WorldWideScience

Sample records for hypothalamic nutrient sensing

  1. Hypothalamic carnitine metabolism integrates nutrient and hormonal feedback to regulate energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Romana; Reichenbach, Alex; Andrews, Zane B

    2015-12-15

    The maintenance of energy homeostasis requires the hypothalamic integration of nutrient feedback cues, such as glucose, fatty acids, amino acids, and metabolic hormones such as insulin, leptin and ghrelin. Although hypothalamic neurons are critical to maintain energy homeostasis research efforts have focused on feedback mechanisms in isolation, such as glucose alone, fatty acids alone or single hormones. However this seems rather too simplistic considering the range of nutrient and endocrine changes associated with different metabolic states, such as starvation (negative energy balance) or diet-induced obesity (positive energy balance). In order to understand how neurons integrate multiple nutrient or hormonal signals, we need to identify and examine potential intracellular convergence points or common molecular targets that have the ability to sense glucose, fatty acids, amino acids and hormones. In this review, we focus on the role of carnitine metabolism in neurons regulating energy homeostasis. Hypothalamic carnitine metabolism represents a novel means for neurons to facilitate and control both nutrient and hormonal feedback. In terms of nutrient regulation, carnitine metabolism regulates hypothalamic fatty acid sensing through the actions of CPT1 and has an underappreciated role in glucose sensing since carnitine metabolism also buffers mitochondrial matrix levels of acetyl-CoA, an allosteric inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase and hence glucose metabolism. Studies also show that hypothalamic CPT1 activity also controls hormonal feedback. We hypothesis that hypothalamic carnitine metabolism represents a key molecular target that can concurrently integrate nutrient and hormonal information, which is critical to maintain energy homeostasis. We also suggest this is relevant to broader neuroendocrine research as it predicts that hormonal signaling in the brain varies depending on current nutrient status. Indeed, the metabolic action of ghrelin, leptin or insulin

  2. Involvement of progranulin in hypothalamic glucose sensing and feeding regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Kyong; Shin, Mi-Seon; Youn, Byung-Soo; Namkoong, Churl; Gil, So Young; Kang, Gil Myoung; Yu, Ji Hee; Kim, Min-Seon

    2011-12-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted glycoprotein with multiple biological functions, including modulation of wound healing and inflammation. Hypothalamic PGRN has been implicated in the development of sexual dimorphism. In the present study, a potential role for PGRN in the hypothalamic regulation of appetite and body weight was investigated. In adult rodents, PGRN was highly expressed in periventricular tanycytes and in hypothalamic neurons, which are known to contain glucose-sensing machinery. Hypothalamic PGRN expression levels were decreased under low-energy conditions (starvation and 2-deoxy-D-glucose administration) but increased under high-energy condition (postprandially). Intracerebrovetricular administration of PGRN significantly suppressed nocturnal feeding as well as hyperphagia induced by 2-deoxyglucose, neuropeptide Y, and Agouti-related peptide. Moreover, the inhibition of hypothalamic PGRN expression or action increased food intake and promoted weight gain, suggesting that endogenous PGRN functions as an appetite suppressor in the hypothalamus. Investigation of the mechanism of action revealed that PGRN diminished orexigenic neuropeptide Y and Agouti-related peptide production but stimulated anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin production, at least in part through the regulation of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase. Notably, PGRN was also expressed in hypothalamic microglia. In diet-induced obese mice, microglial PGRN expression was increased, and the anorectic response to PGRN was blunted. These findings highlight a physiological role for PGRN in hypothalamic glucose-sensing and appetite regulation. Alterations in hypothalamic PGRN production or action may be linked to appetite dysregulation in obesity.

  3. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Directs POMC Gene to Mediate Hypothalamic Glucose Sensing and Energy Balance Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Guo; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Park, Sung-min; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a nuclear transcription factor that responds to environmental and pathological hypoxia to induce metabolic adaptation, vascular growth, and cell survival. Here we found that HIF subunits and HIF2α in particular were normally expressed in the mediobasal hypothalamus of mice. Hypothalamic HIF was up-regulated by glucose to mediate the feeding control of hypothalamic glucose sensing. Two underlying molecular pathways were identified, including suppression of PHDs by glucose metabolites to prevent HIF2α degradation and the recruitment of AMPK and mTOR/S6K to regulate HIF2α protein synthesis. HIF activation was found to directly control the transcription of POMC gene. Genetic approach was then employed to develop conditional knockout mice with HIF inhibition in POMC neurons, revealing that HIF loss-of-function in POMC neurons impaired hypothalamic glucose sensing and caused energy imbalance to promote obesity development. The metabolic effects of HIF in hypothalamic POMC neurons were independent of leptin signaling or pituitary ACTH pathway. Hypothalamic gene delivery of HIF counteracted overeating and obesity under conditions of nutritional excess. In conclusion, HIF controls hypothalamic POMC gene to direct the central nutrient sensing in regulation of energy and body weight balance. PMID:21814490

  4. The receptive function of hypothalamic and brainstem centres to hormonal and nutrient signals affecting energy balance

    OpenAIRE

    Riediger, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the area postrema (AP) represent targets for hormonal and metabolic signals involved in energy homoeostasis, e.g. glucose, amylin, insulin, leptin, peptide YY (PYY), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and ghrelin. Orexigenic neuropeptide Y expressing ARC neurons are activated by food deprivation and inhibited by feeding in a nutrient-dependent manner. PYY and leptin also reverse or prevent fasting-induced activation of the ARC. Interestingly, hypothalam...

  5. Rapid sensing of l-leucine by human and murine hypothalamic neurons: Neurochemical and mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeley, Nicholas; Kirwan, Peter; Darwish, Tamana; Arnaud, Marion; Evans, Mark L; Merkle, Florian T; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M; Blouet, Clemence

    2018-02-07

    Dietary proteins are sensed by hypothalamic neurons and strongly influence multiple aspects of metabolic health, including appetite, weight gain, and adiposity. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which hypothalamic neural circuits controlling behavior and metabolism sense protein availability. The aim of this study is to characterize how neurons from the mediobasal hypothalamus respond to a signal of protein availability: the amino acid l-leucine. We used primary cultures of post-weaning murine mediobasal hypothalamic neurons, hypothalamic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells, and calcium imaging to characterize rapid neuronal responses to physiological changes in extracellular l-Leucine concentration. A neurochemically diverse subset of both mouse and human hypothalamic neurons responded rapidly to l-leucine. Consistent with l-leucine's anorexigenic role, we found that 25% of mouse MBH POMC neurons were activated by l-leucine. 10% of MBH NPY neurons were inhibited by l-leucine, and leucine rapidly reduced AGRP secretion, providing a mechanism for the rapid leucine-induced inhibition of foraging behavior in rodents. Surprisingly, none of the candidate mechanisms previously implicated in hypothalamic leucine sensing (K ATP channels, mTORC1 signaling, amino-acid decarboxylation) were involved in the acute activity changes produced by l-leucine. Instead, our data indicate that leucine-induced neuronal activation involves a plasma membrane Ca 2+ channel, whereas leucine-induced neuronal inhibition is mediated by inhibition of a store-operated Ca 2+ current. A subset of neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus rapidly respond to physiological changes in extracellular leucine concentration. Leucine can produce both increases and decreases in neuronal Ca 2+ concentrations in a neurochemically-diverse group of neurons, including some POMC and NPY/AGRP neurons. Our data reveal that leucine can signal through novel mechanisms to rapidly

  6. The receptive function of hypothalamic and brainstem centres to hormonal and nutrient signals affecting energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riediger, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the area postrema (AP) represent targets for hormonal and metabolic signals involved in energy homoeostasis, e.g. glucose, amylin, insulin, leptin, peptide YY (PYY), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and ghrelin. Orexigenic neuropeptide Y expressing ARC neurons are activated by food deprivation and inhibited by feeding in a nutrient-dependent manner. PYY and leptin also reverse or prevent fasting-induced activation of the ARC. Interestingly, hypothalamic responses to fasting are blunted in different models of obesity (e.g. diet-induced obesity (DIO) or late-onset obesity). The AP also responds to feeding-related signals. The pancreatic hormone amylin acts via the AP to control energy intake. Amylin-sensitive AP neurons are also glucose-responsive. Furthermore, diet-derived protein attenuates amylin responsiveness suggesting a modulation of AP sensitivity by macronutrient supply. This review gives an overview of the receptive function of the ARC and the AP to hormonal and nutritional stimuli involved in the control of energy balance and the possible implications in the context of obesity. Collectively, there is consistency between the neurophysiological actions of these stimuli and their effects on energy homoeostasis under experimental conditions. However, surprisingly little progress has been made in the development of effective pharmacological approaches against obesity. A promising way to improve effectiveness involves combination treatments (e.g. amylin/leptin agonists). Hormonal alterations (e.g. GLP-1 and PYY) are also considered to mediate body weight loss observed in obese patients receiving bariatric surgery. The effects of hormonal and nutritional signals and their interactions might hold the potential to develop poly-mechanistic therapeutic strategies against obesity.

  7. NONRUMINANT NUTRITION SYMPOSIUM: Nutrient and non-nutrient sensing and signaling in the gastrointestinal tract1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J S Radcliffe

    2011-01-01

    .... Here, Radcliffe features a symposium held on Jul 15, 2010 at the annual meeting of the American Society of Animal Science highlighting recent findings regarding "Nutrient and Non-nutrient Sensing...

  8. Nutrient sensing and signaling in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Michaela; Schothorst, Joep; Kankipati, Harish Nag; Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a favorite organism for pioneering studies on nutrient-sensing and signaling mechanisms. Many specific nutrient responses have been elucidated in great detail. This has led to important new concepts and insight into nutrient-controlled cellular regulation. Major highlights include the central role of the Snf1 protein kinase in the glucose repression pathway, galactose induction, the discovery of a G-protein-coupled receptor system, and role of Ras in glucose-induced cAMP signaling, the role of the protein synthesis initiation machinery in general control of nitrogen metabolism, the cyclin-controlled protein kinase Pho85 in phosphate regulation, nitrogen catabolite repression and the nitrogen-sensing target of rapamycin pathway, and the discovery of transporter-like proteins acting as nutrient sensors. In addition, a number of cellular targets, like carbohydrate stores, stress tolerance, and ribosomal gene expression, are controlled by the presence of multiple nutrients. The protein kinase A signaling pathway plays a major role in this general nutrient response. It has led to the discovery of nutrient transceptors (transporter receptors) as nutrient sensors. Major shortcomings in our knowledge are the relationship between rapid and steady-state nutrient signaling, the role of metabolic intermediates in intracellular nutrient sensing, and the identity of the nutrient sensors controlling cellular growth. PMID:24483210

  9. Nutrient-Sensing Biology in Mammals and Birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roura, Eugeni; Foster, Simon R

    2018-01-01

    Nutrient sensing mechanisms have emerged as the fringe articulating nutritional needs with dietary choices. Carbohydrate, amino acid, fatty acid, mineral, and water sensing receptors are highly conserved across mammals and birds, consisting of a repertoire of 22 genes known to date. In contrast......, bitter receptors are highly divergent and have a high incidence of polymorphisms within and between mammals and birds and are involved in the adaptation of species to specific environments. In addition, the expression of nutrient sensing genes outside the oral cavity seems to mediate the required...

  10. Nutrient sensing and TOR signaling in yeast and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Asier; Hall, Michael N

    2017-02-15

    Coordinating cell growth with nutrient availability is critical for cell survival. The evolutionarily conserved TOR (target of rapamycin) controls cell growth in response to nutrients, in particular amino acids. As a central controller of cell growth, mTOR (mammalian TOR) is implicated in several disorders, including cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Here, we review how nutrient availability is sensed and transduced to TOR in budding yeast and mammals. A better understanding of how nutrient availability is transduced to TOR may allow novel strategies in the treatment for mTOR-related diseases. © 2017 The Authors.

  11. PAS kinase: a nutrient sensing regulator of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMille, Desiree; Grose, Julianne H

    2013-11-01

    Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) kinase (PASK, PASKIN, and PSK) is a member of the group of nutrient sensing protein kinases. These protein kinases sense the energy or nutrient status of the cell and regulate cellular metabolism appropriately. PAS kinase responds to glucose availability and regulates glucose homeostasis in yeast, mice, and man. Despite this pivotal role, the molecular mechanisms of PAS kinase regulation and function are largely unknown. This review focuses on what is known about PAS kinase, including its conservation from yeast to man, identified substrates, associated phenotypes and role in metabolic disease. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  12. Hypothalamic roles of mTOR complex I: Integration of nutrient and hormone signals to regulate energy homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) senses nutrient, energy, and hormone signals to regulate metabolism and energy homeostasis. mTOR activity in the hypothalamus, which is associated with changes in energy status, plays a critical role in the regulation of food intake and body weight...

  13. Nutrient Sensing: Another Chemosensitivity of the Olfactory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A-Karyn Julliard

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Olfaction is a major sensory modality involved in real time perception of the chemical composition of the external environment. Olfaction favors anticipation and rapid adaptation of behavioral responses necessary for animal survival. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that there is a direct action of metabolic peptides on the olfactory network. Orexigenic peptides such as ghrelin and orexin increase olfactory sensitivity, which in turn, is decreased by anorexigenic hormones such as insulin and leptin. In addition to peptides, nutrients can play a key role on neuronal activity. Very little is known about nutrient sensing in olfactory areas. Nutrients, such as carbohydrates, amino acids, and lipids, could play a key role in modulating olfactory sensitivity to adjust feeding behavior according to metabolic need. Here we summarize recent findings on nutrient-sensing neurons in olfactory areas and delineate the limits of our knowledge on this topic. The present review opens new lines of investigations on the relationship between olfaction and food intake, which could contribute to determining the etiology of metabolic disorders.

  14. Molecular pharmacology of promiscuous seven transmembrane receptors sensing organic nutrients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Johansen, Lars Dan; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    A number of highly promiscuous seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors have been cloned and characterized within the last few years. It is noteworthy that many of these receptors are activated broadly by amino acids, proteolytic degradation products, carbohydrates, or free fatty acids and are expressed....... The promiscuous tendency in ligand recognition of these receptors is in contrast to the typical specific interaction with one physiological agonist seen for most receptors, which challenges the classic "lock-and-key" concept. We here review the molecular mechanisms of nutrient sensing of the calcium...... drug targets, to treat, for example, type II diabetes by mimicking food intake by potent agonists or positive allosteric modulators. The ligand-receptor interactions of the promiscuous receptors of organic nutrients thus remain an interesting subject of emerging functional importance....

  15. Altered hypothalamic function in diet-induced obesity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Velloso, L A; Schwartz, M W

    2011-01-01

    Energy homeostasis involves a complex network of hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic neurons that transduce hormonal, nutrient and neuronal signals into responses that ultimately match caloric intake...

  16. Hyperspectral remote sensing techniques for grass nutrient estimations in savannah ecosystems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramoelo, Abel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available at various scales such as local, regional and global scale. Traditional field techniques to measure grass nutrient concentration have been reported to be laborious and time consuming. Remote sensing techniques provide opportunity to map grass nutrient...

  17. Dysregulation of Nutrient Sensing and CLEARance in Presenilin Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavya Reddy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Attenuated auto-lysosomal system has been associated with Alzheimer disease (AD, yet all underlying molecular mechanisms leading to this impairment are unknown. We show that the amino acid sensing of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 is dysregulated in cells deficient in presenilin, a protein associated with AD. In these cells, mTORC1 is constitutively tethered to lysosomal membranes, unresponsive to starvation, and inhibitory to TFEB-mediated clearance due to a reduction in Sestrin2 expression. Normalization of Sestrin2 levels through overexpression or elevation of nuclear calcium rescued mTORC1 tethering and initiated clearance. While CLEAR network attenuation in vivo results in buildup of amyloid, phospho-Tau, and neurodegeneration, presenilin-knockout fibroblasts and iPSC-derived AD human neurons fail to effectively initiate autophagy. These results propose an altered mechanism for nutrient sensing in presenilin deficiency and underline an importance of clearance pathways in the onset of AD.

  18. Nutrient sensing pathways as therapeutic targets for healthy ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Anna; Accardi, Giulia; Candore, Giuseppina; Gambino, Caterina Maria; Mirisola, Mario; Taormina, Giusi; Virruso, Claudia; Caruso, Calogero

    2017-04-01

    In the present paper, the authors have discussed anti-aging strategies which aim to slow the aging process and to delay the onset of age-related diseases, focusing on nutrient sensing pathways (NSPs) as therapeutic targets. Indeed, several studies have already demonstrated that both in animal models and humans, dietary interventions might have a positive impact on the aging process through the modulation of these pathways. Areas covered: Achieving healthy aging is the main challenge of the twenty-first century because lifespan is increasing, but not in tandem with good health. The authors have illustrated different approaches that can act on NSPs, modulating the rate of the aging process. Expert opinion: Humanity's lasting dream is to reverse or, at least, postpone aging. In recent years, increasing attention has been devoted to anti-aging therapies. The subject is very popular among the general public, whose imagination runs wild with all the possible tools to delay aging and to gain immortality. Some approaches discussed in the present review should be able to substantially slow down the aging process, extending our productive, youthful lives, without frailty.

  19. Hypothalamic inflammation: a double-edged sword to nutritional diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dongsheng; Liu, Tiewen

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is one of the master regulators of various physiological processes, including energy balance and nutrient metabolism. These regulatory functions are mediated by discrete hypothalamic regions that integrate metabolic sensing with neuroendocrine and neural controls of systemic physiology. Neurons and non-neuronal cells in these hypothalamic regions act supportively to execute metabolic regulations. Under conditions of brain and hypothalamic inflammation, which may result from overnutrition-induced intracellular stresses or disease-associated systemic inflammatory factors, extracellular and intracellular environments of hypothalamic cells are disrupted, leading to central metabolic dysregulations and various diseases. Recent research has begun to elucidate the effects of hypothalamic inflammation in causing diverse components of metabolic syndrome leading to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These new understandings have provocatively expanded previous knowledge on the cachectic roles of brain inflammatory response in diseases, such as infections and cancers. This review describes the molecular and cellular characteristics of hypothalamic inflammation in metabolic syndrome and related diseases as opposed to cachectic diseases, and also discusses concepts and potential applications of inhibiting central/hypothalamic inflammation to treat nutritional diseases. PMID:22417140

  20. Glutamate prevents intestinal atrophy via luminal nutrient sensing in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Weidong; Feng, Yongjia; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    was regulated by T1R3 and mGluR5, suggesting a novel negative regulator pathway for IEC proliferation not previously described. Loss of luminal nutrients with TPN administration may widely affect intestinal taste sensing. GLM has previously unrecognized actions on IEC growth and EBF. Restoring luminal sensing......Small intestine luminal nutrient sensing may be crucial for modulating physiological functions. However, its mechanism of action is incompletely understood. We used a model of enteral nutrient deprivation, or total parenteral nutrition (TPN), resulting in intestinal mucosal atrophy and decreased...

  1. Hypothalamic tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypothalamic glioma; Hypothalamus - tumor ... The exact cause of hypothalamic tumors is not known. It is likely that they result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. In children, ...

  2. Role of Nutrient-Sensing Signals in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Kume

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. The multipronged drug approach still fails to fully prevent the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, a new therapeutic target to improve the prognosis of diabetic nephropathy is urgently required. Nutrient-sensing signals and their related intracellular machinery have evolved to combat prolonged periods of starvation in mammals; and these systems are conserved in the kidney. Recent studies have suggested that the activity of three nutrient-sensing signals, mTORC1, AMPK, and Sirt1, is altered in the diabetic kidney. Furthermore, autophagy activity, which is regulated by the above-mentioned nutrient-sensing signals, is also altered in both podocytes and proximal tubular cells under diabetic conditions. Under diabetic conditions, an altered nutritional state owing to nutrient excess may disturb cellular homeostasis regulated by nutrient-responsible systems, leading to exacerbation of organelle dysfunction and diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we discuss new findings showing relationships between nutrient-sensing signals, autophagy, and diabetic nephropathy and suggest the therapeutic potential of nutrient-sensing signals in diabetic nephropathy.

  3. NPKS uptake, sensing, and signaling and miRNAs in plant nutrient stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Manoj; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-05-01

    Sessile nature of higher plants consequently makes it highly adaptable for nutrient absorption and acquisition from soil. Plants require 17 essential elements for their growth and development which include 14 minerals (macronutrients: N, P, K, Mg, Ca, S; micronutrients: Cl, Fe, B, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Mo) and 3 non-mineral (C, H, O) elements. The roots of higher plants must acquire these macronutrients and micronutrients from rhizosphere and further allocate to other plant parts for completing their life cycle. Plants evolved an intricate series of signaling and sensing cascades to maintain nutrient homeostasis and to cope with nutrient stress/availability. The specific receptors for nutrients in root, root system architecture, and internal signaling pathways help to develop plasticity in response to the nutrient starvation. Nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), and sulfur (S) are essential for various metabolic processes, and their deficiency negatively effects the plant growth and yield. Genes coding for transporters and receptors for nutrients as well as some small non-coding RNAs have been implicated in nutrient uptake and signaling. This review summarizes the N, P, K, and S uptake, sensing and signaling events in nutrient stress condition especially in model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and involvement of microRNAs in nutrient deficiency. This article also provides a framework of uptake, sensing, signaling and to highlight the microRNA as an emerging major players in nutrient stress condition. Nutrient-plant-miRNA cross talk may help plant to cope up nutrient stress, and understanding their precise mechanism(s) will be necessary to develop high yielding smart crop with low nutrient input.

  4. Hypothalamic neurogenesis persists in the aging brain and is controlled by energy-sensing IGF-I pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaker, Zayna; George, Caroline; Petrovska, Marija; Caron, Jean-Baptiste; Lacube, Philippe; Caillé, Isabelle; Holzenberger, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Hypothalamic tanycytes are specialized glial cells lining the third ventricle. They are recently identified as adult stem and/or progenitor cells, able to self-renew and give rise to new neurons postnatally. However, the long-term neurogenic potential of tanycytes and the pathways regulating lifelong cell replacement in the adult hypothalamus are largely unexplored. Using inducible nestin-CreER(T2) for conditional mutagenesis, we performed lineage tracing of adult hypothalamic stem and/or progenitor cells (HySC) and demonstrated that new neurons continue to be born throughout adult life. This neurogenesis was targeted to numerous hypothalamic nuclei and produced different types of neurons in the dorsal periventricular regions. Some adult-born neurons integrated the median eminence and arcuate nucleus during aging and produced growth hormone releasing hormone. We showed that adult hypothalamic neurogenesis was tightly controlled by insulin-like growth factors (IGF). Knockout of IGF-1 receptor from hypothalamic stem and/or progenitor cells increased neuronal production and enhanced α-tanycyte self-renewal, preserving this stem cell-like population from age-related attrition. Our data indicate that adult hypothalamus retains the capacity of cell renewal, and thus, a substantial degree of structural plasticity throughout lifespan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nutrient sensing in the gut: new roads to therapeutics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Sara; Depoortere, Inge

    2013-02-01

    The release of gut hormones involved in the control of food intake is dependent on the acute nutritional status of the body, suggesting that chemosensory mechanisms are involved in the control of their release. G protein-coupled taste receptors similar to those in the lingual system, that respond to sweet, bitter, umami, and fatty acids, are expressed in endocrine cells within the gut mucosa, and coordinate, together with other chemosensory signaling elements, the release of hormones that regulate energy and glucose homeostasis. In health, these nutrient sensors are likely to function as inhibitors to excessive nutrient exposure, and their malfunction may be responsible for a variety of metabolic dysfunctions associated with obesity; they may thus be considered as new therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enoyl-CoA hydratase-1 regulates mTOR signaling and apoptosis by sensing nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-Kun; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Lin, Yan; Wu, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Hou-Zao; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Kai-Qiang; Wei, Yun; Guo, Fushen; Yao, Cui-Fang; He, Xia-Di; Liu, Li-Xia; Yang, Chen; Guan, Zong-Yuan; Wang, Shi-Dong; Zhao, Jianyuan; Liu, De-Pei; Zhao, Shi-Min; Xu, Wei

    2017-09-06

    The oncogenic mechanisms of overnutrition, a confirmed independent cancer risk factor, remain poorly understood. Herein, we report that enoyl-CoA hydratase-1 (ECHS1), the enzyme involved in the oxidation of fatty acids (FAs) and branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), senses nutrients and promotes mTOR activation and apoptotic resistance. Nutrients-promoted acetylation of lys(101) of ECHS1 impedes ECHS1 activity by impairing enoyl-CoA binding, promoting ECHS1 degradation and blocking its mitochondrial translocation through inducing ubiquitination. As a result, nutrients induce the accumulation of BCAAs and FAs that activate mTOR signaling and stimulate apoptosis, respectively. The latter was overcome by selection of BCL-2 overexpressing cells under overnutrition conditions. The oncogenic effects of nutrients were reversed by SIRT3, which deacetylates lys(101) acetylation. Severely decreased ECHS1, accumulation of BCAAs and FAs, activation of mTOR and overexpression of BCL-2 were observed in cancer tissues from metabolic organs. Our results identified ECHS1, a nutrients-sensing protein that transforms nutrient signals into oncogenic signals.Overnutrition has been linked to increased risk of cancer. Here, the authors show that exceeding nutrients suppress Enoyl-CoA hydratase-1 (ECHS1) activity by inducing its acetylation resulting in accumulation of fatty acids and branched-chain amino acids and oncogenic mTOR activation.

  7. VSV infection is sensed by Drosophila, attenuates nutrient signaling, and thereby activates antiviral autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Sara

    2009-10-01

    Innate immune mechanisms are the first line of defense against pathogens including viruses. This work identifies autophagy, an innate intracellular degradative pathway, as antiviral against Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) in Drosophila. VSV is sensed by cells via the surface glycoprotein leading to the attenuation of the nutrient signaling pathway thereby activating an antiviral autophagic program.

  8. Remote sensing of moisture and nutrient stress in turfgrass systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Jason Keith

    Management of irrigation and fertility on a golf course or other large turfgrass area requires a significant amount of time scouting for and identifying problem areas to maintain optimum turfgrass quality. The objectives of these studies were to evaluate the relationship between remotely sensed reflectance data collected from a turfgrass canopy and the associated phosphorus and nitrogen content of turfgrass tissue, and to determine the relationship between reflectance data and soil moisture content as determined by time domain reflectometry (TDR). Phosphorus deficiency symptoms decreased and biomass production increased at P rates above 1.0 g m-2 with a single application while no increase in soil-P was observed. Reflectance measurements were taken in increments from 400 to 1050 nm and correlated with plant tissue P concentration, chlorophyll content, plant biomass and visual quality. Stepwise regression identified a model utilizing reflectance in the blue, yellow, orange, and red regions of the spectrum that explained 73% of the variability in plant tissue P concentration for all sampling dates in 2002 and 2003. Few correlations were found between vegetative indices such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and plant response. Results indicate that P deficiencies of creeping bentgrass can be detected through the use of remote sensing. P deficiencies were corrected with a single foliar application of P at rates above 1.5 g m-2. Using partial least-squares regression, our results indicate a weak relationship between the actual and predicted values for turfgrass quality, biomass production, and chlorophyll content under varying rates of N fertilization. However, a strong relationship was observed between actual and predicted values for N concentration of the plant tissue during 2002 and 2003 (r2 = 0.90 and 0.74 respectively). Similarly, no correlation was observed between visual drought stress ratings and the associated soil moisture content for

  9. Transcriptional coordination of hepatic autophagy by nutrient-sensing nuclear receptor PPARα and FXR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Man Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors are in general ligand-dependent transcription factors that control a variety of mammalian physiologies including development, differentiation, proliferation, and homeostasis. Recent studies have found that two nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and farnesoid x receptor, responding to fasting or feeding state, respectively are able to regulate autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involved in lysosomal degradation. In this review, we discuss the role of these nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors in an aspect of transcriptional regulation of autophagy, and how these nuclear receptor-driven transcriptional programs integrate lipophagy, a lipid autophagy with fatty acid oxidation to coordinate hepatic lipid metabolism in the fasted state of the liver.

  10. NutrimiRAging: Micromanaging Nutrient Sensing Pathways through Nutrition to Promote Healthy Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Micó

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Current sociodemographic predictions point to a demographic shift in developed and developing countries that will result in an unprecedented increase of the elderly population. This will be accompanied by an increase in age-related conditions that will strongly impair human health and quality of life. For this reason, aging is a major concern worldwide. Healthy aging depends on a combination of individual genetic factors and external environmental factors. Diet has been proved to be a powerful tool to modulate aging and caloric restriction has emerged as a valuable intervention in this regard. However, many questions about how a controlled caloric restriction intervention affects aging-related processes are still unanswered. Nutrient sensing pathways become deregulated with age and lose effectiveness with age. These pathways are a link between diet and aging. Thus, fully understanding this link is a mandatory step before bringing caloric restriction into practice. MicroRNAs have emerged as important regulators of cellular functions and can be modified by diet. Some microRNAs target genes encoding proteins and enzymes belonging to the nutrient sensing pathways and, therefore, may play key roles in the modulation of the aging process. In this review, we aimed to show the relationship between diet, nutrient sensing pathways and microRNAs in the context of aging.

  11. Hypothalamic integration of immune function and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guijarro, Ana; Laviano, Alessandro; Meguid, Michael M

    2006-01-01

    The immune and neuroendocrine systems are closely involved in the regulation of metabolism at peripheral and central hypothalamic levels. In both physiological (meals) and pathological (infections, traumas and tumors) conditions immune cells are activated responding with the release of cytokines and other immune mediators (afferent signals). In the hypothalamus (central integration), cytokines influence metabolism by acting on nucleus involved in feeding and homeostasis regulation leading to the acute phase response (efferent signals) aimed to maintain the body integrity. Peripheral administration of cytokines, inoculation of tumor and induction of infection alter, by means of cytokine action, the normal pattern of food intake affecting meal size and meal number suggesting that cytokines acted differentially on specific hypothalamic neurons. The effect of cytokines-related cancer anorexia is also exerted peripherally. Increase plasma concentrations of insulin and free tryptophan and decrease gastric emptying and d-xylose absorption. In addition, in obesity an increase in interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 occurs in mesenteric fat tissue, which together with an increase in corticosterone, is associated with hyperglycemia, dyslipidemias and insulin resistance of obesity-related metabolic syndrome. These changes in circulating nutrients and hormones are sensed by hypothalamic neurons that influence food intake and metabolism. In anorectic tumor-bearing rats, we detected upregulation of IL-1beta and IL-1 receptor mRNA levels in the hypothalamus, a negative correlation between IL-1 concentration in cerebro-spinal fluid and food intake and high levels of hypothalamic serotonin, and these differences disappeared after tumor removal. Moreover, there is an interaction between serotonin and IL-1 in the development of cancer anorexia as well as an increase in hypothalamic dopamine and serotonin production. Immunohistochemical studies have shown a decrease in neuropeptide Y (NPY) and

  12. Nutrient-sensing mechanisms in hypothalamic cell models: neuropeptide regulation and neuroinflammation in male- and female-derived cell lines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loganathan, Neruja; Belsham, Denise D

    2016-01-01

    .... Because obesity often results in central neuroinflammation, we describe markers that could be used to study differences between male and female models, both the whole organism and also at the cellular level...

  13. Hyperspectral remote sensing analysis of short rotation woody crops grown with controlled nutrient and irrigation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Jungho; Jensen, John R.; Coleman, Mark; Nelson, Eric

    2009-08-01

    Abstract - Hyperspectral remote sensing research was conducted to document the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of controlled forest plots subjected to various nutrient and irrigation treatments. The experimental plots were located on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC. AISA hyperspectral imagery were analysed using three approaches, including: (1) normalized difference vegetation index based simple linear regression (NSLR), (2) partial least squares regression (PLSR) and (3) machine-learning regression trees (MLRT) to predict the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of the crops (leaf area index, stem biomass and five leaf nutrients concentrations). The calibration and cross-validation results were compared between the three techniques. The PLSR approach generally resulted in good predictive performance. The MLRT approach appeared to be a useful method to predict characteristics in a complex environment (i.e. many tree species and numerous fertilization and/or irrigation treatments) due to its powerful adaptability.

  14. Cellular Oxygen and Nutrient Sensing in Microgravity Using Time-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmacinski, Henryk

    2003-01-01

    Oxygen and nutrient sensing is fundamental to the understanding of cell growth and metabolism. This requires identification of optical probes and suitable detection technology without complex calibration procedures. Under this project Microcosm developed an experimental technique that allows for simultaneous imaging of intra- and inter-cellular events. The technique consists of frequency-domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), a set of identified oxygen and pH probes, and methods for fabrication of microsensors. Specifications for electronic and optical components of FLIM instrumentation are provided. Hardware and software were developed for data acquisition and analysis. Principles, procedures, and representative images are demonstrated. Suitable lifetime sensitive oxygen, pH, and glucose probes for intra- and extra-cellular measurements of analyte concentrations have been identified and tested. Lifetime sensing and imaging have been performed using PBS buffer, culture media, and yeast cells as a model systems. Spectral specifications, calibration curves, and probes availability are also provided in the report.

  15. Microsensors to the Model Forecasts: Multiscale Embedded Networked Sensing of Nutrients in the Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, T. C.

    2005-12-01

    Hydrologic and water quality observatories are being planned with a vision of enhancing our ability to better understand, forecast and adaptively manage both water quantity and quality. To adequately cover these spatially and temporally variable systems, distributed, embedded sensor networks must be designed with the proper mix (multimodality) of sensors to quantify key system properties, including temperature and chemical distributions, as well as mass and energy fluxes, and to do so across multiple scales. Given resource limitations, process models need to be coupled to the sensor network to interpolate between sensor data. This work focuses on the spatially distributed flux of nutrients, specifically nitrate, in surface-subsurface environments. It begins at the sensor level, describing the development and testing of nitrate microsensors that are scaleable to large, dense sensor networks required to cover heterogeneous watersheds, including associated soil and sediment systems. First and second generation miniature and inexpensive nitrate sensors (ion selective electrodes) fabricated by depositing conducting polymers on carbon substrates are presented in the context of laboratory and field tests. While these sensors are limited to relatively short deployments (4-8 weeks), there are potential strategies for overcoming this problem. Scale-up to one- and three-dimensional soil/sediment sensor arrays is discussed in the context of two deployments: (1) a groundwater quality protection network, where recycled wastewater that is potentially high in nitrate is being used for agricultural irrigation, and (2) nonpoint source nitrate pollution in rivers and groundwater in agricultural watersheds. Recent hardware (wireless transceivers) and software advancements (e.g., network topology design and debugging, energy management) intended for networks spanning 100s of m in space are outlined in these examples. The discussion extends to sensor form factor, in situ calibration

  16. Drosophila sugar receptors in sweet taste perception, olfaction, and internal nutrient sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Shinsuke; Yavuz, Ahmet; Slone, Jesse; Jagge, Christopher; Song, Xiangyu; Amrein, Hubert

    2015-03-02

    Identification of nutritious compounds is dependent on expression of specific taste receptors in appropriate taste-cell types [1]. In contrast to mammals, which rely on a single, broadly tuned heterodimeric sugar receptor [2], the Drosophila genome harbors a small subfamily of eight, closely related gustatory receptor (Gr) genes, Gr5a, Gr61a, and Gr64a-Gr64f, of which three have been proposed to mediate sweet taste [3-6]. However, expression and function of several of these putative sugar Gr genes are not known. Here, we present a comprehensive expression and functional analysis using Gr(LEXA/GAL4) alleles that were generated through homologous recombination. We show that sugar Gr genes are expressed in a combinatorial manner to yield at least eight sets of sweet-sensing neurons. Behavioral investigations show that most sugar Gr mutations affect taste responses to only a small number of sugars and that effective detection of most sugars is dependent on more than one Gr gene. Surprisingly, Gr64a, one of three Gr genes previously proposed to play a major role in sweet taste [3, 4], is not expressed in labellar taste neurons, and Gr64a mutant flies exhibit normal sugar responses elicited from the labellum. Our analysis provides a molecular rationale for distinct tuning profiles of sweet taste neurons, and it favors a model whereby all sugar Grs contribute to sweet taste. Furthermore, expression in olfactory organs and the brain implies novel roles for sugar Gr genes in olfaction and internal nutrient sensing, respectively. Thus, sugar receptors may contribute to feeding behavior via multiple sensory systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Retraction Statement: Mitochondrial protein acetylation mediates nutrient sensing of mitochondrial protein synthesis and mitonuclear protein balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    IUBMB Life (2014) 66:793-802. DOI: 10.1002/iub.1328 The above article, published online on November 15, 2014 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal's Editors-in-Chief, Angelo Azzi and William J. Whelan, Corresponding Author Tina Wenz, the University of Cologne, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The article has been retracted on request of the University of Cologne that, after an investigation, established that the data reported in it are not reproducible. Note from the Corresponding Author: "The paper reports on the influence of mitochondrial acetylation on protein synthesis. After publication, several irregularities appeared and have been thoroughly investigated by the lab of the Corresponding Author in cooperation with the commission of Research integrity of the University of Cologne. Both came to the conclusion that data used for the publication are erroneous and that the presented data are not reproducible by the lab of the Corresponding Author and other labs. The Corresponding Author takes responsibility and regrets not having detected these issues before publication. The appropriate corrective action is retraction of the paper. The Corresponding Author apologizes to the scientific community." Antonella Di Domenico, Annette Hofer, Federica Tundo, Tina Wenz (2014), Mitochondrial protein acetylation mediates nutrient sensing of mitochondrial protein synthesis and mitonuclear protein balance, IUBMB Life. 66: 793-802, 2014. DOI: 10.1002/iub.1328 © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(7):553-553, 2017. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  18. Nutrient Sensing Overrides Somatostatin and Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone to Control Pulsatile Growth Hormone Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, F J

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacological studies reveal that interactions between hypothalamic inhibitory somatostatin and stimulatory growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) govern pulsatile GH release. However, in vivo analysis of somatostatin and GHRH release into the pituitary portal vasculature and peripheral GH output demonstrates that the withdrawal of somatostatin or the appearance of GHRH into pituitary portal blood does not reliably dictate GH release. Consequently, additional intermediates acting at the level of the hypothalamus and within the anterior pituitary gland are likely to contribute to the release of GH, entraining GH secretory patterns to meet physiological demand. The identification and validation of the actions of such intermediates is particularly important, given that the pattern of GH release defines several of the physiological actions of GH. This review highlights the actions of neuropeptide Y in regulating GH release. It is acknowledged that pulsatile GH release may not occur selectively in response to hypothalamic control of pituitary function. As such, interactions between somatotroph networks, the median eminence and pituitary microvasculature and blood flow, and the emerging role of tanycytes and pericytes as critical regulators of pulsatility are considered. It is argued that collective interactions between the hypothalamus, the median eminence and pituitary vasculature, and structural components within the pituitary gland dictate somatotroph function and thereby pulsatile GH release. These interactions may override hypothalamic somatostatin and GHRH-mediated GH release, and modify pulsatile GH release relative to the peripheral glucose supply, and thereby physiological demand. © 2015 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  19. Metabolic Actions of Hypothalamic SIRT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppari, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a small structure located in the ventral diencephalon. Hypothalamic neurons sense changes in circulating metabolic cues (e.g.: leptin, insulin, glucose), and coordinate responses aimed at maintaining normal body weight and glucose homeostasis. Recent findings indicate that a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent protein deacetylase (namely, SIRT1) expressed by hypothalamic neurons is crucial for mounting responses against diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Here, the repercussions of these findings will be discussed and particular emphasis will be given to the potential exploitation of hypothalamic SIRT1 as a target for the treatment of the rapidly-spreading metabolic disorders of obesity and T2DM. The possible roles of hypothalamic SIRT1 on regulating metabolic ageing processes will also be addressed. PMID:22382036

  20. Invited review: nutrient-sensing receptors for free fatty acids and hydroxycarboxylic acids in farm animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielenz, M

    2017-06-01

    Data on nutrient sensing by free fatty acid receptors (FFAR1, FFAR2, FFAR3, FFAR4) and hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors (HCAR1, HCAR2) are increasing for human or rodent models. Both receptor families link intestinal fermentation by the microbiota and energy metabolism with cellular responses. Therefore, this finding provides a link that is independent of the only function of the fermentation products as energy substrates. For example, these reactions are associated with insulin secretion, regulation of lipolysis, adipose tissue differentiation and innate immune responses. In farm animals, the available data on both receptor families from the intestine and other tissues increase. However, currently, the data are primarily linked with the distribution of receptor messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and more rarely with proteins. Functional data on the importance of these receptors in farm animal species is not abundant and is often associated with the immune system. In certain farm animal species, the receptors were cloned and ligand binding was characterised. In chicken, only one FFAR2 was recently identified using genome analysis, which is contradictory to a study using an FFAR1 small interfering RNA. The chicken FFAR2 is composed of more than 20 paralogs. No data on HCAR1 or HCAR2 exist in this species. Currently, in pigs, most available data are on the mRNA distribution within intestine. However, no FFAR1 expression has been shown in this organ to date. In addition to FFAR2, an orthologue (FFAR2-like) with the highest abundance in intestine has been reported. The data on HCAR1 and HCAR2 in pigs is scarce. In ruminants, most of the currently available information on receptor distribution is linked to mRNA data and shows the expression, for example, in mammary gland and adipose tissue. However, some protein data on FFAR2 and FFAR1 protein has been reported and functional data availability is slowly increasing. The receptor mRNAs of HCAR1 and HCAR2 are expressed in bovine. The

  1. Towards regional mapping of grass nutrients using remote sensing in Greater Kruger National Park

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramoelo, Abel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available and livestock. Grass nutrients have rarely been mapped at the regional scale because of the lack of satellite-based sensors that sample reflected light in the red-edge region which is sensitive to foliar chlorophyll and nitrogen (N). Medium resolution satellites...

  2. Nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors PPARα and FXR control liver energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preidis, Geoffrey A; Kim, Kang Ho; Moore, David D

    2017-04-03

    The nuclear receptors PPARα (encoded by NR1C1) and farnesoid X receptor (FXR, encoded by NR1H4) are activated in the liver in the fasted and fed state, respectively. PPARα activation induces fatty acid oxidation, while FXR controls bile acid homeostasis, but both nuclear receptors also regulate numerous other metabolic pathways relevant to liver energy balance. Here we review evidence that they function coordinately to control key nutrient pathways, including fatty acid oxidation and gluconeogenesis in the fasted state and lipogenesis and glycolysis in the fed state. We have also recently reported that these receptors have mutually antagonistic impacts on autophagy, which is induced by PPARα but suppressed by FXR. Secretion of multiple blood proteins is a major drain on liver energy and nutrient resources, and we present preliminary evidence that the liver secretome may be directly suppressed by PPARα, but induced by FXR. Finally, previous studies demonstrated a striking deficiency in bile acid levels in malnourished mice that is consistent with results in malnourished children. We present evidence that hepatic targets of PPARα and FXR are dysregulated in chronic undernutrition. We conclude that PPARα and FXR function coordinately to integrate liver energy balance.

  3. Roles for PI(3,5)P2 in nutrient sensing through TORC1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Natsuko; Mao, Kai; Jin, Yui; Tevzadze, Gela; Kauffman, Emily J.; Park, Sujin; Bridges, Dave; Loewith, Robbie; Saltiel, Alan R.; Klionsky, Daniel J.; Weisman, Lois S.

    2014-01-01

    TORC1, a conserved protein kinase, regulates cell growth in response to nutrients. Localization of mammalian TORC1 to lysosomes is essential for TORC1 activation. Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2), an endosomal signaling lipid, is implicated in insulin-dependent stimulation of TORC1 activity in adipocytes. This raises the question of whether PI(3,5)P2 is an essential general regulator of TORC1. Moreover, the subcellular location where PI(3,5)P2 regulates TORC1 was not known. Here we report that PI(3,5)P2 is required for TORC1 activity in yeast and regulates TORC1 on the vacuole (lysosome). Furthermore, we show that the TORC1 substrate, Sch9 (a homologue of mammalian S6K), is recruited to the vacuole by direct interaction with PI(3,5)P2, where it is phosphorylated by TORC1. Of importance, we find that PI(3,5)P2 is required for multiple downstream pathways via TORC1-dependent phosphorylation of additional targets, including Atg13, the modification of which inhibits autophagy, and phosphorylation of Npr1, which releases its inhibitory function and allows nutrient-dependent endocytosis. These findings reveal PI(3,5)P2 as a general regulator of TORC1 and suggest that PI(3,5)P2 provides a platform for TORC1 signaling from lysosomes. PMID:24478451

  4. Sweet taste signaling functions as a hypothalamic glucose sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueying Ren

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain glucosensing is essential for normal body glucose homeostasis and neuronal function. However, the exact signaling mechanisms involved in the neuronal sensing of extracellular glucose levels remain poorly understood. Of particular interest is the identification of candidate membrane molecular sensors allowing neurons to change firing rates independently of intracellular glucose metabolism. Here we describe for the first time the expression of the taste receptor genes Tas1r1, Tas1r2 and Tas1r3, and their associated G-protein genes, in the mammalian brain. Neuronal expression of taste genes was detected in different nutrient-sensing forebrain regions, including the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei of the hypothalamus, the CA fields and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, the habenula, and cortex. Expression was also observed in the intra-ventricular epithelial cells of the choroid plexus. These same regions were found to express the corresponding gene products that form the heterodimeric T1R2/T1R3 and T1R1/T1R3 sweet and L-amino acid taste G-protein coupled receptors, respectively. These regions were also found to express the taste G-protein α-Gustducin. Moreover, in vivo studies in mice demonstrate that the hypothalamic expression of taste-related genes is regulated by the nutritional state of the animal, with food deprivation significantly increasing expression levels of Tas1r1 and Tas1r2 in hypothalamus, but not in cortex. Furthermore, exposing mouse hypothalamic cells to a low-glucose medium, while maintaining normal L-amino acid concentrations, specifically resulted in higher expression levels of the sweet-associated gene Tas1r2. This latter effect was reversed by adding the non-metabolizable artificial sweetener sucralose to the low-glucose medium, indicating that taste-like signaling in hypothalamic neurons does not require intracellular glucose oxidation. Our findings suggest that the G-protein coupled sweet receptor T1R2/T1R3 is a

  5. Sustained activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin nutrient sensing pathway is associated with hepatic insulin resistance, but not with steatosis, in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korsheninnikova, E.; van der Zon, G. C. M.; Voshol, P. J.; Janssen, G. M.; Havekes, L. M.; Grefhorst, A.; Kuipers, F.; Reijngoud, D. -J.; Romijn, J. A.; Ouwens, D. M.; Maassen, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Activation of nutrient sensing through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been linked to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. We examined activation of mTOR-signalling in relation to insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in mice. Materials and methods Chronic hepatic

  6. Expression, regulation and putative nutrient-sensing function of taste GPCRs in the heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon R Foster

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are critical for cardiovascular physiology. Cardiac cells express >100 nonchemosensory GPCRs, indicating that important physiological and potential therapeutic targets remain to be discovered. Moreover, there is a growing appreciation that members of the large, distinct taste and odorant GPCR families have specific functions in tissues beyond the oronasal cavity, including in the brain, gastrointestinal tract and respiratory system. To date, these chemosensory GPCRs have not been systematically studied in the heart. We performed RT-qPCR taste receptor screens in rodent and human heart tissues that revealed discrete subsets of type 2 taste receptors (TAS2/Tas2 as well as Tas1r1 and Tas1r3 (comprising the umami receptor are expressed. These taste GPCRs are present in cultured cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts, and by in situ hybridization can be visualized across the myocardium in isolated cardiac cells. Tas1r1 gene-targeted mice (Tas1r1(Cre/Rosa26(tdRFP strikingly recapitulated these data. In vivo taste receptor expression levels were developmentally regulated in the postnatal period. Intriguingly, several Tas2rs were upregulated in cultured rat myocytes and in mouse heart in vivo following starvation. The discovery of taste GPCRs in the heart opens an exciting new field of cardiac research. We predict that these taste receptors may function as nutrient sensors in the heart.

  7. Defective regulation of POMC precedes hypothalamic inflammation in diet-induced obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela F. P. Souza; Carina Solon; Lucas F. Nascimento; Jose C. De-Lima-Junior; Guilherme Nogueira; Rodrigo Moura; Guilherme Z. Rocha; Milena Fioravante; Vanessa Bobbo; Joseane Morari; Daniela Razolli; Eliana P. Araujo; Licio A. Velloso

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is the result of a long-term positive energy balance in which caloric intake overrides energy expenditure. This anabolic state results from the defective activity of hypothalamic neurons involved in the sensing and response to adiposity. However, it is currently unknown what the earliest obesity-linked hypothalamic defect is and how it orchestrates the energy imbalance present in obesity. Using an outbred model of diet-induced obesity we show that defective regulation of hypothalamic ...

  8. The Nutrient and Energy Sensor Sirt1 Regulates the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) Axis by Altering the Production of the Prohormone Convertase 2 (PC2) Essential in the Maturation of Corticotropin-releasing Hormone (CRH) from Its Prohormone in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toorie, Anika M; Cyr, Nicole E; Steger, Jennifer S; Beckman, Ross; Farah, George; Nillni, Eduardo A

    2016-03-11

    Understanding the role of hypothalamic neuropeptides and hormones in energy balance is paramount in the search for approaches to mitigate the obese state. Increased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity leads to increased levels of glucocorticoids (GC) that are known to regulate body weight. The axis initiates the production and release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) from the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. Levels of active CRH peptide are dependent on the processing of its precursor pro-CRH by the action of two members of the family of prohormone convertases 1 and 2 (PC1 and PC2). Here, we propose that the nutrient sensor sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) regulates the production of CRH post-translationally by affecting PC2. Data suggest that Sirt1 may alter the preproPC2 gene directly or via deacetylation of the transcription factor Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1). Data also suggest that Sirt1 may alter PC2 via a post-translational mechanism. Our results show that Sirt1 levels in the PVN increase in rats fed a high fat diet for 12 weeks. Furthermore, elevated Sirt1 increased PC2 levels, which in turn increased the production of active CRH and GC. Collectively, this study provides the first evidence supporting the hypothesis that PVN Sirt1 activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and basal GC levels by enhancing the production of CRH through an increase in the biosynthesis of PC2, which is essential in the maturation of CRH from its prohormone, pro-CRH. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Caloric Restriction and the Nutrient-Sensing PGC-1α in Mitochondrial Homeostasis: New Perspectives in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Lettieri Barbato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial activity progressively declines during ageing and in many neurodegenerative diseases. Caloric restriction (CR has been suggested as a dietary intervention that is able to postpone the detrimental aspects of aging as it ameliorates mitochondrial performance. This effect is partially due to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. The nutrient-sensing PGC-1α is a transcriptional coactivator that promotes the expression of mitochondrial genes and is induced by CR. It is believed that many of the mitochondrial and metabolic benefits of CR are due to increased PGC-1α activity. The increase of PGC-1α is also positively linked to neuroprotection and its decrement has been involved in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases. This paper aims to summarize the current knowledge about the role of PGC-1α in neuronal homeostasis and the beneficial effects of CR on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. We also discuss how PGC-1α-governed pathways could be used as target for nutritional intervention to prevent neurodegeneration.

  10. DNA methylation regulates hypothalamic gene expression linking parental diet during pregnancy to the offspring's risk of obesity in Psammomys obesus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, I; Kaspi, A; Ziemann, M; Block, T; Connor, T; Spolding, B; Cooper, A; Zimmet, P; El-Osta, A; Walder, K

    2016-07-01

    The rising incidence of obesity is a major public health issue worldwide. Recent human and animal studies suggest that parental diet can influence fetal development and is implicated with risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in offspring. The hypothalamus is central to body energy homoeostasis and appetite by controlling endocrine signals. We hypothesise that offspring susceptibility to obesity is programmed in the hypothalamus in utero and mediated by changes to DNA methylation, which persist to adulthood. We investigated hypothalamic genome-wide DNA methylation in Psammomys obesus diet during pregnancy to the offspring's risk of obesity. Using methyl-CpG binding domain capture and deep sequencing (MBD-seq), we examined the hypothalamus of offspring exposed to a low-fat diet and standard chow diet during the gestation and lactation period. Offspring exposed to a low-fat parental diet were more obese and had increased circulating insulin and glucose levels. Methylome profiling identified 1447 genomic regions of differential methylation between offspring of parents fed a low-fat diet compared with parents on standard chow diet. Pathway analysis shows novel DNA methylation changes of hypothalamic genes associated with neurological function, nutrient sensing, appetite and energy balance. Differential DNA methylation corresponded to changes in hypothalamic gene expression of Tas1r1 and Abcc8 in the offspring exposed to low-fat parental diet. Subject to parental low-fat diet, we observe DNA methylation changes of genes associated with obesity in offspring.

  11. Targeting lipid sensing in the central nervous system: new therapy against the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Stunff, Hervé; Coant, Nicolas; Migrenne, Stéphanie; Magnan, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    The hypothalamus plays a major role in the control of energy balance, by sensing circulating lipids. Several studies conducted over the past decade suggest that disruption of lipid sensing can lead to hypothalamic lipotoxicity, thereby contributing to the development of various diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. The physiological role of 'lipid sensing' as a regulator of neuronal activity involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis will be reviewed. Next, the emerging evidence that alterations of hypothalamic systems that regulate energy balance during overnutrition can lead to the development of obesity and associated pathologies such as type 2 diabetes will be described. Several studies have highlighted the role of malonyl-CoA and PKCθ and also autophagy within the hypothalamus as signals of nutrient abundance by critical neurons regulating food intake. Besides the physiological role of hypothalamic lipid sensing, it has been shown that overnutrition can also induce hypothalamic lipotoxicity through an inflammatory process. In conclusion, lipid toxicity could be the starting point of perturbations of the central control of energy balance which will favor the appearance of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Lipid sensing in the hypothalamus could be considered as a potential target for anti-obesity/diabetic strategies.

  12. Regulation of energy balance by the hypothalamic lipoprotein lipase regulator Angptl3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Kyong; Shin, Mi-Seon; Youn, Byung-Soo; Kang, Gil Myoung; Gil, So Young; Lee, Chan Hee; Choi, Jong Han; Lim, Hyo Sun; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min-Seon

    2015-04-01

    Hypothalamic lipid sensing is important for the maintenance of energy balance. Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (Angptl3) critically regulates the clearance of circulating lipids by inhibiting lipoprotein lipase (LPL). The current study demonstrated that Angptl3 is highly expressed in the neurons of the mediobasal hypothalamus, an important area in brain lipid sensing. Suppression of hypothalamic Angptl3 increased food intake but reduced energy expenditure and fat oxidation, thereby promoting weight gain. Consistently, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of Angptl3 caused the opposite metabolic changes, supporting an important role for hypothalamic Angptl3 in the control of energy balance. Notably, ICV Angptl3 significantly stimulated hypothalamic LPL activity. Moreover, coadministration of the LPL inhibitor apolipoprotein C3 antagonized the effects of Angptl3 on energy metabolism, indicating that LPL activation is critical for the central metabolic actions of Angptl3. Increased LPL activity is expected to promote lipid uptake by hypothalamic neurons, leading to enhanced brain lipid sensing. Indeed, ICV injection of Angptl3 increased long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) and LCFA-CoA levels in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, inhibitors of hypothalamic lipid-sensing pathways prevented Angptl3-induced anorexia and weight loss. These findings identify Angptl3 as a novel regulator of the hypothalamic lipid-sensing pathway. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  13. Intestinal nutrient sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielen, van der N.

    2016-01-01

    The alarming increase in obesity rates creates an urgent need for effective prevention and treatment strategies. The most effective treatment for obesity today is bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery comprises a number of different procedures having in common that they induce weight loss and alter

  14. To ingest or rest? Specialized roles of lateral hypothalamic area neurons in coordinating energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Juliette A; Woodworth, Hillary L; Leinninger, Gina M

    2015-01-01

    Survival depends on an organism's ability to sense nutrient status and accordingly regulate intake and energy expenditure behaviors. Uncoupling of energy sensing and behavior, however, underlies energy balance disorders such as anorexia or obesity. The hypothalamus regulates energy balance, and in particular the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) is poised to coordinate peripheral cues of energy status and behaviors that impact weight, such as drinking, locomotor behavior, arousal/sleep and autonomic output. There are several populations of LHA neurons that are defined by their neuropeptide content and contribute to energy balance. LHA neurons that express the neuropeptides melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) or orexins/hypocretins (OX) are best characterized and these neurons play important roles in regulating ingestion, arousal, locomotor behavior and autonomic function via distinct neuronal circuits. Recently, another population of LHA neurons containing the neuropeptide Neurotensin (Nts) has been implicated in coordinating anorectic stimuli and behavior to regulate hydration and energy balance. Understanding the specific roles of MCH, OX and Nts neurons in harmonizing energy sensing and behavior thus has the potential to inform pharmacological strategies to modify behaviors and treat energy balance disorders.

  15. To Ingest or Rest? Specialized Roles of Lateral Hypothalamic Area Neurons in Coordinating Energy Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette A. Brown

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Survival depends on an organism’s ability to sense nutrient status and accordingly regulate intake and energy expenditure behaviors. Uncoupling of energy sensing and behavior, however, underlies energy balance disorders such as anorexia or obesity. The hypothalamus regulates energy balance, and in particular the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA is poised to coordinate peripheral cues of energy status and behaviors that impact weight, such as drinking, locomotor behavior, arousal/sleep and autonomic output. There are several populations of LHA neurons that are defined by their neuropeptide content and contribute to energy balance. LHA neurons that express the neuropeptides melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH or orexins/hypocretins (OX are best characterized and these neurons play important roles in regulating ingestion, arousal, locomotor behavior and autonomic function via distinct neuronal circuits. Recently, another population of LHA neurons containing the neuropeptide Neurotensin (Nts has been implicated in coordinating anorectic stimuli and behavior to regulate hydration and energy balance. Understanding the specific roles of MCH, OX and Nts neurons in harmonizing energy sensing and behavior thus has the potential to inform pharmacological strategies to modify behaviors and treat energy balance disorders.

  16. Hypothalamic Inflammation and Energy Balance Disruptions: Spotlight on Chemokines

    OpenAIRE

    Le Thuc, Ophélia; Stobbe, Katharina; Cansell, Céline; Nahon, Jean-Louis; Blondeau, Nicolas; Rovère, Carole

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a key brain region in the regulation of energy balance as it controls food intake and both energy storage and expenditure through integration of humoral, neural, and nutrient-related signals and cues. Many years of research have focused on the regulation of energy balance by hypothalamic neurons, but the most recent findings suggest that neurons and glial cells, such as microglia and astrocytes, in the hypothalamus actually orchestrate together several metabolic functions....

  17. Multifunctional nutrient-binding proteins adapt human symbiotic bacteria for glycan competition in the gut by separately promoting enhanced sensing and catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Elizabeth A; Kwiatkowski, Kurt J; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Hamaker, Bruce R; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Martens, Eric C

    2014-09-09

    To compete for the dynamic stream of nutrients flowing into their ecosystem, colonic bacteria must respond rapidly to new resources and then catabolize them efficiently once they are detected. The Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron starch utilization system (Sus) is a model for nutrient acquisition by symbiotic gut bacteria, which harbor thousands of related Sus-like systems. Structural investigation of the four Sus outer membrane proteins (SusD, -E, -F, and -G) revealed that they contain a total of eight starch-binding sites that we demonstrated, using genetic and biochemical approaches, to play distinct roles in starch metabolism in vitro and in vivo in gnotobiotic mice. SusD, whose homologs are abundant in the human microbiome, is critical for the initial sensing of available starch, allowing sus transcriptional activation at much lower concentrations than without this function. In contrast, seven additional binding sites across SusE, -F, and -G are dispensable for sus activation. However, they optimize the rate of growth on starch in a manner dependent on the expression of the bacterial polysaccharide capsule, suggesting that they have evolved to offset the diffusion barrier created by this structure. These findings demonstrate how proteins with similar biochemical behavior can serve orthogonal functions during different stages of cellular adaptation to nutrients. Finally, we demonstrated in gnotobiotic mice fed a starch-rich diet that the Sus binding sites confer a competitive advantage to B. thetaiotaomicron in vivo in a manner that is dependent on other colonizing microbes. This study reveals how numerically dominant families of carbohydrate-binding proteins in the human microbiome fulfill separate and sometimes cooperative roles to optimize gut commensal bacteria for nutrient acquisition. Our intestinal tract harbors trillions of symbiotic microbes. A critical function contributed by this microbial community is the ability to degrade most of the complex

  18. [Hypothalamic dysfunction in obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande-Lee, Simone; Velloso, Licio A

    2012-08-01

    Obesity, defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair life quality, is one of the major public health problems worldwide. It results from an imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure. The control of energy balance in animals and humans is performed by the central nervous system (CNS) by means of neuroendocrine connections, in which circulating peripheral hormones, such as leptin and insulin, provide signals to specialized neurons of the hypothalamus reflecting body fat stores, and induce appropriate responses to maintain the stability of these stores. The majority of obesity cases are associated with central resistance to both leptin and insulin actions. In experimental animals, high-fat diets can induce an inflammatory process in the hypothalamus, which impairs leptin and insulin intracellular signaling pathways, and results in hyperphagia, decreased energy expenditure and, ultimately, obesity. Recent evidence obtained from neuroimaging studies and assessment of inflammatory markers in the cerebrospinal fluid of obese subjects suggests that similar alterations may be also present in humans. In this review, we briefly present the mechanisms involved with the loss of homeostatic control of energy balance in animal models of obesity, and the current evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction in obese humans.

  19. Multifunctional Nutrient-Binding Proteins Adapt Human Symbiotic Bacteria for Glycan Competition in the Gut by Separately Promoting Enhanced Sensing and Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Elizabeth A.; Kwiatkowski, Kurt J.; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Hamaker, Bruce R.; Koropatkin, Nicole M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To compete for the dynamic stream of nutrients flowing into their ecosystem, colonic bacteria must respond rapidly to new resources and then catabolize them efficiently once they are detected. The Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron starch utilization system (Sus) is a model for nutrient acquisition by symbiotic gut bacteria, which harbor thousands of related Sus-like systems. Structural investigation of the four Sus outer membrane proteins (SusD, -E, -F, and -G) revealed that they contain a total of eight starch-binding sites that we demonstrated, using genetic and biochemical approaches, to play distinct roles in starch metabolism in vitro and in vivo in gnotobiotic mice. SusD, whose homologs are abundant in the human microbiome, is critical for the initial sensing of available starch, allowing sus transcriptional activation at much lower concentrations than without this function. In contrast, seven additional binding sites across SusE, -F, and -G are dispensable for sus activation. However, they optimize the rate of growth on starch in a manner dependent on the expression of the bacterial polysaccharide capsule, suggesting that they have evolved to offset the diffusion barrier created by this structure. These findings demonstrate how proteins with similar biochemical behavior can serve orthogonal functions during different stages of cellular adaptation to nutrients. Finally, we demonstrated in gnotobiotic mice fed a starch-rich diet that the Sus binding sites confer a competitive advantage to B. thetaiotaomicron in vivo in a manner that is dependent on other colonizing microbes. This study reveals how numerically dominant families of carbohydrate-binding proteins in the human microbiome fulfill separate and sometimes cooperative roles to optimize gut commensal bacteria for nutrient acquisition. PMID:25205092

  20. Influence of Nutrient Availability and Quorum Sensing on the Formation of Metabolically Inactive Microcolonies Within Structurally Heterogeneous Bacterial Biofilms: An Individual-Based 3D Cellular Automata Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machineni, Lakshmi; Rajapantul, Anil; Nandamuri, Vandana; Pawar, Parag D

    2017-03-01

    The resistance of bacterial biofilms to antibiotic treatment has been attributed to the emergence of structurally heterogeneous microenvironments containing metabolically inactive cell populations. In this study, we use a three-dimensional individual-based cellular automata model to investigate the influence of nutrient availability and quorum sensing on microbial heterogeneity in growing biofilms. Mature biofilms exhibited at least three structurally distinct strata: a high-volume, homogeneous region sandwiched between two compact sections of high heterogeneity. Cell death occurred preferentially in layers in close proximity to the substratum, resulting in increased heterogeneity in this section of the biofilm; the thickness and heterogeneity of this lowermost layer increased with time, ultimately leading to sloughing. The model predicted the formation of metabolically dormant cellular microniches embedded within faster-growing cell clusters. Biofilms utilizing quorum sensing were more heterogeneous compared to their non-quorum sensing counterparts, and resisted sloughing, featuring a cell-devoid layer of EPS atop the substratum upon which the remainder of the biofilm developed. Overall, our study provides a computational framework to analyze metabolic diversity and heterogeneity of biofilm-associated microorganisms and may pave the way toward gaining further insights into the biophysical mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

  1. IFPA Meeting 2011 workshop report I: Placenta: Predicting future health; roles of lipids in the growth and development of feto-placental unit; placental nutrient sensing; placental research to solve clinical problems--a translational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, G; Albrecht, C; Benton, S J; Cotechini, T; Dechend, R; Dilworth, M R; Duttaroy, A K; Grotmol, T; Heazell, A E; Jansson, T; Johnstone, E D; Jones, H N; Jones, R L; Lager, S; Laine, K; Nagirnaja, L; Nystad, M; Powell, T; Redman, C; Sadovsky, Y; Sibley, C; Troisi, R; Wadsack, C; Westwood, M; Lash, G E

    2012-02-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2011 there were twelve themed workshops, four of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to both basic science and clinical research into placental growth and nutrient sensing and were divided into 1) placenta: predicting future health; 2) roles of lipids in the growth and development of feto-placental unit; 3) placental nutrient sensing; 4) placental research to solve clinical problems: a translational approach. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A tachykinin-like neuroendocrine signalling axis couples central serotonin action and nutrient sensing with peripheral lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamiuc, Lavinia; Noble, Tallie; Witham, Emily; Ratanpal, Harkaranveer; Vaughan, Megan; Srinivasan, Supriya

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin, a central neuromodulator with ancient ties to feeding and metabolism, is a major driver of body fat loss. However, mechanisms by which central serotonin action leads to fat loss remain unknown. Here, we report that the FLP-7 neuropeptide and its cognate receptor, NPR-22, function as the ligand-receptor pair that defines the neuroendocrine axis of serotonergic body fat loss in Caenorhabditis elegans. FLP-7 is secreted as a neuroendocrine peptide in proportion to fluctuations in neural serotonin circuit functions, and its release is regulated from secretory neurons via the nutrient sensor AMPK. FLP-7 acts via the NPR-22/Tachykinin2 receptor in the intestine and drives fat loss via the adipocyte triglyceride lipase ATGL-1. Importantly, this ligand-receptor pair does not alter other serotonin-dependent behaviours including food intake. For global modulators such as serotonin, the use of distinct neuroendocrine peptides for each output may be one means to achieve phenotypic selectivity. PMID:28128367

  3. Reconstruction of the yeast protein-protein interaction network involved in nutrient sensing and global metabolic regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandy, Subir Kumar; Jouhten, Paula; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several protein-protein interaction studies have been performed for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using different high-throughput experimental techniques. All these results are collected in the BioGRID database and the SGD database provide detailed annotation of the different......-sensing and metabolic regulatory signal transduction pathways (STP) operating in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The reconstructed STP network includes a full protein-protein interaction network including the key nodes Snf1, Tor1, Hog1 and Pka1. The network includes a total of 623 structural open reading frames (ORFs...

  4. Leptin Elongates Hypothalamic Neuronal Cilia via Transcriptional Regulation and Actin Destabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Gil Myoung; Han, Yu Mi; Ko, Hyuk Whan; Kim, Joon; Oh, Byung Chul; Kwon, Ijoo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2015-07-17

    Terminally differentiated neurons have a single, primary cilium. The primary cilia of hypothalamic neurons play a critical role in sensing metabolic signals. We recently showed that mice with leptin deficiency or resistance have shorter cilia in the hypothalamic neurons, and leptin treatment elongates cilia in hypothalamic neurons. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which leptin controls ciliary length in hypothalamic neurons. In N1 hypothalamic neuronal cells, leptin treatment increased the expression of intraflagellar transport proteins. These effects occurred via phosphatase and tensin homolog/glycogen synthase kinase-3β-mediated inhibition of the transcriptional factor RFX1. Actin filament dynamics were also involved in leptin-promoted ciliary elongation. Both leptin and cytochalasin-D treatment induced F-actin disruption and cilium elongation in hypothalamic neurons that was completely abrogated by co-treatment with the F-actin polymerizer phalloidin. Our findings suggest that leptin elongates hypothalamic neuronal cilia by stimulating the production of intraflagellar transport proteins and destabilizing actin filaments. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. HYPOTHALAMIC NEUROHORMONES AND IMMUNE RESPONSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Luis eQuintanar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, Corticotropin-releasing hormone and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone. In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed.

  6. Hypothalamic obesity: causes, consequences, treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, Robert H

    2008-12-01

    Hypothalamic obesity, or intractable weight gain after hypothalamic damage, is one of the most pernicious and agonizing late effects of CNS insult. Such patients gain weight even in response to caloric restriction, and attempts at lifestyle modification are useless to prevent or treat the obesity. The pathogenesis of this condition involves the inability to transduce afferent hormonal signals of adiposity, in effect mimicing a state of CNS starvation. Efferent sympathetic activity drops, resulting in malaise and reduced energy expenditure, and vagal activity increases, resulting in increased insulin secretion and adipogenesis. Pharmacologic treatment is difficult, consisting of adrenergics to mimick sympathetic activity, or suppression of insulin secretion with octreotide, or both. Recently, bariatric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic gastric banding, vagotomy) have also been attempted with variable results. Early and intensive management is required to stave off the obesity and its consequences.

  7. Hypothalamic signaling mechanisms in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Casey Y; Wainford, Richard D

    2015-05-01

    The etiology of hypertension, a critical public health issue affecting one in three US adults, involves the integration of the actions of multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system. Increased activation of the central nervous system, driving enhanced sympathetic outflow and increased blood pressure, has emerged as a major contributor to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The hypothalamus is a key brain site acting to integrate central and peripheral inputs to ultimately impact blood pressure in multiple disease states that evoke hypertension. This review highlights recent advances that have identified novel signal transduction mechanisms within multiple hypothalamic nuclei (e.g., paraventricular nucleus, arcuate nucleus) acting to drive the pathophysiology of hypertension in neurogenic hypertension, angiotensin II hypertension, salt-sensitive hypertension, chronic intermittent hypoxia, and obesity-induced hypertension. Increased understanding of hypothalamic activity in hypertension has the potential to identify novel targets for future therapeutic interventions designed to treat hypertension.

  8. Integrating remote sensing with nutrient management plans to calculate nitrogen parameters for swine CAFOs at the sprayfield and sub-watershed scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Elizabeth C; Serre, Marc L

    2017-02-15

    North Carolina (NC) regulates swine concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) using five-year nutrient management plans (NMPs) requiring the plant available nitrogen sprayed (PANspray) to be less than that utilized by crops (PANcrops), i.e. the PAN balance (defined as PANbal=PANspray-PANcrops) remains negative, which avoids over-spraying liquid effluent onto crops. Objectives of this research are first to characterize Duplin County sprayfields and PANbal by creating the first, open-source sprayfield spatial database created for swine CAFOs in NC (for Duplin County). Second, this paper finds that for two sub-watershed scales 199 additional catchments and 1 additional HUC12 were identified as having permitted lagoon effluent applied compared to using CAFO point locations for a total of 510 catchments and 34 HUC12s with swine CAFO sprayfields. Third, a new method disaggregates annual PANbal from NMPs using remote sensing crop data. And finally, probability that sprayfields have excess PANbal is estimated due to k, a PAN availability coefficient. The remote sensing approach finds that 9-14% of catchments in a given year and 24% of catchments over a five year period have a positive PANbal. An additional 3-4% of catchments have probability of a positive PANbal due to variability in k. This work quantifies the impact of crop rotations on of sprayfields at the catchment spatial scale with respect to PANbal and highlights some of the limitations of NMPs have for estimation of PANbal. We recommend that NMPs be permitted based on the crop rotation scenario utilizing the least PAN and that swine producer compliance to manure management practice be encouraged. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Remote sensing of nutrient deficiency in Lactuca sativa using neural networks for terrestrial and advanced life support applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Edie Seldon

    2000-12-01

    A remote sensing study using reflectance and fluorescence spectra of hydroponically grown Lactuca sativa (lettuce) canopies was conducted. An optical receiver was designed and constructed to interface with a commercial fiber optic spectrometer for data acquisition. Optical parameters were varied to determine effects of field of view and distance to target on vegetation stress assessment over the test plant growth cycle. Feedforward backpropagation neural networks (NN) were implemented to predict the presence of canopy stress. Effects of spatial and spectral resolutions on stress predictions of the neural network were also examined. Visual inspection and fresh mass values failed to differentiate among controls, plants cultivated with 25% of the recommended concentration of phosphorous (P), and those cultivated with 25% nitrogen (N) based on fresh mass and visual inspection. The NN's were trained on input vectors created using reflectance and test day, fluorescence and test day, and reflectance, fluorescence, and test day. Four networks were created representing four levels of spectral resolution: 100-nm NN, 10-nm NN, 1-nm NN, and 0.1-nm NN. The 10-nm resolution was found to be sufficient for classifying extreme nitrogen deficiency in freestanding hydroponic lettuce. As a result of leaf angle and canopy structure broadband scattering intensity in the 700-nm to 1000-nm range was found to be the most useful portion of the spectrum in this study. More subtle effects of "greenness" and fluorescence emission were believed to be obscured by canopy structure and leaf orientation. As field of view was not as found to be as significant as originally believed, systems implementing higher repetitions over more uniformly oriented, i.e. smaller, flatter, target areas would provide for more discernible neural network input vectors. It is believed that this technique holds considerable promise for early detection of extreme nitrogen deficiency. Further research is recommended using

  10. A genomic atlas of mouse hypothalamic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimogori, Tomomi; Lee, Daniel A; Miranda-Angulo, Ana; Yang, Yanqin; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Lizhi; Yoshida, Aya C; Kataoka, Ayane; Mashiko, Hiromi; Avetisyan, Marina; Qi, Lixin; Qian, Jiang; Blackshaw, Seth

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a central regulator of many behaviors that are essential for survival, such as temperature regulation, food intake and circadian rhythms. However, the molecular pathways that mediate hypothalamic development are largely unknown. To identify genes expressed in developing mouse hypothalamus, we performed microarray analysis at 12 different developmental time points. We then conducted developmental in situ hybridization for 1,045 genes that were dynamically expressed over the course of hypothalamic neurogenesis. We identified markers that stably labeled each major hypothalamic nucleus over the entire course of neurogenesis and constructed a detailed molecular atlas of the developing hypothalamus. As a proof of concept of the utility of these data, we used these markers to analyze the phenotype of mice in which Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) was selectively deleted from hypothalamic neuroepithelium and found that Shh is essential for anterior hypothalamic patterning. Our results serve as a resource for functional investigations of hypothalamic development, connectivity, physiology and dysfunction. PMID:20436479

  11. Hypothalamic Inflammation and Energy Balance Disruptions: Spotlight on Chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophélia Le Thuc

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is a key brain region in the regulation of energy balance as it controls food intake and both energy storage and expenditure through integration of humoral, neural, and nutrient-related signals and cues. Many years of research have focused on the regulation of energy balance by hypothalamic neurons, but the most recent findings suggest that neurons and glial cells, such as microglia and astrocytes, in the hypothalamus actually orchestrate together several metabolic functions. Because glial cells have been described as mediators of inflammatory processes in the brain, the existence of a causal link between hypothalamic inflammation and the deregulations of feeding behavior, leading to involuntary weight loss or obesity for example, has been suggested. Several inflammatory pathways that could impair the hypothalamic control of energy balance have been studied over the years such as, among others, toll-like receptors and canonical cytokines. Yet, less studied so far, chemokines also represent interesting candidates that could link the aforementioned pathways and the activity of hypothalamic neurons. Indeed, chemokines, in addition to their role in attracting immune cells to the inflamed site, have been suggested to be capable of neuromodulation. Thus, they could disrupt cellular activity together with synthesis and/or secretion of multiple neurotransmitters/mediators involved in the maintenance of energy balance. This review discusses the different inflammatory pathways that have been identified so far in the hypothalamus in the context of feeding behavior and body weight control impairments, with a particular focus on chemokines signaling that opens a new avenue in the understanding of the major role played by inflammation in obesity.

  12. Hypothalamic Inflammation and Energy Balance Disruptions: Spotlight on Chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Thuc, Ophélia; Stobbe, Katharina; Cansell, Céline; Nahon, Jean-Louis; Blondeau, Nicolas; Rovère, Carole

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a key brain region in the regulation of energy balance as it controls food intake and both energy storage and expenditure through integration of humoral, neural, and nutrient-related signals and cues. Many years of research have focused on the regulation of energy balance by hypothalamic neurons, but the most recent findings suggest that neurons and glial cells, such as microglia and astrocytes, in the hypothalamus actually orchestrate together several metabolic functions. Because glial cells have been described as mediators of inflammatory processes in the brain, the existence of a causal link between hypothalamic inflammation and the deregulations of feeding behavior, leading to involuntary weight loss or obesity for example, has been suggested. Several inflammatory pathways that could impair the hypothalamic control of energy balance have been studied over the years such as, among others, toll-like receptors and canonical cytokines. Yet, less studied so far, chemokines also represent interesting candidates that could link the aforementioned pathways and the activity of hypothalamic neurons. Indeed, chemokines, in addition to their role in attracting immune cells to the inflamed site, have been suggested to be capable of neuromodulation. Thus, they could disrupt cellular activity together with synthesis and/or secretion of multiple neurotransmitters/mediators involved in the maintenance of energy balance. This review discusses the different inflammatory pathways that have been identified so far in the hypothalamus in the context of feeding behavior and body weight control impairments, with a particular focus on chemokines signaling that opens a new avenue in the understanding of the major role played by inflammation in obesity.

  13. Bariatric surgery in hypothalamic obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eBingham

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Craniopharyngiomas (CP are epithelial neoplasms generally found in the area of the pituitary and hypothalamus. Despite benign histology, these tumors and/or their treatment often result in significant, debilitating disorders of endocrine, neurological, behavioral, and metabolic systems. Severe obesity is observed in a high percentage of patients with CP resulting in significant comorbidities and negatively impacting quality of life. Obesity occurs as a result of hypothalamic damage and disruption of normal homeostatic mechanisms regulating energy balance. Such pathological weight gain, termed hypothalamic obesity (HyOb, is often severe and refractory to therapy.Unfortunately, neither lifestyle intervention nor pharmacotherapy has proven truly effective in the treatment of CP-HyOb. Given the limited choices and poor results of these treatments, several groups have examined bariatric surgery as a treatment alternative for patients with CP-HyOb. While a large body of evidence exists supporting the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of exogenous obesity and its comorbidities, its role in the treatment of HyOb has yet to be well defined. To date, the existing literature on bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb is largely limited to case reports and series with short term follow-up. Here we review the current reports on the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of CP-HyOb. We also compare these results to those reported for other populations of HyOb, including Prader-Willi Syndrome and patients with melanocortin signaling defects. While initial reports of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb are promising, their limited scope makes it difficult to draw any substantial conclusions as to the long term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb. There continues to be a need for more robust, controlled, prospective trials with long term follow-up in order to better define the role of bariatric surgery in the treatment of all types of hypothalamic

  14. Hypothalamic miRNAs: emerging roles in energy balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Marc; Gomez-Valadés, Alicia G; Ramirez, Sara; Gomis, Ramon; Claret, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a crucial central nervous system area controlling appetite, body weight and metabolism. It consists in multiple neuronal types that sense, integrate and generate appropriate responses to hormonal and nutritional signals partly by fine-tuning the expression of specific batteries of genes. However, the mechanisms regulating these neuronal gene programmes in physiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression that recently emerged as pivotal modulators of systemic metabolism. In this article we will review current evidence indicating that miRNAs in hypothalamic neurons are also implicated in appetite and whole-body energy balance control.

  15. Hypothalamic miRNAs: emerging roles in energy balance control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eSchneeberger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is a crucial central nervous system area controlling appetite, body weight and metabolism. It consists in multiple neuronal types that sense, integrate and generate appropriate responses to hormonal and nutritional signals partly by fine-tuning the expression of specific batteries of genes. However, the mechanisms regulating these neuronal gene programmes in physiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are key regulators of gene expression that recently emerged as pivotal modulators of systemic metabolism. In this article we will review current evidence indicating that miRNAs in hypothalamic neurons are also implicated in appetite and whole-body energy balance control.

  16. Hypothalamic AMP-activated Protein Kinase as a Regulator of Food Intake and Energy Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tae Seok; Jeon, Yoonjeong; Kim, Seolsong; Kim, Eun-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of appetite at proper levels, depending on the energy status, is important; otherwise abnormal appetite may cause a series of disorders, such as anorexia, hyperphagia, obesity, and its complications (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and fatty liver disease). Hypothalamic AMPactivated protein kinase (AMPK) integrates diverse hormonal and nutritional signals to regulate food intake and energy metabolism. Recent evidence suggests that different hormones, nutrients and synthetic chemicals can modulate AMPK activity in the hypothalamus, thereby regulating food intake and body weight, through neuropeptide expressions. In order to elucidate the mechanisms that control hypothalamic AMPK activity, a variety of studies have focused on finding upstream and downstream modulators of hypothalamic AMPK for the regulation of food intake and energy balance. This review highlights the current evidence for understanding how hypothalamic AMPK regulates food intake and energy balance, and will help in the development of effective interventions for the treatment of food intake-related disorders. In the future, it is hoped that new pharmaceutical developments targeting hypothalamic AMPK, in combination with careful clinical trials, will lead to improved and effective therapeutic strategies for complications caused by abnormal appetite and energy balance.

  17. [Hypothalamic inflammation and energy balance deregulations: focus on chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Thuc, Ophélia; Rovère, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a key brain region in the regulation of energy balance. It especially controls food intake and both energy storage and expenditure through integration of humoral, neural and nutrient-related signals and cues. Hypothalamic neurons and glial cells act jointly to orchestrate, both spatially and temporally, regulated metabolic functions of the hypothalamus. Thus, the existence of a causal link between hypothalamic inflammation and deregulations of feeding behavior, such as involuntary weight-loss or obesity, has been suggested. Among the inflammatory mediators that could induce deregulations of hypothalamic control of the energy balance, chemokines represent interesting candidates. Indeed, chemokines, primarily known for their chemoattractant role of immune cells to the inflamed site, have also been suggested capable of neuromodulation. Thus, chemokines could disrupt cellular activity together with synthesis and/or secretion of multiple neurotransmitters/mediators that are involved in the maintenance of energy balance. Here, we relate, on one hand, recent results showing the primary role of the central chemokinergic signaling CCL2/CCR2 for metabolic and behavioral adaptation to high-grade inflammation, especially loss of appetite and weight, through its activity on hypothalamic neurons producing the orexigenic peptide Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH) and, on the other hand, results that suggest that chemokines could also deregulate hypothalamic neuropeptidergic circuits to induce an opposite phenotype and eventually participate in the onset/development of obesity. In more details, we will emphasize a study recently showing, in a model of high-grade acute inflammation of LPS injection in mice, that central CCL2/CCR2 signaling is of primary importance for several aspects explaining weight loss associated with inflammation: after LPS injection, animals lose weight, reduce their food intake, increase their fat oxidation (thus energy consumption from

  18. Hypothalamic hamartoma: Is the epileptogenic zone always hypothalamic? Arguments for independent (third stage) secondary epileptogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scholly, Julia; Valenti, Maria‐Paola; Staack, Anke M; Strobl, Karl; Bast, Thomas; Kehrli, Pierre; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Hirsch, Edouard

    2013-01-01

    Gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas ( HH s) are a clinicoradiologic syndrome presenting with a variety of symptoms, including pharmacoresistant epilepsy with multiple seizure types, electroencephalography ( EEG...

  19. Hypothalamic adipsic syndrome: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, S G; Vaidja, B; Baylis, P H

    1997-10-01

    Patients with hypothalamic adipsic syndrome, especially in conjunction with diabetes insipidus, pose management difficulties. They are at risk of both under- and over-hydration. We present 4 patients with hypothalamic adipsic syndromes, due to different causes, illustrating the practical difficulties encountered in this condition. The principles of management, with a sliding scale of water intake related to changes in daily body weight, are discussed.

  20. Neuropeptide Y stimulates autophagy in hypothalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveleira, Célia A; Botelho, Mariana; Carmo-Silva, Sara; Pascoal, Jorge F; Ferreira-Marques, Marisa; Nóbrega, Clévio; Cortes, Luísa; Valero, Jorge; Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; Álvaro, Ana R; Santana, Magda; Kügler, Sebastian; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2015-03-31

    Aging is characterized by autophagy impairment that contributes to age-related disease aggravation. Moreover, it was described that the hypothalamus is a critical brain area for whole-body aging development and has impact on lifespan. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the major neuropeptides present in the hypothalamus, and it has been shown that, in aged animals, the hypothalamic NPY levels decrease. Because caloric restriction (CR) delays aging, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy, and also increases hypothalamic NPY levels, we hypothesized that NPY could have a relevant role on autophagy modulation in the hypothalamus. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of NPY on autophagy in the hypothalamus. Using both hypothalamic neuronal in vitro models and mice overexpressing NPY in the hypothalamus, we observed that NPY stimulates autophagy in the hypothalamus. Mechanistically, in rodent hypothalamic neurons, NPY increases autophagy through the activation of NPY Y1 and Y5 receptors, and this effect is tightly associated with the concerted activation of PI3K, MEK/ERK, and PKA signaling pathways. Modulation of hypothalamic NPY levels may be considered a potential strategy to produce protective effects against hypothalamic impairments associated with age and to delay aging.

  1. Transcriptional profiling of fetal hypothalamic TRH neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Pérez-Monter, Carlos; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Castillo-Ramírez, Santiago; Gutiérrez-Rios, Rosa María; Joseph-Bravo, Patricia; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor; Charli, Jean-Louis

    2011-05-10

    During murine hypothalamic development, different neuroendocrine cell phenotypes are generated in overlapping periods; this suggests that cell-type specific developmental programs operate to achieve complete maturation. A balance between programs that include cell proliferation, cell cycle withdrawal as well as epigenetic regulation of gene expression characterizes neurogenesis. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) is a peptide that regulates energy homeostasis and autonomic responses. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying TRH neuron development, we performed a genome wide study of its transcriptome during fetal hypothalamic development. In primary cultures, TRH cells constitute 2% of the total fetal hypothalamic cell population. To purify these cells, we took advantage of the fact that the segment spanning -774 to +84 bp of the Trh gene regulatory region confers specific expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the TRH cells. Transfected TRH cells were purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting, various cell preparations pooled, and their transcriptome compared to that of GFP- hypothalamic cells. TRH cells undergoing the terminal phase of differentiation, expressed genes implicated in protein biosynthesis, intracellular signaling and transcriptional control. Among the transcription-associated transcripts, we identified the transcription factors Klf4, Klf10 and Atf3, which were previously uncharacterized within the hypothalamus. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports identifying transcripts with a potentially important role during the development of a specific hypothalamic neuronal phenotype. This genome-scale study forms a rational foundation for identifying genes that might participate in the development and function of hypothalamic TRH neurons.

  2. Hypothalamic hamartoma: Neuropathology and epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, John F; Parsons, Angela; Tsang, Candy; Simeone, Kristina; Coons, Stephen; Wu, Jie

    2017-06-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) are congenital malformations of the ventral hypothalamus resulting in treatment-resistant epilepsy and are intrinsically epileptogenic for the gelastic seizures that are the hallmark symptom of this disorder. This paper reviews the neuropathologic features of HHs associated with epilepsy, with an emphasis on characterizing neuron phenotypes and an ultimate goal of understanding the cellular model of ictogenesis occurring locally within this tissue. We also present previously unpublished findings on Golgi staining of HH. The microarchitecture of HH is relatively simple, with nodular clusters of neurons that vary in size and abundance with poorly defined boundaries. Approximately 80-90% of HH neurons have an interneuron-like phenotype with small, round soma and short, unbranched processes that lack spines. These neurons express glutamic acid decarboxylase and likely utilize γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as their primary neurotransmitter. They have intrinsic membrane properties that lead to spontaneous pacemaker-like firing activity. The remaining HH neurons are large cells with pleomorphic, often pyramidal, soma and dendrites that are more likely to be branched and have spines. These neurons appear to be excitatory, projection-type neurons, and have the functionally immature behavior of depolarizing and firing in response to GABA ligands. We hypothesize that the irregular neuronal clusters are the functional unit for ictogenesis. Further research to define and characterize these local networks is required to fully understand the cellular mechanisms responsible for gelastic seizures. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Sweet taste receptor serves to activate glucose- and leptin-responsive neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and participates in glucose responsiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kohno

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In the feeding center, whole-body energy signals including hormones and nutrients are sensed, processed, and integrated. As a result, food intake and energy expenditure are regulated. Two types of glucose-sensing neurons exist in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC: glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. While some molecules are known to be related to glucose sensing in the hypothalamus, the mechanism underlying glucose sensing in the hypothalamus are not fully understood. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of taste type 1 receptor 2 (T1R2 and taste type 1 receptor 3 (T1R3 and senses sweet tastes. T1R2 and T1R3 receptors are distributed in multiple organs including the tongue, pancreas, adipose tissue, and hypothalamus. However, the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC remains to be clarified. To examine the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC, cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i in isolated single ARC neurons were measured using Fura-2 fluorescent imaging. An artificial sweetener, sucralose at 10-5 M-10-2 M dose dependently increased [Ca2+]i in 12-16% of ARC neurons. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was suppressed by a sweet taste receptor inhibitor, gurmarin. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was inhibited under an extracellular Ca2+-free condition and in the presence of an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nitrendipine. Sucralose-responding neurons were activated by high-concentration of glucose. This response to glucose was markedly suppressed by gurmarin. More than half of sucralose-responding neurons were activated by leptin but not ghrelin. Percentage of proopiomelanocortin (POMC neurons among sucralose-responding neurons and sweet taste receptor expressing neurons were low, suggesting that majority of sucralose-responding neurons are non-POMC neurons. These data suggest that sweet taste receptor-mediated cellular

  4. Sweet Taste Receptor Serves to Activate Glucose- and Leptin-Responsive Neurons in the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus and Participates in Glucose Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Daisuke; Koike, Miho; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In the feeding center, whole-body energy signals including hormones and nutrients are sensed, processed, and integrated. As a result, food intake and energy expenditure are regulated. Two types of glucose-sensing neurons exist in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC): glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. While some molecules are known to be related to glucose sensing in the hypothalamus, the mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in the hypothalamus are not fully understood. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of taste type 1 receptor 2 (T1R2) and taste type 1 receptor 3 (T1R3) and senses sweet tastes. T1R2 and T1R3 are distributed in multiple organs including the tongue, pancreas, adipose tissue, and hypothalamus. However, the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC remains to be clarified. To examine the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC, cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in isolated single ARC neurons were measured using Fura-2 fluorescent imaging. An artificial sweetener, sucralose at 10−5–10−2 M dose dependently increased [Ca2+]i in 12–16% of ARC neurons. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was suppressed by a sweet taste receptor inhibitor, gurmarin. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was inhibited under an extracellular Ca2+-free condition and in the presence of an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nitrendipine. Sucralose-responding neurons were activated by high-concentration of glucose. This response to glucose was markedly suppressed by gurmarin. More than half of sucralose-responding neurons were activated by leptin but not ghrelin. Percentages of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons among sucralose-responding neurons and sweet taste receptor expressing neurons were low, suggesting that majority of sucralose-responding neurons are non-POMC neurons. These data suggest that sweet taste receptor-mediated cellular activation mainly

  5. Sweet Taste Receptor Serves to Activate Glucose- and Leptin-Responsive Neurons in the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus and Participates in Glucose Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Daisuke; Koike, Miho; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In the feeding center, whole-body energy signals including hormones and nutrients are sensed, processed, and integrated. As a result, food intake and energy expenditure are regulated. Two types of glucose-sensing neurons exist in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC): glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. While some molecules are known to be related to glucose sensing in the hypothalamus, the mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in the hypothalamus are not fully understood. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of taste type 1 receptor 2 (T1R2) and taste type 1 receptor 3 (T1R3) and senses sweet tastes. T1R2 and T1R3 are distributed in multiple organs including the tongue, pancreas, adipose tissue, and hypothalamus. However, the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC remains to be clarified. To examine the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC, cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in isolated single ARC neurons were measured using Fura-2 fluorescent imaging. An artificial sweetener, sucralose at 10-5-10-2 M dose dependently increased [Ca2+]i in 12-16% of ARC neurons. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was suppressed by a sweet taste receptor inhibitor, gurmarin. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was inhibited under an extracellular Ca2+-free condition and in the presence of an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nitrendipine. Sucralose-responding neurons were activated by high-concentration of glucose. This response to glucose was markedly suppressed by gurmarin. More than half of sucralose-responding neurons were activated by leptin but not ghrelin. Percentages of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons among sucralose-responding neurons and sweet taste receptor expressing neurons were low, suggesting that majority of sucralose-responding neurons are non-POMC neurons. These data suggest that sweet taste receptor-mediated cellular activation mainly occurs on

  6. Bardoxolone methyl prevents obesity and hypothalamic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camer, Danielle; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wang, Hongqin; Dinh, Chi H L; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-08-25

    High-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity is associated with hypothalamic leptin resistance and low grade chronic inflammation, which largely impairs the neuroregulation of negative energy balance. Neuroregulation of negative energy balance is largely controlled by the mediobasal and paraventricular nuclei regions of the hypothalamus via leptin signal transduction. Recently, a derivative of oleanolic acid, bardoxolone methyl (BM), has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects. We tested the hypothesis that BM would prevent HF diet-induced obesity, hypothalamic leptin resistance, and inflammation in mice fed a HF diet. Oral administration of BM via drinking water (10 mg/kg daily) for 21 weeks significantly prevented an increase in body weight, energy intake, hyperleptinemia, and peripheral fat accumulation in mice fed a HF diet. Furthermore, BM treatment prevented HF diet-induced decreases in the anorexigenic effects of peripheral leptin administration. In the mediobasal and paraventricular nuclei regions of the hypothalamus, BM administration prevented HF diet-induced impairments of the downstream protein kinase b (Akt) pathway of hypothalamic leptin signalling. BM treatment also prevented an increase in inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in these two hypothalamic regions. These results identify a potential novel neuropharmacological application for BM in preventing HF diet-induced obesity, hypothalamic leptin resistance, and inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypothalamic and brainstem neuronal circuits controlling homeostatic energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Marc; Gomis, Ramon; Claret, Marc

    2014-02-01

    Alterations in adequate energy balance maintenance result in serious metabolic disturbances such as obesity. In mammals, this complex process is orchestrated by multiple and distributed neuronal circuits. Hypothalamic and brainstem neuronal circuits are critically involved in the sensing of circulating and local factors conveying information about the energy status of the organism. The integration of these signals culminates in the generation of specific and coordinated physiological responses aimed at regulating energy balance through the modulation of appetite and energy expenditure. In this article, we review current knowledge on the homeostatic regulation of energy balance, emphasizing recent advances in mouse genetics, electrophysiology, and optogenetic techniques that have greatly contributed to improving our understanding of this central process.

  8. Efferent connections from the lateral hypothalamic region and the lateral preoptic area to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P J; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Mikkelsen, J D

    1994-01-01

    , iontophoretic injections of the anterograde tracer Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin were delivered into distinct areas of the lateral hypothalamic region. Neurons of the intermediate hypothalamic area projected mainly to the PVN subnuclei, which contained parvicellular neuroendocrine cells. In contrast...

  9. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Hypothalamic Regulation of Energy Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Diano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand the etiology of metabolic disorders, including obesity and type II diabetes, it is essential to gain better insight into how stored and available energy sources are monitored by the central nervous system. In particular, a comprehension of the fine cellular interplay and intracellular mechanisms that enable appropriate hypothalamic and consequent endocrine and behavioral responses to both circulating hormonal and nutrient signals remains elusive. Recent data, including those from our laboratories, raised the notion that reactive oxygen species (ROS generation is not merely a by-product of substrate oxidation, but it plays a crucial role in modulating cellular responses involved in the regulation of energy metabolism. These review summarizes the published recent data on the effect of ROS levels in the regulation of neuronal function, including that of hypothalamic melanocortin neurons, pro-opiomelanocortin and neuropeptide Y-/agouti related peptide-neurons, in the modulation of food intake.

  10. Hypothalamic inflammation and gliosis in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Mauricio D; Thaler, Joshua P

    2015-10-01

    Hypothalamic inflammation and gliosis are recently discovered mechanisms that may contribute to obesity pathogenesis. Current research in this area suggests that investigation of these central nervous system responses may provide opportunities to develop new weight loss treatments. In rodents, hypothalamic inflammation and gliosis occur rapidly with high-fat diet consumption prior to significant weight gain. In addition, sensitivity or resistance to diet-induced obesity in rodents generally correlates with the presence or absence of hypothalamic inflammation and reactive gliosis (brain response to injury). Moreover, functional interventions that increase or decrease inflammation in neurons and glia correspondingly alter diet-associated weight gain. However, some conflicting data have recently emerged that question the contribution of hypothalamic inflammation to obesity pathogenesis. Nevertheless, several studies have detected gliosis and disrupted connectivity in obese humans, highlighting the potential translational importance of this mechanism. There is growing evidence that obesity is associated with brain inflammation in humans, particularly in the hypothalamus where its presence may disrupt body weight control and glucose homeostasis. More work is needed to determine whether this response is common in human obesity and to what extent it can be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  11. Role of developmental factors in hypothalamic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob eBiran

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is a brain region which regulates homeostasis by mediating endocrine, autonomic and behavioral functions. It is comprised of several nuclei containing distinct neuronal populations producing neuropeptides and neurotransmitters that regulate fundamental body functions including temperature and metabolic rate, thirst and hunger, sexual behavior and reproduction, circadian rhythm, and emotional responses. The identity, number and connectivity of these neuronal populations are established during the organism’s development and are of crucial importance for normal hypothalamic function. Studies have suggested that developmental abnormalities in specific hypothalamic circuits can lead to obesity, sleep disorders, anxiety, depression and autism. At the molecular level, the development of the hypothalamus is regulated by transcription factors, secreted growth factors, neuropeptides and their receptors. Recent studies in zebrafish and mouse have demonstrated that some of these molecules maintain their expression in the adult brain and subsequently play a role in the physiological functions that are regulated by hypothalamic neurons. Here, we summarize the involvement of some of the key developmental factors in hypothalamic development and function by focusing on the mouse and zebrafish genetic model organisms.

  12. Evolution of Gelastic Epilepsy with Hypothalamic Hamartoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The patterns of clinical presentation, evolution of the epilepsy, and electoclinical diagnostic features of hypothalamic hamartoma (HH in 19 patients (8 children and 11 adults, seen between 1991 and 2001, were evaluated at Kings College Hospital and the Institute of Epileptology, London, UK.

  13. Hypothalamic functions in patients with pituitary insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgers, A.J.F.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to increase our understanding of hypothalamic (dys)function in patients with pituitary insufficiency. This goal is driven by the clinical experience of persisting symptoms in patients adequately treated for pituitary insufficiency. We focus primarily on patients

  14. Expanding the definition of hypothalamic obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, I; Hochberg, Z

    2010-10-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HyOb) was first defined as the significant polyphagia and weight gain that occurs after extensive suprasellar operations for excision of hypothalamic tumours. However, polyphagia and weight gain complicate other disorders related to the hypothalamus, including those that cause structural damage to the hypothalamus like tumours, trauma, radiotherapy; genetic disorders such as Prader-Willi syndrome; side effects of psychotropic drugs; and mutations in several genes involved in hypothalamic satiety signalling. Moreover, 'simple' obesity is associated with polymorphisms in several genes involved in hypothalamic weight-regulating pathways. Thus, understanding HyOb may enhance our understanding of 'simple' obesity. This review will claim that HyOb is a far wider phenomenon than hitherto understood by the narrow definition of post-surgical weight gain. It will emphasize the similarity in clinical characteristics and therapeutic approaches for HyOb, as well as its mechanisms. HyOb, regardless of its aetiology, is a result of impairment in hypothalamic regulatory centres of body weight and energy expenditure. The pathophysiology includes loss of sensitivity to afferent peripheral humoral signals, such as, leptin on the one hand and dysfunctional afferent signals, on the other hand. The most important afferent signals deranged are energy regulation by the sympathetic nervous system and regulation of insulin secretion. Dys-regulation of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1) activity and melatonin may also have a role in the development of HyOb. The complexity of the syndrome requires simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms that are deranged in the HyOb patient. We review the studies evaluating possible treatment strategies, including sympathomimetics, somatostatin analogues, triiodothyronine, sibutramine, and surgery. © 2010 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2010 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  15. Understanding how discrete populations of hypothalamic neurons orchestrate complicated behavioral states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison eGraebner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A major question in systems neuroscience is how a single population of neurons can interact with the rest of the brain to orchestrate complex behavioral states. The hypothalamus contains many such discrete neuronal populations that individually regulate arousal, feeding, and drinking. For example, hypothalamic neurons that express hypocretin (Hcrt neuropeptides can sense homeostatic and metabolic factors affecting wakefulness and orchestrate organismal arousal. Neurons that express agouti-related protein (AgRP can sense the metabolic needs of the body and orchestrate a state of hunger. The organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT can detect the hypertonicity of blood and orchestrate a state of thirst. Each hypothalamic population is sufficient to generate complicated behavioral states through the combined efforts of distinct efferent projections. The principal challenge to understanding these brain systems is therefore to determine the individual roles of each downstream projection for each behavioral state. In recent years, the development and application of temporally precise, genetically encoded tools have greatly improved our understanding of the structure and function of these neural systems. This review will survey recent advances in our understanding of how these individual hypothalamic populations can orchestrate complicated behavioral states due to the combined efforts of individual downstream projections.

  16. Hypothalamic survival circuits: blueprints for purposive behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternson, Scott M

    2013-03-06

    Neural processes that direct an animal's actions toward environmental goals are critical elements for understanding behavior. The hypothalamus is closely associated with motivated behaviors required for survival and reproduction. Intense feeding, drinking, aggressive, and sexual behaviors can be produced by a simple neuronal stimulus applied to discrete hypothalamic regions. What can these "evoked behaviors" teach us about the neural processes that determine behavioral intent and intensity? Small populations of neurons sufficient to evoke a complex motivated behavior may be used as entry points to identify circuits that energize and direct behavior to specific goals. Here, I review recent applications of molecular genetic, optogenetic, and pharmacogenetic approaches that overcome previous limitations for analyzing anatomically complex hypothalamic circuits and their interactions with the rest of the brain. These new tools have the potential to bridge the gaps between neurobiological and psychological thinking about the mechanisms of complex motivated behavior. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hormonal regulation of the hypothalamic melanocortin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung D; Leyva, Stephanie; Diano, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of energy homeostasis is fundamental for life. In animal species and humans, the Central Nervous System (CNS) plays a critical role in such regulation by integrating peripheral signals and modulating behavior and the activity of peripheral organs. A precise interplay between CNS and peripheral signals is necessary for the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure in the maintenance of energy balance. Within the CNS, the hypothalamus is a critical center for monitoring, processing and responding to peripheral signals, including hormones such as ghrelin, leptin, and insulin. Once in the brain, peripheral signals regulate neuronal systems involved in the modulation of energy homeostasis. The main hypothalamic neuronal circuit in the regulation of energy metabolism is the melanocortin system. This review will give a summary of the most recent discoveries on the hormonal regulation of the hypothalamic melanocortin system in the control of energy homeostasis.

  18. Hormonal regulation of the hypothalamic melanocortin system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Dae eKim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of energy homeostasis is fundamental for life. In animal species and humans, the Central Nervous System (CNS plays a critical role in such regulation by integrating peripheral signals and modulating behavior and the activity of peripheral organs. A precise interplay between CNS and peripheral signals is necessary for the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure in the maintenance of energy balance. Within the CNS, the hypothalamus is a critical center for monitoring, processing and responding to peripheral signals, including hormones such as ghrelin, leptin and insulin. Once in the brain, peripheral signals regulate neuronal systems involved in the modulation of energy homeostasis. The main hypothalamic neuronal circuit in the regulation of energy metabolism is the melanocortin system. This review will give a summary of the most recent discoveries on the hormonal regulation of the hypothalamic melanocortin system in the control of energy homeostasis.

  19. Ontogeny of the hypothalamic neuropeptide Y system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Kevin L; Smith, M Susan

    2003-06-01

    Early onset obesity and type II diabetes is rapidly becoming an epidemic, especially within the United States. This dramatic increase is likely due to many factors including both prenatal and postnatal environmental cues. The purpose of this review is to highlight some of the recent advances in our knowledge of the development of the hypothalamic circuits involved in the regulation of energy balance, with a focus on the neuropeptide Y (NPY) system. Unlike the adult rat, during the postnatal period NPY is transiently expressed in several hypothalamic regions, along with the expected expression within the arcuate nucleus (ARH). These transient populations of NPY neurons during the postnatal period may provide local NPY production to sustain the necessary energy intake during this critical growth phase. This may be physiologically important since ARH-NPY projections do not fully develop until the 3rd postnatal week. The significance of this ontogeny is that many peripheral metabolic signals have little effect of feeding prior to the development of the ARH projections. The essential questions now are whether prenatal and/or postnatal exposure to high levels of insulin or leptin during development can cause permanent changes in the function of hypothalamic circuits. It is vital to understand not only the natural development of the hypothalamic circuits that regulate energy homeostasis, but also their abnormal development caused by maternal and postnatal environmental cues. This will be pivotal for designing intervention and therapeutics to treat early onset obesity/type II diabetes, which may very well need to be different from those designed to prevent/treat adult onset obesity/type II diabetes.

  20. Hypothalamic innate immune reaction in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälin, Stefanie; Heppner, Frank L; Bechmann, Ingo; Prinz, Marco; Tschöp, Matthias H; Yi, Chun-Xia

    2015-06-01

    Findings from rodent and human studies show that the presence of inflammatory factors is positively correlated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Obesity-associated inflammatory responses take place not only in the periphery but also in the brain. The hypothalamus contains a range of resident glial cells including microglia, macrophages and astrocytes, which are embedded in highly heterogenic groups of neurons that control metabolic homeostasis. This complex neural-glia network can receive information directly from blood-borne factors, positioning it as a metabolic sensor. Following hypercaloric challenge, mediobasal hypothalamic microglia and astrocytes enter a reactive state, which persists during diet-induced obesity. In established mouse models of diet-induced obesity, the hypothalamic vasculature displays angiogenic alterations. Moreover, proopiomelanocortin neurons, which regulate food intake and energy expenditure, are impaired in the arcuate nucleus, where there is an increase in local inflammatory signals. The sum total of these events is a hypothalamic innate immune reactivity, which includes temporal and spatial changes to each cell population. Although the exact role of each participant of the neural-glial-vascular network is still under exploration, therapeutic targets for treating obesity should probably be linked to individual cell types and their specific signalling pathways to address each dysfunction with cell-selective compounds.

  1. Exercise training does not enhance hypothalamic responsiveness to leptin or ghrelin in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, M L; Andrews, Z B; Watt, M J

    2014-02-01

    The detection of hormone and nutrient signals by the hypothalamus is blunted in obesity and contributes to dysregulated energy homeostasis. We investigated whether aerobic exercise training would improve long-term hypothalamic sensitivity to both leptin and ghrelin, independent of acute exercise-induced signalling. Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed either a chow or high-fat diet for 6 weeks, then remained sedentary on their respective diet, or completed 6 weeks of treadmill exercise training with a progressive increase in exercise volume and intensity. Food intake and hypothalamic signalling were assessed in mice injected with leptin or ghrelin at least 24 h after the last exercise bout. Exercise training reduced body mass, increased daily food intake and improved glucose tolerance. Intraperitoneal leptin administration reduced food intake in lean and obese mice, and this was not enhanced after exercise training. Leptin-mediated activation of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in the arcuate nucleus and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus was not enhanced with exercise training. Ghrelin increased food intake and c-Fos positive neurones in the hypothalamus in lean and obese mice, and these physiological and molecular responses were not enhanced with exercise training. This suggests that the previously reported exercise effects on sensitising hypothalamic signalling and food intake responses may be limited to the period immediately after an exercise bout, and are not a result of stable structural or molecular changes that occur with exercise training. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  2. Obesity, a disorder of nutrient partitioning: the MONA LISA hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, G A

    1991-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying different types of obesity have been gradually clarified. Animal models with hypothalamic, genetic or dietary obesity have been examined with a feedback model. Four common final pathways are involved in this model. One of these final common pathways is the sympathetic nervous system. Most Obesities kNown Are Low In Sympathetic Activity states the MONA LISA Hypothesis. A second common pathway is the endocrine system involving adrenal glucocorticosteroids. The third common pathway is hyperphagia. Although not essential for most obesities, hyperphagia may be essential in animals with injury to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. The final pathway is reduced physical activity. The tonic activity of these systems and their response to changes in the diet affect nutrient partitioning between fat and protein. This framework has been used to review genetic obesity, hypothalamic obesity and dietary obesity.

  3. Comparative Shotgun Proteomic Analysis of Wastewater-Cultured Microalgae: Nitrogen Sensing and Carbon Fixation for Growth and Nutrient Removal in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anil K; Huang, Eric L; Low-Décarie, Etienne; Lefsrud, Mark G

    2015-08-07

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was batch-cultured for 12 days under continuous illumination to investigate nitrogen uptake and metabolic responses to wastewater processing. Our approach compared two conditions: (1) artificial wastewater containing nitrate and ammonia and (2) nutrient-sufficient control containing nitrate as sole form of nitrogen. Treatments did not differ in final biomass; however, comparison of group proteomes revealed significant differences. Label-free shotgun proteomic analysis identified 2358 proteins, of which 92 were significantly differentially abundant. Wastewater cells showed higher relative abundances of photosynthetic antenna proteins, enzymes related to carbon fixation, and biosynthesis of amino acids and secondary metabolites. Control cells showed higher abundances of enzymes and proteins related to nitrogen metabolism and assimilation, synthesis and utilization of starch, amino acid recycling, evidence of oxidative stress, and little lipid biosynthesis. This study of the eukaryotic microalgal proteome response to nitrogen source, availability, and switching highlights tightly controlled pathways essential to the maintenance of culture health and productivity in concert with light absorption and carbon assimilation. Enriched pathways in artificial wastewater, notably, photosynthetic carbon fixation and biosynthesis of plant hormones, and those in nitrate only control, most notably, nitrogen, amino acid, and starch metabolism, represent potential targets for genetic improvement requiring targeted elucidation.

  4. Impact of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species in the control of energy metabolism and food intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eDrougard

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamus is a key area involved in the control of metabolism and food intake via the integrations of numerous signals (hormones, neurotransmitters, metabolites from various origins. These factors modify hypothalamic neurons activity and generate adequate molecular and behavioral responses to control energy balance. In this complex integrative system, a new concept has been developed in recent years, that includes reactive oxygen species (ROS as a critical player in energy balance. ROS are known to act in many signaling pathways in different peripheral organs, but also in hypothalamus where they regulate food intake and metabolism by acting on different types of neurons, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC and agouti-related protein (AgRP/neuropeptide Y (NPY neurons. Hypothalamic ROS release is under the influence of different factors such as pancreatic and gut hormones, adipokines (leptin, apelin,..., neurotransmitters and nutrients (glucose, lipids,.... The sources of ROS production are multiple including NADPH oxidase, but also the mitochondria which is considered as the main ROS producer in the brain. ROS are considered as signaling molecules, but conversely impairment of this neuronal signaling ROS pathway contributes to alterations of autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine function, leading to metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.In this review we focus our attention on factors that are able to modulate hypothalamic ROS release in order to control food intake and energy metabolism, and whose deregulations could participate to the development of pathological conditions. This novel insight reveals an original mechanism in the hypothalamus that controls energy balance and identify hypothalamic ROS signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat metabolic disorders.

  5. Impact of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drougard, Anne; Fournel, Audren; Valet, Philippe; Knauf, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamus is a key area involved in the control of metabolism and food intake via the integrations of numerous signals (hormones, neurotransmitters, metabolites) from various origins. These factors modify hypothalamic neurons activity and generate adequate molecular and behavioral responses to control energy balance. In this complex integrative system, a new concept has been developed in recent years, that includes reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a critical player in energy balance. ROS are known to act in many signaling pathways in different peripheral organs, but also in hypothalamus where they regulate food intake and metabolism by acting on different types of neurons, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related protein (AgRP)/neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons. Hypothalamic ROS release is under the influence of different factors such as pancreatic and gut hormones, adipokines (leptin, apelin,…), neurotransmitters and nutrients (glucose, lipids,…). The sources of ROS production are multiple including NADPH oxidase, but also the mitochondria which is considered as the main ROS producer in the brain. ROS are considered as signaling molecules, but conversely impairment of this neuronal signaling ROS pathway contributes to alterations of autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine function, leading to metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this review we focus our attention on factors that are able to modulate hypothalamic ROS release in order to control food intake and energy metabolism, and whose deregulations could participate to the development of pathological conditions. This novel insight reveals an original mechanism in the hypothalamus that controls energy balance and identify hypothalamic ROS signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat metabolic disorders.

  6. Syndrome of alternating hypernatremia and hyponatremia after hypothalamic hamartoma surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abla, Adib A; Wait, Scott D; Forbes, Jonathan A; Pati, Sandipan; Johnsonbaugh, Roger E; Kerrigan, John F; Ng, Yu-Tze

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the authors' goal was to describe the occurrence of alternating hypernatremia and hyponatremia in pediatric patients who underwent resection of hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) for epilepsy...

  7. Key Nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Lessons written to help trainer agents prepare aides for work with families in the Food and Nutrition Program are presented in this booklet. The key nutrients discussed in the 10 lessons are protein, carbohydrates, fat, calcium, iron, iodine, and Vitamins A, B, C, and D. the format of each lesson is as follows: Purpose, Presentation, Application…

  8. Glucose-sensing neurons of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdakov, Denis; Luckman, Simon M; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2005-12-29

    Specialized subgroups of hypothalamic neurons exhibit specific excitatory or inhibitory electrical responses to changes in extracellular levels of glucose. Glucose-excited neurons were traditionally assumed to employ a 'beta-cell' glucose-sensing strategy, where glucose elevates cytosolic ATP, which closes KATP channels containing Kir6.2 subunits, causing depolarization and increased excitability. Recent findings indicate that although elements of this canonical model are functional in some hypothalamic cells, this pathway is not universally essential for excitation of glucose-sensing neurons by glucose. Thus glucose-induced excitation of arcuate nucleus neurons was recently reported in mice lacking Kir6.2, and no significant increases in cytosolic ATP levels could be detected in hypothalamic neurons after changes in extracellular glucose. Possible alternative glucose-sensing strategies include electrogenic glucose entry, glucose-induced release of glial lactate, and extracellular glucose receptors. Glucose-induced electrical inhibition is much less understood than excitation, and has been proposed to involve reduction in the depolarizing activity of the Na+/K+ pump, or activation of a hyperpolarizing Cl- current. Investigations of neurotransmitter identities of glucose-sensing neurons are beginning to provide detailed information about their physiological roles. In the mouse lateral hypothalamus, orexin/hypocretin neurons (which promote wakefulness, locomotor activity and foraging) are glucose-inhibited, whereas melanin-concentrating hormone neurons (which promote sleep and energy conservation) are glucose-excited. In the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, excitatory actions of glucose on anorexigenic POMC neurons in mice have been reported, while the appetite-promoting NPY neurons may be directly inhibited by glucose. These results stress the fundamental importance of hypothalamic glucose-sensing neurons in orchestrating sleep-wake cycles, energy expenditure and

  9. Hypothalamic abnormality in patients with inflammatory demyelinating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Cong; Wu, Linzhan; Chen, Xiaohui; Long, Youming; Zhong, Rong; Yang, Ning; Chen, Yaotang

    2016-11-01

    Hypothalamic lesions in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients might be more specific for NMO than multiple sclerosis (MS). However, this is controversial. To characterize clinical features of patients with inflammatory demyelinating disorders (IDDs) with visible hypothalamic lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with IDDs (n = 429) were recruited retrospectively. Of 52 patients with hypothalamic images enrolled, 42 were positive for aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibodies, including 28 patients with NMO, 6 with recurrent transverse myelitis, 3 with recurrent optic neuritis, and 5 with brainstem and brain syndrome. The remaining 10 patients were anti-AQP4-negative, including 3 with MS, 3 with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and 4 with other disorders. In the AQP4-positive group, manifestations, including ataxia, intractable hiccup and nausea, syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion and encephalopathy were more frequent in those with hypothalamic lesions than those without. Cell counts of cerebrospinal fluid in patients with hypothalamic lesions differed from patients without lesions. Brain MRI abnormalities were more frequent in brainstem and hemisphere of the hypothalamic lesion group. Hypothalamic lesions were observed frequently in patients with AQP4 antibodies. Clinical manifestations and paraclinical features in AQP4-positive patients with hypothalamic lesions differed from those without lesions.

  10. Protective nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Joseph; Turkish, Aaron

    2002-11-01

    Recognition that specific nutrients can be beneficial when consumed in amounts above the accepted daily requirements has provided a major impetus for the critical examination of dietary approaches with single or multiple nutrient supplements chosen to modulate the inflammatory response, enhance immune function, or improve the blood-gut barrier. Patients suffering the effects of hypercatabolism caused by surgery, cancer, or extensive burns are prime candidates for immunonutrition, as the intervention has come to be known, as are immunosuppressed patients with the human immunodeficiency virus or other overwhelming infections. This review focuses on key nutrients used in clinical trials for which a body of information on the mode of action and metabolic pathways is available. The topics covered include the amino acids, glutamine and arginine; omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexanoic acid; vitamin A; and zinc. Lastly, we address the area of pre- and probiotics and how "friendly" microorganisms are being incorporated into therapeutic regimens aimed at sustaining health. The use of immunonutrition requires judicious consideration of the potential undesirable effects of certain additives in clinical settings where enhanced immune responsiveness can translate into tissue damage and altered mucosal defenses.

  11. Increased hypothalamic serotonin turnover in inflammation-induced anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwarkasing, J T; Witkamp, R F; Boekschoten, M V; Ter Laak, M C; Heins, M S; van Norren, K

    2016-05-20

    Anorexia can occur as a serious complication of disease. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation plays a major role, along with a hypothalamic dysregulation characterized by locally elevated serotonin levels. The present study was undertaken to further explore the connections between peripheral inflammation, anorexia and hypothalamic serotonin metabolism and signaling pathways. First, we investigated the response of two hypothalamic neuronal cell lines to TNFα, IL-6 and LPS. Next, we studied transcriptomic changes and serotonergic activity in the hypothalamus of mice after intraperitoneal injection with TNFα, IL-6 or a combination of TNFα and IL-6. In vitro, we showed that hypothalamic neurons responded to inflammatory mediators by releasing cytokines. This inflammatory response was associated with an increased serotonin release. Mice injected with TNFα and IL-6 showed decreased food intake, associated with altered expression of inflammation-related genes in the hypothalamus. In addition, hypothalamic serotonin turnover showed to be elevated in treated mice. Overall, our results underline that peripheral inflammation reaches the hypothalamus where it affects hypothalamic serotoninergic metabolism. These hypothalamic changes in serotonin pathways are associated with decreased food intake, providing evidence for a role of serotonin in inflammation-induced anorexia.

  12. Melatonin and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L; Li, N; Bo, L; Xu, Z

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxy-tryptamine), a principal product of the pineal gland, is produced mainly during the dark phase of the circadian cycle. This hormone plays a crucial role in the regulation of circadian and seasonal changes in various aspects of physiology and neuroendocrine functions. In mammals, melatonin can influence sexual maturation and reproductive functions via activation of its receptors and binding sites in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. This review summarizes current knowledge of melatonin on the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and gonads. We also review recent progress in clinical applications of melatonin or potentials of using melatonin, as a reducer of oxidative stress, to improve reproductive functions for the diseases such as women infertility.

  13. Management of optic chiasmatic/hypothalamic astrocytomas in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbok, P.; Hentschel, S.; Almqvist, P.; Cochrane, D.D. [Univ. of British Columbia, British Columbia' s Children' s Hospital, Div. of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Dept. of Surgery, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Poskitt, K. [Univ. of British Columbia, British Columbia' s Children' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2002-05-01

    The management of optic chiasmatic gliomas is controversial, partly related to failure to separate out those tumors involving the optic chiasm only (chiasmatic tumors) from those also involving the hypothalamus (chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors). The purpose of this study was: (i) to analyze the outcomes of chiasmatic and chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors separately; and (ii) to determine the appropriateness of recommending radical surgical resection for the chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors. A retrospective chart review of all newly diagnosed tumors involving the optic chiasm from 1982-1996 at British Columbia's Children's Hospital was performed. There were 32 patients less than 16 years of age, 14 with chiasmatic and 18 with chiasmatic/hypothalamic astrocytomas, with an average duration of follow-up of 5.8 years and 6.3 years, respectively. Ten of the patients with chiasmatic tumors and none with chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors had neurofibromatosis I. Thirteen of the 14 chiasmatic tumors were managed with observation only, and none had progression requiring active intervention. For the chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors. eight patients had subtotal resections (>95% resection), six had partial resections (50-95%), three had limited resections (<50%), and one had no surgery. There were fewer complications associated with the limited resections, especially with respect to hypothalamic dysfunction. There was no correlation between the extent of resection (subtotal, partial, or limited) and the time to tumor progression (average 18 months). In conclusion, chiasmatic and chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors are different entities, which should be separated out for the Purposes of any study. For the chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors, there was more morbidity and no prolongation of time to progression when radical resections were compared to more limited resections. Therefore, if surgery is performed, it may be appropriate to do a surgical procedure that strives only to provide a

  14. Managing urban nutrient biogeochemistry for sustainable urbanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Gibson, Valerie; Cui, Shenghui; Yu, Chang-Ping; Chen, Shaohua; Ye, Zhilong; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-09-01

    Urban ecosystems are unique in the sense that human activities are the major drivers of biogeochemical processes. Along with the demographic movement into cities, nutrients flow towards the urban zone (nutrient urbanization), causing the degradation of environmental quality and ecosystem health. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of nutrient cycling within the urban ecosystem compared to natural ecosystems. The dynamic process of nutrient urbanization is then explored taking Xiamen city, China, as an example to examine the influence of rapid urbanization on food sourced nitrogen and phosphorus metabolism. Subsequently, the concept of a nutrient footprint and calculation method is introduced from a lifecycle perspective. Finally, we propose three system approaches to mend the broken biogeochemical cycling. Our study will contribute to a holistic solution which achieves synergies between environmental quality and food security, by integrating technologies for nutrient recovery and waste reduction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Binge Drinking Induces Whole-Body Insulin Resistance by Impairing Hypothalamic Insulin Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindtner, Claudia; Scherer, Thomas; Zielinski, Elizabeth; Filatova, Nika; Fasshauer, Martin; Tonks, Nicholas K.; Puchowicz, Michelle; Buettner, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with a history of binge drinking have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Whether binge drinking impairs glucose homeostasis and insulin action is unknown. To test this, we treated Sprague-Dawley rats daily with alcohol (3 g/kg) for three consecutive days to simulate human binge drinking and found that these rats developed and exhibited insulin resistance even after blood alcohol concentrations had become undetectable. The animals were resistant to insulin for up to 54 hours after the last dose of ethanol, chiefly a result of impaired hepatic and adipose tissue insulin action. Because insulin regulates hepatic glucose production and white adipose tissue lipolysis, in part through signaling in the central nervous system, we tested whether binge drinking impaired brain control of nutrient partitioning. Rats that had consumed alcohol exhibited impaired hypothalamic insulin action, defined as the ability of insulin infused into the mediobasal hypothalamus to suppress hepatic glucose production and white adipose tissue lipolysis. Insulin signaling in the hypothalamus, as assessed by insulin receptor and AKT phosphorylation, decreased after binge drinking. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed increased hypothalamic inflammation and expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a negative regulator of insulin signaling. Intracerebroventricular infusion of CPT-157633, a small-molecule inhibitor of PTP1B, prevented binge drinking–induced glucose intolerance. These results show that, in rats, binge drinking induces systemic insulin resistance by impairing hypothalamic insulin action and that this effect can be prevented by inhibition of brain PTP1B. PMID:23363978

  16. Delineating the regulation of energy homeostasis using hypothalamic cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellhauser, Leigh; Gojska, Nicole M; Belsham, Denise D

    2015-01-01

    Attesting to its intimate peripheral connections, hypothalamic neurons integrate nutritional and hormonal cues to effectively manage energy homeostasis according to the overall status of the system. Extensive progress in the identification of essential transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms regulating the controlled expression and actions of hypothalamic neuropeptides has been identified through the use of animal and cell models. This review will introduce the basic techniques of hypothalamic investigation both in vivo and in vitro and will briefly highlight the key advantages and challenges of their use. Further emphasis will be place on the use of immortalized models of hypothalamic neurons for in vitro study of feeding regulation, with a particular focus on cell lines proving themselves most fruitful in deciphering fundamental basics of NPY/AgRP, Proglucagon, and POMC neuropeptide function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypothalamic lipid-laden astrocytes induce microglia migration and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yoon-Hee; Kim, Jiye; Kim, Chu-Sook; Tu, Thai Hien; Kim, Min-Seon; Suk, Kyoungho; Kim, Dong Hee; Lee, Byung Ju; Choi, Hye-Seon; Park, Taesun; Choi, Myung-Sook; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kawada, Teruo; Ha, Tae Youl; Yu, Rina

    2017-06-01

    Obesity-induced hypothalamic inflammation is closely associated with various metabolic complications and neurodegenerative disorders. Astrocytes, the most abundant glial cells in the central nervous system, play a crucial role in pathological hypothalamic inflammatory processes. Here, we demonstrate that hypothalamic astrocytes accumulate lipid droplets under saturated fatty acid-rich conditions, such as obese environment, and that the lipid-laden astrocytes increase astrogliosis markers and inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1) at the transcript and/or protein level. Medium conditioned by the lipid-laden astrocytes stimulate microglial chemotactic activity and upregulate transcripts of the microglia activation marker Iba-1 and inflammatory cytokines. These findings indicate that the lipid-laden astrocytes formed in free fatty acid-rich obese condition may participate in obesity-induced hypothalamic inflammation through promoting microglia migration and activation. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Generation of neuropeptidergic hypothalamic neurons from human pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Florian T.; Maroof, Asif; Wataya, Takafumi; Sasai, Yoshiki; Studer, Lorenz; Eggan, Kevin; Schier, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurons orchestrate many essential physiological and behavioral processes via secreted neuropeptides, and are relevant to human diseases such as obesity, narcolepsy and infertility. We report the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into many of the major types of neuropeptidergic hypothalamic neurons, including those producing pro-opiolemelanocortin, agouti-related peptide, hypocretin/orexin, melanin-concentrating hormone, oxytocin, arginine vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) or thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Hypothalamic neurons can be generated using a ‘self-patterning’ strategy that yields a broad array of cell types, or via a more reproducible directed differentiation approach. Stem cell-derived human hypothalamic neurons share characteristic morphological properties and gene expression patterns with their counterparts in vivo, and are able to integrate into the mouse brain. These neurons could form the basis of cellular models, chemical screens or cellular therapies to study and treat common human diseases. PMID:25670790

  19. Hypothalamic obesity in children: pathophysiology to clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliloglu, Belma; Bereket, Abdullah

    2015-05-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HyOb) is a complex neuroendocrine disorder caused by damage to the hypothalamus, which results in disruption of energy regulation. The key hypothalamic areas of energy regulation are the ARC (arcuate nucleus), the VMH (ventromedial hypothalamus), the PVN (paraventriculer nuclei) and the LHA (lateral hypothalamic area). These pathways can be disrupted mechanically by hypothalamic tumors, neurosurgery, inflammatory disorders, radiotherapy and trauma or functionally as such seen in genetic diseases. Rapid weight gain and severe obesity are the most striking features of HyOb and caused by hyperphagia, reduced basal metabolic rate (BMR) and decreased physical activity. HyOb is usually unresponsive to diet and exercise. Although, GLP-1 and its anologs seem to be a new agent, there is still no curative treatment. Thus, prevention is of prime importance and the clinicians should be alert and vigilant in patients at risk for development of HyOb.

  20. Indirect evidence for decreased hypothalamic somatostatinergic tone in anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Andersen, M; Flyvbjerg, A

    2002-01-01

    in the central feeding mechanism in anorexia nervosa (AN). Peripheral administration of pyridostigmine (PD) minimizes the release of hypothalamic SRIH. DESIGN: To study the influence of hypothalamic somatostatinergic inhibition on the exaggerated somatotroph responsiveness to GHRH in patients with severe AN, two...... indirectly to greater SRIH withdrawal and greater GHRH release in anorexia nervosa. Moreover, hypothalamic SRIH activity seems to be inversely related to cortisol levels, indirectly supporting the hypothesis that SRIH and CRH neuronal activity are inversely related in anorexia nervosa. Leptin, which...... is believed to act on hypothalamic feeding mechanisms, seems to be positively related to SRIH activity. Finally, the present data demonstrate that the potentiating effect of pyridostigmine in anorexia nervosa is related to body mass index and increases upon weight gain, suggesting that the low...

  1. Hypothalamic germinoma masquerading as superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vethakkan, Shireene R; Venugopal, Yogeswari; Tan, Alexander T B; Paramasivam, Sharmila S; Ratnasingam, Jeyakantha; Razak, Rohaya A; Alias, Azmi; Kassim, Fauziah; Choong, Karen

    2013-01-01

    To report a case of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome secondary to hypothalamic germinoma. We describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic work-up, management, and clinical course of a patient admitted with SMA syndrome who was subsequently found to have a hypothalamic germinoma. An adolescent boy was admitted to the surgical ward with progressive weight loss over a 2 year period and postprandial vomiting. He was diagnosed with SMA syndrome based on evidence of proximal duodenal dilatation, extrinsic compression of the distal duodenum, and a narrowed aortomesenteric angle (16°). Investigations performed to exclude thyrotoxicosis unexpectedly revealed secondary hypothyroidism and further evaluation demonstrated evidence of pan-hypopituitarism. Psychiatric evaluation excluded anorexia nervosa and bulimia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a heterogeneously enhancing hypothalamic lesion, but a normal pituitary gland. Hormone replacement with hydrocortisone, desmopressin, testosterone, and thyroxine resulted in weight gain and resolution of gastrointestinal symptoms. A transventricular endoscopic biopsy subsequently confirmed a hypothalamic germinoma and he was referred to an oncologist. SMA syndrome secondary to severe weight loss is an uncommon cause of upper gastrointestinal obstruction. While there have been reports of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and thyrotoxicosis manifesting as SMA syndrome, there are no published reports to date of SMA syndrome secondary to hypothalamic/pituitary disease. Management of SMA syndrome is conservative, as symptoms of intestinal obstruction resolve with weight gain following treatment of the underlying cause. Awareness of this uncommon presentation of endocrine cachexia/hypothalamic disease will prevent unnecessary laparotomies and a misdiagnosis of an eating disorder.

  2. Rax regulates hypothalamic tanycyte differentiation and barrier function in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Angulo, Ana L.; Byerly, Mardi S.; Mesa, Janny; Wang, Hong; Blackshaw, Seth

    2013-01-01

    The wall of the ventral third ventricle is composed of two distinct cell populations: tanycytes and ependymal cells. Tanycytes regulate many aspects of hypothalamic physiology, but little is known about the transcriptional network that regulates their development and function. We observed that the retina and anterior neural fold homeobox transcription factor (Rax) is selectively expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, and showed a complementary pattern of expression to markers of hypothalamic ependymal cells, such as Rarres2 (retinoic acid receptor responder). To determine whether Rax controls tanycyte differentiation and function, we generated Rax haploinsufficient mice and examined their cellular and molecular phenotype in adulthood. These mice appeared grossly normal, but careful examination revealed a thinning of the third ventricular wall and reduction of both tanycyte and ependymal markers. These experiments show that Rax is required for hypothalamic tanycyte and ependymal cell differentiation. Rax haploinsufficiency also resulted in the ectopic presence of ependymal cells in the α2 tanycytic zone, where few ependymal cells are normally found, suggesting that Rax is selectively required for α2 tanycyte differentiation. These changes in the ventricular wall were associated with reduced diffusion of Evans Blue tracer from the ventricle to the hypothalamic parenchyma, with no apparent repercussion on the gross anatomical or behavioral phenotype of these mice. In conclusion, we have provided evidence that Rax is required for the normal differentiation and patterning of hypothalamic tanycytes and ependymal cells, as well as for maintenance of the cerebrospinal fluid-hypothalamus barrier. PMID:23939786

  3. Proteomic analysis of hypothalamic injury in heatstroke rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chien-Ming; Cheng, Bor-Chih; Chen, Chia-Ying; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Chang, Ching-Ping; Yang, Shun-Tai

    2015-06-01

    Ischemic and oxidative damage to the hypothalamus may be associated with decreased heat tolerance as well as heatstroke formation. The present study explores the hypothalamic proteome mechanisms associated with heatstroke-mediated hypothalamic ischemia, and oxidative damage. Heatstroke rats had hypotension, hypothalamic ischemia, and lethality. In addition, they had hyperthermia and hypothalamic blood-brain-barrier disruption, oxidative stress, activated inflammation, and neuronal apoptosis and degeneration. 2DE combined LC-MS/MS revealed that heatstroke-induced ischemic injury and apoptosis were associated with upregulation of L-lactate dehydrogenase but downregulation of both dihydropyriminase-related protein and 14-3-3 Zeta isoform protein. Heat-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption might be related to upregulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein. Oxidative stress caused by heatstroke might be related to upregulation of cytosolic dehydrogenase-1. Also, heat-induced overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines might be associated with downregulation of stathmin 1. Heat-induced hypothalamic ischemia, apoptosis, injury (or upregulation of L-lactate dehydrogenase), blood-brain-barrier disruption (or upregulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein), oxidative stress (or upregulation of cytosolic dehydrogenase-1), and activated inflammation (or downregulation of stathmin 1) were all significantly reversed by whole body cooling. Our data indicate that cooling therapy improves outcomes of heatstroke by modulating hypothalamic proteome mechanisms. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript is present in hypothalamic neuroendocrine neurones and is released to the hypothalamic-pituitary portal circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P J; Seier, V; Fink-Jensen, A

    2003-01-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is present in a number of hypothalamic nuclei. Besides actions in circuits regulating feeding behaviour and stress responses, the hypothalamic functions of CART are largely unknown. We report that CART immunoreactivity is present in hypothalamic...

  5. Anomalous hypothalamic responses to humor in cataplexy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan L Reiss

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Cataplexy is observed in a subset of patients with narcolepsy and affects approximately 1 in 2,000 persons. Cataplexy is most often triggered by strong emotions such as laughter, which can result in transient, yet debilitating, muscle atonia. The objective of this study was to examine the neural systems underlying humor processing in individuals with cataplexy.While undergoing functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, we showed ten narcolepsy-cataplexy patients and ten healthy controls humorous cartoons. In addition, we examined the brain activity of one subject while in a full-blown cataplectic attack. Behavioral results showed that participants with cataplexy rated significantly fewer humorous cartoons as funny compared to controls. Concurrent fMRI showed that patients, when compared to controls and in the absence of overt cataplexy symptoms, showed pronounced activity in the emotional network including the ventral striatum and hypothalamus while viewing humorous versus non-humorous cartoons. Increased activity was also observed in the right inferior frontal gyri--a core component of the inhibitory circuitry. In comparison, the one subject who experienced a cataplectic attack showed dramatic reductions in hypothalamic activity.These findings suggest an overdrive of the emotional circuitry and possible compensatory suppression by cortical inhibitory regions in cataplexy. Moreover, during cataplectic attacks, the hypothalamus is characterized by a marked decrease in activity similar to that observed during sleep. One possible explanation for these findings is an initial overdrive and compensatory shutdown of the hypothalamus resulting in full cataplectic symptoms.

  6. Hypothalamic effects of thyroid hormones on metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Alvarez, Clara V; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel

    2014-10-01

    Over the past few decades, obesity and its related metabolic disorders have increased at an epidemic rate in the developed and developing world. New signals and factors involved in the modulation of energy balance and metabolism are continuously being discovered, providing potential novel drug targets for the treatment of metabolic disease. A parallel strategy is to better understand how hormonal signals, with an already established role in energy metabolism, work, and how manipulation of the pathways involved may lead to amelioration of metabolic dysfunction. The thyroid hormones belong to the latter category, with dysregulation of the thyroid axis leading to marked alterations in energy balance. The potential of thyroid hormones in the treatment of obesity has been known for decades, but their therapeutic use has been hampered because of side-effects. Data gleaned over the past few years, however, have uncovered new features at the mechanisms of action involved in thyroid hormones. Sophisticated neurobiological approaches have allowed the identification of specific energy sensors, such as AMP-activated protein kinase and mechanistic target of rapamycin, acting in specific groups of hypothalamic neurons, mediating many of the effects of thyroid hormones on food intake, energy expenditure, glucose, lipid metabolism, and cardiovascular function. More extensive knowledge about these molecular mechanisms will be of great relevance for the treatment of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fatty acid transporter CD36 mediates hypothalamic effect of fatty acids on food intake in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine S Moullé

    Full Text Available Variations in plasma fatty acid (FA concentrations are detected by FA sensing neurons in specific brain areas such as the hypothalamus. These neurons play a physiological role in the control of food intake and the regulation of hepatic glucose production. Le Foll et al. previously showed in vitro that at least 50% of the FA sensing in ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH neurons is attributable to the interaction of long chain FA with FA translocase/CD36 (CD36. The present work assessed whether in vivo effects of hypothalamic FA sensing might be partly mediated by CD36 or intracellular events such as acylCoA synthesis or β-oxidation. To that end, a catheter was implanted in the carotid artery toward the brain in male Wistar rats. After 1 wk recovery, animals were food-deprived for 5 h, then 10 min infusions of triglyceride emulsion, Intralipid +/- heparin (IL, IL(H, respectively or saline/heparin (SH were carried out and food intake was assessed over the next 5 h. Experimental groups included: 1 Rats previously injected in ventromedian nucleus (VMN with shRNA against CD36 or scrambled RNA; 2 Etomoxir (CPT1 inhibitor or saline co-infused with IL(H/S(H; and 3 Triacsin C (acylCoA synthase inhibitor or saline co-infused with IL(H/S(H. IL(H significantly lowered food intake during refeeding compared to S(H (p<0.001. Five hours after refeeding, etomoxir did not affect this inhibitory effect of IL(H on food intake while VMN CD36 depletion totally prevented it. Triacsin C also prevented IL(H effects on food intake. In conclusion, the effect of FA to inhibit food intake is dependent on VMN CD36 and acylCoA synthesis but does not required FA oxidation.

  8. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and the hypothalamic- pituitary-gonadal axes interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastorakos, George; Pavlatou, Maria G; Mizamtsidi, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Vertebrates respond to stress with activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the adrenergic and the autonomic nervous systems. The principal central nervous system regulators of the HPA axis are corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and antidiuretic hormone (AVP). Apart from in the central nervous system, CRH has been found in the adrenal medulla, ovaries, myometrium, endometrium, placenta, testis and elsewhere. The activation of the HPA axis during stress affects all body systems. The reproductive axis is inhibited by the HPA axis for the sake of saving energy. The changes to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis during stress are species-specific, and depend on the type and duration of the stimulus. Several conditions may be associated with altered regulation of the HPA axis. Polycystic ovary syndrome, anorexia nervosa and pregnancy in the third trimester are all characterized by HPA axis activation. In contrast, during the postpartum period, HPA axis suppression is implicated in the "postpartum blues". The actions of CRH are also essential in fetal development and neonatal survival.

  9. Dynamic localization of glucokinase and its regulatory protein in hypothalamic tanycytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdiel Salgado

    Full Text Available Glucokinase (GK, the hexokinase involved in glucose sensing in pancreatic β cells, is also expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, which cover the ventricular walls of the basal hypothalamus and are implicated in an indirect control of neuronal activity by glucose. Previously, we demonstrated that GK was preferentially localized in tanycyte nuclei in euglycemic rats, which has been reported in hepatocytes and is suggestive of the presence of the GK regulatory protein, GKRP. In the present study, GK intracellular localization in hypothalamic and hepatic tissues of the same rats under several glycemic conditions was compared using confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. In the hypothalamus, increased GK nuclear localization was observed in hyperglycemic conditions; however, it was primarily localized in the cytoplasm in hepatic tissue under the same conditions. Both GK and GKRP were next cloned from primary cultures of tanycytes. Expression of GK by Escherichia coli revealed a functional cooperative protein with a S0.5 of 10 mM. GKRP, expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inhibited GK activity in vitro with a Ki 0.2 µM. We also demonstrated increased nuclear reactivity of both GK and GKRP in response to high glucose concentrations in tanycyte cultures. These data were confirmed using Western blot analysis of nuclear extracts. Results indicate that GK undergoes short-term regulation by nuclear compartmentalization. Thus, in tanycytes, GK can act as a molecular switch to arrest cellular responses to increased glucose.

  10. Dorsomedial hypothalamic NPY and energy balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Sheng; Kim, Yonwook J; Zheng, Fenping

    2012-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a potent hypothalamic orexigenic peptide. Within the hypothalamus, Npy is primarily expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH). While the actions of ARC NPY in energy balance control have been well studied, a role for DMH NPY is still being unraveled. In contrast to ARC NPY that serves as one of downstream mediators of actions of leptin in maintaining energy homeostasis, DMH NPY is not under the control of leptin. Npy gene expression in the DMH is regulated by brain cholecystokinin (CCK) and other yet to be identified molecules. The findings of DMH NPY overexpression or induction in animals with increased energy demands and in certain rodent models of obesity implicate a role for DMH NPY in maintaining energy homeostasis. In support of this view, adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated overexpression of NPY in the DMH causes increases in food intake and body weight and exacerbates high-fat diet-induced hyperphagia and obesity. Knockdown of NPY in the DMH via AAV-mediated RNAi ameliorates hyperphagia, obesity and glucose intolerance of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats in which DMH NPY overexpression has been proposed to play a causal role. NPY knockdown in the DMH also prevents high-fat diet-induced hyperphagia, obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis. A detailed examination of actions of DMH NPY reveals that DMH NPY specifically affects nocturnal meal size and produces an inhibitory action on within meal satiety signals. In addition, DMH NPY modulates energy expenditure likely through affecting brown adipocyte formation and thermogenic activity. Overall, the recent findings provide clear evidence demonstrating critical roles for DMH NPY in energy balance control, and also imply a potential role for DMH NPY in maintaining glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fatty-acid-mediated hypothalamic inflammation and epigenetic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesar, Helena C; Pisani, Luciana Pellegrini

    2017-04-01

    A high-fat diet is the main environmental cue that has been studied in the hypothalamus since the discovery of its connection with hypothalamic inflammation. Current evidence shows hypothalamic inflammation as a likely mechanism for the dysregulation on the homeostatic control of energy balance, which leads to metabolic alterations and obesity. Although this mechanism seems to be reversible when set during adulthood, we argue whether dietary fatty acids, during critical periods of development, could affect hypothalamic function permanently and set an increased susceptibility to obesity. We found few experimental studies that looked at programming induced by different fatty acids on the hypothalamus. They clearly showed a connection between maternal fat diet, hypothalamic inflammation and metabolic alterations in the offspring. We found that not only a high-fat diet but also a normolipidic diet with unbalanced quantities of different fatty acids produced diverse inflammatory responses on the hypothalamus. Therefore, strategies of manipulating dietary fatty acids in pregnant and lactating women may have great impact on the population's future health. However, more research is still needed on the effects of fatty acids and the hypothalamic inflammation on programming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis M. Stranahan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6 animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds.

  13. Hypothyroidism compromises hypothalamic leptin signaling in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Groba (Claudia); S. Mayerl (Steffen); A.A.A. van Mullem (Alies); T.J. Visser (Theo); V.M. Darras (Veerle); A.J. Habenicht (Andreas); H. Heuer (Heike)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe impact of thyroid hormone (TH) on metabolism and energy expenditure is well established, but the role of TH in regulating nutritional sensing, particularly in the central nervous system, is only poorly defined. Here, we studied the consequences of hypothyroidism on leptin production

  14. Hypothalamic BOLD response to glucose intake and hypothalamic volume are similar in anorexia nervosa and healthy control subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Van Opstal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inconsistent findings about the neurobiology of Anorexia Nervosa (AN hinder the development of effective treatments for this severe mental disorder. Therefore the need arises for elucidation of neurobiological factors involved in the pathophysiology of AN. The hypothalamus plays a key role in the neurobiological processes that govern food intake and energy homeostasis, processes that are disturbed in anorexia nervosa (AN. The present study will assess the hypothalamic response to energy intake and the hypothalamic structure in patients with AN and healthy controls. Methods. 10 women aged 18-30 years diagnosed with AN and 11 healthy, lean (BMI <23 kg/m2 women in the same age range were recruited. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to determine function of the hypothalamus in response to glucose. Structural MRI was used to determine differences in hypothalamic volume and local grey volume using manual segmentation and voxel-based morphometry.Results. No differences were found in hypothalamic volume and neuronal activity in response to a glucose load between the patients and controls. Whole brain structural analysis showed a significant decrease in grey matter volume in the cingulate cortex in the AN patients, bilaterally.Conclusions. We argue that in spite of various known changes in the hypothalamus the direct hypothalamic response to glucose intake is similar in AN patients and healthy controls.

  15. Hypothalamic Obesity in Craniopharyngioma Patients: Disturbed Energy Homeostasis Related to Extent of Hypothalamic Damage and Its Implication for Obesity Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian L. Roth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic obesity (HO occurs in patients with tumors and lesions in the medial hypothalamic region. Hypothalamic dysfunction can lead to hyperinsulinemia and leptin resistance. This review is focused on HO caused by craniopharyngiomas (CP, which are the most common childhood brain tumors of nonglial origin. Despite excellent overall survival rates, CP patients have substantially reduced quality of life because of significant long-term sequelae, notably severe obesity in about 50% of patients, leading to a high rate of cardiovascular mortality. Recent studies reported that both hyperphagia and decreased energy expenditure can contribute to severe obesity in HO patients. Recognized risk factors for severe obesity include large hypothalamic tumors or lesions affecting several medial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei that impact satiety signaling pathways. Structural damage in these nuclei often lead to hyperphagia, rapid weight gain, central insulin and leptin resistance, decreased sympathetic activity, low energy expenditure, and increased energy storage in adipose tissue. To date, most efforts to treat HO have shown disappointing long-term success rates. However, treatments based on the distinct pathophysiology of disturbed energy homeostasis related to CP may offer options for successful interventions in the future.

  16. The role of NPY in hypothalamic mediated food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Rebecca E; Chee, Melissa J S; Colmers, William F

    2011-10-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a highly conserved neuropeptide with orexigenic actions in discrete hypothalamic nuclei that plays a role in regulating energy homeostasis. NPY signals via a family of high affinity receptors that mediate the widespread actions of NPY in all hypothalamic nuclei. These actions are also subject to tight, intricate regulation by numerous peripheral and central energy balance signals. The NPY system is embedded within a densely-redundant network designed to ensure stable energy homeostasis. This redundancy may underlie compensation for the loss of NPY or its receptors in germline knockouts, explaining why conventional knockouts of NPY or its receptors rarely yield a marked phenotypic change. We discuss insights into the hypothalamic role of NPY from studies of its physiological actions, responses to genetic manipulations and interactions with other energy balance signals. We conclude that numerous approaches must be employed to effectively study different aspects of NPY action. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficient Generation of Hypothalamic Neurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liheng; Egli, Dieter; Leibel, Rudolph L

    2016-07-01

    The hypothalamus comprises neuronal clusters that are essential for body weight regulation and other physiological functions. Insights into the complex cellular physiology of this region of the brain are critical to understanding the pathogenesis of obesity, but human hypothalamic cells are largely inaccessible for direct study. Here we describe a technique for generation of arcuate-like hypothalamic neurons from human pluripotent stem (hPS) cells. Early activation of SHH signaling and inhibition of BMP and TGFβ signaling, followed by timed inhibition of NOTCH, can efficiently differentiate hPS cells into NKX2.1+ hypothalamic progenitors. Subsequent incubation with BDNF induces the differentiation and maturation of pro-opiomelanocortin and neuropeptide Y neurons, which are major cell types in the arcuate hypothalamus. These neurons have molecular and cellular characteristics consistent with arcuate neurons. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. The Role of Hypothalamic Neuropeptides in Neurogenesis and Neuritogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakos, Jan; Zatkova, Martina; Bacova, Zuzana; Ostatnikova, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a source of neural progenitor cells which give rise to different populations of specialized and differentiated cells during brain development. Newly formed neurons in the hypothalamus can synthesize and release various neuropeptides. Although term neuropeptide recently undergoes redefinition, small-size hypothalamic neuropeptides remain major signaling molecules mediating short- and long-term effects on brain development. They represent important factors in neurite growth and formation of neural circuits. There is evidence suggesting that the newly generated hypothalamic neurons may be involved in regulation of metabolism, energy balance, body weight, and social behavior as well. Here we review recent data on the role of hypothalamic neuropeptides in adult neurogenesis and neuritogenesis with special emphasis on the development of food intake and social behavior related brain circuits. PMID:26881105

  19. AMINO ACIDS: SENSING AND IMPLICATION INTO AGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleh Lushchak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An ability to sense and respond to nutrient availability is an important requisite for life. Nutrient limitation is among main factors to influence the evolution of most cellular processes. Different pathways that sense intracellular and extracellular levels of carbohydtrates, amino acids, lipids, and intermediate metabolites are integrated and coordinated at the organismal level through neuronal and humoral signals. During food abundance, nutrient-sensing pathways engage anabolism and storage, whereas limitation triggers the mechanisms, such as the mobilization of internal stores including through autophagy. These processes are affected during aging and are themselves important regulators of longevity, stress resistance, and age-related complications.

  20. Hypothalamic melanin concentrating hormone neurons communicate the nutrient value of sugar

    OpenAIRE

    Domingos, Ana I; Sordillo, Aylesse; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Tellez, Luis A; Vaynshteyn, Jake; Ferreira, Jozelia G; Ekstrand, Mats I.; Horvath, Tamas L.; de Araujo, Ivan E.; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    eLife digest Sales of full-sugar fizzy drinks are almost triple those of diet versions, providing real-world confirmation of the laboratory finding that humans, as well as animals, prefer sugar to artificial sweeteners. However, it is not simply that sugary things taste better. Mice with a mutation that prevents them from perceiving sweet tastes still prefer the natural sugar sucrose over the artificial sweetener sucralose. This is because sugar, unlike artificial sweeteners, has nutritional ...

  1. Nutrients for the aging eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmussen HM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Helen M Rasmussen,1 Elizabeth J Johnson2 1Educational Studies, Lesley University, Cambridge, MA, USA; 2Carotenoid and Health Laboratory, Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The incidence of age-related eye diseases is expected to rise with the aging of the population. Oxidation and inflammation are implicated in the etiology of these diseases. There is evidence that dietary antioxidants and anti-inflammatories may provide benefit in decreasing the risk of age-related eye disease. Nutrients of interest are vitamins C and E, β-carotene, zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin, and the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. While a recent survey finds that among the baby boomers (45–65 years old, vision is the most important of the five senses, well over half of those surveyed were not aware of the important nutrients that play a key role in eye health. This is evident from a national survey that finds that intake of these key nutrients from dietary sources is below the recommendations or guidelines. Therefore, it is important to educate this population and to create an awareness of the nutrients and foods of particular interest in the prevention of age-related eye disease. Keywords: nutrition, aging, eye health

  2. Evaluation of small hypothalamic hamartomas with 3D constructive interference in steady state (CISS) sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamura, Masayuki; Hirai, Toshinori; Kitajima, Mika; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Ikushima, Ichiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan); Korogi, Yukunori [University of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kitakyushu (Japan); Endo, Fumio [Kumamoto University, Department of Pediatrics,Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2005-03-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas are relatively rare, non-neoplastic congenital malformations. With conventional MR images alone, small hypothalamic hamartomas may be difficult to diagnose because of artifacts from cerebrospinal fluid. We present the usefulness of three-dimensional constructive interference in steady state sequence for evaluating small hypothalamic hamartomas in three pediatric patients. (orig.)

  3. Hypothalamic obesity after treatment for craniopharyngioma: the importance of the home environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijneke, Ruud W. H.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y. N.; de Boer, Nienke Y.; van Zundert, Suzanne; van Trotsenburg, Paul A. S.; Stoelinga, Femke; van Santen, Hanneke M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hypothalamic obesity after treatment for craniopharyngioma is a well-recognized, severe problem. Treatment of hypothalamic obesity is difficult and often frustrating for the patient, the parents and the professional care-giver. Because hypothalamic obesity is caused by an underlying medical

  4. Drainage basin nutrient inputs and eutrophication: an integrated approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wassmann, Paul; Olli, Kalle

    2005-01-01

    Eutrophication is an increase in primary production due to increased nutrient supply and its consequences. In its widest sense eutrophication means any increase of nutrient availability that increases primary production. Frequently, however, eutrophication is understood exclusively as the consequence of nutrient input by anthropogenic activities. The primary consequence of eutrophication in aquatic environments is an enhancement of algal productivity and accumulation of algal biomass. Seco...

  5. Melatonin controls seasonal breeding by a network of hypothalamic targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revel, Florent G; Masson-Pévet, Mireille; Pévet, Paul

    2009-01-01

    /GPR54 system and to the RFamide-related peptides.Interestingly, these systems involve different hypothalamic nuclei, suggesting that several brain loci may be crucial for melatonin to regulate reproduction, and thus represent key starting points to identify the long-sought-after mode and site...

  6. Early life stress experience may blunt hypothalamic leptin signalling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-12-21

    Dec 21, 2016 ... are normally elevated in human obesity (Considine et al. 1996). Leptin is synthesized in adipocytes and released into the blood stream, and acts on its receptors in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) to regulate energy expenditure and weight gain. Anorexic efficacy of leptin; i.e. reducing food.

  7. Functional MRI of human hypothalamic responses following glucose ingestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Grond, J. van der

    2005-01-01

    The hypothalamus is intimately involved in the regulation of food intake, integrating multiple neural and hormonal signals. Several hypothalamic nuclei contain glucose-sensitive neurons, which play a crucial role in energy homeostasis. Although a few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

  8. The hypothalamic transcriptional response to stress is severely impaired in offspring exposed to adverse nutrition during gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, N M; George, R; Reyes, T M

    2017-02-07

    Gestation is a time of profound vulnerability, as insults during pregnancy increase the lifelong risk of morbidity for the offspring. Increasingly, maternal diet is recognized as a key factor influencing the developing fetus. Poor-quality maternal diets, whether they provide an excess or an insufficiency of nutrients, lead to overt gestational growth disturbances in the offspring, and elevated risk for a common cluster of metabolic and mental disorders. Metabolic disturbances, particularly a substantially increased risk of obesity, have been linked in both maternal overnutrition and maternal undernutrition with abnormal development of the offspring hypothalamus, which serves a vital role in the central regulation of feeding. Additionally, the hypothalamus also coordinates physiological responses to stressors, and may thus play a role in vulnerability to psychiatric disease in these offspring. We examined hypothalamic molecular and endocrine responses to a psychological stressor (restraint) and a physiological stressor (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) in adult offspring from dams fed a high-fat diet or a low-protein diet during gestation and lactation. Targeted gene expression in the hypothalamus for 26 genes of interest sorted via hierarchical clustering revealed that the vast majority of these transcripts were substantially upregulated by both stressors. In contrast, offspring of maternal high-fat and low-protein diets mounted essentially no gene expression response to either stressor. However, male and female offspring of all conditions showed elevated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal glucocorticoid responses to both stressors, though the recovery of corticosterone responses after stress termination was significantly impaired in offspring of poor-quality maternal diets. Overall, it appears that the ability of the hypothalamus to respond in the immediate aftermath of stressful experiences is severely impaired in offspring of poor-quality maternal diets, regardless of

  9. Eating behavior in frontotemporal dementia: Peripheral hormones vs hypothalamic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rebekah M; Latheef, Sahar; Bartley, Lauren; Irish, Muireann; Halliday, Glenda M; Kiernan, Matthew C; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier

    2015-10-13

    To contrast the relationships of hormonal eating peptides and hypothalamic volumes to eating behavior and metabolic changes (body mass index [BMI]) in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA). Seventy-five patients with dementia (19 bvFTD, 26 svPPA, and 30 Alzheimer disease dementia) and 23 controls underwent fasting blood analyses of leptin, ghrelin, cholecystokinin, peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY), and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) levels. On brain MRI anterior, posterior, and total hypothalamic volumes were measured. Relationships between endocrine measures, hypothalamic volumes, eating behaviors, and BMI were investigated. Levels of AgRP were higher in patients with bvFTD (69 ± 89 pg/mL) and svPPA (62 ± 81 pg/mL) compared with controls (23 ± 19 pg/mL, p < 0.01). No differences were found for leptin, oxytocin, cholecystokinin, ghrelin, and PYY levels. Patients with bvFTD and svPPA had higher scores on questionnaires measuring eating behaviors. Atrophy of the posterior and total hypothalamus was observed in the bvFTD group only. Linear regression modeling revealed that leptin and AgRP levels predicted BMI. Eating abnormalities are multifactorial in FTD. In bvFTD, they are in part related to hypothalamic degeneration, with potential disintegration of the network connections between the hypothalamus and orbitofrontal cortex/reward pathways. In svPPA, although hypothalamic volumes are preserved, this group experiences elevated AgRP levels similar to bvFTD, which predicts BMI in both groups. This finding highlights the potential key role of AgRP in eating and metabolic changes and provides a potential target for treatment to modify disease progression. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Craniopharyngioma and hypothalamic injury: latest insights into consequent eating disorders and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Hermann L

    2016-02-01

    Hypothalamic alterations, pathological or treatment induced, have major impact on prognosis in craniopharyngioma patients mainly because of consequent hypothalamic obesity. Recent insight in molecular genetics, treatment strategies, risk factors and outcomes associated with hypothalamic obesity provide novel therapeutic perspectives. This review includes relevant publications since 2013. Recent findings confirm that alterations in posterior hypothalamic areas because of tumour location and/or treatment-related injuries are associated with severe hypothalamic obesity, reduced overall survival and impaired quality of life in long-term survivors of childhood-onset craniopharyngioma. However, eating disorders are observed because of hypothalamic obesity without clear disease-specific patterns. Treatment options for hypothalamic obesity are very limited. Treatment with invasive, nonreversible bariatric methods such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is most efficient in weight reduction, but controversial in the paediatric population because of medical, ethical, and legal considerations. Accordingly, treatment in craniopharyngioma should focus on prevention of (further) hypothalamic injury. Presurgical imaging for grading of hypothalamic involvement should be the basis for hypothalamus-sparing strategies conducted by experienced multidisciplinary teams. Until a nonsurgical therapeutic option for hypothalamic obesity for paediatric patients is found, prevention of hypothalamic injury should be the preferred treatment strategy, conducted exclusively by experienced multidisciplinary teams.

  11. [Magnesium for nutrient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mieko

    2012-08-01

    Magnesium is essential nutrient. Here is magnesium for nutrient. Magnesium has a large number of biological or biochemical functions. It's distribution, absorption, deficiency, excess disorder, requirement, supply sources, and especially status and issue of magnesium intake in Japanese are reviewed.

  12. Soluble organic nutrient fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Qualls; Bruce L. Haines; Wayne Swank

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives in this study were (i) compare fluxes of the dissolved organic nutrients dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DON, and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in a clearcut area and an adjacent mature reference area. (ii) determine whether concentrations of dissolved organic nutrients or inorganic nutrients were greater in clearcut areas than in reference areas,...

  13. Hypothalamic circuits regulating appetite and energy homeostasis: pathways to obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Timper

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ‘obesity epidemic’ represents a major global socioeconomic burden that urgently calls for a better understanding of the underlying causes of increased weight gain and its associated metabolic comorbidities, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. Improving our understanding of the cellular basis of obesity could set the stage for the development of new therapeutic strategies. The CNS plays a pivotal role in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. Distinct neuronal cell populations, particularly within the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, sense the nutrient status of the organism and integrate signals from peripheral hormones including pancreas-derived insulin and adipocyte-derived leptin to regulate calorie intake, glucose metabolism and energy expenditure. The arcuate neurons are tightly connected to other specialized neuronal subpopulations within the hypothalamus, but also to various extrahypothalamic brain regions, allowing a coordinated behavioral response. This At a Glance article gives an overview of the recent knowledge, mainly derived from rodent models, regarding the CNS-dependent regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis, and illustrates how dysregulation of the neuronal networks involved can lead to overnutrition and obesity. The potential impact of recent research findings in the field on therapeutic treatment strategies for human obesity is also discussed.

  14. Model of how plants sense zinc deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assuncao, A.G.L.; Persson, D.P.; Husted, S.; Schjorring, J.K.; Alexander, R.D.; Aarts, M.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are capable of inducing a range of physico-chemical and microbial modifications of the rhizosphere which can mobilize mineral nutrients or prevent toxic elements from entering the roots. Understanding how plants sense and adapt to variations in nutrient availability is essential in order to

  15. Integrated approaches to drainage basin nutrient inputs and coastal eutrophication: an introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Wassmann, Paul; Olli, Kalle

    2005-01-01

    Ingress Eutrophication is an increase in primary production due to increased nutrient supply and its consequences. In its widest sense eutrophication means any increase of nutrient availability that increases primary production. Frequently, however, eutrophication is understood exclusively as the consequence of nutrient input by anthropogenic activities. The primary consequence of eutrophication in aquatic environments is an enhancement of algal productivity and ...

  16. Glial Glucokinase Expression in Adult and Post-Natal Development of the Hypothalamic Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Millán

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been proposed that hypothalamic glial cells sense glucose levels and release lactate as a signal to activate adjacent neurons. GK (glucokinase, the hexokinase involved in glucose sensing in pancreatic β-cells, is also expressed in the hypothalamus. However, it has not been clearly determined if glial and/or neuronal cells express this protein. Interestingly, tanycytes, the glia that cover the ventricular walls of the hypothalamus, are in contact with CSF (cerebrospinal fluid, the capillaries of the arcuate nucleus and adjacent neurons; this would be expected for a system that can detect and communicate changes in glucose concentration. Here, we demonstrated by Western-blot analysis, QRT-PCR [quantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR] and in situ hybridization that GK is expressed in tanycytes. Confocal microscopy and immunoultrastructural analysis revealed that GK is localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm of β1–tanycytes. Furthermore, GK expression increased in these cells during the second week of post-natal development. Based on this evidence, we propose that tanycytes mediate, at least in part, the mechanism by which the hypothalamus detects changes in glucose concentrations.

  17. Differential hypothalamic leptin sensitivity in obese rat offspring exposed to maternal and postnatal intake of chocolate and soft drink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaergaard, M; Nilsson, C; Secher, A; Kildegaard, J; Skovgaard, T; Nielsen, M O; Grove, K; Raun, K

    2017-01-16

    Intake of high-energy foods and maternal nutrient overload increases the risk of metabolic diseases in the progeny such as obesity and diabetes. We hypothesized that maternal and postnatal intake of chocolate and soft drink will affect leptin sensitivity and hypothalamic astrocyte morphology in adult rat offspring. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were fed ad libitum chow diet only (C) or with chocolate and high sucrose soft drink supplement (S). At birth, litter size was adjusted into 10 male offspring per mother. After weaning, offspring from both dietary groups were assigned to either S or C diet, giving four groups until the end of the experiment at 26 weeks of age. As expected, adult offspring fed the S diet post weaning became obese (body weight: Pchocolate and soft drink had long-term consequences for the metabolic phenotype in the offspring if they continued on the S diet in postnatal life. These offspring displayed obesity despite lowered energy intake associated with alterations in hypothalamic leptin signalling.

  18. Hypothalamic leptin action is mediated by histone deacetylase 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabra, Dhiraj G; Pfuhlmann, Katrin; García-Cáceres, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic leptin signalling has a key role in food intake and energy-balance control and is often impaired in obese individuals. Here we identify histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) as a regulator of leptin signalling and organismal energy balance. Global HDAC5 KO mice have increased food intake...... and greater diet-induced obesity when fed high-fat diet. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of HDAC5 activity in the mediobasal hypothalamus increases food intake and modulates pathways implicated in leptin signalling. We show HDAC5 directly regulates STAT3 localization and transcriptional activity via...... reciprocal STAT3 deacetylation at Lys685 and phosphorylation at Tyr705. In vivo, leptin sensitivity is substantially impaired in HDAC5 loss-of-function mice. Hypothalamic HDAC5 overexpression improves leptin action and partially protects against HFD-induced leptin resistance and obesity. Overall, our data...

  19. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  20. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eZorzano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1 cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction.

  1. Differential sensitivity to nicotine among hypothalamic magnocellular neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J D; Jacobsen, Julie; Kiss, Adrian Emil

    2012-01-01

    The magnocellular neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) either contain vasopressin or oxytocin. Even though both hormones are released after systemic administration of nicotine, the mechanism through which the two populations of neurons are activated...... is not known. This study was carried out in the rat to investigate the effect of increasing doses of nicotine on subsets of magnocellular neurons containing either oxytocin or vasopressin....

  2. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Endocrine System in the Hagfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masumi eNozaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates. Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrate known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates, the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTH mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates.

  3. Hypothalamic regulation of metabolism: Role of thyroid hormone and estrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormone and estrogen both play an essential role in energy metabolism. The current thesis investigated the possible central effects of these hormones in the control of energy metabolism by administrating triiodothyronine (T3), estradiol (E2) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in distinct hypothalamic nuclei. We evaluated various aspects of metabolic alterations including glucose and lipid metabolism, food intake, body weight, body temperature, locomotor activity, energy expenditu...

  4. Methamphetamine and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis

    OpenAIRE

    Damian Gabriel Zuloaga; Jason eJacobskind; Jacob eRaber

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants such as methamphetamine (MA) induce significant alterations in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. These changes in HPA axis function are associated with altered stress-related behaviors and might contribute to addictive processes such as relapse. In this mini-review we discuss acute and chronic effects of MA (adult and developmental exposure) on the HPA axis, including effects on HPA axis associated genes/proteins, brain regions, and behaviors suc...

  5. EJE PRIZE 2017: Hypothalamic AMPK: a golden target against obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular gauge that is activated under conditions, such as low energy, increasing energy production and reducing energy waste. Centrally, the AMPK pathway is a canonical route regulating energy homeostasis, by integrating peripheral signals, such as hormones and metabolites, with neuronal networks. Current evidence links hypothalamic AMPK with feeding, brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis and browning of white adipose tissue (WAT), as well as muscle metabolism, hepatic function and glucose homeostasis. The relevance of these data is interesting from a therapeutic point of view as several agents with potential anti-obesity and/or antidiabetic effects, some currently in clinical use, such as nicotine, metformin and liraglutide are known to act through AMPK, either peripherally or centrally. Furthermore, the orexigenic and weight-gaining effects of the worldwide use of antipsychotic drugs (APDs), such as olanzapine, are also mediated by hypothalamic AMPK. Overall, this evidence makes hypothalamic AMPK signaling an interesting target for the drug development, with its potential for controlling both sides of the energy balance equation, namely feeding and energy expenditure through defined metabolic pathways. © 2017 The authors.

  6. Role of leptin in energy expenditure: the hypothalamic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, R; Beerens, S; Adan, R A H

    2017-06-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin is a peripheral signal that informs the brain about the metabolic status of an organism. Although traditionally viewed as an appetite-suppressing hormone, studies in the past decade have highlighted the role of leptin in energy expenditure. Leptin has been shown to increase energy expenditure in particular through its effects on the cardiovascular system and brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis via the hypothalamus. The current review summarizes the role of leptin signaling in various hypothalamic nuclei and its effects on the sympathetic nervous system to influence blood pressure, heart rate, and BAT thermogenesis. Specifically, the role of leptin signaling on three different hypothalamic nuclei, the dorsomedial hypothalamus, the ventromedial hypothalamus, and the arcuate nucleus, is reviewed. It is known that all of these brain regions influence the sympathetic nervous system activity and thereby regulate BAT thermogenesis and the cardiovascular system. Thus the current work focuses on how leptin signaling in specific neuronal populations within these hypothalamic nuclei influences certain aspects of energy expenditure. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Hypothalamic stimulation and baroceptor reflex interaction on renal nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M. F.; Ninomiya, I.; Franz, G. N.; Judy, W. V.

    1971-01-01

    The basal level of mean renal nerve activity (MRNA-0) measured in anesthetized cats was found to be modified by the additive interaction of hypothalamic and baroceptor reflex influences. Data were collected with the four major baroceptor nerves either intact or cut, and with mean aortic pressure (MAP) either clamped with a reservoir or raised with l-epinephrine. With intact baroceptor nerves, MRNA stayed essentially constant at level MRNA-0 for MAP below an initial pressure P1, and fell approximately linearly to zero as MAP was raised to P2. Cutting the baroceptor nerves kept MRNA at MRNA-0 (assumed to represent basal central neural output) independent of MAP. The addition of hypothalamic stimulation produced nearly constant increments in MRNA for all pressure levels up to P2, with complete inhibition at some level above P2. The increments in MRNA depended on frequency and location of the stimulus. A piecewise linear model describes MRNA as a linear combination of hypothalamic, basal central neural, and baroceptor reflex activity.

  8. Differential hypothalamic leptin sensitivity in obese rat offspring exposed to maternal and postnatal intake of chocolate and soft drink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstenberg, Marina Kjærgaard; Nilsson, C; Secher, A

    2017-01-01

    Background/objective: Intake of high-energy foods and maternal nutrient overload increases the risk of metabolic diseases in the progeny such as obesity and diabetes. We hypothesized that maternal and postnatal intake of chocolate and soft drink will affect leptin sensitivity and hypothalamic...... astrocyte morphology in adult rat offspring. Methods: Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were fed ad libitum chow diet only (C) or with chocolate and high sucrose soft drink supplement (S). At birth, litter size was adjusted into 10 male offspring per mother. After weaning, offspring from both dietary groups were...... than energy expenditure, suggesting differential programming of leptin sensitivity in ARC in SS offspring. Effects of the maternal S diet were normalized when offspring were fed a chow diet after weaning. Conclusions: Maternal intake of chocolate and soft drink had long-term consequences...

  9. Hypothalamic Integration of Metabolic, Endocrine, and Circadian Signals in Fish: Involvement in the Control of Food Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, María J.; Cerdá-Reverter, José M.; Soengas, José L.

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of food intake in fish is a complex process carried out through several different mechanisms in the central nervous system (CNS) with hypothalamus being the main regulatory center. As in mammals, a complex hypothalamic circuit including two populations of neurons: one co-expressing neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and the second one population co-expressing pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is involved in the integration of information relating to food intake control. The production and release of these peptides control food intake, and the production results from the integration of information of different nature such as levels of nutrients and hormones as well as circadian signals. The present review summarizes the knowledge and recent findings about the presence and functioning of these mechanisms in fish and their differences vs. the known mammalian model. PMID:28694769

  10. Recent Advances in the Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Hypothalamic Neuronal Glucose Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Fioramonti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus have been recognized for decades as one of the major brain centers for the control of energy homeostasis. This area contains specialized neurons able to detect changes in nutrients level. Among them, glucose-sensing neurons use glucose as a signaling molecule in addition to its fueling role. In this review we will describe the different sub-populations of glucose-sensing neurons present in the hypothalamus and highlight their nature in terms of neurotransmitter/neuropeptide expression. This review will particularly discuss whether pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC neurons from the arcuate nucleus are directly glucose-sensing. In addition, recent observations in glucose-sensing suggest a subtle system with different mechanisms involved in the detection of changes in glucose level and their involvement in specific physiological functions. Several data point out the critical role of reactive oxygen species (ROS and mitochondria dynamics in the detection of increased glucose. This review will also highlight that ATP-dependent potassium (KATP channels are not the only channels mediating glucose-sensing and discuss the new role of transient receptor potential canonical channels (TRPC. We will discuss the recent advances in the determination of glucose-sensing machinery and propose potential line of research needed to further understand the regulation of brain glucose detection.

  11. Effects of Fat and Sugar, Either Consumed or Infused toward the Brain, on Hypothalamic ER Stress Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evita Belegri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-folding stress at the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER occurs in the hypothalamus during diet-induced obesity (DIO and is linked to metabolic disease development. ER stress is buffered by the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR, a controlled network of pathways inducing a set of genes that recovers ER function. However, it is unclear whether hypothalamic ER stress during DIO results from obesity related changes or from direct nutrient effects in the brain. We here investigated mRNA expression of UPR markers in the hypothalamus of rats that were exposed to a free choice high-fat high-sugar (fcHFHS diet for 1 week and then overnight fed ad libitum, or fasted, or fat/sugar deprived (i.e., switched from obesogenic diet to chow. In addition, we determined the direct effects of fat/sugar on mRNA expression of hypothalamus UPR markers by intracarotic infusions of intralipids and/or glucose in chow-fed rats that were fasted overnight. Short term (1 week exposure to fcHFHS diet increased adiposity compared to chow-feeding. Short term exposure to a fcHFHS diet, followed by mild food restriction overnight, induced hypothalamic ER stress in rats as characterized by an increase in spliced to unspliced X-box binding protein 1 mRNA ratio in hypothalamus of fcHFHS fed rats compared to chow fed rats. Moreover, infused lipids toward the brain of overnight fasted rats, were able to induce a similar response. Non-restricted ad libitum fcHFHS-diet fed or totally fasted rats did not show altered ratios. We also observed a clear increase in hypothalamic activating transcription factor 4 mRNA in rats on the fcHFHS diet while being ad libitum fed or when infused with intralipid via the carotic artery compared to vehicle infusions. However, we did not observe induction of downstream targets implying that this effect is a more general stress response and not related to ER stress. Overall, we conclude that the hypothalamic stress response might be a sensitive

  12. Drug-nutrient interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander

    2013-07-01

    Drug-nutrient interactions are defined as physical, chemical, physiologic, or pathophysiologic relationships between a drug and a nutrient. The causes of most clinically significant drug-nutrient interactions are usually multifactorial. Failure to identify and properly manage drug-nutrient interactions can lead to very serious consequences and have a negative impact on patient outcomes. Nevertheless, with thorough review and assessment of the patient's history and treatment regimens and a carefully executed management strategy, adverse events associated with drug-nutrient interactions can be prevented. Based on the physiologic sequence of events after a drug or a nutrient has entered the body and the mechanism of interactions, drug-nutrient interactions can be categorized into 4 main types. Each type of interaction can be managed using similar strategies. The existing data that guide the clinical management of most drug-nutrient interactions are mostly anecdotal experience, uncontrolled observations, and opinions, whereas the science in understanding the mechanism of drug-nutrient interactions remains limited. The challenge for researchers and clinicians is to increase both basic and higher level clinical research in this field to bridge the gap between the science and practice. The research should aim to establish a better understanding of the function, regulation, and substrate specificity of the nutrient-related enzymes and transport proteins present in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as assess how the incidence and management of drug-nutrient interactions can be affected by sex, ethnicity, environmental factors, and genetic polymorphisms. This knowledge can help us develop a true personalized medicine approach in the prevention and management of drug-nutrient interactions.

  13. Anorexigenic and Orexigenic Hormone Modulation of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Activity and the Regulation of Hypothalamic Agouti-Related Protein mRNA Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Watterson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin 1 (mTORC1 by nutrients, insulin and leptin leads to appetite suppression (anorexia. Contrastingly, increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activity by ghrelin promotes appetite (orexia. However, the interplay between these mechanisms remains poorly defined. The relationship between the anorexigenic hormones, insulin and leptin, and the orexigenic hormone, ghrelin, on mTORC1 signalling was examined using S6 kinase phosphorylation as a marker for changes in mTORC1 activity in mouse hypothalamic GT1-7 cells. Additionally, the contribution of AMPK and mTORC1 signalling in relation to insulin-, leptin- and ghrelin-driven alterations to mouse hypothalamic agouti-related protein (AgRP mRNA levels was examined. Insulin and leptin increase mTORC1 activity in a phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K- and protein kinase B (PKB-dependent manner, compared to vehicle controls, whereas increasing AMPK activity inhibits mTORC1 activity and blocks the actions of the anorexigenic hormones. Ghrelin mediates an AMPK-dependent decrease in mTORC1 activity and increases hypothalamic AgRP mRNA levels, the latter effect being prevented by insulin in an mTORC1-dependent manner. In conclusion, mTORC1 acts as an integration node in hypothalamic neurons for hormone-derived PI3K and AMPK signalling and mediates at least part of the assimilated output of anorexigenic and orexigenic hormone actions in the hypothalamus.

  14. AMP-kinase regulates food intake by responding to hormonal and nutrient signals in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Alquier, Thierry; Furukawa, Noboru; Kim, Yong-Bum; Lee, Anna; Xue, Bingzhong; Mu, James; Foufelle, Fabienne; Ferré, Pascal; Birnbaum, Morris J; Stuck, Bettina J; Kahn, Barbara B

    2004-04-01

    Obesity is an epidemic in Western society, and causes rapidly accelerating rates of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), functions as a 'fuel gauge' to monitor cellular energy status. We investigated the potential role of AMPK in the hypothalamus in the regulation of food intake. Here we report that AMPK activity is inhibited in arcuate and paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) by the anorexigenic hormone leptin, and in multiple hypothalamic regions by insulin, high glucose and refeeding. A melanocortin receptor agonist, a potent anorexigen, decreases AMPK activity in PVH, whereas agouti-related protein, an orexigen, increases AMPK activity. Melanocortin receptor signalling is required for leptin and refeeding effects on AMPK in PVH. Dominant negative AMPK expression in the hypothalamus is sufficient to reduce food intake and body weight, whereas constitutively active AMPK increases both. Alterations of hypothalamic AMPK activity augment changes in arcuate neuropeptide expression induced by fasting and feeding. Furthermore, inhibition of hypothalamic AMPK is necessary for leptin's effects on food intake and body weight, as constitutively active AMPK blocks these effects. Thus, hypothalamic AMPK plays a critical role in hormonal and nutrient-derived anorexigenic and orexigenic signals and in energy balance.

  15. Differentiation of hypothalamic-like neurons from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liheng; Meece, Kana; Williams, Damian J; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Zimmer, Matthew; Heinrich, Garrett; Martin Carli, Jayne; Leduc, Charles A; Sun, Lei; Zeltser, Lori M; Freeby, Matthew; Goland, Robin; Tsang, Stephen H; Wardlaw, Sharon L; Egli, Dieter; Leibel, Rudolph L

    2015-02-01

    The hypothalamus is the central regulator of systemic energy homeostasis, and its dysfunction can result in extreme body weight alterations. Insights into the complex cellular physiology of this region are critical to the understanding of obesity pathogenesis; however, human hypothalamic cells are largely inaccessible for direct study. Here, we developed a protocol for efficient generation of hypothalamic neurons from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) obtained from patients with monogenetic forms of obesity. Combined early activation of sonic hedgehog signaling followed by timed NOTCH inhibition in human ESCs/iPSCs resulted in efficient conversion into hypothalamic NKX2.1+ precursors. Application of a NOTCH inhibitor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) further directed the cells into arcuate nucleus hypothalamic-like neurons that express hypothalamic neuron markers proopiomelanocortin (POMC), neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AGRP), somatostatin, and dopamine. These hypothalamic-like neurons accounted for over 90% of differentiated cells and exhibited transcriptional profiles defined by a hypothalamic-specific gene expression signature that lacked pituitary markers. Importantly, these cells displayed hypothalamic neuron characteristics, including production and secretion of neuropeptides and increased p-AKT and p-STAT3 in response to insulin and leptin. Our results suggest that these hypothalamic-like neurons have potential for further investigation of the neurophysiology of body weight regulation and evaluation of therapeutic targets for obesity.

  16. Differentiation of hypothalamic-like neurons from human pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liheng; Meece, Kana; Williams, Damian J.; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Zimmer, Matthew; Heinrich, Garrett; Martin Carli, Jayne; Leduc, Charles A.; Sun, Lei; Zeltser, Lori M.; Freeby, Matthew; Goland, Robin; Tsang, Stephen H.; Wardlaw, Sharon L.; Egli, Dieter; Leibel, Rudolph L.

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is the central regulator of systemic energy homeostasis, and its dysfunction can result in extreme body weight alterations. Insights into the complex cellular physiology of this region are critical to the understanding of obesity pathogenesis; however, human hypothalamic cells are largely inaccessible for direct study. Here, we developed a protocol for efficient generation of hypothalamic neurons from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) obtained from patients with monogenetic forms of obesity. Combined early activation of sonic hedgehog signaling followed by timed NOTCH inhibition in human ESCs/iPSCs resulted in efficient conversion into hypothalamic NKX2.1+ precursors. Application of a NOTCH inhibitor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) further directed the cells into arcuate nucleus hypothalamic-like neurons that express hypothalamic neuron markers proopiomelanocortin (POMC), neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AGRP), somatostatin, and dopamine. These hypothalamic-like neurons accounted for over 90% of differentiated cells and exhibited transcriptional profiles defined by a hypothalamic-specific gene expression signature that lacked pituitary markers. Importantly, these cells displayed hypothalamic neuron characteristics, including production and secretion of neuropeptides and increased p-AKT and p-STAT3 in response to insulin and leptin. Our results suggest that these hypothalamic-like neurons have potential for further investigation of the neurophysiology of body weight regulation and evaluation of therapeutic targets for obesity. PMID:25555215

  17. Essential Nutrients, Feed Classification and Nutrient Content of Feeds

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, John Burton, 1960-; Seay, William W.; Baker, Scott M., 1968-

    2005-01-01

    The cow-calf herd's primary source of nutrition is forages, but forages are variable in nutrient content. By knowing the nutrient content of their base forages, producers can then identify the deficient nutrients that need to be supplemented.

  18. Thyroid hormone activation of retinoic acid synthesis in hypothalamic tanycytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoney, Patrick N.; Helfer, Gisela; Rodrigues, Diana; Morgan, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for adult brain function and its actions include several key roles in the hypothalamus. Although TH controls gene expression via specific TH receptors of the nuclear receptor class, surprisingly few genes have been demonstrated to be directly regulated by TH in the hypothalamus, or the adult brain as a whole. This study explored the rapid induction by TH of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (Raldh1), encoding a retinoic acid (RA)‐synthesizing enzyme, as a gene specifically expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, cells that mediate a number of actions of TH in the hypothalamus. The resulting increase in RA may then regulate gene expression via the RA receptors, also of the nuclear receptor class. In vivo exposure of the rat to TH led to a significant and rapid increase in hypothalamic Raldh1 within 4 hours. That this may lead to an in vivo increase in RA is suggested by the later induction by TH of the RA‐responsive gene Cyp26b1. To explore the actions of RA in the hypothalamus as a potential mediator of TH control of gene regulation, an ex vivo hypothalamic rat slice culture method was developed in which the Raldh1‐expressing tanycytes were maintained. These slice cultures confirmed that TH did not act on genes regulating energy balance but could induce Raldh1. RA has the potential to upregulate expression of genes involved in growth and appetite, Ghrh and Agrp. This regulation is acutely sensitive to epigenetic changes, as has been shown for TH action in vivo. These results indicate that sequential triggering of two nuclear receptor signalling systems has the capability to mediate some of the functions of TH in the hypothalamus. GLIA 2016;64:425–439 PMID:26527258

  19. Remote RemoteRemoteRemote sensing potential for sensing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Remote RemoteRemoteRemote sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing p.

  20. Neuropeptides, food intake and body weight regulation: a hypothalamic focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrand, J J G; de Wied, D; Adan, R A H

    2002-12-01

    Energy homeostasis is controlled by a complex neuroendocrine system consisting of peripheral signals like leptin and central signals, in particular, neuropeptides. Several neuropeptides with anorexigenic (POMC, CART, and CRH) as well as orexigenic (NPY, AgRP, and MCH) actions are involved in this complex (partly redundant) controlling system. Starvation as well as overfeeding lead to changes in expression levels of these neuropeptides, which act downstream of leptin, resulting in a physiological response. In this review the role of several anorexigenic and orexigenic (hypothalamic) neuropeptides on food intake and body weight regulation is summarized.

  1. Hypothalamic Inflammation in Obesity, Insulin Resistance and Ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Tsaousidou, Eva

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the role of hypothalamic inflammation in obesity, insulin resistance and the regulation of the ageing process is investigated. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)1- and inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase (IKK)2-dependent signalling plays a crucial role in the development of obesity-associated insulin and leptin resistance not only in peripheral tissues but also in the CNS. This study demonstrates that constitutive JNK1 activation in agouti-related peptide (AgRP)...

  2. Alterations in the hypothalamic melanocortin pathway in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Pauline; Sinniger, Jérôme; El Oussini, Hajer; Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Dengler, Reinhard; Meyer, Thomas; Zierz, Stephan; Kassubek, Jan; Fischer, Wilhelm; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Grehl, Torsten; Hermann, Andreas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Witting, Anke; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease, leads to death within 3 to 5 years after onset. Beyond progressive motor impairment, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis suffer from major defects in energy metabolism, such as weight loss, which are well correlated with survival. Indeed, nutritional intervention targeting weight loss might improve survival of patients. However, the neural mechanisms underlying metabolic impairment in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis remain elusive, in particular due to the lack of longitudinal studies. Here we took advantage of samples collected during the clinical trial of pioglitazone (GERP-ALS), and characterized longitudinally energy metabolism of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in response to pioglitazone, a drug with well-characterized metabolic effects. As expected, pioglitazone decreased glycaemia, decreased liver enzymes and increased circulating adiponectin in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, showing its efficacy in the periphery. However, pioglitazone did not increase body weight of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis independently of bulbar involvement. As pioglitazone increases body weight through a direct inhibition of the hypothalamic melanocortin system, we studied hypothalamic neurons producing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and the endogenous melanocortin inhibitor agouti-related peptide (AGRP), in mice expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutant SOD1(G86R). We observed lower Pomc but higher Agrp mRNA levels in the hypothalamus of presymptomatic SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistently, numbers of POMC-positive neurons were decreased, whereas AGRP fibre density was elevated in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistent with a defect in the hypothalamic melanocortin system, food intake after short term fasting was increased in SOD1(G86R) mice. Importantly, these findings were replicated in two other amyotrophic

  3. Methamphetamine and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Gabriel Zuloaga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Psychostimulants such as methamphetamine (MA induce significant alterations in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. These changes in HPA axis function are associated with altered stress-related behaviors and might contribute to addictive processes such as relapse. In this mini-review we discuss acute and chronic effects of MA (adult and developmental exposure on the HPA axis, including effects on HPA axis associated genes/proteins, brain regions, and behaviors such as anxiety and depression. A better understanding of the mechanisms through which MA affects the HPA axis may lead to more effective treatment strategies for MA addiction.

  4. Methamphetamine and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuloaga, Damian G; Jacobskind, Jason S; Jacosbskind, Jason S; Raber, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants such as methamphetamine (MA) induce significant alterations in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. These changes in HPA axis function are associated with altered stress-related behaviors and might contribute to addictive processes such as relapse. In this mini-review we discuss acute and chronic effects of MA (adult and developmental exposure) on the HPA axis, including effects on HPA axis associated genes/proteins, brain regions, and behaviors such as anxiety and depression. A better understanding of the mechanisms through which MA affects the HPA axis may lead to more effective treatment strategies for MA addiction.

  5. Remote Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Khorram, Siamak; Koch, Frank H; van der Wiele, Cynthia F

    2012-01-01

    Remote Sensing provides information on how remote sensing relates to the natural resources inventory, management, and monitoring, as well as environmental concerns. It explains the role of this new technology in current global challenges. "Remote Sensing" will discuss remotely sensed data application payloads and platforms, along with the methodologies involving image processing techniques as applied to remotely sensed data. This title provides information on image classification techniques and image registration, data integration, and data fusion techniques. How this technology applies to natural resources and environmental concerns will also be discussed.

  6. Consumption of a high‐fat diet, but not regular endurance exercise training, regulates hypothalamic lipid accumulation in mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borg, Melissa L; Omran, Simin Fallah; Weir, Jacquelyn; Meikle, Peter J; Watt, Matthew J

    2012-01-01

    ...‐deficient ob / ob mouse fed a chow diet had normal hypothalamic lipid content. •  These data show that dietary lipids regulate hypothalamic lipid accumulation, which is not readily reversed by exercise training. Abstract...

  7. EFFECT OF ANESTHETIZING THE REGION OF THE PARAVENTRICULAR HYPOTHALAMIC NUCLEI ON ENERGY-METABOLISM DURING EXERCISE IN THE RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDIJK, G; VISSING, J; STEFFENS, AB; GALBO, H

    The ventromedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei are known to influence glucoregulation during exercise. The extensive projections of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN) to the sympathetic nervous system suggest that the PVN also may be involved in glucoregulation during exercise. The

  8. Hepatic vagotomy alters limbic and hypothalamic neuropeptide responses to insulin-dependent diabetes and voluntary lard ingestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    la Fleur, Susanne E.; Manalo, Sotara L.; Roy, Monica; Houshyar, Hani; Dallman, Mary F.

    2005-01-01

    Hypothalamic anorexigenic [corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and proopiomelanocortin] peptides decrease and the orexigen, neuropeptide Y, increases with diabetic hyperphagia. However, when diabetic rats are allowed to eat lard (saturated fat) as well as chow, both caloric intake and hypothalamic

  9. Acute Lesioning and Rapid Repair of Hypothalamic Neurons outside the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernie Yulyaningsih

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurons expressing agouti-related protein (AgRP are essential for feeding. The majority of these neurons are located outside the blood-brain barrier (BBB, allowing them to directly sense circulating metabolic factors. Here, we show that, in adult mice, AgRP neurons outside the BBB (AgRPOBBB were rapidly ablated by peripheral administration of monosodium glutamate (MSG, whereas AgRP neurons inside the BBB and most proopiomelanocortin (POMC neurons were spared. MSG treatment induced proliferation of tanycytes, the putative hypothalamic neural progenitor cells, but the newly proliferated tanycytes did not become neurons. Intriguingly, AgRPOBBB neuronal number increased within a week after MSG treatment, and newly emerging AgRP neurons were derived from post-mitotic cells, including some from the Pomc-expressing cell lineage. Our study reveals that the lack of protection by the BBB renders AgRPOBBB vulnerable to lesioning by circulating toxins but that the rapid re-emergence of AgRPOBBB is part of a reparative process to maintain energy balance.

  10. Semaphorin7A regulates neuroglial plasticity in the adult hypothalamic median eminence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parkash, Jyoti; Messina, Andrea; Langlet, Fanny; Cimino, Irene; Loyens, Anne; Mazur, Danièle; Gallet, Sarah; Balland, Eglantine; Malone, Samuel A.; Pralong, François; Cagnoni, Gabriella; Schellino, Roberta; De Marchis, Silvia; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/197768814; Tamagnone, Luca; Prevot, Vincent; Giacobini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive competence in mammals depends on the projection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the hypothalamic median eminence (ME) and the timely release of GnRH into the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In adult rodents, GnRH neurons and the specialized glial cells named

  11. HYPOTHALAMIC BLOOD-FLOW REMAINS UNALTERED FOLLOWING CHRONIC NITRIC-OXIDE SYNTHASE BLOCKADE IN RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BENYO, Z; SZABO, C; STUIVER, BT; BOHUS, B; SANDOR, P

    1995-01-01

    The effect of the chronic oral application of N-G-nitro-L-arginine methyl eater (L-NAME), a potent inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) production, was studied on hypothalamic blood flow (HBF) and hypothalamic nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in rats. L-NAME was dissolved in the drinking water, in a

  12. Surgical excision of hypothalamic hamartoma in a twenty months old boy with precocious puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh K Ghanta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A twenty months old boy presented to our department with true precocious puberty due to hypothalamic hamartoma. Total surgical excision of pedunculated hypothalamic hamartoma was done successfully by the pterional trans-sylvian approach as he could not afford medical management. Patient had uneventful post-operative course with normalization of serum testosterone levels and regression of secondary sexual characters.

  13. Hypothalamic alterations in Huntington's disease patients: comparison with genetic rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wamelen, D J; Aziz, N A; Roos, R A C; Swaab, D F

    2014-11-01

    Unintended weight loss, sleep and circadian disturbances and autonomic dysfunction are prevalent features of Huntington's disease (HD), an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat sequence in the HTT gene. These features form a substantial contribution to disease burden in HD patients and appear to be accompanied by a number of neuroendocrine and metabolic changes, pointing towards hypothalamic pathology as a likely underlying mechanism. Neuronal inclusion bodies of mutant huntingtin, which are hallmarks of the disease, occur throughout the hypothalamus, and indicate local mutant huntingtin expression that could interfere with hypothalamic neuropeptide production. Also, several genetic rodent models of HD show features that could be related to hypothalamic pathology, such as weight loss and circadian rhythm disturbances. In these rodents, several hypothalamic neuropeptide populations are affected. In the present review, we summarise the changes in genetic rodent models of HD for individual hypothalamic nuclei, compare these observations to the hypothalamic changes that occur in HD patients, and make an inventory of the work that still needs to be done. Surprisingly, there is only limited overlap in the hypothalamic changes reported in HD patients and genetic rodent models. At present, the only similarity between the hypothalamic alterations in HD patients and genetic rodent models is a decrease in the number of orexin-expressing neurones in the lateral hypothalamus. Possible reasons for these discrepancies, as well as potential consequences for the development of novel therapeutic strategies, are discussed. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  14. Horner Syndrome as the Only Focal Neurologic Manifestation of Hypothalamic Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Cansu B; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Trobe, Jonathan D

    2017-12-12

    A 70-year-old woman suffered an anterior dorsal hypothalamic hemorrhage that caused an ipsilateral Horner syndrome (HS) as the only focal neurologic manifestation. This is only the second reported case of hypothalamic hemorrhage producing HS. Because HS was the sole focal neurologic manifestation, its confirmation with topical apraclonidine drops was a valuable clue toward prompt localization of the patient's confusional state.

  15. Role of Hypothalamic Creb-Binding Protein in Obesity and Molecular Reprogramming of Metabolic Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno, C.L.; Yang, L.; Dacks, P.A.; Isoda, F.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Mobbs, C.V.

    2016-01-01

    We have reported a correlation between hypothalamic expression of Creb-binding protein (Cbp) and lifespan, and that inhibition of Cbp prevents protective effects of dietary restriction during aging, suggesting that hypothalamic Cbp plays a role in responses to nutritional status and energy balance.

  16. Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Vaughn Kohl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prenatal migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurosecretory neurons allows nutrients and human pheromones to alter GnRH pulsatility, which modulates the concurrent maturation of the neuroendocrine, reproductive, and central nervous systems, thus influencing the development of ingestive behavior, reproductive sexual behavior, and other behaviors. Methods: This model details how chemical ecology drives adaptive evolution via: (1 ecological niche construction, (2 social niche construction, (3 neurogenic niche construction, and (4 socio-cognitive niche construction. This model exemplifies the epigenetic effects of olfactory/pheromonal conditioning, which alters genetically predisposed, nutrient-dependent, hormone-driven mammalian behavior and choices for pheromones that control reproduction via their effects on luteinizing hormone (LH and systems biology. Results: Nutrients are metabolized to pheromones that condition behavior in the same way that food odors condition behavior associated with food preferences. The epigenetic effects of olfactory/pheromonal input calibrate and standardize molecular mechanisms for genetically predisposed receptor-mediated changes in intracellular signaling and stochastic gene expression in GnRH neurosecretory neurons of brain tissue. For example, glucose and pheromones alter the hypothalamic secretion of GnRH and LH. A form of GnRH associated with sexual orientation in yeasts links control of the feedback loops and developmental processes required for nutrient acquisition, movement, reproduction, and the diversification of species from microbes to man. Conclusion: An environmental drive evolved from that of nutrient ingestion in unicellular organisms to that of pheromone-controlled socialization in insects. In mammals, food odors and pheromones cause changes in hormones such as LH, which has developmental affects on pheromone-controlled sexual behavior in nutrient-dependent reproductively

  17. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Autoimmunity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Guaraldi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of secondary hypopituitarism in children and adults, and is responsible for impaired quality of life, disabilities and compromised development. Alterations of pituitary function can occur at any time after the traumatic event, presenting in various ways and evolving during time, so they require appropriate screening for early detection and treatment. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, several mechanisms have been hypothesized, including hypothalamic-pituitary autoimmunity (HP-A. The aim of this study was to systematically review literature on the association between HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Major pitfalls related to the HP-A investigation were also discussed. Methods: The PubMed database was searched with a string developed for this purpose, without temporal or language limits, for original articles assessing the association of HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Results: Three articles from the same group met the inclusion criteria. Anti-pituitary and anti-hypothalamic antibodies were detected using indirect immunofluorescence in a significant number of patients with acute and chronic TBI. Elevated antibody titer was associated with an increased risk of persistent hypopituitarism, especially somatotroph and gonadotroph deficiency, while no correlations were found with clinical parameters. Conclusion: HPA seems to contribute to TBI-induced pituitary damage, although major methodological issues need to be overcome and larger studies are warranted to confirm these preliminary data.

  18. Glutamate and GABA as rapid effectors of hypothalamic peptidergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia eSchöne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Vital hypothalamic neurons regulating hunger, wakefulness, reward-seeking, and body weight are often defined by unique expression of hypothalamus-specific neuropeptides. Gene-ablation studies show that some of these peptides, notably orexin/hypocretin (hcrt/orx, are themselves critical for stable states of consciousness and metabolic health. However, neuron-ablation studies often reveal more severe phenotypes, suggesting key roles for co-expressed transmitters. Indeed, most hypothalamic neurons, including hcrt/orx cells, contain fast transmitters glutamate and GABA, as well as several neuropeptides. What are the roles and relations between different transmitters expressed by the same neuron? Here, we consider signaling codes for releasing different transmitters in relation to transmitter and receptor diversity in behaviorally-defined, widely-projecting peptidergic neurons, such as hcrt/orx cells. We then discuss latest optogenetic studies of endogenous transmitter release from defined sets of axons in situ, which suggest that recently-characterized vital peptidergic neurons (e.g. hcrt/orx, proopiomelanocortin , and agouti-related peptide cells, as well as classical modulatory neurons (e.g. dopamine and acetylcholine cells, all use fast transmitters to control their postsynaptic targets. These optogenetic insights are complemented by recent observations of behavioral deficiencies caused by genetic ablation of fast transmission from specific neuropeptidergic and aminergic neurons. Powerful and fast (millisecond-scale GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling from neurons previously considered to be primarily modulatory raises new questions about the roles of slower co-transmitters they co-express.

  19. MRI of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyropoulou, Maria I. [University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Kiortsis, Dimitrios Nikiforos [University of Ioannina, Department of Physiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2005-11-01

    In childhood, the MR characteristics of the normal pituitary gland are well established. During the first 2 months of life the adenohypophysis demonstrates high signal. Pituitary gland height (PGH) decreases during the 1st year of life and then increases, reaching a plateau after puberty. The magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) increases in both sexes up to the age of 20 years. On dynamic contrast-enhanced studies, the posterior pituitary lobe enhances simultaneously with the straight sinus, and the adenohypophysis later, but within 30 s. In genetically determined dysfunctional states, the adenohypophysis may be normal, hypoplastic, or enlarged. Pituitary enlargement, observed in Prop 1 gene mutations, is characterized by a mass interposed between the anterior and posterior lobes. An ectopic posterior lobe (EPP), associated with a hypoplastic or absent pituitary stalk, may be observed in patients with hypopituitarism. Tumors of the hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) axis may be the origin of adenohypophyseal deficiencies. A small hypointense adenohypophysis is found in iron overload states and is often associated with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Absence of the posterior lobe bright signal, with or without a thick pituitary stalk or a mass at any site from the median eminence to the posterior pituitary lobe, may be found in diabetes insipidus. Hydrocephalus, suprasellar arachnoid cysts, hypothalamic hamartomas and craniopharyngiomas may result in central precocious puberty (CPP). Increased PGH in girls with idiopathic CPP is useful for its differential diagnosis from premature thelarche (PT). Pituitary adenomas, observed mainly in adolescents, present the same MR characteristics as those in adults. (orig.)

  20. Late gestational nutrient restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Nielsen, Mette Olaf; Nørgaard, Peder

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of 50% nutrient restriction during the last 6 weeks of gestation on twin-pregnant ewes' plasma glucose, non-esterified fatty acid, beta-hydroxybutyrate, insulin, IGF-1 and leptin concentrations and the effects on lamb birth weight and ewes' lactation performance. Plasma...... changes in feed intake and energy balance. It is concluded that severely reduced nutrient availability in late gestation affects fetal growth in utero and has a prolonged negative effect on lactation performance....

  1. Glucose Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Glucose Sensing is the eleventh volume in the popular series Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, edited by Drs. Chris D. Geddes and Joseph R. Lakowicz. This volume incorporates authoritative analytical fluorescence-based glucose sensing reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. Glucose Sensing is an essential reference for any lab working in the analytical fluorescence glucose sensing field. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of glucose sensing, and diabetes care & management, will find this volume an invaluable resource. Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy Volume 11, Glucose Sensing Chapters include: Implantable Sensors for Interstitial Fluid Smart Tattoo Glucose Sensors Optical Enzyme-based Glucose Biosensors Plasmonic Glucose Sens...

  2. Model of how plants sense zinc deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assuncao, Ana G.L.; Persson, Daniel Olof; Husted, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Plants are capable of inducing a range of physico-chemical and microbial modifications of the rhizosphere which can mobilize mineral nutrients or prevent toxic elements from entering the roots. Understanding how plants sense and adapt to variations in nutrient availability is essential in order...... to develop plant-based solutions addressing nutrient-use-efficiency and adaptation to nutrient-limited or -toxic soils. Recently two transcription factors of the bZIP family (basic-region leucine zipper) have been identified in Arabidopsis and shown to be pivotal in the adaptation response to zinc deficiency....... They represent not only the first regulators of zinc homeostasis identified in plants, but also a very promising starting-point that can provide new insights into the molecular basis of how plants sense and adapt to the stress of zinc deficiency. Considering the available information thus far we propose...

  3. Nutrient synchrony in preruminant calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borne, van den J.J.G.C.

    2006-01-01

    In animal nutrition, the nutrient composition of the daily feed supply is composed to match the nutrient requirements for the desired performance. The time of nutrient availability within a day is usually considered not to affect the fate of nutrients. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate effects

  4. Nutrient acquisition by mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederweis, Michael

    2008-03-01

    The growth and nutritional requirements of mycobacteria have been intensively studied since the discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis more than a century ago. However, the identity of many transporters for essential nutrients of M. tuberculosis and other mycobacteria is still unknown despite a wealth of genomic data and the availability of sophisticated genetic tools. Recently, considerable progress has been made in recognizing that two lipid permeability barriers have to be overcome in order for a nutrient molecule to reach the cytoplasm of mycobacteria. Uptake processes are discussed by comparing M. tuberculosis with Mycobacterium smegmatis. For example, M. tuberculosis has only five recognizable carbohydrate transporters in the inner membrane, while M. smegmatis has 28 such transporters at its disposal. The specificities of inner-membrane transporters for sulfate, phosphate and some amino acids have been determined. Outer-membrane channel proteins in both organisms are thought to contribute to nutrient uptake. In particular, the Msp porins have been shown to be required for uptake of carbohydrates, amino acids and phosphate by M. smegmatis. The set of porins also appears to be different for M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis. These differences likely reflect the lifestyles of these mycobacteria and the availability of nutrients in their natural habitats: the soil and the human body. The comprehensive identification and the biochemical and structural characterization of the nutrient transporters of M. tuberculosis will not only promote our understanding of the physiology of this important human pathogen, but might also be exploited to improve tuberculosis chemotherapy.

  5. Pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of hypothalamic obesity in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja Hye Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus plays a key role in the regulation of body weight by balancing the intake of food, energy expenditure, and body fat stores, as evidenced by the fact that most monogenic syndromes of morbid obesity result from mutations in genes expressed in the hypothalamus. Hypothalamic obesity is a result of impairment in the hypothalamic regulatory centers of body weight and energy expenditure, and is caused by structural damage to the hypothalamus, radiotherapy, Prader-Willi syndrome, and mutations in the LEP, LEPR, POMC, MC4R and CART genes. The pathophysiology includes loss of sensitivity to afferent peripheral humoral signals, such as leptin, dysregulated insulin secretion, and impaired activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Dysregulation of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 activity and melatonin may also have a role in the development of hypothalamic obesity. Intervention of this complex entity requires simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms that are deranged in patients with hypothalamic obesity. Despite a great deal of theoretical understanding, effective treatment for hypothalamic obesity has not yet been developed. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that control food intake and energy homeostasis and pathophysiology of hypothalamic obesity can be the cornerstone of the development of new treatments options. Early identification of patients at-risk can relieve the severity of weight gain by the provision of dietary and behavioral modification, and antiobesity medication. This review summarizes recent advances of the pathophysiology, endocrine characteristics, and treatment strategies of hypothalamic obesity.

  6. Hypothalamic stem cells control ageing speed partly through exosomal miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yalin; Kim, Min Soo; Jia, Baosen; Yan, Jingqi; Zuniga-Hertz, Juan Pablo; Han, Cheng; Cai, Dongsheng

    2017-08-03

    It has been proposed that the hypothalamus helps to control ageing, but the mechanisms responsible remain unclear. Here we develop several mouse models in which hypothalamic stem/progenitor cells that co-express Sox2 and Bmi1 are ablated, as we observed that ageing in mice started with a substantial loss of these hypothalamic cells. Each mouse model consistently displayed acceleration of ageing-like physiological changes or a shortened lifespan. Conversely, ageing retardation and lifespan extension were achieved in mid-aged mice that were locally implanted with healthy hypothalamic stem/progenitor cells that had been genetically engineered to survive in the ageing-related hypothalamic inflammatory microenvironment. Mechanistically, hypothalamic stem/progenitor cells contributed greatly to exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs) in the cerebrospinal fluid, and these exosomal miRNAs declined during ageing, whereas central treatment with healthy hypothalamic stem/progenitor cell-secreted exosomes led to the slowing of ageing. In conclusion, ageing speed is substantially controlled by hypothalamic stem cells, partially through the release of exosomal miRNAs.

  7. Hypothalamic Dysfunction and Multiple Sclerosis: Implications for Fatigue and Weight Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burfeind, Kevin G; Yadav, Vijayshree; Marks, Daniel L

    2016-11-01

    Signs and symptoms of multiple sclerosis are usually attributed to demyelinating lesions in the spinal cord or cerebral cortex. The hypothalamus is a region that is often overlooked yet controls many important homeostatic functions, including those that are perturbed in multiple sclerosis. In this review we discuss how hypothalamic dysfunction may contribute to signs and symptoms in people with multiple sclerosis. While dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is common in multiple sclerosis, the effects and mechanisms of this dysfunction are not well understood. We discuss three hypothalamic mechanisms of fatigue in multiple sclerosis: (1) general hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hyperactivity, (2) disordered orexin neurotransmission, (3) abnormal cortisol secretion. We then review potential mechanisms of weight dysregulation caused by hypothalamic dysfunction. Lastly, we propose future studies and therapeutics to better understand and treat hypothalamic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. Hypothalamic dysfunction appears to be common in multiple sclerosis, yet current studies are underpowered and contradictory. Future studies should contain larger sample sizes and standardize hormone and neuropeptide measurements.

  8. Pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of hypothalamic obesity in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ja Hye; Choi, Jin-Ho

    2013-12-01

    The hypothalamus plays a key role in the regulation of body weight by balancing the intake of food, energy expenditure, and body fat stores, as evidenced by the fact that most monogenic syndromes of morbid obesity result from mutations in genes expressed in the hypothalamus. Hypothalamic obesity is a result of impairment in the hypothalamic regulatory centers of body weight and energy expenditure, and is caused by structural damage to the hypothalamus, radiotherapy, Prader-Willi syndrome, and mutations in the LEP, LEPR, POMC, MC4R and CART genes. The pathophysiology includes loss of sensitivity to afferent peripheral humoral signals, such as leptin, dysregulated insulin secretion, and impaired activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Dysregulation of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 activity and melatonin may also have a role in the development of hypothalamic obesity. Intervention of this complex entity requires simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms that are deranged in patients with hypothalamic obesity. Despite a great deal of theoretical understanding, effective treatment for hypothalamic obesity has not yet been developed. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that control food intake and energy homeostasis and pathophysiology of hypothalamic obesity can be the cornerstone of the development of new treatments options. Early identification of patients at-risk can relieve the severity of weight gain by the provision of dietary and behavioral modification, and antiobesity medication. This review summarizes recent advances of the pathophysiology, endocrine characteristics, and treatment strategies of hypothalamic obesity.

  9. The TRH neuron: a hypothalamic integrator of energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechan, Ronald M; Fekete, Csaba

    2006-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) has an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis not only through effects on thyroid function orchestrated through hypophysiotropic neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), but also through central effects on feeding behavior, thermogenesis, locomotor activation and autonomic regulation. Hypophysiotropic TRH neurons are located in the medial and periventricular parvocellular subdivisions of the PVN and receive direct monosynaptic projections from two, separate, populations of leptin-responsive neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus containing either alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), peptides that promote weight loss and increase energy expenditure, or neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related protein (AGRP), peptides that promote weight gain and reduce energy expenditure. During fasting, the reduction in TRH mRNA in hypophysiotropic neurons mediated by suppression of alpha-MSH/CART simultaneously with an increase in NPY/AGRP gene expression in arcuate nucleus neurons contributes to the fall in circulating thyroid hormone levels, presumably by increasing the sensitivity of the TRH gene to negative feedback inhibition by thyroid hormone. Endotoxin administration, however, has the paradoxical effect of increasing circulating levels of leptin and melanocortin signaling and CART gene expression in arcuate nucleus neurons, but inhibiting TRH gene expression in hypophysiotropic neurons. This may be explained by an overriding inhibitory effect of endotoxin to increase type 2 iodothyroine deiodinase (D2) in a population of specialized glial cells, tanycytes, located in the base and infralateral walls of the third ventricle. By increasing the conversion of T4 into T3, tanycytes may increase local tissue concenetrations of thyroid hormone, and thereby induce a state of local tissue hyperthyroidism in the region of hypophysisotrophic

  10. Effects of neonatal programming on hypothalamic mechanisms controlling energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, C; Novelle, M G; Leis, R; Diéguez, C; Skrede, S; López, M

    2013-12-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity in most developed countries has markedly increased during the last decades. In addition to genetic, hormonal, and metabolic influences, environmental factors like fetal and neonatal nutrition play key roles in the development of obesity. Interestingly, overweight during critical developmental periods of fetal and/or neonatal life has been demonstrated to increase the risk of obesity throughout juvenile life into adulthood. In spite of this evidence, the specific mechanisms underlying this fetal/neonatal programming are not perfectly understood. However, it is clear that circulating hormones such as insulin and leptin play a critical role in the development and programming of hypothalamic circuits regulating energy balance. Here, we review what is currently known about the impact of perinatal malnutrition on the mechanisms regulating body weight homeostasis. Understanding these molecular mechanisms may provide new targets for the treatment of obesity. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. The hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory system in developing rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Farina Lipari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies concerning the development of the magnocellular system are scarce and discordant in literature. We carried out an immunohistochemical study on supraotic and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei using antivasopressin and antioxytocin antibodies in developing rats between the 15th day of intrauterine life and the 6th day of postnatal life. In addition, we performed RT-PCR experiments to establish the stage at which these hormones appear and neurosecretory activity commences. The results showed that supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei appear, respectively, on the 16th and the 18th day of intrauterine life and both immediately synthetize vasopressin neurohormone. By contrast, synthesis of oxytocin takes place from the 2nd day after birth. Probably, these nuclei synthetize oxytocin in conjunction with the decline of placental maternal oxytocin.

  12. The Minimal Model of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank; Andersen, Morten; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2011-01-01

    This paper concerns ODE modeling of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenalaxis (HPA axis) using an analytical and numerical approach, combined with biological knowledge regarding physiological mechanisms and parameters. The three hormones, CRH, ACTH, and cortisol, which interact in the HPA axis are m...... thereof. The second part of the paper concerns a specific realization of the minimal model in which feedback functions are built explicitly using receptor dynamics. Using physiologically reasonable parameter values, along with the results of the general case, it is demonstrated that un......-physiological values of the parameters are needed in order to achieve local instability of the fixed point. Small changes inphysiologically relevant parameters cause the system to be globally stable using the analytical criteria. All simulations show a globally stable fixed point, ruling out periodic solutions even...

  13. HYPOTHALAMIC HAMARTOMA REPORT OF ONE CASE TO PRECOCIOUS PUBERTY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Massetta

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The Hypothalamic Hamartomas (HH are masses with low frequency of appearance that usually appear in nodes united to Tuber Cinereum or to the Mamillary Bodies. Since the development of the computerized tomography, hipotalamic hamartoma is considered as one of the the most common cause of precocious puberty, representing the 16% of the subjects in girls and up to 50% in boys. Despite the studies, little it is known about hipotalamic hamartoma natural history. It is considered of interest to present the case of a6 year old child, Patricia, who was diagnosed with (HH that induced precocious puberty ; reviewing part of the clinical manifestations followed by the realised evaluation as well as the therapeutic strategy and its results after a year from the initial diagnosis.

  14. Hypothalamic obesity after craniopharyngioma: mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Lustig

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a common complication after craniopharyngioma therapy, occurring in up to 75% of survivors. Its weight gain is unlike that of normal obesity, in that it occurs even with caloric restriction, and attempts at lifestyle modification are useless to prevent or treat the obesity. The pathogenesis of this condition involves the inability to transduce afferent hormonal signals of adiposity, in effect mimicking a state of CNS starvation. Efferent sympathetic activity drops, resulting in malaise and reduced energy expenditure, and vagal activity increases, resulting in increased insulin secretion and adipogenesis. Lifestyle intervention is essentially useless in this syndrome, termed hypothalamic obesity. Pharmacologic treatment is also difficult, consisting of adrenergics to mimic sympathetic activity, or suppression of insulin secretion with octreotide, or both. Recently, bariatric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic gastric banding, truncal vagotomy have also been attempted with variable results. Early and intensive management is required to mitigate the obesity and its negative consequences.

  15. Genetic Approaches to Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Melinda G; Muglia, Lisa M; Laryea, Gloria; Muglia, Louis J

    2016-01-01

    The normal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and resultant glucocorticoid (GC) secretion, is essential for human health. Disruption of GC regulation is associated with pathologic, psychological, and physiological disease states such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, hypertension, diabetes, and osteopenia, among others. As such, understanding the mechanisms by which HPA output is tightly regulated in its responses to environmental stressors and circadian cues has been an active area of investigation for decades. Over the last 20 years, however, advances in gene targeting and genome modification in rodent models have allowed the detailed dissection of roles for key molecular mediators and brain regions responsible for this control in vivo to emerge. Here, we summarize work done to elucidate the function of critical neuropeptide systems, GC-signaling targets, and inflammation-associated pathways in HPA axis regulation and behavior, and highlight areas for future investigation. PMID:26189452

  16. Bilateral descending hypothalamic projections to the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Khaled; Artola, Alain; Monconduit, Lénaic; Dallel, Radhouane; Luccarini, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the hypothalamus is involved in trigeminal pain processing. However, the organization of descending hypothalamic projections to the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis (Sp5C) remains poorly understood. Microinjections of the retrograde tracer, fluorogold (FG), into the Sp5C, in rats, reveal that five hypothalamic nuclei project to the Sp5C: the paraventricular nucleus, the lateral hypothalamic area, the perifornical hypothalamic area, the A11 nucleus and the retrochiasmatic area. Descending hypothalamic projections to the Sp5C are bilateral, except those from the paraventricular nucleus which exhibit a clear ipsilateral predominance. Moreover, the density of retrogradely FG-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus varies according to the dorso-ventral localization of the Sp5C injection site. There are much more labeled neurons after injections into the ventrolateral part of the Sp5C (where ophthalmic afferents project) than after injections into its dorsomedial or intermediate parts (where mandibular and maxillary afferents, respectively, project). These results demonstrate that the organization of descending hypothalamic projections to the spinal dorsal horn and Sp5C are different. Whereas the former are ipsilateral, the latter are bilateral. Moreover, hypothalamic projections to the Sp5C display somatotopy, suggesting that these projections are preferentially involved in the processing of meningeal and cutaneous inputs from the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve in rats. Therefore, our results suggest that the control of trigeminal and spinal dorsal horn processing of nociceptive information by hypothalamic neurons is different and raise the question of the role of bilateral, rather than unilateral, hypothalamic control.

  17. Endoscopic resection of hypothalamic hamartomas for refractory symptomatic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Y-T; Rekate, H L; Prenger, E C; Wang, N C; Chung, S S; Feiz-Erfan, I; Johnsonbaugh, R E; Varland, M R; Kerrigan, J F

    2008-04-22

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs), rare developmental abnormalities of the inferior hypothalamus, often cause refractory, symptomatic, mixed epilepsy, including gelastic seizures. We present 37 patients with HH who underwent transcortical transventricular endoscopic resection. Between October 2003 and April 2005, 42 consecutive patients with refractory epilepsy who underwent endoscopic resection of HH were studied prospectively. The endoscope was held by an articulated pneumatic arm and tracked with a frameless stereotactic neuronavigation system. Data collection and follow-up were performed by personal interview. Five patients were excluded. The remaining 37 patients (22 males, 15 females; median age 11.8 years; range 8 months to 55 years) had frequent and usually multiple types of seizures. Postoperative MRI confirmed 100% resection of the HH from the hypothalamus in 12 patients. At last follow-up (median 21 months; range 13-28 months), 18 (48.6%) patients were seizure free. Seizures were reduced more than 90% in 26 patients (70.3%) and by 50% to 90% in 8 patients (21.6%). Overall, the mean postoperative stay was shorter in the endoscopic patients compared with our previously reported patients who underwent transcallosal resection (mean 4.1 days vs 7.7 days, respectively; p = 0.0006). The main complications were permanent short-term memory loss in 3 patients and small thalamic infarcts in 11 patients (asymptomatic in 9). Endoscopic resection of hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) is a safe and effective treatment for seizures. Its efficacy seems to be comparable to that of transcallosal resection of HH, but postoperative recovery time is significantly shorter.

  18. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axes: sex differences in regulation of stress responsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyola, Mario G; Handa, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    Gonadal hormones play a key role in the establishment, activation, and regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. By influencing the response and sensitivity to releasing factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, gonadal steroids help orchestrate the gain of the HPA axis to fine-tune the levels of stress hormones in the general circulation. From early life to adulthood, gonadal steroids can differentially affect the HPA axis, resulting in sex differences in the responsivity of this axis. The HPA axis influences many physiological functions making an organism's response to changes in the environment appropriate for its reproductive status. Although the acute HPA response to stressors is a beneficial response, constant activation of this circuitry by chronic or traumatic stressful episodes may lead to a dysregulation of the HPA axis and cause pathology. Compared to males, female mice and rats show a more robust HPA axis response, as a result of circulating estradiol levels which elevate stress hormone levels during non-threatening situations, and during and after stressors. Fluctuating levels of gonadal steroids in females across the estrous cycle are a major factor contributing to sex differences in the robustness of HPA activity in females compared to males. Moreover, gonadal steroids may also contribute to epigenetic and organizational influences on the HPA axis even before puberty. Correspondingly, crosstalk between the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and HPA axes could lead to abnormalities of stress responses. In humans, a dysregulated stress response is one of the most common symptoms seen across many neuropsychiatric disorders, and as a result, such interactions may exacerbate peripheral pathologies. In this review, we discuss the HPA and HPG axes and review how gonadal steroids interact with the HPA axis to regulate the stress circuitry during all stages in life.

  19. Evidence for involvement of a limbic paraventricular hypothalamic inhibitory network in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis adaptations to repeated stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radley, Jason J; Sawchenko, Paul E

    2015-12-15

    Emotional stressors activate a stereotyped set of limbic forebrain cell groups implicated in constraining stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation by inhibiting hypophysiotropic neurons in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH). We previously identified a circumscribed, anterior part of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (aBST) that houses stress-sensitive, PVH-projecting, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic neurons as representing a site of convergence of stress-inhibitory influences originating from medial prefrontal and hippocampal cortices. Here we investigate whether exaggerated HPA axis responses associated with chronic variable stress (CVS; daily exposure to different stressors at unpredictable times over 14 days, followed by restraint stress on day 15) and diminished HPA output seen following repeated (14 days) restraint-stress exposure are associated with differential engagement of the limbic modulatory network. Relative to acutely restrained rats, animals subjected to CVS showed the expected increase (sensitization) in HPA responses and diminished levels of activation (Fos) of GABAergic neurons and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) mRNA expression in the aBST. By contrast, repeated restraint stress produced habituation in HPA responses, maintained levels of activation of GABAergic neurons, and increased GAD expression in the aBST. aBST-projecting neurons in limbic sites implicated in HPA axis inhibition tended to show diminished activational responses in both repeated-stress paradigms, with the exception of the paraventricular thalamic nucleus, in which responsiveness was maintained in repeatedly restrained animals. The results are consistent with the view that differential engagement of HPA inhibitory mechanisms in the aBST may contribute to alterations in HPA axis responses to emotional stress in sensitization and habituation paradigms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. HPG-axis hormones during puberty: A study on the association with hypothalamic and pituitary volumes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peper, J.S.; Brouwer, R.M.; van Leeuwen, M.; Schnack, H.G.; Boomsma, D.I.; Kahn, R.S.; Hulshoff-Poll, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: During puberty, the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is activated, leading to increases in luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and sex steroids (testosterone and estradiol) levels. We aimed to study the association between hypothalamic and pituitary

  1. HPG-axis hormones during puberty : A study on the association with hypothalamic and pituitary volumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peper, Jiska S.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; van Leeuwen, Marieke; Schnack, Hugo G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Kahn, Rene S.; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff

    Objective: During puberty, the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is activated, leading to increases in luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and sex steroids (testosterone and estradiol) levels. We aimed to study the association between hypothalamic and pituitary

  2. Inhibition of hypothalamic Foxo1 expression reduced food intake in diet-induced obesity rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eduardo R. Ropelle; José R. Pauli; Patrícia Prada; Dennys E. Cintra; Guilherme Z. Rocha; Juliana C. Moraes; Marisa J. S. Frederico; Gabrielle da Luz; Ricardo A. Pinho; José B. C. Carvalheira; Licio A. Velloso; Mario A. Saad; Cláudio T. De Souza

    2009-01-01

    ... in insulin resistance and obesity remains unclear. Here, we identify that a high-fat diet impaired insulin-induced hypothalamic Foxo1 phosphorylation and degradation, increasing the nuclear Foxo1 activity and hyperphagic response in rats...

  3. Neonatal GLP1R activation limits adult adiposity by durably altering hypothalamic architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea V. Rozo

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: These observations suggest that the acute activation of GLP1R in neonates durably alters hypothalamic architecture to limit adult weight gain and adiposity, identifying GLP1R as a therapeutic target for obesity prevention.

  4. Effects of intranasal insulin application on the hypothalamic BOLD response to glucose ingestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opstal, Anna M van; Akintola, Abimbola A; Elst, Marjan van der

    2017-01-01

    . In this study, we assessed whether intranasal insulin can be used to enhance neuronal hypothalamic responses to glucose ingestion. In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled 4-double cross-over experiment, hypothalamic activation was measured in young non- diabetic subjects by determining blood......The hypothalamus is a crucial structure in the brain that responds to metabolic cues and regulates energy homeostasis. Patients with type 2 diabetes demonstrate a lack of hypothalamic neuronal response after glucose ingestion, which is suggested to be an underlying cause of the disease......-oxygen-level dependent MRI signals over 30 minutes before and after ingestion of 75 g glucose dissolved in 300 ml water, under intranasal insulin or placebo condition. Glucose ingestion under placebo condition lead to an average 1.4% hypothalamic BOLD decrease, under insulin condition the average response to glucose...

  5. Inhibition of hypothalamic Foxo1 expression reduced food intake in diet-induced obesity rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eduardo R. Ropelle; José R. Pauli; Patrícia Prada; Dennys E. Cintra; Guilherme Z. Rocha; Juliana C. Moraes; Marisa J. S. Frederico; Gabrielle da Luz; Ricardo A. Pinho; José B. C. Carvalheira; Licio A. Velloso; Mario A. Saad; Cláudio T. De Souza

    2009-01-01

    .... Foxo1 stimulates the transcription of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y and Agouti-related protein through the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt signalling pathway, but the role of hypothalamic Foxo1...

  6. Neuropeptide Exocytosis Involving Synaptotagmin-4 and Oxytocin in Hypothalamic Programming of Body Weight and Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo; Bai, Hua; Zhang, Hai; Dean, Camin; Wu, Qiang; Li, Juxue; Guariglia, Sara; Meng, Qingyuan; Cai, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic neuropeptides play essential roles in regulating energy and body weight balance. Energy imbalance and obesity have been linked to hypothalamic signaling defects in regulating neuropeptide genes; however, it is unknown whether dysregulation of neuropeptide exocytosis could be critically involved. This study discovered that synaptotagmin-4, an atypical modulator of synaptic exocytosis, is expressed most abundantly in oxytocin neurons of the hypothalamus. Synaptotagmin-4 negatively regulates oxytocin exocytosis, and dietary obesity is associated with increased vesicle binding of synaptotagmin-4 and thus enhanced negative regulation of oxytocin release. Overexpressing synaptotagmin-4 in hypothalamic oxytocin neurons and centrally antagonizing oxytocin in mice are similarly obesogenic. Synaptotagmin-4 inhibition prevents against dietary obesity by normalizing oxytocin release and energy balance under chronic nutritional excess. In conclusion, the negative regulation of synaptotagmin-4 on oxytocin release represents a hypothalamic basis of neuropeptide exocytosis in controlling obesity and related diseases. PMID:21315262

  7. Modification of Social Memory, Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis, and Brain Asymmetry by Neonatal Novelty Exposure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tang, Akaysha C; Reeb, Bethany C; Romeo, Russell D; McEwen, Bruce S

    2003-01-01

    .... Using neonatal novelty exposure, a brief and transient early life stimulation method known to produce long-lasting changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, we found that social recognition...

  8. Effects of intranasal insulin application on the hypothalamic BOLD response to glucose ingestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Opstal, Anna M.; Akintola, Abimbola A.; Elst, Marjan van der

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a crucial structure in the brain that responds to metabolic cues and regulates energy homeostasis. Patients with type 2 diabetes demonstrate a lack of hypothalamic neuronal response after glucose ingestion, which is suggested to be an underlying cause of the disease....... In this study, we assessed whether intranasal insulin can be used to enhance neuronal hypothalamic responses to glucose ingestion. In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled 4-double cross-over experiment, hypothalamic activation was measured in young non- diabetic subjects by determining blood......-oxygen-level dependent MRI signals over 30 minutes before and after ingestion of 75 g glucose dissolved in 300 ml water, under intranasal insulin or placebo condition. Glucose ingestion under placebo condition lead to an average 1.4% hypothalamic BOLD decrease, under insulin condition the average response to glucose...

  9. Sense and non-sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boezer, Gordon L.; Hines, Charles W.; Balko, Bohdan

    2002-07-01

    There exists a broad and going range of combinations of sensing technologies, targets, applications and possessors. Threats derived from such combinations are unbounded by the cultural processes and moral expectations of the US or of other companion societies. The need to sense various phenomena in the face of these realities is astoundingly broad and diverse. Fortunately, the potential combinations of sensing technologies, computational power and adaptability of national security officials can be tailored to meet these challenges. Threat possibilities will drive national security community members toward new paradigms.

  10. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27144291

  11. Differentiation of hypothalamic-like neurons from human pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liheng; Meece, Kana; Damian J Williams; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Zimmer, Matthew; Heinrich, Garrett; Martin Carli, Jayne; LeDuc, Charles A.; Sun, Lei; Zeltser, Lori M.; Freeby, Matthew; Goland, Robin; Stephen H. Tsang; Wardlaw, Sharon L.; Egli, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is the central regulator of systemic energy homeostasis, and its dysfunction can result in extreme body weight alterations. Insights into the complex cellular physiology of this region are critical to the understanding of obesity pathogenesis; however, human hypothalamic cells are largely inaccessible for direct study. Here, we developed a protocol for efficient generation of hypothalamic neurons from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs...

  12. Proliferative Hypothalamic Neurospheres Express NPY, AGRP, POMC, CART and Orexin-A and Differentiate to Functional Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; Álvaro, Ana Rita; Aveleira, Célia; Santana, Magda; Brandão, Inês; Kügler, Sebastian; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2011-01-01

    Some pathological conditions with feeding pattern alterations, including obesity and Huntington disease (HD) are associated with hypothalamic dysfunction and neuronal cell death. Additionally, the hypothalamus is a neurogenic region with the constitutive capacity to generate new cells of neuronal lineage, in adult rodents. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the expression of feeding-related neuropeptides in hypothalamic progenitor cells and their capacity to differentiate to functional neurons which have been described to be affected by hypothalamic dysfunction. Our study shows that hypothalamic progenitor cells from rat embryos grow as floating neurospheres and express the feeding-related neuropeptides Neuropeptide Y (NPY), Agouti-related Protein (AGRP), Pro-OpioMelanocortin (POMC), Cocaine-and-Amphetamine Responsive Transcript (CART) and Orexin-A/Hypocretin-1. Moreover the relative mRNA expression of NPY and POMC increases during the expansion of hypothalamic neurospheres in proliferative conditions. Mature neurons were obtained from the differentiation of hypothalamic progenitor cells including NPY, AGRP, POMC, CART and Orexin-A positive neurons. Furthermore the relative mRNA expression of NPY, CART and Orexin-A increases after the differentiation of hypothalamic neurospheres. Similarly to the adult hypothalamic neurons the neurospheres-derived neurons express the glutamate transporter EAAT3. The orexigenic and anorexigenic phenotype of these neurons was identified by functional response to ghrelin and leptin hormones, respectively. This work demonstrates the presence of appetite-related neuropeptides in hypothalamic progenitor cells and neurons obtained from the differentiation of hypothalamic neurospheres, including the neuronal phenotypes that have been described by others as being affected by hypothalamic neurodegeneration. These in vitro models can be used to study hypothalamic progenitor cells aiming a therapeutic intervention to mitigate feeding

  13. Proliferative hypothalamic neurospheres express NPY, AGRP, POMC, CART and Orexin-A and differentiate to functional neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Sousa-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Some pathological conditions with feeding pattern alterations, including obesity and Huntington disease (HD are associated with hypothalamic dysfunction and neuronal cell death. Additionally, the hypothalamus is a neurogenic region with the constitutive capacity to generate new cells of neuronal lineage, in adult rodents. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the expression of feeding-related neuropeptides in hypothalamic progenitor cells and their capacity to differentiate to functional neurons which have been described to be affected by hypothalamic dysfunction. Our study shows that hypothalamic progenitor cells from rat embryos grow as floating neurospheres and express the feeding-related neuropeptides Neuropeptide Y (NPY, Agouti-related Protein (AGRP, Pro-OpioMelanocortin (POMC, Cocaine-and-Amphetamine Responsive Transcript (CART and Orexin-A/Hypocretin-1. Moreover the relative mRNA expression of NPY and POMC increases during the expansion of hypothalamic neurospheres in proliferative conditions.Mature neurons were obtained from the differentiation of hypothalamic progenitor cells including NPY, AGRP, POMC, CART and Orexin-A positive neurons. Furthermore the relative mRNA expression of NPY, CART and Orexin-A increases after the differentiation of hypothalamic neurospheres. Similarly to the adult hypothalamic neurons the neurospheres-derived neurons express the glutamate transporter EAAT3. The orexigenic and anorexigenic phenotype of these neurons was identified by functional response to ghrelin and leptin hormones, respectively. This work demonstrates the presence of appetite-related neuropeptides in hypothalamic progenitor cells and neurons obtained from the differentiation of hypothalamic neurospheres, including the neuronal phenotypes that have been described by others as being affected by hypothalamic neurodegeneration. These in vitro models can be used to study hypothalamic progenitor cells aiming a therapeutic intervention to

  14. Increasing fatty acid oxidation remodels the hypothalamic neurometabolome to mitigate stress and inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph W McFadden

    Full Text Available Modification of hypothalamic fatty acid (FA metabolism can improve energy homeostasis and prevent hyperphagia and excessive weight gain in diet-induced obesity (DIO from a diet high in saturated fatty acids. We have shown previously that C75, a stimulator of carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1 and fatty acid oxidation (FAOx, exerts at least some of its hypophagic effects via neuronal mechanisms in the hypothalamus. In the present work, we characterized the effects of C75 and another anorexigenic compound, the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT inhibitor FSG67, on FA metabolism, metabolomics profiles, and metabolic stress responses in cultured hypothalamic neurons and hypothalamic neuronal cell lines during lipid excess with palmitate. Both compounds enhanced palmitate oxidation, increased ATP, and inactivated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in hypothalamic neurons in vitro. Lipidomics and untargeted metabolomics revealed that enhanced catabolism of FA decreased palmitate availability and prevented the production of fatty acylglycerols, ceramides, and cholesterol esters, lipids that are associated with lipotoxicity-provoked metabolic stress. This improved metabolic signature was accompanied by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and yet favorable changes in oxidative stress, overt ER stress, and inflammation. We propose that enhancing FAOx in hypothalamic neurons exposed to excess lipids promotes metabolic remodeling that reduces local inflammatory and cell stress responses. This shift would restore mitochondrial function such that increased FAOx can produce hypothalamic neuronal ATP and lead to decreased food intake and body weight to improve systemic metabolism.

  15. Gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. An update in the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Tellez-Zenteno

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available José F. Tellez-Zenteno1, Cesar Serrano-Almeida2, Farzad Moien-Afshari11Division of Neurology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Gelastic seizures are epileptic events characterized by bouts of laughter. Laughter-like vocalization is usually combined with facial contraction in the form of a smile. Autonomic features such as flushing, tachycardia, and altered respiration are widely recognized. Conscious state may not be impaired, although this is often difficult to asses particularly in young children. Gelastic seizures have been associated classically to hypothalamic hamartomas, although different extrahypothalamic localizations have been described. Hypothalamic hamartomas are rare congenital lesions presenting with the classic triad of gelastic epilepsy, precocious puberty and developmental delay. The clinical course of patients with gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas is progressive, commencing with gelastic seizures in infancy, deteriorating into more complex seizure disorder resulting in intractable epilepsy. Electrophysiological, radiological, and pathophysiological studies have confirmed the intrinsic epileptogenicity of the hypothalamic hamartoma. Currently the most effective surgical approach is the trancallosal anterior interforniceal approach, however newer approaches including the endoscopic and other treatment such as radiosurgery and gamma knife have been used with success. This review focuses on the syndrome of gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas, but it also reviews other concepts such as status gelasticus and some aspects of gelastic seizures in other locations.Keywords: epilepsy, gelastic seizures, epilepsy surgery, hypothalamic hamartoma, intractable epilepsy

  16. Role of Hypothalamic VGF in Energy Balance and Metabolic Adaption to Environmental Enrichment in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglesong, Grant D; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xianglan; Slater, Andrew M; Siu, Jason; Yildiz, Vedat; Salton, Stephen R J; Cao, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE), a housing condition providing complex physical, social, and cognitive stimulation, leads to improved metabolic health and resistance to diet-induced obesity and cancer. One underlying mechanism is the activation of the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis with hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as the key mediator. VGF, a peptide precursor particularly abundant in the hypothalamus, was up-regulated by EE. Overexpressing BDNF or acute injection of BDNF protein to the hypothalamus up-regulated VGF, whereas suppressing BDNF signaling down-regulated VGF expression. Moreover, hypothalamic VGF expression was regulated by leptin, melanocortin receptor agonist, and food deprivation mostly paralleled to BDNF expression. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer of Cre recombinase to floxed VGF mice specifically decreased VGF expression in the hypothalamus. In contrast to the lean and hypermetabolic phenotype of homozygous germline VGF knockout mice, specific knockdown of hypothalamic VGF in male adult mice led to increased adiposity, decreased core body temperature, reduced energy expenditure, and impaired glucose tolerance, as well as disturbance of molecular features of brown and white adipose tissues without effects on food intake. However, VGF knockdown failed to block the EE-induced BDNF up-regulation or decrease of adiposity indicating a minor role of VGF in the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis. Taken together, our results suggest hypothalamic VGF responds to environmental demands and plays an important role in energy balance and glycemic control likely acting in the melanocortin pathway downstream of BDNF.

  17. Protective effect of carbenoxolone on ER stress-induced cell death in hypothalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongwan; Jung, Eun Jung; Moon, Seong-Su; Seo, Minchul

    2015-12-25

    Hypothalamic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is known to be increased in obesity. Induction of ER stress on hypothalamic neurons has been reported to cause hypothalamic neuronal apoptosis and malfunction of energy balance, leading to obesity. Carbenoxolone is an 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) inhibitor that converts inactive glucocorticoid into an active form. In addition to its metabolic effect via enzyme inhibitory action, carbenoxolone has shown anti-apoptotic activity in several studies. In this study, the direct effects of carbenoxolone on ER stress and cell death in hypothalamic neurons were investigated. Carbenoxolone attenuated tunicamycin induced ER stress-mediated molecules such as spliced XBP1, ATF4, ATF6, CHOP, and ROS generation. In vivo study also revealed that carbenoxolone decreased tunicamycin-induced ER stress in the hypothalamus. In conclusion, the results of this study show that carbenoxolone has protective effects against tunicamycin induced-ER stress and apoptosis in hypothalamic neurons, suggesting its direct protective effects against obesity. Further study is warranted to clarify the effects of carbenoxolone on hypothalamic regulation of energy balance in obesity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Adrenalectomy stimulates hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin expression but does not correct diet-induced obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beasley Joe

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated glucocorticoid production and reduced hypothalamic POMC mRNA can cause obese phenotypes. Conversely, adrenalectomy can reverse obese phenotypes caused by the absence of leptin, a model in which glucocorticoid production is elevated. Adrenalectomy also increases hypothalamic POMC mRNA in leptin-deficient mice. However most forms of human obesity do not appear to entail elevated plasma glucocorticoids. It is therefore not clear if reducing glucocorticoid production would be useful to treat these forms of obesity. We hypothesized that adrenalectomy would increase hypothalamic POMC mRNA and reverse obese phenotypes in obesity due to a high-fat diet as it does in obesity due to leptin deficiency. Results Retired breeder male mice were placed on a high-fat diet or a low-fat diet for two weeks, then adrenalectomized or sham-adrenalectomized. The high-fat diet increased body weight, adiposity, and plasma leptin, led to impaired glucose tolerance, and slightly stimulated hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC expression. Adrenalectomy of mice on the high-fat diet significantly reduced plasma corticosterone and strikingly increased both pituitary and hypothalamic POMC mRNA, but failed to reduce body weight, adiposity or leptin, although slight improvements in glucose tolerance and metabolic rate were observed. Conclusion These data suggest that neither reduction of plasma glucocorticoid levels nor elevation of hypothalamic POMC expression is effective to significantly reverse diet-induced obesity.

  19. Hypothalamic Sirt1 regulates food intake in a rodent model system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işin Cakir

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Sirt1 is an evolutionarily conserved NAD(+ dependent deacetylase involved in a wide range of processes including cellular differentiation, apoptosis, as well as metabolism, and aging. In this study, we investigated the role of hypothalamic Sirt1 in energy balance. Pharmacological inhibition or siRNA mediated knock down of hypothalamic Sirt1 showed to decrease food intake and body weight gain. Central administration of a specific melanocortin antagonist, SHU9119, reversed the anorectic effect of hypothalamic Sirt1 inhibition, suggesting that Sirt1 regulates food intake through the central melanocortin signaling. We also showed that fasting increases hypothalamic Sirt1 expression and decreases FoxO1 (Forkhead transcription factor acetylation suggesting that Sirt1 regulates the central melanocortin system in a FoxO1 dependent manner. In addition, hypothalamic Sirt1 showed to regulate S6K signaling such that inhibition of the fasting induced Sirt1 activity results in up-regulation of the S6K pathway. Thus, this is the first study providing a novel role for the hypothalamic Sirt1 in the regulation of food intake and body weight. Given the role of Sirt1 in several peripheral tissues and hypothalamus, potential therapies centered on Sirt1 regulation might provide promising therapies in the treatment of metabolic diseases including obesity.

  20. Syndrome of alternating hypernatremia and hyponatremia after hypothalamic hamartoma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abla, Adib A; Wait, Scott D; Forbes, Jonathan A; Pati, Sandipan; Johnsonbaugh, Roger E; Kerrigan, John F; Ng, Yu-Tze

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the authors' goal was to describe the occurrence of alternating hypernatremia and hyponatremia in pediatric patients who underwent resection of hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) for epilepsy. Hypernatremia in patients after pituitary or hypothalamic surgery can be caused by diabetes insipidus (DI), whereas hyponatremia can occur due to a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone, cerebral salt wasting, or excessive administration of desmopressin (DDAVP). The triphasic response after surgery in the pituitary region can also explain variations in sodium parameters in such cases. One hundred fifty-three patients with HH who underwent surgery were enrolled in a prospective study to monitor outcomes. Of these, 4 patients (2.6%) were noted to experience dramatic alterations in serum sodium values. The medical records of these patients were identified and evaluated. Patients' ages at surgery ranged from 1.2 to 6.0 years. All patients were girls. Two patients had Delalande Type IV lesions (of 16 total Type IV lesions surgically treated) and 2 had Type III lesions (of 39 total Type III lesions). All patients had a history of gelastic seizures refractory to medication. Seizure frequency ranged from 3 to 300 per day. After surgery, all patients experienced hypernatremia and hyponatremia. The largest fluctuation in serum sodium concentration during hospitalization in a single patient was 53 mEq/L (range 123-176 mEq/L). The mean absolute difference in maximum and minimum sodium values was 38.2 mEq/L. All patients exhibited an initial period of immediate DI (independent of treatment) after surgery followed by a period of hyponatremia (independent of treatment), with a minimum value occurring between postoperative Days 5 and 8. All patients then returned to a hypernatremic state of DI, and 3 patients still require DDAVP for DI management. A second occurrence of hyponatremia lasting several days without DDAVP administration occurred in 2 patients during their

  1. Nutrients in the nexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Eric A.; Niphong, Rachel; Ferguson, Richard B.; Palm, Cheryl; Osmond, Deanna L.; Baron, Jill S.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic nitrogen (N) fertilizer has enabled modern agriculture to greatly improve human nutrition during the twentieth century, but it has also created unintended human health and environmental pollution challenges for the twenty-first century. Averaged globally, about half of the fertilizer-N applied to farms is removed with the crops, while the other half remains in the soil or is lost from farmers’ fields, resulting in water and air pollution. As human population continues to grow and food security improves in the developing world, the dual development goals of producing more nutritious food with low pollution will require both technological and socio-economic innovations in agriculture. Two case studies presented here, one in sub-Saharan Africa and the other in Midwestern United States, demonstrate how management of nutrients, water, and energy is inextricably linked in both small-scale and large-scale food production, and that science-based solutions to improve the efficiency of nutrient use can optimize food production while minimizing pollution. To achieve the needed large increases in nutrient use efficiency, however, technological developments must be accompanied by policies that recognize the complex economic and social factors affecting farmer decision-making and national policy priorities. Farmers need access to affordable nutrient supplies and support information, and the costs of improving efficiencies and avoiding pollution may need to be shared by society through innovative policies. Success will require interdisciplinary partnerships across public and private sectors, including farmers, private sector crop advisors, commodity supply chains, government agencies, university research and extension, and consumers.

  2. Programmed hyperphagia in offspring of obese dams: Altered expression of hypothalamic nutrient sensors, neurogenic factors and epigenetic modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mina; Han, Guang; Ross, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Maternal overnutrition results in programmed offspring obesity, mediated in part, by hyperphagia. This is remarkably similar to the effects of maternal undernutrition on offspring hyperphagia and obesity. In view of the marked differences in the energy environment of the over and under-nutrition exposures, we studied the expression of select epigenetic modifiers associated with energy imbalance including neurogenic factors and appetite/satiety neuropeptides which are indicative of neurogenic differentiation. HF offspring were exposed to maternal overnutrition (high fat diet; HF) during pregnancy and lactation. We determined the protein expression of energy sensors (mTOR, pAMPK), epigenetic factors (DNA methylase, DNMT1; histone deacetylase, SIRT1/HDAC1), neurogenic factors (Hes1, Mash1, Ngn3) and appetite/satiety neuropeptides (AgRP/POMC) in newborn hypothalamus and adult arcuate nucleus (ARC). Despite maternal obesity, male offspring born to obese dams had similar body weight at birth as Controls. However, when nursed by the same dams, male offspring of obese dams exhibited marked adiposity. At 1 day of age, HF newborn males had significantly decreased energy sensors, DNMT1 including Hes1 and Mash1, which may impact neuroprogenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. This is consistent with increased AgRP in HF newborns. At 6 months of age, HF adult males had significantly increased energy sensors and decreased histone deactylases. In addition, the persistent decreased Hes1, Mash1 as well as Ngn3 are consistent with increased AgRP and decreased POMC. Thus, altered energy sensors and epigenetic responses which modulate gene expression and adult neuronal differentiation may contribute to hyperphagia and obesity in HF male offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The effects of overnight nutrient intake on hypothalamic inflammation in a free-choice diet-induced obesity rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belegri, Evita; Eggels, Leslie; Unmehopa, Unga A; Mul, Joram D; Boelen, Anita; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2017-01-01

    Consumption of fat and sugar induces hyperphagia and increases the prevalence of obesity and diabetes type 2. Low-grade inflammation in the hypothalamus, a key brain area involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis is shown to blunt signals of satiety after long term high fat diet. The fact

  4. Bacteria, viruses, and hypothalamic inflammation: Potential new players in obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Wierucka-Rybak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Being overweight and obese has become an increasingly serious clinical and socioeconomic problem worldwide. The rapidly rising prevalence of obesity has prompted studies on modifiable, causative factors and novel treatment options for this disorder. Recent evidence indicates that excessive weight gain that leads to being overweight and obese may result from alterations in gut microflora. Studies in humans and animals demonstrated that the composition of gut microbiota may differ in lean and obese subjects, suggesting that these differences result in the increased efficiency of caloric extraction from food, enhanced lipogenesis, and impaired central and peripheral regulation of energy balance. Other studies revealed an excessive increase in body weight in a significant percentage of people infected with human adenoviruses SMAM-1 and Ad-36. Dysregulation of adipocyte function by viruses appears to be the most likely cause of excessive fat accumulation in these individuals. Studies on the pathomechanisms related to the pathogenesis of obesity indicated that a high-fat diet triggers the inflammatory response in the hypothalamus, an event that promotes weight gain and further defends elevated body weight through the initiation of central leptin and insulin resistance and impairment of regenerative capacity of hypothalamic neurons. Exposure to a high-calorie diet appears to predispose individuals to obesity not only because of excessive caloric intake but also because of the induction of microbiota- and central inflammatory response-dependent changes that lead to a dysregulation of energy balance.

  5. Hypothalamic Insulin Resistance in Obesity: Effects on Glucose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiyi; Balland, Eglantine; Cowley, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    The central link between obesity and type 2 diabetes is the development of insulin resistance. To date, it is still not clear whether hyperinsulinemia causes insulin resistance, which underlies the pathogenesis of obesity-associated type 2 diabetes, owing to the sophisticated regulatory mechanisms that exist in the periphery and in the brain. In recent years, accumulating evidence has demonstrated the existence of insulin resistance within the hypothalamus. In this review, we have integrated the recent discoveries surrounding both central and peripheral insulin resistance to provide a comprehensive overview of insulin resistance in obesity and the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. In particular, this review will discuss how hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia in obesity impair insulin sensitivity in tissues such as the liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and the brain. In addition, this review highlights insulin transport into the brain, signaling pathways associated with hypothalamic insulin receptor expression in the regulation of hepatic glucose production, and finally the perturbation of systemic glucose homeostasis as a consequence of central insulin resistance. We also suggest future approaches to overcome both central and peripheral insulin resistance to treat obesity and type 2 diabetes. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Dietary macronutrient composition affects hypothalamic appetite regulation in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConn, Betty R; Matias, Justin; Wang, Guoqing; Cline, Mark A; Gilbert, Elizabeth R

    2018-01-01

    The objective was to determine the effects of high-protein and high-fat diets, and fasting and refeeding, on appetite regulation in chicks. Day of hatch chicks were fed one of four diets: basal, high protein (25% crude protein), and 15 and 30% high fat (15 and 30% metabolizable energy derived from soybean oil, respectively), and assigned to one of three treatments at 4 days: (1) access to feed, (2) 3 hours of fasting, or (3) fasting followed by 1 hour of refeeding. The hypothalamus was collected, total RNA isolated, and mRNA abundance measured. Food intake was reduced in chicks fed the high-protein and high-fat diets. Agouti-related peptide, neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY receptors 1, 2, and 5, melanocortin receptors 3 and 4 (MC3R and 4R, respectively), mesotocin, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), and CRF receptor sub-type 2 (CRFR2) mRNAs were greatest in chicks that consumed the basal diet. Refeeding was associated with increased MC3R mRNA in the high-protein diet group. CRFR2 mRNA was increased by fasting and refeeding in chicks that consumed the high-protein diet. Food intake and hypothalamic gene expression of some important appetite-associated factors were reduced in chicks fed the high-protein or high-fat diets. Fasting and refeeding accentuated several differences and results suggest that the CRF and melanocortin pathways are involved.

  7. Hypothalamic hamartomas: optimal approach to clinical evaluation and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilfong, Angus A; Curry, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) present a difficult medical problem, manifested by gelastic seizures, which are often medically intractable. Although existing techniques offer modest surgical outcomes with the potential for significant morbidity, the relatively novel technique of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided stereotactic laser ablation (SLA) offers a potentially safer, minimally invasive method with high efficacy for the HH treatment. We report here on 14 patients with medically refractory gelastic epilepsy who underwent stereotactic frame-based placement of an MR-compatible laser catheter (1.6 mm diameter) through a 3.2-mm twist drill hole. A U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared laser surgery system (Visualase, Inc.) was utilized to ablate the HH, using real-time MRI thermometry. Seizure freedom was obtained in 12 (86%) of 14 cases, with mean follow-up of 9 months. There were no permanent surgical complications, neurologic deficits, or neuroendocrine disturbances. One patient had a minor subarachnoid hemorrhage that was asymptomatic. Most patients were discharged home within 1 day. SLA was demonstrated to be a safe and effective minimally invasive tool in the ablation of epileptogenic HH. Because use of SLA for HH is being adopted by other medical centers, further data will be acquired to help treat this difficult disorder. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Social behaviour shapes hypothalamic neural ensemble representations of conspecific sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedios, Ryan; Kennedy, Ann; Zelikowsky, Moriel; Grewe, Benjamin F.; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Anderson, David J.

    2017-10-01

    All animals possess a repertoire of innate (or instinctive) behaviours, which can be performed without training. Whether such behaviours are mediated by anatomically distinct and/or genetically specified neural pathways remains unknown. Here we report that neural representations within the mouse hypothalamus, that underlie innate social behaviours, are shaped by social experience. Oestrogen receptor 1-expressing (Esr1+) neurons in the ventrolateral subdivision of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHvl) control mating and fighting in rodents. We used microendoscopy to image Esr1+ neuronal activity in the VMHvl of male mice engaged in these social behaviours. In sexually and socially experienced adult males, divergent and characteristic neural ensembles represented male versus female conspecifics. However, in inexperienced adult males, male and female intruders activated overlapping neuronal populations. Sex-specific neuronal ensembles gradually separated as the mice acquired social and sexual experience. In mice permitted to investigate but not to mount or attack conspecifics, ensemble divergence did not occur. However, 30 minutes of sexual experience with a female was sufficient to promote the separation of male and female ensembles and to induce an attack response 24 h later. These observations uncover an unexpected social experience-dependent component to the formation of hypothalamic neural assemblies controlling innate social behaviours. More generally, they reveal plasticity and dynamic coding in an evolutionarily ancient deep subcortical structure that is traditionally viewed as a ‘hard-wired’ system.

  9. High-fat diet induces apoptosis of hypothalamic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana C Moraes

    Full Text Available Consumption of dietary fats is amongst the most important environmental factors leading to obesity. In rodents, the consumption of fat-rich diets blunts leptin and insulin anorexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus by a mechanism dependent on the in situ activation of inflammation. Since inflammatory signal transduction can lead to the activation of apoptotic signaling pathways, we evaluated the effect of high-fat feeding on the induction of apoptosis of hypothalamic cells. Here, we show that consumption of dietary fats induce apoptosis of neurons and a reduction of synaptic inputs in the arcuate nucleus and lateral hypothalamus. This effect is dependent upon diet composition, and not on caloric intake, since pair-feeding is not sufficient to reduce the expression of apoptotic markers. The presence of an intact TLR4 receptor, protects cells from further apoptotic signals. In diet-induced inflammation of the hypothalamus, TLR4 exerts a dual function, on one side activating pro-inflammatory pathways that play a central role in the development of resistance to leptin and insulin, and on the other side restraining further damage by controlling the apoptotic activity.

  10. Dopamine Autoreceptor Regulation of a Hypothalamic Dopaminergic Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanos Stagkourakis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available How autoreceptors contribute to maintaining a stable output of rhythmically active neuronal circuits is poorly understood. Here, we examine this issue in a dopamine population, spontaneously oscillating hypothalamic rat (TIDA neurons, that underlie neuroendocrine control of reproduction and neuroleptic side effects. Activation of dopamine receptors of the type 2 family (D2Rs at the cell-body level slowed TIDA oscillations through two mechanisms. First, they prolonged the depolarizing phase through a combination of presynaptic increases in inhibition and postsynaptic hyperpolarization. Second, they extended the discharge phase through presynaptic attenuation of calcium currents and decreased synaptic inhibition. Dopamine reuptake blockade similarly reconfigured the oscillation, indicating that ambient somatodendritic transmitter concentration determines electrical behavior. In the absence of D2R feedback, however, discharge was abolished by depolarization block. These results indicate the existence of an ultra-short feedback loop whereby neuroendocrine dopamine neurons tune network behavior to echoes of their own activity, reflected in ambient somatodendritic dopamine, and also suggest a mechanism for antipsychotic side effects.

  11. Hypothalamic eIF2α Signaling Regulates Food Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Catherine Maurin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The reversible phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α is a highly conserved signal implicated in the cellular adaptation to numerous stresses such as the one caused by amino acid limitation. In response to dietary amino acid deficiency, the brain-specific activation of the eIF2α kinase GCN2 leads to food intake inhibition. We report here that GCN2 is rapidly activated in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH after consumption of a leucine-deficient diet. Furthermore, knockdown of GCN2 in this particular area shows that MBH GCN2 activity controls the onset of the aversive response. Importantly, pharmacological experiments demonstrate that the sole phosphorylation of eIF2α in the MBH is sufficient to regulate food intake. eIF2α signaling being at the crossroad of stress pathways activated in several pathological states, our study indicates that hypothalamic eIF2α phosphorylation could play a critical role in the onset of anorexia associated with certain diseases.

  12. Effect of endurance training on hypothalamic serotonin concentration and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caperuto, E C; dos Santos, R V T; Mello, M T; Costa Rosa, L F B P

    2009-02-01

    1. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that modulates several functions, such as food intake, energy expenditure, motor activity, mood and sleep. Acute exhaustive endurance exercise increases the synthesis, concentration and metabolism of serotonin in the brain. This phenomenon could be responsible for central fatigue after prolonged and exhaustive exercise. However, the effect of chronic exhaustive training on serotonin is not known. The present study was conducted to examine the effect of exhaustive endurance training on performance and serotonin concentrations in the hypothalamus of trained rats. 2. Rats were divided into three groups: sedentary rats (SED), moderately trained rats (MOD) and exhaustively trained rats (EXT), with an increase of 200% in the load carried during the final week of training. 3. Hypothalamic serotonin concentrations were similar between the SED and MOD groups, but were higher in the EXT group (P MOD group (P < 0.05). 4. Thus, the present study demonstrates that exhaustive training increases serotonin concentrations in the hypothalamus, together with decreased endurance performance after inadequate recovery time. However, the mechanism underlying these changes remains unknown.

  13. Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and prolactin abnormalities in suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Serafini, Gianluca; Palermo, Mario; Seretti, Maria Elena; Stefani, Henry; Angeletti, Gloria; Lester, David; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity measured with the dexamethasone suppression test and the dexamethesone/CRH test may have some predictive power for suicidal behavior in patients with mood disorders. Increased prolactin (PRL) levels may be related both to physiological and pathological conditions. HPA-axis abnormalities and increased levels of PRL may coexist, and common neuroendocrine changes may activate both HPA axis and PRL release. HPA-axis hyperactivity is presumably present in a large subpopulation of depressed subjects. Suicidal behavior is considered to be a form of inward-directed aggression, and aggressive behavior has been connected to high androgen levels. However, lower plasma total testosterone levels have also been reported in subjects with depression and higher suicidality. Lipid/immune dysregulations, the increased ratio of blood fatty acids, and increased PRL levels may each be associated with the increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which have been reported in patients with major depression and patients engaging in suicidal behavior. Although no studies have been done to determine whether ante-mortem physical stress may be detected by raised post-mortem PRL, this would be of great interest for physicians.

  14. Neonatal ghrelin programs development of hypothalamic feeding circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steculorum, Sophie M.; Collden, Gustav; Coupe, Berengere; Croizier, Sophie; Lockie, Sarah; Andrews, Zane B.; Jarosch, Florian; Klussmann, Sven; Bouret, Sebastien G.

    2015-01-01

    A complex neural network regulates body weight and energy balance, and dysfunction in the communication between the gut and this neural network is associated with metabolic diseases, such as obesity. The stomach-derived hormone ghrelin stimulates appetite through interactions with neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH). Here, we evaluated the physiological and neurobiological contribution of ghrelin during development by specifically blocking ghrelin action during early postnatal development in mice. Ghrelin blockade in neonatal mice resulted in enhanced ARH neural projections and long-term metabolic effects, including increased body weight, visceral fat, and blood glucose levels and decreased leptin sensitivity. In addition, chronic administration of ghrelin during postnatal life impaired the normal development of ARH projections and caused metabolic dysfunction. Consistent with these observations, direct exposure of postnatal ARH neuronal explants to ghrelin blunted axonal growth and blocked the neurotrophic effect of the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin. Moreover, chronic ghrelin exposure in neonatal mice also attenuated leptin-induced STAT3 signaling in ARH neurons. Collectively, these data reveal that ghrelin plays an inhibitory role in the development of hypothalamic neural circuits and suggest that proper expression of ghrelin during neonatal life is pivotal for lifelong metabolic regulation. PMID:25607843

  15. Hypothalamic regulation of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eZhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes are increasing at an alarming rate worldwide, but the strategies for the prevention and treatment of these disorders remain inadequate. Brown adipose tissue (BAT is important for cold protection by producing heat using lipids and glucose as metabolic fuels. This thermogenic action causes increased energy expenditure and significant lipid/glucose disposal. In addition, BAT in white adipose tissue (WAT or beige cells have been found and they also exhibit the thermogenic action similar to BAT. These data provide evidence indicating BAT/beige cells as a potential target for combating obesity and diabetes. Recent discoveries of active BAT and beige cells in adult humans have further highlighted this potential. Growing studies have also shown the importance of central nervous system in the control of BAT thermogenesis and WAT browning using animal models. This review is focused on central neural thermoregulation, particularly addressing our current understanding of the importance of hypothalamic neural signaling in the regulation of BAT/beige thermogenesis and energy homeostasis.

  16. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepashree; Morley, John E

    2014-10-01

    Human aging is associated with increasing frailty and morbidity which can result in significant disability. Dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to aging-related diseases like depression, cognitive deficits, and Alzheimer's disease in some older individuals. In addition to neuro-cognitive dysfunction, it has also been associated with declining physical performance possibly due to sarcopenia. This article reviews the pathophysiology of HPA dysfunction with respect to increased basal adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol secretion, decreased glucocorticoid (GC) negative feedback at the level of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, hippocampus (HC), and prefrontal cortex (PFC), and flattening of diurnal pattern of cortisol release. It is possible that the increased cortisol secretion is secondary to peripheral conversion from cortisone. There is a decline in pregnolone secretion and C-19 steroids (DHEA) with aging. There is a small decrease in aldosterone with aging, but a subset of the older population have a genetic predisposition to develop hyperaldosteronism due to the increased ACTH stimulation. The understanding of the HPA axis and aging remains a complex area with conflicting studies leading to controversial interpretations.

  17. Regulation of germline stem cell proliferation downstream of nutrient sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Richard

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cells have recently attracted significant attention largely due to their potential therapeutic properties, but also because of their role in tumorigenesis and their resemblance, in many aspects, to cancerous cells. Understanding how stem cells are regulated, namely with respect to the control of their proliferation and differentiation within a functional organism, is thus primordial to safely profit from their therapeutic benefits. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of germline stem cell proliferation control by factors that respond to the nutritional status and/or insulin signaling, through studies performed in C. elegans and Drosophila. Together, these data uncover some shared fundamental features that underlie the central control of cellular proliferation within a target stem cell population in an organism. These features may indeed be conserved in higher organisms and may apply to various other stem cell populations.

  18. Investigation of nutrient sensing in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine

    2006-01-01

    Gæren Saccharomyces cerevisiae har udviklet komplekse regulatoriske systemer til at kontrollere ekspression af de proteiner, der importerer næringsstoffer, således at disse kun bliver produceret, når der er brug for dem. Dette er tilfældet for hexose-transportører samt aminosyre-transportører (di...

  19. High Fat Diet Induced Obesity and Nutrient Sensing TOR Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Oldham, Sean

    2011-01-01

    Obesity has grown to epidemic proportions globally, with 400 million considered obese. Evidence indicates that excessive dietary accumulation of lipids (obesity) is a risk factor in causing deleterious effects on metabolism and has been strongly linked to the progression of heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. Investigating the origin and effects of high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and its genetic mediators is an important step in understanding the mechanisms that contribute to obesity. Howe...

  20. Nutrient sensing in the gut: new roads to therapeutics?

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, Sara; Depoortere, Inge

    2013-01-01

    The release of gut hormones involved in the control of food intake is dependent on the acute nutritional status of the body, suggesting that chemosensory mechanisms are involved in the control of their release. G protein-coupled taste receptors similar to those in the lingual system, that respond to sweet, bitter, umami, and fatty acids, are expressed in endocrine cells within the gut mucosa, and coordinate, together with other chemosensory signaling elements, the release of hormones that reg...

  1. Dexmedetomidine ameliorates muscle wasting and attenuates the alteration of hypothalamic neuropeptides and inflammation in endotoxemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Minhua; Gao, Tao; Xi, Fengchan; Cao, Chun; Chen, Yan; Zhao, Chenyan; Li, Qiurong; Yu, Wenkui

    2017-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is generally used for sedaton in critically ill, it could shorten duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU stay and lower basic metabolism. However, the exact mechanism of these positive effects remains unkown. Here we investigated the hypothesis that dexmedetomidine could ameliorate muscle wasting in endotoxemic rats and whether it was related to hypothalamic neuropeptides alteration and inflammation. Fourty-eight adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg/kg) or saline, followed by 50 μg/kg dexmedetomidine or saline administration via the femoral vein catheter (infusion at 5 μg·kg-1·hr-1). Twenty-four hours after injection, hypothalamus tissues and skeletal muscle were obtained. Muscle wasting was measured by the mRNA expression of two E3 ubiquitin ligases, muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF-1) as well as 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) and tyrosine release. Hypothalamic inflammatory markers and neuropeptides expression were also detected in all four groups. Results showed that LPS administration led to significant increase in hypothalamic inflammation together with muscle wasting. Increased hypothalamic neuropeptides, proopiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine and amphetamine-related transcript (CART) and neuropeptides Y (NPY) and decreased agouti-related protein (AgRP) were also observed. Meanwhile dexmedetomidine administration ameliorated muscle wasting, hypothalamic inflammation and modulated the alteration of neuropeptides, POMC, CART and AgRP, in endotoxemic rats. In conclusion, dexmedetomidine could alleviate muscle wasting in endotoxemic rats, and it could also attenuate the alteration of hypothalamic neuropeptides and reduce hypothalamic inflammation.

  2. Remote Sensing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    observed that all bodies at temperatures above zero degrees absolute emit electromagnetic radiation at different wavelengths, as per Planck's law. 2. B(A, T) = 2hc ..... International co-operation of nations in evolving integrated global observa- tion for disaster studies is getting in place. Evolution of Remote Sensing in India.

  3. Rhythmic activities of hypothalamic magnocellular neurons: autocontrol mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, P; Moos, F; Dayanithi, G; Gouzènes, L; Sabatier, N

    1997-12-01

    Electrophysiological recordings in lactating rats show that oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) neurons exhibit specific patterns of activities in relation to peripheral stimuli: periodic bursting firing for OT neurons during suckling, phasic firing for AVP neurons during hyperosmolarity (systemic injection of hypertonic saline). These activities are autocontrolled by OT and AVP released somato-dentritically within the hypothalamic magnocellular nuclei. In vivo, OT enhances the amplitude and frequency of bursts, an effect accompanied with an increase in basal firing rate. However, the characteristics of firing change as facilitation proceeds: the spike patterns become very irregular with clusters of spikes spaced by long silences; the firing rate is highly variable and clearly oscillates before facilitated bursts. This unstable behaviour dramatically decreases during intense tonic activation which temporarily interrupts bursting, and could therefore be a prerequisite for bursting. In vivo, the effects of AVP depend on the initial firing pattern of AVP neurons: AVP excites weakly active neurons (increasing duration of active periods and decreasing silences), inhibits highly active neurons, and does not affect neurons with intermediate phasic activity. AVP brings the entire population of AVP neurons to discharge with a medium phasic activity characterised by periods of firing and silence lasting 20-40 s, a pattern shown to optimise the release of AVP from the neurohypophysis. Each of the peptides (OT or AVP) induces an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, specifically in the neurons containing either OT or AVP respectively. OT evokes the release of Ca2+ from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores. AVP induces an influx of Ca2+ through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels of T-, L- and N-types. We postulate that the facilitatory autocontrol of OT and AVP neurons could be mediated by Ca2+ known to play a key role in the control of the patterns of phasic neurons.

  4. Posterior hypothalamic and brainstem activation in hemicrania continua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matharu, Manjit S; Cohen, Anna S; McGonigle, David J; Ward, Nick; Frackowiak, Richard S; Goadsby, Peter J

    2004-09-01

    To determine the brain structures involved in mediating the pain of hemicrania continua using positron emission tomography. Hemicrania continua is a strictly unilateral, continuous headache of moderate intensity, with superimposed exacerbations of severe intensity that are accompanied by trigeminal autonomic features and migrainous symptoms. The syndrome is exquisitely responsive to indomethacin. Its clinical phenotype overlaps with that of the trigeminal autonomic headaches and migraine in which the hypothalamus and the brainstem, respectively, have been postulated to play central pathophysiologic roles. We hypothesized, based on the clinical phenotype, that hemicrania continua may involve activations in the hypothalamus, or dorsal rostral pons, or both. Seven patients with hemicrania continua were studied in two sessions each. In one session, the patients were scanned during baseline pain and when rendered completely pain free after being administered indomethacin 100 mg intramuscularly. In the other session, the patients were scanned during baseline pain and when still in pain after being administered placebo intramuscularly. Seven age- and sex-matched nonheadache subjects acted as the control group. The scan images were processed and analyzed using SPM99. There was a significant activation of the contralateral posterior hypothalamus and ipsilateral dorsal rostral pons in association with the headache of hemicrania continua. In addition, there was activation of the ipsilateral ventrolateral midbrain, which extended over the red nucleus and the substantia nigra, and bilateral pontomedullary junction. No intracranial vessel dilatation was obvious. This study demonstrated activations of various subcortical structures, in particular the posterior hypothalamus and the dorsal rostral pons. If posterior hypothalamic and brainstem activation are considered as markers of trigeminal autonomic headaches and migrainous syndromes, respectively, then the activation pattern

  5. [Stereotactic radiosurgery in treatment of patients with hypothalamic hamartomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golanov, A V; Kornienko, V N; Trunin, Iu Iu; Kostiuchenko, V V; Gorlachev, G E; Gorelyshev, S K; Melikian, A G; Khukhlaeva, E A; Mazerkina, N A; Sorokin, V A

    2010-01-01

    Hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) is malformation of the brain manifesting by paroxysmal disorders (gelastic seizures) and endocrine disorders (mostly precocious sexual development). Surgical resection of HH is associated with the risk of severe neurological and neuroendocrine complications. Alternative ways of treatment are being investigasted. Stereotactic radiosurgery is one of the leading techniques in treatment of pharmacoresistant seizures due to high effectiveness and low complication rate. Since 2005 till 2009 7 patients with HH were treated in Burdenko Moscow Neurosurgical Institute. Age of patients varied between 9 months and 20 years 9 mean - 8.5 years). In all cases the disease manifested by gelastic seizures with frequency differing between 2-3 per months and 17 per day. All patients received long-term combined anticonvulsant treatment (using valproates, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, topiramate) with temporary and insufficient effect or without any effect. In 4 patients frequency of seizures increased during anticonvulsant therapy. I patient had been operated (partial resection of HH) with temporary effect which consisted of decrease in frequency of seizures for 8 months; later frequency of paroxysms increased. Main indications to radiosurgical treatment included progressive course of disease, low effectiveness of anticonvulsant therapy and high risk of direct surgical treatment. 6 patients were treated using linear accelerator "Novalis" and 1 using "Cyber-knife". Treatment was performed under pharmacological sedation (midazolam, ketamine). Marginal dose was 11-18 Gy (mean 15.7 Gy). Volume of hamartomas was 0.3-3 cm3. Follow-up period varied between 3 and 50 months. Decreased frequency of seizures was observed in 100% of cases. Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective and safe method of treatment for HH and may be considered as treatment of choice for pharmacoresistant seizures caused by HH.

  6. Deleterious effects of lard-enriched diet on tissues fatty acids composition and hypothalamic insulin actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornellas, A P S; Watanabe, R L H; Pimentel, G D; Boldarine, V T; Nascimento, C M O; Oyama, L M; Ghebremeskel, K; Wang, Y; Bueno, A A; Ribeiro, E B

    2015-12-01

    Altered tissue fatty acid (FA) composition may affect mechanisms involved in the control of energy homeostasis, including central insulin actions. In rats fed either standard chow or a lard-enriched chow (high in saturated/low in polyunsaturated FA, HS-LP) for eight weeks, we examined the FA composition of blood, hypothalamus, liver, and retroperitoneal, epididymal and mesenteric adipose tissues. Insulin-induced hypophagia and hypothalamic signaling were evaluated after intracerebroventricular insulin injection. HS-LP feeding increased saturated FA content in adipose tissues and serum while it decreased polyunsaturated FA content of adipose tissues, serum, and liver. Hypothalamic C20:5n-3 and C20:3n-6 contents increased while monounsaturated FA content decreased. HS-LP rats showed hyperglycemia, impaired insulin-induced hypophagia and hypothalamic insulin signaling. The results showed that, upon HS-LP feeding, peripheral tissues underwent potentially deleterious alterations in their FA composition, whist the hypothalamus was relatively preserved. However, hypothalamic insulin signaling and hypophagia were drastically impaired. These findings suggest that impairment of hypothalamic insulin actions by HS-LP feeding was not related to tissue FA composition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypothalamic response to the chemo-signal androstadienone in gender dysphoric children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Burke

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The odorous steroid androstadienone, a putative male chemo-signal, was previously reported to evoke sex differences in hypothalamic activation in adult heterosexual men and women. In order to investigate whether puberty modulated this sex difference in response to androstadienone we measured the hypothalamic responsiveness to this chemo-signal in 39 prepubertal and 41 adolescent boys and girls by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging. We then investigated whether 36 prepubertal children and 38 adolescents diagnosed with Gender Dysphoria (GD; DSM-5 exhibited sex-atypical (in accordance with their experienced gender, rather than sex-typical (in accordance with their natal sex hypothalamic activations during olfactory stimulation with androstadienone. We found that the sex difference in responsiveness to androstadienone was already present in prepubertal control children and thus likely developed during early perinatal development instead of during sexual maturation. Adolescent girls and boys with GD both responded remarkably like their experienced gender, thus sex-atypical. In contrast, prepubertal girls with GD showed neither a typically male nor female hypothalamic activation pattern and prepubertal boys with GD had hypothalamic activations in response to androstadienone that were similar to control boys, thus sex-typical. We present here a unique data set of boys and girls diagnosed with GD at two different developmental stages, showing that these children possess certain sex-atypical functional brain characteristics and may have undergone atypical sexual differentiation of the brain.

  8. Identification of hypothalamic neuron-derived neurotrophic factor as a novel factor modulating appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerly, Mardi S; Swanson, Roy D; Semsarzadeh, Nina N; McCulloh, Patrick S; Kwon, Kiwook; Aja, Susan; Moran, Timothy H; Wong, G William; Blackshaw, Seth

    2013-06-15

    Disruption of finely coordinated neuropeptide signals in the hypothalamus can result in altered food intake and body weight. We identified neuron-derived neurotrophic factor (NENF) as a novel secreted protein through a large-scale screen aimed at identifying novel secreted hypothalamic proteins that regulate food intake. We observed robust Nenf expression in hypothalamic nuclei known to regulate food intake, and its expression was altered under the diet-induced obese (DIO) condition relative to the fed state. Hypothalamic Nenf mRNA was regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, itself an important regulator of appetite. Delivery of purified recombinant BDNF into the lateral cerebral ventricle decreased hypothalamic Nenf expression, while pharmacological inhibition of trkB signaling increased Nenf mRNA expression. Furthermore, recombinant NENF administered via an intracerebroventricular cannula decreased food intake and body weight and increased hypothalamic Pomc and Mc4r mRNA expression. Importantly, the appetite-suppressing effect of NENF was abrogated in obese mice fed a high-fat diet, demonstrating a diet-dependent modulation of NENF function. We propose the existence of a regulatory circuit involving BDNF, NENF, and melanocortin signaling. Our study validates the power of using an integrated experimental and bioinformatic approach to identify novel CNS-derived proteins with appetite-modulating function and reveals NENF as an important central modulator of food intake.

  9. Altered hypothalamic protein expression in a rat model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-na Cong

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder, which is characterized by progressive motor impairment and cognitive alterations. Changes in energy metabolism, neuroendocrine function, body weight, euglycemia, appetite function, and circadian rhythm can also occur. It is likely that the locus of these alterations is the hypothalamus. We used the HD transgenic (tg rat model bearing 51 CAG repeats, which exhibits similar HD symptomology as HD patients to investigate hypothalamic function. We conducted detailed hypothalamic proteome analyses and also measured circulating levels of various metabolic hormones and lipids in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic animals. Our results demonstrate that there are significant alterations in HD rat hypothalamic protein expression such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, heat shock protein-70, the oxidative damage protein glutathione peroxidase (Gpx4, glycogen synthase1 (Gys1 and the lipid synthesis enzyme acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1 (Agpat1. In addition, there are significant alterations in various circulating metabolic hormones and lipids in pre-symptomatic animals including, insulin, leptin, triglycerides and HDL, before any motor or cognitive alterations are apparent. These early metabolic and lipid alterations are likely prodromal signs of hypothalamic dysfunction. Gaining a greater understanding of the hypothalamic and metabolic alterations that occur in HD, could lead to the development of novel therapeutics for early interventional treatment of HD.

  10. Epigenetic changes in fetal hypothalamic energy regulating pathways are associated with maternal undernutrition and twinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Ghazala; Stevens, Adam; Smith, Emma Bolton; Connor, Kristin; Challis, John R G; Bloomfield, Frank; White, Anne

    2012-04-01

    Undernutrition during pregnancy is implicated in the programming of offspring for the development of obesity and diabetes. We hypothesized that maternal programming causes epigenetic changes in fetal hypothalamic pathways regulating metabolism. This study used sheep to examine the effect of moderate maternal undernutrition (60 d before to 30 d after mating) and twinning to investigate changes in the key metabolic regulators proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in fetal hypothalami. Methylation of the fetal hypothalamic POMC promoter was reduced in underfed singleton, fed twin, and underfed twin groups (60, 73, and 63% decrease, respectively). This was associated with reduced DNA methyltransferase activity and altered histone methylation and acetylation. Methylation of the hypothalamic GR promoter was decreased in both twin groups and in maternally underfed singleton fetuses (52, 65, and 55% decrease, respectively). This correlated with changes in histone methylation and acetylation and increased GR mRNA expression in the maternally underfed singleton group. Alterations in GR were hypothalamic specific, with no changes in hippocampi. Unaltered levels of OCT4 promoter methylation indicated gene-specific effects. In conclusion, twinning and periconceptional undernutrition are associated with epigenetic changes in fetal hypothalamic POMC and GR genes, potentially resulting in altered energy balance regulation in the offspring.

  11. Nrf2 Improves Leptin and Insulin Resistance Provoked by Hypothalamic Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagishita, Yoko; Uruno, Akira; Fukutomi, Toshiaki; Saito, Ritsumi; Saigusa, Daisuke; Pi, Jingbo; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Satoru; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2017-02-21

    The relationship between loss of hypothalamic function and onset of diabetes mellitus remains elusive. Therefore, we generated a targeted oxidative-stress murine model utilizing conditional knockout (KO) of selenocysteine-tRNA (Trsp) using rat-insulin-promoter-driven-Cre (RIP-Cre). These Trsp-KO (TrspRIPKO) mice exhibit deletion of Trsp in both hypothalamic cells and pancreatic β cells, leading to increased hypothalamic oxidative stress and severe insulin resistance. Leptin signals are suppressed, and numbers of proopiomelanocortin-positive neurons in the hypothalamus are decreased. In contrast, Trsp-KO mice (TrspIns1KO) expressing Cre specifically in pancreatic β cells, but not in the hypothalamus, do not display insulin and leptin resistance, demonstrating a critical role of the hypothalamus in the onset of diabetes mellitus. Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) regulates antioxidant gene expression. Increased Nrf2 signaling suppresses hypothalamic oxidative stress and improves insulin and leptin resistance in TrspRIPKO mice. Thus, Nrf2 harbors the potential to prevent the onset of diabetic mellitus by reducing hypothalamic oxidative damage. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hypothalamic Response to the Chemo-Signal Androstadienone in Gender Dysphoric Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Sarah M.; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.; Veltman, Dick J.; Klink, Daniel T.; Bakker, Julie

    2014-01-01

    The odorous steroid androstadienone, a putative male chemo-signal, was previously reported to evoke sex differences in hypothalamic activation in adult heterosexual men and women. In order to investigate whether puberty modulated this sex difference in response to androstadienone, we measured the hypothalamic responsiveness to this chemo-signal in 39 pre-pubertal and 41 adolescent boys and girls by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging. We then investigated whether 36 pre-pubertal children and 38 adolescents diagnosed with gender dysphoria (GD; DSM-5) exhibited sex-atypical (in accordance with their experienced gender), rather than sex-typical (in accordance with their natal sex) hypothalamic activations during olfactory stimulation with androstadienone. We found that the sex difference in responsiveness to androstadienone was already present in pre-pubertal control children and thus likely developed during early perinatal development instead of during sexual maturation. Adolescent girls and boys with GD both responded remarkably like their experienced gender, thus sex-atypical. In contrast, pre-pubertal girls with GD showed neither a typically male nor female hypothalamic activation pattern and pre-pubertal boys with GD had hypothalamic activations in response to androstadienone that were similar to control boys, thus sex-typical. We present here a unique data set of boys and girls diagnosed with GD at two different developmental stages, showing that these children possess certain sex-atypical functional brain characteristics and may have undergone atypical sexual differentiation of the brain. PMID:24904525

  13. Remote RemoteRemoteRemote sensing potential for sensing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Remote RemoteRemoteRemote sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing p. A Ngie, F Ahmed, K Abutaleb ...

  14. Conversational sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  15. DiI tracing of the hypothalamic projection systems during perinatal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Georgievna Makarenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is the higher neuroendocrine center of the brain and therefore possesses numerous intrinsic axonal connections and is connected by afferent and efferent fiber systems with other brain structures. These projection systems have been described in detail in the adult but data on their early development is sparse. Here I review studies of the time schedule and features of the development of the major hypothalamic axonal systems. In general, anterograde tracing experiments have been used to analyze short distance projections from the arcuate and anteroventral periventricular nuclei, while hypothalamic projections to the posterior and intermediate pituitary lobes and median eminence, mammillary body tracts and reciprocal septohypothalamic connections have been described with retrograde tracing. The available data demonstrate that hypothalamic connections develop with a high degree of spatial and temporal specificity, innervating each target with a unique developmental schedule which in many cases can be correlated with the functional maturity of the projection system.

  16. Giant hypothalamic hamartoma associated with an intracranial cyst in a newborn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo Yeon; Khang, Shin Kwang [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hye Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    We report the case of a giant hypothalamic hamartoma with a large intracranial cyst in a neonate. On ultrasonography, the lesion presented as a lobulated, mass-like lesion with similar echogenicity to the adjacent brain parenchyma, located anterior to the underdeveloped and compressed left temporal lobe, and presenting as an intracranial cyst in the left cerebral convexity without definite internal echogenicity or septa. The presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma and intracranial neurenteric cyst were confirmed by surgical biopsy. The association of a giant hypothalamic hamartoma and a neurenteric cyst is rare. Due to the rarity of this association, the large size of the intracranial cyst, and the resulting distortion in the regional anatomy, the diagnosis of the solid mass was not made correctly on prenatal high-resolution ultrasonography.

  17. The histone acetyltransferase MOF activates hypothalamic polysialylation to prevent diet-induced obesity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenachot, Xavier; Rigault, Caroline; Nédélec, Emmanuelle; Laderrière, Amélie; Khanam, Tasneem; Gouazé, Alexandra; Chaudy, Sylvie; Lemoine, Aleth; Datiche, Frédérique; Gascuel, Jean; Pénicaud, Luc; Benani, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Overfeeding causes rapid synaptic remodeling in hypothalamus feeding circuits. Polysialylation of cell surface molecules is a key step in this neuronal rewiring and allows normalization of food intake. Here we examined the role of hypothalamic polysialylation in the long-term maintenance of body weight, and deciphered the molecular sequence underlying its nutritional regulation. We found that upon high fat diet (HFD), reduced hypothalamic polysialylation exacerbated the diet-induced obese phenotype in mice. Upon HFD, the histone acetyltransferase MOF was rapidly recruited on the St8sia4 polysialyltransferase-encoding gene. Mof silencing in the mediobasal hypothalamus of adult mice prevented activation of the St8sia4 gene transcription, reduced polysialylation, altered the acute homeostatic feeding response to HFD and increased the body weight gain. These findings indicate that impaired hypothalamic polysialylation contribute to the development of obesity, and establish a role for MOF in the brain control of energy balance. PMID:25161885

  18. Dexamphetamine use for management of obesity and hypersomnolence following hypothalamic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, D; O'Connell, M A; Zacharin, M R

    2006-02-01

    Unrelenting weight gain, morbid obesity and disturbance of the sleep-wake cycle are well-recognized sequelae of hypothalamic injury. These health problems and their risk of significant associated co-morbidity drive the search for potential treatment modalities. To report effects on weight change and wakefulness in a cohort of 12 patients with structural hypothalamic lesions treated with low-dose dexamphetamine. Retrospective review of case notes. Twelve patients received dexamphetamine 5 mg twice daily (median duration 13 months in males, 15 months in females). Ten of 12 patients experienced either stabilisation of weight or weight loss on treatment (median loss -0.7 SDS in males, -0.44 SDS in females). Eleven patients reported improvement in daytime wakefulness and/or concentration and exercise tolerance. Low-dose dexamphetamine therapy has a positive impact on inexorable weight gain and daytime somnolence following hypothalamic injury.

  19. Recent insights into the role of hypothalamic AMPK signaling cascade upon metabolic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eClaret

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, two seminal papers focused on the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in the hypothalamus opened new avenues of research in the field of the central regulation of energy homeostasis. Over the following 8 years, hundreds of studies have firmly established hypothalamic AMPK as a key sensor and integrator of hormonal and nutritional signals with neurochemical and neurophysiological responses to regulate whole-body energy balance. In this review article we aim to discuss the most recent findings in this particular area of research, highlighting the function of hypothalamic AMPK in appetite, thermogenesis and peripheral glucose metabolism. The diversity of mechanisms by which hypothalamic AMPK regulates energy homeostasis illustrates the importance of this evolutionary-conserved energy signaling cascade in the control of this complex and fundamental biological process.

  20. Cognitive brain responses during circadian wake-promotion: evidence for sleep-pressure-dependent hypothalamic activations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Carolin F; Maire, Micheline; Gabel, Virginie; Viola, Antoine U; Götz, Thomas; Scheffler, Klaus; Klarhöfer, Markus; Berthomier, Christian; Strobel, Werner; Phillips, Christophe; Salmon, Eric; Cajochen, Christian; Schmidt, Christina

    2017-07-17

    The two-process model of sleep-wake regulation posits that sleep-wake-dependent homeostatic processes interact with the circadian timing system to affect human behavior. The circadian timing system is fundamental to maintaining stable cognitive performance, as it counteracts growing homeostatic sleep pressure during daytime. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we explored brain responses underlying working memory performance during the time of maximal circadian wake-promotion under varying sleep pressure conditions. Circadian wake-promoting strength was derived from the ability to sleep during an evening nap. Hypothalamic BOLD activity was positively linked to circadian wake-promoting strength under normal, but not under disproportionally high or low sleep pressure levels. Furthermore, higher hypothalamic activity under normal sleep pressure levels predicted better performance under sleep loss. Our results reappraise the two-process model by revealing a homeostatic-dose-dependent association between circadian wake-promotion and cognition-related hypothalamic activity.

  1. Mediobasal hypothalamic p70 S6 kinase 1 modulates the control of energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouet, Clémence; Ono, Hiraku; Schwartz, Gary J

    2008-12-01

    p70 S6 kinase 1 (S6K) is a major downstream effector of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), primarily implicated in the control of protein synthesis, cell growth, and proliferation. Here we demonstrate that specific bidirectional molecular targeting of mediobasal hypothalamic (MBH) S6K activity in rats is sufficient to significantly alter food intake, body weight, hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptide expression, hypothalamic leptin sensitivity, and the metabolic and feeding responses to a fast. In addition, adenoviral-mediated constitutive activation of MBH S6K improved cold tolerance and protected against high-fat diet-induced overeating, fat deposition, and insulin resistance. Our results provide direct evidence that MBH S6K activity bidirectionally drives behavioral and metabolic determinants of energy balance and promote the assessment of MBH S6K activity as a therapeutic target in metabolic diseases.

  2. Hypothalamic KLF4 mediates leptin's effects on food intake via AgRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernon, Monica; Sanchez-Rebordelo, Estrella; Gallego, Rosalia; Gandara, Marina; Lear, Pamela; Lopez, Miguel; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc-finger-type transcription factor expressed in a range of tissues that plays multiple functions. We report that hypothalamic KLF4 represents a new transcription factor specifically modulating agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression in vivo. Hypothalamic KLF4 colocalizes with AgRP neurons and is modulated by nutritional status and leptin. Over-expression of KLF4 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) induces food intake and increases body weight through the specific stimulation of AgRP, as well as blunting leptin sensitivity in lean rats independent of forkhead box protein 01 (FoxO1). Down-regulation of KLF4 in the ARC inhibits fasting-induced food intake in both lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Silencing KLF4, however, does not, on its own, enhance peripheral leptin sensitivity in DIO rats. PMID:24944903

  3. Efferent connections of the anterior hypothalamic nucleus: a biocytin study in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemaru, H; Nakamura, H; Isayama, H; Kawabuchi, M; Tashiro, N

    2000-02-01

    The efferent connections of the anterior hypothalamic nucleus (AH) were examined using biocytin as anterograde tracer in the cat. The results provide several new findings in addition to confirming earlier observations. In the hypothalamus, the AH projections terminated mainly in the medial regions which are related to the defensive, reproductive and feeding behaviors, and autonomic functions. Moreover, we found dense patches of the AH terminals in the medial preoptic area and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, which suggests the existence of modular connections between sub-regions of each nucleus. In addition, the AH projected to regions which may be related to the emotional and autonomic responses, i.e., such regions in the amygdala, midline thalamus, septum, subthalamus, and midbrain. The data suggest that the AH may play an important role in the autonomic functions and behaviors between animals, and thus may play a key role in the defensive behavior elicited in the medial preoptic area and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus.

  4. Hypothalamic Apelin/Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling Controls Hepatic Glucose Metabolism in the Onset of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drougard, Anne; Duparc, Thibaut; Brenachot, Xavier; Carneiro, Lionel; Gouazé, Alexandra; Fournel, Audren; Geurts, Lucie; Cadoudal, Thomas; Prats, Anne-Catherine; Pénicaud, Luc; Vieau, Didier; Lesage, Jean; Leloup, Corinne; Benani, Alexandre; Cani, Patrice D.; Valet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: We have previously demonstrated that central apelin is implicated in the control of peripheral glycemia, and its action depends on nutritional (fast versus fed) and physiological (normal versus diabetic) states. An intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of a high dose of apelin, similar to that observed in obese/diabetic mice, increase fasted glycemia, suggesting (i) that apelin contributes to the establishment of a diabetic state, and (ii) the existence of a hypothalamic to liver axis. Using pharmacological, genetic, and nutritional approaches, we aim at unraveling this system of regulation by identifying the hypothalamic molecular actors that trigger the apelin effect on liver glucose metabolism and glycemia. Results: We show that icv apelin injection stimulates liver glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis via an over-activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), leading to fasted hyperglycemia. The effect of central apelin on liver function is dependent of an increased production of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species (ROS). These data are strengthened by experiments using lentiviral vector-mediated over-expression of apelin in hypothalamus of mice that present over-activation of SNS associated to an increase in hepatic glucose production. Finally, we report that mice fed a high-fat diet present major alterations of hypothalamic apelin/ROS signaling, leading to activation of glycogenolysis. Innovation/Conclusion: These data bring compelling evidence that hypothalamic apelin is one master switch that participates in the onset of diabetes by directly acting on liver function. Our data support the idea that hypothalamic apelin is a new potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 557–573. PMID:23879244

  5. Estrogen Maintains Skeletal Muscle in Septic Rats Associated with Altering Hypothalamic Inflammation and Neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chenyan; Li, Jun; Cheng, Minhua; Shi, Jialing; Shen, Juanhong; Gao, Tao; Xi, Fengchan; Yu, Wenkui

    2017-03-01

    Muscle wasting is one of the main contributors to the worse outcomes in sepsis. Whether estrogen could alleviate muscle wasting induced by sepsis remains unclear. This study was designed to test the effect of estrogen on muscle wasting and its relationship with central alteration in sepsis. Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: control group, sepsis group, and estrogen treated sepsis group. Animals were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (10 mg/kg) or saline, followed by subcutaneous injection of 17β-estradiol (1 mg/kg) or saline. Twenty-four hours later, all animals were killed and their hypothalamus and skeletal muscles were harvested for analysis. Muscle wasting markers, hypothalamic neuropeptides, and hypothalamic inflammatory markers were measured. As a result, lipopolysaccharide administration caused a significant increase in muscle wasting, hypothalamic inflammation, and anorexigenic neuropeptides (POMC and CART) gene expression, and a significant decrease in orexigenic neuropeptides (AgRP and NPY) gene expression. Administration of estrogen signifcantl attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced muscle wasting (body weight and extensor digitorum longus loss [52 and 62 %], tyrosine and 3-methylhistidine release [17 and 22 %], muscle ring fnger 1 [MuRF-1; 65 %], and muscle atrophy F-box [MAFbx] gene expression), hypothalamic inflammation (Tumor necrosis factor-α and interlukin-1β [69 and 70%]) as well as alteration of POMC, CART and AgRP (61, 37, and 1008 %) expression.In conclusion, estrogen could alleviate sepsis-induced muscle wasting and it was associated with reducing hypothalamic inflammation and alteration of hypothalamic neuropeptides. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Nutrients and neurodevelopment: lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Horacio F; Visentin, Silvana

    2016-10-01

    Nutrients, lipids in particular, make up the central nervous system structure and play major functional roles: they stimulate development, migration, and nerve cell differentiation. They are part of gray matter, white matter, nerve nuclei, and synaptogenesis. Breast milk contains lipids which are crucial for infant brain development. The lipid profile of breast milk was used as a guideline for the development of breast milk substitutes. However, to date, no substitute has matched it. Complementary feeding should include docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, other polyunsaturated fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, and complex lipids found in milk fat. The lipid composition of breast milk depends on maternal intake and nutritional status during pregnancy and breast-feeding. It has a great impact on development. Our goal is to review scientific literature regarding the role of lipids on infant brain development and the importance of breast milk lipid composition, maternal diet, and complementary feeding. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  7. Genetic polymorphisms in the hypothalamic pathway in relation to subsequent weight change--the DiOGenes study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Huaidong; Ängquist, Lars Henrik; Vimaleswaran, Karani S

    2011-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the components involved in the hypothalamic pathway may influence weight gain and dietary factors may modify their effects.......Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the components involved in the hypothalamic pathway may influence weight gain and dietary factors may modify their effects....

  8. Effect of Processing Methods on the Nutrients and Anti Nutrients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nutrients and antinutrients compositions of vegetables cannot be over emphasized. The effect of different processing methods on the nutrients and antinutrients compositions in leaves of wild lettuce (Lactuca taraxacifolia) i.e. the sweet type was evaluated to determine the most appropriate methods for retaining its ...

  9. Nutrients and Anti Nutrients Composition of Two Varieties of Sorrel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the nutrients and anti nutrients composition of sorrel leaves and seeds from red and yellow calyx plants. Materials and methods: Fresh leaves and dry seeds of the two varieties were cleaned and milled. Standard assay techniques were used to evaluate the two varieties of the leaves and seeds for ...

  10. Nutrient and Anti-nutrient Composition of Cereal Products ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Content of iron was higher in all the cereal products and levels of antinutrient analyzed were within safe levels. Conclusion: Nutrient density of commonly consumed cereal products in Samaru – Zaria is low but the levels of antinutrient in the cereal product were within the safe levels. Key words: Cereal products, Nutrient ...

  11. The minimal model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther, Frank; Andersen, Morten; Ottesen, Johnny T

    2011-10-01

    This paper concerns ODE modeling of the hypothalamic-pituitary- adrenal axis (HPA axis) using an analytical and numerical approach, combined with biological knowledge regarding physiological mechanisms and parameters. The three hormones, CRH, ACTH, and cortisol, which interact in the HPA axis are modeled as a system of three coupled, nonlinear differential equations. Experimental data shows the circadian as well as the ultradian rhythm. This paper focuses on the ultradian rhythm. The ultradian rhythm can mathematically be explained by oscillating solutions. Oscillating solutions to an ODE emerges from an unstable fixed point with complex eigenvalues with a positive real parts and a non-zero imaginary parts. The first part of the paper describes the general considerations to be obeyed for a mathematical model of the HPA axis. In this paper we only include the most widely accepted mechanisms that influence the dynamics of the HPA axis, i.e. a negative feedback from cortisol on CRH and ACTH. Therefore we term our model the minimal model. The minimal model, encompasses a wide class of different realizations, obeying only a few physiologically reasonable demands. The results include the existence of a trapping region guaranteeing that concentrations do not become negative or tend to infinity. Furthermore, this treatment guarantees the existence of a unique fixed point. A change in local stability of the fixed point, from stable to unstable, implies a Hopf bifurcation; thereby, oscillating solutions may emerge from the model. Sufficient criteria for local stability of the fixed point, and an easily applicable sufficient criteria guaranteeing global stability of the fixed point, is formulated. If the latter is fulfilled, ultradian rhythm is an impossible outcome of the minimal model and all realizations thereof. The second part of the paper concerns a specific realization of the minimal model in which feedback functions are built explicitly using receptor dynamics. Using

  12. The role of ghrelin-responsive mediobasal hypothalamic neurons in mediating feeding responses to fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharath K. Mani

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: These results suggest that 1 activation of GHSR-expressing neurons in the MBH is required for the normal feeding responses following both peripheral administration of ghrelin and fasting, 2 activation of MBH GHSR-expressing neurons is sufficient to induce feeding, and 3 axonal projections to a subset of hypothalamic and/or extra-hypothalamic regions likely mediate these responses. The Ghsr-IRES-Cre line should serve as a valuable tool to further our understanding of the functional significance of ghrelin-responsive/GHSR-expressing neurons and the neuronal circuitry within which they act.

  13. Increased concentration of. cap alpha. - and. gamma. -endorphin in post mortem hypothalamic tissue of schizophrenic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegant, V.M.; Verhoef, C.J.; Burbach, J.P.H.; de Wied, D.

    1988-01-01

    The concentrations of ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..- and ..gamma..-endorphin were determined by radioimmunoassay in HPLC fractionated extracts of post mortem hypothalamic tissue obtained from schizophrenic patients and controls. The hypothalamic concentration of ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-endorphin was significantly higher in patients than in controls. No difference was found in the concentration of ..beta..-endorphin, the putative precursor of ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-endorphins. These results suggest a deviant metabolism of ..beta..-endorphin in the brain of schizophrenic patients. Whether this phenomenon is related to the psychopathology, or is a consequence of ante mortem farmacotherapy, remains to be established.

  14. The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and the control of peripheral substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly-Amado, Aurélie; Cansell, Céline; Denis, Raphaël G P; Delbes, Anne-Sophie; Castel, Julien; Martinez, Sarah; Luquet, Serge

    2014-10-01

    The arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus is particularly regarded as a critical platform that integrates circulating signals of hunger and satiety reflecting energy stores and nutrient availability. Among ARC neurons, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related protein and neuropeptide Y (NPY/AgRP neurons) are considered as two opposing branches of the melanocortin signaling pathway. Integration of circulating signals of hunger and satiety results in the release of the melanocortin receptor ligand α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (αMSH) by the POMC neurons system and decreases feeding and increases energy expenditure. The orexigenic/anabolic action of NPY/AgRP neurons is believed to rely essentially on their inhibitory input onto POMC neurons and second-orders targets. Recent updates in the field have casted a new light on the role of the ARC neurons in the coordinated regulation of peripheral organs involved in the control of nutrient storage, transformation and substrate utilization independent of food intake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. HORIZON SENSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Stolarczyk

    2003-03-18

    With the aid of a DOE grant (No. DE-FC26-01NT41050), Stolar Research Corporation (Stolar) developed the Horizon Sensor (HS) to distinguish between the different layers of a coal seam. Mounted on mining machine cutter drums, HS units can detect or sense the horizon between the coal seam and the roof and floor rock, providing the opportunity to accurately mine the section of the seam most desired. HS also enables accurate cutting of minimum height if that is the operator's objective. Often when cutting is done out-of-seam, the head-positioning function facilitates a fixed mining height to minimize dilution. With this technology, miners can still be at a remote location, yet cut only the clean coal, resulting in a much more efficient overall process. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate the feasibility of horizon sensing on mining machines and demonstrate that Horizon Sensing can allow coal to be cut cleaner and more efficiently. Stolar's primary goal was to develop the Horizon Sensor (HS) into an enabling technology for full or partial automation or ''agile mining''. This technical innovation (R&D 100 Award Winner) is quickly demonstrating improvements in productivity and miner safety at several prominent coal mines in the United States. In addition, the HS system can enable the cutting of cleaner coal. Stolar has driven the HS program on the philosophy that cutting cleaner coal means burning cleaner coal. The sensor, located inches from the cutting bits, is based upon the physics principles of a Resonant Microstrip Patch Antenna (RMPA). When it is in proximity of the rock-coal interface, the RMPA impedance varies depending on the thickness of uncut coal. The impedance is measured by the computer-controlled electronics and then sent by radio waves to the mining machine. The worker at the machine can read the data via a Graphical User Interface, displaying a color-coded image of the coal being cut, and direct the machine

  16. Effect of treatment modality on the hypothalamic-pituitary function of patients treated with radiation therapy for pituitary adenomas: Hypothalamic dose and endocrine outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eElson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Both fractionated external beam radiotherapy and single fraction radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas are associated with the risk of hypothalamic-pituitary (HP axis dysfunction.Objective: To analyze the effect of treatment modality (Linac, TomoTherapy, or Gamma Knife on hypothalamic dose and correlate these with HP-Axis deficits after radiotherapy.Methods:Radiation plans of patients treated postoperatively for pituitary adenomas using Linac-based 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT (n=11, TomoTherapy-based Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT (n=10, or Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS(n=12 were retrospectively reviewed. Dose to the hypothalamus was analyzed and postradiotherapy hormone function including growth hormone (GH, thyroid (TSH, adrenal (ACTH, prolactin (PRL, and gonadotropins (FSH/LH were assessed. Results:Post-radiation, 13 of 27 (48% patients eligible for analysis developed at least one new hormone deficit, of which 8 of 11 (72% occurred in the Linac group, 4 of 8 (50% occurred in the TomoTherapy group, and 1 of 8 (12.5% occurred in the Gamma Knife group. Compared with fractionated techniques, Gamma Knife showed improved hypothalamic sparing for DMax Hypo, and V12Gy. For fractionated modalities, TomoTherapy showed improved dosimetric characteristics over Linac-based treatment with hypothalamic DMean (44.8 Gy vs. 26.8 Gy p=0.02, DMax (49.8 Gy vs. 39.1 Gy p=0.04, and V12Gy (100% vs. 76% p=0.004.Conclusion:Maximal dosimetric avoidance of the hypothalamus was achieved using Gamma Knife-based radiosurgery followed by TomoTherapy-based IMRT, and Linac-based 3D conformal radiation therapy, respectively.

  17. DMPD: The role of macrophages in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation inresponse to endotoxin (LPS). [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1315450 The role of macrophages in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation in...png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The role of macrophages in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation in...e hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation inresponse to endotoxin (LPS). Authors Derijk RH, van Rooijen N,

  18. Nutrient solutions for soilless cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    Nutrient solutions intended for plant growth are already used from the middle of the 19th century, when the importance of mineral elements for plant growth was made clear by Justus von Liebig. In advance, the nutrient solutions used to grow plants in so called “water cultures” had a simple

  19. The Nutrient Density of Snacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hess BA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although Americans receive almost a quarter of their daily energy from snacks, snacking remains a poorly defined and understood eating occasion. However, there is little dietary guidance about choosing snacks. Families, clinicians, and researchers need a comprehensive approach to assessing their nutritional value. Objective: To quantify and compare the nutrient density of commonly consumed snacks by their overall nutrient profiles using the Nutrient-Rich Foods (NRF Index 10.3. Methods: NRF Index scores were calculated for the top 3 selling products (based on 2014 market research data in different snack categories. These NRF scores were averaged to provide an overall nutrient-density score for each category. Results: Based on NRF scores, yogurt (55.3, milk (52.5, and fruit (30.1 emerged as the most nutrient-dense snacks. Ice cream (−4.4, pies and cakes (−11.1, and carbonated soft drinks (−17.2 emerged as the most nutrient-poor snacks. Conclusions: The NRF Index is a useful tool for assessing the overall nutritional value of snacks based on nutrients to limit and nutrients to encourage.

  20. Nutrient management in substrate systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    Speaking about nutrient solutions in soilless cultivation, different solutions can be discerned. Originally, in soilless culture only one nutrient solution was taken into account, being the solution in the containers in which the plants were grown. Such solutions were intensively moved by air

  1. Promiscuous Seven Transmembrane Receptors Sensing L-α-amino Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2014-01-01

    A number of nutrient sensing seven trans-membrane (7TM) receptors have been identified and characterized over the past few years. While the sensing mechanisms to carbohydrates and free fatty acids are well understood, the molecular basis of amino acid sensing has recently come to the limelight. T....... The present review describes the current status of promiscuous L-α-amino acid sensors, the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), the GPRC6A receptor, the T1R1/T1R3 receptor and also their molecular pharmacology, expression pattern and physiological significance....

  2. Approaches and uncertainties in nutrient budgets; Implications for nutrient management and environmental policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oenema, O.; Kros, J.; Vries, de W.

    2003-01-01

    Nutrient budgets of agroecosystems are constructed either (i) to increase the understanding of nutrient cycling, (ii) as performance indicator and awareness raiser in nutrient management and environmental policy, or (iii) as regulating policy instrument to enforce a certain nutrient management

  3. Hypothalamic food intake regulation in a cancer-cachectic mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarkasing, J.T.; Dijk, van M.; Dijk, F.J.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Faber, J.; Argiles, J.M.; Laviano, A.; Müller, M.R.; Witkamp, R.F.; Norren, van K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Appetite is frequently affected in cancer patients leading to anorexia and consequently insufficient food intake. In this study, we report on hypothalamic gene expression profile of a cancer-cachectic mouse model with increased food intake. In this model, mice bearing C26 tumour have an

  4. Hypothalamic gene expression of appetite regulators in a cancer-cachectic mouse model [Dataset 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarkasing, Jvalini; Dijk, Francina J.; Boekschoten, Mark; Faber, Joyce; Argilès, Josep M.; Lavianio, Alessandro; Muller, Michael; Witkamp, Renger; Norren, van Klaske

    2013-01-01

    Appetite is frequently affected in cancer patients, leading to anorexia and consequently insufficient food intake. In this study, we report on hypothalamic gene expression profile of a cancer cachectic mouse model with increased food intake. In this model, mice bearing C26 colon adenocarcinoma have

  5. Hypothalamic gene expression of appetite regulators in a cancer-cachectic mouse model [Dataset 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarkasing, Jvalini; Dijk, Francina J.; Boekschoten, Mark; Faber, Joyce; Argilès, Josep M.; Lavianio, Alessandro; Muller, Michael; Witkamp, Renger; Norren, van Klaske

    2013-01-01

    Appetite is frequently affected in cancer patients, leading to anorexia and consequently insufficient food intake. In this study, we report on hypothalamic gene expression profile of a cancer cachectic mouse model with increased food intake. In this model, mice bearing C26 colon adenocarcinoma have

  6. Regulation of Energy Balance via BDNF Expressed in Nonparaventricular Hypothalamic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haili; An, Juan Ji; Sun, Chao; Xu, Baoji

    2016-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expressed in the paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) has been shown to play a key role in regulating energy intake and energy expenditure. BDNF is also expressed in other hypothalamic nuclei; however, the role in the control of energy balance for BDNF produced in these structures remains largely unknown. We found that deleting the Bdnf gene in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) during embryogenesis using the Sf1-Cre transgene had no effect on body weight in mice. In contrast, deleting the Bdnf gene in the adult VMH using Cre-expressing virus led to significant hyperphagia and obesity. These observations indicate that the lack of a hyperphagia phenotype in the Sf1-Cre/Bdnf mutant mice is likely due to developmental compensation. To investigate the role of BDNF expressed in other hypothalamic areas, we employed the hypothalamus-specific Nkx2.1-Cre transgene to delete the Bdnf gene. We found that the Nkx2.1-Cre transgene could abolish BDNF expression in many hypothalamic nuclei, but not in the PVH, and that the resulting mutant mice developed modest obesity due to reduced energy expenditure. Thus, BDNF produced in the VMH plays a role in regulating energy intake. Furthermore, BDNF expressed in hypothalamic areas other than PVH and VMH is also involved in the control of energy expenditure.

  7. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and early onset of cannabis use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizink, Anja C.; Ferdinand, Robert F.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.

    2006-01-01

    Aims To identify early onset cannabis users by measuring basal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, which may be a risk factor for early onset substance use when showing low activity. Design In a prospective cohort study, adolescents who initiated cannabis use at an early age (9-12

  8. Hypothalamic response to the chemo-signal androstadienone in gender dysphoric children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burke, Sarah M; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Veltman, Dick J; Klink, Daniel T; Bakker, J.

    2014-01-01

    The odorous steroid androstadienone, a putative male chemo-signal, was previously reported to evoke sex differences in hypothalamic activation in adult heterosexual men and women. In order to investigate whether puberty modulated this sex difference in response to androstadienone, we measured the

  9. Relationship between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis and fatty acid metabolism in recurrent depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocking, Roel J. T.; Ruhé, Henricus G.; Assies, Johanna; Lok, Anja; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Visser, Ieke; Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Schene, Aart H.

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activity and fatty acid (FA)-metabolism have been observed in (recurrent) major depressive disorder (MDD). Through the pathophysiological roles of FAs in the brain and cardiovascular system, a hypothesized relationship between HPA-axis

  10. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsbouts, A.M.M.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Laan, R.F.J.M.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Putte, L.B.A. van de

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Fifty patients with RA participated in 3 groups: recent onset active RA (n = 20), longstanding active RA (n = 20) and long-standing RA in remission (n = 10), and were compared with

  11. Relationship between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis and fatty acid metabolism in recurrent depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocking, R. J. T.; Ruhe, E.; Assies, J.; Lok, A.; Koeter, M. W. J.; Visser, I.; Bockting, C. L. H.; Schene, A. H.

    Alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activity and fatty acid (FA)-metabolism have been observed in (recurrent) major depressive disorder (MDD). Through the pathophysiological roles of FAs in the brain and cardiovascular system, a hypothesized relationship between HPA-axis

  12. Revised criteria for PCOS in WHO Group II anovulatory infertility – a revival of hypothalamic amenorrhoea?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Mette Petri; Pinborg, Anja; Loft, Anne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate revised criteria for polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) in the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in anovulatory infertility. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. PATIENTS: WHO Group II anovulatory infertile women (n = 75). MEASUREMENTS: Clinical, sonographic......, but according to AMH levels, the ovaries remain multifollicular. PERSPECTIVES: A better distinction between hypothalamic amenorrhoea and PCOS could improve treatment strategies for anovulatory infertility....

  13. Sleep restriction alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, P; Koehl, M; van der Borght, K; Turek, FW

    2002-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction is an increasing problem in many countries and may have many, as yet unknown, consequences for health and well being. Studies in both humans and rats suggest that sleep deprivation may activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, one of the main neuroendocrine

  14. Fluoxetine Induces Proliferation and Inhibits Differentiation of Hypothalamic Neuroprogenitor Cells In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; Aveleira, Célia; Botelho, Mariana; Álvaro, Ana Rita; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    A significant number of children undergo maternal exposure to antidepressants and they often present low birth weight. Therefore, it is important to understand how selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect the development of the hypothalamus, the key center for metabolism regulation. In this study we investigated the proliferative actions of fluoxetine in fetal hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells and demonstrate that fluoxetine induces the proliferation of these cells, as shown by increased neurospheres size and number of proliferative cells (Ki-67+ cells). Moreover, fluoxetine inhibits the differentiation of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells, as demonstrated by decreased number of mature neurons (Neu-N+ cells) and increased number of undifferentiated cells (SOX-2+ cells). Additionally, fluoxetine-induced proliferation and maintenance of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells leads to changes in the mRNA levels of appetite regulator neuropeptides, including Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Cocaine-and-Amphetamine-Regulated-Transcript (CART). This study provides the first evidence that SSRIs affect the development of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells in vitro with consequent alterations on appetite neuropeptides. PMID:24598761

  15. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity to social stress and adolescent cannabis use : the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Andrea Prince; Creemers, Hanneke E.; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin; Verhulst, Frank C.; Ormel, Johan; Huizink, Anja C.

    Aims To investigate the relationship of life-time and repeated cannabis use with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity to social stress in a general population sample of adolescents. Design Adolescents who reported life-time or repeated cannabis use, life-time or repeated tobacco use

  16. Behavioral and endocrine responses of rats with hereditary hypothalamic diabetes insipidus (Brattleboro strain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohus, B.; Wimersma Greidanus, T.B. van; Wied, D. de

    Behavioral and endocrine profiles were established of homozygous (HO-DI) and heterozygous (HE-DI) rats with hereditary hypothalamic diabetes insipidus in comparison to Wistar strain rats. HO-DI rats were inferior in acquiring and maintaining active and passive avoidance behavior. Behavioral deficits

  17. The cerebello-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation hypothesis in depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.

    2012-01-01

    Depressive disorder can be viewed as an adaptive defense mechanism in response to excessive stress that has gone awry. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is an important node in the brain's stress circuit and suggested to play a role in several subtypes of depression. While the

  18. Mindful Parenting Predicts Mothers' and Infants' Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Activity during a Dyadic Stressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Duncan, Larissa G.; Lightcap, April; Khan, Faaiza

    2017-01-01

    Mindfulness in the parenting relationship has been proposed to help both parents and children better regulate stress, though this has not yet been shown at the physiological level. In this study, we tested relations between maternal mindfulness in parenting and both mothers' and their infants' hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity…

  19. Increased glutamic acid decarboxylase expression in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Xueyan; Balesar, R.A.; Lu, Jing; Farajnia, Sahar; Zhu, Qiongbin; Huang, Manli; Bao, Ai-Min; Swaab, D.F.

    2017-01-01

    In depression, disrupted circadian rhythms reflect abnormalities in the central circadian pacemaker, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Although many SCN neurons are said to be GABAergic, it was not yet known whether and how SCN GABA changes occur in the SCN in depression. We,

  20. Hypothalamic growth hormone deficiency in a patient with ring chromosome 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, A; Boccone, L; Angius, L; Loche, S; Falchi, A M; Cao, A

    1994-02-01

    We report on a boy with a ring 18 chromosome associated with hypothalamic growth hormone (GH) deficiency. A 12-month trial of GH replacement therapy (0.5 U/kg/week) resulted in a marked growth acceleration. Our findings emphasise the need of evaluating GH secretion in patients with abnormalities of the 18 chromosome.

  1. Challenges in the surgical treatment of epilepsy: hypothalamic hamartoma in infancy - case report

    OpenAIRE

    Mehl, Larissa Alessandra; Liberalesso, Paulo Breno Noronha; Spinosa,Mônica Jaques; Machado, Sílvio; Löhr Júnior, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hypothalamic hamartoma is a rare congenital malformation, characterized by epilepsy, especially gelastic seizures, psychomotor developmental delay, mental retardation, behavioral disorders and precocious puberty. Epilepsy has early onset and is usually medically refractory. Etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms are unclear. The EEG can present disorganization and slowing of background activity and multifocal and/or generalized epileptogenic discharges. OBJECTIVE: To report ...

  2. Mechanisms underlying prorenin actions on hypothalamic neurons implicated in cardiometabolic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Pitra

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: We identified novel neuronal targets and cellular mechanisms underlying PR/PRR actions in critical hypothalamic neurons involved in cardiometabolic regulation. This fundamental mechanistic information regarding central PR/PRR actions is essential for the development of novel RAS-based therapeutic targets for the treatment of cardiometabolic disorders in obesity and hypertension.

  3. Exercise in rats does not alter hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ulrika; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Nielsen, Jakob Nis

    2005-01-01

    or ran for 30 or 60 min on a treadmill (22 m/min, 10% slope) were sacrificed immediately after exercise or after 60 min recovery either in the fasted state or after oral gavage with glucose (3 g/kg body weight). Exercise decreased muscle and liver glycogen substantially. Hypothalamic total or a2...

  4. Bile acids modulate glucocorticoid metabolism and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in obstructive jaundice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNeilly, Alison D; Macfarlane, David P; O'Flaherty, Emmett

    2010-01-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs in cirrhosis and cholestasis and is associated with increased concentrations of bile acids. We investigated whether this was mediated through bile acids acting to impair steroid clearance by inhibiting glucocorticoid metabolism by 5bet...

  5. Androgenic anabolic steroid use and severe hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Breda, E.; Keizer, H.A.; Kuipers, H.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.

    The data of the present case demonstrate that the abuse of androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) may lead to serious health effects. Although most clinical attention is usually directed towards peripheral side effects, the most serious central side effect, hypothalamic-pituitary-dysfunction, is often

  6. Regulation of the hypothalamic release of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.M. Rondeel (Jan)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe tripeptide TRH has diverse endocrine and non-endocrine functions and is ubiquitously located in the body. Its endocrine functions relate to its role as a hypothalamic factor which stimulates the release of TSH and PRL from the adenohypophysial thyrotroph and lactotroph,

  7. Exercise protects against high-fat diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chun-Xia; Al-Massadi, Omar; Donelan, Elizabeth; Lehti, Maarit; Weber, Jon; Ress, Chandler; Trivedi, Chitrang; Müller, Timo D; Woods, Stephen C; Hofmann, Susanna M

    2012-06-25

    Hypothalamic inflammation is a potentially important process in the pathogenesis of high-fat diet-induced metabolic disorders that has recently received significant attention. Microglia are macrophage-like cells of the central nervous system which are activated by pro-inflammatory signals causing local production of specific interleukins and cytokines, and these in turn may further promote systemic metabolic disease. Whether or how this microglial activation can be averted or reversed is unknown. Since running exercise improves systemic metabolic health and has been found to promote neuronal survival as well as the recovery of brain functions after injury, we hypothesized that regular treadmill running may blunt the effect of western diet on hypothalamic inflammation. Using low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (l dlr-/-) mice to better reflect human lipid metabolism, we first confirmed that microglial activation in the hypothalamus is severely increased upon exposure to a high-fat, or "western", diet. Moderate, but regular, treadmill running exercise markedly decreased hypothalamic inflammation in these mice. Furthermore, the observed decline in microglial activation was associated with an improvement of glucose tolerance. Our findings support the hypothesis that hypothalamic inflammation can be reversed by exercise and suggest that interventions to avert or reverse neuronal damage may offer relevant potential in obesity treatment and prevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Childhood Craniopharyngioma with Hypothalamic Obesity - No Long-term Weight Reduction due to Rehabilitation Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterkenburg, A. S.; Hoffmann, A.; Gebhardt, U.; Waldeck, E.; Springer, S.; Mueller, H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Severe obesity due to hypothalamic involvement has major impact on prognosis in long-term survivors of childhood craniopharyngioma. The long-term effects of rehabilitation efforts on weight development and obesity in these patients are not analyzed up to now. Patients and Methods: 108

  9. Spontaneous remission of chiasmatic/hypothalamic masses in neurofibromatosis type 1: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, S.; Tavakolian, R.; Lehmann, R. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Humboldt Univ. of Berlin (Germany); Buske, A.; Tinschert, S. [Inst. for Medical Genetics, Humboldt Univ. of Berlin (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    We report two children with neurofibromatosis type 1 showing enhancing masses on MRI suggesting neoplasms in the chiasm and hypothalamic region. In both patients no visual or endocrinal dysfunction was present. On serial MRI spontaneous partial remission was found, implying that a cautious approach to therapeutic management of similar cases should be taken. (orig.) (orig.) With 2 figs., 16 refs.

  10. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in older persons with and without a depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, D.; Korten, N. C. M.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Stek, M. L.; van der Mast, R. C.; Voshaar, R. Oude; Comijs, H. C.

    Background: Altered functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) has been associated with depression, but findings have been inconsistent. Among older depressed persons, both hyperactivity and hypo-activity of the HPA-axis were demonstrated. However, most studies were

  11. Adversity-driven changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning during adolescence. The trails study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laceulle, Odilia M; Nederhof, Esther; van Aken, Marcel A G; Ormel, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been proposed to be a key mechanism underlying the link between adversity and mental health, but longitudinal studies on adversity and HPA-axis functioning are scarce. Here, we studied adversity-driven changes in HPA-axis functioning during

  12. Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal Axis Functioning in Reactive and Proactive Aggression in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Duran, Nestor L.; Olson, Sheryl L.; Hajal, Nastassia J.; Felt, Barbara T.; Vazquez, Delia M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) reactivity and proactive and reactive aggression in pre-pubertal children. After a 30-min controlled base line period, 73 7-year-old children (40 males and 33 females) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental tasks designed to…

  13. The effects of stress on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function in subjects with schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.C. Guest (Paul); D. Martins-de-Souza (Daniel); H. Rahmoune (Hassan); S. Bahn (Sabine); P.C. Guest (Paul)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractOver the last few decades, evidence has been emerging that the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia can involve perturbations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Variations in the manifestation of these effects could be related to the differences in

  14. Adolescent Survivors of Hurricane Katrina: A Pilot Study of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Tucker, Phebe; Nitiéma, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background: The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis constitutes an important biological component of the stress response commonly studied through the measurement of cortisol. Limited research has examined HPA axis dysregulation in youth exposed to disasters. Objective: This study examined HPA axis activation in adolescent Hurricane Katrina…

  15. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity to social stress and adolescent cannabis use: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prince van Leeuwen, A.; Creemers, H.E.; Greaves-Lord, K.; Verhulst, F.C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the relationship of life-time and repeated cannabis use with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity to social stress in a general population sample of adolescents. Design: Adolescents who reported life-time or repeated cannabis use, life-time or repeated tobacco

  16. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in older persons with and without a depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, D.; Korten, N.C.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Stek, M.L.; van der Mast, R.; Oude Voshaar, R.; Comijs, H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Altered functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) has been associated with depression, but findings have been inconsistent. Among older depressed persons, both hyperactivity and hypo-activity of the HPA-axis were demonstrated. However, most studies were

  17. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in older persons with and without a depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, D.; Korten, N.C.; Penninx, B.W.; Stek, M.L.; Mast, R.C. van der; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Comijs, H.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Altered functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) has been associated with depression, but findings have been inconsistent. Among older depressed persons, both hyperactivity and hypo-activity of the HPA-axis were demonstrated. However, most studies were

  18. Non Sense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjort, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    The Danish upper secondary school was reformed in 2005. The reform had been anticipated for a long time. It was badly needed and much was expected of it but when the reform was implemented, many teachers experienced several of the new measures as irrational or even absurd. The new legislation didn......’t make sense but appeared extremely complicated and contradictionary. This article studies the school reform through the filter of discourse analysis. The reform represents an advances version of liberal management and is construed as an alliance between 4 conflicting regimes of practice. Consequently...... the reform is very difficult to handle for the teachers and the school management. They are facing a lot of dilemmas and the issue of professional competence development is becoming crucial....

  19. Sensing temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Piali; Garrity, Paul

    2013-04-22

    Temperature is an omnipresent physical variable reflecting the rotational, vibrational and translational motion of matter, what Richard Feynman called the "jiggling" of atoms. Temperature varies across space and time, and this variation has dramatic effects on the physiology of living cells. It changes the rate and nature of chemical reactions, and it alters the configuration of the atoms that make up nucleic acids, proteins, lipids and other biomolecules, significantly affecting their activity. While life may have started in a "warm little pond", as Charles Darwin mused, the organisms that surround us today have only made it this far by devising sophisticated systems for sensing and responding to variations in temperature, and by using these systems in ways that allow them to persist and thrive in the face of thermal fluctuation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Plasmonic sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic sensors typically rely on detection of changes in the refractive index of the surrounding medium. Here, an alternative approach is reported based on electrical surface screening and controlled dissolution of ultrasmall silver nanoparticles (NPs; R ... increase in the sensitivity, as compared to traditional refractive index sensing. Here, a detection scheme based on controlled dissolution is reported. Monitoring the plasmon band, while the particles are continuously decreased in size, enables the investigation of size-related effects on the same fixed...... in the plasmon band. This is demonstrated by using the strong nucleophiles, cyanide and cysteamine, as ligands. The “dissolution paths” in terms of peak wavelength and amplitude shifts differ significantly between different types of analytes, which are suggested as a means to obtain selectivity of the detection...

  1. Estrogen is neuroprotective against hypoglycemic injury in murine N38 hypothalamic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Tandra R; Cohen, Joshua; Yohanan, Darien; Alicea, Eilliut; Weeks, Benjamin S; Chakraborty, Sanjoy

    2016-12-01

    Estrogen (E2) has been demonstrated to possess protective effects from hypoglycemic toxicity, particularly in the pancreas. In the central nervous system, several brain regions, such as the hypothalamus, are highly vulnerable to hypoglycemic injuries that may lead to seizures, coma, and mortality. The present study performed a novel in vitro assay of hypoglycemic injury to hypothalamic cells, and is the first study, to the best of our knowledge, to demonstrate that E2 protects hypothalamic cells from hypoglycemic toxicity. The toxic effects of hypoglycemia on hypothalamic cells in vitro was determined by performing cell counts, together with MTT and lactate dehydrogenase assays, using the N38 murine hypothalamic cell line. Following 24 and 48 h in hypoglycemic conditions, a 60 and 75% reduction in cell number and mitochondrial function was observed, which reached 80 and ~100% by 72 and 96 h, respectively. E2 treatment prevented the hypoglycemia‑induced loss in cell number and mitochondrial toxicity at 24 and 48 h. However at 72 and 96 h of hypoglycemic conditions, the neuroprotective effects of E2 on cell number or mitochondrial function was not significant or not present at all. In order to determine whether E2 exerted its effects through the AKT signaling pathway, the expression of proline‑rich AKT substrate of 40 kDa (PRAS40) was analyzed. No alterations in PRAS40 expression were observed when N38 cells were exposed to hypoglycemic shock. From the biochemical and molecular data obtained, the authors speculated that E2 exhibits neuroprotective effects against hypoglycemic shock in hypothalamic cells, which dissipates with time. Despite demonstrating no significant effect on total AKT/PRS40 activity, it is possible that E2 may mediate these neuroprotective effects by upregulating the phosphorylated‑AKT/pPRAS40 signaling pathway. The present study presented, to the best of our knowledge, the first in vitro model for hypoglycemic toxicity to

  2. Nutrient removal from farm effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolan, N S; Wong, L; Adriano, D C

    2004-09-01

    The objectives of the study were: (i) to examine the efficiency of nutrient removal during the treatment of dairy farm effluent in a two-pond system, and (ii) to produce an inexpensive but effective nutrient trap which could be recycled as a nutrient source or soil mulch. The concentration of chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) in a two-pond system used to treat dairy farm effluent was monitored over a period of 7 months. The retention of nutrients by two porous materials was examined both in the laboratory batch (zeolite and bark) and pilot-scale field (bark) experiments. The results indicated that biological treatment of farm effluents using the two-pond system was not effective in the removal of nutrients, which are likely to become pollutant when discharged to waterways. Both the bark and zeolite materials were effective in the removal of N, P and K from effluent. These materials can be placed in the second (i.e., aerobic) pond to treat effluents, which can then be discharged to streams with minimum impact on water quality. The nutrient-enriched porous materials can be recycled as a source of nutrients and soil conditioner.

  3. Hypothalamic neuroendocrine circuitry is programmed by maternal obesity: interaction with postnatal nutritional environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Early life nutrition is critical for the development of hypothalamic neurons involved in energy homeostasis. We previously showed that intrauterine and early postnatal overnutrition programmed hypothalamic neurons expressing the appetite stimulator neuropeptide Y (NPY and suppressor proopiomelanocortin (POMC in offspring at weaning. However, the long-term effects of such programming and its interactions with post-weaning high-fat-diet (HFD consumption are unclear. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Female Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to chow or HFD for 5 weeks before mating, throughout gestation and lactation. On postnatal day 1, litters were adjusted to 3/litter to induce postnatal overnutrition (vs. 12 in control. At postnatal day 20, half of the rats from each maternal group were weaned onto chow or HFD for 15 weeks. Hypothalamic appetite regulators, and fuel (glucose and lipid metabolic markers were measured. RESULTS: Offspring from obese dams gained more weight than those from lean dams independent of post-weaning diet. Maternal obesity interacted with post-weaning HFD consumption to cause greater levels of hyperphagia, adiposity, hyperlipidemia, and glucose intolerance in offspring. This was linked to increased hypothalamic NPY signaling and leptin resistance in adult offspring. Litter size reduction had a detrimental impact on insulin and adiponectin, while hypothalamic NPY and POMC mRNA expression were suppressed in the face of normal energy intake and weight gain. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal obesity, postnatal litter size reduction and post-weaning HFD consumption caused obesity via different neuroendocrine mechanism. There were strong additive effects of maternal obesity and post-weaning HFD consumption to increase the metabolic disorders in offspring.

  4. Resolvin RvD2 reduces hypothalamic inflammation and rescues mice from diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoal, Livia B; Bombassaro, Bruna; Ramalho, Albina F; Coope, Andressa; Moura, Rodrigo F; Correa-da-Silva, Felipe; Ignacio-Souza, Leticia; Razolli, Daniela; de Oliveira, Diogo; Catharino, Rodrigo; Velloso, Licio A

    2017-01-05

    Diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation is an important mechanism leading to dysfunction of neurons involved in controlling body mass. Studies have shown that polyunsaturated fats can reduce hypothalamic inflammation. Here, we evaluated the presence and function of RvD2, a resolvin produced from docosahexaenoic acid, in the hypothalamus of mice. Male Swiss mice were fed either chow or a high-fat diet. RvD2 receptor and synthetic enzymes were evaluated by real-time PCR and immunofluorescence. RvD2 was determined by mass spectrometry. Dietary and pharmacological approaches were used to modulate the RvD2 system in the hypothalamus, and metabolic phenotype consequences were determined. All enzymes involved in the synthesis of RvD2 were detected in the hypothalamus and were modulated in response to the consumption of dietary saturated fats, leading to a reduction of hypothalamic RvD2. GPR18, the receptor for RvD2, which was detected in POMC and NPY neurons, was also modulated by dietary fats. The substitution of saturated by polyunsaturated fats in the diet resulted in increased hypothalamic RvD2, which was accompanied by reduced body mass and improved glucose tolerance. The intracerebroventricular treatment with docosahexaenoic acid resulted in increased expression of the RvD2 synthetic enzymes, increased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and improved metabolic phenotype. Finally, intracerebroventricular treatment with RvD2 resulted in reduced adiposity, improved glucose tolerance and increased hypothalamic expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Thus, RvD2 is produced in the hypothalamus, and its receptor and synthetic enzymes are modulated by dietary fats. The improved metabolic outcomes of RvD2 make this substance an attractive approach to treat obesity.

  5. TR alpha 2 exerts dominant negative effects on hypothalamic Trh transcription in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guissouma, Hajer; Ghaddab-Zroud, Rym; Seugnet, Isabelle; Decherf, Stéphanie; Demeneix, Barbara; Clerget-Froidevaux, Marie-Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) have multiple isoforms, including the bona fide receptors that bind T3 (TRα1, TRβ1 and TRβ2) and a non-hormone-binding variant, TRα2. Intriguingly, TRα2 is strongly expressed in the brain, where its mRNA levels exceed those of functional TRs. Ablation of TRα2 in mice results in over-expression of TRα1, and a complex phenotype with low levels of free T3 and T4, without elevated TSH levels, suggesting an alteration in the negative feedback at the hypothalamic-pituitary level. As the hypothesis of a potential TRH response defect has never been tested, we explored the functional role of TRα2 in negative feedback on transcription of hypothalamic thyrotropin, Trh. The in vivo transcriptional effects of TRα2 on hypothalamic Trh were analysed using an in vivo reporter gene approach. Effects on Trh-luc expression were examined to that of two, T3 positively regulated genes used as controls. Applying in vivo gene transfer showed that TRα2 over-expression in the mouse hypothαlamus abrogates T3-dependent repression of Trh and T3 activation of positively regulated promoters, blocking their physiological regulation. Surprisingly, loss of function studies carried out by introducing a shTRα2 construct in the hypothalamus also blocked physiological T3 dependent regulation. Thus, modulating hypothalamic TRα2 expression by either gain or loss of function abrogated T3 dependent regulation of Trh transcription, producing constant transcriptional levels insensitive to feedback. This loss of physiological regulation was reflected at the level of the endogenous Trh gene, were gain or loss of function held mRNA levels constant. These results reveal the as yet undescribed dominant negative role of TRα2 over TRα1 effect on hypothalamic Trh transcription.

  6. Litter size variation in hypothalamic gene expression determines adult metabolic phenotype in Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early postnatal environments may have long-term and potentially irreversible consequences on hypothalamic neurons involved in energy homeostasis. Litter size is an important life history trait and negatively correlated with milk intake in small mammals, and thus has been regarded as a naturally varying feature of the early developmental environment. Here we investigated the long-term effects of litter size on metabolic phenotype and hypothalamic neuropeptide mRNA expression involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, using the offspring reared from large (10-12 and small (3-4 litter sizes, of Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii, a rodent species from Inner Mongolia grassland in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hypothalamic leptin signaling and neuropeptides were measured by Real-Time PCR. We showed that offspring reared from small litters were heavier at weaning and also in adulthood than offspring from large litters, accompanied by increased food intake during development. There were no significant differences in serum leptin levels or leptin receptor (OB-Rb mRNA in the hypothalamus at weaning or in adulthood, however, hypothalamic suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3 mRNA in adulthood increased in small litters compared to that in large litters. As a result, the agouti-related peptide (AgRP mRNA increased in the offspring from small litters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings support our hypothesis that natural litter size has a permanent effect on offspring metabolic phenotype and hypothalamic neuropeptide expression, and suggest central leptin resistance and the resultant increase in AgRP expression may be a fundamental mechanism underlying hyperphagia and the increased risk of overweight in pups of small litters. Thus, we conclude that litter size may be an important and central determinant of metabolic fitness in adulthood.

  7. Decomposition, nutrient release patterns and nutrient fluxes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were conducted on leaf litter fall, decomposition, nutrient release patterns and nutrient fluxes of Akyaakrom (AS) and Dopiri (DS) secondary forest leaf litter in Dwinyama watershed. Leaf litter production were 9.1 and 6.8 t ha-1 y-1 in AS and 8.9 and 6.5 t ha-1 y-1 in DS in the 1st (September 1998-August 1999) and ...

  8. Changes in the responsiveness of hypothalamic prokineticin 2 mRNA expression to food deprivation in developing female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Munkhzaya, Munkhsaikhan; Tungalagsuvd, Altankhuu; Kawami, Takako; Murakami, Masahiro; Yamasaki, Mikio; Kato, Takeshi; Kuwahara, Akira; Yasui, Toshiyuki; Irahara, Minoru

    2014-05-01

    Prokineticin 2 (PK2) is highly expressed in several regions of the central nervous system, including the hypothalamus. Recently, it has been suggested that PK2 plays a role in appetite regulation. In adult male rodents, the administration of PK2 decreased food intake, and PK2 mRNA expression was reduced by food deprivation. Usually, the changes in the expression levels of appetite-regulating factors induced in response to fasting are not fully established during the neonatal period. Thus, we investigated the developmental changes in hypothalamic PK2 mRNA expression and the alterations in hypothalamic PK2 mRNA expression induced by fasting during the pre-pubertal period in female rats. The changes in hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA expression were also examined because NPY is a potent appetite regulatory factor. Hypothalamic PK2 mRNA expression was extremely high during the early neonatal period (postnatal day (PND) 5) compared with that observed during subsequent periods (PND15, 25, and 42), while hypothalamic NPY mRNA expression did not differ among any of the examined periods. A fasting-induced reduction in hypothalamic PK2 mRNA expression was observed on PND5, but no fasting-induced increase in hypothalamic NPY mRNA expression was seen during the same period. In addition, the fasting-induced reduction in hypothalamic PK2 mRNA expression observed on PND5 was more marked than that seen on PND25. These results suggest that the sensitivity of hypothalamic PK2 expression to undernutrition develops during the early neonatal period, when the responses of other appetite regulatory factors to such pressures remain immature. Copyright © 2014 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nutrient and Coliform Loading (NCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a database of available fecal coliform bacteria, fecal streptococci bacteria, and nutrient loading data. Loading for contaminants other than fecal coliform...

  10. Nutrient imbalance in Norway spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelin, Gunnar

    2000-11-01

    The studies presented in my thesis indicate that growing Norway spruce in monoculture does not constitute sustainable forest management in a high N and S deposition environment, such as in southern Sweden. The combination of N-induced high growth rates and leaching due to soil acidification causes soil reserves of nutrients to decrease. This will increase the risk of nutrient imbalance within the trees when nutrient demands are not met. The development of nutrient imbalance in Scania, southern Sweden, was shown as negative trends in needle and soil nutrient status from the mid-80s to the present in Norway spruce and Scots pine stands. This imbalance appears to be connected to high levels of N and S deposition. Clear negative effects on tree vitality were found when using a new branch development method. Today, growth and vitality seems to be limited by K, rather than N, in spruce stands older than 40 years. However, younger stands appear to be able to absorb the deposited N without negative effects on growth and vitality. When investigating effects of nutrient stress on tree vitality, indicators such as branch length and shoot multiplication rate, which include effects accumulated over several years, are suitable. Countermeasures are needed in order to maintain the forest production at a high level. Positive effects on tree nutrient status after vitality fertilization (N-free fertilization) was shown in two micronutrient deficient stands in south-central Sweden. In addition, tree vitality was positively affected after the application of a site-adapted fertilizer to the canopy. Site-adaption of fertilizers will most likely improve the possibilities of a positive response on tree growth and vitality in declining stands. In a survey of Norway spruce in mixtures with beech, birch, or oak compared to monocultures it was shown that spruce nutrient status was higher in mixtures with deciduous species than in monocultures. By using mixed-species stands the need for

  11. [Use of Remote Sensing for Crop and Soil Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Chris J.

    1997-01-01

    The primary agricultural objective of this research is to determine what soil and crop information can be verified from remotely sensed images during the growing season. Specifically: (1) Elements of crop stress due to drought, weeds, disease and nutrient deficiencies will be documented with ground truth over specific agricultural sites and (2) Use of remote sensing with GPS and GIS technology for providing a safe and environmentally friendly application of fertilizers and chemicals will be documented.

  12. Pharyngeal sense organs drive robust sugar consumption in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    LeDue, Emily E; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Jung, Aera Y; Dahanukar, Anupama; Gordon, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    The fly pharyngeal sense organs lie at the transition between external and internal nutrient sensing mechanisms. Here, we investigate the function of pharyngeal sweet gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs), demonstrating that they express a subset of the nine previously identified sweet receptors and respond to stimulation with a panel of sweet compounds. We show that pox-neuro (poxn) mutants lacking taste function in the legs and labial palps have intact pharyngeal sweet taste, which is both nece...

  13. Sonic hedgehog lineage in the mouse hypothalamus: from progenitor domains to hypothalamic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez-Bolado Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hypothalamus is a brain region with essential functions for homeostasis and energy metabolism, and alterations of its development can contribute to pathological conditions in the adult, like hypertension, diabetes or obesity. However, due to the anatomical complexity of the hypothalamus, its development is not well understood. Sonic hedgehog (Shh is a key developmental regulator gene expressed in a dynamic pattern in hypothalamic progenitor cells. To obtain insight into hypothalamic organization, we used genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM to map the lineages derived from Shh-expressing progenitor domains onto the four rostrocaudally arranged hypothalamic regions: preoptic, anterior, tuberal and mammillary. Results Shh-expressing progenitors labeled at an early stage (before embryonic day (E9.5 contribute neurons and astrocytes to a large caudal area including the mammillary and posterior tuberal regions as well as tanycytes (specialized median eminence glia. Progenitors labeled at later stages (after E9.5 give rise to neurons and astrocytes of the entire tuberal region and in particular the ventromedial nucleus, but not to cells in the mammillary region and median eminence. At this stage, an additional Shh-expressing domain appears in the preoptic area and contributes mostly astrocytes to the hypothalamus. Shh-expressing progenitors do not contribute to the anterior region at any stage. Finally, we show a gradual shift from neurogenesis to gliogenesis, so that progenitors expressing Shh after E12.5 generate almost exclusively hypothalamic astrocytes. Conclusions We define a fate map of the hypothalamus, based on the dynamic expression of Shh in the hypothalamic progenitor zones. We provide evidence that the large neurogenic Shh-expressing progenitor domains of the ventral diencephalon are continuous with those of the midbrain. We demonstrate that the four classical transverse zones of the hypothalamus have clearly

  14. Sonic hedgehog lineage in the mouse hypothalamus: from progenitor domains to hypothalamic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Paul, Fabian A; Blaess, Sandra

    2012-01-20

    The hypothalamus is a brain region with essential functions for homeostasis and energy metabolism, and alterations of its development can contribute to pathological conditions in the adult, like hypertension, diabetes or obesity. However, due to the anatomical complexity of the hypothalamus, its development is not well understood. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a key developmental regulator gene expressed in a dynamic pattern in hypothalamic progenitor cells. To obtain insight into hypothalamic organization, we used genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM) to map the lineages derived from Shh-expressing progenitor domains onto the four rostrocaudally arranged hypothalamic regions: preoptic, anterior, tuberal and mammillary. Shh-expressing progenitors labeled at an early stage (before embryonic day (E)9.5) contribute neurons and astrocytes to a large caudal area including the mammillary and posterior tuberal regions as well as tanycytes (specialized median eminence glia). Progenitors labeled at later stages (after E9.5) give rise to neurons and astrocytes of the entire tuberal region and in particular the ventromedial nucleus, but not to cells in the mammillary region and median eminence. At this stage, an additional Shh-expressing domain appears in the preoptic area and contributes mostly astrocytes to the hypothalamus. Shh-expressing progenitors do not contribute to the anterior region at any stage. Finally, we show a gradual shift from neurogenesis to gliogenesis, so that progenitors expressing Shh after E12.5 generate almost exclusively hypothalamic astrocytes. We define a fate map of the hypothalamus, based on the dynamic expression of Shh in the hypothalamic progenitor zones. We provide evidence that the large neurogenic Shh-expressing progenitor domains of the ventral diencephalon are continuous with those of the midbrain. We demonstrate that the four classical transverse zones of the hypothalamus have clearly defined progenitor domains and that there is little or no

  15. Sonic hedgehog lineage in the mouse hypothalamus: from progenitor domains to hypothalamic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypothalamus is a brain region with essential functions for homeostasis and energy metabolism, and alterations of its development can contribute to pathological conditions in the adult, like hypertension, diabetes or obesity. However, due to the anatomical complexity of the hypothalamus, its development is not well understood. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a key developmental regulator gene expressed in a dynamic pattern in hypothalamic progenitor cells. To obtain insight into hypothalamic organization, we used genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM) to map the lineages derived from Shh-expressing progenitor domains onto the four rostrocaudally arranged hypothalamic regions: preoptic, anterior, tuberal and mammillary. Results Shh-expressing progenitors labeled at an early stage (before embryonic day (E)9.5) contribute neurons and astrocytes to a large caudal area including the mammillary and posterior tuberal regions as well as tanycytes (specialized median eminence glia). Progenitors labeled at later stages (after E9.5) give rise to neurons and astrocytes of the entire tuberal region and in particular the ventromedial nucleus, but not to cells in the mammillary region and median eminence. At this stage, an additional Shh-expressing domain appears in the preoptic area and contributes mostly astrocytes to the hypothalamus. Shh-expressing progenitors do not contribute to the anterior region at any stage. Finally, we show a gradual shift from neurogenesis to gliogenesis, so that progenitors expressing Shh after E12.5 generate almost exclusively hypothalamic astrocytes. Conclusions We define a fate map of the hypothalamus, based on the dynamic expression of Shh in the hypothalamic progenitor zones. We provide evidence that the large neurogenic Shh-expressing progenitor domains of the ventral diencephalon are continuous with those of the midbrain. We demonstrate that the four classical transverse zones of the hypothalamus have clearly defined progenitor domains

  16. Sex-dependent effects of microcystin-LR on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad axis and gametogenesis of adult zebrafish

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Wanjing; Chen, Chuanyue; Chen, Liang; Wang, Li; Li, Jian; Chen, Yuanyuan; Jin, Jienan; Kawan, Atufa; Zhang, Xuezhen

    2016-01-01

    .... Transcriptional changes of 22 genes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad (HPG) axis exhibited sex-specific responses, and the relationship between gene transcriptions and gametogenesis was evaluated by principle component analysis (PCA...

  17. The hypothalamic- pituitary -adrenal -leptin axis and metabolic health: A systems approach to resilience, robustness and control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aschbacher, K.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, M.; Wietmarschen, H. van; Tomiyama, A.; Jain, S.; Epel, E.; Doyle III, F.J.; Greef, J. van der

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids contribute to obesity and metabolic syndrome; however, the mechanisms are unclear, and prognostic measures are unavailable. A systems level understanding of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) -leptin axis may reveal novel insights. Eighteen obese premenopausal women provided

  18. Hypothalamic Food Intake Regulating Areas are Involved in the Homeostasis of Blood Glucose and Plasma FFA Levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steffens, A.B.; Scheurink, A.J.W.; Luiten, P.G.M.; Bohus, B.

    1988-01-01

    The hypothalamus fulfills multiple functions, e.g., integration of food and water ingestion, various forms of social behavior and physiological neuroendocrine activities. Hypothalamic areas, particularly the ventromedial, lateral and paraventricular areas (VMH, LHA and PVN respectively), that

  19. Fetal Programming of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) Axis: Low Birth Weight and Central HPA Regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ward, Alexandra M. V; Syddall, Holly E; Wood, Peter J; Chrousos, George P; Phillips, David I. W

    2004-01-01

    Fetal programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been proposed as an intermediary in the association between reduced fetal growth and adult cardiovascular and metabolic diseases...

  20. Compost supplementation with nutrients and microorganisms in composting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Óscar J; Ospina, Diego A; Montoya, Sandra

    2017-11-01

    The composting is an aerobic, microorganism-mediated, solid-state fermentation process by which different organic materials are transformed into more stable compounds. The product obtained is the compost, which contributes to the improvement of physical, chemical and microbiological properties of the soil. However, the compost usage in agriculture is constrained because of its long-time action and reduced supply of nutrients to the crops. To enhance the content of nutrients assimilable by the plants in the compost, its supplementation with nutrients and inoculation with microorganisms have been proposed. The objective of this work was to review the state of the art on compost supplementation with nutrients and the role played by the microorganisms involved (or added) in their transformation during the composting process. The phases of composting are briefly compiled and different strategies for supplementation are analyzed. The utilization of nitrogenous materials and addition of microorganisms fixing nitrogen from the atmosphere or oxidizing ammonia into more assimilable for plants nitrogenous forms are analyzed. Several strategies for nitrogen conservation during composting are presented as well. The supplementation with phosphorus and utilization of microorganisms solubilizing phosphorus and potassium are also discussed. Main groups of microorganisms relevant during the composting process are described as well as most important strategies to identify them. In general, the development of this type of nutrient-enriched bio-inputs requires research and development not only in the supplementation of compost itself, but also in the isolation and identification of microorganisms and genes allowing the degradation and conversion of nitrogenous substances and materials containing potassium and phosphorus present in the feedstocks undergoing the composting process. In this sense, most important research trends and strategies to increase nutrient content in the compost

  1. Crossover of the hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal/interrenal (HPA), -thyroid (HPT), and -gonadal (HPG) axes in testicular development

    OpenAIRE

    Castañeda Cortés, Diana C.; Langlois, Valerie S.; Juan I Fernandino

    2014-01-01

    Besides the well-known function of thyroid hormones (THs) for regulating metabolism, it has recently been discovered that THs are also involved in testicular development in mammalian and non-mammalian species. THs, in combination with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), lead to androgen synthesis in Denio rerio, which results in the onset of spermatogenesis in the testis, potentially relating the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid gland (HPT) to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes. Furt...

  2. Tuberal Hypothalamic Neurons Secreting the Satiety Molecule Nesfatin-1 Are Critically Involved in Paradoxical (REM) Sleep Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Jego, Sonia; Salvert, Denise; Renouard, Leslie; Mori, Masatomo; Goutagny, Romain; Luppi, Pierre-Herv?; Fort, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    The recently discovered Nesfatin-1 plays a role in appetite regulation as a satiety factor through hypothalamic leptin-independent mechanisms. Nesfatin-1 is co-expressed with Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH) in neurons from the tuberal hypothalamic area (THA) which are recruited during sleep states, especially paradoxical sleep (PS). To help decipher the contribution of this contingent of THA neurons to sleep regulatory mechanisms, we thus investigated in rats whether the co-factor Nesfati...

  3. Nutrient acquisition strategies of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Wilhelm; Thompson, Craig B

    2017-06-07

    Mammalian cells are surrounded by diverse nutrients, such as glucose, amino acids, various macromolecules and micronutrients, which they can import through transmembrane transporters and endolysosomal pathways. By using different nutrient sources, cells gain metabolic flexibility to survive periods of starvation. Quiescent cells take up sufficient nutrients to sustain homeostasis. However, proliferating cells depend on growth-factor-induced increases in nutrient uptake to support biomass formation. Here, we review cellular nutrient acquisition strategies and their regulation by growth factors and cell-intrinsic nutrient sensors. We also discuss how oncogenes and tumour suppressors promote nutrient uptake and thereby support the survival and growth of cancer cells.

  4. In situ hybridization of oxytocin messenger RNA: macroscopic distribution and quantitation in rat hypothalamic cell groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbach, J.P.; Voorhuis, T.A.; van Tol, H.H.; Ivell, R.

    1987-05-29

    Oxytocin mRNA was detected in the rat hypothalamus by in situ hybridization to a single stranded /sup 35/S-labelled DNA probe and the distribution of oxytocin mRNA-containing cell groups was studied at the macroscopic level. Specificity of hybridization was confirmed by comparison to vasopressin mRNA hybridization in parallel tissue sections. Cell groups containing oxytocin mRNA were confined to a set of hypothalamic cell groups, i.c. the supraoptic, paraventricular, anterior commissural nuclei, nucleus circularis and scattered hypothalamic islets. These cell groups displayed similar densities of autoradiographic signals indicating that the oxytocin gene is expressed at approximately the same average level at these various sites.

  5. Early life origins of metabolic disease: Developmental programming of hypothalamic pathways controlling energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearden, Laura; Ozanne, Susan E

    2015-10-01

    A wealth of animal and human studies demonstrate that perinatal exposure to adverse metabolic conditions - be it maternal obesity, diabetes or under-nutrition - results in predisposition of offspring to develop obesity later in life. This mechanism is a contributing factor to the exponential rise in obesity rates. Increased weight gain in offspring exposed to maternal obesity is usually associated with hyperphagia, implicating altered central regulation of energy homeostasis as an underlying cause. Perinatal development of the hypothalamus (a brain region key to metabolic regulation) is plastic and sensitive to metabolic signals during this critical time window. Recent research in non-human primate and rodent models has demonstrated that exposure to adverse maternal environments impairs the development of hypothalamic structure and consequently function, potentially underpinning metabolic phenotypes in later life. This review summarizes our current knowledge of how adverse perinatal environments program hypothalamic development and explores the mechanisms that could mediate these effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Anatomy of melancholia: focus on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis overactivity and the role of vasopressin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dinan, Timothy G

    2012-02-03

    Overactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis characterized by hypercortisolism, adrenal hyperplasia and abnormalities in negative feedback is the most consistently described biological abnormality in melancholic depression. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) are the main secretagogues of the HPA\\/stress system. Produced in the parvicellular division of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus the release of these peptides is influenced by inputs from monoaminergic neurones. In depression, anterior pituitary CRH1 receptors are down-regulated and response to CRH infusion is blunted. By contrast, vasopressin V3 receptors on the anterior pituitary show enhanced response to AVP stimulation and this enhancement plays a key role in maintaining HPA overactivity.

  7. The contribution of hypothalamic macroglia to the regulation of energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckman, Laura B; Ellacott, Kate L J

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamus is critical for the regulation of energy homeostasis. Genetic and pharmacologic studies have identified a number of key hypothalamic neuronal circuits that integrate signals controlling food intake and energy expenditure. Recently, studies have begun to emerge demonstrating a role for non-neuronal cell types in the regulation of energy homeostasis. In particular the potential importance of different glial cell types is increasingly being recognized. A number of studies have described changes in the activity of hypothalamic macroglia (principally astrocytes and tanycytes) in response to states of positive and negative energy balance, such as obesity and fasting. This article will review these studies and discuss how these findings are changing our understanding of the cellular mechanisms by which energy homeostasis is regulated.

  8. The contribution of hypothalamic macroglia to the regulation of energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Buckman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is critical for the regulation of energy homeostasis. Genetic and pharmacologic studies have identified a number of key hypothalamic neuronal circuits that integrate signals controlling food intake and energy expenditure. Recently studies have begun to emerge demonstrating a role for non-neuronal cell types in the regulation of energy homeostasis. In particular the potential importance of different glial cell types is increasingly being recognized. A number of studies have described changes in the activity of hypothalamic macroglia (principally astrocytes and tanycytes in response to states of positive and negative energy balance, such as obesity and fasting. This article will review these studies and discuss how these findings are changing our understanding of the cellular mechanisms by which energy homeostasis is regulated.

  9. Primary hypothyroidism, precocious puberty and hypothalamic obesity in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyambada, Leena; Bhatia, Vijayalakshmi; Krishnani, Narendra; Agarwal, Vinita; Bhattacharyya, Avik; Jain, Sunil; Mishra, S K; Marwaha, R K

    2011-03-01

    A 5 year old girl presented with central diabetes insipidus and primary hypothyroidism. No clinical or radiological evidence of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) was present. Absent posterior pituitary bright spot was seen in magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. She subsequently developed severe headache, massive obesity, accelerated growth and thelarche. A repeat MRI of the brain revealed hypothalamic tumor. Hormonal investigations revealed, paradoxically, undetectable growth hormone on a clonidine stimulation test. Langerhans cell histiocytosis was proved on electron microscopy of the thyroid tissue. There needs to be a high degree of suspicion for LCH as an etiology of primary hypothyroidism, especially in the presence of diabetes insipidus. Precocious puberty, accelerated growth despite growth hormone deficiency, hypothalamic obesity may occur in pediatric LCH. CNS lesions may have an evolving course, thus repeat neuroimaging is important.

  10. Hypothalamic, rectal, and muscle temperatures in exercising dogs - Effect of cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, B.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Kozlowski, S.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the mechanisms of performance prolongation during exercise is presented. Measurements were obtained of the rectal, muscle, and hypothalamic temperature of dogs during treadmill exercise at an ambient temperature of 22 + or - 1 C, with and without cooling by use of ice packs. In comparison with exercise without cooling, exercise with cooling was found to: (1) increase exercise duration from 90 + or - 14 to 145 + or - 15 min; (2) attenuate increases in hypothalamic, rectal and muscle temperature; (3) decrease respiratory and heart rates; and (4) lower blood lactic acid content. It is shown that although significant differences were found between the brain, core, and muscle temperatures during exercise with and without cooling, an inverse relation was observed between muscle temperature and the total duration of exercise. It is suggested that sustained muscle hyperthermia may have contributed to the limitation of working ability in exercise with and without cooling.

  11. Are circadian rhythms the code of hypothalamic-immune communication? Insights from natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, Alvaro; Sarkar, Dipak K

    2008-04-01

    Circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior are ultimately regulated at the hypothalamic level by the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). This central oscillator transduces photic information to the cellular clocks in the periphery through the autonomic nervous system and the neuroendocrine system. The fact that these two systems have been shown to modulate leukocyte physiology supports the concept that the circadian component is an important aspect of hypothalamic-immune communication. Circadian disruption has been linked to immune dysregulation, and recent reports suggest that several circadian clock genes, in addition to their time-keeping role, are involved in the immune response. In this overview, we summarize the findings demonstrating that Natural Killer (NK) cell function is under circadian control.

  12. Alterations in hypothalamic gene expression following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkholt, Pernille; Pedersen, Philip J.; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2016-01-01

    of energy balance.  Methods: Lean male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either RYGB or sham surgery. Body weight and food intake were monitored bi-weekly for 60 days post-surgery. In situ hybridization mRNA analysis of hypothalamic AgRP, NPY, CART, POMC and MCH was applied to RYGB and sham animals and compared...... compared with sham operated controls. In the arcuate nucleus, RYGB surgery increased mRNA levels of orexigenic AgRP and NPY, whereas no change was observed in anorexigenic CART and POMC mRNA levels. A similar pattern was seen in food-restricted versus ad libitum fed rats. In contrast to a significant...... surgery increases the mRNA levels of hunger-associated signaling markers in the rat arcuate nucleus without concomitantly increasing downstream MCH expression in the lateral hypothalamus, suggesting that RYGB surgery puts a brake on orexigenic hypothalamic output signals. In addition, down...

  13. Hunger-promoting hypothalamic neurons modulate effector and regulatory T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarese, Giuseppe; Procaccini, Claudio; Menale, Ciro; Kim, Jae Geun; Kim, Jung Dae; Diano, Sabrina; Diano, Nadia; De Rosa, Veronica; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Horvath, Tamas L

    2013-04-09

    Whole-body energy metabolism is regulated by the hypothalamus and has an impact on diverse tissue functions. Here we show that selective knockdown of Sirtuin 1 Sirt1 in hypothalamic Agouti-related peptide-expressing neurons, which renders these cells less responsive to cues of low energy availability, significantly promotes CD4(+) T-cell activation by increasing production of T helper 1 and 17 proinflammatory cytokines via mediation of the sympathetic nervous system. These phenomena were associated with an impaired thymic generation of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3(+)) naturally occurring regulatory T cells and their reduced suppressive capacity in the periphery, which resulted in increased delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and autoimmune disease susceptibility in mice. These observations unmask a previously unsuspected role of hypothalamic feeding circuits in the regulation of adaptive immune response.

  14. Modeling the involvement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axes in autoimmune and stress-related rheumatic syndromes in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofford, L J; Jacobson, J; Young, E

    1999-03-01

    Autoimmune and stress-related rheumatic diseases are significantly more common in women than in men. Our group has focused on the role of two principal neuroendocrine axes, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, in this increased susceptibility to rheumatic disease. We review the physiology of the HPA and HPG axes and discuss their reciprocal interactions. Mechanisms by which hormones of the HPA and HPG axes influence the immune system and modulate the course of autoimmune inflammatory diseases in animal models of rheumatic disease are described. In addition, we review the data suggesting the importance of these neurohormonal systems in rheumatic diseases. These data provide insights into why women may be at increased risk and how we might better understand the mechanisms that provoke expression of rheumatic diseases in women. To advance research in this area, it is critical to develop methods to evaluate the function of the neuroendocrine axes. Secretion of both HPA and HPG axis hormones, particularly the hormones of the hypothalamus and anterior pituitary, is largely by intermittent pulses. In addition, the HPA axis exhibits a profound circadian, or near 24-hour, variation, and HPG axis hormones fluctuate over the monthly cycle. These factors make meaningful analysis of these axes quite complex. We discuss models used in the analyses of neuroendocrine axes and the use of challenge testing to assess the integrity of neuroendocrine axes.

  15. A time-course transcriptional kinetics of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axes in zebrafish eleutheroembryos after exposure to norgestrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan-Qiu; Huang, Guo-Yong; Ying, Guang-Guo; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; Jiang, Yu-Xia; Liu, Shan; Peng, Feng-Jiao

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of norgestrel on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axes in zebrafish eleutheroembryos. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to different concentrations of norgestrel (0 ng L(-1) , 5 ng L(-1) , 50 ng L(-1) , and 100 ng L(-1) ) for 144 h post fertilization (hpf), and the transcriptional profiles of the HPG and HPA axes were examined every day. Norgestrel modulated the expression of Pgr and Vtg1 messenger (m)RNAs mainly at 96 hpf for all treatment groups. In addition, norgestrel strongly altered the expression of Cyp11a1 mRNA above 5 ng L(-1) (significant upregulation from 48 hpf to 120 hpf and significant downregulation for 144 hpf). Norgestrel treatment could significantly induce expression of Cyp19a1a, Cyp11b, Gnrh2, Gnrh3, and Lhb mRNAs but inhibit transcripts of Hsd11b2 and Crh genes above 5 ng L(-1) at different time points. The transcriptional expression levels of Esr1, Ar, Star, Hsd17b3, Fshb, and Pomc were also mediated by 5 ng L(-1) norgestrel or higher during different exposure periods. Taken together, the overall results imply that the transcriptional changes in zebrafish eleutheroembryos may pose a potential effect on embryonic development, in particular in the brain and gonadogenesis. © 2014 SETAC.

  16. Recent advances in understanding the role of the hypothalamic circuit during aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Falkner, Annegret L.; Lin, Dayu

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamus was first implicated in the classic “fight or flight” response nearly a century ago, and since then, many important strides have been made in understanding both the circuitry and the neural dynamics underlying the generation of these behaviors. In this review, we will focus on the role of the hypothalamus in aggression, paying particular attention to recent advances in the field that have allowed for functional identification of relevant hypothalamic subnuclei. Recent progres...

  17. Alterations in hypothalamic gene expression following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille Barkholt

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: RYGB surgery increases the mRNA levels of hunger-associated signaling markers in the rat arcuate nucleus without concomitantly increasing downstream MCH expression in the lateral hypothalamus, suggesting that RYGB surgery puts a brake on orexigenic hypothalamic output signals. In addition, down-regulation of midbrain TH and DAT expression suggests that altered dopaminergic activity also contributes to the reduced intake of palatable food in RYGB rats.

  18. Hyperandrogenism in female athletes with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea: a distinct phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Javed, Asma; Kashyap, Rahul; Lteif, Aida N

    2015-01-01

    Asma Javed,1 Rahul Kashyap,2 Aida N Lteif1 1Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Objective: To compare the reproductive, metabolic, and skeletal profiles of young athletic women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) as well as clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism (FHA-EX+HA) with body mass index matched women with FHA due to exe...

  19. Hypothalamic effects of neonatal diet: reversible and only partially leptin dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sominsky, Luba; Ziko, Ilvana; Nguyen, Thai-Xinh; Quach, Julie; Spencer, Sarah J

    2017-07-01

    Early life diet influences metabolic programming, increasing the risk for long-lasting metabolic ill health. Neonatally overfed rats have an early increase in leptin that is maintained long term and is associated with a corresponding elevation in body weight. However, the immediate and long-term effects of neonatal overfeeding on hypothalamic anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP)/neuropeptide Y (NPY) circuitry, and if these are directly mediated by leptin, have not yet been examined. Here, we examined the effects of neonatal overfeeding on leptin-mediated development of hypothalamic POMC and AgRP/NPY neurons and whether these effects can be normalised by neonatal leptin antagonism in male Wistar rats. Neonatal overfeeding led to an acute (neonatal) resistance of hypothalamic neurons to exogenous leptin, but this leptin resistance was resolved by adulthood. While there were no effects of neonatal overfeeding on POMC immunoreactivity in neonates or adults, the neonatal overfeeding-induced early increase in arcuate nucleus (ARC) AgRP/NPY fibres was reversed by adulthood so that neonatally overfed adults had reduced NPY immunoreactivity in the ARC compared with controls, with no further differences in AgRP immunoreactivity. Short-term neonatal leptin antagonism did not reverse the excess body weight or hyperleptinaemia in the neonatally overfed, suggesting factors other than leptin may also contribute to the phenotype. Our findings show that changes in the availability of leptin during early life period influence the development of hypothalamic connectivity short term, but this is partly resolved by adulthood indicating an adaptation to the metabolic mal-programming effects of neonatal overfeeding. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  20. Brain Innate Immunity Regulates Hypothalamic Arcuate Neuronal Activity and Feeding Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Wagner L; Yi, Chun-Xia; Gao, Yuanqing; Tschöp, Mathias H.; Stern, Javier E.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic inflammation, involving microglia activation in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), is proposed as a novel underlying mechanism in obesity, insulin and leptin resistance. However, whether activated microglia affects ARC neuronal activity, and consequently basal and hormonal-induced food intake, is unknown. We show that lipopolysaccharide, an agonist of the toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), which we found to be expressed in ARC microglia, inhibited the firing activity of the majority of orexige...

  1. Inhibition of hypothalamic Foxo1 expression reduced food intake in diet-induced obesity rats

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo R. Ropelle; Pauli, Jose R.; Prada, Patricia; Cintra, Dennys E.; Rocha, Guilherme Z; Juliana C Moraes; Frederico, Marisa J.S.; Luz,Gabrielle da; Pinho, Ricardo A.; Carvalheira, Jose B. C.; Velloso, Licio A.; Saad, Mario A.; Souza, Claudio T. de

    2009-01-01

    Insulin signalling in the hypothalamus plays a role in maintaining body weight. the forkhead transcription factor Foxo1 is an important mediator of insulin signalling in the hypothalamus. Foxo1 stimulates the transcription of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y and Agouti-related protein through the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt signalling pathway, but the role of hypothalamic Foxo1 in insulin resistance and obesity remains unclear. Here, we identify that a high-fat diet impaired insulin-induce...

  2. Hypothalamic Ceramide Levels Regulated by CPT1C Mediate the Orexigenic Effect of Ghrelin

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, S.; Martins, L.; Jacas, J.; Carrasco, P.; Pozo, M.; Clotet, J.; Serra, D.; Hegardt, F G; Dieguez, C.; Lopez, M.; Casals, N

    2013-01-01

    Recent data suggest that ghrelin exerts its orexigenic action through regulation of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase pathway, leading to a decline in malonyl-CoA levels and desinhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), which increases mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and ultimately enhances the expression of the orexigenic neuropeptides agouti-related protein (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). However, it is unclear whether the brain-specific isoform CPT1C, which is loc...

  3. Hypothalamic CaMKKβ mediates glucagon anorectic effect and its diet-induced resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, Mar; Al-Massadi, Omar; Gallego, Rosalía; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2015-12-01

    Glucagon receptor antagonists and humanized glucagon antibodies are currently studied as promising therapies for obesity and type II diabetes. Among its variety of actions, glucagon reduces food intake, but the molecular mechanisms mediating this effect as well as glucagon resistance are totally unknown. Glucagon and adenoviral vectors were administered in specific hypothalamic nuclei of lean and diet-induced obese rats. The expression of neuropeptides controlling food intake was performed by in situ hybridization. The regulation of factors of the glucagon signaling pathway was assessed by western blot. The central injection of glucagon decreased feeding through a hypothalamic pathway involving protein kinase A (PKA)/Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ)/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent mechanism. More specifically, the central injection of glucagon increases PKA activity and reduces protein levels of CaMKKβ and its downstream target phosphorylated AMPK in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Consistently, central glucagon significantly decreased AgRP expression. Inhibition of PKA and genetic activation of AMPK in the ARC blocked glucagon-induced anorexia in lean rats. Genetic down-regulation of glucagon receptors in the ARC stimulates fasting-induced hyperphagia. Although glucagon was unable to decrease food intake in DIO rats, glucagon sensitivity was restored after inactivation of CaMKKβ, specifically in the ARC. Thus, glucagon decreases food intake acutely via PKA/CaMKKβ/AMPK dependent pathways in the ARC, and CaMKKβ mediates its obesity-induced hypothalamic resistance. This work reveals the molecular underpinnings by which glucagon controls feeding that may lead to a better understanding of disease states linked to anorexia and cachexia.

  4. Elevated Hypothalamic Glucocorticoid Levels Are Associated With Obesity and Hyperphagia in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefton, Charlotte; Harno, Erika; Davies, Alison; Small, Helen; Allen, Tiffany-Jayne; Wray, Jonathan R; Lawrence, Catherine B; Coll, Anthony P; White, Anne

    2016-11-01

    Glucocorticoid (Gc) excess, from endogenous overproduction in disorders of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis or exogenous medical therapy, is recognized to cause adverse metabolic side effects. The Gc receptor (GR) is widely expressed throughout the body, including brain regions such as the hypothalamus. However, the extent to which chronic Gcs affect Gc concentrations in the hypothalamus and impact on GR and target genes is unknown. To investigate this, we used a murine model of corticosterone (Cort)-induced obesity and analyzed Cort levels in the hypothalamus and expression of genes relevant to Gc action. Mice were administered Cort (75 μg/mL) or ethanol (1%, vehicle) in drinking water for 4 weeks. Cort-treated mice had increased body weight, food intake, and adiposity. As expected, Cort increased plasma Cort levels at both zeitgeber time 1 and zeitgeber time 13, ablating the diurnal rhythm. Liquid chromatography dual tandem mass spectrometry revealed a 4-fold increase in hypothalamic Cort, which correlated with circulating levels and concentrations of Cort in other brain regions. This occurred despite decreased 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (Hsd11b1) expression, the gene encoding the enzyme that regenerates active Gcs, whereas efflux transporter Abcb1 mRNA was unaltered. In addition, although Cort decreased hypothalamic GR (Nr3c1) expression 2-fold, the Gc-induced leucine zipper (Tsc22d3) mRNA increased, which indicated elevated GR activation. In keeping with the development of hyperphagia and obesity, Cort increased Agrp, but there were no changes in Pomc, Npy, or Cart mRNA in the hypothalamus. In summary, chronic Cort treatment causes chronic increases in hypothalamic Cort levels and a persistent elevation in Agrp, a mediator in the development of metabolic disturbances.

  5. Involvement of hypothalamus autoimmunity in patients with autoimmune hypopituitarism: role of antibodies to hypothalamic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bellis, A; Sinisi, A A; Pane, E; Dello Iacovo, A; Bellastella, G; Di Scala, G; Falorni, A; Giavoli, C; Gasco, V; Giordano, R; Ambrosio, M R; Colao, A; Bizzarro, A; Bellastella, A

    2012-10-01

    Antipituitary antibodies (APA) but not antihypothalamus antibodies (AHA) are usually searched for in autoimmune hypopituitarism. Our objective was to search for AHA and characterize their hypothalamic target in patients with autoimmune hypopituitarism to clarify, on the basis of the cells stained by these antibodies, the occurrence of autoimmune subclinical/clinical central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and/or possible joint hypothalamic contribution to their hypopituitarism. We conducted a cross-sectional cohort study. Ninety-five APA-positive patients with autoimmune hypopituitarism, 60 without (group 1) and 35 with (group 2) lymphocytic hypophysitis, were studied in comparison with 20 patients with postsurgical hypopituitarism and 50 normal subjects. AHA by immunofluorescence and posterior pituitary function were evaluated; then AHA-positive sera were retested by double immunofluorescence to identify the hypothalamic cells targeted by AHA. AHA were detected at high titer in 12 patients in group 1 and in eight patients in group 2. They immunostained arginine vasopressin (AVP)-secreting cells in nine of 12 in group 1 and in four of eight in group 2. All AVP cell antibody-positive patients presented with subclinical/clinical CDI; in contrast, four patients with GH/ACTH deficiency but with APA staining only GH-secreting cells showed AHA targeting CRH- secreting cells. The occurrence of CDI in patients with lymphocytic hypophysitis seems due to an autoimmune hypothalamic involvement rather than an expansion of the pituitary inflammatory process. To search for AVP antibody in these patients may help to identify those of them prone to develop an autoimmune CDI. The detection of AHA targeting CRH-secreting cells in some patients with GH/ACTH deficiency but with APA targeting only GH-secreting cells indicates that an autoimmune aggression to hypothalamus is jointly responsible for their hypopituitarism.

  6. Epigenetic changes in fetal hypothalamic energy regulating pathways are associated with maternal undernutrition and twinning

    OpenAIRE

    Begum, Ghazala; Stevens, Adam; Smith, Emma Bolton; Connor, Kristin; Challis, John R. G.; Bloomfield, Frank; White, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Undernutrition during pregnancy is implicated in the programming of offspring for the development of obesity and diabetes. We hypothesized that maternal programming causes epigenetic changes in fetal hypothalamic pathways regulating metabolism. This study used sheep to examine the effect of moderate maternal undernutrition (60 d before to 30 d after mating) and twinning to investigate changes in the key metabolic regulators proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in fe...

  7. The relationship between bone mass and body composition in children with hypothalamic and simple obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, M Guftar; Crabtree, Nicola; Kirk, Jeremy M W; Shaw, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with a positive influence on bone mass. This is thought to be due to a mechanical load exerted on the skeleton, together with various hormones and adipocytokines that control appetite and weight, such as leptin, some of which directly affect bone mass. However, there are conflicting reports of the association between fat mass and bone mass in children. Animal studies demonstrate increased bone mass where there is impaired central leptin signalling. Hypothalamic damage can cause abnormal central leptin action, which contributes to the development of obesity. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between body composition and bone mass in hypothalamic and simple childhood obesity, in conjunction with the effect of the adipocytokines, leptin and adiponectin. This was a cross-sectional study of three groups of children, those with hypothalamic obesity (HO), those with congenital hypopituitarism (CH) and those with simple obesity (SO). A total of 65 children (HO = 26 [11 males], CH = 17 [eight males] and SO = 22 [15 males]) had body composition assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry together with measurement of serum leptin and adiponectin. No significant differences were seen in bone mass once bone density (BMD) was adjusted for differences in body size between groups. Significantly elevated levels of leptin and adiponectin were seen in the HO group compared with the SO group (P < 0·01, P < 0·05, respectively). Adiposity is associated with increased bone mass; however, this relationship is complex. Despite the presence of hyperleptinaemia, increased bone mass in the HO group was not seen. This may be due to the effects of other factors such as adiponectin, abnormal hypothalamic signalling, pituitary hormone deficiencies and disruption of normal homoeostatic mechanisms within the hypothalamus. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Hypothalamic CaMKKβ mediates glucagon anorectic effect and its diet-induced resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, Mar; Al-Massadi, Omar; Gallego, Rosalía; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Objective Glucagon receptor antagonists and humanized glucagon antibodies are currently studied as promising therapies for obesity and type II diabetes. Among its variety of actions, glucagon reduces food intake, but the molecular mechanisms mediating this effect as well as glucagon resistance are totally unknown. Methods Glucagon and adenoviral vectors were administered in specific hypothalamic nuclei of lean and diet-induced obese rats. The expression of neuropeptides controlling food intake was performed by in situ hybridization. The regulation of factors of the glucagon signaling pathway was assessed by western blot. Results The central injection of glucagon decreased feeding through a hypothalamic pathway involving protein kinase A (PKA)/Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ)/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent mechanism. More specifically, the central injection of glucagon increases PKA activity and reduces protein levels of CaMKKβ and its downstream target phosphorylated AMPK in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Consistently, central glucagon significantly decreased AgRP expression. Inhibition of PKA and genetic activation of AMPK in the ARC blocked glucagon-induced anorexia in lean rats. Genetic down-regulation of glucagon receptors in the ARC stimulates fasting-induced hyperphagia. Although glucagon was unable to decrease food intake in DIO rats, glucagon sensitivity was restored after inactivation of CaMKKβ, specifically in the ARC. Thus, glucagon decreases food intake acutely via PKA/CaMKKβ/AMPK dependent pathways in the ARC, and CaMKKβ mediates its obesity-induced hypothalamic resistance. Conclusions This work reveals the molecular underpinnings by which glucagon controls feeding that may lead to a better understanding of disease states linked to anorexia and cachexia. PMID:26909312

  9. Early spontaneous regression of a hypothalamic/chiasmatic mass in neurofibromatosis type 1: MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuccoli, G.; Ferrozzi, F.; Bassi, P. [Department of Radiology, University of Parma, V. Gramsci, 14, I-43100 Parma (Italy); Sigorini, M.; Virdis, R. [Department of Paediatrics, University of Parma, V. Gramsci, 14, I-43100 Parma (Italy); Bellomi, M. [Division of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    A patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 was found to have an enhancing mass in the hypothalamus and in the anterior optic pathway. A 3-month MR study showed a reduction in the size and enhancement of the mass. At a 9-month MR follow-up the mass disappeared and ceased to enhance. This report shows the unusual behaviour of a hypothalamic/chiasmatic mass confirming that in such asymptomatic cases the conservative management can be considered the treatment of choice. (orig.)

  10. Lactation undernutrition leads to multigenerational molecular programming of hypothalamic gene networks controlling reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Kaczmarek, Monika M.; Mendoza, Tamra; Kozak, Leslie P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Reproductive success is dependent on development of hypothalamic circuits involving many hormonal systems working in concert to regulate gonadal function and sexual behavior. The timing of pubertal initiation and progression in mammals is likely influenced by the nutritional and metabolic state, leading us to the hypothesis that transient malnutrition experienced at critical times during development may perturb pubertal progression through successive generations. To test this hypot...

  11. Mediobasal hypothalamic and adenohypophyseal TRH-degrading enzyme (PPII) is down-regulated by zinc deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Salas, Elena; Alcántara-Alonso, Viridiana; Matamoros-Trejo, Gilberto; Vargas, Miguel Angel; Morales-Mulia, Marcela; de Gortari, Patricia

    2015-11-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) synthesized in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus directs hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis function, regulating thyrotropin release from adenohypophysis and thyroid hormones serum concentration. Pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase II (PPII), a Zn-dependent metallopeptidase located in adenohypophysis and medial-basal-hypothalamus degrades TRH released from the median eminence and participates in HPT axis function by regulating TRH-induced thyrotropin release from adenohypophysis. It is unknown whether dietary Zn deficiency down-regulates PPII. Our aim was to compare adenohypohyseal and medial-basal-hypothalamic PPII activity and expression of adult rats fed a Zn-deficient diet (2ppm) throughout their lifespan (DD), prenatally (DC) or after weaning (CD) vs. that of animals fed a control diet (20ppm:CC). Female rats consumed a Zn-deficient or control diet from two weeks before gestation and up to the end of lactation. We analyzed adenohypophyseal and medial-basal-hypothalamic PPII activity of dams and male offspring when adults; its relation to median eminence TRH, serum thyrotropin, leptin and thyroid hormones concentration. Offspring ate the same diet as their dams (CC, DD) or were switched from dietary regime after weaning (CD, DC) and until 2.5 months of age. DD males showed decreased adenohypophyseal and medial-basal-hypothalamic PPII activity, along with high thyrotropin serum concentration. Post-weaning Zn-deficiency (CD) decreased PPII activity only in adenohypophysis and increased thyrotropin circulating levels. Zn-replenishment (DC) normalized PPII activity in both regions and serum thyrotropin concentration. Adenohypophyseal PPII activity decreased and prolactin levels increased in Zn-deficient dams. We concluded that long-term changes in dietary Zn down-regulate PPII activity independently of T3, increasing thyrotropin serum concentration, overall resembling sub-clinical hypothyroidism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  12. Embryonic development of the hypothalamic feeding circuitry: Transcriptional, nutritional, and hormonal influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry MacKay

    2014-12-01

    Major conclusions: Emerging data suggest that developmental mechanisms can be perturbed not only by genetic manipulation, but also by manipulations to maternal nutrition during the gestational period, leading to long-lasting behavioral, neurobiological, and metabolic consequences. Leptin is neurotrophic in the embryonic brain, and given that it varies in proportion to maternal energy balance, may mediate these effects through an interaction with the mechanisms of hypothalamic development.

  13. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis induces cellular oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Spiers, Jereme G.; Hsiao-Jou Cortina eChen; Conrad eSernia; Lavidis, Nickolas A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal gland in response to stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis induce activity in the cellular reduction-oxidation (redox) system. The redox system is a ubiquitous chemical mechanism allowing the transfer of electrons between donor/acceptors and target molecules during oxidative phosphorylation while simultaneously maintaining the overall cellular environment in a reduced state. The objective of this review is to prese...

  14. Anti-Obesity Sodium Tungstate Treatment Triggers Axonal and Glial Plasticity in Hypothalamic Feeding Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Amigó-Correig; Sílvia Barceló-Batllori; Guadalupe Soria; Alice Krezymon; Alexandre Benani; Luc Pénicaud; Raúl Tudela; Anna Maria Planas; Eduardo Fernández; Maria del Carmen Carmona; Ramon Gomis

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]: This study aims at exploring the effects of sodium tungstate treatment on hypothalamic plasticity, which is known to have an important role in the control of energy metabolism. [Methods]: Adult lean and high-fat diet-induced obese mice were orally treated with sodium tungstate. Arcuate and paraventricular nuclei and lateral hypothalamus were separated and subjected to proteomic analysis by DIGE and mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemistry and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging...

  15. Soil nutrient availability and reproductive effort drive patterns in nutrient resorption in Pentachlethra macroloba

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. L. Tully; Tana Wood; A. M. Schwantes; D. Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    The removal of nutrients from senescing tissues, nutrient resorption, is a key strategy for conserving nutrients in plants. However, our understanding of what drives patterns of nutrient resorption in tropical trees is limited. We examined the effects of nutrient sources (stand-level and tree-level soil fertility) and sinks (reproductive effort) on nitrogen (N) and...

  16. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction to the nutrients module, when to list nutrients as a candidate cause, ways to measure nutrients, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for nutrients, nutrients module references and literature reviews.

  17. HPG-axis hormones during puberty: a study on the association with hypothalamic and pituitary volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, Jiska S; Brouwer, Rachel M; van Leeuwen, Marieke; Schnack, Hugo G; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kahn, René S; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2010-01-01

    During puberty, the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is activated, leading to increases in luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and sex steroids (testosterone and estradiol) levels. We aimed to study the association between hypothalamic and pituitary volumes and development of pubertal hormones in healthy pubertal children. Hormone levels of LH, FSH, estradiol (measured in urine) and testosterone (measured in saliva) were assessed in 85 healthy children (39 boys, 46 girls) between 10 and 15 years of age. Hypothalamic and pituitary gland volumes were segmented on high resolution structural MRI scans. Since sex hormone production is regulated in a sex-specific manner, associations between hormones, hypothalamus and pituitary were analyzed in boys and girls separately. LH, estradiol and testosterone levels all increased with age in both sexes, whereas FSH level did not. Pituitary volume also increased with age and explained 12%, 10% and 8% of the variance in female estradiol, testosterone and LH levels respectively. Corrected for age, pituitary volume explained 17% of FSH level in girls (not boys). Hypothalamic volume did not change with age and did not significantly explain variance in any hormonal level. Our study suggests that a larger pituitary volume is related to higher FSH production, but this association seems independent of pubertal development. The positive association between estradiol, LH and testosterone and pituitary volume is related to age-related pubertal development. With respect to the hypothalamus, we did not find convincing evidence for a larger structure to be involved in elevated hormonal production.

  18. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca eLizarbe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI, Blood oxygenation level dependent contrast (BOLD and Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI have revealed Mn2+accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks, becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable.

  19. Brain Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF and hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacher Claire-Marie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines play an important role in energy-balance regulation. Notably leptin, an adipocyte-secreted cytokine, regulates the activity of hypothalamic neurons that are involved in the modulation of appetite. Leptin decreases appetite and stimulates weight loss in rodents. Unfortunately, numerous forms of obesity in humans seem to be resistant to leptin action. The ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a neurocytokine that belongs to the same family as leptin and that was originally characterized as a neurotrophic factor that promotes the survival of a broad spectrum of neuronal cell types and that enhances neurogenesis in adult rodents. It presents the advantage of stimulating weight loss in humans, despite the leptin resistance. Moreover, the weight loss persists several weeks after the cessation of treatment. Hence, CNTF has been considered as a promising therapeutic tool for the treatment of obesity and has prompted intense research aimed at identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying its potent anorexigenic properties. It has been found that CNTF shares signaling pathways with leptin and is expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC, a key hypothalamic region controlling food intake. Endogenous CNTF may also participate in the control of energy balance. Indeed, its expression in the ARC is inversely correlated to body weight in rats fed a high-sucrose diet. Thus hypothalamic CNTF may act, in some individuals, as a protective factor against weight gain during hypercaloric diet and could account for individual differences in the susceptibility to obesity.

  20. Hypothalamic AMPK: a canonical regulator of whole-body energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Miguel; Nogueiras, Rubén; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Diéguez, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has a major role in the modulation of energy balance. AMPK is activated in conditions of low energy, increasing energy production and reducing energy consumption. The AMPK pathway is a canonical route regulating energy homeostasis by integrating peripheral signals, such as hormones and metabolites, with neuronal networks. Current evidence has implicated AMPK in the hypothalamus and hindbrain with feeding, brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and browning of white adipose tissue, through modulation of the sympathetic nervous system, as well as glucose homeostasis. Interestingly, several potential antiobesity and/or antidiabetic agents, some of which are currently in clinical use such as metformin and liraglutide, exert some of their actions by acting on AMPK. Furthermore, the orexigenic and weight-gain effects of commonly used antipsychotic drugs are also mediated by hypothalamic AMPK. Overall, this evidence suggests that hypothalamic AMPK signalling is an interesting target for drug development, but is this approach feasible? In this Review we discuss the current understanding of hypothalamic AMPK and its role in the central regulation of energy balance and metabolism.

  1. Developmental programming of hypothalamic neuronal circuits: impact on energy balance control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali Ramamoorthy, Thanuja; Begum, Ghazala; Harno, Erika; White, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in adults and children has increased globally at an alarming rate. Mounting evidence from both epidemiological studies and animal models indicates that adult obesity and associated metabolic disorders can be programmed by intrauterine and early postnatal environment- a phenomenon known as “fetal programming of adult disease.” Data from nutritional intervention studies in animals including maternal under- and over-nutrition support the developmental origins of obesity and metabolic syndrome. The hypothalamic neuronal circuits located in the arcuate nucleus controlling appetite and energy expenditure are set early in life and are perturbed by maternal nutritional insults. In this review, we focus on the effects of maternal nutrition in programming permanent changes in these hypothalamic circuits, with experimental evidence from animal models of maternal under- and over-nutrition. We discuss the epigenetic modifications which regulate hypothalamic gene expression as potential molecular mechanisms linking maternal diet during pregnancy to the offspring's risk of obesity at a later age. Understanding these mechanisms in key metabolic genes may provide insights into the development of preventative intervention strategies. PMID:25954145

  2. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benitez, Ania; Peláez Brioso, Gerardo A.; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Spectroscopy (MRS) methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main MRI and MRS strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), Blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast (BOLD), and Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) have revealed Mn2+ accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions, and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable. PMID:23781199

  3. Hypothalamic ERK mediates the anorectic and thermogenic sympathetic effects of leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmouni, Kamal; Sigmund, Curt D; Haynes, William G; Mark, Allyn L

    2009-03-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte hormone that plays a major role in energy balance. Leptin receptors in the hypothalamus are known to signal via distinct mechanisms, including signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI 3-kinase). Here, we tested the hypothesis that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is mediating leptin action in the hypothalamus. Biochemical, pharmacological, and physiological approaches were combined to characterize leptin activation of ERK in the hypothalamus in rats. Leptin activates ERK1/2 in a receptor-mediated manner that involves JAK2. Leptin-induced ERK1/2 activation was restricted to the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. Pharmacological blockade of hypothalamic ERK1/2 reverses the anorectic and weight-reducing effects of leptin. The pharmacological antagonists of ERK1/2 did not attenuate leptin-induced activation of STAT3 or PI 3-kinase. Blockade of ERK1/2 abolishes leptin-induced increases in sympathetic nerve traffic to thermogenic brown adipose tissue (BAT) but does not alter the stimulatory effects of leptin on sympathetic nerve activity to kidney, hindlimb, or adrenal gland. In contrast, blockade of PI 3-kinase prevents leptin-induced sympathetic activation to kidney but not to BAT, hindlimb, or adrenal gland. Our findings indicate that hypothalamic ERK plays a key role in the control of food intake, body weight, and thermogenic sympathetic outflow by leptin but does not participate in the cardiovascular and renal sympathetic actions of leptin.

  4. Hypothalamic ceramide levels regulated by CPT1C mediate the orexigenic effect of ghrelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Sara; Martins, Luís; Jacas, Jordi; Carrasco, Patricia; Pozo, Macarena; Clotet, Josep; Serra, Dolors; Hegardt, Fausto G; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel; Casals, Núria

    2013-07-01

    Recent data suggest that ghrelin exerts its orexigenic action through regulation of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase pathway, leading to a decline in malonyl-CoA levels and desinhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), which increases mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and ultimately enhances the expression of the orexigenic neuropeptides agouti-related protein (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). However, it is unclear whether the brain-specific isoform CPT1C, which is located in the endoplasmic reticulum of neurons, may play a role in this action. Here, we demonstrate that the orexigenic action of ghrelin is totally blunted in CPT1C knockout (KO) mice, despite having the canonical ghrelin signaling pathway activated. We also demonstrate that ghrelin elicits a marked upregulation of hypothalamic C18:0 ceramide levels mediated by CPT1C. Notably, central inhibition of ceramide synthesis with myriocin negated the orexigenic action of ghrelin and normalized the levels of AgRP and NPY, as well as their key transcription factors phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding protein and forkhead box O1. Finally, central treatment with ceramide induced food intake and orexigenic neuropeptides expression in CPT1C KO mice. Overall, these data indicate that, in addition to formerly reported mechanisms, ghrelin also induces food intake through regulation of hypothalamic CPT1C and ceramide metabolism, a finding of potential importance for the understanding and treatment of obesity.

  5. Inhibition of hypothalamic Foxo1 expression reduced food intake in diet-induced obesity rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropelle, Eduardo R; Pauli, José R; Prada, Patrícia; Cintra, Dennys E; Rocha, Guilherme Z; Moraes, Juliana C; Frederico, Marisa J S; da Luz, Gabrielle; Pinho, Ricardo A; Carvalheira, José B C; Velloso, Licio A; Saad, Mario A; De Souza, Cláudio T

    2009-05-15

    Insulin signalling in the hypothalamus plays a role in maintaining body weight. The forkhead transcription factor Foxo1 is an important mediator of insulin signalling in the hypothalamus. Foxo1 stimulates the transcription of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y and Agouti-related protein through the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt signalling pathway, but the role of hypothalamic Foxo1 in insulin resistance and obesity remains unclear. Here, we identify that a high-fat diet impaired insulin-induced hypothalamic Foxo1 phosphorylation and degradation, increasing the nuclear Foxo1 activity and hyperphagic response in rats. Thus, we investigated the effects of the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusion of Foxo1-antisense oligonucleotide (Foxo1-ASO) and evaluated the food consumption and weight gain in normal and diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Three days of Foxo1-ASO microinfusion reduced the hypothalamic Foxo1 expression by about 85%. i.c.v. infusion of Foxo1-ASO reduced the cumulative food intake (21%), body weight change (28%), epididymal fat pad weight (22%) and fasting serum insulin levels (19%) and increased the insulin sensitivity (34%) in DIO but not in control animals. Collectively, these data showed that the Foxo1-ASO treatment blocked the orexigenic effects of Foxo1 and prevented the hyperphagic response in obese rats. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of Foxo1 may be used to prevent or treat obesity.

  6. Hypothalamic stearoyl-CoA desaturase-2 (SCD2) controls whole-body energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura, R F; Nascimento, L F; Ignacio-Souza, L M; Morari, J; Razolli, D S; Solon, C; de Souza, G F P; Festuccia, W T; Velloso, L A

    2016-03-01

    Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-2 (SCD2) is the main δ9 desaturase expressed in the central nervous system. Because of its potential involvement in controlling whole-body adiposity, we evaluated the expression and function of SCD2 in the hypothalami of mice. Male mice of different strains were used in real-time PCR, immunoblot and metabolic experiments. In addition, antisense oligonucleotides and lentiviral vectors were used to reduce and increase the expression of SCD2 in the hypothalamus. The level of SCD2 in the hypothalamus is similar to other regions of the central nervous system and is ~10-fold higher than in any other region of the body. In the arcuate nucleus, SCD2 is expressed in proopiomelanocortin and neuropeptide-Y neurons. Upon high fat feeding, the level of hypothalamic SCD2 increases. Inhibition of hypothalamic SCD2 as accomplished by two distinct approaches, an antisense oligonucleotide or a short-hairpin RNA delivered by a lentivirus, resulted in reduced body mass gain mostly due to increased energy expenditure and increased spontaneous activity. Increasing hypothalamic SCD2 by a lentivirus approach resulted in no change in body mass and food intake. Thus, SCD2 is highly expressed in the hypothalami of rodents and its knockdown reduces body mass due to increased whole-body energy expenditure.

  7. Estradiol effects on hypothalamic AMPK and BAT thermogenesis: A gateway for obesity treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Miguel; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2017-10-01

    In addition to their prominent roles in the control of reproduction, estrogens are important modulators of energy balance, as evident in conditions of deficiency of estrogens, which are characterized by increased feeding and decreased energy expenditure, leading to obesity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a ubiquitous cellular energy gauge that is activated under conditions of low energy, increasing energy production and reducing energy wasting. Centrally, the AMPK pathway is a canonical route regulating energy homeostasis, by integrating peripheral signals, such as hormones and metabolites, with neuronal networks. As a result of those actions, hypothalamic AMPK modulates feeding, as well as brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis and browning of white adipose tissue (WAT). Here, we will review the central actions of estrogens on energy balance, with particular focus on hypothalamic AMPK. The relevance of this interaction is noteworthy, because some agents with known actions on metabolic homeostasis, such as nicotine, metformin, liraglutide, olanzapine and also natural molecules, such as resveratrol and flavonoids, exert their actions by modulating AMPK. This evidence highlights the possibility that hypothalamic AMPK might be a potential target for the treatment of obesity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Leptin action through hypothalamic nitric oxide synthase-1-expressing neurons controls energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshan, Rebecca L; Greenwald-Yarnell, Megan; Patterson, Christa M; Gonzalez, Ian E; Myers, Martin G

    2012-05-01

    Few effective measures exist to combat the worldwide obesity epidemic(1), and the identification of potential therapeutic targets requires a deeper understanding of the mechanisms that control energy balance. Leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone that signals the long-term status of bodily energy stores, acts through multiple types of leptin receptor long isoform (LepRb)-expressing neurons (called here LepRb neurons) in the brain to control feeding, energy expenditure and endocrine function(2-4). The modest contributions to energy balance that are attributable to leptin action in many LepRb populations(5-9) suggest that other previously unidentified hypothalamic LepRb neurons have key roles in energy balance. Here we examine the role of LepRb in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1)-expressing LebRb (LepRb(NOS1)) neurons that comprise approximately 20% of the total hypothalamic LepRb neurons. Nos1(cre)-mediated genetic ablation of LepRb (Lepr(Nos1KO)) in mice produces hyperphagic obesity, decreased energy expenditure and hyperglycemia approaching that seen in whole-body LepRb-null mice. In contrast, the endocrine functions in Lepr(Nos1KO) mice are only modestly affected by the genetic ablation of LepRb in these neurons. Thus, hypothalamic LepRb(NOS1) neurons are a key site of action of the leptin-mediated control of systemic energy balance.

  9. Role of hypothalamic melanocortin system in adaptation of food intake to food protein increase in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pillot

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic melanocortin system--the melanocortin receptor of type 4 (MC4R and its ligands: α-melanin-stimulating hormone (α-MSH, agonist, inducing hypophagia, and agouti-related protein (AgRP, antagonist, inducing hyperphagia--is considered to play a central role in the control of food intake. We tested its implication in the mediation of the hunger-curbing effects of protein-enriched diets (PED in mice. Whereas there was a 20% decrease in food intake in mice fed on the PED, compared to mice fed on an isocaloric starch-enriched diet, there was a paradoxical decrease in expression of the hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin gene, precursor of α-MSH, and increase in expression of the gene encoding AgRP. The hypophagia effect of PED took place in mice with invalidation of either MC4R or POMC, and was even strengthened in mice with ablation of the AgRP-expressing neurons. These data strongly suggest that the hypothalamic melanocortin system does not mediate the hunger-curbing effects induced by changes in the macronutrient composition of food. Rather, the role of this system might be to defend the body against the variations in food intake generated by the nutritional environment.

  10. Lactation undernutrition leads to multigenerational molecular programming of hypothalamic gene networks controlling reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Monika M; Mendoza, Tamra; Kozak, Leslie P

    2016-05-04

    Reproductive success is dependent on development of hypothalamic circuits involving many hormonal systems working in concert to regulate gonadal function and sexual behavior. The timing of pubertal initiation and progression in mammals is likely influenced by the nutritional and metabolic state, leading us to the hypothesis that transient malnutrition experienced at critical times during development may perturb pubertal progression through successive generations. To test this hypothesis we have utilized a mouse model of undernutrition during suckling by exposing lactating mothers to undernutrition. Using a combination of transcriptomic and biological approaches, we demonstrate that molecular programming of hypothalamus may perturb gender specific phenotypes across generations that are dependent on the nutritional environment of the lactation period. Lactation undernutrition in first (F1) generation offspring affected body composition, reproductive performance parameters and influenced the expression of genes responsible for hypothalamic neural circuits controlling reproductive function of both sexes. Strikingly, F2 offspring showed phenotypes similar to F1 progeny; however, they were sex and parental nutritional history specific. Here, we showed that deregulated expression of genes involved in kisspeptin signaling within the hypothalamus is strongly associated with a delay in the attainment of puberty in F1 and F2 male and female offspring. The early developmental plasticity of hypothalamus when challenged with undernutrition during postnatal development not only leads to altered expression of genes controlling hypothalamic neural circuits, altered body composition, delayed puberty and disturbed reproductive performance in F1 progeny, but also affects F2 offspring, depending on parental malnutrition history and in sexually dimorphic manner.

  11. Crossover of the hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal/interrenal, -thyroid, and -gonadal axes in testicular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda Cortés, Diana C; Langlois, Valerie S; Fernandino, Juan I

    2014-01-01

    Besides the well-known function of thyroid hormones (THs) for regulating metabolism, it has recently been discovered that THs are also involved in testicular development in mammalian and non-mammalian species. THs, in combination with follicle stimulating hormone, lead to androgen synthesis in Danio rerio, which results in the onset of spermatogenesis in the testis, potentially relating the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) gland to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes. Furthermore, studies in non-mammalian species have suggested that by stimulating the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), THs can be induced by corticotropin-releasing hormone. This suggests that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal/interrenal gland (HPA) axis might influence the HPT axis. Additionally, it was shown that hormones pertaining to both HPT and HPA could also influence the HPG endocrine axis. For example, high levels of androgens were observed in the testis in Odonthestes bonariensis during a period of stress-induced sex-determination, which suggests that stress hormones influence the gonadal fate toward masculinization. Thus, this review highlights the hormonal interactions observed between the HPT, HPA, and HPG axes using a comparative approach in order to better understand how these endocrine systems could interact with each other to influence the development of testes.

  12. Developmental programming of hypothalamic neuronal circuits: impact on energy balance control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanuja eGali Ramamoorthy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity in adults and children has increased globally at an alarming rate. Mounting evidence from both epidemiological studies and animal models indicates that adult obesity and associated metabolic disorders can be programmed by intrauterine and early postnatal environment- a phenomenon known as fetal programming of adult disease. Data from nutritional intervention studies in animals including maternal under- and over-nutrition support the developmental origins of obesity and metabolic syndrome. The hypothalamic neuronal circuits located in the arcuate nucleus controlling appetite and energy expenditure are set early in life and are perturbed by maternal nutritional insults. In this review, we focus on the effects of maternal nutrition in programming permanent changes in these hypothalamic circuits, with experimental evidence from animal models of maternal under- and over-nutrition. We discuss the epigenetic modifications which regulate hypothalamic gene expression as potential molecular mechanisms linking maternal diet during pregnancy to the offspring’s risk of obesity at a later age. Understanding these mechanisms in key metabolic genes may provide insights into the development of preventative intervention strategies.

  13. Mediation of oxidative stress in hypothalamic ghrelin-associated appetite control in rats treated with phenylpropanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C-H; Chu, S-C; Chen, P-N; Hsieh, Y-S; Kuo, D-Y

    2017-04-01

    Phenylpropanolamine (PPA)-induced appetite control is associated with oxidative stress in the hypothalamus. This study explored whether hypothalamic antioxidants participated in hypothalamic ghrelin system-associated appetite control in PPA-treated rats. Rats were given PPA daily for 4 days, and changes in food intake and the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), the cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), superoxide dismutase, catalase, ghrelin, acyl ghrelin (AG), ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) and the ghrelin receptor (GHSR1a) were examined and compared. Results showed that both food intake and the expression of NPY and ghrelin/AG/GOAT/GHSR1a decreased in response to PPA treatment with maximum decrease on Day 2 of the treatment. In contrast, the expression of antioxidants and CART increased, with the maximum increase on Day 2, with the expression opposite to that of NPY and ghrelin. A cerebral infusion of either a GHSR1a antagonist or reactive oxygen species scavenger modulated feeding behavior and NPY, CART, antioxidants and ghrelin system expression, showing the involvement of ghrelin signaling and oxidative stress in regulating PPA-mediated appetite control. We suggest that hypothalamic ghrelin signaling system, with the help of antioxidants, may participate in NPY/CART-mediated appetite control in PPA-treated rats. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  14. Anti-obesity sodium tungstate treatment triggers axonal and glial plasticity in hypothalamic feeding centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigó-Correig, Marta; Barceló-Batllori, Sílvia; Soria, Guadalupe; Krezymon, Alice; Benani, Alexandre; Pénicaud, Luc; Tudela, Raúl; Planas, Anna Maria; Fernández, Eduardo; Carmona, Maria del Carmen; Gomis, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at exploring the effects of sodium tungstate treatment on hypothalamic plasticity, which is known to have an important role in the control of energy metabolism. Adult lean and high-fat diet-induced obese mice were orally treated with sodium tungstate. Arcuate and paraventricular nuclei and lateral hypothalamus were separated and subjected to proteomic analysis by DIGE and mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemistry and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging were also performed. Sodium tungstate treatment reduced body weight gain, food intake, and blood glucose and triglyceride levels. These effects were associated with transcriptional and functional changes in the hypothalamus. Proteomic analysis revealed that sodium tungstate modified the expression levels of proteins involved in cell morphology, axonal growth, and tissue remodeling, such as actin, CRMP2 and neurofilaments, and of proteins related to energy metabolism. Moreover, immunohistochemistry studies confirmed results for some targets and further revealed tungstate-dependent regulation of SNAP25 and HPC-1 proteins, suggesting an effect on synaptogenesis as well. Functional test for cell activity based on c-fos-positive cell counting also suggested that sodium tungstate modified hypothalamic basal activity. Finally, in vivo magnetic resonance imaging showed that tungstate treatment can affect neuronal organization in the hypothalamus. Altogether, these results suggest that sodium tungstate regulates proteins involved in axonal and glial plasticity. The fact that sodium tungstate could modulate hypothalamic plasticity and networks in adulthood makes it a possible and interesting therapeutic strategy not only for obesity management, but also for other neurodegenerative illnesses like Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Nutrient density: principles and evaluation tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnowski, Adam; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2014-05-01

    Nutrient profiling is the technique of rating or classifying foods on the basis of their nutritional value. Foods that supply relatively more nutrients than calories are defined as nutrient dense. Nutrient profile models calculate the content of key nutrients per 100 g, 100 kcal, or per serving size of food. For maximum effectiveness, nutrient profile models need to be transparent, based on publicly accessible nutrient composition data, and validated against independent measures of a healthy diet. These rigorous scientific standards were applied to the development of the Nutrient-Rich Foods (NRF) family of nutrient profile models. First, the NRF models included nutrients to encourage as well as nutrients to limit. Second, NRF model performance was repeatedly tested against the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), an independent measure of a healthy diet. HEI values were calculated for participants in the 1999-2002 NHANES. Models based on 100 kcal and serving sizes performed better than those based on 100 g. Formulas based on sums and means performed better than those based on ratios. The final NRF9.3 index was based on 9 beneficial nutrients (protein; fiber; vitamins A, C, and E; calcium; iron; potassium; and magnesium) and on 3 nutrients to limit (saturated fat, added sugar, and sodium). Higher NRF9.3 scores were associated with lower energy density and more nutrient-rich diets. The nutrient density of foods, paired with a comprehensive program of consumer education, can become the foundation of dietary recommendations and guidelines.

  16. Nutrient and Anti nutrient Composition of Jams Prepared from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nutrient composition of prepared jams was higher than that of commercially available (control) one, though commercial jam rated highest in all sensory parameters investigated. Addition of carrot extract improved the â-carotene content and acceptability of prepared jams. Conclusion: The relatively high level of -carotene ...

  17. Nutrient-enhancement of Matooke banana for improved nutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 173 PLHIVregistered with Rakai Health Science Project were chosen and interviewed using structured questionnaires to determine the current contribution of banana to the household food security. Nutrient intake data were collected using Gibson s 24-hour recall method and food frequency questionnaires.

  18. Anti-nutrients and mineral nutrient potential of gmelina ( Gmelina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the mineral and anti-nutrient composition of ripe gmelina whole fruit (RGWF), unripe gmelina whole fruit (UGWF) and ripe gmelina fruit pulp (RGFP) as potential livestock feed ingredients. The fruit pulp was low in alkanoid (0.14-0.58%DM), and phyto-haemaglutinnin (136- 276Hu/g) but high in tannin ...

  19. Broad-spectrum L-amino acid sensing by class 3 G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conigrave, Arthur D; Hampson, David R

    2006-12-01

    The sensing of nutrients is essential to the control of growth and metabolism. Although the sensing mechanisms responsible for the detection and coordination of metabolic responses to some nutrients, most notably glucose, are well understood, the molecular basis of amino acid sensing by cells and tissues is only now emerging. In this article, we consider evidence that some members of G-protein-coupled receptor class 3 are broad-spectrum amino acid sensors that couple changes in extracellular amino acid levels to the activation of intracellular signaling pathways. In particular, we consider both the molecular basis of specific and broad-spectrum amino acid sensing by different members of class 3 and the physiological significance of broad spectrum amino acid sensing by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor, heterodimeric taste receptors and the recently "deorphanized" receptor GPRC6A and its goldfish homolog, the 5.24 chemoreceptor.

  20. Nutrient resorption from seagrass leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stapel, J.; Hemminga, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The resorption of nutrients (C, N and P) from senescent leaves of six seagrass species from nine different locations in tropical (Indonesia and Kenya), Mediterranean (Spain) and temperate (The Netherlands) regions has been investigated. Resorption was quantitatively assessed by calculating the

  1. Recycling nutrients in algae biorefinery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Alba, Laura; Vos, M.P.; Torri, C.; Fabbri, D.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Algal fuel cells: Repeated nutrient recycling is demonstrated by reusing the aqueous phase obtained from the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of microalgae. This is achieved, for the first time, by performing a complete set of four continuous growth–HTL cycles. Results show similar growth rates in

  2. Regulating nutrient allocation in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udvardi, Michael; Yang, Jiading; Worley, Eric

    2014-12-09

    The invention provides coding and promoter sequences for a VS-1 and AP-2 gene, which affects the developmental process of senescence in plants. Vectors, transgenic plants, seeds, and host cells comprising heterologous VS-1 and AP-2 genes are also provided. Additionally provided are methods of altering nutrient allocation and composition in a plant using the VS-1 and AP-2 genes.

  3. [New nutrients in enteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Martínez, C

    2000-01-01

    1. Medical and surgical stress (major surgery, sepsis, injuries,...) increases requirements of certain essential nutrients and others considered non-essential or semi-essential. 2. Some nutrients such as glutamine, arginine, omega 3 fatty acids nucleotides, ... have a considerable influence on the immune function (delayed hypersensitivity, lymphocyte sub-population counts, immunological tests,..) and improve certain metabolic and nutritional indices (nitrogen balance, medium and short life proteins,...). For this reason, they are called "immunonutrients" or "immunity regulators". 3. The supply of special enteral formulas for situations of immunological compromise, with the addition of one or more of the nutrients considered today as "immunity regulators" has increased since 1988 in both absolute and percentage terms. 4. These nutrient-enriched enteral formulas improve the rate of infections, reduce the number of days on ventilator equipment, the length of hospital stays for critical patients, with a more marked effect on surgical patients. 5. The evidence seems today to support the use of enriched formulas with critical patients. Nonetheless, some caution must be maintained as it has not been possible to show any reduction in the mortality of the cases studied nor, in short, in the prognosis of patients affected by situations of hypercatabolism and reduced immunity. 6. We feel that their use should, therefore, be carried out in accordance with the protocols and in patients expected to survive, where the evolution reveals severe catabolism unhindered by conventional therapy.

  4. Developmental changes in hypothalamic oxytocin and oxytocin receptor mRNA expression and their sensitivity to fasting in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Iwasa, Takeshi; Munkhzaya, Munkhsaikhan; Tungalagsuvd, Altankhuu; Kawami, Takako; Murakami, Masahiro; Yamasaki, Mikio; Yamamoto, Yuri; Kato, Takeshi; Kuwahara, Akira; Yasui, Toshiyuki; Irahara, Minoru

    2015-04-01

    Oxytocin (OT) affects the central nervous system and is involved in a variety of social and non-social behaviors. Recently, the role played by OT in energy metabolism and its organizational effects on estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α) during the neonatal period have gained attention. In this study, the developmental changes in the hypothalamic mRNA levels of OT, the OT receptor (OTR), and ER-α were evaluated in male and female rats. In addition, the fasting-induced changes in the hypothalamic mRNA levels of OT and the OTR were evaluated. Hypothalamic explants were taken from postnatal day (PND) 10, 20, and 30 rats, and the mRNA level of each molecule was measured. Hypothalamic OT mRNA expression increased throughout the developmental period in both sexes. The rats' hypothalamic OTR mRNA levels were highest on PND 10 and decreased throughout the developmental period. In the male rats, the hypothalamic mRNA levels of ER-α were higher on PND 30 than on PND 10. On the other hand, no significant differences in hypothalamic ER-α mRNA expression were detected among the examined time points in the female rats, although hypothalamic ER-α mRNA expression tended to be higher on PND 30 than on PND 10. Significant positive correlations were detected between hypothalamic OT and ER-α mRNA expression in both the male and female rats. Hypothalamic OT mRNA expression was not affected by fasting at any of the examined time points in either sex. These results indicate that hypothalamic OT expression is not sensitive to fasting during the developmental period. In addition, as a positive correlation was detected between hypothalamic OT and ER-α mRNA expression, these two molecules might interact with each other to induce appropriate neuronal development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Changes in the responsiveness of hypothalamic PK2 and PKR1 gene expression to fasting in developing male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Tungalagsuvd, Altankhuu; Munkhzaya, Munkhsaikhan; Kawami, Takako; Yamasaki, Mikio; Murakami, Masahiro; Kato, Takeshi; Kuwahara, Akira; Yasui, Toshiyuki; Irahara, Minoru

    2014-11-01

    Prokineticin (PK2) and its receptors (PKRs) are expressed in several regions of the central nervous system, including the hypothalamus. It has been reported that PK2 inhibits food intake via PKR1 and that the hypothalamic PK2 mRNA levels of adult rodents were reduced by food deprivation. However, some hypothalamic factors do not exhibit sensitivity to undernutrition in the early neonatal period, but subsequently become sensitive to it during the neonatal to pre-pubertal period. In this study, we investigated the changes in the sensitivity of hypothalamic PK2 and PKR1 mRNA expression to fasting during the developmental period in male rats. Under the fed conditions, the rats' hypothalamic PK2 and/or PKR1 mRNA levels were higher on postnatal day (PND) 10 than on PND20 or PND30. In addition, the hypothalamic PK2 and/or PKR1 mRNA levels of the male rats were higher than those of the females at all examined ages (PND10, 20, and 30). Hypothalamic PK2 mRNA expression was decreased by 24h fasting at PND10 and 30, but not at PND20. In addition, hypothalamic PKR1 mRNA expression was decreased by 24h fasting at PND10, but not at PND20 or 30. These results indicate that both PK2 and PKR1 are sensitive to nutritional status in male rats and that this sensitivity has already been established by the early neonatal period. It can be speculated that the PK2 system might compensate for the immaturity of other appetite regulatory factors in the early neonatal period. Copyright © 2014 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypothalamic Non-AgRP, Non-POMC GABAergic Neurons Are Required for Postweaning Feeding and NPY Hyperphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Ran; Wu, Zhaofei; Sun, Hao; Xu, Yuanzhong; Mangieri, Leandra R; Xu, Yong; Tong, Qingchun

    2015-07-22

    The hypothalamus is critical for feeding and body weight regulation. Prevailing studies focus on hypothalamic neurons that are defined by selectively expressing transcription factors or neuropeptides including those expressing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related peptides (AgRP). The Cre expression driven by the pancreas-duodenum homeobox 1 promoter is abundant in several hypothalamic nuclei but not in AgRP or POMC neurons. Using this line, we generated mice with disruption of GABA release from a major subset of non-POMC, non-AgRP GABAergic neurons in the hypothalamus. These mice exhibited a reduction in postweaning feeding and growth, and disrupted hyperphagic responses to NPY. Disruption of GABA release severely diminished GABAergic input to the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH). Furthermore, disruption of GABA-A receptor function in the PVH also reduced postweaning feeding and blunted NPY-induced hyperphagia. Given the limited knowledge on postweaning feeding, our results are significant in identifying GABA release from a major subset of less appreciated hypothalamic neurons as a key mediator for postweaning feeding and NPY hyperphagia, and the PVH as one major downstream site that contributes significantly to the GABA action. Significance statement: Prevalent studies on feeding in the hypothalamus focus on well characterized, selective groups neurons [e.g., proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons], and as a result, the role of the majority of other hypothalamic neurons is largely neglected. Here, we demonstrated an important role for GABAergic projections from non-POMC non-AgRP neurons to the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus in promoting postweaning (mainly nocturnal) feeding and mediating NPY-induced hyperphagia. Thus, these results signify an importance to study those yet to be defined hypothalamic neurons in the regulation of energy balance and reveal a neural basis for postweaning (nocturnal) feeding and

  7. Prenatal bisphenol a exposure and dysregulation of infant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function: findings from the APrON cohort study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerald F Giesbrecht; Maede Ejaredar; Jiaying Liu; Jenna Thomas; Nicole Letourneau; Tavis Campbell; Jonathan W Martin; Deborah Dewey

    2017-01-01

    Background Animal models show that prenatal bisphenol A (BPA) exposure leads to sexually dimorphic disruption of the neuroendocrine system in offspring, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA...

  8. Euphotic-zone nutrient algorithms for the NABE and EqPac study sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garside, C.; Garside, J. C.

    Algorithms relating nutrient concentrations to density have been available for parts of the deep ocean for many years. Similar algorithms for the euphotic zone have proved to be elusive because of the relatively dynamic nature of nutrient and other processes there. However, if the hydrographic parameterization is recast to reflect these processes, remarkably good predictions of nutrient concentrations are possible. Regional examples and examples from the spring bloom in the North Atlantic, and for the El Niño and El Niña conditions in the central Pacific are presented. Nitrate concentrations can be predicted with a standard error of 0.5-1.0 μM or better. Possible applications of such algorithms include data QA/QC, retro-fitting and interpolating the nutrient data coverage of mooring and cruise data sets, and remote sensing and improved regional estimates of new production.

  9. Mobile sensing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-12-16

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high.

  10. Mobile Sensing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Macias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high.

  11. Mobile Sensing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high. PMID:24351637

  12. Leptin plasma concentrations, leptin gene expression, and protein localization in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axes of the European beaver (Castor fiber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowska, Katarzyna; Czerwinska, Joanna; Kaminski, Tadeusz; Kaminska, Barbara; Kurzynska, Aleksandra; Bogacka, Iwona

    2017-01-01

    The European beaver (Castor fiber) is the largest seasonal free-living rodent in Eurasia. Since the physiology and endocrine system of this species remains unknown, the present study aimed to determine plasma leptin concentrations and the expression of the leptin gene and protein in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPG and HPA) axes of beavers during breeding (April), postbreeding (July), and prebreeding (November) seasons. Leptin plasma concentrations did not change in females, whereas in males, leptin plasma concentrations were higher in July than those in April. The presence of leptin mRNA and protein was found in all examined tissues. In females, leptin mRNA expression in the hypothalamus, pituitary, ovaries, and myometrium was markedly higher in July than that in April. In males, leptin mRNA levels varied across the examined tissues of the HPG and HPA. Leptin synthesis increased in the hypothalamus during breeding and postbreeding seasons, but seasonal changes were not observed in the pituitary. In turn, testicular leptin levels were higher during breeding and prebreeding stages. Seasonal differences in the concentrations of leptin mRNA were also observed in the adrenal cortex. In males, leptin mRNA levels were higher in November than those in April or July. In females, leptin synthesis increased in the adrenal cortex during pregnancy relative to other seasons. This is the first ever study to demonstrate seasonal differences in leptin expression in beaver tissues, and our results could suggest that leptin is involved in the regulation of the HPG and HPA axes during various stages of the reproductive cycle in beavers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The origins of the vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) endocrine systems: new insights from lampreys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sower, Stacia A; Freamat, Mihael; Kavanaugh, Scott I

    2009-03-01

    The acquisition of a hypothalamic-pituitary axis was a seminal event in vertebrate evolution leading to the neuroendocrine control of many complex functions including growth, reproduction, osmoregulation, stress and metabolism. Lampreys as basal vertebrates are the earliest evolved vertebrates for which there are demonstrated functional roles for two gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs) that act via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis controlling reproductive processes. With the availability of the lamprey genome, we have identified a novel GnRH form (lamprey GnRH-II) and a novel glycoprotein hormone receptor, lGpH-R II (thyroid-stimulating hormone-like receptor). Based on functional studies, in situ hybridization and phylogenetic analysis, we hypothesize that the newly identified lamprey GnRH-II is an ancestral GnRH to the vertebrate GnRHs. This finding opens a new understanding of the GnRH family and can help to delineate the evolution of the complex neuro/endocrine axis of reproduction. A second glycoprotein hormone receptor (lGpH-R II) was also identified in the sea lamprey. The existing data suggest the existence of a primitive, overlapping yet functional HPG and HPT endocrine systems in this organism, involving one possibly two pituitary glycoprotein hormones and two glycoprotein hormone receptors as opposed to three or four glycoprotein hormones interacting specifically with three receptors in gnathostomes. We hypothesize that the glycoprotein hormone/glycoprotein hormone receptor systems emerged as a link between the neuro-hormonal and peripheral control levels during the early stages of gnathostome divergence. The significance of the results obtained by analysis of the HPG/T axes in sea lamprey may transcend the limited scope of the corresponding physiological compartments by providing important clues in respect to the interplay between genome-wide events (duplications), coding sequence (mutation) and expression control level evolutionary mechanisms

  14. Nutrient and energy recovery from urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuntke, P.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords: urine, urine treatment, nutrient recovery, microbial fuel cells, energy production from urine, membrane capacitive deionization. In conventional wastewater treatment plants large amounts of energy are required for the removal and recovery of nutrients (i.e. nitrogen and phosphorus).

  15. Nutrient supply of plants in aquaponic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Bittsanszky

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this preliminary article we present data on plant nutrient concentrations in aquaponics systems, and we compare them to nutrient concentrations in “standard” hydroponic solutions. Our data shows that the nutrient concentrations supplied by the fish in the aquaponics system are significantly lower for most nutrients compared to hydroponic systems. Nevertheless, plants do thrive in solutions that have lower nutrient levels compared to “standard” hydroponic solutions. This is especially true for green leafy vegetables that rarely need additional nutritional supplementation. It is concluded that in the highly complex system of aquaponics, special care has to be taken, via continuous monitoring of the chemical composition of the circulating water, to provide adequate concentrations and ratios of nutrients, and especially for the potentially toxic component, ammonium. If certain plants require nutrient supplementation, we consider that one based on organic substances would be most beneficial. However, protocols for the application of such nutrient amendments still need to be developed.

  16. Vitamins and Other Nutrients during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weight & fitness > Vitamins and other nutrients during pregnancy Vitamins and other nutrients during pregnancy E-mail to ... supplements without your provider’s OK. What are prenatal vitamins? Prenatal vitamins are multivitamins made just for pregnant ...

  17. Nano-bio-sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Carrara, Sandro

    2011-01-01

    This book examines state-of-the-art applications of nano-bio-sensing. It brings together researchers from nano-electronics and bio-technology, providing multidisciplinary content from nano-structures fabrication to bio-sensing applications.

  18. Deficiency of PTP1B Attenuates Hypothalamic Inflammation via Activation of the JAK2-STAT3 Pathway in Microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunekawa, Taku; Banno, Ryoichi; Mizoguchi, Akira; Sugiyama, Mariko; Tominaga, Takashi; Onoue, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Ito, Yoshihiro; Iwama, Shintaro; Goto, Motomitsu; Suga, Hidetaka; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Arima, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) regulates leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons via the JAK2-STAT3 pathway. PTP1B has also been implicated in the regulation of inflammation in the periphery. However, the role of PTP1B in hypothalamic inflammation, which is induced by a high-fat diet (HFD), remains to be elucidated. Here, we showed that STAT3 phosphorylation (p-STAT3) was increased in microglia in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of PTP1B knock-out mice (KO) on a HFD, accompanied by decreased Tnf and increased Il10 mRNA expression in the hypothalamus compared to wild-type mice (WT). In hypothalamic organotypic cultures, incubation with TNFα led to increased p-STAT3, accompanied by decreased Tnf and increased Il10 mRNA expression, in KO compared to WT. Incubation with p-STAT3 inhibitors or microglial depletion eliminated the differences in inflammation between genotypes. These data indicate an important role of JAK2-STAT3 signaling negatively regulated by PTP1B in microglia, which attenuates hypothalamic inflammation under HFD conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Deficiency of PTP1B Attenuates Hypothalamic Inflammation via Activation of the JAK2-STAT3 Pathway in Microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Tsunekawa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B regulates leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons via the JAK2-STAT3 pathway. PTP1B has also been implicated in the regulation of inflammation in the periphery. However, the role of PTP1B in hypothalamic inflammation, which is induced by a high-fat diet (HFD, remains to be elucidated. Here, we showed that STAT3 phosphorylation (p-STAT3 was increased in microglia in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of PTP1B knock-out mice (KO on a HFD, accompanied by decreased Tnf and increased Il10 mRNA expression in the hypothalamus compared to wild-type mice (WT. In hypothalamic organotypic cultures, incubation with TNFα led to increased p-STAT3, accompanied by decreased Tnf and increased Il10 mRNA expression, in KO compared to WT. Incubation with p-STAT3 inhibitors or microglial depletion eliminated the differences in inflammation between genotypes. These data indicate an important role of JAK2-STAT3 signaling negatively regulated by PTP1B in microglia, which attenuates hypothalamic inflammation under HFD conditions.

  20. Introduction to remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Cracknell, Arthur P

    2007-01-01

    Addressing the need for updated information in remote sensing, Introduction to Remote Sensing, Second Edition provides a full and authoritative introduction for scientists who need to know the scope, potential, and limitations in the field. The authors discuss the physical principles of common remote sensing systems and examine the processing, interpretation, and applications of data. This new edition features updated and expanded material, including greater coverage of applications from across earth, environmental, atmospheric, and oceanographic sciences. Illustrated with remotely sensed colo

  1. Attenuated hypothalamic responses to α-melanocyte stimulating hormone during pregnancy in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladyman, S R; Augustine, R A; Scherf, E; Phillipps, H R; Brown, C H; Grattan, D R

    2016-02-15

    Increased appetite and weight gain occurs during pregnancy, associated with development of leptin resistance, and satiety responses to the anorectic peptide α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) are suppressed. This study investigated hypothalamic responses to α-MSH during pregnancy, using c-fos expression in specific hypothalamic nuclei as a marker of neuronal signalling, and in vivo electrophysiology in supraoptic nucleus (SON) oxytocin neurons, as a representative α-MSH-responsive neuronal population that shows a well-characterised α-MSH-induced inhibition of firing. While icv injection of α-MSH significantly increased the number of c-fos-positive cells in the paraventricular, supraoptic, arcuate and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei in non-pregnant rats, this response was suppressed in pregnant rats. Similarly, SON oxytocin neurons in pregnant rats did not demonstrate characteristic α-MSH-induced inhibition of firing that was observed in non-pregnant animals. Given the known functions of α-MSH in the hypothalamus, the attenuated responses are likely to facilitate adaptive changes in appetite regulation and oxytocin secretion during pregnancy. During pregnancy, a state of positive energy balance develops to support the growing fetus and to deposit fat in preparation for the subsequent metabolic demands of lactation. As part of this maternal adaptation, the satiety response to the anorectic peptide α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is suppressed. To investigate whether pregnancy is associated with changes in the response of hypothalamic α-MSH target neurons, non-pregnant and pregnant rats were treated with α-MSH or vehicle and c-fos expression in hypothalamic nuclei was then examined. Furthermore, the firing rate of supraoptic nucleus (SON) oxytocin neurons, a known α-MSH responsive neuronal population, was examined in non-pregnant and pregnant rats following α-MSH treatment. Intracerebroventricular injection of α-MSH significantly

  2. Automated nutrient analyses in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitledge, T.E.; Malloy, S.C.; Patton, C.J.; Wirick, C.D.

    1981-02-01

    This manual was assembled for use as a guide for analyzing the nutrient content of seawater samples collected in the marine coastal zone of the Northeast United States and the Bering Sea. Some modifications (changes in dilution or sample pump tube sizes) may be necessary to achieve optimum measurements in very pronounced oligotrophic, eutrophic or brackish areas. Information is presented under the following section headings: theory and mechanics of automated analysis; continuous flow system description; operation of autoanalyzer system; cookbook of current nutrient methods; automated analyzer and data analysis software; computer interfacing and hardware modifications; and trouble shooting. The three appendixes are entitled: references and additional reading; manifold components and chemicals; and software listings. (JGB)

  3. Short Communication Preliminary Studies on Nutrients Removal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short Communication Preliminary Studies on Nutrients Removal Potential of Selected Aquatic Plants. ... Aquatic plants can remove nutrients (P&N) from sewage or industrial wastewater through accumulation. ... This study had identified some aquatic plants as good potential nutrient removers especially in wetlands.

  4. Modeling global nutrient export from watersheds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, C.; Bouwman, A.F.; Seitzinger, S.

    2012-01-01

    We describe how global models can be used to analyze past and future trends in nutrient export from watersheds and how such models can be used to analyze causes and effects of coastal eutrophication. Future nutrient inputs to coastal waters may be higher than today, and nutrient ratios may depart

  5. Nutrient quality of fast food kids meals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure of children to kids’ meals at fast food restaurants is high; however, the nutrient quality of such meals has not been systematically assessed. We assessed the nutrient quality of fast food meals marketed to young children, i.e., "kids meals". The nutrient quality of kids’ meals was assessed...

  6. Benchmarking nutrient use efficiency of dairy farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mu, W.; Groen, E.A.; Middelaar, van C.E.; Bokkers, E.A.M.; Hennart, S.; Stilmant, D.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The nutrient use efficiency (NUE) of a system, generally computed as the amount of nutrients in valuable outputs over the amount of nutrients in all inputs, is commonly used to benchmark the environmental performance of dairy farms. Benchmarking the NUE of farms, however, may lead to biased

  7. Nutrient behaviour in urban drainages

    OpenAIRE

    Choy, David Kam Wai

    2017-01-01

    Urbanisation has altered the natural landscape, removing features that previously acted to retain, transform and process nitrogen and phosphorus within catchments. In Melbourne the past legacy of traditional urban design aimed at efficient drainage of stormwater has resulted in higher stormwater volumes with high pollutant concentrations. Excessive concentrations of such nutrients in urban runoff can have an adverse impact on the ecological health of receiving waters. The aims of this stu...

  8. Spectral Quantitation Of Hydroponic Nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlager, Kenneth J.; Kahle, Scott J.; Wilson, Monica A.; Boehlen, Michelle

    1996-01-01

    Instrument continuously monitors hydroponic solution by use of absorption and emission spectrometry to determine concentrations of principal nutrients, including nitrate, iron, potassium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, and others. Does not depend on extraction and processing of samples, use of such surrograte parameters as pH or electrical conductivity for control, or addition of analytical reagents to solution. Solution not chemically altered by analysis and can be returned to hydroponic process stream after analysis.

  9. Hypothalamic FTO is associated with the regulation of energy intake not feeding reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radomska Katarzyna J

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphism in the FTO gene is strongly associated with obesity, but little is known about the molecular bases of this relationship. We investigated whether hypothalamic FTO is involved in energy-dependent overconsumption of food. We determined FTO mRNA levels in rodent models of short- and long-term intake of palatable fat or sugar, deprivation, diet-induced increase in body weight, baseline preference for fat versus sugar as well as in same-weight animals differing in the inherent propensity to eat calories especially upon availability of diverse diets, using quantitative PCR. FTO gene expression was also studied in organotypic hypothalamic cultures treated with anorexigenic amino acid, leucine. In situ hybridization (ISH was utilized to study FTO signal in reward- and hunger-related sites, colocalization with anorexigenic oxytocin, and c-Fos immunoreactivity in FTO cells at initiation and termination of a meal. Results Deprivation upregulated FTO mRNA, while leucine downregulated it. Consumption of palatable diets or macronutrient preference did not affect FTO expression. However, the propensity to ingest more energy without an effect on body weight was associated with lower FTO mRNA levels. We found that 4-fold higher number of FTO cells displayed c-Fos at meal termination as compared to initiation in the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei of re-fed mice. Moreover, ISH showed that FTO is present mainly in hunger-related sites and it shows a high degree of colocalization with anorexigenic oxytocin. Conclusion We conclude that FTO mRNA is present mainly in sites related to hunger/satiation control; changes in hypothalamic FTO expression are associated with cues related to energy intake rather than feeding reward. In line with that, neurons involved in feeding termination express FTO. Interestingly, baseline FTO expression appears linked not only with energy intake but also energy metabolism.

  10. Alterations in hypothalamic gene expression following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkholt, Pernille; Pedersen, Philip J; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Jelsing, Jacob; Hansen, Henrik H; Vrang, Niels

    2016-04-01

    The role of the central nervous system in mediating metabolic effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is poorly understood. Using a rat model of RYGB, we aimed to identify changes in gene expression of key hypothalamic neuropeptides known to be involved in the regulation of energy balance. Lean male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either RYGB or sham surgery. Body weight and food intake were monitored bi-weekly for 60 days post-surgery. In situ hybridization mRNA analysis of hypothalamic AgRP, NPY, CART, POMC and MCH was applied to RYGB and sham animals and compared with ad libitum fed and food-restricted rats. Furthermore, in situ hybridization mRNA analysis of dopaminergic transmission markers (TH and DAT) was applied in the midbrain. RYGB surgery significantly reduced body weight and intake of a highly palatable diet but increased chow consumption compared with sham operated controls. In the arcuate nucleus, RYGB surgery increased mRNA levels of orexigenic AgRP and NPY, whereas no change was observed in anorexigenic CART and POMC mRNA levels. A similar pattern was seen in food-restricted versus ad libitum fed rats. In contrast to a significant increase of orexigenic MCH mRNA levels in food-restricted animals, RYGB did not change MCH expression in the lateral hypothalamus. In the VTA, RYGB surgery induced a reduction in mRNA levels of TH and DAT, whereas no changes were observed in the substantia nigra relative to sham surgery. RYGB surgery increases the mRNA levels of hunger-associated signaling markers in the rat arcuate nucleus without concomitantly increasing downstream MCH expression in the lateral hypothalamus, suggesting that RYGB surgery puts a brake on orexigenic hypothalamic output signals. In addition, down-regulation of midbrain TH and DAT expression suggests that altered dopaminergic activity also contributes to the reduced intake of palatable food in RYGB rats.

  11. Important role of hypothalamic Y2 receptors in body weight regulation revealed in conditional knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Amanda; Schwarzer, Christoph; Couzens, Michelle; Fetissov, Serguei; Furtinger, Sabine; Jenkins, Arthur; Cox, Helen M; Sperk, Günther; Hökfelt, Tomas; Herzog, Herbert

    2002-06-25

    Neuropeptide Y is implicated in energy homeostasis, and contributes to obesity when hypothalamic levels remain chronically elevated. To investigate the specific role of hypothalamic Y2 receptors in this process, we used a conditional Y2 knockout model, using the Cre-lox system and adenoviral delivery of Cre-recombinase. Hypothalamus-specific Y2-deleted mice showed a significant decrease in body weight and a significant increase in food intake that was associated with increased mRNA levels for the orexigenic NPY and AgRP, as well as the anorexic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in the arcuate nucleus. These hypothalamic changes persisted until at least 34 days after Y2 deletion, yet the effect on body weight and food intake subsided within this time. Plasma concentrations of pancreatic polypeptide and corticosterone were 3- to 5-fold increased in hypothalamus-specific Y2 knockout mice. Germ-line Y2 receptor knockout also produced a significant increase in plasma levels of pancreatic polypeptide. However, these mice differed from conditional knockout mice in that they showed a sustained reduction in body weight and adiposity associated with increased NPY and AgRP but decreased POMC and CART mRNA levels in the arcuate nucleus. The transience of the observed effects on food intake and body weight in the hypothalamus-specific Y2 knockout mice, and the difference of this model from germ-line Y2 knockout mice, underline the importance of conditional models of gene deletion, because developmental, secondary, or extrahypothalamic mechanisms may mask such effects in germ-line knockouts.

  12. Sodium tungstate regulates food intake and body weight through activation of the hypothalamic leptin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigó-Correig, M; Barceló-Batllori, S; Piquer, S; Soty, M; Pujadas, G; Gasa, R; Bortolozzi, A; Carmona, M C; Gomis, R

    2011-03-01

    Sodium tungstate is an anti-obesity drug targeting peripheral tissues. In vivo, sodium tungstate reduces body weight gain and food intake through increasing energy expenditure and lipid oxidation, but it also modulates hypothalamic gene expression when orally administered, raising the possibility of a direct effect of sodium tungstate on the central nervous system. Sodium tungstate was administered intraperitoneally (ip) to Wistar rats, and its levels were measured in cerebrospinal fluid through mass spectrometry. Body weight gain and food intake were monitored for 24 h after its administration in the third ventricle. Hypothalamic protein was obtained and subjected to western blot. In vitro, hypothalamic N29/4 cells were treated with 100 µM sodium tungstate or 1 nM leptin, and protein and neural gene expression were analysed. Sodium tungstate crossed the blood-brain barrier, reaching a concentration of 1.31 ± 0.07 mg/l in cerebrospinal fluid 30 min after ip injection. When centrally administered, sodium tungstate decreased body weight gain and food intake and increased the phosphorylation state of the main kinases and proteins involved in leptin signalling. In vitro, sodium tungstate increased the phosphorylation of janus kinase-2 (JAK2) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2), but the activation of each kinase did not depend on each other. It regulated c-myc gene expression through the JAK2/STAT system and c-fos and AgRP (agouti-related peptide) gene expression through the ERK1/2 pathway simultaneously and independently. Sodium tungstate increased the activity of several kinases involved in the leptin signalling system in an independent way, making it a suitable and promising candidate as a leptin-mimetic compound in order to manage obesity. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. The anorexigenic effects of metformin involve increases in hypothalamic leptin receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Grégory; Mansuy, Virginie; Voirol, Marie-Jeanne; Pellerin, Luc; Pralong, François P

    2011-03-01

    Metformin demonstrates anorectic effects in vivo and inhibits neuropeptide Y expression in cultured hypothalamic neurons. Here we investigated the mechanisms implicated in the modulation of feeding by metformin in animals rendered obese by long-term high-fat diet (diet-induced obesity [DIO]) and in animals resistant to obesity (diet resistant [DR]). Male Long-Evans rats were kept on normal chow feeding (controls) or on high-fat diet (DIO, DR) for 6 months. Afterward, rats were treated 14 days with metformin (75 mg/kg) or isotonic sodium chloride solution and killed. Energy efficiency, metabolic parameters, and gene expression were analyzed at the end of the high-fat diet period and after 14 days of metformin treatment. At the end of the high-fat diet period, despite higher leptin levels, DIO rats had higher levels of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y expression than DR or control rats, suggesting a central leptin resistance. In DIO but also in DR rats, metformin treatment induced significant reductions of food intake accompanied by decreases in body weight. Interestingly, the weight loss achieved by metformin was correlated with pretreatment plasma leptin levels. This effect was paralleled by a stimulation of the expression of the leptin receptor gene (ObRb) in the arcuate nucleus. These data identify the hypothalamic ObRb as a gene modulated after metformin treatment and suggest that the anorectic effects of the drug are potentially mediated via an increase in the central sensitivity to leptin. Thus, they provide a rationale for novel therapeutic approaches associating leptin and metformin in the treatment of obesity. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Symptomatic hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients following radiation therapy: a retrospective study

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    Lam, K.S.; Ho, J.H.; Lee, A.W.; Tse, V.K.; Chan, P.K.; Wang, C.; Ma, J.T.; Yeung, R.T.

    1987-09-01

    Endocrine assessment was performed in 32 relapse-free southern Chinese patients 5-17 years following radiation therapy (RT) alone for early nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Initial screening was done using questionnaires emphasizing impaired sexual function and menstrual disturbance plus measurement of serum levels of thyroxine, free thyroxine index, thyrotropic hormone, prolactin, and additionally testosterone for males only. Those showing abnormalities were subjected to detailed pituitary function tests. Hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction was found in 7 female patients and only 1 male patient. A delayed TSH response to thyrotropin releasing hormone suggesting a hypothalamic disorder was seen in 6 of the affected female patients, and hyperprolactinaemia in also 6. None of the patients had evidence of diabetes insipidus. Hypopituitarism became symptomatic 2-5 years after RT with a mean latent interval of 3.8 years. A practical protocol for regular endocrine assessment for NPC patients after RT has been proposed. Multiple linear regression analysis of the radiotherapeutic data from the 11 female patients indicates that the likelihood of late occurrence of symptomatic hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction following RT is dependent on the TDF of the target dose to the nasopharyngeal region and the height of the upper margin of the opposed lateral facial fields above the diaphragma sellae (coefficient of multiple correlation = 0.9025). Except when the sphenoid sinus or the middle cranial fossa is involved, it is advisable to set the height of the upper margin of the lateral facial field at a level no higher than the diaphragma sellae. The hypothalamus and possibly the pituitary stalk as well may sustain permanent damage by doses of radiation within the conventional radiotherapeutic range for carcinomas.

  15. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy reduces blood pressure and hypothalamic endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne K. McGavigan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery, such as vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG, causes remarkable improvements in cardiometabolic health, including hypertension remission. However, the mechanisms responsible remain undefined and poorly studied. Therefore, we developed and validated the first murine model of VSG that recapitulates the blood pressure-lowering effect of VSG using gold-standard radiotelemetry technology. We used this model to investigate several potential mechanisms, including body mass, brain endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress signaling and brain inflammatory signaling, which are all critical contributors to the pathogenesis of obesity-associated hypertension. Mice fed on a high-fat diet underwent sham or VSG surgery and radiotelemeter implantation. Sham mice were fed ad libitum or were food restricted to match their body mass to VSG-operated mice to determine the role of body mass in the ability of VSG to lower blood pressure. Blood pressure was then measured in freely moving unstressed mice by radiotelemetry. VSG decreased energy intake, body mass and fat mass. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP was reduced in VSG-operated mice compared with both sham-operated groups. VSG-induced reductions in MAP were accompanied by a body mass-independent decrease in hypothalamic ER stress, hypothalamic inflammation and sympathetic nervous system tone. Assessment of gut microbial populations revealed VSG-induced increases in the relative abundance of Gammaproteobacteria and Enterococcus, and decreases in Adlercreutzia. These results suggest that VSG reduces blood pressure, but this is only partly due to the reduction in body weight. VSG-induced reductions in blood pressure may be driven by a decrease in hypothalamic ER stress and inflammatory signaling, and shifts in gut microbial populations.

  16. Hypothalamic expression of anorexigenic and orexigenic hormone receptors in obese females Neotomodon alstoni: effect of fasting.

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    Báez-Ruiz, Adrián; Luna-Moreno, Dalia; Carmona-Castro, Agustín; Cárdenas-Vázquez, René; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; Carmona-Alcocer, Vania; Fuentes-Granados, Citlalli; Manuel, Miranda-Anaya

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a world problem that requires a better understanding of its physiological and genetic basis, as well as the mechanisms by which the hypothalamus controls feeding behavior. The volcano mouse Neotomodon alstoni develops obesity in captivity when fed with regular chow diet, providing a novel model for the study of obesity. Females develop obesity more often than males; therefore, in this study, we analysed in females, in proestrous lean and obese, the differences in hypothalamus expression of receptors for leptin, ghrelin (growth hormone secretagogue receptor GHS-R), and VPAC, and correlates for plasma levels of total ghrelin. The main comparisons are between mice fed ad libitum and mice after 24 hours of fasting. Mice above 65 g body weight were considered obese, based on behavioral and physiological parameters such as food intake, plasma free fatty acids, and glucose tolerance. Hypothalamic tissue from obese and lean mice was analysed by western blot. Our results indicate that after ad libitum food access, obese mice show no significant differences in hypothalamic leptin receptors, but a significant increase of 60% in the GHS-R, and a nearly 62% decrease in VPAC2 was noted. After a 24-hour fast, plasma ghrelin increased nearly two fold in both lean and obese mice; increases of hypothalamic leptin receptors and GHS-R were also noted, while VPAC2 did not change significantly; levels of plasma free fatty acids were 50% less after fasting in obese than in lean animals. Our results indicate that in obese N. alstoni mice, the levels of orexigenic receptors in the hypothalamus correlate with overfeeding, and the fact that lean and obese females respond in different ways to a metabolic demand such as a 24-hour fast.

  17. Adipsic hypernatremia without hypothalamic lesions accompanied by autoantibodies to subfornical organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyama, Takeshi Y; Utsunomiya, Akari N; Matsumoto, Masahito; Fujikawa, Akihiro; Lin, Chia-Hao; Hara, Keiichi; Kagawa, Reiko; Okada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Ishikawa, Mayumi; Anzo, Makoto; Cho, Hideo; Takayasu, Shinobu; Nigawara, Takeshi; Daimon, Makoto; Sato, Tomohiko; Terui, Kiminori; Ito, Etsuro; Noda, Masaharu

    2017-05-01

    Adipsic (or essential) hypernatremia is a rare hypernatremia caused by a deficiency in thirst regulation and vasopressin release. In 2010, we reported a case in which autoantibodies targeting the sensory circumventricular organs (sCVOs) caused adipsic hypernatremia without hypothalamic structural lesions demonstrable by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); sCVOs include the subfornical organ (SFO) and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), which are centers for the monitoring of body-fluid conditions and the control of water and salt intakes, and harbor neurons innervating hypothalamic nuclei for vasopressin release. We herein report three newly identified patients (3- to 8-year-old girls on the first visit) with similar symptoms. The common features of the patients were extensive hypernatremia without any sensation of thirst and defects in vasopressin response to serum hypertonicity. Despite these features, we could not detect any hypothalamic structural lesions by MRI. Immunohistochemical analyses using the sera of the three patients revealed that antibodies specifically reactive to the mouse SFO were present in the sera of all cases; in one case, the antibodies also reacted with the mouse OVLT. The immunoglobulin (Ig) fraction of serum obtained from one patient was intravenously injected into wild-type mice to determine whether the mice developed similar symptoms. Mice injected with a patient's Ig showed abnormalities in water/salt intake, vasopressin release, and diuresis, which resultantly developed hypernatremia. Prominent cell death and infiltration of reactive microglia was observed in the SFO of these mice. Thus, autoimmune destruction of the SFO may be the cause of the adipsic hypernatremia. This study provides a possible explanation for the pathogenesis of adipsic hypernatremia without demonstrable hypothalamus-pituitary lesions. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  18. Hypothalamic dopaminergic neurons in an animal model of seasonal affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deats, Sean P; Adidharma, Widya; Yan, Lily

    2015-08-18

    Light has profound effects on mood regulation as exemplified in seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and the therapeutic benefits of light therapy. However, the underlying neural pathways through which light regulates mood are not well understood. Our previous work has developed the diurnal grass rat, Arvicanthis niloticus, as an animal model of SAD. Following housing conditions of either 12:12 h dim light:dark (DLD) or 8:16 h short photoperiod (SP), which mimic the lower light intensity or short day-length of winter, respectively, grass rats exhibit an increase in depression-like behavior compared to those housed in a 12:12 h bright light:dark (BLD) condition. Furthermore, we have shown that the orexinergic system is involved in mediating the effects of light on mood and anxiety. To explore other potential neural substrates involved in the depressive phenotype, the present study examined hypothalamic dopaminergic (DA) and somatostatin (SST) neurons in the brains of grass rats housed in DLD, SP and BLD. Using immunostaining for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and SST, we found that the number of TH- and SST-ir cells in the hypothalamus was significantly lower in the DLD and SP groups compared to the BLD group. We also found that treating BLD animals with a selective orexin receptor 1 (OX1R) antagonist SB-334867 significantly reduced the number of hypothalamic TH-ir cells. The present study suggests that the hypothalamic DA neurons are sensitive to daytime light deficiency and are regulated by an orexinergic pathway. The results support the hypothesis that the orexinergic pathways mediate the effects of light on other neuronal systems that collectively contribute to light-dependent changes in the affective state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy reduces blood pressure and hypothalamic endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGavigan, Anne K; Henseler, Zachariah M; Garibay, Darline; Butler, Scott D; Jayasinghe, Sisitha; Ley, Ruth E; Davisson, Robin L; Cummings, Bethany P

    2017-03-01

    Bariatric surgery, such as vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), causes remarkable improvements in cardiometabolic health, including hypertension remission. However, the mechanisms responsible remain undefined and poorly studied. Therefore, we developed and validated the first murine model of VSG that recapitulates the blood pressure-lowering effect of VSG using gold-standard radiotelemetry technology. We used this model to investigate several potential mechanisms, including body mass, brain endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling and brain inflammatory signaling, which are all critical contributors to the pathogenesis of obesity-associated hypertension. Mice fed on a high-fat diet underwent sham or VSG surgery and radiotelemeter implantation. Sham mice were fed ad libitum or were food restricted to match their body mass to VSG-operated mice to determine the role of body mass in the ability of VSG to lower blood pressure. Blood pressure was then measured in freely moving unstressed mice by radiotelemetry. VSG decreased energy intake, body mass and fat mass. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was reduced in VSG-operated mice compared with both sham-operated groups. VSG-induced reductions in MAP were accompanied by a body mass-independent decrease in hypothalamic ER stress, hypothalamic inflammation and sympathetic nervous system tone. Assessment of gut microbial populations revealed VSG-induced increases in the relative abundance of Gammaproteobacteria and Enterococcus, and decreases in Adlercreutzia These results suggest that VSG reduces blood pressure, but this is only partly due to the reduction in body weight. VSG-induced reductions in blood pressure may be driven by a decrease in hypothalamic ER stress and inflammatory signaling, and shifts in gut microbial populations. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Distinct regulation of hypothalamic and brown/beige adipose tissue activities in human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachid, B; van de Sande-Lee, S; Rodovalho, S; Folli, F; Beltramini, G C; Morari, J; Amorim, B J; Pedro, T; Ramalho, A F; Bombassaro, B; Tincani, A J; Chaim, E; Pareja, J C; Geloneze, B; Ramos, C D; Cendes, F; Saad, M J A; Velloso, L A

    2015-10-01

    The identification of brown/beige adipose tissue in adult humans has motivated the search for methods aimed at increasing its thermogenic activity as an approach to treat obesity. In rodents, the brown adipose tissue is under the control of sympathetic signals originating in the hypothalamus. However, the putative connection between the depots of brown/beige adipocytes and the hypothalamus in humans has never been explored. The objective of this study was to evaluate the response of the hypothalamus and brown/beige adipose tissue to cold stimulus in obese subjects undergoing body mass reduction following gastric bypass. We evaluated twelve obese, non-diabetic subjects undergoing Roux-in-Y gastric bypass and 12 lean controls. Obese subjects were evaluated before and approximately 8 months after gastric bypass. Lean subjects were evaluated only at admission. Subjects were evaluated for hypothalamic activity in response to cold by functional magnetic resonance, whereas brown/beige adipose tissue activity was evaluated using a (F 18) fluorodeoxyglucose positron emisson tomography/computed tomography scan and real-time PCR measurement of signature genes. Body mass reduction resulted in a significant increase in brown/beige adipose tissue activity in response to cold; however, no change in cold-induced hypothalamic activity was observed after body mass reduction. No correlation was found between brown/beige adipose tissue activation and hypothalamus activity in obese subjects or in lean controls. In humans, the increase in brown/beige adipose tissue activity related to body mass reduction occurs independently of changes in hypothalamic activity as determined by functional magnetic resonance.

  1. Intrauterine growth restriction alters term fetal baboon hypothalamic appetitive peptide balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cun; McDonald, Thomas J; Wu, Guoyao; Nijland, Mark J; Nathanielsz, Peter W

    2013-06-01

    Neurons controlling appetite are located in the hypothalamic arcuate nuclei (ARH). Offspring appetite regulation has been shown to be modified by dysregulation of ARH nuclear development. Most ARH developmental studies have been in altricial rodents whose hypothalamic development is predominantly postnatal. In primates including humans, much development of hypothalamic appetite regulatory centers occurs before birth. We hypothesized that i) appetitive peptides are abundantly expressed by 90 percent gestation (0.9G), ready for postnatal function; ii) by 0.9G, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) increases the orexigenic:anorexigenic peptide ratio; iii) IUGR increases fetal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression; and iv) IUGR decreases STAT3, which signals inhibition of appetite. We developed a fetal baboon IUGR model resulting from reduced maternal nutrition. Pregnant baboons were fed ad libitum, controls (CTR; n=24), or 70% CTR diet to produce IUGR (n=14). C-section was performed at 0.9G. In CTR (n=7) and IUGR (n=6) fetal brains, ARH appetite regulatory peptides (neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC)) were quantified immunohistochemically. Fetal plasma cortisol was raised in IUGR fetuses. We observed that NPY and POMC were well expressed by 0.9G. IUGR increased NPY, GR, and active phosphorylated GR and decreased POMC and phosphorylated form of STAT3. We conclude that IUGR dysregulates ARH development in ways that will reset the appetitive neuropeptide balance in favor of increased appetite drive in postnatal life. We postulate that changes in peptide abundance are in part due to increased fetal cortisol and ARH GR. These changes may contribute to predisposition to obesity in IUGR offspring.

  2. High ambient temperature reverses hypothalamic MC4 receptor overexpression in an animal model of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, E; Churruca, I; Zárate, J; Carrera, O; Portillo, M P; Cerrato, M; Vázquez, R; Echevarría, E

    2009-04-01

    The potential involvement of the melanocortin system in the beneficial effects of heat application in rats submitted to activity-based anorexia (ABA), an analogous model of anorexia nervosa (AN), was studied. Once ABA rats had lost 20% of body weight, half of the animals were exposed to a high ambient temperature (HAT) of 32 degrees C, whereas the rest were maintained at 21 degrees C. Control sedentary rats yoked to ABA animals received the same treatment. ABA rats (21 degrees C) showed increased Melanocortin 4 (MC4) receptor and Agouti gene Related Peptide (AgRP) expression, and decreased pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA levels (Real Time PCR), with respect to controls. Heat application increased weight gain and food intake, and reduced running rate in ABA rats, when compared with ABA rats at 21 degrees C. However, no changes in body weight and food intake were observed in sedentary rats exposed to heat. Moreover, heat application reduced MC4 receptor, AgRP and POMC expression in ABA rats, but no changes were observed in control rats. These results indicate that hypothalamic MC4 receptor overexpression could occur on the basis of the characteristic hyperactivity, weight loss, and self-starvation of ABA rats, and suggest the involvement of hypothalamic melanocortin neural circuits in behavioural changes shown by AN patients. Changes in AgRP and POMC expression could represent an adaptative response to equilibrate energy balance. Moreover, the fact that HAT reversed hypothalamic MC4 receptor overexpression in ABA rats indicates the involvement of brain melanocortin system in the reported beneficial effects of heat application in AN. A combination of MC4 receptor antagonists and heat application could improve the clinical management of AN.

  3. Functional pharmacology of H1 histamine receptors expressed in mouse preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarean, I V

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Histamine H1 receptors are highly expressed in hypothalamic neurons and mediate histaminergic modulation of several brain-controlled physiological functions, such as sleep, feeding and thermoregulation. In spite of the fact that the mouse is used as an experimental model for studying histaminergic signalling, the pharmacological characteristics of mouse H1 receptors have not been studied. In particular, selective and potent H1 receptor agonists have not been identified. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Ca2+ imaging using fura-2 fluorescence signals and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were carried out in mouse preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons in culture. KEY RESULTS The H1 receptor antagonists mepyramine and trans-triprolidine potently antagonized the activation by histamine of these receptors with IC50 values of 0.02 and 0.2 μM respectively. All H1 receptor agonists studied had relatively low potency at the H1 receptors expressed by these neurons. Methylhistaprodifen and 2-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)histamine had full-agonist activity with potencies similar to that of histamine. In contrast, 2-pyridylethylamine and betahistine showed only partial agonist activity and lower potency than histamine. The histamine receptor agonist, 6-[2-(4-imidazolyl)ethylamino]-N-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)heptanecarboxamide (HTMT) had no agonist activity at the H1 receptors H1 receptors expressed by mouse preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons but displayed antagonist activity. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Methylhistaprodifen and 2-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)histamine were identified as full agonists of mouse H1 receptors. These results also indicated that histamine H1 receptors in mice exhibited a pharmacological profile in terms of agonism, significantly different from those of H1 receptors expressed in other species. PMID:23808378

  4. Anti-obesity sodium tungstate treatment triggers axonal and glial plasticity in hypothalamic feeding centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Amigó-Correig

    Full Text Available This study aims at exploring the effects of sodium tungstate treatment on hypothalamic plasticity, which is known to have an important role in the control of energy metabolism.Adult lean and high-fat diet-induced obese mice were orally treated with sodium tungstate. Arcuate and paraventricular nuclei and lateral hypothalamus were separated and subjected to proteomic analysis by DIGE and mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemistry and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging were also performed.Sodium tungstate treatment reduced body weight gain, food intake, and blood glucose and triglyceride levels. These effects were associated with transcriptional and functional changes in the hypothalamus. Proteomic analysis revealed that sodium tungstate modified the expression levels of proteins involved in cell morphology, axonal growth, and tissue remodeling, such as actin, CRMP2 and neurofilaments, and of proteins related to energy metabolism. Moreover, immunohistochemistry studies confirmed results for some targets and further revealed tungstate-dependent regulation of SNAP25 and HPC-1 proteins, suggesting an effect on synaptogenesis as well. Functional test for cell activity based on c-fos-positive cell counting also suggested that sodium tungstate modified hypothalamic basal activity. Finally, in vivo magnetic resonance imaging showed that tungstate treatment can affect neuronal organization in the hypothalamus.Altogether, these results suggest that sodium tungstate regulates proteins involved in axonal and glial plasticity. The fact that sodium tungstate could modulate hypothalamic plasticity and networks in adulthood makes it a possible and interesting therapeutic strategy not only for obesity management, but also for other neurodegenerative illnesses like Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Serotonin in individual hypothalamic nuclei of rats after space flight on biosatellite cosmos 1129

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čulman, J.; Kvetňansky, T.; Serova, L. V.; Tigranjan, R. A.; Macho, L.

    The experiment on Cosmos 1129 was based on our results obtained in rats exposed to single or repeated restrain stress in the laboratory. These results have convincingly demonstrated a significant increase of serotonin concentration (5-HT) in the hypothalamus in acutely stressed rats. This response, which was found also in the isolated hypothalamic nuclei, was diminished in repeatedly (40 times) immobilized rats. While the concentration of 5-HT was unchanged in the majority of the hypothalamic nuclei of animals subjected to cosmic flight, an increase was recorded only in the supraoptic nucleus (NSO) and a decrease in the periventricular nucleus. These findings demonstrate that only few areas of the hypothalamus respond to cosmic flight with changes of 5-HT concentration and suggest either that long-term cosmic flight cannot be an intensive stressor or that during the flight the rats became already adapted to its long-term effect. However, the exposure of flight rats to repeated immobilization stress resulted in a significant increase of 5-HT in the NSO, paraventricular and dorsomedial (NDM) nuclei. It should be noted that we have never seen any changes of 5-HT concentration, tryptophan hydroxylase and monoamineoxidase activities in repeatedly (40 times) immobilized rats. On the other hand, the increase of 5-HT concentration in the NDM is a typical finding after seven exposures of rats to immobilization on Earth, daily for 150 min. In the experiment COSMOS 1129 such an increase of 5-HT concentration in the NDM was found not only in the flight group but also in the control group of rats subjected to five daily exposures of immobilization stress. With respect to these findings, the increased 5-HT concentrations observed in some isolated hypothalamic nuclei in the flight group of rats exposed after landing to repeated immobilization stress suggest that long-term space flight and the state of weightlessness do not represent a stressogenic factor with respect to the

  6. Decreased Hypothalamic Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Expression in Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Kulve, Jennifer S; van Bloemendaal, Liselotte; Balesar, Rawien; IJzerman, Richard G; Swaab, Dick F; Diamant, Michaela; la Fleur, Susanne E; Alkemade, Anneke

    2016-05-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP-1 receptor agonist treatment in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) reduce blood glucose and food intake. It has been suggested that these effects are partly mediated through central GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs). The rodent and nonhuman primate hypothalamus show clear GLP-1R expression. However, a detailed description of GLP-1R expression in the human hypothalamus is lacking, and it is unknown whether this expression is altered in T2DM patients. The objective of the study was to investigate the GLP-1R distribution in the human postmortem hypothalamus and to determine whether hypothalamic GLP-1R expression is altered in T2DM patients. We investigated the distribution of GLP-1R expression throughout the human hypothalamus by means of in situ hybridization. We also performed quantifications of GLP-1R mRNA expression in two hypothalamic nuclei (ie, the paraventricular nucleus [PVN] and infundibular nucleus [IFN]), comparing patients with T2DM and control subjects. We found that GLP-1R mRNA was expressed in a number of hypothalamic nuclei including the PVN and the IFN, both involved in the regulation of energy metabolism. We observed sporadic colocalization of the GLP-1R in the IFN with the orgexigenic neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide, or proopiomelanocortin transcripts. Comparison of GLP-1R mRNA in the PVN and IFN between T2DM patients and control subjects revealed a decreased expression in T2DM patients. Our studies show that GLP-1R is widely expressed throughout the human hypothalamus. The decreased expression of GLP-1R in the PVN and IFN of T2DM patients may be related to the dysregulation of feeding behavior and glucose homeostasis in T2DM.

  7. Altered hypothalamic inflammatory gene expression correlates with heat stroke severity in a conscious rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, Gerald N; Dineen, Shauna M; Quinn, Carrie M; Leon, Lisa R

    2016-04-15

    It has been suggested that heat-induced hypothalamic damage mediates core temperature (Tc) disturbances during heat stroke (HS) recovery; this is significant as hypothermia and/or fever have been linked to severity and overall pathological insult. However, to date there has been a lack of histological evidence in support of these claims. We hypothesized that local hypothalamic cytokines and/or chemokines, known regulators of Tc, are mediating the elevation in Tc during HS recovery even in the absence of histological damage. In experiment 1, the hypothalamus of Fischer 344 rats was examined for 84 cytokine/chemokine genes (real-time PCR) at multiple time points (Tc,Max, 1, 3, and 10 days) during mild HS recovery. In experiment 2, the hypothalamus of three different HS severities (MILD, moderate [MOD], and severe [SEV]) in rats were examined for the same genes as experiment 1 as well as six oxidative damage markers, at a single intermediate time point (1 day). Systemic cytokines were also analyzed in experiment 2 across the three severities. There were significant alterations in 25 cytokines/chemokines expression at Tc,Max, but little or no changes in expression at longer time points in experiment 1. In experiment 2 there were significant changes in gene expression in SEV rats only, with MILD and MOD rats showing baseline expression at 1 day, despite an absence of systemic cytokine expression in any severity. There was also no change in any oxidative marker of damage at 1 day, regardless of severity. In conclusion, we show only limited changes during long term recovery from HS, but demonstrate differences in hypothalamic gene expression patterns that may be driving HS pathology and morbidity. These findings contribute to our overall understanding of HS pathology in the CNS, as well as providing avenues for future pharmacological intervention. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Fetal alcohol programming of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin system by epigenetic mechanisms and later life vulnerability to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekdash, Rola; Zhang, Changqing; Sarkar, Dipak

    2014-09-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, one of the major regulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, immune functions, and energy homeostasis, are vulnerable to the adverse effects of fetal alcohol exposure (FAE). These effects are manifested in POMC neurons by a decrease in Pomc gene expression, a decrement in the levels of its derived peptide β-endorphin and a dysregulation of the stress response in the adult offspring. The HPA axis is a major neuroendocrine system with pivotal physiological functions and mode of regulation. This system has been shown to be perturbed by prenatal alcohol exposure. It has been demonstrated that the perturbation of the HPA axis by FAE is long-lasting and is linked to molecular, neurophysiological, and behavioral changes in exposed individuals. Recently, we showed that the dysregulation of the POMC system function by FAE is induced by epigenetic mechanisms such as hypermethylation of Pomc gene promoter and an alteration in histone marks in POMC neurons. This developmental programming of the POMC system by FAE altered the transcriptome in POMC neurons and induced a hyperresponse to stress in adulthood. These long-lasting epigenetic changes influenced subsequent generations via the male germline. We also demonstrated that the epigenetic programming of the POMC system by FAE was reversed in adulthood with the application of the inhibitors of DNA methylation or histone modifications. Thus, prenatal environmental influences, such as alcohol exposure, could epigenetically modulate POMC neuronal circuits and function to shape adult behavioral patterns. Identifying specific epigenetic factors in hypothalamic POMC neurons that are modulated by fetal alcohol and target Pomc gene could be potentially useful for the development of new therapeutic approaches to treat stress-related diseases in patients with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Copyright © 2014 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  9. Dietary fat alters the response of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y to subsequent energy intake in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao J; Xu, Shao H; Liu, Lei; Song, Zhi G; Jiao, Hong C; Lin, Hai

    2017-02-15

    Dietary fat affects appetite and appetite-related peptides in birds and mammals; however, the effect of dietary fat on appetite is still unclear in chickens faced with different energy statuses. Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of dietary fat on food intake and hypothalamic neuropeptides in chickens subjected to two feeding states or two diets. In Experiment 1, chickens were fed a high-fat (HF) or low-fat (LF) diet for 35 days, and then subjected to fed (HF-fed, LF-fed) or fasted (HF-fasted, LF-fasted) conditions for 24 h. In Experiment 2, chickens that were fed a HF or LF diet for 35 days were fasted for 24 h and then re-fed with HF (HF-RHF, LF-RHF) or LF (HF-RLF, LF-RLF) diet for 3 h. The results showed that chickens fed a HF diet for 35 days had increased body fat deposition despite decreasing food intake even when the diet was altered during the re-feeding period (PRHF chickens had lower neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression compared with LF-RLF chickens; conversely, HF-RHF chickens had higher NPY expression than HF-RLF chickens (P<0.05). These results demonstrate: (1) that HF diet decreases food intake even when the subsequent diet is altered; (2) the orexigenic effect of hypothalamic AgRP; and (3) that dietary fat alters the response of hypothalamic NPY to subsequent energy intake. These findings provide a novel view of the metabolic perturbations associated with long-term dietary fat over-ingestion in chickens. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Neonatal GLP1R activation limits adult adiposity by durably altering hypothalamic architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozo, Andrea V; Babu, Daniella A; Suen, PoMan A; Groff, David N; Seeley, Randy J; Simmons, Rebecca A; Seale, Patrick; Ahima, Rexford S; Stoffers, Doris A

    2017-07-01

    Adult obesity risk is influenced by alterations to fetal and neonatal environments. Modifying neonatal gut or neurohormone signaling pathways can have negative metabolic consequences in adulthood. Here we characterize the effect of neonatal activation of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP1R) signaling on adult adiposity and metabolism. Wild type C57BL/6 mice were injected with 1 nmol/kg Exendin-4 (Ex-4), a GLP1R agonist, for 6 consecutive days after birth. Growth, body composition, serum analysis, energy expenditure, food intake, and brain and fat pad histology and gene expression were assessed at multiple time points through 42 weeks. Similar analyses were conducted in a Glp1r conditional allele crossed with a Sim1Cre deleter strain to produce Sim1Cre;Glp1r loxP/loxP mice and control littermates. Neonatal administration of Ex-4 reduced adult body weight and fat mass, increased energy expenditure, and conferred protection from diet-induced obesity in female mice. This was associated with induction of brown adipose genes and increased noradrenergic fiber density in parametrial white adipose tissue (WAT). We further observed durable alterations in orexigenic and anorexigenic projections to the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH). Genetic deletion of Glp1r in the PVH by Sim1-Cre abrogated the impact of neonatal Ex-4 on adult body weight, WAT browning, and hypothalamic architecture. These observations suggest that the acute activation of GLP1R in neonates durably alters hypothalamic architecture to limit adult weight gain and adiposity, identifying GLP1R as a therapeutic target for obesity prevention.

  11. Vasopressinergic regulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and stress adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Simona; Rabadan-Diehl, Cristina; Aguilera, Greti

    2004-06-01

    Vasopressin (VP) stimulates pituitary ACTH secretion through interaction with receptors of the V1b subtype (V1bR, V3R), located in the plasma membrane of the pituitary corticotroph, mainly by potentiating the stimulatory effects of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). Chronic stress paradigms associated with corticotroph hyperresponsiveness lead to preferential expression of hypothalamic VP over CRH and upregulation of pituitary V1bR, suggesting an important role for VP during adaptation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to stress. Vasopressinergic regulation of ACTH secretion depends on the number of V1bRs as well as coupling of the receptor to phospholipase C (PLC) in the pituitary. Regulation of V1bR gene transcription may involve a number of regulatory elements in the promoter region, of which a GAGA box was shown to be essential. Although V1bR gene transcription is necessary to maintain V1bR mRNA levels, the lack of correlation between VP binding and V1bR mRNA suggests that regulation of mRNA translation is a major regulatory step of the number of V1bRs. V1bR translation appears to be under tonic inhibition by upstream minicistrons and positive regulation through protein kinase C (PKC) activation of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) in the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of the mRNA. The data provide mechanisms by which regulation of hypothalamic VP and pituitary V1bR content contribute to controlling HPA axis activity during chronic stress.

  12. Hypothalamic-specific proopiomelanocortin deficiency reduces alcohol drinking in male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Rubinstein, M; Low, M J; Kreek, M J

    2017-04-01

    Opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone reduces alcohol consumption and relapse in both humans and rodents. This study investigated whether hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons (producing beta-endorphin and melanocortins) play a role in alcohol drinking behaviors. Both male and female mice with targeted deletion of two neuronal Pomc enhancers nPE1 and nPE2 (nPE-/-), resulting in hypothalamic-specific POMC deficiency, were studied in short-access (4-h/day) drinking-in-the-dark (DID, alcohol in one bottle, intermittent access (IA, 24-h cycles of alcohol access every other day, alcohol vs. water in a two-bottle choice) and alcohol deprivation effect (ADE) models. Wild-type nPE+/+ exposed to 1-week DID rapidly established stable alcohol drinking behavior with more intake in females, whereas nPE-/- mice of both sexes had less intake and less preference. Although nPE-/- showed less saccharin intake and preference than nPE+/+, there was no genotype difference in sucrose intake or preference in the DID paradigm. After 3-week IA, nPE+/+ gradually escalated to high alcohol intake and preference, with more intake in females, whereas nPE-/- showed less escalation. Pharmacological blockade of mu-opioid receptors with naltrexone reduced intake in nPE+/+ in a dose-dependent manner, but had blunted effects in nPE-/- of both sexes. When alcohol was presented again after 1-week abstinence from IA, nPE+/+ of both sexes displayed significant increases in alcohol intake (ADE or relapse-like drinking), with more pronounced ADE in females, whereas nPE-/- did not show ADE in either sex. Our results suggest that neuronal POMC is involved in modulation of alcohol 'binge' drinking, escalation and 'relapse', probably via hypothalamic-mediated mechanisms, with sex differences. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  13. Interactions of photoperiod and ectopic pituitary grafts on hypothalamic and pituitary function in male hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, R W; Matt, K S; Klemcke, H G; Bartke, A

    1985-08-01

    Exposure of adult male hamsters to short days (less than 12.5 light/day) leads to suppression of gonadal function which is secondary to reductions in gonadotropin and prolactin (PRL) secretion. PRL secretion is decreased in short days despite a reduction of dopaminergic (DA) input from the hypothalamus, suggesting that the pituitary may become more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of DA. Although hypothalamic DA metabolism is altered by short-day exposure, it is not known whether the DA system can respond to PRL feedback or whether these changes in DA or PRL levels are responsible for the observed changes in gonadotropin secretion. To address these questions, the effects of PRL-secreting ectopic pituitary grafts on hypothalamic catecholamine metabolism and the effects of experimental manipulations of catecholamine metabolism on PRL and gonadotropin secretion were evaluated in adult male hamsters exposed to a 14 h light: 10 h dark (14L:10D) or a 5L:19D photoperiod. Short-photoperiod exposure led to expected reductions in testes weight, plasma PRL levels, and in vitro PRL secretion, but circulating levels of luteinizing hormone or follicle-stimulating hormone were not affected. Norepinephrine and DA turnover in the median eminence and in the medial basal hypothalamus was also reduced in the 5L:19D as compared to the 14L:10D animals. Pituitary grafts elevated PRL levels and hypothalamic DA turnover in animals from either photoperiod, but in vitro PRL secretion was reduced only from the pituitaries of 14L:10D hamsters. Short-photoperiod exposure increased the ability of DA to suppress PRL secretion, and this effect could be reversed by the presence of an ectopic pituitary graft.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Novel aspects of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation and glucocorticoid actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchoa, Ernane Torres; Aguilera, Greti; Herman, James P.; Fiedler, Jenny L.; Deak, Terrence; Cordeiro de Sousa, Maria Bernardete

    2014-01-01

    Normal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity leading to rhythmic and episodic release of adrenal glucocorticoids is essential for body homeostasis and survival during stress. Acting through specific intracellular receptors in the brain and periphery, glucocorticoids regulate behavior, metabolic, cardiovascular, immune, and neuroendocrine activities. In contrast to chronic elevated levels, circadian and acute stress-induced increases in glucocorticoids are necessary for hippocampal neuronal survival and memory acquisition and consolidation, through inhibiting apoptosis, facilitating glutamate transmission and inducing immediate early genes and spine formation. In addition to its metabolic actions leading to increasing energy availability, glucocorticoids have profound effects on feeding behavior, mainly through modulation of orexigenic and anorixegenic neuropeptides. Evidence is also emerging that in addition to the recognized immune suppressive actions of glucocorticoids by counteracting adrenergic proinflammatory actions, circadian elevations have priming effects in the immune system, potentiating acute defensive responses. In addition, negative feedback by glucocorticoids involves multiple mechanisms leading to limiting HPA axis activation and preventing deleterious effects of excessive glucocorticoid production. Adequate glucocorticoid secretion to meet body demands is tightly regulated by a complex neural circuitry controlling hypothalamic corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) and vasopressin secretion, the main regulators of pituitary adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). Rapid feedback mechanisms, likely involving non-genomic actions of glucocorticoids, mediate immediate inhibition of hypothalamic CRH and ACTH secretion, while intermediate and delayed mechanisms mediated by genomic actions involve modulation of limbic circuitry and peripheral metabolic messengers. Consistent with their key adaptive roles, HPA axis components are evolutionarily

  15. The ventral-hypothalamic input route: a common neural network for abstract cognition and sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motofei, Ion G; Rowland, David L

    2014-02-01

    Classically, external receptors of the body transmit information from the environment to the cerebral cortex via the thalamus. This review explains and argues that only concrete external information is transmitted from peripheral receptors to the cortex via a thalamic route, while abstract and sexual external information are actually transmitted from peripheral receptors to the cortex through a cognitive hypothalamic route. Sexual function typically implies participation of two distinct partners, ensuring reproduction in many species including humans. Human sexual response involves participation of multiple (environmental, biological, psychological) kinds of stimuli and processing, so the understanding of sexual control and response supposes integration between the classical physiological mechanisms with the more complex processes of our 'mind'. Cognition and sexuality are two relational functions, which are dependent on concrete (colours, sounds, etc.) and/or abstract (gestures, facial expression, how you move, the way you say something seemingly trivial, etc.) environmental cues. Abstract cues are encoded independent of the specific object features of the stimuli, suggesting that such cues should be transmitted and interpreted within the brain through a system different than the classical thalamo-cortical network that operates on concrete (material) information. Indeed, data show that the cerebral cortex is capable of interpreting two distinct (concrete and abstract) formats of information via distinct and non-compatible brain areas. We expand upon this abstract-concrete dichotomy of the brain, positing that the two distinct cortical networks should be uploaded with distinct information from the environment via two distinct informational input routes. These two routes would be represented by the two distinct routes of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS), namely the classical/dorsal thalamic input route for concrete information and the ventral

  16. Novel GABA agonists depress the reward effect of lateral hypothalamic stimulation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, L I; Stellar, J R; Jacob, J; Hesse, G W; Shashoua, V E

    1988-07-01

    Rats were given systemic injections of one of a series of novel GABA compounds which can penetrate the blood-brain barrier to release GABA into the brain. They were then tested on lateral hypothalamic self-stimulation behavior using a rate-frequency paradigm to discriminate effects on reward from those on motor/performance. Both reward and, to a lesser extent, motor/performance impairments were found with all GABA compounds. In more extensive testing with one compound, LG2, no differences in the effects of three salts (acetate, ascorbate, and tartarate) were found except that the tartarate salt effects decayed more rapidly.

  17. The role of ghrelin-responsive mediobasal hypothalamic neurons in mediating feeding responses to fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Bharath K; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Mequinion, Mathieu; Lawrence, Sydney; Gautron, Laurent; Andrews, Zane B; Zigman, Jeffrey M

    2017-08-01

    -assisted stimulation of MBH GHSR neuronal activity was sufficient to induce food intake. Axonal projections of GHSR-expressing MBH neurons were observed in a subset of hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic regions. These results suggest that 1) activation of GHSR-expressing neurons in the MBH is required for the normal feeding responses following both peripheral administration of ghrelin and fasting, 2) activation of MBH GHSR-expressing neurons is sufficient to induce feeding, and 3) axonal projections to a subset of hypothalamic and/or extra-hypothalamic regions likely mediate these responses. The Ghsr-IRES-Cre line should serve as a valuable tool to further our understanding of the functional significance of ghrelin-responsive/GHSR-expressing neurons and the neuronal circuitry within which they act.

  18. Hypothalamic tumor associated with atypical forms of anorexia nervosa and diencephalic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Chipkevitch

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 10-year-old girl with a mature teratoma in the hypothalamic region. The patient presented a 2-month history of anorexia, psychic disturbances and a 37% loss of body weight. These symptoms had led initially to a diagnosis of major depression and atypical anorexia nervosa. She also presented some signs and symptoms of diencephalic syndrome. This case illustrates the importance of considering a slow-growing mass as a rare but real possibility in the differential diagnosis of anorexia nervosa, mainly in atypical cases.

  19. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis induces cellular oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jereme G. Spiers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal gland in response to stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis induce activity in the cellular reduction-oxidation (redox system. The redox system is a ubiquitous chemical mechanism allowing the transfer of electrons between donor/acceptors and target molecules during oxidative phosphorylation while simultaneously maintaining the overall cellular environment in a reduced state. The objective of this review is to present an overview of the current literature discussing the link between HPA axis-derived glucocorticoids and increased oxidative stress, particularly focussing on the redox changes observed in the hippocampus following glucocorticoid exposure.

  20. Sensitivity analysis of a pulse nutrient addition technique for estimating nutrient uptake in large streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence Lin; J.R. Webster

    2012-01-01

    The constant nutrient addition technique has been used extensively to measure nutrient uptake in streams. However, this technique is impractical for large streams, and the pulse nutrient addition (PNA) has been suggested as an alternative. We developed a computer model to simulate Monod kinetics nutrient uptake in large rivers and used this model to evaluate the...

  1. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens in adult male rats affects hypothalamic regulation of food intake, induces obesity and alters glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, María Florencia; Stoker, Cora; Rossetti, María Florencia; Alzamendi, Ana; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge Guillermo

    2015-02-05

    The absence of phytoestrogens in the diet during pregnancy has been reported to result in obesity later in adulthood. We investigated whether phytoestrogen withdrawal in adult life could alter the hypothalamic signals that regulate food intake and affect body weight and glucose homeostasis. Male Wistar rats fed from conception to adulthood with a high phytoestrogen diet were submitted to phytoestrogen withdrawal by feeding a low phytoestrogen diet, or a high phytoestrogen-high fat diet. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake through an orexigenic hypothalamic response characterized by upregulation of AGRP and downregulation of POMC. This was associated with elevated leptin and T4, reduced TSH, testosterone and estradiol, and diminished hypothalamic ERα expression, concomitant with alterations in glucose tolerance. Removing dietary phytoestrogens caused manifestations of obesity and diabetes that were more pronounced than those induced by the high phytoestrogen-high fat diet intake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sense of moving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we assume the existence of a sense of “movement activity” that arises when a person actively moves a body part. This sense is usually supposed to be part of sense of agency (SoA). The purpose of the chapter is to determine whether the already existing experimental paradigms can...... be used to study the sense of movement activity, i.e., the part of SoA related to actual movement. The bulk of the chapter is an argument to the effect that standard paradigms are ill equipped to study the sense of movement activity....

  3. Cerebral activations during viewing of food stimuli in adult patients with acquired structural hypothalamic damage: a functional neuroimaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, C A; Powell, J L; Kemp, G J; Halford, J C G; Wilding, J P; Harrold, J A; Kumar, S V D; Cuthbertson, D J; Cross, A A; Javadpour, M; MacFarlane, I A; Stancak, A A; Daousi, C

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is common following hypothalamic damage due to tumours. Homeostatic and non-homeostatic brain centres control appetite and energy balance but their interaction in the presence of hypothalamic damage remains unknown. We hypothesized that abnormal appetite in obese patients with hypothalamic damage results from aberrant brain processing of food stimuli. We sought to establish differences in activation of brain food motivation and reward neurocircuitry in patients with hypothalamic obesity (HO) compared with patients with hypothalamic damage whose weight had remained stable. In a cross-sectional study at a University Clinical Research Centre, we studied 9 patients with HO, 10 age-matched obese controls, 7 patients who remained weight-stable following hypothalamic insult (HWS) and 10 non-obese controls. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in the fasted state, 1 h and 3 h after a test meal, while subjects were presented with images of high-calorie foods, low-calorie foods and non-food objects. Insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1, Peptide YY and ghrelin were measured throughout the experiment, and appetite ratings were recorded. Mean neural activation in the posterior insula and lingual gyrus (brain areas linked to food motivation and reward value of food) in HWS were significantly lower than in the other three groups (P=0.001). A significant negative correlation was found between insulin levels and posterior insula activation (P=0.002). Neural pathways associated with food motivation and reward-related behaviour, and the influence of insulin on their activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of HO.

  4. Nutrient Management in Recirculating Hydroponic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing need to recirculate and reuse nutrient solutions in order to reduce environmental and economic costs. However, one of the weakest points in hydroponics is the lack of information on managing the nutrient solution. Many growers and research scientists dump out nutrient solutions and refill at weekly intervals. Other authors have recommended measuring the concentrations of individual nutrients in solution as a key to nutrient control and maintenance. Dumping and replacing solution is unnecessary. Monitoring ions in solution is not always necessary; in fact the rapid depletion of some nutrients often causes people to add toxic amounts of nutrients to the solution. Monitoring ions in solution is interesting, but it is not the key to effective maintenance.

  5. Nutrient management strategies on Dutch dairy farms: an empirical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ondersteijn, C.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Key Words: MINAS; nitrogen surplus; phosphate surplus; nutrient efficiency; nutrient productivity; financial consequences; strategic management; perceived environmental uncertainty; nutrient management planning; dairy farming; The Netherlands.

    Agricultural nutrients are a

  6. Applications of high-throughput plant phenotyping to study nutrient use efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Bettina; de Regt, Bas; Tester, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Remote sensing and spectral reflectance measurements of plants has long been used to assess the growth and nutrient status of plants in a noninvasive manner. With improved imaging and computer technologies, these approaches can now be used at high-throughput for more extensive physiological and genetic studies. Here, we present an example of how high-throughput imaging can be used to study the growth of plants exposed to different nutrient levels. In addition, the color of the leaves can be used to estimate leaf chlorophyll and nitrogen status of the plant.

  7. Ancient views on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis: an historical and epistemological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toni, R

    2000-10-01

    The modern views on the anatomical and physiological interactions between the hypothalamus, pituitary and thyroid gland have emerged only in the last fifty years, although their historical roots may be found in a number of ancient and still not widely known ideas and observations. The regulation of energy body stores and temperature by the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, for example, is a classical case of "fixitè du mileu interieur" in the sense originally suggested by Claude Bernard in the late 1800s, i.e. a homeostatic mechanism, but already 2100 year previously Aristotle had stated that the brain was necessary for the maintenance of body integrity by regulating food intake and behavior in relation to body temperature, the latter primarily determined by the heat of the blood. Five hundred years later Galen of Pergamon reported fundamental discoveries in the anatomy of the third ventricle region, including the location of the pituitary gland inside the sella turcica embodied in a vascular network, the rete mirabilis, and observed nerves adjoining the "soft flesh" in the neck, i.e. the thyroid gland. He first proposed that the energy of the body (the vital spirit) was carried through the arteries at the level of the rete mirabilis, where it was transformed into nerve impulse (the animal spirit), eventually transferred by the nerves to the periphery of the body, "glands" included, raising implicitly the possibility for a nervous influence over the thyroid activity. The Galenic model remained virtually unaltered up to the beginning of the 14th century, when the mediaeval anatomist Mondino de' Liuzzi put forth the idea that the thyroid gland interacted with the heat of the blood present in the internal carotid arteries due to their anatomical relation with the thyroid. This interaction enriched the vital spirit, i.e. the energy of the body, prior to its transformation into animal spirit, i.e. to nerve impulse directed to the periphery of the body. In addition

  8. Effects of halothane and methoxyflurane on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuri, A R; Engelking, L R; Kumar, M S

    1998-10-01

    Effects of acute exposure (2 h) to either 1.5% halothane or 0.5% methoxyflurane on chemical mediators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis were evaluated in male Sprague-Dawley rats immediately after exposure, after the righting reflex (4 h), or 24 h postexposure. Effects of these anesthetics on hippocampal corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) were also evaluated. Methoxyflurane caused significant elevations in pituitary adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH)-like immunoreactivities in all three of the experiment's time groups, yet halothane failed to cause the same response immediately after exposure. Serum ACTH-like immunoreactivities were significantly elevated immediately after exposure to both anesthetics, but were not elevated at 4 and 24 h postexposure. Corticosterone (CORT)-like immunoreactivities were significantly elevated by halothane in all experimental groups, and in the 2- and 24-h groups following methoxyflurane exposure. Hippocampal CRF-like immunoreactivities remained unaffected by either anesthetic. Results indicate that a 2-h exposure to either halothane or methoxyflurane results in significant activation of the rat hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and that the activation appears to be sustained over a 24-h period.

  9. An 11-month-old girl with central precocious puberty caused by hypothalamic hamartoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Young Yoon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Central precocious puberty (CPP is caused by premature activation of the hypothalamic-gonadal axis, and must be treated adequately. In particular, CPP that occurs at a relatively young age or in boys is likely to be caused by an organic lesion. Hypothalamic hamartoma (HH is the most common organic cause of CPP. The present case report describes an 11-month-old female infant who presented with vaginal bleeding and rapidly progressive secondary sex characteristics from the age of 6 months. She was diagnosed with CPP following the detection of HH via magnetic resonance imaging. The infant girl was successfully treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist. After 6 months, her breast had regressed and clinical and radiological follow-up demonstrated stable findings with no evidence of tumor growth or secondary sexual characteristics until the fourth year after the initiation of treatment. This patient is the one of the youngest infants presenting with CPP and HH in Korea; treatment was successful over a relatively long follow-up period.

  10. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and gonadal axes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, M; Villaggio, B; Foppiani, L; Briata, M; Sulli, A; Pizzorni, C; Faelli, F; Prete, C; Felli, L; Seriolo, B; Giusti, M

    2000-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes involvement or response to immune activation seems crucial for the control of excessive inflammatory and immune conditions such as autoimmune rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, female patients seem to depend more on the HPA axis, whereas male patients seem to depend more on the HPG axis. In particular, hypoandrogenism may play a pathogenetic role in male RA patients because adrenal and gonadal androgens, both products of the HPA and HPG axes, are considered natural immunosuppressors. A significantly altered steroidogenesis of adrenal androgens (i.e., dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, DHEAS and DHEA) in nonglucocorticoid-treated premenopausal RA patients has been described. The menopausal peak of RA suggests that estrogens and/or progesterone deficiency also play a role in the disease, and many data indicate that estrogens suppress cellular immunity, but stimulate humoral immunity (i.e., deficiency promotes cellular Th1-type immunity). A range of physical and psychosocial stressors are also implicated in the activation of the HPA axis and related HPG changes. Chronic and acute stressors appear to have different actions on immune mechanisms with experimental and human studies indicating that acute severe stressors may be even immunosuppressive, while chronic stress may enhance immune responses. The interactions between the immunological and neuroendocrine circuits is the subject of active and extensive ongoing research and might in the near future offer highly promising strategies for hormone-replacement therapies in RA.

  11. Pleiotropic and isoform-specific functions for Pitx2 in superior colliculus and hypothalamic neuronal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Mindy R.; Skidmore, Jennifer M.; Micucci, Joseph A.; Shiratori, Hidetaka; Hamada, Hiroshi; Martin, James F.; Martin, Donna M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during development is critical for proper neuronal differentiation and migration. Alternative splicing and differential isoform expression have been demonstrated for most mammalian genes, but their specific contributions to gene function are not well understood. In mice, the transcription factor gene Pitx2 is expressed as three different isoforms (PITX2A, PITX2B, and PITX2C) which have unique amino termini and common DNA binding homeodomains and carboxyl termini. The specific roles of these isoforms in neuronal development are not known. Here we report the onset of Pitx2ab and Pitx2c isoform-specific expression by E9.5 in the developing mouse brain. Using isoform-specific Pitx2 deletion mouse strains, we show that collicular neuron migration requires PITX2AB and that collicular GABAergic differentiation and targeting of hypothalamic projections require unique Pitx2 isoform dosage. These results provide insights into Pitx2 dosage and isoform-specific requirements underlying midbrain and hypothalamic development. PMID:23147109

  12. Leptin engages a hypothalamic neurocircuitry to permit survival in the absence of insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Teppei; Berglund, Eric D.; Patel, Vishal R.; Ramadori, Giorgio; Vianna, Claudia R.; Vong, Linh; Thorel, Fabrizio; Chera, Simona; Herrera, Pedro L.; Lowell, Bradford B.; Elmquist, Joel K.; Baldi, Pierre; Coppari, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Summary The dogma that life without insulin is incompatible has recently been challenged by results showing viability of insulin-deficient rodents undergoing leptin mono-therapy. Yet, the mechanisms underlying these actions of leptin are unknown. Here, the metabolic outcomes of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of leptin in mice devoid of insulin and lacking or re-expressing leptin receptors (LEPRs) only in selected neuronal groups were assessed. Our results demonstrate that concomitant re-expression of LEPRs only in hypothalamic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons is sufficient to fully mediate the life-saving and anti-diabetic actions of leptin in insulin deficiency. Our analyses indicate that enhanced glucose uptake by brown adipose tissue and soleus muscle, as well as improved hepatic metabolism, underlie these effects of leptin. Collectively, our data elucidate a hypothalamic-dependent pathway enabling life without insulin and hence pave the way for developing better treatments for diseases of insulin deficiency. PMID:24011077

  13. Spontaneous intratumoural and intraventricular haemorrhage associated with a pilomyxoid astrocytoma in the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Yan, Hong-Mei; Zhou, Xiu-Rong; Liu, Jin-Kai; Chang, Jian-Yong; Wang, Yu-Ting

    2016-11-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a rare, low-grade glioma that is recognised as a variant of pilocytic astrocytoma. There have been few reports on this pathologic entity presenting with spontaneous haemorrhage. In this study, we report a rare case of PMA in the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region presenting with intratumoural and intraventricular haemorrhage. An external ventricular drain was urgently inserted. A ventriculo-peritoneal shunt (VP) was undergone 4weeks thereafter. The patient received fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery in another hospital 3weeks after the VP shunt. Three months later, subtotal resection of the tumour was performed in our hospital via a pterional approach. The pathological diagnosis was PMA. Postoperatively, no adjuvant therapy was given, and the neurologic deficits were improved. However, the presentation of endocrine deficits remained. Notably, PMAs in the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region presenting with massive intratumoural and intraventricular haemorrhage may result in a severe condition and long-term impairment of endocrine function. Long-term follow-up is required to monitor the recurrence of the tumour and endocrinopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Meal patterns and hypothalamic NPY expression during chronic social stress and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhorn, Susan J; Krause, Eric G; Scott, Karen A; Mooney, Marie R; Johnson, Jeffrey D; Woods, Stephen C; Sakai, Randall R

    2010-09-01

    In the present study, we examined meal patterns during and after exposure to the visible burrow system (VBS), a rodent model of chronic social stress, to determine how the microstructure of food intake relates to the metabolic consequences of social subordination. Male Long-Evans rats were housed in mixed-sex VBS colonies (4 male, 2 female) for 2 wk, during which time a dominance hierarchy formed [1 dominant male (DOM) and 3 subordinate males (SUB)], and then male rats were individually housed for a 3-wk recovery period. Controls were individually housed with females during the 2-wk VBS period and had no changes in ingestive behavior compared with a habituation period. During the hierarchy-formation phase of VBS housing, DOM and SUB had a reduced meal frequency, whereas SUB also had a reduced meal size. However, during the hierarchy-maintenance phase of VBS housing, DOM meal patterns did not differ from controls, whereas SUB continued to display a reduced food intake via less frequent meals. During recovery, DOM had comparable meal patterns to controls, whereas SUB had an increased meal size. Hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA levels were not different between these groups during the experimental period. Together, the results suggest that exposure to chronic social stress alters ingestive behavior both acutely and in the long term, which may influence the metabolic changes that accompany bouts of stress and recovery; however, these differences in meal patterns do not appear to be mediated by hypothalamic NPY.

  15. Dietary and sex-specific factors regulate hypothalamic neurogenesis in young adult mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eLee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is the central regulator of a broad range of homeostatic and instinctive physiological processes, such as the sleep-wake cycle, food intake, and sexually dimorphic behaviors. These behaviors can be modified by various environmental and physiological cues, although the molecular and cellular mechanisms that mediate these effects remain poorly understood. Recently, it has become clear that both the juvenile and adult hypothalamus exhibit ongoing neurogenesis, which serve to modify homeostatic neural circuitry. In this report, we share new findings on the contributions of sex-specific and dietary factors to regulating neurogenesis in the hypothalamic mediobasal hypothalamus, a recently identified neurogenic niche. We report that high fat diet (HFD selectively activates neurogenesis in the median eminence of young adult female but not male mice, and that focal irradiation of HFD-fed mice likewise reduces weight gain in females but not males. These findings suggest that the physiological effects of high fat diet may be mediated by the stimulation of neurogenesis in the hypothalamic median eminence in a sexually dimorphic manner. We discuss these results in the context of recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate neurogenesis in postnatal and adult hypothalamus.

  16. Hypothalamic-pituitary, ovarian and adrenal contributions to polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskind, N Ellissa; Balen, Adam H

    2016-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a prevalent heterogeneous disorder linked with disturbances of reproductive, endocrine and metabolic function. The definition and aetiological hypotheses of PCOS are continually developing to incorporate evolving evidence of the syndrome, which appears to be both multifactorial and polygenic. The pathophysiology of PCOS encompasses inherent ovarian dysfunction that is strongly influenced by external factors including the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and hyperinsulinaemia. Neuroendocrine abnormalities including increased gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse frequency with consequent hypersecretion of luteinising hormone (LH) affects ovarian androgen synthesis, folliculogenesis and oocyte development. Disturbed ovarian-pituitary and hypothalamic feedback accentuates the gonadotrophin abnormalities, and there is emerging evidence putatively implicating dysfunction of the Kiss 1 system. Within the follicle subunit itself, there are intra-ovarian paracrine modulators, cytokines and growth factors, which appear to play a role. Adrenally derived androgens may also contribute to the pathogenesis of PCOS, but their role is less defined. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Brain innate immunity regulates hypothalamic arcuate neuronal activity and feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Wagner L; Yi, Chun-Xia; Gao, Yuanqing; Tschöp, Mathias H; Stern, Javier E

    2015-04-01

    Hypothalamic inflammation, involving microglia activation in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), is proposed as a novel underlying mechanism in obesity, insulin and leptin resistance. However, whether activated microglia affects ARC neuronal activity, and consequently basal and hormonal-induced food intake, is unknown. We show that lipopolysaccharide, an agonist of the toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), which we found to be expressed in ARC microglia, inhibited the firing activity of the majority of orexigenic agouti gene-related protein/neuropeptide Y neurons, whereas it increased the activity of the majority of anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin neurons. Lipopolysaccharide effects in agouti gene-related protein/neuropeptide Y (but not in proopiomelanocortin) neurons were occluded by inhibiting microglia function or by blocking TLR4 receptors. Finally, we report that inhibition of hypothalamic microglia altered basal food intake, also preventing central orexigenic responses to ghrelin. Our studies support a major role for a TLR4-mediated microglia signaling pathway in the control of ARC neuronal activity and feeding behavior.

  18. Hypothalamic inhibition of socio-sexual behaviour by increasing neuroestrogen synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Haraguchi, Shogo; Tobari, Yasuko; Narihiro, Misato; Ishikawa, Kei; Hayashi, Takanori; Harada, Nobuhiro; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that inhibits gonadotropin secretion and socio-sexual behaviours. Oestrogen (neuroestrogen) synthesized in the brain from androgen by aromatase regulates male socio-sexual behaviours. Here we show that GnIH directly activates aromatase and increases neuroestrogen synthesis in the preoptic area (POA) and inhibits socio-sexual behaviours of male quail. Aromatase activity and neuroestrogen concentration in the POA are low in the morning when the birds are active, but neuroestrogen synthesis gradually increases until the evening when the birds become inactive. Centrally administered GnIH in the morning increases neuroestrogen synthesis in the POA and decreases socio-sexual behaviours. Centrally administered 17β-oestradiol at higher doses also inhibits socio-sexual behaviours in the morning. These results suggest that GnIH inhibits male socio-sexual behaviours by increasing neuroestrogen synthesis beyond its optimum concentration for the expression of socio-sexual behaviours. This is the first demonstration of any hypothalamic neuropeptide that directly regulates neuroestrogen synthesis.

  19. A new scenario of hypothalamic organization: rationale of new hypotheses introduced in the updated prosomeric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puelles, Luis; Rubenstein, John L. R.

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, we aim to explore in depth the new concept of the hypothalamus that was presented in the updated prosomeric model (Puelles et al., 2012b; Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas). Initial sections deal with the antecedents of prosomeric ideas represented by the extensive literature centered on the alternative columnar model of Herrick (1910), Kuhlenbeck (1973) and Swanson (1992, 2003); a detailed critique explores why the columnar model is not helpful in the search for causal developmental explanations. In contrast, the emerging prosomeric scenario visibly includes many possibilities to propose causal explanations of hypothalamic structure relative to both anteroposterior and dorsoventral patterning mechanisms, and insures the possibility to compare hypothalamic histogenesis with that of more caudal parts of the brain. Next the four major changes introduced in the organization of the hypothalamus on occasion of the updated model are presented, and our rationale for these changes is explored in detail. It is hoped that this example of morphological theoretical analysis may be useful for readers interested in brain models, or in understanding why models may need to change in the quest for higher consistency. PMID:25852489

  20. Prolactin induces Egr-1 gene expression in cultured hypothalamic cells and in the rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Annegret; Torner, Luz; Liu, Ying; Subburaju, Sivan; Aguilera, Greti; Neumann, Inga D

    2009-12-11

    Prolactin (PRL), the major lactogenic hormone, acts also as neuromodulator and regulator of neuronal and glial plasticity in the brain. There is an increase in synthesis and release of PRL within the hypothalamus during peripartum and in response to stress. To identify mechanisms by which PRL induces neuroplasticity, we studied the ability of PRL to induce the transcription factor Egr-1 in the hypothalamic cell line, 4B, in vitro, and in specific neuronal cell types of the hypothalamus in vivo. PRL induced Egr-1 mRNA expression in 4B cells, an effect which was prevented by the MEK inhibitor, U0126. In vivo, intracerebroventricular PRL (1 microg) increased Egr-1 mRNA levels in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) of female rats. The increase in mRNA paralleled elevated Egr-1 protein expression in the PVN and SON. Double staining immunohistochemistry revealed Egr-1 localization in oxytocin neurons of the PVN and SON, but not in vasopressin neurons in these regions. In the dorsomedial PVN, a population of non-oxytocin or vasopressin cells localized in a region corresponding to corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons also showed marked Egr-1 immunoreactivity. The data suggest that PRL modulates plasticity in oxytocinergic neurons, through MAP kinase-dependent induction of Egr-1.