well documented in IgE-mediated allergic reactions, whereas other mast cell functions are poorly defined. This study aimed at identifying novel mast cell proteins by proteome analysis of primary human skin mast cells. The proteome of skin mast cells was compared to other cell types and analyzed using bioinformatics. The expression and function of two proteins hitherto not described in skin mast cells was investigated in isolated mast cells as well as in mast cells in situ. Within the mast cell proteome, we identified 49 highly expressed proteins previously not described in mast cells; 21 of these proteins were found to be selectively expressed in mast cells. Two proteins, the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 and dipeptidyl peptidase 4, were further studied. L1 was found to be highly expressed in mast cells in normal, psoriasis, and mastocytosis skin. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 was found to be expressed in mast cells in normal, psoriasis, and mastocytosis skin as well as in bone marrow mast cells in patients with systemic mastocytosis. In normal skin, mast cells were identified as a major source of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 and we also found that skin mast cells and fibroblasts secrete an active form of this enzyme. In a systematic proteomics approach we identified two novel mast cell proteins potentially relevant to skin homeostasis: neural cell adhesion molecule L1 and dipeptidyl peptidase 4. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. How many proteins can be identified in a 2DE gel spot within an analysis of a complex human cancer tissue proteome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianquan; Yang, Haiyan; Peng, Fang; Li, Jianglin; Mu, Yun; Long, Ying; Cheng, Tingting; Huang, Yuda; Li, Zhao; Lu, Miaolong; Li, Na; Li, Maoyu; Liu, Jianping; Jungblut, Peter R

    2018-04-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) in proteomics is traditionally assumed to contain only one or two proteins in each 2DE spot. However, 2DE resolution is being complemented by the rapid development of high sensitivity mass spectrometers. Here we compared MALDI-MS, LC-Q-TOF MS and LC-Orbitrap Velos MS for the identification of proteins within one spot. With LC-Orbitrap Velos MS each Coomassie Blue-stained 2DE spot contained an average of at least 42 and 63 proteins/spot in an analysis of a human glioblastoma proteome and a human pituitary adenoma proteome, respectively, if a single gel spot was analyzed. If a pool of three matched gel spots was analyzed this number further increased up to an average of 230 and 118 proteins/spot for glioblastoma and pituitary adenoma proteome, respectively. Multiple proteins per spot confirm the necessity of isotopic labeling in large-scale quantification of different protein species in a proteome. Furthermore, a protein abundance analysis revealed that most of the identified proteins in each analyzed 2DE spot were low-abundance proteins. Many proteins were present in several of the analyzed spots showing the ability of 2DE-MS to separate at the protein species level. Therefore, 2DE coupled with high-sensitivity LC-MS has a clearly higher sensitivity as expected until now to detect, identify and quantify low abundance proteins in a complex human proteome with an estimated resolution of about 500 000 protein species. This clearly exceeds the resolution power of bottom-up LC-MS investigations. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Hyperglycemia Alters the Schwann Cell Mitochondrial Proteome and Decreases Coupled Respiration in the Absence of Superoxide Production

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Liang; Yu, Cuijuan; Vasquez, Francisco E.; Galeva, Nadya; Onyango, Isaac; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Dobrowsky, Rick T.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to sensory neuron pathology in diabetic neuropathy. Although Schwann cells (SCs) also undergo substantial degeneration in diabetic neuropathy, the effect of hyperglycemia on SC mitochondrial proteome and mitochondrial function has not been examined. Stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) was used to quantify the temporal effect of hyperglycemia on the mitochondrial proteome of primary SCs isolated from neona...

  18. Data set of Aspergillus flavus induced alterations in tear proteome: Understanding the pathogen-induced host response to fungal infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kandhavelu, Jeyalakshmi; Demonte, Naveen Luke; Namperumalsamy, Venkatesh Prajna; Prajna, Lalitha; Thangavel, Chitra; Jayapal, Jeya Maheshwari; Kuppamuthu, Dharmalingam

    2016-01-01

    Fungal keratitis is one of the leading causes of blindness in the tropical countries affecting individuals in their most productive age. The host immune response during this infection is poorly understood. We carried out comparative tear proteome analysis of Aspergillus flavus keratitis patients and uninfected controls. Proteome was separated into glycosylated and non-glycosylated fractions using lectin column chromatography before mass spectrometry. The data revealed the major processes acti...

  19. Dietary Yeast Cell Wall Extract Alters the Proteome of the Skin Mucous Barrier in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar: Increased Abundance and Expression of a Calreticulin-Like Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Micallef

    Full Text Available In order to improve fish health and reduce use of chemotherapeutants in aquaculture production, the immunomodulatory effect of various nutritional ingredients has been explored. In salmon, there is evidence that functional feeds can reduce the abundance of sea lice. This study aimed to determine if there were consistent changes in the skin mucus proteome that could serve as a biomarker for dietary yeast cell wall extract. The effect of dietary yeast cell wall extract on the skin mucus proteome of Atlantic salmon was examined using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Forty-nine spots showed a statistically significant change in their normalised volumes between the control and yeast cell wall diets. Thirteen spots were successfully identified by peptide fragment fingerprinting and LC-MS/MS and these belonged to a variety of functions and pathways. To assess the validity of the results from the proteome approach, the gene expression of a selection of these proteins was studied in skin mRNA from two different independent feeding trials using yeast cell wall extracts. A calreticulin-like protein increased in abundance at both the protein and transcript level in response to dietary yeast cell wall extract. The calreticulin-like protein was identified as a possible biomarker for yeast-derived functional feeds since it showed the most consistent change in expression in both the mucus proteome and skin transcriptome. The discovery of such a biomarker is expected to quicken the pace of research in the application of yeast cell wall extracts.

  20. Excavating the surface-associated and secretory proteome of Mycobacterium leprae for identifying vaccines and diagnostic markers relevant immunodominant epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Aarti; Thakur, Shweta; Bhardwaj, Nupur; Kumar, Devender; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-12-01

    For centuries, Mycobacterium leprae, etiological agent of leprosy, has been afflicting mankind regardless of extensive use of live-attenuated vaccines and antibiotics. Surface-associated and secretory proteins (SASPs) are attractive targets against bacteria. We have integrated biological knowledge with computational approaches and present a proteome-wide identification of SASPs. We also performed computational assignment of immunodominant epitopes as coordinates of prospective antigenic candidates in most important class of SASPs, the outer membrane proteins (OMPs). Exploiting the known protein sequence and structural characteristics shared by the SASPs from bacteria, 17 lipoproteins, 11 secretory and 19 novel OMPs (including 4 essential proteins) were identified in M. leprae As OMPs represent the most exposed antigens on the cell surface, their immunoinformatics analysis showed that the identified 19 OMPs harbor T-cell MHC class I epitopes and class II epitopes against HLA-DR alleles (54), while 15 OMPs present potential T-cell class II epitopes against HLA-DQ alleles (6) and 7 OMPs possess T-cell class II epitopes against HLA-DP alleles (5) of humans. Additionally, 11 M. leprae OMPs were found to have B-cell epitopes and these may be considered as prime candidates for the development of new immunotherapeutics against M. leprae. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Cellular Proteome Alterations in CDV-Infected Mink Lung Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingwei Tong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV, a paramyxovirus, causes a severe highly contagious lethal disease in carnivores, such as mink. Mink lung epithelial cells (Mv.1.Lu cells are sensitive to CDV infection and are homologous to the natural host system of mink. The current study analyzed the response of Mv.1.Lu cells to CDV infection by iTRAQ combined with LC–MS/MS. In total, 151 and 369 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs were markedly up-regulated or down-regulated, respectively. Thirteen DEPs were validated via real-time RT-PCR or western blot analysis. Network and KEGG pathway analyses revealed several regulated proteins associated with the NF-κB signaling pathway. Further validation was performed by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay, which demonstrated that different CDV strains induced NF-κB P65 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Moreover, the results provided interesting information that some identified DEPs possibly associated with the pathogenesis and the immune response upon CDV infection. This study is the first overview of the responses to CDV infection in Mv.1.Lu cells, and the findings will help to analyze further aspects of the molecular mechanisms involved in viral pathogenesis and the immune responses upon CDV infection.

  2. Proteomic analysis reveals that iron availability alters the metabolic status of the pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana F A Parente

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a thermodimorphic fungus and the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM. The ability of P. brasiliensis to uptake nutrients is fundamental for growth, but a reduction in the availability of iron and other nutrients is a host defense mechanism many pathogenic fungi must overcome. Thus, fungal mechanisms that scavenge iron from host may contribute to P. brasiliensis virulence. In order to better understand how P. brasiliensis adapts to iron starvation in the host we compared the two-dimensional (2D gel protein profile of yeast cells during iron starvation to that of iron rich condition. Protein spots were selected for comparative analysis based on the protein staining intensity as determined by image analysis. A total of 1752 protein spots were selected for comparison, and a total of 274 out of the 1752 protein spots were determined to have changed significantly in abundance due to iron depletion. Ninety six of the 274 proteins were grouped into the following functional categories; energy, metabolism, cell rescue, virulence, cell cycle, protein synthesis, protein fate, transcription, cellular communication, and cell fate. A correlation between protein and transcript levels was also discovered using quantitative RT-PCR analysis from RNA obtained from P. brasiliensis under iron restricting conditions and from yeast cells isolated from infected mouse spleens. In addition, western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays validated the differential regulation of proteins identified by 2-D gel analysis. We observed an increase in glycolytic pathway protein regulation while tricarboxylic acid cycle, glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycles, and electron transport chain proteins decreased in abundance under iron limiting conditions. These data suggest a remodeling of P. brasiliensis metabolism by prioritizing iron independent pathways.

  3. Integrated proteomics identified novel activation of dynein IC2-GR-COX-1 signaling in neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) disease model cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Mio; Kobayashi, Daiki; Mizuguchi, Souhei; Morikawa, Takashi; Nagayama, Megumi; Midorikawa, Uichi; Wilson, Masayo M; Nambu, Akiko N; Yoshizawa, Akiyasu C; Kawano, Shin; Araki, Norie

    2013-05-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor suppressor gene product, neurofibromin, functions in part as a Ras-GAP, and though its loss is implicated in the neuronal abnormality of NF1 patients, its precise cellular function remains unclear. To study the molecular mechanism of NF1 pathogenesis, we prepared NF1 gene knockdown (KD) PC12 cells, as a NF1 disease model, and analyzed their molecular (gene and protein) expression profiles with a unique integrated proteomics approach, comprising iTRAQ, 2D-DIGE, and DNA microarrays, using an integrated protein and gene expression analysis chart (iPEACH). In NF1-KD PC12 cells showing abnormal neuronal differentiation after NGF treatment, of 3198 molecules quantitatively identified and listed in iPEACH, 97 molecules continuously up- or down-regulated over time were extracted. Pathway and network analysis further revealed overrepresentation of calcium signaling and transcriptional regulation by glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the up-regulated protein set, whereas nerve system development was overrepresented in the down-regulated protein set. The novel up-regulated network we discovered, "dynein IC2-GR-COX-1 signaling," was then examined in NF1-KD cells. Validation studies confirmed that NF1 knockdown induces altered splicing and phosphorylation patterns of dynein IC2 isomers, up-regulation and accumulation of nuclear GR, and increased COX-1 expression in NGF-treated cells. Moreover, the neurite retraction phenotype observed in NF1-KD cells was significantly recovered by knockdown of the dynein IC2-C isoform and COX-1. In addition, dynein IC2 siRNA significantly inhibited nuclear translocation and accumulation of GR and up-regulation of COX-1 expression. These results suggest that dynein IC2 up-regulates GR nuclear translocation and accumulation, and subsequently causes increased COX-1 expression, in this NF1 disease model. Our integrated proteomics strategy, which combines multiple approaches, demonstrates that NF1-related neural

  4. BISQUE: locus- and variant-specific conversion of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic database identifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael J; Geske, Philip; Yu, Haiyuan

    2016-05-15

    Biological sequence databases are integral to efforts to characterize and understand biological molecules and share biological data. However, when analyzing these data, scientists are often left holding disparate biological currency-molecular identifiers from different databases. For downstream applications that require converting the identifiers themselves, there are many resources available, but analyzing associated loci and variants can be cumbersome if data is not given in a form amenable to particular analyses. Here we present BISQUE, a web server and customizable command-line tool for converting molecular identifiers and their contained loci and variants between different database conventions. BISQUE uses a graph traversal algorithm to generalize the conversion process for residues in the human genome, genes, transcripts and proteins, allowing for conversion across classes of molecules and in all directions through an intuitive web interface and a URL-based web service. BISQUE is freely available via the web using any major web browser (http://bisque.yulab.org/). Source code is available in a public GitHub repository (https://github.com/hyulab/BISQUE). haiyuan.yu@cornell.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid from children with central nervous system tumors identifies candidate proteins relating to tumor metastatic spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreafico, Filippo; Bongarzone, Italia; Pizzamiglio, Sara; Magni, Ruben; Taverna, Elena; De Bortoli, Maida; Ciniselli, Chiara M; Barzanò, Elena; Biassoni, Veronica; Luchini, Alessandra; Liotta, Lance A; Zhou, Weidong; Signore, Michele; Verderio, Paolo; Massimino, Maura

    2017-07-11

    Central nervous system (CNS) tumors are the most common solid tumors in childhood. Since the sensitivity of combined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology and radiological neuroimaging in detecting meningeal metastases remains relatively low, we sought to characterize the CSF proteome of patients with CSF tumors to identify biomarkers predictive of metastatic spread. CSF samples from 27 children with brain tumors and 13 controls (extra-CNS non-Hodgkin lymphoma) were processed using core-shell hydrogel nanoparticles, and analyzed with reverse-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Candidate proteins were identified with Fisher's exact test and/or a univariate logistic regression model. Reverse phase protein array (RPPA), Western blot (WB), and ELISA were used in the training set and in an independent set of CFS samples (60 cases, 14 controls) to validate our discovery findings. Among the 558 non-redundant proteins identified by LC-MS/MS, 147 were missing from the CSF database at http://www.biosino.org. Fourteen of the 26 final top-candidate proteins were chosen for validation with WB, RPPA and ELISA methods. Six proteins (type 1 collagen, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4, procollagen C-endopeptidase enhancer 1, glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor receptor α2, inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4, neural proliferation and differentiation control protein-1) revealed the ability to discriminate metastatic cases from controls. Combining a unique dataset of CSFs from pediatric CNS tumors with a novel enabling nanotechnology led us to identify CSF proteins potentially related to metastatic status.

  6. A Proteomic Approach Identifies Candidate Early Biomarkers to Predict Severe Dengue in Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang My Nhi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Severe dengue with severe plasma leakage (SD-SPL is the most frequent of dengue severe form. Plasma biomarkers for early predictive diagnosis of SD-SPL are required in the primary clinics for the prevention of dengue death.Among 63 confirmed dengue pediatric patients recruited, hospital based longitudinal study detected six SD-SPL and ten dengue with warning sign (DWS. To identify the specific proteins increased or decreased in the SD-SPL plasma obtained 6-48 hours before the shock compared with the DWS, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ technology was performed using four patients each group. Validation was undertaken in 6 SD-SPL and 10 DWS patients.Nineteen plasma proteins exhibited significantly different relative concentrations (p<0.05, with five over-expressed and fourteen under-expressed in SD-SPL compared with DWS. The individual protein was classified to either blood coagulation, vascular regulation, cellular transport-related processes or immune response. The immunoblot quantification showed angiotensinogen and antithrombin III significantly increased in SD-SPL whole plasma of early stage compared with DWS subjects. Even using this small number of samples, antithrombin III predicted SD-SPL before shock occurrence with accuracy.Proteins identified here may serve as candidate predictive markers to diagnose SD-SPL for timely clinical management. Since the number of subjects are small, so further studies are needed to confirm all these biomarkers.

  7. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  8. IBT-based quantitative proteomics identifies potential regulatory proteins involved in pigmentation of purple sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lili; Sun, Lina; Liu, Shilin; Li, Xiaoni; Zhang, Libin; Yang, Hongsheng

    2017-09-01

    Sea cucumbers are an important economic species and exhibit high yield value among aquaculture animals. Purple sea cucumbers are very rare and beautiful and have stable hereditary patterns. In this study, isobaric tags (IBT) were first used to reveal the molecular mechanism of pigmentation in the body wall of the purple sea cucumber. We analyzed the proteomes of purple sea cucumber in early pigmentation stage (Pa), mid pigmentation stage (Pb) and late pigmentation stage (Pc), resulting in the identification of 5580 proteins, including 1099 differentially expressed proteins in Pb: Pa and 339 differentially expressed proteins in Pc: Pb. GO and KEGG analyses revealed possible differentially expressed proteins, including"melanogenesis", "melanosome", "melanoma", "pigment-biosynthetic process", "Epidermis development", "Ras-signaling pathway", "Wnt-signaling pathway", "response to UV light", and "tyrosine metabolism", involved in pigment synthesis and regulation in purple sea cucumbers. The large number of differentially expressed proteins identified here should be highly useful in further elucidating the mechanisms underlying pigmentation in sea cucumbers. Furthermore, these results may also provide the base for further identification of proteins involved in resistance mechanisms against melanoma, albinism, UV damage, and other diseases in sea cucumbers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Proteomic analysis on the alteration of protein expression in the early-stage placental villous tissue of electromagnetic fields associated with cell phone exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qiong; Jiang, Ying; Jin, Min; Xu, Jian; Huang, He-Feng

    2013-09-01

    To explore the possible adverse effects and search for cell phone electromagnetic field (EMF)-responsive proteins in human early reproduction, a proteomics approach was employed to investigate the changes in protein expression profile induced by cell phone EMF in human chorionic tissues of early pregnancy in vivo. Volunteer women about 50 days pregnant were exposed to EMF at the average absorption rate of 1.6 to 8.8 W/kg for 1 hour with the irradiation device placed 10 cm away from the umbilicus at the midline of the abdomen. The changes in protein profile were examined using 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Up to 15 spots have yielded significant change at least 2- to 2.5-folds up or down compared to sham-exposed group. Twelve proteins were identified- procollagen-proline, eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 delta, chain D crystal structure of human vitamin D-binding protein, thioredoxin-like 3, capping protein, isocitrate dehydrogenase 3 alpha, calumenin, Catechol-O-methyltransferase protein, proteinase inhibitor 6 (PI-6; SerpinB6) protein, 3,2-trans-enoyl-CoA isomerase protein, chain B human erythrocyte 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate mutase, and nucleoprotein. Cell phone EMF might alter the protein profile of chorionic tissue of early pregnancy, during the most sensitive stage of the embryos. The exposure to EMF may cause adverse effects on cell proliferation and development of nervous system in early embryos. Furthermore, 2-DE coupled with mass spectrometry is a promising approach to elucidate the effects and search for new biomarkers for environmental toxic effects.

  10. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Altered Protein Expression in the Placental Villous Tissue of Early Pregnancy Loss Using Isobaric Tandem Mass Tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobei Ni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many pregnant women suffer miscarriages during early gestation, but the description of these early pregnancy losses (EPL can be somewhat confusing because of the complexities of early development. Thus, the identification of proteins with different expression profiles related to early pregnancy loss is essential for understanding the comprehensive pathophysiological mechanism. In this study, we report a gel-free tandem mass tags- (TMT- labeling based proteomic analysis of five placental villous tissues from patients with early pregnancy loss and five from normal pregnant women. The application of this method resulted in the identification of 3423 proteins and 19647 peptides among the patient group and the matched normal control group. Qualitative and quantitative proteomic analysis revealed 51 proteins to be differentially abundant between the two groups (≥1.2-fold, Student's t-test, P<0.05. To obtain an overview of the biological functions of the proteins whose expression levels altered significantly in EPL group, gene ontology analysis was performed. We also investigated the twelve proteins with a difference over 1.5-fold using pathways analysis. Our results demonstrate that the gel-free TMT-based proteomic approach allows the quantification of differences in protein expression levels, which is useful for obtaining molecular insights into early pregnancy loss.

  11. Proteomics approach to identify unique xylem sap proteins in Pierce's disease-tolerant Vitis species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Sheikh M; Mazhar, Hifza; Vasanthaiah, Hemanth K N

    2010-03-01

    Pierce's disease (PD) is a destructive bacterial disease of grapes caused by Xylella fastidiosa which is xylem-confined. The tolerance level to this disease varies among Vitis species. Our research was aimed at identifying unique xylem sap proteins present in PD-tolerant Vitis species. The results showed wide variation in the xylem sap protein composition, where a set of polypeptides with pI between 4.5 and 4.7 and M(r) of 31 kDa were present in abundant amount in muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia, PD-tolerant), in reduced levels in Florida hybrid bunch (Vitis spp., PD-tolerant) and absent in bunch grapes (Vitis vinifera, PD-susceptible). Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis of these proteins revealed their similarity to beta-1, 3-glucanase, peroxidase, and a subunit of oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 1, which are known to play role in defense and oxygen generation. In addition, the amount of free amino acids and soluble sugars was found to be significantly lower in xylem sap of muscadine genotypes compared to V. vinifera genotypes, indicating that the higher nutritional value of bunch grape sap may be more suitable for Xylella growth. These data suggest that the presence of these unique proteins in xylem sap is vital for PD tolerance in muscadine and Florida hybrid bunch grapes.

  12. Proteome and metabolome profiling of cytokinin action in Arabidopsis identifying both distinct and similar responses to cytokinin down- and up-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černý, Martin; Kuklová, Alena; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Fragner, Lena; Novák, Ondrej; Rotková, Gabriela; Jedelsky, Petr L; Žáková, Katerina; Šmehilová, Mária; Strnad, Miroslav; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Brzobohaty, Bretislav

    2013-11-01

    In plants, numerous developmental processes are controlled by cytokinin (CK) levels and their ratios to levels of other hormones. While molecular mechanisms underlying the regulatory roles of CKs have been intensely researched, proteomic and metabolomic responses to CK deficiency are unknown. Transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings carrying inducible barley cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CaMV35S>GR>HvCKX2) and agrobacterial isopentenyl transferase (CaMV35S>GR>ipt) constructs were profiled to elucidate proteome- and metabolome-wide responses to down- and up-regulation of CK levels, respectively. Proteome profiling identified >1100 proteins, 155 of which responded to HvCKX2 and/or ipt activation, mostly involved in growth, development, and/or hormone and light signalling. The metabolome profiling covered 79 metabolites, 33 of which responded to HvCKX2 and/or ipt activation, mostly amino acids, carbohydrates, and organic acids. Comparison of the data sets obtained from activated CaMV35S>GR>HvCKX2 and CaMV35S>GR>ipt plants revealed unexpectedly extensive overlaps. Integration of the proteomic and metabolomic data sets revealed: (i) novel components of molecular circuits involved in CK action (e.g. ribosomal proteins); (ii) previously unrecognized links to redox regulation and stress hormone signalling networks; and (iii) CK content markers. The striking overlaps in profiles observed in CK-deficient and CK-overproducing seedlings might explain surprising previously reported similarities between plants with down- and up-regulated CK levels.

  13. Proteomics of the rat myocardium during development of type 2 diabetes mellitus reveals progressive alterations in major metabolic pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edhager, Anders Valdemar; Povlsen, Jonas Agerlund; Løfgren, Bo

    2018-01-01

    in intracellular metabolic pathways in the Zucker diabetic fatty rat heart as T2DM develops using MS based proteomics. The pre-diabetic state only induced minor pathway changes, whereas onset and late T2DM caused pronounced perturbations. Two actin-associated proteins, ARPC2 and TPM3, were up-regulated at the pre...

  14. ICan: an integrated co-alteration network to identify ovarian cancer-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuanshuai; Liu, Yongjing; Li, Kening; Zhang, Rui; Qiu, Fujun; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, an increasing number of integrative studies on cancer-related genes have been published. Integrative analyses aim to overcome the limitation of a single data type, and provide a more complete view of carcinogenesis. The vast majority of these studies used sample-matched data of gene expression and copy number to investigate the impact of copy number alteration on gene expression, and to predict and prioritize candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. However, correlations between genes were neglected in these studies. Our work aimed to evaluate the co-alteration of copy number, methylation and expression, allowing us to identify cancer-related genes and essential functional modules in cancer. We built the Integrated Co-alteration network (ICan) based on multi-omics data, and analyzed the network to uncover cancer-related genes. After comparison with random networks, we identified 155 ovarian cancer-related genes, including well-known (TP53, BRCA1, RB1 and PTEN) and also novel cancer-related genes, such as PDPN and EphA2. We compared the results with a conventional method: CNAmet, and obtained a significantly better area under the curve value (ICan: 0.8179, CNAmet: 0.5183). In this paper, we describe a framework to find cancer-related genes based on an Integrated Co-alteration network. Our results proved that ICan could precisely identify candidate cancer genes and provide increased mechanistic understanding of carcinogenesis. This work suggested a new research direction for biological network analyses involving multi-omics data.

  15. Clinical proteomics identifies urinary CD14 as a potential biomarker for diagnosis of stable coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Yi Lee

    Full Text Available Inflammation plays a key role in coronary artery disease (CAD and other manifestations of atherosclerosis. Recently, urinary proteins were found to be useful markers for reflecting inflammation status of different organs. To identify potential biomarker for diagnosis of CAD, we performed one-dimensional SDS-gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Among the proteins differentially expressed in urine samples, monocyte antigen CD14 was found to be consistently expressed in higher amounts in the CAD patients as compared to normal controls. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to analyze the concentrations of CD14 in urine and serum, we confirmed that urinary CD14 levels were significantly higher in patients (n = 73 with multi-vessel and single vessel CAD than in normal control (n = 35 (P < 0.001. Logistic regression analysis further showed that urinary CD14 concentration level is associated with severity or number of diseased vessels and SYNTAX score after adjustment for potential confounders. Concomitantly, the proportion of CD14+ monocytes was significantly increased in CAD patients (59.7 ± 3.6% as compared with healthy controls (14.9 ± 2.1% (P < 0.001, implicating that a high level of urinary CD14 may be potentially involved in mechanism(s leading to CAD pathogenesis. By performing shotgun proteomics, we further revealed that CD14-associated inflammatory response networks may play an essential role in CAD. In conclusion, the current study has demonstrated that release of CD14 in urine coupled with more CD14+ monocytes in CAD patients is significantly correlated with severity of CAD, pointing to the potential application of urinary CD14 as a novel noninvasive biomarker for large-scale diagnostic screening of susceptible CAD patients.

  16. Proteomics as a Tool to Identify New Targets Against Aspergillus and Scedosporium in the Context of Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Garcia, Andoni; Pellon, Aize; Buldain, Idoia; Antoran, Aitziber; Arbizu-Delgado, Aitana; Guruceaga, Xabier; Rementeria, Aitor; Hernando, Fernando L

    2018-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disorder that increases the risk of suffering microbial, including fungal, infections. In this paper, proteomics-based information was collated relating to secreted and cell wall proteins with potential medical applications from the most common filamentous fungi in CF, i.e., Aspergillus and Scedosporium/Lomentospora species. Among the Aspergillus fumigatus secreted allergens, β-1,3-endoglucanase, the alkaline protease 1 (Alp1/oryzin), Asp f 2, Asp f 13/15, chitinase, chitosanase, dipeptidyl-peptidase V (DppV), the metalloprotease Asp f 5, mitogillin/Asp f 1, and thioredoxin reductase receive a special mention. In addition, the antigens β-glucosidase 1, catalase, glucan endo-1,3-β-glucosidase EglC, β-1,3-glucanosyltransferases Gel1 and Gel2, and glutaminase A were also identified in secretomes of other Aspergillus species associated with CF: Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus nidulans, and Aspergillus terreus. Regarding cell wall proteins, cytochrome P450 and eEF-3 were proposed as diagnostic targets, and alkaline protease 2 (Alp2), Asp f 3 (putative peroxiredoxin pmp20), probable glycosidases Asp f 9/Crf1 and Crf2, GPI-anchored protein Ecm33, β-1,3-glucanosyltransferase Gel4, conidial hydrophobin Hyp1/RodA, and secreted aspartyl protease Pep2 as protective vaccines in A. fumigatus. On the other hand, for Scedosporium/Lomentospora species, the heat shock protein Hsp70 stands out as a relevant secreted and cell wall antigen. Additionally, the secreted aspartyl proteinase and an ortholog of Asp f 13, as well as the cell wall endo-1,3-β-D-glucosidase and 1,3-β-glucanosyl transferase, were also found to be significant proteins. In conclusion, proteins mentioned in this review may be promising candidates for developing innovative diagnostic and therapeutic tools for fungal infections in CF patients.

  17. Regional Differences of Proteins Expressing in Adipose Depots Isolated from Cows, Steers and Bulls as Identified by a Proteomic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hyoung Cho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue in the loin muscle area of beef cattle as a marbling factor is directly associated with beef quality. To elucidate whether properties of proteins involved in depot specific adipose tissue were sex-dependent, we analyzed protein expression of intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT and omental adipose tissue (OMAT from Hanwoo cows, steers, and bulls of Korean native beef cattle by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS–based proteomic analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR and western blot analysis. Two different adipose depots (i.e. intramuscular and omental were collected from cows (n = 7, steers (n = 7, or bulls (n = 7. LC-MS/MS revealed a total of 55 and 35 proteins in IMAT and OMAT, respectively. Of the 55 proteins identified, 44, 40, and 42 proteins were confirmed to be differentially expressed in IMAT of cows, steers, and bulls, respectively. In OMAT of cows, steers, and bulls, 33, 33, and 22 were confirmed to be differentially expressed, respectively. Tropomyosin (TPM 1, TPM 2, and TPM3 were subjected to verification by quantitative PCR and western blot analysis in IMAT and OMAT of Hanwoo cows, steers, and bulls as key factors closely associated with muscle development. Both mRNA levels and protein levels of TPM1, TPM2, and TPM3 in IMAT were lower in bulls compared to in cows or steers suggesting that they were positively correlated with marbling score and quality grade. Our results may aid the regulation of marbling development and improvement of meat quality grades in beef cattle.

  18. Proteomics Mapping of Cord Blood Identifies Haptoglobin ?Switch-On? Pattern as Biomarker of Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis in Preterm Newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Buhimschi, Catalin S.; Bhandari, Vineet; Dulay, Antonette T.; Nayeri, Unzila A.; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya S.; Pettker, Christian M.; Thung, Stephen; Zhao, Guomao; Han, Yiping W.; Bizzarro, Matthew; Buhimschi, Irina A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Intra-amniotic infection and/or inflammation (IAI) are important causes of preterm birth and early-onset neonatal sepsis (EONS). A prompt and accurate diagnosis of EONS is critical for improved neonatal outcomes. We sought to explore the cord blood proteome and identify biomarkers and functional protein networks characterizing EONS in preterm newborns. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied a prospective cohort of 180 premature newborns delivered May 2004-September 2009. A prote...

  19. Melanogenesis stimulation in B16-F10 melanoma cells induces cell cycle alterations, increased ROS levels and a differential expression of proteins as revealed by proteomic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Elizabeth S.; Kawahara, Rebeca [Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Setor de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Parana, P.O. Box 19046, CEP 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Kadowaki, Marina K. [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana, Cascavel, PR (Brazil); Amstalden, Hudson G.; Noleto, Guilhermina R.; Cadena, Silvia Maria S.C.; Winnischofer, Sheila M.B. [Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Setor de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Parana, P.O. Box 19046, CEP 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Martinez, Glaucia R., E-mail: grmartinez@ufpr.br [Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Setor de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Parana, P.O. Box 19046, CEP 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2012-09-10

    Considering that stimulation of melanogenesis may lead to alterations of cellular responses, besides melanin production, our main goal was to study the cellular effects of melanogenesis stimulation of B16-F10 melanoma cells. Our results show increased levels of the reactive oxygen species after 15 h of melanogenesis stimulation. Following 48 h of melanogenesis stimulation, proliferation was inhibited (by induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase) and the expression levels of p21 mRNA were increased. In addition, melanogenesis stimulation did not induce cellular senescence. Proteomic analysis demonstrated the involvement of proteins from other pathways besides those related to the cell cycle, including protein disulfide isomerase A3, heat-shock protein 70, and fructose biphosphate aldolase A (all up-regulated), and lactate dehydrogenase (down-regulated). In RT-qPCR experiments, the levels of pyruvate kinase M2 mRNA dropped, whereas the levels of ATP synthase (beta-F1) mRNA increased. These data indicate that melanogenesis stimulation of B16-F10 cells leads to alterations in metabolism and cell cycle progression that may contribute to an induction of cell quiescence, which may provide a mechanism of resistance against cellular injury promoted by melanin synthesis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melanogenesis stimulation by L-tyrosine+NH{sub 4}Cl in B16-F10 melanoma cells increases ROS levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melanogenesis inhibits cell proliferation, and induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteomic analysis showed alterations in proteins of the cell cycle and glucose metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RT-qPCR analysis confirmed alterations of metabolic targets after melanogenesis stimulation.

  20. Integrated proteomic and N-glycoproteomic analyses of doxorubicin sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer cells reveal glycoprotein alteration in protein abundance and glycosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Junjie; Zhang, Chengqian; Xue, Peng; Wang, Jifeng; Chen, Xiulan; Guo, Xiaojing; Yang, Fuquan

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most common cancer among women in the world, and chemotherapy remains the principal treatment for patients. However, drug resistance is a major obstacle to the effective treatment of ovarian cancers and the underlying mechanism is not clear. An increased understanding of the mechanisms that underline the pathogenesis of drug resistance is therefore needed to develop novel therapeutics and diagnostic. Herein, we report the comparative analysis of the doxorubicin sensitive OVCAR8 cells and its doxorubicin-resistant variant NCI/ADR-RES cells using integrated global proteomics and N-glycoproteomics. A total of 1525 unique N-glycosite-containing peptides from 740 N-glycoproteins were identified and quantified, of which 253 N-glycosite-containing peptides showed significant change in the NCI/ADR-RES cells. Meanwhile, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) based comparative proteomic analysis of the two ovarian cancer cells led to the quantification of 5509 proteins. As about 50% of the identified N-glycoproteins are low-abundance membrane proteins, only 44% of quantified unique N-glycosite-containing peptides had corresponding protein expression ratios. The comparison and calibration of the N-glycoproteome versus the proteome classified 14 change patterns of N-glycosite-containing peptides, including 8 up-regulated N-glycosite-containing peptides with the increased glycosylation sites occupancy, 35 up-regulated N-glycosite-containing peptides with the unchanged glycosylation sites occupancy, 2 down-regulated N-glycosite-containing peptides with the decreased glycosylation sites occupancy, 46 down-regulated N-glycosite-containing peptides with the unchanged glycosylation sites occupancy. Integrated proteomic and N-glycoproteomic analyses provide new insights, which can help to unravel the relationship of N-glycosylation and multidrug resistance (MDR), understand the mechanism of MDR, and discover the new diagnostic and

  1. Long-term smoking alters abundance of over half of the proteome in bronchoalveolar lavage cell in smokers with normal spirometry, with effects on molecular pathways associated with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingxing; Kohler, Maxie; Heyder, Tina; Forsslund, Helena; Garberg, Hilde K; Karimi, Reza; Grunewald, Johan; Berven, Frode S; Magnus Sköld, C; Wheelock, Åsa M

    2018-03-08

    Smoking represents a significant risk factor for many chronic inflammatory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To identify dysregulation of specific proteins and pathways in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells associated with smoking, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based shotgun proteomics analyses were performed on BAL cells from healthy never-smokers and smokers with normal lung function from the Karolinska COSMIC cohort. Multivariate statistical modeling, multivariate correlations with clinical data, and pathway enrichment analysis were performed. Smoking exerted a significant impact on the BAL cell proteome, with more than 500 proteins representing 15 molecular pathways altered due to smoking. The majority of these alterations occurred in a gender-independent manner. The phagosomal- and leukocyte trans endothelial migration (LTM) pathways significantly correlated with FEV 1 /FVC as well as the percentage of CD8 + T-cells and CD8 + CD69 + T-cells in smokers. The correlations to clinical parameters in healthy never-smokers were minor. The significant correlations of proteins in the phagosome- and LTM pathways with activated cytotoxic T-cells (CD69+) and the level of airway obstruction (FEV 1 /FVC) in smokers, both hallmarks of COPD, suggests that these two pathways may play a role in the molecular events preceding the development of COPD in susceptible smokers. Both pathways were found to be further dysregulated in COPD patients from the same cohort, thereby providing further support to this hypothesis. Given that not all smokers develop COPD in spite of decades of smoking, it is also plausible that some of the molecular pathways associated with response to smoking exert protective mechanisms to smoking-related pathologies in resilient individuals. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02627872 ; Retrospectively registered on December 9, 2015.

  2. Whole-genome and Transcriptome Sequencing of Prostate Cancer Identify New Genetic Alterations Driving Disease Progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Shancheng; Wei, Gong-Hong; Liu, Dongbing

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Global disparities in prostate cancer (PCa) incidence highlight the urgent need to identify genomic abnormalities in prostate tumors in different ethnic populations including Asian men. OBJECTIVE: To systematically explore the genomic complexity and define disease-driven genetic......-scale and comprehensive genomic data of prostate cancer from Asian population. Identification of these genetic alterations may help advance prostate cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment....... alterations in PCa. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The study sequenced whole-genome and transcriptome of tumor-benign paired tissues from 65 treatment-naive Chinese PCa patients. Subsequent targeted deep sequencing of 293 PCa-relevant genes was performed in another cohort of 145 prostate tumors. OUTCOME...

  3. Alteration of cancer pain-related signals by radiation: Proteomic analysis in an animal model with cancer bone invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Seong, Jinsil; An, Jung Hee; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Un Jung; Lee, Bae Whan

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Although radiotherapy is highly effective in relieving bone pain due to cancer invasion, its mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to explore this mechanism in an animal model system. Methods and Materials: A hind paw model of cancer pain was developed by transplanting a murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-1, into the periosteal membrane of the foot dorsum of C3H/HeJ mice. Bone invasion from HCa-1 was histopathologically confirmed from sequential tumor sampling. For three experimental groups, a control (N), tumor without radiation (T), and tumor with radiation (TR), the development and level of pain were objectively examined in mice with a growing tumor by assessing pain-associated behavior. The differential expression of pain-related signals in the spinal cord was analyzed by proteomic analysis using high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry, and those of proteins by Western blotting. The pain-mediating neurotransmitters in the spinal cord were also examined by immunohistochemical staining for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P. Results: In the histopathologic examinations, bone invasion from HCa-1 was seen from Day 7 and was evident at Day 14 after transplantation, and measurable pain-associated behaviors were developed from Day 7. After 25 Gy of radiation to the tumors, the objective level of pain in the TR group decreased, with higher thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimulation than in the T group. From the 2-DE of spinal cord, 107 spots were identified; 12 proteins were changed more than fivefold because of tumor formation but then reversed after radiation in the tumor-bearing mice. The proteins involved included secretagogin, syntenin, P2X purinoreceptor 6 (P2X6), and Ca 2+ /Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CaM kinase 1), the functions of which have been known to be involved in the Ca 2+ -signaling cascade, ATP-mediated fast synaptic transmission, or control of vesicular

  4. Alteration of cancer pain-related signals by radiation: Proteomic analysis in an animal model with cancer bone invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Chul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Jung Hee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jiyoung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Un Jung [Yonsei Medical Research Center, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bae Whan [Yonsei Medical Research Center, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Although radiotherapy is highly effective in relieving bone pain due to cancer invasion, its mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to explore this mechanism in an animal model system. Methods and Materials: A hind paw model of cancer pain was developed by transplanting a murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-1, into the periosteal membrane of the foot dorsum of C3H/HeJ mice. Bone invasion from HCa-1 was histopathologically confirmed from sequential tumor sampling. For three experimental groups, a control (N), tumor without radiation (T), and tumor with radiation (TR), the development and level of pain were objectively examined in mice with a growing tumor by assessing pain-associated behavior. The differential expression of pain-related signals in the spinal cord was analyzed by proteomic analysis using high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry, and those of proteins by Western blotting. The pain-mediating neurotransmitters in the spinal cord were also examined by immunohistochemical staining for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P. Results: In the histopathologic examinations, bone invasion from HCa-1 was seen from Day 7 and was evident at Day 14 after transplantation, and measurable pain-associated behaviors were developed from Day 7. After 25 Gy of radiation to the tumors, the objective level of pain in the TR group decreased, with higher thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimulation than in the T group. From the 2-DE of spinal cord, 107 spots were identified; 12 proteins were changed more than fivefold because of tumor formation but then reversed after radiation in the tumor-bearing mice. The proteins involved included secretagogin, syntenin, P2X purinoreceptor 6 (P2X6), and Ca{sup 2+}/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CaM kinase 1), the functions of which have been known to be involved in the Ca{sup 2+}-signaling cascade, ATP-mediated fast synaptic transmission, or control of

  5. Plasma Proteomic Analysis May Identify New Markers for Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Xuwi; Shedden, Kerby; Ao Xiaoping; Davis, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study whether radiation induces differential changes in plasma proteomics in patients with and without radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) of Grade ≥2 (RILT2). Methods and Materials: A total of 57 patients with NSCLC received radiation therapy (RT) were eligible. Twenty patients, 6 with RILT2 with tumor stage matched to 14 without RILT2, were enrolled for this analysis. Platelet-poor plasma was obtained before RT, at 2, 4, 6 weeks during RT, and 1 and 3 months after RT. Plasma proteomes were compared using a multiplexed quantitative proteomics approach involving ExacTag labeling, reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and nano-LC electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Variance components models were used to identify the differential protein expression between patients with and without RILT2. Results: More than 100 proteins were identified and quantified. After excluding proteins for which there were not at least 2 subjects with data for at least two time points, 76 proteins remained for this preliminary analysis. C4b-binding protein alpha chain, Complement C3, and Vitronectin had significantly higher expression levels in patients with RILT2 compared with patients without RILT2, based on both the data sets of RT start to 3 months post-RT (p < 0.01) and RT start to the end of RT (p < 0.01). The expression ratios of patients with RILT2 vs. without RILT2 were 1.60, 1.36, 1.46, and 1.66, 1.34, 1.46, for the above three proteins, respectively. Conclusions: This proteomic approach identified new plasma protein markers for future studies on RILT prediction.

  6. Proteins associated with the size and expansion rate of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall as identified by proteomic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Lindholt, Jes S.; Delbosc, Sandrine

    2010-01-01

    Identification of biomarkers for the natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) holds the key to non-surgical intervention and improved selection for AAA repair. We aimed to associate the basic proteomic composition of AAA wall tissue with the expansion rate and size in patients with AAA....

  7. Chronic β2 -adrenoceptor agonist treatment alters muscle proteome and functional adaptations induced by high intensity training in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostrup, Morten; Onslev, Johan; Jacobson, Glenn

    2018-01-01

    Although the effects of training have been studied for decades, data on muscle proteome signature remodelling induced by high intensity training in relation to functional changes in humans remains incomplete. Likewise, β2 -agonists are frequently used to counteract exercise......-induced bronchoconstriction, but the effects β2 -agonist treatment on muscle remodelling and adaptations to training are unknown. In a placebo-controlled parallel study, we randomized 21 trained men to four weeks of high intensity training with (HIT + β2 A) or without (HIT) daily inhalation of β2 -agonist (terbutaline, 4 mg...... (P ≤ 0.01) and exercise performance (11.6 vs. 6.1%, P ≤ 0.05) in HIT + β2 A compared to HIT. These findings indicate that daily β2 -agonist treatment attenuates the beneficial effects of high intensity training on exercise performance and oxidative capacity, and causes remodelling of muscle proteome...

  8. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis reveals alterations in the liver induced by restricted meal frequency in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingbo; Liu, Zhengqun; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Hongfu

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of meal frequency on metabolite levels in pig plasma and hepatic proteome by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis. Twenty-four pigs (60.7 ± 1.0 kg) consumed the same amount of feed either in 2 (M2, n = 12) or 12 (M12, n = 12) meals per day. After an 8-wk feeding period, plasma concentrations of metabolites and hormones, hepatic biochemical traits, and proteome (n = 4 per group) were measured. Pigs on the M12 regimen had lower average daily gain and gain-to-feed ratio than pigs fed the M2 regimen. The M2 regimen resulted in lower total lipid, glycogen, and triacylglycerol content in the liver and circulating triacylglycerol concentration than that in the M12 pigs. The metabolic hormone concentrations were not affected by meal frequency, with the exception of elevated fibroblast growth factor 21 concentrations in the M2 regimen compared with the M12 regimen. The iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis revealed 35 differentially expressed proteins in the liver between pigs fed two and 12 meals per day, and these differentially expressed proteins were involved in the regulation of general biological process such as glucose and energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, protein and amino acid metabolism, stress response, and cell redox homeostasis. Altogether, the proteomic results provide insights into the mechanism mediating the beneficial effects of restricted meal frequency on the metabolic fitness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Alterations in the cardiac proteome of the spontaneously hypertensive rat induced by transgenic expression of CD36

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Manakov, D.; Ujčíková, Hana; Pravenec, Michal; Novotný, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 145, Aug 11 (2016), s. 177-186 ISSN 1874-3919 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : SHR * CD36 * heart * left and right ventricles * proteomics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.914, year: 2016

  10. Alteration of protein levels during influenza virus H1N1 infection in host cells: a proteomic survey of host and virus reveals differential dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Kummer

    Full Text Available We studied the dynamics of the proteome of influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1 infected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells up to 12 hours post infection by mass spectrometry based quantitative proteomics using the approach of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC. We identified 1311 cell proteins and, apart from the proton channel M2, all major virus proteins. Based on their abundance two groups of virus proteins could be distinguished being in line with the function of the proteins in genesis and formation of new virions. Further, the data indicate a correlation between the amount of proteins synthesized and their previously determined copy number inside the viral particle. We employed bioinformatic approaches such as functional clustering, gene ontology, and pathway (KEGG enrichment tests to uncover co-regulated cellular protein sets, assigned the individual subsets to their biological function, and determined their interrelation within the progression of viral infection. For the first time we are able to describe dynamic changes of the cellular and, of note, the viral proteome in a time dependent manner simultaneously. Through cluster analysis, time dependent patterns of protein abundances revealed highly dynamic up- and/or down-regulation processes. Taken together our study provides strong evidence that virus infection has a major impact on the cell status at the protein level.

  11. A combined physiological and proteomic approach to reveal lactic-acid-induced alterations in Lactobacillus casei Zhang and its mutant with enhanced lactic acid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Wei; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei has traditionally been recognized as a probiotic and frequently used as an adjunct culture in fermented dairy products, where acid stress is an environmental condition commonly encountered. In the present study, we carried out a comparative physiological and proteomic study to investigate lactic-acid-induced alterations in Lactobacillus casei Zhang (WT) and its acid-resistant mutant. Analysis of the physiological data showed that the mutant exhibited 33.8% higher glucose phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system activity and lower glycolytic pH compared with the WT under acidic conditions. In addition, significant differences were detected in both cells during acid stress between intracellular physiological state, including intracellular pH, H(+)-ATPase activity, and intracellular ATP pool. Comparison of the proteomic data based on 2D-DIGE and i-TRAQ indicated that acid stress invoked a global change in both strains. The mutant protected the cells against acid damage by regulating the expression of key proteins involved in cellular metabolism, DNA replication, RNA synthesis, translation, and some chaperones. Proteome results were validated by Lactobacillus casei displaying higher intracellular aspartate and arginine levels, and the survival at pH 3.3 was improved 1.36- and 2.10-fold by the addition of 50-mM aspartate and arginine, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that aspartate may be involved in acid tolerance in Lactobacillus casei. Results presented here may help us understand acid resistance mechanisms and help formulate new strategies to enhance the industrial applications of this species.

  12. Proteomics Analysis to Identify and Characterize the Molecular Signatures of Hepatic Steatosis in Ovariectomized Rats as a Model of Postmenopausal Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Chung Liao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Postmenopausal women are particularly at increased risk of developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Here we aimed to determine the impact of postmenopausal-induced NAFLD (PM-NAFLD in an ovariectomized rat model. Sixteen six-week-old Sprague-Dawley female rats were randomly divided into two groups (eight per group, for sham-operation (Sham or bilateral ovariectomy (Ovx. Four months after surgery, indices of liver damage and liver histomorphometry were measured. Both serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotranferease (ALT levels were significantly higher in the Ovx than Sham group. We performed quantitative LC-MS/MS-based proteomic profiling of livers from rats with PM-NAFLD to provide baseline knowledge of the PM-NAFLD proteome and to investigate proteins involved in PM-NAFLD by ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA to provide corroborative evidence for differential regulation of molecular and cellular functions affecting metabolic processes. Of the 586 identified proteins, the levels of 59 (10.0% and 48 (8.2% were significantly higher and lower, respectively, in the Ovx group compared to the Sham group. In conclusion, the changes in regulation of proteins implicated in PM-NAFLD may affect other vital biological processes in the body apart from causing postmenopause-mediated liver dysfunction. Our quantitative proteomics analysis may also suggest potential biomarkers and further clinical applications for PM-NAFLD.

  13. Quantitative proteomics reveals altered expression of extracellular matrix related proteins of human primary dermal fibroblasts in response to sulfated hyaluronan and collagen applied as artificial extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stephan A; van der Smissen, Anja; von Feilitzsch, Margarete; Anderegg, Ulf; Kalkhof, Stefan; von Bergen, Martin

    2012-12-01

    Fibroblasts are the main matrix producing cells of the dermis and are also strongly regulated by their matrix environment which can be used to improve and guide skin wound healing processes. Here, we systematically investigated the molecular effects on primary dermal fibroblasts in response to high-sulfated hyaluronan [HA] (hsHA) by quantitative proteomics. The comparison of non- and high-sulfated HA revealed regulation of 84 of more than 1,200 quantified proteins. Based on gene enrichment we found that sulfation of HA alters extracellular matrix remodeling. The collagen degrading enzymes cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -14 were found to be down-regulated on hsHA. Additionally protein expression of thrombospondin-1, decorin, collagen types I and XII were reduced, whereas the expression of trophoblast glycoprotein and collagen type VI were slightly increased. This study demonstrates that global proteomics provides a valuable tool for revealing proteins involved in molecular effects of growth substrates for further material optimization.

  14. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor activation affects the C13NJ microglia cell line proteome leading to alterations in glycolysis, motility, and cytoskeletal architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhart, Eva; Kollroser, Manfred; Rechberger, Gerald; Reicher, Helga; Heinemann, Akos; Schratl, Petra; Hallström, Seth; Wintersperger, Andrea; Nusshold, Christoph; DeVaney, Trevor; Zorn-Pauly, Klaus; Malli, Roland; Graier, Wolfgang; Malle, Ernst; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the CNS, are rapidly activated in response to injury and microglia migration towards and homing at damaged tissue plays a key role in CNS regeneration. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is involved in signaling events evoking microglia responses through cognate G protein-coupled receptors. Here we show that human immortalized C13NJ microglia express LPA receptor subtypes LPA1, LPA2, and LPA3 on mRNA and protein level. LPA activation of C13NJ cells induced Rho and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation and enhanced cellular ATP production. In addition, LPA induced process retraction, cell spreading, led to pronounced changes of the actin cytoskeleton and reduced cell motility, which could be reversed by inhibition of Rho activity. To get an indication about LPA-induced global alterations in protein expression patterns a 2-D DIGE/LC-ESI-MS proteomic approach was applied. On the proteome level the most prominent changes in response to LPA were observed for glycolytic enzymes and proteins regulating cell motility and/or cytoskeletal dynamics. The present findings suggest that naturally occurring LPA is a potent regulator of microglia biology. This might be of particular relevance in the pathophysiological context of neurodegenerative disorders where LPA concentrations can be significantly elevated in the CNS. PMID:19899077

  15. Differential Proteomic Analysis Using iTRAQ Reveals Alterations in Hull Development in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuzhen; Chen, Wenyue; Xiao, Wenfei; Yang, Changdeng; Xin, Ya; Qiu, Jieren; Hu, Weimin; Ying, Wu; Fu, Yaping; Tong, Jianxin; Hu, Guocheng; Chen, Zhongzhong; Fang, Xianping; Yu, Hong; Lai, Wenguo; Ruan, Songlin; Ma, Huasheng

    2015-01-01

    Rice hull, the outer cover of the rice grain, determines grain shape and size. Changes in the rice hull proteome in different growth stages may reflect the underlying mechanisms involved in grain development. To better understand these changes, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitative (iTRAQ) MS/MS was used to detect statistically significant changes in the rice hull proteome in the booting, flowering, and milk-ripe growth stages. Differentially expressed proteins were analyzed to predict their potential functions during development. Gene ontology (GO) terms and pathways were used to evaluate the biological mechanisms involved in rice hull at the three growth stages. In total, 5,268 proteins were detected and characterized, of which 563 were differentially expressed across the development stages. The results showed that the flowering and milk-ripe stage proteomes were more similar to each other (r=0.61) than either was to the booting stage proteome. A GO enrichment analysis of the differentially expressed proteins was used to predict their roles during rice hull development. The potential functions of 25 significantly differentially expressed proteins were used to evaluate their possible roles at various growth stages. Among these proteins, an unannotated protein (Q7X8A1) was found to be overexpressed especially in the flowering stage, while a putative uncharacterized protein (B8BF94) and an aldehyde dehydrogenase (Q9FPK6) were overexpressed only in the milk-ripe stage. Pathways regulated by differentially expressed proteins were also analyzed. Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative] cyclase (Q9SDJ2), and two magnesium-chelatase subunits, ChlD (Q6ATS0), and ChlI (Q53RM0), were associated with chlorophyll biosynthesis at different developmental stages. The expression of Q9SDJ2 in the flowering and milk-ripe stages was validated by qRT-PCR. The 25 candidate proteins may be pivotal markers for controlling rice hull development at various

  16. Deep Coverage Proteomics Identifies More Low-Abundance Missing Proteins in Human Testis Tissue with Q-Exactive HF Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Luo, Weijia; Wu, Feilin; Peng, Xuehui; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Manli; Zhao, Yan; Su, Na; Qi, YingZi; Chen, Lingsheng; Zhang, Yangjun; Wen, Bo; He, Fuchu; Xu, Ping

    2016-11-04

    Since 2012, missing proteins (MPs) investigation has been one of the critical missions of Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) through various biochemical strategies. On the basis of our previous testis MPs study, faster scanning and higher resolution mass-spectrometry-based proteomics might be conducive to MPs exploration, especially for low-abundance proteins. In this study, Q-Exactive HF (HF) was used to survey proteins from the same testis tissues separated by two separating methods (tricine- and glycine-SDS-PAGE), as previously described. A total of 8526 proteins were identified, of which more low-abundance proteins were uniquely detected in HF data but not in our previous LTQ Orbitrap Velos (Velos) reanalysis data. Further transcriptomics analysis showed that these uniquely identified proteins by HF also had lower expression at the mRNA level. Of the 81 total identified MPs, 74 and 39 proteins were listed as MPs in HF and Velos data sets, respectively. Among the above MPs, 47 proteins (43 neXtProt PE2 and 4 PE3) were ranked as confirmed MPs after verifying with the stringent spectra match and isobaric and single amino acid variants filtering. Functional investigation of these 47 MPs revealed that 11 MPs were testis-specific proteins and 7 MPs were involved in spermatogenesis process. Therefore, we concluded that higher scanning speed and resolution of HF might be factors for improving the low-abundance MP identification in future C-HPP studies. All mass-spectrometry data from this study have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004092.

  17. Structural health monitoring (vibration) as a tool for identifying structural alterations of the lumbar spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawchuk, Gregory N; Hartvigsen, Jan; Edgecombe, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an engineering technique used to identify mechanical abnormalities not readily apparent through other means. Recently, SHM has been adapted for use in biological systems, but its invasive nature limits its clinical application. As such, the purpose of this pr......Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an engineering technique used to identify mechanical abnormalities not readily apparent through other means. Recently, SHM has been adapted for use in biological systems, but its invasive nature limits its clinical application. As such, the purpose...... of this project was to determine if a non-invasive form of SHM could identify structural alterations in the spines of living human subjects. Lumbar spines of 10 twin pairs were visualized by magnetic resonance imaging then assessed by a blinded radiologist to determine whether twin pairs were structurally...... concordant or discordant. Vibration was then applied to each subject's spine and the resulting response recorded from sensors overlying lumbar spinous processes. The peak frequency, area under the curve and the root mean square were computed from the frequency response function of each sensor. Statistical...

  18. Proteomic analysis of the intestinal adaptation response reveals altered expression of fatty acid binding proteins following massive small bowel resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Andrew N; Pereira-Fantini, Prue M; Wilson, Guineva; Taylor, Russell G; Rainczuk, Adam; Meehan, Katie L; Sourial, Magdy; Fuller, Peter J; Stanton, Peter G; Robertson, David M; Bines, Julie E

    2010-03-05

    Intestinal adaptation in response to the loss of the small intestine is essential to restore enteral autonomy in patients who have undergone massive small bowel resection (MSBR). In a proportion of patients, intestinal function is not restored, resulting in chronic intestinal failure (IF). Early referral of such patients for transplant provides the best prognosis; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain elusive and there is currently no convenient marker to predict whether patients will develop IF. We have investigated the adaptation response in a well-characterized porcine model of intestinal adaptation. 2D DIGE analysis of ileal epithelium from piglets recovering from massive small bowel resection (MSBR) identified over 60 proteins that changed specifically in MSBR animals relative to nonoperational or sham-operated controls. Three fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP, FABP-6, and I-FABP) showed changes in MSBR animals. The expression changes and localization of each FABP were validated by immunoblotting and immunohistochemical analysis. FABP expression changes in MSBR animals occurred concurrently with altered triglyceride and bile acid metabolism as well as weight gain. The observed FABP expression changes in the ileal epithelium occur as part of the intestinal adaptation response and could provide a clinically useful marker to evaluate adaptation following MSBR.

  19. Identifying Aspects of the Post-Transcriptional Program Governing the Proteome of the Green Alga Micromonas pusilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltman, Peter H.; Guo, Jian; Reistetter, Emily Nahas; Purvine, Samuel; Ansong, Charles K.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Wong, Chee-Hong; Wei, Chia-Lin; Smith, Richard D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Worden, Alexandra Z.; Mills, Ken

    2016-07-19

    Micromonas is a unicellular green alga that belongs to the prasinophytes, a sister lineage to land plants. This picoeukaryotic (<2 μm diameter) alga is widespread in the marine environment but still not understood at the cellular level. Here, we examine the mRNA and protein level changes that take place over the course of the day-night cycle using mid-exponential nutrient replete cultures of Micromonas pusilla CCMP1545 grown and analyzed in biological triplicate. During the experiment, samples were collected at key transition points during the diel for evaluation using high-throughput LC-MS proteomics. We also sequenced matched mRNA samples from the same time points, using pair-ended directional Illumina RNA-Seq to investigate the dynamics and relationship between the mRNA and protein expression programs of M. pusilla. Similar to a prior study of the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus, we found significant divergence in the mRNA and proteomics expression dynamics in response to the light:dark cycle. Additionally, expressional responses of genes and the proteins they encoded could also be variable within the same metabolic pathway, such as the oxygenic photosynthesis pathway. A regression framework was used to predict protein levels using both mRNA expression and gene-specific sequence-based features. Several features in the genome sequence were found to influence protein abundance including the codon usage and the length of the 3’ UTR. Collectively, our studies provide insights into the regulation of the proteome over a diel as relationships between the transcriptional and translational programs in the widespread marine green alga Micromonas.

  20. Identifying Aspects of the Post-Transcriptional Program Governing the Proteome of the Green Alga Micromonas pusilla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Waltman

    Full Text Available Micromonas is a unicellular motile alga within the Prasinophyceae, a green algal group that is related to land plants. This picoeukaryote (<2 μm diameter is widespread in the marine environment but is not well understood at the cellular level. Here, we examine shifts in mRNA and protein expression over the course of the day-night cycle using triplicated mid-exponential, nutrient replete cultures of Micromonas pusilla CCMP1545. Samples were collected at key transition points during the diel cycle for evaluation using high-throughput LC-MS proteomics. In conjunction, matched mRNA samples from the same time points were sequenced using pair-ended directional Illumina RNA-Seq to investigate the dynamics and relationship between the mRNA and protein expression programs of M. pusilla. Similar to a prior study of the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus, we found significant divergence in the mRNA and proteomics expression dynamics in response to the light:dark cycle. Additionally, expressional responses of genes and the proteins they encoded could also be variable within the same metabolic pathway, such as we observed in the oxygenic photosynthesis pathway. A regression framework was used to predict protein levels from both mRNA expression and gene-specific sequence-based features. Several features in the genome sequence were found to influence protein abundance including codon usage as well as 3' UTR length and structure. Collectively, our studies provide insights into the regulation of the proteome over a diel cycle as well as the relationships between transcriptional and translational programs in the widespread marine green alga Micromonas.

  1. Proteomic approach for identifying gonad differential proteins in the oyster (Crassostrea angulata) following food-chain contamination with HgCl2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Hong; Huang, Lin; Zhang, Yong; Ke, Cai-Huan; Huang, He-Qing

    2013-12-06

    Hg discharged into the environmental waters can generally be bioaccumulated, transformed and transmited by living organisms, thus resulting in the formation of Hg-toxicity food chains. The pathway and toxicology of food chain contaminated with environmental Hg are rarely revealed by proteomics. Here, we showed that differential proteomics had the potential to understand reproduction toxicity mechanism in marine molluscs through the Hg-contaminated food chain. Hg bioaccumulation was found in every link of the HgCl2-Chlorella vulgaris-oyster-mice food chain. Morphological observations identified the lesions in both the oyster gonad and the mice ovary. Differential proteomics was used to study the mechanisms of Hg toxicity in the oyster gonad and to find some biomarkers of Hg contamination in food chain. Using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, we identified 13 differential protein spots, of which six were up-regulated, six were down-regulated, while one was undecided. A portion of these differential proteins was further confirmed using real-time PCR and western blotting methods. Their major functions involved binding, protein translocation, catalysis, regulation of energy metabolism, reproductive functioning and structural molecular activity. Among these proteins, 14-3-3 protein, GTP binding protein, arginine kinase (AK) and 71kDa heat shock connate protein (HSCP 71) are considered to be suitable biomarkers of environmental Hg contamination. Furthermore, we established the gene correspondence, responding to Hg reproductive toxicity, between mouse and oyster, and then used real-time PCR to analyze mRNA differential expression of the corresponding genes in mice. The results indicated that the mechanism of Hg reproductive toxicity in mouse was similar to that in oyster. We suggest that the proteomics would be further developed in application research of food safety including toxicological mechanism. It is well known that mercury (Hg) is one of the best toxic metal elements in

  2. Novel Somatic Copy Number Alteration Identified for Cervical Cancer in the Mexican American Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Torabi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer affects millions of Americans, but the rate for cervical cancer in the Mexican American is approximately twice that for non-Mexican Americans. The etiologies of cervical cancer are still not fully understood. A number of somatic mutations, including several copy number alterations (CNAs, have been identified in the pathogenesis of cervical carcinomas in non-Mexican Americans. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate CNAs in association with cervical cancer in the Mexican American population. We conducted a pilot study of genome-wide CNA analysis using 2.5 million markers in four diagnostic groups: reference (n = 125, low grade dysplasia (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN-I, n = 4, high grade dysplasia (CIN-II and -III, n = 5 and invasive carcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, n = 5 followed by data analyses using Partek. We observed a statistically-significant difference of CNA burden between case and reference groups of different sizes (>100 kb, 10–100 kb and 1–10 kb of CNAs that included deletions and amplifications, e.g., a statistically-significant difference of >100 kb deletions was observed between the reference (6.6% and pre-cancer and cancer (91.3% groups. Recurrent aberrations of 98 CNA regions were also identified in cases only. However, none of the CNAs have an impact on cancer progression. A total of 32 CNA regions identified contained tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. Moreover, the pathway analysis revealed endometrial cancer and estrogen signaling pathways associated with this cancer (p < 0.05 using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG. This is the first report of CNAs identified for cervical cancer in the U.S. Latino population using high density markers. We are aware of the small sample size in the study. Thus, additional studies with a larger sample are needed to confirm the current findings.

  3. Human omental adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium alters the proteomic profile of epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YL

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Yanling Zhang,1,* Weihong Dong,1,* Junjie Wang,2 Jing Cai,1 Zehua Wang1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Renhe Hospital, China Three Gorges University, Yichang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been reported to participate in the formation of supportive tumor stroma. The abilities of proliferation and invasion of human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC cells were significantly enhanced when indirectly cocultured with human omental adipose-derived MSCs (O-ADSCs in vitro. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, EOC cells were cultured with conditioned medium (CM from O-ADSCs (O-ADSC, and the effect of O-ADSC CM on the proteomic profile of EOC cells was assessed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE, followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The 2-DE assays revealed a global increase in protein expression in the EOC cells treated with CM. Nine proteins were identified from 11 selected protein spots with differential expression after treatment with CM from O-ADSCs. All the nine proteins have been linked to carcinoma and apoptosis, and the migration ability of tumor cells can be regulated by these proteins. Moreover, the upregulation of prohibitin and serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 in EOC cells treated with CM was further confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. These results suggest that O-ADSCs affect the proteomic profile of EOC cells via paracrine mechanism in favor of EOC progression. Keywords: ovarian cancer, mesenchymal stromal cells, mesenchymal stem cells, omentum, proteomic

  4. Redox regulation of cell proliferation: Bioinformatics and redox proteomics approaches to identify redox-sensitive cell cycle regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Wilson, Michael H; Wright, Megan H

    2018-03-29

    Plant stem cells are the foundation of plant growth and development. The balance of quiescence and division is highly regulated, while ensuring that proliferating cells are protected from the adverse effects of environment fluctuations that may damage the genome. Redox regulation is important in both the activation of proliferation and arrest of the cell cycle upon perception of environmental stress. Within this context, reactive oxygen species serve as 'pro-life' signals with positive roles in the regulation of the cell cycle and survival. However, very little is known about the metabolic mechanisms and redox-sensitive proteins that influence cell cycle progression. We have identified cysteine residues on known cell cycle regulators in Arabidopsis that are potentially accessible, and could play a role in redox regulation, based on secondary structure and solvent accessibility likelihoods for each protein. We propose that redox regulation may function alongside other known posttranslational modifications to control the functions of core cell cycle regulators such as the retinoblastoma protein. Since our current understanding of how redox regulation is involved in cell cycle control is hindered by a lack of knowledge regarding both which residues are important and how modification of those residues alters protein function, we discuss how critical redox modifications can be mapped at the molecular level. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Proteomic profiling of antibody-inducing immunogens in tumor tissue identifies PSMA1, LAP3, ANXA3, and maspin as colon cancer markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Roehrl, Michael H.; Wang, Julia Y.

    2018-01-01

    We hypothesized that cancer tissue immunogens – antigens capable of inducing specific antibody production in patients – are promising targets for development of precision diagnostics and humoral immunotherapies. We developed an innovative immuno-proteomic strategy and identified new immunogenic markers of colon cancer. Proteins from cancers and matched normal tissues were separated by 2D gel electrophoresis and blotted with serum antibodies from the same patients. Antibody-reactive proteins were sequenced by mass spectrometry and validated by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. 170 serum antibody-reactive proteins were identified only in cancerous but not matched normal. Among these, proteasome subunit alpha type 1 (PSA1), leucine aminopeptidase 3 (LAP3), annexin A3 (ANXA3), and maspin (serpin B5) were reproducibly found in tissues from three patients. Differential expression patterns were confirmed in samples from eight patients with various stages of colon adenocarcinoma and liver metastases. These tumor-resident proteins and/or their associated serum antibodies may be promising markers for colon cancer screening and early diagnosis. Furthermore, tumor tissue-specific antibodies could potentially be exploited as immunotherapeutic targets against cancer. More generally, proteomic profiling of antibody-inducing cancer-associated immunogens represents a powerful generic method for uncovering the tumor antigen-ome, i.e., the totality of immunogenic tumor-associated proteins. PMID:29423100

  6. Profilin-1 overexpression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells is associated with alterations in proteomics biomarkers of cell proliferation, survival, and motility as revealed by global proteomics analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumans, Joëlle V F; Gau, David; Poljak, Anne; Wasinger, Valerie; Roy, Partha; Moens, Pierre D J

    2014-12-01

    Despite early screening programs and new therapeutic strategies, metastatic breast cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death in women in industrialized countries and regions. There is a need for novel biomarkers of susceptibility, progression, and therapeutic response. Global analyses or systems science approaches with omics technologies offer concrete ways forward in biomarker discovery for breast cancer. Previous studies have shown that expression of profilin-1 (PFN1), a ubiquitously expressed actin-binding protein, is downregulated in invasive and metastatic breast cancer. It has also been reported that PFN1 overexpression can suppress tumorigenic ability and motility/invasiveness of breast cancer cells. To obtain insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of how elevating PFN1 level induces these phenotypic changes in breast cancer cells, we investigated the alteration in global protein expression profiles of breast cancer cells upon stable overexpression of PFN1 by a combination of three different proteome analysis methods (2-DE, iTRAQ, label-free). Using MDA-MB-231 as a model breast cancer cell line, we provide evidence that PFN1 overexpression is associated with alterations in the expression of proteins that have been functionally linked to cell proliferation (FKPB1A, HDGF, MIF, PRDX1, TXNRD1, LGALS1, STMN1, LASP1, S100A11, S100A6), survival (HSPE1, HSPB1, HSPD1, HSPA5 and PPIA, YWHAZ, CFL1, NME1) and motility (CFL1, CORO1B, PFN2, PLS3, FLNA, FLNB, NME2, ARHGDIB). In view of the pleotropic effects of PFN1 overexpression in breast cancer cells as suggested by these new findings, we propose that PFN1-induced phenotypic changes in cancer cells involve multiple mechanisms. Our data reported here might also offer innovative strategies for identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets and companion diagnostics for persons with, or susceptibility to, breast cancer.

  7. Proteomic analysis of membrane microdomain-associated proteins in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder reveals alterations in LAMP, STXBP1 and BASP1 protein expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Behan, A T

    2009-06-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlpfc) is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar disorder (BPD) and, within this region, abnormalities in glutamatergic neurotransmission and synaptic function have been described. Proteins associated with these functions are enriched in membrane microdomains (MM). In the current study, we used two complementary proteomic methods, two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by reverse phase-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (RP-LC-MS\\/MS) (gel separation liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS\\/MS)) to assess protein expression in MM in pooled samples of dlpfc from SCZ, BPD and control cases (n=10 per group) from the Stanley Foundation Brain series. We identified 16 proteins altered in one\\/both disorders using proteomic methods. We selected three proteins with roles in synaptic function (syntaxin-binding protein 1 (STXBP1), brain abundant membrane-attached signal protein 1 (BASP1) and limbic system-associated membrane protein (LAMP)) for validation by western blotting. This revealed significantly increased expression of these proteins in SCZ (STXBP1 (24% difference; P<0.001), BASP1 (40% difference; P<0.05) and LAMP (22% difference; P<0.01)) and BPD (STXBP1 (31% difference; P<0.001), BASP1 (23% difference; P<0.01) and LAMP (20% difference; P<0.01)) in the Stanley brain series (n=20 per group). Further validation in dlpfc from the Harvard brain subseries (n=10 per group) confirmed increased protein expression in SCZ of STXBP1 (18% difference; P<0.0001), BASP1 (14% difference; P<0.0001) but not LAMP (20% difference; P=0.14). No significant differences in STXBP1, BASP1 or LAMP protein expression in BPD dlpfc were observed. This study, through proteomic assessments of MM in dlpfc and validation in two brain series, strongly implicates LAMP, STXBP1 and BASP1 in SCZ and supports

  8. Using Copy Number Alterations to Identify New Therapeutic Targets for Bladder Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Conconi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer represents the ninth most widespread malignancy throughout the world. It is characterized by the presence of two different clinical and prognostic subtypes: non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers (NMIBCs and muscle-invasive bladder cancers (MIBCs. MIBCs have a poor outcome with a common progression to metastasis. Despite improvements in knowledge, treatment has not advanced significantly in recent years, with the absence of new therapeutic targets. Because of the limitations of current therapeutic options, the greater challenge will be to identify biomarkers for clinical application. For this reason, we compared our array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH results with those reported in literature for invasive bladder tumors and, in particular, we focused on the evaluation of copy number alterations (CNAs present in biopsies and retained in the corresponding cancer stem cell (CSC subpopulations that should be the main target of therapy. According to our data, CCNE1, MYC, MDM2 and PPARG genes could be interesting therapeutic targets for bladder CSC subpopulations. Surprisingly, HER2 copy number gains are not retained in bladder CSCs, making the gene-targeted therapy less interesting than the others. These results provide precious advice for further study on bladder therapy; however, the clinical importance of these results should be explored.

  9. MVisAGe Identifies Concordant and Discordant Genomic Alterations of Driver Genes in Squamous Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Vonn; Du, Ying; Danilova, Ludmila; Hayward, Michele C; Hayes, D Neil

    2018-06-15

    Integrated analyses of multiple genomic datatypes are now common in cancer profiling studies. Such data present opportunities for numerous computational experiments, yet analytic pipelines are limited. Tools such as the cBioPortal and Regulome Explorer, although useful, are not easy to access programmatically or to implement locally. Here, we introduce the MVisAGe R package, which allows users to quantify gene-level associations between two genomic datatypes to investigate the effect of genomic alterations (e.g., DNA copy number changes on gene expression). Visualizing Pearson/Spearman correlation coefficients according to the genomic positions of the underlying genes provides a powerful yet novel tool for conducting exploratory analyses. We demonstrate its utility by analyzing three publicly available cancer datasets. Our approach highlights canonical oncogenes in chr11q13 that displayed the strongest associations between expression and copy number, including CCND1 and CTTN , genes not identified by copy number analysis in the primary reports. We demonstrate highly concordant usage of shared oncogenes on chr3q, yet strikingly diverse oncogene usage on chr11q as a function of HPV infection status. Regions of chr19 that display remarkable associations between methylation and gene expression were identified, as were previously unreported miRNA-gene expression associations that may contribute to the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Significance: This study presents an important bioinformatics tool that will enable integrated analyses of multiple genomic datatypes. Cancer Res; 78(12); 3375-85. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Cadmium Toxicity Induced Alterations in the Root Proteome of Green Gram in Contrasting Response towards Iron Supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowbiya Muneer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium signifies a severe threat to crop productivity and green gram is a notably iron sensitive plant which shows considerable variation towards cadmium stress. A gel-based proteomics analysis was performed with the roots of green gram exposed to iron and cadmium combined treatments. The resulting data show that twenty three proteins were down-regulated in iron-deprived roots either in the absence (−Fe/−Cd or presence (−Fe/+Cd of cadmium. These down-regulated proteins were however well expressed in roots under iron sufficient conditions, even in the presence of cadmium (+Fe/+Cd. The functional classification of these proteins determined that 21% of the proteins are associated with nutrient metabolism. The other proteins in higher quantities are involved in either transcription or translation regulation, and the rest are involved in biosynthesis metabolism, antioxidant pathways, molecular chaperones and stress response. On the other hand, several protein spots were also absent in roots in response to iron deprivation either in absence (−Fe/−Cd or presence (−Fe/+Cd of cadmium but were well expressed in the presence of iron (+Fe/+Cd. Results suggest that green gram plants exposed to cadmium stress are able to change the nutrient metabolic balance in roots, but in the mean time regulate cadmium toxicity through iron supplements.

  11. Proteomic profiling of the epileptic dentate gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Aiqing; Choi, Yun-Sik; Dziema, Heather; Cao, Ruifeng; Cho, Hee-Yeon; Jung, Yeon Joo; Obrietan, Karl

    2010-01-01

    The development of epilepsy is often associated with marked changes in central nervous system cell structure and function. Along these lines, reactive gliosis and granule cell axonal sprouting within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are commonly observed in individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy. Here we used the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy in mice to screen the proteome and phosphoproteome of the dentate gyrus to identify molecular events that are altered as part of the ...

  12. Integration analysis of quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics data identifies potential targets of frizzled-8 protein-related antiproliferative factor in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Kim, Yongsoo; Kim, Taek-Kyun; Keay, Susan K; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Steen, Hanno; Freeman, Michael R; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Jayoung

    2012-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a prevalent and debilitating pelvic disorder generally accompanied by chronic pain combined with chronic urinating problems. Over one million Americans are affected, especially middle-aged women. However, its aetiology or mechanism remains unclear. No efficient drug has been provided to patients. Several urinary biomarker candidates have been identified for IC; among the most promising is antiproliferative factor (APF), whose biological activity is detectable in urine specimens from >94% of patients with both ulcerative and non-ulcerative IC. The present study identified several important mediators of the effect of APF on bladder cell physiology, suggesting several candidate drug targets against IC. In an attempt to identify potential proteins and genes regulated by APF in vivo, and to possibly expand the APF-regulated network identified by stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), we performed an integration analysis of our own SILAC data and the microarray data of Gamper et al. (2009) BMC Genomics 10: 199. Notably, two of the proteins (i.e. MAPKSP1 and GSPT1) that are down-regulated by APF are involved in the activation of mTORC1, suggesting that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is potentially a critical pathway regulated by APF in vivo. Several components of the mTOR pathway are currently being studied as potential therapeutic targets in other diseases. Our analysis suggests that this pathway might also be relevant in the design of diagnostic tools and medications targeting IC. • To enhance our understanding of the interstitial cystitis urine biomarker antiproliferative factor (APF), as well as interstitial cystitis biology more generally at the systems level, we reanalyzed recently published large-scale quantitative proteomics and in vivo transcriptomics data sets using an integration analysis tool that we have developed. • To

  13. Differential proteomic analysis to identify proteins associated with quality traits of frozen mud shrimp (Solenocera melantho) using an iTRAQ-based strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; Zhang, Longteng; Lei, Yutian; Shen, Huixing; Yu, Xunpei; Luo, Yongkang

    2018-06-15

    An iTRAQ-based strategy was applied to investigate proteome changes in mud shrimp during long-term frozen storage under different conditions. A total of 226 proteins was identified as differential abundance proteins (DAPs) in mud shrimp from two frozen treatment groups (-20 °C and -40 °C) compared with the fresh control group. The proteome changes in mud shrimp muscle stored under -20 °C was much greater than that under -40 °C. Correlation analysis between DAPs and quality traits of mud shrimp muscle showed that 12 proteins were correlated closely with color (L ∗ , a ∗ , and b ∗ value) and texture (hardness, elasticity, and chewiness). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that most of these proteins were involved in protein structure, metabolic enzymes, and protein turnover. Among them, several proteins might be potential protein markers for color, and some proteins are good candidate predictors for textural properties of mud shrimp muscle. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Proteomic Profiling of a Primary CD4+ T Cell Model of HIV-1 Latency Identifies Proteins Whose Differential Expression Correlates with Reactivation of Latent HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Jamaluddin Md; Liu, Hongbing; Hu, Pei-Wen; Nikolai, Bryan C; Wu, Hulin; Miao, Hongyu; Rice, Andrew P

    2018-01-01

    The latent HIV-1 reservoir of memory CD4 + T cells that persists during combination antiviral therapy prevents a cure of infection. Insight into mechanisms of latency and viral reactivation are essential for the rational design of strategies to reduce the latent reservoir. In this study, we quantified the levels of >2,600 proteins in the CCL19 primary CD4 + T cell model of HIV-1 latency. We profiled proteins under conditions that promote latent infection and after cells were treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) + ionomycin, which is known to efficiently induce reactivation of latent HIV-1. In an analysis of cells from two healthy blood donors, we identified 61 proteins that were upregulated ≥2-fold, and 36 proteins that were downregulated ≥2-fold under conditions in which latent viruses were reactivated. These differentially expressed proteins are, therefore, candidates for cellular factors that regulate latency or viral reactivation. Two unexpected findings were obtained from the proteomic data: (1) the interactions among the majority of upregulated proteins are largely undetermined in published protein-protein interaction networks and (2) downregulated proteins are strongly associated with Gene Ontology terms related to mitochondrial protein synthesis. This proteomic data set provides a useful resource for future mechanistic studies of HIV-1 latency.

  15. Single-cell-type quantitative proteomic and ionomic analysis of epidermal bladder cells from the halophyte model plant Mesembryanthemum crystallinum to identify salt-responsive proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, Bronwyn J; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Raymond, Carolyn

    2016-05-10

    Epidermal bladder cells (EBC) are large single-celled, specialized, and modified trichomes found on the aerial parts of the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. Recent development of a simple but high throughput technique to extract the contents from these cells has provided an opportunity to conduct detailed single-cell-type analyses of their molecular characteristics at high resolution to gain insight into the role of these cells in the salt tolerance of the plant. In this study, we carry out large-scale complementary quantitative proteomic studies using both a label (DIGE) and label-free (GeLC-MS) approach to identify salt-responsive proteins in the EBC extract. Additionally we perform an ionomics analysis (ICP-MS) to follow changes in the amounts of 27 different elements. Using these methods, we were able to identify 54 proteins and nine elements that showed statistically significant changes in the EBC from salt-treated plants. GO enrichment analysis identified a large number of transport proteins but also proteins involved in photosynthesis, primary metabolism and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). Validation of results by western blot, confocal microscopy and enzyme analysis helped to strengthen findings and further our understanding into the role of these specialized cells. As expected EBC accumulated large quantities of sodium, however, the most abundant element was chloride suggesting the sequestration of this ion into the EBC vacuole is just as important for salt tolerance. This single-cell type omics approach shows that epidermal bladder cells of M. crystallinum are metabolically active modified trichomes, with primary metabolism supporting cell growth, ion accumulation, compatible solute synthesis and CAM. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004045.

  16. Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting alter hepatic lipid droplet proteome and diacylglycerol species and prevent diabetes in NZO mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeier, Christian; Kaiser, Daniel; Heeren, Jörg; Scheja, Ludger; John, Clara; Weise, Christoph; Eravci, Murat; Lagerpusch, Merit; Schulze, Gunnar; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schwenk, Robert Wolfgang; Schürmann, Annette

    2015-05-01

    Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are known to improve glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance in several species including humans. The aim of this study was to unravel potential mechanisms by which these interventions improve insulin sensitivity and protect from type 2 diabetes. Diabetes-susceptible New Zealand Obese mice were either 10% calorie restricted (CR) or fasted every other day (IF), and compared to ad libitum (AL) fed control mice. AL mice showed a diabetes prevalence of 43%, whereas mice under CR and IF were completely protected against hyperglycemia. Proteomic analysis of hepatic lipid droplets revealed significantly higher levels of PSMD9 (co-activator Bridge-1), MIF (macrophage migration inhibitor factor), TCEB2 (transcription elongation factor B (SIII), polypeptide 2), ACY1 (aminoacylase 1) and FABP5 (fatty acid binding protein 5), and a marked reduction of GSTA3 (glutathione S-transferase alpha 3) in samples of CR and IF mice. In addition, accumulation of diacylglycerols (DAGs) was significantly reduced in livers of IF mice (P=0.045) while CR mice showed a similar tendency (P=0.062). In particular, 9 DAG species were significantly reduced in response to IF, of which DAG-40:4 and DAG-40:7 also showed significant effects after CR. This was associated with a decreased PKCε activation and might explain the improved insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, our data indicate that protection against diabetes upon caloric restriction and intermittent fasting associates with a modulation of lipid droplet protein composition and reduction of intracellular DAG species. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tue Bjerg Bennike

    2015-12-01

    In addition, we analyzed the proteome of human plasma, and compared the proteomes to the obtained porcine synovial fluid proteome. The proteome of the two body fluids were found highly similar, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. The healthy porcine synovial fluid proteomics data, human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid proteomics data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935.

  18. Combination of Multiple Spectral Libraries Improves the Current Search Methods Used to Identify Missing Proteins in the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jin-Young; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Kim, Kwang-Youl; Kwon, Kyung-Hoon; Yoo, Jong Shin; Omenn, Gilbert S; Baker, Mark S; Hancock, William S; Paik, Young-Ki

    2015-12-04

    Approximately 2.9 billion long base-pair human reference genome sequences are known to encode some 20 000 representative proteins. However, 3000 proteins, that is, ~15% of all proteins, have no or very weak proteomic evidence and are still missing. Missing proteins may be present in rare samples in very low abundance or be only temporarily expressed, causing problems in their detection and protein profiling. In particular, some technical limitations cause missing proteins to remain unassigned. For example, current mass spectrometry techniques have high limits and error rates for the detection of complex biological samples. An insufficient proteome coverage in a reference sequence database and spectral library also raises major issues. Thus, the development of a better strategy that results in greater sensitivity and accuracy in the search for missing proteins is necessary. To this end, we used a new strategy, which combines a reference spectral library search and a simulated spectral library search, to identify missing proteins. We built the human iRefSPL, which contains the original human reference spectral library and additional peptide sequence-spectrum match entries from other species. We also constructed the human simSPL, which contains the simulated spectra of 173 907 human tryptic peptides determined by MassAnalyzer (version 2.3.1). To prove the enhanced analytical performance of the combination of the human iRefSPL and simSPL methods for the identification of missing proteins, we attempted to reanalyze the placental tissue data set (PXD000754). The data from each experiment were analyzed using PeptideProphet, and the results were combined using iProphet. For the quality control, we applied the class-specific false-discovery rate filtering method. All of the results were filtered at a false-discovery rate of libraries, iRefSPL and simSPL, were designed to ensure no overlap of the proteome coverage. They were shown to be complementary to spectral library

  19. Plasma low-molecular-weight proteome profiling identified neuropeptide-Y as a prostate cancer biomarker polypeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Koji; Tatsuguchi, Ayako; Saichi, Naomi; Toyama, Atsuhiko; Tamura, Kenji; Furihata, Mutsuo; Takata, Ryo; Akamatsu, Shusuke; Igarashi, Masahiro; Nakayama, Masato; Sato, Taka-Aki; Ogawa, Osamu; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Shuin, Taro; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2013-10-04

    In prostate cancer diagnosis, PSA test has greatly contributed to the early detection of prostate cancer; however, expanding overdiagnosis and unnecessary biopsies have emerged as serious issues. To explore plasma biomarkers complementing the specificity of PSA test, we developed a unique proteomic technology QUEST-MS (Quick Enrichment of Small Targets for Mass Spectrometry). The QUEST-MS method based on 96-well formatted sequential reversed-phase chromatography allowing efficient enrichment of <20 kDa proteins quickly and reproducibly. Plasma from 24 healthy controls, 19 benign prostate hypertrophy patients, and 73 prostate cancer patients were purified with QUEST-MS and analyzed by LC/MS/MS. Among 153 057 nonredundant peptides, 189 peptides showed prostate cancer specific detection pattern, which included a neurotransmitter polypeptide neuropeptide-Y (NPY). We further validated the screening results by targeted multiple reaction monitoring technology using independent sample set (n = 110). The ROC curve analysis revealed that logistic regression-based combination of NPY, and PSA showed 81.5% sensitivity and 82.2% specificity for prostate cancer diagnosis. Thus QUEST-MS technology allowed comprehensive and high-throughput profiling of plasma polypeptides and had potential to effectively uncover very low abundant tumor-derived small molecules, such as neurotransmitters, peptide hormones, or cytokines.

  20. A strategy for interaction site prediction between phospho-binding modules and their partners identified from proteomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucher, Willy; Becker, Emmanuelle; Ma, Emilie; Miron, Simona; Martel, Arnaud; Ochsenbein, Françoise; Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude; Guerois, Raphaël

    2010-12-01

    Small and large scale proteomic technologies are providing a wealth of potential interactions between proteins bearing phospho-recognition modules and their substrates. Resulting interaction maps reveal such a dense network of interactions that the functional dissection and understanding of these networks often require to break specific interactions while keeping the rest intact. Here, we developed a computational strategy, called STRIP, to predict the precise interaction site involved in an interaction with a phospho-recognition module. The method was validated by a two-hybrid screen carried out using the ForkHead Associated (FHA)1 domain of Rad53, a key protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA checkpoint, as a bait. In this screen we detected 11 partners, including Cdc7 and Cdc45, essential components of the DNA replication machinery. FHA domains are phospho-threonine binding modules and the threonines involved in both interactions could be predicted using the STRIP strategy. The threonines T484 and T189 in Cdc7 and Cdc45, respectively, were mutated and loss of binding could be monitored experimentally with the full-length proteins. The method was further tested for the analysis of 63 known Rad53 binding partners and provided several key insights regarding the threonines likely involved in these interactions. The STRIP method relies on a combination of conservation, phosphorylation likelihood, and binding specificity criteria and can be accessed via a web interface at http://biodev.extra.cea.fr/strip/.

  1. A Strategy for Interaction Site Prediction between Phospho-binding Modules and their Partners Identified from Proteomic Data*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucher, Willy; Becker, Emmanuelle; Ma, Emilie; Miron, Simona; Martel, Arnaud; Ochsenbein, Françoise; Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude; Guerois, Raphaël

    2010-01-01

    Small and large scale proteomic technologies are providing a wealth of potential interactions between proteins bearing phospho-recognition modules and their substrates. Resulting interaction maps reveal such a dense network of interactions that the functional dissection and understanding of these networks often require to break specific interactions while keeping the rest intact. Here, we developed a computational strategy, called STRIP, to predict the precise interaction site involved in an interaction with a phospho-recognition module. The method was validated by a two-hybrid screen carried out using the ForkHead Associated (FHA)1 domain of Rad53, a key protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA checkpoint, as a bait. In this screen we detected 11 partners, including Cdc7 and Cdc45, essential components of the DNA replication machinery. FHA domains are phospho-threonine binding modules and the threonines involved in both interactions could be predicted using the STRIP strategy. The threonines T484 and T189 in Cdc7 and Cdc45, respectively, were mutated and loss of binding could be monitored experimentally with the full-length proteins. The method was further tested for the analysis of 63 known Rad53 binding partners and provided several key insights regarding the threonines likely involved in these interactions. The STRIP method relies on a combination of conservation, phosphorylation likelihood, and binding specificity criteria and can be accessed via a web interface at http://biodev.extra.cea.fr/strip/. PMID:20733106

  2. Identifying Virulence-Associated Genes Using Transcriptomic and Proteomic Association Analyses of the Plant Parasitic Nematode Bursaphelenchus mucronatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bursaphelenchus mucronatus (B. mucronatus isolates that originate from different regions may vary in their virulence, but their virulence-associated genes and proteins are poorly understood. Thus, we conducted an integrated study coupling RNA-Seq and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ to analyse transcriptomic and proteomic data of highly and weakly virulent B. mucronatus isolates during the pathogenic processes. Approximately 40,000 annotated unigenes and 5000 proteins were gained from the isolates. When we matched all of the proteins with their detected transcripts, a low correlation coefficient of r = 0.138 was found, indicating probable post-transcriptional gene regulation involved in the pathogenic processes. A functional analysis showed that five differentially expressed proteins which were all highly expressed in the highly virulent isolate were involved in the pathogenic processes of nematodes. Peroxiredoxin, fatty acid- and retinol-binding protein, and glutathione peroxidase relate to resistance against plant defence responses, while β-1,4-endoglucanase and expansin are associated with the breakdown of plant cell walls. Thus, the pathogenesis of B. mucronatus depends on its successful survival in host plants. Our work adds to the understanding of B. mucronatus’ pathogenesis, and will aid in controlling B. mucronatus and other pinewood nematode species complexes in the future.

  3. Fluvastatin mediated breast cancer cell death: a proteomic approach to identify differentially regulated proteins in MDA-MB-231 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anantha Koteswararao Kanugula

    Full Text Available Statins are increasingly being recognized as anti-cancer agents against various cancers including breast cancer. To understand the molecular pathways targeted by fluvastatin and its differential sensitivity against metastatic breast cancer cells, we analyzed protein alterations in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with fluvastatin using 2-DE in combination with LC-MS/MS. Results revealed dys-regulation of 39 protein spots corresponding to 35 different proteins. To determine the relevance of altered protein profiles with breast cancer cell death, we mapped these proteins to major pathways involved in the regulation of cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell cycle, Rho GDI and proteasomal pathways using IPA analysis. Highly interconnected sub networks showed that vimentin and ERK1/2 proteins play a central role in controlling the expression of altered proteins. Fluvastatin treatment caused proteolysis of vimentin, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. This effect of fluvastatin was reversed in the presence of mevalonate, a downstream product of HMG-CoA and caspase-3 inhibitor. Interestingly, fluvastatin neither caused an appreciable cell death nor did modulate vimentin expression in normal mammary epithelial cells. In conclusion, fluvastatin alters levels of cytoskeletal proteins, primarily targeting vimentin through increased caspase-3- mediated proteolysis, thereby suggesting a role for vimentin in statin-induced breast cancer cell death.

  4. Proteome analysis demonstrates profound alterations in human dendritic cell nature by TX527, an analogue of vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, G. B.; van Etten, E.; Lage, K.

    2009-01-01

    Structural analogues of vitamin D have been put forward as therapeutic agents able to exploit the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D, without its undesired calcemic side effects. We have demonstrated that TX527 affects dendritic cell (DC) maturation in vitro, resulting in the generation...... of a tolerogenic cell. In the present study, we aimed to explore the global protein changes induced by the analogue in immature DC (iDC) and mature human DC and to correlate them with alterations in DC morphology and function. Human CD14(+) monocytes were differentiated toward iDC or mature DCs, in the presence...

  5. Plasma membrane proteomics of human breast cancer cell lines identifies potential targets for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne S Ziegler

    Full Text Available The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease.

  6. Integration of Serum Protein Biomarker and Tumor Associated Autoantibody Expression Data Increases the Ability of a Blood-Based Proteomic Assay to Identify Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith C Henderson

    Full Text Available Despite significant advances in breast imaging, the ability to accurately detect Breast Cancer (BC remains a challenge. With the discovery of key biomarkers and protein signatures for BC, proteomic technologies are currently poised to serve as an ideal diagnostic adjunct to imaging. Research studies have shown that breast tumors are associated with systemic changes in levels of both serum protein biomarkers (SPB and tumor associated autoantibodies (TAAb. However, the independent contribution of SPB and TAAb expression data for identifying BC relative to a combinatorial SPB and TAAb approach has not been fully investigated. This study evaluates these contributions using a retrospective cohort of pre-biopsy serum samples with known clinical outcomes collected from a single site, thus minimizing potential site-to-site variation and enabling direct assessment of SPB and TAAb contributions to identify BC. All serum samples (n = 210 were collected prior to biopsy. These specimens were obtained from 18 participants with no evidence of breast disease (ND, 92 participants diagnosed with Benign Breast Disease (BBD and 100 participants diagnosed with BC, including DCIS. All BBD and BC diagnoses were based on pathology results from biopsy. Statistical models were developed to differentiate BC from non-BC (i.e., BBD and ND using expression data from SPB alone, TAAb alone, and a combination of SPB and TAAb. When SPB data was independently used for modeling, clinical sensitivity and specificity for detection of BC were 74.7% and 77.0%, respectively. When TAAb data was independently used, clinical sensitivity and specificity for detection of BC were 72.2% and 70.8%, respectively. When modeling integrated data from both SPB and TAAb, the clinical sensitivity and specificity for detection of BC improved to 81.0% and 78.8%, respectively. These data demonstrate the benefit of the integration of SPB and TAAb data and strongly support the further development of

  7. Proteomics mapping of cord blood identifies haptoglobin "switch-on" pattern as biomarker of early-onset neonatal sepsis in preterm newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhimschi, Catalin S; Bhandari, Vineet; Dulay, Antonette T; Nayeri, Unzila A; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya S; Pettker, Christian M; Thung, Stephen; Zhao, Guomao; Han, Yiping W; Bizzarro, Matthew; Buhimschi, Irina A

    2011-01-01

    Intra-amniotic infection and/or inflammation (IAI) are important causes of preterm birth and early-onset neonatal sepsis (EONS). A prompt and accurate diagnosis of EONS is critical for improved neonatal outcomes. We sought to explore the cord blood proteome and identify biomarkers and functional protein networks characterizing EONS in preterm newborns. We studied a prospective cohort of 180 premature newborns delivered May 2004-September 2009. A proteomics discovery phase employing two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry identified 19 differentially-expressed proteins in cord blood of newborns with culture-confirmed EONS (n = 3) versus GA-matched controls (n = 3). Ontological classifications of the proteins included transfer/carrier, immunity/defense, protease/extracellular matrix. The 1(st)-level external validation conducted in the remaining 174 samples confirmed elevated haptoglobin and haptoglobin-related protein immunoreactivity (Hp&HpRP) in newborns with EONS (presumed and culture-confirmed) independent of GA at birth and birthweight (PLCA) was further used for unbiased classification of all 180 cases based on probability of "antenatal IAI exposure" as latent variable. This was then subjected to 2(nd)-level validation against indicators of adverse short-term neonatal outcome. The optimal LCA algorithm combined Hp&HpRP switch pattern (most input), interleukin-6 and neonatal hematological indices yielding two non-overlapping newborn clusters with low (≤20%) versus high (≥70%) probability of IAI exposure. This approach reclassified ∼30% of clinical EONS diagnoses lowering the number needed to harm and increasing the odds ratios for several adverse outcomes including intra-ventricular hemorrhage. Antenatal exposure to IAI results in precocious switch-on of Hp&HpRP expression. As EONS biomarker, cord blood Hp&HpRP has potential to improve the selection of newborns for prompt and targeted treatment at birth.

  8. Proteomics Mapping of Cord Blood Identifies Haptoglobin “Switch-On” Pattern as Biomarker of Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis in Preterm Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhimschi, Catalin S.; Bhandari, Vineet; Dulay, Antonette T.; Nayeri, Unzila A.; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya S.; Pettker, Christian M.; Thung, Stephen; Zhao, Guomao; Han, Yiping W.; Bizzarro, Matthew; Buhimschi, Irina A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Intra-amniotic infection and/or inflammation (IAI) are important causes of preterm birth and early-onset neonatal sepsis (EONS). A prompt and accurate diagnosis of EONS is critical for improved neonatal outcomes. We sought to explore the cord blood proteome and identify biomarkers and functional protein networks characterizing EONS in preterm newborns. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied a prospective cohort of 180 premature newborns delivered May 2004-September 2009. A proteomics discovery phase employing two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry identified 19 differentially-expressed proteins in cord blood of newborns with culture-confirmed EONS (n = 3) versus GA-matched controls (n = 3). Ontological classifications of the proteins included transfer/carrier, immunity/defense, protease/extracellular matrix. The 1st-level external validation conducted in the remaining 174 samples confirmed elevated haptoglobin and haptoglobin-related protein immunoreactivity (Hp&HpRP) in newborns with EONS (presumed and culture-confirmed) independent of GA at birth and birthweight (PLCA) was further used for unbiased classification of all 180 cases based on probability of “antenatal IAI exposure” as latent variable. This was then subjected to 2nd-level validation against indicators of adverse short-term neonatal outcome. The optimal LCA algorithm combined Hp&HpRP switch pattern (most input), interleukin-6 and neonatal hematological indices yielding two non-overlapping newborn clusters with low (≤20%) versus high (≥70%) probability of IAI exposure. This approach reclassified ∼30% of clinical EONS diagnoses lowering the number needed to harm and increasing the odds ratios for several adverse outcomes including intra-ventricular hemorrhage. Conclusions/Significance Antenatal exposure to IAI results in precocious switch-on of Hp&HpRP expression. As EONS biomarker, cord blood Hp&HpRP has potential to improve the

  9. Upper airway alterations/abnormalities in a case series of obstructive sleep apnea patients identified with cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigeta, Y.; Shintaku, W.H.; Clark, G.T.; Enciso, R.; Ogawa, T.

    2007-01-01

    There are many factors that influence the configuration of the upper airway and may contribute to the development of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This paper presents a series of 12 consecutive OSA cases where various upper airway alteration/abnormalities were identified using 3D anatomic reconstructions generated from cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Some cases exhibited more than one type of abnormality and below we describe each of the six types identified with CBCT in this case series. (orig.)

  10. Upper airway alterations/abnormalities in a case series of obstructive sleep apnea patients identified with cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigeta, Y; Shintaku, W H; Clark, G T [Orofacial Pain/Oral Medicine Center, Div. of Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dentistry, Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Enciso, R [Div. of Craniofacial Sciences and Therapeutics, School of Dentistry, Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ogawa, T [Dept. of Fixed Prosthodontic Dentistry, Tsurumi Univ., School of Dental Medicine, Tsurumi (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    There are many factors that influence the configuration of the upper airway and may contribute to the development of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This paper presents a series of 12 consecutive OSA cases where various upper airway alteration/abnormalities were identified using 3D anatomic reconstructions generated from cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Some cases exhibited more than one type of abnormality and below we describe each of the six types identified with CBCT in this case series. (orig.)

  11. Preliminary analysis of proteome alterations in non-aneurysmal, internal mammary artery tissue from patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidholm, Christina Lund; Beck, Hans Christian; Madsen, Julie Bukh

    2018-01-01

    with AAA and 33 sex- and age-matched controls without AAA. Samples were selected from a biobank of leftover internal mammary arterial tissue gathered at coronary by-pass operations. Results We identified and quantitated 877 proteins, of which 44 were differentially expressed between the two groups (nominal...

  12. Monitoring CSF proteome alterations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: obstacles and perspectives in translating a novel marker panel to the clinic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils von Neuhoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal disorder of the motor neuron system with poor prognosis and marginal therapeutic options. Current clinical diagnostic criteria are based on electrophysiological examination and exclusion of other ALS-mimicking conditions. Neuroprotective treatments are, however, most promising in early disease stages. Identification of disease-specific CSF biomarkers and associated biochemical pathways is therefore most relevant to monitor disease progression, response to neuroprotective agents and to enable early inclusion of patients into clinical trials. METHODS AND FINDINGS: CSF from 35 patients with ALS diagnosed according to the revised El Escorial criteria and 23 age-matched controls was processed using paramagnetic bead chromatography for protein isolation and subsequently analyzed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. CSF protein profiles were integrated into a Random Forest model constructed from 153 mass peaks. After reducing this peak set to the top 25%, a classifier was built which enabled prediction of ALS with high accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Further analysis of the identified peptides resulted in a panel of five highly sensitive ALS biomarkers. Upregulation of secreted phosphoprotein 1 in ALS-CSF samples was confirmed by univariate analysis of ELISA and mass spectrometry data. Further quantitative validation of the five biomarkers was achieved in an 80-plex Multiple Reaction Monitoring mass spectrometry assay. CONCLUSIONS: ALS classification based on the CSF biomarker panel proposed in this study could become a valuable predictive tool for early clinical risk stratification. Of the numerous CSF proteins identified, many have putative roles in ALS-related metabolic processes, particularly in chromogranin-mediated secretion signaling pathways. While a stand-alone clinical application of this classifier will only be possible after further validation and a multicenter trial, it could be

  13. Gene expression analysis in human osteoblasts exposed to dexamethasone identifies altered developmental pathways as putative drivers of osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadlier Denise M

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoporosis, a disease of decreased bone mineral density represents a significant and growing burden in the western world. Aging population structure and therapeutic use of glucocorticoids have contributed in no small way to the increase in the incidence of this disease. Despite substantial investigative efforts over the last number of years the exact molecular mechanism underpinning the initiation and progression of osteoporosis remain to be elucidated. This has meant that no significant advances in therapeutic strategies have emerged, with joint replacement surgery being the mainstay of treatment. Methods In this study we have used an integrated genomics profiling and computational biology based strategy to identify the key osteoblast genes and gene clusters whose expression is altered in response to dexamethasone exposure. Primary human osteoblasts were exposed to dexamethasone in vitro and microarray based transcriptome profiling completed. Results These studies identified approximately 500 osteoblast genes whose expression was altered. Functional characterization of the transcriptome identified developmental networks as being reactivated with 106 development associated genes found to be differentially regulated. Pathway reconstruction revealed coordinate alteration of members of the WNT signaling pathway, including frizzled-2, frizzled-7, DKK1 and WNT5B, whose differential expression in this setting was confirmed by real time PCR. Conclusion The WNT pathway is a key regulator of skeletogenesis as well as differentiation of bone cells. Reactivation of this pathway may lead to altered osteoblast activity resulting in decreased bone mineral density, the pathological hallmark of osteoporosis. The data herein lend weight to the hypothesis that alterations in developmental pathways drive the initiation and progression of osteoporosis.

  14. Global Liver Proteome Analysis Using iTRAQ Reveals AMPK-mTOR-Autophagy Signaling Is Altered by Intrauterine Growth Restriction in Newborn Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Baisheng; Yin, Cong; Fan, Qiwen; Yan, Guokai; Wang, Zhichang; Li, Xiuzhi; Chen, Changqing; Yang, Xingya; Liu, Lu; Zheng, Zilong; Shi, Min; Yan, Xianghua

    2016-04-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) impairs fetal growth and development, perturbs nutrient metabolism, and increases the risk of developing diseases in postnatal life. However, the underlying mechanisms by which IUGR affects fetal liver development and metabolism remain incompletely understood. Here, we applied a high-throughput proteomics approach and biochemical analysis to investigate the impact of IUGR on the liver of newborn piglets. As a result, we identified 78 differentially expressed proteins in the three biological replicates, including 31 significantly up-regulated proteins and 47 significantly down-regulated proteins. Among them, a majority of differentially expressed proteins were related to nutrient metabolism and mitochondrial function. Additionally, many significantly down-regulated proteins participated in the mTOR signaling pathway and the phagosome maturation signaling pathway. Further analysis suggested that glucose concentration and hepatic glycogen storage were both reduced in IUGR newborn piglets, which may contribute to AMPK activation and mTORC1 inhibition. However, AMPK activation and mTORC1 inhibition failed to induce autophagy in the liver of IUGR neonatal pigs. A possible reason is that PP2Ac, a potential candidate in autophagy regulation, is significantly down-regulated in the liver of IUGR newborn piglets. These findings may provide implications for preventing and treating IUGR in human beings and domestic animals.

  15. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Functional Molecules in Drug Resistance Caused by E-Cadherin Knockdown in 3D-Cultured Colorectal Cancer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    of human MCF10A cells. Proteomics 2011, 11 (10), 2019−26. (23) Siu, S. O.; Lam , M. P.; Lau , E.; Kong, R. P.; Lee, S. M.; Chu, I. K. Fully automatable...signaling. J. Proteome Res. 2011, 10 (12), 5383−97. (17) Kettenbach, A. N .; Gerber, S. A. Rapid and reproducible single- stage phosphopeptide enrichment of...McGowan, T.; Bandhakavi, S.; Cheng, B.; Rhodus, N . L.; Griffin, T. J. Large-scale phosphoproteomics Journal of Proteome Research Article dx.doi.org

  16. Research Resource: A Dual Proteomic Approach Identifies Regulated Islet Proteins During β-Cell Mass Expansion In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Signe; Kirkegaard, Jeannette S.; Hoelper, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    to be up regulated as a response to pregnancy. These included several proteins, not previously associated with pregnancy-induced islet expansion, such as CLIC1, STMN1, MCM6, PPIB, NEDD4, and HLTF. Confirming the validity of our approach, we also identified proteins encoded by genes known to be associated...

  17. Quantitative proteomics identifies central players in erlotinib resistance of the non-small cell lung cancer cell line HCC827

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirstine; Lund, Rikke Raaen; Beck, Hans Christian

    Background: Erlotinib (Tarceva®, Roche) has significantly changed the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as 70% of patients show significant tumor regression when treated. However, all patients relapse due to development of acquired resistance, which in 43-50% of cases are caused...... by a secondary mutation (T790M) in EGFR. Importantly, a majority of resistance cases are still unexplained. Our aim is to identify novel resistance mechanisms in erlotinib-resistant subclones of the NSCLC cell line HCC827. Materials & Methods: We established 3 erlotinib-resistant subclones (resistant to 10, 20...... or other EGFR or KRAS mutations, potentiating the identification of novel resistance mechanisms. We identified 2875 cytoplasmic proteins present in all 4 cell lines. Of these 87, 56 and 23 are upregulated >1.5 fold; and 117, 72 and 32 are downregulated >1.5 fold, respectively, in the 3 resistant clones...

  18. Proteomic profiling of pretreatment serum from HIV-infected patients identifies candidate markers predictive of lymphoma development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vase, Maja Ølholm; Ludvigsen, Maja; Bendix, Knud

    2016-01-01

    . Differentially expressed proteins were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A tissue microarray, containing diagnostic HIV-lymphoma tissue samples (N = 40), was used to investigate immunohistochemical expression of markers in tumoural lesions. RESULTS: Fourteen differentially expressed...... protein spots were detected. Using principal components analysis, spots containing immunoglobulin J chain, apolipoprotein A-I, procollagen C-endopeptidase enhancer-1 and complement C4-A were associated with lymphoma development (P ... with subsequent lymphoma compared with patients without subsequent lymphoma. In the tissue microarray, amyloid A was widely expressed, and high expression showed a tendency towards inferior outcome (log-rank 0.073). CONCLUSION: We identified several differentially expressed protein spots present already...

  19. IL-1beta induced protein changes in diabetes prone BB rat islets of Langerhans identified by proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, T; Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Mose Larsen, P

    2002-01-01

    of 82 out of 1 815 protein spots detected by two dimensional gel electrophoresis in IL-1beta exposed diabetes prone Bio Breeding (BB-DP) rat islets of Langerhans in vitro. The aim of this study was to identify the proteins in these 82 spots by mass spectrometry and compare these changes with those seen......Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus is characterized by selective destruction of the insulin producing beta cells. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) modulates the beta-cell function, protein synthesis, energy production and causes apoptosis. We have previously shown changes in the expression...

  20. Proteomic profiling of mammary carcinomas identifies C7orf24, a gamma-glutamyl cyclotransferase, as a potential cancer biomarker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Friis, Esbern

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women today and is the most common cancer (excluding skin cancers) among women in the Western world. Although cancers detected by screening mammography are significantly smaller than nonscreening ones, noninvasive biomarkers for detection......, and a novel protein, C7orf24, was identified as being upregulated in cancer cells. Protein expression levels of C7orf24 were evaluated by immunohistochemical assays to qualify deregulation of this protein. Analysis of C7orf24 expression showed up-regulation in 36.4 and 23.4% of cases present in the discovery...

  1. Clinical proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Frederiksen, Hanne; Johannsen, Trine Holm

    2018-01-01

    Clinical proteomics aims to deliver cost-effective multiplexing of potentially hundreds of diagnostic proteins, including distinct protein isoforms. The analytical strategy known as targeted proteomics is particularly promising because it is compatible with robust mass spectrometry (MS)-platforms...... standards and calibrants. The present challenge is to examine if targeted proteomics of IGF-I can truly measure up to the routine performance that must be expected from a clinical testing platform.......Clinical proteomics aims to deliver cost-effective multiplexing of potentially hundreds of diagnostic proteins, including distinct protein isoforms. The analytical strategy known as targeted proteomics is particularly promising because it is compatible with robust mass spectrometry (MS......)-platforms already implemented in many clinical laboratories for routine quantitation of small molecules (i.e. uHPLC coupled to triple-quadrupole MS). Progress in targeted proteomics of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) have provided valuable insights about tryptic peptides, transitions, internal...

  2. A Biotin Switch-Based Proteomics Approach Identifies 14-3-3ζ as a Target of Sirt1 in the Metabolic Regulation of Caspase-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Joshua L.; Thompson, J. Will; Lindblom, Kelly R.; Johnson, Erika S.; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Lilley, Lauren R.; Freel, Christopher D.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Kornbluth, Sally

    2011-01-01

    While lysine acetylation in the nucleus is well characterized, comparatively little is known about its significance in cytoplasmic signaling. Here we show that inhibition of the Sirt1 deacetylase, which is primarily cytoplasmic in cancer cell lines, sensitizes these cells to caspase-2-dependent death. To identify relevant Sirt1 substrates, we developed a novel proteomics strategy, enabling the identification of a range of putative substrates, including 14-3-3ζ, a known direct regulator of caspase-2. We show here that inhibition of Sirtuin activity accelerates caspase activation and overrides caspase-2 suppression by nutrient abundance. Furthermore, 14-3-3ζ is acetylated prior to caspase activation, and supplementation of Xenopus egg extract with glucose-6-phosphate, which promotes caspase-2/14-3-3ζ binding, enhances 14-3-3ζ-directed Sirtuin activity. Conversely, inhibiting Sirtuin activity promotes 14-3-3ζ dissociation from caspase-2 in both egg extract and human cell lines. These data reveal a role for Sirt1 in modulating apoptotic sensitivity, in response to metabolic changes, by antagonizing 14-3-3ζ acetylation. PMID:21884983

  3. Quantitative proteomics identifies Gemin5, a scaffolding protein involved in ribonucleoprotein assembly, as a novel partner for eukaryotic initiation factor 4E

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fierro-Monti, Ivo; Mohammed, Shabaz; Matthiesen, Rune

    2006-01-01

    Protein complexes are dynamic entities; identification and quantitation of their components is critical in elucidating functional roles under specific cellular conditions. We report the first quantitative proteomic analysis of the human cap-binding protein complex. Components and proteins......-starved tumorigenic human mesenchymal stromal cells, attested to their activated translational states. The WD-repeat, scaffolding-protein Gemin5 was identified as a novel eIF4E binding partner, which interacted directly with eIF4E through a motif (YXXXXLPhi) present in a number of eIF4E-interacting partners. Elevated...... levels of Gemin5:eIF4E complexes were found in phorbol ester treated HEK293 cells. Gemin5 and eIF4E co-localized to cytoplasmic P-bodies in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells. Interaction between eIF4E and Gemin5 and their co-localization to the P-bodies, may serve to recruit capped mRNAs to these RNP...

  4. AbMiner: A bioinformatic resource on available monoclonal antibodies and corresponding gene identifiers for genomic, proteomic, and immunologic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankavaram Uma

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monoclonal antibodies are used extensively throughout the biomedical sciences for detection of antigens, either in vitro or in vivo. We, for example, have used them for quantitation of proteins on "reverse-phase" protein lysate arrays. For those studies, we quality-controlled > 600 available monoclonal antibodies and also needed to develop precise information on the genes that encode their antigens. Translation among the various protein and gene identifier types proved non-trivial because of one-to-many and many-to-one relationships. To organize the antibody, protein, and gene information, we initially developed a relational database in Filemaker for our own use. When it became apparent that the information would be useful to many other researchers faced with the need to choose or characterize antibodies, we developed it further as AbMiner, a fully relational web-based database under MySQL, programmed in Java. Description AbMiner is a user-friendly, web-based relational database of information on > 600 commercially available antibodies that we validated by Western blot for protein microarray studies. It includes many types of information on the antibody, the immunogen, the vendor, the antigen, and the antigen's gene. Multiple gene and protein identifier types provide links to corresponding entries in a variety of other public databases, including resources for phosphorylation-specific antibodies. AbMiner also includes our quality-control data against a pool of 60 diverse cancer cell types (the NCI-60 and also protein expression levels for the NCI-60 cells measured using our high-density "reverse-phase" protein lysate microarrays for a selection of the listed antibodies. Some other available database resources give information on antibody specificity for one or a couple of cell types. In contrast, the data in AbMiner indicate specificity with respect to the antigens in a pool of 60 diverse cell types from nine different

  5. AbMiner: a bioinformatic resource on available monoclonal antibodies and corresponding gene identifiers for genomic, proteomic, and immunologic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Sylvia M; Nishizuka, Satoshi; Morita, Daisaku; Rowland, Rick; Sunshine, Margot; Shankavaram, Uma; Washburn, Frank; Asin, Daniel; Kouros-Mehr, Hosein; Kane, David; Weinstein, John N

    2006-04-06

    Monoclonal antibodies are used extensively throughout the biomedical sciences for detection of antigens, either in vitro or in vivo. We, for example, have used them for quantitation of proteins on "reverse-phase" protein lysate arrays. For those studies, we quality-controlled > 600 available monoclonal antibodies and also needed to develop precise information on the genes that encode their antigens. Translation among the various protein and gene identifier types proved non-trivial because of one-to-many and many-to-one relationships. To organize the antibody, protein, and gene information, we initially developed a relational database in Filemaker for our own use. When it became apparent that the information would be useful to many other researchers faced with the need to choose or characterize antibodies, we developed it further as AbMiner, a fully relational web-based database under MySQL, programmed in Java. AbMiner is a user-friendly, web-based relational database of information on > 600 commercially available antibodies that we validated by Western blot for protein microarray studies. It includes many types of information on the antibody, the immunogen, the vendor, the antigen, and the antigen's gene. Multiple gene and protein identifier types provide links to corresponding entries in a variety of other public databases, including resources for phosphorylation-specific antibodies. AbMiner also includes our quality-control data against a pool of 60 diverse cancer cell types (the NCI-60) and also protein expression levels for the NCI-60 cells measured using our high-density "reverse-phase" protein lysate microarrays for a selection of the listed antibodies. Some other available database resources give information on antibody specificity for one or a couple of cell types. In contrast, the data in AbMiner indicate specificity with respect to the antigens in a pool of 60 diverse cell types from nine different tissues of origin. AbMiner is a relational database that

  6. The Proteome of Primary Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias-Gato, Diego; Wikström, Pernilla; Tyanova, Stefka

    2016-01-01

    for disease aggressiveness. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Mass spectrometry was used for genome-scale quantitative proteomic profiling of 28 prostate tumors (Gleason score 6-9) and neighboring nonmalignant tissue in eight cases, obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostatectomy samples. Two...... changes occurring during prostate cancer (PCa) initiation and progression can result in clinically relevant discoveries. OBJECTIVES: To study cellular processes altered in PCa using system-wide quantitative analysis of changes in protein expression in clinical samples and to identify prognostic biomarkers......BACKGROUND: Clinical management of the prostate needs improved prognostic tests and treatment strategies. Because proteins are the ultimate effectors of most cellular reactions, are targets for drug actions and constitute potential biomarkers; a quantitative systemic overview of the proteome...

  7. Proteomics in studying cancer stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranenburg, Onno; Emmink, Benjamin L; Knol, Jaco; van Houdt, Winan J; Rinkes, Inne H M Borel; Jimenez, Connie R

    2012-06-01

    Normal multipotent tissue stem cells (SCs) are the driving force behind tissue turnover and repair. The cancer stem cell theory holds that tumors also contain stem-like cells that drive tumor growth and metastasis formation. However, very little is known about the regulation of SC maintenance pathways in cancer and how these are affected by cancer-specific genetic alterations and by treatment. Proteomics is emerging as a powerful tool to identify the signaling complexes and pathways that control multi- and pluri-potency and SC differentiation. Here, the authors review the novel insights that these studies have provided and present a comprehensive strategy for the use of proteomics in studying cancer SC biology.

  8. PathScore: a web tool for identifying altered pathways in cancer data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Stephen G; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2016-12-01

    PathScore quantifies the level of enrichment of somatic mutations within curated pathways, applying a novel approach that identifies pathways enriched across patients. The application provides several user-friendly, interactive graphic interfaces for data exploration, including tools for comparing pathway effect sizes, significance, gene-set overlap and enrichment differences between projects. Web application available at pathscore.publichealth.yale.edu. Site implemented in Python and MySQL, with all major browsers supported. Source code available at: github.com/sggaffney/pathscore with a GPLv3 license. stephen.gaffney@yale.edu. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A fractionation method to identify qauntitative changes in protein expression mediated by IGF-1 on the proteome of murine C2C12 myoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedmann Theodore

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although much is known about signal transduction downstream of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, relatively little is known about the global changes in protein expression induced by this hormone. In this study, the acute effects of IGF-1 on the proteome of murine C2C12 cells were examined. Cells were treated with IGF-1 for up to 24 hours, lysed, and fractionated into cytosolic, nuclear, and insoluble portions. Proteins from the cytosolic fraction were further separated using a new batch ion-exchange chromatography method to reduce sample complexity, followed by two-dimensional (2D electrophoresis, and identification of selected proteins by mass spectrometry. PDQuest software was utilized to identify and catalogue temporal changes in protein expression during IGF-1 stimulation. In response to IGF-1 stimulation, expression of 23 proteins increased at least three-fold and expression of 17 proteins decreased at least three-fold compared with control un-stimulated C2C12 cells. Changes in expression of selected proteins from each group, including Rho-GDI, cofillin, RAD50, enolase, IκB kinase b (IκBKb and Hsp70 were confirmed by Western blotting. Additionally, the position of 136 'landmark' proteins whose expression levels and physicochemical properties did not change appreciably or consistently during IGF-1 treatment were mapped and identified. This characterization of large-scale changes in protein expression in response to growth factor stimulation of C2C12 cells will further help to establish a comprehensive understanding of the networks and pathways involved in the action of IGF-1.

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ppGpp-deficient mutant to identify a novel virulence protein required for intracellular survival in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumagai Yoshinori

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The global ppGpp-mediated stringent response in pathogenic bacteria plays an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium, several genes, including virulence genes, are regulated by ppGpp when bacteria are under the stringent response. To understand the control of virulence genes by ppGpp in S. Typhimurium, agarose 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE combined with mass spectrometry was used and a comprehensive 2-DE reference map of amino acid-starved S. Typhimurium strain SH100, a derivative of ATCC 14028, was established. Results Of the 366 examined spots, 269 proteins were successfully identified. The comparative analysis of the wild-type and ppGpp0 mutant strains revealed 55 proteins, the expression patterns of which were affected by ppGpp. Using a mouse infection model, we further identified a novel virulence-associated factor, STM3169, from the ppGpp-regulated and Salmonella-specific proteins. In addition, Salmonella strains carrying mutations in the gene encoding STM3169 showed growth defects and impaired growth within macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, we found that expression of stm3169 was controlled by ppGpp and SsrB, a response regulator of the two-component system located on Salmonella pathogenicity island 2. Conclusions A proteomic approach using a 2-DE reference map can prove a powerful tool for analyzing virulence factors and the regulatory network involved in Salmonella pathogenesis. Our results also provide evidence of a global response mediated by ppGpp in S. enterica.

  11. Detection of ROS Induced Proteomic Signatures by Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian McDonagh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Reversible and irreversible post-translational modifications (PTMs induced by endogenously generated reactive oxygen species (ROS in regulatory enzymes and proteins plays an essential role in cellular signaling. Almost all cellular processes including metabolism, transcription, translation and degradation have been identified as containing redox regulated proteins. Specific redox modifications of key amino acids generated by ROS offers a dynamic and versatile means to rapidly alter the activity or functional structure of proteins in response to biochemical, environmental, genetic and pathological perturbations. How the proteome responds to these stimuli is of critical importance in oxidant physiology, as it can regulate the cell stress response by reversible and irreversible PTMs, affecting protein activity and protein-protein interactions. Due to the highly labile nature of many ROS species, applying redox proteomics can provide a signature footprint of the ROS species generated. Ideally redox proteomic approaches would allow; (1 the identification of the specific PTM, (2 identification of the amino acid residue that is modified and (3 the percentage of the protein containing the PTM. New developments in MS offer the opportunity of a more sensitive targeted proteomic approach and retrospective data analysis. Subsequent bioinformatics analysis can provide an insight into the biochemical and physiological pathways or cell signaling cascades that are affected by ROS generation. This mini-review will detail current redox proteomic approaches to identify and quantify ROS induced PTMs and the subsequent effects on cellular signaling.

  12. Quantitative proteomics of heavy metal exposure in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals alterations in one-carbon metabolism enzymes upon exposure to zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, Bronwyn J; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Miranda-Vergara, María Cristina; Pantoja, Omar

    2014-12-05

    Plant zinc (Zn) homeostasis must be tightly regulated as the requirement for this micronutrient necessitates its uptake. However, excessive Zn can lead to toxicity and the plant must respond rapidly and effectively within its capacity to minimize damage. To detect mechanisms that may be important for coping with excess Zn we carried out a quantitative proteomics approach using 2D-DIGE to identify Zn-responsive proteins in microsomal fractions from leaves of 4day, 200μM Zn-treated, Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Of the eight proteins which showed significant changes in abundance in the Zn-treated samples and which met all of the selection criteria following statistical analysis, six were successfully identified by LC-MS/MS with 2 or more unique peptides. Three of the proteins were found to be involved in the one-carbon metabolism pathway; including glycine decarboxylase P protein, serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) and methionine synthase, all of which showed reduced abundance in the Zn-treated samples. Western blot analysis confirmed the decrease in SHMT, while changes in metal tolerance protein indicated plants were most likely actively sequestering Zn. Interestingly, excess Zn led to increased petiole length, a phenotype which may reflect the reduced levels of methionine, a key product of the one-carbon metabolism pathway. Metal contamination is becoming an increasingly common environmental problem. High levels of zinc can be found in certain soils naturally or as a result of long-term anthropogenic activity which leads to its accumulation; i.e. use of fertilizers or industrial waste. The study of metal tolerant plants, particularly those classified as hyperaccumulators has been driven by the potential use of these plants for bioremediation purposes. However, the effects of heavy metal exposure on sensitive plants and the different cellular processes that are affected have received significantly less attention. We are interested in identifying proteins in A

  13. Altered endoribonuclease activity of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 variants identified in the human population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Cheol Kim

    Full Text Available Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1 is the major mammalian enzyme in the DNA base excision repair pathway and cleaves the DNA phosphodiester backbone immediately 5' to abasic sites. APE1 also has 3'-5' DNA exonuclease and 3' DNA phosphodiesterase activities, and regulates transcription factor DNA binding through its redox regulatory function. The human APE1 has recently been shown to endonucleolytically cleave single-stranded regions of RNA. Towards understanding the biological significance of the endoribonuclease activity of APE1, we examined eight different amino acid substitution variants of APE1 previously identified in the human population. Our study shows that six APE1 variants, D148E, Q51H, I64V, G241R, R237A, and G306A, exhibit a 76-85% reduction in endoribonuclease activity against a specific coding region of the c-myc RNA, yet fully retain the ability to cleave apurinic/apyrimidinic DNA. We found that two APE1 variants, L104R and E126D, exhibit a unique RNase inhibitor-resistant endoribonuclease activity, where the proteins cleave c-myc RNA 3' of specific single-stranded guanosine residues. Expression of L104R and E126D APE1 variants in bacterial Origami cells leads to a 60-80% reduction in colony formation and a 1.5-fold increase in cell doubling time, whereas the other variants, which exhibit diminished endoribonuclease activity, had no effect. These data indicate that two human APE1 variants exhibit a unique endoribonuclease activity, which correlates with their ability to induce cytotoxicity or slow down growth in bacterial cells and supports the notion of their biological functionality.

  14. Structural health monitoring (vibration) as a tool for identifying structural alterations of the lumbar spine: a twin control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawchuk, Gregory N; Hartvigsen, Jan; Edgecombe, Tiffany; Prasad, Narasimha; van Dieen, Jaap H

    2016-03-11

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an engineering technique used to identify mechanical abnormalities not readily apparent through other means. Recently, SHM has been adapted for use in biological systems, but its invasive nature limits its clinical application. As such, the purpose of this project was to determine if a non-invasive form of SHM could identify structural alterations in the spines of living human subjects. Lumbar spines of 10 twin pairs were visualized by magnetic resonance imaging then assessed by a blinded radiologist to determine whether twin pairs were structurally concordant or discordant. Vibration was then applied to each subject's spine and the resulting response recorded from sensors overlying lumbar spinous processes. The peak frequency, area under the curve and the root mean square were computed from the frequency response function of each sensor. Statistical analysis demonstrated that in twins whose structural appearance was discordant, peak frequency was significantly different between twin pairs while in concordant twins, no outcomes were significantly different. From these results, we conclude that structural changes within the spine can alter its vibration response. As such, further investigation of SHM to identify spinal abnormalities in larger human populations is warranted.

  15. Hemorheological alterations in adults with prediabetes identified by hemoglobin A1c levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, M A; Fiorentino, T V; Andreozzi, F; Mannino, G C; Succurro, E; Sciacqua, A; Perticone, F; Sesti, G

    2017-07-01

    A link between increased blood viscosity and type 2 diabetes has been previously reported. Herein, we investigated the association of blood viscosity with prediabetes, identified by glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) according to the new American Diabetes Association criteria, and subclinical atherosclerosis. The study cohort includes 1136 non-diabetic adults submitted to anthropometrical evaluation, an oral glucose tolerance test and ultrasound measurement of carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Whole blood viscosity was estimated using a validated formula based on hematocrit and total plasma proteins. After adjusting for age, and gender, individuals with HbA1c-defined prediabetes (HbA1c 5.7-6.4% [39-47 mmol/mol]) exhibited significantly higher values of hematocrit, and predicted blood viscosity as compared with controls. Increased levels of IMT were observed in subjects with HbA1c-defined prediabetes in comparison to controls. Predicted blood viscosity was positively correlated with age, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, fibrinogen, white blood cell, HbA1c, fasting and 2-h post-load glucose levels, fasting insulin, IMT and inversely correlated with HDL and Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity. Of the three glycemic parameters, i.e. HbA1c, fasting and 2-h post-load glucose, only HbA1c showed a significant correlation with predicted blood viscosity (β = 0.054, P = 0.04) in a multivariate regression analysis model including multiple atherosclerosis risk factors. The study shows that individuals with HbA1c-defined prediabetes have increased predicted blood viscosity and IMT. The HbA1c criterion may be helpful to capture individuals with an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease who may benefit from an intensive lifestyle intervention. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical

  16. A proteomics approach to the identification of biomarkers for psoriasis utilising keratome biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James C; Scheipers, Peter; Schwämmle, Veit

    2013-01-01

    a quantitative proteomics screen of four patients with psoriasis using stable isotope dimethyl labelling and identified over 50 proteins consistently altered in abundance in psoriasis lesional versus non-lesional skin. This includes several canonical psoriasis related proteins (e.g. S100A7 [Psoriasin] and FABP5...

  17. DNA Repair Alterations in Children With Pediatric Malignancies: Novel Opportunities to Identify Patients at Risk for High-Grade Toxicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Fricke, Andreas; Schneider, Ruth; Simon, Karin; Kuehne, Martin; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Graeber, Stefan; Graf, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a pilot study, the phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci approach for identifying patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: The DSB repair capacity of children with solid cancers was analyzed compared with that of age-matched control children and correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses (n = 47). Double-strand break repair was investigated by counting γH2AX foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after irradiation of blood samples. Results: Whereas all healthy control children exhibited proficient DSB repair, 3 children with tumors revealed clearly impaired DSB repair capacities, and 2 of these repair-deficient children developed life-threatening or even lethal normal-tissue toxicities. The underlying mutations affecting regulatory factors involved in DNA repair pathways were identified. Moreover, significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity were observed between children with tumors and control children, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DSB repair function. Conclusions: Double-strand break repair alteration in children may predispose to cancer formation and may affect children's susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. Phosphorylated H2AX analysis of blood samples allows one to detect DSB repair deficiencies and thus enables identification of children at risk for high-grade toxicities.

  18. Proteomic analysis identifies MMP-9, DJ-1 and A1BG as overexpressed proteins in pancreatic juice from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Mei; Cui, Ya-Zhou; Song, Guan-Hua; Zong, Mei-Juan; Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Yu; Han, Jin-Xiang

    2008-01-01

    There is an urgent need to discover more sensitive and specific biomarkers to improve early diagnosis and screen high-risk patients for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Pancreatic juice is an ideal specimen for PDAC biomarkers discovery, because it is an exceptionally rich source of proteins released from pancreatic cancer cells. To identify novel potential biomarkers for PDAC from pancreatic juice, we carried out difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to compare the pancreatic juice profiling from 9 PDAC patients and 9 cancer-free controls. Of the identified differently expressed proteins, three up-regulated proteins in pancreatic cancer juice, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), oncogene DJ1 (DJ-1) and alpha-1B-glycoprotein precursor (A1BG), were selected for validation by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Serum MMP-9 levels were also detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Fourteen proteins were up-regulated and ten proteins were down-regulated in cancerous pancreatic juice compared with cancer-free controls. Increased MMP-9, DJ-1 and A1BG expression in cancerous pancreatic juice were confirmed by Western blot. Immunohistochemical study showed MMP-9, DJ-1 and A1BG positively expressed in 82.4%, 72.5% and 86.3% of pancreatic cancer tissues, significantly higher than that in normal pancreas tissues. Up-regulation of DJ-1 was associated with better differentiation (p < 0.05). Serum MMP-9 levels were significantly higher in PDAC (255.14 ng/ml) than those in chronic pancreatitis (210.22 ng/ml, p = 0.009) and healthy control (203.77 ng/ml, p = 0.027). The present proteome analysis revealed MMP-9, DJ-1 and A1BG proteins as elevated in pancreatic juice from PDAC, which suggest their further utility in PDAC diagnosis and screening. This is the first time A1BG was identified as a potential biomarker in pancreatic cancer associated samples. The measurement of serum MMP-9 might be clinically useful for PDAC

  19. Genome Wide Association Mapping in Arabidopsis thaliana Identifies Novel Genes Involved in Linking Allyl Glucosinolate to Altered Biomass and Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Marta; Joseph, Bindu; Caligagan, Hart; Li, Baohua; Corwin, Jason A; Lin, Catherine; Kerwin, Rachel E; Burow, Meike; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    A key limitation in modern biology is the ability to rapidly identify genes underlying newly identified complex phenotypes. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have become an increasingly important approach for dissecting natural variation by associating phenotypes with genotypes at a genome wide level. Recent work is showing that the Arabidopsis thaliana defense metabolite, allyl glucosinolate (GSL), may provide direct feedback regulation, linking defense metabolism outputs to the growth, and defense responses of the plant. However, there is still a need to identify genes that underlie this process. To start developing a deeper understanding of the mechanism(s) that modulate the ability of exogenous allyl GSL to alter growth and defense, we measured changes in plant biomass and defense metabolites in a collection of natural 96 A. thaliana accessions fed with 50 μM of allyl GSL. Exogenous allyl GSL was introduced exclusively to the roots and the compound transported to the leaf leading to a wide range of heritable effects upon plant biomass and endogenous GSL accumulation. Using natural variation we conducted GWAS to identify a number of new genes which potentially control allyl responses in various plant processes. This is one of the first instances in which this approach has been successfully utilized to begin dissecting a novel phenotype to the underlying molecular/polygenic basis.

  20. Genome wide association mapping in Arabidopsis thaliana identifies novel genes involved in linking allyl glucosinolate to altered biomass and defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Francisco

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A key limitation in modern biology is the ability to rapidly identify genes underlying newly identified complex phenotypes. Genome wide association studies (GWAS have become an increasingly important approach for dissecting natural variation by associating phenotypes with genotypes at a genome wide level. Recent work is showing that the Arabidopsis thaliana defense metabolite, allyl glucosinolate (GSL, may provide direct feedback regulation, linking defense metabolism outputs to the growth and defense responses of the plant. However, there is still a need to identify genes that underlie this process. To start developing a deeper understanding of the mechanism(s that modulate the ability of exogenous allyl GSL to alter growth and defense, we measured changes in plant biomass and defense metabolites in a collection of natural 96 A. thaliana accessions fed with 50 µM of allyl GSL. Exogenous allyl GSL was introduced exclusively to the roots and the compound transported to the leaf leading to a wide range of heritable effects upon plant biomass and endogenous GSL accumulation. Using natural variation we conducted GWAS to identify a number of new genes which potentially control allyl responses in various plant processes. This is one of the first instances in which this approach has been successfully utilized to begin dissecting a novel phenotype to the underlying molecular/polygenic basis.

  1. Annotating N termini for the human proteome project: N termini and Nα-acetylation status differentiate stable cleaved protein species from degradation remnants in the human erythrocyte proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Philipp F; Huesgen, Pitter F; Nguyen, Karen; Overall, Christopher M

    2014-04-04

    A goal of the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project is to identify all human protein species. With 3844 proteins annotated as "missing", this is challenging. Moreover, proteolytic processing generates new protein species with characteristic neo-N termini that are frequently accompanied by altered half-lives, function, interactions, and location. Enucleated and largely void of internal membranes and organelles, erythrocytes are simple yet proteomically challenging cells due to the high hemoglobin content and wide dynamic range of protein concentrations that impedes protein identification. Using the N-terminomics procedure TAILS, we identified 1369 human erythrocyte natural and neo-N-termini and 1234 proteins. Multiple semitryptic N-terminal peptides exhibited improved mass spectrometric identification properties versus the intact tryptic peptide enabling identification of 281 novel erythrocyte proteins and six missing proteins identified for the first time in the human proteome. With an improved bioinformatics workflow, we developed a new classification system and the Terminus Cluster Score. Thereby we described a new stabilizing N-end rule for processed protein termini, which discriminates novel protein species from degradation remnants, and identified protein domain hot spots susceptible to cleavage. Strikingly, 68% of the N-termini were within genome-encoded protein sequences, revealing alternative translation initiation sites, pervasive endoproteolytic processing, and stabilization of protein fragments in vivo. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange with the data set identifier .

  2. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-05-13

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed.

  3. Plant plasma membrane proteomics for improving cold tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke eTakahashi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants are always exposed to various stresses. We have focused on freezing stress, which causes serious problems for agricultural management. When plants suffer freeze-induced damage, the plasma membrane is thought to be the primary site of injury because of its central role in regulation of various cellular processes. Cold tolerant species, however, adapt to such freezing conditions by modifying cellular components and functions (cold acclimation. One of the most important adaptation mechanisms to freezing is alteration of plasma membrane compositions and functions. Advanced proteomic technologies have succeeded in identification of many candidates that may play roles in adaptation of the plasma membrane to freezing stress. Proteomics results suggest that adaptations of plasma membrane functions to low temperature are associated with alterations of protein compositions during cold acclimation. Some of proteins identified by proteomic approaches have been verified their functional roles in freezing tolerance mechanisms further. Thus, accumulation of proteomic results in the plasma membrane is of importance for application to molecular breeding efforts to increase cold tolerance in crops.

  4. Proteomic analysis of human bladder epithelial cells by 2D blue native SDS-PAGE reveals TCDD-induced alterations of calcium and iron homeostasis possibly mediated by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Nisha; Pink, Mario; Petrat, Frank; Rettenmeier, Albert W; Schmitz-Spanke, Simone

    2015-01-02

    A proteomic analysis of the interaction among multiprotein complexes involved in 2,3,7,8-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-mediated toxicity in urinary bladder epithelial RT4 cells was performed using two-dimensional blue native SDS-PAGE (2D BN/SDS-PAGE). To enrich the protein complexes, unexposed and TCDD-exposed cells were fractionated. BN/SDS-PAGE of the resulting fractions led to an effective separation of proteins and protein complexes of various origins, including cell membrane, mitochondria, and other intracellular compartments. Major differences between the proteome of control and exposed cells involved the alteration of many calcium-regulated proteins (calmodulin, protein S100-A2, annexin A5, annexin A10, gelsolin isoform b) and iron-regulated proteins (ferritin, heme-binding protein 2, transferrin). On the basis of these findings, the intracellular calcium concentration was determined, revealing a significant increase after 24 h of exposure to TCDD. Moreover, the concentration of the labile iron pool (LIP) was also significantly elevated in TCDD-exposed cells. This increase was strongly inhibited by the calmodulin (CaM) antagonist W-7, which pointed toward a possible interaction between iron and calcium signaling. Because nitric oxide (NO) production was significantly enhanced in TCDD-exposed cells and was also inhibited by W-7, we hypothesize that alterations in calcium and iron homeostasis upon exposure to TCDD may be linked through NO generated by CaM-activated nitric oxide synthase. In our model, we propose that NO produced upon TCDD exposure interacts with the iron centers of iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs) that modulate the alteration of ferritin and transferrin, resulting in an augmented cellular LIP and, hence, increased toxicity.

  5. Chromosome 17 alterations identify good-risk and poor-risk tumors independently of clinical factors in medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Martin G.; Bäcklund, L. Magnus; Leong, Hui Sun; Ichimura, Koichi; Collins, V. Peter

    2011-01-01

    Current risk stratification schemas for medulloblastoma, based on combinations of clinical variables and histotype, fail to accurately identify particularly good- and poor-risk tumors. Attempts have been made to improve discriminatory power by combining clinical variables with cytogenetic data. We report here a pooled analysis of all previous reports of chromosomal copy number related to survival data in medulloblastoma. We collated data from previous reports that explicitly quoted survival data and chromosomal copy number in medulloblastoma. We analyzed the relative prognostic significance of currently used clinical risk stratifiers and the chromosomal aberrations previously reported to correlate with survival. In the pooled dataset metastatic disease, incomplete tumor resection and severe anaplasia were associated with poor outcome, while young age at presentation was not prognostically significant. Of the chromosomal variables studied, isolated 17p loss and gain of 1q correlated with poor survival. Gain of 17q without associated loss of 17p showed a trend to improved outcome. The most commonly reported alteration, isodicentric chromosome 17, was not prognostically significant. Sequential multivariate models identified isolated 17p loss, isolated 17q gain, and 1q gain as independent prognostic factors. In a historical dataset, we have identified isolated 17p loss as a marker of poor outcome and 17q gain as a novel putative marker of good prognosis. Biological markers of poor-risk and good-risk tumors will be critical in stratifying treatment in future trials. Our findings should be prospectively validated independently in future clinical studies. PMID:21292688

  6. Use of epitope libraries to identify exon-specific monoclonal antibodies for characterization of altered dystrophins in muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen thi Man; Morris, G.E. (North East Wales Inst., Clwyd (United Kingdom))

    1993-06-01

    The majority of mutations in Xp21-linked muscular dystrophy (MD) can be identified by PCR or Southern blotting, as deletions or duplications of groups of exons in the dystrophin gene, but it is not always possible to predict how much altered dystrophin, if any, will be produced. Use of exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on muscle biopsies from MD patients can, in principle, provide information on both the amount of altered dystrophin produced and, when dystrophin is present, the nature of the genetic deletion or point mutation. For this purpose, mAbs which recognize regions of dystrophin encoded by known exons and whose binding is unaffected by the absence of adjacent exons are required. To map mAbs to specific exons, random [open quotes]libraries[close quotes] of expressed dystrophin fragments were created by cloning DNAseI digestion fragments of a 4.3-kb dystrophin cDNA into a pTEX expression vector. The libraries were then used to locate the epitopes recognized by 48 mAbs to fragments of 25--60 amino acids within the 1,434-amino-acid dystrophin fragment used to produce the antibodies. This is sufficiently detailed to allow further refinement by using synthetic peptides and, in many cases, to identify the exon in the DMD (Duchenne MD) gene which encodes the epitope. To illustrate their use in dystrophin analysis, a Duchenne patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 42 and 43 makes a truncated dystrophin encoded by exons 1--41, and the authors now show that this can be detected in the sarcolemma by mAbs up to and including those specific for exon 41 epitopes but not by mAbs specific for exon 43 or later epitopes. 38 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Proteomics - new analytical approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, W.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Recent developments in the sequencing of the human genome have indicated that the number of coding gene sequences may be as few as 30,000. It is clear, however, that the complexity of the human species is dependent on the much greater diversity of the corresponding protein complement. Estimates of the diversity (discrete protein species) of the human proteome range from 200,000 to 300,000 at the lower end to 2,000,000 to 3,000,000 at the high end. In addition, proteomics (the study of the protein complement to the genome) has been subdivided into two main approaches. Global proteomics refers to a high throughput examination of the full protein set present in a cell under a given environmental condition. Focused proteomics refers to a more detailed study of a restricted set of proteins that are related to a specified biochemical pathway or subcellular structure. While many of the advances in proteomics will be based on the sequencing of the human genome, de novo characterization of protein microheterogeneity (glycosylation, phosphorylation and sulfation as well as the incorporation of lipid components) will be required in disease studies. To characterize these modifications it is necessary to digest the protein mixture with an enzyme to produce the corresponding mixture of peptides. In a process analogous to sequencing of the genome, shot-gun sequencing of the proteome is based on the characterization of the key fragments produced by such a digest. Thus, a glycopeptide and hence a specific glycosylation motif will be identified by a unique mass and then a diagnostic MS/MS spectrum. Mass spectrometry will be the preferred detector in these applications because of the unparalleled information content provided by one or more dimensions of mass measurement. In addition, highly efficient separation processes are an absolute requirement for advanced proteomic studies. For example, a combination of the orthogonal approaches, HPLC and HPCE, can be very powerful

  8. System-Level and Granger Network Analysis of Integrated Proteomic and Metabolomic Dynamics Identifies Key Points of Grape Berry Development at the Interface of Primary and Secondary Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lei; Sun, Xiaoliang; Weiszmann, Jakob; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    Grapevine is a fruit crop with worldwide economic importance. The grape berry undergoes complex biochemical changes from fruit set until ripening. This ripening process and production processes define the wine quality. Thus, a thorough understanding of berry ripening is crucial for the prediction of wine quality. For a systemic analysis of grape berry development we applied mass spectrometry based platforms to analyse the metabolome and proteome of Early Campbell at 12 stages covering major d...

  9. Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ)-Based Untargeted Quantitative Proteomic Approach To Identify Change of the Plasma Proteins by Salbutamol Abuse in Beef Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Tang, Chaohua; Liang, Xiaowei; Zhao, Qingyu; Zhang, Junmin

    2018-01-10

    Salbutamol, a selective β 2 -agonist, endangers the safety of animal products as a result of illegal use in food animals. In this study, an iTRAQ-based untargeted quantitative proteomic approach was applied to screen potential protein biomarkers in plasma of cattle before and after treatment with salbutamol for 21 days. A total of 62 plasma proteins were significantly affected by salbutamol treatment, which can be used as potential biomarkers to screen for the illegal use of salbutamol in beef cattle. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay measurements of five selected proteins demonstrated the reliability of iTRAQ-based proteomics in screening of candidate biomarkers among the plasma proteins. The plasma samples collected before and after salbutamol treatment were well-separated by principal component analysis (PCA) using the differentially expressed proteins. These results suggested that an iTRAQ-based untargeted quantitative proteomic strategy combined with PCA pattern recognition methods can discriminate differences in plasma protein profiles collected before and after salbutamol treatment.

  10. Proteomic approaches for the study of tissue specific effects of 3,5,3’-triiodo-L-thyronine and 3,5-diiodo-L-thyronine in conditions of altered energy metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eSilvestri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrates and, specifically, in mammals, energy homeostasis is achieved by the integration of metabolic and neuroendocrine signals linked to one another in an intricate network hierarchically responding to the tight modulating action of hormones among which thyroid hormones (THs play a central role. At the cellular level, 3,5,3’-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3 acts mainly by binding to specific nuclear receptors (TRs but actually it is becoming more and more evident that some T3- actions are independent of TRs and that other iodothyronines, such as 3,5-diiodo-L-thyronine (T2, affect energy metabolism and adiposity. In the postgenomic era, clinical and basic biological researches are increasingly benefiting from the recently developed new omics approaches including, among the others, proteomics. Considering the recognized value of proteins as excellent targets in physiology, the functional and simultaneous analysis of the expression level and the cellular localization of multiple proteins can actually be considered fundamental in the understanding of complex mechanisms such as those involved in thyroid control of metabolism. Here, we will discuss new leads (i.e. target proteins and metabolic pathways emerging in applying proteomics to the actions of T3 and T2 in conditions of altered energy metabolism in animal tissues having a central role in the control of energy balance.

  11. Albumin Homodimers in Patients with Cirrhosis: Clinical and Prognostic Relevance of a Novel Identified Structural Alteration of the Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarre, Maurizio; Domenicali, Marco; Naldi, Marina; Laggetta, Maristella; Giannone, Ferdinando A; Biselli, Maurizio; Patrono, Daniela; Bertucci, Carlo; Bernardi, Mauro; Caraceni, Paolo

    2016-10-26

    Decompensated cirrhosis is associated to extensive post-transcriptional changes of human albumin (HA). This study aims to characterize the occurrence of HA homodimerization in a large cohort of patients with decompensated cirrhosis and to evaluate its association with clinical features and prognosis. HA monomeric and dimeric isoforms were identified in peripheral blood by using a HPLC-ESI-MS technique in 123 cirrhotic patients hospitalized for acute decompensation and 50 age- and sex-comparable healthy controls. Clinical and biochemical parameters were recorded and patients followed up to one year. Among the monomeric isoforms identified, the N- and C-terminal truncated and the native HA underwent homodimerization. All three homodimers were significantly more abundant in patients with cirrhosis, acute-on-chronic liver failure and correlate with the prognostic scores. The homodimeric N-terminal truncated isoform was independently associated to disease complications and was able to stratify 1-year survival. As a result of all these changes, the monomeric native HA was significantly decreased in patients with cirrhosis, being also associated with a poorer prognosis. In conclusion homodimerization is a novel described structural alteration of the HA molecule in decompensated cirrhosis and contributes to the progressive reduction of the monomeric native HA, the only isoform provided of structural and functional integrity.

  12. Targeted sequencing identifies genetic alterations that confer primary resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (Korean Lung Cancer Consortium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sun Min; Kim, Hye Ryun; Cho, Eun Kyung; Min, Young Joo; Ahn, Jin Seok; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Cho, Byoung Chul; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Jeong, Hye Cheol; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Joo-Hang

    2016-06-14

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations may exhibit primary resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). We aimed to examine genomic alterations associated with de novo resistance to gefitinib in a prospective study of NSCLC patients. One-hundred and fifty two patients with activating EGFR mutations were included in this study and 136 patients' tumor sample were available for targeted sequencing of genomic alterations in 22 genes using the Colon and Lung Cancer panel (Ampliseq, Life Technologies). All 132 patients with EGFR mutation were treated with gefitinib for their treatment of advanced NSCLC. Twenty patients showed primary resistance to EGFR TKI, and were classified as non-responders. A total of 543 somatic single-nucleotide variants (498 missense, 13 nonsense) and 32 frameshift insertions/deletions, with a median of 3 mutations per sample. TP53 was most commonly mutated (47%) and mutations in SMAD4 was also common (19%), as well as DDR2 (16%), PIK3CA (15%), STK11 (14%), and BRAF (7%). Genomic mutations in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway were commonly found in non-responders (45%) compared to responders (27%), and they had significantly shorter progression-free survival and overall survival compared to patients without mutations (2.1 vs. 12.8 months, P=0.04, 15.7 vs. not reached, PAkt/mTOR pathway were commonly identified in non-responders and may confer resistance to EGFR TKI. Screening lung adenocarcinoma patients with clinical cancer gene test may aid in selecting out those who show primary resistance to EGFR TKI (NCT01697163).

  13. Redox proteomic analysis of the gastrocnemius muscle from adult and old mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian McDonagh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The data provides information in support of the research article, “Differential Cysteine Labeling and Global Label-Free Proteomics Reveals an Altered Metabolic State in Skeletal Muscle Aging”, Journal of Proteome Research, 2014, 13 (11, 2008–21 [1]. Raw data is available from ProteomeXchange [2] with identifier PDX001054. The proteome of gastrocnemius muscle from adult and old mice was analyzed by global label-free proteomics and the relative quantification of specific reduced and reversibly oxidized Cysteine (Cys residues was performed using Skyline [3]. Briefly, reduced Cysteine (Cys containing peptides was alkylated using N-ethylmalemide (d0-NEM. Samples were desalted and reversibly oxidized Cys residues were reduced using tris(2-carboxyethylphosphine (TCEP and the newly formed reduced Cys residues were labeled with heavy NEM( d5-NEM. Label-free analysis of the global proteome of adult (n=5 and old (n=4 gastrocnemius muscles was performed using Peaks7™ mass spectrometry data analysis software [4]. Relative quantification of Cys containing peptides that were identified as reduced (d(0 NEM labeled and reversibly oxidized d(5–NEM labeled was performed using the intensity of their precursor ions in Skyline. Results indicate that muscles from old mice show reduced redox flexibility particularly in proteins involved in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy metabolism, indicating a loss in the flexibility of the redox energy response.

  14. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Fifth People' s Hospital of Shanghai, School of Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Zhao, Libo [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Third People' s Hospital of Chongqing, 400014 (China); Yang, Yongtao [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Bode, Liv [Bornavirus Research Group affiliated to the Free University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Huang, Hua [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Liu, Chengyu [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Huang, Rongzhong [Department of Rehabilitative Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400010 (China); Zhang, Liang [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  15. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xia; Zhao, Libo; Yang, Yongtao; Bode, Liv; Huang, Hua; Liu, Chengyu; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs

  16. Quantitative Non-canonical Amino Acid Tagging (QuaNCAT) Proteomics Identifies Distinct Patterns of Protein Synthesis Rapidly Induced by Hypertrophic Agents in Cardiomyocytes, Revealing New Aspects of Metabolic Remodeling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Kenney, Justin W.; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Johnston, Harvey E.; Kamei, Makoto; Woelk, Christopher H.; Xie, Jianling; Schwarzer, Michael; Proud, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes undergo growth and remodeling in response to specific pathological or physiological conditions. In the former, myocardial growth is a risk factor for cardiac failure and faster protein synthesis is a major factor driving cardiomyocyte growth. Our goal was to quantify the rapid effects of different pro-hypertrophic stimuli on the synthesis of specific proteins in ARVC and to determine whether such effects are caused by alterations on mRNA abundance or the translation of specific mRNAs. Cardiomyocytes have very low rates of protein synthesis, posing a challenging problem in terms of studying changes in the synthesis of specific proteins, which also applies to other nondividing primary cells. To study the rates of accumulation of specific proteins in these cells, we developed an optimized version of the Quantitative Noncanonical Amino acid Tagging LC/MS proteomic method to label and selectively enrich newly synthesized proteins in these primary cells while eliminating the suppressive effects of pre-existing and highly abundant nonisotope-tagged polypeptides. Our data revealed that a classical pathologic (phenylephrine; PE) and the recently identified insulin stimulus that also contributes to the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy (insulin), both increased the synthesis of proteins involved in, e.g. glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and beta-oxidation, and sarcomeric components. However, insulin increased synthesis of many metabolic enzymes to a greater extent than PE. Using a novel validation method, we confirmed that synthesis of selected candidates is indeed up-regulated by PE and insulin. Synthesis of all proteins studied was up-regulated by signaling through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 without changes in their mRNA levels, showing the key importance of translational control in the rapid effects of hypertrophic stimuli. Expression of PKM2 was up-regulated in rat hearts following TAC. This isoform possesses specific regulatory

  17. Proteomic analysis revealed the altered tear protein profile in a rabbit model of Sjögren's syndrome-associated dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Wei, Ruihua; Zhao, Ping; Koh, Siew Kwan; Beuerman, Roger W; Ding, Chuanqing

    2013-08-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease that results in pathological dryness of mouth and eye. The diagnosis of SS depends on both clinical evaluation and specific antibodies. The goal of this study was to use quantitative proteomics to investigate changes in tear proteins in a rabbit model of SS-associated dry eye, induced autoimmune dacryoadenitis (IAD). Proteomic analysis was performed by iTRAQ and nano LC-MS/MS on tears collected from the ocular surface, and specific proteins were verified by high resolution MRM. It was found that in the tears of IAD rabbits at 2 and 4 weeks after induction, S100 A6, S100 A9, and serum albumin were upregulated, whereas serotransferrin (TF), prolactin-inducible protein (PIP), polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), and Ig gamma chain C region were downregulated. High resolution MRM with mTRAQ labeling verified the changes in S100 A6, TF, PIP, and pIgR. Our results indicated significant changes of tear proteins in IAD rabbits, suggesting these proteins could potentially be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of dry eye. Several of these proteins were also found in the tears of non-SS dry eye patients indicating a common basis of ocular surface pathology, however, pIgR appears to be unique to SS. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. System-Level and Granger Network Analysis of Integrated Proteomic and Metabolomic Dynamics Identifies Key Points of Grape Berry Development at the Interface of Primary and Secondary Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Grapevine is a fruit crop with worldwide economic importance. The grape berry undergoes complex biochemical changes from fruit set until ripening. This ripening process and production processes define the wine quality. Thus, a thorough understanding of berry ripening is crucial for the prediction of wine quality. For a systemic analysis of grape berry development we applied mass spectrometry based platforms to analyse the metabolome and proteome of Early Campbell at 12 stages covering major developmental phases. Primary metabolites involved in central carbon metabolism, such as sugars, organic acids and amino acids together with various bioactive secondary metabolites like flavonols, flavan-3-ols and anthocyanins were annotated and quantified. At the same time, the proteomic analysis revealed the protein dynamics of the developing grape berries. Multivariate statistical analysis of the integrated metabolomic and proteomic dataset revealed the growth trajectory and corresponding metabolites and proteins contributing most to the specific developmental process. K-means clustering analysis revealed 12 highly specific clusters of co-regulated metabolites and proteins. Granger causality network analysis allowed for the identification of time-shift correlations between metabolite-metabolite, protein- protein and protein-metabolite pairs which is especially interesting for the understanding of developmental processes. The integration of metabolite and protein dynamics with their corresponding biochemical pathways revealed an energy-linked metabolism before veraison with high abundances of amino acids and accumulation of organic acids, followed by protein and secondary metabolite synthesis. Anthocyanins were strongly accumulated after veraison whereas other flavonoids were in higher abundance at early developmental stages and decreased during the grape berry developmental processes. A comparison of the anthocyanin profile of Early Campbell to other

  19. System-Level and Granger Network Analysis of Integrated Proteomic and Metabolomic Dynamics Identifies Key Points of Grape Berry Development at the Interface of Primary and Secondary Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Sun, Xiaoliang; Weiszmann, Jakob; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    Grapevine is a fruit crop with worldwide economic importance. The grape berry undergoes complex biochemical changes from fruit set until ripening. This ripening process and production processes define the wine quality. Thus, a thorough understanding of berry ripening is crucial for the prediction of wine quality. For a systemic analysis of grape berry development we applied mass spectrometry based platforms to analyse the metabolome and proteome of Early Campbell at 12 stages covering major developmental phases. Primary metabolites involved in central carbon metabolism, such as sugars, organic acids and amino acids together with various bioactive secondary metabolites like flavonols, flavan-3-ols and anthocyanins were annotated and quantified. At the same time, the proteomic analysis revealed the protein dynamics of the developing grape berries. Multivariate statistical analysis of the integrated metabolomic and proteomic dataset revealed the growth trajectory and corresponding metabolites and proteins contributing most to the specific developmental process. K-means clustering analysis revealed 12 highly specific clusters of co-regulated metabolites and proteins. Granger causality network analysis allowed for the identification of time-shift correlations between metabolite-metabolite, protein- protein and protein-metabolite pairs which is especially interesting for the understanding of developmental processes. The integration of metabolite and protein dynamics with their corresponding biochemical pathways revealed an energy-linked metabolism before veraison with high abundances of amino acids and accumulation of organic acids, followed by protein and secondary metabolite synthesis. Anthocyanins were strongly accumulated after veraison whereas other flavonoids were in higher abundance at early developmental stages and decreased during the grape berry developmental processes. A comparison of the anthocyanin profile of Early Campbell to other cultivars revealed

  20. Proteomics and pathway analysis identifies JNK signaling as critical for high linear energy transfer radiation-induced apoptosis in non-small lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhl, Sara; Fung, Eva; Adams, Christopher; Lengqvist, Johan; Mörk, Birgitta; Stenerlöw, Bo; Lewensohn, Rolf; Lehtiö, Janne; Zubarev, Roman; Viktorsson, Kristina

    2009-05-01

    During the past decade, we have witnessed an explosive increase in generation of large proteomics data sets, not least in cancer research. There is a growing need to extract and correctly interpret information from such data sets to generate biologically relevant hypotheses. A pathway search engine (PSE) has recently been developed as a novel tool intended to meet these requirements. Ionizing radiation (IR) is an anticancer treatment modality that triggers multiple signal transduction networks. In this work, we show that high linear energy transfer (LET) IR induces apoptosis in a non-small cell lung cancer cell line, U-1810, whereas low LET IR does not. PSE was applied to study changes in pathway status between high and low LET IR to find pathway candidates of importance for high LET-induced apoptosis. Such pathways are potential clinical targets, and they were further validated in vitro. We used an unsupervised shotgun proteomics approach where high resolution mass spectrometry coupled to nanoflow liquid chromatography determined the identity and relative abundance of expressed proteins. Based on the proteomics data, PSE suggested the JNK pathway (p = 6.10(-6)) as a key event in response to high LET IR. In addition, the Fas pathway was found to be activated (p = 3.10(-5)) and the p38 pathway was found to be deactivated (p = 0.001) compared with untreated cells. Antibody-based analyses confirmed that high LET IR caused an increase in phosphorylation of JNK. Moreover pharmacological inhibition of JNK blocked high LET-induced apoptotic signaling. In contrast, neither an activation of p38 nor a role for p38 in high LET IR-induced apoptotic signaling was found. We conclude that, in contrast to conventional low LET IR, high LET IR can trigger activation of the JNK pathway, which in turn is critical for induction of apoptosis in these cells. Thus PSE predictions were largely confirmed, and PSE was proven to be a useful hypothesis-generating tool.

  1. Recently Identified Mutations in the Ebola Virus-Makona Genome Do Not Alter Pathogenicity in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Marzi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Ebola virus (EBOV, isolate Makona, the causative agent of the West African EBOV epidemic, has been the subject of numerous investigations to determine the genetic diversity and its potential implication for virus biology, pathogenicity, and transmissibility. Despite various mutations that have emerged over time through multiple human-to-human transmission chains, their biological relevance remains questionable. Recently, mutations in the glycoprotein GP and polymerase L, which emerged and stabilized early during the outbreak, have been associated with improved viral fitness in cell culture. Here, we infected mice and rhesus macaques with EBOV-Makona isolates carrying or lacking those mutations. Surprisingly, all isolates behaved very similarly independent of the genotype, causing severe or lethal disease in mice and macaques, respectively. Likewise, we could not detect any evidence for differences in virus shedding. Thus, no specific biological phenotype could be associated with these EBOV-Makona mutations in two animal models. : Marzi et al. demonstrate that recently identified mutations in the EBOV-Makona genome, which appeared during the West African epidemic, do not significantly alter pathogenicity in IFNAR−/− mice and rhesus macaques. Other factors may have been more important for increased case numbers, case fatalities, and human-to-human transmission during this unprecedented epidemic. Keywords: Ebola virus, Ebola Makona, glycoprotein GP, polymerase L, GP mutation A82V, L mutation D759G, West African epidemic, pathogenicity

  2. A structured proteomic approach identifies 14-3-3Sigma as a novel and reliable protein biomarker in panel based differential diagnostics of liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Henning; Pütter, Carolin; Megger, Dominik A; Bracht, Thilo; Weber, Frank; Hoffmann, Andreas-C; Bertram, Stefanie; Wohlschläger, Jeremias; Hagemann, Sascha; Eisenacher, Martin; Scherag, André; Schlaak, Jörg F; Canbay, Ali; Meyer, Helmut E; Sitek, Barbara; Baba, Hideo A

    2015-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major lethal cancer worldwide. Despite sophisticated diagnostic algorithms, the differential diagnosis of small liver nodules still is difficult. While imaging techniques have advanced, adjuvant protein-biomarkers as glypican3 (GPC3), glutamine-synthetase (GS) and heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) have enhanced diagnostic accuracy. The aim was to further detect useful protein-biomarkers of HCC with a structured systematic approach using differential proteome techniques, bring the results to practical application and compare the diagnostic accuracy of the candidates with the established biomarkers. After label-free and gel-based proteomics (n=18 HCC/corresponding non-tumorous liver tissue (NTLT)) biomarker candidates were tested for diagnostic accuracy in immunohistochemical analyses (n=14 HCC/NTLT). Suitable candidates were further tested for consistency in comparison to known protein-biomarkers in HCC (n=78), hepatocellular adenoma (n=25; HCA), focal nodular hyperplasia (n=28; FNH) and cirrhosis (n=28). Of all protein-biomarkers, 14-3-3Sigma (14-3-3S) exhibited the most pronounced up-regulation (58.8×) in proteomics and superior diagnostic accuracy (73.0%) in the differentiation of HCC from non-tumorous hepatocytes also compared to established biomarkers as GPC3 (64.7%) and GS (45.4%). 14-3-3S was part of the best diagnostic three-biomarker panel (GPC3, HSP70, 14-3-3S) for the differentiation of HCC and HCA which is of most important significance. Exclusion of GS and inclusion of 14-3-3S in the panel (>1 marker positive) resulted in a profound increase in specificity (+44.0%) and accuracy (+11.0%) while sensitivity remained stable (96.0%). 14-3-3S is an interesting protein biomarker with the potential to further improve the accuracy of differential diagnostic process of hepatocellular tumors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteomics of Maize Root Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochholdinger, Frank; Marcon, Caroline; Baldauf, Jutta A; Yu, Peng; Frey, Felix P

    2018-01-01

    Maize forms a complex root system with structurally and functionally diverse root types that are formed at different developmental stages to extract water and mineral nutrients from soil. In recent years proteomics has been intensively applied to identify proteins involved in shaping the three-dimensional architecture and regulating the function of the maize root system. With the help of developmental mutants, proteomic changes during the initiation and emergence of shoot-borne, lateral and seminal roots have been examined. Furthermore, root hairs were surveyed to understand the proteomic changes during the elongation of these single cell type structures. In addition, primary roots have been used to study developmental changes of the proteome but also to investigate the proteomes of distinct tissues such as the meristematic zone, the elongation zone as well as stele and cortex of the differentiation zone. Moreover, subcellular fractions of the primary root including cell walls, plasma membranes and secreted mucilage have been analyzed. Finally, the superior vigor of hybrid seedling roots compared to their parental inbred lines was studied on the proteome level. In summary, these studies provide novel insights into the complex proteomic interactions of the elaborate maize root system during development.

  4. Proteomics of Maize Root Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Hochholdinger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Maize forms a complex root system with structurally and functionally diverse root types that are formed at different developmental stages to extract water and mineral nutrients from soil. In recent years proteomics has been intensively applied to identify proteins involved in shaping the three-dimensional architecture and regulating the function of the maize root system. With the help of developmental mutants, proteomic changes during the initiation and emergence of shoot-borne, lateral and seminal roots have been examined. Furthermore, root hairs were surveyed to understand the proteomic changes during the elongation of these single cell type structures. In addition, primary roots have been used to study developmental changes of the proteome but also to investigate the proteomes of distinct tissues such as the meristematic zone, the elongation zone as well as stele and cortex of the differentiation zone. Moreover, subcellular fractions of the primary root including cell walls, plasma membranes and secreted mucilage have been analyzed. Finally, the superior vigor of hybrid seedling roots compared to their parental inbred lines was studied on the proteome level. In summary, these studies provide novel insights into the complex proteomic interactions of the elaborate maize root system during development.

  5. Arabidopsis peroxisome proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Bussell

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The analytical depth of investigation of the peroxisomal proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has not yet reached that of other major cellular organelles such as chloroplasts or mitochondria. This is primarily due to the difficulties associated with isolating and obtaining purified samples of peroxisomes from Arabidopsis. So far only a handful of research groups have been successful in obtaining such fractions. To make things worse, enriched peroxisome fractions frequently suffer from significant organellar contamination, lowering confidence in localization assignment of the identified proteins. As with other cellular compartments, identification of peroxisomal proteins forms the basis for investigations of the dynamics of the peroxisomal proteome. It is therefore not surprising that, in terms of functional analyses by proteomic means, there remains a considerable gap between peroxisomes and chloroplasts or mitochondria. Alternative strategies are needed to overcome the obstacle of hard-to-obtain organellar fractions. This will help to close the knowledge gap between peroxisomes and other organelles and provide a full picture of the physiological pathways shared between organelles. In this review we briefly summarize the status quo and discuss some of the methodological alternatives to classic organelle proteomic approaches.

  6. Genomes to Proteomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panisko, Ellen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Daly, Don S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baker, Scott E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  7. Extensive proteomic screening identifies the obesity-related NYGGF4 protein as a novel LRP1-interactor, showing reduced expression in early Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taddei Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 (LRP1 has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD but its signalling has not been fully evaluated. There is good evidence that the cytoplasmic domain of LRP1 is involved in protein-protein interactions, important in the cell biology of LRP1. Results We carried out three yeast two-hybrid screens to identify proteins that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of LRP1. The screens included both conventional screens as well as a novel, split-ubiquitin-based screen in which an LRP1 construct was expressed and screened as a transmembrane protein. The split-ubiquitin screen was validated in a screen using full-length amyloid protein precursor (APP, which successfully identified FE65 and FE65L2, as well as novel interactors (Rab3a, Napg, and ubiquitin b. Using both a conventional screen as well as the split-ubiquitin screen, we identified NYGGF4 as a novel LRP1 interactor. The interaction between LRP1 and NYGGF4 was validated using two-hybrid assays, coprecipitation and colocalization in mammalian cells. Mutation analysis demonstrated a specific interaction of NYGGF4 with an NPXY motif that required an intact tyrosine residue. Interestingly, while we confirmed that other LRP1 interactors we identified, including JIP1B and EB-1, were also able to bind to APP, NYGGF4 was unique in that it showed specific binding with LRP1. Expression of NYGGF4 decreased significantly in patients with AD as compared to age-matched controls, and showed decreasing expression with AD disease progression. Examination of Nyggf4 expression in mice with different alleles of the human APOE4 gene showed significant differences in Nyggf4 expression. Conclusions These results implicate NYGGF4 as a novel and specific interactor of LRP1. Decreased expression of LRP1 and NYGGF4 over disease, evident with the presence of even moderate numbers of neuritic plaques, suggests that LRP1-NYGGF4 is a system altered

  8. Differential proteome analysis of chikungunya virus infection on host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Li-Ping Thio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused multiple unprecedented and re-emerging outbreaks in both tropical and temperate countries. Despite ongoing research efforts, the underlying factors involved in facilitating CHIKV replication during early infection remains ill-characterized. The present study serves to identify host proteins modulated in response to early CHIKV infection using a proteomics approach. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The whole cell proteome profiles of CHIKV-infected and mock control WRL-68 cells were compared and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE. Fifty-three spots were found to be differentially modulated and 50 were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. Eight were significantly up-regulated and 42 were down-regulated. The mRNA expressions of 15 genes were also found to correlate with the corresponding protein expression. STRING network analysis identified several biological processes to be affected, including mRNA processing, translation, energy production and cellular metabolism, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP and cell cycle regulation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study constitutes a first attempt to investigate alteration of the host cellular proteome during early CHIKV infection. Our proteomics data showed that during early infection, CHIKV affected the expression of proteins that are involved in mRNA processing, host metabolic machinery, UPP, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 regulation (in favour of virus survival, replication and transmission. While results from this study complement the proteomics results obtained from previous late host response studies, functional characterization of these proteins is warranted to reinforce our understanding of their roles during early CHIKV infection in humans.

  9. Integrative Analysis of Hippocampus Gene Expression Profiles Identifies Network Alterations in Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Lanke

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder contributing to rapid decline in cognitive function and ultimately dementia. Most cases of AD occur in elderly and later years. There is a growing need for understanding the relationship between aging and AD to identify shared and unique hallmarks associated with the disease in a region and cell-type specific manner. Although genomic studies on AD have been performed extensively, the molecular mechanism of disease progression is still not clear. The major objective of our study is to obtain a higher-order network-level understanding of aging and AD, and their relationship using the hippocampal gene expression profiles of young (20–50 years, aging (70–99 years, and AD (70–99 years. The hippocampus is vulnerable to damage at early stages of AD and altered neurogenesis in the hippocampus is linked to the onset of AD. We combined the weighted gene co-expression network and weighted protein–protein interaction network-level approaches to study the transition from young to aging to AD. The network analysis revealed the organization of co-expression network into functional modules that are cell-type specific in aging and AD. We found that modules associated with astrocytes, endothelial cells and microglial cells are upregulated and significantly correlate with both aging and AD. The modules associated with neurons, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum are downregulated and significantly correlate with AD than aging. The oligodendrocytes module does not show significant correlation with neither aging nor disease. Further, we identified aging- and AD-specific interactions/subnetworks by integrating the gene expression with a human protein–protein interaction network. We found dysregulation of genes encoding protein kinases (FYN, SYK, SRC, PKC, MAPK1, ephrin receptors and transcription factors (FOS, STAT3, CEBPB, MYC, NFKβ, and EGR1 in AD. Further, we found genes that encode proteins

  10. Proteomics and Pathway Analysis Identifies JNK Signaling as Critical for High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation-induced Apoptosis in Non-small Lung Cancer Cells*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhl, Sara; Fung, Eva; Adams, Christopher; Lengqvist, Johan; Mörk, Birgitta; Stenerlöw, Bo; Lewensohn, Rolf; Lehtiö, Janne; Zubarev, Roman; Viktorsson, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    During the past decade, we have witnessed an explosive increase in generation of large proteomics data sets, not least in cancer research. There is a growing need to extract and correctly interpret information from such data sets to generate biologically relevant hypotheses. A pathway search engine (PSE) has recently been developed as a novel tool intended to meet these requirements. Ionizing radiation (IR) is an anticancer treatment modality that triggers multiple signal transduction networks. In this work, we show that high linear energy transfer (LET) IR induces apoptosis in a non-small cell lung cancer cell line, U-1810, whereas low LET IR does not. PSE was applied to study changes in pathway status between high and low LET IR to find pathway candidates of importance for high LET-induced apoptosis. Such pathways are potential clinical targets, and they were further validated in vitro. We used an unsupervised shotgun proteomics approach where high resolution mass spectrometry coupled to nanoflow liquid chromatography determined the identity and relative abundance of expressed proteins. Based on the proteomics data, PSE suggested the JNK pathway (p = 6·10−6) as a key event in response to high LET IR. In addition, the Fas pathway was found to be activated (p = 3·10−5) and the p38 pathway was found to be deactivated (p = 0.001) compared with untreated cells. Antibody-based analyses confirmed that high LET IR caused an increase in phosphorylation of JNK. Moreover pharmacological inhibition of JNK blocked high LET-induced apoptotic signaling. In contrast, neither an activation of p38 nor a role for p38 in high LET IR-induced apoptotic signaling was found. We conclude that, in contrast to conventional low LET IR, high LET IR can trigger activation of the JNK pathway, which in turn is critical for induction of apoptosis in these cells. Thus PSE predictions were largely confirmed, and PSE was proven to be a useful hypothesis-generating tool. PMID:19168796

  11. Using ASD data to identify the altered minerals for exploring of gold deposit in the Beishan area, North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, G. L.; Yi, H.; Yang, M.; Liang, N.; Li, J. Q.; Yang, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    Hyperspectral information of altered minerals plays an important role in the identifications of mineralized zones. In this study, the altered minerals of two gold deposits from Fangshankou-Laojinchang regions of Beishan metallogenic belt were measured by ASD field Spectrometer. Many gold deposits would have a close relationship with Variscan magma intrusion, which have been found in study region. The alteration minerals have been divided six types by the spectral results, i.e. sericite, limonite, dolomite, chlorite, epidote and calcite. The distribution characteristics and formations of altered minerals were discussed here. By the ASD, the spectral curve of different geological units in the Jintanzi and Fangshankou gold deposits were analysed and summarized. The results show that the sericite and limonite are mainly related with the gold mineralization and widely occurred in the gold deposits. Therefore, we proposed that the sericite and limonite are the iconic alteration mineral assemblages for gold mineralization and the models of altered minerals for gold deposits could be established in this region.

  12. Proteomic analysis of human tooth pulp: proteomics of human tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Adam; Jágr, Michal; Pataridis, Statis; Mikšík, Ivan

    2014-12-01

    The unique pulp-dentin complex demonstrates strong regenerative potential, which enables it to respond to disease and traumatic injury. Identifying the proteins of the pulp-dentin complex is crucial to understanding the mechanisms of regeneration, tissue calcification, defense processes, and the reparation of dentin by dental pulp. The lack of knowledge of these proteins limits the development of more efficient therapies. The proteomic profile of human tooth pulp was investigated and compared with the proteome of human dentin and blood. The samples of tooth pulp were obtained from 5 sound permanent human third molars of 5 adults (n = 5). The extracted proteins were separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, and identified by correlating mass spectra to the proteomic databases. A total of 342 proteins were identified with high confidence, and 2 proteins were detected for the first time in an actual human sample. The identified tooth pulp proteins have a variety of functions: structural, catalytic, transporter, protease activity, immune response, and many others. In a comparison with dentin and blood plasma, 140 (pulp/dentin) shared proteins were identified, 37 of which were not observed in plasma. It can be suggested that they might participate in the unique pulp-dentin complex. This proteomic investigation of human tooth pulp, together with the previously published study of human dentin, is one of the most comprehensive proteome lists of human teeth to date. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Proteomic Investigation of Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 Identifies Secretome and Mycelial Proteins with roles in Plant Cell Wall Degradation and Virulence

    KAUST Repository

    Lakshman, Dilip; Roberts, Daniel P.; Garrett, Wesley M.; Natarajan, Savithiry S.; Darwish, Omar; Alkharouf, Nadim; Pain, Arnab; Khan, Farooq; Jambhulkar, Prashant P.; Mitra, Amitava

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 is a soilborne necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen that causes economically important diseases on agronomic crops worldwide. Here we used a proteomics approach to characterize both intracellular proteins and the secretome of R. solani AG 4 isolate Rs23A under several growth conditions; the secretome being highly important in pathogenesis. From over 500 total secretome and soluble intracellular protein spots from 2-D gels, 457 protein spots were analyzed and 318 proteins positively matched with fungal proteins of known function by comparison with available R. solani genome databases specific for anastomosis groups 1-IA, 1-IB, and 3. These proteins were categorized to possible cellular locations and functional groups; and for some proteins their putative roles in plant cell wall degradation and virulence. The majority of the secreted proteins were grouped to extracellular regions and contain hydrolase activity.

  14. Proteomic Investigation of Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 Identifies Secretome and Mycelial Proteins with roles in Plant Cell Wall Degradation and Virulence

    KAUST Repository

    Lakshman, Dilip

    2016-03-28

    Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 is a soilborne necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen that causes economically important diseases on agronomic crops worldwide. Here we used a proteomics approach to characterize both intracellular proteins and the secretome of R. solani AG 4 isolate Rs23A under several growth conditions; the secretome being highly important in pathogenesis. From over 500 total secretome and soluble intracellular protein spots from 2-D gels, 457 protein spots were analyzed and 318 proteins positively matched with fungal proteins of known function by comparison with available R. solani genome databases specific for anastomosis groups 1-IA, 1-IB, and 3. These proteins were categorized to possible cellular locations and functional groups; and for some proteins their putative roles in plant cell wall degradation and virulence. The majority of the secreted proteins were grouped to extracellular regions and contain hydrolase activity.

  15. Proteome analysis in the assessment of ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Koeck, Thomas; Mischak, Harald; Pich, Andreas; Schanstra, Joost P; Zürbig, Petra; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-11-01

    Based on demographic trends, the societies in many developed countries are facing an increasing number and proportion of people over the age of 65. The raise in elderly populations along with improved health-care will be concomitant with an increased prevalence of ageing-associated chronic conditions like cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory diseases, arthritis, dementia, and diabetes mellitus. This is expected to pose unprecedented challenges both for individuals and societies and their health care systems. An ultimate goal of ageing research is therefore the understanding of physiological ageing and the achievement of 'healthy' ageing by decreasing age-related pathologies. However, on a molecular level, ageing is a complex multi-mechanistic process whose contributing factors may vary individually, partly overlap with pathological alterations, and are often poorly understood. Proteome analysis potentially allows modelling of these multifactorial processes. This review summarises recent proteomic research on age-related changes identified in animal models and human studies. We combined this information with pathway analysis to identify molecular mechanisms associated with ageing. We identified some molecular pathways that are affected in most or even all organs and others that are organ-specific. However, appropriately powered studies are needed to confirm these findings based in in silico evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Data from proteomic characterization and comparison of mammalian milk fat globule proteomes by iTRAQ analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Milk fat globules memebrane (MFGM-enriched proteomes from Holstein, Jersey, yak, buffalo, goat, camel, horse, and human were extracted and identified by an iTRAQ quantification proteomic approach. Proteomes data were analyzed by bioinformatic and multivariate statistical analysis and used to present the characteristic traits of the MFGM proteins among the studied mammals. The data of this study are also related to the research article “Proteomic characterization and comparison of mammalian milk fat globule proteomes by iTRAQ analysis” in the Journal of Proteomics [1].

  17. In-depth proteomics characterization of embryogenesis of the honey bee worker (Apis mellifera ligustica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Han, Bin; Lu, Xiaoshan; Ramadan, Haitham; Li, Jianke

    2014-09-01

    Identifying proteome changes of honey bee embryogenesis is of prime importance for unraveling the molecular mechanisms that they underlie. However, many proteomic changes during the embryonic period are not well characterized. We analyzed the proteomic alterations over the complete time course of honey bee worker embryogenesis at 24, 48, and 72 h of age, using mass spectrometry-based proteomics, label-free quantitation, and bioinformatics. Of the 1460 proteins identified the embryo of all three ages, the core proteome (proteins shared by the embryos of all three ages, accounting for 40%) was mainly involved in protein synthesis, metabolic energy, development, and molecular transporter, which indicates their centrality in driving embryogenesis. However, embryos at different developmental stages have their own specific proteome and pathway signatures to coordinate and modulate developmental events. The young embryos (proteins related to nutrition storage and nucleic acid metabolism may correlate with the cell proliferation occurring at this stage. The middle aged embryos (24-48 h) enhanced expression of proteins associated with cell cycle control, transporters, antioxidant activity, and the cytoskeleton suggest their roles to support rudimentary organogenesis. Among these proteins, the biological pathways of aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, β-alanine metabolism, and protein export are intensively activated in the embryos of middle age. The old embryos (48-72 h) elevated expression of proteins implicated in fatty acid metabolism and morphogenesis indicate their functionality for the formation and development of organs and dorsal closure, in which the biological pathways of fatty acid metabolism and RNA transport are highly activated. These findings add novel understanding to the molecular details of honey bee embryogenesis, in which the programmed activation of the proteome matches with the physiological transition observed during embryogenesis. The identified biological

  18. In-depth Proteomics Characterization of Embryogenesis of the Honey Bee Worker (Apis mellifera ligustica) *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Han, Bin; Lu, Xiaoshan; Ramadan, Haitham; Li, Jianke

    2014-01-01

    Identifying proteome changes of honey bee embryogenesis is of prime importance for unraveling the molecular mechanisms that they underlie. However, many proteomic changes during the embryonic period are not well characterized. We analyzed the proteomic alterations over the complete time course of honey bee worker embryogenesis at 24, 48, and 72 h of age, using mass spectrometry-based proteomics, label-free quantitation, and bioinformatics. Of the 1460 proteins identified the embryo of all three ages, the core proteome (proteins shared by the embryos of all three ages, accounting for 40%) was mainly involved in protein synthesis, metabolic energy, development, and molecular transporter, which indicates their centrality in driving embryogenesis. However, embryos at different developmental stages have their own specific proteome and pathway signatures to coordinate and modulate developmental events. The young embryos (proteins related to nutrition storage and nucleic acid metabolism may correlate with the cell proliferation occurring at this stage. The middle aged embryos (24–48 h) enhanced expression of proteins associated with cell cycle control, transporters, antioxidant activity, and the cytoskeleton suggest their roles to support rudimentary organogenesis. Among these proteins, the biological pathways of aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, β-alanine metabolism, and protein export are intensively activated in the embryos of middle age. The old embryos (48–72 h) elevated expression of proteins implicated in fatty acid metabolism and morphogenesis indicate their functionality for the formation and development of organs and dorsal closure, in which the biological pathways of fatty acid metabolism and RNA transport are highly activated. These findings add novel understanding to the molecular details of honey bee embryogenesis, in which the programmed activation of the proteome matches with the physiological transition observed during embryogenesis. The identified

  19. Proteomic analysis uncovers a metabolic phenotype in C. elegans after nhr-40 reduction of function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohludka, Michal; Simeckova, Katerina; Vohanka, Jaroslav; Yilma, Petr; Novak, Petr; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouchova, Marta; Kostrouch, Zdenek

    2008-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has an unexpectedly large number (284) of genes encoding nuclear hormone receptors, most of which are nematode-specific and are of unknown function. We have exploited comparative two-dimensional chromatography of synchronized cultures of wild type C. elegans larvae and a mutant in nhr-40 to determine if proteomic approaches will provide additional insight into gene function. Chromatofocusing, followed by reversed-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, identified altered chromatographic patterns for a set of proteins, many of which function in muscle and metabolism. Prompted by the proteomic analysis, we find that the penetrance of the developmental phenotypes in the mutant is enhanced at low temperatures and by food restriction. The combination of our phenotypic and proteomic analysis strongly suggests that NHR-40 provides a link between metabolism and muscle development. Our results highlight the utility of comparative two-dimensional chromatography to provide a relatively rapid method to gain insight into gene function

  20. Combinatorial hexapeptide ligand libraries (ProteoMiner): an innovative fractionation tool for differential quantitative clinical proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Sonja; Czibere, Akos; Kotzka, Jorg; Passlack, Waltraud; Haas, Rainer; Eckel, Jürgen; Lehr, Stefan

    2009-07-01

    Blood serum samples are the major source for clinical proteomics approaches, which aim to identify diagnostically relevant or treatment-response related proteins. But, the presence of very high-abundance proteins and the enormous dynamic range of protein distribution hinders whole serum analysis. An innovative tool to overcome these limitations, utilizes combinatorial hexapeptide ligand libraries (ProteoMiner). Here, we demonstrate that ProteoMiner can be used for comparative and quantitative analysis of complex proteomes. We spiked serum samples with increasing amounts (3 microg to 300 microg) of whole E. coli lysate, processed it with ProteoMiner and performed quantitative analyses of 2D-gels. We found, that the concentration of the spiked bacteria proteome, reflected by the maintained proportional spot intensities, was not altered by ProteoMiner treatment. Therefore, we conclude that the ProteoMiner technology can be used for quantitative analysis of low abundant proteins in complex biological samples.

  1. The landscape of viral proteomics and its potential to impact human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxford, Kristie L.; Wendler, Jason P.; McDermott, Jason E.; White III, Richard A.; Powell, Joshua D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2016-05-06

    Translating the intimate discourse between viruses and their host cells during infection is a challenging but critical task for development of antiviral interventions and diagnostics. Viruses commandeer cellular processes at every step of their life cycle, altering expression of genes and proteins. Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies are enhancing studies of viral pathogenesis by identifying virus-induced changes in the protein repertoire of infected cells or extracellular fluids. Interpretation of proteomics results using knowledge of cellular pathways and networks leads to identification of proteins that influence a range of infection processes, thereby focusing efforts for clinical diagnoses and therapeutics development. Herein we discuss applications of global proteomic studies of viral infections with the goal of providing a basis for improved studies that will benefit community-wide data integration and interpretation.

  2. Proteomic Biomarkers for Spontaneous Preterm Birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacerovsky, Marian; Lenco, Juraj; Musilova, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    This review aimed to identify, synthesize, and analyze the findings of studies on proteomic biomarkers for spontaneous preterm birth (PTB). Three electronic databases (Medline, Embase, and Scopus) were searched for studies in any language reporting the use of proteomic biomarkers for PTB published...

  3. Modification-specific proteomics in plant biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Jensen, Ole N

    2010-01-01

    and proteomics. In general, methods for PTM characterization are developed to study yeast and mammalian biology and later adopted to investigate plants. Our point of view is that it is advantageous to enrich for PTMs on the peptide level as part of a quantitative proteomics strategy to not only identify the PTM...

  4. Dynamic adaptation of myocardial proteome during heart failure development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poesch, Axel; Dörr, Marcus; Völker, Uwe; Grube, Karina; Hammer, Elke; Felix, Stephan B.

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) development is characterized by huge structural changes that are crucial for disease progression. Analysis of time dependent global proteomic adaptations during HF progression offers the potential to gain deeper insights in the disease development and identify new biomarker candidates. Therefore, hearts of TAC (transverse aortic constriction) and sham mice were examined by cardiac MRI on either day 4, 14, 21, 28, 42, and 56 after surgery (n = 6 per group/time point). At each time point, proteomes of the left (LV) and right ventricles (RV) of TAC and sham mice were analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS). In TAC mice, systolic LV heart function worsened from day 4 to day 14, remained on a stable level from day 14 to day 42, and showed a further pronounced decline at day 56. MS analysis identified in the LV 330 and in RV 246 proteins with altered abundance over time (TAC vs. sham, fc≥±2). Functional categorization of proteins disclosed the time-dependent alteration of different pathways. Heat shock protein beta-7 (HSPB7) displayed differences in abundance in tissue and serum at an early stage of HF. This study not only provides an overview of the time dependent molecular alterations during transition to HF, but also identified HSPB7 as a novel blood biomarker candidate for the onset of cardiac remodeling. PMID:28973020

  5. Multidimensional proteomics analysis of amniotic fluid to provide insight into the mechanisms of idiopathic preterm birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina A Buhimschi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Though recent advancement in proteomics has provided a novel perspective on several distinct pathogenetic mechanisms leading to preterm birth (inflammation, bleeding, the etiology of most preterm births still remains elusive. We conducted a multidimensional proteomic analysis of the amniotic fluid to identify pathways related to preterm birth in the absence of inflammation or bleeding.A proteomic fingerprint was generated from fresh amniotic fluid using surface-enhanced laser desorbtion ionization time of flight (SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry in a total of 286 consecutive samples retrieved from women who presented with signs or symptoms of preterm labor or preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Inflammation and/or bleeding proteomic patterns were detected in 32% (92/286 of the SELDI tracings. In the remaining tracings, a hierarchical algorithm was applied based on descriptors quantifying similarity/dissimilarity among proteomic fingerprints. This allowed identification of a novel profile (Q-profile based on the presence of 5 SELDI peaks in the 10-12.5 kDa mass area. Women displaying the Q-profile (mean+/-SD, gestational age: 25+/-4 weeks, n = 40 were more likely to deliver preterm despite expectant management in the context of intact membranes and normal amniotic fluid clinical results. Utilizing identification-centered proteomics techniques (fluorescence two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis, robotic tryptic digestion and mass spectrometry coupled with Protein ANalysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships (PANTHER ontological classifications, we determined that in amniotic fluids with Q-profile the differentially expressed proteins are primarily involved in non-inflammatory biological processes such as protein metabolism, signal transduction and transport.Proteomic profiling of amniotic fluid coupled with non-hierarchical bioinformatics algorithms identified a subgroup of patients at risk for preterm birth in the absence of intra

  6. Proteomic analysis of trichloroethylene-induced alterations in expression, distribution, and interactions of SET/TAF-Iα and two SET/TAF-Iα-binding proteins, eEF1A1 and eEF1A2, in hepatic L-02 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wen-Xu; Yang, Liang; Chen, Moutong; Yang, Xifei; Ren, Xiaohu; Fang, Shisong; Ye, Jinbo; Huang, Haiyan; Peng, Chaoqiong; Zhou, Li; Huang, Xinfeng; Yang, Fan; Wu, Desheng; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun

    2012-09-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure causes severe hepatotoxicity. However, the mechanisms of TCE hepatotoxicity remain unclear. Recently, we reported that TCE exposure up-regulated the expression of the oncoprotein SET/TAF-Iα and SET knockdown attenuated TCE-induced cytotoxicity in hepatic L-02 cells. To decipher the function of SET/TAF-Iα and its contributions to TCE-induced hepatotoxicity, we employed a proteomic analysis of SET/TAF-Iα with tandem affinity purification to identify SET/TAF-Iα-binding proteins. We identified 42 novel Gene Ontology co-annotated SET/TAF-Iα-binding proteins. The identifications of two of these proteins (eEF1A1, elongation factor 1-alpha 1; eEF1A2, elongation factor 1-alpha 2) were confirmed by Western blot analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP). Furthermore, we analyzed the effects of TCE on the expression, distribution and interactions of eEF1A1, eEF1A2 and SET in L-02 cells. Western blot analysis reveals a significant up-regulation of eEF1A1, eEF1A2 and two isoforms of SET, and immunocytochemical analysis reveals that eEF1A1 and SET is redistributed by TCE. SET is redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, while eFE1A1 is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Moreover, we find by Co-IP that TCE exposure significantly increases the interaction of SET with eEF1A2. Our data not only provide insights into the physiological functions of SET/TAF-Iα and complement the SET interaction networks, but also demonstrate that TCE exposure induces alterations in the expression, distribution and interactions of SET and its binding partners. These alterations may constitute the mechanisms of TCE cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. NIH Common Fund - Disruptive Proteomics Technologies - Challenges and Opportunities | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Request for Information (RFI) is directed toward determining how best to accelerate research in disruptive proteomics technologies. The Disruptive Proteomics Technologies (DPT) Working Group of the NIH Common Fund wishes to identify gaps and opportunities in current technologies and methodologies related to proteome-wide measurements.  For the purposes of this RFI, “disruptive” is defined as very rapid, very significant gains, similar to the "disruptive" technology development that occurred in DNA sequencing technology.

  8. Spatiotemporal proteomic analyses during pancreas cancer progression identifies serine/threonine stress kinase 4 (STK4) as a novel candidate biomarker for early stage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Justin E; Zhang, Yuzheng; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Solan, Joell L; Lampe, Paul D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-12-01

    Pancreas cancer, or pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, is the deadliest of solid tumors, with a five-year survival rate of pancreas cancer. Mouse models that accurately recapitulate the human condition allow disease tracking from inception to invasion and can therefore be useful for studying early disease stages in which surgical resection is possible. Using a highly faithful mouse model of pancreas cancer in conjunction with a high-density antibody microarray containing ∼2500 antibodies, we interrogated the pancreatic tissue proteome at preinvasive and invasive stages of disease. The goal was to discover early stage tissue markers of pancreas cancer and follow them through histologically defined stages of disease using cohorts of mice lacking overt clinical signs and symptoms and those with end-stage metastatic disease, respectively. A panel of seven up-regulated proteins distinguishing pancreas cancer from normal pancreas was validated, and their levels were assessed in tissues collected at preinvasive, early invasive, and moribund stages of disease. Six of the seven markers also differentiated pancreas cancer from an experimental model of chronic pancreatitis. The levels of serine/threonine stress kinase 4 (STK4) increased between preinvasive and invasive stages, suggesting its potential as a tissue biomarker, and perhaps its involvement in progression from precursor pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry of STK4 at different stages of disease revealed a dynamic expression pattern further implicating it in early tumorigenic events. Immunohistochemistry of a panel of human pancreas cancers confirmed that STK4 levels were increased in tumor epithelia relative to normal tissue. Overall, this integrated approach yielded several tissue markers that could serve as signatures of disease stage, including early (resectable), and therefore clinically meaningful, stages. © 2014 by The American Society for

  9. Classification System for Identifying Women at Risk for Altered Partial Breast Irradiation Recommendations After Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalchik, Kristin V.; Vallow, Laura A.; McDonough, Michelle; Thomas, Colleen S.; Heckman, Michael G.; Peterson, Jennifer L.; Adkisson, Cameron D.; Serago, Christopher; McLaughlin, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To study the utility of preoperative breast MRI for partial breast irradiation (PBI) patient selection, using multivariable analysis of significant risk factors to create a classification rule. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2009, 712 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI at Mayo Clinic Florida. Of this cohort, 566 were retrospectively deemed eligible for PBI according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39 inclusion criteria using physical examination, mammogram, and/or ultrasound. Magnetic resonance images were then reviewed to determine their impact on patient eligibility. The patient and tumor characteristics were evaluated to determine risk factors for altered PBI eligibility after MRI and to create a classification rule. Results: Of the 566 patients initially eligible for PBI, 141 (25%) were found ineligible because of pathologically proven MRI findings. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional ipsilateral breast cancer in 118 (21%). Of these, 62 (11%) had more extensive disease than originally noted before MRI, and 64 (11%) had multicentric disease. Contralateral breast cancer was detected in 28 (5%). Four characteristics were found to be significantly associated with PBI ineligibility after MRI on multivariable analysis: premenopausal status (P=.021), detection by palpation (P<.001), first-degree relative with a history of breast cancer (P=.033), and lobular histology (P=.002). Risk factors were assigned a score of 0-2. The risk of altered PBI eligibility from MRI based on number of risk factors was 0:18%; 1:22%; 2:42%; 3:65%. Conclusions: Preoperative bilateral breast MRI altered the PBI recommendations for 25% of women. Women who may undergo PBI should be considered for breast MRI, especially those with lobular histology or with 2 or more of the following risk factors: premenopausal, detection by palpation, and first-degree relative with a history of

  10. DNA fingerprinting tags novel altered chromosomal regions and identifies the involvement of SOX5 in the progression of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Stephanie; Chan, Yuen Piu; Woolcock, Bruce; Hu, Liang; Wong, Kai Yau; Ling, Ming Tat; Bainbridge, Terry; Webber, Douglas; Chan, Tim Hon Man; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Lam, Wan; Vielkind, Juergen; Chan, Kwok Wah

    2009-05-15

    Identification of genomic alterations associated with the progression of prostate cancer may facilitate the better understanding of the development of this highly variable disease. Matched normal, premalignant high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive prostate carcinoma cells were procured by laser capture microdissection (LCM) from human radical prostatectomy specimens. From these cells, comparative DNA fingerprints were generated by a modified PCR-based technique called scanning of microdissected archival lesion (SMAL)-PCR. Recurrent polymorphic fingerprint fragments were used in tagging altered chromosomal regions. Altered regions were found at cytobands 1p31.3, 1q44, 2p23.1, 3p26.3, 3q22.3, 4q22.3, 4q35.2, 5q23.2, 8q22.3, 8q24.13, 9q21.3, 9q22.32, 10q11.21, 11p13, 12p12.1, 13q12.1, 16q12.2 and 18q21.31. Candidate genes in the surrounding area that may possibly harbor mutations that change normal prostatic cells to progress into their tumor stages were proposed. Of these fragments, a 420 bp alteration, absent in all 26 normal samples screened, was observed in 2 tumors. This fragment was cloned, sequenced and localized to chromosome 12p12.1. Within this region, candidate gene sex determining region Y-box 5 (SOX5) was proposed. Further studies of SOX5 in cell lines, xenografts and human prostate specimens, at both the RNA and protein levels, found overexpression of the gene in tumors. This overexpression was then subsequently found by fluorescent in situ hybridization to be caused by amplification of the region. In conclusion, our results suggest LCM coupled with SMAL-PCR DNA fingerprinting is a useful method for the screening and identification of chromosomal regions and genes associated with cancer development. Further, overexpression of SOX5 is associated with prostate tumor progression and early development of distant metastasis. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Describing the Diapause-Preparatory Proteome of the Beetle Colaphellus bowringi and Identifying Candidates Affecting Lipid Accumulation Using Isobaric Tags for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteome Quantification (iTRAQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Hahn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Prior to entering diapause, insects must prepare themselves physiologically to withstand the stresses of arresting their development for a lengthy period. While studies describing the biochemical and cellular milieu of the maintenance phase of diapause are accumulating, few studies have taken an “omics” approach to describing molecular events during the diapause preparatory phase. We used isobaric tags and mass spectrometry (iTRAQ to quantitatively compare the expression profiles of proteins identified during the onset of diapause preparation phase in the heads of adult female cabbage beetles, Colaphellus bowringi. A total of 3,175 proteins were identified, 297 of which were differentially expressed between diapause-destined and non-diapause-destined female adults and could therefore be involved in diapause preparation in this species. Comparison of identified proteins with protein function databases shows that many of these differentially expressed proteins enhanced in diapause destined beetles are involved in energy production and conversion, carbohydrate metabolism and transport, and lipid metabolism. Further hand annotation of differentially abundant peptides nominates several associated with stress hardiness, including HSPs and antioxidants, as well as neural development. In contrast, non-diapause destined beetles show substantial increases in cuticle proteins, suggesting additional post-emergence growth. Using RNA interference to silence a fatty acid-binding protein (FABP that was highly abundant in the head of diapause-destined females prevented the accumulation of lipids in the fat body, a common product of diapause preparation in this species and others. Surprisingly, RNAi against the FABP also affected the transcript abundance of several heat shock proteins. These results suggest that the identified differentially expressed proteins that play vital roles in lipid metabolism may also contribute somehow to enhanced hardiness to

  12. Infectious Disease Proteome Biomarkers: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Charles L.

    2011-12-31

    Research for the DOE Infectious Disease Proteome Biomarkers focused on Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV). RVFV and VEEV are Category A and B pathogens respectively. Among the priority threats, RVFV and VEEV rank high in their potential for being weaponized and introduced to the United States, spreading quickly, and having a large health and economic impact. In addition, they both have live attenuated vaccine, which allows work to be performed at BSL-2. While the molecular biology of RVFV and VEEV are increasingly well-characterized, little is known about its host-pathogen interactions. Our research is aimed at determining critical alterations in host signaling pathways to identify therapeutics targeted against the host.

  13. Application of a new procedure for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry profiling of plasma amino acid-related metabolites and untargeted shotgun proteomics to identify mechanisms and biomarkers of calcific aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkowicz, Mariola; Debski, Janusz; Jablonska, Patrycja; Dadlez, Michal; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2017-09-29

    Calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAS) increasingly affects our ageing population, but the mechanisms of the disease and its biomarkers are not well established. Recently, plasma amino acid-related metabolite (AA) profiling has attracted attention in studies on pathology and development of biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases, but has not been studied in CAS. To evaluate the potential relationship between CAS and AA metabolome, a new ion-pairing reversed-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (IP-RPLC-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for simultaneous determination of 43 AAs in plasma of stenotic patients and age-matched control subjects. Furthermore, untargeted mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis and confirmatory ELISA assays were performed. The method developed offered high accuracy (intra-assay imprecision averaged 4.4% for all compounds) and sensitivity (LOQ within 0.01-0.5μM). We found that 22 AAs and three AA ratios significantly changed in the CAS group as compared to control. The most pronounced differences were observed in urea cycle-related AAs and branched-chain AA (BCAA)-related AAs. The contents of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and its monomethylated derivative (NMMA) were increased by 30-64% with CAS. The arginine/ADMA and Fischer's ratios as well as arginine, homoarginine, ADMA, symmetric dimethylarginine, hydroxyproline, betaine and 3-methylhistidine correlated with cardiac function-related parameters and concomitant systemic factors in the CAS patients. The results of proteomic analysis were consistent with involvement of inflammation, lipid abnormalities, hemostasis and extracellular matrix remodeling in CAS. In conclusion, changes in plasma AA profile and protein pattern that we identified in CAS provide information relevant to pathomechanisms and may deliver new biomarkers of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Drought-Induced Leaf Proteome Changes in Switchgrass Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhujia Ye

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum is a perennial crop producing deep roots and thus highly tolerant to soil water deficit conditions. However, seedling establishment in the field is very susceptible to prolonged and periodic drought stress. In this study, a “sandwich” system simulating a gradual water deletion process was developed. Switchgrass seedlings were subjected to a 20-day gradual drought treatment process when soil water tension was increased to 0.05 MPa (moderate drought stress and leaf physiological properties had expressed significant alteration. Drought-induced changes in leaf proteomes were identified using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ labeling method followed by nano-scale liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS analysis. Additionally, total leaf proteins were processed using a combinatorial library of peptide ligands to enrich for lower abundance proteins. Both total proteins and those enriched samples were analyzed to increase the coverage of the quantitative proteomics analysis. A total of 7006 leaf proteins were identified, and 257 (4% of the leaf proteome expressed a significant difference (p < 0.05, fold change <0.6 or >1.7 from the non-treated control to drought-treated conditions. These proteins are involved in the regulation of transcription and translation, cell division, cell wall modification, phyto-hormone metabolism and signaling transduction pathways, and metabolic pathways of carbohydrates, amino acids, and fatty acids. A scheme of abscisic acid (ABA-biosynthesis and ABA responsive signal transduction pathway was reconstructed using these drought-induced significant proteins, showing systemic regulation at protein level to deploy the respective mechanism. Results from this study, in addition to revealing molecular responses to drought stress, provide a large number of proteins (candidate genes that can be employed to improve switchgrass seedling growth and

  15. Proteomic analysis of trichloroethylene-induced alterations in expression, distribution, and interactions of SET/TAF-Iα and two SET/TAF-Iα-binding proteins, eEF1A1 and eEF1A2, in hepatic L-02 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Wen-Xu; Yang, Liang; Chen, Moutong; Yang, Xifei; Ren, Xiaohu; Fang, Shisong; Ye, Jinbo; Huang, Haiyan; Peng, Chaoqiong; Zhou, Li; Huang, Xinfeng; Yang, Fan; Wu, Desheng; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun, E-mail: bio-research@hotmail.com

    2012-09-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure causes severe hepatotoxicity. However, the mechanisms of TCE hepatotoxicity remain unclear. Recently, we reported that TCE exposure up-regulated the expression of the oncoprotein SET/TAF-Iα and SET knockdown attenuated TCE-induced cytotoxicity in hepatic L-02 cells. To decipher the function of SET/TAF-Iα and its contributions to TCE-induced hepatotoxicity, we employed a proteomic analysis of SET/TAF-Iα with tandem affinity purification to identify SET/TAF-Iα-binding proteins. We identified 42 novel Gene Ontology co-annotated SET/TAF-Iα-binding proteins. The identifications of two of these proteins (eEF1A1, elongation factor 1-alpha 1; eEF1A2, elongation factor 1-alpha 2) were confirmed by Western blot analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP). Furthermore, we analyzed the effects of TCE on the expression, distribution and interactions of eEF1A1, eEF1A2 and SET in L-02 cells. Western blot analysis reveals a significant up-regulation of eEF1A1, eEF1A2 and two isoforms of SET, and immunocytochemical analysis reveals that eEF1A1 and SET is redistributed by TCE. SET is redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, while eFE1A1 is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Moreover, we find by Co-IP that TCE exposure significantly increases the interaction of SET with eEF1A2. Our data not only provide insights into the physiological functions of SET/TAF-Iα and complement the SET interaction networks, but also demonstrate that TCE exposure induces alterations in the expression, distribution and interactions of SET and its binding partners. These alterations may constitute the mechanisms of TCE cytotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► Identify 62 SET/TAF-Iα-associated proteins in human L-02 cells ► Trichloroethylene (TCE) alters the interaction of SET with eEF1A1 and eEF1A2. ► TCE induces the translocation and up-regulation of SET. ► TCE induces the translocation and up-regulation of eEF1A.

  16. Proteomic analysis of trichloroethylene-induced alterations in expression, distribution, and interactions of SET/TAF-Iα and two SET/TAF-Iα-binding proteins, eEF1A1 and eEF1A2, in hepatic L-02 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Wen-Xu; Yang, Liang; Chen, Moutong; Yang, Xifei; Ren, Xiaohu; Fang, Shisong; Ye, Jinbo; Huang, Haiyan; Peng, Chaoqiong; Zhou, Li; Huang, Xinfeng; Yang, Fan; Wu, Desheng; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure causes severe hepatotoxicity. However, the mechanisms of TCE hepatotoxicity remain unclear. Recently, we reported that TCE exposure up-regulated the expression of the oncoprotein SET/TAF-Iα and SET knockdown attenuated TCE-induced cytotoxicity in hepatic L-02 cells. To decipher the function of SET/TAF-Iα and its contributions to TCE-induced hepatotoxicity, we employed a proteomic analysis of SET/TAF-Iα with tandem affinity purification to identify SET/TAF-Iα-binding proteins. We identified 42 novel Gene Ontology co-annotated SET/TAF-Iα-binding proteins. The identifications of two of these proteins (eEF1A1, elongation factor 1-alpha 1; eEF1A2, elongation factor 1-alpha 2) were confirmed by Western blot analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP). Furthermore, we analyzed the effects of TCE on the expression, distribution and interactions of eEF1A1, eEF1A2 and SET in L-02 cells. Western blot analysis reveals a significant up-regulation of eEF1A1, eEF1A2 and two isoforms of SET, and immunocytochemical analysis reveals that eEF1A1 and SET is redistributed by TCE. SET is redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, while eFE1A1 is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Moreover, we find by Co-IP that TCE exposure significantly increases the interaction of SET with eEF1A2. Our data not only provide insights into the physiological functions of SET/TAF-Iα and complement the SET interaction networks, but also demonstrate that TCE exposure induces alterations in the expression, distribution and interactions of SET and its binding partners. These alterations may constitute the mechanisms of TCE cytotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► Identify 62 SET/TAF-Iα-associated proteins in human L-02 cells ► Trichloroethylene (TCE) alters the interaction of SET with eEF1A1 and eEF1A2. ► TCE induces the translocation and up-regulation of SET. ► TCE induces the translocation and up-regulation of eEF1A.

  17. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals heart toxicity induced by chronic arsenic exposure in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Qingyu; Xi, Guochen; Alamdar, Ambreen; Zhang, Jie; Shen, Heqing

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic is a widespread metalloid in the environment, which poses a broad spectrum of adverse effects on human health. However, a global view of arsenic-induced heart toxicity is still lacking, and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. By performing a comparative quantitative proteomic analysis, the present study aims to investigate the alterations of proteome profile in rat heart after long-term exposure to arsenic. As a result, we found that the abundance of 81 proteins were significantly altered by arsenic treatment (35 up-regulated and 46 down-regulated). Among these, 33 proteins were specifically associated with cardiovascular system development and function, including heart development, heart morphology, cardiac contraction and dilation, and other cardiovascular functions. It is further proposed that the aberrant regulation of 14 proteins induced by arsenic would disturb cardiac contraction and relaxation, impair heart morphogenesis and development, and induce thrombosis in rats, which is mediated by the Akt/p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Overall, these findings will augment our knowledge of the involved mechanisms and develop useful biomarkers for cardiotoxicity induced by environmental arsenic exposure. - Highlights: • Arsenic exposure has been associated with a number of adverse health effects. • The molecular mechanisms involved in arsenic-induced cardiotoxicity remain unclear. • Differential proteins were identified in arsenic-exposed rat heart by proteomics. • Arsenic induces heart toxicity through the Akt/p38 MAPK signaling pathway. - Label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of rat heart reveals putative mechanisms and biomarkers for arsenic-induced cardiotoxicity.

  18. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul

    2016-01-01

    , of altered protein expressions profiles and/or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics offer enormous promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and exercise-induced adaptation; however, skeletal muscle......Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability...... of muscle to respond to circulating insulin. Physical exercise improves insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolism and remains one of the most promising interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle might be a cause, or consequence...

  19. Identification Of Protein Vaccine Candidates Using Comprehensive Proteomic Analysis Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohrbough, James G

    2007-01-01

    Presented in this dissertation are proteomic analysis studies focused on identifying proteins to be used as vaccine candidates against Coccidioidomycosis, a potentially fatal human pulmonary disease...

  20. Tackling probiotic and gut microbiota functionality through proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Lorena; Hidalgo, Claudio; Blanco-Míguez, Aitor; Lourenço, Anália; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo

    2016-09-16

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Many strains exert their beneficial effects after transiently colonizing the human gut, where they interact with the rest of the intestinal microorganisms and with the host mucosa. Indeed the human gut harbours a huge number of microorganisms also known as gut microbiota. Imbalances in the relative abundances of the individual components of the gut microbiota may determine the health status of the host and alterations in specific groups have been related to different diseases and metabolic disorders. Proteomics provide a set of high-throughput methodologies for protein identification that are extremely useful for studying probiotic functionality and helping in the assessment of specific health-promoting activities, such as their immunomodulatory activity, the intestinal colonization processes, and the crosstalk mechanisms with the host. Furthermore, proteomics have been used to identify markers of technological performance and stress adaptation, which helps to predict traits such as behaviour into food matrices and ability to survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this review is to compile studies in which proteomics have been used to assess probiotic functionality and to identify molecular players supporting their mechanisms of action. Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Molecular basis underlying the functional properties of probiotic bacteria responsible for the health promoting effects have been in the background for many years. Breakthrough of omics technologies in the probiotic and microbiota fields has had a very relevant impact in the elucidation of probiotic mechanisms and in the procedures to select these microorganisms, based on solid scientific evidence. It is unquestionable that, in the near future, the evolution of proteomic techniques

  1. Quantitative proteomics as a tool to identify resistance mechanisms in erlotinib-resistant subclones of the non-small cell lung cancer cell line HCC827

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirstine

    , which in 43-50% of cases are caused by a secondary mutation (T790M) in EGFR. Importantly, a majority of resistance cases are still unexplained (Lin & Bivona, 2012). Our aim is to identify novel resistance mechanisms – and potentially new drug targets - in erlotinib-resistant subclones of the NSCLC cell...... of erlotinib, and in biological triplicates on a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer. Only proteins identified with minimum 2 unique peptides and in minimum 2 of 3 replicates were accepted. Results: Importantly, the resistant clones did not acquire the T790M or other EGFR or KRAS mutations, potentiating...... the identification of novel resistance mechanisms. We identified 2875 cytoplasmic proteins present in all 4 cell lines. Of these 87, 56 and 23 are upregulated >1.5 fold; and 117, 72 and 32 are downregulated >1.5 fold, respectively, in the 3 resistant clones compared to the parental cell line. By network analysis, we...

  2. Proteomic interrogation of human chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P Torrente

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the "Chromatome" is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes.

  3. Analysis of A549 cell proteome alteration in response to recombinant influenza A virus nucleoprotein and its interaction with cellular proteins, a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D; Tiwari, K; Rajala, M S

    Influenza A virus undergoes frequent changes of antigenicity and contributes to seasonal epidemics or unpredictable pandemics. Nucleoprotein, encoded by gene segment 5, is an internal protein of the virus and is conserved among strains of different host origins. In the current study, we analyzed the differentially expressed proteins in A549 cells transiently transfected with the recombinant nucleoprotein of influenza A virus by 2D gel electrophoresis. The resolved protein spots on gel were identified by MALDI-TOF/Mass spectrometry analysis. The majority of the host proteins detected to be differentially abundant in recombinant nucleoprotein-expressing cells as compared to vector-transfected cells are the proteins of metabolic pathways, glycolytic enzymes, molecular chaperones and cytoskeletal proteins. We further demonstrated the interaction of virus nucleoprotein with some of the identified host cellular proteins. In vitro binding assay carried out using the purified recombinant nucleoprotein (pET29a+NP-His) and A549 cell lysate confirmed the interaction between nucleoprotein and host proteins, such as alpha enolase 1, pyruvate kinase and β-actin. The preliminary data of our study provides the information on virus nucleoprotein interaction with proteins involved in glycolysis. However, studies are ongoing to understand the significance of these interactions in modulating the host factors during virus replication.

  4. Proteome Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi Response to Environmental Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, Thomas E.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Yang, Xiaohua; Nicora, Carrie D.; Camp, David G.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-11-02

    We examined global changes in protein expression in the B31 strain of Borrelia burgdorferi, in response to two environmental cues (pH and temperature) chosen for their reported similarity to those encountered at different stages of the organism’s life cycle. Multidimensional nano-liquid chromatographic separations coupled with tandem mass spectrometry were used to examine the array of proteins (i.e., the proteome) of B. burgdorferi for different pH and temperature culture conditions. Changes in pH and temperature elicited in vitro adaptations of this spirochete known to cause Lyme disease and led to alterations in protein expression that are associated with increased microbial pathogenesis. We identified 1031 proteins that represent 59% of the annotated genome of B. burgdorferi and elucidated a core proteome of 414 proteins that were present in all environmental conditions investigated. Observed changes in protein abundances indicated varied replicon usage, as well as proteome functional distributions between the in vitro cell culture conditions. Surprisingly, the pH and temperature conditions that mimicked B. burgdorferi residing in the gut of a fed tick showed a marked reduction in protein diversity. Additionally, the results provide us with leading candidates for exploring how B. burgdorferi adapts to and is able to survive in a wide variety of environmental conditions and lay a foundation for planned in situ studies of B. burgdorferi isolated from the tick midgut and infected animals.

  5. Proteomic analysis of urine in rats chronically exposed to fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Claudia Ayumi Nakai; Leite, Aline de Lima; da Silva, Thelma Lopes; dos Santos, Lucilene Delazari; Nogueira, Fábio César Sousa; Santos, Keity Souza; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; Palma, Mario Sérgio; Domont, Gilberto Barbosa; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2011-01-01

    Urine is an ideal source of materials to search for potential disease-related biomarkers as it is produced by the affected tissues and can be easily obtained by noninvasive methods. 2-DE-based proteomic approach was used to better understand the molecular mechanisms of injury induced by fluoride (F(-)) and define potential biomarkers of dental fluorosis. Three groups of weanling male Wistar rats were treated with drinking water containing 0 (control), 5, or 50 ppm F(-) for 60 days (n = 15/group). During the experimental period, the animals were kept individually in metabolic cages, to analyze the water and food consumption, as well as fecal and urinary F(-) excretion. Urinary proteome profiles were examined using 2-DE and Colloidal Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining. A dose-response regarding F(-) intake and excretion was detected. Quantitative intensity analysis revealed 8, 11, and 8 significantly altered proteins between control vs. 5 ppm F(-), control vs. 50 ppm F(-) and 5 ppm F(-) vs. 50 ppm F(-) groups, respectively. Two proteins regulated by androgens (androgen-regulated 20-KDa protein and α-2μ-globulin) and one related to detoxification (aflatoxin-B1-aldehyde-reductase) were identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF MS/MS. Thus, proteomic analysis can help to better understand the mechanisms underlying F(-) toxicity, even in low doses. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Wild-Type and SAP Domain Mutant Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus-Infected Porcine Cells Identifies the Ubiquitin-Activating Enzyme UBE1 Required for Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zixiang; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Keshan; Cao, Weijun; Jin, Ye; Wang, Guoqing; Mao, Ruoqing; Li, Dan; Guo, Jianhong; Liu, Xiangtao; Zheng, Haixue

    2015-10-02

    Leader protein (L(pro)) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) manipulates the activities of several host proteins to promote viral replication and pathogenicity. L(pro) has a conserved protein domain SAP that is suggested to subvert interferon (IFN) production to block antiviral responses. However, apart from blocking IFN production, the roles of the SAP domain during FMDV infection in host cells remain unknown. Therefore, we identified host proteins associated with the SAP domain of L(pro) by a high-throughput quantitative proteomic approach [isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) in conjunction with liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry]. Comparison of the differentially regulated proteins in rA/FMDVΔmSAP- versus rA/FMDV-infected SK6 cells revealed 45 down-regulated and 32 up-regulated proteins that were mostly associated with metabolic, ribosome, spliceosome, and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways. The results also imply that the SAP domain has a function similar to SAF-A/B besides its potential protein inhibitor of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription (PIAS) function. One of the identified proteins UBE1 was further analyzed and displayed a novel role for the SAP domain of L(pro). Overexpression of UBE1 enhanced the replication of FMDV, and knockdown of UBE1 decreased FMDV replication. This shows that FMDV manipulates UBE1 for increased viral replication, and the SAP domain was involved in this process.

  7. Proteomic analysis of rutin-induced secreted proteins from Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Martha L; Kiernan, Urban A; Francisco, Wilson A

    2004-03-01

    Few studies have been conducted to identify the extracellular proteins and enzymes secreted by filamentous fungi, particularly with respect to dispensable metabolic pathways. Proteomic analysis has proven to be the most powerful method for identification of proteins in complex mixtures and is suitable for the study of the alteration of protein expression under different environmental conditions. The filamentous fungus Aspergillus flavus can degrade the flavonoid rutin as the only source of carbon via an extracellular enzyme system. In this study, a proteomic analysis was used to differentiate and identify the extracellular rutin-induced and non-induced proteins secreted by A. flavus. The secreted proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. While 15 rutin-induced proteins and 7 non-induced proteins were identified, more than 90 protein spots remain unidentified, indicating that these proteins are either novel proteins or proteins that have not yet been sequenced.

  8. A proteomics method using immunoaffinity fluorogenic derivatization-liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (FD-LC-MS/MS) to identify a set of interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Katsunori; Saitoh, Ryoichi; Ishigai, Masaki; Imai, Kazuhiro

    2018-02-01

    Biological functions in organisms are usually controlled by a set of interacting proteins, and identifying the proteins that interact is useful for understanding the mechanism of the functions. Immunoprecipitation is a method that utilizes the affinity of an antibody to isolate and identify the proteins that have interacted in a biological sample. In this study, the FD-LC-MS/MS method, which involves fluorogenic derivatization followed by separation and quantification by HPLC and finally identification of proteins by HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry, was used to identify proteins in immunoprecipitated samples, using heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) as a model of an interacting protein in HepaRG cells. As a result, HSC70 protein, which was known to form a complex with HSP90, was isolated, together with three different types of HSP90-beta. The results demonstrated that the proposed immunoaffinity-FD-LC-MS/MS method could be useful for simultaneously detecting and identifying the proteins that interact with a certain protein. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Quantitative proteomic analysis of paired colorectal cancer and non-tumorigenic tissues reveals signature proteins and perturbed pathways involved in CRC progression and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Manveen K; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Kim, Hoguen; Park, Cheol Keun; Baker, Mark S; Packer, Nicolle H; Paik, Young-Ki; Hancock, William S; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Modern proteomics has proven instrumental in our understanding of the molecular deregulations associated with the development and progression of cancer. Herein, we profile membrane-enriched proteome of tumor and adjacent normal tissues from eight CRC patients using label-free nanoLC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteomics and advanced pathway analysis. Of the 948 identified proteins, 184 proteins were differentially expressed (P1.5) between the tumor and non-tumor tissue (69 up-regulated and 115 down-regulated in tumor tissues). The CRC tumor and non-tumor tissues clustered tightly in separate groups using hierarchical cluster analysis of the differentially expressed proteins, indicating a strong CRC-association of this proteome subset. Specifically, cancer associated proteins such as FN1, TNC, DEFA1, ITGB2, MLEC, CDH17, EZR and pathways including actin cytoskeleton and RhoGDI signaling were deregulated. Stage-specific proteome signatures were identified including up-regulated ribosomal proteins and down-regulated annexin proteins in early stage CRC. Finally, EGFR(+) CRC tissues showed an EGFR-dependent down-regulation of cell adhesion molecules, relative to EGFR(-) tissues. Taken together, this study provides a detailed map of the altered proteome and associated protein pathways in CRC, which enhances our mechanistic understanding of CRC biology and opens avenues for a knowledge-driven search for candidate CRC protein markers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Proteomic Signatures of Thymomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linan Wang

    Full Text Available Based on the histological features and outcome, the current WHO classification separates thymomas into A, AB, B1, B2 and B3 subtypes. It is hypothesized that the type A thymomas are derived from the thymic medulla while the type B thymomas are derived from the cortex. Due to occasional histological overlap between the tumor subtypes creating difficulties in their separation, the aim of this study was to provide their proteomic characterization and identify potential immunohistochemical markers aiding in tissue diagnosis. Pair-wise comparison of neoplastic and normal thymus by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS of formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue revealed 61 proteins differentially expressed in thymomas compared to normal tissue. Hierarchical clustering showed distinct segregation of subtypes AB, B1 and B2 from that of A and B3. Most notably, desmoyokin, a protein that is encoded by the AHNAK gene, was associated with type A thymomas and medulla of normal thymus, by LC-MS/MS and immunohistochemistry. In this global proteomic characterization of the thymoma, several proteins unique to different thymic compartments and thymoma subtypes were identified. Among differentially expressed proteins, desmoyokin is a marker specific for thymic medulla and is potentially promising immunohistochemical marker in separation of type A and B3 thymomas.

  11. The toxicity of NaF on BmN cells and a comparative proteomics approach to identify protein expression changes in cells under NaF-stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liang; Chen, Huiqing; Yao, Chun; Chang, Cheng; Xia, Hengchuan; Zhang, Chunxia; Zhou, Yang; Yao, Qin; Chen, Keping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • On the cellular level, we identified IC 50 of NaF on BmN cell by flow cytometry. • High concentration of NaF gives effect on BmN cell morphology. • Five significantly differential proteins were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. • ALDH2 and WPH were up-regulated, while CRT and SCF were down-regulated, providing new information for metabolic pathway of fluoride. - Abstract: Fluorides negatively affect the development of organisms and are a threat to human health and environmental safety. In this study, Bombyx mori N cell line (BmN) were used to explore effects of NaF on insect cells. We found that 8 h (hrs) culture with high concentration of NaF (≥1 mM) induced significantly morphological changes. Dose-response curves of 72 h continuously cultured BmN treated with NaF showed that the half inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) value was 56.60 μM. Treatment of BmN with 100 and 300 μM of NaF induced apoptosis and necrosis. 2-D electrophoresis of whole cell extracted from BmN showed that treatment with 300 μM NaF up-regulated 32 proteins and down-regulated 11 proteins when compared with controls. We identified 5 different proteins by MALDI-TOF MS, and 4 of them were identified for the first time, including 2 up-regulated proteins (mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH2 and prohibitin protein WPH) and 2 down-regulated proteins (calreticulin precursor CRT and DNA supercoiling factor SCF). These observations were further confirmed by fluorescence quantitative PCR. Together, our data suggest that these target proteins could be regarded as targets influenced by NaF and also provide clues for studies on the response metabolism pathway under NaF stress

  12. The toxicity of NaF on BmN cells and a comparative proteomics approach to identify protein expression changes in cells under NaF-stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liang; Chen, Huiqing [Institute of Life Sciences, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Yao, Chun [Department of Stomatology, Zhenjiang First People’s Hospital, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Chang, Cheng; Xia, Hengchuan; Zhang, Chunxia; Zhou, Yang; Yao, Qin [Institute of Life Sciences, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Chen, Keping, E-mail: kpchen@ujs.edu.cn [Institute of Life Sciences, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • On the cellular level, we identified IC{sub 50} of NaF on BmN cell by flow cytometry. • High concentration of NaF gives effect on BmN cell morphology. • Five significantly differential proteins were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. • ALDH2 and WPH were up-regulated, while CRT and SCF were down-regulated, providing new information for metabolic pathway of fluoride. - Abstract: Fluorides negatively affect the development of organisms and are a threat to human health and environmental safety. In this study, Bombyx mori N cell line (BmN) were used to explore effects of NaF on insect cells. We found that 8 h (hrs) culture with high concentration of NaF (≥1 mM) induced significantly morphological changes. Dose-response curves of 72 h continuously cultured BmN treated with NaF showed that the half inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) value was 56.60 μM. Treatment of BmN with 100 and 300 μM of NaF induced apoptosis and necrosis. 2-D electrophoresis of whole cell extracted from BmN showed that treatment with 300 μM NaF up-regulated 32 proteins and down-regulated 11 proteins when compared with controls. We identified 5 different proteins by MALDI-TOF MS, and 4 of them were identified for the first time, including 2 up-regulated proteins (mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH2 and prohibitin protein WPH) and 2 down-regulated proteins (calreticulin precursor CRT and DNA supercoiling factor SCF). These observations were further confirmed by fluorescence quantitative PCR. Together, our data suggest that these target proteins could be regarded as targets influenced by NaF and also provide clues for studies on the response metabolism pathway under NaF stress.

  13. Genomic profiling in Down syndrome acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies histone gene deletions associated with altered methylation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudin, Michael G.; Wang, Jinhua; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood; Gurusiddappa, Sivashankarappa; Meyer, Julia; Condos, Gregory; Morrison, Debra; Tsimelzon, Anna; Devidas, Meenakshi; Heerema, Nyla A.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Plon, Sharon E.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Basso, Giuseppe; Pession, Andrea; Bhojwani, Deepa; Carroll, William L.; Rabin, Karen R.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Down syndrome (DS) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have distinct clinical and biological features. Whereas most DS-ALL cases lack the sentinel cytogenetic lesions that guide risk assignment in childhood ALL, JAK2 mutations and CRLF2 overexpression are highly enriched. To further characterize the unique biology of DS-ALL, we performed genome-wide profiling of 58 DS-ALL and 68 non-Down syndrome (NDS) ALL cases by DNA copy number, loss of heterozygosity, gene expression, and methylation analyses. We report a novel deletion within the 6p22 histone gene cluster as significantly more frequent in DS-ALL, occurring in 11 DS (22%) and only two NDS cases (3.1%) (Fisher’s exact p = 0.002). Homozygous deletions yielded significantly lower histone expression levels, and were associated with higher methylation levels, distinct spatial localization of methylated promoters, and enrichment of highly methylated genes for specific pathways and transcription factor binding motifs. Gene expression profiling demonstrated heterogeneity of DS-ALL cases overall, with supervised analysis defining a 45-transcript signature associated with CRLF2 overexpression. Further characterization of pathways associated with histone deletions may identify opportunities for novel targeted interventions. PMID:21647151

  14. T cell receptor sequencing of early-stage breast cancer tumors identifies altered clonal structure of the T cell repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, John F; Wheeler, Amanda J; Chan, Natalie H; Hanft, Violet R; Dirbas, Frederick M; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Quake, Stephen R

    2017-11-28

    Tumor-infiltrating T cells play an important role in many cancers, and can improve prognosis and yield therapeutic targets. We characterized T cells infiltrating both breast cancer tumors and the surrounding normal breast tissue to identify T cells specific to each, as well as their abundance in peripheral blood. Using immune profiling of the T cell beta-chain repertoire in 16 patients with early-stage breast cancer, we show that the clonal structure of the tumor is significantly different from adjacent breast tissue, with the tumor containing ∼2.5-fold greater density of T cells and higher clonality compared with normal breast. The clonal structure of T cells in blood and normal breast is more similar than between blood and tumor, and could be used to distinguish tumor from normal breast tissue in 14 of 16 patients. Many T cell sequences overlap between tissue and blood from the same patient, including ∼50% of T cells between tumor and normal breast. Both tumor and normal breast contain high-abundance "enriched" sequences that are absent or of low abundance in the other tissue. Many of these T cells are either not detected or detected with very low frequency in the blood, suggesting the existence of separate compartments of T cells in both tumor and normal breast. Enriched T cell sequences are typically unique to each patient, but a subset is shared between many different patients. We show that many of these are commonly generated sequences, and thus unlikely to play an important role in the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  15. Artificial intelligence in neurodegenerative disease research: use of IBM Watson to identify additional RNA-binding proteins altered in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkar, Nadine; Kovalik, Tina; Lorenzini, Ileana; Spangler, Scott; Lacoste, Alix; Sponaugle, Kyle; Ferrante, Philip; Argentinis, Elenee; Sattler, Rita; Bowser, Robert

    2018-02-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with no effective treatments. Numerous RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have been shown to be altered in ALS, with mutations in 11 RBPs causing familial forms of the disease, and 6 more RBPs showing abnormal expression/distribution in ALS albeit without any known mutations. RBP dysregulation is widely accepted as a contributing factor in ALS pathobiology. There are at least 1542 RBPs in the human genome; therefore, other unidentified RBPs may also be linked to the pathogenesis of ALS. We used IBM Watson ® to sieve through all RBPs in the genome and identify new RBPs linked to ALS (ALS-RBPs). IBM Watson extracted features from published literature to create semantic similarities and identify new connections between entities of interest. IBM Watson analyzed all published abstracts of previously known ALS-RBPs, and applied that text-based knowledge to all RBPs in the genome, ranking them by semantic similarity to the known set. We then validated the Watson top-ten-ranked RBPs at the protein and RNA levels in tissues from ALS and non-neurological disease controls, as well as in patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. 5 RBPs previously unlinked to ALS, hnRNPU, Syncrip, RBMS3, Caprin-1 and NUPL2, showed significant alterations in ALS compared to controls. Overall, we successfully used IBM Watson to help identify additional RBPs altered in ALS, highlighting the use of artificial intelligence tools to accelerate scientific discovery in ALS and possibly other complex neurological disorders.

  16. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Mads; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias

    2004-01-01

    Proteomic technologies provide an excellent means for analysis of body fluids for cataloging protein constituents and identifying biomarkers for early detection of cancers. The biomarkers currently available for pancreatic cancer, such as CA19-9, lack adequate sensitivity and specificity...... contributing to late diagnosis of this deadly disease. In this study, we carried out a comprehensive characterization of the "pancreatic juice proteome" in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Pancreatic juice was first fractionated by 1-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequently analyzed by liquid...... in this study could be directly assessed for their potential as biomarkers for pancreatic cancer by quantitative proteomics methods or immunoassays....

  17. [Proteomics and transfusion medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, N; Prudent, M; Crettaz, D; Tissot, J-D

    2011-04-01

    The term "proteomics" covers tools and techniques that are used to analyze and characterize complex mixtures of proteins from various biological samples. In this short review, a typical proteomic approach, related to the study of particular and illustrative situation related to transfusion medicine is reported. This "case report" will allow the reader to be familiar with a practical proteomic approach of a real situation, and will permit to describe the tools that are usually used in proteomic labs, and, in a second part, to present various proteomic applications in transfusion medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Intact Flagella of Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei Cells Identifies Novel Flagellar Proteins with Unique Sub-localization and Dynamics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subota, Ines; Julkowska, Daria; Vincensini, Laetitia; Reeg, Nele; Buisson, Johanna; Blisnick, Thierry; Huet, Diego; Perrot, Sylvie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Duchateau, Magalie; Hourdel, Véronique; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Cayet, Nadège; Namane, Abdelkader; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are complex organelles made of hundreds of proteins of highly variable structures and functions. Here we report the purification of intact flagella from the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei using mechanical shearing. Structural preservation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that showed that flagella still contained typical elements such as the membrane, the axoneme, the paraflagellar rod, and the intraflagellar transport particles. It also revealed that flagella severed below the basal body, and were not contaminated by other cytoskeletal structures such as the flagellar pocket collar or the adhesion zone filament. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 751 proteins with high confidence, including 88% of known flagellar components. Comparison with the cell debris fraction revealed that more than half of the flagellum markers were enriched in flagella and this enrichment criterion was taken into account to identify 212 proteins not previously reported to be associated to flagella. Nine of these were experimentally validated including a 14-3-3 protein not yet reported to be associated to flagella and eight novel proteins termed FLAM (FLAgellar Member). Remarkably, they localized to five different subdomains of the flagellum. For example, FLAM6 is restricted to the proximal half of the axoneme, no matter its length. In contrast, FLAM8 is progressively accumulating at the distal tip of growing flagella and half of it still needs to be added after cell division. A combination of RNA interference and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching approaches demonstrated very different dynamics from one protein to the other, but also according to the stage of construction and the age of the flagellum. Structural proteins are added to the distal tip of the elongating flagellum and exhibit slow turnover whereas membrane proteins such as the arginine kinase show rapid turnover without a detectible polarity. PMID:24741115

  19. Proteomic analysis of intact flagella of procyclic Trypanosoma brucei cells identifies novel flagellar proteins with unique sub-localization and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subota, Ines; Julkowska, Daria; Vincensini, Laetitia; Reeg, Nele; Buisson, Johanna; Blisnick, Thierry; Huet, Diego; Perrot, Sylvie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Duchateau, Magalie; Hourdel, Véronique; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Cayet, Nadège; Namane, Abdelkader; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    Cilia and flagella are complex organelles made of hundreds of proteins of highly variable structures and functions. Here we report the purification of intact flagella from the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei using mechanical shearing. Structural preservation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that showed that flagella still contained typical elements such as the membrane, the axoneme, the paraflagellar rod, and the intraflagellar transport particles. It also revealed that flagella severed below the basal body, and were not contaminated by other cytoskeletal structures such as the flagellar pocket collar or the adhesion zone filament. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 751 proteins with high confidence, including 88% of known flagellar components. Comparison with the cell debris fraction revealed that more than half of the flagellum markers were enriched in flagella and this enrichment criterion was taken into account to identify 212 proteins not previously reported to be associated to flagella. Nine of these were experimentally validated including a 14-3-3 protein not yet reported to be associated to flagella and eight novel proteins termed FLAM (FLAgellar Member). Remarkably, they localized to five different subdomains of the flagellum. For example, FLAM6 is restricted to the proximal half of the axoneme, no matter its length. In contrast, FLAM8 is progressively accumulating at the distal tip of growing flagella and half of it still needs to be added after cell division. A combination of RNA interference and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching approaches demonstrated very different dynamics from one protein to the other, but also according to the stage of construction and the age of the flagellum. Structural proteins are added to the distal tip of the elongating flagellum and exhibit slow turnover whereas membrane proteins such as the arginine kinase show rapid turnover without a detectible polarity. © 2014 by The

  20. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-03-20

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  1. Network-based analysis of proteomic profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Limsoon

    2016-01-26

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is a widely used and powerful tool for profiling systems-wide protein expression changes. It can be applied for various purposes, e.g. biomarker discovery in diseases and study of drug responses. Although RNA-based high-throughput methods have been useful in providing glimpses into the underlying molecular processes, the evidences they provide are indirect. Furthermore, RNA and corresponding protein levels have been known to have poor correlation. On the other hand, MS-based proteomics tend to have consistency issues (poor reproducibility and inter-sample agreement) and coverage issues (inability to detect the entire proteome) that need to be urgently addressed. In this talk, I will discuss how these issues can be addressed by proteomic profile analysis techniques that use biological networks (especially protein complexes) as the biological context. In particular, I will describe several techniques that we have been developing for network-based analysis of proteomics profile. And I will present evidence that these techniques are useful in identifying proteomics-profile analysis results that are more consistent, more reproducible, and more biologically coherent, and that these techniques allow expansion of the detected proteome to uncover and/or discover novel proteins.

  2. Proteomic analysis of protein phosphatase Z1 from Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadett Márkus

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase Z is a "novel type" fungus specific serine/threonine protein phosphatase. Previously our research group identified the CaPPZ1 gene in the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans and reported that the gene deletion had several important physiological consequences. In order to reveal the protein targets and the associated mechanisms behind the functions of the phosphatase a proteomic method was adopted for the comparison of the cappz1 deletion mutant and the genetically matching QMY23 control strain. Proteins extracted from the control and deletion mutant strains were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the protein spots were stained with RuBPS and Pro-Q Diamond in order to visualize the total proteome and the phosphoproteome, respectively. The alterations in spot intensities were determined by densitometry and were analysed with the Delta2D (Decodon software. Spots showing significantly different intensities between the mutant and control strains were excised from the gels and were digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were identified by LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry. As many as 15 protein spots were found that exhibited significant changes in their intensity upon the deletion of the phosphatase and 20 phosphoproteins were identified in which the level of phosphorylation was modified significantly in the mutant. In agreement with previous findings we found that the affected proteins function in protein synthesis, oxidative stress response, regulation of morphology and metabolism. Among these proteins we identified two potential CaPpz1 substrates (Eft2 and Rpp0 that may regulate the elongation step of translation. RT-qPCR experiments revealed that the expression of the genes coding for the affected proteins was not altered significantly. Thus, the absence of CaPpz1 exerted its effects via protein synthesis/degradation and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. In addition, our proteomics data strongly

  3. Proteomic analysis of protein phosphatase Z1 from Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfliegler, Walter P.; Petrényi, Katalin; Boros, Enikő; Pócsi, István; Tőzsér, József; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z is a “novel type” fungus specific serine/threonine protein phosphatase. Previously our research group identified the CaPPZ1 gene in the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans and reported that the gene deletion had several important physiological consequences. In order to reveal the protein targets and the associated mechanisms behind the functions of the phosphatase a proteomic method was adopted for the comparison of the cappz1 deletion mutant and the genetically matching QMY23 control strain. Proteins extracted from the control and deletion mutant strains were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the protein spots were stained with RuBPS and Pro-Q Diamond in order to visualize the total proteome and the phosphoproteome, respectively. The alterations in spot intensities were determined by densitometry and were analysed with the Delta2D (Decodon) software. Spots showing significantly different intensities between the mutant and control strains were excised from the gels and were digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were identified by LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry. As many as 15 protein spots were found that exhibited significant changes in their intensity upon the deletion of the phosphatase and 20 phosphoproteins were identified in which the level of phosphorylation was modified significantly in the mutant. In agreement with previous findings we found that the affected proteins function in protein synthesis, oxidative stress response, regulation of morphology and metabolism. Among these proteins we identified two potential CaPpz1 substrates (Eft2 and Rpp0) that may regulate the elongation step of translation. RT-qPCR experiments revealed that the expression of the genes coding for the affected proteins was not altered significantly. Thus, the absence of CaPpz1 exerted its effects via protein synthesis/degradation and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. In addition, our proteomics data strongly suggested a role for

  4. Proteome analysis identifies the Dpr protein of Streptococcus mutans as an important factor in the presence of early streptococcal colonizers of tooth surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Yoshida

    Full Text Available Oral streptococci are primary colonizers of tooth surfaces and Streptococcus mutans is the principal causative agent of dental caries in humans. A number of proteins are involved in the formation of monospecies biofilms by S. mutans. This study analyzed the protein expression profiles of S. mutans biofilms formed in the presence or absence of S. gordonii, a pioneer colonizer of the tooth surface, by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE. After identifying S. mutans proteins by Mass spectrometric analysis, their expression in the presence of S. gordonii was analyzed. S. mutans was inoculated with or without S. gordonii DL1. The two species were compartmentalized using 0.2-μl Anopore membranes. The biofilms on polystyrene plates were harvested, and the solubilized proteins were separated by 2-DE. When S. mutans biofilms were formed in the presence of S. gordonii, the peroxide resistance protein Dpr of the former showed 4.3-fold increased expression compared to biofilms that developed in the absence of the pioneer colonizer. In addition, we performed a competition assay using S. mutans antioxidant protein mutants together with S. gordonii and other initial colonizers. Growth of the dpr-knockout S. mutans mutant was significantly inhibited by S. gordonii, as well as by S. sanguinis. Furthermore, a cell viability assay revealed that the viability of the dpr-defective mutant was significantly attenuated compared to the wild-type strain when co-cultured with S. gordonii. Therefore, these results suggest that Dpr might be one of the essential proteins for S. mutans survival on teeth in the presence of early colonizing oral streptococci.

  5. Proteome Analysis Identifies the Dpr Protein of Streptococcus mutans as an Important Factor in the Presence of Early Streptococcal Colonizers of Tooth Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akihiro; Niki, Mamiko; Yamamoto, Yuji; Yasunaga, Ai; Ansai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Oral streptococci are primary colonizers of tooth surfaces and Streptococcus mutans is the principal causative agent of dental caries in humans. A number of proteins are involved in the formation of monospecies biofilms by S. mutans. This study analyzed the protein expression profiles of S. mutans biofilms formed in the presence or absence of S. gordonii, a pioneer colonizer of the tooth surface, by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). After identifying S. mutans proteins by Mass spectrometric analysis, their expression in the presence of S. gordonii was analyzed. S. mutans was inoculated with or without S. gordonii DL1. The two species were compartmentalized using 0.2-μl Anopore membranes. The biofilms on polystyrene plates were harvested, and the solubilized proteins were separated by 2-DE. When S. mutans biofilms were formed in the presence of S. gordonii, the peroxide resistance protein Dpr of the former showed 4.3-fold increased expression compared to biofilms that developed in the absence of the pioneer colonizer. In addition, we performed a competition assay using S. mutans antioxidant protein mutants together with S. gordonii and other initial colonizers. Growth of the dpr-knockout S. mutans mutant was significantly inhibited by S. gordonii, as well as by S. sanguinis. Furthermore, a cell viability assay revealed that the viability of the dpr-defective mutant was significantly attenuated compared to the wild-type strain when co-cultured with S. gordonii. Therefore, these results suggest that Dpr might be one of the essential proteins for S. mutans survival on teeth in the presence of early colonizing oral streptococci. PMID:25816242

  6. The state of proteome profiling in the fungal genus Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yonghyun; Nandakumar, M P; Marten, Mark R

    2008-03-01

    Aspergilli are an important genus of filamentous fungi that contribute to a multibillion dollar industry. Since many fungal genome sequencing were recently completed, it would be advantageous to profile their proteome to better understand the fungal cell factory. Here, we review proteomic data generated for the Aspergilli in recent years. Thus far, a combined total of 28 cell surface, 102 secreted and 139 intracellular proteins have been identified based on 10 different studies on Aspergillus proteomics. A summary proteome map highlighting identified proteins in major metabolic pathway is presented.

  7. Differential Proteomics Identification of HSP90 as Potential Serum Biomarker in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Two-dimensional Electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyi Sun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study is to identify the potential biomarkers involved in Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC carcinogenesis. A comparative proteomics approach was utilized to identify the differentially expressed proteins in the serum of 10 HCC patients and 10 controls. A total of 12 significantly altered proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. Of the 12 proteins identified, HSP90 was one of the most significantly altered proteins and its over-expression in the serum of 20 HCC patients was confirmed using ELISA analysis. The observations suggest that HSP90 might be a potential biomarker for early diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring in the therapy of HCC. This work demonstrates that a comprehensive strategy of proteomic identification combined with further validation should be adopted in the field of cancer biomarker discovery.

  8. Shotgun proteomics reveals physiological response to ocean acidification in Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins-Schiffman, Emma; Coffey, William D; Hua, Wilber; Nunn, Brook L; Dickinson, Gary H; Roberts, Steven B

    2014-11-03

    Ocean acidification as a result of increased anthropogenic CO2 emissions is occurring in marine and estuarine environments worldwide. The coastal ocean experiences additional daily and seasonal fluctuations in pH that can be lower than projected end-of-century open ocean pH reductions. In order to assess the impact of ocean acidification on marine invertebrates, Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) were exposed to one of four different p CO2 levels for four weeks: 400 μatm (pH 8.0), 800 μatm (pH 7.7), 1000 μatm (pH 7.6), or 2800 μatm (pH 7.3). At the end of the four week exposure period, oysters in all four p CO2 environments deposited new shell, but growth rate was not different among the treatments. However, micromechanical properties of the new shell were compromised by elevated p CO2. Elevated p CO2 affected neither whole body fatty acid composition, nor glycogen content, nor mortality rate associated with acute heat shock. Shotgun proteomics revealed that several physiological pathways were significantly affected by ocean acidification, including antioxidant response, carbohydrate metabolism, and transcription and translation. Additionally, the proteomic response to a second stress differed with p CO2, with numerous processes significantly affected by mechanical stimulation at high versus low p CO2 (all proteomics data are available in the ProteomeXchange under the identifier PXD000835). Oyster physiology is significantly altered by exposure to elevated p CO2, indicating changes in energy resource use. This is especially apparent in the assessment of the effects of p CO2 on the proteomic response to a second stress. The altered stress response illustrates that ocean acidification may impact how oysters respond to other changes in their environment. These data contribute to an integrative view of the effects of ocean acidification on oysters as well as physiological trade-offs during environmental stress.

  9. Comparative and quantitative proteomics reveal the adaptive strategies of oyster larvae to ocean acidification

    KAUST Repository

    Dineshram, R.; Q., Quan; Sharma, Rakesh; Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli; Yalamanchili, Hari Krishna; Chu, Ivan; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Decreasing pH due to anthropogenic CO2 inputs, called ocean acidification (OA), can make coastal environments unfavorable for oysters. This is a serious socioeconomical issue for China which supplies >70% of the world's edible oysters. Here, we present an iTRAQ-based protein profiling approach for the detection and quantification of proteome changes under OA in the early life stage of a commercially important oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis. Availability of complete genome sequence for the pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) enabled us to confidently quantify over 1500 proteins in larval oysters. Over 7% of the proteome was altered in response to OA at pHNBS 7.6. Analysis of differentially expressed proteins and their associated functional pathways showed an upregulation of proteins involved in calcification, metabolic processes, and oxidative stress, each of which may be important in physiological adaptation of this species to OA. The downregulation of cytoskeletal and signal transduction proteins, on the other hand, might have impaired cellular dynamics and organelle development under OA. However, there were no significant detrimental effects in developmental processes such as metamorphic success. Implications of the differentially expressed proteins and metabolic pathways in the development of OA resistance in oyster larvae are discussed. The MS proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD002138 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002138).

  10. Comparative and quantitative proteomics reveal the adaptive strategies of oyster larvae to ocean acidification

    KAUST Repository

    Dineshram, R.

    2015-10-28

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Decreasing pH due to anthropogenic CO2 inputs, called ocean acidification (OA), can make coastal environments unfavorable for oysters. This is a serious socioeconomical issue for China which supplies >70% of the world\\'s edible oysters. Here, we present an iTRAQ-based protein profiling approach for the detection and quantification of proteome changes under OA in the early life stage of a commercially important oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis. Availability of complete genome sequence for the pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) enabled us to confidently quantify over 1500 proteins in larval oysters. Over 7% of the proteome was altered in response to OA at pHNBS 7.6. Analysis of differentially expressed proteins and their associated functional pathways showed an upregulation of proteins involved in calcification, metabolic processes, and oxidative stress, each of which may be important in physiological adaptation of this species to OA. The downregulation of cytoskeletal and signal transduction proteins, on the other hand, might have impaired cellular dynamics and organelle development under OA. However, there were no significant detrimental effects in developmental processes such as metamorphic success. Implications of the differentially expressed proteins and metabolic pathways in the development of OA resistance in oyster larvae are discussed. The MS proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD002138 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002138).

  11. Review of application of mass spectrometry for analyses of anterior eye proteome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sherif; Elsobky; Ashley; M; Crane; Michael; Margolis; Teresia; A; Carreon; Sanjoy; K; Bhattacharya

    2014-01-01

    Proteins have important functional roles in the body, which can be altered in disease states. The eye is a complex organ rich in proteins; in particular, the anterior eye is very sophisticated in function and is most commonly involved in ophthalmic diseases. Proteomics, the large scale study of proteins, has greatly impacted our knowledge and understanding of gene function in the post-genomic period. The most significant breakthrough in proteomics has been mass spectrometric identification of proteins, which extends analysis far beyond the mere display of proteins that classical techniques provide. Mass spectrometry functions as a "mass analyzer" which simplifies the identification and quantification of proteins extracted from biological tissue. Mass spectrometric analysis of the anterior eye proteome provides a differential display for protein comparison of normal and diseased tissue. In this article wepresent the key proteomic findings in the recent literature related to the cornea, aqueous humor, trabecular meshwork, iris, ciliary body and lens. Through this we identified unique proteins specific to diseases related to the anterior eye.

  12. Polyphemus, Odysseus and the ovine milk proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Fasoli, Elisa; Di Francesco, Antonella; Saletti, Rosaria; Muccilli, Vera; Gallina, Serafina; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Foti, Salvatore

    2017-01-30

    In the last years the amount of ovine milk production, mainly used to formulate a wide range of different and exclusive dairy products often categorized as gourmet food, has been progressively increasing. Taking also into account that sheep milk (SM) also appears to be potentially less allergenic than cow's one, an in-depth information about its protein composition is essential to improve the comprehension of its potential benefits for human consumption. The present work reports the results of an in-depth characterization of SM whey proteome, carried out by coupling the CPLL technology with SDS-PAGE and high resolution UPLC-nESI MS/MS analysis. This approach allowed the identification of 718 different protein components, 644 of which are from unique genes. Particularly, this identification has expanded literature data about sheep whey proteome by 193 novel proteins previously undetected, many of which are involved in the defence/immunity mechanisms or in the nutrient delivery system. A comparative analysis of SM proteome known to date with cow's milk proteome, evidenced that while about 29% of SM proteins are also present in CM, 71% of the identified components appear to be unique of SM proteome and include a heterogeneous group of components which seem to have health-promoting benefits. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Urinary collagen fragments are significantly altered in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maahs, David M; Siwy, Justyna; Argilés, Angel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM) is variable, comprising different inflammatory and immune responses. Proteome analysis holds the promise of delivering insight into the pathophysiological changes associated with diabetes. Recently, we identified and validated urinary proteom...

  14. Proteome stability analysis of snap frozen, RNAlater preserved, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human colon mucosal biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Kastaniegaard, Kenneth; Padurariu, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Large repositories of well characterized RNAlater preserved samples and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples have been generated worldwide. However, the impact on the proteome of the preservation methods remain poorly described. Therefore, we analyzed the impact on the proteome of preserving...... throughput gel free quantitative proteomics. The MS proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002029....

  15. [Methods of quantitative proteomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylov, A T; Zgoda, V G

    2007-01-01

    In modern science proteomic analysis is inseparable from other fields of systemic biology. Possessing huge resources quantitative proteomics operates colossal information on molecular mechanisms of life. Advances in proteomics help researchers to solve complex problems of cell signaling, posttranslational modification, structure and functional homology of proteins, molecular diagnostics etc. More than 40 various methods have been developed in proteomics for quantitative analysis of proteins. Although each method is unique and has certain advantages and disadvantages all these use various isotope labels (tags). In this review we will consider the most popular and effective methods employing both chemical modifications of proteins and also metabolic and enzymatic methods of isotope labeling.

  16. Proteome analysis of Aspergillus ochraceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Miller, Ingrid; Tasneem, Fareeha; Böhm, Josef; Gemeiner, Manfred; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim

    2010-08-01

    Genome sequencing for many important fungi has begun during recent years; however, there is still some deficiency in proteome profiling of aspergilli. To obtain a comprehensive overview of proteins and their expression, a proteomic approach based on 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was used to investigate A. ochraceus. The cell walls of fungi are exceptionally resistant to destruction, therefore two lysis protocols were tested: (1) lysis via manual grinding using liquid nitrogen, and (2) mechanical lysis via rapid agitation with glass beads using MagNalyser. Mechanical grinding with mortar and pestle using liquid nitrogen was found to be a more efficient extraction method for our purpose, resulting in extracts with higher protein content and a clear band pattern in SDS-PAGE. Two-dimensional electrophoresis gave a complex spot pattern comprising proteins of a broad range of isoelectric points and molecular masses. The most abundant spots were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis. We could identify 31 spots representing 26 proteins, most of them involved in metabolic processes and response to stress. Seventeen spots were identified by de novo sequencing due to a lack of DNA and protein database sequences of A. ochraceus. The proteins identified in our study have been reported for the first time in A. ochraceus and this represents the first proteomic approach with identification of major proteins, when the fungus was grown under submerged culture.

  17. Proteomic analysis of MG132-treated germinating pollen reveals expression signatures associated with proteasome inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candida Vannini

    Full Text Available Chemical inhibition of the proteasome has been previously found to effectively impair pollen germination and tube growth in vitro. However, the mediators of these effects at the molecular level are unknown. By performing 2DE proteomic analysis, 24 differentially expressed protein spots, representing 14 unique candidate proteins, were identified in the pollen of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa germinated in the presence of the MG132 proteasome inhibitor. qPCR analysis revealed that 11 of these proteins are not up-regulated at the mRNA level, but are most likely stabilized by proteasome inhibition. These differentially expressed proteins are predicted to function in various pathways including energy and lipid metabolism, cell wall synthesis, protein synthesis/degradation and stress responses. In line with this evidence, the MG132-induced changes in the proteome were accompanied by an increase in ATP and ROS content and by an alteration in fatty acid composition.

  18. Clinical proteomic analysis of scrub typhus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Edmond Changkyun; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Lee, Hayoung; Song, Hyun Seok; Jun, Sangmi; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Lee, Chang-Seop; Kim, Seung Il

    2018-01-01

    Scrub typhus is an acute and febrile infectious disease caused by the Gram-negative α-proteobacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi from the family Rickettsiaceae that is widely distributed in Northern, Southern and Eastern Asia. In the present study, we analysed the serum proteome of scrub typhus patients to investigate specific clinical protein patterns in an attempt to explain pathophysiology and discover potential biomarkers of infection. Serum samples were collected from three patients (before and after treatment with antibiotics) and three healthy subjects. One-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was performed to identify differentially abundant proteins using quantitative proteomic approaches. Bioinformatic analysis was then performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Proteomic analysis identified 236 serum proteins, of which 32 were differentially expressed in normal subjects, naive scrub typhus patients and patients treated with antibiotics. Comparative bioinformatic analysis of the identified proteins revealed up-regulation of proteins involved in immune responses, especially complement system, following infection with O. tsutsugamushi , and normal expression was largely rescued by antibiotic treatment. This is the first proteomic study of clinical serum samples from scrub typhus patients. Proteomic analysis identified changes in protein expression upon infection with O. tsutsugamushi and following antibiotic treatment. Our results provide valuable information for further investigation of scrub typhus therapy and diagnosis.

  19. The Succinated Proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkley, Eric D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John; Frizell, Norma

    2014-03-30

    Succination is a chemical modification of cysteine in protein by the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, yielding S-(2-succino)cysteine (2SC). Intracellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins are increased by hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in concert with mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress in adipocytes grown in high glucose medium and in adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes. Increased succination of proteins is also detected in the kidney of a fumarase conditional knock-out mouse which develops renal tumors. Keap1, the gatekeeper of the antioxidant response, was identified as a major succinated protein in renal cancer cells, suggesting that succination may play a role in activation of the antioxidant response. A wide range of proteins is subject to succination, including enzymes, adipokines, cytoskeletal proteins and ER chaperones with functional cysteine residues. There is also significant overlap between succinated and glutathionylated proteins, and with proteins containing cysteine residues that are readily oxidized to the sulfenic (cysteic) acid. Succination of adipocyte proteins is inhibited by uncouplers, which discharge the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and by ER stress inhibitors. 2SC serves as a biomarker of mitochondrial stress or dysfunction in chronic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and cancer, and recent studies suggest that succination is a mechanistic link between mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative and ER stress, and cellular progression toward apoptosis. In this article, we review the history of the succinated proteome and the challenges associated with measuring this non-enzymatic post-translational modification of proteins by proteomics approaches.

  20. Urinary proteomic biomarkers for diagnosis and risk stratification of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a multicentric study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas D Kistler

    Full Text Available Treatment options for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD will likely become available in the near future, hence reliable diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for the disease are strongly needed. Here, we aimed to define urinary proteomic patterns in ADPKD patients, which aid diagnosis and risk stratification. By capillary electrophoresis online coupled to mass spectrometry (CE-MS, we compared the urinary peptidome of 41 ADPKD patients to 189 healthy controls and identified 657 peptides with significantly altered excretion, of which 209 could be sequenced using tandem mass spectrometry. A support-vector-machine based diagnostic biomarker model based on the 142 most consistent peptide markers achieved a diagnostic sensitivity of 84.5% and specificity of 94.2% in an independent validation cohort, consisting of 251 ADPKD patients from five different centers and 86 healthy controls. The proteomic alterations in ADPKD included, but were not limited to markers previously associated with acute kidney injury (AKI. The diagnostic biomarker model was highly specific for ADPKD when tested in a cohort consisting of 481 patients with a variety of renal and extrarenal diseases, including AKI. Similar to ultrasound, sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic score depended on patient age and genotype. We were furthermore able to identify biomarkers for disease severity and progression. A proteomic severity score was developed to predict height adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV based on proteomic analysis of 134 ADPKD patients and showed a correlation of r = 0.415 (p<0.0001 with htTKV in an independent validation cohort consisting of 158 ADPKD patients. In conclusion, the performance of peptidomic biomarker scores is superior to any other biochemical markers of ADPKD and the proteomic biomarker patterns are a promising tool for prognostic evaluation of ADPKD.

  1. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Barnaby, Omar; Steen, Hanno

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid is present in all joint cavities, and protects the articular cartilage surfaces in large by lubricating the joint, thus reducing friction. Several studies have described changes in the protein composition of synovial fluid in patients with joint disease. However, the protein concen...... data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935....

  2. Exploring glycopeptide-resistance in Staphylococcus aureus: a combined proteomics and transcriptomics approach for the identification of resistance-related markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzoni Adriana

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To unravel molecular targets involved in glycopeptide resistance, three isogenic strains of Staphylococcus aureus with different susceptibility levels to vancomycin or teicoplanin were subjected to whole-genome microarray-based transcription and quantitative proteomic profiling. Quantitative proteomics performed on membrane extracts showed exquisite inter-experimental reproducibility permitting the identification and relative quantification of >30% of the predicted S. aureus proteome. Results In the absence of antibiotic selection pressure, comparison of stable resistant and susceptible strains revealed 94 differentially expressed genes and 178 proteins. As expected, only partial correlation was obtained between transcriptomic and proteomic results during stationary-phase. Application of massively parallel methods identified one third of the complete proteome, a majority of which was only predicted based on genome sequencing, but never identified to date. Several over-expressed genes represent previously reported targets, while series of genes and proteins possibly involved in the glycopeptide resistance mechanism were discovered here, including regulators, global regulator attenuator, hyper-mutability factor or hypothetical proteins. Gene expression of these markers was confirmed in a collection of genetically unrelated strains showing altered susceptibility to glycopeptides. Conclusion Our proteome and transcriptome analyses have been performed during stationary-phase of growth on isogenic strains showing susceptibility or intermediate level of resistance against glycopeptides. Altered susceptibility had emerged spontaneously after infection with a sensitive parental strain, thus not selected in vitro. This combined analysis allows the identification of hundreds of proteins considered, so far as hypothetical protein. In addition, this study provides not only a global picture of transcription and expression adaptations

  3. Spermatogenesis in mammals: proteomic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chocu, Sophie; Calvel, Pierre; Rolland, Antoine D; Pineau, Charles

    2012-08-01

    Spermatogenesis is a highly sophisticated process involved in the transmission of genetic heritage. It includes halving ploidy, repackaging of the chromatin for transport, and the equipment of developing spermatids and eventually spermatozoa with the advanced apparatus (e.g., tightly packed mitochondrial sheat in the mid piece, elongating of the tail, reduction of cytoplasmic volume) to elicit motility once they reach the epididymis. Mammalian spermatogenesis is divided into three phases. In the first the primitive germ cells or spermatogonia undergo a series of mitotic divisions. In the second the spermatocytes undergo two consecutive divisions in meiosis to produce haploid spermatids. In the third the spermatids differentiate into spermatozoa in a process called spermiogenesis. Paracrine, autocrine, juxtacrine, and endocrine pathways all contribute to the regulation of the process. The array of structural elements and chemical factors modulating somatic and germ cell activity is such that the network linking the various cellular activities during spermatogenesis is unimaginably complex. Over the past two decades, advances in genomics have greatly improved our knowledge of spermatogenesis, by identifying numerous genes essential for the development of functional male gametes. Large-scale analyses of testicular function have deepened our insight into normal and pathological spermatogenesis. Progress in genome sequencing and microarray technology have been exploited for genome-wide expression studies, leading to the identification of hundreds of genes differentially expressed within the testis. However, although proteomics has now come of age, the proteomics-based investigation of spermatogenesis remains in its infancy. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of large-scale proteomic analyses of spermatogenesis, from germ cell development during sex determination to spermatogenesis in the adult. Indeed, a few laboratories have undertaken differential protein profiling

  4. The iron-responsive microsomal proteome of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Nicola M; Owens, Rebecca A; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Dolan, Stephen K; Mulvihill, Eoin; Clynes, Martin; Doyle, Sean

    2016-03-16

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen. Siderophore biosynthesis and iron acquisition are essential for virulence. Yet, limited data exist with respect to the adaptive nature of the fungal microsomal proteome under iron-limiting growth conditions, as encountered during host infection. Here, we demonstrate that under siderophore biosynthetic conditions--significantly elevated fusarinine C (FSC) and triacetylfusarinine C (TAFC) production (pproteome remodelling occurs. Specifically, a four-fold enrichment of transmembrane-containing proteins was observed with respect to whole cell lysates following ultracentrifugation-based microsomal extraction. Comparative label-free proteomic analysis of microsomal extracts, isolated following iron-replete and -deplete growth, identified 710 unique proteins. Scatterplot analysis (MaxQuant) demonstrated high correlation amongst biological replicates from each growth condition (Pearson correlation >0.96 within groups; biological replicates (n=4)). Quantitative and qualitative comparison revealed 231 proteins with a significant change in abundance between the iron-replete and iron-deplete conditions (pAspergillus fumigatus must acquire iron to facilitate growth and pathogenicity. Iron-chelating non-ribosomal peptides, termed siderophores, mediate iron uptake via membrane-localised transporter proteins. Here we demonstrate for the first time that growth of A. fumigatus under iron-deplete conditions, concomitant with siderophore biosynthesis, leads to an extensive remodelling of the microsomal proteome which includes significantly altered levels of 231 constituent proteins (96 increased and 135 decreased in abundance), many of which have not previously been localised to the microsome. We also demonstrate the first synthesis of a fluorescent version of fusarinine C, an extracellular A. fumigatus siderophore, and its uptake and localization under iron-restricted conditions. This infers the use of an A. fumigatus

  5. Using a novel "Integrated Biomarker Proteomic" index to assess the effects of freshwater pollutants in European eel peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Kathleen; Kestemont, Patrick; Dieu, Marc; Raes, Martine; Silvestre, Frédéric

    2016-03-30

    Using proteomic data as biomarkers of environmental pollution has the potential to be of a great interest in ecological risk assessment as they constitute early warning indicators of ecologically relevant effects on biological systems. To develop such specific and sensitive biomarkers, the use of a set of proteins is required and the identification of protein expression signatures (PES) may reflect the exposure to specific classes of pollutants. Using 2D-DIGE (Differential in Gel Electrophoresis) methodology, this study aimed at identifying specific PES on European eel (Anguilla anguilla) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after 48 h in vitro exposure to two sublethal concentrations of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT) (10 μg/L and 1mg/L) or cadmium (Cd) (1 μg/L and 100 μg/L). The present results have been supplemented with data of a first in vitro study on cells exposed to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) (10 μg/L and 1mg/L). A total of thirty-four protein spots, belonging to 18 different identified proteins found in all conditions, have been selected as possible biomarkers to develop a synthetic Integrated Biomarker Proteomic (IBP) index. IBP follows a dose-response relationship with higher values at the highest tested concentration for each pollutant (Cd: 9.96; DDT: 7.44; PFOS: 7.94) compared to the lowest tested concentration (Cd: 3.81; DDT: 2.91; PFOS: 2.06). In a second step, star plot graphs have been applied to proteomic data in order to allow visual integration of a set of early warning responses measured with protein biomarkers. Such star plots permit to discriminate the type of pollutant inducing a proteomic response. We conclude that using IBP is relevant in environmental risk assessment, giving to this index the potential to be applied as a global index of proteome alteration in endangered species such as the European eel. In this study, 34 protein spots have been selected as possible biomarkers to develop a synthetic Integrated

  6. A comprehensive proteomics study on platelet concentrates: Platelet proteome, storage time and Mirasol pathogen reduction technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunkhe, Vishal; De Cuyper, Iris M; Papadopoulos, Petros; van der Meer, Pieter F; Daal, Brunette B; Villa-Fajardo, María; de Korte, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2018-03-19

    Platelet concentrates (PCs) represent a blood transfusion product with a major concern for safety as their storage temperature (20-24°C) allows bacterial growth, and their maximum storage time period (less than a week) precludes complete microbiological testing. Pathogen inactivation technologies (PITs) provide an additional layer of safety to the blood transfusion products from known and unknown pathogens such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites. In this context, PITs, such as Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology (PRT), have been developed and are implemented in many countries. However, several studies have shown in vitro that Mirasol PRT induces a certain level of platelet shape change, hyperactivation, basal degranulation, and increased oxidative damage during storage. It has been suggested that Mirasol PRT might accelerate what has been described as the platelet storage lesion (PSL), but supportive molecular signatures have not been obtained. We aimed at dissecting the influence of both variables, that is, Mirasol PRT and storage time, at the proteome level. We present comprehensive proteomics data analysis of Control PCs and PCs treated with Mirasol PRT at storage days 1, 2, 6, and 8. Our workflow was set to perform proteomics analysis using a gel-free and label-free quantification (LFQ) approach. Semi-quantification was based on LFQ signal intensities of identified proteins using MaxQuant/Perseus software platform. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD008119. We identified marginal differences between Mirasol PRT and Control PCs during storage. However, those significant changes at the proteome level were specifically related to the functional aspects previously described to affect platelets upon Mirasol PRT. In addition, the effect of Mirasol PRT on the platelet proteome appeared not to be exclusively due to an accelerated or enhanced PSL. In summary, semi-quantitative proteomics allows to discern between proteome changes due to

  7. Comparative proteomics analysis of placenta from pregnant women with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Guo, Yueshuai; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Tao; Chen, Daozhen; Xiang, Jingying; Zhou, Zuomin

    2013-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) usually occurs in the third trimester and associated with increased risks in fetal complications. Currently, the exact cause of this disease is unknown. In this study we aim to investigate the potential proteins in placenta, which may participate in the molecular mechanisms of ICP-related fetal complications using iTRAQ-based proteomics approach. The iTRAQ analysis combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was performed to separate differentially expressed placental proteins from 4 pregnant women with ICP and 4 healthy pregnant women. Bioinformatics analysis was used to find the relative processes that these differentially expressed proteins were involved in. Three apoptosis related proteins ERp29, PRDX6 and MPO that resulted from iTRAQ-based proteomics were further verified in placenta by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Placental apoptosis was also detected by TUNEL assay. Proteomics results showed there were 38 differentially expressed proteins from pregnant women with ICP and healthy pregnant women, 29 were upregulated and 9 were downregulated in placenta from pregnant women with ICP. Bioinformatics analysis showed most of the identified proteins was functionally related to specific cell processes, including apoptosis, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism. The expression levels of ERp29, PRDX6 and MPO were consistent with the proteomics data. The apoptosis index in placenta from ICP patients was significantly increased. This preliminary work provides a better understanding of the proteomic alterations of placenta from pregnant women with ICP and may provide us some new insights into the pathophysiology and potential novel treatment targets for ICP.

  8. Proteomic Technologies for the Study of Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie D. Byrum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone cancer of children and is established during stages of rapid bone growth. The disease is a consequence of immature osteoblast differentiation, which gives way to a rapidly synthesized incompletely mineralized and disorganized bone matrix. The mechanism of osteosarcoma tumorogenesis is poorly understood, and few proteomic studies have been used to interrogate the disease thus far. Accordingly, these studies have identified proteins that have been known to be associated with other malignancies, rather than being osteosarcoma specific. In this paper, we focus on the growing list of available state-of-the-art proteomic technologies and their specific application to the discovery of novel osteosarcoma diagnostic and therapeutic targets. The current signaling markers/pathways associated with primary and metastatic osteosarcoma that have been identified by early-stage proteomic technologies thus far are also described.

  9. Proteomics in medical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, P

    2000-04-01

    The techniques of proteomics (high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis and protein characterisation) are widely used for microbiological research to analyse global protein synthesis as an indicator of gene expression. The rapid progress in microbial proteomics has been achieved through the wide availability of whole genome sequences for a number of bacterial groups. Beyond providing a basic understanding of microbial gene expression, proteomics has also played a role in medical areas of microbiology. Progress has been made in the use of the techniques for investigating the epidemiology and taxonomy of human microbial pathogens, the identification of novel pathogenic mechanisms and the analysis of drug resistance. In each of these areas, proteomics has provided new insights that complement genomic-based investigations. This review describes the current progress in these research fields and highlights some of the technical challenges existing for the application of proteomics in medical microbiology. The latter concern the analysis of genetically heterogeneous bacterial populations and the integration of the proteomic and genomic data for these bacteria. The characterisation of the proteomes of bacterial pathogens growing in their natural hosts remains a future challenge.

  10. ProteomicsDB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Tobias; Samaras, Patroklos; Frejno, Martin; Gessulat, Siegfried; Barnert, Maximilian; Kienegger, Harald; Krcmar, Helmut; Schlegl, Judith; Ehrlich, Hans-Christian; Aiche, Stephan; Kuster, Bernhard; Wilhelm, Mathias

    2018-01-04

    ProteomicsDB (https://www.ProteomicsDB.org) is a protein-centric in-memory database for the exploration of large collections of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics data. ProteomicsDB was first released in 2014 to enable the interactive exploration of the first draft of the human proteome. To date, it contains quantitative data from 78 projects totalling over 19k LC-MS/MS experiments. A standardized analysis pipeline enables comparisons between multiple datasets to facilitate the exploration of protein expression across hundreds of tissues, body fluids and cell lines. We recently extended the data model to enable the storage and integrated visualization of other quantitative omics data. This includes transcriptomics data from e.g. NCBI GEO, protein-protein interaction information from STRING, functional annotations from KEGG, drug-sensitivity/selectivity data from several public sources and reference mass spectra from the ProteomeTools project. The extended functionality transforms ProteomicsDB into a multi-purpose resource connecting quantification and meta-data for each protein. The rich user interface helps researchers to navigate all data sources in either a protein-centric or multi-protein-centric manner. Several options are available to download data manually, while our application programming interface enables accessing quantitative data systematically. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 PeptideAtlas: toward strategies for targeted proteomics and improved proteome coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Phu T; Schmid, Amy K; King, Nichole L; Kaur, Amardeep; Pan, Min; Whitehead, Kenia; Koide, Tie; Facciotti, Marc T; Goo, Young Ah; Deutsch, Eric W; Reiss, David J; Mallick, Parag; Baliga, Nitin S

    2008-09-01

    The relatively small numbers of proteins and fewer possible post-translational modifications in microbes provide a unique opportunity to comprehensively characterize their dynamic proteomes. We have constructed a PeptideAtlas (PA) covering 62.7% of the predicted proteome of the extremely halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 by compiling approximately 636 000 tandem mass spectra from 497 mass spectrometry runs in 88 experiments. Analysis of the PA with respect to biophysical properties of constituent peptides, functional properties of parent proteins of detected peptides, and performance of different mass spectrometry approaches has highlighted plausible strategies for improving proteome coverage and selecting signature peptides for targeted proteomics. Notably, discovery of a significant correlation between absolute abundances of mRNAs and proteins has helped identify low abundance of proteins as the major limitation in peptide detection. Furthermore, we have discovered that iTRAQ labeling for quantitative proteomic analysis introduces a significant bias in peptide detection by mass spectrometry. Therefore, despite identifying at least one proteotypic peptide for almost all proteins in the PA, a context-dependent selection of proteotypic peptides appears to be the most effective approach for targeted proteomics.

  12. Proteomics as a Tool for Understanding Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Martins-de-Souza, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is likely to be a multifactorial disorder, consequence of alterations in gene and protein expression since the neurodevelopment that together to environmental factors will trigger the establishment of the disease. In the post-genomic era, proteomics has emerged as a promising strategy for revealing disease and treatment biomarkers as well as a tool for the comprehension of the mechanisms of schizophrenia pathobiology. Here, there is a discussion of the potential pathways and str...

  13. FSHD myotubes with different phenotypes exhibit distinct proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassin, Alexandra; Leroy, Baptiste; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wauters, Armelle; Vanderplanck, Céline; Le Bihan, Marie-Catherine; Coppée, Frédérique; Wattiez, Ruddy; Belayew, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a progressive muscle disorder linked to a contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array in the 4q35 subtelomeric region. This deletion induces epigenetic modifications that affect the expression of several genes located in the vicinity. In each D4Z4 element, we identified the double homeobox 4 (DUX4) gene. DUX4 expresses a transcription factor that plays a major role in the development of FSHD through the initiation of a large gene dysregulation cascade that causes myogenic differentiation defects, atrophy and reduced response to oxidative stress. Because miRNAs variably affect mRNA expression, proteomic approaches are required to define the dysregulated pathways in FSHD. In this study, we optimized a differential isotope protein labeling (ICPL) method combined with shotgun proteomic analysis using a gel-free system (2DLC-MS/MS) to study FSHD myotubes. Primary CD56(+) FSHD myoblasts were found to fuse into myotubes presenting various proportions of an atrophic or a disorganized phenotype. To better understand the FSHD myogenic defect, our improved proteomic procedure was used to compare predominantly atrophic or disorganized myotubes to the same matching healthy control. FSHD atrophic myotubes presented decreased structural and contractile muscle components. This phenotype suggests the occurrence of atrophy-associated proteolysis that likely results from the DUX4-mediated gene dysregulation cascade. The skeletal muscle myosin isoforms were decreased while non-muscle myosin complexes were more abundant. In FSHD disorganized myotubes, myosin isoforms were not reduced, and increased proteins were mostly involved in microtubule network organization and myofibrillar remodeling. A common feature of both FSHD myotube phenotypes was the disturbance of several caveolar proteins, such as PTRF and MURC. Taken together, our data suggest changes in trafficking and in the membrane microdomains of FSHD myotubes. Finally, the adjustment of a

  14. FSHD myotubes with different phenotypes exhibit distinct proteomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Tassin

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is a progressive muscle disorder linked to a contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array in the 4q35 subtelomeric region. This deletion induces epigenetic modifications that affect the expression of several genes located in the vicinity. In each D4Z4 element, we identified the double homeobox 4 (DUX4 gene. DUX4 expresses a transcription factor that plays a major role in the development of FSHD through the initiation of a large gene dysregulation cascade that causes myogenic differentiation defects, atrophy and reduced response to oxidative stress. Because miRNAs variably affect mRNA expression, proteomic approaches are required to define the dysregulated pathways in FSHD. In this study, we optimized a differential isotope protein labeling (ICPL method combined with shotgun proteomic analysis using a gel-free system (2DLC-MS/MS to study FSHD myotubes. Primary CD56(+ FSHD myoblasts were found to fuse into myotubes presenting various proportions of an atrophic or a disorganized phenotype. To better understand the FSHD myogenic defect, our improved proteomic procedure was used to compare predominantly atrophic or disorganized myotubes to the same matching healthy control. FSHD atrophic myotubes presented decreased structural and contractile muscle components. This phenotype suggests the occurrence of atrophy-associated proteolysis that likely results from the DUX4-mediated gene dysregulation cascade. The skeletal muscle myosin isoforms were decreased while non-muscle myosin complexes were more abundant. In FSHD disorganized myotubes, myosin isoforms were not reduced, and increased proteins were mostly involved in microtubule network organization and myofibrillar remodeling. A common feature of both FSHD myotube phenotypes was the disturbance of several caveolar proteins, such as PTRF and MURC. Taken together, our data suggest changes in trafficking and in the membrane microdomains of FSHD myotubes. Finally, the

  15. Integration of gel-based and gel-free proteomic data for functional analysis of proteins through Soybean Proteome Database

    KAUST Repository

    Komatsu, Setsuko

    2017-05-10

    The Soybean Proteome Database (SPD) stores data on soybean proteins obtained with gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The database was constructed to provide information on proteins for functional analyses. The majority of the data is focused on soybean (Glycine max ‘Enrei’). The growth and yield of soybean are strongly affected by environmental stresses such as flooding. The database was originally constructed using data on soybean proteins separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which is a gel-based proteomic technique. Since 2015, the database has been expanded to incorporate data obtained by label-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics, which is a gel-free proteomic technique. Here, the portions of the database consisting of gel-free proteomic data are described. The gel-free proteomic database contains 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as temporal and organ-specific samples of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions. In addition, data on organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored. Furthermore, the database integrates multiple omics data such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics. The SPD database is accessible at http://proteome.dc.affrc.go.jp/Soybean/. Biological significanceThe Soybean Proteome Database stores data obtained from both gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The gel-free proteomic database comprises 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as different organs of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions in a time-dependent manner. In addition, organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored in the gel-free proteomics database. A total of 44,704 proteins, including 5490 proteins identified using a gel-based proteomic technique, are stored in the SPD. It accounts for approximately 80% of all

  16. Integration of gel-based and gel-free proteomic data for functional analysis of proteins through Soybean Proteome Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Wang, Xin; Yin, Xiaojian; Nanjo, Yohei; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sakata, Katsumi

    2017-06-23

    The Soybean Proteome Database (SPD) stores data on soybean proteins obtained with gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The database was constructed to provide information on proteins for functional analyses. The majority of the data is focused on soybean (Glycine max 'Enrei'). The growth and yield of soybean are strongly affected by environmental stresses such as flooding. The database was originally constructed using data on soybean proteins separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which is a gel-based proteomic technique. Since 2015, the database has been expanded to incorporate data obtained by label-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics, which is a gel-free proteomic technique. Here, the portions of the database consisting of gel-free proteomic data are described. The gel-free proteomic database contains 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as temporal and organ-specific samples of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions. In addition, data on organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored. Furthermore, the database integrates multiple omics data such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics. The SPD database is accessible at http://proteome.dc.affrc.go.jp/Soybean/. The Soybean Proteome Database stores data obtained from both gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The gel-free proteomic database comprises 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as different organs of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions in a time-dependent manner. In addition, organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored in the gel-free proteomics database. A total of 44,704 proteins, including 5490 proteins identified using a gel-based proteomic technique, are stored in the SPD. It accounts for approximately 80% of all predicted proteins from

  17. Integration of gel-based and gel-free proteomic data for functional analysis of proteins through Soybean Proteome Database

    KAUST Repository

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Wang, Xin; Yin, Xiaojian; Nanjo, Yohei; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sakata, Katsumi

    2017-01-01

    The Soybean Proteome Database (SPD) stores data on soybean proteins obtained with gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The database was constructed to provide information on proteins for functional analyses. The majority of the data is focused on soybean (Glycine max ‘Enrei’). The growth and yield of soybean are strongly affected by environmental stresses such as flooding. The database was originally constructed using data on soybean proteins separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which is a gel-based proteomic technique. Since 2015, the database has been expanded to incorporate data obtained by label-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics, which is a gel-free proteomic technique. Here, the portions of the database consisting of gel-free proteomic data are described. The gel-free proteomic database contains 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as temporal and organ-specific samples of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions. In addition, data on organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored. Furthermore, the database integrates multiple omics data such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics. The SPD database is accessible at http://proteome.dc.affrc.go.jp/Soybean/. Biological significanceThe Soybean Proteome Database stores data obtained from both gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The gel-free proteomic database comprises 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as different organs of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions in a time-dependent manner. In addition, organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored in the gel-free proteomics database. A total of 44,704 proteins, including 5490 proteins identified using a gel-based proteomic technique, are stored in the SPD. It accounts for approximately 80% of all

  18. Proteomics in evolutionary ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, B; Millar, A H

    2016-03-01

    Evolutionary ecologists are traditionally gene-focused, as genes propagate phenotypic traits across generations and mutations and recombination in the DNA generate genetic diversity required for evolutionary processes. As a consequence, the inheritance of changed DNA provides a molecular explanation for the functional changes associated with natural selection. A direct focus on proteins on the other hand, the actual molecular agents responsible for the expression of a phenotypic trait, receives far less interest from ecologists and evolutionary biologists. This is partially due to the central dogma of molecular biology that appears to define proteins as the 'dead-end of molecular information flow' as well as technical limitations in identifying and studying proteins and their diversity in the field and in many of the more exotic genera often favored in ecological studies. Here we provide an overview of a newly forming field of research that we refer to as 'Evolutionary Proteomics'. We point out that the origins of cellular function are related to the properties of polypeptide and RNA and their interactions with the environment, rather than DNA descent, and that the critical role of horizontal gene transfer in evolution is more about coopting new proteins to impact cellular processes than it is about modifying gene function. Furthermore, post-transcriptional and post-translational processes generate a remarkable diversity of mature proteins from a single gene, and the properties of these mature proteins can also influence inheritance through genetic and perhaps epigenetic mechanisms. The influence of post-transcriptional diversification on evolutionary processes could provide a novel mechanistic underpinning for elements of rapid, directed evolutionary changes and adaptations as observed for a variety of evolutionary processes. Modern state-of the art technologies based on mass spectrometry are now available to identify and quantify peptides, proteins, protein

  19. Differential proteomic profiling of primary and recurrent chordomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su; Xu, Wei; Jiao, Jian; Jiang, Dongjie; Liu, Jian; Chen, Tenghui; Wan, Zongmiao; Xu, Leqin; Zhou, Zhenhua; Xiao, Jianru

    2015-05-01

    Chordomas are locally destructive tumors with high rates of recurrence and a poor prognosis. The mechanisms involved in chordoma recurrence remain largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the proteomic profile of a chordoma primary tumor (CSO) and a recurrent tumor (CSR) through mass spectrum in a chordoma patient who underwent surgery. Bioinformatic analysis of the profile showed that 359 proteins had a significant expression difference and 21 pathways had a striking alteration between the CSO and the CSR. The CSR showed a significant increase in carbohydrate metabolism. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) confirmed that the cancer stem cell marker activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM or CD166) expression level was higher in the recurrent than that in the primary tumor. The present study analyzed the proteomic profile change between CSO and CSR and identified a new biomarker ALCAM in recurrent chordomas. This finding sheds light on unraveling the pathophysiology of chordoma recurrence and on exploring more effective prognostic biomarkers and targeted therapies against this devastating disease.

  20. Comparative proteome analysis of human epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagné Jean-Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial ovarian cancer is a devastating disease associated with low survival prognosis mainly because of the lack of early detection markers and the asymptomatic nature of the cancer until late stage. Using two complementary proteomics approaches, a differential protein expression profile was carried out between low and highly transformed epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines which realistically mimic the phenotypic changes observed during evolution of a tumour metastasis. This investigation was aimed at a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying differentiation, proliferation and neoplastic progression of ovarian cancer. Results The quantitative profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer model cell lines TOV-81D and TOV-112D generated using iTRAQ analysis and two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled to liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry revealed some proteins with altered expression levels. Several of these proteins have been the object of interest in cancer research but others were unrecognized as differentially expressed in a context of ovarian cancer. Among these, series of proteins involved in transcriptional activity, cellular metabolism, cell adhesion or motility and cytoskeleton organization were identified, suggesting their possible role in the emergence of oncogenic pathways leading to aggressive cellular behavior. Conclusion The differential protein expression profile generated by the two proteomics approaches combined to complementary characterizations studies will open the way to more exhaustive and systematic representation of the disease and will provide valuable information that may be helpful to uncover the molecular mechanisms related to epithelial ovarian cancer.

  1. Quantitative proteomic analysis of human lung tumor xenografts treated with the ectopic ATP synthase inhibitor citreoviridin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Wu

    Full Text Available ATP synthase is present on the plasma membrane of several types of cancer cells. Citreoviridin, an ATP synthase inhibitor, selectively suppresses the proliferation and growth of lung cancer without affecting normal cells. However, the global effects of targeting ectopic ATP synthase in vivo have not been well defined. In this study, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ and provided a comprehensive insight into the complicated regulation by citreoviridin in a lung cancer xenograft model. With high reproducibility of the quantitation, we obtained quantitative proteomic profiling with 2,659 proteins identified. Bioinformatics analysis of the 141 differentially expressed proteins selected by their relative abundance revealed that citreoviridin induces alterations in the expression of glucose metabolism-related enzymes in lung cancer. The up-regulation of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis and storage of glucose indicated that citreoviridin may reduce the glycolytic intermediates for macromolecule synthesis and inhibit cell proliferation. Using comprehensive proteomics, the results identify metabolic aspects that help explain the antitumorigenic effect of citreoviridin in lung cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the links between metabolism and tumorigenesis in cancer therapy.

  2. Comparative proteomics in alkaptonuria provides insights into inflammation and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Paffetti, Alessandro; Millucci, Lia; Geminiani, Michela; Laschi, Marcella; Frediani, Bruno; Marzocchi, Barbara; Santucci, Annalisa

    2016-12-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an ultra-rare inborn error of metabolism associated with a defective catabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine leading to increased systemic levels of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excess HGA is partly excreted in the urine, partly accumulated within the body and deposited onto connective tissues under the form of an ochronotic pigment, leading to a range of clinical manifestations. No clear genotype/phenotype correlation was found in AKU, and today there is the urgent need to identify biomarkers able to monitor AKU progression and evaluate response to treatment. With this aim, we provided the first proteomic study on serum and plasma samples from alkaptonuric individuals showing pathological SAA, CRP and Advanced Oxidation Protein Products (AOPP) levels. Interesting similarities with proteomic studies on other rheumatic diseases were highlighted together with proteome alterations supporting the existence of oxidative stress and inflammation in AKU. Potential candidate biomarkers to assess disease severity, monitor disease progression and evaluate response to treatment were identified as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bergamot (Citrus bergamia Risso) fruit extracts and identified components alter expression of interleukin 8 gene in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway pathology is a fatal, autosomal, recessive genetic disease characterized by extensive lung inflammation. After induction by TNF-α, elevated concentrations of several pro-inflammatory cytokines (i.e. IL-6, IL-1β) and chemokines (i.e. IL-8) are released from airway epithelial cells. In order to reduce the excessive inflammatory response in the airways of CF patients, new therapies have been developed and in this respect, medicinal plant extracts have been studied. In this article we have investigated the possible use of bergamot extracts (Citrus bergamia Risso) and their identified components to alter the expression of IL-8 associated with the cystic fibrosis airway pathology. Methods The extracts were chemically characterized by 1H-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance), GC-FID (gas chromatography-flame ionization detector), GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) and HPLC (high pressure liquid chromatography). Both bergamot extracts and main detected chemical constituents were assayed for their biological activity measuring (a) cytokines and chemokines in culture supernatants released from cystic fibrosis IB3-1 cells treated with TNF-α by Bio-Plex cytokine assay; (b) accumulation of IL-8 mRNA by real-time PCR. Results The extracts obtained from bergamot (Citrus bergamia Risso) epicarps contain components displaying an inhibitory activity on IL-8. Particularly, the most active molecules were bergapten and citropten. These effects have been confirmed by analyzing mRNA levels and protein release in the CF cellular models IB3-1 and CuFi-1 induced with TNF-α or exposed to heat-inactivated Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusions These obtained results clearly indicate that bergapten and citropten are strong inhibitors of IL-8 expression and could be proposed for further studies to verify possible anti-inflammatory properties to reduce lung inflammation in CF patients. PMID:21496221

  4. Proteome Modification in Tomato Plants upon Long-Term Aluminum Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Suping; Okekeogbu, Ikenna; Sangireddy, Sasikiran; Ye, Zhujia; Li, Hui; Bhatti, Sarabjit; Hui, Dafeng; McDonald, Daniel W; Yang, Yong; Giri, Shree; Howe, Kevin J; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2016-05-06

    This study aimed to identify the aluminum (Al)-induced proteomes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, "Micro-Tom") after long-term exposure to the stress factor. Plants were treated in Magnavaca's solution (pH 4.5) supplemented with 7.5 μM Al(3+) ion activity over a 4 month period beginning at the emergence of flower buds and ending when the lower mature leaves started to turn yellow. Proteomes were identified using a 8-plex isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling strategy followed by a two-dimensional (high- and low-pH) chromatographic separation and final generation of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra of tryptic peptides on an LTQ-Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer. Principal component analysis revealed that the Al-treatment had induced systemic alterations in the proteomes from roots and leaves but not seed tissues. The significantly changed root proteins were shown to have putative functions in Al(3+) ion uptake and transportation, root development, and a multitude of other cellular processes. Changes in the leaf proteome indicate that the light reaction centers of photosynthetic machinery are the primary targets of Al-induced stress. Embryo and seed-coat tissues derived from Al-treated plants were enriched with stress proteins. The biological processes involving these Al-induced proteins concur with the physiological and morphological changes, such as the disturbance of mineral homeostasis (higher contents of Al, P, and Fe and reduced contents of S, Zn, and Mn in Al-treated compared to nontreated plants) in roots and smaller sizes of roots and the whole plants. More importantly, the identified significant proteins might represent a molecular mechanism for plants to develop toward establishing the Al tolerance and adaptation mechanism over a long period of stress treatment.

  5. Proteomic and functional profiles of a follicle-stimulating hormone positive human nonfunctional pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Guo, Tianyao; Peng, Fang; Long, Ying; Mu, Yun; Yang, Haiyan; Ye, Ningrong; Li, Xuejun; Zhan, Xianquan

    2015-06-01

    Nonfunctional pituitary adenoma (NFPA) is highly heterogeneous with different hormone-expressed subtypes in NFPA tissues including follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) positive, luteinizing hormone-positive, FSH/luteinizing hormone-positive, and negative types. To analyze in-depth the variations in the proteomes among different NFPA subtypes for our long-term goal to clarify molecular mechanisms of NFPA and to detect tumor biomarker for personalized medicine practice, a reference map of proteome of a human FSH-expressed NFPA tissue was described here. 2DE and PDQuest image analysis were used to array each protein. MALDI-TOF PMF and human Swiss-Prot databases with MASCOT search were used to identify each protein. A good 2DE pattern with high level of between-gel reproducibility was attained with an average positional deviation 1.98 ± 0.75 mm in the IEF direction and 1.62 ± 0.68 mm in the SDS-PAGE direction. Approximately 1200 protein spots were 2DE-detected and 192 redundant proteins that were contained in 141 protein spots were PMF-identified, representing 107 nonredundant proteins. Those proteins were located in cytoplasm, nucleus, plasma membrane, extracellular space, and so on, and those functioned in transmembrane receptor, ion channel, transcription/translation regulator, transporter, enzyme, phosphatase, kinase, and so on. Several important pathway networks were characterized from those identified proteins with DAVID and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis systems, including gluconeogenesis and glycolysis, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, cell-cycle alteration, MAPKsignaling system, immune response, TP53-signaling, VEGF-signaling, and inflammation signaling pathways. Those resulting data contribute to a functional profile of the proteome of a human FSH-positive NFPA tissue, and will serve as a reference for the heterogeneity analysis of NFPA proteomes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Alterations of white matter structural networks in patients with non-neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus identified by probabilistic tractography and connectivity-based analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Xu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: This study reveals an altered topological organization of white matter networks in non-NPSLE patients. Furthermore, this research provides new insights into the structural disruptions underlying the functional and neurocognitive deficits in non-NPSLE patients.

  7. Bacterial membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetsch, Ansgar; Wolters, Dirk

    2008-10-01

    About one quarter to one third of all bacterial genes encode proteins of the inner or outer bacterial membrane. These proteins perform essential physiological functions, such as the import or export of metabolites, the homeostasis of metal ions, the extrusion of toxic substances or antibiotics, and the generation or conversion of energy. The last years have witnessed completion of a plethora of whole-genome sequences of bacteria important for biotechnology or medicine, which is the foundation for proteome and other functional genome analyses. In this review, we discuss the challenges in membrane proteome analysis, starting from sample preparation and leading to MS-data analysis and quantification. The current state of available proteomics technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages will be described with a focus on shotgun proteomics. Then, we will briefly introduce the most abundant proteins and protein families present in bacterial membranes before bacterial membrane proteomics studies of the last years will be presented. It will be shown how these works enlarged our knowledge about the physiological adaptations that take place in bacteria during fine chemical production, bioremediation, protein overexpression, and during infections. Furthermore, several examples from literature demonstrate the suitability of membrane proteomics for the identification of antigens and different pathogenic strains, as well as the elucidation of membrane protein structure and function.

  8. Mass spectrometry based proteomics profiling as diagnostic tool in oncology: current status and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Peter; Neumaier, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Proteomics analysis has been heralded as a novel tool for identifying new and specific biomarkers that may improve diagnosis and monitoring of various disease states. Recent years have brought a number of proteomics profiling technologies. Although proteomics profiling has resulted in the detection of disease-associated differences and modification of proteins, current proteomics technologies display certain limitations that are hampering the introduction of these new technologies into clinical laboratory diagnostics and routine applications. In this review, we summarize current advances in mass spectrometry based biomarker discovery. The promises and challenges of this new technology are discussed with particular emphasis on diagnostic perspectives of mass-spectrometry based proteomics profiling for malignant diseases.

  9. Proteomics of Eosinophil Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deane F. Mosher

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We recently identified and quantified >7,000 proteins in non-activated human peripheral blood eosinophils using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS and described phosphoproteomic changes that accompany acute activation of eosinophils by interleukin-5 (IL5 (1. These data comprise a treasure trove of information about eosinophils. We illustrate the power of label-free LC–MS/MS quantification by considering four examples: complexity of eosinophil STATs, contribution of immunoproteasome subunits to eosinophil proteasomes, complement of integrin subunits, and contribution of platelet proteins originating from platelet–eosinophil complexes to the overall proteome. We describe how isobaric labeling enables robust sample-to-sample comparisons and relate the 220 phosphosites that changed significantly upon treatment with IL5 to previous studies of eosinophil activation. Finally, we review previous attempts to leverage the power of mass spectrometry to discern differences between eosinophils of healthy subjects and those with eosinophil-associated conditions and point out features of label-free quantification and isobaric labeling that are important in planning future mass spectrometric studies.

  10. Proteomics-grade de novo sequencing approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savitski, Mikhail M; Nielsen, Michael L; Kjeldsen, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The conventional approach in modern proteomics to identify proteins from limited information provided by molecular and fragment masses of their enzymatic degradation products carries an inherent risk of both false positive and false negative identifications. For reliable identification of even kn...

  11. Advances in Proteomics of Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, O; Singh, B P

    2012-04-01

    Although Mycobacterium leprae was the first bacterial pathogen identified causing human disease, it remains one of the few that is non-cultivable. Understanding the biology of M. leprae is one of the primary challenges in current leprosy research. Genomics has been extremely valuable, nonetheless, functional proteins are ultimately responsible for controlling most aspects of cellular functions, which in turn could facilitate parasitizing the host. Furthermore, bacterial proteins provide targets for most of the vaccines and immunodiagnostic tools. Better understanding of the proteomics of M. leprae could also help in developing new drugs against M. leprae. During the past nearly 15 years, there have been several developments towards the identification of M. leprae proteins employing contemporary proteomics tools. In this review, we discuss the knowledge gained on the biology and pathogenesis of M. leprae from current proteomic studies. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Mycobacterium bovis and BCG Vaccine Strains

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Ge

    2013-01-01

    , Danish, Phipps and Birkhaug by Tandem Mass Tag® (TMT®)-labeling quantitative proteomic approach. In total, 420 proteins were identified and 377 of them were quantitated for their relative abundance. We reported the number and relationship of differential

  13. Proteome analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a methodological outline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fey, S J; Nawrocki, A; Görg, A

    1997-01-01

    Proteome analysis offers a unique means of identifying important proteins, characterizing their modifications and beginning to describe their function. This is achieved through the combination of two technologies: protein separation and selection by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and protei...

  14. Proteomic analysis of liver in rats chronically exposed to fluoride.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloísa Aparecida Barbosa da Silva Pereira

    Full Text Available Fluoride (F is a potent anti-cariogenic element, but when ingestion is excessive, systemic toxicity may be observed. This can occur as acute or chronic responses, depending on both the amount of F and the time of exposure. The present study identified the profile of protein expression possibly associated with F-induced chronic hepatotoxicity. Weanling male Wistar rats (three-weeks old were divided into three groups and treated with drinking water containing 0, 5 or 50 mg/L F for 60 days (n=6/group. At this time point, serum and livers were collected for F analysis, which was done using the ion-sensitive electrode, after hexamethyldisiloxane-facilitated diffusion. Livers were also submitted to histological and proteomic analyses (2D-PAGE followed by LC-MS/MS. Western blotting was done for confirmation of the proteomic data A dose-response was observed in serum F levels. In the livers, F levels were significantly increased in the 50 mg/L F group compared to groups treated with 0 and 5 mg/L F. Liver morphometric analysis did not reveal alterations in the cellular structures and lipid droplets were present in all groups. Proteomic quantitative intensity analysis detected 33, 44, and 29 spots differentially expressed in the comparisons between control vs. 5 mg/L F, control vs. 50 mg/L F, and 5 mg/L vs. 50 mg/L F, respectively. From these, 92 proteins were successfully identified. In addition, 18, 1, and 5 protein spots were shown to be exclusive in control, 5, and 50 mg/L F, respectively. Most of proteins were related to metabolic process and pronounced alterations were seen for the high-F level group. In F-treated rats, changes in the apolipoprotein E (ApoE and GRP-78 expression may account for the F-induced toxicity in the liver. This can contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying hepatoxicity induced by F, by indicating key-proteins that should be better addressed in future studies.

  15. Identification of redox-sensitive cysteines in the arabidopsis proteome using OxiTRAQ, a quantitative redox proteomics method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Pei; Zhang, Huoming; Wang, Hai; Xia, Yiji

    2014-01-01

    -throughput quantitative proteomic approach termed OxiTRAQ for identifying proteins whose thiols undergo reversible oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells subjected to oxidative stress. In this approach, a biotinylated thiol-reactive reagent is used for differential

  16. Proteomics analysis of the DF-1 chicken fibroblasts infected with avian reovirus strain S1133.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ting Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Avian reovirus (ARV is a member of the Orthoreovirus genus in the Reoviridae family. It is the etiological agent of several diseases, among which viral arthritis and malabsorption syndrome are the most commercially important, causing considerable economic losses in the poultry industry. Although a small but increasing number of reports have characterized some aspects of ARV infection, global changes in protein expression in ARV-infected host cells have not been examined. The current study used a proteomics approach to obtain a comprehensive view of changes in protein levels in host cells upon infection by ARV. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The proteomics profiles of DF-1 chicken fibroblast cells infected with ARV strain S1133 were analyzed by two-dimensional differential-image gel electrophoresis. The majority of protein expression changes (≥ 1.5 fold, p<0.05 occurred at 72 h post-infection. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry identified 51 proteins with differential expression levels, including 25 that were upregulated during ARV infection and 26 that were downregulated. These proteins were divided into eight groups according to biological function: signal transduction, stress response, RNA processing, the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, energy metabolism, and cytoskeleton organization. They were further examined by immunoblotting to validate the observed alterations in protein expression. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of a time-course proteomic analysis of ARV-infected host cells. Notably, all identified proteins involved in signal transduction, RNA processing, and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway were downregulated in infected cells, whereas proteins involved in DNA synthesis, apoptosis, and energy production pathways were upregulated. In addition, other differentially expressed proteins were linked with the cytoskeleton

  17. Hydroponics on a chip: analysis of the Fe deficient Arabidopsis thylakoid membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Gómez, Stephen M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Nishio, John N

    2009-04-13

    The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was used to evaluate the thylakoid membrane proteome under Fe-deficient conditions. Plants were cultivated using a novel hydroponic system, called "hydroponics on a chip", which yields highly reproducible plant tissue samples for physiological analyses, and can be easily used for in vivo stable isotope labeling. The thylakoid membrane proteome, from intact chloroplasts isolated from Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient plants grown with hydroponics on a chip, was analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Intact masses of thylakoid membrane proteins were measured, many for the first time, and several proteins were identified with post-translational modifications that were altered by Fe deficiency; for example, the doubly phosphorylated form of the photosystem II oxygen evolving complex, PSBH, increased under Fe-deficiency. Increased levels of photosystem II protein subunit PSBS were detected in the Fe-deficient samples. Antioxidant enzymes, including ascorbate peroxidase and peroxiredoxin Q, were only detected in the Fe-deficient samples. We present the first biochemical evidence that the two major LHC IIb proteins (LHCB1 and LHCB2) may have significantly different functions in the thylakoid membrane. The study illustrates the utility of intact mass proteomics as an indispensable tool for functional genomics. "Hydroponics on a chip" provides the ability to grow A. thaliana under defined conditions that will be useful for systems biology.

  18. Redox proteomics and the dynamic molecular landscape of the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perluigi, Marzia; Swomley, Aaron M; Butterfield, D Allan

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the risk to develop neurodegenerative disorders increases with chronological aging. Accumulating studies contributed to characterize the age-dependent changes either at gene and protein expression level which, taken together, show that aging of the human brain results from the combination of the normal decline of multiple biological functions with environmental factors that contribute to defining disease risk of late-life brain disorders. Finding the "way out" of the labyrinth of such complex molecular interactions may help to fill the gap between "normal" brain aging and development of age-dependent diseases. To this purpose, proteomics studies are a powerful tool to better understand where to set the boundary line of healthy aging and age-related disease by analyzing the variation of protein expression levels and the major post translational modifications that determine "protein" physio/pathological fate. Increasing attention has been focused on oxidative modifications due to the crucial role of oxidative stress in aging, in addition to the fact that this type of modification is irreversible and may alter protein function. Redox proteomics studies contributed to decipher the complexity of brain aging by identifying the proteins that were increasingly oxidized and eventually dysfunctional as a function of age. The purpose of this review is to summarize the most important findings obtained by applying proteomics approaches to murine models of aging with also a brief overview of some human studies, in particular those related to dementia. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Analysis of 3-MCPD- and 3-MCPD dipalmitate-induced proteomic changes in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeuning, Albert; Sawada, Stefanie; Oberemm, Axel; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-12-01

    3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) and 3-MCPD fatty acid esters are process contaminants in foodstuff which are generated during thermal treatment. Long-term exposure to 3-MCPD or 3-MCPD esters causes toxicity especially in kidney and testis. 3-MCPD esters are efficiently hydrolyzed in the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that their toxicity is mediated by free 3-MCPD. Combined exposure to free 3-MCPD and 3-MCPD released from 3-MCPD esters might lead to dietary consumption above the tolerable daily intake of 2 μg/kg body weight/day. Suspected mechanisms of 3-MCPD toxicity include the inhibition of glycolysis and oxidative stress. Here, a comparative proteomic approach was followed to analyze the effects of 3-MCPD or 3-MCPD dipalmitate in livers from rats exposed to 10 mg/kg body weight 3-MCPD, an equimolar dose of 3-MCPD dipalmitate, or a 4-fold lower dose of the ester during a 28-day repeated-dose feeding study. Early cellular changes were monitored in the absence of overt toxicity. A comprehensive view of 3-MCPD- or 3-MCPD dipalmitate-triggered proteomic changes in rat liver links to previously proposed mechanisms of toxicity and substantially extends our knowledge on molecular hepatic effects of 3-MCPD. Organ-independent marker proteins altered upon 3-MCPD exposure, for example DJ-1/PARK7, were identified by comparison of the proteomic patterns of kidney, testis and liver. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Proteome analysis of body fluids for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Thomas; Lautenschläger, Janin; Grosskreutz, Julian; Rhode, Heidrun

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons leading to death of the patients, mostly within 2-5 years after disease onset. The pathomechanism of motor neuron degeneration is only partially understood and therapeutic strategies based on mechanistic insights are largely ineffective. The discovery of reliable biomarkers of disease diagnosis and progression is the sine qua non of both the revelation of insights into the ALS pathomechanism and the assessment of treatment efficacies. Proteomic approaches are an important pillar in ALS biomarker discovery. Cerebrospinal fluid is the most promising body fluid for differential proteome analyses, followed by blood (serum, plasma), and even urine and saliva. The present study provides an overview about reported peptide/protein biomarker candidates that showed significantly altered levels in certain body fluids of ALS patients. These findings have to be discussed according to proposed pathomechanisms to identify modifiers of disease progression and to pave the way for the development of potential therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, limitations and advantages of proteomic approaches for ALS biomarker discovery in different body fluids and reliable validation of biomarker candidates have been addressed. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals Temporal Proteomic Changes in Signaling Pathways during BV2 Mouse Microglial Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jongmin; Han, Dohyun; Wang, Joseph Injae; Park, Joonho; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Youngsoo

    2017-09-01

    The development of systematic proteomic quantification techniques in systems biology research has enabled one to perform an in-depth analysis of cellular systems. We have developed a systematic proteomic approach that encompasses the spectrum from global to targeted analysis on a single platform. We have applied this technique to an activated microglia cell system to examine changes in the intracellular and extracellular proteomes. Microglia become activated when their homeostatic microenvironment is disrupted. There are varying degrees of microglial activation, and we chose to focus on the proinflammatory reactive state that is induced by exposure to such stimuli as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Using an improved shotgun proteomics approach, we identified 5497 proteins in the whole-cell proteome and 4938 proteins in the secretome that were associated with the activation of BV2 mouse microglia by LPS or IFN-γ. Of the differentially expressed proteins in stimulated microglia, we classified pathways that were related to immune-inflammatory responses and metabolism. Our label-free parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) approach made it possible to comprehensively measure the hyper-multiplex quantitative value of each protein by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Over 450 peptides that corresponded to pathway proteins and direct or indirect interactors via the STRING database were quantified by label-free PRM in a single run. Moreover, we performed a longitudinal quantification of secreted proteins during microglial activation, in which neurotoxic molecules that mediate neuronal cell loss in the brain are released. These data suggest that latent pathways that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be discovered by constructing and analyzing a pathway network model of proteins. Furthermore, this systematic quantification platform has tremendous potential for applications in large-scale targeted analyses. The proteomics data for

  2. Proteomics Insights into Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudjoe, Emmanuel K; Saleh, Tareq; Hawkridge, Adam M; Gewirtz, David A

    2017-10-01

    Autophagy, a conserved cellular process by which cells recycle their contents either to maintain basal homeostasis or in response to external stimuli, has for the past two decades become one of the most studied physiological processes in cell biology. The 2016 Nobel Prize in Medicine and Biology awarded to Dr. Ohsumi Yoshinori, one of the first scientists to characterize this cellular mechanism, attests to its importance. The induction and consequent completion of the process of autophagy results in wide ranging changes to the cellular proteome as well as the secretome. MS-based proteomics affords the ability to measure, in an unbiased manner, the ubiquitous changes that occur when autophagy is initiated and progresses in the cell. The continuous improvements and advances in mass spectrometers, especially relating to ionization sources and detectors, coupled with advances in proteomics experimental design, has made it possible to study autophagy, among other process, in great detail. Innovative labeling strategies and protein separation techniques as well as complementary methods including immuno-capture/blotting/staining have been used in proteomics studies to provide more specific protein identification. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in proteomics studies focused on autophagy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Translational plant proteomics: A perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agrawal, G.K.; Pedreschi, R.; Barkla, B.J.; Bindschedler, L.V.; Cramer, R.; Sarkar, A.; Renaut, J.; Job, D.; Rakwal, R.

    2012-01-01

    Translational proteomics is an emerging sub-discipline of the proteomics field in the biological sciences. Translational plant proteomics aims to integrate knowledge from basic sciences to translate it into field applications to solve issues related but not limited to the recreational and economic

  4. Comparative proteomic profiling of soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carberry, Steven; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Zhang, Yaxin; Winkler, Claudia K; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is due to genetic abnormalities in the dystrophin gene and represents one of the most frequent genetic childhood diseases. In the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse model of dystrophinopathy, different subtypes of skeletal muscles are affected to a varying degree albeit the same single base substitution within exon 23 of the dystrophin gene. Thus, to determine potential muscle subtype-specific differences in secondary alterations due to a deficiency in dystrophin, in this study, we carried out a comparative histological and proteomic survey of mdx muscles. We intentionally included the skeletal muscles that are often used for studying the pathomechanism of muscular dystrophy. Histological examinations revealed a significantly higher degree of central nucleation in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles compared with the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. Muscular hypertrophy of 20-25% was likewise only observed in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx mice, but not in the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. For proteomic analysis, muscle protein extracts were separated by fluorescence two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Proteins with a significant change in their expression were identified by mass spectrometry. Proteomic profiling established an altered abundance of 24, 17, 19 and 5 protein species in the dystrophin-deficient soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscle, respectively. The key proteomic findings were verified by immunoblot analysis. The identified proteins are involved in the contraction-relaxation cycle, metabolite transport, muscle metabolism and the cellular stress response. Thus, histological and proteomic profiling of muscle subtypes from mdx mice indicated that distinct skeletal muscles are differentially affected by the loss of the membrane cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Varying degrees of perturbed protein

  5. Pathway analysis of kidney cancer using proteomics and metabolic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiehn Oliver

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the sixth leading cause of cancer death and is responsible for 11,000 deaths per year in the US. Approximately one-third of patients present with disease which is already metastatic and for which there is currently no adequate treatment, and no biofluid screening tests exist for RCC. In this study, we have undertaken a comprehensive proteomic analysis and subsequently a pathway and network approach to identify biological processes involved in clear cell RCC (ccRCC. We have used these data to investigate urinary markers of RCC which could be applied to high-risk patients, or to those being followed for recurrence, for early diagnosis and treatment, thereby substantially reducing mortality of this disease. Results Using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis, we identified 31 proteins which were differentially expressed with a high degree of significance in ccRCC as compared to adjacent non-malignant tissue, and we confirmed some of these by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and comparison to published transcriptomic data. When evaluated by several pathway and biological process analysis programs, these proteins are demonstrated to be involved with a high degree of confidence (p values Conclusion Extensive pathway and network analysis allowed for the discovery of highly significant pathways from a set of clear cell RCC samples. Knowledge of activation of these processes will lead to novel assays identifying their proteomic and/or metabolomic signatures in biofluids of patient at high risk for this disease; we provide pilot data for such a urinary bioassay. Furthermore, we demonstrate how the knowledge of networks, processes, and pathways altered in kidney cancer may be used to influence the choice of optimal therapy.

  6. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Carbonylated Proteins from the Striatum and Cortex of Pesticide-Treated Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Coughlan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies indicate exposures to the herbicide paraquat (PQ and fungicide maneb (MB are associated with increased risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Oxidative stress appears to be a premier mechanism that underlies damage to the nigrostriatal dopamine system in PD and pesticide exposure. Enhanced oxidative stress leads to lipid peroxidation and production of reactive aldehydes; therefore, we conducted proteomic analyses to identify carbonylated proteins in the striatum and cortex of pesticide-treated mice in order to elucidate possible mechanisms of toxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were treated biweekly for 6 weeks with saline, PQ (10 mg/kg, MB (30 mg/kg, or the combination of PQ and MB (PQMB. Treatments resulted in significant behavioral alterations in all treated mice and depleted striatal dopamine in PQMB mice. Distinct differences in 4-hydroxynonenal-modified proteins were observed in the striatum and cortex. Proteomic analyses identified carbonylated proteins and peptides from the cortex and striatum, and pathway analyses revealed significant enrichment in a variety of KEGG pathways. Further analysis showed enrichment in proteins of the actin cytoskeleton in treated samples, but not in saline controls. These data indicate that treatment-related effects on cytoskeletal proteins could alter proper synaptic function, thereby resulting in impaired neuronal function and even neurodegeneration.

  7. Nutritional Proteomics: Investigating molecular mechanisms underlying the health beneficial effect of functional foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Kawashima

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjective: We introduce a new technical and conceptual term “nutritional proteomics” by identifying and quantifying the proteins and their changes in a certain organ or tissue dependent on the food intake by utilizing a mass spectrometry-based proteomics technique.Purpose: Food intake is essentially important for every life on earth to sustain the physical as well as mental functions. The outcome of food intake will be manifested in the health state and its dysfunction. The molecular information about the protein expression change caused by diets will assist us to understand the significance of functional foods. We wish to develop nutritional proteomics to promote a new area in functional food studies for a better understanding of the role of functional foods in health and disease.Methods: We chose two classes of food ingredients to show the feasibility of nutritional proteomics, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids both of which are involved in the inflammation/anti-inflammation axis. Each class of the polyunsaturated fatty acids was mixed in mouse chow respectively. The liver tissue of mice fed with omega-3 diet or omega-3 diet was analyzed by the state-of-the-art shotgun proteomics using nano-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The data were analyzed by the number of differentially expressed proteins that were guaranteed by 1% false discovery rate for protein identification and by the statistical significance of variance evaluated by p-value in two-tailed distribution analysis better than 0.05 (n=4. The differential pattern of protein expression was characterized with Gene Ontology designation.Results: The data analysis of the shotgun nutritional proteomics identified 2,810 proteins that are validated with 1% FDR. Among these 2,810 proteins, 125 were characterized with statistical significance of variance (p<0.05; n=4 between the omega-3 diet and the omega-6 diet by twotailed distribution analysis. The results

  8. Proteomics in uveal melanoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramasamy, Pathma

    2014-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with an incidence of 5-7 per million per year. It is associated with the development of metastasis in about 50% of cases, and 40% of patients with uveal melanoma die of metastatic disease despite successful treatment of the primary tumour. The survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years are 65%, 50% and 45% respectively. Unlike progress made in many other areas of cancer, uveal melanoma is still poorly understood and survival rates have remained similar over the past 25 years. Recently, advances made in molecular genetics have improved our understanding of this disease and stratification of patients into low risk and high risk for developing metastasis. However, only a limited number of studies have been performed using proteomic methods. This review will give an overview of various proteomic technologies currently employed in life sciences research, and discuss proteomic studies of uveal melanoma.

  9. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  10. An update on the mouse liver proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borlak Jürgen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decoding of the liver proteome is subject of intense research, but hampered by methodological constraints. We recently developed an improved protocol for studying rat liver proteins based on 2-DE-MALDI-TOF-MS peptide mass finger printing. This methodology was now applied to develop a mouse liver protein database. Results Liver proteins were extracted by two different lysis buffers in sequence followed by a liquid-phase IEF pre-fractionation and separation of proteins by 2 DE at two different pH ranges, notably 5-8 and 7-10. Based on 9600 in gel digests a total of 643 mouse liver proteins with high sequence coverage (> 20 peptides per protein could be identified by MALDI-TOF-MS peptide mass finger printing. Notably, 255 proteins are novel and have not been reported so far by conventional two-dimensional electrophoresis proteome mapping. Additionally, the results of the present findings for mouse liver were compared to published data of the rat proteome to compile as many proteins as possible in a rodent liver database. Conclusion Based on 2-DE MALDI-TOF-MS a significantly improved proteome map of mouse liver was obtained. We discuss some prominent members of newly identified proteins for a better understanding of liver biology.

  11. Proteomic profile of the plant-pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora capsici in response to the fungicide pyrimorph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhili; Chen, Lei; Miao, Jianqiang; Wang, Zhiwen; Bulone, Vincent; Liu, Xili

    2015-09-01

    Pyrimorph is a novel fungicide from the carboxylic acid amide (CAA) family used to control plant-pathogenic oomycetes such as Phytophthora capsici. The proteomic response of P. capsici to pyrimorph was investigated using the iTRAQ technology to determine the target site of the fungicide and potential biomarker candidates of drug efficacy. A total of 1336 unique proteins were identified from the mycelium of wild-type P. capsici isolate (Hd3) and two pyrimorph-resistant mutants (R3-1 and R3-2) grown in the presence or absence of pyrimorph. Comparative analysis revealed that the three P. capsici isolates Hd3, R3-1, and R3-2 produced 163, 77, and 13 unique proteins, respectively, which exhibited altered levels of abundance in response to the pyrimorph treatment. Further investigations, using Cluster of Orthologous Groups of Proteins (COG) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis identified 35 proteins related to the mode of action of pyrimorph against P. capsici and 62 proteins involved in the stress response of P. capsici to pyrimorph. Many of the proteins with altered expression were associated with glucose and energy metabolism. Biochemical analysis using d-[U-(14) C]glucose verified the proteomics data, suggesting that the major mode of action of pyrimorph in P. capsici is the inhibition of cell wall biosynthesis. These results also illustrate that proteomics approaches are useful tools for determining the pathways targeted by novel fungicides as well as for evaluating the tolerance of plant pathogens to environmental challenges, such as the presence of fungicides. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Proteomic Profiling in the Brain of CLN1 Disease Model Reveals Affected Functional Modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikka, Saara; Monogioudi, Evanthia; Gotsopoulos, Athanasios; Soliymani, Rabah; Pezzini, Francesco; Scifo, Enzo; Uusi-Rauva, Kristiina; Tyynelä, Jaana; Baumann, Marc; Jalanko, Anu; Simonati, Alessandro; Lalowski, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are the most commonly inherited progressive encephalopathies of childhood. Pathologically, they are characterized by endolysosomal storage with different ultrastructural features and biochemical compositions. The molecular mechanisms causing progressive neurodegeneration and common molecular pathways linking expression of different NCL genes are largely unknown. We analyzed proteome alterations in the brains of a mouse model of human infantile CLN1 disease-palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1 (Ppt1) gene knockout and its wild-type age-matched counterpart at different stages: pre-symptomatic, symptomatic and advanced. For this purpose, we utilized a combination of laser capture microdissection-based quantitative liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS imaging to quantify/visualize the changes in protein expression in disease-affected brain thalamus and cerebral cortex tissue slices, respectively. Proteomic profiling of the pre-symptomatic stage thalamus revealed alterations mostly in metabolic processes and inhibition of various neuronal functions, i.e., neuritogenesis. Down-regulation in dynamics associated with growth of plasma projections and cellular protrusions was further corroborated by findings from RNA sequencing of CLN1 patients' fibroblasts. Changes detected at the symptomatic stage included: mitochondrial functions, synaptic vesicle transport, myelin proteome and signaling cascades, such as RhoA signaling. Considerable dysregulation of processes related to mitochondrial cell death, RhoA/Huntington's disease signaling and myelin sheath breakdown were observed at the advanced stage of the disease. The identified changes in protein levels were further substantiated by bioinformatics and network approaches, immunohistochemistry on brain tissues and literature knowledge, thus identifying various functional modules affected in the CLN1 childhood

  13. The Effect of Ambient Temperatures of Two Threatened Caribbean Coral Species: a Proteomic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricaurte, M.; Schizas, N. V.; Weil, E.; Ciborowski, P.; Boukli, N. M.

    2016-02-01

    Coral reefs are among the most valuable ecosystems on the earth. Increasing water temperatures as a consequence of global warming have been identified, as an overriding cause of coral decline (e.g. increased incidence of diseases, bleaching), and one of the regions that has been identified vulnerable to climatic changes, is the Caribbean. Laboratory experiments have shown negative effects of different temperatures in coral growth, larval and adult survival, and gene expression. In order to understand the molecular and cellular basis in the protein regulation during changes in temperature in the field, a comparative proteomic analysis associated with thermal fluctuations was made from wet and dry season of 2014. In the study, we investigated alterations in proteins of Acropora palmata and Orbicella faveolata by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE) followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, protein identification, and confirmation at the gene expression level by qRT-PCR.Proteomes of related samples demonstrated 195 differentially expressed proteins (DEP) in A. palmata during dry season and 108 (DEP) during wet season of 2014. O. faveolata overexpressed 62 (DEP) in dry season and 190 (DEP) during wet season of 2014. All proteins had a two-fold or greater change in expression due to temperature, altering several components of the cellular stress response that include chaperones, stress proteins, antioxidant enzymes, proteases, cytoskeletal and apoptosis regulating proteins. Our results suggest that A. palmata and O. faveolata display a distinct response by expressing these key protein signatures in dry and wet season. This proteomic approach may open new avenues of research to detect potential early biomarkers involved in response to these stressors, during seasonal changes in water temperatures. The results provide insight into targets and mechanistic strategies to detect potential markers involved in response to temperature change for A

  14. The Redox Proteome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2013-01-01

    The redox proteome consists of reversible and irreversible covalent modifications that link redox metabolism to biologic structure and function. These modifications, especially of Cys, function at the molecular level in protein folding and maturation, catalytic activity, signaling, and macromolecular interactions and at the macroscopic level in control of secretion and cell shape. Interaction of the redox proteome with redox-active chemicals is central to macromolecular structure, regulation, and signaling during the life cycle and has a central role in the tolerance and adaptability to diet and environmental challenges. PMID:23861437

  15. Proteomics of Trypanosoma evansi infection in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nainita; Nageshan, Rishi Kumar; Pallavi, Rani; Chakravarthy, Harshini; Chandran, Syama; Kumar, Rajender; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Raj Kumar; Yadav, Suresh Chandra; Tatu, Utpal

    2010-03-22

    Trypanosoma evansi infections, commonly called 'surra', cause significant economic losses to livestock industry. While this infection is mainly restricted to large animals such as camels, donkeys and equines, recent reports indicate their ability to infect humans. There are no World Animal Health Organization (WAHO) prescribed diagnostic tests or vaccines available against this disease and the available drugs show significant toxicity. There is an urgent need to develop improved methods of diagnosis and control measures for this disease. Unlike its related human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi whose genomes have been fully sequenced T. evansi genome sequence remains unavailable and very little efforts are being made to develop improved methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment. With a view to identify potential diagnostic markers and drug targets we have studied the clinical proteome of T. evansi infection using mass spectrometry (MS). Using shot-gun proteomic approach involving nano-lc Quadrupole Time Of Flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry we have identified over 160 proteins expressed by T. evansi in mice infected with camel isolate. Homology driven searches for protein identification from MS/MS data led to most of the matches arising from related Trypanosoma species. Proteins identified belonged to various functional categories including metabolic enzymes; DNA metabolism; transcription; translation as well as cell-cell communication and signal transduction. TCA cycle enzymes were strikingly missing, possibly suggesting their low abundances. The clinical proteome revealed the presence of known and potential drug targets such as oligopeptidases, kinases, cysteine proteases and more. Previous proteomic studies on Trypanosomal infections, including human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi, have been carried out from lab grown cultures. For T. evansi infection this is indeed the first ever proteomic study reported thus far. In addition to providing a glimpse into the

  16. Proteomics of Trypanosoma evansi infection in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nainita Roy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi infections, commonly called 'surra', cause significant economic losses to livestock industry. While this infection is mainly restricted to large animals such as camels, donkeys and equines, recent reports indicate their ability to infect humans. There are no World Animal Health Organization (WAHO prescribed diagnostic tests or vaccines available against this disease and the available drugs show significant toxicity. There is an urgent need to develop improved methods of diagnosis and control measures for this disease. Unlike its related human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi whose genomes have been fully sequenced T. evansi genome sequence remains unavailable and very little efforts are being made to develop improved methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment. With a view to identify potential diagnostic markers and drug targets we have studied the clinical proteome of T. evansi infection using mass spectrometry (MS.Using shot-gun proteomic approach involving nano-lc Quadrupole Time Of Flight (QTOF mass spectrometry we have identified over 160 proteins expressed by T. evansi in mice infected with camel isolate. Homology driven searches for protein identification from MS/MS data led to most of the matches arising from related Trypanosoma species. Proteins identified belonged to various functional categories including metabolic enzymes; DNA metabolism; transcription; translation as well as cell-cell communication and signal transduction. TCA cycle enzymes were strikingly missing, possibly suggesting their low abundances. The clinical proteome revealed the presence of known and potential drug targets such as oligopeptidases, kinases, cysteine proteases and more.Previous proteomic studies on Trypanosomal infections, including human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi, have been carried out from lab grown cultures. For T. evansi infection this is indeed the first ever proteomic study reported thus far. In addition to providing a

  17. Proteome regulation during Olea europaea fruit development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Bianco

    Full Text Available Widespread in the Mediterranean basin, Olea europaea trees are gaining worldwide popularity for the nutritional and cancer-protective properties of the oil, mechanically extracted from ripe fruits. Fruit development is a physiological process with remarkable impact on the modulation of the biosynthesis of compounds affecting the quality of the drupes as well as the final composition of the olive oil. Proteomics offers the possibility to dig deeper into the major changes during fruit development, including the important phase of ripening, and to classify temporal patterns of protein accumulation occurring during these complex physiological processes.In this work, we started monitoring the proteome variations associated with olive fruit development by using comparative proteomics coupled to mass spectrometry. Proteins extracted from drupes at three different developmental stages were separated on 2-DE and subjected to image analysis. 247 protein spots were revealed as differentially accumulated. Proteins were identified from a total of 121 spots and discussed in relation to olive drupe metabolic changes occurring during fruit development. In order to evaluate if changes observed at the protein level were consistent with changes of mRNAs, proteomic data produced in the present work were compared with transcriptomic data elaborated during previous studies.This study identifies a number of proteins responsible for quality traits of cv. Coratina, with particular regard to proteins associated to the metabolism of fatty acids, phenolic and aroma compounds. Proteins involved in fruit photosynthesis have been also identified and their pivotal contribution in oleogenesis has been discussed. To date, this study represents the first characterization of the olive fruit proteome during development, providing new insights into fruit metabolism and oil accumulation process.

  18. Proteome regulation during Olea europaea fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Linda; Alagna, Fiammetta; Baldoni, Luciana; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte; Perrotta, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    Widespread in the Mediterranean basin, Olea europaea trees are gaining worldwide popularity for the nutritional and cancer-protective properties of the oil, mechanically extracted from ripe fruits. Fruit development is a physiological process with remarkable impact on the modulation of the biosynthesis of compounds affecting the quality of the drupes as well as the final composition of the olive oil. Proteomics offers the possibility to dig deeper into the major changes during fruit development, including the important phase of ripening, and to classify temporal patterns of protein accumulation occurring during these complex physiological processes. In this work, we started monitoring the proteome variations associated with olive fruit development by using comparative proteomics coupled to mass spectrometry. Proteins extracted from drupes at three different developmental stages were separated on 2-DE and subjected to image analysis. 247 protein spots were revealed as differentially accumulated. Proteins were identified from a total of 121 spots and discussed in relation to olive drupe metabolic changes occurring during fruit development. In order to evaluate if changes observed at the protein level were consistent with changes of mRNAs, proteomic data produced in the present work were compared with transcriptomic data elaborated during previous studies. This study identifies a number of proteins responsible for quality traits of cv. Coratina, with particular regard to proteins associated to the metabolism of fatty acids, phenolic and aroma compounds. Proteins involved in fruit photosynthesis have been also identified and their pivotal contribution in oleogenesis has been discussed. To date, this study represents the first characterization of the olive fruit proteome during development, providing new insights into fruit metabolism and oil accumulation process.

  19. The Emerging Role of Proteomics in Precision Medicine: Applications in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Neurotrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaaeddine, Rana; Fayad, Mira; Nehme, Eliana; Bahmad, Hisham F; Kobeissy, Firas

    2017-01-01

    Inter-individual variability in response to pharmacotherapy has provoked a higher demand to personalize medical decisions. As the field of pharmacogenomics has served to translate personalized medicine from concept to practice, the contribution of the "omics" disciplines to the era of precision medicine seems to be vital in improving therapeutic outcomes. Although we have observed significant advances in the field of genomics towards personalized medicine , the field of proteomics-with all its capabilities- is still in its infancy towards the area of personalized precision medicine. Neurodegenerative diseases and neurotrauma are among the areas where the implementation of neuroproteomics approaches has enabled neuroscientists to broaden their understanding of neural disease mechanisms and characteristics. It has been shown that the influence of epigenetics, genetics and environmental factors were among the recognized factors contributing to the diverse presentation of a single disease as well as its treatment establishing the factor-disease interaction. Thus, management of these variable single disease presentation/outcome necessitated the need for factoring the influence of epigenetics, genetics, epigenetics, and other factors on disease progression to create a custom treatment plan unique to each individual. In fact, neuroproteomics with its high ability to decipher protein alterations along with their post translational modifications (PTMs) can be an ideal tool for personalized medicine goals including: discovery of molecular mechanisms underlying disease pathobiology, development of novel diagnostics, enhancement of pharmacological neurotherapeutic approaches and finally, providing a "proteome identity" for patients with certain disorders and diseases. So far, neuroproteomics approaches have excelled in the areas of biomarker discovery arena where several diagnostic, prognostic and injury markers have been identified with a direct impact on the

  20. Quantitative proteomic characterization of the lung extracellular matrix in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åhrman, Emma; Hallgren, Oskar; Malmström, Lars; Hedström, Ulf; Malmström, Anders; Bjermer, Leif; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Malmström, Johan

    2018-03-01

    Remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a common feature in lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Here, we applied a sequential tissue extraction strategy to describe disease-specific remodeling of human lung tissue in disease, using end-stages of COPD and IPF. Our strategy was based on quantitative comparison of the disease proteomes, with specific focus on the matrisome, using data-independent acquisition and targeted data analysis (SWATH-MS). Our work provides an in-depth proteomic characterization of human lung tissue during impaired tissue remodeling. In addition, we show important quantitative and qualitative effects of the solubility of matrisome proteins. COPD was characterized by a disease-specific increase in ECM regulators, metalloproteinase inhibitor 3 (TIMP3) and matrix metalloproteinase 28 (MMP-28), whereas for IPF, impairment in cell adhesion proteins, such as collagen VI and laminins, was most prominent. For both diseases, we identified increased levels of proteins involved in the regulation of endopeptidase activity, with several proteins belonging to the serpin family. The established human lung quantitative proteome inventory and the construction of a tissue-specific protein assay library provides a resource for future quantitative proteomic analyses of human lung tissues. We present a sequential tissue extraction strategy to determine changes in extractability of matrisome proteins in end-stage COPD and IPF compared to healthy control tissue. Extensive quantitative analysis of the proteome changes of the disease states revealed altered solubility of matrisome proteins involved in ECM regulators and cell-ECM communication. The results highlight disease-specific remodeling mechanisms associated with COPD and IPF. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Translational plant proteomics: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Pedreschi, Romina; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Bindschedler, Laurence Veronique; Cramer, Rainer; Sarkar, Abhijit; Renaut, Jenny; Job, Dominique; Rakwal, Randeep

    2012-08-03

    Translational proteomics is an emerging sub-discipline of the proteomics field in the biological sciences. Translational plant proteomics aims to integrate knowledge from basic sciences to translate it into field applications to solve issues related but not limited to the recreational and economic values of plants, food security and safety, and energy sustainability. In this review, we highlight the substantial progress reached in plant proteomics during the past decade which has paved the way for translational plant proteomics. Increasing proteomics knowledge in plants is not limited to model and non-model plants, proteogenomics, crop improvement, and food analysis, safety, and nutrition but to many more potential applications. Given the wealth of information generated and to some extent applied, there is the need for more efficient and broader channels to freely disseminate the information to the scientific community. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translational Proteomics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Abnormal Electron Transport and Excessive Oxidative Stress Cause Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Placental Tissues of Early-Onset Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongwei; Jin, Xiaohan; Cai, Wei; Zhou, Maobin; Shao, Ping; Yang, Zhen; Fu, Rong; Cao, Jin; Liu, Yan; Yu, Fang; Fan, Rong; Zhang, Yan; Zou, Shuang; Zhou, Xin; Yang, Ning; Chen, Xu; Li, Yuming

    2018-04-20

    Early-onset preeclampsia (EOS-PE) refers to preeclampsia that occurred before 34 gestation weeks. This study was conducted to explore the relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of EOS-PE using proteomic strategy. To identify altering expressed mitochondrial proteins between severe EOS-PE and healthy pregnancies, enrichment of mitochondria coupled with iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic method was performed. IHC and western blot were performed to detect the alteration of changing expression proteins, and confirmed the accuracy of proteomic results. We totally quantified 1372 proteins and screened 132 altering expressed mitochondrial proteins, including 86 down-regulated expression proteins and 46 up-regulated expression proteins (pelectron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation. Especially, mitochondrial related molecules, PRDX2, PARK7, BNIP3, BCL2, PDHA1, SUCLG1, ACADM and NDUFV1, were involved in energy production process in the matrix and membrane of mitochondria. Our results showed that abnormal electron transport, excessive oxidative stress and mitochondrion disassembly might be the main cause of mitochondrial dysfunction, and was related to the pathogenesis of EOS-PE. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteomic and comparative genomic analysis reveals adaptability of Brassica napus to phosphorus-deficient stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuisen; Ding, Guangda; Wang, Zhenhua; Cai, Hongmei; Xu, Fangsen

    2015-03-18

    Given low solubility and immobility in many soils of the world, phosphorus (P) may be the most widely studied macronutrient for plants. In an attempt to gain an insight into the adaptability of Brassica napus to P deficiency, proteome alterations of roots and leaves in two B. napus contrasting genotypes, P-efficient 'Eyou Changjia' and P-inefficient 'B104-2', under long-term low P stress and short-term P-free starvation conditions were investigated, and proteomic combined with comparative genomic analyses were conducted to interpret the interrelation of differential abundance protein species (DAPs) responding to P deficiency with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for P deficiency tolerance. P-efficient 'Eyou Changjia' had higher dry weight and P content, and showed high tolerance to low P stress compared with P-inefficient 'B104-2'. A total of 146 DAPs were successfully identified by MALDI TOF/TOF MS, which were categorized into several groups including defense and stress response, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, signaling and regulation, amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, protein process, biogenesis and cellular component, and function unknown. 94 of 146 DAPs were mapped to a linkage map constructed by a B. napus population derived from a cross between the two genotypes, and 72 DAPs were located in the confidence intervals of QTLs for P efficiency related traits. We conclude that the identification of these DAPs and the co-location of DAPs with QTLs in the B. napus linkage genetic map provide us novel information in understanding the adaptability of B. napus to P deficiency, and helpful to isolate P-efficient genes in B. napus. Low P seriously limits the production and quality of B. napus. Proteomics and genetic linkage map were widely used to study the adaptive strategies of B. napus response to P deficiency, proteomic combined with comparative genetic analysis to investigate the correlations between DAPs and QTLs are scarce. Thus, we herein investigated

  4. Proteomic analyses of host and pathogen responses during bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, Jamie L

    2011-12-01

    The pursuit of biomarkers for use as clinical screening tools, measures for early detection, disease monitoring, and as a means for assessing therapeutic responses has steadily evolved in human and veterinary medicine over the past two decades. Concurrently, advances in mass spectrometry have markedly expanded proteomic capabilities for biomarker discovery. While initial mass spectrometric biomarker discovery endeavors focused primarily on the detection of modulated proteins in human tissues and fluids, recent efforts have shifted to include proteomic analyses of biological samples from food animal species. Mastitis continues to garner attention in veterinary research due mainly to affiliated financial losses and food safety concerns over antimicrobial use, but also because there are only a limited number of efficacious mastitis treatment options. Accordingly, comparative proteomic analyses of bovine milk have emerged in recent years. Efforts to prevent agricultural-related food-borne illness have likewise fueled an interest in the proteomic evaluation of several prominent strains of bacteria, including common mastitis pathogens. The interest in establishing biomarkers of the host and pathogen responses during bovine mastitis stems largely from the need to better characterize mechanisms of the disease, to identify reliable biomarkers for use as measures of early detection and drug efficacy, and to uncover potentially novel targets for the development of alternative therapeutics. The following review focuses primarily on comparative proteomic analyses conducted on healthy versus mastitic bovine milk. However, a comparison of the host defense proteome of human and bovine milk and the proteomic analysis of common veterinary pathogens are likewise introduced.

  5. Proteome identification of the silkworm middle silk gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-ying Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the functional differentiation among the anterior (A, middle (M, and posterior (P regions of silkworm middle silk gland (MSG, their proteomes were characterized by shotgun LC–MS/MS analysis with a LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. To get better proteome identification and quantification, triplicate replicates of mass spectrometry analysis were performed for each sample. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaíno et al., 2014 [1] via the PRIDE partner repository (Vizcaino, 2013 [2] with the dataset identifier http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD003371. The peptide identifications that were further processed by PeptideProphet program in Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP after database search with Mascot software were also available in .XML format files. Data presented here are related to a research article published in Journal of Proteomics by Li et al. (2015 [3]. Keywords: Bombyx mori, Middle silk gland, Silk protein synthesis, Shotgun proteomics, Label-free

  6. Bayesian Proteoform Modeling Improves Protein Quantification of Global Proteomic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Datta, Susmita; Payne, Samuel H.; Kang, Jiyun; Bramer, Lisa M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Tardiff, Mark F.; McDermott, Jason E.; Pounds, Joel G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2014-12-01

    As the capability of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has matured, tens of thousands of peptides can be measured simultaneously, which has the benefit of offering a systems view of protein expression. However, a major challenge is that with an increase in throughput, protein quantification estimation from the native measured peptides has become a computational task. A limitation to existing computationally-driven protein quantification methods is that most ignore protein variation, such as alternate splicing of the RNA transcript and post-translational modifications or other possible proteoforms, which will affect a significant fraction of the proteome. The consequence of this assumption is that statistical inference at the protein level, and consequently downstream analyses, such as network and pathway modeling, have only limited power for biomarker discovery. Here, we describe a Bayesian model (BP-Quant) that uses statistically derived peptides signatures to identify peptides that are outside the dominant pattern, or the existence of multiple over-expressed patterns to improve relative protein abundance estimates. It is a research-driven approach that utilizes the objectives of the experiment, defined in the context of a standard statistical hypothesis, to identify a set of peptides exhibiting similar statistical behavior relating to a protein. This approach infers that changes in relative protein abundance can be used as a surrogate for changes in function, without necessarily taking into account the effect of differential post-translational modifications, processing, or splicing in altering protein function. We verify the approach using a dilution study from mouse plasma samples and demonstrate that BP-Quant achieves similar accuracy as the current state-of-the-art methods at proteoform identification with significantly better specificity. BP-Quant is available as a MatLab ® and R packages at https://github.com/PNNL-Comp-Mass-Spec/BP-Quant.

  7. MAPU: Max-Planck Unified database of organellar, cellular, tissue and body fluid proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Yong; Adachi, Jun; Olsen, Jesper V; Shi, Rong; de Souza, Gustavo; Pasini, Erica; Foster, Leonard J; Macek, Boris; Zougman, Alexandre; Kumar, Chanchal; Wisniewski, Jacek R; Jun, Wang; Mann, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has become a powerful technology to map the protein composition of organelles, cell types and tissues. In our department, a large-scale effort to map these proteomes is complemented by the Max-Planck Unified (MAPU) proteome database. MAPU contains several body fluid proteomes; including plasma, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. Cell lines have been mapped to a depth of several thousand proteins and the red blood cell proteome has also been analyzed in depth. The liver proteome is represented with 3200 proteins. By employing high resolution MS and stringent validation criteria, false positive identification rates in MAPU are lower than 1:1000. Thus MAPU datasets can serve as reference proteomes in biomarker discovery. MAPU contains the peptides identifying each protein, measured masses, scores and intensities and is freely available at http://www.mapuproteome.com using a clickable interface of cell or body parts. Proteome data can be queried across proteomes by protein name, accession number, sequence similarity, peptide sequence and annotation information. More than 4500 mouse and 2500 human proteins have already been identified in at least one proteome. Basic annotation information and links to other public databases are provided in MAPU and we plan to add further analysis tools.

  8. Proteomic approach to nanotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Magdalena; Kapka-Skrzypczak, Lucyna; Brzóska, Kamil; Gutleb, Arno C; Kruszewski, Marcin

    2016-03-30

    In recent years a large number of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) have been developed with promising technical benefits for consumers and medical appliances. In addition to already known potentially advantageous biological properties (antibiotic, antifungal and antiviral activity) of NMs, many new medical applications of NMs are foreseen, such as drug carriers, contrast agents, radiopharmaceuticals and many others. However, there is increasing concern about potential environmental and health effects due to NMs exposure. An increasing body of evidence suggests that NMs may trigger undesirable hazardous interactions with biological systems with potential to generate harmful effects. In this review we summarized a current state of knowledge on the proteomics approaches to nanotoxicity, including protein corona formation, in vitro and in vivo effects of exposure to NMs on proteome of different classes of organisms, from bacteria and plants to mammals. The effects of NMs on the proteome of environmentally relevant organisms are also described. Despite the benefit that development of nanotechnology may bring to the society, there are still major gaps of knowledge on the influence of nanomaterials on human health and the environment. Thus, it seems necessary to conduct further interdisciplinary research to fill the knowledge gaps in NM toxicity, using more holistic approaches than offered by conventional biological techniques. “OMICS” techniques will certainly help researchers in this field. In this paper we summarized the current stage of knowledge of the effects of nanoparticles on the proteome of different organisms, including those commonly used as an environmentally relevant indicator organisms.

  9. Xylem sap proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bernonville, Thomas Dugé; Albenne, Cécile; Arlat, Matthieu; Hoffmann, Laurent; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of xylem sap has recently become a major field of interest to understand several biological questions related to plant development and responses to environmental clues. The xylem sap appears as a dynamic fluid undergoing changes in its proteome upon abiotic and biotic stresses. Unlike cell compartments which are amenable to purification in sufficient amount prior to proteomic analysis, the xylem sap has to be collected in particular conditions to avoid contamination by intracellular proteins and to obtain enough material. A model plant like Arabidopsis thaliana is not suitable for such an analysis because efficient harvesting of xylem sap is difficult. The analysis of the xylem sap proteome also requires specific procedures to concentrate proteins and to focus on proteins predicted to be secreted. Indeed, xylem sap proteins appear to be synthesized and secreted in the root stele or to originate from dying differentiated xylem cells. This chapter describes protocols to collect xylem sap from Brassica species and to prepare total and N-glycoprotein extracts for identification of proteins by mass spectrometry analyses and bioinformatics.

  10. Cutting edge proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Jakob; Espadas, Guadalupe; Molina, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Tryptic digestion is an important component of most proteomics experiments, and trypsin is available from many sources with a cost that varies by more than 1000-fold. This high-mass-accuracy LC-MS study benchmarks six commercially available trypsins with respect to autolytic species and sequence ...

  11. Examining hemodialyzer membrane performance using proteomic technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, Mario; Pieroni, Luisa; Di Liberato, Lorenzo; Sirolli, Vittorio; Urbani, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    The success and the quality of hemodialysis therapy are mainly related to both clearance and biocompatibility properties of the artificial membrane packed in the hemodialyzer. Performance of a membrane is strongly influenced by its interaction with the plasma protein repertoire during the extracorporeal procedure. Recognition that a number of medium-high molecular weight solutes, including proteins and protein-bound molecules, are potentially toxic has prompted the development of more permeable membranes. Such membrane engineering, however, may cause loss of vital proteins, with membrane removal being nonspecific. In addition, plasma proteins can be adsorbed onto the membrane surface upon blood contact during dialysis. Adsorption can contribute to the removal of toxic compounds and governs the biocompatibility of a membrane, since surface-adsorbed proteins may trigger a variety of biologic blood pathways with pathophysiologic consequences. Over the last years, use of proteomic approaches has allowed polypeptide spectrum involved in the process of hemodialysis, a key issue previously hampered by lack of suitable technology, to be assessed in an unbiased manner and in its full complexity. Proteomics has been successfully applied to identify and quantify proteins in complex mixtures such as dialysis outflow fluid and fluid desorbed from dialysis membrane containing adsorbed proteins. The identified proteins can also be characterized by their involvement in metabolic and signaling pathways, molecular networks, and biologic processes through application of bioinformatics tools. Proteomics may thus provide an actual functional definition as to the effect of a membrane material on plasma proteins during hemodialysis. Here, we review the results of proteomic studies on the performance of hemodialysis membranes, as evaluated in terms of solute removal efficiency and blood-membrane interactions. The evidence collected indicates that the information provided by proteomic

  12. Elucidation of cross-species proteomic effects in human and hominin bone proteome identification through a bioinformatics experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, F

    2018-02-20

    The study of ancient protein sequences is increasingly focused on the analysis of older samples, including those of ancient hominins. The analysis of such ancient proteomes thereby potentially suffers from "cross-species proteomic effects": the loss of peptide and protein identifications at increased evolutionary distances due to a larger number of protein sequence differences between the database sequence and the analyzed organism. Error-tolerant proteomic search algorithms should theoretically overcome this problem at both the peptide and protein level; however, this has not been demonstrated. If error-tolerant searches do not overcome the cross-species proteomic issue then there might be inherent biases in the identified proteomes. Here, a bioinformatics experiment is performed to test this using a set of modern human bone proteomes and three independent searches against sequence databases at increasing evolutionary distances: the human (0 Ma), chimpanzee (6-8 Ma) and orangutan (16-17 Ma) reference proteomes, respectively. Incorrectly suggested amino acid substitutions are absent when employing adequate filtering criteria for mutable Peptide Spectrum Matches (PSMs), but roughly half of the mutable PSMs were not recovered. As a result, peptide and protein identification rates are higher in error-tolerant mode compared to non-error-tolerant searches but did not recover protein identifications completely. Data indicates that peptide length and the number of mutations between the target and database sequences are the main factors influencing mutable PSM identification. The error-tolerant results suggest that the cross-species proteomics problem is not overcome at increasing evolutionary distances, even at the protein level. Peptide and protein loss has the potential to significantly impact divergence dating and proteome comparisons when using ancient samples as there is a bias towards the identification of conserved sequences and proteins. Effects are minimized

  13. Mining the active proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renier A. L. Van Der Hoorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Assigning functions to the >30.000 proteins encoded by the Arabidopsis genome is a challenging task of the Arabidopsis Functional Genomics Network. Although genome-wide technologies like proteomics and transcriptomics have generated a wealth of information that significantly accelerated gene annotation, protein activities are poorly predicted by transcript or protein levels as protein activities are post-translationally regulated. To directly display protein activities in Arabidopsis proteomes, we developed and applied Activity-based Protein Profiling (ABPP. ABPP is based on the use of small molecule probes that react with the catalytic residues of distinct protein classes in an activity-dependent manner. Labeled proteins are separated and detected from proteins gels and purified and identified by mass spectrometry. Using probes of six different chemotypes we have displayed of activities of 76 Arabidopsis proteins. These proteins represent over ten different protein classes that contain over 250 Arabidopsis proteins, including cysteine- serine- and metallo-proteases, lipases, acyltransferases, and the proteasome. We have developed methods for identification of in vivo labeled proteins using click-chemistry and for in vivo imaging with fluorescent probes. In vivo labeling has revealed novel protein activities and unexpected subcellular activities of the proteasome. Labeling of extracts displayed several differential activities e.g. of the proteasome during immune response and methylesterases during infection. These studies illustrate the power of ABPP to display the functional proteome and testify to a successful interdisciplinary collaboration involving chemical biology, organic chemistry and proteomics.

  14. Elucidation of cross-species proteomic effects in human and hominin bone proteome identification through a bioinformatics experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welker, F.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The study of ancient protein sequences is increasingly focused on the analysis of older samples, including those of ancient hominins. The analysis of such ancient proteomes thereby potentially suffers from "cross-species proteomic effects": the loss of peptide and protein identificati......Background: The study of ancient protein sequences is increasingly focused on the analysis of older samples, including those of ancient hominins. The analysis of such ancient proteomes thereby potentially suffers from "cross-species <