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Sample records for hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon ignicoccus

  1. Happy together: genomic insights into the unique Nanoarchaeum/Ignicoccus association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forterre, Patrick; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Brochier-Armanet, Céline

    2009-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis published recently in Genome Biology provides a great leap forward in the dissection of its unique association with another hyperthermophilic archaeon, Nanoarchaeum equitans.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Desulfurococcus fermentans, a Hyperthermophilic Cellulolytic Crenarchaeon Isolated from a Freshwater Hot Spring in Kamchatka, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susanti, Dwi [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Johnson, Eric F [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Rodriquez, Jason [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Perevalova, Anna [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Gopapan, Venkay [Ohio State University; Chan, Patricia [University of California, Santa Cruz; Atomi, Haruyuki [Kyoto University, Japan; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

    2012-01-01

    Desulfurococcus fermentans is the first known cellulolytic archaeon. This hyperthermophilic and strictly anaerobic crenarchaeon produces hydrogen from fermentation of various carbohydrates and peptides without inhibition by accumulating hydrogen. The complete genome sequence reported here suggested that D. fermentans employs membrane-bound hydrogenases and novel glycohydrolases for hydrogen production from cellulose.

  3. Complete genome sequence of the anaerobic, protein-degrading hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Desulfurococcus kamchatkensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Nikolai V; Mardanov, Andrey V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Kublanov, Ilya V; Kolganova, Tatiana V; Lebedinsky, Alexander V; Chernyh, Nikolai A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Skryabin, Konstantin G

    2009-04-01

    Desulfurococcus kamchatkensis is an anaerobic organotrophic hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon isolated from a terrestrial hot spring. Its genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 1,365,223 bp with no extrachromosomal elements. A total of 1,474 protein-encoding genes were annotated, among which 205 are exclusive for D. kamchatkensis. The search for a replication origin site revealed a single region coinciding with a global extreme of the nucleotide composition disparity curve and containing a set of crenarchaeon-type origin recognition boxes. Unlike in most archaea, two genes encoding homologs of the eukaryotic initiator proteins Orc1 and Cdc6 are located distantly from this site. A number of mobile elements are present in the genome, including seven transposons representing IS607 and IS200/IS605 families and multiple copies of miniature inverted repeat transposable elements. Two large clusters of regularly interspaced repeats are present; none of the spacer sequences matches known archaeal extrachromosomal elements, except one spacer matches the sequence of a resident gene of D. kamchatkensis. Many of the predicted metabolic enzymes are associated with the fermentation of peptides and sugars, including more than 30 peptidases with diverse specificities, a number of polysaccharide degradation enzymes, and many transporters. Consistently, the genome encodes both enzymes of the modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway of glucose oxidation and a set of enzymes needed for gluconeogenesis. The genome structure and content reflect the organism's nutritionally diverse, competitive natural environment, which is periodically invaded by viruses and other mobile elements.

  4. Properties of the alpha subunit of a Chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

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    Son, Hae-Jin; Shin, Eun-Jung; Nam, Soo-Wan; Kim, Dong-Eun; Jeon, Sung-Jong

    2007-01-01

    The gene encoding for a putative thermosome from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 (ApcpnA) was cloned and the biochemical characteristics of the resulting recombinant protein were examined. The gene (accession no. APE0907) from A. pernix K1 showed some homology with other group II chaperonins from archaea. The recombinant ApcpnA protein has a molecular mass of 60 kDa, determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and exhibited ATPase activity with an optimum temperature and pH of 90 degrees C and 5.0, respectively. The ATPase activity was found to be dependent on manganese and potassium ions, but not magnesium ion. The K(m) for ATP at pH 5.0 and 90 degrees C was 10.04 (+/- 1.31) microM, and k(cat) was determined to be 2.21 (+/- 0.11) min(-1) for the ApcpnA monomer. The recombinant ApcpnA prevents thermal aggregation of bovine rhodanese and enhances the thermal stability of alcohol dehydrogenase in vitro, indicating that the protein is suitable as a molecular chaperonin in the high-temperature environment.

  5. Vulcanisaeta thermophila sp. nov., a hyperthermophilic and acidophilic crenarchaeon isolated from solfataric soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Kyung June; Cha, In-Tae; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Song, Hye Seon; Hyun, Dong-Wook; Lee, Hae-Won; Kim, Daekyung; Kim, Kil-Nam; Nam, Young-Do; Seo, Myung-Ji; Bae, Jin-Woo; Roh, Seong Woon

    2015-01-01

    An anaerobic, rod-shaped, hyperthermophilic and acidophilic crenarchaeon, designated strain CBA1501(T), was isolated from solfataric soil of the Mayon volcano in the Republic of the Philippines. Phylogenetic analysis showed that strain CBA1501(T) is affiliated with the genus Vulcanisaeta in the phylum Crenarchaeota. DNA sequence similarities between the 16S rRNA gene of strain CBA1501(T) and those of Vulcanisaeta distributa IC-017(T) and Vulcanisaeta souniana IC-059(T) were 98.5 and 97.4 %, respectively. Strain CBA1501(T) grew between 75-90 °C, over a pH range of 4.0-6.0 and in the presence of 0-1.0 % (w/v) NaCl, with optimal growth occurring at 85 °C, pH 5.0, and with 0 % (w/v) NaCl. Fumarate, malate, oxidized glutathione, sulfur and thiosulfate were used as final electron acceptors, but FeCl3, nitrate and sulfate were not. The DNA G+C content of strain CBA1501(T) was 43.1 mol%. On the basis of polyphasic taxonomic analysis, strain CBA1501(T) represents a novel species of the genus Vulcanisaeta in the phylum Crenarchaeota, for which we propose the name Vulcanisaeta thermophila sp. nov. The type strain is CBA1501(T) ( = ATCC BAA-2415(T) = JCM 17228(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  6. Crystal structure of an archaeal peroxiredoxin from the aerobic hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizohata, Eiichi; Sakai, Hiroaki; Fusatomi, Emiko; Terada, Takaho; Murayama, Kazutaka; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2005-11-25

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are thiol-dependent peroxidases that catalyze the detoxification of various peroxide substrates such as H2O2, peroxinitrite, and hydroperoxides, and control some signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. Prxs are found in all cellular organisms and represent an enormous superfamily. Recent genome sequencing projects and biochemical studies have identified a novel subfamily, the archaeal Prxs. Their primary sequences are similar to those of the 1-Cys Prxs, which use only one cysteine residue in catalysis, while their catalytic properties resemble those of the typical 2-Cys Prxs, which utilize two cysteine residues from adjacent monomers within a dimer in catalysis. We present here the X-ray crystal structure of an archaeal Prx from the aerobic hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, determined at 2.3 A resolution (Rwork of 17.8% and Rfree of 23.0%). The overall subunit arrangement of the A.pernix archaeal Prx is a toroid-shaped pentamer of homodimers, or an (alpha2)5 decamer, as observed in the previously reported crystal structures of decameric Prxs. The basic folding topology and the peroxidatic active site structure are essentially the same as those of the 1-Cys Prx, hORF6, except that the C-terminal extension of the A.pernix archaeal Prx forms a unique helix with its flanking loops. The thiol group of the peroxidatic cysteine C50 is overoxidized to sulfonic acid. Notably, the resolving cysteine C213 forms the intra-monomer disulfide bond with the third cysteine, C207, which should be a unique structural characteristic in the many archaeal Prxs that retain two conserved cysteine residues in the C-terminal region. The conformational flexibility near the intra-monomer disulfide linkage might be necessary for the dramatic structural rearrangements that occur in the catalytic cycle.

  7. The First Archaeal ATP-Dependent Glucokinase, from the Hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix, Represents a Monomeric, Extremely Thermophilic ROK Glucokinase with Broad Hexose Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas; Reichstein, Bianca; Schmid, Roland; Schönheit, Peter

    2002-01-01

    An ATP-dependent glucokinase of the hyperthermophilic aerobic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix was purified 230-fold to homogeneity. The enzyme is a monomeric protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 36 kDa. The apparent Km values for ATP and glucose (at 90°C and pH 6.2) were 0.42 and 0.044 mM, respectively; the apparent Vmax was about 35 U/mg. The enzyme was specific for ATP as a phosphoryl donor, but showed a broad spectrum for phosphoryl acceptors: in addition to glucose, which showed the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km), the enzyme also phosphorylates glucosamin, fructose, mannose, and 2-deoxyglucose. Divalent cations were required for maximal activity: Mg2+, which was most effective, could partially be replaced with Co2+, Mn2+, and Ni2+. The enzyme had a temperature optimum of at least 100°C and showed significant thermostability up to 100°C. The coding function of open reading frame (ORF) APE2091 (Y. Kawarabayasi, Y. Hino, H. Horikawa, S. Yamazaki, Y. Haikawa, K. Jin-no, M. Takahashi, M. Sekine, S. Baba, A. Ankai, H. Kosugi, A. Hosoyama, S. Fukui, Y. Nagai, K. Nishijima, H. Nakazawa, M. Takamiya, S. Masuda, T. Funahashi, T. Tanaka, Y. Kudoh, J. Yamazaki, N. Kushida, A. Oguchi, and H. Kikuchi, DNA Res. 6:83-101, 145-152, 1999), previously annotated as gene glk, coding for ATP-glucokinase of A. pernix, was proved by functional expression in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant ATP-dependent glucokinase showed a 5-kDa higher molecular mass on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but almost identical kinetic and thermostability properties in comparison to the native enzyme purified from A. pernix. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the native enzyme revealed that the translation start codon is a GTG 171 bp downstream of the annotated start codon of ORF APE2091. The amino acid sequence deduced from the truncated ORF APE2091 revealed sequence similarity to members of the ROK family, which comprise bacterial sugar kinases and

  8. Perchlorate and chlorate reduction by the Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix and two thermophilic Firmicutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebensteiner, M.G.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Nijsse, B.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.; Tsesmetzis, N.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lomans, B.P.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the ability of one hyperthermophilic and two thermophilic microorganisms to grow anaerobically by the reduction of chlorate and perchlorate. Physiological, genomic and proteome analyses suggest that the Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix reduces perchlorate with a periplasmic enzyme

  9. Cleavage of intron from the standard or non-standard position of the precursor tRNA by the splicing endonuclease of Aeropyrum pernix, a hyper-thermophilic Crenarchaeon, involves a novel RNA recognition site in the Crenarchaea specific loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akira; Kitajima, Tsubasa; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    In Crenarchaea, several tRNA genes are predicted to express precursor-tRNAs (pre-tRNAs) with canonical or non-canonical introns at various positions. We initially focused on the tRNA(Thr) species of hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix (APE) and found that in the living APE cells three tRNA(Thr) species were transcribed and subsequently matured to functional tRNAs. During maturation, introns in two of them were cleaved from standard and non-standard positions. Biochemical studies revealed that the APE splicing endonuclease (APE-EndA) removed both types of introns, including the non-canonical introns, without any nucleotide modification. To clarify the underlying reasons for broad substrate specificity of APE-EndA, we determined the crystal structure of wild-type APE-EndA and subsequently compared its structure with that of Archaeaoglobus fulgidus (AFU)-EndA, which has narrow substrate specificity. Remarkably, structural comparison revealed that APE-EndA possesses a Crenarchaea specific loop (CSL). Introduction of CSL into AFU-EndA enhanced its intron-cleaving activity irrespective of the position or motif of the intron. Thus, our biochemical and crystallographic analyses of the chimera-EndA demonstrated that the CSL is responsible for the broad substrate specificity of APE-EndA. Furthermore, mutagenesis studies revealed that Lys44 in CSL functions as the RNA recognition site.

  10. Characterization of a whole set of tRNA molecules in an aerobic hyper-thermophilic Crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

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    Yamazaki, Syuji; Kikuchi, Hisashi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka

    2005-01-01

    The tRNA molecule has an important role in translation, the function of which is to carry amino acids to the ribosomes. It is known that tRNA is transcribed from tRNA genes, some of which, in Eukarya and Archaea, contain introns. A computational analysis of the complete genome of Aeropyrum pernix K1 predicted the presence of 14 intron-containing tRNA genes. To elucidate whether these introns are actually processed in living cells and what mechanism detects the intron regions, cDNAs for premature and mature forms of the tRNA molecules transcribed from the intron-containing tRNA genes in the model aerobic acidothermophilic crenarchaeon, A. pernix K1 were identified and analyzed. A comparison between the nucleotide sequences of these two types of cDNAs indicated that the intron regions of the tRNA molecules were indeed processed in A. pernix K1 living cells. Some cDNA clones showed that the actual splicing positions were different from those predicted by computational analysis. However, the bulge-helix-bulge structure, which has been previously identified in exon-intron boundaries of archaeal tRNA genes, was evident in all boundary regions confirmed in this work. These results indicate that the generally described mechanism for tRNA processing in Archaea is utilized for processing the intron region of the tRNA molecules in A. pernix K1.

  11. Biochemical characterization of TyrA enzymes from Ignicoccus hospitalis and Haemophilus influenzae: A comparative study of the bifunctional and monofunctional dehydrogenase forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlaifer, Irina; Quashie, Peter Kojo; Kim, Hyun Young; Turnbull, Joanne L

    2017-03-01

    Biosynthesis of l-tyrosine (l-Tyr) is directed by the interplay of two enzymes. Chorismate mutase (CM) catalyzes the rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate, which is then converted to hydroxyphenylpyruvate by prephenate dehydrogenase (PD). This work reports the first characterization of the independently expressed PD domain of bifunctional CM-PD from the crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis and the first functional studies of both full-length CM-PD and the PD domain from the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae. All proteins were hexa-histidine tagged, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Expression and purification of I. hospitalis CM-PD generated a degradation product identified as a PD fragment lacking the protein's first 80 residues, Δ80CM-PD. A comparable stable PD domain could also be generated by limited tryptic digestion of this bifunctional enzyme. Thus, Δ80CM-PD constructs were prepared in both organisms. CM-PD and Δ80CM-PD from both organisms were dimeric and displayed the predicted enzymatic activities and thermal stabilities in accord with their hyperthermophilic and mesophilic origins. In contrast with H. influenzae PD activity which was NAD+-specific and displayed >75% inhibition with 50μM l-Tyr, I. hospitalis PD demonstrated dual cofactor specificity with a preference for NADP+ and an insensitivity to l-Tyr. These properties are consistent with a model of the I. hospitalis PD domain based on the previously reported structure of the H. influenzae homolog. Our results highlight the similarities and differences between the archaeal and bacterial TyrA proteins and reveal that the PD activity of both prokaryotes can be successfully mapped to a functionally independent unit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The ultrastructure of Ignicoccus: Evidence for a novel outer membrane and for intracellular vesicle budding in an archaeon

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    Reinhard Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel genus of hyperthermophilic, strictly chemolithotrophic archaea, Ignicoccus, has been described recently, with (so far three isolates in pure culture. Cells were prepared for ultrastructural investigation by cultivation in cellulose capillaries and processing by high-pressure freezing, freeze-substitution and embedding in Epon. Cells prepared in accordance with this protocol consistently showed a novel cell envelope structure previously unknown among the Archaea: a cytoplasmic membrane; a periplasmic space with a variable width of 20 to 400 nm, containing membrane-bound vesicles; and an outer sheath, approximately 10 nm wide, resembling the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. This sheath contained three types of particles: numerous tightly, irregularly packed single particles, about 8 nm in diameter; pores with a diameter of 24 nm, surrounded by tiny particles, arranged in a ring with a diameter of 130 nm; and clusters of up to eight particles, each particle 12 nm in diameter. Freeze-etched cells exhibited a smooth surface, without a regular pattern, with frequent fracture planes through the outer sheath, indicating the presence of an outer membrane and the absence of an S-layer. The study illustrates the novel complex architecture of the cell envelope of Ignicoccus as well as the importance of elaborate preparation procedures for ultrastructural investigations.

  13. A genomic analysis of the archael system Ignicoccus hospitalis-Nanoarchaeum equitans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hui; Anderson, Iain; Makarova, Kira S.; Elkins, James G.; Ivanova, Natalia; Wall, Mark A.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Podar, Mircea; Hudson, Matthew E.; Chen, Wenqiong; Deciu, Cosmin; Hutchinson, Don; Eads, Jonathan R.; Anderson, Abraham; Fernandes, Fillipe; Szeto, Ernest; Lapidus, Alla; Kyrpides, NikosC.; Saier Jr., Milton G.; Richardson, Paul M.; Rachel, Reinhard; Huber, Harald; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Keller, Martin; Stetter, Karl O.

    2008-09-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between the hyperthermophiles Ignicoccus hospitalis and Nanoarchaeum equitans is the only known example of a specific association between two species of Archaea. Little is known about the mechanisms that enable this relationship. RESULTS: We sequenced the complete genome of I. hospitalis and found it to be the smallest among independent, free-living organisms. A comparative genomic reconstruction suggests that the I. hospitalis lineage has lost most of the genes associated with a heterotrophic metabolism that is characteristic of most of the Crenarchaeota. A streamlined genome is also suggested by a low frequency of paralogs and fragmentation of many operons. However, this process appears to be partially balanced by lateral gene transfer from archaeal and bacterial sources. CONCLUSIONS: A combination of genomic and cellular features suggests highly efficient adaptation to the low energy yield of sulfur-hydrogen respiration and efficient inorganic carbon and nitrogen assimilation. Evidence of lateral gene exchange between N. equitans and I. hospitalis indicates that the relationship has impacted both genomes. This association is the simplest symbiotic system known to date and a unique model for studying mechanisms of interspecific relationships at the genomic and metabolic levels.

  14. Stability of Hyperthermophilic Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiefler-Jensen, Daniel

    in the high stability of hyperthermophilic enzymes. The thesis starts with an introduction to the field of protein and enzyme stability with special focus on the thermophilic and hyperthermophilic enzymes and proteins. After the introduction three original research manuscripts present the experimental data...

  15. Perchlorate and chlorate reduction by the Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix and two thermophilic Firmicutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebensteiner, Martin G; Pinkse, Martijn W H; Nijsse, Bart; Verhaert, Peter D E M; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Stams, Alfons J M; Lomans, Bart P

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the ability of one hyperthermophilic and two thermophilic microorganisms to grow anaerobically by the reduction of chlorate and perchlorate. Physiological, genomic and proteome analyses suggest that the Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix reduces perchlorate with a periplasmic enzyme related to nitrate reductases, but that it lacks a functional chlorite-disproportionating enzyme (Cld) to complete the pathway. Aeropyrum pernix, previously described as a strictly aerobic microorganism, seems to rely on the chemical reactivity of reduced sulfur compounds with chlorite, a mechanism previously reported for perchlorate-reducing Archaeoglobus fulgidus. The chemical oxidation of thiosulfate (in excessive amounts present in the medium) and the reduction of chlorite result in the release of sulfate and chloride, which are the products of a biotic-abiotic perchlorate reduction pathway in Ae. pernix. The apparent absence of Cld in two other perchlorate-reducing microorganisms, Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans and Moorella glycerini strain NMP, and their dependence on sulfide for perchlorate reduction is consistent with the observations made on Ar. fulgidus. Our findings suggest that microbial perchlorate reduction at high temperature differs notably from the physiology of perchlorate- and chlorate-reducing mesophiles and that it is characterized by the lack of a chlorite dismutase and is enabled by a combination of biotic and abiotic reactions. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A Novel Highly Thermostable Multifunctional Beta-Glycosidase from Crenarchaeon Acidilobus saccharovorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumerov, Vadim M; Rakitin, Andrey L; Mardanov, Andrey V; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2015-01-01

    We expressed a putative β-galactosidase Asac_1390 from hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Acidilobus saccharovorans in Escherichia coli and purified the recombinant enzyme. Asac_1390 is composed of 490 amino acid residues and showed high sequence similarity to family 1 glycoside hydrolases from various thermophilic Crenarchaeota. The maximum activity was observed at pH 6.0 and 93°C. The half-life of the enzyme at 90°C was about 7 hours. Asac_1390 displayed high tolerance to glucose and exhibits hydrolytic activity towards cellobiose and various aryl glucosides. The hydrolytic activity with p-nitrophenyl (pNP) substrates followed the order pNP-β-D-galactopyranoside (328 U mg(-1)), pNP-β-D-glucopyranoside (246 U mg(-1)), pNP-β-D-xylopyranoside (72 U mg(-1)), and pNP-β-D-mannopyranoside (28 U mg(-1)). Thus the enzyme was actually a multifunctional β-glycosidase. Therefore, the utilization of Asac_1390 may contribute to facilitating the efficient degradation of lignocellulosic biomass and help enhance bioconversion processes.

  17. A Novel Highly Thermostable Multifunctional Beta-Glycosidase from Crenarchaeon Acidilobus saccharovorans

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    Vadim M. Gumerov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We expressed a putative β-galactosidase Asac_1390 from hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Acidilobus saccharovorans in Escherichia coli and purified the recombinant enzyme. Asac_1390 is composed of 490 amino acid residues and showed high sequence similarity to family 1 glycoside hydrolases from various thermophilic Crenarchaeota. The maximum activity was observed at pH 6.0 and 93°C. The half-life of the enzyme at 90°C was about 7 hours. Asac_1390 displayed high tolerance to glucose and exhibits hydrolytic activity towards cellobiose and various aryl glucosides. The hydrolytic activity with p-nitrophenyl (pNP substrates followed the order pNP-β-D-galactopyranoside (328 U mg−1, pNP-β-D-glucopyranoside (246 U mg−1, pNP-β-D-xylopyranoside (72 U mg−1, and pNP-β-D-mannopyranoside (28 U mg−1. Thus the enzyme was actually a multifunctional β-glycosidase. Therefore, the utilization of Asac_1390 may contribute to facilitating the efficient degradation of lignocellulosic biomass and help enhance bioconversion processes.

  18. Bypassing rRNA methylation by RsmA/Dim1during ribosome maturation in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seistrup, Kenneth H; Rose, Simon; Birkedal, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    In all free-living organisms a late-stage checkpoint in the biogenesis of the small ribosomal subunit involves rRNA modification by an RsmA/Dim1 methyltransferase. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans, whose existence is confined to the surface of a second archaeon, Ignicoccus....... hospitalis to N. equitans across their fused cell membrane structures and the corresponding nucleotides in N. equitans 16S rRNA remain unmethylated. An alternative mechanism for ribosomal subunit maturation in N. equitans is suggested by sRNA interactions that span the redundant RsmA/Dim1 site to introduce 2...

  19. Orthologs of the small RPB8 subunit of the eukaryotic RNA polymerases are conserved in hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota and "Korarchaeota".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene V; Makarova, Kira S; Elkins, James G

    2007-12-14

    Although most of the key components of the transcription apparatus, and in particular, RNA polymerase (RNAP) subunits, are conserved between archaea and eukaryotes, no archaeal homologs of the small RPB8 subunit of eukaryotic RNAP have been detected. We report that orthologs of RPB8 are encoded in all sequenced genomes of hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota and a recently sequenced "korarchaeal" genome, but not in Euryarchaeota or the mesophilic crenarchaeon Cenarchaeum symbiosum. These findings suggest that all 12 core subunits of eukaryotic RNAPs were already present in the last common ancestor of the extant archaea.

  20. Orthologs of the small RPB8 subunit of the eukaryotic RNA polymerases are conserved in hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota and "Korarchaeota"

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    Elkins James G

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although most of the key components of the transcription apparatus, and in particular, RNA polymerase (RNAP subunits, are conserved between archaea and eukaryotes, no archaeal homologs of the small RPB8 subunit of eukaryotic RNAP have been detected. We report that orthologs of RPB8 are encoded in all sequenced genomes of hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota and a recently sequenced "korarchaeal" genome, but not in Euryarchaeota or the mesophilic crenarchaeon Cenarchaeum symbiosum. These findings suggest that all 12 core subunits of eukaryotic RNAPs were already present in the last common ancestor of the extant archaea. Open peer review This article was reviewed by Purificacion Lopez-Garcia and Chris Ponting.

  1. Unmarked gene deletion and host-vector system for the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Ling; Zhu, Haojun; Chen, Zhengjun

    2009-01-01

    , and unmarked lacS mutants were obtained by each method. A new alternative recombination mechanism, i.e., marker circularization and integration, was shown to operate in the latter method, which did not yield the designed deletion mutation. Subsequently, Sulfolobus-E. coli plasmid shuttle vectors were...... constructed, which genetically complemented DeltapyrEFDeltalacS mutation after transformation. Thus, a complete set of genetic tools was established for S. islandicus with pyrEF and lacS as genetic markers.......Sulfolobus islandicus is being used as a model for studying archaeal biology, geo-biology and evolution. However, no genetic system is available for this organism. To produce an S. islandicus mutant suitable for genetic analyses, we screened for colonies with a spontaneous pyrEF mutation. One...

  2. Proteome analysis of an aerobic hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Syuji; Yamazaki, Jun; Nishijima, Keiko; Otsuka, Rie; Mise, Miyako; Ishikawa, Hanako; Sasaki, Kazumi; Tago, Shin-ichi; Isono, Katsumi

    2006-05-01

    We analyzed the proteome of a crenararchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, by using the following four methods: (i) two-dimensional PAGE followed by MALDI-TOF MS, (ii) one-dimensional SDS-PAGE in combination with two-dimensional LC-MS/MS, (iii) multidimensional LC-MS/MS, and (iv) two-dimensional PAGE followed by amino-terminal amino acid sequencing. These methods were found to be complementary to each other, and biases in the data obtained in one method could largely be compensated by the data obtained in the other methods. Consequently a total of 704 proteins were successfully identified, 134 of which were unique to A. pernix K1, and 19 were not described previously in the genomic annotation. We found that the original annotation of the genomic data of this archaeon was not adequate in particular with respect to proteins of 10-20 kDa in size, many of which were described as hypothetical. Furthermore the amino-terminal amino acid sequence analysis indicated that surprisingly the translation of 52% of their genes starts with TTG in contrast to ATG (28%) and GTG (20%). Thus, A. pernix K1 is the first example of an organism in which TTG is the most predominant translational initiation codon.

  3. Proteolysis in hyperthermophilic microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Donald E.; Shockley, Keith R.; Chang, Lara S.; Levy, Ryan D.; Michel, Joshua K.; Conners, Shannon B.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    Proteases are found in every cell, where they recognize and break down unneeded or abnormal polypeptides or peptide-based nutrients within or outside the cell. Genome sequence data can be used to compare proteolytic enzyme inventories of different organisms as they relate to physiological needs for protein modification and hydrolysis. In this review, we exploit genome sequence data to compare hyperthermophilic micro...

  4. Development of a Simvastatin Selection Marker for a Hyperthermophilic Acidophile, Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Tao; Huang, Qihong; Zhang, Changyi

    2012-01-01

    We report here a novel selectable marker for the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. The marker cassette is composed of the sac7d promoter and the hmg gene coding for the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (P(sac7d)-hmg), which confers simvastatin resistance....... islandicus was constructed using pyrEF marker and used as the host to obtain pSSRNherA transformant with simvastatin selection. While the gene knockout (¿herA) cells generated from the herA merodiploid cells failed to form colonies in the presence of 5-fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA), the mutant cells could...... be rescued by expression of the gene from a plasmid (pSSRNherA), because their transformants formed colonies on a solid medium containing 5-FOA and simvastatin. This demonstrates that HerA is essential for cell viability of S. islandicus. To our knowledge, this is the first application of an antibiotic...

  5. Untargeted metabolomics studies employing NMR and LC-MS reveal metabolic coupling between Nanoarcheum equitans and its archaeal host Ignicoccus hospitalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerly, Timothy; Tripet, Brian P; Tigges, Michelle; Giannone, Richard J; Wurch, Louie; Hettich, Robert L; Podar, Mircea; Copié, Valerie; Bothner, Brian

    2015-08-01

    Interspecies interactions are the basis of microbial community formation and infectious diseases. Systems biology enables the construction of complex models describing such interactions, leading to a better understanding of disease states and communities. However, before interactions between complex organisms can be understood, metabolic and energetic implications of simpler real-world host-microbe systems must be worked out. To this effect, untargeted metabolomics experiments were conducted and integrated with proteomics data to characterize key molecular-level interactions between two hyperthermophilic microbial species, both of which have reduced genomes. Metabolic changes and transfer of metabolites between the archaea Ignicoccus hospitalis and Nanoarcheum equitans were investigated using integrated LC-MS and NMR metabolomics. The study of such a system is challenging, as no genetic tools are available, growth in the laboratory is challenging, and mechanisms by which they interact are unknown. Together with information about relative enzyme levels obtained from shotgun proteomics, the metabolomics data provided useful insights into metabolic pathways and cellular networks of I. hospitalis that are impacted by the presence of N. equitans, including arginine, isoleucine, and CTP biosynthesis. On the organismal level, the data indicate that N. equitans exploits metabolites generated by I. hospitalis to satisfy its own metabolic needs. This finding is based on N. equitans's consumption of a significant fraction of the metabolite pool in I. hospitalis that cannot solely be attributed to increased biomass production for N. equitans. Combining LC-MS and NMR metabolomics datasets improved coverage of the metabolome and enhanced the identification and quantitation of cellular metabolites.

  6. Carboxylic ester hydrolases from hyperthermophiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levisson, M.; Oost, van der J.; Kengen, S.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    Carboxylic ester hydrolyzing enzymes constitute a large group of enzymes that are able to catalyze the hydrolysis, synthesis or transesterification of an ester bond. They can be found in all three domains of life, including the group of hyperthermophilic bacteria and archaea. Esterases from the

  7. Gene recognition based on nucleotide distribution of ORFs in a hyper-thermophilic crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng-Biao; Wang, Ju; Zhang, Chun-Ting

    2004-12-31

    The 2694 ORFs originally annotated as potential genes in the genome of Aeropyrum pernix can be categorized into three clusters (A, B, C), according to their nucleotide composition at three codon positions. Coding potential was found to be responsible for the phenomenon of three clusters in a 9-dimensional space derived from the nucleotide composition of ORFs: ORFs assigned to cluster A are coding ones, while those assigned to clusters B and C are non-coding ORFs. A "codingness" index called the AZ score is defined based on a clustering method used to recognize protein-coding genes in the A. pernix genome. The criterion for a coding or non-coding ORF is based on the AZ score. ORFs with AZ > 0 or AZ pernix genome is 1610, which is significantly less than 2694 in the original annotation and also much less than 1841 in the RefSeq annotation curated by NCBI staff. Annotation information of re-recognized genes and their AZ scores are available at: http://tubic.tju.edu.cn/Aper/.

  8. Genomic analysis of the symbiotic marine crenarchaeon, Cenarchaeumsymbiosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallam, Steven J.; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Brochier,Celine; Putnam, Nik; Schleper, Christa; Watanabe, Yoh-ichi; Sugahara,Junichi; Preston, Christina; de la Torre, Jose; Richardson, Paul M.; DeLong, Edward F.

    2006-06-24

    Crenarchaea are ubiquitous and abundant microbial constituents of soils, sediments, lakes and ocean waters, yet relatively little is known about their fundamental evolutionary, ecological, and physiological properties. To better describe the ubiquitous nonthermophilic Crenarchaea, we analyzed the genome sequence of one representative, the uncultivated sponge symbiont, Cenarchaeum symbiosum. C. symbiosum genotypes coinhabiting the same host partitioned into two dominant populations, corresponding to previously described a- and b-type ribosomal RNA variants. Although synthetic, overlapping a- and b-type ribotypes harbored significant genetic variability. A single tiling path comprising the dominant a-type genotype was assembled, and used to explore the biological properties of C. symbiosum and its planktonic relatives. Out of a total of 2,066 predicted open reading frames, 36% were more highly conserved with other Archaea. The remainder partitioned between bacteria (18%), eukaryotes (1.5%) and viruses (0.1%). A total of 525 open reading frames were more highly conserved with sequences derived from marine environmental genomic surveys, most probably representing orthologous genes found in free-living planktonic Crenarchaea. The remaining genes partitioned between functional RNAs (2.4%), and hypotheticals (42%) with limited homology to known functional genes. The latter category likely contains genes specifically involved in mediated archaeal-sponge symbiosis. Phylogenetic analyses placed C. symbiosum as a basal crenarchaeon, sharing specific genomic features in common with either Crenarchaea, Euryarchaea, or both. The genome sequence of C. symbiosum reflect a unique and unusual evolutionary, physiological, and ecological history, one remarkably distinct from that of any other previously known microbial lineage.

  9. A synthetic arabinose-inducible promoter confers high levels of recombinant protein expression in hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Nan; Deng, Ling; Mei, Yuxia

    2012-01-01

    in Sulfolobus islandicus, a hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon. Two expression vectors, pSeSD and pEXA, harboring 11 unique restriction sites were constructed. They contain coding sequences of two hexahistidine (6×His) peptide tags and those coding for two protease sites, the latter of which make it possible...... levels of target gene expression. More strikingly, N-terminal amino acid sequencing of recombinant proteins unraveled that the protein synthesized from pEXA-N-lacS lacked the designed 6×His tag and that translation initiation did not start at the ATG codon of the fusion gene. Instead, it started......-terminal coding sequences of proteins to specify translation initiation in the absence of an RBS site....

  10. Molecular characterization of hydrolytic enzymes from hyperthermophilic archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorhorst, W.G.B.

    1998-01-01

    Hyperthermophiles are recently discovered microorganisms which are able to grow optimally above 85 °C. Most hyperthermophiles belong to the Archaea, the third domain of life. One of the main interests in hyperthermophiles to deepen the insight in the way their proteins

  11. Genome variation in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum

    OpenAIRE

    Daifuku, Takashi; Yoshida, Takashi; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Aeropyrum spp are aerobic, heterotrophic, and hyperthermophilic marine archaea. There are two closely related Aeropyrum species, Aeropyrum camini and Aeropyrum pernix, which are isolated from geographically distinct locations. Recently, we compared their genome sequences to determine their genomic variation. They possess highly conserved small genomes, reflecting their close relationship. The entire genome similarity may result from their survival strategies in adapting to extreme environment...

  12. POLYPEPTIDE AND POLYSACCHARIDE PROCESSING IN HYPERTHERMOPHILIC MICROORGANISMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KELLY, ROBERT M.

    2008-12-22

    This project focused on the microbial physiology and biochemistry of heterotrophic hyperthermophiles with respect to mechanisms by which these organisms process polypeptides and polysaccharides under normal and stressed conditions. Emphasis is on two model organisms, for which completed genome sequences are available: Pyrococcus furiosus (growth Topt of 98°C), an archaeon, and Thermotoga maritima (growth Topt of 80°C), a bacterium. Both organisms are obligately anaerobic heterotrophs that reduce sulfur facultatively. Whole genome cDNA spotted microarrays were used to follow transcriptional response to a variety of environmental conditions in order to identify genes encoding proteins involved in the acquisition, synthesis, processing and utilization of polypeptides and polysaccharides. This project provided new insights into the physiological aspects of hyperthermophiles as these relate to microbial biochemistry and biological function in high temperature habitats. The capacity of these microorganisms to produce biohydrogen from renewable feedstocks makes them important for future efforts to develop biofuels.

  13. From genomes to metabolomes: Understanding mechanisms of symbiosis and cell-cell signaling using the archaeal system Ignicoccus-Nanoarchaeum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podar, Mircea [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hettich, Robert [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Copie, Valerie [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Bothner, Brian [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2016-12-16

    The main objective of this project was to use symbiotic Nanoarchaeaota, a group of thermophilic Archaea that are obligate symbionts/parasites on other Archaea, to develop an integrated multi-omic approach to study inter-species interactions as well as to understand fundamental mechanism that enable such relationships. As part of this grant we have achieved a number of important milestone on both technical and scientific levels. On the technical side, we developed immunofluorescence labeling and tracking methods to follow Nanoarchaeota in cultures and in environmental samples, we applied such methods in conjunction with flow cytometry to quantify and isolate uncultured representatives from the environment and characterized them by single cell genomics. On the proteomics side, we developed a more efficient and sensitive method to recover and semi-quantitatively measure membrane proteins, while achieving high total cellular proteome coverage (70-80% of the predicted proteome). Metabolomic analyses used complementary NMR and LC/GC mass spectrometry and led to the identification of novel lipids in these organisms as well as quantification of some of the major metabolites. Importantly, using several informatics approaches we were also able to integrate the transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic datasets, revealing aspects of the interspecies interaction that were not evident in the single omic analyses (manuscript in review). On the science side we determined that N. equitans and I. hospitalis are metabolically coupled and that N. equitans is strictly dependent on its host both for metabolic precursors and energetic needs. The actual mechanism by which small molecules move across the cell membrane remains unknown. The Ignicoccus host responds to the metabolic and energetic burned by upregulating of key primary metabolism steps and ATP synthesis. The two species have co-evolved, aspect that we determined by comparative genomics with other species of Ignicoccus

  14. Hyperthermophilic endoglucanase for in planta lignocellulose conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The enzymatic conversion of lignocellulosic plant biomass into fermentable sugars is a crucial step in the sustainable and environmentally friendly production of biofuels. However, a major drawback of enzymes from mesophilic sources is their suboptimal activity under established pretreatment conditions, e.g. high temperatures, extreme pH values and high salt concentrations. Enzymes from extremophiles are better adapted to these conditions and could be produced by heterologous expression in microbes, or even directly in the plant biomass. Results Here we show that a cellulase gene (sso1354) isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus can be expressed in plants, and that the recombinant enzyme is biologically active and exhibits the same properties as the wild type form. Since the enzyme is inactive under normal plant growth conditions, this potentially allows its expression in plants without negative effects on growth and development, and subsequent heat-inducible activation. Furthermore we demonstrate that the recombinant enzyme acts in high concentrations of ionic liquids and can therefore degrade α-cellulose or even complex cell wall preparations under those pretreatment conditions. Conclusion The hyperthermophilic endoglucanase SSO1354 with its unique features is an excellent tool for advanced biomass conversion. Here we demonstrate its expression in planta and the possibility for post harvest activation. Moreover the enzyme is suitable for combined pretreatment and hydrolysis applications. PMID:22928996

  15. Hyperthermophilic endoglucanase for in planta lignocellulose conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klose Holger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enzymatic conversion of lignocellulosic plant biomass into fermentable sugars is a crucial step in the sustainable and environmentally friendly production of biofuels. However, a major drawback of enzymes from mesophilic sources is their suboptimal activity under established pretreatment conditions, e.g. high temperatures, extreme pH values and high salt concentrations. Enzymes from extremophiles are better adapted to these conditions and could be produced by heterologous expression in microbes, or even directly in the plant biomass. Results Here we show that a cellulase gene (sso1354 isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus can be expressed in plants, and that the recombinant enzyme is biologically active and exhibits the same properties as the wild type form. Since the enzyme is inactive under normal plant growth conditions, this potentially allows its expression in plants without negative effects on growth and development, and subsequent heat-inducible activation. Furthermore we demonstrate that the recombinant enzyme acts in high concentrations of ionic liquids and can therefore degrade α-cellulose or even complex cell wall preparations under those pretreatment conditions. Conclusion The hyperthermophilic endoglucanase SSO1354 with its unique features is an excellent tool for advanced biomass conversion. Here we demonstrate its expression in planta and the possibility for post harvest activation. Moreover the enzyme is suitable for combined pretreatment and hydrolysis applications.

  16. Habitability of Mars: hyperthermophiles in permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilichinsky, David; Rivkina, Elizaveta; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Felipe, Gomez; Mironov, Vasilii; Blamey, Jenny; Ramos, Miguel; Ángel de Pablo, Miguel; Castro, Miguel; Boehmwald, Freddy

    This is a first microbiological study of volcanic permafrost carried out on Kluchevskaya volcano group (Kamchatka Peninsula) and Deception Island (Antarctica). By culture-and culture-independent methods we showed the presence of viable hyper(thermophilic) microorganisms and their genes within volcanic permafrost. The optimal temperature for sulfide producing bacteria was 65, whereas acetogens and methanogens were able to produce acetate and methane at temperatures up to 75o C, while sulphur-reducers showed optimal growth at 85-92o C. Hy-per(thermophiles) were never found in permafrost outside the volcanic areas before. The only way they are to appear within a frozen material is a concurrent deposition during the eruption, together with products associated with volcano heated subsurface geothermal oases. The elo-quent evidence to the hypothesis is the presence among clones of the sequences affiliated with (hyper)thermophilic bacteria, both, aerobic and anaerobic, in the environmental DNA derived from ashes freshly deposited on snow in close proximity to volcano Shiveluch (Kamchatka) and aerobic bacteria incubated at 80o C from ashes freshly deposited on the top of Llaima Vol-cano glacier (Andes). Thus, in the areas of active volcanism the catastrophic geological events transports the life from the depths to the surface and this life from high-temperature ecological niches might survive in permafrost over a long period of time. The results obtained give insights for habitability of Mars. Terrestrial permafrost represents a possible ecosystem for Mars as an Earth-like cryogenic planet. But permafrost on Earth and Mars vary in age, from a few million years on Earth to a few billion years on Mars. Because such difference in age, the longevity of life forms preserved within terrestrial permafrost may only serve as an approximate model for Mars. On the other hand, numerous ancient extinct volcanoes are known on Mars. Their past eruptions periodically burn-through the

  17. Molecular characterisation of the thermostability and catalytic properties of enzymes from hyperthermophiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebbink, J.H.G.

    1999-01-01

    Hyperthermophilic organisms are able to survive and reproduce optimally between 80°C and 113°C. Most of them belong to the domain of the Archaea, although several hyperthermophilic Bacteria have been described. One of the major questions regarding hyperthermophiles concerns the molecular

  18. Genome variation in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daifuku, Takashi; Yoshida, Takashi; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2013-09-01

    Aeropyrum spp are aerobic, heterotrophic, and hyperthermophilic marine archaea. There are two closely related Aeropyrum species, Aeropyrum camini and Aeropyrum pernix, which are isolated from geographically distinct locations. Recently, we compared their genome sequences to determine their genomic variation. They possess highly conserved small genomes, reflecting their close relationship. The entire genome similarity may result from their survival strategies in adapting to extreme environmental conditions. Meanwhile, synteny disruptions were observed in some regions including clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats elements. Further, the largest portion of their non-orthologous genes were genes in the two proviral regions of A. pernix (Aeropyrum pernix spindle-shaped virus 1 and Aeropyrum pernix ovoid virus 1) or ORFans considered to be derived from viruses. Our data shows that genomic diversification of Aeropyrum spp may be substantially induced by viruses. This suggests that Aeropyrum spp may have a large pan-genome that can be extended by viruses, while each of the species shares a highly conserved small genome specializing for extreme environments.

  19. A First Analysis of Metallome Biosignatures of Hyperthermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyllinniskii Cameron

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, no experimental data has been reported for the metallome of hyperthermophilic microorganisms although their metal requirements for growth are known to be unique. Here, experiments were conducted to determine (i cellular trace metal concentrations of the hyperthermophilic Archaea Methanococcus jannaschii and Pyrococcus furiosus, and (ii a first estimate of the metallome for these hyperthermophilic species via ICP-MS. The metal contents of these cells were compared to parallel experiments using the mesophilic bacterium Escherichia coli grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Fe and Zn were typically the most abundant metals in cells. Metal concentrations for E. coli grown aerobically decreased in the order Fe > Zn > Cu > Mo > Ni > W > Co. In contrast, M. jannaschii and P. furiosus show almost the reverse pattern with elevated Ni, Co, and W concentrations. Of the three organisms, a biosignature is potentially demonstrated for the methanogen M. jannaschii that may, in part, be related to the metallome requirements of methanogenesis. The bioavailability of trace metals more than likely has varied through time. If hyperthermophiles are very ancient, then the trace metal patterns observed here may begin to provide some insights regarding Earth's earliest cells and in turn, early Earth chemistry.

  20. Development of the Multiple Gene Knockout System with One-Step PCR in Thermoacidophilic Crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Suzuki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple gene knockout systems developed in the thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius are powerful genetic tools. However, plasmid construction typically requires several steps. Alternatively, PCR tailing for high-throughput gene disruption was also developed in S. acidocaldarius, but repeated gene knockout based on PCR tailing has been limited due to lack of a genetic marker system. In this study, we demonstrated efficient homologous recombination frequency (2.8 × 104 ± 6.9 × 103 colonies/μg DNA by optimizing the transformation conditions. This optimized protocol allowed to develop reliable gene knockout via double crossover using short homologous arms and to establish the multiple gene knockout system with one-step PCR (MONSTER. In the MONSTER, a multiple gene knockout cassette was simply and rapidly constructed by one-step PCR without plasmid construction, and the PCR product can be immediately used for target gene deletion. As an example of the applications of this strategy, we successfully made a DNA photolyase- (phr- and arginine decarboxylase- (argD- deficient strain of S. acidocaldarius. In addition, an agmatine selection system consisting of an agmatine-auxotrophic strain and argD marker was also established. The MONSTER provides an alternative strategy that enables the very simple construction of multiple gene knockout cassettes for genetic studies in S. acidocaldarius.

  1. Alpha-amylase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardsdotter, E. C. M. J.; Pusey, M. L.; Ng, M. L.; Garriott, O. K.

    2003-01-01

    Extremophiles are microorganisms that thrive in, from an anthropocentric view, extreme environments such as hot springs. The ability of survival at extreme conditions has rendered enzymes from extremophiles to be of interest in industrial applications. One approach to producing these extremozymes entails the expression of the enzyme-encoding gene in a mesophilic host such as E.coli. This method has been employed in the effort to produce an alpha-amylase from a hyperthermophile (an organism that displays optimal growth above 80 C) isolated from a hydrothermal vent at the Rainbow vent site in the Atlantic Ocean. alpha-amylases catalyze the hydrolysis of starch to produce smaller sugars and constitute a class of industrial enzymes having approximately 25% of the enzyme market. One application for thermostable alpha-amylases is the starch liquefaction process in which starch is converted into fructose and glucose syrups. The a-amylase encoding gene from the hyperthermophile Thermococcus thioreducens was cloned and sequenced, revealing high similarity with other archaeal hyperthermophilic a-amylases. The gene encoding the mature protein was expressed in E.coli. Initial characterization of this enzyme has revealed an optimal amylolytic activity between 85-90 C and around pH 5.3-6.0.

  2. Energetic and hydrogen limitations of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, L. C.; Holden, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are a unique ecosystem, based ultimately not on photosynthesis but chemosynthetic primary production. This makes them an excellent analog environment for the early Earth, and for potential extraterrestrial habitable environments, such as those on Mars and Europa. The habitability of given vent systems for chemoautotrophic prokaryotes can be modeled energetically by estimating the available Gibbs energy for specific modes of chemoautotrophy, using geochemical data and mixing models for hydrothermal fluids and seawater (McCollom and Shock, 1997). However, modeling to date has largely not taken into account variation in organisms' energy demands in these environments. Controls on maintenance energies are widely assumed to be temperature-dependent, rising with increasing temperature optima (Tijhuis et al., 1993), and species-independent. The impacts of other environmental stressors and particular energy-gathering strategies on maintenance energies have not been investigated. We have undertaken culture-based studies of growth and maintenance energies in thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogenic (hydrogenotrophic) archaea from deep-sea hydrothermal vents to investigate potential controls on energy demands in hydrothermal vent microbes, and to quantify their growth and maintenance energies for future bioenergetic modeling. We have investigated trends in their growth energies over their full temperature range and a range of nitrogen concentrations, and in their maintenance energies at different hydrogen concentrations. Growth energies in these organisms appear to rise with temperature, but do not vary between hyperthermophilic and thermophilic methanogens. Nitrogen availability at tested levels (40μM - 9.4 mM) does not appear to affect growth energies in all but one tested organism. In continuous chemostat culture, specific methane production varied with hydrogen availability but was similar between a thermophilic and a hyperthermophilic

  3. Genetic analyses in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    She, Qunxin; Zhang, Changyi; Deng, Ling

    2009-01-01

    been developed, including methods for constructing gene knockouts and for identifying essential genes. These genetic tools enable us to conduct genetic analysis on the functions of the genes involved in DNA replication and repair processes in S. islandicus and they should also facilitate in vivo......Sulfolobus belongs to the hyperthermophilic archaea and it serves as a model organism to study archaeal molecular biology and evolution. In the last few years, we have focused on developing genetic systems for Sulfolobus islandicus using pyrEF as a selection marker and versatile genetic tools have...

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crytallographic analysis of phosphoglucose isomerase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akerboom, A.P.; Turnbull, A.P.; Hargreaves, D.; Fischer, M.; Geus, de D.; Sedelnikova, S.E.; Berrisford, J.M.; Baker, P.J.; Verhees, C.H.; Oost, van der J.; Rice, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    The glycolytic enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase catalyses the reversible isomerization of glucose 6-phosphate to fructose 6-phosphate. The phosphoglucose isomerase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which shows no sequence similarity to any known bacterial or eukaryotic

  5. Purification and characterization of a proteasome from the hyperthermophilic archaeon pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, M.W.; Bauer, S.H.; Kelly, R.M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1997-03-01

    A 640-kDa proteasome consisting of {alpha} (25-kDa) and {beta} (22-kDa) subunits, and with a temperature optimum of 95{degrees}C, was purified from crude cell extracts of a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus. Although this is the fourth member of the kingdom Euryarchaeota (and the first hyperthermophile) found to contain a proteasome, none has been identified among the members of the kingdom Crenarchaeota. 38 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Exceptionally diverse morphotypes and genomes of crenarchaeal hyperthermophilic viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, D; Garrett, R A

    2004-01-01

    The remarkable diversity of the morphologies of viruses found in terrestrial hydrothermal environments with temperatures >80 degrees C is unprecedented for aquatic ecosystems. The best-studied viruses from these habitats have been assigned to novel viral families: Fuselloviridae, Lipothrixviridae...... no significant matches to sequences in public databases. This suggests that these hyperthermophilic viruses have exceptional biochemical solutions for biological functions. Specific features of genome organization, as well as strategies for DNA replication, suggest that phylogenetic relationships exist between...... crenarchaeal rudiviruses and the large eukaryal DNA viruses: poxviruses, the African swine fever virus and Chlorella viruses. Sequence patterns at the ends of the linear genome of the lipothrixvirus AFV1 are reminiscent of the telomeric ends of linear eukaryal chromosomes and suggest that a primitive telomeric...

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus solfataricus phosphotriesterase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Mikael [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Modélisation des Matériaux Minéraux et Biologiques, CNRS-Université Henri Poincaré, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Dupuy, Jérôme [Laboratoire de Cristallogenèse et Cristallographie des Protéines, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble (France); Merone, Luigia [Istituto di Biochimica delle Proteine, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via P. Castellino 111, 80131 Napoli (Italy); Lecomte, Claude [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Modélisation des Matériaux Minéraux et Biologiques, CNRS-Université Henri Poincaré, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Rossi, Mosè [Istituto di Biochimica delle Proteine, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via P. Castellino 111, 80131 Napoli (Italy); Masson, Patrick [Unité d’Enzymologie, Département de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 38702 La Tronche (France); Manco, Giuseppe [Istituto di Biochimica delle Proteine, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via P. Castellino 111, 80131 Napoli (Italy); Chabriere, Eric, E-mail: eric.chabriere@lcm3b.uhp-nancy.fr [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Modélisation des Matériaux Minéraux et Biologiques, CNRS-Université Henri Poincaré, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Unité d’Enzymologie, Département de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 38702 La Tronche (France)

    2007-07-01

    A phosphotriesterase (PTE) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon S. solfataricus has been crystallized. Combined with biochemical and bioengineering studies, it is expected that the structure of this protein will provide insight into the natural function of the PTE family and provide important data for achieving an efficient organophosphate biodecontaminant. Organophosphates constitute the largest class of insecticides used worldwide and some of them are potent nerve agents. Consequently, organophosphate-degrading enzymes are of paramount interest as they could be used as bioscavengers and biodecontaminants. Phosphotriesterases (PTEs) are capable of hydrolyzing these toxic compounds with high efficiency. A distant and hyperthermophilic representative of the PTE family was cloned from the archeon Sulfolobus solfataricus MT4, overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized; the crystals diffracted to 2.54 Å resolution. Owing to its exceptional thermostability, this PTE may be an excellent candidate for obtaining an efficient organophosphate biodecontaminant. Here, the crystallization conditions and data collection for the hyperthermophilic S. solfataricus PTE are reported.

  8. Metabolic evolution of a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier Braakman

    Full Text Available Aquifex aeolicus is a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium restricted to hydrothermal vents and hot springs. These characteristics make it an excellent model system for studying the early evolution of metabolism. Here we present the whole-genome metabolic network of this organism and examine in detail the driving forces that have shaped it. We make extensive use of phylometabolic analysis, a method we recently introduced that generates trees of metabolic phenotypes by integrating phylogenetic and metabolic constraints. We reconstruct the evolution of a range of metabolic sub-systems, including the reductive citric acid (rTCA cycle, as well as the biosynthesis and functional roles of several amino acids and cofactors. We show that A. aeolicus uses the reconstructed ancestral pathways within many of these sub-systems, and highlight how the evolutionary interconnections between sub-systems facilitated several key innovations. Our analyses further highlight three general classes of driving forces in metabolic evolution. One is the duplication and divergence of genes for enzymes as these progress from lower to higher substrate specificity, improving the kinetics of certain sub-systems. A second is the kinetic optimization of established pathways through fusion of enzymes, or their organization into larger complexes. The third is the minimization of the ATP unit cost to synthesize biomass, improving thermodynamic efficiency. Quantifying the distribution of these classes of innovations across metabolic sub-systems and across the tree of life will allow us to assess how a tradeoff between maximizing growth rate and growth efficiency has shaped the long-term metabolic evolution of the biosphere.

  9. Formate hydrogenlyase in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus litoralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rákhely Gábor

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermococcus litoralis is a heterotrophic facultative sulfur dependent hyperthermophilic Archaeon, which was isolated from a shallow submarine thermal spring. It has been successfully used in a two-stage fermentation system, where various keratinaceous wastes of animal origin were converted to biohydrogen. In this system T. litoralis performed better than its close relative, P. furiosus. Therefore, new alternative enzymes involved in peptide and hydrogen metabolism were assumed in T. litoralis. Results An about 10.5 kb long genomic region was isolated and sequenced from Thermococcus litoralis. In silico analysis revealed that the region contained a putative operon consisting of eight genes: the fdhAB genes coding for a formate dehydrogenase and the mhyCDEFGH genes encoding a [NiFe] hydrogenase belonging to the group of the H2-evolving, energy-conserving, membrane-bound hydrogenases. Reverse transcription linked quantitative Real-Time PCR and Western blotting experiments showed that the expression of the fdh-mhy operon was up-regulated during fermentative growth on peptides and down-regulated in cells cultivated in the presence of sulfur. Immunoblotting and protein separation experiments performed on cell fractions indicated that the formate dehydrogenase part of the complex is associated to the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase. Conclusion The formate dehydrogenase together with the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase formed a formate hydrogenlyase (formate dehydrogenase coupled hydrogenase, FDH-MHY complex. The expression data suggested that its physiological role is linked to the removal of formate likely generated during anaerobic peptide fermentation.

  10. Formate hydrogenlyase in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus litoralis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Mária; Tóth, András; Bogos, Balázs; Varga, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Kovács, Kornél L

    2008-01-01

    Background Thermococcus litoralis is a heterotrophic facultative sulfur dependent hyperthermophilic Archaeon, which was isolated from a shallow submarine thermal spring. It has been successfully used in a two-stage fermentation system, where various keratinaceous wastes of animal origin were converted to biohydrogen. In this system T. litoralis performed better than its close relative, P. furiosus. Therefore, new alternative enzymes involved in peptide and hydrogen metabolism were assumed in T. litoralis. Results An about 10.5 kb long genomic region was isolated and sequenced from Thermococcus litoralis. In silico analysis revealed that the region contained a putative operon consisting of eight genes: the fdhAB genes coding for a formate dehydrogenase and the mhyCDEFGH genes encoding a [NiFe] hydrogenase belonging to the group of the H2-evolving, energy-conserving, membrane-bound hydrogenases. Reverse transcription linked quantitative Real-Time PCR and Western blotting experiments showed that the expression of the fdh-mhy operon was up-regulated during fermentative growth on peptides and down-regulated in cells cultivated in the presence of sulfur. Immunoblotting and protein separation experiments performed on cell fractions indicated that the formate dehydrogenase part of the complex is associated to the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase. Conclusion The formate dehydrogenase together with the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase formed a formate hydrogenlyase (formate dehydrogenase coupled hydrogenase, FDH-MHY) complex. The expression data suggested that its physiological role is linked to the removal of formate likely generated during anaerobic peptide fermentation. PMID:18522724

  11. The activity of hyperthermophilic glycosynthases is significantly enhanced at acidic pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perugino, G.; Trincone, A.; Giordano, A.; Oost, van der J.; Kaper, T.; Rossi, M.; Moracci, M.

    2003-01-01

    We have previously shown that the hyperthermophilic glycosynthase from Sulfolobus so fataricus (Ssbeta-glyE387G) can promote the synthesis of branched oligosaccharides from activated beta-glycosides, at pH 6.5, in the presence of 2 M sodium formate as an external nucleophile. In an effort to

  12. Genome Sequence of a Hyperthermophilic Archaeon, Thermococcus nautili 30-1, That Produces Viral Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberto, Jacques; Gaudin, Marie; Cossu, Matteo; Gorlas, Aurore; Slesarev, Alexeï; Marguet, Evelyne; Forterre, Patrick

    2014-03-27

    Thermococcus nautili 30-1 (formerly Thermococcus nautilus), an anaerobic hyperthermophilic marine archaeon, was isolated in 1999 from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent during the Amistad campaign. Here, we present the complete sequence of T. nautili, which is able to produce membrane vesicles containing plasmid DNA. This property makes T. nautili a model organism to study horizontal gene transfer.

  13. Improved oligosaccharide synthesis by protein engineering of b-glucosidase from hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanson, T.; Kaper, T.; Oost, van der J.; Vos, de W.M.

    2001-01-01

    Enzymatic transglycosylation of lactose into oligosaccharides was studied using wild-type -glucosidase (CelB) and active site mutants thereof (M424K, F426Y, M424K/F426Y) and wild-type -mannosidase (BmnA) of the hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus furiosus. The effects of the mutations on kinetics, enzyme

  14. Genome-scale reconstruction and analysis of the metabolic network in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ulas

    Full Text Available We describe the reconstruction of a genome-scale metabolic model of the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, a hyperthermoacidophilic microorganism. It grows in terrestrial volcanic hot springs with growth occurring at pH 2-4 (optimum 3.5 and a temperature of 75-80°C (optimum 80°C. The genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 contains 2,992,245 bp on a single circular chromosome and encodes 2,977 proteins and a number of RNAs. The network comprises 718 metabolic and 58 transport/exchange reactions and 705 unique metabolites, based on the annotated genome and available biochemical data. Using the model in conjunction with constraint-based methods, we simulated the metabolic fluxes induced by different environmental and genetic conditions. The predictions were compared to experimental measurements and phenotypes of S. solfataricus. Furthermore, the performance of the network for 35 different carbon sources known for S. solfataricus from the literature was simulated. Comparing the growth on different carbon sources revealed that glycerol is the carbon source with the highest biomass flux per imported carbon atom (75% higher than glucose. Experimental data was also used to fit the model to phenotypic observations. In addition to the commonly known heterotrophic growth of S. solfataricus, the crenarchaeon is also able to grow autotrophically using the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate cycle for bicarbonate fixation. We integrated this pathway into our model and compared bicarbonate fixation with growth on glucose as sole carbon source. Finally, we tested the robustness of the metabolism with respect to gene deletions using the method of Minimization of Metabolic Adjustment (MOMA, which predicted that 18% of all possible single gene deletions would be lethal for the organism.

  15. Adsorption of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus furiosus on hydrophobic (polystyrene) and hydrophilic (silica) surfaces increases protein heat stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S.; van der Oost, J.; Norde, Willem

    2004-01-01

    The interaction of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus with two types of surfaces, that is, hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica, was investigated, and the adsorption isotherms were determined. The adsorbed hyperthermostable enzyme did not undergo

  16. Electrical current generation in microbial electrolysis cells by hyperthermophilic archaea Ferroglobus placidus and Geoglobus ahangari.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmazel, Yasemin D; Zhu, Xiuping; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Holmes, Dawn E; Logan, Bruce E

    2018-02-01

    Few microorganisms have been examined for current generation under thermophilic (40-65°C) or hyperthermophilic temperatures (≥80°C) in microbial electrochemical systems. Two iron-reducing archaea from the family Archaeoglobaceae, Ferroglobus placidus and Geoglobus ahangari, showed electro-active behavior leading to current generation at hyperthermophilic temperatures in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). A current density (j) of 0.68±0.11A/m2 was attained in F. placidus MECs at 85°C, and 0.57±0.10A/m2 in G. ahangari MECs at 80°C, with an applied voltage of 0.7V. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) showed that both strains produced a sigmoidal catalytic wave, with a mid-point potential of -0.39V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for F. placidus and -0.37V for G. ahangari. The comparison of CVs using spent medium and turnover CVs, coupled with the detection of peaks at the same potentials in both turnover and non-turnover conditions, suggested that mediators were not used for electron transfer and that both archaea produced current through direct contact with the electrode. These two archaeal species, and other hyperthermophilic exoelectrogens, have the potential to broaden the applications of microbial electrochemical technologies for producing biofuels and other bioelectrochemical products under extreme environmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Space agriculture for habitation on Mars with hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Tomita-Yokotani, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kitaya, Y.; Yamashita, M.; Nagatomo, M.; Oshima, T.; Wada, H.; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    Manned Mars exploration requires recycle of materials to support human life A conceptual design is developed for space agriculture which is driven by the biologically regenerative function Hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacterial ecology is the core of materials recycling system to process human metabolic waste and inedible biomass and convert them to fertilizer for plants cultivation A photosynthetic reaction of plants will be driven by solar energy Water will be recycled by cultivation of plants and passing it through plant bodies Sub-surface water and atmospheric carbon dioxide are the natural resource available on Mars and these resources will be converted to oxygen and foods We envision that the agricultural system will be scaled up by importing materials from Martian environment Excess oxygen will be obtained from growing trees for structural and other components Minor elements including N P K and other traces will be introduced as fertilizers or nutrients into the agricultural materials circulation Nitrogen will be collected from Martian atmosphere We will assess biological fixation of nitrogen using micro-organisms responsible in Earth biosphere Hyper-thermophilic aerobic bacterial ecology is effective to convert waste materials into useful forms to plants This microbial technology has been well established on ground for processing sewage and waste materials For instance the hyper-thermophilic bacterial system is applied to a composting machine in a size of a trash box in home kitchen Since such a home electronics

  18. Electrical current generation in microbial electrolysis cells by hyperthermophilic archaea Ferroglobus placidus and Geoglobus ahangari

    KAUST Repository

    Yilmazel, Yasemin D.

    2017-10-02

    Few microorganisms have been examined for current generation under thermophilic (40–65 °C) or hyperthermophilic temperatures (≥ 80 °C) in microbial electrochemical systems. Two iron-reducing archaea from the family Archaeoglobaceae, Ferroglobus placidus and Geoglobus ahangari, showed electro-active behavior leading to current generation at hyperthermophilic temperatures in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). A current density (j) of 0.68 ± 0.11 A/m2 was attained in F. placidus MECs at 85 °C, and 0.57 ± 0.10 A/m2 in G. ahangari MECs at 80 °C, with an applied voltage of 0.7 V. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) showed that both strains produced a sigmoidal catalytic wave, with a mid-point potential of − 0.39 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for F. placidus and − 0.37 V for G. ahangari. The comparison of CVs using spent medium and turnover CVs, coupled with the detection of peaks at the same potentials in both turnover and non-turnover conditions, suggested that mediators were not used for electron transfer and that both archaea produced current through direct contact with the electrode. These two archaeal species, and other hyperthermophilic exoelectrogens, have the potential to broaden the applications of microbial electrochemical technologies for producing biofuels and other bioelectrochemical products under extreme environmental conditions.

  19. Understanding DNA Repair in Hyperthermophilic Archaea: Persistent Gaps and Other Reasons to Focus on the Fork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis W. Grogan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although hyperthermophilic archaea arguably have a great need for efficient DNA repair, they lack members of several DNA repair protein families broadly conserved among bacteria and eukaryotes. Conversely, the putative DNA repair genes that do occur in these archaea often do not generate the expected phenotype when deleted. The prospect that hyperthermophilic archaea have some unique strategies for coping with DNA damage and replication errors has intellectual and technological appeal, but resolving this question will require alternative coping mechanisms to be proposed and tested experimentally. This review evaluates a combination of four enigmatic properties that distinguishes the hyperthermophilic archaea from all other organisms: DNA polymerase stalling at dU, apparent lack of conventional NER, lack of MutSL homologs, and apparent essentiality of homologous recombination proteins. Hypothetical damage-coping strategies that could explain this set of properties may provide new starting points for efforts to define how archaea differ from conventional models of DNA repair and replication fidelity.

  20. The effects of NaCl concentration and pH on the stability of hyperthermophilic protein Ssh10b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Xiang-Rong

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperthermophiles constitute a group of microorganisms with an optimum growth temperature of between 80°C and 100°C. Although the molecular underpinnings of protein thermostabilization have been the focus of many theoretical and experimental efforts, the properties leading to the higher denaturation temperature of hyperthermophilic proteins are still controversial. Among the large number of factors identified as responsible for the thermostability of hyperthermophilic proteins, the electrostatic interactions are thought to be a universally important factor. Results In this study, we report the effects of pH and salt concentration on the urea-induced denaturation of the protein Ssh10b from a hyperthermophile in low ionic strength buffer. In the absence of NaCl, the unfolding ΔG of the protein increased from about 33 kJ/mol at pH 3 to about 78 kJ/mol at pH 10. At all values of pH, the ΔG increased with increasing NaCl concentration, indicating that salt stabilizes the protein significantly. Conclusion These findings suggests that the increased number of charged residues and ion pairs in the protein Ssh10b from hyperthermophiles does not contribute to the stabilization of the folded protein, but may play a role in determining the denatured state ensemble and also in increasing the denaturation temperature.

  1. Superoxide reduction by a superoxide reductase lacking the highly conserved lysine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ana F; Romão, Célia V; Pinto, Liliana C; Huber, Harald; Saraiva, Lígia M; Todorovic, Smilja; Cabelli, Diane; Teixeira, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are the most recently identified superoxide detoxification systems, being found in microorganisms from the three domains of life. These enzymes are characterized by a catalytic mononuclear iron site, with one cysteine and four histidine ligands of the ferrous active form. A lysine residue in the -EKHVP- motif, located close to the active site, has been considered to be essential for the enzyme function, by contributing to the positive surface patch that attracts the superoxide anion and by controlling the chemistry of the catalytic mechanism through a hydrogen bond network. However, we show here that this residue is substituted by non-equivalent amino acids in several putative SORs from Archaea and unicellular Eukarya. In this work, we focus on mechanistic and spectroscopic studies of one of these less common enzymes, the SOR from the hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis. We employ pulse radiolysis fast kinetics and spectroscopic approaches to study the wild-type enzyme (-E23T24HVP-), and two mutants, T24K and E23A, the later mimicking enzymes lacking both the lysine and glutamate (a ferric ion ligand) of the motif. The efficiency of the wild-type protein and mutants in reducing superoxide is comparable to other SORs, revealing the robustness of these enzymes to single mutations.

  2. Refolding, characterization and crystal structure of (S)-malate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ryushi; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Goda, Shuichiro; Tsuge, Hideaki; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2009-10-01

    Tartrate oxidation activity was found in the crude extract of an aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, and the enzyme was identified as (S)-malate dehydrogenase (MDH), which, when produced in Escherichia coli, was mainly obtained as an inactive inclusion body. The inclusion body was dissolved in 6 M guanidine-HCl and gradually refolded to the active enzyme through dilution of the denaturant. The purified recombinant enzyme consisted of four identical subunits with a molecular mass of about 110 kDa. NADP was preferred as a coenzyme over NAD for (S)-malate oxidation and, unlike MDHs from other sources, this enzyme readily catalyzed the oxidation of (2S,3S)-tartrate and (2S,3R)-tartrate. The tartrate oxidation activity was also observed in MDHs from the hyperthermophilic archaea Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Archaeoglobus fulgidus, suggesting these hyperthermophilic MDHs loosely bind their substrates. The refolded A. pernix MDH was also crystallized, and the structure was determined at a resolution of 2.9 A. Its overall structure was similar to those of the M. jannaschii, Chloroflexus aurantiacus, Chlorobium vibrioforme and Cryptosporidium parvum [lactate dehydrogenase-like] MDHs with root-mean-square-deviation values between 1.4 and 2.1 A. Consistent with earlier reports, Ala at position 53 was responsible for coenzyme specificity, and the next residue, Arg, was important for NADP binding. Structural comparison revealed that the hyperthermostability of the A. pernix MDH is likely attributable to its smaller cavity volume and larger numbers of ion pairs and ion-pair networks, but the molecular strategy for thermostability may be specific for each enzyme.

  3. Space agriculture for habitation on Mars with hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Space Agriculture Task Force; Ishikawa, Y.; Tomita-Yokotani, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kitaya, Y.; Yamashita, M.; Nagatomo, M.; Oshima, T.; Wada, H.

    Manned Mars exploration, especially for extended periods of time, will require recycle of materials to support human life. Here, a conceptual design is developed for a Martian agricultural system driven by biologically regenerative functions. One of the core biotechnologies function is the use of hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacterial ecology. These thermophilic bacteria can play an important role in increasing the effectiveness of the processing of human metabolic waste and inedible biomass and of converting them to fertilizer for the cultivation of plants. This microbial technology has been already well established for the purpose of processing sewage and waste materials for small local communities in Japan. One of the characteristics of the technology is that the metabolic heat release that occurs during bacterial fermentation raises the processing temperature sufficiently high at 80 100 °C to support hyper-thermophilic bacteria. Such a hyper-thermophilic system is found to have great capability of decomposing wastes including even their normally recalcitrant components, in a reasonably short period of time and of providing a better quality of fertilizer as an end-product. High quality compost has been shown to be a key element in creating a healthy regenerative food production system. In ground-based studies, the soil microbial ecology after the addition of high quality compost was shown to improve plant growth and promote a healthy symbiosis of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Another advantage of such high processing temperature is the ability to sterilize the pathogenic organisms through the fermentation process and thus to secure the hygienic safety of the system. Plant cultivation is one of the other major systems. It should fully utilize solar energy received on the Martian surface for supplying energy for photosynthesis. Subsurface water and atmospheric carbon dioxide mined on Mars should be also used in the plant cultivation system. Oxygen and

  4. Proteomic Insights into Sulfur Metabolism in the Hydrogen-Producing Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Jung Moon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 has been shown to produce H2 when using CO, formate, or starch as a growth substrate. This strain can also utilize elemental sulfur as a terminal electron acceptor for heterotrophic growth. To gain insight into sulfur metabolism, the proteome of T. onnurineus NA1 cells grown under sulfur culture conditions was quantified and compared with those grown under H2-evolving substrate culture conditions. Using label-free nano-UPLC-MSE-based comparative proteomic analysis, approximately 38.4% of the total identified proteome (589 proteins was found to be significantly up-regulated (≥1.5-fold under sulfur culture conditions. Many of these proteins were functionally associated with carbon fixation, Fe–S cluster biogenesis, ATP synthesis, sulfur reduction, protein glycosylation, protein translocation, and formate oxidation. Based on the abundances of the identified proteins in this and other genomic studies, the pathways associated with reductive sulfur metabolism, H2-metabolism, and oxidative stress defense were proposed. The results also revealed markedly lower expression levels of enzymes involved in the sulfur assimilation pathway, as well as cysteine desulfurase, under sulfur culture condition. The present results provide the first global atlas of proteome changes triggered by sulfur, and may facilitate an understanding of how hyperthermophilic archaea adapt to sulfur-rich, extreme environments.

  5. Structural analysis of β-glucosidase mutants derived from a hyperthermophilic tetrameric structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakabayashi, Makoto; Kataoka, Misumi; Mishima, Yumiko; Maeno, Yuka; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kazu-ishikawa@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science, 3-11-32, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    Substitutive mutations that convert a tetrameric β-glucosidase into a dimeric state lead to improvement of its crystal quality. β-Glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus (BGLPf) is a hyperthermophilic tetrameric enzyme which can degrade cellooligosaccharides to glucose under hyperthermophilic conditions and thus holds promise for the saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass at high temperature. Prior to the production of large amounts of this enzyme, detailed information regarding the oligomeric structure of the enzyme is required. Several crystals of BGLPf have been prepared over the past ten years, but its crystal structure had not been solved until recently. In 2011, the first crystal structure of BGLPf was solved and a model was constructed at somewhat low resolution (2.35 Å). In order to obtain more detailed structural data on BGLPf, the relationship between its tetrameric structure and the quality of the crystal was re-examined. A dimeric form of BGLPf was constructed and its crystal structure was solved at a resolution of 1.70 Å using protein-engineering methods. Furthermore, using the high-resolution crystal structural data for the dimeric form, a monomeric form of BGLPf was constructed which retained the intrinsic activity of the tetrameric form. The thermostability of BGLPf is affected by its oligomeric structure. Here, the biophysical and biochemical properties of engineered dimeric and monomeric BGLPfs are reported, which are promising prototype models to apply to the saccharification reaction. Furthermore, details regarding the oligomeric structures of BGLPf and the reasons why the mutations yielded improved crystal structures are discussed.

  6. Temperature dependent mistranslation in a hyperthermophile adapts proteins to lower temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael H.; Pan, Tao

    2016-01-01

    All organisms universally encode, synthesize and utilize proteins that function optimally within a subset of growth conditions. While healthy cells are thought to maintain high translational fidelity within their natural habitats, natural environments can easily fluctuate outside the optimal functional range of genetically encoded proteins. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix (A. pernix) can grow throughout temperature variations ranging from 70 to 100°C, although the specific factors facilitating such adaptability are unknown. Here, we show that A. pernix undergoes constitutive leucine to methionine mistranslation at low growth temperatures. Low-temperature mistranslation is facilitated by the misacylation of tRNALeu with methionine by the methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS). At low growth temperatures, the A. pernix MetRS undergoes a temperature dependent shift in tRNA charging fidelity, allowing the enzyme to conditionally charge tRNALeu with methionine. We demonstrate enhanced low-temperature activity for A. pernix citrate synthase that is synthesized during leucine to methionine mistranslation at low-temperature growth compared to its high-fidelity counterpart synthesized at high-temperature. Our results show that conditional leucine to methionine mistranslation can make protein adjustments capable of improving the low-temperature activity of hyperthermophilic proteins, likely by facilitating the increasing flexibility required for greater protein function at lower physiological temperatures. PMID:26657639

  7. Biochemical evidence for the presence of two α-glucoside ABC-transport systems in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Sonja M.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus can utilize different carbohydrates, such as starch, maltose and trehalose. Uptake of α-glucosides is mediated by two different, binding protein-dependent, ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type transport systems. The maltose transporter also transports

  8. Widespread occurrence of structurally diverse tetraether membrane lipids : Evidence for the ubiquitous presence of low-temperature relatives of hyperthermophiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.; Hopmans, E.C.; Pancost, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    Isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) and branched glycerol dialkyl diethers are main membrane constituents of cultured hyperthermophilic archaea and eubacteria, respectively, and are found in environments with temperatures >60°C. Recently, we developed a new technique for the

  9. Structure of flap endonuclease 1 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfuro­coccus amylolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Tomoko; Kubota, Keiko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Tanokura, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is a key enzyme in DNA repair and DNA replication. It is a structure-specific nuclease that removes 5′-overhanging flaps and the RNA/DNA primer during maturation of the Okazaki fragment. Homologues of FEN1 exist in a wide range of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. In order to further understand the structural basis of the DNA recognition, binding and cleavage mechanism of FEN1, the structure of FEN1 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus amylolyticus (DaFEN1) was determined at 2.00 Å resolution. The overall fold of DaFEN1 was similar to those of other archaeal FEN1 proteins; however, the helical clamp and the flexible loop exhibited a putative substrate-binding pocket with a unique conformation. PMID:21301087

  10. Improving anaerobic sewage sludge digestion by implementation of a hyper-thermophilic prehydrolysis step

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jingquan; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.

    2008-01-01

    The present study focuses on a two-step process for treatment and stabilisation of primary sludge. The process consists of a hyperthermophilic hydrolysis step operated at 70 degrees C and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 clays followed by a thermophilic (55 degrees C) anaerobic digestion step...... at a HRT of 13 days. A one-step anaerobic digester operated at 55 degrees C and 15 days HRT Was used as a reference process. The two-step process was characterized by a 12% higher organic suspended solids removal efficiency and better pathogen reduction effect than the conventional one-step digestion......) with and Without pre-treatment respectively) and up to 115% increase of the methane production rate. Finally it was shown that the extra energy requirements for the operation of a pre-treatment step would be covered by the energy Produced from the extra methane production and in addition there would...

  11. A novel phospholipase A2/esterase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baijing; Lu, Dongmei; Gao, Renjun; Yang, Zhen; Cao, Shugui; Feng, Yan

    2004-06-01

    An open reading frame of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 APE2325, which composed of 474 bases, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) Codon Plus-RIL. The recombinant protein was purified by Ni-chelation affinity chromatography. It showed a single band with a molecular mass of 18kDa in SDS-PAGE. The purified enzyme exhibited both phospholipase A(2) and esterase activities with the optimal catalytic temperature at 90 degrees C. The enzyme activity was Ca(2+)-independent. Kinetic analysis revealed its Km, k cat, and Vm for the p-nitrophenyl propionate substrate were 103microM, 39s(-1), and 249micromol/min/mg, respectively. The recombinant protein was thermostable and its half-life at 100 degrees C was about 1h.

  12. Characterization of thermostable native alkaline phosphatase from an aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helianti, Is; Okubo, Takako; Morita, Yasutaka; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports the characterization of an alkaline phosphatase (AP) from an aerobic hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1. The native AP was purified into homogeneity. The enzyme is predicted as a homodimeric structure with a native molecular mass of about 75 kDa and monomer of about 40 kDa. Apparent optimum pH and temperature were estimated at 10.0 and above 95 degrees C, respectively. Magnesium ion increased both the stability and the activity of the enzyme. A. pernix AP has been demonstrated as a very thermostable AP, retaining about 76% of its activity after being incubated at 90 degrees C for 5.5 h and 67% of its activity after being incubated at 100 degrees C for 2.5 h, respectively, under the presence of Mg(II). Enzyme activity was increased in addition of exogenous Mg(II), Ca(II), Zn(II), and Co(II).

  13. Substrate specificity of undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takeshi; Ogawa, Takuya; Yoshimura, Tohru; Hemmi, Hisashi

    2013-06-28

    Cis-prenyltransferase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified for characterization. Properties such as substrate specificity, product chain-length, thermal stability and cofactor requirement were investigated using the recombinant enzyme. In particular, the substrate specificity of the enzyme attracts interest because only dimethylallyl diphosphate and geranylfarnesyl diphosphate, both of which are unusual substrates for known cis-prenyltransferases, are likely available as an allylic primer substrate in A. pernix. From the enzymatic study, the archaeal enzyme was shown to be undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase that has anomalous substrate specificity, which results in a preference for geranylfarnesyl diphosphate. This means that the product of the enzyme, which is probably used as the precursor of the glycosyl carrier lipid, would have an undiscovered structure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimization of growth for the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix on a small-batch scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milek, Igor; Cigic, Blaz; Skrt, Mihaela; Kaletunç, Gönül; Ulrih, Natasa Poklar

    2005-09-01

    Growth of Aeropyrum pernix, the first reported aerobic neutrophilic hyperthermophilic archaeon, was investigated under different cultivation parameters. Different sources of seawater, pH, and the cultivation methods were tested with the aim to improve the biomass production. A 1-L glass flask fitted with a condenser and air diffuser was used as a bioreactor. The optimum conditions for maximizing A. pernix biomass were obtained when Na2S2O3.5H2O (1 g/L) with added marine broth 2216 at pH 7.0 (20 mmol HEPES buffer/L) was used as a growing medium in a 1-L flask. The biomass production was 0.45 g dry cell mass/L in 40 h under the optimum conditions, which is more than the 0.42 g dry cell mass/L in 60 h previously obtained.

  15. Identification and characterization of small RNAs in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xu

    Full Text Available The term RNA silencing (RNA interference, RNAi describes a set of mechanisms that regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. Small interfering RNAs (siRNA and microRNAs (miRNAs are two major types of RNAi-associated small RNAs (smRNAs found in most eukaryotic organisms. Despite the presence of a plethora of non-coding RNAs longer than 50-nucleotide (nt in length in various species of Archaea, little is known about smRNAs in archaea that resemble the 20-24-nt long smRNAs found in eukaryotes, which have been implicated in the post-transcriptional control of gene expression. Here, we report the finding of a large number of smRNAs approximatelly 20-nt in length, including phased smRNAs and potential miRNAs, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus p2 (Ssp2 based on deep sequencing. The expression of some of the miRNA candidates in Ssp2 was confirmed. Consistent with the Ssp2 hyperthermophilic properties, we found that higher temperatures more efficiently induced the production of the miRNA candidates in an in vitro system using the putative foldback precursor transcripts incubated with Ssp2 extract. Although we initially predicted putative target genes of some miRNA candidates, further analysis mapped the cleavage sites downstream of the miRNA candidate complementary regions, similar to those involved in plant miRNA-mediated TAS transcript cleavage. We also identified smRNAs from clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR loci, which play important roles in prokaryotic microbial defense systems. Archaea represent a unique life form next to Bacteria and Eukarya, and our results may provide a useful resource for further in-depth study on the regulation and evolution of smRNAs in this special organism.

  16. Variation of the virus-related elements within syntenic genomes of the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daifuku, Takashi; Yoshida, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki; Kawaichi, Satoshi; Inoue, Takahiro; Nomura, Keigo; Yoshida, Yui; Kuno, Sotaro; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2013-10-01

    The increasing number of genome sequences of archaea and bacteria show their adaptation to different environmental conditions at the genomic level. Aeropyrum spp. are aerobic and hyperthermophilic archaea. Aeropyrum camini was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent, and Aeropyrum pernix was isolated from a coastal solfataric vent. To investigate the adaptation strategy in each habitat, we compared the genomes of the two species. Shared genome features were a small genome size, a high GC content, and a large portion of orthologous genes (86 to 88%). The genomes also showed high synteny. These shared features may have been derived from the small number of mobile genetic elements and the lack of a RecBCD system, a recombinational enzyme complex. In addition, the specialized physiology (aerobic and hyperthermophilic) of Aeropyrum spp. may also contribute to the entire-genome similarity. Despite having stable genomes, interference of synteny occurred with two proviruses, A. pernix spindle-shaped virus 1 (APSV1) and A. pernix ovoid virus 1 (APOV1), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) elements. Spacer sequences derived from the A. camini CRISPR showed significant matches with protospacers of the two proviruses infecting A. pernix, indicating that A. camini interacted with viruses closely related to APSV1 and APOV1. Furthermore, a significant fraction of the nonorthologous genes (41 to 45%) were proviral genes or ORFans probably originating from viruses. Although the genomes of A. camini and A. pernix were conserved, we observed nonsynteny that was attributed primarily to virus-related elements. Our findings indicated that the genomic diversification of Aeropyrum spp. is substantially caused by viruses.

  17. Crystal structure of novel dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Satomura, Takenori; Kawakami, Ryushi; Kim, Kwang; Hara, Yusuke; Yoneda, Kazunari; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2012-06-08

    Two types of dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase (PDH1, α4β4-type hetero-octamer, and PDH2, αβγδ-type heterotetramer) have been identified so far in hyperthermophilic archaea. Here, we report the crystal structure of a third type of L-proline dehydrogenase, found in the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, whose structure (homodimer) is much simpler than those of previously studied L-proline dehydrogenases. The structure was determined at a resolution of 1.92 Å. The asymmetric unit contained one subunit, and a crystallographic 2-fold axis generated the functional dimer. The overall fold of the subunit showed similarity to that of the PDH1 β-subunit, which is responsible for catalyzing L-proline dehydrogenation. However, the situation at the subunit-subunit interface of the A. pernix enzyme was totally different from that in PDH1. The presence of additional surface elements in the A. pernix enzyme contributes to a unique dimer association. Moreover, the C-terminal Leu(428), which is provided by a tail extending from the FAD-binding domain, shielded the active site, and an L-proline molecule was entrapped within the active site cavity. The K(m) value of a Leu(428) deletion mutant for L-proline was about 800 times larger than the K(m) value of the wild-type enzyme, although the k(cat) values did not differ much between the two enzymes. This suggests the C-terminal Leu(428) is not directly involved in catalysis, but it is essential for maintaining a high affinity for the substrate. This is the first description of an LPDH structure with L-proline bound, and it provides new insight into the substrate binding of LPDH.

  18. Crystal Structure of Novel Dye-linked l-Proline Dehydrogenase from Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Satomura, Takenori; Kawakami, Ryushi; Kim, Kwang; Hara, Yusuke; Yoneda, Kazunari; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Two types of dye-linked l-proline dehydrogenase (PDH1, α4β4-type hetero-octamer, and PDH2, αβγδ-type heterotetramer) have been identified so far in hyperthermophilic archaea. Here, we report the crystal structure of a third type of l-proline dehydrogenase, found in the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, whose structure (homodimer) is much simpler than those of previously studied l-proline dehydrogenases. The structure was determined at a resolution of 1.92 Å. The asymmetric unit contained one subunit, and a crystallographic 2-fold axis generated the functional dimer. The overall fold of the subunit showed similarity to that of the PDH1 β-subunit, which is responsible for catalyzing l-proline dehydrogenation. However, the situation at the subunit-subunit interface of the A. pernix enzyme was totally different from that in PDH1. The presence of additional surface elements in the A. pernix enzyme contributes to a unique dimer association. Moreover, the C-terminal Leu428, which is provided by a tail extending from the FAD-binding domain, shielded the active site, and an l-proline molecule was entrapped within the active site cavity. The Km value of a Leu428 deletion mutant for l-proline was about 800 times larger than the Km value of the wild-type enzyme, although the kcat values did not differ much between the two enzymes. This suggests the C-terminal Leu428 is not directly involved in catalysis, but it is essential for maintaining a high affinity for the substrate. This is the first description of an LPDH structure with l-proline bound, and it provides new insight into the substrate binding of LPDH. PMID:22511758

  19. 3-Phosphoglycerate is an allosteric activator of pyruvate kinase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, J T Graham; Johnsen, Ulrike; Schönheit, Peter; Davies, Christopher

    2013-08-27

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) is a highly regulated enzyme that catalyzes the final step of glycolysis. PK from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum (PaPK) is distinguished from most PK enzymes of eukarya and bacteria by not responding to any known allosteric effectors and apparently exhibiting only cooperative regulation. We determined the crystal structure of PaPK to 2.2 Å resolution and, in a manner consistent with the lack of a response to conventional effectors, observed that the canonical allosteric site is occluded by a tyrosine. Unexpectedly, though, a bound sulfate was observed at a position equivalent to the 6'-phosphate of sugar effectors, suggesting an allosteric site, but for an unknown effector and sharing only the phosphate position. A search of three-carbon intermediates of glycolysis revealed 3-phosphoglycerate (3PG) as a potent allosteric activator of PaPK. The response was abolished by mutation of residues that contact the sulfate and of an arginine proposed to interact with the 3PG carboxylate group. Regulation of PK by 3PG is consistent with the ancestral glycolysis of hyperthermophilic archaea in which this intermediate is produced by an irreversible enzyme, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Coordinated regulation within the lower half of glycolysis contrasts sharply with conventional glycolysis in which 3PG is produced reversibly and PK is regulated by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, the product of phosphofructokinase, an irreversible enzyme in the upper half of the pathway. Regulation of PaPK by a carboxylate molecule rather than a sugar phosphate may reflect a step in the evolution of glycolysis that predates the dominance of sugars in metabolism.

  20. A Novel Process Configuration for Anaerobic Digestion of Source-Sorted Household Waste Using Hyper-Thermophilic Post-Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, H.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2005-01-01

    A novel reactor configuration was investigated for anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). An anaerobic hyper-thermophilic (68°C) reactor R68 was implemented as a post–treatment step for the effluent of a thermophilic reactor R1 (55°C) in order to enhance......). A single-stage thermophilic (55°C) reactor R2 was used as control. VS reduction and biogas yield of the combined system was 78 – 89% and 640 – 790 ml/g-VS, respectively. While the VS reduction in the combined system was up to 7% higher than in the single-stage treatment, no increase in methane yield......-thermophilic post-treatment. 7% of the ammonia load was removed in the hyper-thermophilic reactor with a flow of headspace gas through the reactor equivalent to four times the biogas flow produced in reactor R1....

  1. Differential Effects of Hydrophobic Core Packing Residues for Thermodynamic and Mechanical Stability of a Hyperthermophilic Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Batchelor, Matthew; Hoffmann, Toni; Wilson, Michael C; Hughes, Megan L; Paci, Emanuele; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-26

    Proteins from organisms that have adapted to environmental extremes provide attractive systems to explore and determine the origins of protein stability. Improved hydrophobic core packing and decreased loop-length flexibility can increase the thermodynamic stability of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms. However, their impact on protein mechanical stability is not known. Here, we use protein engineering, biophysical characterization, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to measure the effect of altering hydrophobic core packing on the stability of the cold shock protein TmCSP from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. We make two variants of TmCSP in which a mutation is made to reduce the size of aliphatic groups from buried hydrophobic side chains. In the first, a mutation is introduced in a long loop (TmCSP L40A); in the other, the mutation is introduced on the C-terminal β-strand (TmCSP V62A). We use MD simulations to confirm that the mutant TmCSP L40A shows the most significant increase in loop flexibility, and mutant TmCSP V62A shows greater disruption to the core packing. We measure the thermodynamic stability (ΔGD-N) of the mutated proteins and show that there is a more significant reduction for TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG = 63%) than TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG = 47%), as might be expected on the basis of the relative reduction in the size of the side chain. By contrast, SMFS measures the mechanical stability (ΔG*) and shows a greater reduction for TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG* = 8.4%) than TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG* = 2.5%). While the impact on the mechanical stability is subtle, the results demonstrate the power of tuning noncovalent interactions to modulate both the thermodynamic and mechanical stability of a protein. Such understanding and control provide the opportunity to design proteins with optimized thermodynamic and mechanical properties.

  2. A Structurally Novel Chitinase from the Chitin-Degrading Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus chitonophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Ayumi; Aslam, Mehwish; Kanai, Tamotsu; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2016-06-15

    A structurally novel chitinase, Tc-ChiD, was identified from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus chitonophagus, which can grow on chitin as the sole organic carbon source. The gene encoding Tc-ChiD contains regions corresponding to a signal sequence, two chitin-binding domains, and a putative catalytic domain. This catalytic domain shows no similarity with previously characterized chitinases but resembles an uncharacterized protein found in the mesophilic anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum Two recombinant Tc-ChiD proteins were produced in Escherichia coli, one without the signal sequence [Tc-ChiD(ΔS)] and the other corresponding only to the putative catalytic domain [Tc-ChiD(ΔBD)]. Enzyme assays using N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) oligomers indicated that both proteins hydrolyze GlcNAc oligomers longer than (GlcNAc)4 Chitinase assays using colloidal chitin suggested that Tc-ChiD is an exo-type chitinase that releases (GlcNAc)2 or (GlcNAc)3 Analysis with GlcNAc oligomers modified with p-nitrophenol suggested that Tc-ChiD recognizes the reducing end of chitin chains. While Tc-ChiD(ΔBD) displayed a higher initial velocity than that of Tc-ChiD(ΔS), we found that the presence of the two chitin-binding domains significantly enhanced the thermostability of the catalytic domain. In T. chitonophagus, another chitinase ortholog that is similar to the Thermococcus kodakarensis chitinase ChiA is present and can degrade chitin from the nonreducing ends. Therefore, the presence of multiple chitinases in T. chitonophagus with different modes of cleavage may contribute to its unique ability to efficiently degrade chitin. A structurally novel chitinase, Tc-ChiD, was identified from Thermococcus chitonophagus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon. The protein contains a signal peptide for secretion, two chitin-binding domains, and a catalytic domain that shows no similarity with previously characterized chitinases. Tc-ChiD thus represents a new family of chitinases. Tc

  3. Substrate specificity and transglycosylation catalyzed by a thermostable beta-glucosidase from marine hyperthermophile Thermotoga neapolitana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tak-Hyun; Choi, Ki-Won; Park, Cheon-Seok; Lee, Soo-Bok; Kang, Ho-Young; Shon, Kwang-Jae; Park, Jang-Su; Cha, Jaeho

    2005-12-01

    The gene encoding beta-glucosidase of the marine hyperthermophilic eubacterium Thermotoga neapolitana (bglA) was subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant BglA (rBglA) was efficiently purified by heat treatment at 75 degrees C, and a Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and its molecular mass were determined to be 56.2 kDa by mass spectrometry (MS). At 100 degrees C, the enzyme showed more than 94% of its optimal activity. The half-life of the enzyme was 3.6 h and 12 min at 100 and 105 degrees C, respectively. rBglA was active toward artificial (p-nitrophenyl beta-D: -glucoside) and natural substrates (cellobiose and lactose). The enzyme also exhibited activity with positional isomers of cellobiose: sophorose, laminaribiose, and gentiobiose. Kinetic studies of the enzyme revealed that the enzyme showed biphasic behavior with p-nitrophenyl beta-D: -glucoside as the substrate. Whereas metal ions did not show any significant effect on its activity, dithiothreitol and beta-mercaptoethanol markedly increased enzymatic activity. When arbutin and cellobiose were used as an acceptor and a donor, respectively, three distinct intermolecular transfer products were found by thin-layer chromatography and recycling preparative high-performance liquid chromatography. Structural analysis of three arbutin transfer products by MS and nuclear magnetic resonance indicated that glucose from cellobiose was transferred to the C-3, C-4, and C-6 in the glucose unit of acceptor, respectively.

  4. Minimal sulfur requirement for growth and sulfur-dependent metabolism of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Staphylothermus marinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Hao

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon that uses peptides as carbon and energy sources. Elemental sulfur (S° is obligately required for its growth and is reduced to H2S. The metabolic functions and mechanisms of S° reduction were explored by examining S°-dependent growth and activities of key enzymes present in this organism. All three forms of S° tested—sublimed S°, colloidal S° and polysulfide—were used by S. marinus, and no other sulfur-containing compounds could replace S°. Elemental sulfur did not serve as physical support but appeared to function as an electron acceptor. The minimal S° concentration required for optimal growth was 0.05% (w/v. At this concentration, there appeared to be a metabolic transition from H2 production to S° reduction. Some enzymatic activities related to S°-dependent metabolism, including sulfur reductase, hydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase and electron transfer activities, were detected in cell-free extracts of S. marinus. These results indicate that S° plays an essential role in the heterotrophic metabolism of S. marinus. Reducing equivalents generated by the oxidation of amino acids from peptidolysis may be transferred to sulfur reductase and hydrogenase, which then catalyze the production of H2S and H2, respectively.

  5. Modeling DNA Repair: Approaching In Vivo Techniques in the Hyperthermophile Sulfolobus Solfataricus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanton, J.; Fuss, J.; Yannone, S.M.; Tainer, J.A.; Cooper, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    Archaea are found in some of the most extreme environments on earth and represent a third domain of life distinct from Eukarya and Eubacteria. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, isolated from acidic hot springs (80oC, pH 3) in Yellowstone National Park, has emerged as a potential model system for studying human DNA repair processes. Archaea are more closely related to Eukarya than to Eubacteria, suggesting that archaeal DNA repair machinery may model the complex human system much more closely than that of other prokaryotes. DNA repair requires coordinated protein-protein interactions that are frequently transient. Protein complexes that are transient at extreme temperatures where archaea thrive may be more stable at room temperature, allowing for the characterization of otherwise short-lived complexes. However, characterization of these systems in archaea has been limited by the absence of a stable in vivo transformation and expression system. The work presented here is a pilot study in gene cloning and recombinant protein expression in S. solfataricus. Three genes associated with DNA repair were selected for expression: MRE11, PCNA1, and a putative CSB homologue. Though preparation of these recombinant genes followed standard methods, preparation of a suitable vector proved more challenging. The shuttle vector pSSV64, derived from the SSV1 virus and the E. coli vector pBSSK+, was most successfully isolated from the DH5α E. coli strain. Currently, alternative vectors are being designed for more efficient genetic manipulations in S. solfataricus.

  6. Membrane homeoviscous adaptation in the piezo-hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaïs eCario

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The archaeon Thermococcus barophilus, one of the most extreme members of hyperthermophilic piezophiles known thus far, is able to grow at temperatures up to 103°C and pressures up to 80MPa. We analyzed the membrane lipids of T. barophilus by HPLC-MS as a function of pressure and temperature. In contrast to previous reports, we show that under optimal growth conditions (40 MPa, 85°C the membrane spanning tetraether lipid GDGT-0 (sometimes called caldarchaeol is a major membrane lipid of T. barophilus together with archaeol. Increasing pressure and decreasing temperature lead to an increase of the proportion of archaeol and, reversely, a higher proportion of GDGT-0 is observed under low pressure and high temperature conditions. Noticeably, pressure and temperature fluctuations also impact the level of unsaturation of non-polar lipids with an irregular polyisoprenoid carbon skeleton (polyunsaturated lycopane derivatives, suggesting a structural role for these neutral lipids in the membrane of T. barophilus. Whether these apolar lipids insert in the membrane or not remains to be addressed. However, our results raise questions about the structure of the membrane in this archaeon and other archaeon harboring a mixture of di- and tetraether lipids.

  7. Thermogladius shockii gen. nov., sp. nov., a hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote from Yellowstone National Park, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, Magdalena R; Amend, Jan P

    2011-01-01

    A hyperthermophilic heterotrophic archaeon (strain WB1) was isolated from a thermal pool in the Washburn hot spring group of Yellowstone National Park, USA. WB1 is a coccus, 0.6-1.2 μm in diameter, with a tetragonal S-layer, vacuoles, and occasional stalk-like protrusions. Growth is optimal at 84°C (range 64-93°C), pH 5-6 (range 3.5-8.5), and <1 g/l NaCl (range 0-4.6 g/l NaCl). Tests of metabolic properties show the isolate to be a strict anaerobe that ferments complex organic substrates. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence places WB1 in a clade of previously uncultured Desulfurococcaceae and shows it to have ≤ 96% 16S rRNA sequence identity to Desulfurococcus mobilis, Staphylothermus marinus, Staphylothermus hellenicus, and Sulfophobococcus zilligii. The 16S rRNA gene contains a large insertion similar to homing endonuclease introns reported in Thermoproteus and Pyrobaculum species. Growth is unaffected by the presence of S(0) or SO(4)(2-), thereby differentiating the isolate from its closest relatives. Based on phylogenetic and physiological differences, it is proposed that isolate WB1 represents the type strain of a novel genus and species within the Desulfurococcaceae, Thermogladius shockii gen. nov., sp. nov. (RIKEN = JCM-16579, ATCC = BAA-1607, Genbank 16S rRNA gene = EU183120).

  8. Production of galactooligosaccharides using a hyperthermophilic β-galactosidase in permeabilized whole cells of Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, L; O'Sullivan, D J

    2014-02-01

    Galactooligosaccharides (GOS) are novel prebiotic food ingredients that can be produced from lactose using β-galactosidase, but the process is more efficient at higher temperatures. To efficiently express the lacS gene from the hyperthermophile Sulfolobus solfataricus, in Lactococcus lactis a synthetic gene (lacSt) with optimized codon usage for Lc. lactis was designed and synthesized. This hyperthermostable β-galactosidase enzyme was successfully overexpressed in Lc. lactis LM0230 using a nisin-controlled gene expression system. Enzyme-containing cells were then killed and permeabilized using 50% ethanol and were used to determine both hydrolysis and transgalactosylation activity. The optimum conditions for GOS synthesis was found to be at pH 6.0 and 85 °C. A maximum production of 197 g/L of GOS tri- and tetrasaccharides was obtained from 40% initial lactose, after 55 h of incubation. The total GOS yield increased with the initial lactose concentration, whereas the highest lactose conversion rate (72%) was achieved from a low lactose solution (5%). Given that a significant proportion of the remaining lactose would be expected to be converted into disaccharide GOS, this should enable the future development of a cost-effective approach for the conversion of whey-based substrates into GOS-enriched food ingredients using this cell-based technology. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. High hydrostatic pressure increases amino acid requirements in the piezo-hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cario, Anaïs; Lormières, Florence; Xiang, Xiao; Oger, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    We have established a defined growth medium for the piezophilic hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus, which allows growth yields of ca. 10(8) cells/ml under both atmospheric and high hydrostatic pressure. Our results demonstrate a major impact of hydrostatic pressure on amino acid metabolism, with increases from 3 amino acids required at atmospheric pressure to 17 at 40 MPa. We observe in T. barophilus and other Thermococcales a similar discrepancy between the presence/absence of amino acid synthesis pathways and amino acid requirements, which supports the existence of alternate, but yet unknown, amino acid synthesis pathways, and may explain the low number of essential amino acids observed in T. barophilus and other Thermococcales. T. barophilus displays a strong metabolic preference for organic polymers such as polypeptides and chitin, which may constitute a more readily available resource of carbon and energy in situ in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. We hypothesize that the low energy yields of fermentation of organic polymers, together with energetic constraints imposed by high hydrostatic pressure, may render de novo synthesis of amino acids ecologically unfavorable. Induction of this metabolic switch to amino acid recycling can explain the requirement for non-essential amino acids by Thermococcales for efficient growth in defined medium. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of the glycolytic enzyme enolase which is abundant in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peak, M.J.; Peak, J.G.; Stevens, F.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Blamey, J.; Mai, X.; Zhou, Z.H.; Adams, M.W.W. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    High enolase activity, as measured by the conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolphyruvate, was found in the cytoplasm of Pyrococcus (an anaerobic, hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100{degree}C). In this organism, the enzyme probably functions in a sugar fermentation pathway. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity. It had a temperature optimum of >90 {degree}C, and a pH optimum of 8.1. The enzyme was extremely thermostable with a half time for inactivation at 100{degree}C of 40 min. In contrast, an enolase from yeast was inactivated in 1 min at 88{degree}C. Both the P. furiosus and yeast enzymes required a metal ion for activity, but whereas the yeast enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mg{sup ++} the P. furiosus enolase was equally active in the presence of Mn{sup ++}. Both enzymes were competitively inhibited by citrate. P. furiosus enolase, as for mesophilic enolases, probably has a homodimeric structure with subunit M{sub r} greater than 45,000. A highly conserved sequence of eight amino acids in the N-terminal region was found in enolases from P. furiosus and a wide range of other organisms including bacteria, yeast, birds, and mammals.

  11. The complete genome sequence of hyperthermophile Dictyoglomus turgidum DSM 6724™ reveals a specialized carbohydrate fermentor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Brumm

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the complete genome sequence of the chemoorganotrophic, extremely thermophilic bacterium, Dictyoglomus turgidum, which is a Gram negative, strictly anaerobic bacterium. D. turgidum and D. thermophilum together form the Dictyoglomi phylum. The two Dictyoglomus genomes are highly syntenic, and both are distantly related to Caldicellulosiruptor spp. D. turgidum is able to grow on a wide variety of polysaccharide substrates due to significant genomic commitment to glycosyl hydrolases, sixteen of which were cloned and expressed in our study. The GH5, GH10 and GH42 enzymes characterized in this study suggest that D. turgidum can utilize most plant-based polysaccharides except crystalline cellulose. The DNA polymerase I enzyme was also expressed and characterized. The pure enzyme showed improved amplification of long PCR targets compared to Taq polymerase. The genome contains a full complement of DNA modifying enzymes, and an unusually high copy number (4 of a new, ancestral family of polB type nucleotidyltransferases designated as MNT (minimal nucleotidyltransferases. Considering its optimal growth at 72ºC, D. turgidum has an anomalously low G+C content of 39.9% that may account for the presence of reverse gyrase, usually associated with hyperthermophiles.

  12. Thermodynamic and kinetic stability of a large multi-domain enzyme from the hyperthermophile Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlström, Mikael; Chiaraluce, Roberta; Giangiacomo, Laura; Steen, Ida Helene; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Ladenstein, Rudolf; Consalvi, Valerio

    2010-03-01

    The multi-domain enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophile Aeropyrum pernix was studied by denaturant-induced unfolding. At pH 7.5, changes in circular dichroism ellipticity and intrinsic fluorescence showed a complex unfolding transition, whereas at pH 3.0, an apparently two-state and highly reversible unfolding occurred. Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed the dissociation from dimer to monomer at pH 3.0. The thermodynamic and kinetic stability were studied at pH 3.0 to explore the role of inter-domain interactions independently of inter-subunit interplay on the wild type and R211M, a mutant where a seven-membered inter-domain ionic network has been disrupted. The unfolding and folding transitions occurred at slightly different denaturant concentrations even after prolonged equilibration time. The difference between the folding and the unfolding profiles was decreased in the mutant R211M. The apparent Gibbs free energy decreased approximately 2 kcal/mol and the unfolding rate increased 4.3-fold in the mutant protein, corresponding to a decrease in activation free energy of unfolding of 0.86 kcal/mol. These results suggest that the inter-domain ionic network might be responsible for additional stabilization through a significant kinetic barrier in the unfolding pathway that could also explain the larger difference observed between the folding and unfolding transitions of the wild type.

  13. Preservation and Evolution of Organic Matter During Experimental Fossilisation of the Hyperthermophilic Archaea Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, François; Disnar, Jean-Robert; Gautret, Pascale; Westall, Frances; Bienvenu, Nadège; Lottier, Nathalie; Prieur, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Identification of the earliest traces of life is made difficult by the scarcity of the preserved microbial remains and by the alteration and potential contamination of the organic matter (OM) content of rocks. These factors can confuse interpretations of the biogenicity and syngenicity of fossilised structures and organic molecules found in ancient rocks. In order to improve our knowledge of the fossilisation processes and their effects at the molecular level, we made a preliminary study of the fate of OM during experimental fossilisation. Changes in the composition and quantity of amino acids, monosaccharides and fatty acids were followed with HPLC, GC and GC-MS analyses during 1 year of silicification of the hyperthermophilic Archaea Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. Although the cells themselves did not fossilise and the accompanying extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) did, our analyses showed that the OM initially present in both cells and EPS was uniformly preserved in the precipitated silica, with amino acids and fatty acids being the best preserved compounds. This study thus completes previous data obtained by electron microscopy investigations of simulated microbial fossilisation and can help better identification and interpretation of microbial biosignatures in both ancient rocks and in recent hydrothermal formations and sediments.

  14. Pyrobaculum calidifontis sp. nov., a novel hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows in atmospheric air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Amo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel, facultatively aerobic, heterotrophic hyperthermophilic archaeon was isolated from a terrestrial hot spring in the Philippines. Cells of the new isolate, strain VA1, were rod-shaped with a length of 1.5 to 10 μm and a width of 0.5 to 1.0 μm. Isolate VA1 grew optimally at 90 to 95 °C and pH 7.0 under atmospheric air. Oxygen served as a final electron acceptor under aerobic growth conditions, and vigorous shaking of the medium significantly enhanced growth. Elemental sulfur inhibited cell growth under aerobic growth conditions, whereas thiosulfate stimulated cell growth. Under anaerobic growth conditions, nitrate served as a final electron acceptor, but nitrite or sulfur-containing compounds such as elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfate and sulfite could not act as final electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 51 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA sequences indicated that strain VA1 exhibited close relationships to species of the genus Pyrobaculum. A DNA–DNA hybridization study revealed a low level of similarity (≤ 18% between strain VA1 and previously described members of the genus Pyrobaculum. Physiological characteristics also indicated that strain VA1 was distinct from these Pyrobaculum species. Our results indicate that isolate VA1 represents a novel species, named Pyrobaculum calidifontis.

  15. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Jun; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Fujimoto, Zui; Momma, Mitsuru; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2005-11-01

    Hyperthermophilic archaeal tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein was purified by Cibacron Blue affinity chromatography following heat treatment at 363 K. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction studies were obtained under optimized crystallization conditions in the presence of 1.5 M ammonium sulfate using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.1, c = 196.2 A, and diffracted to beyond 2.15 A resolution at 100 K.

  16. Molecular recognition of histidine tRNA by histidyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatoyo, Yukari; Iwaki, Jun; Suzuki, Satoko; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the recognition sites of histidine tRNA for histidyl-tRNA synthetase from an extreme hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, we examined histidylation activities by using overexpressed histidyl-tRNA synthetase and various histidine tRNA transcripts that were prepared by in vitro transcription system. Results indicated that anticodon was not recognized by the histidyl-tRNA synthetase similar to that of Escherichia coli histidine tRNA recognition system. Discriminator base C73 was weekly recognized and an additional G residue was specifically recognized by the enzyme.

  17. Continuous Hydrogen Production from Agricultural Wastewaters at Thermophilic and Hyperthermophilic Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Lucas Rodrigues; Silva, Edson Luiz

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) (8 to 0.5 h) and temperature (55 to 75 °C) in two anaerobic fluidized bed reactors (AFBR) using cheese whey (AFBR-CW = 10,000 mg sugars L -1 ) and vinasse (AFBR-V = 10,000 mg COD L -1 ) as substrates. Decreasing the HRT to 0.5 h increased the hydrogen production rates in both reactors, with maximum values of 5.36 ± 0.81 L H 2 h -1 L -1 in AFBR-CW and 0.71 ± 0.16 L H 2 h -1 L -1 in AFBR-V. The optimal conditions for hydrogen production were the HRT of 4 h and temperature of 65 °C in AFBR-CW, observing maximum hydrogen yield (HY) of 5.51 ± 0.37 mmol H 2 g COD -1 . Still, the maximum HY in AFBR-V was 1.64 ± 0.22 mmol H 2 g COD -1 at 4 h and 55 °C. However, increasing the temperature to 75 °C reduced the hydrogen production in both reactors. Methanol and butyric, acetic, and lactic acids were the main metabolites at temperatures of 55 and 65 °C, favoring the butyric and acetic metabolic pathways of hydrogen production. The increased productions of lactate, propionate, and methanol at 75 °C indicate that the hydrogen-producing bacteria in the thermophilic inoculum were inhibited under hyperthermophilic conditions.

  18. Enzymes of the benzoyl-coenzyme A degradation pathway in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Ferroglobus placidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Georg; René, Sandra Bosch; Boll, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    The Fe(III)-respiring Ferroglobus placidus is the only known archaeon and hyperthermophile for which a complete degradation of aromatic substrates to CO2 has been reported. Recent genome and transcriptome analyses proposed a benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) degradation pathway similar to that found in the phototrophic Rhodopseudomonas palustris, which involves a cyclohex-1-ene-1-carboxyl-CoA (1-enoyl-CoA) forming, ATP-dependent key enzyme benzoyl-CoA reductase (BCR). In this work, we demonstrate, by first in vitro studies, that benzoyl-CoA is ATP-dependently reduced by two electrons to cyclohexa-1,5-dienoyl-CoA (1,5-dienoyl-CoA), which is further degraded by hydration to 6-hydroxycyclohex-1-ene-1-carboxyl-CoA (6-OH-1-enoyl-CoA); upon addition of NAD(+) , the latter was subsequently converted to β-oxidation intermediates. The four candidate genes of BCR were heterologously expressed, and the enriched, oxygen-sensitive enzyme catalysed the two-electron reduction of benzoyl-CoA to 1,5-dienoyl-CoA. A gene previously assigned to a 2,3-didehydropimeloyl-CoA hydratase was heterologously expressed and shown to act as a typical 1,5-dienoyl-CoA hydratase that does not accept 1-enoyl-CoA. A gene previously assigned to a 1-enoyl-CoA hydratase was heterologously expressed and identified to code for a bifunctional crotonase/3-OH-butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase. In summary, the results consistently provide biochemical evidence that F. placidus and probably other archaea predominantly degrade aromatics via the Thauera/Azoarcus type and not or only to a minor extent via the predicted R. palustris-type benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Growth kinetics and energetics of a deep-sea hyperthermophilic methanogen under varying environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ver Eecke, Helene C; Akerman, Nancy H; Huber, Julie A; Butterfield, David A; Holden, James F

    2013-10-01

    A hyperthermophilic deep-sea methanogen, Methanocaldococcus strain JH146, was isolated from 26°C hydrothermal fluid at Axial Volcano to model high temperature methanogenesis in the subseafloor. Emphasis was placed on defining growth kinetics, cell yields and growth energy demand (GE) across a range of conditions. The organism uses H2 and CO2 as its sole carbon and energy sources. At various temperatures, pHs, and chlorinities, its growth rates and cell yields co-varied while GE remained uniform at 1.69 × 10(-11) J cell(-1)s(-1) ± 0.68 × 10(-11) J cell(-1)s(-1) (s.d., n = 23). An exception was at superoptimal growth temperatures where GE increased to 7.25 × 10(-11) J cell(-1)s(-1) presumably due to heat shock. GE also increased from 5.1 × 10(-12) J cell(-1)s(-1) to 7.61 × 10(-11) J cell(-1)s(-1) as NH4 (+) concentrations decreased from 9.4 mM to 0.14 mM. JH146 did not fix N2 or assimilate NO3 (-), lacked the N2-fixing (cluster II) nifH gene, and became nitrogen limited below 0.14 mM NH4Cl. Nitrogen availability may impact growth in situ since ammonia concentrations at Axial Volcano are < 18 μM. Our approach contributes to refining bioenergetic and carbon flux models for methanogens and other organisms in hydrothermal vents and other environments. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Heterologous Production of an Energy-Conserving Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Complex in the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

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    Gerrit Jan Schut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100°C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80°C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally-relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms.

  1. Domain-swapping of mesophilic xylanase with hyper-thermophilic glucanase

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    Liu Liangwei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domain fusion is limited at enzyme one terminus. The issue was explored by swapping a mesophilic Aspergillus niger GH11 xylanase (Xyn with a hyper-thermophilic Thermotoga maritima glucanase (Glu to construct two chimeras, Xyn-Glu and Glu-Xyn, with an intention to create thermostable xylanase containing glucanase activity. Results When expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3, the two chimeras exhibited bi-functional activities of xylanase and glucanase. The Xyn-Glu Xyn moiety had optimal reaction temperature (Topt at 50 °C and thermal in-activation half-life (t1/2 at 50 °C for 47.6 min, compared to 47 °C and 17.6 min for the Xyn. The Glu-Xyn Xyn moiety had equivalent Topt to and shorter t1/2 (5.2 min than the Xyn. Both chimera Glu moieties were more thermostable than the Glu, and the three enzyme Topt values were higher than 96 °C. The Glu-Xyn Glu moiety optimal pH was 5.8, compared to 3.8 for the Xyn-Glu Glu moiety and the Glu. Both chimera two moieties cooperated with each other in degrading substrates. Conclusions Domain-swapping created different effects on each moiety properties. Fusing the Glu domain at C-terminus increased the xylanase thermostability, but fusing the Glu domain at N-terminus decreased the xylanase thermostability. Fusing the Xyn domain at either terminus increased the glucanase thermostability, and fusing the Xyn domain at C-terminus shifted the glucanase pH property 2 units higher towards alkaline environments. Fusing a domain at C-terminus contributes more to enzyme catalytic activity; whereas, fusing a bigger domain at N-terminus disturbs enzyme substrate binding affinity.

  2. Outside the unusual cell wall of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Gianna; Cannio, Raffaele; Fiume, Immacolata; Rossi, Mosé; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella

    2009-11-01

    In contrast to the extensively studied eukaryal and bacterial protein secretion systems, comparatively less is known about how and which proteins cross the archaeal cell membrane. To identify secreted proteins of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 we used a proteomics approach to analyze the extracellular and cell surface protein fractions. The experimentally obtained data comprising 107 proteins were compared with the in silico predicted secretome. Because of the lack of signal peptide and cellular localization prediction tools specific for archaeal species, programs trained on eukaryotic and/or Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial signal peptide data sets were used. PSortB Gram-negative and Gram-positive analysis predicted 21 (1.2% of total ORFs) and 24 (1.4% of total ORFs) secreted proteins, respectively, from the entire A. pernix K1 proteome, 12 of which were experimentally identified in this work. Six additional proteins were predicted to follow non-classical secretion mechanisms using SecP algorithms. According to at least one of the two PSortB predictions, 48 proteins identified in the two fractions possess an unknown localization site. In addition, more than half of the proteins do not contain signal peptides recognized by current prediction programs. This suggests that known mechanisms only partly describe archaeal protein secretion. The most striking characteristic of the secretome was the high number of transport-related proteins identified from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC), tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic, ATPase, small conductance mechanosensitive ion channel (MscS), and dicarboxylate amino acid-cation symporter transporter families. In particular, identification of 21 solute-binding receptors of the ABC superfamily of the 24 predicted in silico confirms that ABC-mediated transport represents the most frequent strategy adopted by A. pernix for solute translocation across the cell membrane.

  3. Purification and biochemical properties of a cytochrome bc complex from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashima, Yoshiki; Sakamoto, Junshi

    2011-03-14

    The bioenergetics of Archaea with respect to the evolution of electron transfer systems is very interesting. In contrast to terminal oxidases, a canonical bc1 complex has not yet been isolated from Archaea. In particular, c-type cytochromes have been reported only for a limited number of species. Here, we isolated a c-type cytochrome-containing enzyme complex from the membranes of the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix, grown aerobically. The redox spectrum of the isolated c-type cytochrome showed a characteristic α-band peak at 553 nm corresponding to heme C. The pyridine hemochrome spectrum also revealed the presence of heme B. In non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the cytochrome migrated as a single band with an apparent molecular mass of 80 kDa, and successive SDS-PAGE separated the 80-kDa band into 3 polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 40, 30, and 25 kDa. The results of mass spectrometry indicated that the 25-kDa band corresponded to the hypothetical cytochrome c subunit encoded by the ORF APE_1719.1. In addition, the c-type cytochrome-containing polypeptide complex exhibited menaquinone: yeast cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities. In conclusion, we showed that A. pernix, a hyperthemophilic archaeon, has a "full" bc complex that includes a c-type cytochrome, and to the best of our knowledge, A. pernix is the first archaea from which such a bc complex has been identified. However, an electron donor candidates for cytochrome c oxidase, such as a blue copper protein, have not yet been identified in the whole genome data of this archaeon. We are currently trying to identify an authentic substrate between a bc complex and terminal oxidase.

  4. Two Family B DNA Polymerases from Aeropyrum pernix, an Aerobic Hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeote

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Isaac K. O.; Ishino, Sonoko; Nomura, Norimichi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    1999-01-01

    DNA polymerase activities in fractionated cell extract of Aeropyrum pernix, a hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote, were investigated. Aphidicolin-sensitive (fraction I) and aphidicolin-resistant (fraction II) activities were detected. The activity in fraction I was more heat stable than that in fraction II. Two different genes (polA and polB) encoding family B DNA polymerases were cloned from the organism by PCR using degenerated primers based on the two conserved motifs (motif A and B). The deduced amino acid sequences from their entire coding regions contained all of the motifs identified in family B DNA polymerases for 3′→5′ exonuclease and polymerase activities. The product of polA gene (Pol I) was aphidicolin resistant and heat stable up to 80°C. In contrast, the product of polB gene (Pol II) was aphidicolin sensitive and stable at 95°C. These properties of Pol I and Pol II are similar to those of fractions II and I, respectively, and moreover, those of Pol I and Pol II of Pyrodictium occultum. The deduced amino acid sequence of A. pernix Pol I exhibited the highest identities to archaeal family B DNA polymerase homologs found only in the crenarchaeotes (group I), while Pol II exhibited identities to homologs found in both euryarchaeotes and crenarchaeotes (group II). These results provide further evidence that the subdomain Crenarchaeota has two family B DNA polymerases. Furthermore, at least two DNA polymerases work in the crenarchaeal cells, as found in euryarchaeotes, which contain one family B DNA polymerase and one heterodimeric DNA polymerase of a novel family. PMID:10498710

  5. Purification and biochemical properties of a cytochrome bc complex from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix

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    Kabashima Yoshiki

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bioenergetics of Archaea with respect to the evolution of electron transfer systems is very interesting. In contrast to terminal oxidases, a canonical bc1 complex has not yet been isolated from Archaea. In particular, c-type cytochromes have been reported only for a limited number of species. Results Here, we isolated a c-type cytochrome-containing enzyme complex from the membranes of the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix, grown aerobically. The redox spectrum of the isolated c-type cytochrome showed a characteristic α-band peak at 553 nm corresponding to heme C. The pyridine hemochrome spectrum also revealed the presence of heme B. In non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the cytochrome migrated as a single band with an apparent molecular mass of 80 kDa, and successive SDS-PAGE separated the 80-kDa band into 3 polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 40, 30, and 25 kDa. The results of mass spectrometry indicated that the 25-kDa band corresponded to the hypothetical cytochrome c subunit encoded by the ORF APE_1719.1. In addition, the c-type cytochrome-containing polypeptide complex exhibited menaquinone: yeast cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities. Conclusion In conclusion, we showed that A. pernix, a hyperthemophilic archaeon, has a "full" bc complex that includes a c-type cytochrome, and to the best of our knowledge, A. pernix is the first archaea from which such a bc complex has been identified. However, an electron donor candidates for cytochrome c oxidase, such as a blue copper protein, have not yet been identified in the whole genome data of this archaeon. We are currently trying to identify an authentic substrate between a bc complex and terminal oxidase.

  6. Characterization of a Zinc-Containing Alcohol Dehydrogenase with Stereoselectivity from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus guaymasensis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Xiangxian; Ma, Kesen

    2011-01-01

    An alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus guaymasensis was purified to homogeneity and was found to be a homotetramer with a subunit size of 40 ± 1 kDa. The gene encoding the enzyme was cloned and sequenced; this gene had 1,095 bp, corresponding to 365 amino acids, and showed high sequence homology to zinc-containing ADHs and l-threonine dehydrogenases with binding motifs of catalytic zinc and NADP+. Metal analyses revealed that this NADP+-dependent enzyme contained 0.9 ± 0.03 g-atoms of zinc per subunit. It was a primary-secondary ADH and exhibited a substrate preference for secondary alcohols and corresponding ketones. Particularly, the enzyme with unusual stereoselectivity catalyzed an anti-Prelog reduction of racemic (R/S)-acetoin to (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol and meso-2,3-butanediol. The optimal pH values for the oxidation and formation of alcohols were 10.5 and 7.5, respectively. Besides being hyperthermostable, the enzyme activity increased as the temperature was elevated up to 95°C. The enzyme was active in the presence of methanol up to 40% (vol/vol) in the assay mixture. The reduction of ketones underwent high efficiency by coupling with excess isopropanol to regenerate NADPH. The kinetic parameters of the enzyme showed that the apparent Km values and catalytic efficiency for NADPH were 40 times lower and 5 times higher than those for NADP+, respectively. The physiological roles of the enzyme were proposed to be in the formation of alcohols such as ethanol or acetoin concomitant to the NADPH oxidation. PMID:21515780

  7. An Integrative Genomic Island Affects the Adaptations of Piezophilic Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus yayanosii to High Temperature and High Hydrostatic Pressure

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    Zhen Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments are characterized by high hydrostatic pressure and sharp temperature and chemical gradients. Horizontal gene transfer is thought to play an important role in the microbial adaptation to such an extreme environment. In this study, a 21.4-kb DNA fragment was identified as a genomic island, designated PYG1, in the genomic sequence of the piezophilic hyperthermophile Pyrococcus yayanosii. According to the sequence alignment and functional annotation, the genes in PYG1 could tentatively be divided into five modules, with functions related to mobility, DNA repair, metabolic processes and the toxin-antitoxin system. Integrase can mediate the site-specific integration and excision of PYG1 in the chromosome of P. yayanosii A1. Gene replacement of PYG1 with a SimR cassette was successful. The growth of the mutant strain ∆PYG1 was compared with its parent strain P. yayanosii A2 under various stress conditions, including different pH, salinity, temperature and hydrostatic pressure. The ∆PYG1 mutant strain showed reduced growth when grown at 100 °C, while the biomass of ∆PYG1 increased significantly when cultured at 80 MPa. Differential expression of the genes in module Ⅲ of PYG1 was observed under different temperature and pressure conditions. This study demonstrates the first example of an archaeal integrative genomic island that could affect the adaptation of the hyperthermophilic piezophile P. yayanosii to high temperature and high hydrostatic pressure.

  8. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwaki, Jun [Department of Material and Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Suzuki, Ryuichiro [Department of Material and Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Research Centre for Glycoscience, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Fujimoto, Zui, E-mail: zui@affrc.go.jp; Momma, Mitsuru [Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Kuno, Atsushi [Department of Material and Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Research Centre for Glycoscience, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Hasegawa, Tsunemi [Department of Material and Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan)

    2005-11-01

    Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon A. pernix K1 was cloned, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.1, c = 196.2 Å, and diffracted to beyond 2.15 Å resolution at 100 K. Hyperthermophilic archaeal tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein was purified by Cibacron Blue affinity chromatography following heat treatment at 363 K. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction studies were obtained under optimized crystallization conditions in the presence of 1.5 M ammonium sulfate using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.1, c = 196.2 Å, and diffracted to beyond 2.15 Å resolution at 100 K.

  9. Cloning, expression, and characterization of the first archaeal ATP-dependent glucokinase from aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Mitani, Yuri; Goda, Shuichiro; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2003-02-01

    The gene encoding the ATP-dependent glucokinase of hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was identified, cloned, and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 40% identity to that of the putative glucokinase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobacurum aerophilum. The purified recombinant enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 35 kDa. The enzyme retained its full activity on heating at 70 degrees C for 10 min and retained 65% of the activity after 10-min incubation at 100 degrees C. The enzyme exclusively catalyzed the phosphorylation of D-glucose using ATP as a phosphoryl donor. ITP was accepted in addition to ATP. The rate dependence with both glucose and ATP followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with apparent K(m) values of 0.054 and 0.50 mM, respectively. The enzyme activity required divalent cations; Mg(2+), which was most effective, could partially be replaced by Mn(2+) or Ca(2+). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the glucokinase from A. pernix does not belong to the clusters of enzymes found in bacteria and eukarya. This is the first description of the characteristics of an ATP-dependent glucokinase from an archaeon.

  10. Thermal stability and unfolding pathways of hyperthermophilic and mesophilic periplasmic binding proteins studied by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Li, Xue; Wang, Ruige; Fang, Fengqin; Yang, Wanli; Kan, Wei

    2016-07-01

    The ribose binding protein (RBP), a sugar-binding periplasmic protein, is involved in the transport and signaling processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although several cellular and structural studies have been reported, a description of the thermostability of RBP at the molecular level remains elusive. Focused on the hyperthermophilic Thermoytoga maritima RBP (tmRBP) and mesophilic Escherichia coli homolog (ecRBP), we applied molecular dynamics simulations at four different temperatures (300, 380, 450, and 500 K) to obtain a deeper insight into the structural features responsible for the reduced thermostability of the ecRBP. The simulations results indicate that there are distinct structural differences in the unfolding pathway between the two homologs and the ecRBP unfolds faster than the hyperthermophilic homologs at certain temperatures in accordance with the lower thermal stability found experimentally. Essential dynamics analysis uncovers that the essential subspaces of ecRBP and tmRBP are non-overlapping and these two proteins show different directions of motion within the simulations trajectories. Such an understanding is required for designing efficient proteins with characteristics for a particular application.

  11. A three-dimensional model of RNase P in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuzhu; Oshima, Kosuke; Ueda, Toshifumi; Nakashima, Takashi; Kimura, Makoto

    2017-11-18

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is an endoribonuclease involved in maturation of the 5'-end of tRNA. We found previously that RNase P in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 consists of a catalytic RNase P RNA (PhopRNA) and five protein cofactors designated PhoPop5, PhoRpp21, PhoRpp29, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp38. The crystal structures of the five proteins have been determined, a three-dimensional (3-D) model of PhopRNA has been constructed, and biochemical data, including protein-RNA interaction sites, have become available. Here, this information was combined to orient the crystallographic structures of the proteins relative to their RNA binding sites in the PhopRNA model. Some alterations were made to the PhopRNA model to improve the fit. In the resulting structure, a heterotetramer composed of PhoPop5 and PhoRpp30 bridges helices P3 and P16 in the PhopRNA C-domain, thereby probably stabilizing a double-stranded RNA structure (helix P4) containing catalytic Mg(2+) ions, while a heterodimer of PhoRpp21 and PhoRpp29 locates on a single-stranded loop connecting helices P11 and P12 in the specificity domain (S-domain) in PhopRNA, probably forming an appropriate conformation of the precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA) binding site. The fifth protein PhoRpp38 binds each kink-turn (K-turn) motif in helices P12.1, P12.2, and P16 in PhopRNA. Comparison of the structure of the resulting 3-D model with that of bacterial RNase P suggests transition from RNA-RNA interactions in bacterial RNase P to protein-RNA interactions in archaeal RNase P. The proposed 3-D model of P. horikoshii RNase P will serve as a framework for further structural and functional studies on archaeal, as well as eukaryotic, RNase Ps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of thioredoxin peroxidase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kai, Yasushi; Uegaki, Koichi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Ataka, Mitsuo; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2005-03-01

    Thioredoxin peroxidase is a member of the peroxiredoxin family and plays a dominant role in a hydrogen peroxide metabolism. A recombinant form of the hyperthermostable thioredoxin peroxidase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1, a polypeptide consisting of 250 amino acids, was purified. The C207S mutant protein was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using potassium sodium tartrate as the precipitant at 298 K. Diffraction data were collected and processed to 2.7 A resolution. The crystal belongs to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 126.2, b = 126.3, c = 213.7 A, alpha = 80.4, beta = 80.3, gamma = 70.7 degrees. Calculation of the self-rotation function showed that the protein quaternary structure includes a fivefold axis and five twofold axes.

  13. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of a catalytic domain of hyperthermophilic chitinase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mine, Shouhei; Nakamura, Tsutomu [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Hirata, Kunio [RIKEN/SPring-8, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Uegaki, Koichi, E-mail: k-uegaki@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan)

    2006-08-01

    The expression, purification and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a catalytic domain of a chitinase from P. furiosus is reported. The crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a catalytic domain of chitinase (PF1233 gene) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is reported. The recombinant protein, prepared using an Escherichia coli expression system, was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected at the undulator beamline BL44XU at SPring-8 to a resolution of 1.50 Å. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 90.0, b = 92.8, c = 107.2 Å.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a chitin-binding domain of hyperthermophilic chitinase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Oku, Takashi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Nakagawa, Atsushi [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Inoue, Tsuyoshi [Department of Materials Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ataka, Mitsuo; Uegaki, Koichi, E-mail: k-uegaki@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan)

    2005-05-01

    The expression, purification and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a chitin-binding domain of the chitinase from P. furiosus are reported. The crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the chitin-binding domain of chitinase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, are reported. The recombinant protein was prepared using an Escherichia coli overexpression system and was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 1.70 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The unit-cell parameters were determined to be a = b = 48.8, c = 85.0 Å.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of an active-site mutant of pro-Tk-subtilisin from a hyperthermophilic archaeon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Saito, Kenji; Chon, Hyongi [Department of Material and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Matsumura, Hiroyoshi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); CREST (Sosho Project), JST, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Koga, Yuichi [Department of Material and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Takano, Kazufumi [Department of Material and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); CREST (Sosho Project), JST, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kanaya, Shigenori, E-mail: kanaya@mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Material and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2006-09-01

    Crystallization of and preliminary crystallographic studies on an active-site mutant of pro-Tk-subtilisin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon T. kodakaraensis were performed. Crystallization of and preliminary crystallographic studies on an active-site mutant of pro-Tk-subtilisin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis were performed. The crystal was grown at 277 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Native X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation from station BL41XU at SPring-8. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 92.69, b = 121.78, c = 77.53 Å. Assuming the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, the Matthews coefficient V{sub M} was calculated to be 2.6 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and the solvent content was 53.1%.

  16. TM0416, a Hyperthermophilic Promiscuous Nonphosphorylated Sugar Isomerase, Catalyzes Various C5 and C6 Epimerization Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sun-Mi; Cao, Thinh-Phat; Choi, Jin Myung; Kim, Seong-Bo; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Sung Haeng; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2017-05-15

    There is currently little information on nonphosphorylated sugar epimerases, which are of potential interest for producing rare sugars. We found a gene (the TM0416 gene) encoding a putative d-tagatose-3-epimerase-related protein from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima We overexpressed the TM0416 gene in Escherichia coli and purified the resulting recombinant protein for detailed characterization. Amino acid sequence alignment and a structural similarity search revealed that TM0416 is a putative nonphosphorylated sugar epimerase. The recombinant enzyme exhibited maximal C-3 epimerization of l-ribulose to l-xylulose at ∼80°C and pH 7 in the presence of 1 mM Mn2+ In addition, this enzyme showed unusually high activity for the epimerization of d-tagatose to d-sorbose, with a conversion yield of 20% after 6 h at 80°C. Remarkably, the enzyme catalyzed the isomerization of d-erythrose or d-threose to d-erythrulose significantly, with conversion yields of 71% and 54.5%, respectively, after 6 h at 80°C at pH 7. To further investigate the substrate specificity of TM0416, we determined its crystal structures in complex with divalent metal ions and l-erythrulose at resolutions of 1.5 and 1.6 Å. Detailed inspection of the structural features and biochemical data clearly demonstrated that this metalloenzyme, with a freely accessible substrate-binding site and neighboring hydrophobic residues, exhibits different and promiscuous substrate preferences, compared with its mesophilic counterparts. Therefore, this study suggests that TM0416 can be functionally classified as a novel type of l-ribulose 3-epimerase (R3E) with d-erythrose isomerase activity.IMPORTANCE Rare sugars, which occur naturally in small amounts, have attracted considerable attention in the food and drug industries. However, there is little information on nonphosphorylated sugar epimerases, which might potentially be applied for the production of rare sugars. This study describes the

  17. Hyperthermophile Protein Behavior: Partially-Structured Conformations of Pyrococcus furiosus Rubredoxin Monomers Generated through Forced Cold-Denaturation and Refolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shubbir; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2014-01-01

    Some years ago, we showed that thermo-chemically denatured, partially-unfolded forms of Pyrococcus furiosus triosephosphateisomerase (PfuTIM) display cold-denaturation upon cooling, and heat-renaturation upon reheating, in proportion with the extent of initial partial unfolding achieved. This was the first time that cold-denaturation was demonstrated for a hyperthermophile protein, following unlocking of surface salt bridges. Here, we describe the behavior of another hyperthermophile protein, the small, monomeric, 53 residues-long rubredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus (PfRd), which is one of the most thermostable proteins known to man. Like PfuTIM, PfRd too displays cold-denaturation after initial thermo-chemical perturbation, however, with two differences: (i) PfRd requires considerably higher temperatures as well as higher concentrations of guanidium hydrochloride (Gdm.HCl) than PfuTIM; (ii) PfRd's cold-denaturation behavior during cooling after thermo-chemical perturbation is incompletely reversible, unlike PfuTIM's, which was clearly reversible (from each different conformation generated). Differential cold-denaturation treatments allow PfRd to access multiple partially-unfolded states, each of which is clearly highly kinetically-stable. We refer to these as ‘Trishanku’ unfolding intermediates (or TUIs). Fascinatingly, refolding of TUIs through removal of Gdm.HCl generates multiple partially-refolded, monomeric, kinetically-trapped, non-native ‘Trishanku’ refolding intermediates (or TRIs), which differ from each other and from native PfRd and TUIs, in structural content and susceptibility to proteolysis. We find that the occurrence of cold denaturation and observations of TUI and TRI states is contingent on the oxidation status of iron, with redox agents managing to modulate the molecule's behavior upon gaining access to PfRd's iron atom. Mass spectrometric examination provides no evidence of the formation of disulfide bonds, but other experiments suggest

  18. Hyperthermophile protein behavior: partially-structured conformations of Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin monomers generated through forced cold-denaturation and refolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrayan, Sanjeev Kumar; Prakash, Satya; Ahmed, Shubbir; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2014-01-01

    Some years ago, we showed that thermo-chemically denatured, partially-unfolded forms of Pyrococcus furiosus triosephosphateisomerase (PfuTIM) display cold-denaturation upon cooling, and heat-renaturation upon reheating, in proportion with the extent of initial partial unfolding achieved. This was the first time that cold-denaturation was demonstrated for a hyperthermophile protein, following unlocking of surface salt bridges. Here, we describe the behavior of another hyperthermophile protein, the small, monomeric, 53 residues-long rubredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus (PfRd), which is one of the most thermostable proteins known to man. Like PfuTIM, PfRd too displays cold-denaturation after initial thermo-chemical perturbation, however, with two differences: (i) PfRd requires considerably higher temperatures as well as higher concentrations of guanidium hydrochloride (Gdm.HCl) than PfuTIM; (ii) PfRd's cold-denaturation behavior during cooling after thermo-chemical perturbation is incompletely reversible, unlike PfuTIM's, which was clearly reversible (from each different conformation generated). Differential cold-denaturation treatments allow PfRd to access multiple partially-unfolded states, each of which is clearly highly kinetically-stable. We refer to these as 'Trishanku' unfolding intermediates (or TUIs). Fascinatingly, refolding of TUIs through removal of Gdm.HCl generates multiple partially-refolded, monomeric, kinetically-trapped, non-native 'Trishanku' refolding intermediates (or TRIs), which differ from each other and from native PfRd and TUIs, in structural content and susceptibility to proteolysis. We find that the occurrence of cold denaturation and observations of TUI and TRI states is contingent on the oxidation status of iron, with redox agents managing to modulate the molecule's behavior upon gaining access to PfRd's iron atom. Mass spectrometric examination provides no evidence of the formation of disulfide bonds, but other experiments suggest that

  19. Hyperthermophile protein behavior: partially-structured conformations of Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin monomers generated through forced cold-denaturation and refolding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar Chandrayan

    Full Text Available Some years ago, we showed that thermo-chemically denatured, partially-unfolded forms of Pyrococcus furiosus triosephosphateisomerase (PfuTIM display cold-denaturation upon cooling, and heat-renaturation upon reheating, in proportion with the extent of initial partial unfolding achieved. This was the first time that cold-denaturation was demonstrated for a hyperthermophile protein, following unlocking of surface salt bridges. Here, we describe the behavior of another hyperthermophile protein, the small, monomeric, 53 residues-long rubredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus (PfRd, which is one of the most thermostable proteins known to man. Like PfuTIM, PfRd too displays cold-denaturation after initial thermo-chemical perturbation, however, with two differences: (i PfRd requires considerably higher temperatures as well as higher concentrations of guanidium hydrochloride (Gdm.HCl than PfuTIM; (ii PfRd's cold-denaturation behavior during cooling after thermo-chemical perturbation is incompletely reversible, unlike PfuTIM's, which was clearly reversible (from each different conformation generated. Differential cold-denaturation treatments allow PfRd to access multiple partially-unfolded states, each of which is clearly highly kinetically-stable. We refer to these as 'Trishanku' unfolding intermediates (or TUIs. Fascinatingly, refolding of TUIs through removal of Gdm.HCl generates multiple partially-refolded, monomeric, kinetically-trapped, non-native 'Trishanku' refolding intermediates (or TRIs, which differ from each other and from native PfRd and TUIs, in structural content and susceptibility to proteolysis. We find that the occurrence of cold denaturation and observations of TUI and TRI states is contingent on the oxidation status of iron, with redox agents managing to modulate the molecule's behavior upon gaining access to PfRd's iron atom. Mass spectrometric examination provides no evidence of the formation of disulfide bonds, but other experiments

  20. Isolation and characterization of the first xylanolytic hyperthermophilic euryarchaeon Thermococcus sp. strain 2319x1 and its unusual multidomain glycosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N Gavrilov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes from (hyperthermophiles Thermozymes offer a great potential for biotechnological applications. Thermophilic adaptation does not only provide stability towards high temperature but is also often accompanied by a higher resistance to other harsh physicochemical conditions, which are also frequently employed in industrial processes, such as the presence of e.g. denaturing agents as well as low or high pH of the medium. In order to find new thermostable, xylan degrading hydrolases with potential for biotechnological application we used an in situ enrichment strategy incubating Hungate tubes with xylan as the energy substrate in a hot vent located in the tidal zone of Kunashir Island (Kuril archipelago. Using this approach a hyperthermophilic euryarchaeon, designated Thermococcus sp. strain 2319x1, growing on xylan as sole energy and carbon source was isolated. The organism grows optimally at 85°C and pH 7.0 on a variety of natural polysaccharides including xylan, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC, amorphous cellulose (AMC, xyloglucan, and chitin. The protein fraction extracted from the cells surface with Twin 80 exhibited endoxylanase, endoglucanase and xyloglucanase activities. The genome of Thermococcus sp. strain 2319x1 was sequenced and assembled into one circular chromosome. Within the newly sequenced genome, a gene, encoding a novel type of glycosidase (143 kDa with a unique five-domain structure, was identified. It consists of three glycoside hydrolase (GH domains and two carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM with the domain order GH5-12-12-CBM2-2 (N- to C-terminal direction. The full length protein, as well as truncated versions, were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and their activity was analyzed. The full length multidomain glycosidase (MDG was able to hydrolyze various polysaccharides, with the highest activity for barley β-glucan (β-1,3/1,4-glucoside, followed by that for carboxymethyl cellulose (β-1,4-glucoside

  1. Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis sp. nov., a hyperthermophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D; Gibson, Robert A; Green, Stefan J; Hopmans, Ellen C; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T J; Shields, John P; Damsté, Jaap S S; Elkins, James G

    2013-03-01

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium designated OPF15(T) was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The phylogeny of 16S rRNA and functional genes (dsrAB) placed the organism within the family Thermodesulfobacteriaceae. The organism displayed hyperthermophilic temperature requirements for growth with a range of 70-90 °C and an optimum of 83 °C. Optimal pH was around 6.5-7.0 and the organism required the presence of H2 or formate as an electron donor and CO2 as a carbon source. Electron acceptors supporting growth included sulfate, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur. Lactate, acetate, pyruvate, benzoate, oleic acid, and ethanol did not serve as electron donors. Membrane lipid analysis revealed diacyl glycerols and acyl/ether glycerols which ranged from C14:0 to C20:0. Alkyl chains present in acyl/ether and diether glycerol lipids ranged from C16:0 to C18:0. Straight, iso- and anteiso-configurations were found for all lipid types. The presence of OPF15(T) was also shown to increase cellulose consumption during co-cultivation with Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis, a fermentative, cellulolytic extreme thermophile isolated from the same environment. On the basis of phylogenetic, phenotypic, and structural analyses, Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis sp. nov. is proposed as a new species with OPF15(T) representing the type strain.

  2. Improving the catalytic activity of hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus prolidases for detoxification of organophosphorus nerve agents over a broad range of temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Casey M; Du, Xuelian; Tove, Sherry R; Grunden, Amy M

    2010-08-01

    Prolidase isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has potential for application for decontamination of organophosphorus compounds in certain pesticides and chemical warfare agents under harsh conditions. However, current applications that use an enzyme-based cocktail are limited by poor long-term enzyme stability and low reactivity over a broad range of temperatures. To obtain a better enzyme for OP nerve agent decontamination and to investigate structural factors that influence protein thermostability and thermoactivity, randomly mutated P. furiosus prolidases were prepared by using XL1-red-based mutagenesis and error-prone PCR. An Escherichia coli strain JD1 (lambdaDE3) (auxotrophic for proline [DeltaproA] and having deletions in pepQ and pepP dipeptidases with specificity for proline-containing dipeptides) was constructed for screening mutant P. furiosus prolidase expression plasmids. JD1 (lambdaDE3) cells were transformed with mutated prolidase expression plasmids and plated on minimal media supplemented with 50 muM Leu-Pro as the only source of proline. By using this positive selection, Pyrococcus prolidase mutants with improved activity over a broader range of temperatures were isolated. The activities of the mutants over a broad temperature range were measured for both Xaa-Pro dipeptides and OP nerve agents, and the thermoactivity and thermostability of the mutants were determined.

  3. Enhanced activity and enantioselectivity of a hyperthermophilic esterase from archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 by acetone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Fangdi; Xing, Kezhi; Gao, Renjun; Cao, Shugui; Zhang, Guirong

    2011-10-01

    To improve the activity and enantioselectivity of hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 esterase (APE1547) and its mutants, they were purified by acetone-treated method. It was found that the acetone treatment not only caused APE1547 and its mutants to display higher activity and enantioselectivity but also saved more than 90% of time spent in purifying them by Ni-chelating column. In hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl caprylate, the acetone-treated APE1547 and mutant A containing the following substitutions R11G, L36P, V225A, I551L, and A564T showed 5.7- and 6.9-fold active increase, respectively. In the resolution of 2-octanol acetate, the acetone-treated mutant A had a 9-fold enantioselective increase relative to that purified by Ni-chelating column. In addition, the impact of pH, temperature, and chemical reagents on activity of APE1547 and mutant A was discussed in this paper.

  4. Provirus induction in hyperthermophilic archaea: characterization of Aeropyrum pernix spindle-shaped virus 1 and Aeropyrum pernix ovoid virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Sako, Yoshihiko; Prangishvili, David

    2011-10-01

    By in silico analysis, we have identified two putative proviruses in the genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, and under special conditions of A. pernix growth, we were able to induce their replication. Both viruses were isolated and characterized. Negatively stained virions of one virus appeared as pleomorphic spindle-shaped particles, 180 to 210 nm by 40 to 55 nm, with tails of heterogeneous lengths in the range of 0 to 300 nm. This virus was named Aeropyrum pernix spindle-shaped virus 1 (APSV1). Negatively stained virions of the other virus appeared as slightly irregular oval particles with one pointed end, while in cryo-electron micrographs, the virions had a regular oval shape and uniform size (70 by 55 nm). The virus was named Aeropyrum pernix ovoid virus 1 (APOV1). Both viruses have circular, double-stranded DNA genomes of 38,049 bp for APSV1 and 13,769 bp for APOV1. Similarities to proteins of other archaeal viruses were limited to the integrase and Dna1-like protein. We propose to classify APOV1 into the family Guttaviridae.

  5. Temperature- and pH-induced structural changes in the membrane of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrih, Natasa Poklar; Adamlje, Urska; Nemec, Marjanca; Sentjurc, Marjeta

    2007-10-01

    The influence of pH and temperature on the structural organization, fluidity and permeability of the hyperthermophilic archaeon membrane was investigated in situ by a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and fluorescence emission spectroscopy. For EPR measurements, Aeropyrum pernix cells, after growing at different pHs, were spin-labeled with the doxyl derivative of palmitic acid methylester (MeFASL(10,3)). From the EPR spectra maximal hyperfine splitting (2A (max)) and empirical correlation time (tau (emp)), which are related to mean membrane fluidity, were determined. The mean membrane fluidity increases with temperature and depends on the pH of the growth medium. Computer simulation of the EPR spectra shows that membrane of A. pernix is heterogeneous and consists of the regions characterized with three different types of motional characteristics, which define three types of membrane domains. Order parameter and proportion of the spin probes in the three types of domains define mean membrane fluidity. The fluidity changes of the membrane with pH and temperature correlate well with the ratio between the fluorescence emission intensity of the first and third bands in the vibronic spectra of pyrene, I(1)/I(3). At pH 7.0 a decrease of I(1)/I(3) from 2.0 to 1.2, due to the penetration of pyrene into the nonpolar membrane region, is achieved at temperatures above 65 degrees C, the lower temperature limit of A. pernix growth.

  6. Cooperativity of alpha- and beta-subunits of group II chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeum Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Jin-Woo; Shin, Eun-Jung; Nam, Soo-Wan

    2011-02-01

    alpha- and beta-subunits (ApCpnA and ApCpnB) are group II chaperonins from the hyperthermophilic archaeum Aeropyrum pernix K1, specialized in preventing the aggregation and inactivation of substrate proteins under conditions of transient heat stress. In the present study, the cooperativity of alpha- and beta-subunits from the A. pernix K1 was investigated. The ApCpnA and ApCpnB chaperonin genes were overexpressed in E. coli Rosetta and Codonplus (DE3), respectively. Each of the recombinant alpha- and beta- subunits was purified to 92% and 94% by using anionexchange chromatography. The cooperative activity between purified alpha- and beta-subunits was examined using citrate synthase (CS), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) as substrate proteins. The addition of both alpha- and beta-subunits could effectively protect CS and ADH from thermal aggregation and inactivation at 43 degreesC and 50 degreesC, respectively, and MDH from thermal inactivation at 80 degreesC and 85 degreesC. Moreover, in the presence of ATP, the protective effects of alpha- and beta-subunits on CS from thermal aggregation and inactivation, and ADH from thermal aggregation, were more enhanced, whereas cooperation between chaperonins and ATP in protection activity on ADH and MDH (at 85 degreesC) from thermal inactivation was not observed. Specifically, the presence of both alpha- and beta- subunits could effectively protect MDH from thermal inactivation at 80 degreesC in an ATP-dependent manner.

  7. Discrimination of esterase and peptidase activities of acylaminoacyl peptidase from hyperthermophilic Aeropyrum pernix K1 by a single mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuyan; Yang, Guangyu; Liu, Yanli; Feng, Yan

    2006-07-07

    It has been shown that highly conserved residues that form crucial structural elements of the catalytic apparatus may be used to account for the evolutionary history of enzymes. Using saturation mutagenesis, we investigated the role of a conserved residue (Arg(526)) at the active site of acylaminoacyl peptidase from hyperthermophilic Aeropyrum pernix K1 in substrate discrimination and catalytic mechanism. This enzyme has both peptidase and esterase activities. The esterase activity of the wild-type enzyme with p-nitrophenyl caprylate as substrate is approximately 7 times higher than the peptidase activity with Ac-Leu-p-nitroanilide as substrate. However, with the same substrates, this difference was increased to approximately 150-fold for mutant R526V. A more dramatic effect occurred with mutant R526E, which essentially completely abolished the peptidase activity but decreased the esterase activity only by a factor of 2, leading to a 785-fold difference in the enzyme activities. These results provide rare examples that illustrate how enzymes can be evolved to discriminate their substrates by a single mutation. The possible structural and energetic effects of the mutations on k(cat) and K(m) of the enzyme were discussed based on molecular dynamics simulation studies.

  8. Oxidative stress protection and the repair response to hydrogen peroxide in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus and in related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Kari R; Sun, Chengjun; Li, Ting; Jenney, Francis E; Schut, Gerrit J; Adams, Michael W W

    2010-06-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus is a shallow marine, anaerobic archaeon that grows optimally at 100 degrees C. Addition of H(2)O(2) (0.5 mM) to a growing culture resulted in the cessation of growth with a 2-h lag before normal growth resumed. Whole genome transcriptional profiling revealed that the main response occurs within 30 min of peroxide addition, with the up-regulation of 62 open reading frames (ORFs), 36 of which are part of 10 potential operons. More than half of the up-regulated ORFs are of unknown function, while some others encode proteins that are involved potentially in sequestering iron and sulfide, in DNA repair and in generating NADPH. This response is thought to involve primarily damage repair rather than protection, since cultures exposed to sub-toxic levels of H(2)O(2) were not more resistant to the subsequent addition of H(2)O(2) (0.5-5.0 mM). Consequently, there is little if any induced protective response to peroxide. The organism maintains a constitutive protective mechanism involving high levels of oxidoreductase-type enzymes such as superoxide reductase, rubrerythrin, and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase. Related hyperthermophiles contain homologs of the proteins involved in the constitutive protective mechanism but these organisms were more sensitive to peroxide than P. furiosus and lack several of its peroxide-responsive ORFs.

  9. Influence of C-terminal tail deletion on structure and stability of hyperthermophile Sulfolobus tokodaii RNase HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Ji-Long; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Chu, Wen-Ting; Xue, Qiao; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2013-06-01

    The C-terminus tail (G144-T149) of the hyperthermophile Sulfolobus tokodaii (Sto-RNase HI) plays an important role in this protein's hyperstabilization and may therefore be a good protein stability tag. Detailed understanding of the structural and dynamic effects of C-terminus tail deletion is required for gaining insights into the thermal stability mechanism of Sto-RNase HI. Focused on Sulfolobus tokodaii RNase HI (Sto-RNase HI) and its derivative lacking the C-terminal tail (ΔC6 Sto-RNase HI) (PDB codes: 2EHG and 3ALY), we applied molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at four different temperatures (300, 375, 475, and 500 K) to examine the effect of the C-terminal tail on the hyperstabilization of Sto-RNase HI and to investigate the unfolding process of Sto-RNase HI and ΔC6 Sto-RNase HI. The simulations suggest that the C-terminal tail has significant impact in hyperstabilization of Sto-RNase HI and the unfolding of these two proteins evolves along dissimilar pathways. Essential dynamics analysis indicates that the essential subspaces of the two proteins at different temperatures are non-overlapping within the trajectories and they exhibit different directions of motion. Our work can give important information to understand the three-state folding mechanism of Sto-RNase HI and to offer alternative strategies to improve the protein stability.

  10. Heterologous production and functional and thermodynamic characterization of cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) transporters of mesophilic and hyperthermophilic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Devrishi; Kaur, Jagdeep; Surade, Sachin; Grell, Ernst; Michel, Hartmut

    2012-07-01

    The members of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family transport heavy metal ions and play an important function in zinc ion homeostasis of the cell. A recent structure of an Escherichia coli CDF transporter protein YiiP has revealed its dimeric nature and autoregulatory zinc transport mechanism. Here, we report the cloning and heterologous production of four different CDF transporters, two each from the pathogenic mesophilic bacterium Salmonella typhimurium and from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus, in E. coli host cells. STM0758 of S. typhimurium was able to restore resistance to zinc ions when tested by complementation assays in the zinc-sensitive GG48 strain. Furthermore, copurification of bicistronically produced STM0758 and cross-linking experiments with the purified protein have revealed its possible oligomeric nature. The interaction between heavy metal ions and Aq_2073 of A. aeolicus was investigated by titration calorimetry. The entropy-driven, high-affinity binding of two Cd2+ and two Zn2+ per protein monomer with Kd values of around 100 nm and 1 μm, respectively, was observed. In addition, at least one more Zn2+ can be bound per monomer with low affinity. This low-affinity site is likely to possess a functional role contributing to Zn2+ transport across membranes.

  11. Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis sp. nov., a hyperthermophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D.; Gibson, Robert A.; Green, Stefan J.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Shields, John P.; Damsté, Jaap S. S.; Elkins, James G.

    2013-01-24

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium designated OPF15T was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The phylogeny of 16S rRNA and functional genes (dsrAB) placed the organism within the family Thermodesulfobacteriaceae. The organism displayed hyperthermophilic temperature requirements for growth with a range of 70 90 C and an optimum of 83 C. Optimal pH was around 6.5 7.0 and the organism required the presence of H2 or formate as an electron donor and CO2 as a carbon source. Electron acceptors supporting growth included sulfate, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur. Lactate, acetate, pyruvate, benzoate, oleic acid, and ethanol did not serve as electron donors. Membrane lipid analysis revealed diacyl glycerols and acyl/ether glycerols which ranged from C14:0 to C20:0. Alkyl chains present in acyl/ether and diether glycerol lipids ranged from C16:0 to C18:0. Straight, iso- and anteiso-configurations were found for all lipid types. The presence of OPF15T was also shown to increase cellulose consumption during co-cultivation with Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis, a fermentative, cellulolytic extreme thermophile isolated from the same environment. On the basis of phylogenetic, phenotypic, and structural analyses, Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis sp. nov. is proposed as a new species with OPF15T representing the type strain.

  12. Unusual Starch Degradation Pathway via Cyclodextrins in the Hyperthermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus Strain 7324▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labes, Antje; Schönheit, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain 7324 has been shown to grow on starch and sulfate and thus represents the first sulfate reducer able to degrade polymeric sugars. The enzymes involved in starch degradation to glucose 6-phosphate were studied. In extracts of starch-grown cells the activities of the classical starch degradation enzymes, α-amylase and amylopullulanase, could not be detected. Instead, evidence is presented here that A. fulgidus utilizes an unusual pathway of starch degradation involving cyclodextrins as intermediates. The pathway comprises the combined action of an extracellular cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase) converting starch to cyclodextrins and the intracellular conversion of cyclodextrins to glucose 6-phosphate via cyclodextrinase (CDase), maltodextrin phosphorylase (Mal-P), and phosphoglucomutase (PGM). These enzymes, which are all induced after growth on starch, were characterized. CGTase catalyzed the conversion of starch to mainly β-cyclodextrin. The gene encoding CGTase was cloned and sequenced and showed highest similarity to a glucanotransferase from Thermococcus litoralis. After transport of the cyclodextrins into the cell by a transport system to be defined, these molecules are linearized via a CDase, catalyzing exclusively the ring opening of the cyclodextrins to the respective maltooligodextrins. These are degraded by a Mal-P to glucose 1-phosphate. Finally, PGM catalyzes the conversion of glucose 1-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate, which is further degraded to pyruvate via the modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway. PMID:17921308

  13. Biochemical, transcriptional and translational evidences of the phenol-meta-degradation pathway by the hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus solfataricus 98/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comte, Alexia; Christen, Pierre; Davidson, Sylvain; Pophillat, Matthieu; Lorquin, Jean; Auria, Richard; Simon, Gwenola; Casalot, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Phenol is a widespread pollutant and a model molecule to study the biodegradation of monoaromatic compounds. After a first oxidation step leading to catechol in mesophilic and thermophilic microorganisms, two main routes have been identified depending on the cleavage of the aromatic ring: ortho involving a catechol 1,2 dioxygenase (C12D) and meta involving a catechol 2,3 dioxygenase (C23D). Our work aimed at elucidating the phenol-degradation pathway in the hyperthermophilic archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus 98/2. For this purpose, the strain was cultivated in a fermentor under different substrate and oxygenation conditions. Indeed, reducing dissolved-oxygen concentration allowed slowing down phenol catabolism (specific growth and phenol-consumption rates dropped 55% and 39%, respectively) and thus, evidencing intermediate accumulations in the broth. HPLC/Diode Array Detector and LC-MS analyses on culture samples at low dissolved-oxygen concentration (DOC  =  0.06 mg x L(-1)) suggested, apart for catechol, the presence of 2-hydroxymuconic acid, 4-oxalocrotonate and 4-hydroxy-2-oxovalerate, three intermediates of the meta route. RT-PCR analysis on oxygenase-coding genes of S. solfataricus 98/2 showed that the gene coding for the C23D was expressed only on phenol. In 2D-DIGE/MALDI-TOF analysis, the C23D was found and identified only on phenol. This set of results allowed us concluding that S. solfataricus 98/2 degrade phenol through the meta route.

  14. Biochemical, transcriptional and translational evidences of the phenol-meta-degradation pathway by the hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus solfataricus 98/2.

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    Alexia Comte

    Full Text Available Phenol is a widespread pollutant and a model molecule to study the biodegradation of monoaromatic compounds. After a first oxidation step leading to catechol in mesophilic and thermophilic microorganisms, two main routes have been identified depending on the cleavage of the aromatic ring: ortho involving a catechol 1,2 dioxygenase (C12D and meta involving a catechol 2,3 dioxygenase (C23D. Our work aimed at elucidating the phenol-degradation pathway in the hyperthermophilic archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus 98/2. For this purpose, the strain was cultivated in a fermentor under different substrate and oxygenation conditions. Indeed, reducing dissolved-oxygen concentration allowed slowing down phenol catabolism (specific growth and phenol-consumption rates dropped 55% and 39%, respectively and thus, evidencing intermediate accumulations in the broth. HPLC/Diode Array Detector and LC-MS analyses on culture samples at low dissolved-oxygen concentration (DOC  =  0.06 mg x L(-1 suggested, apart for catechol, the presence of 2-hydroxymuconic acid, 4-oxalocrotonate and 4-hydroxy-2-oxovalerate, three intermediates of the meta route. RT-PCR analysis on oxygenase-coding genes of S. solfataricus 98/2 showed that the gene coding for the C23D was expressed only on phenol. In 2D-DIGE/MALDI-TOF analysis, the C23D was found and identified only on phenol. This set of results allowed us concluding that S. solfataricus 98/2 degrade phenol through the meta route.

  15. Identification of a novel amino acid racemase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT-3 induced by D-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ryushi; Ohmori, Taketo; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-08-01

    To date, there have been few reports analyzing the amino acid requirement for growth of hyperthermophilic archaea. We here found that the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT-3 requires Thr, Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, Trp, His and Arg in the medium for growth, and shows slow growth in medium lacking Met or Ile. This largely corresponds to the presence, or absence, of genes related to amino acid biosynthesis in its genome, though there are exceptions. The amino acid requirements were dramatically lost by addition of D-isomers of Met, Leu, Val, allo-Ile, Phe, Tyr, Trp and Arg. Tracer analysis using (14)C-labeled D-Trp showed that D-Trp in the medium was used as a protein component in the cells, suggesting the presence of D-amino acid metabolic enzymes. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent racemase activity toward Met, Leu and Phe was detected in crude extract of P. horikoshii and was enhanced in cells grown in the medium supplemented with D-amino acids, especially D-allo-Ile. The gene encoding the racemase was narrowed down to one open reading frame on the basis of enzyme purification from P. horikoshii cells, and the recombinant enzyme exhibited PLP-dependent racemase activity toward several amino acids, including Met, Leu and Phe, but not Pro, Asp or Glu. This is the first report showing the presence in a hyperthermophilic archaeon of a PLP-dependent amino acid racemase with broad substrate specificity that is likely responsible for utilization of D-amino acids for growth.

  16. Determination of tryptophan tRNA recognition sites for tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Umehara, Takuya; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the recognition mechanism of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from extreme hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, tryptophanylation activities were examined by using mutant tryptophan tRNA transcripts prepared by in vitro transcription system. Their transcripts were aminoacylated with tryptophan by overexpressed A. pernix tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase. The results indicated that anticodon nucleotides C34, C35 and A36, discriminator base A73, G1-C72 and G2-C71 base pairs of acceptor stem were base-specifically recognized by A. pernix tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a dye-linked D-lactate dehydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, Takenori; Satomura, Takenori; Kawakami, Ryushi; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Sakuraba, Haruhiko

    2011-11-01

    A dye-linked D-lactate dehydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol 8000 as the precipitant. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 63.4, b = 119.4, c = 70.2 Å, β = 112.0°, and diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution on the BL26B1 beamline at SPring-8. The overall R(merge) was 4.5% and the completeness was 99.8%. © 2011 International Union of Crystallography. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of phenylalanine tRNA recognition sites by phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Kimura, Manami; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2007-01-01

    Phenylalanine tRNA identity has been determined in the bacteria and the eukaryote system, but remains unknown for the archaea system. To investigate the molecular recognition mechanism of phenylalanine tRNA by phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, various mutant transcripts of phenylalanine tRNA prepared by an in vitro transcription system were examined by overexpressed A. pernix phenylalanyl tRNA synthetase. The results indicated that anticodon nucleotides G34, A35 and A36, discriminator base A73 and G20 in the variable pocket were base-specifically recognized by A. pernix phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

  19. Crystal structure of hyperthermophilic esterase EstE1 and the relationship between its dimerization and thermostability properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Eunhee

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EstE1 is a hyperthermophilic esterase belonging to the hormone-sensitive lipase family and was originally isolated by functional screening of a metagenomic library constructed from a thermal environmental sample. Dimers and oligomers may have been evolutionally selected in thermophiles because intersubunit interactions can confer thermostability on the proteins. The molecular mechanisms of thermostabilization of this extremely thermostable esterase are not well understood due to the lack of structural information. Results Here we report for the first time the 2.1-Å resolution crystal structure of EstE1. The three-dimensional structure of EstE1 exhibits a classic α/β hydrolase fold with a central parallel-stranded beta sheet surrounded by alpha helices on both sides. The residues Ser154, Asp251, and His281 form the catalytic triad motif commonly found in other α/β hydrolases. EstE1 exists as a dimer that is formed by hydrophobic interactions and salt bridges. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and heat inactivation kinetic analysis of EstE1 mutants, which were generated by structure-based site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues participating in EstE1 dimerization, revealed that hydrophobic interactions through Val274 and Phe276 on the β8 strand of each monomer play a major role in the dimerization of EstE1. In contrast, the intermolecular salt bridges contribute less significantly to the dimerization and thermostability of EstE1. Conclusion Our results suggest that intermolecular hydrophobic interactions are essential for the hyperthermostability of EstE1. The molecular mechanism that allows EstE1 to endure high temperature will provide guideline for rational design of a thermostable esterase/lipase using the lipolytic enzymes showing structural similarity to EstE1.

  20. Relationship between glycosyl hydrolase inventory and growth physiology of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus on carbohydrate-based media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskill, L E; Kusy, K; Bauer, M W; Kelly, R M

    1999-03-01

    Utilization of a range of carbohydrates for growth by the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated by examining the spectrum of glycosyl hydrolases produced by this microorganism and the thermal labilities of various saccharides. Previously, P. furiosus had been found to grow in batch cultures on several alpha-linked carbohydrates and cellobiose but not on glucose or other beta-linked sugars. Although P. furiosus was not able to grow on any nonglucan carbohydrate or any form of cellulose in this study (growth on oat spelt arabinoxylan was attributed to glucan contamination of this substrate), significant growth at 98 degrees C occurred on beta-1,3- and beta-1,3-beta-1,4-linked glucans. Oligosaccharides generated by digestion with a recombinant laminarinase derived from P. furiosus were the compounds that were most effective in stimulating growth of the microorganism. In several cases, periodic addition of beta-glucan substrates to fed-batch cultures limited adverse thermochemical modifications of the carbohydrates (i.e., Maillard reactions and caramelization) and led to significant increases (as much as two- to threefold) in the cell yields. While glucose had only a marginally positive effect on growth in batch culture, the final cell densities nearly tripled when glucose was added by the fed-batch procedure. Nonenzymatic browning reactions were found to be significant at 98 degrees C for saccharides with degrees of polymerization (DP) ranging from 1 to 6; glucose was the most labile compound on a mass basis and the least labile compound on a molar basis. This suggests that for DP of 2 or greater protection of the nonreducing monosaccharide component may be a factor in substrate availability. For P. furiosus, carbohydrate utilization patterns were found to reflect the distribution of the glycosyl hydrolases which are known to be produced by this microorganism.

  1. Identification and characterization of an archaeal kojibiose catabolic pathway in the hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Dong-Ho; Holden, James F; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2014-03-01

    A unique gene cluster responsible for kojibiose utilization was identified in the genome of Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04. The proteins it encodes hydrolyze kojibiose, a disaccharide product of glucose caramelization, and form glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) in two steps. Heterologous expression of the kojibiose-related enzymes in Escherichia coli revealed that two genes, Py04_1502 and Py04_1503, encode kojibiose phosphorylase (designated PsKP, for Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 kojibiose phosphorylase) and β-phosphoglucomutase (PsPGM), respectively. Enzymatic assays show that PsKP hydrolyzes kojibiose to glucose and β-glucose-1-phosphate (β-G1P). The Km values for kojibiose and phosphate were determined to be 2.53 ± 0.21 mM and 1.34 ± 0.04 mM, respectively. PsPGM then converts β-G1P into G6P in the presence of 6 mM MgCl2. Conversion activity from β-G1P to G6P was 46.81 ± 3.66 U/mg, and reverse conversion activity from G6P to β-G1P was 3.51 ± 0.13 U/mg. The proteins are highly thermostable, with optimal temperatures of 90°C for PsKP and 95°C for PsPGM. These results indicate that Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 converts kojibiose into G6P, a substrate of the glycolytic pathway. This is the first report of a disaccharide utilization pathway via phosphorolysis in hyperthermophilic archaea.

  2. The structure of hyperthermophilic β-N-acetylglucosaminidase reveals a novel dimer architecture associated with the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, Shouhei; Kado, Yuji; Watanabe, Masahiro; Fukuda, Yohta; Abe, Yoshito; Ueda, Tadashi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-11-01

    The β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from the hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima (NagA) hydrolyzes chitooligomers into monomer β-N-acetylglucosamine. Although NagA contains a highly conserved sequence motif found in glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 3, it can be distinguished from other GH family 3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidases by its substrate specificity and biological assembly. To investigate its unique structure around the active site, we determined the crystal structure of NagA at a resolution of 2.43 Å. The NagA forms a dimer structure in which the monomer structure consists of an N- and a C-terminal domain. The dimer structure exhibits high solvation free energy for dimer formation. From mutagenesis analyses, the catalytic nucleophile and general acid-base residues were supposed to be Asp245 and His173, respectively. The most striking characteristic of NagA was that it forms the active site cleft from the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal domain of the next polypeptide chain, whereas the other two-domain GH family 3 enzymes form the site within the same molecule. Another striking feature is that the loops located around the active site show high flexibility. One of the flexible loops contains the general acid-base His173 and was thought to be involved in substrate distortion during catalysis. In addition, a loop in close contact with the active site, which comes from the C-terminal domain of the next polypeptide chain, contains a region of high B-factor values, indicating the possibility that the C-terminal domain is involved in catalysis. These results suggest that the dimer structure of NagA is important for its activity and thermostability. Structural data are available in the Protein Data Bank under accession number 3WO8. © 2014 FEBS.

  3. Overexpression, purification, and characterization of beta-subunit group II chaperonin from hyperthermophilic Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Eun-Jung; Lee, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Jeon, Sung-Jong; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Nam, Soo-Wan

    2010-03-01

    In the present study, overexpression, purification, and characterization of Aeropyrum pernix K1 chaperonin B in E. coli were investigated. The chaperonin beta-subunit gene (ApCpnB, 1,665 bp ORF) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon A. pernix K1 was amplified by PCR and subcloned into vector pET21a. The constructed pET21a-ApCpnB (6.9 kb) was transformed into E. coli BL21 Codonplus (DE3). The transformant cell successfully expressed ApCpnB, and the expression of ApCpnB (61.2 kDa) was identified through analysis of the fractions by SDS-PAGE (14% gel). The recombinant ApCpnB was purified to higher than 94% by using heat-shock treatment at 90 degrees C for 20 min and fast protein liquid chromatography on a HiTrap Q column step. The purified ApCpnB showed ATPase activity and its activity was dependent on temperature. In the presence of ATP, ApCpnB effectively protected citrate synthase (CS) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from thermal aggregation and inactivation at 43 degrees C and 50 degrees C, respectively. Specifically, the activity of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) at 85 degrees C was greatly stabilized by the addition of ApCpnB and ATP. Coexpression of procarboxypeptidase B (pro-CPB) and ApCpnB in E. coli BL21 Codonplus (DE3) had a marked effect on the yield of pro-CPB as a soluble and active form, speculating that ApCpnB facilitates the correct folding of pro-CPB. These results suggest that ApCpnB has both foldase and holdase activities and can be used as a powerful molecular machinery for the production of recombinant proteins as soluble and active forms in E. coli.

  4. Structural analysis of the substrate recognition mechanism in O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Kawai, Yoshito; Kunimoto, Kohei; Iwasaki, Yuka; Nishii, Kaoru; Kataoka, Misumi; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2012-09-07

    L-Cysteine is synthesized from O-acetyl-L-serine (OAS) and sulfide by O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS; EC 2.5.1.47) in plants and bacteria. O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase (OPSS; EC 2.5.1.65) is a novel enzyme from the hyperthermophilic aerobic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 (2003). OPSS can use OAS or O-phospho-L-serine (OPS) to synthesize L-cysteine. To elucidate the mechanism of the substrate specificity of OPSS, we analyzed three-dimensional structures of the active site of the enzyme. The active-site lysine (K127) of OPSS forms an internal Schiff base with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Therefore, crystals of the complexes formed by the K127A mutant with the external Schiff base of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate with either OPS or OAS were prepared and examined by X-ray diffraction analysis. In contrast to that observed for OASS, no significant difference was seen in the overall structure between the free and complexed forms of OPSS. The side chains of T152, S153, and Q224 interacted with the carboxylate of the substrates, as a previous study has suggested. The side chain of R297 has been proposed to recognize the phosphate group of OPS. Surprisingly, however, the position of R297 was significantly unchanged in the complex of the OPSS K127A mutant with the external Schiff base, allowing enough space for an interaction with OPS. The positively charged environment around the entrance of the active site including S153 and R297 is important for accepting negatively charged substrates such as OPS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The elusive third subunit IIa of the bacterial B-type oxidases: the enzyme from the hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus.

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    Laurence Prunetti

    Full Text Available The reduction of molecular oxygen to water is catalyzed by complicated membrane-bound metallo-enzymes containing variable numbers of subunits, called cytochrome c oxidases or quinol oxidases. We previously described the cytochrome c oxidase II from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus as a ba(3-type two-subunit (subunits I and II enzyme and showed that it is included in a supercomplex involved in the sulfide-oxygen respiration pathway. It belongs to the B-family of the heme-copper oxidases, enzymes that are far less studied than the ones from family A. Here, we describe the presence in this enzyme of an additional transmembrane helix "subunit IIa", which is composed of 41 amino acid residues with a measured molecular mass of 5105 Da. Moreover, we show that subunit II, as expected, is in fact longer than the originally annotated protein (from the genome and contains a transmembrane domain. Using Aquifex aeolicus genomic sequence analyses, N-terminal sequencing, peptide mass fingerprinting and mass spectrometry analysis on entire subunits, we conclude that the B-type enzyme from this bacterium is a three-subunit complex. It is composed of subunit I (encoded by coxA(2 of 59000 Da, subunit II (encoded by coxB(2 of 16700 Da and subunit IIa which contain 12, 1 and 1 transmembrane helices respectively. A structural model indicates that the structural organization of the complex strongly resembles that of the ba(3 cytochrome c oxidase from the bacterium Thermus thermophilus, the IIa helical subunit being structurally the lacking N-terminal transmembrane helix of subunit II present in the A-type oxidases. Analysis of the genomic context of genes encoding oxidases indicates that this third subunit is present in many of the bacterial oxidases from B-family, enzymes that have been described as two-subunit complexes.

  6. EXPRESSION, PURIFICATION, AND SMALL ANGLE X-RAY SCATTERING OF DNA REPLICATION AND REPAIR PROTEINS FROM THE HYPERTHERMOPHILE SULFOLOBUS SOLFATARICUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, S.M.; Hatherill, J.R.; Hammel, M.; Hura, G.L.; Tainer, J.A.; Yannone, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    Vital molecular processes such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, and maintenance occur through transient protein interactions. Elucidating the mechanisms by which these protein complexes and interactions function could lead to treatments for diseases related to DNA damage and cell division control. In the recent decades since its introduction as a third domain, Archaea have shown to be simpler models for complicated eukaryotic processes such as DNA replication, repair, transcription, and translation. Sulfolobus solfataricus is one such model organism. A hyperthermophile with an optimal growth temperature of 80°C, Sulfolobus protein-protein complexes and transient protein interactions should be more stable at moderate temperatures, providing a means to isolate and study their structure and function. Here we provide the initial steps towards characterizing three DNA-related Sulfolobus proteins with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS): Sso0257, a cell division control and origin recognition complex homolog, Sso0768, the small subunit of the replication factor C, and Sso3167, a Mut-T like protein. SAXS analysis was performed at multiple concentrations for both short and long exposure times. The Sso0257 sample was determined to be either a mixture of monomeric and dimeric states or a population of dynamic monomers in various conformational states in solution, consistent with a fl exible winged helix domain. Sso0768 was found to be a complex mixture of multimeric states in solution. Finally, molecular envelope reconstruction from SAXS data for Sso3167 revealed a novel structural component which may function as a disordered to ordered region in the presence of its substrates and/or protein partners.

  7. Thermostability Mechanism for the Hyperthermophilicity of Extremophile Cellulase TmCel12A: Implied from Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Peng; Yuan, Congmin; Xu, Qin; Fu, Wei

    2016-08-04

    Thermostability is of considerable importance for the application of cellulase in cellulosic ethanol production. The cellulase 12A from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima (TmCel12A) is an ideal candidate to study thermostability of cellulases. Optimal temperature of the wild-type enzyme is 85 °C. Recently, it has been observed that surface loop mutation Y61G not only accelerates the hydrolysis rate but also extends the half-life of the enzyme at high temperature. However, the mechanism of how Y61G enhances thermostability of TmCel12A has not been revealed. Here, molecular dynamics simulation together with dynamic correlation network analysis was used to explore thermostability mechanism of TmCel12A. A hydrophobic cluster constructed by Y61, W176, V62, and L144 in the binding pocket was found to play a pivotal role in modulating thermostability as well as catalytic capability of TmCel12A. It stabilizes the apoenzyme at high temperature; however, it impedes the substrate binding. Y61G mutation disturbs the hydrophobic cluster as the counterpart amino acid W176 forms a cation-π interaction with R60 instead of the π-π interaction with Y61 in WT. Moreover, Y61G mutation makes the enzyme more rigid and more extended via altering the amino acid communities at the hinge part of the enzyme. An earlier hypothesis proposed from crystallographic observation that Y61G may accelerate the products releasing has been also confirmed by our simulations. These findings may provide a new direction for both theoretical and experimental scientists to improve the thermostability of other cellulases that can be potentially applied in biofuel industry.

  8. The Achilles' Heel of "Ultrastable" Hyperthermophile Proteins: Submillimolar Concentrations of SDS Stimulate Rapid Conformational Change, Aggregation, and Amyloid Formation in Proteins Carrying Overall Positive Charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Javed M; Sharma, Prerna; Arora, Kanika; Kishor, Nitin; Kaila, Pallavi; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2016-07-19

    Low concentrations (SDS) have been shown to induce the formation of amyloid fibers in more than 20 different mesophile-derived proteins in the cationic state. It is not known whether SDS has similar effects on hyperthermophile-derived proteins, which are otherwise thought to be "ultrastable" and inordinately resistant to structural perturbations at room temperature. Here, we show that low (SDS rapidly induce the formation of aggregates and amyloid fibers in five different ultrastable Pyrococcus furiosus proteins in the cationic state. We also show that amyloid formation is accompanied by the development of a characteristic, negative circular dichroism band at ∼230 nm. These effects are not seen if the proteins have a net negative charge or when higher concentrations of SDS are used (which induce helix formation instead). Our results appear to reveal a potential weakness or "Achilles' heel" in ultrastable proteins from hyperthermophiles. They also provide very strong support for the view that SDS initially interacts with proteins through electrostatic interactions, and not hydrophobic interactions, eliciting similar effects entirely regardless of protein molecular weight, or structural features such as quaternary structure or tertiary structural stability.

  9. The conserved N-terminal helix of acylpeptide hydrolase from archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 is important for its hyperthermophilic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zuoming; Zheng, Baisong; Wang, Yanping; Chen, Yiqian; Manco, Giuseppe; Feng, Yan

    2008-09-01

    The acylpeptide hydrolases from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 has a short conserved N-terminal helix in its family. The role of this N-terminal helix in the function of the hyperthermophilic enzyme, however, is unknown. Here, we investigated this question by protein engineering and biophysical methods. We found that a mutant (DeltaN21) with the N-terminal helix deleted is no longer functional at the optimum temperature for WT enzyme (95 degrees C), required for the survival of Aeropyrum pernix K1. Instead, DeltaN21 has the optimum activity at approximately 77 degrees C, with higher activities than the WT enzyme below this temperature. DeltaN21 is less stable than the WT enzyme and started unfolding at approximately 77 degrees C, indicating that the loss of the enzymatic activity of DeltaN21 at higher temperature is due to its low thermodynamic stability. In addition, we found that the salt bridges formed between the N-terminal helix and the catalytic domain of the enzyme play only a minor role in stabilizing the enzyme, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions mainly contribute to the stabilization. Since the N-terminal helix is conserved in this family of enzymes, our results suggest that the N-terminal helix is likely to play an important role for stabilizing all other enzymes in this family.

  10. Gene expression and characterization of a third type of dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomura, Takenori; Hara, Yusuke; Suye, Shin-ichiro; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    A third novel type of dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase (LPDH) has recently been found in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrobaculum calidifontis, by Satomura et al. The gene encoding the enzyme homologue was identified in the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix. The gene was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli, and the product was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The expressed enzyme was highly thermostable LPDH having a molecular mass of about 88 kDa and a homodimeric structure. The preferred substrate for the enzyme was L-proline with 2,6-dichloroindophenol (DCIP) as the electron acceptor. However, the enzyme did not utilize ferricyanide as the electron acceptor, in contrast to all other known LPDHs. The electrochemical determination of L-proline at concentrations from 0 to 0.7 mM was achieved by using A. pernix LPDH. A phylogenetic analysis revealed A. pernix LPDH to be clustered with the third type of LPDHs, and to be clearly separated from the clusters of previously known heterooligomeric LPDHs.

  11. Contribution of Pentose Catabolism to Molecular Hydrogen Formation by Targeted Disruption of Arabinose Isomerase (araA) in the Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga maritima

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Derrick; Singh, Raghuveer; Rudrappa, Deepak; Mateo, Jackie; Kramer, Levi; Freese, Laura

    2016-01-01

    hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacterium that is well known for its efficient synthesis of molecular hydrogen (H2) from the fermentation of sugars. Despite considerable efforts to advance compatible genetic methods, chromosome manipulation has remained elusive and hindered use of T. maritima or its close relatives as model hyperthermophiles. Lack of a genetic method also prevented efforts to manipulate specific metabolic pathways to measure their contributions to H2 yield. To overcome this barrier, a homologous chromosomal recombination method was developed and used to characterize the contribution of arabinose catabolism to H2 formation. We report here a stable genetic method for a hyperthermophilic bacterium that will advance studies on the basic and synthetic biology of Thermotogales. PMID:27940539

  12. Deletion of the topoisomerase III gene in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus results in slow growth and defects in cell cycle control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiyang; Guo, Li; Deng, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Topoisomerase III (topo III), a type IA topoisomerase, is widespread in hyperthermophilic archaea. In order to interrogate the in vivo role of archaeal topo III, we constructed and characterized a topo III gene deletion mutant of Sulfolobus islandicus. The mutant was viable but grew more slowly......-growing cultures. As shown by fluorescence microscopy, a fraction of mutant cells in the cultures were drastically enlarged, and at least some of the enlarged cells were apparently capable of resuming cell division. The mutant also shows a different transcriptional profile from that of the wild-type strain. Our...... results suggest that the enzyme may serve roles in chromosomal segregation and control of the level of supercoiling in the cell....

  13. Biohydrogen production from hyperthermophilic anaerobic digestion of fruit and vegetable wastes in seawater: Simplification of the culture medium of Thermotoga maritima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Rafika; Liebgott, Pierre Pol; Gannoun, Hana; Ben Gaida, Lamia; Miladi, Baligh; Hamdi, Moktar; Bouallagui, Hassib; Auria, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Biohydrogen production by the hyperthermophilic and halophilic bacterium T. maritima, using fruit and vegetable wastes as the carbon and energy sources was studied. Batch fermentation cultures showed that the use of a culture medium containing natural seawater and fruit and vegetable wastes can replace certain components (CaCl2, MgCl2, Balch's oligo-elements, yeast extract, KH2PO4 and K2HPO4) present in basal medium. However, a source of nitrogen and sulfur remained necessary for biohydrogen production. When fruit and vegetable waste collected from a wholesale market landfill was used, no decreases in total H2 production (139 mmol L-1) or H2 yield (3.46 mol mol-1) was observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a novel dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomura, Takenori; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Hara, Yusuke; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2010-11-01

    A novel dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol 8000 as the precipitant. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(1)2(1)2 or its enantiomorph P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 61.1, c = 276.3 Å, and diffracted to 2.87 Å resolution using a Cu Kα rotating-anode generator with an R-AXIS VII detector. The asymmetric unit contained one protein molecule, giving a crystal volume per enzyme mass (V(M)) of 2.75 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 55.3%.

  15. Viruses of hyperthermophilic Crenarchaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, D.; Garrett, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    , when one examines the archaeal viruses, the picture appears complex. Most viruses that are known to infect members of the kingdom Euryarchaeota resemble bacterial viruses, whereas those associated with the kingdom Crenarchaeota show little resemblance to either bacterial or eukaryal viruses....... This review summarizes our current knowledge of this group of exceptional and highly diverse archaeal viruses....

  16. Physiological and isotopic characteristics of nitrogen fixation by hyperthermophilic methanogens: Key insights into nitrogen anabolism of the microbial communities in Archean hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Manabu; Miyazaki, Junichi; Makabe, Akiko; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2014-08-01

    Hyperthermophilic hydrogenotrophic methanogens are considered to be one of the most predominant primary producers in hydrogen (H2)-abundant hydrothermal environments in the present-day ocean and throughout the history of the Earth. However, the nitrogen sources supporting the development of microbial communities in hydrothermal environments remain poorly understood. We have investigated, for the first time, methanogenic archaea commonly found in deep-sea hydrothermal environments to understand their physiological properties (growth kinetics, energetics, and metal requirements) and isotopic characteristics during the fixation of dinitrogen (N2), which is an abundant but less-bioavailable compound in hydrothermal fluids. Culture experiments showed that Methanocaldococcus strain (Mc 1-85N) (Topt = 85 °C) and Methanothermococcus strain (Mt 5-55N) (Topt = 55 °C) assimilated N2 and ammonium, but not nitrate. Previous phylogenetic studies have predicted that the Methanocaldococcus and Methanothermococcus lineages have nitrogenases, key enzymes for N2 fixation, with biochemically uncharacterised active site metal cofactors. We showed that Mt 5-55N required molybdenum for the nitrogenase to function, implying a molybdenum-bearing cofactor in the strain. Molybdenum also stimulated diazotrophic (i.e., N2-fixing) growth of Mc 1-85N, though further experiments are required to test whether the strain contains a molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase. Importantly, Mc 1-85N exhibited an apparently lower requirement of and higher tolerance to molybdenum and iron than Mt 5-55N. Furthermore, both strains produced more 15N-depleted biomass (-4‰ relative to N2) than that previously reported for diazotrophic photosynthetic prokaryotes. These results demonstrate that diazotrophic hyperthermophilic methanogens can be broadly distributed in seafloor and subseafloor hydrothermal environments, where the availability of transition metals is variable and where organic carbon, organic nitrogen

  17. Catalytic properties and crystal structure of thermostable NAD(P)H-dependent carbonyl reductase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Yudai; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Araki, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Yoneda, Kazunari

    2016-09-01

    A gene encoding NAD(P)H-dependent carbonyl reductase (CR) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Its product was effectively purified and characterized. The expressed enzyme was the most thermostable CR found to date; the activity remained at approximately 75% of its activity after incubation for 10min up to 90°C. In addition, A. pernix CR exhibited high stability at a wider range of pH values and longer periods of storage compared with CRs previously identified from other sources. A. pernix CR catalyzed the reduction of various carbonyl compounds including ethyl 4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, similar to the CR from thyroidectomized (Tx) chicken fatty liver. However, A. pernix CR exhibited significantly higher Km values against several substrates than Tx chicken fatty liver CR. The three-dimensional structure of A. pernix CR was determined using the molecular replacement method at a resolution of 2.09Å, in the presence of NADPH. The overall fold of A. pernix CR showed moderate similarity to that of Tx chicken fatty liver CR; however, A. pernix CR had no active-site lid unlike Tx chicken fatty liver CR. Consequently, the active-site cavity in the A. pernix CR was much more solvent-accessible than that in Tx chicken fatty liver CR. This structural feature may be responsible for the enzyme's lower affinity for several substrates and NADPH. The factors contributing to the much higher thermostability of A. pernix CR were analyzed by comparing its structure with that of Tx chicken fatty liver CR. This comparison showed that extensive formation of the intrasubunit ion pair networks, and the presence of the strong intersubunit interaction, is likely responsible for A. pernix CR thermostability. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu99 plays a major role in the intersubunit interaction. This is the first report regarding the characteristics and three-dimensional structure of

  18. Morphology and genome organization of the virus PSV of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genera Pyrobaculum and Thermoproteus: a novel virus family, the Globuloviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häring, Monika; Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim; Rachel, Reinhard; Stetter, Karl O; Garrett, Roger A; Prangishvili, David

    2004-06-01

    A novel virus, termed Pyrobaculum spherical virus (PSV), is described that infects anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaea of the genera Pyrobaculum and Thermoproteus. Spherical enveloped virions, about 100 nm in diameter, contain a major multimeric 33-kDa protein and host-derived lipids. A viral envelope encases a superhelical nucleoprotein core containing linear double-stranded DNA. The PSV infection cycle does not cause lysis of host cells. The viral genome was sequenced and contains 28337 bp. The genome is unique for known archaeal viruses in that none of the genes, including that encoding the major structural protein, show any significant sequence matches to genes in public sequence databases. Exceptionally for an archaeal double-stranded DNA virus, almost all the recognizable genes are located on one DNA strand. The ends of the genome consist of 190-bp inverted repeats that contain multiple copies of short direct repeats. The two DNA strands are probably covalently linked at their termini. On the basis of the unusual morphological and genomic properties of this DNA virus, we propose to assign PSV to a new viral family, the Globuloviridae.

  19. Crystal structure, SAXS and kinetic mechanism of hyperthermophilic ADP-dependent glucokinase from Thermococcus litoralis reveal a conserved mechanism for catalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Andrés Rivas-Pardo

    Full Text Available ADP-dependent glucokinases represent a unique family of kinases that belong to the ribokinase superfamily, being present mainly in hyperthermophilic archaea. For these enzymes there is no agreement about the magnitude of the structural transitions associated with ligand binding and whether they are meaningful to the function of the enzyme. We used the ADP-dependent glucokinase from Thermococcus litoralis as a model to investigate the conformational changes observed in X-ray crystallographic structures upon substrate binding and to compare them with those determined in solution in order to understand their interplay with the glucokinase function. Initial velocity studies indicate that catalysis follows a sequential ordered mechanism that correlates with the structural transitions experienced by the enzyme in solution and in the crystal state. The combined data allowed us to resolve the open-closed conformational transition that accounts for the complete reaction cycle and to identify the corresponding clusters of aminoacids residues responsible for it. These results provide molecular bases for a general mechanism conserved across the ADP-dependent kinase family.

  20. Crystal Structure, SAXS and Kinetic Mechanism of Hyperthermophilic ADP-Dependent Glucokinase from Thermococcus litoralis Reveal a Conserved Mechanism for Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Herrera-Morande, Alejandra; Castro-Fernandez, Victor; Fernandez, Francisco J.; Vega, M. Cristina; Guixé, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    ADP-dependent glucokinases represent a unique family of kinases that belong to the ribokinase superfamily, being present mainly in hyperthermophilic archaea. For these enzymes there is no agreement about the magnitude of the structural transitions associated with ligand binding and whether they are meaningful to the function of the enzyme. We used the ADP-dependent glucokinase from Termococcus litoralis as a model to investigate the conformational changes observed in X-ray crystallographic structures upon substrate binding and to compare them with those determined in solution in order to understand their interplay with the glucokinase function. Initial velocity studies indicate that catalysis follows a sequential ordered mechanism that correlates with the structural transitions experienced by the enzyme in solution and in the crystal state. The combined data allowed us to resolve the open-closed conformational transition that accounts for the complete reaction cycle and to identify the corresponding clusters of aminoacids residues responsible for it. These results provide molecular bases for a general mechanism conserved across the ADP-dependent kinase family. PMID:23818958

  1. Enantioselective Resolution of γ-Lactam by a Novel Thermostable Type II (+)-γ-Lactamase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lu; Zhu, Shaozhou; Shi, Ying; Gao, Shuahua; Zheng, Guojun

    2015-05-01

    A thermostable formamidase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was revealed a novel type II (+)-γ-lactamase. This type II (+)-γ-lactamase is only composed of 377 amino acid residues, in contrast to another thermostable (+)-γ-lactamase from Sulfolobus solfataricus with 504 amino acid residues (type I). It is interesting that there are low identities between these two (+)-γ-lactamases, and herein, we further proved that at least two types of (+)-γ-lactamases exist in nature due to enzyme promiscuity. The gene of this thermostable (+)-γ-lactamase was cloned, functionally expressed in Escherichia coli BL21, and purified by a simple yet effective heat treatment method. It showed incredible thermostability, retaining 100% of its activity after 12 h at 100 °C. The optimum temperature for this enzyme was supposed to be more than 100 °C, and the optimum pH for this enzyme was about 9.0. The lactamase maintained its activity in the presence of most metal ions, except for Cu(2+). This thermo- and alkaline-tolerant (+)-γ-lactamase presents promising properties for the industrial application. Specifically, it could be used for the production of chirally pure (-)-γ-lactam for the synthesis of well-known carbocyclic nucleosides like abacavir and peramivir. The optical purity of the chiral product reached over 97% enantiomeric excess.

  2. Provirus Induction in Hyperthermophilic Archaea: Characterization of Aeropyrum pernix Spindle-Shaped Virus 1 and Aeropyrum pernix Ovoid Virus 1▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Sako, Yoshihiko; Prangishvili, David

    2011-01-01

    By in silico analysis, we have identified two putative proviruses in the genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, and under special conditions of A. pernix growth, we were able to induce their replication. Both viruses were isolated and characterized. Negatively stained virions of one virus appeared as pleomorphic spindle-shaped particles, 180 to 210 nm by 40 to 55 nm, with tails of heterogeneous lengths in the range of 0 to 300 nm. This virus was named Aeropyrum pernix spindle-shaped virus 1 (APSV1). Negatively stained virions of the other virus appeared as slightly irregular oval particles with one pointed end, while in cryo-electron micrographs, the virions had a regular oval shape and uniform size (70 by 55 nm). The virus was named Aeropyrum pernix ovoid virus 1 (APOV1). Both viruses have circular, double-stranded DNA genomes of 38,049 bp for APSV1 and 13,769 bp for APOV1. Similarities to proteins of other archaeal viruses were limited to the integrase and Dna1-like protein. We propose to classify APOV1 into the family Guttaviridae. PMID:21784945

  3. Distribution and phylogenies of enzymes of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway from archaea and hyperthermophilic bacteria support a gluconeogenic origin of metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron S. Ronimus

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes of the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathway (the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP pathway, the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, the reductive pentose phosphate cycle and the Entner-Doudoroff pathway are widely distributed and are often considered to be central to the origins of metabolism. In particular, several enzymes of the lower portion of the EMP pathway (the so-called trunk pathway, including triosephosphate isomerase (TPI; EC 5.3.1.1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH; EC 1.2.1.12/13, phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK; EC 2.7.2.3 and enolase (EC 4.2.1.11, are extremely well conserved and universally distributed among the three domains of life. In this paper, the distribution of enzymes of gluconeogenesis/glycolysis in hyperthermophiles—microorganisms that many believe represent the least evolved organisms on the planet—is reviewed. In addition, the phylogenies of the trunk pathway enzymes (TPIs, GAPDHs, PGKs and enolases are examined. The enzymes catalyzing each of the six-carbon transformations in the upper portion of the EMP pathway, with the possible exception of aldolase, are all derived from multiple gene sequence families. In contrast, single sequence families can account for the archaeal and hyperthermophilic bacterial enzyme activities of the lower portion of the EMP pathway. The universal distribution of the trunk pathway enzymes, in combination with their phylogenies, supports the notion that the EMP pathway evolved in the direction of gluconeogenesis, i.e., from the bottom up.

  4. Computational identification of a new SelD-like family that may participate in sulfur metabolism in hyperthermophilic sulfur-reducing archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gao-Peng; Jiang, Liang; Ni, Jia-Zuan; Liu, Qiong; Zhang, Yan

    2014-10-17

    Selenium (Se) and sulfur (S) are closely related elements that exhibit similar chemical properties. Some genes related to S metabolism are also involved in Se utilization in many organisms. However, the evolutionary relationship between the two utilization traits is unclear. In this study, we conducted a comparative analysis of the selenophosphate synthetase (SelD) family, a key protein for all known Se utilization traits, in all sequenced archaea. Our search showed a very limited distribution of SelD and Se utilization in this kingdom. Interestingly, a SelD-like protein was detected in two orders of Crenarchaeota: Sulfolobales and Thermoproteales. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that SelD-like protein contains the same domain and conserved functional residues as those of SelD, and might be involved in S metabolism in these S-reducing organisms. Further genome-wide analysis of patterns of gene occurrence in different thermoproteales suggested that several genes, including SirA-like, Prx-like and adenylylsulfate reductase, were strongly related to SelD-like gene. Based on these findings, we proposed a simple model wherein SelD-like may play an important role in the biosynthesis of certain thiophosphate compound. Our data suggest novel genes involved in S metabolism in hyperthermophilic S-reducing archaea, and may provide a new window for understanding the complex relationship between Se and S metabolism in archaea.

  5. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (GAPOR) and nonphosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPN), key enzymes of the respective modified Embden-Meyerhof pathways in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeota Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reher, Matthias; Gebhard, Susanne; Schönheit, Peter

    2007-08-01

    The growth of Pyrobaculum aerophilum on yeast extract and nitrate was stimulated by the addition of maltose. Extracts of maltose/yeast extract/nitrate-grown cells contained all enzyme activities of a modified Embden-Meyerhof (EM) pathway, including ATP-dependent glucokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, ATP-dependent 6-phosphofructokinase, fructose-1,6-phosphate aldolase, triose-phosphate isomerase, GAPOR, phosphoglycerate mutase, enolase and pyruvate kinase. The activity of GAPOR was stimulated about fourfold by maltose, indicating a role in sugar degradation. GAPOR was purified 200-fold to homogeneity and characterized as a 67 kDa monomeric, extremely thermostable protein. The enzyme showed high specificity for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and did not use glyceraldehyde, acetaldehyde or formaldehyde as substrates. By matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight analysis of the purified enzyme, ORF PA1029 was identified as a coding gene, gapor, in the sequenced genome of Pyrobaculum aerophilum. The data indicate that the (micro)aerophilic Pyrobaculum aerophilum contains a functional GAPOR as part of a modified EM pathway. Cells of the strictly aerobic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix also contain enzyme activities of a modified EM pathway similar to that of Pyrobaculum aerophilum, except that a GAPN activity replaces GAPOR activity.

  6. Lesion-Induced Mutation in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Its Avoidance by the Y-Family DNA Polymerase Dbh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Grogan, Dennis W

    2015-10-01

    Hyperthermophilic archaea offer certain advantages as models of genome replication, and Sulfolobus Y-family polymerases Dpo4 (S. solfataricus) and Dbh (S. acidocaldarius) have been studied intensively in vitro as biochemical and structural models of trans-lesion DNA synthesis (TLS). However, the genetic functions of these enzymes have not been determined in the native context of living cells. We developed the first quantitative genetic assays of replication past defined DNA lesions and error-prone motifs in Sulfolobus chromosomes and used them to measure the efficiency and accuracy of bypass in normal and dbh(-) strains of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Oligonucleotide-mediated transformation allowed low levels of abasic-site bypass to be observed in S. acidocaldarius and demonstrated that the local sequence context affected bypass specificity; in addition, most erroneous TLS did not require Dbh function. Applying the technique to another common lesion, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG), revealed an antimutagenic role of Dbh. The efficiency and accuracy of replication past 8-oxo-dG was higher in the presence of Dbh, and up to 90% of the Dbh-dependent events inserted dC. A third set of assays, based on phenotypic reversion, showed no effect of Dbh function on spontaneous -1 frameshifts in mononucleotide tracts in vivo, despite the extremely frequent slippage at these motifs documented in vitro. Taken together, the results indicate that a primary genetic role of Dbh is to avoid mutations at 8-oxo-dG that occur when other Sulfolobus enzymes replicate past this lesion. The genetic evidence that Dbh is recruited to 8-oxo-dG raises questions regarding the mechanism of recruitment, since Sulfolobus spp. have eukaryotic-like replisomes but no ubiquitin. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  7. Dihydroorotase from the Hyperthermophile Aquifiex aeolicus Is Activated by Stoichiometric Association with Aspartate Transcarbamoylase and Forms a One-Pot Reactor for Pyrimidine Biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Martin, Philip D.; Purcarea, Cristina; Vaishnav, Asmita; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Fernando, Roshini; Guy-Evans, Hedeel I.; Evans, David R.; Edwards, Brian F.P.; (WSU-MED); (IB-Bucharest); (NWU); (E.Mich.U.)

    2009-08-14

    In prokaryotes, the first three enzymes in pyrimidine biosynthesis, carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS), aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC), and dihydroorotase (DHO), are commonly expressed separately and either function independently (Escherichia coli) or associate into multifunctional complexes (Aquifex aeolicus). In mammals the enzymes are expressed as a single polypeptide chain (CAD) in the order CPS-DHO-ATC and associate into a hexamer. This study presents the three-dimensional structure of the noncovalent hexamer of DHO and ATC from the hyperthermophile A. aeolicus at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. It is the first structure of any multienzyme complex in pyrimidine biosynthesis and is a possible model for the core of mammalian CAD. The structure has citrate, a near isosteric analogue of carbamoyl aspartate, bound to the active sites of both enzymes. Three active site loops that are intrinsically disordered in the free, inactive DHO are ordered in the complex. The reorganization also changes the peptide bond between Asp153, a ligand of the single zinc atom in DHO, and Gly154, to the rare cis conformation. In the crystal structure, six DHO and six ATC chains form a hollow dodecamer, in which the 12 active sites face an internal reaction chamber that is approximately 60 {angstrom} in diameter and connected to the cytosol by narrow tunnels. The entrances and the interior of the chamber are both electropositive, which suggests that the architecture of this nanoreactor modifies the kinetics of the bisynthase, not only by steric channeling but also by preferential escape of the product, dihydroorotase, which is less negatively charged than its precursors, carbamoyl phosphate, aspartate, or carbamoyl aspartate.

  8. Crystal structure of the NADP+and tartrate-bound complex of L-serine 3-dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Kazunari; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Araki, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2018-01-20

    A gene encoding L-serine dehydrogenase (L-SerDH) that exhibits extremely low sequence identity to the Agrobacterium tumefaciens L-SerDH was identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis. The predicted amino acid sequence showed 36% identity with that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa L-SerDH, suggesting that P. calidifontis L-SerDH is a novel type of L-SerDH, like Ps. aeruginosa L-SerDH. The overexpressed enzyme appears to be the most thermostable L-SerDH described to date, and no loss of activity was observed by incubation for 30 min at temperatures up to 100 °C. The enzyme showed substantial reactivity towards D-serine, in addition to L-serine. Two different crystal structures of P. calidifontis L-SerDH were determined using the Se-MAD and MR method: the structure in complex with NADP + /sulfate ion at 1.18 Å and the structure in complex with NADP + /L-tartrate (substrate analog) at 1.57 Å. The fold of the catalytic domain showed similarity with that of Ps. aeruginosa L-SerDH. However, the active site structure significantly differed between the two enzymes. Based on the structure of the tartrate, L- and D-serine and 3-hydroxypropionate molecules were modeled into the active site and the substrate binding modes were estimated. A structural comparison suggests that the wide cavity at the substrate binding site is likely responsible for the high reactivity of the enzyme toward both L- and D-serine enantiomers. This is the first description of the structure of the novel type of L-SerDH with bound NADP + and substrate analog, and it provides new insight into the substrate binding mechanism of L-SerDH. The results obtained here may be very informative for the creation of L- or D-serine-specific SerDH by protein engineering.

  9. Physiological properties and genome structure of the hyperthermophilic filamentous phage φOH3 which infects Thermus thermophilus HB8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko eNagayoshi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A filamentous bacteriophage, φOH3, was isolated from hot spring sediment in Obama hot spring in Japan with the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB8 as its host. Phage φOH3, which was classified into the Inoviridae family, consists of a flexible filamentous particle 830 nm long and 8 nm wide. φOH3 was stable at temperatures ranging from 70 to 90 °C and at pHs ranging from 6 to 9. A one-step growth curve of the phage showed a 60-min latent period beginning immediately postinfection, followed by intracellular virus particle production during the subsequent 40 min. The released virion number of φOH3 was 109. During the latent period, both single stranded DNA (ssDNA and the replicative form (RF of phage DNA were multiplied from min 40 onward. During the release period, the copy numbers of both ssDNA and RF DNA increased sharply. The size of the φOH3 genome is 5,688 bp, and 8 putative open reading frames (ORFs were annotated. These ORFs were encoded on the plus strand of RF DNA and showed no significant homology with any known phage genes, except ORF 5, which showed 60% identity with the gene VIII product of the Thermus filamentous phage PH75. All the ORFs were similar to predicted genes annotated in the Thermus aquaticus Y51MC23 and Meiothermus timidus DSM 17022 genomes at the amino acid sequence level. This is the first report of the whole genome structure and DNA multiplication of a filamentous T. thermophilus phage within its host cell.

  10. Molecular Characterization and Postsplicing Fate of Three Introns within the Single rRNA Operon of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Norimichi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Uchida, Aritsune

    1998-01-01

    The single rRNA operon (arnS-arnL) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 was sequenced. The DNA sequence data and detailed RNA analyses disclosed an unusual feature: the presence of three introns at hitherto undescribed insertion positions within the rRNA genes. The 699-nucleotide (nt) intron Iα was located at position 908 (Escherichia coli numbering [H. F. Noller, Annu. Rev. Biochem. 53:119–162, 1984]) of the 16S rRNA, while the 202-nt intron Iβ and 575-nt intron Iγ were located at positions 1085 and 1927 (E. coli numbering), respectively, of the 23S rRNA. They were located within highly conserved sites which have been implicated as crucial for rRNA function in E. coli. All three introns were remarkably AT rich (41.5 to 43.1 mol% G+C) compared with the mature rRNAs (67.7 and 69.2 mol% G+C for 16S and 23S rRNAs, respectively). No obvious primary sequence similarities were detected among them. After splicing from rRNA transcripts in vivo, a large quantity of intronic RNAs were stably retained in the linear monomeric form, whereas a trace of topoisomeric RNA molecules also appeared, as characterized by their behavior in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Secondary structural models of the Iα-, Iβ-, and Iγ-containing rRNA precursors agree with the bulge-helix-bulge motif. Two of the introns, Iα and Iγ, contained open reading frames whose protein translation exhibited no overall similarity with proteins reported so far. However, both share a LAGLI-DADG motif characteristic of homing endonucleases. PMID:9658008

  11. Three-dimensional structure of a new enzyme, O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase, involved in l-cysteine biosynthesis by a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, at 2.0A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yutaka; Mino, Koshiki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Ataka, Mitsuo

    2005-08-12

    O-Phosphoserine sulfhydrylase is a new enzyme found in a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1. This enzyme catalyzes a novel cysteine synthetic reaction from O-phospho-l-serine and sulfide. The crystal structure of the enzyme was determined at 2.0A resolution using the method of multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion. A monomer consists of three domains, including an N-terminal domain with a new alpha/beta fold. The topology folds of the middle and C-terminal domains were similar to those of the O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A from Salmonella typhimurium and the cystathionine beta-synthase from human. The cofactor, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, is bound in a cleft between the middle and C-terminal domains through a covalent linkage to Lys127. Based on the structure determined, O-phospho-l-serine could be rationally modeled into the active site of the enzyme. An enzyme-substrate complex model and a mutation experiment revealed that Arg297, unique to hyperthermophilic archaea, is one of the most crucial residues for O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylation activity. There are more hydrophobic areas and less electric charges at the dimer interface, compared to the S.typhimurium O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase.

  12. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side chain NMR resonance assignments for E73 from Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus ragged hills, a hyperthermophilic crenarchaeal virus from Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Casey; Menon, Smita; Lawrence, C Martin; Copié, Valérie

    2009-12-01

    Crenarchaeal viruses are commonly found in hyperthermal acidic environments such as those of Yellowstone National Park. These remarkable viruses not only exhibit unusual morphologies, but also display extreme genetic diversity. However, little is known about crenarchaeal viral life cycles, virus-host interactions, and their adaptation to hyperthermophilic environments. In an effort to better understand the functions of crenarchaeal viruses and the proteins encoded by their genomes, we have undertaken detailed structural and functional studies of gene products encoded in the open reading frames of Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus ragged hills. Herein, we report ((15)N, (13)C, (1)H) resonance assignments of backbone and side chain atoms of a 19.1 kDa homodimeric E73 protein of SSVRH.

  13. RNA-Seq analyses reveal the order of tRNA processing events and the maturation of C/D box and CRISPR RNAs in the hyperthermophile Methanopyrus kandleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Andreas A H; Tripp, Vanessa; Randau, Lennart

    2013-07-01

    The methanogenic archaeon Methanopyrus kandleri grows near the upper temperature limit for life. Genome analyses revealed strategies to adapt to these harsh conditions and elucidated a unique transfer RNA (tRNA) C-to-U editing mechanism at base 8 for 30 different tRNA species. Here, RNA-Seq deep sequencing methodology was combined with computational analyses to characterize the small RNome of this hyperthermophilic organism and to obtain insights into the RNA metabolism at extreme temperatures. A large number of 132 small RNAs were identified that guide RNA modifications, which are expected to stabilize structured RNA molecules. The C/D box guide RNAs were shown to exist as circular RNA molecules. In addition, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats RNA processing and potential regulatory RNAs were identified. Finally, the identification of tRNA precursors before and after the unique C8-to-U8 editing activity enabled the determination of the order of tRNA processing events with termini truncation preceding intron removal. This order of tRNA maturation follows the compartmentalized tRNA processing order found in Eukaryotes and suggests its conservation during evolution.

  14. Two-step efficient synthesis of 5-methyluridine via two thermostable nucleoside phosphorylase from Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shaozhou; Ren, Lu; Wang, Jianjun; Zheng, Guojun; Tang, Pingwah

    2012-03-01

    5-Methyluridine has been synthesized in high yield using guanosine and thymine as starting materials in the presence of highly thermostable recombinant purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and uridine phosphorylase (UP) obtained from hyperthermophilic aerobic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix. Key reaction parameters such as pH, temperature, concentration of buffer and substrates were investigated. At the optimal conditions, 5-methyluridine was achieved in yield 85% with a guanosine conversion of 96% in 10ml scale. The process can be performed at high temperature, which will highly increase the solubility of substrates, therefore, this process is suitable for the industry application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hyperthermophilic Archaeal Viruses as Novel Nanoplatforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldahl, Kristine Buch

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on earth, and with an estimated 1031 virus-like particles in the biosphere, viruses are virtually everywhere. Traditionally, the study of viruses has focused on their roles as infectious agents. However, over the last decades with the development...... of a broad range of genetic and chemical engineering methods, viral research has expanded. Viruses are now emerging as nanoplatforms with applications in materials science and medicine. A great challenge in biomedicine is the targeting of therapeutics to specific locations in the body in order to increase...... therapeutic benefit and minimize adverse effects. Virus-based nanoplatforms take advantage of the natural circulatory and targeting properties of viruses, to design therapeutics that specifically target tissues of interest in vivo. Plant-based viruses and bacteriophages are typically considered safer...

  16. Crystal structure of translation initiation factor 5B from the crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Ryo; Miyoshi, Tomohiro; Uchiumi, Toshio; Ito, Kosuke

    2016-05-01

    Initiation factor 5B (IF5B) is a universally conserved translational GTPase that catalyzes ribosomal subunit joining. In eukaryotes, IF5B directly interacts via a groove in its domain IV with initiation factor 1A (IF1A), another universally conserved initiation factor, to accomplish efficient subunit joining. Here, we have determined the first structure of a crenarchaeal IF5B, which revealed that the archaea-specific region of IF5B (helix α15) binds and occludes the groove of domain IV. Therefore, archaeal IF5B cannot access IF1A in the same manner as eukaryotic IF5B. This fact suggests that different relationships between IF5B and IF1A exist in archaea and eukaryotes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Autophosphorylation and Cross-Phosphorylation of Protein Kinases from the Crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihong Huang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation, one of the most important post-translational modifications, regulates almost every cellular process. Although signal transduction by protein phosphorylation is extensively studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge of this process in archaea is greatly lagging behind, especially for Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation by eukaryotic-like protein kinases (ePKs. So far, only a few studies on archaeal ePKs have been reported, most of which focused on the phosphorylation activities in vitro, but their physiological functions and interacting network are still largely unknown. In this study, we systematically investigated the autophosphorylation and cross-phosphorylation activities of ePKs from Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A using proteins expressed in Escherichia coli or S. islandicus. In vitro kinase assay showed that 7 out of the 11 putative ePKs have autophosphorylation activity. A protein Ser/Thr phosphatase, SiRe_1009, was able to dephosphorylate various autophosphorylated ePKs, confirming that these proteins are Ser/Thr kinases. Two ePKs, SiRe_2030 and SiRe_2056, homologs of typical eukaryotic PKs involved in peptide synthesis in response to various cellular stresses, exhibit highly efficient phosphorylation activities on both themselves and other ePKs. Overexpression of the protein kinases in vivo revealed that elevated level of either SiRe_1531 or SiRe_2056 inhibited the cell growth of S. islandicus cells. Finally, a phosphorylation network of the protein kinases was proposed and their putative physiological roles were discussed.

  18. Gene expression and characterization of two 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Yumie; Yabuki, Takashi; Fukuda, Eriko; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2005-04-25

    A hyperthermophilic and aerobic crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, has two sets of genes possibly encoding 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases. One is encoded in open reading frames (ORFs) ape2126 and ape2128, and the other in ORFs ape1473 and ape1472. The two sets of genes were expressed. The product enzymes, Ape2126/2128 and Ape1473/1472, showed optimal temperatures of 105 and over 110 degrees C, and optimal pHs of 8.5 and 9.0, respectively, using pyruvate as a substrate. Pyruvate, 2-oxobutyrate, and glyoxylate were the best substrates for both enzymes, and additionally Ape1473/1472 was able to act on 2-oxoglutarate, suggesting the enzyme operates in the TCA cycle.

  19. Isolation and distribution of a novel iron-oxidizing crenarchaeon from acidic geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozubal, M; Macur, R E; Korf, S; Taylor, W P; Ackerman, G G; Nagy, A; Inskeep, W P

    2008-02-01

    Novel thermophilic crenarchaea have been observed in Fe(III) oxide microbial mats of Yellowstone National Park (YNP); however, no definitive work has identified specific microorganisms responsible for the oxidation of Fe(II). The objectives of the current study were to isolate and characterize an Fe(II)-oxidizing member of the Sulfolobales observed in previous 16S rRNA gene surveys and to determine the abundance and distribution of close relatives of this organism in acidic geothermal springs containing high concentrations of dissolved Fe(II). Here we report the isolation and characterization of the novel, Fe(II)-oxidizing, thermophilic, acidophilic organism Metallosphaera sp. strain MK1 obtained from a well-characterized acid-sulfate-chloride geothermal spring in Norris Geyser Basin, YNP. Full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain MK1 exhibits only 94.9 to 96.1% sequence similarity to other known Metallosphaera spp. and less than 89.1% similarity to known Sulfolobus spp. Strain MK1 is a facultative chemolithoautotroph with an optimum pH range of 2.0 to 3.0 and an optimum temperature range of 65 to 75 degrees C. Strain MK1 grows optimally on pyrite or Fe(II) sorbed onto ferrihydrite, exhibiting doubling times between 10 and 11 h under aerobic conditions (65 degrees C). The distribution and relative abundance of MK1-like 16S rRNA gene sequences in 14 acidic geothermal springs containing Fe(III) oxide microbial mats were evaluated. Highly related MK1-like 16S rRNA gene sequences (>99% sequence similarity) were consistently observed in Fe(III) oxide mats at temperatures ranging from 55 to 80 degrees C. Quantitative PCR using Metallosphaera-specific primers confirmed that organisms highly similar to strain MK1 comprised up to 40% of the total archaeal community at selected sites. The broad distribution of highly related MK1-like 16S rRNA gene sequences in acidic Fe(III) oxide microbial mats is consistent with the observed characteristics and growth optima of Metallosphaera-like strain MK1 and emphasizes the importance of this newly described taxon in Fe(II) chemolithotrophy in acidic high-temperature environments of YNP.

  20. Towards understanding the first genome sequence of a crenarchaeon by genome annotation using clusters of orthologous groups of proteins (COGs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Darren A; Shankavaram, Uma T; Galperin, Michael Y; Wolf, Yuri I; Aravind, L; Koonin, Eugene V

    2000-01-01

    Background: Standard archival sequence databases have not been designed as tools for genome annotation and are far from being optimal for this purpose. We used the database of Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs) to reannotate the genomes of two archaea, Aeropyrum pernix, the first member of the Crenarchaea to be sequenced, and Pyrococcus abyssi. Results: A. pernix and P. abyssi proteins were assigned to COGs using the COGNITOR program; the results were verified on a case-by-case basis and augmented by additional database searches using the PSI-BLAST and TBLASTN programs. Functions were predicted for over 300 proteins from A. pernix, which could not be assigned a function using conventional methods with a conservative sequence similarity threshold, an approximately 50% increase compared to the original annotation. A. pernix shares most of the conserved core of proteins that were previously identified in the Euryarchaeota. Cluster analysis or distance matrix tree construction based on the co-occurrence of genomes in COGs showed that A. pernix forms a distinct group within the archaea, although grouping with the two species of Pyrococci, indicative of similar repertoires of conserved genes, was observed. No indication of a specific relationship between Crenarchaeota and eukaryotes was obtained in these analyses. Several proteins that are conserved in Euryarchaeota and most bacteria are unexpectedly missing in A. pernix, including the entire set of de novo purine biosynthesis enzymes, the GTPase FtsZ (a key component of the bacterial and euryarchaeal cell-division machinery), and the tRNA-specific pseudouridine synthase, previously considered universal. A. pernix is represented in 48 COGs that do not contain any euryarchaeal members. Many of these proteins are TCA cycle and electron transport chain enzymes, reflecting the aerobic lifestyle of A. pernix. Conclusions: Special-purpose databases organized on the basis of phylogenetic analysis and carefully curated with respect to known and predicted protein functions provide for a significant improvement in genome annotation. A differential genome display approach helps in a systematic investigation of common and distinct features of gene repertoires and in some cases reveals unexpected connections that may be indicative of functional similarities between phylogenetically distant organisms and of lateral gene exchange. PMID:11178258

  1. Bifunctional phosphoglucose/phosphomannose isomerases from the Archaea Aeropyrum pernix and Thermoplasma acidophilum constitute a novel enzyme family within the phosphoglucose isomerase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas; Wendorff, Daniel; Schönheit, Peter

    2004-01-16

    The hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix contains phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) activity. However, obvious homologs with significant identity to known PGIs could not be identified in the sequenced genome of this organism. The PGI activity from A. pernix was purified and characterized. Kinetic analysis revealed that, unlike all known PGIs, the enzyme catalyzed reversible isomerization not only of glucose 6-phosphate but also of epimeric mannose 6-phosphate at similar catalytic efficiency, thus defining the protein as bifunctional phosphoglucose/phosphomannose isomerase (PGI/PMI). The gene pgi/pmi encoding PGI/PMI (open reading frame APE0768) was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analyses; the gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as functional PGI/PMI. Putative PGI/PMI homologs were identified in several (hyper)thermophilic archaea and two bacteria. The homolog from Thermoplasma acidophilum (Ta1419) was overexpressed in E. coli, and the recombinant enzyme was characterized as bifunctional PGI/PMI. PGI/PMIs showed low sequence identity to the PGI superfamily and formed a distinct phylogenetic cluster. However, secondary structure predictions and the presence of several conserved amino acids potentially involved in catalysis indicate some structural and functional similarity to the PGI superfamily. Thus, we propose that bifunctional PGI/PMI constitutes a novel protein family within the PGI superfamily.

  2. Hyper-thermophilic aerobic bacterial ecology for space agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, T.; Kanazawa, S.; Moriya, T.; Ishikawa, Y.; Hashimoto, H.; Yamashita, M.; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    A material recycling is one of core issues in engineering for habitation on extraterrestrial bodies such as Mars A new composting system has been developed in Japan which utilizes some thermophilic bacteria to attain higher temperature than normally expected in the ordinary composting system Dead body of rat was found to be eaten up by the thermophilic bacteria under aerated condition and oxidized to carbon dioxide and few other inorganics within two hours Ecology of these composting bacteria is structured on the intensive symbiotic interactions among various species that participate in various reaction networks in a concert Complexity in the composting bacteria might be based on multiple interaction and interdependency among participating species and organisms Species identification and phylogeny of symbiotic bacteria and understanding of their ecology have been made Those bacterial systems are active and durable under temperature high in a range of 80 to 100 r C Biological combustion release heat and temperature goes up when air is fed through the reaction bed Since microbial activity decreases at exceeding temperature and release of heat decreases as well temperature in the reacting bed itself-regulated in the range Even though it should be verified composting bacteria themselves are presumed to be safe for human agricultural plant and animal species Their activity is restricted only to the condition under elevated temperature Their activities depend greatly on their symbiotic partners and extreme environment created by them The

  3. Hyperthermophilic hydrogen production from wastewater biosolids by caldicellulosiruptor bescii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastewater biosolids are abundant renewable resources that are rich in organic matter and offer a low cost potential feedstock for biohydrogen production. Relevant literature indicates that biosolids conversion rates are relatively low and therefore this option is not considered feasible. This study...

  4. CrRNA-Protospacer Recognition during CRISPR- Directed DNA Interference Sulfolobus islandicus REY 15A and Structural Studies of CRISPR Binding Proteins (CBP) of Crenarchaeon Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousaei, Marzieh

    ribonucleoprotein complex which is involved directly in defense, there are some less- known parts of the system including CPBs (CRISPR repeat-binding proteins) which are suggested to play a role in transcription. In the first part of my thesis, I provide a brief introduction to archaea and viruses that infect......The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and associated proteins) is one of the important known immune mechanisms in archaea and bacteria. This adaptive immune system degrades invading genetic elements and protects the cell. Amongst 3 main types I, II and III...... archaeal species followed by an introduction to CRISPR, including a description of the different types and subtypes, the role of the seed sequence, PAM and general mode of action of CRISPR. I also provide a brief summary of CRISPR-binding proteins. In the second part, I present the results obtained from...

  5. A single amino acid substitution in the DNA-binding domain of Aeropyrum pernix DNA ligase impairs its interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyonari, Shinichi; Kamigochi, Toru; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2007-09-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is known as a DNA sliding clamp that acts as a platform for the assembly of enzymes involved in DNA replication and repair. Previously, it was reported that a crenarchaeal PCNA formed a heterotrimeric structure, and that each PCNA subunit has distinct binding specificity to PCNA-binding proteins. Here we describe the PCNA-binding properties of a DNA ligase from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1. Based on our findings on the Pyrococcus furiosus DNA ligase-PCNA interaction, we predicted that the aromatic residue, Phe132, in the DNA-binding domain of A. pernix DNA ligase (ApeLig) would play a critical role in binding to A. pernix PCNA (ApePCNA). Surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed that the ApeLig F132A mutant does not interact with an immobilized subunit of ApePCNA. Furthermore, we could not detect any stimulation of the ligation activity of the ApeLig F132A protein by ApePCNA in vitro. These results indicated that the phenylalanine, which is located in our predicted PCNA-binding region in ApeLig, has a critical role for the physical and functional interaction with ApePCNA.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Pyrolobus fumarii type strain (1AT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Huber, Harald [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Yasawong, Montri [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Wirth, Reinhard [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolobus fumarii Bl chl et al. 1997 is the type species of the genus Pyrolobus, which be- longs to the crenarchaeal family Pyrodictiaceae. The species is a facultatively microaerophilic non-motile crenarchaeon. It is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the tree of life and because it is a hyperthermophilic chemolithoautotroph known as the primary producer of organic matter at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. P. fumarii exhibits currently the highest optimal growth temperature of all life forms on earth (106 C). This is the first com- pleted genome sequence of a member of the genus Pyrolobus to be published and only the second genome sequence from a member of the family Pyrodictiaceae. Although Diversa Corporation announced the completion of sequencing of the P. fumarii genome on Septem- ber 25, 2001, this sequence was never released to the public. The 1,843,267 bp long genome with its 1,986 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09141-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ) Genomic sequence for Arabidopsis ... 115 1e-24 CP000816_989( CP000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN...p cDNA c... 95 2e-18 CP000816_691( CP000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN4/I, co... 95 2e-18 CR382122...CP000816_585( CP000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN4/I, co... 82 2e-14 CP000241_289( CP000241 |pid:n

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13249-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ; EC=... 69 2e-10 CP000816_1279( CP000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN4/I, c... 69 2e-10 (B0R7Q2) Re...000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN4/I, co... 54 3e-06 CP000413_1489( CP000413 |pid:none) Lactobacil...1777( CP000800 |pid:none) Escherichia coli E24377A, compl... 49 2e-04 CP000816_1339( CP000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospital...eticus RS-1 D... 42 0.016 CP000816_1165( CP000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospitali

  9. Metagenomic analyses of novel viruses and plasmids from a cultured environmental sample of hyperthermophilic neutrophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett, Roger Antony; Prangishvili, David; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2010-01-01

    ), and derive apparently from archaeal viruses HAV1 and HAV2. Genomic DNA was obtained from samples enriched in filamentous and tadpole-shaped virus-like particles respectively. They yielded few significant matches in public sequence databases reinforcing, further, the wide diversity of archaeal viruses...

  10. Hydrogen Production by a Hyperthermophilic Membrane-Bound Hydrogenase in Soluble Nanolipoprotein Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S E; Hopkins, R C; Blanchette, C; Walsworth, V; Sumbad, R; Fischer, N; Kuhn, E; Coleman, M; Chromy, B; Letant, S; Hoeprich, P; Adams, M W; Henderson, P T

    2008-10-22

    Hydrogenases constitute a promising class of enzymes for ex vivo hydrogen production. Implementation of such applications is currently hindered by oxygen sensitivity and, in the case of membrane-bound hydrogenases (MBH), poor water solubility. Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs), formed from apolipoproteins and phospholipids, offer a novel means to incorporate MBH into in a well-defined water-soluble matrix that maintains the enzymatic activity and is amenable to incorporation into more complex architectures. We report the synthesis, hydrogen-evolving activity and physical characterization of the first MBH-NLP assembly. This may ultimately lead to the development of biomimetic hydrogen production devices.

  11. A novel rudivirus, ARV1, of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Acidianus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Häring, Monika; Peng, Xu

    2005-01-01

    . Other assigned functions include a thymidylate synthase and three DNA-binding proteins. The genome sequence and composition differ strongly from those of the Sulfolobus rudiviruses SIRV1 and SIRV2, and the genome stability is very high, with no sequence variants being detected. Although the sequences...

  12. Anaerobic Oxidation of Benzene by the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Ferroglobus placidus▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Dawn E.; Risso, Carla; Smith, Jessica A.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic benzene oxidation coupled to the reduction of Fe(III) was studied in Ferroglobus placidus in order to learn more about how such a stable molecule could be metabolized under strict anaerobic conditions. F. placidus conserved energy to support growth at 85°C in a medium with benzene provided as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor. The stoichiometry of benzene loss and Fe(III) reduction, as well as the conversion of [14C]benzene to [14C]carbon dioxide, was consistent with complete oxidation of benzene to carbon dioxide with electron transfer to Fe(III). Benzoate, but not phenol or toluene, accumulated at low levels during benzene metabolism, and [14C]benzoate was produced from [14C]benzene. Analysis of gene transcript levels revealed increased expression of genes encoding enzymes for anaerobic benzoate degradation during growth on benzene versus growth on acetate, but genes involved in phenol degradation were not upregulated during growth on benzene. A gene for a putative carboxylase that was more highly expressed in benzene- than in benzoate-grown cells was identified. These results suggest that benzene is carboxylated to benzoate and that phenol is not an important intermediate in the benzene metabolism of F. placidus. This is the first demonstration of a microorganism in pure culture that can grow on benzene under strict anaerobic conditions and for which there is strong evidence for degradation of benzene via clearly defined anaerobic metabolic pathways. Thus, F. placidus provides a much-needed pure culture model for further studies on the anaerobic activation of benzene in microorganisms. PMID:21742914

  13. A virus of hyperthermophilic archaea with a unique architecture among DNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, E.I.; Mochizuki, T,; Quemin, E.R. J.; Schouten, S.; Krupovica, M.; Prangishvili, D.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses package their genetic material in diverse ways. Most known strategies include encapsulation of nucleic acids into spherical or filamentous virions with icosahedral or helical symmetry, respectively. Filamentous viruses with dsDNA genomes are currently associated exclusively with Archaea.

  14. Hyperthermophilic Composting Accelerates the Removal of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Mobile Genetic Elements in Sewage Sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Hanpeng; Lu, Xiaomei; Rensing, Christopher; Friman, Ville Petri; Geisen, Stefan; Chen, Zhi; Yu, Zhen; Wei, Zhong; Zhou, Shungui; Zhu, Yongguan

    2018-01-01

    Composting is an efficient way to convert organic waste into fertilizers. However, waste materials often contain large amounts of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) that can reduce the efficacy of antibiotic treatments when transmitted to humans. Because

  15. Expanding and understanding the genetic toolbox of the hyperthermophilic genus Sulfolobus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Michaela; Berkner, Silvia; Ajon, Malgorzata; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Lipps, Georg; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    Although Sulfolobus species are among the best studied archaeal micro-organisms, the development and availability of genetic tools has lagged behind. in the present paper, we discuss the latest progress in understanding recombination events of exogenous DNA into the chromosomes of Sulfolobus

  16. Characterization of the cupin-type phosphoglucose isomerase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jong-Jin; Fushinobu, Shinya; Ito, Sohei; Jeon, Beong-Sam; Shoun, Hirofumi; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2003-01-30

    The gene encoding phosphoglucose isomerase was cloned from Thermococcus litoralis, and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme, a homodimer of 21.5 kDa subunits, was biochemically characterized. The inhibition constants for four competitive inhibitors were determined. The enzyme contained 1.25 mol Fe and 0.24 mol Zn per dimer. The activity was enhanced by the addition of Fe(2+), but inhibited by Zn(2+) and EDTA. Enzymes with mutations in conserved histidine and glutamate residues in their cupin motifs contained no metals, and showed large decreases in k(cat). The circular dichroism spectra of the mutant enzymes and the wild type enzyme were essentially the same but with slight differences.

  17. Maillard reactions and increased enzyme inactivation during oligosaccharide synthesis by a hyperthermophilic glycosidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, M.E.; Hellemond, van E.W.; Janssen, A.E.M.; Boom, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    The thermostable Pyrococcus furiosus beta-glycosidase was used for oligosaccharide production from lactose in a kinetically controlled reaction. Our experiments showed that higher temperatures are beneficial for the absolute as well as relative oligosaccharide yield. However, at reaction

  18. The ABC of ABC-transport in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, S

    2003-01-01

    Living organisms of our earth can be divided into two groups, the prokaryotes and the eukaryotes. Eukaryotic cells have a nucleus, a special compartment in the cell, where the genetic material, the DNA is located. The DNA in the prokaryotic cell is floating freely in the cell. The eukaryotes, that

  19. Purification and characterization of the oxygen-thermostable hydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum camini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2009-10-01

    Aeropyrum camini that was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney, possessed two hydrogenases (161 and 85 kDa) in its soluble fraction. The 85-kDa hydrogenase was purified to homogeneity using several chromatography columns. The specific activities of the purified hydrogenase were: 14.8 micromol methyl viologen(ox)/mg/min for hydrogen oxidation, and 14.6 micromol methyl viologen(red)/mg/min for proton reduction. The oxygen stabilities of hydrogenases that were purified from A. camini and the hydrogen thermophilic bacterium Persephonella hydrogeniphila, were compared. The hydrogenase purified from P. hydrogeniphila completely lost its activity following a 96-h exposure to atmosphere; however, the A. camini hydrogenase maintained 75% of its initial activity, even after a 168 h of atmospheric exposure. A. camini hydrogenase showed a half-life of 48 h at 90 degrees C, while P. hydrogeniphila hydrogenase showed complete denaturation after a 30 min incubation at the same temperature. Nine residues of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of A. camini hydrogenases (MARLLMIPGT) correspond to the protein sequence encoded by the hypothetical soluble hydrogenase subunit gene (APE2423) from A. pernix strain K1. A. camini hydrogenase has a high thermostability and is very tolerant to oxygen; therefore, it may be used for actual H(2) production.

  20. Stability of diether C(25,25) liposomes from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmajner, Dejan; Ota, Ajda; Sentjurc, Marjeta; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar

    2011-03-01

    Temperature and pH effects were studied for stability, structural organization, fluidity and permeability of vesicles from a polar lipid methanol fraction isolated from the Aeropyrum pernix. We determined the permeability of C(25,25) liposomes using fluorescence intensity of released calcein. At pH 7.0 and 9.0, and from 85°C to 98°C, only 10% of entrapped calcein was released. After 10 h at 90°C, calcein release reached 27%, independent of pH. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements of hydrophobic probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene revealed gradual changes up to 60°C. At higher temperatures, the anisotropy did not change significantly. Fluorescence alone did not provide detailed and direct structural information about these C(25,25) liposomes, so we used electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). From EPR spectra, mean membrane fluidity determined according to maximal hyperfine splitting and empirical correlation times showed continuous increases with temperature. Computer simulation of EPR spectra showed heterogeneous membranes of these C(25,25) liposomes: at low temperatures, they showed three types of membrane regions characterized by different motional modes. Above 65°C, the membrane becomes homogeneous with only one fluid-like region. DSC thermograms of C(25,25) liposomes reveal a very broad and endothermic transition in the temperature range from 0°C to 40°C. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of the first archaeal oligopeptide-binding protein from the hyperthermophile Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Gianna; Casbarra, Annarita; Fiume, Immacolata; Catara, Giuliana; Capasso, Antonio; Marino, Gennaro; Onesti, Silvia; Rossi, Mosé

    2006-10-01

    The archaeon Aeropyrum pernix grows optimally at 90 degrees C and derives energy primarily from aerobic degradation of complex proteinaceous substrates. The ability of these nutrients to sustain growth is generally associated with the presence of oligopeptide transport systems, such as the well-known protein-dependent ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. This study is concerned with the isolation and characterisation of the first archaeal oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA(Ap)) from the extracellular medium of A. pernix. The protein shows a pI of 3.9 and a molecular mass of about 90 kDa under native conditions. By using a proteomic approach, the OppA(Ap)-encoding gene was identified (APE1583) and about 55% of the protein amino-acid sequence was validated. The extracellular purified protein was able to efficiently bind oligopeptide substrates such as Xenopsin. The amount of a liganded peptide to OppA(Ap) was about 70% at 90 degrees C using a 1/100 (w/w) OppA(Ap)/substrate ratio. Sequence comparisons showed a weak but significant similarity of OppA(Ap) with bacterial oligopeptide binding proteins. Furthermore, APE1583 neighbouring genes encode for the cognate components of an ABC transport system, suggesting that these ORFs are organised in an operon-like structure, with OppA(Ap )as the extracellular component for the uptake of oligopeptides.

  2. Proteomic mapping of the hyperthermophilic and acidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Richard C.; Young, Mark J.; Stedman, Kenneth M.; Dratz, Edward A.

    2006-07-14

    A proteomic map of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2, an archaeon that grows optimally at 80 C and pH 3.2, was developed using high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting. A total of 867 protein spots (659 aqueous tris-soluble spots and 208 aqueous tris-insoluble) were mapped over IPG 3-10, 4-7, and 6-11, with second dimension gels made of 8-18% polyacrylamide. 324 different gene products were represented by the 867 spots, with 274 gene products being identified in the tris-soluble fractions and 100 gene products in the tris-insoluble portion. Fifty gene products were found on gels from both fractions. Additionally, an average of 1.50 + 0.12 isoforms/per protein were identified. This mapping study confirmed the expression of proteins involved in numerous metabolic, transport, energy production, nucleic acid replication, translation, and transcription pathways. Of particular interest, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (SSO2537) was detected even though the pathway for gluconeogenesis is unknown for this archaeon. Tris-soluble fractions contained many cytosolic proteins while tris-insoluble fractions contained many membrane-associated proteins, including ABC transporters and an ATP synthase. This study provides an optimized 2-DE approach for investigating the biochemical pathways and post-translational modifications employed by Sulfolobus to survive in its extreme environment.

  3. [Capacity of hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota for decomposition of refractory protiens (α- and β-keratins)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidzhieva, S Kh; Derbikova, K S; Kublanov, I V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E A

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic thermophilic archaea of the genera Thermogladius and Desulfurococcus capable of a- and P3-keratin decomposition were isolated from hot springs of Kamchatka and Kunashir Island. For two of them (strains 2355k and 3008g), the presence of high-molecular mass, cell-bound endopeptidases active against nonhydrolyzed and partially hydrolyzed proteins at high values of temperature and pH was shown. Capacity for β-keratin decomposition was also found in collection strains (type strains of Desulfurococcus amylolyticus subsp. amylolyticus, D. mucosus subsp. mobilis, and D. fermentans).

  4. Production of Recombinant and Tagged Proteins in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, S.-V.; Jonuscheit, M.; Dinkelaker, S.; Urich, T.; Kletzin, A.; Tampé, R.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Schleper, C.

    Many systems are available for the production of recombinant proteins in bacterial and eukaryotic model organisms, which allow us to study proteins in their native hosts and to identify protein-protein interaction partners. In contrast, only a few transformation systems have been developed for

  5. CRISPR-mediated defense mechanisms in the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Sulfolobus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manica, Andrea; Schleper, Christa

    2013-01-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-mediated virus defense based on small RNAs is a hallmark of archaea and also found in many bacteria. Archaeal genomes and, in particular, organisms of the extremely thermoacidophilic genus Sulfolobus, carry extensive CRISPR loci each with dozens of sequence signatures (spacers) able to mediate targeting and degradation of complementary invading nucleic acids. The diversity of CRISPR systems and their associated protein complexes indicates an extensive functional breadth and versatility of this adaptive immune system. Sulfolobus solfataricus and S. islandicus represent two of the best characterized genetic model organisms in the archaea not only with respect to the CRISPR system. Here we address and discuss in a broader context particularly recent progress made in understanding spacer recruitment from foreign DNA, production of small RNAs, in vitro activity of CRISPR-associated protein complexes and attack of viruses and plasmids in in vivo test systems. PMID:23535277

  6. DHAP-dependent aldolases from (hyper)thermophiles: biochemistry and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcicchio, P.; Wolterink-van Loo, S.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Oost, van der J.

    2014-01-01

    Generating new carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds in an enantioselective way is one of the big challenges in organic synthesis. Aldolases are a natural tool for stereoselective C-C bond formation in a green and sustainable way. This review will focus on thermophilic aldolases in general and on

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0189 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0189 ref|YP_001435838.1| hypothetical protein Igni_1255 [Ignicoccus hospital...is KIN4/I] gb|ABU82431.1| hypothetical protein Igni_1255 [Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN4/I] YP_001435838.1 1e-04 21% ...

  8. AcEST: DK953902 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ult : TrEMBL tr_hit_id A8ABH9 Definition tr|A8ABH9|A8ABH9_IGNH4 Putative uncharacterized protein OS=Ignicoccus hospital...d protein OS=Lyngb... 33 9.1 >tr|A8ABH9|A8ABH9_IGNH4 Putative uncharacterized protein OS=Ignicoccus hospital

  9. AcEST: DK952901 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Definition tr|A8A8G8|A8A8G8_IGNH4 Anaerobic ribonucleoside-triphosphate reductase OS=Ignicoccus hospital...te reductase OS=Ignicoccus hospitalis (strain KIN4/I / DSM 18386 / JCM 14125) GN=Igni_0036 PE=4 SV=1 Length

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12921-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lodictyon luteolum DSM 273, co... 35 2.4 CP000816_496( CP000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospital...|pid:none) Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. ... 33 7.1 CP000816_1087( CP000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospital

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TNIG-22-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TNIG-22-0045 ref|YP_001435838.1| hypothetical protein Igni_1255 [Ignicoccus hospital...is KIN4/I] gb|ABU82431.1| hypothetical protein Igni_1255 [Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN4/I] YP_001435838.1 0.066 23% ...

  12. AcEST: BP918973 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8 Definition sp|A8A8L8|SUCC_IGNH4 Succinyl-CoA ligase [ADP-forming] subunit beta OS=Ignicoccus hospital...e [ADP-forming] subunit beta OS=Ignicoccus hospitalis (strain KIN4/I / DSM 18386 / JCM 14125) GN=sucC PE=3 S

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10171-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available imus SCM1, co... 99 3e-19 CP000816_1203( CP000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN4/I, c... 96 2e-18 B71...P000816_794( CP000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN4/I, co... 80 1e-13 CU6

  14. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05084-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -10 CP000816_1087( CP000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN4/I, c... 69 2e-10 CP000283_3255( CP000283 |...AN1pec, complete g... 49 2e-04 CP000816_596( CP000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN4/I, co... 49 2e-0

  15. Characterization of a Single-Stranded DNA-Binding-Like Protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans--A Nucleic Acid Binding Protein with Broad Substrate Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Olszewski

    Full Text Available SSB (single-stranded DNA-binding proteins play an essential role in all living cells and viruses, as they are involved in processes connected with ssDNA metabolism. There has recently been an increasing interest in SSBs, since they can be applied in molecular biology techniques and analytical methods. Nanoarchaeum equitans, the only known representative of Archaea phylum Nanoarchaeota, is a hyperthermophilic, nanosized, obligatory parasite/symbiont of Ignicoccus hospitalis.This paper reports on the ssb-like gene cloning, gene expression and characterization of a novel nucleic acid binding protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans archaeon (NeqSSB-like protein. This protein consists of 243 amino acid residues and one OB fold per monomer. It is biologically active as a monomer like as SSBs from some viruses. The NeqSSB-like protein displays a low sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli SSB, namely 10% identity and 29% similarity, and is the most similar to the Sulfolobus solfataricus SSB (14% identity and 32% similarity. The NeqSSB-like protein binds to ssDNA, although it can also bind mRNA and, surprisingly, various dsDNA forms, with no structure-dependent preferences as evidenced by gel mobility shift assays. The size of the ssDNA binding site, which was estimated using fluorescence spectroscopy, is 7 ± 1 nt. No salt-dependent binding mode transition was observed. NeqSSB-like protein probably utilizes a different model for ssDNA binding than the SSB proteins studied so far. This protein is highly thermostable; the half-life of the ssDNA binding activity is 5 min at 100 °C and melting temperature (T(m is 100.2 °C as shown by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis.NeqSSB-like protein is a novel highly thermostable protein which possesses a unique broad substrate specificity and is able to bind all types of nucleic acids.

  16. The composition, structure and stability of a group II chaperonin are temperature regulated in a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Hiromi K; Yaoi, Takuro; Brocchieri, Luciano; McMillan, R Andrew; Alton, Thomas; Trent, Jonathan D

    2003-04-01

    The hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae contains group II chaperonins, known as rosettasomes, which are two nine-membered rings composed of three different 60 kDa subunits (TF55 alpha, beta and gamma). We sequenced the gene for the gamma subunit and studied the temperature-dependent changes in alpha, beta and gamma expression, their association into rosettasomes and their phylogenetic relationships. Alpha and beta gene expression was increased by heat shock (30 min, 86 degrees C) and decreased by cold shock (30 min, 60 degrees C). Gamma expression was undetectable at heat shock temperatures and low at normal temperatures (75-79 degrees C), but induced by cold shock. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that in vitro alpha and beta subunits form homo-oligomeric rosettasomes, and mixtures of alpha, beta and gamma form hetero-oligomeric rosettasomes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that beta homo-oligomeric rosettasomes and all hetero-oligomeric rosettasomes associate into filaments. In vivo rosettasomes were hetero-oligomeric with an average subunit ratio of 1alpha:1beta:0.1gamma in cultures grown at 75 degrees C, a ratio of 1alpha:3beta:1gamma in cultures grown at 60 degrees C and a ratio of 2alpha:3beta:0gamma after 86 degrees C heat shock. Using differential scanning calorimetry, we determined denaturation temperatures (Tm) for alpha, beta and gamma subunits of 95.7 degrees C, 96.7 degrees C and 80.5 degrees C, respectively, and observed that rosettasomes containing gamma were relatively less stable than those with alpha and/or beta only. We propose that, in vivo, the rosettasome structure is determined by the relative abundance of subunits and not by a fixed geometry. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicate that archaeal chaperonin subunits underwent multiple duplication events within species (paralogy). The independent evolution of these paralogues raises the possibility that chaperonins have functionally diversified between species.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an esterese with a novel domein from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, L.; Levisson, M.; Hendriks, S.N.A.; Akveld, T.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Dijkstra, B.W.; Oost, van der J.

    2007-01-01

    Esterase A4 (EA4) is a timer protein found in diapause eggs of the silkworm Bombyx mori. The gene for this metalloglycoprotein was cloned from B. mori eggs and expressed using a baculovirus expression system in silkworm pupae. Crystals of the purified protein have been grown that diffract to beyond

  18. Identification and Characterization of an Archaeal Kojibiose Catabolic Pathway in the Hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus sp. Strain ST04

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Dong-Ho; Holden, James F.; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2014-01-01

    A unique gene cluster responsible for kojibiose utilization was identified in the genome of Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04. The proteins it encodes hydrolyze kojibiose, a disaccharide product of glucose caramelization, and form glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) in two steps. Heterologous expression of the kojibiose-related enzymes in Escherichia coli revealed that two genes, Py04_1502 and Py04_1503, encode kojibiose phosphorylase (designated PsKP, for Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 kojibiose phosphorylase) a...

  19. Enzyme inactivation due to Maillard reactions during oligosaccharide synthesis by a hyperthermophilic glycosidase : influence of enzyme immobilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, M.E.; Thewessen, A.J.H.; Janssen, A.E.M.; Boom, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    The extremely thermostable beta-glycosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus was used for the production of oligosaccharides with lactose as a substrate. Using a thermozyme made it possible to operate at higher reaction temperatures, and thus to increase the substrate concentration. This increased the

  20. The phosphoglucose isomerase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a unique glycolytic enzyme that belongs to the cupin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhees, C H; Huynen, M A; Ward, D E; Schiltz, E; de Vos, W M; van der Oost, J

    2001-11-02

    Pyrococcus furiosus uses a variant of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway during growth on sugars. All but one of the genes that encode the glycolytic enzymes of P. furiosus have previously been identified, either by homology searching of its genome or by reversed genetics. We here report the isolation of the missing link of the pyrococcal glycolysis, the phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), which was purified to homogeneity from P. furiosus and biochemically characterized. The P. furiosus PGI, a dimer of identical 23.5-kDa subunits, catalyzes the reversible isomerization of glucose 6-phosphate to fructose 6-phosphate, with K(m) values of 1.99 and 0.63 mm, respectively. An optimum pH of 7.0 has been determined in both directions, and at its optimum temperature of 90 degrees C the enzyme has a half-life of 2.4 h. The N-terminal sequence was used for the identification of the pgiA gene in the P. furiosus genome. The pgiA transcription start site has been determined, and a monocistronic messenger was detected in P. furiosus during growth on maltose and pyruvate. The pgiA gene was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The deduced amino acid sequence of this first archaeal PGI revealed that it is not related to its bacterial and eukaryal counterparts. In contrast, this archaeal PGI shares similarity with the cupin superfamily that consists of a variety of proteins that are generally involved in sugar metabolism in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. As for the P. furiosus PGI, distinct phylogenetic origins have previously been reported for other enzymes from the pyrococcal glycolytic pathway. Apparently, convergent evolution by recruitment of several unique enzymes has resulted in the unique Pyrococcus glycolysis.

  1. The microcosm of a biogas fermenter: comparison of moderate hyperthermophilic (60 C) with thermophilic (55 C) conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakat, Niclas [Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Faculty Life Sciences, HAW Hamburg, Hamburg-Bergedorf (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Westphal, Antje [Universitaet Hamburg, Biozentrum Klein Flottbek, Hamburg (Germany); Satke, Kaspar; Scherer, Paul [Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Faculty Life Sciences, HAW Hamburg, Hamburg-Bergedorf (Germany); Schmidt, Stefan [University of KwaZulu-Natal, Discipline of Microbiology, School of Biochemistry, Genetics and Microbiology, Pietermaritzburg (South Africa)

    2010-12-15

    An automated biogas fermenter running continuously for about two years using fodder and sugar beet silage as mono-substrate without manure addition was analyzed simultaneously by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and microscopy. In this long-term fermentation study, an oscillating population of prokaryotes was observed. The presence of most bacteria expected to be involved in hydrolysis of biomass via the anaerobic food chain was confirmed. In any case the methanogen population appeared more stable as it exhibited a lesser degree of variability. The more fluctuating population structure of the bacteria might be due to the fact that most of them were carbohydrate fermenting species which were therefore somewhat interchangeable. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens using H{sub 2}+CO{sub 2} as substrate (Methanobacteriales and Methanomicrobiales) clearly dominated. Therefore, the methanogenesis of energy crops is apparently initiated by gasification to H{sub 2}+CO{sub 2} followed by the biogasification to CH{sub 4}+CO{sub 2}. Acetotrophic methanogens (Methanosarcinales) represented a minority with a proportion of 10% or less of the methanogenic population (only at 55 C). The acetotrophic Methanosaeta seemed to be completely absent at temperatures of 55 or 60 C. Pure culture studies established previously that Methanobacteria tolerate at least a sixfold higher ammonium concentration (6000 mg/L) than Methanosaeta and a twofold higher ammonium concentration than Methansarcina. This indicates that running industrial scale fermenters at thermophilic instead of the common mesophilic conditions might be an effective way to exclude the more stress susceptible (e.g. high concentration of ammonium, H{sub 2}S and acetate) acetotrophic methanogens and therefore improve the reliability of such plants. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Energy conservation by oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen via a sodium ion current in a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae Kyu; Mayer, Florian; Kang, Sung Gyun; Müller, Volker

    2014-08-05

    Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 is known to grow by the anaerobic oxidation of formate to CO2 and H2, a reaction that operates near thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we demonstrate that this reaction is coupled to ATP synthesis by a transmembrane ion current. Formate oxidation leads to H(+) translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane that then drives Na(+) translocation. The ion-translocating electron transfer system is rather simple, consisting of only a formate dehydrogenase module, a membrane-bound hydrogenase module, and a multisubunit Na(+)/H(+) antiporter module. The electrochemical Na(+) gradient established then drives ATP synthesis. These data give a mechanistic explanation for chemiosmotic energy conservation coupled to formate oxidation to CO2 and H2. Because it is discussed that the membrane-bound hydrogenase with the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter module are ancestors of complex I of mitochondrial and bacterial electron transport these data also shed light on the evolution of ion transport in complex I-like electron transport chains.

  3. Structural and genomic properties of the hyperthermophilic archaeal virus ATV with an extracellular stage of the reproductive cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, David; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Häring, Monika

    2006-01-01

    a periodic structure. Tail development produces a one half reduction in the volume of the virion, concurrent with a slight expansion of the virion surface. The circular, double-stranded DNA genome contains 62,730 bp and is exceptional for a crenarchaeal virus in that it carries four putative transposable...... complexity sequence domains, which are unusual for archaea. One protein, in particular P800, resembles an intermediate filament protein in its structural properties. It is modified in the two-tailed, but not in the tail-less, virion particles and it may contribute to viral tail development. Exceptionally...

  4. Cloning and expression of the catalase-peroxidase gene from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus and characterization of the enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kengen, S.W.M.; Bikker, F.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2001-01-01

    A putative perA gene from Archaeoglobus fulgidus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), and the recombinant catalase-peroxidase was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 85 kDa. UV-visible spectroscopic analysis indicated the presence of

  5. The Phosphoglucose Isomerase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a Unique Glycolytic Enzyme that belongs to the Cupin Superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhees, C.H.; Huynen, M.A.; Ward, D.E.; Schiltz, E.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2001-01-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus uses a variant of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway during growth on sugars. All but one of the genes that encode the glycolytic enzymes of P. furiosus have previously been identified, either by homology searching of its genome or by reversed genetics. We here report the isolation of

  6. A novel extracellular subtilisin-like protease from the hyperthermophile Aeropyrum pernix K1: biochemical properties, cloning, and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catara, G; Ruggiero, G; La Cara, F; Digilio, F A; Capasso, A; Rossi, M

    2003-10-01

    A novel extracellular serine protease designated Pernisine was purified to homogeneity and characterized from the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1. The molecular mass, estimated by SDS-PAGE analysis and by gel filtration chromatography, was about 34 kDa suggesting that the enzyme is monomeric. Pernisine was active in a broad range of pH (5.0-12.0) and temperature (60-120 degrees C) with maximal activity at 90 degrees C and between pH 8.0 and 9.0. In the presence of 1 mM CaCl(2) the activity, as a function of the temperature, reached a maximum at 90 degrees C but at 120 degrees C the enzyme retained almost 80% of its maximal activity. Activity inhibition studies suggest that the enzyme is a serine metalloprotease and biochemical data indicate that Pernisine is a subtilisin-like enzyme. The protease gene, identified from the sequenced genome of A. pernix, was amplified from total genomic DNA by PCR technique to construct the expression plasmid pGEX-Pernisine. The Pernisine, lacking the leader sequence, was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 strain as a fusion protein with glutathione- S-transferase. The biochemical properties of the recombinant enzyme were found to be similar to those of the native enzyme.

  7. Thermostability and reactivity in organic solvent of O-phospho-L-serine sulfhydrylase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Asai, Shinji; Nakata, Kaori; Kunimoto, Kohei; Oguri, Masateru; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    O-phospho-l-serine sulfhydrylase (OPSS) from archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 is able to synthesize l-cysteine even at 80 °C. In this article, we compared thermal stability and reactivity in organic solvent of OPSS with those of O-acetyl-l-serine sulfhydrylase B (OASS-B) from Escherichia coli. As a result, the thermostability of OPSS was much higher than that of OASS-B. Moreover, the activity of OPSS increased in the reaction mixture containing the organic solvent, such as N, N'-dimethyl formamide and 1,4-dioxane, whereas that of OASS-B gradually decreased as the content of organic solvent increased. From the crystal structural analysis, the intramolecular electrostatic interactions of N-terminal domain in OPSS seemed to be correlated with the tolerance of OPSS to high temperature and organic solvent. These results indicate that OPSS is more superior to OASS-B for the industrial production of l-cysteine and unnatural amino acids that are useful pharmaceuticals in the presence of organic solvent.

  8. Recognition sites of glycine tRNA for glycyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Koji; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2005-01-01

    To elucidate the tRNA recognition sites of glycine tRNA from an extreme thermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, we examined glycylation activities using in vitro mutant glycine tRNA transcripts and recombinant A. pernix glycyl-tRNA synthetase. The recognition nucleotides were determined to be C35 and C36 of anticodon, C2-G71 and G3-C70 base-pairs of acceptor stem. However, discriminator base A73 was not recognized by glycyl-tRNA synthetase.

  9. Hydrogen production and enzyme activities in the hyperthermophile Thermococcus paralvinellae grown on maltose, tryptone and agricultural waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Hensley

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermococcus may be an important alternative source of H2 in the hot subseafloor in otherwise low H2 environments such as some hydrothermal vents and oil reservoirs. It may also be useful in industry for rapid agricultural waste treatment and concomitant H2 production. Thermococcus paralvinellae grown at 82°C without sulfur produced up to 5 mmol of H2 L-1 at rates of 5-36 fmol H2 cell-1 h-1 on 0.5% (wt vol-1 maltose, 0.5% (wt vol-1 tryptone, and 0.5% maltose + 0.05% tryptone media. Two potentially inhibiting conditions, the presence of 10 mM acetate and low pH (pH 5 in maltose-only medium, did not significantly affect growth or H2 production. Growth rates, H2 production rates, and cell yields based on H2 production were the same as those for Pyrococcus furiosus grown at 95°C on the same media for comparison. Acetate, butyrate, succinate, isovalerate and formate were also detected as end products. After 100 h, T. paralvinellae produced up to 5 mmol of H2 L-1 of medium when grown on up to 70% (vol vol-1 waste milk from cows undergoing treatment for mastitis with the bacterial antibiotic Ceftiofur and from untreated cows. The amount of H2 produced by T. paralvinellae increased with increasing waste concentrations, but decreased in P. furiosus cultures supplemented with waste milk above 1% concentration. All mesophilic bacteria from the waste milk that grew on Luria Bertani, Sheep’s Blood (selective for Staphylococcus, the typical cause of mastitis, and MacConkey (selective for Gram-negative enteric bacteria agar plates were killed by heat during incubation at 82°C. Ceftiofur, which is heat labile, was below the detection limit following incubation at 82°C. T. paralvinellae also produced up to 6 mmol of H2 L-1 of medium when grown on 0.1-10% (wt vol-1 spent brewery grain while P. furiosus produced < 1 mmol of H2 L-1. Twelve of 13 enzyme activities in T. paralvinellae showed significant (p<0.05 differences across six different growth conditions; however, methyl viologen-dependent membrane hydrogenase activity remained constant across all media types. The results demonstrate the potential of at least some Thermococcus species to produce H2 if protein and α-glucosides are present as substrates.

  10. Mutational analyses of the enzymes involved in the metabolism of hydrogen by the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit J Schut

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyrococcus furiosus grows optimally near 100°C by fermenting carbohydrates to produce hydrogen (H2 or, if elemental sulfur (S0, is present hydrogen sulfide instead. It contains two cytoplasmic hydrogenases, SHI and SHII, that use NADP(H as an electron carrier, and a membrane bound hydrogenase (MBH, that utilizes the redox protein ferredoxin. We previously constructed deletion strains lacking SHI and/or SHII and showed that they exhibited no obvious phenotype. This study has now been extended to include biochemical analyses and growth studies using the ΔSHI and ΔSHII deletion strains together with strains lacking a functional MBH (ΔMbhL. Hydrogenase activities in cytoplasmic extracts of ΔSHII and the parent strain were similar but were much lower (<10% in the ΔSHI strain, and no activity was detected in the ΔSHIΔSHII double deletion strain, indicating that SHI is responsible for most of the cytoplasmic hydrogenase activity. In contrast, the ΔmbhL strain showed no growth in the absence of S0, confirming the hypothesis that, in the absence of S0, MBH is the only enzyme that can dispose of reductant (as H2 generated during sugar oxidation. The deletion strain devoid of all three hydrogenases also grew only in the presence of S0 and did not produce any detectable H2. When grown in the presence of limiting S0, both H2S and H2 were produced by the parent and ΔSHI/ΔSHII strains. A significant amount of H2 was also produced by the ΔmbhL strain, showing that SHI can produce H2 from NADPH in vivo, although this does not enable significant growth of ΔmbhL in the absence of S0. We propose that the physiological function of SHI is to recycle H2 and provide a link between external H2 and the intracellular pool of NADPH needed for biosynthesis. This likely has a distinct energetic advantage in the environment, but it is clearly not required for growth of the organism under the usual laboratory conditions. The function of SHII, however, remains unknown.

  11. Temperature effect on the sulfur isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction by two strains of the hyperthermophilic Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchell, K.; Heyer, A.; Canfield, D.E.; Hoek, J.; Habicht, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Sulfur isotope fractionation during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by two strains of the thermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus (strains VC-16 and Z) was explored over the entire temperature range of growth. The optimal cell-specific sulfate reduction rate (14 fmol cell-1 h -1) was

  12. Genomics and genetics of Sulfolobus islandicus LAL14/1, a model hyperthermophilic archaeon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaubert, Carole; Danioux, Chloë; Oberto, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The 2 465 177 bp genome of Sulfolobus islandicus LAL14/1, host of the model rudivirus SIRV2, was sequenced. Exhaustive comparative genomic analysis of S. islandicus LAL14/1 and the nine other completely sequenced S. islandicus strains isolated from Iceland, Russia and USA revealed a highly synten...

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04338-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN4/I, co... 63 1e-08 DQ199645_1( DQ199645 |pid:none) Astragalus si...10 CP000816_455( CP000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN4/I, co... 43 0.010 AG1946( AG1946 ) hypotheti...pid:none) Lactobacillus helveticus DPC 457... 40 0.082 CP000816_144( CP000816 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospit... |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN4/I, complete genome. Length = 147 Score = 62.8 bits (151), Expect = 1e...0854 |pid:none) Mycobacterium marinum M, comple... 33 7.7 >CP000816_562( CP000816

  14. AcEST: DK948385 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ype ATP synthase subunit E OS=Ignicoccus hospitalis (strain KIN4/I / DSM 18386 / ...Link to BlastX Result : Swiss-Prot sp_hit_id A8ABF5 Definition sp|A8ABF5|VATE_IGNH4 V-type ATP synthase subunit E OS=Ignicoccus hospi...talis (strain KIN4/I / DSM 18386 / JCM 14125) Align length 35 Score (bit) 32.3 E-va

  15. AcEST: DK958257 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available k to BlastX Result : TrEMBL tr_hit_id A8A8E1 Definition tr|A8A8E1|A8A8E1_IGNH4 Beta-lactamase domain protein OS=Ignicoccus hospital...... 34 8.6 >tr|A8A8E1|A8A8E1_IGNH4 Beta-lactamase domain protein OS=Ignicoccus hospitalis (strain KIN4/I / D

  16. Identification of the rate‐limiting step of the peroxygenase reactions catalyzed by the thermophilic cytochrome P450 from Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hayakawa, Shohei; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Yohda, Masafumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 from the thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7 (P450st) is a thermophilic cytochrome P450 that shows high tolerance of harsh conditions and is capable of catalyzing some peroxygenase reactions...

  17. Photobiosynthesis of stable and functional silver/silver chloride nanoparticles with hydrolytic activity using hyperthermophilic β-glucosidases with industrial potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Juscemácia N; Tofanello, Aryane; da Silva, Viviam M; Sato, Juliana A P; Squina, Fabio M; Nantes, Iseli L; Garcia, Wanius

    2017-09-01

    The β-glucosidases are important enzymes employed in a large number of processes and industrial applications, including biofuel production from biomass. Therefore, in this study, we reported for the first time the photobiosynthesis of stable and functional silver/silver chloride nanoparticles (Ag/AgCl-NPs) using two hyperthermostable bacterial β-glucosidases with industrial potential. The syntheses were straightforward and rapid processes carried out by mixing β-glucosidase and silver nitrate (in buffer 10mM Tris-HCl, pH 8) under irradiation with light (over a wavelength range of 450-600nm), therefore, compatible with the green chemistry procedure. Synthesized Ag/AgCl-NPs were characterized using a series of physical techniques. Absorption spectroscopy showed a strong absorption band centered at 460nm due to surface plasmon resonance of the Ag-NPs. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the Ag/AgCl-NPs were purely crystalline in nature. Under electron microscopy, Ag/AgCl-NPs of variable diameter ranging from 10 to 100nm can be visualized. Furthermore, electron microscopy, zeta potential and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results confirmed the presence of β-glucosidases coating and stabilizing the Ag/AgCl-NPs. Finally, the results showed that the enzymatic activities were maintained in the β-glucosidases assisted Ag/AgCl-NPs. The information described here should provide a useful basis for future studies of β-glucosidases assisted Ag/AgCl-NPs, including biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Structural analysis by reductive cleavage with LiAlH4 of an allyl ether choline-phospholipid, archaetidylcholine, from the hyperthermophilic methanoarchaeon Methanopyrus kandleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Masateru; Morii, Hiroyuki; Matsuno, Koji; Ohga, Mami; Stetter, Karl O; Koga, Yosuke

    2002-09-01

    A choline-containing phospholipid (PL-4) in Methanopyrus kandleri cells was identified as archaetidylcholine, which has been described by Sprott et al. (1997). The PL-4 consisted of a variety of molecular species differing in hydrocarbon composition. Most of the PL-4 was acid-labile because of its allyl ether bond. The identity of PL-4 was confirmed by thin-layer chromatography followed by positive staining with Dragendorff reagent and fast-atom bombardment-mass spectrometry. A new method of LiAlH4 hydrogenolysis was developed to cleave allyl ether bonds and recover the corresponding hydrocarbons. We confirmed the validity of the LiAlH4 method in a study of the model compound synthetic unsaturated archaetidic acid (2,3-di-O-geranylgeranyl-sn-glycerol-1-phosphate). Saturated ether bonds were not cleaved by the LiAlH4 method. The hydrocarbons formed following LiAlH4 hydrogenolysis of PL-4 were identified by gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Four kinds of hydrocarbons with one to four double bonds were detected: 47% of the hydrocarbons had four double bonds; 11% had three double bonds; 14% had two double bonds; 7% had one double bond; and 6% were saturated species. The molecular species composition of PL-4 was also estimated based on acid lability: 77% of the molecular species had two acid-labile hydrocarbons; 11% had one acid-labile and one acid-stable hydrocarbon; and 11% had two acid-stable hydrocarbons. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a specific chemical degradation method for the structural analysis of allyl ether phospholipid in archaea.

  19. Constitutive high-level expression of a codon-optimized β-fructosidase gene from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Carmen; Martínez, Duniesky; Trujillo, Luis E; Mazola, Yuliet; González, Ernesto; Pérez, Enrique R; Hernández, Lázaro

    2013-02-01

    Enzymes for use in the sugar industry are preferred to be thermotolerant. In this study, a synthetic codon-optimized gene encoding a highly thermostable β-fructosidase (BfrA, EC 3.2.1.26) from the bacterium Thermotoga maritima was expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The gradual increase of the transgene dosage from one to four copies under the control of the constitutive glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter had an additive effect on BfrA yield without causing cell toxicity. Maximal values of cell biomass (115 g/l, dry weight) and overall invertase activity (241 U/ml) were reached at 72 h in fed-batch fermentations using cane sugar as the main carbon source for growth. Secretion driven by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor signal peptide resulted in periplasmic retention (44 %) and extracellular release (56 %) of BfrA. The presence of N-linked oligosaccharides did not influence the optimal activity, thermal stability, kinetic properties, substrate specificity, and exo-type action mode of the yeast-secreted BfrA in comparison to the native unglycosylated enzyme. Complete inversion of cane sugar at initial concentration of 60 % (w/v) was achieved by periplasmic BfrA in undisrupted cells reacting at pH 5.5 and 70 °C, with average productivity of 4.4 g of substrate hydrolyzed per grams of biomass (wet weight) per hour. The high yield of fully active glycosylated BfrA here attained by recombinant P. pastoris in a low-cost fermentation process appears to be attractive for the large-scale production of this thermostable enzyme useful for the manufacture of inverted sugar syrup.

  20. Improving the Catalytic Activity of Hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus horikoshii Prolidase for Detoxification of Organophosphorus Nerve Agents over a Broad Range of Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Pro, 4mM final concentration) and allowed to proceed for 10min at 100◦C. The reaction was stopped with 500 μL glacial acetic acid and 500 μL ninhydrin ...specific activity was calculated using the absorbance value at 515 nm and an extinction coefficient of 4,570M−1 cm−1 for the ninhydrin -proline complex

  1. Improving the Catalytic Activity of Hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus horikoshii Prolidase for Detoxification of Organophosphorus Nerve Agents over a Broad Range of Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey M. Theriot

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prolidases hydrolyze Xaa-Pro dipeptides and can also cleave the P-F and P-O bonds found in organophosphorus (OP compounds, including the nerve agents soman and sarin. Ph1prol (PH0974 has previously been isolated and characterized from Pyrococcus horikoshii and was shown to have higher catalytic activity over a broader pH range, higher affinity for metal, and increased thermostability compared to P. furiosus prolidase, Pfprol (PF1343. To obtain a better enzyme for OP nerve agent decontamination and to investigate the structural factors that may influence protein thermostability and thermoactivity, randomly mutated Ph1prol enzymes were prepared. Four Ph1prol mutants (A195T/G306S-, Y301C/K342N-, E127G/E252D-, and E36V-Ph1prol were isolated which had greater thermostability and improved activity over a broader range of temperatures against Xaa-Pro dipeptides and OP nerve agents compared to wild type Pyrococcus prolidases.

  2. Structural analysis by reductive cleavage with LiAlH4 of an allyl ether choline-phospholipid, archaetidylcholine, from the hyperthermophilic methanoarchaeon Methanopyrus kandleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masateru Nishihara

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A choline-containing phospholipid (PL-4 in Methanopyrus kandleri cells was identified as archaetidylcholine, which has been described by Sprott et al. (1997. The PL-4 consisted of a variety of molecular species differing in hydrocarbon composition. Most of the PL-4 was acid-labile because of its allyl ether bond. The identity of PL-4 was confirmed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC followed by positive staining with Dragendorff-reagent and fast-atom bombardment–mass spectrometry. A new method of LiAlH4 hydrogenolysis was developed to cleave allyl ether bonds and recover the corresponding hydrocarbons. We confirmed the validity of the LiAlH4 method in a study of the model compound synthetic unsaturated archaetidic acid (2,3-di-O-geranylgeranyl-sn-glycerol-1-phosphate. Saturated ether bonds were not cleaved by the LiAlH4 method. The hydrocarbons formed following LiAlH4 hydrogenolysis of PL-4 were identified by gas–liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Four kinds of hydrocarbons with one to four double bonds were detected: 47% of the hydrocarbons had four double bonds; 11% had three double bonds; 14% had two double bonds; 7% had one double bond; and 6% were saturated species. The molecular species composition of PL-4 was also estimated based on acid lability: 77% of the molecular species had two acid-labile hydrocarbons; 11% had one acid-labile and one acid-stable hydrocarbon; and 11% had two acid-stable hydrocarbons. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a specific chemical degradation method for the structural analysis of allyl ether phospholipid in archaea.

  3. Genome Sequence of Thermotoga sp Strain RQ2, a Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Geothermally Heated Region of the Seafloor near Ribeira Quente, the Azores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swithers, Kristen S [University of Connecticut, Storrs; DiPippo, Jonathan L [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Len [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lykidis, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Stetter, Karl O [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Nelson, Karen E [J. Craig Venter Institute; Gogarten, Peter [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Noll, Kenneth M [University of Connecticut, Storrs

    2011-01-01

    Thermotoga sp. strain RQ2 is probably a strain of Thermotoga maritima. Its complete genome sequence allows for an examination of the extent and consequences of gene flow within Thermotoga species and strains. Thermotoga sp. RQ2 differs from T. maritima in its genes involved in myo-inositol metabolism. Its genome also encodes an apparent fructose phosphotransferase system (PTS) sugar transporter. This operon is also found in Thermotoga naphthophila strain RKU-10 but no other Thermotogales. These are the first reported PTS transporters in the Thermotogales.

  4. Three Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen-Like Proteins Found in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix: Interactions with the Two DNA Polymerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Katsuya; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Hisashi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2002-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential component in the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery, in which it works for tethering DNA polymerases on the DNA template to accomplish processive DNA synthesis. The PCNA also interacts with many other proteins in important cellular processes, including cell cycle control, DNA repair, and an apoptotic pathway in the domain Eucarya. We identified three genes encoding PCNA-like sequences in the genome of Aeropyrum pernix, a crenarchaeal archaeon. We cloned and expressed these genes in Escherichia coli and analyzed the gene products. All three PCNA homologs stimulated the primer extension activities of the two DNA polymerases, polymerase I (Pol I) and Pol II, identified in A. pernix to various extents, among which A. pernix PCNA 3 (ApePCNA3) provided a most remarkable effect on both Pol I and Pol II. The three proteins were confirmed to exist in the A. pernix cells. These results suggest that the three PCNAs work as the processivity factor of DNA polymerases in A. pernix cells under different conditions. In Eucarya, three checkpoint proteins, Hus1, Rad1, and Rad9, have been proposed to form a PCNA-like ring structure and may work as a sliding clamp for the translesion DNA polymerases. Therefore, it is very interesting that three active PCNAs were found in one archaeal cell. Further analyses are necessary to determine whether each PCNA has specific roles, and moreover, how they reveal different functions in the cells. PMID:11790738

  5. Diversity of viruses of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Aeropyrum, and isolation of the Aeropyrum pernix bacilliform virus 1, APBV1, the first representative of the family Clavaviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Tanaka, Reiji; Forterre, Patrick; Sako, Yoshihiko; Prangishvili, David

    2010-07-05

    We have surveyed the morphological diversity of viruses infecting the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, the most thermophilic species among aerobic organisms, growing optimally at 90 degrees C, and isolated and characterized a novel virus, Aeropyrum pernix bacilliform virus 1, APBV1. This is the first virus to be described of the genus Aeropyrum and the archaeal order Desulfurococcales. The virion of APBV1 has rigid bacilliform morphology, about 140x20nm, with one end pointed and the other rounded. It contains highly glycosylated single major protein and three minor proteins. The circular, double-stranded DNA genome comprising 5278bp is the smallest for known archaeal viruses. None of the 14 putative genes, all on the same DNA strand, shows significant similarity to sequences in the public databases. The APBV1 infection caused neither retardation of host growth nor lysis of host cells, and integration of the viral genome into the host chromosome was not detected. On the basis of unusual morphological and genomic properties, we propose to consider APBV1 as the first representative of a new viral family, the Clavaviridae. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diversity of viruses of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Aeropyrum, and isolation of the Aeropyrum pernix bacilliform virus 1, APBV1, the first representative of the family Clavaviridae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Tanaka, Reiji; Forterre, Patrick; Sako, Yoshihiko; Prangishvili, David

    2010-01-01

    We have surveyed the morphological diversity of viruses infecting the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, the most thermophilic species among aerobic organisms, growing optimally at 90 degrees C, and isolated...

  7. Isocitrate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophile Aeropyrum pernix: X-ray structure analysis of a ternary enzyme-substrate complex and thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlström, Mikael; Stokke, Runar; Steen, Ida Helene; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Ladenstein, Rudolf

    2005-01-21

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix (ApIDH) is a homodimeric enzyme that belongs to the beta-decarboxylating dehydrogenase family and is the most thermostable IDH identified. It catalyzes the NADP+ and metal-dependent oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate. We have solved the crystal structures of a native ApIDH at 2.2 A, a pseudo-native ApIDH at 2.1 A, and of ApIDH in complex with NADP+, Ca2+ and d-isocitrate at 2.3 A. The pseudo-native ApIDH is in complex with etheno-NADP+ which was located at the surface instead of in the active site revealing a novel adenine-nucleotide binding site in ApIDH. The native and the pseudo-native ApIDHs were found in an open conformation, whereas one of the subunits of the ternary complex was closed upon substrate binding. The closed subunit showed a domain rotation of 19 degrees compared to the open subunit. The binding of isocitrate in the closed subunit was identical with that of the binary complex of porcine mitochondrial IDH, whereas the binding of NADP+ was similar to that of the ternary complex of IDH from Escherichiacoli. The reaction mechanism is likely to be conserved in the different IDHs. A proton relay chain involving at least five solvent molecules, the 5'-phosphate group of the nicotinamide-ribose and a coupled lysine-tyrosine pair in the active site, is postulated as essential in both the initial and the final steps of the catalytic reaction of IDH. ApIDH was found to be highly homologous to the mesophilic IDHs and was subjected to a comparative analysis in order to find differences that could explain the large difference in thermostability. Mutational studies revealed that a disulfide bond at the N terminus and a seven-membered inter-domain ionic network at the surface are major determinants for the higher thermostability of ApIDH compared to EcIDH. Furthermore, the total number of ion pairs was dramatically higher in ApIDH compared to the mesophilic IDHs if a cutoff of 4.2 A was used. A calculated net charge of only +1 compared to -19 and -25 in EcIDH and BsIDH, respectively, suggested a high degree of electrostatic optimization, which is known to be an important determinant for increased thermostability.

  8. AcEST: DK951027 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GKISVNKAKALSIALFIIGIALSILLNIYALVIALVTAIGL 117 >sp|A8A9J7|DGGGP_IGNH4 Digeranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate synthase OS=Ignicoccus hospit...alis (strain KIN4/I / DSM 18386 / JCM 14125) GN=Igni_0416 PE=3 SV=2 Length = 303 Sc

  9. AcEST: DK953566 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available : 464 YTTPPKQTFARYEER 508 Y P + + + ER Sbjct: 403 YKEPLLECYTKLRER 417 >sp|A8A9E3|SYP_IGNH4 Prolyl-tRNA synthetase OS=Ignicoccus hospi...talis (strain KIN4/I / DSM 18386 / JCM 14125) GN=proS PE=3 SV=1 Length = 478 Score

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05401-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 6 |pid:none) Ignicoccus hospitalis KIN4/I, co... 32 5.7 AP005400_26( AP005400 |pid:none) Oryza sativa Japoni..... 33 3.3 AE014134_1873( AE014134 |pid:none) Drosophila melanogaster chromos... 33 4.3 CP000816_637( CP00081

  11. AcEST: DK960459 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ein Alba OS=Ignicoccus hospitalis (strain KIN4/I / DSM 18386 / JCM 14125) GN=albA...VDTVEIVRNRFLPD--KIEVKEIRIG 74 Query: 406 DE 411 + Sbjct: 75 SQ 76 >sp|A8A8V6|ALBA_IGNH4 DNA/RNA-binding prot

  12. AcEST: BP918420 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D 180 >sp|A8AC98|APGM_IGNH4 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase OS=Ignicoccus hosp...italis (strain KIN4/I / DSM 18386 / JCM 14125) GN=apgM PE=3 SV=1 Length = 416 Score

  13. Stabilization of enzymes against thermal stress and freeze-drying by mannosylglycerate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos, A.; Raven, N.; Sharp, R.J.; Bartolucci, S.; Rossi, M.; Cannio, R.; Lebbink, J.; Oost, van der J.; Vos, de W.M.; Santos, H.

    1997-01-01

    2-O-(beta)-Mannosylglycerate, a solute that accumulates in some (hyper)thermophilic organisms, was purified from Pyrococcus furiosus cells, and its effect on enzyme stabilization in vitro was assessed. Enzymes from hyperthermophilic, thermophilic, and mesophilic sources were examined. The

  14. In situ structure and activity studies of an enzyme adsorbed on spectroscopically undetectable particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S; Tjeerdsma, AM; Lieshout, JFT; van der Oost, J; Norde, W

    2005-01-01

    The structural characteristics and the activity of a hyperthermophilic endoglucanase were investigated upon adsorption. Silica (hydrophilic) and Teflon (hydrophobic) surfaces were selected for the study. The materials were specially designed so that the interaction of the particles with light was

  15. Functional analysis of thermostable proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akerboom, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Thermostable proteins can resist temperature stress whilst keeping their integrity and functionality. In many cases,  thermostable proteins originate from hyperthermophilic microorganisms that thrive in extreme environments. These systems are generally located close to geothermal (volcanic)

  16. Identification of a glycolytic regulon in the Archaea Pyrococcus and Thermococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werken, van de H.J.G.; Verhees, C.H.; Akerboom, A.P.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    The glycolytic pathway of the hyperthermophilic archaea that belong to the order Thermococcales (Pyrococcus, Thermococcus and Palaeococcus) differs significantly from the canonical Embden-Meyerhof pathway in bacteria and eukarya. This archaeal glycolysis variant consists of several novel enzymes,

  17. Reduction of Folate by Dihydrofolate Reductase from Thermotoga maritima

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loveridge, E Joel; Hroch, Lukas; Hughes, Robert L; Williams, Thomas; Davies, Rhidian L; Angelastro, Antonio; Luk, Louis Y P; Maglia, Giovanni; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian dihydrofolate reductases (DHFR) catalyse the reduction of folate more efficiently than the equivalent bacterial enzymes, despite typically having similar efficiencies for the reduction of their natural substrate dihydrofolate. In contrast, we show here that DHFR from the hyperthermophilic

  18. Temperature-dependent structural and functional features of a hyperthermostable enzyme using elastic neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S; van der Oost, J; Norde, W

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated using elastic neutron scattering. The temperature dependence of the atomic motions was correlated with conformational. and functional characteristics of the enzyme. The onset of

  19. AcEST: DK956639 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNA/RNA-binding protein Alba OS=Sulfolobus ... 35 0.60 sp|A3CVI3|ALBA_METMJ DNA/RNA-binding protein Alba OS...A8A8V6|ALBA_IGNH4 DNA/RNA-binding protein Alba OS=Ignicoccus ... 33 1.7 sp|A3CTJ9|SYT_METMJ Threonyl-tRNA sy...6 DEM----RGRTVQKPKMEITLKK 392 ++ GR + +EI ++K Sbjct: 73 SQVVTSQDGRQSRVSTIEIGIRK 95 >sp|A3CVI3|ALBA_METMJ DNA

  20. The Origin of Life--Did It Occur at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stanley L.; Lazcano, Antonio

    1995-01-01

    A high-temperature origin of life has been proposed, largely for the reason that the hyperthermophiles are claimed to be the last common ancestor of modern organisms. Even if they are the oldest extant organisms, which is in dispute, their existence can say nothing about the temperatures of the origin of life, the RNA world, and organisms preceding the hyperthermophiles. There is no geological evidence for the physical setting of the origin of life because there are no unmetamorphosed rocks from that period. Prebiotic chemistry points to a low-temperature origin because most biochemicals decompose rather rapidly at temperatures of 100 C (e.g., half-lives are 73 min for ribose, 21 days for cytosine, and 204 days for adenine). Hyperthermophiles may appear at the base of some phylogenetic trees because they outcompeted the mesophiles when they adapted to lower temperatures, possibly due to enhanced production of heat-shock proteins.

  1. Evidence of molecular adaptation to extreme environments and applicability to space environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This is initial investigation of gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the extreme Earth environments. We present preliminary results on identification of the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile (non-hyperthermophile: Escherichia coli (E. coli K12, will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme temperatures. Comparative genome analyses represent a powerful tool in discovery of novel genes responsible for adaptation to specific extreme environments. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0ºC (Metarhizium frigidum (M. frigidum and Methanococcoides burtonii (M. burtonii and 110ºC (Methanopyrus kandleri (M. kandleri. Although not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the chaperones known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. However, highly conserved chaperons found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique chaperone TF55. Our aim was to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The following hyperthermophile genomes incorporated in this software were used for these studies: Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M. jannaschii, M. kandleri, Archaeoglobus fulgidus (A. fulgidus and three species of Pyrococcus. Common genes were annotated and grouped according to their roles in cellular processes where such information was available and proteins not previously implicated in the heat-adaptation of hyperthermophiles were identified. Additional experimental data are needed in order to learn more about these proteins. To address non-gene based components of thermal adaptation, all sequenced extremophiles were

  2. Hyperthermostable cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes and their biotechnological applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tipparat Hongpattarakere

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermal cellulases and hemicellulases have been intensively studied due to their highly potential applications at extreme temperatures, which mimic industrial processes involving cellulose and hemicellulose degradation. More than 50 species of hyperthermophiles have been isolated, many of which possess hyperthermal enzymes required for hydrolyzing cellulose and hemicelluloses. Endoglucanases, exoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases, xylanases, β-glucosidase and β-galactosidase, which are produced by the hyperthermophiles, are resistant to boiling temperature. The characteristics of these enzymes and the ability to maintain their functional integrity at high temperature as well as their biotechnological application are discussed.

  3. Autotrophic CO2 fixation pathways in archaea (Crenarchaeota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hügler, Michael; Huber, Harald; Stetter, Karl Otto; Fuchs, Georg

    2003-03-01

    Representative autotrophic and thermophilic archaeal species of different families of Crenarchaeota were examined for key enzymes of the known autotrophic CO(2) fixation pathways. Pyrobaculum islandicum ( Thermoproteaceae) contained key enzymes of the reductive citric acid cycle. This finding is consistent with the operation of this pathway in the related Thermoproteus neutrophilus. Pyrodictium abyssi and Pyrodictium occultum ( Pyrodictiaceae) contained ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, which was active in boiling water. Yet, phosphoribulokinase activity was not detectable. Operation of the Calvin cycle remains to be demonstrated. Ignicoccus islandicus and Ignicoccus pacificus ( Desulfurococcaceae) contained pyruvate oxidoreductase as potential carboxylating enzyme, but apparently lacked key enzymes of known pathways; their mode of autotrophic CO(2) fixation is at issue. Metallosphaera sedula, Acidianus ambivalens and Sulfolobus sp. strain VE6 ( Sulfolobaceae) contained key enzymes of a 3-hydroxypropionate cycle. This finding is in line with the demonstration of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and propionyl-CoA carboxylase activities in the related Acidianus brierleyi and Sulfolobus metallicus. Enzymes of central carbon metabolism in Metallosphaera sedula were studied in more detail. Enzyme activities of the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle were strongly up-regulated during autotrophic growth, supporting their role in CO(2) fixation. However, formation of acetyl-CoA from succinyl-CoA could not be demonstrated, suggesting a modified pathway of acetyl-CoA regeneration. We conclude that Crenarchaeota exhibit a mosaic of three or possibly four autotrophic pathways. The distribution of the pathways so far correlates with the 16S-rRNA-based taxa of the Crenarchaeota.

  4. Four newly isolated fuselloviruses from extreme geothermal environments reveal unusual morphologies and a possible interviral recombination mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redder, Peter; Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Spindle-shaped virus-like particles are abundant in extreme geothermal environments, from which five spindle-shaped viral species have been isolated to date. They infect members of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Sulfolobus, and constitute the Fuselloviridae, a family of double-stranded DNA...

  5. Virology: Independent virus development outside a host

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häring, M.; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Rachel, R.

    2005-01-01

    Viruses are thought to be functionally inactive once they are outside and independent of their host cell 1 . Here we describe an exceptional property of a newly discovered virus that infects a hyperthermophilic archaeon growing in acidic hot springs: the lemon-shaped viral particle develops a very...

  6. Glycerol fermentation to hydrogen by Thermotoga maritima: Proposed pathway and bioenergetic considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maru, B.T.; Bielen, A.A.M.; Constanti, M.; Medina, F.; Kengen, S.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    The production of biohydrogen from glycerol, by the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima DSM 3109, was investigated in batch and chemostat systems. T. maritima converted glycerol to mainly acetate, CO2 and H2. Maximal hydrogen yields of 2.84 and 2.41 hydrogen per glycerol were observed

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of a Highly Flagellated, Fast-Swimming Archaeon, Methanocaldococcus villosus Strain KIN24-T80 (DSM 22612)

    KAUST Repository

    Thennarasu, Sugumar

    2013-07-11

    We report the draft genome sequence of a hyperthermophilic Methanocaldococcus villosus strain, KIN24-T80. The gene associated with its heavy flagellum formation was annotated in the 1.2-Mb draft genome sequence, and this strain may be a good model system to study the extensive functional role of flagella and their fast motor activity.

  8. The genes coding for the hsp70(dnaK) molecular chaperone machine occur in the moderate thermophilic archaeon Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider; Lange, Marianne; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1999-01-01

    of response by hsp70(dnaK), and a similar response by trkA. The data suggest that the moderate thermophile TM-1 has an active Hsp70(DnaK)-chaperone machine in contrast to hyperthermophilic archaea, and that trkA is a stress gene, inasmuch as it responds like classic heat-shock genes to stressors that induce...

  9. Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamilton-Brehm, S.D.; Gibson, R.A.; Green, S.J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; van der Meer, M.T.J.; Shields, J.P.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Elkins, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium designated OPF15(T) was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The phylogeny of 16S rRNA and functional genes (dsrAB) placed the organism within the family Thermodesulfobacteriaceae. The organism displayed hyperthermophilic temperature

  10. Identification of a system required for the functional surface localization of sugar binding proteins with class III signal peptides in Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zolghadr, Behnam; Weber, Stefan; Szabo, Zalan; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus contains an unusual large number of sugar binding proteins that are synthesized as precursors with a class III signal peptide. Such signal peptides are commonly used to direct archaeal flagellin subunits or bacterial (pseudo)pilins into

  11. Domain Modeling: NP_036359.1 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_036359.1 chrX Crystal structure of a GTP-binding protein from the hyperthermophi...lic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus in complex with GDP p2qtha_ chrX/NP_036359.1/NP_036359.1_holo_9-341.pdb

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, FY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This program provides the resources for Berkeley Lab scientists to make rapid and significant contributions to critical nation science and technology problems: accelerators and fusion, chemical sciences, earth sciences, energy and environment, engineering, life sciences, materials, nuclear science, physics, and structural biology (hyperthermophilic microorganisms).

  13. Biohydrogen Production from Glycerol using Thermotoga spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maru, B.T.; Bielen, A.A.M.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Constantini, M.; Medina, F.

    2012-01-01

    Given the highly reduced state of carbon in glycerol and its availability as a substantial byproduct of biodiesel production, glycerol is of special interest for sustainable biofuel production. Glycerol was used as a substrate for biohydrogen production using the hyperthermophilic bacterium,

  14. Characterization of different crystal forms of the alpha-glucosidase MalA from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt; Willemoës, Martin; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2005-01-01

    MalA is an alpha-glucosidase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. It belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 31, which includes several medically interesting alpha-glucosidases. MalA and its selenomethionine derivative have been overproduced in Escherichia coli...

  15. The tungsten metallome of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Bol, E.; Krijger, G.C.; Wolterbeek, H.T.; Verhaert, P.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    The tungsten metallome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been investigated using electroanalytical metal analysis and native-native 2D-PAGE with the radioactive tungsten isotope W-187 (t(1/2) = 23.9 h). P. furiosus cells have an intracellular tungsten concentration of 29 mu

  16. The tungsten metallome of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M.; Pinkse, M.; Bol, E.; Krijgen, G.; Wolterbeek, H.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    The tungsten metallome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been investigated using electroanalytical metal analysis and native–native 2D-PAGE with the radioactive tungsten isotope W-187 (t1/2 = 23.9 h). P. furiosus cells have an intracellular tungsten concentration of 29 mM, of

  17. Exploring the reductive capacity of Pyrococcus furiosus : the reduction of carboxylic acids and pyridine nucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ban, van den E.C.D.

    2001-01-01

    This Ph.D. project started in 1997 and its main goal was to obtain insight in the reductive capacity of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus . The research was focused on the biocatalytic reduction of carboxylic

  18. Molybdenum incorporation in tungsten aldehyde oxidoreductase enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M.; Bevers, L.E.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Krijger, G.C.; Wolterbeek, H.T.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.; Hagen, W.R.; Hagedoorn, P.L.

    2010-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus expresses five aldehyde oxidoreductase (AOR) enzymes, all containing a tungsto-bispterin cofactor. The growth of this organism is fully dependent on the presence of tungsten in the growth medium. Previous studies have suggested that molybdenum is

  19. Crenarchaeol: the characteristic core glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether membrane lipid of cosmopolitan pelagic crenarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; van Duin, Adri C T; Geenevasen, Jan A J

    2002-10-01

    The basic structure and stereochemistry of the characteristic glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipid of cosmopolitan pelagic crenarchaeota has been identified by high field two-dimensional (2D)-NMR techniques. It contains one cyclohexane and four cyclopentane rings formed by internal cyclisation of the biphytanyl chains. Its structure is similar to that of GDGTs biosynthesized by (hyper)thermophilic crenarchaeota apart from the cyclohexane ring. These findings are consistent with the close phylogenetic relationship of (hyper)thermophilic and pelagic crenarchaeota based 16S rRNA. The latter group inherited the biosynthetic capabilities for a membrane composed of cyclopentane ring-containing GDGTs from the (hyper)thermophilic crenarchaeota. However, to cope with the much lower temperature of the ocean, a small but key step in their evolution was the adjustment of the membrane fluidity by making a kink in one of the bicyclic biphytanyl chains by the formation of a cyclohexane ring. This prevents the dense packing characteristic for the cyclopentane ring-containing GDGTs membrane lipids used by hyperthermophilic crenarchaeota to adjust their membrane fluidity to high temperatures.

  20. The Complete Genome Sequence of Thermoproteus tenax: A Physiologically Versatile Member of the Crenarchaeota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebers, B.; Zaparty, M.; Raddatz, G.; Tjaden, B.; Albers, S.V.; Bell, S.D.; Blombach, F.; Kletzin, A.; Kyrpides, N.; Lanz, C.; Plagens, A.; Rampp, M.; Rosinus, A.; Jan, von M.; Makarova, K.S.; Klenk, H.P.; Schuster, S.C.; Hensel, R.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report on the complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeum Thermoproteus tenax (strain Kra 1, DSM 2078(T)) a type strain of the crenarchaeotal order Thermoproteales. Its circular 1.84-megabase genome harbors no extrachromosomal elements and 2,051 open reading frames are

  1. Crystal structure and biochemical properties of a novel thermostable esterase containing an immunoglobulin-like domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levisson, M.; Sun, L.; Hendriks, S.N.A.; Swinkels, P.; Akveld, T.; Bultema, J.B.; Barendregt, A.; Heuvel, van den R.H.H.; Dijkstra, B.W.; Oost, van der J.; Kengen, S.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the genome of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima revealed a hypothetical protein (EstA) with typical esterase features. The EstA protein was functionally produced in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. It indeed displayed esterase activity with

  2. Entropic stabilization of proteins and its proteomic consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor N Berezovsky

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary traces of thermophilic adaptation are manifest, on the whole-genome level, in compositional biases toward certain types of amino acids. However, it is sometimes difficult to discern their causes without a clear understanding of underlying physical mechanisms of thermal stabilization of proteins. For example, it is well-known that hyperthermophiles feature a greater proportion of charged residues, but, surprisingly, the excess of positively charged residues is almost entirely due to lysines but not arginines in the majority of hyperthermophilic genomes. All-atom simulations show that lysines have a much greater number of accessible rotamers than arginines of similar degree of burial in folded states of proteins. This finding suggests that lysines would preferentially entropically stabilize the native state. Indeed, we show in computational experiments that arginine-to-lysine amino acid substitutions result in noticeable stabilization of proteins. We then hypothesize that if evolution uses this physical mechanism as a complement to electrostatic stabilization in its strategies of thermophilic adaptation, then hyperthermostable organisms would have much greater content of lysines in their proteomes than comparably sized and similarly charged arginines. Consistent with that, high-throughput comparative analysis of complete proteomes shows extremely strong bias toward arginine-to-lysine replacement in hyperthermophilic organisms and overall much greater content of lysines than arginines in hyperthermophiles. This finding cannot be explained by genomic GC compositional biases or by the universal trend of amino acid gain and loss in protein evolution. We discovered here a novel entropic mechanism of protein thermostability due to residual dynamics of rotamer isomerization in native state and demonstrated its immediate proteomic implications. Our study provides an example of how analysis of a fundamental physical mechanism of

  3. Evolution and thermodynamics of the slow unfolding of hyperstable monomeric proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koga Yuichi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfolding speed of some hyperthermophilic proteins is dramatically lower than that of their mesostable homologs. Ribonuclease HII from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis (Tk-RNase HII is stabilized by its remarkably slow unfolding rate, whereas RNase HI from the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus (Tt-RNase HI unfolds rapidly, comparable with to that of RNase HI from Escherichia coli (Ec-RNase HI. Results To clarify whether the difference in the unfolding rate is due to differences in the types of RNase H or differences in proteins from archaea and bacteria, we examined the equilibrium stability and unfolding reaction of RNases HII from the hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima (Tm-RNase HII and Aquifex aeolicus (Aa-RNase HII and RNase HI from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii (Sto-RNase HI. These proteins from hyperthermophiles are more stable than Ec-RNase HI over all the temperature ranges examined. The observed unfolding speeds of all hyperstable proteins at the different denaturant concentrations studied are much lower than those of Ec-RNase HI, which is in accordance with the familiar slow unfolding of hyperstable proteins. However, the unfolding rate constants of these RNases H in water are dispersed, and the unfolding rate constant of thermophilic archaeal proteins is lower than that of thermophilic bacterial proteins. Conclusions These results suggest that the nature of slow unfolding of thermophilic proteins is determined by the evolutionary history of the organisms involved. The unfolding rate constants in water are related to the amount of buried hydrophobic residues in the tertiary structure.

  4. Mechanisms for stabilisation and the maintenance of solubility in proteins from thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warwicker Jim

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The database of protein structures contains representatives from organisms with a range of growth temperatures. Various properties have been studied in a search for the molecular basis of protein adaptation to higher growth temperature. Charged groups have emerged as key distinguishing factors for proteins from thermophiles and mesophiles. Results A dataset of 291 thermophile-derived protein structures is compared with mesophile proteins. Calculations of electrostatic interactions support the importance of charges, but indicate that increases in charge contribution to folded state stabilisation do not generally correlate with the numbers of charged groups. Relative propensities of charged groups vary, such as the substitution of glutamic for aspartic acid sidechains. Calculations suggest an energetic basis, with less dehydration for longer sidechains. Most other properties studied show weak or insignificant separation of proteins from moderate thermophiles or hyperthermophiles and mesophiles, including an estimate of the difference in sidechain rotameric entropy upon protein folding. An exception is increased burial of alanine and proline residues and decreased burial of phenylalanine, methionine, tyrosine and tryptophan in hyperthermophile proteins compared to those from mesophiles. Conclusion Since an increase in the number of charged groups for hyperthermophile proteins is separable from charged group contribution to folded state stability, we hypothesise that charged group propensity is important in the context of protein solubility and the prevention of aggregation. Accordingly we find some separation between mesophile and hyperthermophile proteins when looking at the largest surface patch that does not contain a charged sidechain. With regard to our observation that aromatic sidechains are less buried in hyperthermophile proteins, further analysis indicates that the placement of some of these groups may facilitate the

  5. Evidence of Molecular Adaptation to Extreme Environments and Applicability to Space Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović, M. D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This is initial investigation of gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the extreme Earth environments. We present preliminary results on identification of the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile (non-hyperthermophile: {it Escherichia coli (E. coli K12}, will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme temperatures. Comparative genome analyses represent a powerful tool in discovery of novel genes responsible for adaptation to specific extreme environments. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0D C ({it Metarhizium frigidum (M.~frigidum} and {it Methanococcoides burtonii (M.~burtonii} and 110D C ({it Methanopyrus kandleri (M.~kandleri}. Although not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the {it chaperones} known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. However, highly conserved {it chaperons} found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique {it chaperone TF55}. Our aim was to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The followinghyperthermophile genomes incorporated in this software were used forthese studies: {it Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M.~jannaschii, M.~kandleri, Archaeoglobus fulgidus (A.~fulgidus} and threespecies of {it Pyrococcus}. Common genes were annotated and groupedaccording to their roles in cellular processes where such informationwas available and proteins not previously implicated in theheat-adaptation of hyperthermophiles were identified. Additionalexperimental data are needed in order to learn more about theseproteins. To address non-gene based components of thermaladaptation

  6. Familial relationships in hyperthermo- and acidophilic archaeal viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happonen, Lotta Johanna; Redder, Peter; Peng, Xu

    2010-01-01

    Archaea often live in extreme, harsh environments such as acidic hot springs and hypersaline waters. To date, only two icosahedrally symmetric, membrane-containing archaeal viruses, SH1 and Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV), have been described in detail. We report the sequence and three......-dimensional structure of a third such virus isolated from a hyperthermoacidophilic crenarchaeon, Sulfolobus strain G4ST-2. Characterization of this new isolate revealed it to be similar to STIV on the levels of genome and structural organization. The genome organization indicates that these two viruses have diverged...... from a common ancestor. Interestingly, the prominent surface turrets of the two viruses are strikingly different. By sequencing and mass spectrometry, we mapped several large insertions and deletions in the known structural proteins that could account for these differences and showed that both viruses...

  7. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili,, David; Basta, Tamara; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2016-01-01

    Viruses infecting members of Archaea, the third domain of life, constitute an integral, yet unique part of the virosphere. Many of these viruses, specifically the species that infect hyperthermophilic hosts, display morphotypes – for example, bottle shaped, spindle shaped, droplet shaped, coil...... shaped, bacilliform – not known to be associated with the other two cellular domains, Bacteria and Eukarya. The distinctiveness of the hyperthermophilic archaeal viruses extends to their genome sequences: a large majority of the predicted genes yield no sequence matches in public databases and encode...... proteins with exceptional structures and unknown functions. Moreover, the ways in which these viruses interact with their hosts are also unique, as indicated by a unique virion egress mechanism, which involves formation of pyramidal portals on the cell surface. Some viruses that infect extremely halophilic...

  8. Energetics of amino acid synthesis in hydrothermal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, J. P.; Shock, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations showed that the autotrophic synthesis of all 20 protein-forming amino acids was energetically favored in hot (100 degrees C), moderately reduced, submarine hydrothermal solutions relative to the synthesis in cold (18 degrees C), oxidized, surface seawater. The net synthesis reactions of 11 amino acids were exergonic in the hydrothermal solution, but all were endergonic in surface seawater. The synthesis of the requisite amino acids of nine thermophilic and hyperthermophilic proteins in a 100 degreesC hydrothermal solution yielded between 600 and 8000 kilojoules per mole of protein, which is energy that is available to drive the intracellular synthesis of enzymes and other biopolymers in hyperthermophiles thriving in these ecosystems.

  9. Operon prediction in Pyrococcus furiosus

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Thao T.; Dam, Phuongan; Su, Zhengchang; Poole, Farris L.; Adams, Michael W.W.; Zhou, G. Tong; Xu, Ying

    2006-01-01

    Identification of operons in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus represents an important step to understanding the regulatory mechanisms that enable the organism to adapt and thrive in extreme environments. We have predicted operons in P.furiosus by combining the results from three existing algorithms using a neural network (NN). These algorithms use intergenic distances, phylogenetic profiles, functional categories and gene-order conservation in their operon prediction. Our me...

  10. Measurements of Protein Crystal Face Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal growth rates will be determined for several hyperthermophile proteins.; The growth rates will be assessed using available theoretical models, including kinetic roughening.; If/when kinetic roughening supersaturations are established, determinations of protein crystal quality over a range of supersaturations will also be assessed.; The results of our ground based effort may well address the existence of a correlation between fundamental growth mechanisms and protein crystal quality.

  11. Thermus thermophilus Strains Active in Purine Nucleoside Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Almendros

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Several strains of Thermus thermophilus were tested in order to detect purine nucleoside synthase activity using pyrimidine nucleosides as the sugar-donor and adenine or hypoxanthine as bases. High productivity values (t =1 hr were obtained while completely avoiding adenosine-deaminase degradation of the products. N-2-deoxy-ribosyltransferase activity is described for the first time in hyperthermophilic bacteria.

  12. Widespread distribution of archaeal reverse gyrase in thermophilic bacteria suggests a complex history of vertical inheritance and lateral gene transfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Brochier-Armanet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse gyrase, an enzyme of uncertain funtion, is present in all hyperthermophilic archaea and bacteria. Previous phylogenetic studies have suggested that the gene for reverse gyrase has an archaeal origin and was transferred laterally (LGT to the ancestors of the two bacterial hyperthermophilic phyla, Thermotogales and Aquificales. Here, we performed an in-depth analysis of the evolutionary history of reverse gyrase in light of genomic progress. We found genes coding for reverse gyrase in the genomes of several thermophilic bacteria that belong to phyla other than Aquificales and Thermotogales. Several of these bacteria are not, strictly speaking, hyperthermophiles because their reported optimal growth temperatures are below 80 °C. Furthermore, we detected a reverse gyrase gene in the sequence of the large plasmid of Thermus thermophilus strain HB8, suggesting a possible mechanism of transfer to the T. thermophilus strain HB8 involving plasmids and transposases. The archaeal part of the reverse gyrase tree is congruent with recent phylogenies of the archaeal domain based on ribosomal proteins or RNA polymerase subunits. Although poorly resolved, the complete reverse gyrase phylogeny suggests an ancient acquisition of the gene by bacteria via one or two LGT events, followed by its secondary distribution by LGT within bacteria. Finally, several genes of archaeal origin located in proximity to the reverse gyrase gene in bacterial genomes have bacterial homologues mostly in thermophiles or hyperthermophiles, raising the possibility that they were co-transferred with the reverse gyrase gene. Our new analysis of the reverse gyrase history strengthens the hypothesis that the acquisition of reverse gyrase may have been a crucial evolutionary step in the adaptation of bacteria to high-temperature environments. However, it also questions the role of this enzyme in thermophilic bacteria and the selective advantage its presence could provide.

  13. Cell Cycle Characteristics of Crenarchaeota: Unity among Diversity▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, Magnus; Malandrin, Laurence; Eriksson, Stefan; Huber, Harald; Bernander, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaea Acidianus hospitalis, Aeropyrum pernix, Pyrobaculum aerophilum, Pyrobaculum calidifontis, and Sulfolobus tokodaii representing three different orders in the phylum Crenarchaeota were analyzed by flow cytometry and combined phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy. The overall organization of the cell cycle was found to be similar in all species, with a short prereplicative period and a dominant postreplicative period that accounted for 64 to 77% of the gener...

  14. Distribution of Crenarchaeota Representatives in Terrestrial Hot Springs of Russia and Iceland ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Perevalova, Anna A.; Kolganova, Tatiana V.; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Schleper, Christa; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A.; Lebedinsky, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    Culture-independent (PCR with Crenarchaeota-specific primers and subsequent denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) and culture-dependent approaches were used to study the diversity of Crenarchaeota in terrestrial hot springs of the Kamchatka Peninsula and the Lake Baikal region (Russia) and of Iceland. Among the phylotypes detected there were relatives of both cultured (mainly hyperthermophilic) and uncultured Crenarchaeota. It was found that there is a large and diverse group of uncultured...

  15. Crenarchaeol : The characteristic core glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether membrane lipid of cosmopolitan pelagic crenarchaeota

    OpenAIRE

    Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; van Duin, A. C. T.; Geenevasen, J.A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The basic structure and stereochemistry of the characteristic glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipid of cosmopolitan pelagic crenarchaeota has been identified by high field two-dimensional (2D)-NMR techniques. It contains one cyclohexane and four cyclopentane rings formed by internal cyclisation of the biphytanyl chains. Its structure is similar to that of GDGTs biosynthesized by (hyper)thermophilic crenarchaeota apart from the cyclohexane ring. These findings are con...

  16. Complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus Stetter and Fiala 1986 type strain F1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sun, Hui [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huber, Harald [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Staphylothermus marinus Fiala and Stetter 1986 belongs to the order Desulfurococcales within the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. S. marinus is a hyperthermophilic, sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph. Strain F1 was isolated from geothermally heated sediments at Vulcano, Italy, but S. marinus has also been isolated from a hydrothermal vent on the East Pacific Rise. We report the complete genome of S. marinus strain F1, the type strain of the species. This is the fifth reported complete genome sequence from the order Desulfurococcales.

  17. The extraordinary thermal stability of EstA from S. islandicus is independent of post translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefler-Jensen, Daniel; Schwarz-Linnet, Troels; de Lichtenberg, Casper; Nguyen, Tam T T N; Rand, Kasper D; Huang, Li; She, Qunxin; Teilum, Kaare

    2017-09-01

    Enzymes from thermophilic and hyper-thermophilic organisms have an intrinsic high stability. Understanding the mechanisms behind their high stability will be important knowledge for the engineering of novel enzymes with high stability. Lysine methylation of proteins is prevalent in Sulfolobus, a genus of hyperthermophilic and acidophilic archaea. Both unspecific and temperature dependent lysine methylations are seen, but the significance of this post-translational modification has not been investigated. Here, we test the effect of eliminating in vivo lysine methylation on the stability of an esterase (EstA). The enzyme was purified from the native host S. islandicus as well as expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli, a mesophilic host that does not code for any machinery for in vivo lysine methylation. We find that lysine mono methylation indeed has a positive effect on the stability of EstA, but the effect is small. The effect of the lysine methylation on protein stability is secondary to that of protein expression in E. coli, as the E. coli recombinant enzyme is compromised both on stability and activity. We conclude that these differences are not attributed to any covalent difference between the protein expressed in hyperthermophilic versus mesophilic hosts. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  18. The evolution of lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Y. H.; Sugai, A.; Uda, I.; Itoh, T.

    2001-01-01

    Living organisms on the Earth which are divided into three major domains - Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya, probably came from a common ancestral cell. Because there are many thermophilic microorganisms near the root of the universal phylogenetic tree, the common ancestral cell should be considered to be a thermophilic microorganism. The existence of a cell is necessary for the living organisms; the cell membrane is the essential structural component of a cell, so its amphiphilic property is vital for the molecule of lipids for cell membranes. Tetraether type glycerophospholipids with C 40 isoprenoid chains are major membrane lipids widely distributed in archaeal cells. Cyclization number of C 40 isoprenoid chains in thermophilic archaea influences the fluidity of lipids whereas the number of carbons and degree of unsaturation in fatty acids do so in bacteria and eucarya. In addition to the cyclization of the tetraether lipids, covalent bonding of two C 40 isoprenoid chains was found in hyperthermophiles. These characteristic structures of the lipids seem to contribute to their fundamental physiological roles in hyperthermophiles. Stereochemical differences between G-1-P archaeal lipids and G-3-P bacterial and eucaryal lipids might have occured by the function of some proteins long after the first cell was developed by the reactions of small organic molecules. We propose that the structure of lipids of the common ancestral cell may have been similar to those of hyperthermophilic archaea.

  19. Experimental silicification of the extremophilic Archaea Pyrococcus abyssi and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: applications in the search for evidence of life in early Earth and extraterrestrial rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, F; Westall, F; Disnar, J-R; Prieur, D; Bienvenu, N; Le Romancer, M; Défarge, Ch

    2009-09-01

    Hydrothermal activity was common on the early Earth and associated micro-organisms would most likely have included thermophilic to hyperthermophilic species. 3.5-3.3 billion-year-old, hydrothermally influenced rocks contain silicified microbial mats and colonies that must have been bathed in warm to hot hydrothermal emanations. Could they represent thermophilic or hyperthermophilic micro-organisms and if so, how were they preserved? We present the results of an experiment to silicify anaerobic, hyperthermophilic micro-organisms from the Archaea Domain Pyrococcus abyssi and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, that could have lived on the early Earth. The micro-organisms were placed in a silica-saturated medium for periods up to 1 year. Pyrococcus abyssi cells were fossilized but the M. jannaschii cells lysed naturally after the exponential growth phase, apart from a few cells and cell remains, and were not silicified although their extracellular polymeric substances were. In this first simulated fossilization of archaeal strains, our results suggest that differences between species have a strong influence on the potential for different micro-organisms to be preserved by fossilization and that those found in the fossil record represent probably only a part of the original diversity. Our results have important consequences for biosignatures in hydrothermal or hydrothermally influenced deposits on Earth, as well as on early Mars, as environmental conditions were similar on the young terrestrial planets and traces of early Martian life may have been similarly preserved as silicified microfossils.

  20. Yellowstone Lake Nanoarchaeota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eClingenpeel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1,349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels. However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (70 pyrosequencing reads was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations.

  1. Gain and loss of an intron in a protein-coding gene in Archaea: the case of an archaeal RNA pseudouridine synthase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokobori Shin-ichi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously found the first examples of splicing of archaeal pre-mRNAs for homologs of the eukaryotic CBF5 protein (also known as dyskerin in humans in Aeropyrum pernix, Sulfolobus solfataricus, S. tokodaii, and S. acidocaldarirus, and also showed that crenarchaeal species in orders Desulfurococcales and Sulfolobales, except for Hyperthermus butylicus, Pyrodictium occultum, Pyrolobus fumarii, and Ignicoccus islandicus, contain the (putative cbf5 intron. However, the exact timing of the intron insertion was not determined and verification of the putative secondary loss of the intron in some lineages was not performed. Results In the present study, we determined approximately two-thirds of the entire coding region of crenarchaeal Cbf5 sequences from 43 species. A phylogenetic analysis of our data and information from the available genome sequences suggested that the (putative cbf5 intron existed in the common ancestor of the orders Desulfurococcales and Sulfolobales and that probably at least two independent lineages in the order Desulfurococcales lost the (putative intron. Conclusion This finding is the first observation of a lineage-specific loss of a pre-mRNA intron in Archaea. As the insertion or deletion of introns in protein-coding genes in Archaea has not yet been seriously considered, our finding suggests the possible difficulty of accurately and completely predicting protein-coding genes in Archaea.

  2. Yellowstone lake nanoarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Kan, Jinjun; Macur, Richard E; Woyke, Tanja; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Inskeep, William P; Nealson, Kenneth; McDermott, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR) were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels). However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp) demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (71 pyrosequencing reads) was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations.

  3. Identification of Missing Genes and Enzymes for Autotrophic Carbon Fixation in Crenarchaeota▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Vera, W. Hugo; Weiss, Michael; Strittmatter, Eric; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Fuchs, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Two autotrophic carbon fixation cycles have been identified in Crenarchaeota. The dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle functions in anaerobic or microaerobic autotrophic members of the Thermoproteales and Desulfurococcales. The 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle occurs in aerobic autotrophic Sulfolobales; a similar cycle may operate in autotrophic aerobic marine Crenarchaeota. Both cycles form succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA) from acetyl-CoA and two molecules of inorganic carbon, but they use different means. Both cycles have in common the (re)generation of acetyl-CoA from succinyl-CoA via identical intermediates. Here, we identified several missing enzymes/genes involved in the seven-step conversion of succinyl-CoA to two molecules of acetyl-CoA in Thermoproteus neutrophilus (Thermoproteales), Ignicoccus hospitalis (Desulfurococcales), and Metallosphaera sedula (Sulfolobales). The identified enzymes/genes include succinyl-CoA reductase, succinic semialdehyde reductase, 4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA ligase, bifunctional crotonyl-CoA hydratase/(S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, and beta-ketothiolase. 4-Hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase, which catalyzes a mechanistically intriguing elimination of water, is well conserved and rightly can be considered the key enzyme of these two cycles. In contrast, several of the other enzymes evolved from quite different sources, making functional predictions based solely on genome interpretation difficult, if not questionable. PMID:21169482

  4. Identification of missing genes and enzymes for autotrophic carbon fixation in crenarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Vera, W Hugo; Weiss, Michael; Strittmatter, Eric; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Fuchs, Georg

    2011-03-01

    Two autotrophic carbon fixation cycles have been identified in Crenarchaeota. The dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle functions in anaerobic or microaerobic autotrophic members of the Thermoproteales and Desulfurococcales. The 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle occurs in aerobic autotrophic Sulfolobales; a similar cycle may operate in autotrophic aerobic marine Crenarchaeota. Both cycles form succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA) from acetyl-CoA and two molecules of inorganic carbon, but they use different means. Both cycles have in common the (re)generation of acetyl-CoA from succinyl-CoA via identical intermediates. Here, we identified several missing enzymes/genes involved in the seven-step conversion of succinyl-CoA to two molecules of acetyl-CoA in Thermoproteus neutrophilus (Thermoproteales), Ignicoccus hospitalis (Desulfurococcales), and Metallosphaera sedula (Sulfolobales). The identified enzymes/genes include succinyl-CoA reductase, succinic semialdehyde reductase, 4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA ligase, bifunctional crotonyl-CoA hydratase/(S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, and beta-ketothiolase. 4-Hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase, which catalyzes a mechanistically intriguing elimination of water, is well conserved and rightly can be considered the key enzyme of these two cycles. In contrast, several of the other enzymes evolved from quite different sources, making functional predictions based solely on genome interpretation difficult, if not questionable.

  5. Characterization of Fatty Acids in Crenarchaeota by GC-MS and NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Hamerly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipids composed of condensed isoprenyl units connected to glycerol backbones by ether linkages are a distinguishing feature of Archaea. Data suggesting that fatty acids with linear hydrocarbon chains are present in some Archaea have been available for decades. However, lack of genomic and biochemical evidence for the metabolic machinery required to synthesize and degrade fatty acids has left the field unclear on this potentially significant biochemical aspect. Because lipids are energy currency and cell signaling molecules, their presence in Archaea is significant for understanding archaeal biology. A recent large-scale bioinformatics analysis reignited the debate as to the importance of fatty acids in Archaea by presenting genetic evidence for the presence of enzymes required for anabolic and catabolic fatty acid metabolism across the archaeal domain. Here, we present direct biochemical evidence from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy for the presence of fatty acids in two members of the Crenarchaeota, Sulfolobus solfataricus and Ignicoccus hospitalis. This is the first report providing biochemical data for the existence of fatty acids in these Crenarchaeota, opening new discussions on energy balance and the potential for the discovery of new thermostable enzymes for industry.

  6. Characterization of Fatty Acids in Crenarchaeota by GC-MS and NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerly, Timothy; Tripet, Brian; Wurch, Louie; Hettich, Robert L; Podar, Mircea; Bothner, Brian; Copié, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Lipids composed of condensed isoprenyl units connected to glycerol backbones by ether linkages are a distinguishing feature of Archaea. Data suggesting that fatty acids with linear hydrocarbon chains are present in some Archaea have been available for decades. However, lack of genomic and biochemical evidence for the metabolic machinery required to synthesize and degrade fatty acids has left the field unclear on this potentially significant biochemical aspect. Because lipids are energy currency and cell signaling molecules, their presence in Archaea is significant for understanding archaeal biology. A recent large-scale bioinformatics analysis reignited the debate as to the importance of fatty acids in Archaea by presenting genetic evidence for the presence of enzymes required for anabolic and catabolic fatty acid metabolism across the archaeal domain. Here, we present direct biochemical evidence from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for the presence of fatty acids in two members of the Crenarchaeota, Sulfolobus solfataricus and Ignicoccus hospitalis. This is the first report providing biochemical data for the existence of fatty acids in these Crenarchaeota, opening new discussions on energy balance and the potential for the discovery of new thermostable enzymes for industry.

  7. Alterations of the transcriptome of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by exoribonuclease aCPSF2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Märtens

    Full Text Available Recent studies identified a 5´ to 3´ exoribonuclease termed Sso-RNase J in the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus (Sso, which has been reclassified to the aCPSF2 (archaeal cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 2 group of β-CASP proteins. In this study, the Sso-aCPSF2 orthologue of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius (Saci-aCPSF2 was functionally characterized. Like Sso-aCPSF2, Saci-aCPSF2 degrades RNA with 5´ to 3´ directionality in vitro. To address the biological significance of Saci-aCPSF2, a deletion mutant was constructed, and the influence of Saci-aCPSF2 on the transcriptome profile was assessed employing high throughput RNA sequencing. This analysis revealed 560 genes with differential transcript abundance, suggesting a considerable role of this enzyme in RNA metabolism. In addition, bioinformatic analyses revealed several transcripts that are preferentially degraded at the 5´ end. This was exemplarily verified for two transcripts by Northern-blot analyses, showing for the first time that aCPSF2 proteins play a role in 5' to 3' directional mRNA decay in the crenarchaeal clade of Archaea.

  8. Differentiation and Structure in Sulfolobus islandicus Rod-Shaped Virus Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Bautista

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, molecular surveys of viral diversity have revealed that viruses are the most diverse and abundant biological entities on Earth. In culture, however, most viral isolates that infect microbes are represented by a few variants isolated on type strains, limiting our ability to study how natural variation affects virus-host interactions in the laboratory. We screened a set of 137 hot spring samples for viruses that infect a geographically diverse panel of the hyperthemophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. We isolated and characterized eight SIRVs (Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped viruses from two different regions within Yellowstone National Park (USA. Comparative genomics revealed that all SIRV sequenced isolates share 30 core genes that represent 50–60% of the genome. The core genome phylogeny, as well as the distribution of variable genes (shared by some but not all SIRVs and the signatures of host-virus interactions recorded on the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats repeat-spacer arrays of S. islandicus hosts, identify different SIRV lineages, each associated with a different geographic location. Moreover, our studies reveal that SIRV core genes do not appear to be under diversifying selection and thus we predict that the abundant and diverse variable genes govern the coevolutionary arms race between SIRVs and their hosts.

  9. NQO-Induced DNA-Less Cell Formation Is Associated with Chromatin Protein Degradation and Dependent on A0A1-ATPase in Sulfolobus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyuan Han

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To investigate DNA damage response in the model crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus, four different DNA damage agents were tested for their effects on cell death of this archaeon, including UV irradiation, methyl methanesulfonate, cisplatin, and 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (NQO. Cell death featured with DNA-less cell formation was revealed in DNA damage treatment with each agent. Cellular responses upon NQO treatment were characterized in details, and following sequential events were revealed, including: a modest accumulation of G1/S phase cells, membrane depolarization, proteolytic degradation of chromatin proteins, and chromosomal DNA degradation. Further insights into the process were gained from studying drugs that affect the archaeal ATP synthase, including a proton gradient uncoupler and an ATP synthase inhibitor. Whereas the proton uncoupler-mediated excess proton influx yielded cell death as observed for the NQO treatment, inhibition of ATP synthase attenuated NQO-induced membrane depolarization and DNA-less cell formation. In conclusion, the NQO-induced cell death in S. islandicus is characterized by proteolytic degradation of chromatin protein, and chromosomal DNA degradation, which probably represents a common feature for the cell death induced by different DNA damage agents.

  10. Expression and Characterization of the RKOD DNA Polymerase in Pichia pastoris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    Full Text Available The present study assessed high-level expression of the KOD DNA polymerase in Pichia pastoris. Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 is a DNA polymerase that is widely used in PCR. The DNA coding sequence of KOD was optimized based on the codon usage bias of P. pastoris and synthesized by overlapping PCR, and the nonspecific DNA-binding protein Sso7d from the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus was fused to the C-terminus of KOD. The resulting novel gene was cloned into a pHBM905A vector and introduced into P. pastoris GS115 for secretory expression. The yield of the target protein reached approximately 250 mg/l after a 6-d induction with 1% (v/v methanol in shake flasks. This yield is much higher than those of other DNA polymerases expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme was purified, and its enzymatic features were studied. Its specific activity was 19,384 U/mg. The recombinant KOD expressed in P. pastoris exhibited excellent thermostability, extension rate and fidelity. Thus, this report provides a simple, efficient and economic approach to realize the production of a high-performance thermostable DNA polymerase on a large scale. This is the first report of the expression in yeast of a DNA polymerase for use in PCR.

  11. Crenactin forms actin-like double helical filaments regulated by arcadin-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izoré, Thierry; Kureisaite-Ciziene, Danguole; McLaughlin, Stephen H; Löwe, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The similarity of eukaryotic actin to crenactin, a filament-forming protein from the crenarchaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis supports the theory of a common origin of Crenarchaea and Eukaryotes. Monomeric structures of crenactin and actin are similar, although their filament architectures were suggested to be different. Here we report that crenactin forms bona fide double helical filaments that show exceptional similarity to eukaryotic F-actin. With cryo-electron microscopy and helical reconstruction we solved the structure of the crenactin filament to 3.8 Å resolution. When forming double filaments, the 'hydrophobic plug' loop in crenactin rearranges. Arcadin-2, also encoded by the arcade gene cluster, binds tightly with its C-terminus to the hydrophobic groove of crenactin. Binding is reminiscent of eukaryotic actin modulators such as cofilin and thymosin β4 and arcadin-2 is a depolymeriser of crenactin filaments. Our work further supports the theory of shared ancestry of Eukaryotes and Crenarchaea. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21600.001 PMID:27852434

  12. Versatile genetic tool box for the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela eWagner

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available For reverse genetic approaches inactivation or selective modification of genes are required to elucidate their putative function. Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is a thermoacidophilic Crenarchaeon which grows optimally at 76 °C and pH 3. As many antibiotics do not withstand these conditions the development of a genetic system in this organism is dependent on auxotrophies. Therefore we constructed a pyrE deletion mutant of S. acidocaldarius wild type strain DSM639 missing 322 bp called MW001. Using this strain as the base, we describe here different methods using single as well as double crossover events to obtain markerless deletion mutants, tag genes genomically and ectopically integrate foreign DNA into MW001. These methods enable us to construct single, double and triple deletions strains that can still be complemented with the pRN1 based expression vector. Taken together we have developed a versatile and robust genetic tool box for the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that will promote the study of unknown gene functions in this organism and makes this organism a suitable host for synthetic biology approaches.

  13. Studies on crenarchaeal tyrosylation accuracy with mutational analyses of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and tyrosine tRNA from Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Jun; Endo, Kanako; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Fujimoto, Zui; Momma, Mitsuru; Kuno, Atsushi; Nishimura, Susumu; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2012-12-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases play a key role in the translation of genetic code into correct protein sequences. These enzymes recognize cognate amino acids and tRNAs from noncognate counterparts, and catalyze the formation of aminoacyl-tRNAs. While Although several tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases (TyrRSs) from various species have been structurally and functionally well characterized, the crenarchaeal TyrRS remains poorly understood. In this study, we performed mutational analyses on tyrosine tRNA (tRNA(Tyr)) and TyrRS from the crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix, to investigate the molecular recognition mechanism. Kinetics for tyrosylation using in vitro transcript indicated that the discriminator base A73 and adjacent G72 in the acceptor stem are identity elements of tRNA(Tyr), whereas the C1 base and anticodon had modest roles as identity determinants. Intriguingly, in contrast to the identity element of eukaryotic/euryarchaeal TyrRSs, the first base-pair (C1-G72) of the acceptor stem was not essential in crenarchaeal TyrRS as a pair. Furthermore, A. pernix TyrRS mutants were constructed at positions Tyr39 and Asp172, which could form hydrogen bonds with the 4-hydroxyl group of l-tyrosine. The tyrosylation activities with the mutants resulted that Asp172 mutants completely abolished tyrosylation activity, whereas Tyr39 mutants had no effect on activity. Thus, crenarchaeal TyrRS appears to adopt different molecular recognition mechanism from other TyrRSs.

  14. Biochemical and Structural Properties of a Thermostable Mercuric Ion Reductase from Metallosphaera sedula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, Jacob H.; White, Spencer N.; Zadvornyy, Oleg A.; Fugate, Corey J.; Hicks, Danny; Gauss, George H.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Boyd, Eric S.; Peters, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Mercuric ion reductase (MerA), a mercury detoxification enzyme, has been tuned by evolution to have high specificity for mercuric ions (Hg2+) and to catalyze their reduction to a more volatile, less toxic elemental form. Here, we present a biochemical and structural characterization of MerA from the thermophilic crenarchaeon Metallosphaera sedula. MerA from M. sedula is a thermostable enzyme, and remains active after extended incubation at 97°C. At 37°C, the NADPH oxidation-linked Hg2+ reduction specific activity was found to be 1.9 μmol/min⋅mg, increasing to 3.1 μmol/min⋅mg at 70°C. M. sedula MerA crystals were obtained and the structure was solved to 1.6 Å, representing the first solved crystal structure of a thermophilic MerA. Comparison of both the crystal structure and amino acid sequence of MerA from M. sedula to mesophillic counterparts provides new insights into the structural determinants that underpin the thermal stability of the enzyme. PMID:26217660

  15. The genome of Hyperthermus butylicus: a sulfur-reducing, peptide fermenting, neutrophilic Crenarchaeote growing up to 108 degrees C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Kim; Chen, Lanming; Stark, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Hyperthermus butylicus, a hyperthermophilic neutrophile and anaerobe, is a member of the archaeal kingdom Crenarchaeota. Its genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 1,667,163 bp with a 53.7% G+C content. A total of 1672 genes were annotated, of which 1602 are protein-coding, and up...... to a third are specific to H. butylicus. In contrast to some other crenarchaeal genomes, a high level of GUG and UUG start codons are predicted. Two cdc6 genes are present, but neither could be linked unambiguously to an origin of replication. Many of the predicted metabolic gene products are associated...

  16. Genome of the Acidianus bottle-shaped virus and insights into the replication and packaging mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu; Basta, Tamara; Häring, Monika

    2007-01-01

    The Acidianus bottle-shaped virus, ABV, infects strains of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Acidianus and is morphologically distinct from all other known viruses. Its genome consists of linear double-stranded DNA, containing 23,814 bp with a G+C content of 35%, and it exhibits a 590-bp...... viruses. The results confirm the unique nature of the ABV virus, and support its assignment to the newly proposed viral family the Ampullaviridae. Exceptionally, one region at the end of the linear genome of ABV is similar in both gene content and organization to corresponding regions in the genomes...

  17. Identification of a crenarchaeal orthologue of Elf1: implications for chromatin and transcription in Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Steven

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transcription machineries of Archaea and eukaryotes are similar in many aspects, but little is understood about archaeal chromatin and its role in transcription. Here, we describe the identification in hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota and a Korarchaeon of an orthologue of the eukaryotic transcription elongation factor Elf1, which has been shown to function in chromatin structure maintenance of actively transcribed templates. Our discovery has implications for the relationship of chromatin and transcription in Archaea and the evolution of these processes in eukaryotes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Chris P. Ponting and Eugene V. Koonin.

  18. Mesophilic Crenarchaeota: proposal for a third archaeal phylum, the Thaumarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Boussau, Bastien; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Forterre, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    The archaeal domain is currently divided into two major phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. During the past few years, diverse groups of uncultivated mesophilic archaea have been discovered and affiliated with the Crenarchaeota. It was recently recognized that these archaea have a major role in geochemical cycles. Based on the first genome sequence of a crenarchaeote, Cenarchaeum symbiosum, we show that these mesophilic archaea are different from hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota and branch deeper than was previously assumed. Our results indicate that C. symbiosum and its relatives are not Crenarchaeota, but should be considered as a third archaeal phylum, which we propose to name Thaumarchaeota (from the Greek 'thaumas', meaning wonder).

  19. Identification of a crenarchaeal orthologue of Elf1: implications for chromatin and transcription in Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Jan-Peter; Kelly, Steven; Wickstead, Bill; Gull, Keith

    2009-01-01

    The transcription machineries of Archaea and eukaryotes are similar in many aspects, but little is understood about archaeal chromatin and its role in transcription. Here, we describe the identification in hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota and a Korarchaeon of an orthologue of the eukaryotic transcription elongation factor Elf1, which has been shown to function in chromatin structure maintenance of actively transcribed templates. Our discovery has implications for the relationship of chromatin and transcription in Archaea and the evolution of these processes in eukaryotes. This article was reviewed by Chris P. Ponting and Eugene V. Koonin. PMID:19640276

  20. Complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus hellenicus P8T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wirth, Reinhard [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Staphylothermus hellenicus belongs to the order Desulfurococcales within the archaeal phy- lum Crenarchaeota. Strain P8T is the type strain of the species and was isolated from a shal- low hydrothermal vent system at Palaeochori Bay, Milos, Greece. It is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic heterotroph. Here we describe the features of this organism together with the com- plete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,580,347 bp genome with its 1,668 protein- coding and 48 RNA genes was sequenced as part of a DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI) La- boratory Sequencing Program (LSP) project.

  1. Extremely thermophilic microorganisms and their polymer-hidrolytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Carolina M.M.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms are found as normal inhabitants of continental and submarine volcanic areas, geothermally heated sea-sediments and hydrothermal vents and thus are considered extremophiles. Several present or potential applications of extremophilic enzymes are reviewed, especially polymer-hydrolysing enzymes, such as amylolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes. The purpose of this review is to present the range of morphological and metabolic features among those microorganisms growing from 70oC to 100°C and to indicate potential opportunities for useful applications derived from these features.

  2. Expression, Purification, and Characterisation of Dehydroquinate Synthase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Negron

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dehydroquinate synthase (DHQS catalyses the second step of the shikimate pathway to aromatic compounds. DHQS from the archaeal hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus was insoluble when expressed in Escherichia coli but was partially solubilised when KCl was included in the cell lysis buffer. A purification procedure was developed, involving lysis by sonication at 30∘C followed by a heat treatment at 70∘C and anion exchange chromatography. Purified recombinant P. furiosus DHQS is a dimer with a subunit Mr of 37,397 (determined by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and is active over broad pH and temperature ranges. The kinetic parameters are KM (3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate 3.7 μM and kcat 3.0 sec-1 at 60∘C and pH 6.8. EDTA inactivates the enzyme, and enzyme activity is restored by several divalent metal ions including (in order of decreasing effectiveness Cd2+, Co2+, Zn2+, and Mn2+. High activity of a DHQS in the presence of Cd2+ has not been reported for enzymes from other sources, and may be related to the bioavailability of Cd2+ for P. furiosus. This study is the first biochemical characterisation of a DHQS from a thermophilic source. Furthermore, the characterisation of this hyperthermophilic enzyme was carried out at elevated temperatures using an enzyme-coupled assay.

  3. Phthalic acid esters found in municipal organic waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    ) in OFMSW was monitored in the influent and effluent of anaerobic thermophilic (55degreesC) and hyper-thermophilic CO (68degreesC) laboratory-scale reactor systems. In the thermophilic reactors with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of W 15 days 38-70% of DBP was removed, but no consistent removal of DEHP...... was observed. However, after treatment of the effluent from the thermophilic reactor in a hyper-thermophilic digester (HRT: 5 days) 0 CO 34-53% of the DEHP content was removed and the DBP removal was increased to further 62-74%. Removal rates (k(h)) of DEHP and DBP were found to be 0.11-0.32 d(-1) and 0.......41-0.79 d(-1), which is much higher than in previous investigations. It can be concluded that the higher removal rates are due to the higher temperature and higher initial concentrations per kg dry matter. These results suggest that the limiting factor for DEHP degradation is the bioavailability, which...

  4. Hydrothermal systems as environments for the emergence of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, E L

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of the chemical disequilibrium provided by the mixing of hydrothermal fluids and seawater in present-day systems indicates that organic synthesis from CO2 or carbonic acid is thermodynamically favoured in the conditions in which hyperthermophilic microorganisms are known to live. These organisms lower the Gibbs free energy of the chemical mixture by synthesizing many of the components of their cells. Primary productivity is enormous in hydrothermal systems because it depends only on catalysis of thermodynamically favourable, exergonic reactions. It follows that hydrothermal systems may be the most favourable environments for life on Earth. This fact makes hydrothermal systems logical candidates for the location of the emergence of life, a speculation that is supported by genetic evidence that modern hyperthermophilic organisms are closer to a common ancestor than any other forms of life. The presence of hydrothermal systems on the early Earth would correspond to the presence of liquid water. Evidence that hydrothermal systems existed early in the history of Mars raises the possibility that life may have emerged on Mars as well. Redox reactions between water and rock establish the potential for organic synthesis in and around hydrothermal systems. Therefore, the single most important parameter for modelling the geochemical emergence of life on the early Earth or Mars is the composition of the rock which hosts the hydrothermal system.

  5. Functional adaptations of the bacterial chaperone trigger factor to extreme environmental temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin-Roulling, Amandine; Schmidpeter, Philipp A M; Schmid, Franz X; Feller, Georges

    2015-07-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is the first molecular chaperone interacting cotranslationally with virtually all nascent polypeptides synthesized by the ribosome in bacteria. Thermal adaptation of chaperone function was investigated in TFs from the Antarctic psychrophile Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis, the mesophile Escherichia coli and the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima. This series covers nearly all temperatures encountered by bacteria. Although structurally homologous, these TFs display strikingly distinct properties that are related to the bacterial environmental temperature. The hyperthermophilic TF strongly binds model proteins during their folding and protects them from heat-induced misfolding and aggregation. It decreases the folding rate and counteracts the fast folding rate imposed by high temperature. It also functions as a carrier of partially folded proteins for delivery to downstream chaperones ensuring final maturation. By contrast, the psychrophilic TF displays weak chaperone activities, showing that these functions are less important in cold conditions because protein folding, misfolding and aggregation are slowed down at low temperature. It efficiently catalyses prolyl isomerization at low temperature as a result of its increased cellular concentration rather than from an improved activity. Some chaperone properties of the mesophilic TF possibly reflect its function as a cold shock protein in E. coli. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Thermophilic hydrogen fermentation from Korean rice straw by Thermotoga neapolitana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tam-Anh D.; Kim, Kyoung-Rok; Sim, Sang Jun [Department of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Sun [Bioenergy Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Rice straw, a low-cost lignocellulosic biomass was used as feedstock for thermophilic hydrogen fermentation by Thermotoga neapolitana. Hydrogen production, the growth and cellulose digestibility of the hyperthermophile in batch mode from untreated as well as chemically pretreated (ammonia and dilute sulfuric acid) Korean rice straws were investigated. Pretreatment method using combination of 10% ammonia and 1.0% dilute sulfuric acid was developed to increase the digestibility of rice straw for the hyperthermophilic H{sub 2} fermentation and to decrease the time consumption. In a typical fermentation using raw rice straw, 29% of the substrate was digested and 2.3 mmol H{sub 2}/g straw of hydrogen yield was consistently obtained. Compared with the pretreatments using only ammonia or dilute sulfuric acid, the combined pretreatment method using both chemical agents significantly increases the digestibility of rice straw with 85.4% of substrate consumption. H{sub 2} production on rice straw from this combined pretreatment showed the highest yield (2.7 mmol H{sub 2}/g straw) and the highest sugar conversions (72.9% of glucose and 95.7% of xylose). (author)

  7. Archaeal virus with exceptional virion architecture and the largest single-stranded DNA genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Krupovic, Mart; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Sako, Yoshihiko; Forterre, Patrick; Prangishvili, David

    2012-01-01

    Known viruses build their particles using a restricted number of redundant structural solutions. Here, we describe the Aeropyrum coil-shaped virus (ACV), of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, with a virion architecture not previously observed in the viral world. The nonenveloped, hollow, cylindrical virion is formed from a coiling fiber, which consists of two intertwining halves of a single circular nucleoprotein. The virus ACV is also exceptional for its genomic properties. It is the only virus with a single-stranded (ss) DNA genome among the known hyperthermophilic archaeal viruses. Moreover, the size of its circular genome, 24,893 nt, is double that of the largest known ssDNA genome, suggesting an efficient solution for keeping ssDNA intact at 90–95 °C, the optimal temperature range of A. pernix growth. The genome content of ACV is in line with its unique morphology and confirms that ACV is not closely related to any known virus. PMID:22826255

  8. Did the Ancient Crenarchaeal Viruses from the Dawn of Life Survive Exceptionally Well the Eons of Meteorite Bombardment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalasvuori, Matti; Bamford, Jaana K. H.

    2009-02-01

    The viruses of Crenarchaeota are unexpectedly diverse in their morphologies, and most have no, or few, genes related to bacterial, eukaryal, euryarchaeal, or other crenarchaeal viruses. Though several different virus morphotypes have been discovered in enrichment cultures of microbial communities collected from geothermally heated environments around the world, the origins of such differences are unknown. We present a model that combines consideration of Earth's geological history, the early emergence of hyperthermophiles, and the early formation of viruses from primordial genes with the intent to explain this vast diversity of crenarchaeal viruses. Several meteorite- or flood basalt-induced extinction events in the past resulted in a reduction in the numbers of cellular organisms. Acidophilic hyperthermophiles survived the global thermal rises and, therefore, still host a wide variety of ancient virus morphotypes. In contrast, other, more "recent" cellular lineages have lost the majority of their original viruses, as they have been separated geologically and genetically, and have gone through several near-extinction-level episodes of decimation. This view suggests that, among crenarchaeal viruses, the direct descendants of very early genetic elements are well preserved; thus, their examination would improve our understanding as to how life actually evolved from its origins to the complex cellular systems we see today. We also present a hypothesis that describes the role of viral armadas and extinctions during evolution, as extinctions may have episodically eliminated most of the abusive parasites.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase from Rubrobacter xylanophilus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sá-Moura, Bebiana [IBMC - Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Albuquerque, Luciana; Empadinhas, Nuno [Centro de Neurociências e Biologia Celular, Departamento de Zoologia, Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Costa, Milton S. da [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra, E-mail: sribeiro@ibmc.up.pt [IBMC - Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal)

    2008-08-01

    The enzyme mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase from R. xylanophilus has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 5}22 and diffract to 2.2 Å resolution. Rubrobacter xylanophilus is the only Gram-positive bacterium known to synthesize the compatible solute mannosylglycerate (MG), which is commonly found in hyperthermophilic archaea and some thermophilic bacteria. Unlike the salt-dependent pattern of accumulation observed in (hyper)thermophiles, in R. xylanophilus MG accumulates constitutively. The synthesis of MG in R. xylanophilus was tracked from GDP-mannose and 3-phosphoglycerate, but the genome sequence of the organism failed to reveal any of the genes known to be involved in this pathway. The native enzyme was purified and its N-terminal sequence was used to identify the corresponding gene (mpgS) in the genome of R. xylanophilus. The gene encodes a highly divergent mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (MpgS) without relevant sequence homology to known mannosylphosphoglycerate synthases. In order to understand the specificity and enzymatic mechanism of this novel enzyme, it was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals thus obtained belonged to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 5}22 and contained two protein molecules per asymmetric unit. The structure was solved by SIRAS using a mercury derivative.

  10. Borders of life: lessons from Microbiology of deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieur, D.

    Thirty years ago, the deep-sea was known as a low density biotope due to coldness, darkness and famine-like conditions. The discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Eastern Pacific in 1977 and the associated black smokers in 1979 considerably changed our views about life on Earth. For the first time, an ecosystem almost independent (at least for tens of years) of solar nergy was discovered. Besides the spectacular and unexpected communities of invertebrates based on symbiotic associations with chemo-litho-autotrophic bacteria, prokaryotic communities associated with high temperature black smokers fascinated microbiologists of extreme environments. Within mineral structures where temperature gradients may fluctuate from ambient seawater temperatures (2°C) up to 350°C, thermophilic (optimal growth above 60°C) and hyperthermophilic (optimal growth above 80°C) microorganisms thrived under very severe conditions due to elevated hydrostatic pressure, toxic compounds or strong ionizing radiations. These organisms belong to both domains of Bacteria and Archaea and live aerobically but mostly anaerobically, using a variety of inorganic and organic carbon sources, and a variety of electron donnors and acceptors as well. The most thermophilic organism known on Earth was isolated from a mid-Atlantic-Ridge hydrotermal vent: Pyrolobus fumarii grows optimally at 110°c and its upper temperature limit for life is 113°C. Such an organism survived to autoclaving conditions currently used for sterilization procedures. Many other hyperthermophilic organisms were isolated and described, including fermenters, sulphate and sulphur reducers, hydrogen oxidizers, nitrate reducers, methanogens, etc. Although most of anaerobes are killed when exposed to oxygen, several deep-sea hyperthermophiles appeared to survive to both oxygen and starvation exposures, indicating that they probably can colonize rather distant environments Because of elevated hydrostatic pressure that exists at

  11. Horizontal gene transfers with or without cell fusions in all categories of the living matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the history of widespread exchanges of genetic segments initiated over 3 billion years ago, to be part of their life style, by sphero-protoplastic cells, the ancestors of archaea, prokaryota, and eukaryota. These primordial cells shared a hostile anaerobic and overheated environment and competed for survival. "Coexist with, or subdue and conquer, expropriate its most useful possessions, or symbiose with it, your competitor" remain cellular life's basic rules. This author emphasizes the role of viruses, both in mediating cell fusions, such as the formation of the first eukaryotic cell(s) from a united crenarchaeon and prokaryota, and the transfer of host cell genes integrated into viral (phages) genomes. After rising above the Darwinian threshold, rigid rules of speciation and vertical inheritance in the three domains of life were established, but horizontal gene transfers with or without cell fusions were never abolished. The author proves with extensive, yet highly selective documentation, that not only unicellular microorganisms, but the most complex multicellular entities of the highest ranks resort to, and practice, cell fusions, and donate and accept horizontally (laterally) transferred genes. Cell fusions and horizontally exchanged genetic materials remain the fundamental attributes and inherent characteristics of the living matter, whether occurring accidentally or sought after intentionally. These events occur to cells stagnating for some 3 milliard years at a lower yet amazingly sophisticated level of evolution, and to cells achieving the highest degree of differentiation, and thus functioning in dependence on the support of a most advanced multicellular host, like those of the human brain. No living cell is completely exempt from gene drains or gene insertions.

  12. Crenarchaeol dominates the membrane lipids of Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis, a thermophilic group I.1b Archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Angela; Rychlik, Nicolas; Hopmans, Ellen C; Spieck, Eva; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Ossebaar, Jort; Schouten, Stefan; Wagner, Michael; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe

    2010-04-01

    Analyses of archaeal membrane lipids are increasingly being included in ecological studies as a comparatively unbiased complement to gene-based microbiological approaches. For example, crenarchaeol, a glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) with a unique cyclohexane moiety, has been postulated as biomarker for ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA). Crenarchaeol has been detected in Nitrosopumilus maritimus and 'Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii' representing two of the three lineages within the Crenarchaeota containing described AOA. In this paper we present the membrane GDGT composition of 'Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis', a moderately thermophilic AOA, and the only cultivated Group I.1b Crenarchaeon. At a cultivation temperature of 46 degrees C, GDGTs of this organism consisted primarily of crenarchaeol, its regioisomer, and a novel GDGT. Intriguingly, 'Ca. N. gargensis' is the first cultivated archaeon to synthesize substantial amounts of the crenarchaeol regioisomer, a compound found in large relative abundances in tropical ocean water and some soils, and an important component of the TEX(86) paleothermometer. Intact polar lipid (IPL) analysis revealed that 'Ca. N. gargensis' synthesizes IPLs similar to those reported for the Goup I.1a AOA, Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCMI, in addition to IPLs containing uncharacterized headgroups. Overall, the unique GDGT composition of 'Ca. N. gargensis' extends the known taxonomic distribution of crenarchaeol synthesis to the Group I.1b Crenarchaeota, implicating this clade as a potentially important source of crenarchaeol in soils and moderately high temperature environments. Moreover, this work supports the hypothesis that crenarchaeol is specific to all AOA and highlights specific lipids, which may prove useful as biomarkers for 'Ca. N. gargensis'-like AOA.

  13. MarR-Like Transcriptional Regulator Involved in Detoxification of Aromatic Compounds in Sulfolobus solfataricus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Gabriella; Ronca, Raffaele; Cannio, Raffaele; Rossi, Mosè; Bartolucci, Simonetta

    2007-01-01

    A DNA binding protein, BldR, was identified in the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus as a protein 5- to 10-fold more abundant in cells grown in the presence of toxic aldehydes; it binds to regulatory sequences located upstream of an alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Sso2536). BldR is homologous to bacterial representatives of the MarR (multiple antibiotic resistance) family of transcriptional regulators that mediate response to multiple environmental stresses. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the bldR gene was transcribed in a bicistronic unit composed of the genes encoding the transcriptional regulator (Sso1352) and a putative multidrug transporter (Sso1351) upstream. By homology to bacterial counterparts, the bicistron was named the mar-like operon. The level of mar-like operon expression was found to be increased at least 10-fold in response to chemical stress by aromatic aldehydes. Under the same growth conditions, similar enhanced in vivo levels of Sso2536 gene transcript were also measured. The gene encoding BldR was expressed in E. coli, and the recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity. DNA binding assays demonstrated that the protein is indeed a transcription factor able to recognize site specifically both the Sso2536 and mar-like promoters at sites containing palindromic consensus sequences. Benzaldehyde, the substrate of ADHSs, stimulates DNA binding of BldR at both promoters. The role of BldR in the auto-activation as well as in the regulation of the Sso2536 gene, together with results of increased operon and gene expression under conditions of exposure to aromatic aldehydes, indicates a novel coordinate regulatory mechanism in cell defense against stress by aromatic compounds. PMID:17675388

  14. Transcriptional Regulation of the Gene Encoding an Alcohol Dehydrogenase in the Archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus Involves Multiple Factors and Control Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Gabriella; Cannio, Raffaele; Rossi, Mosè; Bartolucci, Simonetta

    2003-01-01

    A transcriptionally active region has been identified in the 5′ flanking region of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene of the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus through the evaluation of the activity of putative transcriptional regulators and the role of the region upstream of the gene under specific metabolic circumstances. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with crude extracts revealed protein complexes that most likely contain TATA box-associated factors. When the TATA element was deleted from the region, binding sites for both DNA binding proteins, such as the small chromatin structure-modeling Sso7d and Sso10b (Alba), and transcription factors, such as the repressor Lrs14, were revealed. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the substrate-induced expression of the adh gene, the promoter was analyzed for the presence of cis-acting elements recognized by specific transcription factors upon exposure of the cell to benzaldehyde. Progressive dissection of the identified promoter region restricted the analysis to a minimal responsive element (PAL) located immediately upstream of the transcription factor B-responsive element-TATA element, resembling typical bacterial regulatory sequences. A benzaldehyde-activated transcription factor (Bald) that specifically binds to the PAL cis-acting element was also identified. This protein was purified from heparin-fractionated extracts of benzaldehyde-induced cells and was shown to have a molecular mass of ∼16 kDa. The correlation between S. solfataricus adh gene activation and benzaldehyde-inducible occupation of a specific DNA sequence in its promoter suggests that a molecular signaling mechanism is responsible for the switch of the aromatic aldehyde metabolism as a response to environmental changes. PMID:12813087

  15. Electrostatic braiding and homologous pairing of DNA double helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortini, Ruggero; Kornyshev, Alexei A; Lee, Dominic J; Leikin, Sergey

    2011-08-17

    Homologous pairing and braiding (supercoiling) have crucial effects on genome organization, maintenance, and evolution. Generally, the pairing and braiding processes are discussed in different contexts, independently of each other. However, analysis of electrostatic interactions between DNA double helices suggests that in some situations these processes may be related. Here we present a theory of DNA braiding that accounts for the elastic energy of DNA double helices as well as for the chiral nature of the discrete helical patterns of DNA charges. This theory shows that DNA braiding may be affected, stabilized, or even driven by chiral electrostatic interactions. For example, electrostatically driven braiding may explain the surprising recent observation of stable pairing of homologous double-stranded DNA in solutions containing only monovalent salt. Electrostatic stabilization of left-handed braids may stand behind the chiral selectivity of type II topoisomerases and positive plasmid supercoiling in hyperthermophilic bacteria and archea. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Single-molecule fluorescence polarization study of conformational change in archaeal group II chaperonin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Iizuka

    Full Text Available Group II chaperonins found in archaea and in eukaryotic cytosol mediate protein folding without a GroES-like cofactor. The function of the cofactor is substituted by the helical protrusion at the tip of the apical domain, which forms a built-in lid on the central cavity. Although many studies on the change in lid conformation coupled to the binding and hydrolysis of nucleotides have been conducted, the molecular mechanism of lid closure remains poorly understood. Here, we performed a single-molecule polarization modulation to probe the rotation of the helical protrusion of a chaperonin from a hyperthermophilic archaeum, Thermococcus sp. strain KS-1. We detected approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion immediately after photorelease of ATP. The result suggests that the conformational change from the open lid to the closed lid state is responsible for the approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion.

  17. The role of stabilization centers in protein thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magyar, Csaba [Institute of Enzymology, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar Tudósok krt 2, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Gromiha, M. Michael [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Sávoly, Zoltán [Institute of Enzymology, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar Tudósok krt 2, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Simon, István, E-mail: simon.istvan@ttk.mta.hu [Institute of Enzymology, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar Tudósok krt 2, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary)

    2016-02-26

    The definition of stabilization centers was introduced almost two decades ago. They are centers of noncovalent long range interaction clusters, believed to have a role in maintaining the three-dimensional structure of proteins by preventing their decay due to their cooperative long range interactions. Here, this hypothesis is investigated from the viewpoint of thermal stability for the first time, using a large protein thermodynamics database. The positions of amino acids belonging to stabilization centers are correlated with available experimental thermodynamic data on protein thermal stability. Our analysis suggests that stabilization centers, especially solvent exposed ones, do contribute to the thermal stabilization of proteins. - Highlights: • Stabilization centers contribute to thermal stabilization of protein structures. • Stabilization center content correlates with melting temperature of proteins. • Exposed stabilization center content correlates with stability even in hyperthermophiles. • Stability changing mutations are frequently found at stabilization centers.

  18. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basta, T.; Garrett, Roger Antony; Prangishvili,, David

    2009-01-01

    Double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) viruses that infect members of the third domain of life, the Archaea, are diverse and exceptional in both their morphotypes and their genomic properties. The majority of characterized species infect hyperthermophilic hosts and carry morphological features...... which have not been observed for viruses from the other domains of life, the Bacteria and the Eukarya. This exceptional status of the archaeal viruses is reinforced by the finding that a large majority of their predicted genes yield no sequence matches in public sequence databases, and their functions...... remain unknown. One of the viruses, the bicaudavirus ATV (Acidianus two-tailed virus), is quite unique in that it undergoes a major morphological change, growing long tail structures, extracellularly. A small minority of archaeal viruses, which exclusively infect mesophilic or moderately thermophilic...

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) from Desulfurococcus amylolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Tomoko; Kubota, Keiko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Tanokura, Masaru

    2009-09-01

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is a structure-specific nuclease that removes 5'-overhanging flaps in DNA repair and removes the RNA/DNA primer during maturation of the Okazaki fragment in lagging-strand DNA replication. FEN1 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus amylolyticus was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with monoammonium dihydrogen phosphate as the precipitant at pH 8.3. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.00 A resolution. The space group of the crystal was determined as the primitive hexagonal space group P321, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.76, c = 84.58 A. The crystal contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  20. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d’Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N. L.; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production. PMID:26053393

  1. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirakar Pradhan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production.

  2. Aquifex aeolicus membrane hydrogenase for hydrogen biooxidation: Role of lipids and physiological partners in enzyme stability and activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Infossi, Pascale; Lojou, Elisabeth; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Therese [Unite de Bioenergetique et Ingenierie des Proteines, UPR 9036, Institut de Microbiologie de la Mediterranee - CNRS, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Chauvin, Jean-Paul [Institut de Biologie du developpement de Marseille Luminy, UMR 6216, Parc Scientifique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, BP 907, 13009 Marseille (France); Herbette, Gaetan [Spectropole FI 1739, Aix-Marseille Universite case 511, Faculte de St Jerome Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Brugna, Myriam [Unite de Bioenergetique et Ingenierie des Proteines, UPR 9036, Institut de Microbiologie de la Mediterranee - CNRS, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Universite de Provence, 3 Place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 03 (France)

    2010-10-15

    Hydrogenase I from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is a good candidate for biotechnological devices thanks to its ability to oxidize hydrogen at high temperature, even in the presence of oxygen and CO. In order to enhance the enzyme stability and the catalytic efficiency, we investigated the hydrogen oxidation process with hydrogenase I embedded in a physiological-like environment. Hydrogenase I partners in the metabolic chain, namely membrane quinone and cytochrome b, were purified and fully characterized. The complex hydrogenase I-cytochrome b was inserted into liposomes. Surface Plasmon Resonance revealed that quinone took part in the stabilization of the complex. By use of molecular modelization and electrochemistry analysis, enzyme stability has been demonstrated to be stronger and enzymatic efficiency to be five times higher when hydrogenase is embedded into the liposomes. This result raises the possibility of using hydrogenases as biocatalysts in fuel cells. (author)

  3. Early steps of biosynthesis of ether lipids in archaebacteria; Eteru shishitsu seigosei no shoki dankai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishino, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-05-20

    Membrane lipids in archaebacteria are different from those of eubacteria and eukaryote which are fatty acid esters of glycerol. Archaebacterial lipids are mainly ether-linked lipids composed of glycerol linked to two molecules of isoprenoid phytanyl groups or of ether-linked glycerol with phytanyl group. This structural feature is one of the origins of survival and growth of archaebacteria in extreme conditions of high temperature, strong acid or alkali. It is considered that geranylgeranyl phosphate (GGPP) is synthesized and attached to glycerol phosphate, followed by reduction of the double bond in the geranylgeranyl moieties to form the diether lipids while the head-to-heat condensation of the phytanyl groups produces the tetraether lipids. Aiming to elucidate the lipid biosynthesis mechanism in a hyperthermophilic archaebacterium, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, the gene of GGPP synthase was cloned with the aid of carotenoid synthesis in phytopathogenic Erwinia uredovora and its sequence was studied. 29 refs., 9 figs.

  4. High hydrostatic pressure adaptive strategies in an obligate piezophile Pyrococcus yayanosii

    KAUST Repository

    Michoud, Gregoire

    2016-06-02

    Pyrococcus yayanosii CH1, as the first and only obligate piezophilic hyperthermophilic microorganism discovered to date, extends the physical and chemical limits of life on Earth. It was isolated from the Ashadze hydrothermal vent at 4,100 m depth. Multi-omics analyses were performed to study the mechanisms used by the cell to cope with high hydrostatic pressure variations. In silico analyses showed that the P. yayanosii genome is highly adapted to its harsh environment, with a loss of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways and the high constitutive expression of the energy metabolism compared with other non-obligate piezophilic Pyrococcus species. Differential proteomics and transcriptomics analyses identified key hydrostatic pressure-responsive genes involved in translation, chemotaxis, energy metabolism (hydrogenases and formate metabolism) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats sequences associated with Cellular apoptosis susceptibility proteins.

  5. Crystal structure of archaeal chromatin protein Alba2-double-stranded DNA complex from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Padavattan, Sivaraman; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri

    2012-03-23

    All thermophilic and hyperthermophilic archaea encode homologs of dimeric Alba (Sac10b) proteins that bind cooperatively at high density to DNA. Here, we report the 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of an Alba2 (Ape10b2)-dsDNA complex from Aeropyrum pernix K1. A rectangular tube-like structure encompassing duplex DNA reveals the positively charged residues in the monomer-monomer interface of each dimer packing on either side of the bound dsDNA in successive minor grooves. The extended hairpin loop connecting strands β3 and β4 undergoes significant conformational changes upon DNA binding to accommodate the other Alba2 dimer during oligomerization. Mutational analysis of key interacting residues confirmed the specificity of Alba2-dsDNA interactions.

  6. Crystal structure of an archaeal specific DNA-binding protein (Ape10b2) from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Sakamoto, Keiko; Gopinath, Subash C B; Shinkai, Akeo; Kumar, Penmetcha K R; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2008-05-15

    DNA binding proteins are essential in all organisms, and they play important roles in both compacting and regulating the genetic material. All thermophilic and hyperthermophilic archaea encode one or more copies of Alba or Sso10b, which is a small, abundant, basic protein that binds DNA. Here, we present the crystal structure of Ape10b2 from Aeropyrum pernix K1 at 1.70 A. Although the overall structure resembles the known Alba protein fold, a significant conformational change was observed in the loop regions. Specifically, the L5 loop is slightly longer, as compared to those of other known proteins, and the flexibility of this loop may facilitate the interaction with double stranded DNA. In addition, we showed that Ape10b2 binds to 16 and 39 bp duplex DNAs with high affinity. On the basis of our analyses, we have created a putative protein-DNA complex model. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. An efficient method for the expression and reconstitution of thermostable Mn/Fe superoxide dismutase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee-Jin; Kwon, Hye-Won; Koh, Jong-Uk; Lee, Dong-Kuk; Moon, Ja-Young; Kong, Kwang-Hoon

    2010-04-01

    The gene APE0743 encoding the superoxide dismutase (ApSOD) of a hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 was cloned and over-expressed as a GST fusion protein at a high level in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein was simply purified by the process of glutathione affinity chromatography and thrombin treatment. The ApSOD was a homodimer of 25 kDa subunits and a cambialistic SOD which was active with either Fe(II) or Mn(II) as a cofactor. The ApSOD was highly stable against high temperature. This thermostable ApSOD is expected to be applicable as a useful biocatalyst for medicine and bio-industrial processes.

  8. Structure of the Aeropyrum pernix L7Ae multifunctional protein and insight into its extreme thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiya, Mohammad Wadud; Suryadi, Jimmy; Zhou, Zholi; Brown, Bernard Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Archaeal ribosomal protein L7Ae is a multifunctional RNA-binding protein that directs post-transcriptional modification of archaeal RNAs. The L7Ae protein from Aeropyrum pernix (Ap L7Ae), a member of the Crenarchaea, was found to have an extremely high melting temperature (>383 K). The crystal structure of Ap L7Ae has been determined to a resolution of 1.56 Å. The structure of Ap L7Ae was compared with the structures of two homologs: hyperthermophilic Methanocaldococcus jannaschii L7Ae and the mesophilic counterpart mammalian 15.5 kD protein. The primary stabilizing feature in the Ap L7Ae protein appears to be the large number of ion pairs and extensive ion-pair network that connects secondary-structural elements. To our knowledge, Ap L7Ae is among the most thermostable single-domain monomeric proteins presently observed.

  9. Crystal Structure of Archaeal Chromatin Protein Alba2-Double-stranded DNA Complex from Aeropyrum pernix K1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Padavattan, Sivaraman; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri

    2012-01-01

    All thermophilic and hyperthermophilic archaea encode homologs of dimeric Alba (Sac10b) proteins that bind cooperatively at high density to DNA. Here, we report the 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of an Alba2 (Ape10b2)-dsDNA complex from Aeropyrum pernix K1. A rectangular tube-like structure encompassing duplex DNA reveals the positively charged residues in the monomer-monomer interface of each dimer packing on either side of the bound dsDNA in successive minor grooves. The extended hairpin loop connecting strands β3 and β4 undergoes significant conformational changes upon DNA binding to accommodate the other Alba2 dimer during oligomerization. Mutational analysis of key interacting residues confirmed the specificity of Alba2-dsDNA interactions. PMID:22334696

  10. A site-specific endonuclease encoded by a typical archaeal intron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Jacob; Garrett, Roger Antony; Belfort, Malene

    1993-01-01

    . Additionally, although the archaeal and group I introns have entirely different structural properties and splicing pathways, I-Dmo I shares sequence similarity, in the form of the LAGLI-DADG motif, with group I intron endonucleases of eukaryotes. These observations support the independent evolutionary origin......The protein encoded by the archaeal intron in the 23S rRNA gene of the hyperthermophile Desulfurococcus mobilis is a double-strand DNase that, like group I intron homing endonucleases, is capable of cleaving an intronless allele of the gene. This enzyme, I-Dmo I, is unusual among the intron...... endonucleases in that it is thermostable and is expressed only from linear and cyclized intron species and not from the precursor RNA. However, in analogy to its eukaryotic counterparts, but unlike the bacteriophage enzymes, I-Dmo I makes a staggered double-strand cut that generates 4-nt 3' extensions...

  11. Structure and dynamics of mesophilic variants from the homing endonuclease I-DmoI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alba, Josephine; Marcaida, Maria Jose; Prieto, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    this particular application, many efforts have been made to generate mesophilic variants of I-DmoI that function at lower temperatures than the wild-type. Here, we report a structural and computational analysis of two I-DmoI mesophilic mutants. Despite very limited structural variations between the crystal......I-DmoI, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus mobilis, belongs to the LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease protein family. Its members are highly specific enzymes capable of recognizing long DNA target sequences, thus providing potential tools for genome manipulation. Working towards...... structures of these variants and the wild-type, a different dynamical behaviour near the cleavage sites is observed. In particular, both the dynamics of the water molecules and the protein perturbation effect on the cleavage site correlate well with the changes observed in the experimental enzymatic activity....

  12. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-06-04

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production.

  13. Sulfolobus Replication Factor C stimulates the activity of DNA Polymerase B1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Xuanxuan; Zhang, Likui; Guo, Li

    2014-01-01

    Replication factor C (RFC) is known to function in loading proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) onto primed DNA, allowing PCNA to tether DNA polymerase for highly processive DNA synthesis in eukaryotic and archaeal replication. In this report, we show that an RFC complex from...... with the ability of RFC to facilitate DNA binding by PolB1 through protein-protein interaction. These results suggest that Sulfolobus RFC may play a role in recruiting DNA polymerase for efficient primer extension, in addition to clamp loading, during DNA replication....... the hyperthermophilic archaea of the genus Sulfolobus physically interacts with DNA polymerase B1 (PolB1) and enhances both the polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities of PolB1 in an ATP-independent manner. Stimulation of the PolB1 activity by RFC is independent of the ability of RFC to bind DNA but is consistent...

  14. Distribution of Crenarchaeota Representatives in Terrestrial Hot Springs of Russia and Iceland ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevalova, Anna A.; Kolganova, Tatiana V.; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Schleper, Christa; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A.; Lebedinsky, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    Culture-independent (PCR with Crenarchaeota-specific primers and subsequent denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) and culture-dependent approaches were used to study the diversity of Crenarchaeota in terrestrial hot springs of the Kamchatka Peninsula and the Lake Baikal region (Russia) and of Iceland. Among the phylotypes detected there were relatives of both cultured (mainly hyperthermophilic) and uncultured Crenarchaeota. It was found that there is a large and diverse group of uncultured Crenarchaeota that inhabit terrestrial hot springs with moderate temperatures (55 to 70°C). Two of the lineages of this group were given phenotypic characterization, one as a result of cultivation in an enrichment culture and another one after isolation of a pure culture, “Fervidococcus fontis,” which proved to be a moderately thermophilic, neutrophilic (optimum pH of 6.0 to 7.5), anaerobic organotroph. PMID:18849450

  15. Cell cycle characteristics of crenarchaeota: unity among diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Magnus; Malandrin, Laurence; Eriksson, Stefan; Huber, Harald; Bernander, Rolf

    2008-08-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaea Acidianus hospitalis, Aeropyrum pernix, Pyrobaculum aerophilum, Pyrobaculum calidifontis, and Sulfolobus tokodaii representing three different orders in the phylum Crenarchaeota were analyzed by flow cytometry and combined phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy. The overall organization of the cell cycle was found to be similar in all species, with a short prereplicative period and a dominant postreplicative period that accounted for 64 to 77% of the generation time. Thus, in all Crenarchaeota analyzed to date, cell division and initiation of chromosome replication occur in close succession, and a long time interval separates termination of replication from cell division. In Pyrobaculum, chromosome segregation overlapped with or closely followed DNA replication, and further genome separation appeared to occur concomitant with cellular growth. Cell division in P. aerophilum took place without visible constriction.

  16. Cell Cycle Characteristics of Crenarchaeota: Unity among Diversity▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Magnus; Malandrin, Laurence; Eriksson, Stefan; Huber, Harald; Bernander, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaea Acidianus hospitalis, Aeropyrum pernix, Pyrobaculum aerophilum, Pyrobaculum calidifontis, and Sulfolobus tokodaii representing three different orders in the phylum Crenarchaeota were analyzed by flow cytometry and combined phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy. The overall organization of the cell cycle was found to be similar in all species, with a short prereplicative period and a dominant postreplicative period that accounted for 64 to 77% of the generation time. Thus, in all Crenarchaeota analyzed to date, cell division and initiation of chromosome replication occur in close succession, and a long time interval separates termination of replication from cell division. In Pyrobaculum, chromosome segregation overlapped with or closely followed DNA replication, and further genome separation appeared to occur concomitant with cellular growth. Cell division in P. aerophilum took place without visible constriction. PMID:18502873

  17. Circular Permutation of a Chaperonin Protein: Biophysics and Application to Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavola, Chad; Chan, Suzanne; Li, Yi-Fen; McMillan, R. Andrew; Trent, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    We have designed five circular permutants of a chaperonin protein derived from the hyperthermophilic organism Sulfolobus shibatae. These permuted proteins were expressed in E. coli and are well-folded. Furthermore, all the permutants assemble into 18-mer double rings of the same form as the wild-type protein. We characterized the thermodynamics of folding for each permutant by both guanidine denaturation and differential scanning calorimetry. We also examined the assembly of chaperonin rings into higher order structures that may be used as nanoscale templates. The results show that circular permutation can be used to tune the thermodynamic properties of a protein template as well as facilitating the fusion of peptides, binding proteins or enzymes onto nanostructured templates.

  18. Sugar Transport and Metabolism in Thermotoga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noll, Kenneth M.; Romano, Antonio H.

    2003-02-11

    The work conducted under this grant demonstrated that the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana carries out glucose and lactose transport in a sodium-dependent manner and that energization of anaerobic cells is required to observe transport. We also demonstrated that Thermotoga maritima carries out maltose and glucose transport using periplasmic sugar binding proteins. We began defining patterns of expression of genes encoding sugar transport and catabolic functions in both T. maritima and T. neapolitana. We began a collaborative effort to identify all the genes regulated at the transcriptional level in response to sugars substrates. These funds also allowed us to begin an examination of the functions of several periplasmic substrate binding proteins encoded in the genome of T. maritima.

  19. Distribution of Crenarchaeota representatives in terrestrial hot springs of Russia and Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevalova, Anna A; Kolganova, Tatiana V; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Schleper, Christa; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Lebedinsky, Alexander V

    2008-12-01

    Culture-independent (PCR with Crenarchaeota-specific primers and subsequent denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) and culture-dependent approaches were used to study the diversity of Crenarchaeota in terrestrial hot springs of the Kamchatka Peninsula and the Lake Baikal region (Russia) and of Iceland. Among the phylotypes detected there were relatives of both cultured (mainly hyperthermophilic) and uncultured Crenarchaeota. It was found that there is a large and diverse group of uncultured Crenarchaeota that inhabit terrestrial hot springs with moderate temperatures (55 to 70 degrees C). Two of the lineages of this group were given phenotypic characterization, one as a result of cultivation in an enrichment culture and another one after isolation of a pure culture, "Fervidococcus fontis," which proved to be a moderately thermophilic, neutrophilic (optimum pH of 6.0 to 7.5), anaerobic organotroph.

  20. Production and Application of a Soluble Hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hao Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen gas is a potential renewable alternative energy carrier that could be used in the future to help supplement humanity’s growing energy needs. Unfortunately, current industrial methods for hydrogen production are expensive or environmentally unfriendly. In recent years research has focused on biological mechanisms for hydrogen production and specifically on hydrogenases, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the reduction of protons to generate hydrogen. In particular, a better understanding of this enzyme might allow us to generate hydrogen that does not use expensive metals, such as platinum, as catalysts. The soluble hydrogenase I (SHI from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, a member of the euryarchaeota, has been studied extensively and used in various biotechnological applications. This review summarizes the strategies used in engineering and characterizing three different forms of SHI and the properties of the recombinant enzymes. SHI has also been used in in vitro systems for hydrogen production and NADPH generation and these systems are also discussed.

  1. Hydroxyurea-Mediated Cytotoxicity Without Inhibition of Ribonucleotide Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Phing Liew

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In many organisms, hydroxyurea (HU inhibits class I ribonucleotide reductase, leading to lowered cellular pools of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates. The reduced levels for DNA precursors is believed to cause replication fork stalling. Upon treatment of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus with HU, we observe dose-dependent cell cycle arrest, accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks, stalled replication forks, and elevated levels of recombination structures. However, Sulfolobus has a HU-insensitive class II ribonucleotide reductase, and we reveal that HU treatment does not significantly impact cellular DNA precursor pools. Profiling of protein and transcript levels reveals modulation of a specific subset of replication initiation and cell division genes. Notably, the selective loss of the regulatory subunit of the primase correlates with cessation of replication initiation and stalling of replication forks. Furthermore, we find evidence for a detoxification response induced by HU treatment.

  2. Structure and dynamics of mesophilic variants from the homing endonuclease I-DmoI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Josephine; Marcaida, Maria Jose; Prieto, Jesus; Montoya, Guillermo; Molina, Rafael; D'Abramo, Marco

    2017-12-01

    I-DmoI, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus mobilis, belongs to the LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease protein family. Its members are highly specific enzymes capable of recognizing long DNA target sequences, thus providing potential tools for genome manipulation. Working towards this particular application, many efforts have been made to generate mesophilic variants of I-DmoI that function at lower temperatures than the wild-type. Here, we report a structural and computational analysis of two I-DmoI mesophilic mutants. Despite very limited structural variations between the crystal structures of these variants and the wild-type, a different dynamical behaviour near the cleavage sites is observed. In particular, both the dynamics of the water molecules and the protein perturbation effect on the cleavage site correlate well with the changes observed in the experimental enzymatic activity.

  3. High sensitive RNA detection by one-step RT-PCR using the genetically engineered variant of DNA polymerase with reverse transcriptase activity from hyperthermophilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Hiroyuki; Baba, Misato; Kawato, Katsuhiro; Hidese, Ryota; Yanagihara, Itaru; Kojima, Kenji; Takita, Teisuke; Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi

    2017-10-31

    One-step RT-PCR has not been widely used even though some thermostable DNA polymerases with reverse transcriptase (RT) activity were developed from bacterial and archaeal polymerases, which is owing to low cDNA synthesis activity from RNA. In the present study, we developed highly-sensitive one-step RT-PCR using the single variant of family A DNA polymerase with RT activity, K4pol L329A (L329A), from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga petrophila K4 or the 16-tuple variant of family B DNA polymerase with RT activity, RTX, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. Optimization of reaction condition revealed that the activities for cDNA synthesis and PCR of K4pol L329A and RTX were highly affected by the concentrations of MgCl 2 and Mn(OCOCH 3 ) 2 as well as those of K4pol L329A or RTX. Under the optimized condition, 300 copies/μl of target RNA in 10 μl reaction volumes were successfully detected by the one-step RT-PCR with K4pol L329A or RTX, which was almost equally sensitive enough compared with the current RT-PCR condition using retroviral RT and thermostable DNA polymerase. Considering that K4pol L329A and RTX are stable even at 90-100°C, our results suggest that the one-step RT-PCR with K4pol L329A or RTX is more advantageous than the current one. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanisms of thermal adaptation revealed from the genomes of the Antarctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, Neil F.W.; Thomas, Torsten; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Mattick, John S.; Kuczek, Elizabeth; Slade, Rob; Davis, John; Franzmann, Peter; Boone, David; Rusterholtz, Karl; Feldman, Robert; Gates, Chris; Bench, Shellie; Sowers, Kevin; Kadner, Kristen; Aerts, Andrea; Dehal, Paramvir; Detter, Chris; Glavina, Tijana; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, Paul; Larimer, Frank; Hauser , Frank; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Cavicchioli, Richard

    2003-03-01

    We generated draft genome sequences for two cold-adapted Archaea, Methanogenium frigidum and Methanococcoides burtonii, to identify genotypic characteristics that distinguish them from Archaea with a higher optimal growth temperature (OGT). Comparative genomics revealed trends in amino acid and tRNA composition, and structural features of proteins. Proteins from the cold-adapted Archaea are characterized by a higher content of non-charged polar amino acids, particularly Gln and Thr and a lower content of hydrophobic amino acids, particularly Leu. Sequence data from nine methanogen genomes (OGT 15-98 C) was used to generate 1 111 modeled protein structures. Analysis of the models from the cold-adapted Archaea showed a strong tendency in the solvent accessible area for more Gln, Thr an hydrophobic residues and fewer charged residues. A cold shock domain (CSD) protein (CspA homolog) was identified in M. frigidum, two hypothetical proteins with CSD-folds in M. burtonii, and a unique winged helix DNA-binding domain protein in M. burtonii. This suggests that these types of nucleic acid binding proteins have a critical role in cold-adapted Archaea. Structural analysis of tRNA sequences from the Archaea indicated that GC content is the major factor influencing tRNA stability in hyperthermophiles, but not in the psychrophiles, mesophiles or moderate thermophiles. Below an OGT of 60 C, the GC content in tRNA was largely unchanged, indicating that any requirement for flexibility of tRNA in psychrophiles is mediated by other means. This is the first time that comparisons have been performed with genome data from Archaea spanning the growth temperature extremes from psychrophiles to hyperthermophiles.

  5. Methanogenic H2 syntrophy among thermophiles: a model of metabolism, adaptation and survival in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcuoglu, B. D.; Stewart, L. C.; Butterfield, D. A.; Huber, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 1 giga ton (Gt, 1015 g) of CH4 is formed globally per year from H2, CO2 and acetate through methanogenesis, largely by methanogens growing in syntrophic association with anaerobic microbes that hydrolyze and ferment biopolymers. However, our understanding of methanogenesis in hydrothermal regions of the subseafloor and potential syntrophic methanogenesis at thermophilic temperatures (i.e., >50°C) is nascent. In this study, the growth of natural assemblages of thermophilic methanogens from Axial Seamount was primarily limited by H2 availability. Heterotrophs supported thermophilic methanogenesis by H2 syntrophy in microcosm incubations of hydrothermal fluids at 55°C and 80°C supplemented with tryptone only. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, only heterotrophic archaea that produce H2, H2-consuming methanogens, and sulfate reducing archaea were found in 80°C tryptone microcosms from Marker 113 vent. No bacteria were found. In 55°C tryptone microcosms, sequences were found from H2-producing bacteria and H2-consuming methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. In order to model the impact of H2 syntrophy at hyperthemophilic temperatures, a co-culture was established consisting of the H2-producing hyperthermophilic heterotroph Thermococcus paralvinellae and a H2-consuming hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens. When grown alone in a chemostat, the growth rates and steady-state cell concentrations of T. paralvinellae decreased significantly when a high H2 (70 µM) background was present. H2 inhibition was ameliorated by the production of formate, but in silico modeling suggests less energetic yield for the cells. H2 syntrophy relieved H2 inhibition for both the heterotroph and the methanogenic partners. The results demonstrate that thermophilic H2 syntrophy can support methanogenesis within natural microbial assemblages and may be an important alternative energy source for thermophilic autotrophs in marine geothermal environments.

  6. Compressibilities and Volume Fluctuations of Archaeal Tetraether Liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau; Sulc, Michael; Winter, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Bipolar tetraether lipids (BTLs) are abundant in crenarchaeota, which thrive in both thermophilic and nonthermophilic environments, with wide-ranging growth temperatures (4–108°C). BTL liposomes can serve as membrane models to explore the role of BTLs in the thermal stability of the plasma membrane of crenarchaeota. In this study, we focus on the liposomes made of the polar lipid fraction E (PLFE). PLFE is one of the main BTLs isolated from the thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Using molecular acoustics (ultrasound velocimetry and densimetry), pressure perturbation calorimetry, and differential scanning calorimetry, we have determined partial specific adiabatic and isothermal compressibility, their respective compressibility coefficients, partial specific volume, and relative volume fluctuations of PLFE large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) over a wide range of temperatures (20–85°C). The results are compared with those obtained from liposomes made of dipalmitoyl-L-α-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a conventional monopolar diester lipid. We found that, in the entire temperature range examined, compressibilities of PLFE LUVs are low, comparable to those found in gel state of DPPC. Relative volume fluctuations of PLFE LUVs at any given temperature examined are 1.6–2.2 times more damped than those found in DPPC LUVs. Both compressibilities and relative volume fluctuations in PLFE LUVs are much less temperature-sensitive than those in DPPC liposomes. The isothermal compressibility coefficient (βTlipid) of PLFE LUVs changes from 3.59 × 10−10 Pa−1 at 25°C to 4.08 × 10−10 Pa−1 at 78°C. Volume fluctuations of PLFE LUVs change only 0.25% from 30°C to 80°C. The highly damped volume fluctuations and their low temperature sensitivity, echo that PLFE liposomes are rigid and tightly packed. To our knowledge, the data provide a deeper understanding of lipid packing in PLFE liposomes than has been previously reported, as well as a molecular

  7. Clusters of orthologous genes for 41 archaeal genomes and implications for evolutionary genomics of archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Kira S; Sorokin, Alexander V; Novichkov, Pavel S; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2007-01-01

    Background An evolutionary classification of genes from sequenced genomes that distinguishes between orthologs and paralogs is indispensable for genome annotation and evolutionary reconstruction. Shortly after multiple genome sequences of bacteria, archaea, and unicellular eukaryotes became available, an attempt on such a classification was implemented in Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs). Rapid accumulation of genome sequences creates opportunities for refining COGs but also represents a challenge because of error amplification. One of the practical strategies involves construction of refined COGs for phylogenetically compact subsets of genomes. Results New Archaeal Clusters of Orthologous Genes (arCOGs) were constructed for 41 archaeal genomes (13 Crenarchaeota, 27 Euryarchaeota and one Nanoarchaeon) using an improved procedure that employs a similarity tree between smaller, group-specific clusters, semi-automatically partitions orthology domains in multidomain proteins, and uses profile searches for identification of remote orthologs. The annotation of arCOGs is a consensus between three assignments based on the COGs, the CDD database, and the annotations of homologs in the NR database. The 7538 arCOGs, on average, cover ~88% of the genes in a genome compared to a ~76% coverage in COGs. The finer granularity of ortholog identification in the arCOGs is apparent from the fact that 4538 arCOGs correspond to 2362 COGs; ~40% of the arCOGs are new. The archaeal gene core (protein-coding genes found in all 41 genome) consists of 166 arCOGs. The arCOGs were used to reconstruct gene loss and gene gain events during archaeal evolution and gene sets of ancestral forms. The Last Archaeal Common Ancestor (LACA) is conservatively estimated to possess 996 genes compared to 1245 and 1335 genes for the last common ancestors of Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota, respectively. It is inferred that LACA was a chemoautotrophic hyperthermophile that, in addition to the

  8. Clusters of orthologous genes for 41 archaeal genomes and implications for evolutionary genomics of archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Yuri I

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An evolutionary classification of genes from sequenced genomes that distinguishes between orthologs and paralogs is indispensable for genome annotation and evolutionary reconstruction. Shortly after multiple genome sequences of bacteria, archaea, and unicellular eukaryotes became available, an attempt on such a classification was implemented in Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs. Rapid accumulation of genome sequences creates opportunities for refining COGs but also represents a challenge because of error amplification. One of the practical strategies involves construction of refined COGs for phylogenetically compact subsets of genomes. Results New Archaeal Clusters of Orthologous Genes (arCOGs were constructed for 41 archaeal genomes (13 Crenarchaeota, 27 Euryarchaeota and one Nanoarchaeon using an improved procedure that employs a similarity tree between smaller, group-specific clusters, semi-automatically partitions orthology domains in multidomain proteins, and uses profile searches for identification of remote orthologs. The annotation of arCOGs is a consensus between three assignments based on the COGs, the CDD database, and the annotations of homologs in the NR database. The 7538 arCOGs, on average, cover ~88% of the genes in a genome compared to a ~76% coverage in COGs. The finer granularity of ortholog identification in the arCOGs is apparent from the fact that 4538 arCOGs correspond to 2362 COGs; ~40% of the arCOGs are new. The archaeal gene core (protein-coding genes found in all 41 genome consists of 166 arCOGs. The arCOGs were used to reconstruct gene loss and gene gain events during archaeal evolution and gene sets of ancestral forms. The Last Archaeal Common Ancestor (LACA is conservatively estimated to possess 996 genes compared to 1245 and 1335 genes for the last common ancestors of Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota, respectively. It is inferred that LACA was a chemoautotrophic hyperthermophile

  9. Space Agriculture for Recovery of Fukushima from the Nuclear Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Hasegawa, Katsuya; Kanazawa, Shinjiro; Oshima, Tairo

    2012-07-01

    Space agriculture is an engineering challenge to realize life support functions on distant planetary bodies under their harsh environment. After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, its land was heavily contaminated by radioactive cesium and other nuclei. We proposed the use of space agriculture to remediate the contaminated land. Since materials circulation in the human dominant system should remove sodium from metabolic waste at processing fertilizer for crop plants, handling of sodium and potassium ions in agro-ecosystem has been one of major research targets of space agriculture. Cesium resembles to potassium as alkaline metal. Knowledge on behavior of sodium/potassium in agro-ecosystem might contribute to Fukushima. Reduction of volume of contaminated biomass made by hyperthermophilic aerobic composting bacterial system is another proposal from space agriculture. Volume and mass of plant bodies should be reduced for safe storage of nuclear wastes. Capacity of the storage facility will be definitely limited against huge amount of contaminated soil, plants and others. For this purpose, incineration of biomass first choice. The process should be under the lowered combustion temperature and with filters to confine radioactive ash to prevent dispersion of radioactive cesium. Biological combustion made by hyperthermophilic aerobic composting bacterial system might offer safe alternative for the volume reduction of plant biomass. Scientific evidence are demanded for Fukushima in order to to judge health risks of the low dose rate exposure and their biological mechanism. Biology and medicine for low dose rate exposure have been intensively studied for space exploration. The criteria of radiation exposure for general public should be remained as 1 mSv/year, because people has no merit at being exposed. However, the criteria of 1,200 mSv for life long, which is set to male astronaut, age of his first flight after age 40, might be informative to people for understanding

  10. Evolution of mal ABC transporter operons in the Thermococcales and Thermotogales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Kenneth M; Lapierre, Pascal; Gogarten, J Peter; Nanavati, Dhaval M

    2008-01-15

    The mal genes that encode maltose transporters have undergone extensive lateral transfer among ancestors of the archaea Thermococcus litoralis and Pyrococcus furiosus. Bacterial hyperthermophiles of the order Thermotogales live among these archaea and so may have shared in these transfers. The genome sequence of Thermotoga maritima bears evidence of extensive acquisition of archaeal genes, so its ancestors clearly had the capacity to do so. We examined deep phylogenetic relationships among the mal genes of these hyperthermophiles and their close relatives to look for evidence of shared ancestry. We demonstrate that the two maltose ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter operons now found in Tc. litoralis and P. furiosus (termed mal and mdx genes, respectively) are not closely related to one another. The Tc. litoralis and P. furiosus mal genes are most closely related to bacterial mal genes while their respective mdx genes are archaeal. The genes of the two mal operons in Tt. maritima are not related to genes in either of these archaeal operons. They are highly similar to one another and belong to a phylogenetic lineage that includes mal genes from the enteric bacteria. A unique domain of the enteric MalF membrane spanning proteins found also in these Thermotogales MalF homologs supports their relatively close relationship with these enteric proteins. Analyses of genome sequence data from other Thermotogales species, Fervidobacterium nodosum, Thermosipho melanesiensis, Thermotoga petrophila, Thermotoga lettingae, and Thermotoga neapolitana, revealed a third apparent mal operon, absent from the published genome sequence of Tt. maritima strain MSB8. This third operon, mal3, is more closely related to the Thermococcales' bacteria-derived mal genes than are mal1 and mal2. F. nodosum, Ts. melanesiensis, and Tt. lettingae have only one of the mal1-mal2 paralogs. The mal2 operon from an unknown species of Thermotoga appears to have been horizontally acquired by a Thermotoga

  11. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Canganella

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong

  12. Evolution of mal ABC transporter operons in the Thermococcales and Thermotogales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogarten J Peter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mal genes that encode maltose transporters have undergone extensive lateral transfer among ancestors of the archaea Thermococcus litoralis and Pyrococcus furiosus. Bacterial hyperthermophiles of the order Thermotogales live among these archaea and so may have shared in these transfers. The genome sequence of Thermotoga maritima bears evidence of extensive acquisition of archaeal genes, so its ancestors clearly had the capacity to do so. We examined deep phylogenetic relationships among the mal genes of these hyperthermophiles and their close relatives to look for evidence of shared ancestry. Results We demonstrate that the two maltose ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter operons now found in Tc. litoralis and P. furiosus (termed mal and mdx genes, respectively are not closely related to one another. The Tc. litoralis and P. furiosus mal genes are most closely related to bacterial mal genes while their respective mdx genes are archaeal. The genes of the two mal operons in Tt. maritima are not related to genes in either of these archaeal operons. They are highly similar to one another and belong to a phylogenetic lineage that includes mal genes from the enteric bacteria. A unique domain of the enteric MalF membrane spanning proteins found also in these Thermotogales MalF homologs supports their relatively close relationship with these enteric proteins. Analyses of genome sequence data from other Thermotogales species, Fervidobacterium nodosum, Thermosipho melanesiensis, Thermotoga petrophila, Thermotoga lettingae, and Thermotoga neapolitana, revealed a third apparent mal operon, absent from the published genome sequence of Tt. maritima strain MSB8. This third operon, mal3, is more closely related to the Thermococcales' bacteria-derived mal genes than are mal1 and mal2. F. nodosum, Ts. melanesiensis, and Tt. lettingae have only one of the mal1-mal2 paralogs. The mal2 operon from an unknown species of Thermotoga appears to

  13. MAGGIE Component 1: Identification and Purification of Native and Recombinant Multiprotein Complexes and Modified Proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Michael W. [University of Georgia; W. W. Adams, Michael

    2014-01-07

    Virtualy all cellular processes are carried out by dynamic molecular assemblies or multiprotein complexes (PCs), the composition of which is largely unknown. Structural genomics efforts have demonstrated that less than 25% of the genes in a given prokaryotic genome will yield stable, soluble proteins when expressed using a one-ORF-at-a-time approach. We proposed that much of the remaining 75% of the genes encode proteins that are part of multiprotein complexes or are modified post-translationally, for example, with metals. The problem is that PCs and metalloproteins (MPs) cannot be accurately predicted on a genome-wide scale. The only solution to this dilemma is to experimentally determine PCs and MPs in biomass of a model organism and to develop analytical tools that can then be applied to the biomass of any other organism. In other words, organisms themselves must be analyzed to identify their PCs and MPs: “native proteomes” must be determined. This information can then be utilized to design multiple ORF expression systems to produce recombinant forms of PCs and MPs. Moreover, the information and utility of this approach can be enhanced by using a hyperthermophile, one that grows optimally at 100°C, as a model organism. By analyzing the native proteome at close to 100 °C below the optimum growth temperature, we will trap reversible and dynamic complexes, thereby enabling their identification, purification, and subsequent characterization. The model organism for the current study is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100°C. It is grown up to 600-liter scale and kg quantities of biomass are available. In this project we identified native PCs and MPs using P. furiosus biomass (with MS/MS analyses to identify proteins by component 4). In addition, we provided samples of abundant native PCs and MPs for structural characterization (using SAXS by component 5). We also designed and evaluated generic bioinformatics and

  14. Search for the algorithm of genes distribution during the process of microbial evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.

    2015-09-01

    Previous two and three dimensional graph analysis of eco-physiological data of Archaea demonstrated specific geometry for distribution of major Prokaryotic groups in a hyperboloid function. The function of a two-sheet hyperboloid covered all known biological groups, and therefore, could be applied for the entire evolution of life on Earth. The vector of evolution was indicated from the point of hyper temperature, extreme acidity and low salinity to the point of low temperature and increased alkalinity and salinity. According to this vector, the following groups were chosen for the gene screening analysis. In the vector "High-Temperature → Low-Temperature" within extreme acidic pH (0-3), it is: 1) the hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota - order Sulfolobales, 2) moderately thermophilic Euryarchaeota - Class Thermoplasmata, and 3) mesophilic acidophiles- genus Thiobacillus and others. In the vector "Low pH → High pH" the following groups were selected in three temperature ranges: a) Hyperthermophilic Archaea and Eubacteria, b) moderately thermophilic - representatives of the genera Anaerobacter and Anoxybacillus, and c) mesophilic haloalkaliphiles (Eubacteria and Archaea). The genes associated with acidophily (H+ pump), chemolitho-autotrophy (proteins of biochemichal cycles), polymerases, and histones were proposed for the first vector, and for the second vector the genes associated with halo-alkaliphily (Na+ pumps), enzymes of organotrophic metabolisms (sugar- and proteolytics), and others were indicated for the screening. Here, an introduction to the phylogenetic constant (ρη) is presented and discussed. This universal characteristic is calculated for two principally different life forms -Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes; Existence of the second type of living forms is impossible without the first one. The number of chromosomes in Prokaryotic organisms is limited to one (with very rare exceptions, to two), while in Eukaryotic organisms this number is larger. Currently

  15. Dissimilatory Iron Reduction in Microorganisms Growing Near 100 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, L.; Holden, J.

    2006-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron reduction for microbial energy-generation has been well studied in mesophilic bacteria, such as Geobacter and Shewanella, but has only recently been found in organisms that grow optimally above 80°C, namely hyperthermophilic archaea. Dissimilatory iron reduction at high temperatures is likely to be widespread in high-temperature, anoxic environments such as deep-sea hydrothermal vents and terrestrial hot springs. Understanding the physiological mechanisms of microbe-metal interactions will help us to interpret the interplay between microorganisms and their geochemical environment. Our studies sought to characterize iron reduction in members of the hyperthermophilic genus Pyrobaculum (Topt 100°C) and the constraints associated with it and alternative terminal electron accepting processes. P. aerophilum and P. islandicum grew on soluble (Fe(III) citrate) and insoluble (Fe(III) oxide hydroxide) forms of iron. In P. aerophilum, ferric reductase and nitrate reductase activities and nitrate reductase abundances varied in iron- and nitrate-grown cultures suggesting that dissimilatory iron and nitrate reduction are regulated. P. aerophilum grew on Fe(III) oxide hydroxide that was separated from the cells by a dialysis membrane (12,000-14,000 MWCO). This suggests that direct contact with insoluble iron was not necessary for growth and that the organism may use an extracellular mediator for iron reduction. A hydroquinone-like molecule (MW = 234 Da) was identified by LC-MS in spent medium from cultures grown on insoluble Fe(III) oxide hydroxide that was far less abundant in spent media with other electron acceptors. P. aerophilum produced c- type cytochromes but genome analyses showed that the organism lacks polyheme c-type cytochromes, which are required for iron reduction in Geobacter and Shewanella species. There were significant differences between Pyrobaculum species with respect to pH and reduction potential preference of the media, which may have

  16. Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudritz, Ralph; Higgs, Paul; Stone, Jonathon

    2013-01-01

    Preface; Part I. Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life: 1. Observations of extrasolar planetary systems Shay Zucker; 2. The atmospheres of extrasolar planets L. Jeremy Richardson and Sara Seager; 3. Terrestrial planet formation Edward Thommes; 4. Protoplanetary disks, amino acids and the genetic code Paul Higgs and Ralph Pudritz; 5. Emergent phenomena in biology: the origin of cellular life David Deamer; Part II. Life on Earth: 6. Extremophiles: defining the envelope for the search for life in the Universe Lynn Rothschild; 7. Hyperthermophilic life on Earth - and on Mars? Karl Stetter; 8. Phylogenomics: how far back in the past can we go? Henner Brinkmann, Denis Baurain and Hervé Philippe; 9. Horizontal gene transfer, gene histories and the root of the tree of life Olga Zhaxybayeva and J. Peter Gogarten; 10. Evolutionary innovation versus ecological incumbency Adolf Seilacher; 11. Gradual origins for the Metazoans Alexandra Pontefract and Jonathan Stone; Part III. Life in the Solar System?: 12. The search for life on Mars Chris McKay; 13. Life in the dark dune spots of Mars: a testable hypothesis Eörs Szathmary, Tibor Ganti, Tamas Pocs, Andras Horvath, Akos Kereszturi, Szaniszlo Berzci and Andras Sik; 14. Titan: a new astrobiological vision from the Cassini-Huygens data François Raulin; 15. Europa, the Ocean Moon: tides, permeable ice, and life Richard Greenberg; Index.

  17. The hot spring and geyser sinters of El Tatio, Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Turiel, J. L.; Garcia-Valles, M.; Gimeno-Torrente, D.; Saavedra-Alonso, J.; Martinez-Manent, S.

    2005-10-01

    The siliceous sinter deposits of El Tatio geothermal field in northern Chile have been examined petrographically and mineralogically. These sinters consist of amorphous silica (opal-A) deposited around hot springs and geysers from nearly neutral, silica-saturated, sodium chloride waters. Water cooling and evaporation to dryness are the main processes that control the opal-A deposition in both subaqueous and subaerial settings, in close spatial relation to microbial communities. All fingerprints of organisms observed in the studied sinter samples represent microbes and suggest that the microbial community is moderately diverse (cyanobacteria, green bacteria, and diatoms). The most important ecological parameter is the temperature gradient, which is closely related to the observed depositional settings: 1) Geyser setting: water temperature = 70-86 °C (boiling point at El Tatio: 4200 m a.s.l.); coarse laminated sinter macrostructure with rapid local variations; biota comprises non-photosynthetic hyperthermophilic bacteria. 2) Splash areas around geysers: water temperature = 60-75 °C; laminated spicule and column macrostructure, locally forming cupolas (El Tatio is a natural laboratory of great interest because the sedimentary macrostructures and microtextures reflect the geological and biological processes involved in the primary deposition and early diagenesis of siliceous sinters.

  18. The stability of the RNA bases: implications for the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature origin-of-life theories require that the components of the first genetic material are stable. We therefore have measured the half-lives for the decomposition of the nucleobases. They have been found to be short on the geologic time scale. At 100 degreesC, the growth temperatures of the hyperthermophiles, the half-lives are too short to allow for the adequate accumulation of these compounds (t1/2 for A and G approximately 1 yr; U = 12 yr; C = 19 days). Therefore, unless the origin of life took place extremely rapidly (origin of life may be possible, but it cannot involve adenine, uracil, guanine, or cytosine. The rates of hydrolysis at 100 degreesC also suggest that an ocean-boiling asteroid impact would reset the prebiotic clock, requiring prebiotic synthetic processes to begin again. At 0 degreesC, A, U, G, and T appear to be sufficiently stable (t1/2 >/= 10(6) yr) to be involved in a low-temperature origin of life. However, the lack of stability of cytosine at 0 degreesC (t1/2 = 17, 000 yr) raises the possibility that the GC base pair may not have been used in the first genetic material unless life arose quickly (<10(6) yr) after a sterilization event. A two-letter code or an alternative base pair may have been used instead.

  19. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  20. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  1. Chaperonin filaments : their formation and an evaluation of methods for studying them.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaoi, T.; Kagawa, K. H.; Trent, J. D.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1998-08-01

    Chaperonins are multisubunit protein complexes that can be isolated from cells as high-molecular-weight structures that appear as double rings in the electron microscope. We recently discovered that chaperonin double rings isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, when incubated at physiological temperatures in the presence of ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, stacked into filaments; we hypothesized that these filaments are related to filaments seen inside S. shibatae cells and that chaperonins exist as filaments in vivo. This paper elucidates the conditions under which we have observed S. shibatae chaperonins to form filaments and evaluates native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation as methods for studying these filaments. We observed that in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} combined with ATP, ADP, ATP{gamma}S, or GTP, native PAGE indicated that chaperonin subunits assembled into double rings and that the conformation of these double rings was effected by nucleotide binding, but we saw no indication of chaperonin filament formation. Under these same conditions, however, TEM, spectroscopy, and centrifugation methods indicated that chaperonin subunits and double rings had assembled into filaments. We determined that this discrepancy in the representation of the chaperonin structure was due to the native PAGE method itself. When we exposed chaperonin filaments to the electrophoretic field used in native PAGE, the filaments dissociated into double rings. This suggests that TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation are the preferred methods for studying the higher-order structures of chaperonins, which are likely to be of biological significance.

  2. Construction and transformation of a Thermotoga-E. coli shuttle vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Dongmei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermotoga spp. are attractive candidates for producing biohydrogen, green chemicals, and thermostable enzymes. They may also serve as model systems for understanding life sustainability under hyperthermophilic conditions. A lack of genetic tools has hampered the investigation and application of these organisms. This study aims to develop a genetic transfer system for Thermotoga spp. Results Methods for preparing and handling Thermotoga solid cultures under aerobic conditions were optimized. A plating efficiency of ~50% was achieved when the bacterial cells were embedded in 0.3% Gelrite. A Thermotoga-E. coli shuttle vector pDH10 was constructed using pRQ7, a cryptic mini-plasmid found in T. sp. RQ7. Plasmid pDH10 was introduced to T. maritima and T. sp. RQ7 by electroporation and liposome-mediated transformation. Transformants were isolated, and the transformed kanamycin resistance gene (kan was detected from the plasmid DNA extracts of the recombinant strains by PCR and was confirmed by restriction digestions. The transformed DNA was stably maintained in both Thermotoga and E. coli even without the selective pressure. Conclusions Thermotoga are transformable by multiple means. Recombinant Thermotoga strains have been isolated for the first time. A heterologous kan gene is functionally expressed and stably maintained in Thermotoga.

  3. Crystal structure of an archaeal DNA sliding clamp: proliferating cell nuclear antigen from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, S; Ishino, Y; Morikawa, K

    2001-01-01

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is now recognized as one of the key proteins in DNA metabolic events because of its direct interactions with many proteins involved in important cellular processes. We have determined the crystal structure of PCNA from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus (pfuPCNA), at 2.1 A resolution. pfuPCNA forms a toroidal, ring-shaped structure consisting of homotrimeric molecules, which is also observed in the PCNA crystals from human and yeast. The overall structure of pfuPCNA is highly conserved with other PCNA proteins, as well as with the bacterial ss clamp and the bacteriophage gp45. This result shows that the three-dimensional structure of the sliding clamp is conserved in the three domains of life. pfuPCNA has two remarkable features compared with the human and yeast PCNA molecules: it has more ion pairs and fewer intermolecular main chain hydrogen bonds. The former may contribute to the thermal stability of pfuPCNA, and the latter may be the cause of the stimulatory effect of pfuPCNA on the DNA synthesizing activity of P. furiosus DNA polymerases in the absence of the clamp loader replication factor C in vitro.

  4. Flipping chromosomes in deep-sea archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Matteo; Badel, Catherine; Catchpole, Ryan; Gadelle, Danièle; Marguet, Evelyne; Barbe, Valérie; Forterre, Patrick; Oberto, Jacques

    2017-06-01

    One of the major mechanisms driving the evolution of all organisms is genomic rearrangement. In hyperthermophilic Archaea of the order Thermococcales, large chromosomal inversions occur so frequently that even closely related genomes are difficult to align. Clearly not resulting from the native homologous recombination machinery, the causative agent of these inversions has remained elusive. We present a model in which genomic inversions are catalyzed by the integrase enzyme encoded by a family of mobile genetic elements. We characterized the integrase from Thermococcus nautili plasmid pTN3 and showed that besides canonical site-specific reactions, it catalyzes low sequence specificity recombination reactions with the same outcome as homologous recombination events on DNA segments as short as 104bp both in vitro and in vivo, in contrast to other known tyrosine recombinases. Through serial culturing, we showed that the integrase-mediated divergence of T. nautili strains occurs at an astonishing rate, with at least four large-scale genomic inversions appearing within 60 generations. Our results and the ubiquitous distribution of pTN3-like integrated elements suggest that a major mechanism of evolution of an entire order of Archaea results from the activity of a selfish mobile genetic element.

  5. Crystal Structure of PAV1-137: A Protein from the Virus PAV1 That Infects Pyrococcus abyssi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Leulliot

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1 was the first virus particle infecting a hyperthermophilic Euryarchaeota (Pyrococcus abyssi strain GE23 that has been isolated and characterized. It is lemon shaped and is decorated with a short fibered tail. PAV1 morphologically resembles the fusiform members of the family Fuselloviridae or the genus Salterprovirus. The 18 kb dsDNA genome of PAV1 contains 25 predicted genes, most of them of unknown function. To help assigning functions to these proteins, we have initiated structural studies of the PAV1 proteome. We determined the crystal structure of a putative protein of 137 residues (PAV1-137 at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The protein forms dimers both in solution and in the crystal. The fold of PAV1-137 is a four-α-helical bundle analogous to those found in some eukaryotic adhesion proteins such as focal adhesion kinase, suggesting that PAV1-137 is involved in protein-protein interactions.

  6. Doubling Power Output of Starch Biobattery Treated by the Most Thermostable Isoamylase from an Archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kun; Zhang, Fei; Sun, Fangfang; Chen, Hongge; Percival Zhang, Y-H

    2015-08-20

    Biobattery, a kind of enzymatic fuel cells, can convert organic compounds (e.g., glucose, starch) to electricity in a closed system without moving parts. Inspired by natural starch metabolism catalyzed by starch phosphorylase, isoamylase is essential to debranch alpha-1,6-glycosidic bonds of starch, yielding linear amylodextrin - the best fuel for sugar-powered biobattery. However, there is no thermostable isoamylase stable enough for simultaneous starch gelatinization and enzymatic hydrolysis, different from the case of thermostable alpha-amylase. A putative isoamylase gene was mined from megagenomic database. The open reading frame ST0928 from a hyperthermophilic archaeron Sulfolobus tokodaii was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant protein was easily purified by heat precipitation at 80 (o)C for 30 min. This enzyme was characterized and required Mg(2+) as an activator. This enzyme was the most stable isoamylase reported with a half lifetime of 200 min at 90 (o)C in the presence of 0.5 mM MgCl2, suitable for simultaneous starch gelatinization and isoamylase hydrolysis. The cuvett-based air-breathing biobattery powered by isoamylase-treated starch exhibited nearly doubled power outputs than that powered by the same concentration starch solution, suggesting more glucose 1-phosphate generated.

  7. The stability of the RNA bases: implications for the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature origin-of-life theories require that the components of the first genetic material are stable. We therefore have measured the half-lives for the decomposition of the nucleobases. They have been found to be short on the geologic time scale. At 100 degreesC, the growth temperatures of the hyperthermophiles, the half-lives are too short to allow for the adequate accumulation of these compounds (t1/2 for A and G approximately 1 yr; U = 12 yr; C = 19 days). Therefore, unless the origin of life took place extremely rapidly (life may be possible, but it cannot involve adenine, uracil, guanine, or cytosine. The rates of hydrolysis at 100 degreesC also suggest that an ocean-boiling asteroid impact would reset the prebiotic clock, requiring prebiotic synthetic processes to begin again. At 0 degreesC, A, U, G, and T appear to be sufficiently stable (t1/2 >/= 10(6) yr) to be involved in a low-temperature origin of life. However, the lack of stability of cytosine at 0 degreesC (t1/2 = 17, 000 yr) raises the possibility that the GC base pair may not have been used in the first genetic material unless life arose quickly (<10(6) yr) after a sterilization event. A two-letter code or an alternative base pair may have been used instead.

  8. Crystal structures of the all-cysteinyl-coordinated D14C variant of Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin: [4Fe–4S] ↔ [3Fe–4S] cluster conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvgreen, Monika Nøhr; Martic, Maja; Windahl, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the all-cysteinyl-coordinated D14C variant of [4Fe–4S] ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been determined to 1.7 Å resolution from a crystal belonging to space group C2221 with two types of molecules, A and B, in the asymmetric unit. A and B...... was chemically oxidized at pH 5.8 to [3Fe–4S]. For purification at pH 8.0, two forms of the protein are obtained. Mass spectrometric analysis shows that the two forms are the D14C [3Fe–4S] P. furiosus ferredoxin monomer and a disulfide-bonded dimer of D14C [3Fe–4S] P. furiosus ferredoxin. When oxidization...... and purification are carried out at pH 5.8, only the monomer is obtained. The crystal structure of D14C [3Fe–4S] P. furiosus ferredoxin monomer was determined to 2.8 Å resolution from a crystal belonging to space group P212121 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The molecules resemble molecule A of D14C [4...

  9. PCR-based gene synthesis to produce recombinant proteins for crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne-Steele Miranda L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene synthesis technologies are an important tool for structural biology projects, allowing increased protein expression through codon optimization and facilitating sequence alterations. Existing methods, however, can be complex and not always reproducible, prompting researchers to use commercial suppliers rather than synthesize genes themselves. Results A PCR-based gene synthesis method, referred to as SeqTBIO, is described to efficiently assemble the coding regions of two novel hyperthermophilic proteins, PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille domain, a siRNA-binding domain of an Argonaute protein homologue and a deletion mutant of a family A DNA polymerase (PolA. The gene synthesis procedure is based on sequential assembly such that homogeneous DNA products can be obtained after each synthesis step without extensive manipulation or purification requirements. Coupling the gene synthesis procedure to in vivo homologous recombination techniques allows efficient subcloning and site-directed mutagenesis for error correction. The recombinant proteins of PAZ and PolA were subsequently overexpressed in E. coli and used for protein crystallization. Crystals of both proteins were obtained and they were suitable for X-ray analysis. Conclusion We demonstrate, by using PAZ and PolA as examples, the feasibility of integrating the gene synthesis, error correction and subcloning techniques into a non-automated gene to crystal pipeline such that genes can be designed, synthesized and implemented for recombinant expression and protein crystallization.

  10. Parallel evolution of transcriptome architecture during genome reorganization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung Ho; Reiss, David J.; Bare, J. Christopher; Tenenbaum, Dan; Pan, Min; Slagel, Joseph; Moritz, Robert L.; Lim, Sujung; Hackett, Murray; Menon, Angeli Lal; Adams, Michael W.W.; Barnebey, Adam; Yannone, Steven M.; Leigh, John A.; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2011-01-01

    Assembly of genes into operons is generally viewed as an important process during the continual adaptation of microbes to changing environmental challenges. However, the genome reorganization events that drive this process are also the roots of instability for existing operons. We have determined that there exists a statistically significant trend that correlates the proportion of genes encoded in operons in archaea to their phylogenetic lineage. We have further characterized how microbes deal with operon instability by mapping and comparing transcriptome architectures of four phylogenetically diverse extremophiles that span the range of operon stabilities observed across archaeal lineages: a photoheterotrophic halophile (Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1), a hydrogenotrophic methanogen (Methanococcus maripaludis S2), an acidophilic and aerobic thermophile (Sulfolobus solfataricus P2), and an anaerobic hyperthermophile (Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638). We demonstrate how the evolution of transcriptional elements (promoters and terminators) generates new operons, restores the coordinated regulation of translocated, inverted, and newly acquired genes, and introduces completely novel regulation for even some of the most conserved operonic genes such as those encoding subunits of the ribosome. The inverse correlation (r = –0.92) between the proportion of operons with such internally located transcriptional elements and the fraction of conserved operons in each of the four archaea reveals an unprecedented view into varying stages of operon evolution. Importantly, our integrated analysis has revealed that organisms adapted to higher growth temperatures have lower tolerance for genome reorganization events that disrupt operon structures. PMID:21750103

  11. Solution Structure of Pfu RPP21, a Component of the Archaeal RNase P Holoenzyme, and Interactions with its RPP29 Protein Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amero, Carlos D; Boomershine, William P; Xu, Yiren; Foster, Mark

    2009-01-01

    RNase P is the ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein metalloenzyme responsible for cleaving the 5′-leader sequence of precursor tRNAs during their maturation. While the RNA subunit is catalytically active on its own at high monovalent and divalent ion concentration, four proteins subunits are associated with archaeal RNase P activity in vivo: RPP21, RPP29, RPP30 and POP5. These proteins have been shown to function in pairs: RPP21-RPP29 and POP5-RPP30. We have determined the solution structure of RPP21 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) using conventional and paramagnetic NMR techniques. Pfu RPP21 in solution consists of an unstructured N-terminus, two alpha helices, a zinc binding motif, and an unstructured C-terminus. Moreover, we have used chemical shift perturbations to characterize the interaction of RPP21 with Pfu RPP29. The data show that the primary contact with RPP29 is localized to the two helices of RPP21. This information represents a fundamental step towards understanding structure-function relationships of the archaeal RNase P holoenzyme. PMID:18922021

  12. Solution structure of Pyrococcus furiosus RPP21, a component of the archaeal RNase P holoenzyme, and interactions with its RPP29 protein partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amero, Carlos D; Boomershine, William P; Xu, Yiren; Foster, Mark

    2008-11-11

    RNase P is the ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein metalloenzyme responsible for cleaving the 5'-leader sequence of precursor tRNAs during their maturation. While the RNA subunit is catalytically active on its own at high monovalent and divalent ion concentrations, four protein subunits are associated with archaeal RNase P activity in vivo: RPP21, RPP29, RPP30, and POP5. These proteins have been shown to function in pairs: RPP21-RPP29 and POP5-RPP30. We have determined the solution structure of RPP21 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus ( Pfu) using conventional and paramagnetic NMR techniques. Pfu RPP21 in solution consists of an unstructured N-terminus, two alpha-helices, a zinc binding motif, and an unstructured C-terminus. Moreover, we have used chemical shift perturbations to characterize the interaction of RPP21 with RPP29. The data show that the primary contact with RPP29 is localized to the two helices of RPP21. This information represents a fundamental step toward understanding structure-function relationships of the archaeal RNase P holoenzyme.

  13. An In Silico Approach for Characterization of an Aminoglycoside Antibiotic-Resistant Methyltransferase Protein from Pyrococcus furiosus (DSM 3638).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oany, Arafat Rahman; Jyoti, Tahmina Pervin; Ahmad, Shah Adil Ishtiyaq

    2014-01-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus is a hyperthermophilic archaea. A hypothetical protein of this archaea, PF0847, was selected for computational analysis. Basic local alignment search tool and multiple sequence alignment (MSA) tool were employed to search for related proteins. Both the secondary and tertiary structure prediction were obtained for further analysis. Three-dimensional model was assessed by PROCHECK and QMEAN6 programs. To get insights about the physical and functional associations of the protein, STRING network analysis was performed. Binding of the SAM (S-adenosyl-l-methionine) ligand with our protein, fetched from an antibiotic-related methyltransferase (PDB code: 3P2K: D), showed high docking energy and suggested the function of the protein as methyltransferase. Finally, we tried to look for a specific function of the proposed methyltransferase, and binding of the geneticin bound to the eubacterial 16S rRNA A-site (PDB code: 1MWL) in the active site of the PF0847 gave us the indication to predict the protein responsible for aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance.

  14. Structures of the signal recognition particle receptor from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus: implications for the targeting step at the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Pascal F; Tsuruta, Hiro; de Leon, Gladys P; Napetschnig, Johanna; Walter, Peter; Stroud, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    In all organisms, a ribonucleoprotein called the signal recognition particle (SRP) and its receptor (SR) target nascent proteins from the ribosome to the translocon for secretion or membrane insertion. We present the first X-ray structures of an archeal FtsY, the receptor from the hyper-thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu), in its free and GDP*magnesium-bound forms. The highly charged N-terminal domain of Pfu-FtsY is distinguished by a long N-terminal helix. The basic charges on the surface of this helix are likely to regulate interactions at the membrane. A peripheral GDP bound near a regulatory motif could indicate a site of interaction between the receptor and ribosomal or SRP RNAs. Small angle X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the crystal structure of Pfu-FtsY correlates well with the average conformation in solution. Based on previous structures of two sub-complexes, we propose a model of the core of archeal and eukaryotic SRP*SR targeting complexes.

  15. Structures of the Signal Recognition Particle Receptor From the Archaeon Pyrococcus Furiosus: Implications for the Targeting Step at the Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egea, P.F.; Tsuruta, H.; Leon, G.P.de; Napetschnig, J.; Walter, P.; Stroud, R.M.

    2009-05-18

    In all organisms, a ribonucleoprotein called the signal recognition particle (SRP) and its receptor (SR) target nascent proteins from the ribosome to the translocon for secretion or membrane insertion. We present the first X-ray structures of an archeal FtsY, the receptor from the hyper-thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu), in its free and GDP {center_dot} magnesium-bound forms. The highly charged N-terminal domain of Pfu-FtsY is distinguished by a long N-terminal helix. The basic charges on the surface of this helix are likely to regulate interactions at the membrane. A peripheral GDP bound near a regulatory motif could indicate a site of interaction between the receptor and ribosomal or SRP RNAs. Small angle X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the crystal structure of Pfu-FtsY correlates well with the average conformation in solution. Based on previous structures of two sub-complexes, we propose a model of the core of archeal and eukaryotic SRP {center_dot} SR targeting complexes.

  16. Protein thermodynamics can be predicted directly from biological growth rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Corkrey

    Full Text Available Life on Earth is capable of growing from temperatures well below freezing to above the boiling point of water, with some organisms preferring cooler and others hotter conditions. The growth rate of each organism ultimately depends on its intracellular chemical reactions. Here we show that a thermodynamic model based on a single, rate-limiting, enzyme-catalysed reaction accurately describes population growth rates in 230 diverse strains of unicellular and multicellular organisms. Collectively these represent all three domains of life, ranging from psychrophilic to hyperthermophilic, and including the highest temperature so far observed for growth (122 °C. The results provide credible estimates of thermodynamic properties of proteins and obtain, purely from organism intrinsic growth rate data, relationships between parameters previously identified experimentally, thus bridging a gap between biochemistry and whole organism biology. We find that growth rates of both unicellular and multicellular life forms can be described by the same temperature dependence model. The model results provide strong support for a single highly-conserved reaction present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA. This is remarkable in that it means that the growth rate dependence on temperature of unicellular and multicellular life forms that evolved over geological time spans can be explained by the same model.

  17. Insights on how the activity of an endoglucanase is affected by physical properties of insoluble celluloses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragatto, Juliano; Segato, Fernando; Cota, Junio; Mello, Danilo B; Oliveira, Marcelo M; Buckeridge, Marcos S; Squina, Fabio M; Driemeier, Carlos

    2012-05-31

    Cellulose physical properties like crystallinity, porosity, and particle size are known to influence cellulase activity, but knowledge is still insufficient for activity prediction from such measurable substrate characteristics. With the aim of illuminating enzyme-substrate relationships, this work evaluates a purified hyperthermophilic endo-1,4-beta-glucanase (from Pyrococcus furiosus) acting on 13 celluloses characterized for crystallinity and crystal width (by X-ray diffraction), wet porosity (by thermoporometry), and particle size (by light scattering). Activities are analyzed by the Michaelis-Menten kinetic equation, which is justified by low enzyme-substrate affinity. Michaelis-Menten coefficients K(m) and k(cat) are reinterpreted in the context of heterogeneous cellulose hydrolysis. For a set of as-received and milled microcrystalline celluloses, activity is successfully described as a function of accessible substrate concentration, with accessibility proportional to K(m)(-1). Accessibility contribution from external particle areas, pore areas, and crystalline packing are discriminated to have comparable magnitudes, implying that activity prediction demands all these substrate properties to be considered. Results additionally suggest that looser crystalline packing increases the lengths of released cello-oligomers as well as the maximum endoglucanase specific activity (k(cat)).

  18. An extra dimension in protein tagging by quantifying universal proteotypic peptides using targeted proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemoortele, Giel; Staes, An; Gonnelli, Giulia; Samyn, Noortje; De Sutter, Delphine; Vandermarliere, Elien; Timmerman, Evy; Gevaert, Kris; Martens, Lennart; Eyckerman, Sven

    2016-06-06

    The use of protein tagging to facilitate detailed characterization of target proteins has not only revolutionized cell biology, but also enabled biochemical analysis through efficient recovery of the protein complexes wherein the tagged proteins reside. The endogenous use of these tags for detailed protein characterization is widespread in lower organisms that allow for efficient homologous recombination. With the recent advances in genome engineering, tagging of endogenous proteins is now within reach for most experimental systems, including mammalian cell lines cultures. In this work, we describe the selection of peptides with ideal mass spectrometry characteristics for use in quantification of tagged proteins using targeted proteomics. We mined the proteome of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus to obtain two peptides that are unique in the proteomes of all known model organisms (proteotypic) and allow sensitive quantification of target proteins in a complex background. By combining these 'Proteotypic peptides for Quantification by SRM' (PQS peptides) with epitope tags, we demonstrate their use in co-immunoprecipitation experiments upon transfection of protein pairs, or after introduction of these tags in the endogenous proteins through genome engineering. Endogenous protein tagging for absolute quantification provides a powerful extra dimension to protein analysis, allowing the detailed characterization of endogenous proteins.

  19. The stability of the RNA bases: implications for the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature origin-of-life theories require that the components of the first genetic material are stable. We therefore have measured the half-lives for the decomposition of the nucleobases. They have been found to be short on the geologic time scale. At 100 degreesC, the growth temperatures of the hyperthermophiles, the half-lives are too short to allow for the adequate accumulation of these compounds (t1/2 for A and G approximately 1 yr; U = 12 yr; C = 19 days). Therefore, unless the origin of life took place extremely rapidly (clock, requiring prebiotic synthetic processes to begin again. At 0 degreesC, A, U, G, and T appear to be sufficiently stable (t1/2 >/= 10(6) yr) to be involved in a low-temperature origin of life. However, the lack of stability of cytosine at 0 degreesC (t1/2 = 17, 000 yr) raises the possibility that the GC base pair may not have been used in the first genetic material unless life arose quickly (<10(6) yr) after a sterilization event. A two-letter code or an alternative base pair may have been used instead.

  20. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a penicillin-binding protein homologue from Pyrococcus abyssi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delfosse, Vanessa [Laboratoire de Recherche Moléculaire sur les Antibiotiques, INSERM U655, Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), CHU Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris (France); Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel [Laboratoire de Recherche Moléculaire sur les Antibiotiques, INSERM U655, Institut des Cordeliers, Paris (France); Sougakoff, Wladimir; Mayer, Claudine, E-mail: mayer@chups.jussieu.fr [Laboratoire de Recherche Moléculaire sur les Antibiotiques, INSERM U655, Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), CHU Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris (France)

    2005-11-01

    The crystallization of a hypothetical penicillin-binding protein from the archaeon P. abyssi in space group C2 by hanging-drop vapour diffusion is reported. The genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi contains a gene (pab0087) encoding a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) homologue. This sequence consists of 447 residues and shows significant sequence similarity to low-molecular-weight PBPs and class C β-lactamases. The Pab0087 protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data from two different crystal forms were collected to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution. Both crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 160.59, b = 135.74, c = 113.02 Å, β = 117.36° and a = 166.97, b = 131.25, c = 189.39 Å, β = 113.81°, respectively. The asymmetric unit contains four and eight molecules, respectively, with fourfold non-crystallographic symmetry.

  1. Protein thermodynamics can be predicted directly from biological growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkrey, Ross; McMeekin, Tom A; Bowman, John P; Ratkowsky, David A; Olley, June; Ross, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Life on Earth is capable of growing from temperatures well below freezing to above the boiling point of water, with some organisms preferring cooler and others hotter conditions. The growth rate of each organism ultimately depends on its intracellular chemical reactions. Here we show that a thermodynamic model based on a single, rate-limiting, enzyme-catalysed reaction accurately describes population growth rates in 230 diverse strains of unicellular and multicellular organisms. Collectively these represent all three domains of life, ranging from psychrophilic to hyperthermophilic, and including the highest temperature so far observed for growth (122 °C). The results provide credible estimates of thermodynamic properties of proteins and obtain, purely from organism intrinsic growth rate data, relationships between parameters previously identified experimentally, thus bridging a gap between biochemistry and whole organism biology. We find that growth rates of both unicellular and multicellular life forms can be described by the same temperature dependence model. The model results provide strong support for a single highly-conserved reaction present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). This is remarkable in that it means that the growth rate dependence on temperature of unicellular and multicellular life forms that evolved over geological time spans can be explained by the same model.

  2. Construction and transformation of a Thermotoga-E. coli shuttle vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongmei; Norris, Stephen M; Xu, Zhaohui

    2012-01-06

    Thermotoga spp. are attractive candidates for producing biohydrogen, green chemicals, and thermostable enzymes. They may also serve as model systems for understanding life sustainability under hyperthermophilic conditions. A lack of genetic tools has hampered the investigation and application of these organisms. This study aims to develop a genetic transfer system for Thermotoga spp. Methods for preparing and handling Thermotoga solid cultures under aerobic conditions were optimized. A plating efficiency of ~50% was achieved when the bacterial cells were embedded in 0.3% Gelrite. A Thermotoga-E. coli shuttle vector pDH10 was constructed using pRQ7, a cryptic mini-plasmid found in T. sp. RQ7. Plasmid pDH10 was introduced to T. maritima and T. sp. RQ7 by electroporation and liposome-mediated transformation. Transformants were isolated, and the transformed kanamycin resistance gene (kan) was detected from the plasmid DNA extracts of the recombinant strains by PCR and was confirmed by restriction digestions. The transformed DNA was stably maintained in both Thermotoga and E. coli even without the selective pressure. Thermotoga are transformable by multiple means. Recombinant Thermotoga strains have been isolated for the first time. A heterologous kan gene is functionally expressed and stably maintained in Thermotoga.

  3. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-05-01

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer “ghosts” during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record.

  4. Novel, deep-branching heterotrophic bacterial populations recovered from thermal spring metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Colman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal spring ecosystems are a valuable resource for the discovery of novel hyperthermophilic Bacteria and Archaea, and harbor deeply-branching lineages that provide insight regarding the nature of early microbial life. We characterized bacterial populations in two circumneutral (pH ~ 8 Yellowstone National Park thermal (T ~ 80 oC spring filamentous ‘streamer’ communities using random metagenomic DNA sequence to investigate the metabolic potential of these novel populations. Four de novo assemblies representing three abundant, deeply-branching bacterial phylotypes were recovered. Analysis of conserved phylogenetic marker genes indicated that two of the phylotypes represent separate groups of an uncharacterized phylum (for which we propose the candidate phylum name ‘Pyropristinus’. The third new phylotype falls within the proposed Calescamantes phylum. Metabolic reconstructions of the 'Pyropristinus' and Calescamantes populations showed that these organisms appear to be chemoorganoheterotrophs, and have the genomic potential for aerobic respiration and oxidative phosphorylation via archaeal-like V-type, and bacterial F-type ATPases, respectively. A survey of similar phylotypes (> 97% nt identity within 16S rRNA gene datasets suggest that the newly described organisms are restricted to terrestrial thermal springs ranging from 70 - 90 oC and pH values of ~ 7 - 9. The characterization of these lineages is important for understanding the diversity of deeply-branching bacterial phyla, and their functional role in high-temperature circumneutral ‘streamer’ communities.

  5. Functional screening of hydrolytic activities reveals an extremely thermostable cellulase from a deep-sea archaeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt eLeis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Extreme habitats serve as a source of enzymes which are active under extreme conditions and are candidates for industrial applications. In this work, six large-insert mixed genomic libraries were screened for hydrolase activities in a broad temperature range (8 to 70 °C. Among a variety of hydrolytic activities, one fosmid clone, derived from a library of pooled isolates of hyperthermophilic archaea from deep sea vents, displayed hydrolytic activity on carboxymethyl cellulose substrate plates at 70 °C but not at lower temperatures. Sequence analysis of the fosmid insert revealed a gene encoding a novel glycoside hydrolase family 12 (GHF12 endo-1,4-β-glucanase, termed Cel12E. The enzyme shares 45 % sequence identity with a protein from the archaeon Thermococcus sp. AM4 and displays a unique multidomain architecture. Biochemical characterization of Cel12E revealed a remarkably thermostable protein, which appears to be of archaeal origin. The enzyme displayed maximum activity at 92 °C and was active on a variety of linear 1,4-β-glucans like carboxymethyl cellulose, β-glucan, lichenan, and phosphoric acid swollen cellulose. The protein is able to bind to various insoluble β-glucans. Product pattern analysis indicated that Cel12E is an endo-cleaving β-glucanase. Cel12E expands the toolbox of hyperthermostable archaeal cellulases with biotechnological potential.

  6. Genome sequence of the Thermotoga thermarum type strain (LA3(T)) from an African solfataric spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Scheuner, Carmen; Anderson, Iain; Zeytun, Ahmet; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Rohde, Manfred; Detter, John C; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2014-06-15

    Thermotoga thermarum Windberger et al. 1989 is a member to the genomically well characterized genus Thermotoga in the phylum 'Thermotogae'. T. thermarum is of interest for its origin from a continental solfataric spring vs. predominantly marine oil reservoirs of other members of the genus. The genome of strain LA3T also provides fresh data for the phylogenomic positioning of the (hyper-)thermophilic bacteria. T. thermarum strain LA3(T) is the fourth sequenced genome of a type strain from the genus Thermotoga, and the sixth in the family Thermotogaceae to be formally described in a publication. Phylogenetic analyses do not reveal significant discrepancies between the current classification of the group, 16S rRNA gene data and whole-genome sequences. Nevertheless, T. thermarum significantly differs from other Thermotoga species regarding its iron-sulfur cluster synthesis, as it contains only a minimal set of the necessary proteins. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,039,943 bp long chromosome with its 2,015 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  7. Towards a microbial thermoelectric cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Rodríguez-Barreiro

    Full Text Available Microbial growth is an exothermic process. Biotechnological industries produce large amounts of heat, usually considered an undesirable by-product. In this work, we report the construction and characterization of the first microbial thermoelectric cell (MTC, in which the metabolic heat produced by a thermally insulated microbial culture is partially converted into electricity through a thermoelectric device optimized for low ΔT values. A temperature of 41°C and net electric voltage of around 250-600 mV was achieved with 1.7 L baker's yeast culture. This is the first time microbial metabolic energy has been converted into electricity with an ad hoc thermoelectric device. These results might contribute towards developing a novel strategy to harvest excess heat in the biotechnology industry, in processes such as ethanol fermentation, auto thermal aerobic digestion (ATAD or bioremediation, which could be coupled with MTCs in a single unit to produce electricity as a valuable by-product of the primary biotechnological product. Additionally, we propose that small portable MTCs could be conceived and inoculated with suitable thermophilic of hyperthermophilic starter cultures and used for powering small electric devices.

  8. Sequence, Structure, and Binding Analysis of Cyclodextrinase (TK1770 from T. kodakarensis (KOD1 Using an In Silico Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermostable cyclodextrinase (Tk1770 CDase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis (KOD1 hydrolyzes cyclodextrins into linear dextrins. The sequence of Tk1770 CDase retrieved from UniProt was aligned with sequences of sixteen CD hydrolyzing enzymes and a phylogenetic tree was constructed using Bayesian inference. The homology model of Tk1770 CDase was constructed and optimized with Modeller v9.14 program. The model was validated with ProSA server and PROCHECK analysis. Four conserved regions and the catalytic triad consisting of Asp411, Glu437, and Asp502 of GH13 family were identified in catalytic site. Also an additional fifth conserved region downstream to the fourth region was also identified. The structure of Tk1770 CDase consists of an additional N′-domain and a helix-loop-helix motif that is conserved in all archaeal CD hydrolyzing enzymes. The N′-domain contains an extended loop region that forms a part of catalytic domain and plays an important role in stability and substrate binding. The docking of substrate into catalytic site revealed the interactions with different conserved residues involved in substrate binding and formation of enzyme-substrate complex.

  9. Biosynthesis of D-xylulose 5-phosphate from D-xylose and polyphosphate through a minimized two-enzyme cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Eung; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-02-01

    Sugar phosphates cannot be produced easily by microbial fermentation because negatively-charged compounds cannot be secreted across intact cell membrane. D-xylulose 5-phosphate (Xu5P), a very expensive sugar phosphate, was synthesized from D-xylose and polyphosphate catalyzed by enzyme cascades in one pot. The synthetic enzymatic pathway comprised of xylose isomerase and xylulokinase was designed to produce Xu5P, along with a third enzyme, polyphosphate kinase, responsible for in site ATP regeneration. Due to the promiscuous activity of the ATP-based xylulokinase from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima on polyphosphate, the number of enzymes in the pathway was minimized to two without polyphosphate kinase. The reactions catalyzed by the two-enzyme and three-enzyme pathways were compared for Xu5P production, and the reaction conditions were optimized by examining effects of reaction temperature, enzyme ratio and substrate concentration. The optimized two-enzyme system produced 32 mM Xu5P from 50 mM xylose and polyphosphate after 36 h at 45°C. Biosynthesis of less costly Xu5P from D-xylose and polyphosphate could be highly feasible via this minimized two-enzyme pathway. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Flipping chromosomes in deep-sea archaea.

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    Matteo Cossu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the major mechanisms driving the evolution of all organisms is genomic rearrangement. In hyperthermophilic Archaea of the order Thermococcales, large chromosomal inversions occur so frequently that even closely related genomes are difficult to align. Clearly not resulting from the native homologous recombination machinery, the causative agent of these inversions has remained elusive. We present a model in which genomic inversions are catalyzed by the integrase enzyme encoded by a family of mobile genetic elements. We characterized the integrase from Thermococcus nautili plasmid pTN3 and showed that besides canonical site-specific reactions, it catalyzes low sequence specificity recombination reactions with the same outcome as homologous recombination events on DNA segments as short as 104bp both in vitro and in vivo, in contrast to other known tyrosine recombinases. Through serial culturing, we showed that the integrase-mediated divergence of T. nautili strains occurs at an astonishing rate, with at least four large-scale genomic inversions appearing within 60 generations. Our results and the ubiquitous distribution of pTN3-like integrated elements suggest that a major mechanism of evolution of an entire order of Archaea results from the activity of a selfish mobile genetic element.

  11. Microbial diversity in a submarine carbonate edifice from the serpentinizing hydrothermal system of the Prony Bay (New Caledonia over a 6-year period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne ePostec

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Active carbonate chimneys from the shallow marine serpentinizing Prony Hydrothermal Field were sampled 3 times over a 6 years period at site ST09. Archaeal and bacterial communities composition was investigated using PCR-based methods (clone libraries, Denaturating Gel Gradient Electrophoresis, quantitative PCR targeting 16S rRNA genes, methyl coenzyme M reductase A and dissimilatory sulfite reductase subunit B genes. Methanosarcinales (Euryarchaeota and Thaumarchaea were the main archaeal members. The Methanosarcinales, also observed by epifluorescent microscopy and FISH, consisted of two phyotypes that were previously solely detected in two other serpentinitzing ecosystems (The Cedars and Lost City Hydrothermal Field. Surprisingly, members of the hyperthermophilic order Thermococcales were also found which may indicate the presence of a hot subsurface biosphere. The bacterial community mainly consisted of Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Alpha-, Gamma-, Beta- and Delta-proteobacteria and of the candidate division NPL-UPA2. Members of these taxa were consistently found each year and may therefore represent a stable core of the indigenous bacterial community of the PHF chimneys. Firmicutes isolates representing new bacterial taxa were obtained by cultivation under anaerobic conditions. Our study revealed diverse microbial communities in PHF ST09 related to methane and sulfur compounds that share common populations with other terrestrial or submarine serpentinizing ecosystems.

  12. Microbial diversity in a submarine carbonate edifice from the serpentinizing hydrothermal system of the Prony Bay (New Caledonia) over a 6-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postec, Anne; Quéméneur, Marianne; Bes, Méline; Mei, Nan; Benaïssa, Fatma; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Monnin, Christophe; Guentas-Dombrowsky, Linda; Ollivier, Bernard; Gérard, Emmanuelle; Pisapia, Céline; Gérard, Martine; Ménez, Bénédicte; Erauso, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    Active carbonate chimneys from the shallow marine serpentinizing Prony Hydrothermal Field were sampled 3 times over a 6 years period at site ST09. Archaeal and bacterial communities composition was investigated using PCR-based methods (clone libraries, Denaturating Gel Gradient Electrophoresis, quantitative PCR) targeting 16S rRNA genes, methyl coenzyme M reductase A and dissimilatory sulfite reductase subunit B genes. Methanosarcinales (Euryarchaeota) and Thaumarchaea were the main archaeal members. The Methanosarcinales, also observed by epifluorescent microscopy and FISH, consisted of two phylotypes that were previously solely detected in two other serpentinitzing ecosystems (The Cedars and Lost City Hydrothermal Field). Surprisingly, members of the hyperthermophilic order Thermococcales were also found which may indicate the presence of a hot subsurface biosphere. The bacterial community mainly consisted of Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Alpha-, Gamma-, Beta-, and Delta-proteobacteria and of the candidate division NPL-UPA2. Members of these taxa were consistently found each year and may therefore represent a stable core of the indigenous bacterial community of the PHF chimneys. Firmicutes isolates representing new bacterial taxa were obtained by cultivation under anaerobic conditions. Our study revealed diverse microbial communities in PHF ST09 related to methane and sulfur compounds that share common populations with other terrestrial or submarine serpentinizing ecosystems.

  13. Kinetic study of the thermal denaturation of a hyperthermostable extracellular α-amylase from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I; Dafforn, T R; Fryer, P J; Cox, P W

    2013-12-01

    Hyperthermophilic enzymes are of industrial importance and interest, especially due to their denaturation kinetics at commercial sterilisation temperatures inside safety indicating time-temperature integrators (TTIs). The thermal stability and irreversible thermal inactivation of native extracellular Pyrococcus furiosus α-amylase were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Denaturation of the amylase was irreversible above a Tm of approximately 106°C and could be described by a one-step irreversible model. The activation energy at 121°C was found to be 316kJ/mol. Using CD and FT-IR spectroscopy it was shown that folding and stability greatly increase with temperature. Under an isothermal holding temperature of 121°C, the structure of the PFA changes during denaturation from an α-helical structure, through a β-sheet structure to an aggregated protein. Such data reinforces the use of P. furiosus α-amylase as a labile species in TTIs. © 2013.

  14. A Rapid Analysis of Variations in Conformational Behavior during Dihydrofolate Reductase Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Robert L; Johnson, Luke A; Behiry, Enas M; Loveridge, E Joel; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2017-04-18

    Protein flexibility is central to enzyme catalysis, yet it remains challenging both to predict conformational behavior on the basis of analysis of amino acid sequence and protein structure and to provide the necessary breadth of experimental support to any such predictions. Here a generic and rapid procedure for identifying conformational changes during dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) catalysis is described. Using DHFR from Escherichia coli (EcDHFR), selective side-chain 13 C labeling of methionine and tryptophan residues is shown to be sufficient to detect the closed-to-occluded conformational transition that follows the chemical step in the catalytic cycle, with clear chemical shift perturbations found for both methionine methyl and tryptophan indole groups. In contrast, no such perturbations are seen for the DHFR from the psychrophile Moritella profunda, where the equivalent conformational change is absent. Like EcDHFR, Salmonella enterica DHFR shows experimental evidence of a large-scale conformational change following hydride transfer that relies on conservation of a key hydrogen bonding interaction between the M20 and GH loops, directly comparable to the closed-to-occluded conformational change observed in EcDHFR. For the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima, no chemical shift perturbations were observed, suggesting that no major conformational change occurs during the catalytic cycle. In spite of their conserved tertiary structures, DHFRs display variations in conformational sampling that occurs concurrently with catalysis.

  15. Crenarchaeal biofilm formation under extreme conditions.

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    Andrea Koerdt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biofilm formation has been studied in much detail for a variety of bacterial species, as it plays a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria. However, only limited information is available for the development of archaeal communities that are frequently found in many natural environments. METHODOLOGY: We have analyzed biofilm formation in three closely related hyperthermophilic crenarchaeotes: Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, S. solfataricus and S. tokodaii. We established a microtitre plate assay adapted to high temperatures to determine how pH and temperature influence biofilm formation in these organisms. Biofilm analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the three strains form very different communities ranging from simple carpet-like structures in S. solfataricus to high density tower-like structures in S. acidocaldarius in static systems. Lectin staining indicated that all three strains produced extracellular polysaccharides containing glucose, galactose, mannose and N-acetylglucosamine once biofilm formation was initiated. While flagella mutants had no phenotype in two days old static biofilms of S. solfataricus, a UV-induced pili deletion mutant showed decreased attachment of cells. CONCLUSION: The study gives first insights into formation and development of crenarchaeal biofilms in extreme environments.

  16. Discovering Antioxidant Molecules in the Archaea Domain: Peroxiredoxin Bcp1 from Sulfolobus solfataricus Protects H9c2 Cardiomyoblasts from Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sarcinelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxins (Prxs are ubiquitous thiol peroxidases that are involved in the reduction of peroxides. It has been reported that prokaryotic Prxs generally show greater structural robustness than their eukaryotic counterparts, making them less prone to inactivation by overoxidation. This difference has inspired the search for new antioxidants from prokaryotic sources that can be used as possible therapeutic biodrugs. Bacterioferritin comigratory proteins (Bcps of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus that belong to the Prx family have recently been characterized. One of these proteins, Bcp1, was chosen to determine its antioxidant effects in H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells. Bcp1 activity was measured in vitro under physiological temperature and pH conditions that are typical of mammalian cells; the yeast thioredoxin reductase (yTrxR/thioredoxin (yTrx reducing system was used to evaluate enzyme activity. A TAT-Bcp1 fusion protein was constructed to allow its internalization and verify the effect of Bcp1 on H9c2 rat cardiomyoblasts subjected to oxidative stress. The results reveal that TAT-Bcp1 is not cytotoxic and inhibits H2O2-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells by reducing the H2O2 content inside these cells.

  17. Proteome Profiling of Heat, Oxidative, and Salt Stress Responses in Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baolei eJia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermophilic species, Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1, a model microorganism for studying hyperthermophiles, has adapted to optimal growth under conditions of high temperature and salinity. However, the environmental conditions for the strain are not always stable, and this strain might face different stresses. In the present study, we compared the proteome response of T. kodakarensis to heat, oxidative, and salt stresses using two-dimensional electrophoresis, and protein spots were identified through MALDI-TOF/MS. Fifty-nine, forty-two, and twenty-nine spots were induced under heat, oxidative, and salt stresses, respectively. Among the up-regulated proteins, four proteins (a hypothetical protein, pyridoxal biosynthesis lyase, peroxiredoxin, and protein disulphide oxidoreductase were associated with all three stresses. Gene ontology analysis showed that these proteins were primarily involved metabolic and cellular processes. The KEGG pathway analysis suggested that the main metabolic pathways involving these enzymes were related to carbohydrate metabolism, secondary metabolite synthesis, and amino acid biosynthesis. These data might enhance our understanding of the functions and molecular mechanisms of thermophilic Archaea for survival and adaptation in extreme environments.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of protein 14 from Sulfolobus islandicus filamentous virus (SIFV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulet, Adeline; Spinelli, Silvia; Campanacci, Valérie; Porciero, Sophie; Blangy, Stéphanie [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, CNRS and Universités d’Aix-Marseille I et II, UMR 6098, Case 932, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille CEDEX 9 (France); Garrett, Roger A. [Danish Archaea Centre, Institute of Molecular Biology, Copenhagen University, Soelvgade 83H, DK1307 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Tilbeurgh, Herman van; Leulliot, Nicolas [Institut de Biochimie et de Biophysique Moléculaire et Cellulaire (CNRS-UMR 8619), Université Paris 11, Bâtiment 430, 91405 Orsay (France); Basta, Tamara; Prangishvili, David [Institut Pasteur, Unité de Biologie Moléculaire du Gène chez les Extrêmophiles, 25 Rue du Dr Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Cambillau, Christian, E-mail: cambillau@afmb.univ-mrs.fr [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, CNRS and Universités d’Aix-Marseille I et II, UMR 6098, Case 932, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille CEDEX 9 (France)

    2006-09-01

    Crystals of S. islandicus filamentous virus (SIFV) protein 14 have been grown at 293 K. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 2}22 or P6{sub 4}22 and diffract to a resolution of 2.95 Å. A large-scale programme has been embarked upon aiming towards the structural determination of conserved proteins from viruses infecting hyperthermophilic archaea. Here, the crystallization of protein 14 from the archaeal virus SIFV is reported. This protein, which contains 111 residues (MW 13 465 Da), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal His{sub 6} tag and purified to homogeneity. The tag was subsequently cleaved and the protein was crystallized using PEG 1000 or PEG 4000 as a precipitant. Large crystals were obtained of the native and the selenomethionine-labelled protein using sitting drops of 100–300 nl. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 2}22 or P6{sub 4}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 68.1, c = 132.4 Å. Diffraction data were collected to a maximum acceptable resolution of 2.95 and 3.20 Å for the SeMet-labelled and native protein, respectively.

  19. Structural basis for activation of an archaeal ribonuclease P RNA by protein cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Makoto

    2017-09-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is an endoribonuclease that catalyzes the processing of the 5'-leader sequence of precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA) in all phylogenetic domains. We have found that RNase P in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 consists of RNase P RNA (PhopRNA) and five protein cofactors designated PhoPop5, PhoRpp21, PhoRpp29, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp38. Biochemical characterizations over the past 10 years have revealed that PhoPop5 and PhoRpp30 fold into a heterotetramer and cooperate to activate a catalytic domain (C-domain) in PhopRNA, whereas PhoRpp21 and PhoRpp29 form a heterodimer and function together to activate a specificity domain (S-domain) in PhopRNA. PhoRpp38 plays a role in elevation of the optimum temperature of RNase P activity, binding to kink-turn (K-turn) motifs in two stem-loops in PhopRNA. This review describes the structural and functional information on P. horikoshii RNase P, focusing on the structural basis for the PhopRNA activation by the five RNase P proteins.

  20. Thermostable Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 for Enantioselective Bioconversion of Aromatic Secondary Alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xi; Zhang, Chong; Orita, Izumi; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2013-01-01

    A novel thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) showing activity toward aromatic secondary alcohols was identified from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 (TkADH). The gene, tk0845, which encodes an aldo-keto reductase, was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was found to be a monomer with a molecular mass of 31 kDa. It was highly thermostable with an optimal temperature of 90°C and a half-life of 4.5 h at 95°C. The apparent Km values for the cofactors NAD(P)+ and NADPH were similar within a range of 66 to 127 μM. TkADH preferred secondary alcohols and accepted various ketones and aldehydes as substrates. Interestingly, the enzyme could oxidize 1-phenylethanol and its derivatives having substituents at the meta and para positions with high enantioselectivity, yielding the corresponding (R)-alcohols with optical purities of greater than 99.8% enantiomeric excess (ee). TkADH could also reduce 2,2,2-trifluoroacetophenone to (R)-2,2,2-trifluoro-1-phenylethanol with high enantioselectivity (>99.6% ee). Furthermore, the enzyme showed high resistance to organic solvents and was particularly highly active in the presence of H2O–20% 2-propanol and H2O–50% n-hexane or n-octane. This ADH is expected to be a useful tool for the production of aromatic chiral alcohols. PMID:23354700

  1. Introducing capnophilic lactic fermentation in a combined dark-photo fermentation process: a route to unparalleled H2 yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipasquale, L; Adessi, A; d'Ippolito, G; Rossi, F; Fontana, A; De Philippis, R

    2015-01-01

    Two-stage process based on photofermentation of dark fermentation effluents is widely recognized as the most effective method for biological production of hydrogen from organic substrates. Recently, it was described an alternative mechanism, named capnophilic lactic fermentation, for sugar fermentation by the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana in CO2-rich atmosphere. Here, we report the first application of this novel process to two-stage biological production of hydrogen. The microbial system based on T. neapolitana DSM 4359(T) and Rhodopseudomonas palustris 42OL gave 9.4 mol of hydrogen per mole of glucose consumed during the anaerobic process, which is the best production yield so far reported for conventional two-stage batch cultivations. The improvement of hydrogen yield correlates with the increase in lactic production during capnophilic lactic fermentation and takes also advantage of the introduction of original conditions for culturing both microorganisms in minimal media based on diluted sea water. The use of CO2 during the first step of the combined process establishes a novel strategy for biohydrogen technology. Moreover, this study opens the way to cost reduction and use of salt-rich waste as feedstock.

  2. Effect of temperature and temperature shock on the stability of continuous cellulosic-hydrogen fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Samir I; Jiang, Hongyu; Watanabe, Ryoya; Li, Yu-You

    2013-08-01

    Three continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were operated under mesophilic (37 ± 1°C), thermophilic (55 ± 1°C) and hyper-thermophilic (80 ± 1°C) temperatures for 164 days to investigate the effect of temperature and temperature shock on the cellulosic-dark hydrogen fermentation by mixed microflora. During steady state condition, the sudden decreases in the fermentation temperature occurred twice in each condition for 24h. The results show that the 55 ± 1 and 80 ± 1°C presented stable hydrogen yields of 12.28 and 9.72 mmol/g cellulose, respectively. However, the 37 ± 1°C presented low hydrogen yield of 3.56 mmol/g cellulose and methane yield of 5.4 mmol/g cellulose. The reactor performance under 55 ± 1 or 80 ± 1°C appeared to be more resilient to the sudden decreases in the fermentation temperature than 37 ± 1°C. The experimental analysis results indicated that the changing in soluble by-products could explain the effect of temperature and temperature shock, and the thermophilic temperature is expected having a better economic performance for cellulosic-hydrogen fermentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The structure of TON1937 from archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 reveals a eukaryotic HEAT-like architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae-Hee; Kim, Yi-Seul; Rojviriya, Catleya; Cha, Hyung Jin; Ha, Sung-Chul; Kim, Yeon-Gil

    2013-10-01

    The members of the ARM/HEAT repeat-containing protein superfamily in eukaryotes have been known to mediate protein-protein interactions by using their concave surface. However, little is known about the ARM/HEAT repeat proteins in prokaryotes. Here we report the crystal structure of TON1937, a hypothetical protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1. The structure reveals a crescent-shaped molecule composed of a double layer of α-helices with seven anti-parallel α-helical repeats. A structure-based sequence alignment of the α-helical repeats identified a conserved pattern of hydrophobic or aliphatic residues reminiscent of the consensus sequence of eukaryotic HEAT repeats. The individual repeats of TON1937 also share high structural similarity with the canonical eukaryotic HEAT repeats. In addition, the concave surface of TON1937 is proposed to be its potential binding interface based on this structural comparison and its surface properties. These observations lead us to speculate that the archaeal HEAT-like repeats of TON1937 have evolved to engage in protein-protein interactions in the same manner as eukaryotic HEAT repeats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a conserved domain in plants and prokaryotes from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Linyen; Nakano, Hiroaki; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fujimoto, Satoru; Matsunaga, Sachihiro [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, 565-0871 Osaka (Japan); Nakamura, Shota; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ohkubo, Tadayasu [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, 565-0871 Osaka (Japan); Fukui, Kiichi, E-mail: kfukui@bio.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, 565-0871 Osaka (Japan)

    2005-04-01

    A plant- and prokaryote-conserved domain (PPC) has been crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 1.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6{sub 3}22. A plant- and prokaryote-conserved domain (PPC) has previously been found in AT-hook motif nuclear localized protein 1 (AHL1) localized in the nuclear matrix of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAHL1). AtAHL1 has a DNA-binding function. Mutation analyses of AtAHL1 has previously revealed that the hydrophobic region of the PPC domain is essential for its nuclear localization. In this study, the PPC of the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhPPC) was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 53.69, c = 159.2 Å. Data were obtained at 100 K, with diffraction being observed to a resolution of 1.7 Å. A complete data set from crystals of the SeMet-substituted protein was also obtained.

  5. In situ analysis of proteins at high temperatures mediated by capillary-flow hydrothermal UV-vis spectrophotometer with a water-soluble chromogenic reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Kunio; Nagayoshi, Hiroki; Yao, Toshio

    2010-05-14

    In situ monitoring of quantities, interactions, and conformations of proteins is essential for the study of biochemistry under hydrothermal environments and the analysis of hyperthermophilic organisms in natural hydrothermal systems on Earth. We have investigated the potential of a capillary-flow hydrothermal UV-vis spectrophotometer (CHUS) for performing in situ measurements of proteins and determining their behavior at extremely high temperatures, in combination with a chromogenic reagents probe, which interacts with the proteins. The spectral shift obtained using a combination of water-soluble porphyrin (TPPS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was the best among the spectral shifts obtained using different combinations of chromogenic reagents and proteins. The association behavior of TPPS with BSA was investigated in detail using CHUS at temperatures up to 175 degrees C and the association constant (K(ass)) of TPPS with BSA was successfully determined at temperatures up to 100 degrees C. The lnK(ass) values were inversely proportional to the T(-1) values in the temperature range 50-100 degrees C. These analyses showed for the first time that the decrease of association of TPPS with BSA is due to the conformational change, fragmentation, and/or denaturing of BSA rather than the decrease of the hydrophobic association between TPPS and BSA. This study conclusively demonstrates the usability of the CHUS system with a chromogenic reagent as an in situ detection and measurement system for thermostable proteins at extremely high temperatures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Expression and characterization of thymine-DNA glycosylase from Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi-Peng; Li, Chun-Peng; Hou, Jing-Li; Liu, Yu-Fen; Liang, Ru-Bing; Liu, Jian-Hua

    2010-03-01

    The recombinant thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) from Aeropyrum pernix (A. pernix) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzymatic activity of recombinant A. pernix TDG (ApeTDG) was characterized using oligonucleotides containing a thymine/uracil base as substrate. ApeTDG had distinct glycosylase activity on T/G mismatch. The optimal temperature and pH for thymine removal were 65-70 degrees C and pH 7.0-8.5, respectively. High concentration of NaCl inhibited the thymine removal. Divalent ions had different influence on the thymine removal by ApeTDG. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) had no inhibition on the enzymic activity, but Ni(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+), and Zn(2+) completely inhibited the excision reaction. As derived from a hyperthermophilic archaea, ApeTDG protein was heat-resistant at 75 degrees C. ApeTDG also had a relatively weak DNA glycosylase activity on uracil base, with the following order: U/C>U/G approximately U/T>U/U approximately U/I approximately U/AP approximately U/->U/A. Additional mismatch located at 3' of T/G had less inhibition on the thymine removal than that located at 5' of T/G, and two additional mismatches located at each side of T/G completely inhibited the excision of thymine. Together, these data suggest that ApeTDG is a TDG protein with weak UDG activity. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of F225 in O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Emi; Kunimoto, Kohei; Kawai, Yoshito; Kataoka, Misumi; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    O-Phosphoserine sulfhydrylase (OPSS) synthesizes cysteine from O-phospho-L-serine (OPS) and sulfide. We have determined the three-dimensional structures of OPSS from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 (ApOPSS) in complex with aminoacrylate intermediate (AA) formed from pyridoxal 5'-phosphate with OPS or in complex with cysteine and compared them with that of ApOPSS. We found an orientational change of F225 at the active-site entrance and constructed an F225A mutant to examine its activities and AA stability and clarify the role of F225 in ApOPSS. The OPS and O-acetyl-L-serine (OAS) sulfhydrylase activities of the F225A mutant decreased by 4.2- and 15-fold compared to those of the wild-type (wt) ApOPSS, respectively. The ability of OPS and OAS to form AA also decreased by 12- and 27-fold, respectively. AA was less stable in the F225A mutant than in the wt ApOPSS. Simulated docking showed that leaving groups, such as phosphate and acetate, were oriented to the inside of the active site in the F225A mutant, whereas they were oriented to the entrance in the wt ApOPSS. These results suggest that F225 in ApOPSS plays important roles in maintaining the hydrophobic environment of AA from solvent water and in controlling the orientation of leaving groups.

  8. Heme A synthase in bacteria depends on one pair of cysteinyls for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Anna; Hederstedt, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Heme A is a prosthetic group unique for cytochrome a-type respiratory oxidases in mammals, plants and many microorganisms. The poorly understood integral membrane protein heme A synthase catalyzes the synthesis of heme A from heme O. In bacteria, but not in mitochondria, this enzyme contains one or two pairs of cysteine residues that are present in predicted hydrophilic polypeptide loops on the extracytoplasmic side of the membrane. We used heme A synthase from the eubacterium Bacillus subtilis and the hyperthermophilic archeon Aeropyrum pernix to investigate the functional role of these cysteine residues. Results with B. subtilis amino acid substituted proteins indicated the pair of cysteine residues in the loop connecting transmembrane segments I and II as being essential for catalysis but not required for binding of the enzyme substrate, heme O. Experiments with isolated A. pernix and B. subtilis heme A synthase demonstrated that a disulfide bond can form between the cysteine residues in the same loop and also between loops showing close proximity of the two loops in the folded enzyme protein. Based on the findings, we propose a classification scheme for the four discrete types of heme A synthase found so far in different organisms and propose that essential cysteinyls mediate transfer of reducing equivalents required for the oxygen-dependent catalysis of heme A synthesis from heme O. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Crystal structure of the cambialistic superoxide dismutase from Aeropyrum pernix K1--insights into the enzyme mechanism and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Torikai, Kasumi; Uegaki, Koichi; Morita, Junji; Machida, Kodai; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawata, Yasushi

    2011-02-01

    Aeropyrum pernix K1, an aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon, produces a cambialistic superoxide dismutase that is active in the presence of either of Mn or Fe. The crystal structures of the superoxide dismutase from A. pernix in the apo, Mn-bound and Fe-bound forms were determined at resolutions of 1.56, 1.35 and 1.48 Å, respectively. The overall structure consisted of a compact homotetramer. Analytical ultracentrifugation was used to confirm the tetrameric association in solution. In the Mn-bound form, the metal was in trigonal bipyramidal coordination with five ligands: four side chain atoms and a water oxygen. One aspartate and two histidine side chains ligated to the central metal on the equatorial plane. In the Fe-bound form, an additional water molecule was observed between the two histidines on the equatorial plane and the metal was in octahedral coordination with six ligands. The additional water occupied the postulated superoxide binding site. The thermal stability of the enzyme was compared with superoxide dismutase from Thermus thermophilus, a thermophilic bacterium, which contained fewer ion pairs. In aqueous solution, the stabilities of the two enzymes were almost identical but, when the solution contained ethylene glycol or ethanol, the A. pernix enzyme had significantly higher thermal stability than the enzyme from T. thermophilus. This suggests that dominant ion pairs make A. pernix superoxide dismutase tolerant to organic media. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS.

  10. Cytotoxicity and uptake of archaeosomes prepared from Aeropyrum pernix lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napotnik, T B; Valant, J; Gmajner, D; Passamonti, S; Miklavčič, D; Ulrih, N P

    2013-09-01

    Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 is an obligate aerobic hyperthermophilic organism with C25,25-archeol membrane lipids with head groups containing inositol. Interactions of archaeosomes, liposomes prepared from lipids of A. pernix, with mammalian cells in vitro were studied. In vitro cytotoxicity was tested on five different cell lines: rodent mouse melanoma cells (B16-F1) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and three human cell lines-epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (CACO-2), liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (Hep G2) and endothelial umbilical vein cell line (EA.hy926). Archaeosomes were nontoxic to human Hep G2, CACO-2 and mildly toxic to rodent CHO and B16-F1 cells but showed strong cytotoxic effect on EA.hy926 cells. Confocal microscopy revealed that archaeosomes are taken up by endocytosis. The uptake of archaeosomes and the release of loaded calcein are more prominent in EA.hy926 cells, which is in line with high toxicity toward these cells. The mechanisms of uptake, release and action in these cells as well as in vivo functioning have to be further studied for possible targeted drug delivery.

  11. Specific interactions of three proliferating cell nuclear antigens with replication-related proteins in Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Kaori; Fukunaga, Kenzo; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2007-04-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a well-known multifunctional protein involved in eukaryotic and archaeal DNA transactions. The homotrimeric PCNA ring encircles double-stranded DNA within its central hole and tethers many proteins on DNA. Plural genes encoding PCNA-like proteins have been found in the genome sequence of crenarchaeal organisms. We describe here the biochemical properties of the three PCNAs, PCNA1, PCNA2 and PCNA3, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix. PCNA2 can form a trimeric structure by itself, and it also forms heterotrimeric structures with PCNA1 and PCNA3. However, neither PCNA1 nor PCNA3 can form homotrimers. The DNA synthesis activity of DNA polymerase I and II, the endonuclease activity of FEN1, and the nick-sealing activity of DNA ligase were stimulated by the complex of PCNA2 and 3 or PCNA1, 2 and 3. These results suggest that the heterotrimeric PCNA at least including PCNA2 and 3 function as the clamp in the replisome. However, PCNA2 is the most abundant in the cells throughout the growth stages among the three PCNAs, and therefore, PCNA2 may perform multitasks by changing complex composition.

  12. Characterization of a Novel Thermostable O-Acetylserine Sulfhydrylase from Aeropyrum pernix K1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino, Koshiki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    An O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1, which shares the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate binding motif with both OASS and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), was cloned and expressed by using Escherichia coli Rosetta(DE3). The purified protein was a dimer and contained pyridoxal 5′-phosphate. It was shown to be an enzyme with CBS activity as well as OASS activity in vitro. The enzyme retained 90% of its activity after a 6-h incubation at 100°C. In the O-acetyl-l-serine sulfhydrylation reaction, it had a pH optimum of 6.7, apparent Km values for O-acetyl-l-serine and sulfide of 28 and below 0.2 mM, respectively, and a rate constant of 202 s−1. In the l-cystathionine synthetic reaction, it showed a broad pH optimum in the range of 8.1 to 8.8, apparent Km values for l-serine and l-homocysteine of 8 and 0.51 mM, respectively, and a rate constant of 0.7 s−1. A. pernix OASS has a high activity in the l-cysteine desulfurization reaction, which produces sulfide and S-(2,3-hydroxy-4-thiobutyl)-l-cysteine from l-cysteine and dithiothreitol. PMID:12644499

  13. Molecular recognition of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2009-05-01

    The identity elements of transfer RNA are the molecular basis for recognition by each cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. In the archaea system, the tryptophan tRNA identity has not been determined in detail. To investigate the molecular recognition mechanism of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) from the hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, various mutant transcripts of tryptophan tRNA prepared by an in vitro transcription system were examined by overexpression of A. pernix TrpRS. Substitution of the discriminator base, A73, impaired tryptophan incorporation activity. Changing the G1-C72 base pair to other base pairs also decreased the aminoacylation activity. Substitutions of anticodon CCA revealed that the C34 and C35 mutants dramatically reduced aminoacylation with tryptophan, but the A36 mutants had the same activity as the wild type. The results indicate that the anticodon nucleotides C34, C35, discriminator base A73 and G1-C72 base pair are major recognition sites for A. pernix TrpRS.

  14. In vivo characterization of thermal stabilities of Aeropyrum pernix cellular components by differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milek, Igor; Crnigoj, Miha; Ulrih, Natasa Poklar; Kaletunç, Gönül

    2007-09-01

    Revival studies of Aeropyrum pernix show that the viability of cells and cell recovery after heat treatment depends on the temperature of treatment. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to analyze the relative thermal stabilities of cellular components of A. pernix and to identify the cellular components responsible for the observed lag phase and reduced maximum growth following a heat treatment. DSC thermograms show 5 visible endothermic transitions with 2 major transitions. DSC analysis of isolated crude ribosomes aids the assignment of the 2 major peaks observed in whole-cell thermograms to denaturation of ribosomal structures. A comparison of partial and immediate full rescan thermograms of A. pernix whole cells indicates that both major peaks represent irreversible thermal transitions. A DNA peak is also identified in the whole-cell thermogram by comparison with the optical data of isolated pure DNA. DNA melting is shown to be irreversible in dilute solution, whereas it is partially reversible in whole cells, owing at least in part, to restricted volume effects. In contrast to mesophilic organisms, hyperthermophilic A. pernix ribosomes are more thermally stable than DNA, but in both organisms, irreversible changes leading to cell death occur owing to ribosomal denaturation.

  15. Characterization of the PH1704 protease from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 and the critical functions of Tyr120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Dongling; Bai, Aixi; Yu, Lei; Han, Weiwei; Feng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The PH1704 protease from hyperthermophilic archaean Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 is a member of DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily with diverse functional subclasses. The recombinant PH1704 was efficiently purified and was systematically characterized by a combination of substrate specificity analysis, steady-state kinetics study and molecular docking research. The homogeneous protease was obtained as a presumed dodecamer with molecular weight of ∼240 kDa. Iodoacetamide strongly inhibited the peptidase activity, confirming that Cys100 is a nucleophilic residue. The recombinant protein was identified as both an aminopeptidase and an endopeptidase. Experimental data showed that L-R-amc was the best substrate of PH1704. Structural interaction fingerprint analysis (SIFt) indicated the binding pose of PH1704 and showed that Tyr120 is important in substrate binding. Kinetic parameters Kcat and Kcat/Km of the Y120P mutant with L-R-amc was about 7 and 7.8 times higher than that of the wild type (WT). For the endopeptidase Y120P with AAFR-amc, Kcat and Kcat/Km is 10- and 21-fold higher than that of WT. Experimental data indicate the important functions of Tyr120: involvement in enzyme activity to form a hydrogen bond with Cys100 and as an entrance gate of the substrate with Lys43. The results of this study can be used to investigate the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily.

  16. Every OGT Is Illuminated … by Fluorescent and Synchrotron Lights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Miggiano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available O6-DNA-alkyl-guanine-DNA-alkyl-transferases (OGTs are evolutionarily conserved, unique proteins that repair alkylation lesions in DNA in a single step reaction. Alkylating agents are environmental pollutants as well as by-products of cellular reactions, but are also very effective chemotherapeutic drugs. OGTs are major players in counteracting the effects of such agents, thus their action in turn affects genome integrity, survival of organisms under challenging conditions and response to chemotherapy. Numerous studies on OGTs from eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea have been reported, highlighting amazing features that make OGTs unique proteins in their reaction mechanism as well as post-reaction fate. This review reports recent functional and structural data on two prokaryotic OGTs, from the pathogenic bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, respectively. These studies provided insight in the role of OGTs in the biology of these microorganisms, but also important hints useful to understand the general properties of this class of proteins.

  17. Genome sequence of Thermofilum pendens reveals an exceptional loss of biosynthetic pathways without genome reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Anderson, Iain; Rodriguez, Jason; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Reich, Claudia; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kim, Edwin; Thompson, Linda S.; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Detter, Chris; Zhulin, Igor B.; Olsen, Gary J.; Whitman, William; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deep-branching, hyperthermophilic member of the order Thermoproteales within the archaeal kingdom Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It is an extracellular commensal, requiring an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. In fact T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than obligate intracellular parasites, although it does not display other features common among obligate parasites and thus does not appear to be in the process of becoming a parasite. It appears that T. pendens has adapted to life in an environment rich in nutrients. T. pendens was known to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome reveals substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have a transporter of the phosphotransferase system. In addition to fermentation, T. pendens may gain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogenlyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time this enzyme has been found outside of Methanosarcinales, and a presenilin-related protein. Predicted highly expressed proteins do not include housekeeping genes, and instead include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides, and CRISPR-associated proteins.

  18. Roles of L5-7 loop in the structure and chaperone function of SsHSP14.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Yong-Hua; Yang, Bo; Xie, Ming-Quan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2011-03-01

    The small heat shock protein SsHSP14.1 from the hyper-thermophilic archeaon, Sulfolobus solfataricus (S. solfataricus) was able to protect proteins from thermal aggregation and prevent enzymes from heat induced inactivation. According to the 3D (dimensional) structural model of SsHSP14.1 developed by us before, the region L5-7 (β5-β7, 68-82 residues) plays an important role for the oligomerization of SsHSP14.1 and its chaperone function. Here, to validate the findings, an in-depth investigation was conducted of both the wild type SsHSP14.1 and its deletion mutant DEL75-79. With E. coli proteins and bromelain as substrate, the deletion mutant DEL75-79 can protect them from thermo-aggregating as effective as the wild protein. Interestingly, unlike the wild protein, DEL75-79 was unable to prevent bromelain and EcoRI from thermo-inactivating. Results of size exclusion HPLC showed that the oligomerization state was changed in mutant protein. This was in accordance with the changed structure and lower hydrophobicity of DEL75-79. These outcomes proved that the L5-7 loop did play a role for the oligomerizing SsHSP14.1, and that the residues 75-79 were indispensable for its function of prevent enzymes from thermo-inactivating.

  19. Thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase from Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 for enantioselective bioconversion of aromatic secondary alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xi; Zhang, Chong; Orita, Izumi; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Fukui, Toshiaki; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2013-04-01

    A novel thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) showing activity toward aromatic secondary alcohols was identified from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 (TkADH). The gene, tk0845, which encodes an aldo-keto reductase, was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was found to be a monomer with a molecular mass of 31 kDa. It was highly thermostable with an optimal temperature of 90°C and a half-life of 4.5 h at 95°C. The apparent K(m) values for the cofactors NAD(P)(+) and NADPH were similar within a range of 66 to 127 μM. TkADH preferred secondary alcohols and accepted various ketones and aldehydes as substrates. Interestingly, the enzyme could oxidize 1-phenylethanol and its derivatives having substituents at the meta and para positions with high enantioselectivity, yielding the corresponding (R)-alcohols with optical purities of greater than 99.8% enantiomeric excess (ee). TkADH could also reduce 2,2,2-trifluoroacetophenone to (R)-2,2,2-trifluoro-1-phenylethanol with high enantioselectivity (>99.6% ee). Furthermore, the enzyme showed high resistance to organic solvents and was particularly highly active in the presence of H2O-20% 2-propanol and H2O-50% n-hexane or n-octane. This ADH is expected to be a useful tool for the production of aromatic chiral alcohols.

  20. Triad pattern algorithm for predicting strong promoter candidates in bacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakanyan Vehary

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial promoters, which increase the efficiency of gene expression, differ from other promoters by several characteristics. This difference, not yet widely exploited in bioinformatics, looks promising for the development of relevant computational tools to search for strong promoters in bacterial genomes. Results We describe a new triad pattern algorithm that predicts strong promoter candidates in annotated bacterial genomes by matching specific patterns for the group I σ70 factors of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. It detects promoter-specific motifs by consecutively matching three patterns, consisting of an UP-element, required for interaction with the α subunit, and then optimally-separated patterns of -35 and -10 boxes, required for interaction with the σ70 subunit of RNA polymerase. Analysis of 43 bacterial genomes revealed that the frequency of candidate sequences depends on the A+T content of the DNA under examination. The accuracy of in silico prediction was experimentally validated for the genome of a hyperthermophilic bacterium, Thermotoga maritima, by applying a cell-free expression assay using the predicted strong promoters. In this organism, the strong promoters govern genes for translation, energy metabolism, transport, cell movement, and other as-yet unidentified functions. Conclusion The triad pattern algorithm developed for predicting strong bacterial promoters is well suited for analyzing bacterial genomes with an A+T content of less than 62%. This computational tool opens new prospects for investigating global gene expression, and individual strong promoters in bacteria of medical and/or economic significance.

  1. Diversity of prokaryotic community at a shallow marine hydrothermal site elucidated by Illumina sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentini, Valeria; Gugliandolo, Concetta; Bunk, Boyke; Overmann, Jörg; Maugeri, Teresa L

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the prokaryotic community structure and composition in an active hydrothermal site, named Black Point, off Panarea Island (Eolian Islands, Italy), we examined sediment and fluid samples, differing in temperature, by a massive parallel sequencing (Illumina) technique targeting the V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene. The used technique enabled us to detect a greater prokaryotic diversity than that until now observed and to reveal also microorganisms occurring at very low abundance (≤0.01 %). Most of sequences were assigned to Bacteria while Archaea were a minor component of the microbial community in both low- and high-temperature samples. Proteobacteria (mainly consisting of Alpha-, Gamma-, and Epsilonproteobacteria) dominated among all samples followed by Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Analyzed DNA obtained from samples taken at different temperatures indicated the presence of members of different dominant genera. The main differences were observed between sediment samples where Rhodovulum and Thiohalospira prevailed at high temperature, while Thalassomonas and Sulfurimonas at low temperature. Chlorobium, Acinetobacter, Sulfurimonas, and Brevundimonas were abundant in both low- and high-temperature fluid samples. Euryarchaeota dominated the archaeal community in all samples. Classes of Euryarchaeota embracing hyperthermophilic members (Thermococci and Thermoplasmata) and of Crenarchaeota (Thermoprotei) were more abundant in high-temperature samples. A great number of sequences referred to Bacteria and Archaea still remained unaffiliated, indicating that Black Point site represents a rich source of so-far uncharted prokaryotic diversity.

  2. Restriction glycosylases: involvement of endonuclease activities in the restriction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingbiao; Matsuzaka, Tomoyuki; Yano, Hirokazu; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Nakano, Toshiaki; Ishikawa, Ken; Fukuyo, Masaki; Takahashi, Noriko; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Ide, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2017-02-17

    All restriction enzymes examined are phosphodiesterases generating 3΄-OH and 5΄-P ends, but one restriction enzyme (restriction glycosylase) excises unmethylated bases from its recognition sequence. Whether its restriction activity involves endonucleolytic cleavage remains unclear. One report on this enzyme, R.PabI from a hyperthermophile, ascribed the breakage to high temperature while another showed its weak AP lyase activity generates atypical ends. Here, we addressed this issue in mesophiles. We purified R.PabI homologs from Campylobacter coli (R.CcoLI) and Helicobacter pylori (R.HpyAXII) and demonstrated their DNA cleavage, DNA glycosylase and AP lyase activities in vitro at 37°C. The AP lyase activity is more coupled with glycosylase activity in R.CcoLI than in R.PabI. R.CcoLI/R.PabI expression caused restriction of incoming bacteriophage/plasmid DNA and endogenous chromosomal DNA within Escherichia coli at 37°C. The R.PabI-mediated restriction was promoted by AP endonuclease action in vivo or in vitro. These results reveal the role of endonucleolytic DNA cleavage in restriction and yet point to diversity among the endonucleases. The cleaved ends are difficult to repair in vivo, which may indicate their biological significance. These results support generalization of the concept of restriction–modification system to the concept of self-recognizing epigenetic system, which combines any epigenetic labeling and any DNA damaging.

  3. The Limits of Life on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, J. W.

    2002-12-01

    Microorganisms inhabit environments more extreme than those of higher organisms, and recent research results are vastly expanding our notion of where life may occur elsewhere in the Universe. These "extremophiles" have evolved to handle conditions previously thought impossible for life. The temperature limits of microbial activity currently stand at -20 deg C in Arctic winter sea-ice brines (psychrophiles) and 113 deg C in the pressurized water emerging from seafloor hydrothermal vents (hyperthermophiles). Moreover, indirect evidence exists that this upper temperature limit may be significantly higher. The pressure limits on microbial activity are unknown, since some cultures (barophiles) continue to metabolize at the highest pressures tested (1100 atm, mimicking the deepest trench in the ocean). Recent studies have extended the pressure for metabolic activity in bacteria to greater than 10,000 atm. Certain types of microorganisms (acidophiles) are also known to grow in the extreme acidic conditions (pH = 0) found in some geothermal vents and mine waste sites, as well as others (alkalophiles) in alkaline environments such as high-carbonate lakes (pH = 12). Other microbes (halophiles) have evolved to grow in saturated brines (5 Molar NaCl), with heavy metals (e.g., 5mMolar Cd), and under levels of DNA-damaging radiation up to 6000 rad/hr and 15 Mrad total.

  4. Diversity of thermophilic and non-thermophilic Crenarchaeota at 80 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist, Thomas; Mengewein, Anett; Manzei, Stefanie; Ahring, Birgitte K; Westermann, Peter

    2005-03-01

    A hot spring in the solfataric field of Pisciarelli (Naples-Italy) was analysed for Archaeal diversity. Total DNA was extracted from the environment, archaeal 16S rRNA genes were amplified with Archaea specific primers, and a clone library consisting of 201 clones was established. The clones were grouped in 10 different groups each representing a specific band pattern using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Members of all 10 groups were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Surprisingly, a high abundance of clones belonging to non-thermophilic Crenarchaeal clusters were detected together with the thermophilic archaeon Acidianus infernus in this thermophilic environment. Neither Sulfolobus species nor other hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota were detected in the clone library. The relative abundance of the sequenced clones was confirmed by terminal restriction fragment analyses. Amplification of 16S rRNA genes from Archaea transferred from the surrounding environment was considered negligible because DNA from non-thermophilic Crenarchaeota incubated under conditions similar to the solfatara could not be PCR amplified after 5 min.

  5. Properties and evolution of an alcohol dehydrogenase from the Crenarchaeota Pyrobaculum aerophilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Annalisa; Rosso, Francesco; Barbarisi, Alfonso; Labella, Tullio; D'Auria, Sabato

    2010-08-01

    The gene encoding a novel alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) that belongs to the medium chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR) superfamily was identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrobaculum aerophilum. The P. aerophilum ADH gene (Pae2687) was over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the protein (PyAeADHII) was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The PyAeADHII belongs to a medium chain class because its monomer size is 330 residues and even if it is structurally similar to other enzymes belonging to MDR superfamily, it lacks key residues involved in the coordination of the catalytic Zn ion and in the binding of alcoholic substrates typical of other ADHs. Consistently, PyAeADHII does not show activity on a large number of alcohols, aldheydes or ketones. It is active only when alpha-tetralone is used as a substrate. The enzyme has a strict requirement for NADP(H) as the coenzyme and has remarkable thermophilicity, displaying activity at temperatures up to 95 degrees C. The study of the metabolic pathways of P. aerophilum can provide information on the evolution of genes and enzymes and may be crucial for understanding the evolution of eukaryotic cells. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of an RNase J ortholog in Sulfolobus solfataricus: implications for 5'-to-3' directional decay and 5'-end protection of mRNA in Crenarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenöhrl, David; Konrat, Robert; Bläsi, Udo

    2011-01-01

    In both Bacteria and Eukaryotes, degradation is known to start at the 5' and at the 3' extremities of mRNAs. Until the recent discovery of 5'-to-3' exoribonucleases in hyperthermophilic Euryarchaeota, the exosome was assumed to be the key enzyme in mRNA degradation in Archaea. By means of zymogram assays and bioinformatics, we have identified a 5'-to-3' exoribonuclease activity in the crenarchaeum Sulfolobus solfataricus (Sso), which is affected by the phosphorylation state of the 5'-end of the mRNA. The protein comprises typical signature motifs of the β-CASP family of metallo-β-lactamases and was termed Sso-RNAse J. Thus, our study provides the first evidence for a 5'-to-3' directional mRNA decay pathway in the crenarchaeal clade of Archaea. In Bacteria the 5'-end of mRNAs is often protected by a tri-phosphorylated 5'-terminus and/or by stem-loop structures, while in Eukaryotes the cap-binding complex is responsible for this task. Here, we show that binding of translation initiation factor a/eIF2(γ) to the 5'-end of mRNA counteracts the 5'-to-3' exoribonucleolytic activity of Sso-RNase J in vitro. Hence, 5'-to-3' directional decay and 5'-end protection appear to be conserved features of mRNA turnover in all kingdoms of life.

  7. The genome of Hyperthermus butylicus: a sulfur-reducing, peptide fermenting, neutrophilic Crenarchaeote growing up to 108 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Brügger

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermus butylicus, a hyperthermophilic neutrophile and anaerobe, is a member of the archaeal kingdom Crenarchaeota. Its genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 1,667,163 bp with a 53.7% G+C content. A total of 1672 genes were annotated, of which 1602 are protein-coding, and up to a third are specific to H. butylicus. In contrast to some other crenarchaeal genomes, a high level of GUG and UUG start codons are predicted. Two cdc6 genes are present, but neither could be linked unambiguously to an origin of replication. Many of the predicted metabolic gene products are associated with the fermentation of peptide mixtures including several peptidases with diverse specificities, and there are many encoded transporters. Most of the sulfur-reducing enzymes, hydrogenases and electron-transfer proteins were identified which are associated with energy production by reducing sulfur to H2S. Two large clusters of regularly interspaced repeats (CRISPRs are present, one of which is associated with a crenarchaeal-type cas gene superoperon; none of the spacer sequences yielded good sequence matches with known archaeal chromosomal elements. The genome carries no detectable transposable or integrated elements, no inteins, and introns are exclusive to tRNA genes. This suggests that the genome structure is quite stable, possibly reflecting a constant, and relatively uncompetitive, natural environment.

  8. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. © FEMS 2016.

  9. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  10. Anion binding in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  11. Anion binding in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiters, Martin C [Department of Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [EMBL Hamburg Outstation at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, Sorge 5, Rostov-na-Donu, 344090 (Russian Federation); Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris-VI, Station Biologique de Roscoff, Place Georges Teissier, BP 74, F-29682 Roscoff cedex, Bretagne (France); Kuepper, Frithjof C [Scottish Association for Marine Science, Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstrasse 20, Zuerich, 8093 (Switzerland); Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R, E-mail: m.feiters@science.ru.n [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L{sub 3} (2p{sub 3/2}) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  12. Role of Mn2+ and Compatible Solutes in the Radiation Resistance of Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M. Webb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn2+-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell.

  13. Insights into thermoadaptation and the evolution of mesophily from the bacterial phylum Thermotogae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, Stephen M J; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Nesbø, Camilla L

    2015-09-01

    Thermophiles are extremophiles that grow optimally at temperatures >45 °C. To survive and maintain function of their biological molecules, they have a suite of characteristics not found in organisms that grow at moderate temperature (mesophiles). At the cellular level, thermophiles have mechanisms for maintaining their membranes, nucleic acids, and other cellular structures. At the protein level, each of their proteins remains stable and retains activity at temperatures that would denature their mesophilic homologs. Conversely, cellular structures and proteins from thermophiles may not function optimally at moderate temperatures. These differences between thermophiles and mesophiles presumably present a barrier for evolutionary transitioning between the 2 lifestyles. Therefore, studying closely related thermophiles and mesophiles can help us determine how such lifestyle transitions may happen. The bacterial phylum Thermotogae contains hyperthermophiles, thermophiles, mesophiles, and organisms with temperature ranges wide enough to span both thermophilic and mesophilic temperatures. Genomic, proteomic, and physiological differences noted between other bacterial thermophiles and mesophiles are evident within the Thermotogae. We argue that the Thermotogae is an ideal group of organisms for understanding of the response to fluctuating temperature and of long-term evolutionary adaptation to a different growth temperature range.

  14. Structures of the signal recognition particle receptor from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus: implications for the targeting step at the membrane.

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    Pascal F Egea

    Full Text Available In all organisms, a ribonucleoprotein called the signal recognition particle (SRP and its receptor (SR target nascent proteins from the ribosome to the translocon for secretion or membrane insertion. We present the first X-ray structures of an archeal FtsY, the receptor from the hyper-thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu, in its free and GDP*magnesium-bound forms. The highly charged N-terminal domain of Pfu-FtsY is distinguished by a long N-terminal helix. The basic charges on the surface of this helix are likely to regulate interactions at the membrane. A peripheral GDP bound near a regulatory motif could indicate a site of interaction between the receptor and ribosomal or SRP RNAs. Small angle X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the crystal structure of Pfu-FtsY correlates well with the average conformation in solution. Based on previous structures of two sub-complexes, we propose a model of the core of archeal and eukaryotic SRP*SR targeting complexes.

  15. Endoglucanase activity at a second site inPyrococcus furiosustriosephosphate isomerase-Promiscuity or compensation for a metabolic handicap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prerna; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2017-08-01

    The eight-stranded (β/α) 8 barrel fold known as the Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel is the most commonly observed fold in enzymes, displaying an eightfold structural symmetry. The sequences and structures of different TIM barrel enzymes suggest that nature exploits the modularity inherent in the eightfold symmetry to generate enzymes with diverse enzymatic activities and, in certain cases, more than one catalytic activity per enzyme. Here, we report the discovery, verification, and characterization of such an additional activity, a novel endoglucanase/cellulase activity in what is otherwise a triosephosphate isomerase from the hyperthermophile archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (PfuTIM). The activity is seen in two different ranges of temperatures, with one maximum at 40 °C and a second maximum close to 100 °C. The endoglucanase/cellulase activity is inhibited by norharman, a TIM inhibitor, which is suspected to bind at a site different to that of the regular substrate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P). However, endoglucanase/cellulose activity is not inhibited either by G3P analogs or by glycine-scanning mutations involving residues in loops 1, 4, and 6 of PfuTIM, which are known to be important for TIM activity. It appears, therefore, that two different sites on PfuTIM are responsible for the observed TIM and endoglucanase activities. We discuss possible correlations between this discovery and certain unusual features of the glycolytic pathway in P. furiosus . Pyrococcus furiosus Triosephosphate isomerase (EC:5.3.1.1).

  16. Unifying principles of the deep terrestrial and deep marine biospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Frederick S.; Smith, Richard P.

    Recent estimates of the amount of microbial biomass in the combined marine and terrestrial subsurface boost this portion of the biosphere to a level which needs to be considered when integrating where life exists on our planet. Additionally, the subsurface serves practical needs associated with groundwater, waste disposal, and resource recovery. Although our view of this isolated ecosystem is restricted by technologies used to access samples, we are learning more about places where life thrives in the subsurface and where life is severely repressed. Until studies of hyperthermophiles provide different information, a thermal boundary to life exists at the 120°C isotherm. Other locations in the subsurface are barren where they are impoverished by low fluid flux to supply electron donors and acceptors or by limited pore space in which microorganisms can reside. Examples of such locations include deep vadose zones and igneous rock masses with limited fractures. In contrast, subsurface locations that show evidence of gaseous or liquid flux are the most likely to yield higher numbers of microorganisms. Locations that have marine and terrestrial hydrothermal convection cells, active methane venting, solid-liquid-gas phase changes, as well as zones of salinity and porosity contrasts are all examples of demonstrated or potential subsurface oases. Our ability to conceptualize and quantify the subsurface biosphere will be accelerated by new sampling tools and molecular characterization methods for microbes. The merging of disparate disciplines such as microbiology, geophysics, and tectonic research will extend our ability to fully comprehend the deep biosphere.

  17. Characterization of the Family I inorganic pyrophosphatase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jong Jeon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A gene encoding for a putative Family inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase, EC 3.6.1.1 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 was cloned and the biochemical characteristics of the resulting recombinant protein were examined. The gene (Accession No. 1907 from P. horikoshii showed some identity with other Family I inorganic pyrophosphatases from archaea. The recombinant PPase from P. horikoshii (PhPPase has a molecular mass of 24.5 kDa, determined by SDS-PAGE. This enzyme specifically catalyzed the hydrolysis of pyrophosphate and was sensitive to NaF. The optimum temperature and pH for PPase activity were 70 °C and 7.5, respectively. The half-life of heat inactivation was about 50 min at 105 °C. The heat stability of PhPPase was enhanced in the presence of Mg2+. A divalent cation was absolutely required for enzyme activity, Mg2+ being most effective; Zn2+, Co2+ and Mn2+ efficiently supported hydrolytic activity in a narrow range of concentrations (0.05– 0.5 mM. The Km for pyrophosphate and Mg2+ were 113 and 303 µM, respectively; and maximum velocity, Vmax, was estimated at 930 U mg–1.

  18. Marine Extremophiles: A Source of Hydrolases for Biotechnological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Zamith Leal Dalmaso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The marine environment covers almost three quarters of the planet and is where evolution took its first steps. Extremophile microorganisms are found in several extreme marine environments, such as hydrothermal vents, hot springs, salty lakes and deep-sea floors. The ability of these microorganisms to support extremes of temperature, salinity and pressure demonstrates their great potential for biotechnological processes. Hydrolases including amylases, cellulases, peptidases and lipases from hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles and piezophiles have been investigated for these reasons. Extremozymes are adapted to work in harsh physical-chemical conditions and their use in various industrial applications such as the biofuel, pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and food industries has increased. The understanding of the specific factors that confer the ability to withstand extreme habitats on such enzymes has become a priority for their biotechnological use. The most studied marine extremophiles are prokaryotes and in this review, we present the most studied archaea and bacteria extremophiles and their hydrolases, and discuss their use for industrial applications.

  19. Characterization and Structure of a Zn[superscript 2+] and [2Fe-2S]-containing Copper Chaperone from Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sazinsky, Matthew H.; LeMoine, Benjamin; Orofino, Maria; Davydov, Roman; Bencze, Krisztina Z.; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Arguello, Jose M.; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (Worcester); (WSU-MED); (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    Bacterial CopZ proteins deliver copper to P{sub 1B}-type Cu{sup +}-ATPases that are homologous to the human Wilson and Menkes disease proteins. The genome of the hyperthermophile Archaeoglobus fulgidus encodes a putative CopZ copper chaperone that contains an unusual cysteine-rich N-terminal domain of 130 amino acids in addition to a C-terminal copper binding domain with a conserved CXXC motif. The N-terminal domain (CopZ-NT) is homologous to proteins found only in extremophiles and is the only such protein that is fused to a copper chaperone. Surprisingly, optical, electron paramagnetic resonance, and x-ray absorption spectroscopic data indicate the presence of a [2Fe-2S] cluster in CopZ-NT. The intact CopZ protein binds two copper ions, one in each domain. The 1.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of CopZ-NT reveals that the [2Fe-2S] cluster is housed within a novel fold and that the protein also binds a zinc ion at a four-cysteine site. CopZ can deliver Cu{sup +} to the A. fulgidus CopA N-terminal metal binding domain and is capable of reducing Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup +}. This unique fusion of a redox-active domain with a CXXC-containing copper chaperone domain is relevant to the evolution of copper homeostatic mechanisms and suggests new models for copper trafficking.

  20. A first insight into the occurrence and expression of functional amoA and accA genes of autotrophic and ammonia-oxidizing bathypelagic Crenarchaeota of Tyrrhenian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimov, Michail M.; Cono, Violetta La; Denaro, Renata

    2009-05-01

    The autotrophic and ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeal assemblage at offshore site located in the deep Mediterranean (Tyrrhenian Sea, depth 3000 m) water was studied by PCR amplification of the key functional genes involved in energy (ammonia mono-oxygenase alpha subunit, amoA) and central metabolism (acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha subunit, accA). Using two recently annotated genomes of marine crenarchaeons, an initial set of primers targeting archaeal accA-like genes was designed. Approximately 300 clones were analyzed, of which 100% of amoA library and almost 70% of accA library were unambiguously related to the corresponding genes from marine Crenarchaeota. Even though the acetyl-CoA carboxylase is phylogenetically not well conserved and the remaining clones were affiliated to various bacterial acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA carboxylase genes, the pool of archaeal sequences was applied for development of quantitative PCR analysis of accA-like distribution using TaqMan ® methodolgy. The archaeal accA gene fragments, together with alignable gene fragments from the Sargasso Sea and North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (ALOHA Station) metagenome databases, were analyzed by multiple sequence alignment. Two accA-like sequences, found in ALOHA Station at the depth of 4000 m, formed a deeply branched clade with 64% of all archaeal Tyrrhenian clones. No close relatives for residual 36% of clones, except of those recovered from Eastern Mediterranean, was found, suggesting the existence of a specific lineage of the crenarchaeal accA genes in deep Mediterranean water. Alignment of Mediterranean amoA sequences defined four cosmopolitan phylotypes of Crenarchaeota putative ammonia mono-oxygenase subunit A gene occurring in the water sample from the 3000 m depth. Without exception all phylotypes fell into Deep Marine Group I cluster that contain the vast majority of known sequences recovered from global deep-sea environment. Remarkably, three phylotypes accounted for 91% of all Mediterranean

  1. [Engineering issues of microbial ecology in space agriculture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Yoji; Oshima, Tairo

    2005-03-01

    Closure of the materials recycle loop for water-foods-oxygen is the primary purpose of space agriculture on Mars and Moon. A microbial ecological system takes a part of agriculture to process our metabolic excreta and inedible biomass and convert them to nutrients and soil substrate for cultivating plants. If we extend the purpose of space agriculture to the creation and control of a healthy and pleasant living environment, we should realize that our human body should not be sterilized but exposed to the appropriate microbial environment. We are proposing a use of hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting microbial ecology in space agriculture. Japan has a broad historical and cultural background on this subject. There had been agriculture that drove a closed loop of materials between consuming cities and farming villages in vicinity. Recent environmental problems regarding garbage collection and processing in towns have motivated home electronics companies to innovate "garbage composting" machines with bacterial technology. Based on those matured technology, together with new insights on microbiology and microbial ecology, we have been developing a conceptual design of space agriculture on Moon and Mars. There are several issues to be answered in order to prove effectiveness of the use of microbial systems in space. 1) Can the recycled nutrients, processed by the hyper-thermal aerobic composting microbial ecology, be formed in the physical and chemical state or configuration, with which plants can uptake those nutrients? A possibility of removing any major components of fertilizer from its recycle loop is another item to be evaluated. 2) What are the merits of forming soil microbial ecology around the root system of plants? This might be the most crucial question. Recent researches exhibit various mutually beneficial relationships among soil microbiota and plants, and symbiotic ecology in composting bacteria. It is essential to understand those features, and define

  2. Lessons from Suiyo Seamount studies, for understanding extreme (ancient?) microbial ecosystems in the deep-sea hydrothermal fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, A.; Higashi, Y.; Sunamura, M.; Urabe, T.

    2004-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystems are driven with various geo-thermally modified, mainly reduced, compounds delivered from extremely hot subsurface environments. To date, several unique microbes including thermophilic archaeons have been isolated from/around vent chimneys. However, there is little information about microbes in over-vent and sub-vent fields. Here, we report several new findings on microbial diversity and ecology of the Suiyo Seamount that locates on the Izu-Bonin Arc in the northwest Pacific Ocean, as a result of the Japanese Archaean Park project, with special concern to the sub-vent biosphere. At first, we succeeded to reveal a very unique microbial ecosystem in hydrothermal plume reserved within the outer rim of the seamount crater, that is, it consisted of almost all metabolically active microbes belonged to only two Bacteria phylotypes, probably of sulfur oxidizers. In the center of the caldera seafloor (ca. 1,388-m deep) consisted mainly of whitish sands and pumices, we found many small chimneys (ca. 5-10 cm) and bivalve colonies distributed looking like gray to black patches. These geo/ecological features of the seafloor were supposed to be from a complex mixing of hydrothermal venting and strong water current near the seafloor. Through quantitative FISH analysis for various environmental samples, one of the two representative groups in the plume was assessed to be from some of the bivalve colonies. Using the Benthic Multi-coring System (BMS), total 10 points were drilled and 6 boreholes were maintained with stainless or titanium casing pipes. In the following submersible surveys, newly developed catheter- and column-type in situ growth chambers were deployed in and on the boreholes, respectively, for collecting indigenous sub-vent microbes. Finally, we succeeded to detect several new phylotypes of microbes in these chamber samples, e.g., within epsilon-Proteobacteria, a photosynthetic group of alpha-Proteobacteria, and hyperthermophile

  3. Hydrothermal Fluid Permeability, Temperature, and Nutrient Fluxes: Three Controls on the Structure and the Dynamics of Subsurface Extremophilic Microbe Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M. P.; Yang, J.

    2002-05-01

    We continue to develop a set of models whose aim is to provide broad constraints on the range of possible community structures for subsurface thermally-tolerant microbes. We combine studies of the three-dimensional internal structure of the dike and sill complexes of active volcanoes, studies of the scale- and direction-dependent 3-D in-situ permeability of intrusive and extrusive rocks from in-situ and laboratory data, numerical modelling of hydrothermal convection in volcanic interiors, data on the optimal metabolic and life-limiting thermal requirements of extremophilic microbes, with the set of nutrients and nutrient pathways required for the survival of given species of thermophiles and hyperthermophiles. With this mix of data bases and analysis tools, we can begin to divine a set of broad theoretical guidelines for constraining the structure and dynamics of extremophilic communities in the subsurface environments of volcanoes. We are searching for the first-order controls on transport. The effects of mineral attachment, detachment, and microbial reproduction may be incorporated in refinements of this basic model. Critical thermal intervals and/or isotherms that correlate with (1) optimal metabolic and (2) life-limiting temperatures for thermophilic microbes are, e.g., in degrees Celcius: Thermus thermophilius [70, 85]; Thermomicrobium roseum [70-75, 85]; Thermus aquaticus [70, 79]; and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius [70-75, 90]. Numerical models of the convective migration of thermophilic (50-80 C), and hyperthermophilic (80-113 C) microbes and their macromolecular amino acid building blocks (113- ~200 C) have been developed that explicitly incorporate the roles of fractures and fluid properties. Fluid transport properties are evaluated through the optimal metabolic and life-limiting temperate ranges and beyond. These models quantify our intuition with respect to controls on community structure and dynamics. Important relationships appear to be: (1) Great

  4. The Ultramafic-Hosted Lost City Hydrothermal Field: Clues in the Search for Life Elsewhere in the Solar System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, D. S.; Baross, J. A.; Frueh-Green, G. L.; Schrenk, M. O.; Karson, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    The recent discovery of the peridotite-hosted Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) raises the possibility that such systems are prevalent not only on Earth, but that similar systems may have existed, or currently exist, elsewhere in the solar system. The LCHF, which rests atop the Atlantis massif at 30N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, is unlike any previously known hydrothermal field: 1) it is located on 1.5 my-old crust, nearly 15 km west of the spreading axis; 2) it hosts at least 30 active and inactive carbonate-brucite chimneys that tower up to 60 m above the seafloor; 3) the venting pinnacles appear to be the surface expression of warm (40-75C), high pH (9-10) fluids emanating from fault zones that tap a region of active serpentinization in the underlying peridotites; and 5) hydrothermal flow is facilitated by exothermic serpentinization reactions at depth. The diffusely venting fluids support dense and diverse communities of mesophilic to hyperthermophilic organisms that may include sulfur-, methane- and hydrogen-oxidizers. The Lost City Field may represent our closest analogue to hydrothermal systems operative during early Earth where ultramafic rocks were predominant. The reducing conditions associated with serpentinization of ultramafic material may be similar to those present in the Hadean ocean (4.5-3.9 Gyr) and it has been suggested that such high-pH systems were a requirement for the emergence of life on the seafloor. Model calculations based on thermodynamic considerations and experimental studies suggest that synthesis of numerous organic compounds is favored during mixing of warm, serpentinite-derived, high-pH, reducing fluids with cool, oxygenated seawater. Dissolved hydrogen, present in hydrothermal fluids due to reaction of olivine and other iron-bearing minerals with fluids, provides the reduction potential and the thermodynamic drive for organic synthesis. Significant quantities of methane and hydrogen produced during serpentinization reactions form

  5. Diversity and Functional Analysis of the FeMo-Cofactor Maturase NifB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Arragain

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main hurdles to engineer nitrogenase in a non-diazotrophic host is achieving NifB activity. NifB is an extremely unstable and oxygen sensitive protein that catalyzes a low-potential SAM-radical dependent reaction. The product of NifB activity is called NifB-co, a complex [8Fe-9S-C] cluster that serves as obligate intermediate in the biosyntheses of the active-site cofactors of all known nitrogenases. Here we study the diversity and phylogeny of naturally occurring NifB proteins, their protein architecture and the functions of the distinct NifB domains in order to understand what defines a catalytically active NifB. Focus is on NifB from the thermophile Chlorobium tepidum (two-domain architecture, the hyperthermophile Methanocaldococcus infernus (single-domain architecture and the mesophile Klebsiella oxytoca (two-domain architecture, showing in silico characterization of their nitrogen fixation (nif gene clusters, conserved NifB motifs, and functionality. C. tepidum and M. infernus NifB were able to complement an Azotobacter vinelandii (ΔnifB mutant restoring the Nif+ phenotype and thus demonstrating their functionality in vivo. In addition, purified C. tepidum NifB exhibited activity in the in vitro NifB-dependent nitrogenase reconstitution assay. Intriguingly, changing the two-domain K. oxytoca NifB to single-domain by removal of the C-terminal NifX-like extension resulted in higher in vivo nitrogenase activity, demonstrating that this domain is not required for nitrogen fixation in mesophiles.

  6. Chaperonin filaments: their formation and an evaluation of methods for studying them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, T; Kagawa, H K; Trent, J D

    1998-08-01

    Chaperonins are multisubunit protein complexes that can be isolated from cells as high-molecular-weight structures that appear as double rings in the electron microscope. We recently discovered that chaperonin double rings isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, when incubated at physiological temperatures in the presence of ATP and Mg2+, stacked into filaments; we hypothesized that these filaments are related to filaments seen inside S. shibatae cells and that chaperonins exist as filaments in vivo (J. D. Trent et al., 1997, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94, 5383-5388). This paper elucidates the conditions under which we have observed S. shibatae chaperonins to form filaments and evaluates native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation as methods for studying these filaments. We observed that in the presence of Mg2+ combined with ATP, ADP, ATPgammaS, or GTP, native PAGE indicated that chaperonin subunits assembled into double rings and that the conformation of these double rings was effected by nucleotide binding, but we saw no indication of chaperonin filament formation. Under these same conditions, however, TEM, spectroscopy, and centrifugation methods indicated that chaperonin subunits and double rings had assembled into filaments. We determined that this discrepancy in the representation of the chaperonin structure was due to the native PAGE method itself. When we exposed chaperonin filaments to the electrophoretic field used in native PAGE, the filaments dissociated into double rings. This suggests that TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation are the preferred methods for studying the higher-order structures of chaperonins, which are likely to be of biological significance. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  7. Two Strategies for Microbial Production of an Industrial Enzyme-Alpha-Amylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Garriott, Owen; Pusey, Marc L.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2003-01-01

    Extremophiles are microorganisms that thrive in, from an anthropocentric view, extreme environments including hot springs, soda lakes and arctic water. This ability of survival at extreme conditions has rendered extremophiles to be of interest in astrobiology, evolutionary biology as well as in industrial applications. Of particular interest to the biotechnology industry are the biological catalysts of the extremophiles, the extremozymes, whose unique stabilities at extreme conditions make them potential sources of novel enzymes in industrial applications. There are two major approaches to microbial enzyme production. This entails enzyme isolation directly from the natural host or creating a recombinant expression system whereby the targeted enzyme can be overexpressed in a mesophilic host. We are employing both methods in the effort to produce alpha-amylases from a hyperthermophilic archaeon (Thermococcus) isolated from a hydrothermal vent in the Atlantic Ocean, as well as from alkaliphilic bacteria (Bacillus) isolated from a soda lake in Tanzania. Alpha-amylases catalyze the hydrolysis of internal alpha-1,4-glycosidic linkages in starch to produce smaller sugars. Thermostable alpha-amylases are used in the liquefaction of starch for production of fructose and glucose syrups, whereas alpha-amylases stable at high pH have potential as detergent additives. The alpha-amylase encoding gene from Thermococcus was PCR amplified using carefully designed primers and analyzed using bioinformatics tools such as BLAST and Multiple Sequence Alignment for cloning and expression in E.coli. Four strains of Bacillus were grown in alkaline starch-enriched medium of which the culture supernatant was used as enzyme source. Amylolytic activity was detected using the starch-iodine method.

  8. Structure and substrate specificity of the pyrococcal coenzyme A disulfide reductases/polysulfide reductases (CoADR/Psr): implications for S(0)-based respiration and a sulfur-dependent antioxidant system in Pyrococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwald, Sanna; Liu, Albert Y; Zhu, Brian E; Sea, Kevin W; Lopez, Karlo M; Sazinsky, Matthew H; Crane, Edward J

    2013-04-23

    FAD and NAD(P)H-dependent coenzyme A disulfide reductases/polysulfide reductases (CoADR/Psr) have been proposed to be important for the reduction of sulfur and disulfides in the sulfur-reducing anaerobic hyperthermophiles Pyrococcus horikoshii and Pyrococcus furiosus; however, the form(s) of sulfur that the enzyme actually reduces are not clear. Here we determined the structure for the FAD- and coenzyme A-containing holoenzyme from P. horikoshii to 2.7 Å resolution and characterized its substrate specificity. The enzyme is relatively promiscuous and reduces a range of disulfide, persulfide, and polysulfide compounds. These results indicate that the likely in vivo substrates are NAD(P)H and di-, poly-, and persulfide derivatives of coenzyme A, although polysulfide itself is also efficiently reduced. The role of the enzyme in the reduction of elemental sulfur (S(8)) in situ is not, however, ruled out by these results, and the possible roles of this substrate are discussed. During aerobic persulfide reduction, rapid recycling of the persulfide substrate was observed, which is proposed to occur via sulfide oxidation by O(2) and/or H(2)O(2). As expected, this reaction disappears under anaerobic conditions and may explain observations by others that CoADR is not essential for S(0) respiration in Pyrococcus or Thermococcus but appears to participate in oxidative defense in the presence of S(0). When compared to the homologous Npsr enzyme from Shewanella loihica PV-4 and homologous enzymes known to reduce CoA disulfide, the phCoADR structure shows a relatively restricted substrate channel leading into the sulfur-reducing side of the FAD isoalloxazine ring, suggesting how this enzyme class may select for specific disulfide substrates.

  9. Enhancement of fermentative hydrogen production from green algal biomass of Thermotoga neapolitana by various pretreatment methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tam-Anh D.; Kim, Kyoung-Rok; Nguyen, Minh-Thu; Sim, Sang Jun [Department of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Sun [Bioenergy Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Donhue [Department of Biochemical Engineering, Dongyang Mirae College, Seoul 152-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Biomass of the green algae has been recently an attractive feedstock source for bio-fuel production because the algal carbohydrates can be derived from atmospheric CO{sub 2} and their harvesting methods are simple. We utilized the accumulated starch in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as the sole substrate for fermentative hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production by the hyperthermophilic eubacterium Thermotoga neapolitana. Because of possessing amylase activity, the bacterium could directly ferment H{sub 2} from algal starch with H{sub 2} yield of 1.8-2.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol glucose and the total accumulated H{sub 2} level from 43 to 49% (v/v) of the gas headspace in the closed culture bottle depending on various algal cell-wall disruption methods concluding sonication or methanol exposure. Attempting to enhance the H{sub 2} production, two pretreatment methods using the heat-HCl treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis were applied on algal biomass before using it as substrate for H{sub 2} fermentation. Cultivation with starch pretreated by 1.5% HCl at 121 C for 20 min showed the total accumulative H{sub 2} yield of 58% (v/v). In other approach, enzymatic digestion of starch by thermostable {alpha}-amylase (Termamyl) applied in the SHF process significantly enhanced the H{sub 2} productivity of the bacterium to 64% (v/v) of total accumulated H{sub 2} level and a H{sub 2} yield of 2.5 mol H{sub 2}/mol glucose. Our results demonstrated that direct H{sub 2} fermentation from algal biomass is more desirably potential because one bacterial cultivation step was required that meets the cost-savings, environmental friendly and simplicity of H{sub 2} production. (author)

  10. Metabolic versatility and indigenous origin of the archaeon Thermococcus sibiricus, isolated from a siberian oil reservoir, as revealed by genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanov, Andrey V; Ravin, Nikolai V; Svetlitchnyi, Vitali A; Beletsky, Alexey V; Miroshnichenko, Margarita L; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Skryabin, Konstantin G

    2009-07-01

    Thermococcus species are widely distributed in terrestrial and marine hydrothermal areas, as well as in deep subsurface oil reservoirs. Thermococcus sibiricus is a hyperthermophilic anaerobic archaeon isolated from a well of the never flooded oil-bearing Jurassic horizon of a high-temperature oil reservoir. To obtain insight into the genome of an archaeon inhabiting the oil reservoir, we have determined and annotated the complete 1,845,800-base genome of T. sibiricus. A total of 2,061 protein-coding genes have been identified, 387 of which are absent in other members of the order Thermococcales. Physiological features and genomic data reveal numerous hydrolytic enzymes (e.g., cellulolytic enzymes, agarase, laminarinase, and lipases) and metabolic pathways, support the proposal of the indigenous origin of T. sibiricus in the oil reservoir, and explain its survival over geologic time and its proliferation in this habitat. Indeed, in addition to proteinaceous compounds known previously to be present in oil reservoirs at limiting concentrations, its growth was stimulated by cellulose, agarose, and triacylglycerides, as well as by alkanes. Two polysaccharide degradation loci were probably acquired by T. sibiricus from thermophilic bacteria following lateral gene transfer events. The first, a "saccharolytic gene island" absent in the genomes of other members of the order Thermococcales, contains the complete set of genes responsible for the hydrolysis of cellulose and beta-linked polysaccharides. The second harbors genes for maltose and trehalose degradation. Considering that agarose and laminarin are components of algae, the encoded enzymes and the substrate spectrum of T. sibiricus indicate the ability to metabolize the buried organic matter from the original oceanic sediment.

  11. The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, iain J.; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Rodriguez, Jason; Hooper, Sean; Porat, Iris; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Sun, Hui; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Barry, Kerrie; Huber, Harald; Zhulin, Igor B.; Whitman, William B.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-09-05

    Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced - Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

  12. Fundamental Studies of Recombinant Hydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Michael W. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2014-01-25

    This research addressed the long term goals of understanding the assembly and organization of hydrogenase enzymes, of reducing them in size and complexity, of determining structure/function relationships, including energy conservation via charge separation across membranes, and in screening for novel H2 catalysts. A key overall goal of the proposed research was to define and characterize minimal hydrogenases that are produced in high yields and are oxygen-resistant. Remarkably, in spite of decades of research carried out on hydrogenases, it is not possible to readily manipulate or design the enzyme using molecular biology approaches since a recombinant form produced in a suitable host is not available. Such resources are essential if we are to understand what constitutes a “minimal” hydrogenase and design such catalysts with certain properties, such as resistance to oxygen, extreme stability and specificity for a given electron donor. The model system for our studies is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophile that grows optimally at 100°C, which contains three different nickel-iron [NiFe-] containing hydrogenases. Hydrogenases I and II are cytoplasmic while the other, MBH, is an integral membrane protein that functions to both evolve H2 and pump protons. Three important breakthroughs were made during the funding period with P. furiosus soluble hydrogenase I (SHI). First, we produced an active recombinant form of SHI in E. coli by the co-expression of sixteen genes using anaerobically-induced promoters. Second, we genetically-engineered P. furiosus to overexpress SHI by an order of magnitude compared to the wild type strain. Third, we generated the first ‘minimal’ form of SHI, one that contained two rather than four subunits. This dimeric form was stable and active, and directly interacted with a pyruvate-oxidizing enzyme with any intermediate electron carrier. The research resulted in five peer-reviewed publications.

  13. Insights into archaeal evolution and symbiosis from the genomes of a nanoarchaeon and its inferred crenarchaeal host from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Mircea; Makarova, Kira S; Graham, David E; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2013-04-22

    A single cultured marine organism, Nanoarchaeum equitans, represents the Nanoarchaeota branch of symbiotic Archaea, with a highly reduced genome and unusual features such as multiple split genes. The first terrestrial hyperthermophilic member of the Nanoarchaeota was collected from Obsidian Pool, a thermal feature in Yellowstone National Park, separated by single cell isolation, and sequenced together with its putative host, a Sulfolobales archaeon. Both the new Nanoarchaeota (Nst1) and N. equitans lack most biosynthetic capabilities, and phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal RNA and protein sequences indicates that the two form a deep-branching archaeal lineage. However, the Nst1 genome is more than 20% larger, and encodes a complete gluconeogenesis pathway as well as the full complement of archaeal flagellum proteins. With a larger genome, a smaller repertoire of split protein encoding genes and no split non-contiguous tRNAs, Nst1 appears to have experienced less severe genome reduction than N. equitans. These findings imply that, rather than representing ancestral characters, the extremely compact genomes and multiple split genes of Nanoarchaeota are derived characters associated with their symbiotic or parasitic lifestyle. The inferred host of Nst1 is potentially autotrophic, with a streamlined genome and simplified central and energetic metabolism as compared to other Sulfolobales. Comparison of the N. equitans and Nst1 genomes suggests that the marine and terrestrial lineages of Nanoarchaeota share a common ancestor that was already a symbiont of another archaeon. The two distinct Nanoarchaeota-host genomic data sets offer novel insights into the evolution of archaeal symbiosis and parasitism, enabling further studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of these relationships. This article was reviewed by Patrick Forterre, Bettina Siebers (nominated by Michael Galperin) and Purification Lopez-Garcia.

  14. Archaeal and bacterial communities in three alkaline hot springs in Heart Lake Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara Bowen De León

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Lake Geyser Basin (HLGB is remotely located at the base of Mount Sheridan in southern Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA and is situated along Witch Creek and the northwestern shore of Heart Lake. Likely because of its location, little is known about the microbial community structure of springs in the HLGB. Bacterial and archaeal populations were monitored via small subunit (SSU rRNA gene pyrosequencing over 3 years in 3 alkaline (pH 8.5 hot springs with varying temperatures (44°C, 63°C, 75°C. The bacterial populations were generally stable over time, but varied by temperature. The dominant bacterial community changed from moderately thermophilic and photosynthetic members (Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi at 44°C to a mixed photosynthetic and thermophilic community (Deinococcus-Thermus at 63°C and a non-photosynthetic thermophilic community at 75°C. The archaeal community was more variable across time and was predominantly a methanogenic community in the 44°C and 63°C springs and a hyperthermophilic community in the 75°C spring. The 75°C spring demonstrated large shifts in the archaeal populations and was predominantly Candidatus Nitrosocaldus, an ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeote, in the 2007 sample, and almost exclusively Thermofilum or Candidatus Caldiarchaeum in the 2009 sample, depending on SSU rRNA gene region examined. The majority of sequences were dissimilar (≥10% different to any known organisms suggesting that HLGB possesses numerous new phylogenetic groups that warrant cultivation efforts.

  15. New Insights on the Mechanism of the K+-Independent Activity of Crenarchaeota Pyruvate Kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Vega-Ruíz, Gustavo; Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Guerrero-Mendiola, Carlos; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Hernández-Alcántara, Gloria; García-Trejo, José J.; Ramírez-Silva, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Eukarya pyruvate kinases have glutamate at position 117 (numbered according to the rabbit muscle enzyme), whereas in Bacteria have either glutamate or lysine and in Archaea have other residues. Glutamate at this position makes pyruvate kinases K+-dependent, whereas lysine confers K+-independence because the positively charged residue substitutes for the monovalent cation charge. Interestingly, pyruvate kinases from two characterized Crenarchaeota exhibit K+-independent activity, despite having serine at the equivalent position. To better understand pyruvate kinase catalytic activity in the absence of K+ or an internal positive charge, the Thermofilum pendens pyruvate kinase (valine at the equivalent position) was characterized. The enzyme activity was K+-independent. The kinetic mechanism was random order with a rapid equilibrium, which is equal to the mechanism of the rabbit muscle enzyme in the presence of K+ or the mutant E117K in the absence of K+. Thus, the substrate binding order of the T. pendens enzyme was independent despite lacking an internal positive charge. Thermal stability studies of this enzyme showed two calorimetric transitions, one attributable to the A and C domains (Tm of 99.2°C), and the other (Tm of 105.2°C) associated with the B domain. In contrast, the rabbit muscle enzyme exhibits a single calorimetric transition (Tm of 65.2°C). The calorimetric and kinetic data indicate that the B domain of this hyperthermophilic enzyme is more stable than the rest of the protein with a conformation that induces the catalytic readiness of the enzyme. B domain interactions of pyruvate kinases that have been determined in Pyrobaculum aerophilum and modeled in T. pendens were compared with those of the rabbit muscle enzyme. The results show that intra- and interdomain interactions of the Crenarchaeota enzymes may account for their higher B domain stability. Thus the structural arrangement of the T. pendens pyruvate kinase could allow charge

  16. Comparative Study of Guaymas Basin Microbiomes: Cold Seeps vs. Hydrothermal Vents Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrine Cruaud

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Guaymas Basin, the presence at a few tens of kilometers of cold seeps and hydrothermal vents coupled with comparable sedimentary settings and depths offer a unique opportunity to assess and compare the microbial community composition of these deep-sea ecosystems. The microbial diversity in sediments from three cold seep and two hydrothermal vent assemblages were investigated using high-throughput 16S rRNA-sequencing. Numerous bacterial and archaeal lineages were detected in both cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. Various potential organic matter degraders (e.g., Chloroflexi, Atribacteria, MBG-D and methane and sulfur cycling related microorganisms (e.g., ANME and methanogenic lineages, sulfate-reducing lineages were detected in both ecosystems. This suggests that analogous metabolic processes such as organic matter degradation and anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to sulfate reduction, were probably occurring in these two contrasted ecosystems. These highlighted “core microbiome” of the Guaymas Basin chemosynthetic ecosystems might therefore result from the combined presence of up-rising fluid emissions and high sedimentary rates of organic matter in the Basin. These results, coupled with the detailed ribotype analysis of major archaeal lineages (ANME-1, ANME-2, and MBG-D, also suggest a potential connectivity among deep-sea ecosystems of the Guaymas Basin likely due to the sedimentary context and the absence of physical border. However, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic lineages (e.g., Thermodesulfobacteria, Desulfurococcales, etc. were exclusively identified in hydrothermally impacted sediments highlighting the strong influence of temperature gradients and other hydrothermally-related factors such as thermogenic sulfate reduction and sulfide formation on microbial community composition.

  17. Bacterial sulfate reduction in hydrothermal sediments of the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Andreas; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2002-05-01

    Depth distribution and temperature dependence of bacterial sulfate reduction were studied in hydrothermal surface sediments of the southern trough of the Guaymas Basin at 2000 m water depth. In situ temperatures ranged from 2.8°C at the sediment surface to >130°C at 30 cm depth in the proximity of active vent chimneys. Sediment cores recovered from geothermally heated mud were incubated in the laboratory at 12°C, 25°C, 35°C, 70°C, 80°C and 90°C. The peak rates of bacterial sulfate reduction, up to 2550 nmol cm -3 d -1, were found in surface sediments (0-5 cm) covered with Beggiatoa mats. In sediments with a higher diffuse flow of hydrothermal fluid, a substrate pool ascending with the fluid flow was apparently available in the subsurface sediment below 15 cm, and the thermophilic sulfate reduction rose to a subsurface maximum of 3350 nmol cm -3 d -1 at 70°C. In cold sediments, a few hundred meters outside the hydrothermal fields, sulfate reduction rates peaked at only 12 nmol cm -3 d -1, i.e. >200-fold lower. When incubated in a temperature gradient block at 31 increments over 0-120°C, the hydrothermal surface sediments revealed meso- to thermophilic optimum temperatures for sulfate reduction between 40°C and 60°C. In hydrothermal sediment from 15-20 cm depth with in situ temperatures of 71-93°C, thermo- to hyperthermophilic sulfate reduction was found in the temperature range 70-100°C. Sulfate reduction was not detected above 100°C.

  18. Biohydrogen production from xylose by fresh and digested activated sludge at 37, 55 and 70 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessì, Paolo; Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Lens, Piet N L

    2017-05-15

    Two heat-treated inocula, fresh and digested activated sludge from the same municipal wastewater treatment plant, were compared for their H2 production via dark fermentation at mesophilic (37 °C), thermophilic (55 °C) and hyperthermophilic (70 °C) conditions using xylose as the substrate. At both 37 and 55 °C, the fresh activated sludge yielded more H2 than the digested sludge, whereas at 70 °C, neither of the inocula produced H2 effectively. A maximum yield of 1.85 mol H2 per mol of xylose consumed was obtained at 55 °C. H2 production was linked to acetate and butyrate production, and there was a linear correlation (R2 = 0.96) between the butyrate and H2 yield for the fresh activated sludge inoculum at 55 °C. Approximately 2.4 mol H2 per mol of butyrate produced were obtained against a theoretical maximum of 2.0, suggesting that H2 was produced via the acetate pathway prior to switching to the butyrate pathway due to the increased H2 partial pressure. Clostridia sp. were the prevalent species at both 37 and 55 °C, irrespectively of the inoculum type. Although the two inocula originated from the same plant, different thermophilic microorganisms were detected at 55 °C. Thermoanaerobacter sp., detected only in the fresh activated sludge cultures, may have contributed to the high H2 yield obtained with such an inoculum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Recombinant production and biochemical characterization of a hyperthermostable α-glucan/maltodextrin phosphorylase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman M. Mizanur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-glucan phosphorylase catalyzes the reversible cleavage of α-1-4-linked glucose polymers into α-D-glucose-1-phosphate. We report the recombinant production of an α-glucan/maltodextrin phosphorylase (PF1535 from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, and the first detailed biochemical characterization of this enzyme from any archaeal source using a mass-spectrometry-based assay. The apparent 98 kDa recombinant enzyme was active over a broad range of temperatures and pH, with optimal activity at 80 °C and pH 6.5–7. This archaeal protein retained its complete activity after 24 h at 80 °C in Tris-HCl buffer. Unlike other previously reported phosphorylases, the Ni-affinity column purified enzyme showed broad substrate specificity in both the synthesis and degradation of maltooligosaccharides. In the synthetic direction of the enzymatic reaction, the lowest oligosaccharide required for the chain elongation was maltose. In the degradative direction, the archaeal enzyme can produce glucose-1-phosphate from maltotriose or longer maltooligosaccharides including both glycogen and starch. The specific activity of the enzyme at 80 °C in the presence of 10 mM maltoheptaose and at 10 mg ml–1 glycogen concentration was 52 U mg–1 and 31 U mg–1, respectively. The apparent Michaelis constant and maximum velocity for inorganic phosphate were 31 ± 2 mM and 0.60 ± 0.02 mM min–1 µg–1, respectively. An initial velocity study of the enzymatic reaction indicated a sequential bi-bi catalytic mechanism. Unlike the more widely studied mammalian glycogen phosphorylase, the Pyrococcus enzyme is active in the absence of added AMP.

  20. Responses of Microbial Community Composition to Temperature Gradient and Carbon Steel Corrosion in Production Water of Petroleum Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xiao Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil reservoir production systems are usually associated with a temperature gradient and oil production facilities frequently suffer from pipeline corrosion failures. Both bacteria and archaea potentially contribute to biocorrosion of the oil production equipment. Here the response of microbial populations from the petroleum reservoir to temperature gradient and corrosion of carbon steel coupons were investigated under laboratory condition. Carbon steel coupons were exposed to production water from a depth of 1809 m of Jiangsu petroleum reservoir (China and incubated for periods of 160 and 300 days. The incubation temperatures were set at 37, 55, and 65°C to monitoring mesophilic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms associated with anaerobic carbon steel corrosion. The results showed that corrosion rate at 55°C (0.162 ± 0.013 mm year-1 and 37°C (0.138 ± 0.008 mm year-1 were higher than that at 65°C (0.105 ± 0.007 mm year-1, and a dense biofilm was observed on the surface of coupons under all biotic incubations. The microbial community analysis suggests a high frequency of bacterial taxa associated with families Porphyromonadaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, and Spirochaetaceae at all three temperatures. While the majority of known sulfate-reducing bacteria, in particular Desulfotignum, Desulfobulbus and Desulfovibrio spp., were predominantly observed at 37°C; Desulfotomaculum spp., Thermotoga spp. and Thermanaeromonas spp. as well as archaeal members closely related to Thermococcus and Archaeoglobus spp. were substantially enriched at 65°C. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens of the family Methanobacteriaceae were dominant at both 37 and 55°C; acetoclastic Methanosaeta spp. and methyltrophic Methanolobus spp. were enriched at 37°C. These observations show that temperature changes significantly alter the microbial community structure in production fluids and also affected the biocorrosion of carbon steel under anaerobic conditions.

  1. Diffuse flow environments within basalt- and sediment-based hydrothermal vent ecosystems harbor specialized microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara J Campbell

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal vents differ both in surface input and subsurface geochemistry. The effects of these differences on their microbial communities are not clear. Here, we investigated both alpha and beta diversity of diffuse flow-associated microbial communities emanating from vents at a basalt-based hydrothermal system along the East Pacific Rise (EPR and a sediment-based hydrothermal system, Guaymas Basin. Both Bacteria and Archaea were targeted using high throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analyses. A novel aspect of this study was the use of a universal set of 16S rRNA gene primers to characterize total and diffuse flow-specific microbial communities from varied deep-sea hydrothermal environments. Both surrounding seawater and diffuse flow water samples contained large numbers of Marine Group I (MGI Thaumarchaea and Gammaproteobacteria taxa previously observed in deep sea systems. However, these taxa were geographically distinct and segregated according to type of spreading center. Diffuse flow microbial community profiles were highly differentiated. In particular, EPR dominant diffuse-flow taxa were most closely associated with chemolithoautotrophs and off axis water were dominated by heterotrophic-related taxa, where the opposite was true for Guaymas basin. The diversity and richness of diffuse flow specific microbial communities were strongly correlated to the relative abundance of Epsilonproteobacteria, proximity to macrofauna, and hydrothermal system type. Archaeal diversity was higher than or equivalent to bacterial diversity in about one third of the samples. Most diffuse flow-specific communities were dominated by OTUs associated with Epsilonproteobacteria, but many of the Guaymas Basin diffuse flow samples were dominated by either OTUs within the Planctomycetes or hyperthermophilic Archaea. This study emphasizes the unique microbial communities associated with geochemically and geographically distinct hydrothermal diffuse flow

  2. Codon optimisation is key for pernisine expression in Escherichia coli.

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    Marko Šnajder

    Full Text Available Pernisine is an extracellular serine protease from the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1. Low yields from the natural host and expression problems in heterologous hosts have limited the potential applications of pernisine in industry.The challenges of pernisine overexpression in Escherichia coli were overcome by codon preference optimisation and de-novo DNA synthesis. The following forms of the pernisine gene were cloned into the pMCSGx series of vectors and expressed in E. coli cells: wild-type (pernisinewt, codon-optimised (pernisineco, and codon-optimised with a S355A mutation of a predicted active site (pernisineS355Aco. The fusion-tagged pernisines were purified using fast protein liquid chromatography equipped with Ni2+ chelate and gel filtration chromatography columns. The identities of the resultant proteins were confirmed with N-terminal sequencing, tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and immunodetection. Pernisinewt was not expressed in E. coli at detectable levels, while pernisineco and pernisineS355Aco were expressed and purified as 55-kDa proforms with yields of around 10 mg per litre E. coli culture. After heat activation of purified pernisine, the proteolytic activity of the mature pernisineco was confirmed using zymography, at a molecular weight of 36 kDa, while the mutant pernisineS355Aco remained inactive. Enzymatic performances of pernisine evaluated under different temperatures and pHs demonstrate that the optimal enzymatic activity of the recombinant pernisine is ca. 100°C and pH 7.0, respectively.These data demonstrate that codon optimisation is crucial for pernisine overexpression in E. coli, and that the proposed catalytic Ser355 has an important role in pernisine activity, but not in its activation process. Pernisine is activated by autoproteolytical cleavage of its N-terminal proregion. We have also confirmed that the recombinant pernisine retains the characteristics of native pernisine, as a calcium

  3. Novel thermostable amine transferases from hot spring metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandi, Erica Elisa; Previdi, Alessandra; Bassanini, Ivan; Riva, Sergio; Peng, Xu; Monti, Daniela

    2017-06-01

    Hot spring metagenomes, prepared from samples collected at temperatures ranging from 55 to 95 °C, were submitted to an in silico screening aimed at the identification of novel amine transaminases (ATAs), valuable biocatalysts for the preparation of optically pure amines. Three novel (S)-selective ATAs, namely Is3-TA, It6-TA, and B3-TA, were discovered in the metagenome of samples collected from hot springs in Iceland and in Italy, cloned from the corresponding metagenomic DNAs and overexpressed in recombinant form in E. coli. Functional characterization of the novel ATAs demonstrated that they all possess a thermophilic character and are capable of performing amine transfer reactions using a broad range of donor and acceptor substrates, thus suggesting a good potential for practical synthetic applications. In particular, the enzyme B3-TA revealed to be exceptionally thermostable, retaining 85% of activity after 5 days of incubation at 80 °C and more than 40% after 2 weeks under the same condition. These results, which were in agreement with the estimation of an apparent melting temperature around 88 °C, make B3-TA, to the best of our knowledge, the most thermostable natural ATA described to date. This biocatalyst showed also a good tolerance toward different water-miscible and water-immiscible organic solvents. A detailed inspection of the homology-based structural model of B3-TA showed that the overall active site architecture of mesophilic (S)-selective ATAs was mainly conserved in this hyperthermophilic homolog. Additionally, a subfamily of B3-TA-like transaminases, mostly uncharacterized and all from thermophilic microorganisms, was identified and analyzed in terms of phylogenetic relationships and sequence conservation.

  4. Thermal-induced conformational changes in the product release area drive the enzymatic activity of xylanases 10B: Crystal structure, conformational stability and functional characterization of the xylanase 10B from Thermotoga petrophila RKU-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Camila Ramos; Meza, Andreia Navarro [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias (LNBio), Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Hoffmam, Zaira Bruna; Silva, Junio Cota; Alvarez, Thabata Maria; Ruller, Roberto [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE), Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Giesel, Guilherme Menegon; Verli, Hugo [Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Squina, Fabio Marcio [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE), Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Prade, Rolf Alexander [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Murakami, Mario Tyago, E-mail: mario.murakami@lnbio.org.br [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias (LNBio), Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} The hyperthermostable xylanase 10B from Thermotoga petrophila RKU-1 produces exclusively xylobiose at the optimum temperature. {yields} Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests a coupling effect of temperature-induced structural changes with its enzymatic behavior. {yields} Crystallographic and molecular dynamics studies indicate that conformational changes in the product release area modulate the enzyme action mode. -- Abstract: Endo-xylanases play a key role in the depolymerization of xylan and recently, they have attracted much attention owing to their potential applications on biofuels and paper industries. In this work, we have investigated the molecular basis for the action mode of xylanases 10B at high temperatures using biochemical, biophysical and crystallographic methods. The crystal structure of xylanase 10B from hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga petrophila RKU-1 (TpXyl10B) has been solved in the native state and in complex with xylobiose. The complex crystal structure showed a classical binding mode shared among other xylanases, which encompasses the -1 and -2 subsites. Interestingly, TpXyl10B displayed a temperature-dependent action mode producing xylobiose and xylotriose at 20 {sup o}C, and exclusively xylobiose at 90 {sup o}C as assessed by capillary zone electrophoresis. Moreover, circular dichroism spectroscopy suggested a coupling effect of temperature-induced structural changes with this particular enzymatic behavior. Molecular dynamics simulations supported the CD analysis suggesting that an open conformational state adopted by the catalytic loop (Trp297-Lys326) provokes significant modifications in the product release area (+1,+2 and +3 subsites), which drives the enzymatic activity to the specific release of xylobiose at high temperatures.

  5. Characterization of a thermostable recombinant l-rhamnose isomerase from Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis OB47 and its application for the production of l-fructose and l-rhamnulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ziwei; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wenli; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    2017-09-27

    l-Hexoses are rare sugars that are important components and precursors in the synthesis of biological compounds and pharmaceutical drugs. l-Rhamnose isomerase (L-RI, EC 5.3.1.14) is an aldose-ketose isomerase that plays a significant role in the production of l-sugars. In this study, a thermostable, l-sugar-producing L-RI from the hyperthermophile Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis OB47 was characterized. The recombinant L-RI displayed maximal activity at pH 8.0 and 85 °C and was significantly activated by Co(2+) . It exhibited a relatively high thermostability, with measured half-lives of 24.75, 11.55, 4.15 and 3.30 h in the presence of Co(2+) at 70, 75, 80 and 85 °C, respectively. Specific activities of 277.6, 57.9, 13.7 and 9.6 U mg(-1) were measured when l-rhamnose, l-mannose, d-allose and l-fructose were used as substrates, respectively. l-Rhamnulose was produced with conversion ratios of 44.0% and 38.6% from 25 and 50 g L(-1)  l-rhamnose, respectively. l-Fructose was also efficiently produced by the L-RI, with conversion ratios of 67.0% and 58.4% from 25 and 50 g L(-1)  l-mannose, respectively. The recombinant L-RI could effectively catalyze the formation of l-rhamnulose and l-fructose, suggesting that it was a promising candidate for industrial production of l-rhamnulose and l-fructose. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. The Genome Sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the Role of Genome Evolution in Cold-adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Michelle A.; Lauro, Federico M.; Williams, Timothy J.; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S.; De Francisci, David; Chong, Kevin W.Y.; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H.; De Maere, Matthew Z.; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Anderson, Iain J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michelle; Lapidus, Alla; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-04-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five tiered Evidence Rating system that ranked annotations from Evidence Rating (ER) 1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis COG genes are over-represented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are over-represented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two over-represented COG categories appear to have been acquired from {var_epsilon}- and {delta}-proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they play an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have

  7. Functional and structural characterization of a novel mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase from Rubrobacter xylanophilus reveals its dual substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Empadinhas, Nuno; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa; Albuquerque, Luciana; Costa, Joana; Sá-Moura, Bebiana; Marques, Alexandra T; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; da Costa, Milton S

    2011-01-01

    Rubrobacter xylanophilus is the only actinobacterium known to accumulate the organic solute mannosylglycerate (MG); moreover, the accumulation of MG is constitutive. The key enzyme for MG synthesis, catalysing the conversion of GDP-mannose (GDP-Man) and D-3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) into the phosphorylated intermediate mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate and GDP, was purified from R. xylanophilus cell extracts and the corresponding gene was expressed in E. coli. Despite the related solute glucosylglycerate (GG) having never been detected in R. xylanophilus, the cell extracts and the pure recombinant mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (MpgS) could also synthesize glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate (GPG), the precursor of GG, in agreement with the higher homology of the novel MpgS towards GPG-synthesizing mycobacterial glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthases (GpgS) than towards MpgSs from hyper/thermophiles, known to accumulate MG under salt or thermal stress. To understand the specificity and substrate ambiguity of this novel enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the unliganded MpgS and of its complexes with the nucleotide and sugar donors, at 2.2, 2.8 and 2.5 Å resolution respectively. The first three-dimensional structures of a protein from this extremely gamma-radiation-resistant thermophile here reported show that MpgS (GT81 family) contains a GT-A like fold and clearly explain its nucleotide and sugar-donor specificity. In the GDP-Man complex, a flexible loop ((254) RQNRHQ(259) ), located close to the active site moves towards the incoming sugar moiety, providing the ligands for both magnesium ion co-ordination and sugar binding. A triple mutant of R. xylanophilus MpgS, mimicking the (206) PLAGE(210) loop stabilizing hydrogen bond network observed for mycobacterial GpgSs, reduces significantly the affinity to GDP-Man, implicating this loop in the sugar-donor discrimination. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Isolation and analysis of a gene encoding alpha-glucuronidase, an enzyme with a novel primary structure involved in the breakdown of xylan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruile, P; Winterhalter, C; Liebl, W

    1997-01-01

    This is the first report describing the analysis of a gene encoding an alpha-glucuronidase, an enzyme essential for the complete breakdown of substituted xylans. A DNA fragment that carries the gene for alpha-glucuronidase was isolated from chromosomal DNA of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima MSB8. The alpha-glucuronidase gene (aguA) was identified and characterized with the aid of nucleotide sequence analysis, deletion experiments and expression studies in Escherichia coli, and the start of the coding region was defined by amino-terminal sequencing of the purified recombinant enzyme. The aguA gene encodes a 674-amino-acid, largely hydrophilic polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 78593 Da. The alpha-glucuronidase of T. maritima has a novel primary structure with no significant similarity to any other known amino acid sequence. The recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity as judged by SDS-PAGE. Gel filtration analysis at low salt concentrations revealed a high apparent molecular mass (> 630 kDa) for the recombinant enzyme, but the oligomeric structure changed upon variation of the ionic strength or the pH, yielding hexameric and/or dimeric forms which were also enzymatically active. The enzyme hydrolysed 2-O-(4-O-methyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyluronic acid)-D-xylobiose (MeGlcAX2) to xylobiose and 4-O-methylglucuronic acid. The K(m) for MeGlcAX2 was 0.95 mM. The pH optimum was 6.3. Maximum activity was measured at 85 degrees C, about 25 degrees C or more above the values reported for all other alpha-glucuronidases known to date. When incubated at 55-75 degrees C, the enzyme suffered partial inactivation, but thereafter the residual activity remained nearly constant for several days.

  9. Structural basis of thermal stability of the tungsten cofactor synthesis protein MoaB from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastassia Havarushka

    Full Text Available Molybdenum and tungsten cofactors share a similar pterin-based scaffold, which hosts an ene-dithiolate function being essential for the coordination of either molybdenum or tungsten. The biosynthesis of both cofactors involves a multistep pathway, which ends with the activation of the metal binding pterin (MPT by adenylylation before the respective metal is incorporated. In the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus, the hexameric protein MoaB (PfuMoaB has been shown to catalyse MPT-adenylylation. Here we determined the crystal structure of PfuMoaB at 2.5 Å resolution and identified key residues of α3-helix mediating hexamer formation. Given that PfuMoaB homologues from mesophilic organisms form trimers, we investigated the impact on PfuMoaB hexamerization on thermal stability and activity. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, we successfully disrupted the hexamer interface in PfuMoaB. The resulting PfuMoaB-H3 variant formed monomers, dimers and trimers as determined by size exclusion chromatography. Circular dichroism spectroscopy as well as chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry confirmed a wild-type-like fold of the protomers as well as inter-subunits contacts. The melting temperature of PfuMoaB-H3 was found to be reduced by more than 15 °C as determined by differential scanning calorimetry, thus demonstrating hexamerization as key determinant for PfuMoaB thermal stability. Remarkably, while a loss of activity at temperatures higher than 50 °C was observed in the PfuMoaB-H3 variant, at lower temperatures, we determined a significantly increased catalytic activity. The latter suggests a gain in conformational flexibility caused by the disruption of the hexamerization interface.

  10. Heterologous expression and maturation of an NADP-dependent [NiFe]-hydrogenase: a key enzyme in biofuel production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsong Sun

    Full Text Available Hydrogen gas is a major biofuel and is metabolized by a wide range of microorganisms. Microbial hydrogen production is catalyzed by hydrogenase, an extremely complex, air-sensitive enzyme that utilizes a binuclear nickel-iron [NiFe] catalytic site. Production and engineering of recombinant [NiFe]-hydrogenases in a genetically-tractable organism, as with metalloprotein complexes in general, has met with limited success due to the elaborate maturation process that is required, primarily in the absence of oxygen, to assemble the catalytic center and functional enzyme. We report here the successful production in Escherichia coli of the recombinant form of a cytoplasmic, NADP-dependent hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus, an anaerobic hyperthermophile. This was achieved using novel expression vectors for the co-expression of thirteen P. furiosus genes (four structural genes encoding the hydrogenase and nine encoding maturation proteins. Remarkably, the native E. coli maturation machinery will also generate a functional hydrogenase when provided with only the genes encoding the hydrogenase subunits and a single protease from P. furiosus. Another novel feature is that their expression was induced by anaerobic conditions, whereby E. coli was grown aerobically and production of recombinant hydrogenase was achieved by simply changing the gas feed from air to an inert gas (N2. The recombinant enzyme was purified and shown to be functionally similar to the native enzyme purified from P. furiosus. The methodology to generate this key hydrogen-producing enzyme has dramatic implications for the production of hydrogen and NADPH as vehicles for energy storage and transport, for engineering hydrogenase to optimize production and catalysis, as well as for the general production of complex, oxygen-sensitive metalloproteins.

  11. The complete genome sequence of Thermoproteus tenax: a physiologically versatile member of the Crenarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebers, Bettina; Zaparty, Melanie; Raddatz, Guenter; Tjaden, Britta; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Bell, Steve D; Blombach, Fabian; Kletzin, Arnulf; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lanz, Christa; Plagens, André; Rampp, Markus; Rosinus, Andrea; von Jan, Mathias; Makarova, Kira S; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Schuster, Stephan C; Hensel, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report on the complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeum Thermoproteus tenax (strain Kra1, DSM 2078(T)) a type strain of the crenarchaeotal order Thermoproteales. Its circular 1.84-megabase genome harbors no extrachromosomal elements and 2,051 open reading frames are identified, covering 90.6% of the complete sequence, which represents a high coding density. Derived from the gene content, T. tenax is a representative member of the Crenarchaeota. The organism is strictly anaerobic and sulfur-dependent with optimal growth at 86°C and pH 5.6. One particular feature is the great metabolic versatility, which is not accompanied by a distinct increase of genome size or information density as compared to other Crenarchaeota. T. tenax is able to grow chemolithoautotrophically (CO₂/H₂) as well as chemoorganoheterotrophically in presence of various organic substrates. All pathways for synthesizing the 20 proteinogenic amino acids are present. In addition, two presumably complete gene sets for NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) were identified in the genome and there is evidence that either NADH or reduced ferredoxin might serve as electron donor. Beside the typical archaeal A₀A₁-ATP synthase, a membrane-bound pyrophosphatase is found, which might contribute to energy conservation. Surprisingly, all genes required for dissimilatory sulfate reduction are present, which is confirmed by growth experiments. Mentionable is furthermore, the presence of two proteins (ParA family ATPase, actin-like protein) that might be involved in cell division in Thermoproteales, where the ESCRT system is absent, and of genes involved in genetic competence (DprA, ComF) that is so far unique within Archaea.

  12. New insights on the mechanism of the K(+- independent activity of crenarchaeota pyruvate kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo De la Vega-Ruíz

    Full Text Available Eukarya pyruvate kinases have glutamate at position 117 (numbered according to the rabbit muscle enzyme, whereas in Bacteria have either glutamate or lysine and in Archaea have other residues. Glutamate at this position makes pyruvate kinases K+-dependent, whereas lysine confers K+-independence because the positively charged residue substitutes for the monovalent cation charge. Interestingly, pyruvate kinases from two characterized Crenarchaeota exhibit K+-independent activity, despite having serine at the equivalent position. To better understand pyruvate kinase catalytic activity in the absence of K+ or an internal positive charge, the Thermofilum pendens pyruvate kinase (valine at the equivalent position was characterized. The enzyme activity was K+-independent. The kinetic mechanism was random order with a rapid equilibrium, which is equal to the mechanism of the rabbit muscle enzyme in the presence of K+ or the mutant E117K in the absence of K+. Thus, the substrate binding order of the T. pendens enzyme was independent despite lacking an internal positive charge. Thermal stability studies of this enzyme showed two calorimetric transitions, one attributable to the A and C domains (Tm of 99.2°C, and the other (Tm of 105.2°C associated with the B domain. In contrast, the rabbit muscle enzyme exhibits a single calorimetric transition (Tm of 65.2°C. The calorimetric and kinetic data indicate that the B domain of this hyperthermophilic enzyme is more stable than the rest of the protein with a conformation that induces the catalytic readiness of the enzyme. B domain interactions of pyruvate kinases that have been determined in Pyrobaculum aerophilum and modeled in T. pendens were compared with those of the rabbit muscle enzyme. The results show that intra- and interdomain interactions of the Crenarchaeota enzymes may account for their higher B domain stability. Thus the structural arrangement of the T. pendens pyruvate kinase could allow charge

  13. The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Kerrie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. Results The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced – Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. Conclusion The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

  14. The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lakshmi, Lakshmi Dharmarajan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Rodriquez, Jason [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Hooper, Sean [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Porat, I. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Ulrich, Luke [ORNL; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sun, Hui [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huber, Harald [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Zhulin, Igor B [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Whitman, W. B. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Woese, Carl [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Background Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. Results The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. Conclusion The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

  15. Crenarchaeal CdvA forms double-helical filaments containing DNA and interacts with ESCRT-III-like CdvB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Moriscot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The phylum Crenarchaeota lacks the FtsZ cell division hallmark of bacteria and employs instead Cdv proteins. While CdvB and CdvC are homologues of the eukaryotic ESCRT-III and Vps4 proteins, implicated in membrane fission processes during multivesicular body biogenesis, cytokinesis and budding of some enveloped viruses, little is known about the structure and function of CdvA. Here, we report the biochemical and biophysical characterization of the three Cdv proteins from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Metallospherae sedula. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and negative staining electron microscopy, we evidenced for the first time that CdvA forms polymers in association with DNA, similar to known bacterial DNA partitioning proteins. We also observed that, in contrast to full-lengh CdvB that was purified as a monodisperse protein, the C-terminally deleted CdvB construct forms filamentous polymers, a phenomenon previously observed with eukaryotic ESCRT-III proteins. Based on size exclusion chromatography data combined with detection by multi-angle laser light scattering analysis, we demonstrated that CdvC assembles, in a nucleotide-independent way, as homopolymers resembling dodecamers and endowed with ATPase activity in vitro. The interactions between these putative cell division partners were further explored. Thus, besides confirming the previous observations that CdvB interacts with both CdvA and CdvC, our data demonstrate that CdvA/CdvB and CdvC/CdvB interactions are not mutually exclusive. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data reinforce the concept that Cdv proteins are closely related to the eukaryotic ESCRT-III counterparts and suggest that the organization of the ESCRT-III machinery at the Crenarchaeal cell division septum is organized by CdvA an ancient cytoskeleton protein that might help to coordinate genome segregation.

  16. The complete genome sequence of Thermoproteus tenax: a physiologically versatile member of the Crenarchaeota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Siebers

    Full Text Available Here, we report on the complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeum Thermoproteus tenax (strain Kra1, DSM 2078(T a type strain of the crenarchaeotal order Thermoproteales. Its circular 1.84-megabase genome harbors no extrachromosomal elements and 2,051 open reading frames are identified, covering 90.6% of the complete sequence, which represents a high coding density. Derived from the gene content, T. tenax is a representative member of the Crenarchaeota. The organism is strictly anaerobic and sulfur-dependent with optimal growth at 86°C and pH 5.6. One particular feature is the great metabolic versatility, which is not accompanied by a distinct increase of genome size or information density as compared to other Crenarchaeota. T. tenax is able to grow chemolithoautotrophically (CO₂/H₂ as well as chemoorganoheterotrophically in presence of various organic substrates. All pathways for synthesizing the 20 proteinogenic amino acids are present. In addition, two presumably complete gene sets for NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I were identified in the genome and there is evidence that either NADH or reduced ferredoxin might serve as electron donor. Beside the typical archaeal A₀A₁-ATP synthase, a membrane-bound pyrophosphatase is found, which might contribute to energy conservation. Surprisingly, all genes required for dissimilatory sulfate reduction are present, which is confirmed by growth experiments. Mentionable is furthermore, the presence of two proteins (ParA family ATPase, actin-like protein that might be involved in cell division in Thermoproteales, where the ESCRT system is absent, and of genes involved in genetic competence (DprA, ComF that is so far unique within Archaea.

  17. The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iain J; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Rodriguez, Jason; Hooper, Sean; Porat, Iris; Ulrich, Luke E; Elkins, James G; Mavromatis, Kostas; Sun, Hui; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Barry, Kerrie; Huber, Harald; Zhulin, Igor B; Whitman, William B; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-04-02

    Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced -- Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

  18. New insights on the mechanism of the K(+-) independent activity of crenarchaeota pyruvate kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Vega-Ruíz, Gustavo; Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Guerrero-Mendiola, Carlos; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Hernández-Alcántara, Gloria; García-Trejo, José J; Ramírez-Silva, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Eukarya pyruvate kinases have glutamate at position 117 (numbered according to the rabbit muscle enzyme), whereas in Bacteria have either glutamate or lysine and in Archaea have other residues. Glutamate at this position makes pyruvate kinases K+-dependent, whereas lysine confers K+-independence because the positively charged residue substitutes for the monovalent cation charge. Interestingly, pyruvate kinases from two characterized Crenarchaeota exhibit K+-independent activity, despite having serine at the equivalent position. To better understand pyruvate kinase catalytic activity in the absence of K+ or an internal positive charge, the Thermofilum pendens pyruvate kinase (valine at the equivalent position) was characterized. The enzyme activity was K+-independent. The kinetic mechanism was random order with a rapid equilibrium, which is equal to the mechanism of the rabbit muscle enzyme in the presence of K+ or the mutant E117K in the absence of K+. Thus, the substrate binding order of the T. pendens enzyme was independent despite lacking an internal positive charge. Thermal stability studies of this enzyme showed two calorimetric transitions, one attributable to the A and C domains (Tm of 99.2°C), and the other (Tm of 105.2°C) associated with the B domain. In contrast, the rabbit muscle enzyme exhibits a single calorimetric transition (Tm of 65.2°C). The calorimetric and kinetic data indicate that the B domain of this hyperthermophilic enzyme is more stable than the rest of the protein with a conformation that induces the catalytic readiness of the enzyme. B domain interactions of pyruvate kinases that have been determined in Pyrobaculum aerophilum and modeled in T. pendens were compared with those of the rabbit muscle enzyme. The results show that intra- and interdomain interactions of the Crenarchaeota enzymes may account for their higher B domain stability. Thus the structural arrangement of the T. pendens pyruvate kinase could allow charge

  19. Transcriptional regulation of the carbohydrate utilization network in Thermotoga maritima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A Rodionov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermophilic bacteria from the Thermotogales lineage can produce hydrogen by fermenting a wide range of carbohydrates. Previous experimental studies identified a large fraction of genes committed to carbohydrate degradation and utilization in the model bacterium Thermotoga maritima. Knowledge of these genes enabled comprehensive reconstruction of biochemical pathways comprising the carbohydrate utilization network. However, transcriptional factors (TFs and regulatory mechanisms driving this network remained largely unknown. Here, we used an integrated approach based on comparative analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data for the reconstruction of the carbohydrate utilization regulatory networks in 11 Thermotogales genomes. We identified DNA-binding motifs and regulons for 19 orthologous TFs in the Thermotogales. The inferred regulatory network in T. maritima contains 181 genes encoding TFs, sugar catabolic enzymes and ABC-family transporters. In contrast to many previously described bacteria, a transcriptional regulation strategy of Thermotoga does not employ global regulatory factors. The reconstructed regulatory network in T. maritima was validated by gene expression profiling on a panel of mono- and disaccharides and by in vitro DNA-binding assays. The observed upregulation of genes involved in catabolism of pectin, trehalose, cellobiose, arabinose, rhamnose, xylose, glucose, galactose, and ribose showed a strong correlation with the UxaR, TreR, BglR, CelR, AraR, RhaR, XylR, GluR, GalR, and RbsR regulons. Ultimately, this study elucidated the transcriptional regulatory network and mechanisms controlling expression of carbohydrate utilization genes in T. maritima. In addition to improving the functional annotations of associated transporters and catabolic enzymes, this research provides novel insights into the evolution of regulatory networks in Thermotogales.

  20. Radioisotopic, Culture-Based, and Oligonucleotide Microchip Analyses of Thermophilic Microbial Communities in a Continental High-Temperature Petroleum Reservoir†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A.; Miroshnichenko, Margarita L.; Lebedinsky, Alexander V.; Chernyh, Nikolai A.; Nazina, Tamara N.; Ivoilov, Valery S.; Belyaev, Sergey S.; Boulygina, Eugenia S.; Lysov, Yury P.; Perov, Alexander N.; Mirzabekov , Andrei D.; Hippe, Hans; Stackebrandt, Erko; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Jeanthon, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Activity measurements by radioisotopic methods and cultural and molecular approaches were used in parallel to investigate the microbial biodiversity and its physiological potential in formation waters of the Samotlor high-temperature oil reservoir (Western Siberia, Russia). Sulfate reduction with rates not exceeding 20 nmol of H2S liter−1 day−1 occurred at 60 and 80°C. In upper horizons (AB, A, and B), methanogenesis (lithotrophic and/or acetoclastic) was detected only in wells in which sulfate reduction did not occur. In some of the wells from deeper (J) horizons, high-temperature sulfate reduction and methanogenesis occurred simultaneously, the rate of lithotrophic methanogenesis exceeding 80 nmol of CH4 liter−1 day−1. Enrichment cultures indicated the presence of diverse physiological groups representing aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles and hyperthermophiles; fermentative organotrophs were predominant. Phylogenetic analyses of 15 isolates identified representatives of the genera Thermotoga, Thermoanaerobacter, Geobacillus, Petrotoga, Thermosipho, and Thermococcus, the latter four being represented by new species. Except for Thermosipho, the isolates were members of genera recovered earlier from similar habitats. DNA obtained from three samples was hybridized with a set of oligonucleotide probes targeting selected microbial groups encompassing key genera of thermophilic bacteria and archaea. Oligonucleotide microchip analyses confirmed the cultural data but also revealed the presence of several groups of microorganisms that escaped cultivation, among them representatives of the Aquificales/Desulfurobacterium-Thermovibrio cluster and of the genera Desulfurococcus and Thermus, up to now unknown in this habitat. The unexpected presence of these organisms suggests that their distribution may be much wider than suspected. PMID:14532074