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Sample records for hyperaccumulation gene depends

  1. Transcriptional up-regulation of genes involved in photosynthesis of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii in response to zinc and cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lu; Yao, Aijun; Ming Yuan; Tang, Yetao; Liu, Jian; Liu, Xi; Qiu, Rongliang

    2016-12-01

    Zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) are two closely related chemical elements with very different biological roles in photosynthesis. Zinc plays unique biochemical functions in photosynthesis. Previous studies suggested that in some Zn/Cd hyperaccumulators, many steps in photosynthesis may be Cd tolerant or even Cd stimulated. Using RNA-seq data, we found not only that Cd and Zn both up-regulated the CA1 gene, which encodes a β class carbonic anhydrase (CA) in chloroplasts, but that a large number of other Zn up-regulated genes in the photosynthetic pathway were also significantly up-regulated by Cd in leaves of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii. These genes also include chloroplast genes involved in transcription and translation (rps18 and rps14), electron transport and ATP synthesis (atpF and ccsA), Photosystem II (PSBI, PSBM, PSBK, PSBZ/YCF9, PSBO-1, PSBQ, LHCB1.1, LHCB1.4, LHCB2.1, LHCB4.3 and LHCB6) and Photosystem I (PSAE-1, PSAF, PSAH2, LHCA1 and LHCA4). Cadmium and Zn also up-regulated the VAR1 gene, which encodes the ATP-dependent zinc metalloprotease FTSH 5 (a member of the FtsH family), and the DAG gene, which influences chloroplast differentiation and plastid development, and the CP29 gene, which supports RNA processing in chloroplasts and has a potential role in signal-dependent co-regulation of chloroplast genes. Further morphological parameters (dry biomass, cross-sectional thickness, chloroplast size, chlorophyll content) and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters confirmed that leaf photosynthesis of S. alfredii responded to Cd much as it did to Zn, which will contribute to our understanding of the positive effects of Zn and Cd on growth of this plant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Selection and validation of reference genes for real-time quantitative PCR in hyperaccumulating ecotype of Sedum alfredii under different heavy metals stresses.

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    Jian Sang

    Full Text Available Real-time Quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR has become an effective method for accurate analysis of gene expression in several biological systems as well as under different experimental conditions. Although with high sensitivity, specificity and broad dynamic range, this method requires suitable reference genes for transcript normalization in order to guarantee reproducible and meaningful results. In the present study, we evaluated five traditional housekeeping genes and five novel reference genes in Hyperaccumulating ecotype of Sedum alfredii, a well known hyperaccumulator for heavy metals phytoremediation, under Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu stresses of seven different durations. The expression stability of these ten candidates were determined with three programs--geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. The results showed that all the selected reference genes except for SAND could be used for RT-qPCR normalization. Among them UBC9 and TUB were ranked as the most stable candidates across all samples by three programs together. For the least stable reference genes, however, BestKeeper produced different results compared with geNorm and NormFinder. Meanwhile, the expression profiles of PCS under Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu stresses were assessed using UBC9 and TUB respectively, and similar trends were obtained from the results of the two groups. The distinct expression patterns of PCS indicated that various strategies could be taken by plants in adaption to different heavy metals stresses. This study will provide appropriate reference genes for further gene expression quantification using RT-qPCR in Hyperaccumulator S. alfredii.

  3. Identification of up-regulated genes from the metal-hyperaccumulator aquatic fern Salvinia minima Baker, in response to lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Alvarado, Daniel A; Martínez-Hernández, A; Calderón-Vázquez, C L; Uh-Ramos, D; Fuentes, G; Ramírez-Prado, J H; Sáenz-Carbonell, L; Santamaría, J M

    2017-12-01

    Lead (Pb) is one of the most serious environmental pollutants. The aquatic fern Salvinia minima Baker is capable to hyper-accumulate Pb in their tissues. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in its Pb accumulation and tolerance capacity are not fully understood. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms that are activated by S. minima in response to Pb, we constructed a suppression subtractive hybridization library (SSH) in response to an exposure to 40μM of Pb(NO 3 ) 2 for 12h. 365 lead-related differentially expressed sequences tags (ESTs) were isolated and sequenced. Among these ESTs, 143 unique cDNA (97 were registered at the GenBank and 46 ESTs were not registered, because they did not meet the GenBank conditions). Those ESTs were identified and classified into 3 groups according to Blast2GO. In terms of metabolic pathways, they were grouped into 29 KEGG pathways. Among the ESTs, we identified some that might be part of the mechanism that this fern may have to deal with this metal, including abiotic-stress-related transcription factors, some that might be involved in tolerance mechanisms such as ROS scavenging, membrane protection, and those of cell homeostasis recovery. To validate the SSH library, 4 genes were randomly selected from the library and analyzed by qRT-PCR. These 4 genes were transcriptionally up-regulated in response to lead in at least one of the two tested tissues (roots and leaves). The present library is one of the few genomics approaches to study the response to metal stress in an aquatic fern, representing novel molecular information and tools to understand the molecular physiology of its Pb tolerance and hyperaccumulation capacity. Further research is required to elucidate the functions of the lead-induced genes that remain classified as unknown, to perhaps reveal novel molecular mechanisms of Pb tolerance and accumulation capacity in aquatic plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Disruption of a rice gene for α-glucan water dikinase, OsGWD1, leads to hyperaccumulation of starch in leaves but exhibits limited effects on growth

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    Tatsuro eHirose

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To identify potential regulators of photoassimilate partitioning, we screened for rice mutant plants that accumulate high levels of starch in the leaf blades, and a mutant line Leaf Starch Excess 1 (LSE1 was obtained and characterized. The starch content in the leaf blades of LSE1 was more than 10-fold higher than that in wild-type plants throughout the day, while the sucrose content was unaffected. The gene responsible for the LSE1 phenotype was identified by gene mapping to be a gene encoding α-glucan water dikinase, OsGWD1 (Os06g0498400, and a 3.4-kbp deletion of the gene was found in the mutant plant. Despite the hyperaccumulation of starch in their leaf blades, LSE1 plants exhibited no significant change in vegetative growth, presenting a clear contrast to the reported mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana and Lotus japonicus in which disruption of the genes for α-glucan water dikinase leads to marked inhibition of vegetative growth. In reproductive growth, however, LSE1 exhibited fewer panicles per plant, lower percentage of ripened grains and smaller grains; consequently, the grain yield was lower in LSE1 plants than in wild-type plants by 20~40 %. Collectively, although α-glucan water dikinase was suggested to have universal importance in leaf starch degradation in higher plants, the physiological priority of leaf starch in photoassimilate allocation may vary among plant species.

  5. Identification of target genes of the bZIP transcription factor OsTGAP1, whose overexpression causes elicitor-induced hyperaccumulation of diterpenoid phytoalexins in rice cells.

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    Koji Miyamoto

    Full Text Available Phytoalexins are specialised antimicrobial metabolites that are produced by plants in response to pathogen attack. Momilactones and phytocassanes are the major diterpenoid phytoalexins in rice and are synthesised from geranylgeranyl diphosphate, which is derived from the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP pathway. The hyperaccumulation of momilactones and phytocassanes due to the hyperinductive expression of the relevant biosynthetic genes and the MEP pathway gene OsDXS3 in OsTGAP1-overexpressing (OsTGAP1ox rice cells has previously been shown to be stimulated by the chitin oligosaccharide elicitor. In this study, to clarify the mechanisms of the elicitor-stimulated coordinated hyperinduction of these phytoalexin biosynthetic genes in OsTGAP1ox cells, transcriptome analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing were performed, resulting in the identification of 122 OsTGAP1 target genes. Transcriptome analysis revealed that nearly all of the momilactone and phytocassane biosynthetic genes, which are clustered on chromosomes 4 and 2, respectively, and the MEP pathway genes were hyperinductively expressed in the elicitor-stimulated OsTGAP1ox cells. Unexpectedly, none of the clustered genes was included among the OsTGAP1 target genes, suggesting that OsTGAP1 did not directly regulate the expression of these biosynthetic genes through binding to each promoter region. Interestingly, however, several OsTGAP1-binding regions were found in the intergenic regions among and near the cluster regions. Concerning the MEP pathway genes, only OsDXS3, which encodes a key enzyme of the MEP pathway, possessed an OsTGAP1-binding region in its upstream region. A subsequent transactivation assay further confirmed the direct regulation of OsDXS3 expression by OsTGAP1, but other MEP pathway genes were not included among the OsTGAP1 target genes. Collectively, these results suggest that OsTGAP1 participates in the enhanced accumulation of

  6. Genetic and Molecular Dissection of Arsenic Hyperaccumulation in the fern Pteris vittata.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo Ann Banks; David Salt

    2008-04-04

    Pteris vittata is a fern that is extraordinary in its ability to tolerate hyperaccumulate high levels of arsenic (As). The goals of the proposed research, to identify the genes that are necessary for As hyperaccumulation in P. vittata using molecular and genetic approaches and to understand the physiology of arsenic uptake and distribution in the living plant, were accomplished during the funding period. The genes that have been identified may ultimately enable the engineering or selection of other plants capable of As hyperaccumulation. This is important for the phytoremediation of arsenic-contaminated soils in areas where P. vittata cannot grow.

  7. Arsenic Hyperaccumulation Strategies: An Overview

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    Zahra Souri

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As pollution, which is on the increase around the world, poses a growing threat to the environment. Phytoremediation, an important green technology, uses different strategies, including As uptake, transport, translocation, and detoxification, to remediate this metalloid. Arsenic hyperaccumulator plants have developed various strategies to accumulate and tolerate high concentrations of As. In these plants, the formation of AsIII complexes with GSH and phytochelatins and their transport into root and shoot vacuoles constitute important mechanisms for coping with As stress. The oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS production is one of the principal toxic effects of As; moreover, the strong antioxidative defenses in hyperaccumulator plants could constitute an important As detoxification strategy. On the other hand, nitric oxide activates antioxidant enzyme and phytochelatins biosynthesis which enhances As stress tolerance in plants. Although several studies have focused on transcription, metabolomics, and proteomic changes in plants induced by As, the mechanisms involved in As transport, translocation, and detoxification in hyperaccumulator plants need to be studied in greater depth. This review updates recent progress made in the study of As uptake, translocation, chelation, and detoxification in As hyperaccumulator plants.

  8. Phytoremediation and Potency of Hyperaccumulator Plants

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    NURIL HIDAYATI

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation is defined as cleaning up of pollutants mediated primarily by plants. It is an emerging technology for environmental remediation that offers a low-cost technique suitable for use against different types of contaminants in a variety of media. Phytoremediation is potentially applicable to a diversity of substances, involving hyperaccumulators heavy metals and radionuclides. It is also applicable to other inorganic contaminants such as arsenic, various salts and nutrients, and a variety of organic contaminants, including explosives, petroleum hydrocarbons and pesticides. At least there are one taxon of plant as hyperaccumulator for Cd, 28 taxa for Co, 37 taxa for Cu, 9 taxa for Mg, 317 taxa for Ni, and 11 taxa for Zn. Extensive progress were done in characterizing physiology of plants which hyperaccumulate or hypertolerate metals. Hypertolerance is fundamental to hyperaccumulator, and high rates of uptake and translocation are observed in hyperaccumulator plants. Hyperaccumulator plants and agronomic technology were undertaken to improve the annual rate of phytoextraction and to allow recycling of soil toxic metals accumulated in plant biomass. These techniques are very likely to support commercial environmental remediation. Most phytoremediation systems are still in development, or in the stage of plant breeding to improve the cultivars for field use. However, application for commercial purposes has already been initiated. Many opportunities have also been identified for research and development to improve the efficiency of phytoremediation

  9. A comparison of lead accumulation and tolerance among heavy metal hyperaccumulating and non-hyperaccumulating metallophytes

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    Mohtadi, A.; Ghaderian, S.M.; Schat, H.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the present study was to compare lead accumulation and tolerance among heavy metal hyperaccumulating and non-hyperaccumulating metallophytes. Methods: To this purpose, we compared Pb tolerance and accumulation in hydroponics among calamine and non-calamine populations of Silene

  10. The bacterial rhizobiome of hyperaccumulators: future perspectives based on omics analysis and advanced microscopy

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    Giovanna eVisioli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperaccumulators are plants that can extract heavy metal ions from the soil and translocate those ions to the shoots, where they are sequestered and detoxified. Hyperaccumulation depends not only on the availability of mobilized metal ions in the soil, but also on the enhanced activity of metal transporters and metal chelators which may be provided by the plant or its associated microbes. The rhizobiome is captured by plant root exudates from the complex microbial community in the soil, and may colonize the root surface or infiltrate the root cortex. This community can increase the root surface area by inducing hairy root proliferation. It may also increase the solubility of metals in the rhizosphere and promote the uptake of soluble metals by the plant. The bacterial rhizobiome, a subset of specialized microorganisms that colonize the plant rhizosphere and endosphere, makes an important contribution to the hyperaccumulator phenotype. In this review, we discuss classic and more recent tools that are used to study the interactions between hyperaccumulators and the bacterial rhizobiome, and consider future perspectives based on the use of omics analysis and microscopy to study plant metabolism in the context of metal accumulation. Recent data suggest that metal-resistant bacteria isolated from the hyperaccumulator rhizosphere and endosphere could be useful in applications such as phytoextraction and phytoremediation, although more research is required to determine whether such properties can be transferred successfully to non-accumulator species.

  11. Compartmentation and complexation of metals in hyperaccumulator plants

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    Barbara eLeitenmaier

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyperaccumulators are being intensely investigated. They are not only interesting in scientific context due to their strange behaviour in terms of dealing with high concentrations of metals, but also because of their use in phytoremediation and phytomining, for which understanding the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation is crucial. Hyperaccumulators naturally use metal accumulation as a defence against herbivores and pathogens, and therefore deal with accumulated metals in very specific ways of complexation and compartmentation, different from non-hyperaccumulator plants and also non-hyperaccumulated metals. For example, in contrast to non-hyperaccumulators, in hyperaccumulators even the classical phytochelatin-inducing metal, cadmium, is predominantly not bound by such sulfur ligands, but only by weak oxygen ligands. This applies to all hyperaccumulated metals investigated so far, as well as hyperaccumulation of the metalloid arsenic. Stronger ligands, as they have been shown to complex metals in non-hyperaccumulators, are in hyperaccumulators used for transient binding during transport to the storage sites. This confirmed that enhanced active metal transport, and not metal complexation, is the key mechanism of hyperaccumulation. Hyperaccumulators tolerate the high amount of accumulated heavy metals by sequestering them into vacuoles, usually in large storage cells of the epidermis. This is mediated by strongly elevated expression of specific transport proteins in various tissues from metal uptake in the shoots up to the storage sites in the leaf epidermis. However, this mechanism seems to be very metal specific. Non-hyperaccumulated metals in hyperaccumulators seem to be dealt with like in non-hyperaccumulator plants, i.e. detoxified by binding to strong ligands such as metallothioneins.

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of cadmium stress response in the heavy metal hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance.

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    Jun Gao

    Full Text Available The Sedum alfredii Hance hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE has the ability to hyperaccumulate cadmium (Cd, as well as zinc (Zn and lead (Pb in above-ground tissues. Although many physiological studies have been conducted with these plants, the molecular mechanisms underlying their hyper-tolerance to heavy metals are largely unknown. Here we report on the generation of 9.4 gigabases of adaptor-trimmed raw sequences and the assembly of 57,162 transcript contigs in S. alfredii Hance (HE shoots by the combination of Roche 454 and Illumina/Solexa deep sequencing technologies. We also have functionally annotated the transcriptome and analyzed the transcriptome changes upon Cd hyperaccumulation in S. alfredii Hance (HE shoots. There are 110 contigs and 123 contigs that were up-regulated (Fold Change ≥ 2.0 and down-regulated (Fold Change gene expression patterns between S. alfredii Hance (HE and non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE. Our results demonstrated that several genes involved in cell wall modification, metal translocation and remobilization were more induced or constitutively expressed at higher levels in HE shoots than that in NHE shoots in response to Cd exposure. Together, our study provides large-scale expressed sequence information and genome-wide transcriptome profiling of Cd responses in S. alfredii Hance (HE shoots.

  13. Role of sulfur assimilation pathway in cadmium hyperaccumulation by Sedum alfredii Hance.

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    Liang, Jun; Shohag, M J I; Yang, Xiaoe; Tian, Shengke; Zhang, Yibin; Feng, Ying; He, Zhenli

    2014-02-01

    Sedum alfredii Hance is a promising cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulating plant recently identified in China. However, the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying Cd accumulation, which differentiate hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) from non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) has not been elucidated yet. A hydroponic experiment was conducted to investigate the role of sulfur assimilation pathway in Cd hyperaccumulation by the S. alfredii Hance, by analyzing gene expression pattern in sulfur assimilation pathway and the concentration of some sulfur containing compounds. The results show that, sulfur assimilation pathway was affected by Cd differently in HE and NHE S. alfredii Hance. The gene expression pattern of sulfur assimilation pathway was regulated differently in HE and NHE plants, especially the nicotianamine synthase (NAS). NAS transcript levels in root of HE was 141-fold higher than NHE, while in shoots of HE only 0.31-fold higher than NHE. In HE roots, NAS expression level was maximum 3171-fold higher than shoots, while in NHE plants roots NAS expression level was maximum 45.3-fold higher than shoots. In HE plant roots, sulfur, cysteine and methionine concentrations increased 30%, 46% and 835% respectively, by Cd treatment, but in NHE plants roots, sulfur concentration increased less than 1%, cysteine and methionine concentrations decreased 78.5% and 13.3% respectively, by Cd. Cd exposure increased glutathione levels by 142% in HE but less than 10% in NHE plant roots. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Subcellular localization of cadmium in hyperaccumulator Populus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of damage to organs of grey poplar was as follows: root > stem> leaves. It was suggested that the Populus × canescens as a renewable resource has the potential to decontaminate cadmium stress development, accumulation and distribution. Key words: Cadmium, phytoremediation, hyperaccumulator, grey poplar, organ.

  15. Using hyperaccumulator plants to phytoextract soil Ni and Cd

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    Chaney, R.L. [USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Animal Manure and By-Products Lab, Beltsville, MD (United States); Scott Angle, J.; McIntosh, M.S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Phytoextraction Associates LLC, Baltimore, MD (United States); Reeves, R.D. [Inst. of Fundamental Science-Chemistry, Massey Univ., Palmerston North, NZ (United States); Li Yin-Ming; Brewer, E.P. [Viridian LLC, Houston, TX (United States); Chen Kuang-Yu; Synkowski, E.C.; Leigh Broadhurst, C.; Wang, S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Roseberg, R.J. [Oregon State Univ., Central Point, OR (United States); Perner, H. [Inst. for Plant Nutrition, Hohenheim Univ. (Germany); Baker, A.J.M. [Univ. of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2005-04-01

    Two strategies of phytoextraction have been shown to have promise for practical soil remediation: domestication of natural hyperaccumulators and bioengineering plants with the genes that allow natural hyperaccumulators to achieve useful phytoextraction. Because different elements have different value, some can be phytomined for profit and others can be phytoremediated at lower cost than soil removal and replacement. Ni phytoextraction from contaminated or mineralized soils offers economic return greater than producing most crops, especially when considering the low fertility or phytotoxicity of Ni rich soils. Only soils that require remediation based on risk assessment will comprise the market for phytoremediation. Improved risk assessment has indicated that most Zn + Cd contaminated soils will not require Cd phytoextraction because the Zn limits practical risk from soil Cd. But rice and tobacco, and foods grown on soils with Cd contamination without corresponding 100-fold greater Zn contamination, allow Cd to readily enter food plants and diets. Clear evidence of human renal tubular dysfunction from soil Cd has only been obtained for subsistence rice farm families in Asia. Because of historic metal mining and smelting, Zn + Cd contaminated rice soils have been found in Japan, China, Korea, Vietnam and Thailand. Phytoextraction using southern France populations of Thlaspi caerulescens appears to be the only practical method to alleviate Cd risk without soil removal and replacement. The southern France plants accumulate 10-20-fold higher Cd in shoots than most T. caerulescens populations such as those from Belgium and the UK. Addition of fertilizers to maximize yield does not reduce Cd concentration in shoots; and soil management promotes annual Cd removal. The value of Cd in the plants is low, so the remediation service must pay the costs of Cd phytoextraction plus profits to the parties who conduct phytoextraction. Some other plants have been studied for Cd

  16. Selenium hyperaccumulators harbor a diverse endophytic bacterial community characterized by high selenium resistance and plant growth promoting properties

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    Martina eSura - de Jong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se-rich plants may be used to provide dietary Se to humans and livestock, and also to clean up Se-polluted soils or waters. This study focused on endophytic bacteria of plants that hyperaccumulate selenium (Se to 0.5-1% of dry weight. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP analysis was used to compare the diversity of endophytic bacteria of hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata (Brassicaceae and Astragalus bisulcatus (Fabaceae with those from related non-accumulators Physaria bellii (Brassicaceae and Medicago sativa (Fabaceae collected on the same, seleniferous site. Hyperaccumulators and non-accumulators showed equal T-RF diversity. Parsimony analysis showed that T-RFs from individuals of the same species were more similar to each other than to those from other species, regardless of plant Se content or spatial proximity. Cultivable endophytes from hyperaccumulators S. pinnata and A. bisulcatus were further identified and characterized. The 66 bacterial morphotypes were shown by MS MALDI-TOF Biotyper analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to include strains of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Staphylococcus, Paenibacillus, Advenella, Arthrobacter and Variovorax. Most isolates were highly resistant to selenate and selenite (up to 200 mM and all could reduce selenite to red elemental Se, reduce nitrite and produce siderophores. Seven isolates were selected for plant inoculation and found to have plant growth promoting properties, both in pure culture and when co-cultivated with crop species Brassica juncea (Brassicaceae or M. sativa. There were no effects on plant Se accumulation. We conclude that Se hyperaccumulators harbor an endophytic bacterial community in their natural seleniferous habitat that is equally diverse to that of comparable non-accumulators. The hyperaccumulator endophytes are characterized by high Se resistance, capacity to produce elemental Se and plant growth promoting properties.

  17. A compound containing substituted indole ligand from a hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance under Zn exposure.

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    Xing, Yan; Peng, Hongyun; Gao, Lingling; Luo, Ancheng; Yang, Xiaoe

    2013-01-01

    Sedum alfredii Hance is a fast-growing and high-biomass zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulator native to China. A compound containing substituted indole ligand was isolated from this Zn hyperaccumulator plants by sonication/ethanol extraction, macroporous resin column as well as preparative HPLC (P-HPLC). Hydroponic experiment showed that the concentrations of both Zn and the compound containing substituted indole ligand were remarkably increased in stems and leaves of both hyperaccumulator and non-hyperaccumulator as Zn rising from 0.5 to 50 micromol L(-1), with much more in the stems of hyperaccumulator than non-hyperaccumulator. At 50 micromol L(-1) Zn, hyperaccumulator grew normally but its non-hyperaccumulator suffered from strongly Zn-induced toxicity. This suggested that there was a positive correlation between the compound containing substituted indole ligand and Zn concentration in shoots of hyperaccumulator S. alfredii.

  18. Uptake, sequestration and tolerance of cadmium at cellular levels in the hyperaccumulator plant species Sedum alfredii

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    Tian, Shengke; Xie, Ruohan; Wang, Haixin; Hu, Yan; Hou, Dandi; Liao, Xingcheng; Brown, Patrick H.; Yang, Hongxia; Lin, Xianyong; Labavitch, John M.; Lu, Lingli

    2017-04-01

    Sedum alfredii is one of a few plant species known to hyperaccumulate cadmium (Cd). Uptake, localization, and tolerance of Cd at cellular levels in shoots were compared in hyperaccumulating (HE) and non-hyperaccumulating (NHE) ecotypes of Sedum alfredii. X-ray fluorescence images of Cd in stems and leaves showed only a slight Cd signal restricted within vascular bundles in the NHEs, while enhanced localization of Cd, with significant tissue- and age-dependent variations, was detected in HEs. In contrast to the vascular-enriched Cd in young stems, parenchyma cells in leaf mesophyll, stem pith and cortex tissues served as terminal storage sites for Cd sequestration in HEs. Kinetics of Cd transport into individual leaf protoplasts of the two ecotypes showed little difference in Cd accumulation. However, far more efficient storage of Cd in vacuoles was apparent in HEs. Subsequent analysis of cell viability and hydrogen peroxide levels suggested that HE protoplasts exhibited higher resistance to Cd than those of NHE protoplasts. These results suggest that efficient sequestration into vacuoles, as opposed to rapid transport into parenchyma cells, is a pivotal process in Cd accumulation and homeostasis in shoots of HE S. alfredii. This is in addition to its efficient root-to-shoot translocation of Cd.

  19. Arabis gemmifera is a hyperaccumulator of Cd and Zn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Hiroshi; Takenaka, Chisato

    2003-01-01

    Hyperaccumulators are essential for phytoremediation of heavy metals. In Europe and North America, many studies have been conducted to find more effective plants for phytoremediation of various pollutants. In Japan, this field of research has just recently come more into focus. A type of fern in Japan, Athyrium yokoscense, is well known as a hyperaccumulator of Cd and Zn. However, it is not suitable for phytoremediation because it is a summer green and grows slowly. Therefore, in order to find hyperaccumulators other than from A. yokoscense, we surveyed plants growing at polluted sites in Japan. We found that the Brassicae Arabis gemmifera is a hyperaccumulator of Cd and Zn, with phytoextraction capacities almost equal to Thlaspi caerulescens.

  20. Repositioning-dependent fate of duplicate genes.

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    Rodin, Sergei N; Parkhomchuk, Dmitri V; Rodin, Andrei S; Holmquist, Gerald P; Riggs, Arthur D

    2005-09-01

    Gene duplication is the main source of evolutionary novelties. However, the problem with duplicates is that the purifying selection overlooks deleterious mutations in the redundant sequence, which therefore, instead of gaining a new function, often degrades into a functionless pseudogene. This risk of functional loss instead of gain is much higher for small populations of higher organisms with a slow and complex development. We propose that it is the epigenetic tissue/stage-complementary silencing of duplicates that makes them exposable to the purifying selection, thus saving them from pseudogenization and opening the way towards new function(s). Our genome-wide analyses of gene duplicates in several eukaryotic species combined with the phylogenetic comparison of vertebrate alpha- and beta-globin gene clusters strongly support this epigenetic complementation (EC) model. The distinctive condition for a new duplicate to survive by the EC mechanism seems to be its repositioning to an ectopic site, which is accompanied by changes in the rate and direction of mutagenesis. The most distinguished in this respect is the human genome. In this review, we extend and discuss the data on the EC- and repositioning-dependent fate of gene duplicates with the special emphasis on the problem of detecting brief postduplication period of adaptive evolution driven by positive selection. Accordingly, we propose a new CpG-focused measure of selection that is insensitive to translocation-caused biases in mutagenesis.

  1. Effects of selenium hyperaccumulation on plant-plant interactions: evidence for elemental allelopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mehdawi, Ali F; Quinn, Colin F; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2011-07-01

    • Few studies have investigated plant-plant interactions involving hyperaccumulator plants. Here, we investigated the effect of selenium (Se) hyperaccumulation on neighboring plants. • Soil and litter Se concentrations were determined around the hyperaccumulators Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata and around the nonhyperaccumulators Medicago sativa and Helianthus pumilus. We also compared surrounding vegetative cover, species composition and Se concentration in two plant species (Artemisia ludoviciana and Symphyotrichum ericoides) growing either close to or far from Se hyperaccumulators. Then, Arabidopsis thaliana germination and growth were compared on soils collected next to the hyperaccumulators and the nonhyperaccumulators. • Soil collected around hyperaccumulators contained more Se (up to 266 mg Se kg(-1) ) than soil collected around nonhyperaccumulators. Vegetative ground cover was 10% lower around Se hyperaccumulators compared with nonhyperaccumulators. The Se concentration was higher in neighboring species A. ludoviciana and S. ericoides when growing close to, compared with far from, Se hyperaccumulators. A. thaliana showed reduced germination and growth, and higher Se accumulation, when grown on soil collected around Se hyperaccumulators compared with soil collected around nonaccumulators. • In conclusion, Se hyperaccumulators may increase the surrounding soil Se concentration (phytoenrichment). The enhanced soil Se contents around hyperaccumulators can impair the growth of Se-sensitive plant species, pointing to a possible role of Se hyperaccumulation in elemental allelopathy. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Effects of arsenic on nitrate metabolism in arsenic hyperaccumulating and non-hyperaccumulating ferns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nandita [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl 32611-0290 (United States); Eco-Auditing group, National Botanical Research Institute, Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Ma, Lena Q., E-mail: lqma@ufl.ed [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl 32611-0290 (United States); Vu, Joseph C. [Chemistry Research Unit, CMAVE, USDA-ARS, Gainesville, FL 32608-1069 and Agronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0500 (United States); Raj, Anshita [Eco-Auditing group, National Botanical Research Institute, Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India)

    2009-08-15

    This study investigated the effects of arsenic on the in vitro activities of the enzymes (nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase) involved in nitrate metabolism in the roots, rhizomes, and fronds of four-month old Pteris vittata (arsenic - hyperaccumulator) and Pteris ensiformis (non-arsenic--hyperaccumulator) plants. The arsenic treatments (0, 150, and 300 muM as sodium arsenate) in hydroponics had adverse effects on the root and frond dry weights, and this effect was more evident in P. ensiformis than in P. vittata. Nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase activities of arsenate-treated plants were reduced more in P. ensiformis than in P. vittata. This effect was accompanied by similar decreases in tissue NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations. Therefore, this decrease is interpreted as being indirect, i.e., the consequence of the reduced NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake and translocation in the plants. The study shows the difference in the tolerance level of the two Pteris species with varying sensitivity to arsenic. - Arsenic reduced the activity of nitrate and nitrite reductase more in Pteris ensiformis than Pteris vittata.

  3. Characterization of Zinc and Cadmium Hyperaccumulation in Three Noccaea (Brassicaceae) Populations from Non-metalliferous Sites in the Eastern Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Soledad; Gallego, Berta; Sáez, Llorenç; López-Alvarado, Javier; Cabot, Catalina; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The Southern slope of the Pyrenees is the meridional limit for the distribution of several Noccaea populations. However, the systematic description of these populations and their hyperaccumulation mechanisms are not well established. Morphological and genetic analysis (ITS and 3 chloroplast regions) were used to identify Noccaea populations localized on non-metallicolous soils during a survey in the Catalonian Pyrenees. Cd and Zn concentrations were analyzed in soils and plants both sampled in the field and grown hydroponically. The expression of selected metal transporter genes was assessed by quantitative PCR. The populations were identified as Noccaea brachypetala (Jord.) F.K. Mey by conspicuous morphological traits. Principal component analysis provided a clear separation among N. brachypetala, Noccaea caerulescens J. Presl & C. Presl and Noccaea occitanica (Jord.) F.K. Mey., three Noccaea species reported in the Pyrenees. Contrastingly, ITS and cpDNA analyses were unable to clearly differentiate these taxa. Differences in the expression of the metal transporter genes HMA3, HMA4, and MTP1 between N. caerulescens and N. brachypetala, and those amongst the N. brachypetala populations suggest differences in the strategies for handling enhanced Cd and Zn availability. This is the first report demonstrating Cd and Zn hyperaccumulation by N. brachypetala both in the field and in hydroponics. This comprehensive study based on taxonomic, molecular, and physiological data allows both the correct identification of this species and the characterization of population differences in hyperaccumulation and tolerance of Zn and Cd. PMID:26904085

  4. Selenium hyperaccumulation offers protection from cell disruptor herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn Colin F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperaccumulation, the rare capacity of certain plant species to accumulate toxic trace elements to levels several orders of magnitude higher than other species growing on the same site, is thought to be an elemental defense mechanism against herbivores and pathogens. Previous research has shown that selenium (Se hyperaccumulation protects plants from a variety of herbivores and pathogens. Selenium hyperaccumulating plants sequester Se in discrete locations in the leaf periphery, making them potentially more susceptible to some herbivore feeding modes than others. In this study we investigate the protective function of Se in the Se hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata and Astragalus bisulcatus against two cell disrupting herbivores, the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis and the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae. Results Astragalus bisulcatus and S. pinnata with high Se concentrations (greater than 650 mg Se kg-1 were less subject to thrips herbivory than plants with low Se levels (less than 150 mg Se kg-1. Furthermore, in plants containing elevated Se levels, leaves with higher concentrations of Se suffered less herbivory than leaves with less Se. Spider mites also preferred to feed on low-Se A. bisulcatus and S. pinnata plants rather than high-Se plants. Spider mite populations on A. bisulcatus decreased after plants were given a higher concentration of Se. Interestingly, spider mites could colonize A. bisulcatus plants containing up to 200 mg Se kg-1 dry weight, concentrations which are toxic to many other herbivores. Selenium distribution and speciation studies using micro-focused X-ray fluorescence (μXRF mapping and Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the spider mites accumulated primarily methylselenocysteine, the relatively non-toxic form of Se that is also the predominant form of Se in hyperaccumulators. Conclusions This is the first reported study investigating the

  5. Nickel and zinc isotope fractionation in hyperaccumulating and nonaccumulating plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Teng-Hao-Bo; Cloquet, Christophe; Tang, Ye-Tao; Sterckeman, Thibault; Echevarria, Guillaume; Estrade, Nicolas; Morel, Jean-Louis; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2014-10-21

    Until now, there has been little data on the isotope fractionation of nickel (Ni) in higher plants and how this can be affected by plant Ni and zinc (Zn) homeostasis. A hydroponic cultivation was conducted to investigate the isotope fractionation of Ni and Zn during plant uptake and translocation processes. The nonaccumulator Thlaspi arvense, the Ni hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale and the Ni and Zn hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens were grown in low (2 μM) and high (50 μM) Ni and Zn solutions. Results showed that plants were inclined to absorb light Ni isotopes, presumably due to the functioning of low-affinity transport systems across root cell membrane. The Ni isotope fractionation between plant and solution was greater in the hyperaccumulators grown in low Zn treatments (Δ(60)Ni(plant-solution) = -0.90 to -0.63‰) than that in the nonaccumulator T. arvense (Δ(60)Ni(plant-solution) = -0.21‰), thus indicating a greater permeability of the low-affinity transport system in hyperaccumulators. Light isotope enrichment of Zn was observed in most of the plants (Δ(66)Zn(plant-solution) = -0.23 to -0.10‰), but to a lesser extent than for Ni. The rapid uptake of Zn on the root surfaces caused concentration gradients, which induced ion diffusion in the rhizosphere and could result in light Zn isotope enrichment in the hyperaccumulator N. caerulescens. In high Zn treatment, Zn could compete with Ni during the uptake process, which reduced Ni concentration in plants and decreased the extent of Ni isotope fractionation (Δ(60)Ni(plant-solution) = -0.11 to -0.07‰), indicating that plants might take up Ni through a low-affinity transport system of Zn. We propose that isotope composition analysis for transition elements could become an empirical tool to study plant physiological processes.

  6. Studying the Complex Expression Dependences between Sets of Coexpressed Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Huerta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms simplify the orchestration of gene expression by coregulating genes whose products function together in the cell. The use of clustering methods to obtain sets of coexpressed genes from expression arrays is very common; nevertheless there are no appropriate tools to study the expression networks among these sets of coexpressed genes. The aim of the developed tools is to allow studying the complex expression dependences that exist between sets of coexpressed genes. For this purpose, we start detecting the nonlinear expression relationships between pairs of genes, plus the coexpressed genes. Next, we form networks among sets of coexpressed genes that maintain nonlinear expression dependences between all of them. The expression relationship between the sets of coexpressed genes is defined by the expression relationship between the skeletons of these sets, where this skeleton represents the coexpressed genes with a well-defined nonlinear expression relationship with the skeleton of the other sets. As a result, we can study the nonlinear expression relationships between a target gene and other sets of coexpressed genes, or start the study from the skeleton of the sets, to study the complex relationships of activation and deactivation between the sets of coexpressed genes that carry out the different cellular processes present in the expression experiments.

  7. A comprehensive set of transcript sequences of the heavy metal hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YA-FEN eLIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Noccaea caerulescens is an extremophile plant species belonging to the Brassicaceae family. It has adapted to grow on soils containing high, normally toxic, concentrations of metals such as nickel, zinc and cadmium. Next to being extremely tolerant to these metals, it is one of the few species known to hyperaccumulate these metals to extremely high concentrations in their aboveground biomass. In order to provide additional molecular resources for this model metal hyperaccumulator species to study and understand the mechanism of heavy metal exposure adaptation, we aimed to provide a comprehensive database of transcript sequences for N. caerulescens. In this study, 23830 transcript sequences (isotigs with an average length of 1025 bps were determined for roots, shoots and inflorescences of N. caerulescens accession ‘Ganges’ by Roche GS-FLEX 454 pyrosequencing. These isotigs were grouped into 20,378 isogroups, representing potential genes. This is a large expansion of the existing N. caerulescens transcriptome set consisting of 3705 unigenes. When compared to a Brassicaceae proteome set, 22,232 (93.2% of the N. caerulescens isotigs (corresponding to 19191 isogroups had a significant match and could be annotated accordingly. Of the remaining sequences, 98 isotigs resembled non-plant sequences and 1386 had no significant similarity to any sequence in the GenBank database. Among the annotated set there were many isotigs with similarity to metal homeostasis genes or genes for glucosinolate biosynthesis. Only for transcripts similar to Metallothionein3 (MT3, clear evidence for an additional copy was found. This comprehensive set of transcripts is expected to further contribute to the discovery of mechanisms used by N. caerulescens to adapt to heavy metal exposure.

  8. Selenium-tolerant diamondback moth disarms hyperaccumulator plantdefense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, J.L.; Quinn, C.F.; Marcus, M.A.; Fakra, S.; Pilon-Smits,E.A.H.

    2006-11-20

    Background Some plants hyperaccumulate the toxic element selenium (Se) to extreme levels, up to 1% of dry weight. The function of this intriguing phenomenon is obscure. Results Here, we show that the Se in the hyperaccumulator prince's plume (Stanleya pinnata) protects it from caterpillar herbivory because of deterrence and toxicity. In its natural habitat, however, a newly discovered variety of the invasive diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) has disarmed this elemental defense. It thrives on plants containing highly toxic Se levels and shows no oviposition or feeding deterrence, in contrast to related varieties. Interestingly, a Se-tolerant wasp (Diadegma insulare) was found to parasitize the tolerant moth. The insect's Se tolerance mechanism was revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography--mass spectroscopy, which showed that the Se-tolerant moth and its parasite both accumulate methylselenocysteine, the same form found in the hyperaccumulator plant, whereas related sensitive moths accumulate selenocysteine. The latter is toxic because of its nonspecific incorporation into proteins. Indeed, the Se-tolerant diamondback moth incorporated less Se into protein. Additionally, the tolerant variety sequestered Se in distinct abdominal areas, potentially involved in detoxification and larval defense to predators. Conclusions Although Se hyperaccumulation protects plants from herbivory by some invertebrates, it can give rise to the evolution of unique Se-tolerant herbivores and thus provide a portal for Se into the local ecosystem. In a broader context, this study provides insight into the possible ecological implications of using Se-enriched crops as a source of anti-carcinogenic selenocompounds and for the remediation of Se-polluted environments.

  9. Differential expression of ATP-dependent RNA helicase gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-02-07

    Feb 7, 2012 ... lysogeny broth (LB) medium at 4°C was induced for VBNC state; activated genes were detected using. mRNA differential display .... 191 amino acids. This cDNA sequence had a homology of 95 to 100% to the nucleotide of adenosine tripho- sphate (ATP)-dependent RNA helicase rh1B gene in different ...

  10. Adaptative evolution of metallothionein 3 in the Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roosens, N.H.; Bernard, C.; Verbruggen, N. [Lab. de Physiologie et Genetique Moleculaire des Plantes, Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium); Leplae, R. [Service de Conformation des Macromolecules Biologiques et Bioinformatique, Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-04-01

    A functional screening in yeast allowed to identify various cDNAs from the Cd/Zn hyper-accumulator Thlaspi caerulescens. TcMT3 displayed high identity with its closest homologue in Arabidopsis thaliana but variation in its Cys residues. Functional analysis in yeast supported a higher binding capacity for Cu, but not for Cd or Zn, of TcMT3 compared to AtMT3. Expression analysis in plants indicated that metallothionein 3 (MT3) like all the other T. caerulescens genes from the screen studied is overexpressed in all studied populations of T. caerulescens compared to A. thaliana. TcMT3 was induced by Cu, but not by Cd. Moreover significant variation in expression within T. caerulescens populations that have contrasting tolerance and accumulation capacities indicated a possible local adaptation of MT3. (orig.)

  11. Multivariate analysis of protein profiles of metal hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens accessions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuomainen, M.H.; Nunan, N.; Lehesranta, S.J.; Tervahauta, A.I.; Hassinen, V.H.; Schat, H.; Koistinen, K.M.; Auriola, S.; McNicol, J.; Karenlampi, S.O.

    2006-01-01

    Thlaspi caerulescens is increasingly acknowledged as one of the best models for studying metal hyperaccumulation in plants. In order to study the mechanisms underlying metal hyper-accumulation, we used proteomic profiling to identify differences in protein intensities among three T caerulescens

  12. A copula method for modeling directional dependence of genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Min; Jung, Yoon-Sung; Sungur, Engin A; Han, Kap-Hoon; Park, Changyi; Sohn, Insuk

    2008-05-01

    Genes interact with each other as basic building blocks of life, forming a complicated network. The relationship between groups of genes with different functions can be represented as gene networks. With the deposition of huge microarray data sets in public domains, study on gene networking is now possible. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the reconstruction of gene networks from gene expression data. Recent work includes linear models, Boolean network models, and Bayesian networks. Among them, Bayesian networks seem to be the most effective in constructing gene networks. A major problem with the Bayesian network approach is the excessive computational time. This problem is due to the interactive feature of the method that requires large search space. Since fitting a model by using the copulas does not require iterations, elicitation of the priors, and complicated calculations of posterior distributions, the need for reference to extensive search spaces can be eliminated leading to manageable computational affords. Bayesian network approach produces a discretely expression of conditional probabilities. Discreteness of the characteristics is not required in the copula approach which involves use of uniform representation of the continuous random variables. Our method is able to overcome the limitation of Bayesian network method for gene-gene interaction, i.e. information loss due to binary transformation. We analyzed the gene interactions for two gene data sets (one group is eight histone genes and the other group is 19 genes which include DNA polymerases, DNA helicase, type B cyclin genes, DNA primases, radiation sensitive genes, repaire related genes, replication protein A encoding gene, DNA replication initiation factor, securin gene, nucleosome assembly factor, and a subunit of the cohesin complex) by adopting a measure of directional dependence based on a copula function. We have compared our results with those from other methods in the

  13. Rethinking cell-cycle-dependent gene expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Stephen

    2017-11-01

    Three studies of gene expression during the division cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe led to the proposal that a large number of genes are expressed at particular times during the S. pombe cell cycle. Yet only a small fraction of genes proposed to be expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent manner are reproducible in all three published studies. In addition to reproducibility problems, questions about expression amplitudes, cell-cycle timing of expression, synchronization artifacts, and the problem with methods for synchronizing cells must be considered. These problems and complications prompt the idea that caution should be used before accepting the conclusion that there are a large number of genes expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent manner in S. pombe.

  14. Variants of opioid system genes are associated with non-dependent opioid use and heroin dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randesi, Matthew; van den Brink, Wim; Levran, Orna; Blanken, Peter; Butelman, Eduardo R; Yuferov, Vadim; da Rosa, Joel Correa; Ott, Jurg; van Ree, Jan M; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heroin addiction is a chronic, relapsing brain disease. Genetic factors are involved in the development of drug addiction. The aim of this study was to determine whether specific variants in genes of the opioid system are associated with non-dependent opioid use and heroin dependence.

  15. Variants of opioid system genes are associated with non-dependent opioid use and heroin dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randesi, Matthew; van den Brink, Wim; Levran, Orna; Blanken, Peter; Butelman, Eduardo R.; Yuferov, Vadim; da Rosa, Joel Correa; Ott, Jurg; van Ree, Jan M.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a chronic, relapsing brain disease. Genetic factors are involved in the development of drug addiction. The aim of this study was to determine whether specific variants in genes of the opioid system are associated with non-dependent opioid use and heroin dependence. Genetic

  16. Genome assembly and annotation of Arabidopsis halleri, a model for heavy metal hyperaccumulation and evolutionary ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briskine, Roman V; Paape, Timothy; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Akama, Satoru; Sese, Jun; Shimizu, Kentaro K

    2017-09-01

    The self-incompatible species Arabidopsis halleri is a close relative of the self-compatible model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The broad European and Asian distribution and heavy metal hyperaccumulation ability make A. halleri a useful model for ecological genomics studies. We used long-insert mate-pair libraries to improve the genome assembly of the A. halleri ssp. gemmifera Tada mine genotype (W302) collected from a site with high contamination by heavy metals in Japan. After five rounds of forced selfing, heterozygosity was reduced to 0.04%, which facilitated subsequent genome assembly. Our assembly now covers 196 Mb or 78% of the estimated genome size and achieved scaffold N50 length of 712 kb. To validate assembly and annotation, we used synteny of A. halleri Tada mine with a previously published high-quality reference assembly of a closely related species, Arabidopsis lyrata. Further validation of the assembly quality comes from synteny and phylogenetic analysis of the HEAVY METAL ATPASE4 (HMA4) and METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN1 (MTP1) regions using published sequences from European A. halleri for comparison. Three tandemly duplicated copies of HMA4, key gene involved in cadmium and zinc hyperaccumulation, were assembled on a single scaffold. The assembly will enhance the genomewide studies of A. halleri as well as the allopolyploid Arabidopsis kamchatica derived from A. lyrata and A. halleri. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Tissue Fractions of Cadmium in Two Hyperaccumulating Jerusalem Artichoke Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Long

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the mechanisms in two Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L. genotypes that hyperaccumulate Cd, a sand-culture experiment was carried out to characterize fractionation of Cd in tissue of Cd-hyperaccumulating genotypes NY2 and NY5. The sequential extractants were: 80% v/v ethanol (FE, deionized water (FW, 1 M NaCl (FNaCl, 2% v/v acetic acid (FAcet, and 0.6 M HCl (FHCl. After 20 days of treatments, NY5 had greater plant biomass and greater Cd accumulation in tissues than NY2. In both genotypes the FNaCl fraction was the highest in roots and stems, whereas the FAcet and FHCl fractions were the highest in leaves. With an increase in Cd concentration in the culture solution, the content of every Cd fraction also increased. The FW and FNaCl ratios in roots were lower in NY5 than in NY2, while the amount of other Cd forms was higher. It implied that, in high accumulator, namely, NY5, the complex of insoluble phosphate tends to be shaped more easily which was much better for Cd accumulation. Besides, translocation from plasma to vacuole after combination with protein may be one of the main mechanisms in Cd-accumulator Jerusalem artichoke genotypes.

  18. Nickel biopathways in tropical nickel hyperaccumulating trees from Sabah (Malaysia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ent, Antony; Callahan, Damien L.; Noller, Barry N.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, Jolanta; Przybylowicz, Wojciech J.; Barnabas, Alban; Harris, Hugh H.

    2017-02-01

    The extraordinary level of accumulation of nickel (Ni) in hyperaccumulator plants is a consequence of specific metal sequestering and transport mechanisms, and knowledge of these processes is critical for advancing an understanding of transition element metabolic regulation in these plants. The Ni biopathways were elucidated in three plant species, Phyllanthus balgooyi, Phyllanthus securinegioides (Phyllanthaceae) and Rinorea bengalensis (Violaceae), that occur in Sabah (Malaysia) on the Island of Borneo. This study showed that Ni is mainly concentrated in the phloem in roots and stems (up to 16.9% Ni in phloem sap in Phyllanthus balgooyi) in all three species. However, the species differ in their leaves - in P. balgooyi the highest Ni concentration is in the phloem, but in P. securinegioides and R. bengalensis in the epidermis and in the spongy mesophyll (R. bengalensis). The chemical speciation of Ni2+ does not substantially differ between the species nor between the plant tissues and transport fluids, and is unambiguously associated with citrate. This study combines ion microbeam (PIXE and RBS) and metabolomics techniques (GC-MS, LC-MS) with synchrotron methods (XAS) to overcome the drawbacks of the individual techniques to quantitatively determine Ni distribution and Ni2+ chemical speciation in hyperaccumulator plants.

  19. Iron- and hemin-dependent gene expression of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya-Bergman, C; Rosato, A; Lewis, J P

    2015-02-01

    Although iron under anaerobic conditions is more accessible and highly reactive because of its reduced form, iron-dependent regulation is not well known in anaerobic bacteria. Here, we investigated iron- and hemin-dependent gene regulation in Porphyromonas gingivalis, an established periodontopathogen that primarily inhabits anaerobic pockets. Whole-genome microarrays of P. gingivalis genes were used to compare the levels of gene expression under iron-replete and iron-depleted conditions as well as under hemin-replete and hemin-depleted conditions. Under iron-depleted conditions, the expression of genes encoding proteins that participate in iron uptake and adhesion/invasion of host cells was increased, while that of genes encoding proteins involved in iron storage, energy metabolism, and electron transport was decreased. Interestingly, many of the genes with altered expression had no known function. Limiting the amount of hemin also resulted in a reduced expression of the genes encoding proteins involved in energy metabolism and electron transport. However, hemin also had a significant effect on many other biological processes such as oxidative stress protection and lipopolysaccharide synthesis. Overall, comparison of the data from iron-depleted conditions to those from hemin-depleted ones showed that although some regulation is through the iron derived from hemin, there also is significant distinct regulation through hemin only. Furthermore, our data showed that the molecular mechanisms of iron-dependent regulation are novel as the deletion of the putative Fur protein had no effect on the expression of iron-regulated genes. Finally, our functional studies demonstrated greater survivability of host cells in the presence of the iron-stressed bacterium than the iron-replete P. gingivalis cells. The major iron-regulated proteins encoded by PG1019-20 may play a role in this process as deletion of these sequences also resulted in reduced survival of the bacterium when

  20. Characterization of a Selenium-Tolerant Rhizosphere Strain from a Novel Se-Hyperaccumulating Plant Cardamine hupingshanesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzhao Tong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel selenium- (Se- hyperaccumulating plant, Cardamine hupingshanesis, accumulating Se as a form of SeCys2, was discovered in Enshi, Hubei, China, which could not be explained by present selenocysteine methyltransferase (SMT theory. However, it is interesting to investigate if rhizosphere bacteria play some roles during SeCys2 accumulation. Here, one Se-tolerant rhizosphere strain, Microbacterium oxydans, was isolated from C. hupingshanesis. Phylogenetic analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequences determined the strain as a kind of Gram positive bacillus and belonged to the family Brevibacterium frigoritolerans. Furthermore, Se tolerance test indicated the strain could grow in extreme high Se level of 15.0 mg Se L−1. When exposed to 1.5 mg Se L−1, SeCys2 was the predominant Se species in the bacteria, consistent with the Se species in C. hupingshanesis. This coincidence might reveal that this strain played some positive effect in SeCys2 accumulation of C. hupingshanesis. Moreover, when exposed to 1.5 mg Se L−1 or 15.0 mg Se L−1, As absorption diminished in the logarithmic phase. In contrast, As absorption increased when exposed to 7.5 mg Se L−1, indicating As metabolism processes could be affected by Se on this strain. The present study provided a sight on the role of rhizosphere bacteria during Se accumulation for Se-hyperaccumulating plant.

  1. Gene expression results in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated monocytes depend significantly on the choice of reference genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øvstebø Reidun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated monocytes is mainly studied by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR using GAPDH (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase or ACTB (beta-actin as reference gene for normalization. Expression of traditional reference genes has been shown to vary substantially under certain conditions leading to invalid results. To investigate whether traditional reference genes are stably expressed in LPS-stimulated monocytes or if RT-qPCR results are dependent on the choice of reference genes, we have assessed and evaluated gene expression stability of twelve candidate reference genes in this model system. Results Twelve candidate reference genes were quantified by RT-qPCR in LPS-stimulated, human monocytes and evaluated using the programs geNorm, Normfinder and BestKeeper. geNorm ranked PPIB (cyclophilin B, B2M (beta-2-microglobulin and PPIA (cyclophilin A as the best combination for gene expression normalization in LPS-stimulated monocytes. Normfinder suggested TBP (TATA-box binding protein and B2M as the best combination. Compared to these combinations, normalization using GAPDH alone resulted in significantly higher changes of TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL10 (interleukin 10 expression. Moreover, a significant difference in TNF-α expression between monocytes stimulated with equimolar concentrations of LPS from N. meningitides and E. coli, respectively, was identified when using the suggested combinations of reference genes for normalization, but stayed unrecognized when employing a single reference gene, ACTB or GAPDH. Conclusions Gene expression levels in LPS-stimulated monocytes based on RT-qPCR results differ significantly when normalized to a single gene or a combination of stably expressed reference genes. Proper evaluation of reference gene stabiliy is therefore mandatory before reporting RT-qPCR results in LPS-stimulated monocytes.

  2. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lingjun; Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Guo, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Chunlong; Tan, Yunlong; Wang, Zhiren; Wang, Jijun; Wang, Xiaoping; Kang, Longli; Lu, Lu; Chen, Xiangning; Li, Chiang-Shan R; Luo, Xingguang

    2016-11-07

    It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND) and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs) and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4). These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4,CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD.

  3. Molecular Dissection of The Cellular Mechanisms Involved In Nickel Hyperaccumulation in Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Salt

    2002-04-08

    Hyperaccumulator plant species are able to accumulate between 1-5% of their biomass as metal. However, these plants are often small, slow growing, and do not produce a high biomass. Phytoextraction, a cost-effective, in situ, plant based approach to soil remediation takes advantage of the remarkable ability of hyperaccumulating plants to concentrate metals from the soil and accumulate them in their harvestable, above-ground tissues. However, to make use of the valuable genetic resources identified in metal hyperaccumulating species, it will be necessary to transfer this material to high biomass rapidly growing crop plants. These plants would then be ideally suited to the phytoremediation process, having the ability to produce large amount of metal-rich plant biomass for rapid harvest and soil cleanup. Although progress is being made in understanding the genetic basis of metal hyperaccumulation a more complete understanding will be necessary before we can take full advantage of the genetic potential of these plants.

  4. Revisiting the plant hyperaccumulation criteria to rare plants and earth abundant elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branquinho, Cristina [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Ecologia e Biologia Vegetal, Campo Grande C2, Piso 4, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal) and Universidade Atlantica, Antiga Fabrica da Polvora de Barcarena, 2745-615 Barcarena (Portugal)]. E-mail: cmbranquinho@fc.ul.pt; Serrano, Helena Cristina [Universidade de Lisboa, Museu Nacional de Historia Natural, Jardim Botanico (Portugal); Pinto, Manuel Joao [Universidade de Lisboa, Museu Nacional de Historia Natural, Jardim Botanico (Portugal); Martins-Loucao, Maria Amelia [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Ecologia e Biologia Vegetal, Campo Grande C2, Piso 4, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Universidade de Lisboa, Museu Nacional de Historia Natural, Jardim Botanico (Portugal)

    2007-03-15

    The several established criteria to define a hyperaccumulator plant were applied to a rare and endangered species, Plantago almogravensis, and to the 3rd most abundant element in the earth crust, Al. Using the most common criteria, P. almogravensis undoubtedly is an Al hyperaccumulator plant. If the recent proposed requirements were considered, most of them matching those for a plant to be used in phytoextraction, it can only be considered an unusual accumulator of Al. A discussion is made concerning the several criteria of a hyperaccumulator plant in order to include rare and endemic ones and abundant elements. In ecological terms, the enrichment in Al and Fe observed may account for the differences in the vegetation pattern. Due to the rarity and endangered nature of this plant, the contribution of this work is also relevant for the ecological understanding and the development of conservation options of this endemic species. - Revisiting plant hyperaccumulation criteria.

  5. Biofortification of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit with the anticancer compound methylselenocysteine using a selenocysteine methyltransferase from a selenium hyperaccumulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummell, David A; Watson, Lyn M; Pathirana, Ranjith; Joyce, Nigel I; West, Phillip J; Hunter, Donald A; McKenzie, Marian J

    2011-10-26

    Methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys) is an amino acid derivative that possesses potent anticancer activity in animals. Plants that can tolerate growth on soils with high Se content, known as Se hyperaccumulators, do so by converting inorganic Se to MeSeCys by the enzyme selenocysteine methyltransferase (SMT). A cDNA encoding the SMT from a Se hyperaccumulator was overexpressed in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Transgenic plants were provided with selenite or selenate to the roots during fruit development, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to show that MeSeCys accumulated in the fruit but not in the leaves. Depending on the transgenic line and Se treatment, up to 16% of the total Se in the fruit was present as MeSeCys. MeSeCys was produced more effectively from selenite on a percentage conversion basis, but greater accumulation of MeSeCys could be achieved from selenate due to its better translocation from the roots. MeSeCys was heat stable and survived processing of the fruit to tomato juice.

  6. Is it worth hyperaccumulating Ni on non-serpentine soils? Decomposition dynamics of mixed-species litters containing hyperaccumulated Ni across serpentine and non-serpentine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamidis, George C; Kazakou, Elena; Aloupi, Maria; Dimitrakopoulos, Panayiotis G

    2016-06-01

    Nickel (Ni)-hyperaccumulating species produce high-Ni litters and may potentially influence important ecosystem processes such as decomposition. Although litters resembling the natural community conditions are essential in order to predict decomposition dynamics, decomposition of mixed-species litters containing hyperaccumulated Ni has never been studied. This study aims to test the effect of different litter mixtures containing hyperaccumulated Ni on decomposition and Ni release across serpentine and non-serpentine soils. Three different litter mixtures were prepared based on the relative abundance of the dominant species in three serpentine soils in the island of Lesbos, Greece where the Ni-hyperaccumulator Alyssum lesbiacum is present. Each litter mixture decomposed on its original serpentine habitat and on an adjacent non-serpentine habitat, in order to investigate whether the decomposition rates differ across the contrasted soils. In order to make comparisons across litter mixtures and to investigate whether additive or non-additive patterns of mass loss occur, a control non-serpentine site was used. Mass loss and Ni release were measured after 90, 180 and 270 d of field exposure. The decomposition rates and Ni release had higher values on serpentine soils after all periods of field exposure. The recorded rapid release of hyperaccumulated Ni is positively related to the initial litter Ni concentration. No differences were found in the decomposition of the three different litter mixtures at the control non-serpentine site, while their patterns of mass loss were additive. Our results: (1) demonstrate the rapid decomposition of litters containing hyperaccumulated Ni on serpentine soils, indicating the presence of metal-tolerant decomposers; and (2) imply the selective decomposition of low-Ni parts of litters by the decomposers on non-serpentine soils. This study provides support for the elemental allelopathy hypothesis of hyperaccumulation, presenting the

  7. Nrf2-dependent gene expressions: a molecular toxicological aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takemi

    2004-05-01

    Although NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) was found to be a transcriptional regulator that controls an expression of the beta-globin gene, the notion is now widely accepted that this transfactor serves as a master regulator for the gene expression of a battery of proteins acting on anti-oxidative stress and detoxification of electrophiles. The function of Nrf2 that bears transcriptional activation depends solely on its nuclear localization, which is regulated by interaction with the cytosolic anchor protein Keap1 and its own turnover rate. In the present mini-review, we focus on the regulation of Nrf2 function and discuss the physiological and toxicological aspects of this transcriptional factor.

  8. Novel genes identified in a high-density genome wide association study for nicotine dependence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bierut, Laura Jean; Madden, Pamela A.F; Breslau, Naomi; Johnson, Eric O; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Pomerleau, Ovide F; Swan, Gary E; Rutter, Joni; Bertelsen, Sarah; Fox, Louis; Fugman, Douglas; Goate, Alison M; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Konvicka, Karel; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Saccone, Nancy L; Saccone, Scott F; Wang, Jen C; Chase, Gary A; Rice, John P; Ballinger, Dennis G

    .... To identify novel genes for which natural variation contributes to the development of nicotine dependence, we performed a comprehensive genome wide association study using nicotine dependent smokers...

  9. Lead, zinc and cadmium accumulation from two metalliferous soils with contrasting calcium contents in hyperaccumulating and non-hyperaccumulating metallophytes: a comparative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohtadi, A.; Ghaderian, S.M.; Schat, H.

    2012-01-01

    Aims and background: We previously compared metallicolous (M) and non-metallicolous (NM) populations of Noccaea (=Thlaspi) caerulescens, Silene vulgaris, and Matthiola flavida for their abilities to tolerate and (hyper)-accumulate lead (Pb) in hydroponics. In the present study we aimed 1) to check

  10. Hyperaccumulator straw improves the cadmium phytoextraction efficiency of emergent plant Nasturtium officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Keqiang; Lin, Lijin; Wang, Jin; Xia, Hui; Liang, Dong; Wang, Xun; Liao, Ming'an; Wang, Li; Liu, Li; Chen, Cheng; Tang, Yi

    2017-08-01

    With the development of economy, the heavy metal contamination has become an increasingly serious problem, especially the cadmium (Cd) contamination. The emergent plant Nasturtium officinale R. Br. is a Cd-accumulator with low phytoremediation ability. To improve Cd phytoextraction efficiency of N. officinale, the straw from Cd-hyperaccumulator plants Youngia erythrocarpa, Galinsoga parviflora, Siegesbeckia orientalis, and Bidens pilosa was applied to Cd-contaminated soil and N. officinale was then planted; the study assessed the effect of hyperaccumulator straw on the growth and Cd accumulation of N. officinale. The results showed that application of hyperaccumulator species straws increased the biomass and photosynthetic pigment content and reduced the root/shoot ratio of N. officinale. All straw treatments significantly increased Cd content in roots, but significantly decreased Cd content in shoots of N. officinale. Applying hyperaccumulator straw significantly increased the total Cd accumulation in the roots, shoots, and whole plants of N. officinale. Therefore, application of straw from four hyperaccumulator species promoted the growth of N. officinale and improved the phytoextraction efficiency of N. officinale in Cd-contaminated paddy field soil; the straw of Y. erythrocarpa provided the most improvement.

  11. Selenium hyperaccumulation - Astragalus bisulcatus, Cardamine hupingshanensis and Stanleya pinnata - may be useful for agromining selenium-rich soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium hyperaccumulator plants like Stanleya pinnata, Astragalus bisulcatus and the newly discovered Se-accumulator Cardamine hupingshanensis may play an important role in the Se cycle from soil to plant to human in China. Se-hyperaccumulators can be used for agromining or for phytoremediation of ...

  12. Aquarius, a novel gene isolated by gene trapping with an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, M; Wurst, W; Klüppel, M; Jin, O; Heng, H; Bernstein, A

    1998-06-01

    In a retinoic acid (RA) gene trap screen of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, a novel gene, named Aquarius (Aqr), was identified and characterized. The promoterless lacZ marker was used to trap the genomic locus and to determine the expression pattern of the gene. Aqr transcripts are strongly induced in response to RA in vitro. During embryogenesis, Aqr is expressed in mesoderm, in the neural crest and its target tissues, and in neuroepithelium. Expression was first detected at 8.5 days postcoitum, when neural crest cells are visible at the lateral ridges of the neural plate. The gene-trapped Aqr locus was transmitted through the mouse germ line in three genetic backgrounds. In the F2 generation, the expected mendelian ratio of 1:2:1 was observed in all backgrounds, indicating that homozygous mice are viable. Homozygotes are normal in size and weight and breed normally. The gene trap insertion, however, does not seem to generate a null mutation, because Aqr transcripts are still present in the homozygous mutant animals. The Aqr open reading frame has weak homology to RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RRPs) of the murine hepatitis viruses and contains an RRP motif. Aqr was mapped to mouse chromosome 2 between regions E5 through F2 by using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis.

  13. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals by submerged macrophytes: looking for hyperaccumulators in eutrophic lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Wu, Haoping; Hao, Beibei; Huang, Wenmin; Liu, Guihua

    2013-05-07

    To directly select submerged macrophytes with high accumulation capability from the field, 24 eutrophic lakes along the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River were investigated in the study. These eutrophic lakes have large amounts of heavy metals in both water and sediments because of human activities. The results showed that Najas marina is a hyperaccumulator of As and Cd, Ceratophyllum demersum is a hyperaccumulator of Co, Cr, and Fe, and Vallisneria natans is a hyperaccumulator of Pb. Strong positive correlations were found between concentrations of heavy metals in tissues of submerged macrophytes, probably because of coaccumulation of heavy metals. However, for most heavy metals, no significant correlations were found between submerged macrophytes and their surrounding environments. In conclusion, N. marina, C. demersum, and V. natans are good candidate species for removing heavy metals from eutrophic lakes.

  14. Growth phase-dependent gene regulation in vivo in Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeYoung, M.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosomal genes are strongly regulated dependent on growth phase in all organisms, but this regulation is poorly understood in Archaea. Moreover, very little is known about growth phase-dependent gene regulation in Archaea. SSV1-based lacS reporter gene constructs containing the Sulfolobus 16S/23S

  15. Effect of microbial siderophore DFO-B on Cd accumulation by Thlaspi caerulescens hyperaccumulator in the presence of zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Lotfollah; Heilmeier, Hermann; Merkel, Broder J

    2012-07-01

    Hyperaccumulators are grown in contaminated soil and water in order that contaminants are taken up and accumulated. Transport of metals from soil to plant is initially dependent on the solubility and mobility of metals in soil solution which is controlled by soil and metal properties and plant physiology. Complexation with organic and inorganic ligands may increase mobility and availability of metals for plants. In this work the influence of desferrioxamine-B (DFO-B), which naturally is produced in the rhizosphere, and zeolite on Cd accumulation in root and shoot of Thlaspi caerulescens (Cd hyperaccumulator) was investigated. Plants were grown in pots with clean quartz sand, amended with 1% zeolite; treatment solutions included 0, 10, and 100 μM Cd and 70 μM DFO-B. Addition of zeolite to the quartz sand significantly reduced Cd concentration in plant tissues and translocation from root to shoot. On contrary, DFO-B considerably enhanced Cd sorption by roots and translocation to aerial part of plants. Treating the plants with zeolite and DFO-B together at 10 μM Cd resulted in reduction of the bioaccumulation factor but enhancement of Cd translocation from root to shoot at the rate of 13%. In contrast, at 100 μM Cd in the solution both bioaccumulation and translocation factors decreased. Total metal accumulation as a key factor for evaluating the efficiency of phytoremediation was highly influenced by treatments. Presence of zeolite in pots significantly decreased total Cd accumulation by plants, whereas, DFO-B clearly enhanced it. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene dosage and suceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, R S; Baker, L; Zmijewski, C M

    1980-10-01

    1. All members of 33 families in which two or more sibs have insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) were HLA-typed. The results strongly support the hypothesis that, closely linked to the HLA region, there is a locus (S) for susceptibility to IDDM. We use Sd for alleles at this locus which confer susceptibility to disease, and Sa for all other alleles. 2. Published prevalence (recurrence) rates for relatives of an IDDM proband, which are essential for the analysis, are reviewed critically, and a new estimate of prevalence at age 30 in the general population is calculated from published data. 3. The analysis allows for greater risk (penetrance) of the genotype SdSd (two doses of Sd) than of SaSd (one dose of Sd) and for recombination between the HLA region and S. With either our own data on 26 affected sib pairs or a much larger sample assembled by pooling with published data, the maximum-likelihood estimate of the two-dose penetrance is 71%, of the one dose penetrance 6.5%. The hypothesis of differential penetrance according to gene dosage provides a significantly better explanation than either simple dominant or simple recessive inheritance. 4. Estimates of the recombination fraction between HLA and S are very sensitive to the proportion of affected sib pairs sharing neither HLA haplotype, which varies considerably among the samples pooled. With the pooled data the recombination fraction is estimated as 3%, but in view of the strong associations with particular HLA alleles seen in population data, this should probably be considered an upper limit.

  17. Foliar Mn accumulation in eastern Australian herbarium specimens: prospecting for ‘new’ Mn hyperaccumulators and potential applications in taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Denise R.; Guymer, Gordon; Reeves, Roger D.; Woodrow, Ian E.; Baker, Alan J.; Batianoff, George N.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The analysis of herbarium specimens has previously been used to prospect for ‘new’ hyperaccumulators, while the use of foliar manganese (Mn) concentrations as a taxonomic tool has been suggested. On the basis of their geographic and taxonomic affiliations to known Mn hyperaccumulators, six eastern Australian genera from the Queensland Herbarium collection were sampled for leaf tissue analyses. Methods ICP-OES was used to measure Mn and other elemental concentrations in 47 species within the genera Austromyrtus, Lenwebbia, Gossia (Myrtaceae), Macadamia (Proteaceae), Maytenus and Denhamia (Celastraceae). Key Results The resulting data demonstrated (a) up to seven ‘new’ Mn hyperaccumulators, mostly tropical rainforest species; (b) that one of these ‘new’ Mn hyperaccumulators also had notably elevated foliar Ni concentrations; (c) evidence of an interrelationship between foliar Mn and Al uptake among the Macadamias; (d) considerable variability of Mn hyperaccumulation within Gossia; and (e) the possibility that Maytenus cunninghamii may include subspecies. Conclusions Gossia bamagensis, G. fragrantissima, G. sankowsiorum, G. gonoclada and Maytenus cunninghamii were identified as ‘new’ Mn hyperaccumulators, while Gossia lucida and G. shepherdii are possible ‘new’ Mn hyperaccumulators. Of the three Myrtaceae genera examined, Mn hyperaccumulation appears restricted to Gossia, supporting its recent taxonomic revision. In the context of this present investigation and existing information, a reassesment of the general definition of Mn hyperaccumulation may be warranted. Morphological variation of Maytenus cunninghamii at two extremities was consistent with variation in Mn accumulation, indicating two possible ‘new’ subspecies. Although caution should be exercised in interpreting the data, surveying herbarium specimens by chemical analysis has provided an effective means of assessing foliar Mn accumulation. These findings should be

  18. Dopamine genes and nicotine dependence in treatment seeking and community smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Bergen, AW; Conti, DV; Van Den Berg, D.; Lee, W.; Liu, J.; D. Li; Guo, N; Mi, H.; Thomas, PD; Lessov-Schlaggar, CN; Krasnow, R.; He, Y.; Nishita, D; Jiang, R; McClure, JB

    2009-01-01

    We utilized a cohort of 828 treatment-seeking self-identified white cigarette smokers (50% female) to rank candidate gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND), a measure of nicotine dependence which assesses quantity of cigarettes smoked and time- and place-dependent characteristics of the respondent's smoking behavior. A total of 1123 SNPs at 55 autosomal candidate genes, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and genes involved...

  19. Dependence of gene copy number variation on reproductive processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin; Clark, Brian

    2009-11-01

    DNA is divided into genes, which are generally thought to come in pairs and code for a trait or part of a trait. Recently, evidence shows that there are multiple copies of a non-trivial number of genes and that the number of copies of some genes varies greatly from individual to individual. The role of fundamental processes including mutation, crossover, and inversion in determining the number of copies of specific genes is not understood. We report on the relationship between these fundamental processes and copy number variation as investigated via a numerical simulation. In the simulation, individuals are modeled by a single strand of DNA consisting of a set number of genes assigned to different traits. Individuals reproduce according to their fitness as calculated with the two most fit genes assigned to one specific trait.

  20. A cosegregation analysis of zinc (Zn) accumulation and Zn tolerance in the Zn hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assunção, A.G.L.; ten Bookum, W.M.; Nelissen, H.J.M.; Vooijs, H.; Schat, H.; Ernst, W.H.O.

    2003-01-01

    • To analyse the relation between zinc (Zn) accumulation and Zn tolerance in the Zn hyperaccumulator, Thlaspi caerulescens, a cross was made between a plant from a nonmetallicolous population (LE: high accumulation, low tolerance) and one from a calamine population (LC: low accumulation, high

  1. Cadmium tolerance and accumulation in Excluder Thlaspi arvense and various accessions of hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seregin, I.V.; Kozhevnikova, A.D.; Zhukovskaya, V.; Schat, H.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) accumulation and tolerance were analyzed in hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens F.K. Mey and excluder Thlaspi arvense L. Five accessions of N. caerulescens (La Calamine (LC, Belgium), Saint Félix de Palliéres (SF, France), Col du Mas de l’Aire (CMA, France), Ganges (GA, France) from

  2. Plants as extreme environments? Ni-resistant bacteria and Ni-hyperaccumulators of serpentine flora.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mengoni, A.; Schat, H.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2010-01-01

    During recent years there has been an increasing interest in the bacterial communities occurring in unusual, often extreme, environments. On serpentine outcrops around the world, a high diversity of plant species showing the peculiar features of metal hyperaccumulation is present. These metal

  3. FLO gene-dependent phenotypes in industrial wine yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Patrick; Bester, Michael; Bauer, Florian F

    2010-04-01

    Most commercial yeast strains are nonflocculent. However, controlled flocculation phenotypes could provide significant benefits to many fermentation-based industries. In nonflocculent laboratory strains, it has been demonstrated that it is possible to adjust flocculation and adhesion phenotypes to desired specifications by altering expression of the otherwise silent but dominant flocculation (FLO) genes. However, FLO genes are characterized by high allele heterogeneity and are subjected to epigenetic regulation. Extrapolation of data obtained in laboratory strains to industrial strains may therefore not always be applicable. Here, we assess the adhesion phenotypes that are associated with the expression of a chromosomal copy of the FLO1, FLO5, or FLO11 open reading frame in two nonflocculent commercial wine yeast strains, BM45 and VIN13. The chromosomal promoters of these genes were replaced with stationary phase-inducible promoters of the HSP30 and ADH2 genes. Under standard laboratory and wine making conditions, the strategy resulted in expected and stable expression patterns of these genes in both strains. However, the specific impact of the expression of individual FLO genes showed significant differences between the two wine strains and with corresponding phenotypes in laboratory strains. The data suggest that optimization of the flocculation pattern of individual commercial strains will have to be based on a strain-by-strain approach.

  4. AI-2-dependent gene regulation in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sturdevant Daniel E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoinducer 2 (AI-2, a widespread by-product of the LuxS-catalyzed S-ribosylhomocysteine cleavage reaction in the activated methyl cycle, has been suggested to serve as an intra- and interspecies signaling molecule, but in many bacteria AI-2 control of gene expression is not completely understood. Particularly, we have a lack of knowledge about AI-2 signaling in the important human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis. Results To determine the role of LuxS and AI-2 in S. epidermidis, we analyzed genome-wide changes in gene expression in an S. epidermidis luxS mutant and after addition of AI-2 synthesized by over-expressed S. epidermidis Pfs and LuxS enzymes. Genes under AI-2 control included mostly genes involved in sugar, nucleotide, amino acid, and nitrogen metabolism, but also virulence-associated genes coding for lipase and bacterial apoptosis proteins. In addition, we demonstrate by liquid chromatography/mass-spectrometry of culture filtrates that the pro-inflammatory phenol-soluble modulin (PSM peptides, key virulence factors of S. epidermidis, are under luxS/AI-2 control. Conclusion Our results provide a detailed molecular basis for the role of LuxS in S. epidermidis virulence and suggest a signaling function for AI-2 in this bacterium.

  5. Local adaptation is associated with zinc tolerance in Pseudomonas endophytes of the metal-hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens

    OpenAIRE

    Fones, HN; McCurrach, H; Mithani, A.; Smith, JAC; Preston, GM

    2016-01-01

    Metal-hyperaccumulating plants, which are hypothesized to use metals for defence against pests and pathogens, provide a unique context in which to study plant–pathogen coevolution. Previously, we demonstrated that the high concentrations of zinc found in leaves of the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens provide protection against bacterial pathogens, with a potential trade-off between metal-based and pathogen-induced defences. We speculated that an evolutionary arms race between zinc-based ...

  6. Iron-dependent gene expression in Actinomyces oris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Mulé

    2015-12-01

    Results: When A. oris was grown under iron-limiting conditions, the genes encoding iron/siderophore transporters fetA and sidD showed increased expression. One of these genes (sidD was mutated, and the sidD::Km strain exhibited a 50% reduction in growth in late log and stationary phase cells in media that contained iron. This growth defect was restored when the sidD gene was provided in a complemented strain. We were able to isolate the AmdR-encoding gene in seven clinical isolates of Actinomyces. When these protein sequences were aligned to the laboratory strain, there was a high degree of sequence similarity. Conclusions: The growth of the sidD::Km mutant in iron-replete medium mirrored the growth of the wild-type strain grown in iron-limiting medium, suggesting that the sidD::Km mutant was compromised in iron uptake. The known iron regulator AmdR is well conserved in clinical isolates of A. oris. This work provides additional insight into iron metabolism in this important oral microbe.

  7. A Grhl2-dependent gene network controls trophoblast branching morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walentin, Katharina; Hinze, Christian; Werth, Max; Haase, Nadine; Varma, Saaket; Morell, Robert; Aue, Annekatrin; Pötschke, Elisabeth; Warburton, David; Qiu, Andong; Barasch, Jonathan; Purfürst, Bettina; Dieterich, Christoph; Popova, Elena; Bader, Michael; Dechend, Ralf; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Yurtdas, Zeliha Yesim; Kilic, Ergin; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M

    2015-03-15

    Healthy placental development is essential for reproductive success; failure of the feto-maternal interface results in pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth retardation. We found that grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2), a CP2-type transcription factor, is highly expressed in chorionic trophoblast cells, including basal chorionic trophoblast (BCT) cells located at the chorioallantoic interface in murine placentas. Placentas from Grhl2-deficient mouse embryos displayed defects in BCT cell polarity and basement membrane integrity at the chorioallantoic interface, as well as a severe disruption of labyrinth branching morphogenesis. Selective Grhl2 inactivation only in epiblast-derived cells rescued all placental defects but phenocopied intraembryonic defects observed in global Grhl2 deficiency, implying the importance of Grhl2 activity in trophectoderm-derived cells. ChIP-seq identified 5282 GRHL2 binding sites in placental tissue. By integrating these data with placental gene expression profiles, we identified direct and indirect Grhl2 targets and found a marked enrichment of GRHL2 binding adjacent to genes downregulated in Grhl2(-/-) placentas, which encoded known regulators of placental development and epithelial morphogenesis. These genes included that encoding the serine protease inhibitor Kunitz type 1 (Spint1), which regulates BCT cell integrity and labyrinth formation. In human placenta, we found that human orthologs of murine GRHL2 and its targets displayed co-regulation and were expressed in trophoblast cells in a similar domain as in mouse placenta. Our data indicate that a conserved Grhl2-coordinated gene network controls trophoblast branching morphogenesis, thereby facilitating development of the site of feto-maternal exchange. This might have implications for syndromes related to placental dysfunction. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. The potential use of indigenous nickel hyperaccumulators for small-scale mining in The Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Fernando

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Uptake of nickel and three other heavy metals (copper, cobalt, and chromium was examined in 33 species of the common and rare native vascular plants growing in an ultramafic area currently subjected to mining in Zambales Province, Luzon, Philippines. Leaf tissue samples were initially screened in the field using filter paper impregnated with dimethylglyoxime (1% solution in 70% ethyl alcohol and later analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. One species was found to be a hypernickelophore (>10,000 µg/g, eight species were nickel hyperaccumulators (>1,000 µg/g, nineteen species were hemi-accumulators (>100-1,000 µg/g, and five species were non-accumulators (<100 µg/g. This paper significantly adds to the list of hyperaccumulator species first reported for the Philippines in 1992. The findings will be discussed in context of using indigenous species for post mining ecological restoration and nickel phytoextraction in small-scale mining in the Philippines

  9. Effect of hyperaccumulator plants and associated rhizobacteria on the efficiency of nickel extraction

    OpenAIRE

    RUE, Marie; Echevarria, Guillaume; Benizri, Émile

    2014-01-01

    Many works have attempted to relate the association of different plants on the efficiency of inorganic pollutants extraction, with the hypothesis that these multi-species covers promoted the development and the activity of rhizosphere microorganisms, such as PGPR. Up to now, the focus has been on crop associations (maize, tabacco, Brassica species). Only few studies have concerned the effect of the combination of metal hyperaccumulator plants with other species non-hyperaccumulato...

  10. Mn accumulation and tolerance in Celosia argentea Linn.: a new Mn-hyperaccumulating plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Shang, Weiwei; Zhang, Xuehong; Zhu, Yinian; Yu, Ke

    2014-02-28

    Identifying a hyperaccumulator is an important groundwork for the phytoextraction of heavy metal-contaminated soil. Celosia argentea Linn., which grew on a Mn tailing wasteland, was found to hyperaccumulate Mn (14 362mgkg(-1) in leaf dry matter) in this study. To investigate Mn tolerance and accumulation in C. argentea, a hydroponic culture experiment was conducted in a greenhouse. Results showed that the biomass and the relative growth rate of C. argentea were insignificantly different (p>0.05) at the Mn supply level ranging from 2.5mgL(-1) (control) to 400mgL(-1). Manganese concentrations in leaves, stems, and roots reached maxima of 20228, 8872, and 2823mgkg(-1) at 600mgMnL(-1), respectively. The relative rate of Mn accumulation increased by 91.2% at 400mgMnL(-1). Over 95% of the total Mn taken up by C. argentea was translocated to shoots. Thus, C. argentea exhibits the basic characteristics of a Mn-hyperaccumulator. This species has great potential to remediate Mn-contaminated soil cheaply and can also aid the studies of Mn uptake, translocation, speciation, distribution and detoxification in plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Determination of Cu, Pb, Fe, and Zn in plant component polymers of a hyperaccumulating plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Maki, Teruya; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi; Ueda, Kazumasa

    2005-12-01

    Phytoremediation is an innovative technology that utilizes the natural properties of plants to remediate hazardous waste sites. For more cost-effective phytoremediation, it is important to utilize a hyperaccumulating plant after phytoremediation, i.e. the recovery of valuable metals and the production of useful materials. In this work, the determination of metals in plant component polymers in a fern, Athyrium yokoscense, as a hyper-accumulating plant was established using steam explosion, Wayman's extraction method, and ICP emission spectrometry. After A. yokoscense plants were treated by steam explosion, the steam-exploded A. yokoscense were separated into four plant component polymers, ie. water-soluble material fraction, holocellulose fraction, methanol-soluble lignin fraction, and residual lignin fraction. The concentrations of Cu, Pb, Fe, and Zn in these plant component polymers and the dry weights of plant component polymers were measured. These analytical process determining metals in the plants will contribute to not only the evaluation and the efforts of phytoremediation using a hyperaccumulating plant, but also to the development of more effective phytoremediation.

  12. A more complete picture of metal hyperaccumulation through next-generation sequencing technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eVerbruggen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanistic understanding of metal hyperaccumulation has benefitted immensely from the use of molecular genetics tools developed for Arabidopsis thaliana. The revolution in DNA sequencing will enable even greater strides in the near future, this time not restricted to the family Brassicaceae. Reference genomes are within reach for many ecologically interesting species including heterozygous outbreeders. They will allow deep RNA-seq transcriptome studies and the re-sequencing of contrasting individuals to unravel the genetic basis of phenotypic variation. Cell-type specific transcriptome analyses, which will be essential for the dissection of metal translocation pathways in hyperaccumulators, can be achieved through the combination of RNA-seq and translatome approaches. Affordable high-resolution genotyping of many individuals enables the elucidation of quantitative trait loci in intra- and interspecific crosses as well as through genome-wide association mapping across large panels of accessions. Furthermore, genome-wide scans have the power to detect loci under recent selection. Together these approaches will lead to a detailed understanding of the evolutionary path towards the emergence of hyperaccumulation traits.

  13. Thermal Characteristics of Hyperaccumulator and Fate of Heavy Metals during Thermal Treatment of Sedum plumbizincicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Daoxu; Zhong, Zhaoping; Wu, Longhua; Xue, Hui; Song, Zuwei; Luo, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Thermal treatment is one of the most promising disposal techniques for heavy metal- (HM)-enriched hyperaccumulators. However, the thermal characteristics and fate of HMs during thermal treatment of hyperaccumulator biomass need to be known in detail. A horizontal tube furnace was used to analyze the disposal process of hyperaccumulator biomass derived from a phyto-extracted field in which the soil was moderately contaminated with heavy metals. Different operational conditions regarding temperature and gas composition were tested. A thermo-dynamic analysis by advanced system for process engineering was performed to predict HM speciation during thermal disposal and SEM-EDS, XRD and sequential chemical extraction were used to characterize the heavy metals. The recovery of Zn, Pb and Cd in bottom ash decreased with increasing temperature but recovery increased in the fly ash. Recovery of Zn, Pb and Cd fluctuated with increasing air flow rate and the metal recovery rates were higher in the fly ash than the bottom ash. Most Cl, S, Fe, Al and SiO2 were found as alkali oxides, SO2, Fe2(SO4)3, iron oxide, Ca3Al2O6, K2SiO3 and SiO2 instead of reacting with HMs. Thus, the HMs were found to occur as the pure metals and their oxides during the combustion process and as the sulfides during the reducing process.

  14. A kinetic analysis of cadmium accumulation in a Cd hyper-accumulator fern, Athyrium yokoscense and tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Toshihiro; Suzui, Nobuo; Ishii, Satomi; Kitazaki, Mayu; Yamazaki, Haruaki; Kitazaki, Kazuyoshi; Kawachi, Naoki; Yin, Yong-Gen; Ito-Tanabata, Sayuri; Hashida, Shin-nosuke; Shoji, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Hiroaki; Goto, Fumiyuki; Fujimaki, Shu

    2014-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) accumulations in a Cd hyper-accumulator fern, Athyrium yokoscense (Ay), and tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum (Nt), were kinetically analysed using the positron-emitting tracer imaging system under two medium conditions (basal and no-nutrient). In Ay, maximumly 50% and 15% of the total Cd accumulated in the distal roots and the shoots under the basal condition, respectively. Interestingly, a portion of the Cd in the distal roots returned to the medium. In comparison with Ay, a little fewer Cd accumulations in the distal roots and clearly higher Cd migration to the shoots were observed in Nt under the basal condition (maximumly 40% and 70% of the total Cd, respectively). The no-nutrient condition down-regulated the Cd migration in both species, although the regulation was highly stricter in Ay than in Nt (almost no migration in Ay and around 20% migration in Nt). In addition, the present work enabled to estimate physical and physiological Cd accumulation capacities in the distal roots, and demonstrated condition-dependent changes especially in Ay. These results clearly suggested occurrences of species-/condition-specific regulations in each observed parts. It is probable that integration of these properties govern the specific Cd tolerance/accumulation in Ay and Nt. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Local adaptation is associated with zinc tolerance in Pseudomonas endophytes of the metal-hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fones, H N; McCurrach, H; Mithani, A; Smith, J A C; Preston, G M

    2016-05-11

    Metal-hyperaccumulating plants, which are hypothesized to use metals for defence against pests and pathogens, provide a unique context in which to study plant-pathogen coevolution. Previously, we demonstrated that the high concentrations of zinc found in leaves of the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens provide protection against bacterial pathogens, with a potential trade-off between metal-based and pathogen-induced defences. We speculated that an evolutionary arms race between zinc-based defences in N. caerulescens and zinc tolerance in pathogens might have driven the development of the hyperaccumulation phenotype. Here, we investigate the possibility of local adaptation by bacteria to the zinc-rich environment of N. caerulescens leaves and show that leaves sampled from the contaminated surroundings of a former mine site harboured endophytes with greater zinc tolerance than those within plants of an artificially created hyperaccumulating population. Experimental manipulation of zinc concentrations in plants of this artificial population influenced the zinc tolerance of recovered endophytes. In laboratory experiments, only endophytic bacteria isolated from plants of the natural population were able to grow to high population densities in any N. caerulescens plants. These findings suggest that long-term coexistence with zinc-hyperaccumulating plants leads to local adaptation by endophytic bacteria to the environment within their leaves. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Growth and metal accumulation of an Alyssum murale nickel hyperaccumulator ecotype co-cropped with Alyssum montanum or perennial ryegrass in serpentine soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    More than 400 plant species naturally accumulate high levels of metals such as Cd, Cu, Co, Mn, Ni, and Zn. The genus Alyssum (Brassicaceae) contains the greatest number of reported Ni hyperaccumulators (50), many of which can achieve 3 wt% Ni in dry leaves. Some Alyssum hyperaccumulators are viabl...

  17. Genes involved in systemic and arterial bed dependent atherosclerosis--Tampere Vascular study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Levula

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is a complex disease with hundreds of genes influencing its progression. In addition, the phenotype of the disease varies significantly depending on the arterial bed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized the genes generally involved in human advanced atherosclerotic (AHA type V-VI plaques in carotid and femoral arteries as well as aortas from 24 subjects of Tampere Vascular study and compared the results to non-atherosclerotic internal thoracic arteries (n=6 using genome-wide expression array and QRT-PCR. In addition we determined genes that were typical for each arterial plaque studied. To gain a comprehensive insight into the pathologic processes in the plaques we also analyzed pathways and gene sets dysregulated in this disease using gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA. According to the selection criteria used (>3.0 fold change and p-value <0.05, 235 genes were up-regulated and 68 genes down-regulated in the carotid plaques, 242 genes up-regulated and 116 down-regulated in the femoral plaques and 256 genes up-regulated and 49 genes down-regulated in the aortic plaques. Nine genes were found to be specifically induced predominantly in aortic plaques, e.g., lactoferrin, and three genes in femoral plaques, e.g., chondroadherin, whereas no gene was found to be specific for carotid plaques. In pathway analysis, a total of 28 pathways or gene sets were found to be significantly dysregulated in atherosclerotic plaques (false discovery rate [FDR] <0.25. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes comprehensively the gene expression changes that generally prevail in human atherosclerotic plaques. In addition, site specific genes induced only in femoral or aortic plaques were found, reflecting that atherosclerotic process has unique features in different vascular beds.

  18. Chronic ethanol exposure produces time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Osterndorff-Kahanek

    Full Text Available Repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal in mice increases voluntary drinking and represents an animal model of physical dependence. We examined time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks in amygdala (AMY, nucleus accumbens (NAC, prefrontal cortex (PFC, and liver after four weekly cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE vapor exposure in C57BL/6J mice. Microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles at 0-, 8-, and 120-hours following the last ethanol exposure. Each brain region exhibited a large number of differentially expressed genes (2,000-3,000 at the 0- and 8-hour time points, but fewer changes were detected at the 120-hour time point (400-600. Within each region, there was little gene overlap across time (~20%. All brain regions were significantly enriched with differentially expressed immune-related genes at the 8-hour time point. Weighted gene correlation network analysis identified modules that were highly enriched with differentially expressed genes at the 0- and 8-hour time points with virtually no enrichment at 120 hours. Modules enriched for both ethanol-responsive and cell-specific genes were identified in each brain region. These results indicate that chronic alcohol exposure causes global 'rewiring' of coexpression systems involving glial and immune signaling as well as neuronal genes.

  19. Zinc hyperaccumulation substitutes for defense failures beyond salicylate and jasmonate signaling pathways of Alternaria brassicicola attack in Noccaea caerulescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Berta; Martos, Soledad; Cabot, Catalina; Barceló, Juan; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2017-04-01

    The hypothesis of metal defense as a substitute for a defective biotic stress signaling system in metal hyperaccumulators was tested using the pathosystem Alternaria brassicicola-Noccaea caerulescens under low (2 µM), medium (12 µM) and high (102 µM) Zn supply. Regardless the Zn supply, N. caerulescens responded to fungal attack with the activation of both HMA4 coding for a Zn transporter, and biotic stress signaling pathways. Salicylate, jasmonate, abscisic acid and indoleacetic acid concentrations, as well as biotic stress marker genes (PDF1.2, CHIB, LOX2, PR1 and BGL2) were activated 24 h upon inoculation. Based on the activation of defense genes 24 h after the inoculation an incompatible fungal-plant interaction could be predicted. Nonetheless, in the longer term (7 days) no effective protection against A. brassicicola was achieved in plants exposed to low and medium Zn supply. After 1 week the biotic stress markers were even further increased in these plants, and this compatible interaction was apparently not caused by a failure in the signaling of the fungal attack, but due to the lack of specificity in the type of the activated defense mechanisms. Only plants receiving high Zn exhibited an incompatible fungal interaction. High Zn accumulation in these plants, possibly in cooperation with high glucosinolate concentrations, substituted for the ineffective defense system and the interaction turned into incompatible. In a threshold-type response, these joint effects efficiently hampered fungal spread and, consequently decreased the biotic stress signaling. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  20. Genetic analysis of AUTS2 as a susceptibility gene of heroin dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Liao, Ding-Lieh; Lai, Chih-Hao; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-03-01

    Both alcoholism and heroin dependence are common substance use disorders with a high genetic basis. A recent genetic study reported that the autism susceptibility candidate 2 gene (AUTS2) was involved in regulating the alcohol drinking behavior. In our previous total gene expression profiling study, we found that the AUTS2 transcript was significantly down-regulated in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) in heroin dependent individuals compared with control subjects, which prompted us to investigate whether AUTS2 is associated with heroin dependence. We compared the AUTS2 transcript level of LCL between 124 heroin dependent males and 116 control males using real-time quantitative PCR, and conducted a genetic association study of the rs6943555 of AUTS2 with heroin dependence using a sample of 546 heroin dependent males and 373 control males. We first verified that the average transcript level of AUTS2 in the heroin dependent group was significantly lower than that in the control group (p=0.017). In the genetic association analysis, we found that AA homozygotes of rs6943555 were significantly over-represented in the heroin dependent subjects compared with the control subjects (odds ratio=1.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.08-2.74, p=0.017). Analyzing the sample from the AUTS2 transcript experiment, we found that AA carriers (n=19) had significantly lower AUTS2 mRNA levels in their LCL compared to TT carriers (n=97, p=0.002) and AT carriers (n=91, p=0.005). Our data indicate that the AUTS2 gene might be associated with heroin dependence, and reduced AUTS2 gene expression might confer increased susceptibility to heroin dependence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The μ-opioid receptor gene and smoking initiation and nicotine dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendler Kenneth S

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The gene encoding the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1 is reported to be associated with a range of substance dependence. Experiments in knockout mice indicate that the mu-opioid receptor may mediate reinforcing effects of nicotine. In humans, opioid antagonist naltrexone may reduce the reinforcing effects of tobacco smoking. Additionally, the OPRM1 gene is located in a region showing linkage to nicotine dependence. The OPRM1 is thus a plausible candidate gene for smoking behavior. To investigate whether OPRM1 contributes to the susceptibility of smoking initiation and nicotine dependence, we genotyped 11 SNPs in the gene for 688 Caucasian subjects of lifetime smokers and nonsmokers. Three SNPs showed nominal significance for smoking initiation and one reached significance for nicotine dependence. The global test for three-marker (rs9479757-rs2075572-rs10485057 haplotypes was significant for smoking initiation (p = 0.0022. The same three-marker haplotype test was marginal (p = 0.0514 for nicotine dependence. These results suggest that OPRM1 may be involved in smoking initiation and nicotine dependence.

  2. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Krause, Michael W. [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kostrouch, Zdenek [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Kostrouchova, Marta, E-mail: marta.kostrouchova@lf1.cuni.cz [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. {yields} The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. {yields} Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. {yields} Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. {yields} New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  3. Extraction and isolation of the salidroside-type metabolite from zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan; Peng, Hong-yun; Li, Xia; Zhang, Meng-xi; Gao, Ling-ling; Yang, Xiao-e

    2012-01-01

    The active metabolite in the post-harvested biomass of zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance from phytoextraction is of great interest in China. The current study demonstrates that a salidroside-type metabolite can be yielded from the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator S. alfredii biomass by means of sonication/ethanol extraction and macroporous resin column (AB-8 type) isolation. The concentrations of Zn and Cd in the salidroside-type metabolite were below the limitation of the national standards. PMID:23024051

  4. Identification of murine and human XCP1 genes as C/EBP-epsilon-dependent members of FIZZ/Resistin gene family

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chumakov, Alexey M; Kubota, Tetsuya; Walter, Steffen; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2004-01-01

    .... We have found a novel C/EBP-epsilon-dependent promyelocyte-specific gene, mXCP1. mXCP1 belongs to a family of XCP/FIZZ/Resistin genes, which includes four murine genes and two human genes, hXCP1 and hXCP2...

  5. Size-dependent foraging gene expression and behavioral caste differentiation in Bombus ignitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaira, Yosuke; Ohtsuki, Hajime; Yokoyama, Jun; Kawata, Masakado

    2009-01-01

    Background In eusocial hymenopteran insects, foraging genes, members of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase family, are considered to contribute to division of labor through behavioral caste differentiation. However, the relationship between foraging gene expression and behavioral caste in honeybees is opposite to that observed in ants and wasps. In the previously examined eusocial Hymenoptera, workers behave as foragers or nurses depending on age. We reasoned that examination of a different system of behavioral caste determination might provide new insights into the relationship between foraging genes and division of labor, and accordingly focused on bumblebees, which exhibit size-dependent behavioral caste differentiation. We characterized a foraging gene (Bifor) in bumblebees (Bombus ignitus) and examined the relationship between Bifor expression and size-dependent behavioral caste differentiation. Findings A putative open reading frame of the Bifor gene was 2004 bp in length. It encoded 668 aa residues and showed high identity to orthologous genes in other hymenopterans (85.3-99.0%). As in ants and wasps, Bifor expression levels were higher in nurses than in foragers. Bifor expression was negatively correlated with individual body size even within the same behavioral castes (regression coefficient = -0.376, P < 0.001, all individuals; -0.379, P = 0.018, within foragers). Conclusion These findings indicate that Bifor expression is size dependent and support the idea that Bifor expression levels are related to behavioral caste differentiation in B. ignitus. Thus, the relationship between foraging gene expression and behavioral caste differentiation found in ants and wasps was identified in a different system of labor determination. PMID:19758422

  6. β-Actin-dependent global chromatin organization and gene expression programs control cellular identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xin; Almuzzaini, Bader; Drou, Nizar; Kremb, Stephan; Yousif, Ayman; Farrants, Ann-Kristin Östlund; Gunsalus, Kristin; Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2017-11-03

    During differentiation and development, cell fate and identity are established by waves of genetic reprogramming. Although the mechanisms are largely unknown, during these events, dynamic chromatin reorganization is likely to ensure that multiple genes involved in the same cellular functions are coregulated, depending on the nuclear environment. In this study, using high-content screening of embryonic fibroblasts from a β-actin knockout (KO) mouse, we found major chromatin rearrangements and changes in histone modifications, such as methylated histone (H)3-lysine-(K)9. Genome-wide H3K9 trimethylation-(Me)3 landscape changes correlate with gene up- and down-regulation in β-actin KO cells. Mechanistically, we found loss of chromatin association by the Brahma-related gene (Brg)/Brahma-associated factor (BAF) chromatin remodeling complex subunit Brg1 in the absence of β-actin. This actin-dependent chromatin reorganization was concomitant with the up-regulation of sets of genes involved in angiogenesis, cytoskeletal organization, and myofibroblast features in β-actin KO cells. Some of these genes and phenotypes were gained in a β-actin dose-dependent manner. Moreover, reintroducing a nuclear localization signal-containing β-actin in the knockout cells affected nuclear features and gene expression. Our results suggest that, by affecting the genome-wide organization of heterochromatin through the chromatin-binding activity of the BAF complex, β-actin plays an essential role in the determination of gene expression programs and cellular identity.-Xie, X., Almuzzaini, B., Drou, N., Kremb, S., Yousif, A., Östlund Farrants, A.-K., Gunsalus, K., Percipalle, P. β-Actin-dependent global chromatin organization and gene expression programs control cellular identity. © FASEB.

  7. Natural sesquiterpene lactones as inhibitors of Myb-dependent gene expression: structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomburg, Caroline; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Da Costa, Fernando B; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz; Schmidt, Thomas J

    2013-05-01

    c-myb is a proto-oncogene encoding a transcription factor which is highly expressed in hematopoietic progenitor cells. It regulates the expression of genes important for lineage determination, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Deregulation of c-myb expression is known to be involved in the development of human tumors, especially certain types of leukemia and breast and colon cancer. The c-Myb protein has thus been identified as an interesting therapeutic target. We recently discovered that some sesquiterpene lactones suppress Myb-dependent gene expression which is a new mechanism for these natural products' potential anti-cancer activity. We developed a test system to screen compounds for inhibitory activity on Myb-inducible reporter gene activation. Using this system we have now investigated 60 sesquiterpene lactones for their capacity to inhibit c-Myb-dependent gene activation. The IC50 values were in a range between 0.7 and >30 μM. The furanoheliangolide goyazensolide and the pseudoguaianolide helenalin acetate (IC50 = 0.6 and 0.7 μM, respectively) represent the most active inhibitors of c-Myb dependent gene expression found up to present. Control measurements for cell viability (MTS assay) proved that the observed activity on c-Myb dependent gene expression is not a function of cytotoxicity/unspecific cell damage. Structure-activity relationships were investigated by a QSAR approach based on flexible alignment of the most active compounds and a common pharmacophore model. These investigations resulted in a QSAR model which indicates that the potency of inhibitory activity on c-Myb-dependent transcription does not only depend on the presence of reactive Michael-acceptor features but also on their optimal spatial arrangement in the molecule. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits AID-induced antibody gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J L Cook

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Affinity maturation and class switching of antibodies requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID-dependent hypermutation of Ig V(DJ rearrangements and Ig S regions, respectively, in activated B cells. AID deaminates deoxycytidine bases in Ig genes, converting them into deoxyuridines. In V(DJ regions, subsequent excision of the deaminated bases by uracil-DNA glycosylase, or by mismatch repair, leads to further point mutation or gene conversion, depending on the species. In Ig S regions, nicking at the abasic sites produced by AID and uracil-DNA glycosylases results in staggered double-strand breaks, whose repair by nonhomologous end joining mediates Ig class switching. We have tested whether nonhomologous end joining also plays a role in V(DJ hypermutation using chicken DT40 cells deficient for Ku70 or the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs. Inactivation of the Ku70 or DNA-PKcs genes in DT40 cells elevated the rate of AID-induced gene conversion as much as 5-fold. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs-deficiency appeared to reduce point mutation. The data provide strong evidence that double-strand DNA ends capable of recruiting the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex are important intermediates in Ig V gene conversion.

  9. Expression dynamics of RpoS/Crl-dependent genes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudin, Omaya; Lacour, Stéphan; Geiselmann, Johannes

    2013-10-01

    The alternative sigma factor RpoS is a central regulator of the stress response in many Proteobacteria, acting both during exponential growth and in stationary phase. The small protein Crl increases the interaction between RpoS and RNA polymerase and thereby activates certain RpoS-dependent promoters. However, the growth-phase dependence of the interaction of Crl with different forms of polymerase remains unknown. We use 41 GFP transcriptional fusions to study the dynamics of gene regulation by RpoS and Crl during growth transition from exponential to stationary phase in Escherichia coli. We confirm that RpoS can regulate gene expression in exponential phase, both positively and negatively. Crl slightly stimulates transcription by RpoS in exponential phase and controls a subset of RpoS-dependent genes in stationary phase. Growth temperature strongly affects induction of specific promoters by RpoS, whereas its impact on gene regulation by Crl is much less significant. In addition, we identify five new genes regulated by Crl (ada, cbpA, glgS, sodC and flgM) and demonstrate that Crl improves promoter binding and opening by RpoS-containing RNA polymerase at the hdeA promoter. Our study also shows that Crl is a cognate enhancer of RpoS activity under different growth conditions, since its deletion has no effect on genes transcribed by other sigma factors. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. The temperature-dependent expression of the desaturase gene desA in Synechocystis PCC6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, D; Horvath, I; Vigh, L; Murata, N

    1993-02-22

    We examined the temperature-dependent regulation of the expression of the desA gene, which encodes delta 12 desaturase of Synechocystis PCC6803. The level of desA transcript increased 10-fold within 1 h upon a decrease in temperature from 36 degrees C to 22 degrees C. This suggests that the low-temperature-induced desaturation of membrane lipid fatty acids is regulated at the level of the expression of the desaturase genes. The accumulation of the desA transcript depended on the extent of temperature change over a certain threshold level, but not on the absolute temperature.

  11. Topoisomerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression in Neurons through Cleavage Complex-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Mabb

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1 inhibitors, including camptothecin and topotecan, covalently trap TOP1 on DNA, creating cleavage complexes (cc's that must be resolved before gene transcription and DNA replication can proceed. We previously found that topotecan reduces the expression of long (>100 kb genes and unsilences the paternal allele of Ube3a in neurons. Here, we sought to evaluate overlap between TOP1cc-dependent and -independent gene regulation in neurons. To do this, we utilized Top1 conditional knockout mice, Top1 knockdown, the CRISPR-Cas9 system to delete Top1, TOP1 catalytic inhibitors that do not generate TOP1cc's, and a TOP1 mutation (T718A that stabilizes TOP1cc's. We found that topotecan treatment significantly alters the expression of many more genes, including long neuronal genes, immediate early genes, and paternal Ube3a, when compared to Top1 deletion. Our data show that topotecan has a stronger effect on neuronal transcription than Top1 deletion, and identifies TOP1cc-dependent and -independent contributions to gene expression.

  12. BMRF-MI: integrative identification of protein interaction network by modeling the gene dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xu; Wang, Xiao; Shajahan, Ayesha; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Clarke, Robert; Xuan, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Identification of protein interaction network is a very important step for understanding the molecular mechanisms in cancer. Several methods have been developed to integrate protein-protein interaction (PPI) data with gene expression data for network identification. However, they often fail to model the dependency between genes in the network, which makes many important genes, especially the upstream genes, unidentified. It is necessary to develop a method to improve the network identification performance by incorporating the dependency between genes. We proposed an approach for identifying protein interaction network by incorporating mutual information (MI) into a Markov random field (MRF) based framework to model the dependency between genes. MI is widely used in information theory to measure the uncertainty between random variables. Different from traditional Pearson correlation test, MI is capable of capturing both linear and non-linear relationship between random variables. Among all the existing MI estimators, we choose to use k-nearest neighbor MI (kNN-MI) estimator which is proved to have minimum bias. The estimated MI is integrated with an MRF framework to model the gene dependency in the context of network. The maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation is applied on the MRF-based model to estimate the network score. In order to reduce the computational complexity of finding the optimal network, a probabilistic searching algorithm is implemented. We further increase the robustness and reproducibility of the results by applying a non-parametric bootstrapping method to measure the confidence level of the identified genes. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we test the method on simulation data under different conditions. The experimental results show an improved accuracy in terms of subnetwork identification compared to existing methods. Furthermore, we applied our method onto real breast cancer patient data; the identified protein interaction

  13. Plastidial fatty acid levels regulate resistance gene-dependent defense signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra-Shekara, A C; Venugopal, Srivathsa C; Barman, Subhankar Roy; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2007-04-24

    In Arabidopsis, resistance to Turnip Crinkle Virus (TCV) depends on the resistance (R) gene, HRT, and the recessive locus rrt. Resistance also depends on salicylic acid (SA), EDS1, and PAD4. Exogenous application of SA confers resistance in RRT-containing plants by increasing HRT transcript levels in a PAD4-dependent manner. Here we report that reduction of oleic acid (18:1) can also induce HRT gene expression and confer resistance to TCV. However, the 18:1-regulated pathway is independent of SA, rrt, EDS1, and PAD4. Reducing the levels of 18:1, via a mutation in the SSI2-encoded stearoyl-acyl carrier protein-desaturase, or by exogenous application of glycerol, increased transcript levels of HRT as well as several other R genes. Second-site mutations in the ACT1-encoded glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase or GLY1-encoded glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase restored 18:1 levels in HRT ssi2 plants and reestablished a dependence on rrt. Resistance to TCV and HRT gene expression in HRT act1 plants was inducible by SA but not by glycerol, whereas that in HRT pad4 plants was inducible by glycerol but not by SA. The low 18:1-mediated induction of R gene expression was also dependent on ACT1 but independent of EDS1, PAD4, and RAR1. Intriguingly, TCV inoculation did not activate this 18:1-regulated pathway in HRT plants, but instead resulted in the induction of several genes that encode 18:1-synthesizing isozymes. These results suggest that the 18:1-regulated pathway may be specifically targeted during pathogen infection and that altering 18:1 levels may serve as a unique strategy for promoting disease resistance.

  14. Space experiment "Rad Gene"-report 1; p53-Dependent gene expression in human cultured cells exposed to space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki

    The space environment contains two major biologically significant influences: space radiations and microgravity. A p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a role as a guardian of the genome through the activity of p53-centered signal transduction pathways. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological effects of space radiations, microgravity and a space environment on the gene and protein expression of p53-dependent regulated genes. Space experiments were performed with two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines: one cells line (TSCE5) bears a wild-type p53 gene status, and another cells line (WTK1) bears a mutated p53 gene status. Un-der one gravity or microgravity condition, the cells were grown in the cell biology experimental facility (CBEF) of the International Space Station (ISS) for 8 days without experiencing the stress during launching and landing because the cells were frozen during these periods. Ground control samples also were cultured for 8 days in the CBEF on the ground during the same periods as space flight. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by using DNA chip (a 44k whole human genome microarray, Agilent Technologies Inc.) and protein chip (PanoramaTM Ab MicroArray, Sigma-Aldrich Co.), respectively. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression in cultured cells after space flight during 133 days with frozen condition. We report the results and discussion from the viewpoint of the functions of the up-regulated and down-regulated genes after an exposure to space radiations and/or microgravity. The initial goal of this space experiment was completely achieved. It is expected that data from this type of work will be helpful in designing physical protection from the deleterious effects of space radiations during long term stays in space.

  15. Accumulation and tolerance characteristics of chromium in a cordgrass Cr-hyperaccumulator, Spartina argentinensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo-Gomez, Susana, E-mail: susana@us.es [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal y Ecologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1095, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Vecino-Bueno, Inmaculada [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal y Ecologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1095, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Feldman, Susana R. [Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias y CIUNR, Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Spain)

    2011-01-30

    The cordgrass Spartina argentinensis, which occurs in inland marshes of the Chaco-Pampean regions of Argentina, has been found to be a new chromium hyperaccumulator. A glasshouse experiment was designed to investigate the effect of Cr{sup 6+} from 0 to 20 mmol l{sup -1} on growth and photosynthetic apparatus of S. argentinensis by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, gas exchange and photosynthetic pigment concentrations. Boron, calcium, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, magnesium, potassium and phosphorous concentrations were also determined. S. argentinensis showed phytotoxicity at tiller concentration of 4 mg g{sup -1} Cr, and symptoms of stress at tiller concentration of 1.5 mg g{sup -1} Cr, as well as reductions in leaf gas exchange, in chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters, in photosynthetic pigment contents and in the uptake of essential nutrients. Reductions in net photosynthetic rate could be accounted for by non-stomatal limitations. Moreover, the bioaccumulator factors exceeded greatly the critical value (1.0) for all Cr treatments, and the transport factors indicated that this species has a higher ability to transfer Cr from roots to tillers at higher Cr concentrations. These results confirmed that S. argentinensis is a chromium hyperaccumulator and that it may be useful for restoring Cr-contaminated sites.

  16. Accumulation and tolerance characteristics of cadmium in a potential hyperaccumulator-Lonicera japonica Thunb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zhouli [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenhe District, Shenyang 110016 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Jia 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100039 (China); He Xingyuan, E-mail: hexy@iae.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenhe District, Shenyang 110016 (China); Chen Wei; Yuan Fenghui [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenhe District, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yan Kun [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenhe District, Shenyang 110016 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Jia 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100039 (China); Tao Dali [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenhe District, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2009-09-30

    Phytoremediation using hyperaccumulators is a promising technique of removing soil pollutants. In the study, growth responses, cadmium (Cd) accumulation capability and physiological mechanisms of Lonicera japonica Thunb. under Cd stress were investigated. Exposed to 5 and 10 mg L{sup -1} Cd, the plants did not show any visual symptoms, furthermore, the height, dry biomass of leaves, roots and total and the chlorophyll (CHL) content were obtained different grade increase. When the concentration of Cd was up to 50 mg L{sup -1}, the height, dry biomass of leaves and roots had not significant differences compared with the control. The indexes of tolerance (IT) were all above 0.8. The maintenance of high superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities was observed along with the increased Cd concentration, suggesting strong internal detoxification mechanisms inside plant cells. After 21 days exposure to 25 mg L{sup -1} Cd, stem and shoot Cd concentrations reached 344.49 {+-} 0.71 and 286.12 {+-} 9.38 {mu}g g{sup -1} DW, respectively and the plant had higher bioaccumulation coefficient (BC) and translocation factor (TF). According to these results, it was shown L. japonica had strong tolerance and accumulation capability to Cd, therefore it is a potential Cd-hyperaccumulator.

  17. Fractionation of Stable Cadmium Isotopes in the Cadmium Tolerant Ricinus communis and Hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Rongfei; Guo, Qingjun; Wen, Hanjie; Liu, Congqiang; Yang, Junxing; Peters, Marc; Hu, Jian; Zhu, Guangxu; Zhang, Hanzhi; Tian, Liyan; Han, Xiaokun; Ma, Jie; Zhu, Chuanwei; Wan, Yingxin

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) isotopes provide new insights into Cd uptake, transport and storage mechanisms in plants. Therefore, the present study adopted the Cd-tolerant Ricinus communis and Cd-hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum, which were cultured under controlled conditions in a nutrient solution with variable Cd supply, to test the isotopic fractionation of Cd during plant uptake. The Cd isotope compositions of nutrient solutions and organs of the plants were measured by multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The mass balance of Cd isotope yields isotope fractionations between plant and Cd source (δ114/110Cdorgans-solution) of −0.70‰ to −0.22‰ in Ricinus communis and −0.51‰ to −0.33‰ in Solanum nigrum. Moreover, Cd isotope fractionation during Cd transport from stem to leaf differs between the Cd-tolerant and -hyperaccumulator species. Based on these results, the processes (diffusion, adsorption, uptake or complexation), which may induce Cd isotope fractionation in plants, have been discussed. Overall, the present study indicates potential applications of Cd isotopes for investigating plant physiology. PMID:27076359

  18. Cellular Sequestration of Cadmium in the Hyperaccumulator Plant Species Sedum alfredii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Shengke; Lu, Lingli; Labavitch, John M.; Yang, Xiaoe; He, Zhenli; Hu, Hening; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Newville, Matt; Commisso, Joel; Brown, Patrick Hugh (UCD); (SLAC); (Zhejiang); (FSU); (UC)

    2012-07-23

    Spatial imaging of cadmium (Cd) in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii was investigated in vivo by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and x-ray microfluorescence imaging. Preferential Cd accumulation in the pith and cortex was observed in stems of the Cd hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE), whereas Cd was restricted to the vascular bundles in its contrasting nonhyperaccumulating ecotype. Cd concentrations of up to 15,000 {micro}g g{sup -1} were measured in the pith cells, which was many fold higher than the concentrations in the stem epidermis and vascular bundles in the HE plants. In the leaves of the HE, Cd was mainly localized to the mesophyll and vascular cells rather than the epidermis. The distribution pattern of Cd in both stems and leaves of the HE was very similar to calcium but not zinc, irrespective of Cd exposure levels. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy analysis showed that Cd in the stems and leaves of the HE was mainly associated with oxygen ligands, and a larger proportion (about 70% in leaves and 47% in stems) of Cd was bound with malic acid, which was the major organic acid in the shoots of the plants. These results indicate that a majority of Cd in HE accumulates in the parenchyma cells, especially in stems, and is likely associated with calcium pathways and bound with organic acid (malate), which is indicative of a critical role of vacuolar sequestration of Cd in the HE S. alfredii.

  19. Floral induction in tissue culture: a system for the analysis of LEAFY-dependent gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Doris; Wellmer, Frank; Dilks, Kieran; William, Dilusha; Smith, Michael R; Kumar, Prakash P; Riechmann, José Luis; Greenland, Andrew J; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2004-07-01

    We have developed a versatile floral induction system that is based on ectopic overexpression of the transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) in callus. During shoot regeneration, flowers or floral organs are formed directly from root explants without prior formation of rosette leaves. Morphological and reporter gene analyses show that leaf-like structures are converted to floral organs in response to LFY activity. Thus, increased levels of LFY activity are sufficient to bypass normal vegetative development and to direct formation of flowers in tissue culture. We found that about half of the cultured cells respond to inducible LFY activity with a rapid upregulation of the known direct target gene of LFY, APETALA1 (AP1). This dramatic increase in the number of LFY-responsive cells compared to whole plants suggested that the tissue culture system could greatly facilitate the analysis of LFY-dependent gene regulation by genomic approaches. To test this, we monitored the gene expression changes that occur in tissue culture after activation of LFY using a flower-specific cDNA microarray. Induction of known LFY target genes was readily detected in these experiments. In addition, several other genes were identified that had not been implicated in signaling downstream of LFY before. Thus, the floral induction system is suitable for the detection of low abundance transcripts whose expression is controlled in an LFY-dependent manner.

  20. Transcription factor control of growth rate dependent genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A three factor design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2008-01-01

    Background: Characterization of cellular growth is central to understanding living systems. Here, we applied a three-factor design to study the relationship between specific growth rate and genome-wide gene expression in 36 steady-state chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The three...... factors we considered were specific growth rate, nutrient limitation, and oxygen availability. Results: We identified 268 growth rate dependent genes, independent of nutrient limitation and oxygen availability. The transcriptional response was used to identify key areas in metabolism around which m......RNA expression changes are significantly associated. Among key metabolic pathways, this analysis revealed de novo synthesis of pyrimidine ribonucleotides and ATP producing and consuming reactions at fast cellular growth. By scoring the significance of overlap between growth rate dependent genes and known...

  1. Protein Biochemistry and Expression Regulation of Cadmium/Zinc Pumping ATPases in the Hyperaccumulator Plants Arabidopsis halleri and Noccaea caerulescens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mishra, S.; Mishra, Archana; Küpper, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, May 22 (2017), č. článku 835. ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000336 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cellular compartmentation * zinc homeostasis * cadmium * metal hyperaccumulator plants Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  2. Exogenous cytokinin treatments of a Ni hyper-accumulator, Alyssum murale, grown in a serpentine soil: Implications for phytoextraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Application of exogenous plant growth regulators was examined as a viable technique to increase the efficiency of plant metal phytoextraction from contaminated soils. The aim of this study was to investigate the alteration of Ni phytoextraction by Alyssum murale, a Ni hyperaccumulator, following the...

  3. Addition of straw from hyperaccumulator plants to cadmium-contaminated soil increases cadmium uptake by loquat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lijin; Liao, Ming'an; Lv, Xiulan; Liang, Dong; Xia, Hui; Wang, Jin; Wang, Xun

    2017-05-01

    The straw from three different cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulators (Galinsoga parviflora, Youngia erythrocarpa, and Solanum photeinocarpum) was added to Cd-contaminated soil, and its effects on plant growth and Cd accumulation in loquat seedlings were evaluated. Straw from each of G. parviflora, Y. erythrocarpa, and S. photeinocarpum was added to Cd-contaminated soil before planting seedlings of two varieties of loquat (Dawuxing and Chuanzao). Addition of straw from G. parviflora and S. photeinocarpum increased the root and shoot biomasses of both loquat varieties, compared with that in the control. Addition of straw also increased Cd uptake by loquat seedlings. The treatments could be ranked, from highest Cd contents in roots and shoots of loquat seedlings to lowest, as follows: S. photeinocarpum straw > Y. erythrocarpa straw > G. parviflora straw > control. All three types of hyperaccumulator straw increased the amount of Cd extracted by shoots of two loquat seedlings, with the maximum effect in the S. photeinocarpum straw treatment. Addition of hyperaccumulator straw also resulted in increased soil invertase, urease, and catalase activities to varying degrees. Among the three types of hyperaccumulator straw, S. photeinocarpum straw was the most effective to increase Cd accumulation in loquat seedlings. Therefore, this material has the potential to increase the phytoremediation capacity of loquat seedlings in Cd-contaminated orchards.

  4. Selenium biofortification of broccoli and carrots grown in soil amended with Se-enriched hyperaccumulator Stanleya pinnata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amending soils with Se-hyperaccumulator plant derived sources of selenium (Se) may be useful for increasing Se content in food crops in Se-deficient regions of the world. In this study, we evaluated total Se and the different chemical species of Se in broccoli and carrots grown in soils amended with...

  5. Receptor Ck-dependent signaling regulates hTERT gene transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varma Neelam

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Available evidence suggests that the regulation of telomerase activity primarily depends on the transcriptional control of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene. Although several activators and repressors of hTERT gene transcription have been identified, the exact mechanism by which hTERT transcription is repressed in normal cells and activated in cancer cells remains largely unknown. In an attempt to identify possible novel mechanisms involved in the regulation of hTERT transcription, the present study examined the role of Receptor Ck, a cell surface receptor specific for cholesterol, in the transcription of hTERT gene in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results Activated Receptor Ck was found to down-regulate hTERT mRNA expression by repressing the transcription of c-myc gene. Receptor Ck-dependent signaling was also found to down-regulate the mRNA expression of the gene coding for the ligand inducible transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ. The ligand activation of PPARγ resulted in the down-regulation of c-myc and hTERT mRNA expression. By using specific activator and inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC, it was demonstrated that Receptor Ck dependent down-regulation of hTERT gene transcription involved inhibition of PKC. In addition, 25-hydroxycholesterol was found to contribute to the transcriptional regulation of hTERT gene. Conclusion Taken together, the findings of this study present evidence for a molecular link between cholesterol-activated Receptor Ck and hTERT transcription, and provide new insights into the regulation of hTERT expression in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  6. Evidence for evolutionary divergence of activity-dependent gene expression in developing neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jing; McQueen, Jamie; Bilican, Bilada; Dando, Owen; Magnani, Dario; Punovuori, Karolina; Selvaraj, Bhuvaneish T; Livesey, Matthew; Haghi, Ghazal; Heron, Samuel; Burr, Karen; Patani, Rickie; Rajan, Rinku; Sheppard, Olivia; Kind, Peter C; Simpson, T Ian; Tybulewicz, Victor LJ; Wyllie, David JA; Fisher, Elizabeth MC; Lowell, Sally; Chandran, Siddharthan; Hardingham, Giles E

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary differences in gene regulation between humans and lower mammalian experimental systems are incompletely understood, a potential translational obstacle that is challenging to surmount in neurons, where primary tissue availability is poor. Rodent-based studies show that activity-dependent transcriptional programs mediate myriad functions in neuronal development, but the extent of their conservation in human neurons is unknown. We compared activity-dependent transcriptional responses in developing human stem cell-derived cortical neurons with those induced in developing primary- or stem cell-derived mouse cortical neurons. While activity-dependent gene-responsiveness showed little dependence on developmental stage or origin (primary tissue vs. stem cell), notable species-dependent differences were observed. Moreover, differential species-specific gene ortholog regulation was recapitulated in aneuploid mouse neurons carrying human chromosome-21, implicating promoter/enhancer sequence divergence as a factor, including human-specific activity-responsive AP-1 sites. These findings support the use of human neuronal systems for probing transcriptional responses to physiological stimuli or indeed pharmaceutical agents. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20337.001 PMID:27692071

  7. Verification of Three-Phase Dependency Analysis Bayesian Network Learning Method for Maize Carotenoid Gene Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianxiao; Tian, Zonglin

    2017-01-01

    Mining the genes related to maize carotenoid components is important to improve the carotenoid content and the quality of maize. On the basis of using the entropy estimation method with Gaussian kernel probability density estimator, we use the three-phase dependency analysis (TPDA) Bayesian network structure learning method to construct the network of maize gene and carotenoid components traits. In the case of using two discretization methods and setting different discretization values, we compare the learning effect and efficiency of 10 kinds of Bayesian network structure learning methods. The method is verified and analyzed on the maize dataset of global germplasm collection with 527 elite inbred lines. The result confirmed the effectiveness of the TPDA method, which outperforms significantly another 9 kinds of Bayesian network learning methods. It is an efficient method of mining genes for maize carotenoid components traits. The parameters obtained by experiments will help carry out practical gene mining effectively in the future.

  8. Identification of novel Cyclooxygenase-2-dependent genes in Helicobacter pylori infection in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiedenmann Bertram

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is a crucial determining factor in the pathogenesis of benign and neoplastic gastric diseases. Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2 is the inducible key enzyme of arachidonic acid metabolism and is a central mediator in inflammation and cancer. Expression of the Cox-2 gene is up-regulated in the gastric mucosa during H. pylori infection but the pathobiological consequences of this enhanced Cox-2 expression are not yet characterized. The aim of this study was to identify novel genes down-stream of Cox-2 in an in vivo model, thereby identifying potential targets for the study of the role of Cox- 2 in H. pylori pathogenesis and the initiation of pre- cancerous changes. Results Gene expression profiles in the gastric mucosa of mice treated with a specific Cox-2 inhibitor (NS398 or vehicle were analysed at different time points (6, 13 and 19 wk after H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection affected the expression of 385 genes over the experimental period, including regulators of gastric physiology, proliferation, apoptosis and mucosal defence. Under conditions of Cox-2 inhibition, 160 target genes were regulated as a result of H. pylori infection. The Cox-2 dependent subset included those influencing gastric physiology (Gastrin, Galr1, epithelial barrier function (Tjp1, connexin45, Aqp5, inflammation (Icam1, apoptosis (Clu and proliferation (Gdf3, Igf2. Treatment with NS398 alone caused differential expression of 140 genes, 97 of which were unique, indicating that these genes are regulated under conditions of basal Cox-2 expression. Conclusion This study has identified a panel of novel Cox-2 dependent genes influenced under both normal and the inflammatory conditions induced by H. pylori infection. These data provide important new links between Cox-2 and inflammatory processes, epithelial repair and integrity.

  9. Genotype-dependent regulation of drought-responsive genes in tolerant and sensitive sugarcane cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Manassés Daniel; de Oliveira Silva, Roberta Lane; Ferreira Neto, José Ribamar Costa; Benko-Iseppon, Ana Maria; Kido, Ederson Akio

    2017-10-30

    Drought is the most damaging among the major abiotic stresses. Transcriptomic studies allow a global overview of expressed genes, providing the basis for molecular markers development. Here, the HT-SuperSAGE technique allowed the evaluation of four drought-tolerant cultivars and four-sensitive cultivars, after 24h of irrigation suppression. We identified 9831 induced unitags from roots of the tolerant cultivars with different regulations by the -sensitive cultivars after the applied stress. These unitags allowed a proposal of 15 genes, whose expressed profiles were validated by RT-qPCR, evaluating each cultivar independently. These genes covered broad metabolic processes: ethylene stress attenuation (ACCD); root growth (β-EXP8); protein degradation [ubiquitination pathway (E2, 20SPβ4); plant proteases (AP, C13)]; oxidative detoxification (TRX); fatty acid synthesis (ACC); amino acid transport (AAT), and carbohydrate metabolism [glycolysis (PFK, TPI, FBA); TCA cycle (LDP, MDH); pentose phosphate pathway (TKT)]. The expressed profiles showed a genotype-dependent regulation of the target genes. Two drought-tolerant cultivars (SP83-2847; CTC6) presented each one, nine of the induced genes. Among the -sensitive cultivars, CTC13 induced only one, while SP90-1636 induced two genes. These genes should help breeders to identify accessions managing drought stress tolerance responses, showing better ethylene stress attenuation, energy allocation, amino acid transport, and protein homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. An allele of an ancestral transcription factor dependent on a horizontally acquired gene product.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Deborah Chen

    Full Text Available Changes in gene regulatory circuits often give rise to phenotypic differences among closely related organisms. In bacteria, these changes can result from alterations in the ancestral genome and/or be brought about by genes acquired by horizontal transfer. Here, we identify an allele of the ancestral transcription factor PmrA that requires the horizontally acquired pmrD gene product to promote gene expression. We determined that a single amino acid difference between the PmrA proteins from the human adapted Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi B and the broad host range S. enterica serovar Typhimurium rendered transcription of PmrA-activated genes dependent on the PmrD protein in the former but not the latter serovar. Bacteria harboring the serovar Typhimurium allele exhibited polymyxin B resistance under PmrA- or under PmrA- and PmrD-inducing conditions. By contrast, isogenic strains with the serovar Paratyphi B allele displayed PmrA-regulated polymyxin B resistance only when experiencing activating conditions for both PmrA and PmrD. We establish that the two PmrA orthologs display quantitative differences in several biochemical properties. Strains harboring the serovar Paratyphi B allele showed enhanced biofilm formation, a property that might promote serovar Paratyphi B's chronic infection of the gallbladder. Our findings illustrate how subtle differences in ancestral genes can impact the ability of horizontally acquired genes to confer new properties.

  11. Spatial Imaging, Speciation, and Quantification of Selenium in theHyperaccumulator Plants Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, J.L.; Zhang, L.H.; Marcus, M.A.; Fakra, S.; McGrath,S.P.; Pilon-Smits, E.A.H.

    2006-09-01

    Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) up to 1% of plant dry weight. In the field, Se was mostly present in the young leaves and reproductive tissues of both hyperaccumulators. Microfocused scanning x-ray fluorescence mapping revealed that Se was hyperaccumulated in trichomes in young leaves of A. bisulcatus. None of 10 other elements tested were accumulated in trichomes. Micro x-ray absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that Se in trichomes was present in the organic forms methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys; 53%) and {gamma}-glutamyl-MeSeCys (47%). In the young leaf itself, there was 30% inorganic Se (selenate and selenite) in addition to 70% MeSeCys. In young S. pinnata leaves, Se was highly concentrated near the leaf edge and surface in globular structures that were shown by energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis to be mainly in epidermal cells. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed both MeSeCys (88%) and selenocystathionine (12%) inside leaf edges. In contrast, both the Se accumulator Brassica juncea and the nonaccumulator Arabidopsis thaliana accumulated Se in their leaf vascular tissues and mesophyll cells. Se in hyperaccumulators appears to be mobile in both the xylem and phloem because Se-treated S. pinnata was found to be highly toxic to phloem-feeding aphids, and MeSeCys was present in the vascular tissues of a S. pinnata young leaf petiole as well as in guttation fluid. The compartmentation of organic selenocompounds in specific storage areas in the plant periphery appears to be a unique property of Se hyperaccumulators. The high concentration of Se in the plant periphery may contribute to Se tolerance and may also serve as an elemental plant defense mechanism.

  12. Resveratrol inhibits LXRα-dependent hepatic lipogenesis through novel antioxidant Sestrin2 gene induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, So Hee; Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Seo, Kyuhwa; Shin, Sang Mi [College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Il Je, E-mail: skek023@dhu.ac.kr [MRC-GHF, College of Korean Medicine, Daegu Haany University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbukdo 712-715 (Korea, Republic of); Ki, Sung Hwan, E-mail: shki@chosun.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Liver X receptor-α (LXRα), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors, regulates de novo fatty acid synthesis that leads to stimulate hepatic steatosis. Although, resveratrol has beneficial effects on metabolic disease, it is not known whether resveratrol affects LXRα-dependent lipogenic gene expression. This study investigated the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-mediated lipogenesis and the underlying molecular mechanism. Resveratrol inhibited the ability of LXRα to activate sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and thereby inhibited target gene expression in hepatocytes. Moreover, resveratrol decreased LXRα–RXRα DNA binding activity and LXRE-luciferase transactivation. Resveratrol is known to activate Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), although its precise mechanism of action remains controversial. We found that the ability of resveratrol to repress T0901317-induced SREBP-1c expression was not dependent on AMPK and Sirt1. It is well established that hepatic steatosis is associated with antioxidant and redox signaling. Our data showing that expression of Sestrin2 (Sesn2), which is a novel antioxidant gene, was significantly down-regulated in the livers of high-fat diet-fed mice. Moreover, resveratrol up-regulated Sesn2 expression, but not Sesn1 and Sesn3. Sesn2 overexpression repressed LXRα-activated SREBP-1c expression and LXRE-luciferase activity. Finally, Sesn2 knockdown using siRNA abolished the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-induced FAS luciferase gene transactivation. We conclude that resveratrol affects Sesn2 gene induction and contributes to the inhibition of LXRα-mediated hepatic lipogenesis. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-mediated lipogenesis. • Resveratrol attenuated the ability of the LXRα-mediated lipogenic gene expression. • Resveratrol’s effects on T090-induced lipogenesis is not dependent on Sirt1 or AMPK.

  13. Trade-off between toxicity and signal detection orchestrated by frequency- and density-dependent genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laury Arthaud

    Full Text Available Behaviors in insects are partly highly efficient Bayesian processes that fulfill exploratory tasks ending with the colonization of new ecological niches. The foraging (for gene in Drosophila encodes a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG. It has been extensively described as a frequency-dependent gene and its transcripts are differentially expressed between individuals, reflecting the population density context. Some for transcripts, when expressed in a population at high density for many generations, concomitantly trigger strong dispersive behavior associated with foraging activity. Moreover, genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI analysis has highlighted a dormant role of for in energetic metabolism in a food deprivation context. In our current report, we show that alleles of for encoding different cGMP-dependent kinase isoforms influence the oxidation of aldehyde groups of aromatic molecules emitted by plants via Aldh-III and a phosphorylatable adaptor. The enhanced efficiency of oxidation of aldehyde odorants into carboxyl groups by the action of for lessens their action and toxicity, which should facilitate exploration and guidance in a complex odor environment. Our present data provide evidence that optimal foraging performance requires the fast metabolism of volatile compounds emitted by plants to avoid neurosensory saturation and that the frequency-dependent genes that trigger dispersion influence these processes.

  14. Rhizobium metallidurans sp. nov., a symbiotic heavy metal resistant bacterium isolated from the Anthyllis vulneraria Zn-hyperaccumulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, Claire M; Jackson, Stephen; Merlot, Sylvain; Dobson, Alan; Grison, Claude

    2015-05-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterium (ChimEc512(T)) was isolated from 56 host seedlings of the hyperaccumulating Anthyllis vulneraria legume, which was on an old zinc mining site at Les Avinières, Saint-Laurent-Le-Minier, Gard, South of France. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, strain ChimEc512(T) was shown to belong to the genus Rhizobium and to be most closely related to Rhizobium endophyticum CCGE 2052(T) (98.4%), Rhizobium tibeticum CCBAU 85039(T) (98.1%), Rhizobium grahamii CCGE 502(T) (98.0%) and Rhizobium mesoamericanum CCGE 501(T) (98.0%). The phylogenetic relationships of ChimEc512(T) were confirmed by sequencing and analyses of recA and atpD genes. DNA-DNA relatedness values of strain ChimEc512(T) with R. endophyticum CCGE 2052(T), R. tibeticum CCBAU 85039(T), R. mesoamericanum CCGE 52(T), Rhizobium grahamii CCGE 502(T), Rhizobium etli CCBAU 85039(T) and Rhizobium radiobacter KL09-16-8-2(T) were 27, 22, 16, 18, 19 and 11%, respectively. The DNA G+C content of strain ChimEc512(T) was 58.9 mol%. The major cellular fatty acid was C18 : 1ω7c, characteristic of the genus Rhizobium . The polar lipid profile included phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine and moderate amounts of aminolipids, phospholipid and sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. Although ChimEc512(T) was able to nodulate A. vulneraria, the nodC and nifH genes were not detected by PCR. The rhizobial strain was tolerant to high concentrations of heavy metals: up to 35 mM Zn and up to 0.5 mM Cd and its growth kinetics was not impacted by Zn. The results of DNA-DNA hybridizations and physiological tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain ChimEc512(T) from species of the genus Rhizobium with validly published names. Strain ChimEc512(T), therefore, represents a novel species, for which the name Rhizobium metallidurans sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain

  15. Evidence of autoinducer-dependent and -independent heterogeneous gene expression in Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Jessica; Krysciak, Dagmar; Schorn, Andrea; Dahlke, Renate I; Soonvald, Liina; Müller, Johannes; Hense, Burkhard A; Schwarzfischer, Michael; Sauter, Margret; Schmeisser, Christel; Streit, Wolfgang R

    2014-09-01

    Populations of genetically identical Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234 cells differ significantly in their expression profiles of autoinducer (AI)-dependent and AI-independent genes. Promoter fusions of the NGR234 AI synthase genes traI and ngrI showed high levels of phenotypic heterogeneity during growth in TY medium on a single-cell level. However, adding very high concentrations of N-(3-oxooctanoyl-)-l-homoserine lactone resulted in a more homogeneous expression profile. Similarly, the lack of internally synthesized AIs in the background of the NGR234-ΔtraI or the NGR234-ΔngrI mutant resulted in a highly homogenous expression of the corresponding promoter fusions in the population. Expression studies with reporter fusions of the promoter regions of the quorum-quenching genes dlhR and qsdR1 and the type IV pilus gene cluster located on pNGR234b suggested that factors other than AI molecules affect NGR234 phenotypic heterogeneity. Further studies with root exudates and developing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings provide the first evidence that plant root exudates have strong effects on the heterogeneity of AI synthase and quorum-quenching genes in NGR234. Therefore, plant-released octopine appears to play a key role in modulation of heterogeneous gene expression. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Transcriptomic gene profiling of porcine muscle tissue depending on histological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropka-Molik, Katarzyna; Bereta, Anna; Żukowski, Kacper; Piórkowska, Katarzyna; Gurgul, Artur; Żak, Grzegorz

    2017-08-01

    In pig, the histological profile of muscle tissue, especially the proportion of individual fiber types, is one of the main factors affecting meat quality properties. In the present research, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) by using next generation sequencing method was applied to estimate the whole gene expression profile of Longissimus lumborum muscle of pigs (Large White breed) differing in the percentage of two fiber types (slow-twitch (type I) fibers and fast-twitch glycolytic (type IIB) fibers). The RNA-seq approach allowed us to identify 355 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) indicated as significant (false discovery rate-adjusted P < 0.05) using three types of software: DESeq2, edgeR and baySeq. Detected genes and pathways deregulated in muscle depending on tissue microstructure were associated with: metabolic processes - 158 genes; cellular processes - 122; biological regulation - 62; localization - 51; and 35 genes with developmental processes. The DEGs were included in: PI3K-Akt; FoxO and MAPK signaling pathways, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, lysine degradation and insulin signaling pathway as well as mTOR and Hippo signaling pathways. These results highlight the mainly metabolic pathways related to glucose metabolism and contraction processes of muscle cells. Detection of genes involved in variation of fiber-type distribution will be useful in understanding of the genetic factors affecting muscle structure, metabolic process and indirectly, meat quality traits. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. Pseudomonas moraviensis subsp. stanleyae, a bacterial endophyte of hyperaccumulator Stanleya pinnata, is capable of efficient selenite reduction to elemental selenium under aerobic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staicu, L. C.; Ackerson, C. J.; Cornelis, P.; Ye, L.; Berendsen, R. L.; Hunter, W. J.; Noblitt, S. D.; Henry, C. S.; Cappa, J. J.; Montenieri, R. L.; Wong, A. O.; Musilova, L.; Sura-de Jong, M.; van Hullebusch, E. D.; Lens, P. N L; Reynolds, R. J B; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To identify bacteria with high selenium tolerance and reduction capacity for bioremediation of wastewater and nanoselenium particle production. Methods and Results: A bacterial endophyte was isolated from the selenium hyperaccumulator Stanleya pinnata (Brassicaceae) growing on seleniferous

  18. Progress and prospects: gene therapy for genetic diseases with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, P

    2008-04-01

    Preclinical studies in small and large animal models using helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) have generated promising results for the treatment of genetic diseases. However, clinical translation is complicated by the dose-dependent, capsid-mediated acute toxic response following systemic vector injection. With the advancements in vectorology, a better understanding of vector-mediated toxicity, and improved delivery methods, HDAds may emerge as an important vector for gene therapy of genetic diseases and this report highlights recent progress and prospects in this field.

  19. ERK Oscillation-Dependent Gene Expression Patterns and Deregulation by Stress-Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Cummings, Brian S.; Shankaran, Harish; Scholpa, Natalie E.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2014-09-15

    Studies were undertaken to determine whether ERK oscillations regulate a unique subset of genes in human keratinocytes and subsequently, whether the p38 stress response inhibits ERK oscillations. A DNA microarray identified many genes that were unique to ERK oscillations, and network reconstruction predicted an important role for the mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1) node in mediating ERK oscillation-dependent gene expression. Increased ERK-dependent phosphorylation of MED1 was observed in oscillating cells compared to non-oscillating counterparts as validation. Treatment of keratinocytes with a p38 inhibitor (SB203580) increased ERK oscillation amplitudes and MED1 and phospho-MED1 protein levels. Bromate is a probable human carcinogen that activates p38. Bromate inhibited ERK oscillations in human keratinocytes and JB6 cells and induced an increase in phospho-p38 and decrease in phospho-MED1 protein levels. Treatment of normal rat kidney cells and primary salivary gland epithelial cells with bromate decreased phospho-MED1 levels in a reversible fashion upon treatment with p38 inhibitors (SB202190; SB203580). Our results indicate that oscillatory behavior in the ERK pathway alters homeostatic gene regulation patterns and that the cellular response to perturbation may manifest differently in oscillating vs non-oscillating cells.

  20. Efficient Gene Delivery to Pig Airway Epithelia and Submucosal Glands Using Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibi Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway gene delivery is a promising strategy to treat patients with life-threatening lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF. However, this strategy has to be evaluated in large animal preclinical studies in order to translate it to human applications. Because of anatomic and physiological similarities between the human and pig lungs, we utilized pig as a large animal model to examine the safety and efficiency of airway gene delivery with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors. Helper-dependent vectors carrying human CFTR or reporter gene LacZ were aerosolized intratracheally into pigs under bronchoscopic guidance. We found that the LacZ reporter and hCFTR transgene products were efficiently expressed in lung airway epithelial cells. The transgene vectors with this delivery can also reach to submucosal glands. Moreover, the hCFTR transgene protein localized to the apical membrane of both ciliated and nonciliated epithelial cells, mirroring the location of wild-type CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Aerosol delivery procedure was well tolerated by pigs without showing systemic toxicity based on the limited number of pigs tested. These results provide important insights into developing clinical strategies for human CF lung gene therapy.

  1. Efficient gene delivery to pig airway epithelia and submucosal glands using helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huibi; Machuca, Tiago N; Yeung, Jonathan C; Wu, Jing; Du, Kai; Duan, Cathleen; Hashimoto, Kohei; Linacre, Virginia; Coates, Allan L; Leung, Kitty; Wang, Jian; Yeger, Herman; Cutz, Ernest; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf; Hu, Jim

    2013-10-08

    Airway gene delivery is a promising strategy to treat patients with life-threatening lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). However, this strategy has to be evaluated in large animal preclinical studies in order to translate it to human applications. Because of anatomic and physiological similarities between the human and pig lungs, we utilized pig as a large animal model to examine the safety and efficiency of airway gene delivery with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors. Helper-dependent vectors carrying human CFTR or reporter gene LacZ were aerosolized intratracheally into pigs under bronchoscopic guidance. We found that the LacZ reporter and hCFTR transgene products were efficiently expressed in lung airway epithelial cells. The transgene vectors with this delivery can also reach to submucosal glands. Moreover, the hCFTR transgene protein localized to the apical membrane of both ciliated and nonciliated epithelial cells, mirroring the location of wild-type CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Aerosol delivery procedure was well tolerated by pigs without showing systemic toxicity based on the limited number of pigs tested. These results provide important insights into developing clinical strategies for human CF lung gene therapy.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e127; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.55; published online 8 October 2013.

  2. Chelator effects on bioconcentration and translocation of cadmium by hyperaccumulators, Tagetes patula and Impatiens walleriana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jhen-Lian; Lai, Hung-Yu; Chen, Zueng-Sang

    2012-10-01

    French marigold (Tagetes patula) and impatiens (Impatiens walleriana) can act as hyperaccumulator plants for removal of cadmium (Cd) from contaminated sites. In this study, an exponential decay model was used to predict the maximum removal of Cd from artificially spiked soils by impatiens. Application of a chelator, EDTA, was also assessed for effects on the bioconcentration (BCF) and translocation (TF) factors of the two species with four replicates. Exposure to Cd significantly decreased the biomass of two plant species. Impatiens and French marigold accumulated Cd at a rate of 200-1200 mg Cd kg(-1) in shoots, with BCFs and TFs of 8.5-15 and 1.7-2.6, respectively. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Manganese uptake and interactions with cadmium in the hyperaccumulator-Phytolacca Americana L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Kejian [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Hunan Research Academy of Environmental Sciences Changsha 410004 (China); Luo Chunling [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); You Wuxin [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Lian Chunlan [Asian Natural Environmental Science Center, University of Tokyo, 1-1-8 Midori-cho, Nishitokyo, Tokyo 188-0002 (Japan); Li Xiangdong [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Shen Zhenguo [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)], E-mail: zgshen@njau.edu.cn

    2008-06-15

    In the present study, the accumulation of Mn and other metals by Phytolacca Americana L. from contaminated soils in Hunan Province, South China, was investigated. Results showed that the average concentrations of Mn in the leaves and roots reached 2198 and 80.4 mg kg{sup -1} (dry weight), respectively, with a maximum 13,400 mg kg{sup -1} in the leaves. A significant correlation was found between Mn concentrations in the plant leaves and those in the corresponding soils. Hydroponic experiments were also conducted to study the Cd uptake ability and interactions between Mn and Cd in the plant. It was found that P. americana hyperaccumulated not only Mn, but also Cd in the leaves. In the presence of Cd, adding Mn to the solution significantly improved the plant growth and reduced the concentrations of Cd in all organs of the plant.

  4. Enhancement of Cd phytoextraction by hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii using electrical field and organic amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wendan; Li, Dan; Ye, Xuezhu; Xu, Haizhou; Yao, Guihua; Wang, Jingwen; Zhang, Qi; Hu, Jing; Gao, Na

    2017-02-01

    The combined use of organic amendment-assisted phytoextraction and electrokinetic remediation to decontaminate Cd-polluted soil was demonstrated in a laboratory-scale experiment. The plant species selected was the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii. Prior to the pot experiment, the loamy soil was treated with 15 g kg-1 of pig manure compost, 10 g kg-1 of humic acid, or 5 mmol kg-1 of EDTA, and untreated soil without application of any amendment was the control. Two conditions were applied to each treatment: no voltage (without an electrical field) and a direct current (DC) electrical field (1 V cm-1 with switching polarity every day). Results indicated that Cd concentrations in S. alfredii were significantly (p electrical field and soil amendments (pig manure compost, humic acid, and EDTA). By switching the polarity of the DC electrical field, significant pH variation from anode to cathode can be avoided, and no significant impact was observed on shoot biomass production. Electrical field application increased DTPA-extractable Cd in soils and the Cd accumulation in shoots by 6.06-15.64 and 24.53-52.31%, respectively. The addition of pig manure compost and humic acid enhanced shoot Cd accumulation by 1.54- to 1.92- and 1.38- to 1.64-fold because of their simultaneous enhancement of Cd concentration in shoots and biomass production. However, no enhancement of Cd accumulation was found in the EDTA treatment, which can be ascribed to the inhibition of plant growth caused by EDTA. In conclusion, pig manure compost or humic acid addition in combination with the application of a switched-polarity DC electrical field could significantly enhance Cd phytoextraction by hyperaccumulator S. alfredii.

  5. Immune response to helper dependent adenoviral mediated liver gene therapy: challenges and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Michael P; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Lee, Brendan

    2007-10-01

    Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy holds significant potential especially for applications requiring high levels of target tissue transduction. While significant advances in clinical adenoviral gene therapy applications have been made in cancer, the clinical translation of adenoviral gene replacement therapy for genetic disease has lagged. Encouragingly, advances in vector production have led to the development of Helper-Dependent ("gutted" or "high capacity") adenoviral vectors (HDV) deleted of all viral coding genes. HDV significantly reduces the chronic toxicity associated with early generation adenoviral vectors that has been most significant after systemic administration in both small and large animal models. However, the field remains confounded by innate immune responses inherent to adenovirus, and more generally, to the adaptive immune response to transgene. Together they decrease the effective therapeutic index for any particular treatment. This review summarizes the current advances toward understanding the decisive cell and molecular mechanisms underlying the acute toxicity to systemic HDV administration. We focus on the complex immune response and consequences of systemic vector delivery in the context of liver-directed monogenic disease therapy. Future development of interventions to avoid the innate immune response, including vector and pharmacologic manipulations, should further contribute to minimizing vector toxicity while maximizing the efficacy of systemic HDV gene transfer.

  6. Alginate-Dependent Gene Expression Mechanism in Sphingomonas sp. Strain A1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Chie; Takase, Ryuichi; Momma, Keiko; Maruyama, Yukie; Murata, Kousaku

    2014-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain A1, a Gram-negative bacterium, directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm through a periplasmic alginate-binding protein-dependent ATP-binding cassette transporter. The polysaccharide is degraded to monosaccharides via the formation of oligosaccharides by endo- and exotype alginate lyases. The strain A1 proteins for alginate uptake and degradation are encoded in both strands of a genetic cluster in the bacterial genome and inducibly expressed in the presence of alginate. Here we show the function of the alginate-dependent transcription factor AlgO and its mode of action on the genetic cluster and alginate oligosaccharides. A putative gene within the genetic cluster seems to encode a transcription factor-like protein (AlgO). Mutant strain A1 (ΔAlgO mutant) cells with a disrupted algO gene constitutively produced alginate-related proteins. DNA microarray analysis indicated that wild-type cells inducibly transcribed the genetic cluster only in the presence of alginate, while ΔAlgO mutant cells constitutively expressed the genetic cluster. A gel mobility shift assay showed that AlgO binds to the specific intergenic region between algO and algS (algO-algS). Binding of AlgO to the algO-algS intergenic region diminished with increasing alginate oligosaccharides. These results demonstrated a novel alginate-dependent gene expression mechanism. In the absence of alginate, AlgO binds to the algO-algS intergenic region and represses the expression of both strands of the genetic cluster, while in the presence of alginate, AlgO dissociates from the algO-algS intergenic region via binding to alginate oligosaccharides produced through the lyase reaction and subsequently initiates transcription of the genetic cluster. This is the first report on the mechanism by which alginate regulates the expression of the gene cluster. PMID:24816607

  7. Calcium controls smooth muscle TRPC gene transcription via the CaMK/calcineurin-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Sara; Diez, Amalia; Puyet, Antonio; Camello, Pedro J; Camello-Almaraz, Cristina; Bautista, Jose M; Pozo, María J

    2007-01-01

    Transient receptor potential protein family C (TRPC) has been proposed as a candidate for channels involved in capacitative Ca(2+) entry (CCE) mechanisms, but the modulation of their gene expression remains unexplored. In this study we show that guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscle contains mRNA encoding TRPC1, TRPC2, TRPC3, and TRPC4 proteins whose abundance depends on cytosolic Ca(2+) level ([Ca(2+)](i)). Thus lowering the levels of cellular calcium with the chelators EGTA and BAPTA AM results in a downregulation of TRPC1-TRPC4 gene and protein expression. In contrast, activation of Ca(2+) influx through L-type Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores induced an increase in TRPC1-TRPC4 mRNA and protein abundance. Activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMK) and phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding protein accounts for the increase in TRPC mRNA transcription in response to L-type channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx . In addition to this mechanism, activation of TRPC gene expression by intracellular Ca(2+) release also involves calcineurin pathway. According to the proposed role for these channels, activation of CCE induced an increase in TRPC1 and TRPC3 mRNA abundance, which depends on the integrity of the calcineurin and CaMK pathways. These findings show for the first time an essential autoregulatory role of Ca(2+) in Ca(2+) homeostasis at the level of TRPC gene and protein expression.

  8. Bacterial Suppression of RNA Polymerase II-Dependent Host Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Ambite

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU is a bacterial carrier state in the urinary tract that resembles commensalism at other mucosal sites. ABU strains often lack the virulence factors that characterize uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli strains and therefore elicit weak innate immune responses in the urinary tract. In addition, ABU strains are active modifiers of the host environment, which they influence by suppressing RNA polymerase II (Pol II-dependent host gene expression. In patients inoculated with the ABU strain E. coli 83972, gene expression was markedly reduced after 24 h (>60% of all regulated genes. Specific repressors and activators of Pol II-dependent transcription were modified, and Pol II Serine 2 phosphorylation was significantly inhibited, indicating reduced activity of the polymerase. This active inhibition included disease–associated innate immune response pathways, defined by TLR4, IRF-3 and IRF-7, suggesting that ABU strains persist in human hosts by active suppression of the antibacterial defense. In a search for the mechanism of inhibition, we compared the whole genome sequences of E. coli 83972 and the uropathogenic strain E. coli CFT073. In addition to the known loss of virulence genes, we observed that the ABU strain has acquired several phages and identified the lytic Prophage 3 as a candidate Pol II inhibitor. Intact phage particles were released by ABU during in vitro growth in human urine. To address if Prophage 3 affects Pol II activity, we constructed a Prophage 3 negative deletion mutant in E. coli 83972 and compared the effect on Pol II phosphorylation between the mutant and the E. coli 83972 wild type (WT strains. No difference was detected, suggesting that the Pol II inhibitor is not encoded by the phage. The review summarizes the evidence that the ABU strain E. coli 83972 modifies host gene expression by inhibition of Pol II phosphorylation, and discusses the ability of ABU strains to actively create an

  9. Role of Dicer1-Dependent Factors in the Paracrine Regulation of Epididymal Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Jerczynski

    Full Text Available Dicer1 is an endoribonuclease involved in the biogenesis of functional molecules such as microRNAs (miRNAs and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs. These small non-coding RNAs are important regulators of post-transcriptional gene expression and participate in the control of male fertility. With the knowledge that 1 Dicer1-dependent factors are required for proper sperm maturation in the epididymis, and that 2 miRNAs are potent mediators of intercellular communication in most biological systems, we investigated the role of Dicer1-dependent factors produced by the proximal epididymis (initial segment/caput- including miRNAs- on the regulation of epididymal gene expression in the distal epididymis regions (i.e. corpus and cauda. To this end, we performed comparative microarray and ANOVA analyses on control vs. Defb41iCre/wt;Dicer1fl/fl mice in which functional Dicer1 is absent from the principal cells of the proximal epididymis. We identified 35 and 33 transcripts that displayed significant expression level changes in the corpus and cauda regions (Fold change > 2 or 2 or < -2; p < 0.01. These miRNAs are secreted via extracellular vesicles (EVs derived from the DC2 epididymal principal cell line, and their expression correlates with target transcripts involved in distinct biological pathways, as evidenced by in silico analysis. Albeit correlative and based on in silico approach, our study proposes that Dicer1-dependent factors trigger- directly or not-significant genes expression changes in distinct regions of this organ. The paracrine control of functions important to post-testicular sperm maturation by Dicer1-dependent factors may open new avenues for the identification of molecular targets important to male fertility control.

  10. Learning-dependent gene expression of CREB1 isoforms in the molluscan brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisayo Sadamoto

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein1 (CREB1 has multiple functions in gene regulation. Various studies have reported that CREB1-dependent gene induction is necessary for memory formation and long-lasting behavioral changes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, we characterized Lymnaea CREB1 (LymCREB1 mRNA isoforms of spliced variants in the central nervous system (CNS of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Among these spliced variants, the three isoforms that code a whole LymCREB1 protein are considered to be the activators for gene regulation. The other four isoforms, which code truncated LymCREB1 proteins with no kinase inducible domain, are the repressors. For a better understanding of the possible roles of different LymCREB1 isoforms, the expression level of these isoform mRNAs was investigated by a real-time quantitative RT-PCR method. Further, we examined the changes in gene expression for all the isoforms in the CNS after conditioned taste aversion (CTA learning or backward conditioning as a control. The results showed that CTA learning increased LymCREB1 gene expression, but it did not change the activator/repressor ratio. Our findings showed that the repressor isoforms, as well as the activator ones, are expressed in large amounts in the CNS, and the gene expression of CREB1 isoforms appeared to be specific for the given stimulus. This was the first quantitative analysis of the expression patterns of CREB1 isoforms at the mRNA level and their association with learning behavior.

  11. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification detects DCX gene deletions in band heterotopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, D; Parrini, E; Pasqualetti, M; Tortorella, G; Franzoni, E; Giussani, U; Marini, C; Migliarini, S; Guerrini, R

    2007-02-06

    Subcortical band heterotopia (SBH, or double cortex syndrome) is a neuronal migration disorder consisting of heterotopic bands of gray matter located between the cortex and the ventricular surface, with or without concomitant pachygyria. Most cases show diffuse or anteriorly predominant (A>P) migration abnormality. All familial and 53% to 84% of sporadic cases with diffuse or A>P SBH harbor a mutation of the DCX gene, leaving the genetic causes unexplained, and genetic counseling problematic, in the remaining patients. Our purpose was to verify the extent to which exonic deletions or duplications of the DCX gene would account for sporadic SBH with A>P gradient but normal gene sequencing. We identified 23 patients (22 women, 1 man) with sporadic, diffuse, or anteriorly predominant SBH. After sequencing the DCX gene and finding mutations in 12 (11 women, 1 man), we used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to search for whole-exon deletions or duplications in the 11 remaining women. We used semiquantitative fluorescent multiplex PCR (SQF-PCR) and Southern blot to confirm MLPA findings. MLPA assay uncovered two deletions encompassing exons 3 to 5, and one involving exon 6, in 3 of 11 women (27%) and raised the percentage of DCX mutations from 52% to 65% in our series. SQF-PCR performed in all three women and Southern blot analysis performed in two confirmed the deletions. MLPA uncovers large genomic deletions of the DCX gene in a subset of patients with SBH in whom no mutations are found after gene sequencing. Deletions of DCX are an underascertained cause of SBH.

  12. D{sub 2} dopamine receptor gene and behavioral characteristics in nicotine dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, E.P.; Fitch, R.J.; Syndulko, K. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The D{sub 2} dopamine receptor (DRD2) A1 allele has been recently associated with nicotine dependence. In the present study, TaqI A alleles (the minor A1 and the major A2 allele) of the DRD2 were determined in medically-ill subjects. The sample was composed of 41 non-smokers (N), 69 ex-smokers (X) and 63 active smokers (A). The relationships of DRD2 alleles to personality (Eysenick`s Addictive Personality [AP]), depression and nicotine dependence (Fagerstroem) scores were ascertained. A significant (P = 0.002) group effect prevailed in the AP scores, with the A group having the highest scores. Moreover, a significant (P = 0.025) allele by group interaction was found, with A1 allelic subjects in group A showing the highest AP scores. Significant group effects were also found in both the depression (P = 0.0004) and the nicotine dependence (P = 0.0003) scores, with the A group again showing the highest scores. However, in contrast to the AP scores, no significant allele by group interaction was found either in the depression or the nicotine dependence scores. In conclusion, the present findings suggest a role for the DRD2 gene in personality of smokers. However, relationship of the DRD2 gene to the degree of depression or nicotine dependence was not found. The data indicate the importance of using behavioral and genetic variables in dissecting the complex set of variables associated with the smoking habit, and thus in achieving a better understanding of the biobehavioral bases of this addiction.

  13. Functional analysis of zinc hyperaccumulation related genes of Noccaea (Thlaspi) caerulescens for phytoremediation purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) are toxic metals that can cause serious soil contamination when present in excess. Especially Cd exposure is a threat to human health. Plants can potentially be used to clean-up the Zn- and/or Cd-contaminated soils in a technology called “Phytoremediation”. Two

  14. In vivo gene regulation in Salmonella spp. by a salicylate-dependent control circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo, José Luis; Becker, Pablo Daniel; Camacho, Eva María; Cebolla, Angel; Link, Claudia; Santero, Eduardo; Guzmán, Carlos Alberto

    2007-11-01

    Systems allowing tightly regulated expression of prokaryotic genes in vivo are important for performing functional studies of bacterial genes in host-pathogen interactions and establishing bacteria-based therapies. We integrated a regulatory control circuit activated by acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) in attenuated Salmonella enterica that carries an expression module with a gene of interest under control of the XylS2-dependent Pm promoter. This resulted in 20-150-fold induction ex vivo. The regulatory circuit was also efficiently induced by ASA when the bacteria resided in eukaryotic cells, both in vitro and in vivo. To validate the circuit, we administered Salmonella spp., carrying an expression module encoding the 5-fluorocytosine-converting enzyme cytosine deaminase in the bacterial chromosome or in a plasmid, to mice with tumors. Induction with ASA before 5-fluorocytosine administration resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the regulatory control circuit to selectively switch on gene expression during bacterial infection.

  15. Hypoxia favors myosin heavy chain beta gene expression in an Hif-1alpha-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binó, Lucia; Procházková, Jiřina; Radaszkiewicz, Katarzyna Anna; Kučera, Jan; Kudová, Jana; Pacherník, Jiří; Kubala, Lukáš

    2017-01-01

    The potentiation of the naturally limited regenerative capacity of the heart is dependent on an understanding of the mechanisms that are activated in response to pathological conditions such as hypoxia. Under these conditions, the expression of genes suggested to support cardiomyocyte survival and heart adaptation is triggered. Particularly important are changes in the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. We propose here that alterations in the expression profiles of MHC genes are induced in response to hypoxia and are primarily mediated by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). In in vitro models of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, we showed that hypoxia (1% O2) or the pharmacological stabilization of HIFs significantly increased MHCbeta (Myh7) gene expression. The key role of HIF-1alpha is supported by the absence of these effects in HIF-1alpha-deficient cells, even in the presence of HIF-2alpha. Interestingly, ChIP analysis did not confirm the direct interaction of HIF-1alpha with putative HIF response elements predicted in the MHCalpha and beta encoding DNA region. Further analyses showed the significant effect of the mTOR signaling inhibitor rapamycin in inducing Myh7 expression and a hypoxia-triggered reduction in the levels of antisense RNA transcripts associated with the Myh7 gene locus. Overall, the recognized and important role of HIF in the regulation of heart regenerative processes could be highly significant for the development of novel therapeutic interventions in heart failure. PMID:29137374

  16. A gene for pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy maps to chromosome 5q31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier-Daire, V; Dagoneau, N; Nabbout, R; Burglen, L; Penet, C; Soufflet, C; Desguerre, I; Munnich, A; Dulac, O

    2000-10-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by generalized seizures in the first hours of life and responding only to pyridoxine hydrochloride. The pathogenesis of PDE is unknown, but an alteration in the binding of pyridoxal 5-phosphate to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) has been postulated in patients with PDE. Results are reported for genetic linkage analyses in four families with consanguineous parents and in one family with nonconsanguineous parents. The GAD1 (2q31) and GAD2 genes (10p23) were tested and excluded. A genomewide search was subsequently performed, using microsatellite markers at an average distance of 10 cM, and the search revealed linkage of the disease-causing gene to markers on chromosome 5q31.2-q31.3 (maximum LOD score [Z(max)] 8.43 at recombination fraction [theta] 0 and Zmax=7.58 at straight theta=0 at loci D5S2017 and D5S1972, respectively). A recombination event, between loci D5S638 and D5S463, in one family defined the distal boundary, and a second recombination event between loci D5S2011 and D5S2017 in another family defined the proximal boundary of the genetic interval encompassing the PDE gene (5.1 cM). Ongoing studies may lead to the identification of the disease-causing gene.

  17. An ant-plant mutualism through the lens of cGMP-dependent kinase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malé, Pierre-Jean G; Turner, Kyle M; Doha, Manjima; Anreiter, Ina; Allen, Aaron M; Sokolowski, Marla B; Frederickson, Megan E

    2017-09-13

    In plant-animal mutualisms, how an animal forages often determines how much benefit its plant partner receives. In many animals, foraging behaviour changes in response to foraging gene expression or activation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) that foraging encodes. Here, we show that this highly conserved molecular mechanism affects the outcome of a plant-animal mutualism. We studied the two PKG genes of Allomerus octoarticulatus, an Amazonian ant that defends the ant-plant Cordia nodosa against herbivores. Some ant colonies are better 'bodyguards' than others. Working in the field in Peru, we found that colonies fed with a PKG activator recruited more workers to attack herbivores than control colonies. This resulted in less herbivore damage. PKG gene expression in ant workers correlated with whether an ant colony discovered an herbivore and how much damage herbivores inflicted on leaves in a complex way; natural variation in expression levels of the two genes had significant interaction effects on ant behaviour and herbivory. Our results suggest a molecular basis for ant protection of plants in this mutualism. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. A cancer derived mutation in the Retinoblastoma gene with a distinct defect for LXCXE dependent interactions

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    Demone Jordan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction between viral oncoproteins such as Simian virus 40 TAg, adenovirus E1A, and human papilloma virus E7, and the retinoblastoma protein (pRB occurs through a well characterized peptide sequence, LXCXE, on the viral protein and a well conserved groove in the pocket domain of pRB. Cellular proteins, such as histone deacetylases, also use this mechanism to interact with the retinoblastoma protein to repress transcription at cell cycle regulated genes. For these reasons this region of the pRB pocket domain is thought to play a critical role in growth suppression. Results In this study, we identify and characterize a tumor derived allele of the retinoblastoma gene (RB1 that possesses a discrete defect in its ability to interact with LXCXE motif containing proteins that compromises proliferative control. To assess the frequency of similar mutations in the RB1 gene in human cancer, we screened blood and tumor samples for similar alleles. We screened almost 700 samples and did not detect additional mutations, indicating that this class of mutation is rare. Conclusions Our work provides proof of principal that alleles encoding distinct, partial loss of function mutations in the retinoblastoma gene that specifically lose LXCXE dependent interactions, are found in human cancer.

  19. Contrasted zinc hyperaccumulation levels between metallicolous and non-metallicolous populations of Arabidopsis halleri is driven by divergent selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babst-Kostecka, Alicja; Waldmann, Patrik; Pauwels, Maxime; Schat, Henk; Bourceaux, Angélique; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Grodzińska, Krystyna; Frérot, Hélène

    2017-04-01

    Approximately 400 species that can survive and reproduce in metalliferous environments have developed "metal hyperaccumulation" capacity, allowing them to allocate large amounts of trace elements to their aerial parts without showing severe toxicity symptoms. The potential of hyperaccumulators to be applied in phytoremediation efforts is of great research and commercial interest. Yet, the genetic basis and evolutionary significance of this trait are to date insufficiently understood. This lack of knowledge limits the efficiency and large-scale use of such plants in reducing soil pollution through "green and clean technologies" (phytoremediation). In this context, the objective of this study was to find some evidence of selection acting on metal hyperaccumulation, thus supporting the existence of genetic adaptation for this trait. Here, we collected six metallicolous and five non-metallicolous populations of the pseudometallophyte model species Arabidopsis halleri in Poland that are genetically and geographically close. We asexually propagated genotypes that were sampled in natural populations to produce several clones of each individual. These were subsequently used in a soil culture experiment with artificially zinc-contaminated compost for accumulation assessment. The zinc content of shoots was determined after five weeks of culture using the colorimetric reagent zincon. The heritability and the genetic differentiation of the zinc accumulation trait were estimated (Qst statistic) and the latter was compared to the differentiation at neutral molecular markers (Fst statistic). Despite significantly (Pselection, supporting the occurrence of local adaptation. These findings encourage further genetic and genomic research to uncover the genetic basis of local adaptation of A. halleri to contaminated environments. In particular, due to their enhanced zinc hyperaccumulation capacities non-metallicolous populations may be particularly promising for phytoremediation

  20. Gene Therapy with Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors: Current Advances and Future Perspectives

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    Philip Ng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant Adenoviral vectors represent one of the best gene transfer platforms due to their ability to efficiently transduce a wide range of quiescent and proliferating cell types from various tissues and species. The activation of an adaptive immune response against the transduced cells is one of the major drawbacks of first generation Adenovirus vectors and has been overcome by the latest generation of recombinant Adenovirus, the Helper-Dependent Adenoviral (HDAd vectors. HDAds have innovative features including the complete absence of viral coding sequences and the ability to mediate high level transgene expression with negligible chronic toxicity. This review summarizes the many aspects of HDAd biology and structure with a major focus on in vivo gene therapy application and with an emphasis on the unsolved issues that these vectors still presents toward clinical application.

  1. The effect of mycorrhiza on the growth and elemental composition of Ni-hyperaccumulating plant Berkheya coddii Roessler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlowska, Elzbieta, E-mail: elo@mb.au.dk [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Przybylowicz, Wojciech; Orlowski, Dariusz [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Turnau, Katarzyna [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Krakow (Poland); Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, Jolanta [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa)

    2011-12-15

    The effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on growth and element uptake by Ni-hyperaccumulating plant, Berkheya coddii, was studied. Plants were grown under laboratory conditions on ultramafic soil without or with the AM fungi of different origin. The AM colonization, especially with the indigenous strain, significantly enhanced plants growth and their survival. AMF affected also the elemental concentrations that were studied with Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). AMF (i) increased K and Fe in shoots, Zn and Mn in roots, P and Ca both, in roots and shoots; (ii) decreased Mn in shoots, Co and Ni both, in shoots and roots. Due to higher biomass of mycorrhizal plants, total Ni content was up to 20 times higher in mycorrhizal plants compared to the non-mycorrhizal ones. The AMF enhancement of Ni uptake may therefore provide an improvement of a presently used technique of nickel phytomining. - Highlights: > The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Ni-hyperaccumulating plant was studied. > Growth of Berkheya coddii was significantly enhanced by mycorrhizal inoculation. > Mycorrhizal symbiosis increased Ni uptake to aboveground part of the plants. > Mycorrhizal colonization affected concentration and uptake of other elements. > Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi could improve the techniques of nickel phytomining. - Inoculation of Ni-hyperaccumulating plant Berkheya coddii with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi significantly enhanced plant growth and increased Ni uptake.

  2. A humidity shock leads to rapid, temperature dependent changes in coffee leaf physiology and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thioune, El-Hadji; McCarthy, James; Gallagher, Thomas; Osborne, Bruce

    2017-03-01

    Climate change is expected to increase the frequency of above-normal atmospheric water deficits contemporaneous with periods of high temperatures. Here we explore alterations in physiology and gene expression in leaves of Coffea canephora Pierre ex A. Froehner caused by a sharp drop in relative humidity (RH) at three different temperatures. Both stomatal conductance (gs) and CO2 assimilation (A) measurements showed that gs and A values fell quickly at all temperatures after the transfer to low RH.  However, leaf relative water content measurements indicated that leaves nonetheless experienced substantial water losses, implying that stomatal closure and/or resupply of water was not fast enough to stop excessive evaporative losses.  At 27 and 35 °C, upper leaves showed significant decreases in Fv/Fm compared with lower leaves, suggesting a stronger impact on photosystem II for upper leaves, while at 42 °C, both upper and lower leaves were equally affected. Quantitative gene expression analysis of transcription factors associated with conventional dehydration stress, and genes involved with abscisic acid signalling, such as CcNCED3, indicated temperature-dependent, transcriptional changes during the Humidity Shock ('HuS') treatments.  No expression was seen at 27 °C for the heat-shock gene CcHSP90-7, but it was strongly induced during the 42 °C 'HuS' treatment. Consistent with a proposal that important cellular damage occurred during the 42 °C 'HuS' treatment, two genes implicated in senescence were induced by this treatment. Overall, the data show that C. canephora plants subjected to a sharp drop in RH exhibit major, temperature-dependent alterations in leaf physiology and important changes in the expression of genes associated with abiotic stress and senescence. The results presented suggest that more detailed studies on the combined effects of low RH and high temperature are warranted. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights

  3. Challenges and Prospects for Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vector-Mediated Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Piccolo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd vectors that are devoid of all viral coding sequences are promising non-integrating vectors for gene therapy because they efficiently transduce a variety of cell types in vivo, have a large cloning capacity, and drive long-term transgene expression without chronic toxicity. The main obstacle preventing clinical applications of HDAd vectors is the host innate inflammatory response against the vector capsid proteins that occurs shortly after intravascular vector administration and result in acute toxicity, the severity of which is dose dependent. Intense efforts have been focused on elucidating adenoviral vector–host interactions and the factors involved in the acute toxicity. This review focuses on the recent acquisition of data on such interactions and on strategies investigated to improve the therapeutic index of HDAd vectors.

  4. Cloning and characterization of a calcium dependent protein kinase gene associated with cotton fiber development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Quan-Sheng; Wang, Hai-Yun; Gao, Peng; Wang, Guo-Ying; Xia, Gui-Xian

    2008-12-01

    The gene GhCPK1 encoding a calcium dependent protein kinase was identified from cotton. Transcripts of GhCPK1 accumulated primarily in the elongating fiber, and Arabidopsis plants transformed with GhCPK1 promoter-GUS construct exhibited GUS activity mainly in the developing trichomes, roots, young leaves and sepals. In the bombarded onion epidermal cells, GhCPK1-GFP fusion proteins showed a subcellular distribution in the plasma membrane. In vitro assays indicated that GhCPK1 was a functional calcium-dependent kinase able to undergo autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of the known substrate histone III-S. Together, these results suggest that GhCPK1 may play a role in the calcium signaling events associated with fiber elongation.

  5. Tissue distribution, gender- and genotype-dependent expression of autophagy-related genes in avian species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa Piekarski

    Full Text Available As a result of the genetic selection of broiler (meat-type breeders chickens for enhanced growth rate and lower feed conversion ratio, it has become necessary to restrict feed intake. When broilers are fed ad libitum, they would become obese and suffer from several health-related problems. A vital adaptation to starvation is autophagy, a self-eating mechanism for recycling cellular constituents. The autophagy pathway has witnessed dramatic growth in the last few years and extensively studied in yeast and mammals however, there is a paucity of information in avian (non-mammalian species. Here we characterized several genes involved in autophagosome initiation and elongation in Red Jungle fowl (Gallus gallus and Japanese quail (coturnix coturnix Japonica. Both complexes are ubiquitously expressed in chicken and quail tissues (liver, leg and breast muscle, brain, gizzard, intestine, heart, lung, kidney, adipose tissue, ovary and testis. Alignment analysis showed high similarity (50.7 to 91.5% between chicken autophagy-related genes and their mammalian orthologs. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the evolutionary relationship between autophagy genes is consistent with the consensus view of vertebrate evolution. Interestingly, the expression of autophagy-related genes is tissue- and gender-dependent. Furthermore, using two experimental male quail lines divergently selected over 40 generations for low (resistant, R or high (sensitive, S stress response, we found that the expression of most studied genes are higher in R compared to S line. Together our results indicate that the autophagy pathway is a key molecular signature exhibited gender specific differences and likely plays an important role in response to stress in avian species.

  6. Keratin-dependent regulation of Aire and gene expression in skin tumor keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Ryan P; DePianto, Daryle J; Jacob, Justin T; Han, Minerva C; Chung, Byung-Min; Batazzi, Adriana S; Poll, Brian G; Guo, Yajuan; Han, Jingnan; Ong, SuFey; Zheng, Wenxin; Taube, Janis M; Čiháková, Daniela; Wan, Fengyi; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2015-08-01

    Expression of the intermediate filament protein keratin 17 (K17) is robustly upregulated in inflammatory skin diseases and in many tumors originating in stratified and pseudostratified epithelia. We report that autoimmune regulator (Aire), a transcriptional regulator, is inducibly expressed in human and mouse tumor keratinocytes in a K17-dependent manner and is required for timely onset of Gli2-induced skin tumorigenesis in mice. The induction of Aire mRNA in keratinocytes depends on a functional interaction between K17 and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein hnRNP K. Further, K17 colocalizes with Aire protein in the nucleus of tumor-prone keratinocytes, and each factor is bound to a specific promoter region featuring an NF-κB consensus sequence in a relevant subset of K17- and Aire-dependent proinflammatory genes. These findings provide radically new insight into keratin intermediate filament and Aire function, along with a molecular basis for the K17-dependent amplification of inflammatory and immune responses in diseased epithelia.

  7. Salt-dependent expression of ammonium assimilation genes in the halotolerant yeast, Debaryomyces hansenii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Aranda, Cristina; Deluna, Alexander; Filetici, Patrizia; Riego, Lina; Anaya, Víctor Hugo; González, Alicia

    2005-03-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is adapted to grow in saline environments, accumulating high intracellular Na(+) concentrations. Determination of the DhGDH1-encoded NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase enzymatic activity showed that it increased in a saline environment. Thus, it was proposed that, in order to overcome Na(+) inhibition of enzyme activity, this organism possessed salt-dependent mechanisms which resulted in increased activity of enzymes pertaining to the central metabolic pathways. However, the nature of the mechanisms involved in augmented enzyme activity were not analyzed. To address this matter, we studied the expression of DhGDH1 and DhGLN1 encoding glutamine synthetase, which constitute the central metabolic circuit involved in ammonium assimilation. It was found that: (1) expression of DhGDH1 is increased when D. hansenii is grown in the presence of high NaCl concentrations, while that of DhGLN1 is reduced, (2) DhGDH1 expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae takes place in a GLN3- and HAP2,3-dependent manner and (3) salt-dependent DhGDH1 and DhGLN1 expression involves mechanisms which are limited to D. hansenii and are not present in S. cerevisiae. Thus, salt-dependent regulation of the genes involved in central metabolic pathways could form part of a strategy leading to the ability to grow under hypersaline conditions.

  8. The effect of 5-HTT gene promoter polymorphism on impulsivity depends on family relations in girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paaver, Marika; Kurrikoff, Triin; Nordquist, Niklas; Oreland, Lars; Harro, Jaanus

    2008-07-01

    The short (S) allele of the 5-HTT gene promoter region polymorphism (5-HTTLPR), in combination with adverse environmental influence, leads to higher likelihood of depression. Impulsivity has been related to low serotonin turnover, poor regulation of affect, and problems in the family, including child maltreatment. The current study explored the effect of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene and adverse family environment on impulsivity in adolescents. Healthy adolescents participating in the Estonian Children Personality Behaviour and Health Study (n=483) filled the Adaptive and Maladaptive Impulsivity Scale (AMIS), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), a scale measuring family relations, and were genotyped. While genotype alone was not associated with thoughtlessness, BIS-11 impulsiveness, fast decision-making or excitement seeking, 5-HTTLPR S allele carriers, however, had higher scores of disinhibition. In girls carrying the S allele, scores of thoughtlessness and disinhibition depended on family relations, being higher with less warmth in the family. Adverse family relations had no effect on impulsivity in girls with LL genotype. In boys, the effects of family relations on maladaptive impulsivity did not depend on genotype. However, the S allele and high maltreatment in the family both independently increased disinhibition and the BIS-11 score in boys. Family environment and the 5-HTTLPR genotype had no interactive effect on excitement seeking or fast decision-making. In summary, carrying the S allele may lead to high maladaptive impulsivity due to higher sensitivity to environmental adversity, which is more significantly expressed in girls.

  9. Targeting Activation of Specific NF-κB Subunits Prevents Stress-Dependent Atherothrombotic Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuric, Zdenka; Kashif, Muhammed; Fleming, Thomas; Muhammad, Sajjad; Piel, David; von Bauer, Rüdiger; Bea, Florian; Herzig, Stephan; Zeier, Martin; Pizzi, Marina; Isermann, Berend; Hecker, Markus; Schwaninger, Markus; Bierhaus, Angelika; Nawroth, Peter P

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial stress has been shown to be a contributing factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Although the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated entirely, it has been shown previously that the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is an important component of stress-activated signaling pathway. In this study, we aimed to decipher the mechanisms of stress-induced NF-κB-mediated gene expression, using an in vitro and in vivo model of psychosocial stress. Induction of stress led to NF-κB-dependent expression of proinflammatory (tissue factor, intracellular adhesive molecule 1 [ICAM-1]) and protective genes (manganese superoxide dismutase [MnSOD]) via p50, p65 or cRel. Selective inhibition of the different subunits and the respective kinases showed that inhibition of cRel leads to the reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein−/− (ApoE−/−) mice via suppression of proinflammatory gene expression. This observation may therefore provide a possible explanation for ineffectiveness of antioxidant therapies and suggests that selective targeting of cRel activation may provide a novel approach for the treatment of stress-related inflammatory vascular disease. PMID:23114885

  10. GATA-dependent regulation of TPO-induced c-mpl gene expression during megakaryopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunohara, Masataka; Morikawa, Shigeru; Fuse, Akira; Sato, Iwao

    2014-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and its receptor, c-Mpl, play the crucial role during megakaryocytopoiesis. Previously, we have shown that the promoter activity of c-mpl induced by TPO is modulated by transcription through a PKC-dependent pathway and that GATA(-77) is involved as a positive regulatory element in TPO-induced c-mpl gene expression in the megakaryoblastic CMK cells. In this research, to examine participating possibility of GATA promoter element in TPO- induced c-mpl gene expression through a PKC-independent pathway, the promoter activity of site-directed mutagenesis and the effect of potein kinase C modulator were measured by a transient transfection assay system. Together with our previous results on the TPO-induced c-mpl promoter, this study indicates destruction of -77GATA in c-mpl promoter decreased the activity by 47.3% under existence of GF109203. These results suggest that GATA promoter element plays significant role in TPO-induced c-mpl gene expression through a PKC-independent pathway.

  11. Role of HLA genes in predisposition to develop insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsby, E; Rønningen, K S

    1992-12-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), or type I diabetes, is the end result mainly of a T-cell mediated autoimmune destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells. Genetical and environmental factors are both of importance in the pathogenesis. Genes in the HLA complex seem to be the most important genetical factors. Among Blacks, Caucasoids and Orientals, IDDM susceptibility is associated with some particular combinations of DQA1 and DQB1 genes in cis or trans position. This strongly argues that susceptibility is primarily associated to the corresponding HLA-DQ molecules themselves. However, weaker contributions by other genes in the HLA complex cannot be excluded. Similarly, a dominant protection is strongly associated with some other DQ molecules, in particular HLA-DQ6, in all three ethnic groups. The function of HLA-DQ (and other class II) molecules is to present peptide-fragments of antigens to CD4+ T cells (mainly helper T cells). Thus, the recognition of certain islet beta cell derived peptides by self-reactive CD4+ T cells, may be an initial event in the pathogenesis. The DQ molecules involved in IDDM susceptibility or protection may exert their function either during thymic development of potential self-reactive CD4+ T cells, or by preferential presentation of certain beta-cell derived peptides to CD4+ T cells, or both. The finding that certain DQ molecules as such confer IDDM susceptibility may lead to new methods to prevent IDDM, for example by using blocking peptide analogues.

  12. Protein Kinase C Regulates Late Cell Cycle-Dependent Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darieva, Zoulfia; Han, Namshik; Warwood, Stacey; Doris, Kathryn S.; Morgan, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    The control of the cell cycle in eukaryotes is exerted in part by the coordinated action of a series of transcription factor complexes. This is exemplified by the Mcm1p-Fkh2p-Ndd1p complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which controls the cyclical expression of the CLB2 cluster of genes at the G2/M phase transition. The activity of this complex is positively controlled by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and polo kinases. Here, we demonstrate that the protein kinase Pkc1p works in the opposite manner to inhibit the activity of the Mcm1p-Fkh2p-Ndd1p complex and the expression of its target genes. In particular, Pkc1p causes phosphorylation of the coactivator protein Ndd1p. Reductions in Pkc1p activity and the presence of Pkc1p-insensitive Ndd1p mutant proteins lead to changes in the timing of CLB2 cluster expression and result in associated late cell cycle defects. This study therefore identifies an important role for Pkc1p in controlling the correct temporal expression of genes in the cell cycle. PMID:22966207

  13. Genes involved in sex pheromone discrimination in Drosophila melanogaster and their background-dependent effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Houot

    Full Text Available Mate choice is based on the comparison of the sensory quality of potential mating partners, and sex pheromones play an important role in this process. In Drosophila melanogaster, contact pheromones differ between male and female in their content and in their effects on male courtship, both inhibitory and stimulatory. To investigate the genetic basis of sex pheromone discrimination, we experimentally selected males showing either a higher or lower ability to discriminate sex pheromones over 20 generations. This experimental selection was carried out in parallel on two different genetic backgrounds: wild-type and desat1 mutant, in which parental males showed high and low sex pheromone discrimination ability respectively. Male perception of male and female pheromones was separately affected during the process of selection. A comparison of transcriptomic activity between high and low discrimination lines revealed genes not only that varied according to the starting genetic background, but varied reciprocally. Mutants in two of these genes, Shaker and quick-to-court, were capable of producing similar effects on discrimination on their own, in some instances mimicking the selected lines, in others not. This suggests that discrimination of sex pheromones depends on genes whose activity is sensitive to genetic context and provides a rare, genetically defined example of the phenomenon known as "allele flips," in which interactions have reciprocal effects on different genetic backgrounds.

  14. Evaluation of specimen preparation techniques for micro-PIXE localisation of elements in hyperaccumulating plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachenko, Anthony G. [Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)], E-mail: a.kachenko@usyd.edu.au; Siegele, Rainer; Bhatia, Naveen P. [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Lucas Heights, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); Singh, Balwant [Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Ionescu, Mihail [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Lucas Heights, New South Wales 2234 (Australia)

    2008-04-15

    Hybanthus floribundus subsp. floribundus, a rare Australian Ni-hyperaccumulating shrub and Pityrogramma calomelanos var. austroamericana, an Australian naturalized As-hyperaccumulating fern are promising species for use in phytoremediation of contaminated sites. Micro-proton-induced X-ray emission ({mu}-PIXE) spectroscopy was used to map the elemental distribution of the accumulated metal(loid)s, Ca and K in leaf or pinnule tissues of the two plant species. Samples were prepared by two contrasting specimen preparation techniques: freeze-substitution in tetrahydrofuran (THF) and freeze-drying. The specimens were analysed to compare the suitability of each technique in preserving (i) the spatial elemental distribution and (ii) the tissue structure of the specimens. Further, the {mu}-PIXE results were compared with concentration of elements in the bulk tissue obtained by ICP-AES analysis. In H. floribundus subsp. floribundus, {mu}-PIXE analysis revealed Ni, Ca and K concentrations in freeze-dried leaf tissues were at par with bulk tissue concentrations. Elemental distribution maps illustrated that Ni was preferentially localised in the adaxial epidermal tissues (1% DW) and least concentration was found in spongy mesophyll tissues (0.53% DW). Conversely, elemental distribution maps of THF freeze-substituted tissues indicated significantly lower Ni, Ca and K concentrations than freeze-dried specimens and bulk tissue concentrations. Moreover, Ni concentrations were uniform across the whole specimen and no localisation was observed. In P. calomelanos var. austroamericana freeze-dried pinnule tissues, {mu}-PIXE revealed statistically similar As, Ca and K concentrations as compared to bulk tissue concentrations. Elemental distribution maps showed that As localisation was relatively uniform across the whole specimen. Once again, THF freeze-substituted tissues revealed a significant loss of As compared to freeze-dried specimens and the concentrations obtained by bulk tissue

  15. Regulation of glucose-dependent gene expression by the RNA helicase Dbp2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Zachary T; Cloutier, Sara C; Schipma, Matthew J; Petell, Christopher J; Ma, Wai Kit; Tran, Elizabeth J

    2014-11-01

    Cellular homeostasis requires a fine balance between energy uptake, utilization, and growth. Dbp2 is a member of the DEAD-box protein family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with characterized ATPase and helicase activity in vitro. DEAD-box RNA helicases are a class of enzymes that utilize ATP hydrolysis to remodel RNA and/or RNA-protein (RNP) composition. Dbp2 has been proposed to utilize its helicase activity in vivo to promote RNA-protein complex assembly of both messenger (m)RNAs and long noncoding (lnc)RNAs. Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated that loss of DBP2 enhances the lncRNA-dependent transcriptional induction of the GAL genes by abolishing glucose-dependent repression. Herein, we report that either a carbon source switch or glucose deprivation results in rapid export of Dbp2 to the cytoplasm. Genome-wide RNA sequencing identified a new class of antisense hexose transporter transcripts that are specifically upregulated upon loss of DBP2. Further investigation revealed that both sense and antisense hexose transporter (HXT) transcripts are aberrantly expressed in DBP2-deficient cells and that this expression pathway can be partially mimicked in wild-type cells by glucose depletion. We also find that Dbp2 promotes ribosome biogenesis and represses alternative ATP-producing pathways, as loss of DBP2 alters the transcript levels of ribosome biosynthesis (snoRNAs and associated proteins) and respiration gene products. This suggests that Dbp2 is a key integrator of nutritional status and gene expression programs required for energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Cloning and overexpression in Escherichia coli of the genes encoding NAD-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from two Sulfolobus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannio, R; Fiorentino, G; Carpinelli, P; Rossi, M; Bartolucci, S

    1996-01-01

    The gene adh encoding a NAD-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from the novel strain RC3 of Sulfolobus sp. was cloned and sequenced. Both the adh gene from Sulfolobus sp. strain RC3 and the alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Sulfolobus solfataricus (DSM 1617) were expressed at a high level in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzymes were purified, characterized, and compared. Only a few amino acid replacements were responsible for the different kinetic and physicochemical features investigated. PMID:8550434

  17. Association between the Dopamine Receptor D5 Gene and the Liability to Substance Dependence in Males: A Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanyukov, Michael M.; Maher, Brion S.; Ferrell, Robert E.; Devlin, Bernard; Marazita, Mary L.; Kirillova, Galina P.

    2001-01-01

    The heritability of substance dependence (SD) liability is based on polymorphisms at the genes that are likely to be related to the function of the central nervous system. We have recently shown an association between the dopamine D5 receptor gene and SD liability. We report herein a replication of this association in an independent case-control…

  18. Plasticity-related genes in brain development and amygdala-dependent learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, D E; Josselyn, S A

    2016-01-01

    Learning about motivationally important stimuli involves plasticity in the amygdala, a temporal lobe structure. Amygdala-dependent learning involves a growing number of plasticity-related signaling pathways also implicated in brain development, suggesting that learning-related signaling in juveniles may simultaneously influence development. Here, we review the pleiotropic functions in nervous system development and amygdala-dependent learning of a signaling pathway that includes brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), extracellular signaling-related kinases (ERKs) and cyclic AMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Using these canonical, plasticity-related genes as an example, we discuss the intersection of learning-related and developmental plasticity in the immature amygdala, when aversive and appetitive learning may influence the developmental trajectory of amygdala function. We propose that learning-dependent activation of BDNF, ERK and CREB signaling in the immature amygdala exaggerates and accelerates neural development, promoting amygdala excitability and environmental sensitivity later in life. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  19. Accumulation and distribution characteristics of zinc and cadmium in the hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dong; Zhang, Hongzheng; Wang, Yaodong; Zheng, Leina

    2014-08-01

    Accumulation and distribution of Zn and Cd in the hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola were investigated in a hydroponic experiment. Mean Cd and Zn concentrations in shoots (7,010 and 18,400 mg kg(-1)) were about sevenfold and fivefold higher than those in roots (840 and 3,000 mg kg(-1)) after exposure to 100 μM CdSO4 and 600 μM ZnSO4, respectively. Cd and Zn concentrations in young leaves (4,330 and 9,820 mg kg(-1)) were about sixfold and twofold higher than those in mature leaves (636 and 2,620 mg kg(-1)), respectively. MicroPIXE analysis showed that Zn was predominantly localized in epidermal cells in both young and mature leaves, but large amounts of Zn occurred in mesophyll cells in young leaves. Leaf tissue fractionation showed that soluble and cell wall fractions were different at the two stages of leaf growth. Young and mature leaves of S. plumbizincicola also showed different accumulation and distribution characteristics for Zn and Cd.

  20. Characterization of As efflux from the roots of As hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Hatayama, Masayoshi; Inoue, Chihiro

    2011-12-01

    In some plant species, various arsenic (As) species have been reported to efflux from the roots. However, the details of As efflux by the As hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata remain unknown. In this study, root As efflux was investigated for different phosphorus (P) supply conditions during or after a 24-h arsenate uptake experiment under hydroponic growth conditions. During an 8-h arsenate uptake experiment, P-supplied (P+) P. vittata exhibited much greater arsenite efflux relative to arsenate uptake when compared with P-deprived (P-) P. vittata, indicating that arsenite efflux was not proportional to arsenate uptake. In the As efflux experiment following 24 h of arsenate uptake, arsenate efflux was also observed with arsenite efflux in the external solution. All the results showed relatively low rates of arsenate efflux, ranging from 5.4 to 16.1% of the previously absorbed As, indicating that a low rate of arsenate efflux to the external solution is also a characteristic of P. vittata, as was reported with arsenite efflux. In conclusion, after 24 h of arsenate uptake, both P+ and P- P. vittata loaded/effluxed similar amounts of arsenite to the fronds and the external solution, indicating a similar process of xylem loading and efflux for arsenite, with the order of the arsenite concentrations being solution ≪ roots ≪ fronds.

  1. Sulfate and glutathione enhanced arsenic accumulation by arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Shuhe [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Processes, Institute of Applied Ecology, Shenyang 110116 (China); Ma, Lena Q., E-mail: lqma@ufl.ed [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Processes, Institute of Applied Ecology, Shenyang 110116 (China); Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290 (United States); Saha, Uttam; Mathews, Shiny [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290 (United States); Sundaram, Sabarinath; Rathinasabapathi, Bala [Horticultural Sciences Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0690 (United States); Zhou Qixing [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Processes, Institute of Applied Ecology, Shenyang 110116 (China)

    2010-05-15

    This experiment examined the effects of sulfate (S) and reduced glutathione (GSH) on arsenic uptake by arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata after exposing to arsenate (0, 15 or 30 mg As L{sup -1}) with sulfate (6.4, 12.8 or 25.6 mg S L{sup -1}) or GSH (0, 0.4 or 0.8 mM) for 2-wk. Total arsenic, S and GSH concentrations in plant biomass and arsenic speciation in the growth media and plant biomass were determined. While both S (18-85%) and GSH (77-89%) significantly increased arsenic uptake in P. vittata, GSH also increased arsenic translocation by 61-85% at 0.4 mM (p < 0.05). Sulfate and GSH did not impact plant biomass or arsenic speciation in the media and biomass. The S-induced arsenic accumulation by P. vittata was partially attributed to increased plant GSH (21-31%), an important non-enzymatic antioxidant countering oxidative stress. This experiment demonstrated that S and GSH can effectively enhance arsenic uptake and translocation by P. vittata. - Sulfate and glutathione increased arsenic uptake and translocation in Pteris vittata.

  2. Combined endophytic inoculants enhance nickel phytoextraction from serpentine soil in the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna eVisioli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the effects of specific bacterial endophytes on the phytoextraction capacity of the Ni-hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens, spontaneously growing in a serpentine soil environment. Five metal-tolerant endophytes had already been selected for their high Ni tolerance (6 mM and plant growth promoting ability. Here we demonstrate that individual bacterial inoculation is ineffective in enhancing Ni translocation and growth of N. caerulescens in serpentine soil, except for specific strains Ncr-1 and Ncr-8, belonging to the Arthrobacter and Microbacterium genera, which showed the highest IAA production and ACC-deaminase activity. Ncr-1 and Ncr-8 co-inoculation was even more efficient in promoting plant growth, soil Ni removal and translocation of Ni, together with that of Fe, Co and Cu. Bacteria of both strains densely colonised the root surfaces and intercellular spaces of leaf epidermal tissue. These two bacterial strains also turned out to stimulate root length, shoot biomass and Ni uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana grown in MS agar medium supplemented with Ni. It is concluded that adaptation of N. caerulescens in highly Ni-contaminated serpentine soil can be enhanced by an integrated community of bacterial endophytes rather than by single strains; of the former, Arthrobacter and Microbacterium may be useful candidates for future phytoremediation trials

  3. Accumulation and tolerance characteristics of cadmium in a halophytic Cd-hyperaccumulator, Arthrocnemum macrostachyum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo-Gomez, Susana, E-mail: susana@us.es [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal y Ecologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1095, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Andrades-Moreno, Luis [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal y Ecologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1095, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    The potential of the extreme halophyte Arthrocnemum macrostachyum was examined to determine its tolerance and ability to accumulate cadmium for phytoremediation purposes. A glasshouse experiment was designed to investigate the effect of cadmium from 0 to 1.35 mmol l{sup -1} on the growth and the photosynthetic apparatus of A. macrostachyum by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, gas exchange and photosynthetic pigment concentrations. We also determined ash, cadmium, calcium, copper, iron, manganese, magnesium, phosphorous, sodium, and zinc concentrations, and C/N ratio. A. macrostachyum demonstrated hypertolerance to cadmium stress; it did not show phytotoxicity at shoot concentration as high as 70 mg kg{sup -1}. The bioaccumulator factors exceeded the critical value (1.0) for all Cd treatments, and the transport factors indicated that this species has higher ability to transfer Cd from roots to shoots at lower Cd concentrations. At 1.35 mmol l{sup -1} Cd A. macrostachyum showed 25% biomass reduction after a month of treatment. Long-term effects of cadmium on the growth were mainly determined by variations in net photosynthetic rate (P{sub N}). Reductions in P{sub N} could be accounted by higher dark respiration and lower pigment concentrations. Finally, A. macrostachyum has the basic characteristics of a Cd-hyperaccumulator and may be useful for restoring Cd-contaminated sites.

  4. The variation of root exudates from the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii under cadmium stress: metabonomics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Luo

    Full Text Available Hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate the variation of root exudates from the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii under the stress of cadmium (Cd. S. alfredii was cultured for 4 days in the nutrient solution spiked with CdCl2 at concentrations of 0, 5, 10, 40, and 400 µM Cd after the pre-culture. The root exudates were collected and analyzed by GC-MS, and 62 compounds were identified. Of these compounds, the orthogonal partial least-squares discrimination analysis (OPLS-DA showed that there were a distinct difference among the root exudates with different Cd treatments and 20 compounds resulting in this difference were found out. Changing tendencies in the relative content of these 20 compounds under the different Cd treatments were analyzed. These results indicated that trehalose, erythritol, naphthalene, d-pinitol and n-octacosane might be closely related to the Cd stabilization, phosphoric acid, tetradecanoic acid, oxalic acid, threonic acid and glycine could be attributed to the Cd mobilization, and mannitol, oleic acid, 3-hydroxybutanoic acid, fructose, octacosanol and ribitol could copy well with the Cd stress.

  5. Effect of elevated CO2 concentration on photosynthetic characteristics of hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii under cadmium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingqiang; Tao, Qi; Di, Zhenzhen; Lu, Fan; Yang, Xiaoe

    2015-07-01

    The combined effects of elevated CO2 and cadmium (Cd) on photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence and Cd accumulation in hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance were investigated to predict plant growth under Cd stress with rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. Both pot and hydroponic experiments were conducted and the plants were grown under ambient (350 µL L(-1)) or elevated (800 µL L(-1)) CO2 . Elevated CO2 significantly (P < 0.05) increased Pn (105%-149%), Pnmax (38.8%-63.0%) and AQY (20.0%-34.8%) of S. alfredii in all the Cd treatments, but reduced chlorophyll concentration, dark respiration and photorespiration. After 10 days growth in medium with 50 µM Cd under elevated CO2 , PSII activities were significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) with Pm, Fv/Fm, Φ(II) and qP increased by 66.1%, 7.5%, 19.5% and 16.4%, respectively, as compared with ambient-grown plants. Total Cd uptake in shoot of S. alfredii grown under elevated CO2 was increased by 44.1%-48.5%, which was positively correlated with the increase in Pn. These results indicate that elevated CO2 promoted the growth of S. alfredii due to increased photosynthetic carbon uptake rate and photosynthetic light-use efficiency, and showed great potential to improve the phytoextraction of Cd by S. alfredii. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  6. Root responses to soil Ni heterogeneity in a hyperaccumulator and a non-accumulator species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Ahmad B., E-mail: ahmad.moradi@ufz.d [Hydrogeology Department, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Conesa, Hector M.; Robinson, Brett H. [Institute of Terrestrial Ecosystems, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Lehmann, Eberhard; Kaestner, Anders [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Schulin, Rainer [Institute of Terrestrial Ecosystems, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-08-15

    We compared root responses of the Ni-hyperaccumulator plant Berkheya coddii Rossler with the non-accumulator plant Cicer arietinum L. to Ni heterogeneity in soil. We grew plants in growth containers filled with control soil, homogeneously spiked, and heterogeneously spiked soil with Ni concentrations of 62 and 125 mg kg{sup -1}. Neutron radiography (NR) was used to observe the root distribution and the obtained images were analysed to reveal the root volumes in the spiked and unspiked segments of the growth container. There was no significant difference in root distribution pattern of B. coddii among different concentrations of Ni. Unlike B. coddii, the roots of C. arietinum initially grew into the spiked segments. However, the later developing roots did not penetrate the spiked segment suggesting an avoidance strategy. Our results indicate that, B. coddii does not forage towards the Ni-rich patches, although presence of Ni in soil changes its root morphology. - Ni heterogeneity in soil affects the morphology and root distribution patterns of Berkheya coddii and Cicer arietinum.

  7. Distribution of rare earth elements among chloroplast components of hyperaccumulator Dicranopteris dichotoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Ping; Shan, Xiao-Quan; Zhang, Shu-Zhen; Wen, Bei

    2003-07-01

    A rare earth element (REE) hyperaccumulator, Dicranopteris dichotoma, that accumulates more than 0.1% REEs dry leaf mass has been discovered in southern China. The different components of chloroplast were isolated and the concentration of REEs in each component was determined by ICP-MS. The experimental data indicated that about 8% of total leaf REEs was present in the chloroplast of Dicranopteris dichotoma. In order to thoroughly study the distribution of REEs among different components of chloroplast, the membrane of chloroplast, the intact thylakoid and the photosystem II (PS II system) of D. dichotoma were isolated from the chloroplast. It was found that half of total chloroplast REEs was stored at the membrane of the chloroplast and another half was in the thylakoid. And 25% of total chloroplast REEs was bound with PS II system of D.dichotoma. The concentration of REEs in chlorophyll a was only at the level of microg/g on the bases of chlorophylls. These data are useful for understanding of both the storage of REEs in chloroplast and the effect of REEs on the photosynthesis of plants.

  8. Mycorrhizae increase arsenic uptake by the hyperaccumulator Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Agely, Abid; Sylvia, David M; Ma, Lena Q

    2005-01-01

    Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata L.) is a hyperaccumulator of arsenic (As) that grows naturally on soils in the southern United States. It is reasonable to expect that mycorrhizal symbiosis may be involved in As uptake by this fern. This is because arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have a well-documented role in increasing plant phosphorus (P) uptake, P and As have similar chemical properties, and ferns are known to be colonized by AM fungi. We conducted a factorial greenhouse experiment with three levels of As (0, 50, and 100 mg kg(-1)) and P (0, 25, and 50 mg kg(-1)) and with and without Chinese brake fern colonized by a community of AM fungi from an As-contaminated site. We found that the AM fungi not only tolerated As amendment, but their presence increased frond dry mass at the highest As application rate. Furthermore, the AM fungi increased As uptake across a range of P levels, while P uptake was generally increased only when there was no As amendment. These data indicate that AM fungi have an important role in arsenic accumulation by Chinese brake fern. Therefore, to effectively phytoremediate As-contaminated soils, the mycorrhizal status of ferns needs to be taken into account.

  9. ClpE from Lactococcus lactis promotes repression of CtsR-dependent gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varmanen, P.; Vogensen, F.K.; Hammer, Karin

    2003-01-01

    The heat shock response in bacterial cells is characterized by rapid induction of heat shock protein expression, followed by an adaptation period during which heat shock protein synthesis decreases to a new steady-state level. In this study we found that after a shift to a high temperature the Clp...... ATPase (ClpE) in Lactococcus lactis is required for such a decrease in expression of a gene negatively regulated by the heat shock regulator (CtsR). Northern blot analysis showed that while a shift to a high temperature in wild-type cells resulted in a temporal increase followed by a decrease...... in expression of clpP encoding the proteolytic component of the Clp protease complex, this decrease was delayed in the absence of ClpE. Site-directed mutagenesis of the zinc-binding motif conserved in ClpE ATPases interfered with the ability to repress CtsR-dependent expression. Quantification of Clp...

  10. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada F Rady

    Full Text Available Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC. DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route.

  11. Concentration-dependent gene expression responses to flusilazole in embryonic stem cell differentiation cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dartel, Dorien A M; Pennings, Jeroen L A; de la Fonteyne, Liset J J; Brauers, Karen J J; Claessen, Sandra; van Delft, Joost H; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Piersma, Aldert H

    2011-03-01

    The murine embryonic stem cell test (EST) is designed to evaluate developmental toxicity based on compound-induced inhibition of embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation into cardiomyocytes. The addition of transcriptomic evaluation within the EST may result in enhanced predictability and improved characterization of the applicability domain, therefore improving usage of the EST for regulatory testing strategies. Transcriptomic analyses assessing factors critical for risk assessment (i.e. dose) are needed to determine the value of transcriptomic evaluation in the EST. Here, using the developmentally toxic compound, flusilazole, we investigated the effect of compound concentration on gene expression regulation and toxicity prediction in ESC differentiation cultures. Cultures were exposed for 24 h to multiple concentrations of flusilazole (0.54-54 μM) and RNA was isolated. In addition, we sampled control cultures 0, 24, and 48 h to evaluate the transcriptomic status of the cultures across differentiation. Transcriptomic profiling identified a higher sensitivity of development-related processes as compared to cell division-related processes in flusilazole-exposed differentiation cultures. Furthermore, the sterol synthesis-related mode of action of flusilazole toxicity was detected. Principal component analysis using gene sets related to normal ESC differentiation was used to describe the dynamics of ESC differentiation, defined as the 'differentiation track'. The concentration-dependent effects on development were reflected in the significance of deviation of flusilazole-exposed cultures from this transcriptomic-based differentiation track. Thus, the detection of developmental toxicity in EST using transcriptomics was shown to be compound concentration-dependent. This study provides further insight into the possible application of transcriptomics in the EST as an improved alternative model system for developmental toxicity testing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc

  12. Association of GABAA receptor α2 subunit gene (GABRA2) with alcohol dependence-related aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strac, Dubravka Svob; Erjavec, Gordana Nedic; Perkovic, Matea Nikolac; Sviglin, Korona Nenadic; Borovecki, Fran; Pivac, Nela

    2015-12-03

    Alcohol dependence is a common chronic disorder precipitated by the complex interaction between biological, genetic and environmental risk factors. Recent studies have demonstrated that polymorphisms of the gene encoding the GABAA receptor α2 subunit (GABRA2) are associated with alcohol dependence in different populations of European ancestry. As aggression often occurs in the context of alcohol dependence, the aim of this study was to examine the allelic and haplotypic association of GABRA2 gene with alcohol dependence and related aggressive behavior in subjects of Eastern European (Croatian) origin. Genotyping of the 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the GABRA2 gene (rs567926, rs279858 and rs9291283) was performed in patients with alcohol dependence (N=654) and healthy control subjects (N=574). Alcohol-dependent participants were additionally subdivided according to the presence/absence of aggressive behavior and type of alcohol dependence according to the Cloninger's classification. The association of rs279858 with alcohol dependence yielded nominal significance level. Haplotype analysis revealed a high degree of linkage disequilibrium (LD) for rs567926 and rs279858, but not for rs9291283 polymorphism in the GABRA2 gene. In patients with alcohol dependence, the A-C (rs567926 and rs279858) haplotype carriers were more likely to demonstrate aggressive behavior. The same haplotype (present only in 1.6% of all subjects) was significantly more often present in patients with a combination of early onset alcohol abuse and aggression, corresponding to the Cloninger's type II alcoholism subgroup. These findings support the involvement of GABRA2 gene in alcohol dependence-related aggressive behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The tuberous sclerosis genes and regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Margit; Freilinger, Angelika; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2006-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant tumor syndrome that affects approximately 1 in 6000 individuals. It is characterized by the development of tumors, named hamartomas, in the kidneys, heart, skin and brain. The latter often cause seizures, mental retardation, and a variety of developmental disorders, including autism. This disease is caused by mutations within the tumor suppressor gene TSC1 on chromosome 9q34 encoding hamartin or within TSC2 on chromosome 16p13.3 encoding tuberin. TSC patients carry a mutant TSC1 or TSC2 gene in each of their somatic cells, and loss of heterozygosity has been documented in a wide variety of TSC tumors. Recent data suggest that functional inactivation of TSC proteins might also be involved in the development of other diseases not associated with TSC, such as sporadic bladder cancer, breast cancer, ovarian carcinoma, gall bladder carcinoma, non-small-cell carcinoma of the lung, and Alzheimer's disease. Tuberin and hamartin form a heterodimer, suggesting they might affect the same processes. Tuberin is assumed to be the functional component of the complex and has been implicated in the regulation of different cellular functions. The TSC proteins regulate cell size control due to their involvement in the insulin signalling pathway. Furthermore, they are potent positive regulators of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27, a major regulator of the mammalian cell cycle. Here we review the current knowledge on how mutations within the TSC genes could trigger deregulation of stability and localization of the tumor suppressor p27.

  14. The success of assisted colonization and assisted gene flow depends on phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadgymar, Susana M; Cumming, Matthew N; Weis, Arthur E

    2015-10-01

    Global warming will jeopardize the persistence and genetic diversity of many species. Assisted colonization, or the movement of species beyond their current range boundary, is a conservation strategy proposed for species with limited dispersal abilities or adaptive potential. However, species that rely on photoperiodic and thermal cues for development may experience conflicting signals if transported across latitudes. Relocating multiple, distinct populations may remedy this quandary by expanding genetic variation and promoting evolutionary responses in the receiving habitat--a strategy known as assisted gene flow. To better inform these policies, we planted seeds from latitudinally distinct populations of the annual legume, Chamaecrista fasciculata, in a potential future colonization site north of its current range boundary. Plants were exposed to ambient or elevated temperatures via infrared heating. We monitored several life history traits and estimated patterns of natural selection to determine the adaptive value of plastic responses. To assess the feasibility of assisted gene flow between phenologically distinct populations, we counted flowers each day and estimated the degree of temporal isolation between populations. Increased temperatures advanced each successive phenological trait more than the last, resulting in a compressed life cycle for all but the southern-most population. Warming altered patterns of selection on flowering onset and vegetative biomass. Population performance was dependent on latitude of origin, with the northern-most population performing best under ambient conditions and the southern-most performing most poorly, even under elevated temperatures. Among-population differences in flowering phenology limited the potential for genetic exchange among the northern- and southern-most populations. All plastic responses to warming were neutral or adaptive; however, photoperiodic constraints will likely necessitate evolutionary responses for

  15. A complex rearrangement in the APC gene uncovered by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagenstecher, Constanze; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Stienen, Dietlinde; Uhlhaas, Siegfried; Mangold, Elisabeth; Rahner, Nils; Arslan-Kirchner, Mine; Propping, Peter; Friedl, Waltraut; Aretz, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene APC are the underlying cause of familial adenomatous polyposis, an autosomal-dominant cancer predisposition syndrome of the colorectum. Here, we describe a complex pathogenic rearrangement in the APC gene that was detected during deletion screening and transmitted throughout at least three generations. The rearrangement consists of a deletion of 604 bp in intron 4 that impairs the binding site of the reverse primer for exon 4 and of an insertion of 119 bp in exon 4 that interferes with the binding site of the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) probes for exon 4. The insertion is composed of three duplicated sequences derived from exon 4, intron 3, and intron 4, all in inverse direction. By transcript analysis, we found that the mutation results in complete skipping of exon 4 and that it leads to a frameshift. The rearrangement would not have been identified had it occurred outside the MLPA hybridization site. Our findings demonstrate that part of the pathogenic mutations remain undetected by routine methods. Moreover, MLPA and RNA analysis alone would have led to an incorrect interpretation of a genomic deletion of exon 4.

  16. Rlm1 mediates positive autoregulatory transcriptional feedback that is essential for Slt2-dependent gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Raúl; Sanz, Ana Belén; Rodríguez-Peña, José Manuel; Nombela, César; Arroyo, Javier

    2016-04-15

    Activation of the yeast cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway induces an adaptive transcriptional programme that is largely dependent on the transcription factor Rlm1 and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Slt2. Upon cell wall stress, the transcription factor Rlm1 is recruited to the promoters of RLM1 and SLT2, and exerts positive-feedback mechanisms on the expression of both genes. Activation of the MAPK Slt2 by cell wall stress is not impaired in strains with individual blockade of any of the two feedback pathways. Abrogation of the autoregulatory feedback mechanism on RLM1 severely affects the transcriptional response elicited by activation of the CWI pathway. In contrast, a positive trans-acting feedback mechanism exerted by Rlm1 on SLT2 also regulates CWI output responses but to a lesser extent. Therefore, a complete CWI transcriptional response requires not only phosphorylation of Rlm1 by Slt2 but also concurrent SLT2- and RLM1-mediated positive-feedback mechanisms; sustained patterns of gene expression are mainly achieved by positive autoregulatory circuits based on the transcriptional activation of Rlm1. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Silencing of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene enhances glioma radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Youl [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young Hyun [Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeen-Woo, E-mail: parkjw@knu.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-05

    Highlights: •Silencing of the IDPm gene enhances IR-induced autophagy in glioma cells. •Autophagy inhibition augmented apoptosis of irradiated glioma cells. •Results offer a redox-active therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels are elevated in organisms that have been exposed to ionizing radiation and are protagonists in the induction of cell death. Recently, we demonstrated that the control of mitochondrial redox balance and the cellular defense against oxidative damage are primary functions of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDPm) via the supply of NADPH for antioxidant systems. In the present study, we report an autophagic response to ionizing radiation in A172 glioma cells transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the IDPm gene. Autophagy in A172 transfectant cells was associated with enhanced autophagolysosome formation and GFP–LC3 punctuation/aggregation. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine augmented apoptotic cell death of irradiated A172 cells transfected with IDPm siRNA. Taken together, our data suggest that autophagy functions as a survival mechanism in A172 cells against ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis and the sensitizing effect of IDPm siRNA and autophagy inhibitor on the ionizing radiation-induced apoptotic cell death of glioma cells offers a novel redox-active therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer.

  18. Pitx2-dependent occupancy by histone deacetylases is associated with T-box gene regulation in mammalian abdominal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Traci; Gross, Michael K; Kioussi, Chrissa

    2010-04-09

    The homeodomain transcription factor Pitx2 and the T-box transcription factors are essential for organogenesis. Pitx2 and T-box genes are induced by growth factors and function as transcriptional activators or repressors. Gene expression analyses on abdominal tissue were used to identify seven of the T-box genes of the genome as Pitx2 target genes in the abdomen at embryonic day.10.5. Pitx2 activated Tbx4, Tbx15, and Mga and repressed Tbx1, Tbx2, Tbx5, and Tbx6 expression. As expected, activated genes showed reduced expression patterns, and repressed T-box genes showed increased expression patterns in the abdomen of Pitx2 mutants. Pitx2 occupied chromatin sites near all of these T-box genes. Co-occupancy by coactivators, corepressors, and histone acetylation at these sites was frequently Pitx2-dependent. Genes repressed by Pitx2 generally showed increased histone acetylation and decreased histone deacetylase (HDAC)/corepressor occupancy in Pitx2 mutants. The lower N-CoR, HDAC1, and HDAC3 occupancy observed at multiple sites along Tbx1 chromatin in mutants is consistent with the model that increased histone acetylation and gene expression of Tbx1 may result from a loss of recruitment of corepressors by Pitx2. Genes activated by Pitx2 showed less consistent patterns in chromatin analyses. Reduced H4 acetylation and increased HDAC1/nuclear receptor corepressor (N-CoR) occupancy at some Tbx4 sites were accompanied by increased H3 acetylation and reduced HDAC3 occupancy at the same or other more distal chromatin sites in mutants. Pitx2-dependent occupancy by corepressors resulted in alteration of the acetylation levels of several T-box genes, whereas Pitx2-dependent occupancy by coactivators was more site-localized. These studies will provide the basic scientific underpinning to understand abdominal wall syndromes.

  19. Characterization of Zur-dependent genes and direct Zur targets in Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaoyi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zinc uptake regulator Zur is a Zn2+-sensing metalloregulatory protein involved in the maintenance of bacterial zinc homeostasis. Up to now, regulation of zinc homeostasis by Zur is poorly understood in Y. pestis. Results We constructed a zur null mutant of Y. pestis biovar microtus strain 201. Microarray expression analysis disclosed a set of 154 Zur-dependent genes of Y. pestis upon exposure to zinc rich condition. Real-time reverse transcription (RT-PCR was subsequently used to validate the microarray data. Based on the 154 Zur-dependent genes, predicted regulatory Zur motifs were used to screen for potential direct Zur targets including three putative operons znuA, znuCB and ykgM-RpmJ2. The LacZ reporter fusion analysis verified that Zur greatly repressed the promoter activity of the above three operons. The subsequent electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA demonstrated that a purified Zur protein was able to bind to the promoter regions of the above three operons. The DNase I footprinting was used to identify the Zur binding sites for the above three operons, verifying the Zur box sequence as predicted previously in γ-Proteobacteria. The primer extension assay was further used to determine the transcription start sites for the above three operons and to localize the -10 and -35 elements. Zur binding sites overlapped the -10 sequence of its target promoters, which was consistent with the previous observation that Zur binding would block the entry of the RNA polymerase to repress the transcription of its target genes. Conclusion Zur as a repressor directly controls the transcription of znuA, znuCB and ykgM-RpmJ2 in Y. pestis by employing a conserved mechanism of Zur-promoter DNA association as observed in γ-Proteobacteria. Zur contributes to zinc homeostasis in Y. pestis likely through transcriptional repression of the high-affinity zinc uptake system ZnuACB and two alternative ribosomal proteins YkgM and RpmJ2.

  20. Bards, poets, and cliques: frequency-dependent selection and the evolution of language genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Reed A

    2011-09-01

    The ability of humans to communicate via language is a complex, adapted phenotype, which undoubtedly has a recently evolved genetic component. However, the evolutionary dynamics of language-associated alleles are poorly understood. To improve our knowledge of such systems, a population-genetics model for language-associated genes is developed. (The model is general and applicable to social interactions other than communication.) When an allele arises that potentially improves the ability of individuals to communicate, it will experience positive frequency-dependent selection because its fitness will depend on how many other individuals communicate the same way. Consequently, new and rare alleles are selected against, posing a problem for the evolutionary origin of language. However, the model shows that if individuals form language-based cliques, then novel language-associated alleles can sweep through a population. Thus, the origin of language ability can be sufficiently explained by Darwinian processes operating on genetic diversity in a finite population of human ancestors. © Society for Mathematical Biology 2010

  1. DNA sequence-dependent epigenetic inheritance of gene silencing and histone H3K9 methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyi; Moazed, Danesh

    2017-04-07

    Epigenetic inheritance mechanisms play fundamental roles in maintaining cellular memory of gene expression states. In fission yeast, histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) is methylated (H3K9me) at heterochromatic domains. These domains can be epigenetically inherited when epe1+ , encoding an enzyme that promotes H3K9 demethylation, is deleted. How native epigenetic states are stably maintained in epe1+ cells remains unknown. Here, we developed a system to examine the role of DNA sequence and genomic context in propagation of a cis-heritable H3K9me-dependent silenced state. We show that in epe1+ cells, in addition to sequence-independent mechanisms that propagate H3K9me, epigenetic inheritance of silencing requires binding sites for sequence-dependent activating transcription factor (ATF)-adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB) family transcription factors within their native chromosomal context. Thus, specific DNA sequences contribute to cis inheritance of H3K9me and silent epigenetic states. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Genome-Wide Dosage-Dependent and -Independent Regulation Contributes to Gene Expression and Evolutionary Novelty in Plant Polyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Zhang, Changqing; Ko, Dae Kwan; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Polyploidy provides evolutionary and morphological novelties in many plants and some animals. However, the role of genome dosage and composition in gene expression changes remains poorly understood. Here, we generated a series of resynthesized Arabidopsis tetraploids that contain 0-4 copies of Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa genomes and investigated ploidy and hybridity effects on gene expression. Allelic expression can be defined as dosage dependent (expression levels correlate with genome dosages) or otherwise as dosage independent. Here, we show that many dosage-dependent genes contribute to cell cycle, photosynthesis, and metabolism, whereas dosage-independent genes are enriched in biotic and abiotic stress responses. Interestingly, dosage-dependent genes tend to be preserved in ancient biochemical pathways present in both plant and nonplant species, whereas many dosage-independent genes belong to plant-specific pathways. This is confirmed by an independent analysis using Arabidopsis phylostratigraphic map. For A. thaliana loci, the dosage-dependent alleles are devoid of TEs and tend to correlate with H3K9ac, H3K4me3, and CG methylation, whereas the majority of dosage-independent alleles are enriched with TEs and correspond to H3K27me1, H3K27me3, and CHG (H = A, T, or C) methylation. Furthermore, there is a parent-of-origin effect on nonadditively expressed genes in the reciprocal allotetraploids especially when A. arenosa is used as the pollen donor, leading to metabolic and morphological changes. Thus, ploidy, epigenetic modifications, and cytoplasmic-nuclear interactions shape gene expression diversity in polyploids. Dosage-dependent expression can maintain growth and developmental stability, whereas dosage-independent expression can facilitate functional divergence between homeologs (subfunctionalization and/or neofunctionalization) during polyploid evolution. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  3. Copper changes the yield and cadmium/zinc accumulation and cellular distribution in the cadmium/zinc hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhu [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wu, Longhua, E-mail: lhwu@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Hu, Pengjie [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Luo, Yongming [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Yantai 264003 (China); Christie, Peter [Agri-Environment Branch, Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Newforge Lane, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Low Cu has no significant effect on Sedum plumbizincicola plant growth and Cd and Zn uptake. • Plant held Cu in unactive areas and insoluble forms as de-toxification mechanisms. • Influence of Cu on Zn and Cd uptake and translocation were different. • Cu accumulation in leaf veins may restrain Cd/Zn unloading to the leaves -- Abstract: Non-accumulated metals in mixed metal contaminated soils may affect hyperaccumulator growth and metal accumulation and thus remediation efficiency. Two hydroponics experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of copper (Cu) on cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) accumulation by the Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola, Cu toxicity and plant detoxification using chemical sequential extraction of metals, sub-cellular separation, micro synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. Compared with the control (0.31 μM Cu), 5–50 μM Cu had no significant effect on Cd/Zn accumulation, but Cu at 200 μM induced root cell plasmolysis and disordered chloroplast structure. The plants held Cu in the roots and cell walls and complexed Cu in insoluble forms as their main detoxification mechanisms. Exposure to 200 μM Cu for 4 days inhibited plant Cd uptake and translocation but did not affect Zn concentrations in roots and stems. Moreover, unloading of Cd and Zn from stem to leaf was restrained compared to control plants, perhaps due to Cu accumulation in leaf veins. Copper may thus interfere with root Cd uptake and restrain Cd/Zn unloading to the leaves. Further investigation of how Cu affects plant metal uptake may help elucidate the Cd/Zn hyper-accumulating mechanisms of S. plumbizincicola.

  4. In vivo localization of manganese in the hyperaccumulator Gossia bidwillii (Benth.) N. Snow & Guymer (Myrtaceae) by cryo-SEM/EDAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Denise R; Batianoff, George N; Baker, Alan J; Woodrow, Ian E

    2006-05-01

    Gossia bidwillii (Myrtaceae) is a manganese (Mn)-hyperaccumulating tree native to subtropical eastern Australia. It typically contains foliar Mn levels in excess of 1% dry weight. However, in G. bidwillii and other Mn-hyperaccumulating species, the cellular and subcellular localization of Mn has not been measured. Quantitative in vivo cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) was used to localize Mn and other elements in tissue collected from mature trees growing in a natural population. Cryo-SEM showed that the leaf mesophyll is differentiated as a double-layer palisade mesophyll above spongy mesophyll. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the palisade and epidermal cells are highly vacuolated. EDAX data were used to estimate in situ vacuolar Mn concentrations of all cell types in fresh cryo-fixed leaf tissues. The highest average vacuolar Mn concentration of over 500 mM was found in the upper-layer palisade mesophyll, while the lowest concentration of around 100 mM was found in the spongy mesophyll. Qualitative in vivo cryo-SEM/EDAX was employed to further investigate the spatial distribution of Mn in fresh leaf tissues and young bark tissue, which was also found to have a high Mn concentration. It is concluded that Mn distribution in G. bidwillii is quantitatively different to metal distribution in other hyperaccumulating species where the highest localized concentrations of these elements occur in non-photosynthmetic tissues such as epidermal cells and associated dermal structures including trichomes and leaf hairs.

  5. Effects of Cu on the content of chlorophylls and secondary metabolites in the Cu-hyperaccumulator lichen Stereocaulon japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiromitsu; Hara, Kojiro; Yamamoto, Yoshikazu; Itoh, Kiminori

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the relationship between Cu and Cu-hyperaccumulator lichens is important for their application in monitoring and assessing heavy metal pollution. We investigated the Cu-hyperaccumulator lichen Stereocaulon japonicum at several Cu-polluted and control sites in Japan, and found the lichen to be widely distributed. Its concentrations of Cu, chlorophylls, and secondary metabolites, chlorophyll-related indices, and absorption spectra were measured, and we observed negative effects of Cu on these concentrations and indices. For highly Cu-polluted samples (>100ppm dry weight), however, we found significant linear correlations between Cu and chlorophyll concentrations. This can be considered as the response of the photobiont in S. japonicum to Cu stress. In highly Cu-polluted samples the chlorophyll-related indices and concentration of total secondary metabolites were almost constant regardless of Cu concentration. This suggests that the increase in chlorophyll concentration with the increase in Cu concentration enhances photosynthetic productivity per unit biomass, which will allow the production of extra structure and energy for maintaining the chlorophyll-related indices under Cu stress. The relationship between the increase in chlorophyll concentration of S. japonicum and the decrease in secondary metabolite concentration of the lichen can be explained by considering the balance of carbohydrates in the lichen. We found that a spectral index A372-A394 can be a useful index of the concentrations of Cu and total secondary metabolites in S. japonicum. These findings show the adjustment of the content of chlorophylls and secondary metabolites in S. japonicum to Cu stress, and provide a better understanding of the relationship between Cu and the Cu-hyperaccumulator lichen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Differential alterations in gene expression profiles contribute to time-dependent effects of nandrolone to prevent denervation atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauman William A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anabolic steroids, such as nandrolone, slow muscle atrophy, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are largely unknown. Their effects on muscle size and gene expression depend upon time, and the cause of muscle atrophy. Administration of nandrolone for 7 days beginning either concomitantly with sciatic nerve transection (7 days or 29 days later (35 days attenuated denervation atrophy at 35 but not 7 days. We reasoned that this model could be used to identify genes that are regulated by nandrolone and slow denervation atrophy, as well as genes that might explain the time-dependence of nandrolone effects on such atrophy. Affymetrix microarrays were used to profile gene expression changes due to nandrolone at 7 and 35 days and to identify major gene expression changes in denervated muscle between 7 and 35 days. Results Nandrolone selectively altered expression of 124 genes at 7 days and 122 genes at 35 days, with only 20 genes being regulated at both time points. Marked differences in biological function of genes regulated by nandrolone at 7 and 35 days were observed. At 35, but not 7 days, nandrolone reduced mRNA and protein levels for FOXO1, the mTOR inhibitor REDD2, and the calcineurin inhibitor RCAN2 and increased those for ApoD. At 35 days, correlations between mRNA levels and the size of denervated muscle were negative for RCAN2, and positive for ApoD. Nandrolone also regulated genes for Wnt signaling molecules. Comparison of gene expression at 7 and 35 days after denervation revealed marked alterations in the expression of 9 transcriptional coregulators, including Ankrd1 and 2, and many transcription factors and kinases. Conclusions Genes regulated in denervated muscle after 7 days administration of nandrolone are almost entirely different at 7 versus 35 days. Alterations in levels of FOXO1, and of genes involved in signaling through calcineurin, mTOR and Wnt may be linked to the favorable action of nandrolone on

  7. Ethylene regulates Apple (Malus x domestica) fruit softening through a dose x time-dependent mechanism and through differential sensitivities and dependencies of cell wall-modifying genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Hilary S; Gunaseelan, Kularajathevan; Muddumage, Ratnasiri; Tacken, Emma J; Putterill, Jo; Johnston, Jason W; Schaffer, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    In fleshy fruit species that have a strong requirement for ethylene to ripen, ethylene is synthesized autocatalytically, producing increasing concentrations as the fruits ripen. Apple fruit with the ACC OXIDASE 1 (ACO1) gene suppressed cannot produce ethylene autocatalytically at ripening. Using these apple lines, an ethylene sensitivity dependency model was previously proposed, with traits such as softening showing a high dependency for ethylene as well as low sensitivity. In this study, it is shown that the molecular control of fruit softening is a complex process, with different cell wall-related genes being independently regulated and exhibiting differential sensitivities to and dependencies on ethylene at the transcriptional level. This regulation is controlled through a dose × time mechanism, which results in a temporal transcriptional response that would allow for progressive cell wall disassembly and thus softening. This research builds on the sensitivity dependency model and shows that ethylene-dependent traits can progress over time to the same degree with lower levels of ethylene. This suggests that a developmental clock measuring cumulative ethylene controls the fruit ripening process.

  8. [Phenolic antioxidant TS-13 regulating ARE-dependent genes induces tumor cell death by mitochondria-dependent pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinovich, G G; Martinovich, I V; Zenkov, N K; Men'shikova, E B; Kandalintseva, N V; Cherenkevich, S N

    2015-01-01

    Effects of water-soluble phenolic antioxidant sodium 3-(3'-tret-butyl-4'-hydroxyphenyl)-propyl thiosulfonate (TS-13), potassium 3,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxybenzyl thioetanoate (BEP-11-K) and potassium 3-(3',5'-ditretbutyl-4'-hydroxyphenyl)-propionate (potassium phenosan) on tumor cells proliferative activity and the role of redox-dependent and calcium-dependent signaling mechanisms in realization of tumor cell response to the antioxidant action were studied. Potassium phenosan and BEP-11-K were found to stimulate proliferation and ARE-inducing phenolic antioxidant TS-13 was found to inhibit tumor cell growth in culture. The tumor cell growth rate depended on the rate of intracellular reactive oxygen species production and was decreased by apocynin (a NADPH-oxidase inhibitor) and antimycin A (an ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase inhibitor). TS-13 action on tumor cells was accompanied by a transient increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species production and the intracellular calcium concentration, whereas cell incubation with potassium phenosan and BEP-11-K did not influence the reactive oxygen species level and intracellular calcium ions. Cyclosporine A blocked the inhibitory effect of TS-13. Thus, it can be reasonably speculated that phenolic antioxidant TS-13 starts mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in tumor cells by the opening of permeability transition pores.

  9. Daclatasvir inhibits hepatitis C virus NS5A motility and hyper-accumulation of phosphoinositides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukkapalli, Vineela; Berger, Kristi L.; Kelly, Sean M.; Thomas, Meryl; Deiters, Alexander; Randall, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Combinations of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against the hepatitis C virus (HCV) have the potential to revolutionize the HCV therapeutic regime. An integral component of DAA combination therapies are HCV NS5A inhibitors. It has previously been proposed that NS5A DAAs inhibit two functions of NS5A: RNA replication and virion assembly. In this study, we characterize the impact of a prototype NS5A DAA, daclatasvir (DCV), on HCV replication compartment formation. DCV impaired HCV replicase localization and NS5A motility. In order to characterize the mechanism behind altered HCV replicase localization, we examined the impact of DCV on the interaction of NS5A with its essential cellular cofactor, phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase III α (PI4KA). We observed that DCV does not inhibit PI4KA directly, nor does it impair early events of the NS5A-PI4KA interaction that can occur when NS5A is expressed alone. NS5A functions that are unaffected by DCV include PI4KA binding, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation, and a basal accumulation of the PI4KA product, PI4P. However, DCV impairs late steps in PI4KA activation that requires NS5A expressed in the context of the HCV polyprotein. These NS5A functions include hyper-stimulation of PI4P levels and appropriate replication compartment formation. The data are most consistent with a model wherein DCV inhibits conformational changes in the NS5A protein or protein complex formations that occur in the context of HCV polyprotein expression and stimulate PI4P hyper-accumulation and replication compartment formation. PMID:25546252

  10. Cadmium tolerance of carbon assimilation enzymes and chloroplast in Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Picris divaricata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Rong-Rong; Qiu, Rong-Liang; Tang, Ye-Tao; Hu, Peng-Jie; Qiu, Hao; Chen, Hong-Ru; Shi, Tai-Hong; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-15

    To better understand the photosynthesis under stress, the effect of cadmium on carbon assimilation and chloroplast ultrastructure of a newly found Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Picris divaricata in China was investigated in solution culture. The shoot and root Cd concentrations increased with increase in Cd supply, reaching maxima of 1109 and 5604mgkg(-1) dry weight at 75microM Cd, respectively. As Cd supply to P. divaricata increased, the shoot and root dry weight, leaf water content (except 75microM Cd), concentrations of chlorophyll a and b, chlorophyll a/b ratio and the concentration of carotenoids were not depressed at high Cd. However, the stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, net photosynthetic rate and intercellular CO(2) concentration were significantly affected when the Cd concentration reached 10, 10, 25 and 75microM, respectively. Meanwhile, carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) activity and Rubisco (EC 4.1.1.39) content reached maxima in the presence of 50 and 5microM Cd, respectively. In addition, CA activity correlated positively with shoot Cd in plants treated with Cd at a range of 0-50microM. Moreover, the activities of NADP(+)-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13), Rubisco and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) were not significantly suppressed by increased Cd supply. Although the mesophyll cell size was reduced, chloroplast ultrastructure remained intact at the highest Cd treatment. Our finding revealed that P. divaricata chloroplast and the enzymes of carbon assimilation tolerate high levels of Cd, demonstrating its potential in possible application in phytoremediation.

  11. Lewis acid catalysis and Green oxidations: sequential tandem oxidation processes induced by Mn-hyperaccumulating plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escande, Vincent; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Among the phytotechnologies used for the reclamation of degraded mining sites, phytoextraction aims to diminish the concentration of polluting elements in contaminated soils. However, the biomass resulting from the phytoextraction processes (highly enriched in polluting elements) is too often considered as a problematic waste. The manganese-enriched biomass derived from native Mn-hyperaccumulating plants of New Caledonia was presented here as a valuable source of metallic elements of high interest in chemical catalysis. The preparation of the catalyst Eco-Mn1 and reagent Eco-Mn2 derived from Grevillea exul exul and Grevillea exul rubiginosa was investigated. Their unusual polymetallic compositions allowed to explore new reactivity of low oxidative state of manganese-Mn(II) for Eco-Mn1 and Mn(IV) for Eco-Mn2. Eco-Mn1 was used as a Lewis acid to catalyze the acetalization/elimination of aldehydes into enol ethers with high yields; a new green and stereoselective synthesis of (-)-isopulegol via the carbonyl-ene cyclization of (+)-citronellal was also performed with Eco-Mn1. Eco-Mn2 was used as a mild oxidative reagent and controlled the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols into aldehydes with quantitative yields. Oxidative cleavage was interestingly noticed when Eco-Mn2 was used in the presence of a polyol. Eco-Mn2 allowed direct oxidative iodination of ketones without using iodine, which is strongly discouraged by new environmental legislations. Finally, the combination of the properties in the Eco-Mn catalysts and reagents gave them an unprecedented potential to perform sequential tandem oxidation processes through new green syntheses of p-cymene from (-)-isopulegol and (+)-citronellal; and a new green synthesis of functionalized pyridines by in situ oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines.

  12. Soil pollution assessment and identification of hyperaccumulating plants in chromated copper arsenate (CCA) contaminated sites, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Adel R A; Lee, Sang Soo; Awad, Yasser M; Lim, Kyoung Jae; Yang, Jae E; Ok, Yong Sik

    2012-05-01

    In recent decades, heavy metal contamination in soil adjacent to chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood has received increasing attention. This study was conducted to determine the pollution level (PL) based on the concentrations of Cr, Cu and As in soils and to evaluate the remediative capacity of native plant species grown in the CCA contaminated site, Gangwon Province, Korea. The pollution index (PI), integrated pollution index (IPI), bioaccumulation factors (BAF(shoots) and BAF(roots)) and translocation factor (TF) were determined to ensure soil contamination and phytoremediation availability. The 19 soil samples from 10 locations possibly contaminated with Cr, Cu and As were collected. The concentrations of Cr, Cu and As in the soil samples ranged from 50.56-94.13 mg kg(-1), 27.78-120.83 mg kg(-1), and 0.13-9.43 mg kg(-1), respectively. Generally, the metal concentrations decreased as the distance between the CCA-treated wood structure and sampling point increased. For investigating phytoremediative capacity, the 19 native plant species were also collected in the same area with soil samples. Our results showed that only one plant species of Iris ensata, which presented the highest accumulations of Cr (1120 mg kg(-1)) in its shoot, was identified as a hyperaccumulator. Moreover, the relatively higher values of BAF(shoot) (3.23-22.10) were observed for Typha orientalis, Iris ensata and Scirpus radicans Schk, suggesting that these plant species might be applicable for selective metal extraction from the soils. For phytostabilization, the 15 plant species with BAF(root) values>1 and TF values<1 were suitable; however, Typha orientalis was the best for Cr. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. YB-1 represses AP1-dependent gene transactivation and interacts with an AP-1 DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Shaija; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Bernstein, Lori R

    2005-06-15

    Involvement of the AP-1 (activator protein-1) transcription factor has been demonstrated previously in the regulation of cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression, in the control of cell migration, invasion and metastasis, and in signal transduction, stress responsiveness, DNA replication and DNA repair. YB-1 (Y-box-binding protein-1) has also been implicated in many of these processes. However, the mechanism by which YB-1 mediates these processes is poorly understood. In the present study, we report that overexpression of a transfected gene encoding YB-1 in human HeLa cervical carcinoma cells significantly represses the transactivation of a minimal AP-1 reporter construct in response to the tumour promoter PMA. YB-1 also represses mRNA expression and PMA-induced promoter transactivation of the endogenous AP-1 target gene encoding matrix metalloproteinase-12 (metalloelastase). YB-1 transrepression of both the minimal and matrix metalloproteinase-12 promoter reporter constructs is dependent on the AP-1 sequence. To identify new nuclear proteins that bind specifically to the AP-1 DNA-binding site, we devised a DNA-affinity-chromatography-based assay termed NAPSTER (nucleotide-affinity preincubation specificity test of recognition) and discovered a 49 kDa protein from human cancer cells that binds in a sequence-specific manner to the AP-1 DNA sequence. By tandem MS fragmentation sequencing analyses we determined that p49 is a YB-1. Immunoblotting of the NAPSTER-purified p49 protein using anti-YB-1 antibodies confirmed YB-1 binding to the AP-1 DNA sequence, as did gel mobility-supershift assays using YB-1 antibodies. This is the first report of YB-1 transrepression and interaction at the AP-1 DNA-binding site.

  14. Interactions Between Alcohol Metabolism Genes and Religious Involvement in Association With Maximum Drinks and Alcohol Dependence Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Chartier, KG; Dick, DM; Almasy, L.; Chan, G.; Aliev, F.; Schuckit, MA; Scott, DM; Kramer, J.; Bucholz, KK; Bierut, LJ; Jr, NJ; Porjesz, B; Hesselbrock, VM

    2016-01-01

    Variations in the genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzymes are associated with both alcohol consumption and dependence in multiple populations. Additionally, some environmental factors have been recognized as modifiers of these relationships. This study examined the modifying effect of religious involvement on relationships between ADH gene variants and alcohol consumption-related phenotypes.Subjects were African American, European American, and Hispanic American adults with lifetim...

  15. The Fitness Consequences of Aneuploidy Are Driven by Condition-Dependent Gene Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunshine, Anna B.; Payen, Celia; Ong, Giang T.; Liachko, Ivan; Tan, Kean Ming; Dunham, Maitreya J.

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploidy is a hallmark of tumor cells, and yet the precise relationship between aneuploidy and a cell’s proliferative ability, or cellular fitness, has remained elusive. In this study, we have combined a detailed analysis of aneuploid clones isolated from laboratory-evolved populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a systematic, genome-wide screen for the fitness effects of telomeric amplifications to address the relationship between aneuploidy and cellular fitness. We found that aneuploid clones rise to high population frequencies in nutrient-limited evolution experiments and show increased fitness relative to wild type. Direct competition experiments confirmed that three out of four aneuploid events isolated from evolved populations were themselves sufficient to improve fitness. To expand the scope beyond this small number of exemplars, we created a genome-wide collection of >1,800 diploid yeast strains, each containing a different telomeric amplicon (Tamp), ranging in size from 0.4 to 1,000 kb. Using pooled competition experiments in nutrient-limited chemostats followed by high-throughput sequencing of strain-identifying barcodes, we determined the fitness effects of these >1,800 Tamps under three different conditions. Our data revealed that the fitness landscape explored by telomeric amplifications is much broader than that explored by single-gene amplifications. As also observed in the evolved clones, we found the fitness effects of most Tamps to be condition specific, with a minority showing common effects in all three conditions. By integrating our data with previous work that examined the fitness effects of single-gene amplifications genome-wide, we found that a small number of genes within each Tamp are centrally responsible for each Tamp’s fitness effects. Our genome-wide Tamp screen confirmed that telomeric amplifications identified in laboratory-evolved populations generally increased fitness. Our results show that Tamps are mutations that

  16. Investigation of Neuronal Cell Type-Specific Gene Expression of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mima Kazuko

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The promoter activity of the rat Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II gene was analyzed using the luciferase reporter gene in neuronal and non-neuronal cell lines. Neuronal cell type-specific promoter activity was found in the 5'-flanking region of &agr; and &bgr; isoform genes of the kinase. Silencer elements were also found further upstream of promoter regions. A brain-specific protein bound to the DNA sequence of the 5'-flanking region of the gene was found by gel mobility shift analysis in the nuclear extract of the rat brain, including the cerebellum, forebrain, and brainstem, but not in that of non-neuronal tissues, including liver, kidney and spleen. The luciferase expression system and gel shift analysis can be used as an additional and better index by which to monitor gene expression in most cell types.

  17. Ploidy-dependent changes in the epigenome of symbiotic cells correlate with specific patterns of gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Nagymihály, Marianna

    2017-04-13

    The formation of symbiotic nodule cells in Medicago truncatula is driven by successive endoreduplication cycles and transcriptional reprogramming in different temporal waves including the activation of more than 600 cysteine-rich NCR genes expressed only in nodules. We show here that the transcriptional waves correlate with growing ploidy levels and have investigated how the epigenome changes during endoreduplication cycles. Differential DNA methylation was found in only a small subset of symbiotic nodule-specific genes, including more than half of the NCR genes, whereas in most genes DNA methylation was unaffected by the ploidy levels and was independent of the genes\\' active or repressed state. On the other hand, expression of nodule-specific genes correlated with ploidy-dependent opening of the chromatin as well as, in a subset of tested genes, with reduced H3K27me3 levels combined with enhanced H3K9ac levels. Our results suggest that endoreduplication-dependent epigenetic changes contribute to transcriptional reprogramming in the differentiation of symbiotic cells.

  18. Comparing large covariance matrices under weak conditions on the dependence structure and its application to gene clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jinyuan; Zhou, Wen; Zhou, Wen-Xin; Wang, Lan

    2017-03-01

    Comparing large covariance matrices has important applications in modern genomics, where scientists are often interested in understanding whether relationships (e.g., dependencies or co-regulations) among a large number of genes vary between different biological states. We propose a computationally fast procedure for testing the equality of two large covariance matrices when the dimensions of the covariance matrices are much larger than the sample sizes. A distinguishing feature of the new procedure is that it imposes no structural assumptions on the unknown covariance matrices. Hence, the test is robust with respect to various complex dependence structures that frequently arise in genomics. We prove that the proposed procedure is asymptotically valid under weak moment conditions. As an interesting application, we derive a new gene clustering algorithm which shares the same nice property of avoiding restrictive structural assumptions for high-dimensional genomics data. Using an asthma gene expression dataset, we illustrate how the new test helps compare the covariance matrices of the genes across different gene sets/pathways between the disease group and the control group, and how the gene clustering algorithm provides new insights on the way gene clustering patterns differ between the two groups. The proposed methods have been implemented in an R-package HDtest and are available on CRAN. © 2016, The International Biometric Society.

  19. TSHZ1-dependent gene regulation is essential for olfactory bulb development and olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragancokova, Daniela; Rocca, Elena; Oonk, Anne M M; Schulz, Herbert; Rohde, Elvira; Bednarsch, Jan; Feenstra, Ilse; Pennings, Ronald J E; Wende, Hagen; Garratt, Alistair N

    2014-03-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) receives odor information from the olfactory epithelium and relays this to the olfactory cortex. Using a mouse model, we found that development and maturation of OB interneurons depends on the zinc finger homeodomain factor teashirt zinc finger family member 1 (TSHZ1). In mice lacking TSHZ1, neuroblasts exhibited a normal tangential migration to the OB; however, upon arrival to the OB, the neuroblasts were distributed aberrantly within the radial dimension, and many immature neuroblasts failed to exit the rostral migratory stream. Conditional deletion of Tshz1 in mice resulted in OB hypoplasia and severe olfactory deficits. We therefore investigated olfaction in human subjects from families with congenital aural atresia that were heterozygous for TSHZ1 loss-of-function mutations. These individuals displayed hyposmia, which is characterized by impaired odor discrimination and reduced olfactory sensitivity. Microarray analysis, in situ hybridization, and ChIP revealed that TSHZ1 bound to and regulated expression of the gene encoding prokineticin receptor 2 (PROKR2), a G protein–coupled receptor essential for OB development. Mutations in PROKR2 lead to Kallmann syndrome, characterized by anosmia and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Our data indicate that TSHZ1 is a key regulator of mammalian OB development and function and controls the expression of molecules involved in human Kallmann syndrome.

  20. Exposure enriched outcome dependent designs for longitudinal studies of gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhichao; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Estes, Jason P; Vokonas, Pantel S; Park, Sung Kyun

    2017-08-15

    Joint effects of genetic and environmental factors have been increasingly recognized in the development of many complex human diseases. Despite the popularity of case-control and case-only designs, longitudinal cohort studies that can capture time-varying outcome and exposure information have long been recommended for gene-environment (G × E) interactions. To date, literature on sampling designs for longitudinal studies of G × E interaction is quite limited. We therefore consider designs that can prioritize a subsample of the existing cohort for retrospective genotyping on the basis of currently available outcome, exposure, and covariate data. In this work, we propose stratified sampling based on summaries of individual exposures and outcome trajectories and develop a full conditional likelihood approach for estimation that adjusts for the biased sample. We compare the performance of our proposed design and analysis with combinations of different sampling designs and estimation approaches via simulation. We observe that the full conditional likelihood provides improved estimates for the G × E interaction and joint exposure effects over uncorrected complete-case analysis, and the exposure enriched outcome trajectory dependent design outperforms other designs in terms of estimation efficiency and power for detection of the G × E interaction. We also illustrate our design and analysis using data from the Normative Aging Study, an ongoing longitudinal cohort study initiated by the Veterans Administration in 1963. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Combinatorial treatment with oncolytic adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus augments adenoviral cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzad, Lisa; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Yagyu, Shigeki; Bertin, Terry; Hemminki, Akseli; Rooney, Cliona; Lee, Brendan; Suzuki, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Onc.Ads) produce significant antitumor effects but as single agents they rarely eliminate tumors. Investigators have therefore incorporated sequences into these vectors that encode immunomodulatory molecules to enhance antitumor immunity. Successful implementation of this strategy requires multiple tumor immune inhibitory mechanisms to be overcome, and insertion of the corresponding multiple functional genes reduces the titer and replication of Onc.Ads, compromising their direct ant-tumor effects. By contrast, helper-dependent (HD) Ads are devoid of viral coding sequences, allowing inclusion of multiple transgenes. HDAds, however, lack replicative capacity. Since HDAds encode the adenoviral packaging signal, we hypothesized that the coadministration of Onc.Ad with HDAd would allow to be amplified and packaged during replication of Onc.Ad in transduced cancer cells. This combination could provide immunostimulation without losing oncolytic activity. We now show that coinfection of Onc.Ad with HDAd subsequently replicates HDAd vector DNA in trans in human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo, amplifying the transgenes the HDAd encode. This combinatorial treatment significantly suppresses the tumor growth compared to treatment with a single agent in an immunocompetent mouse model. Hence, combinatorial treatment of Onc.Ad with HDAd should overcome the inherent limitations of each agent and provide a highly immunogenic oncolytic therapy.

  2. Age-Dependent Defects of Regulatory B Cells in Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Gene Knockout Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadafumi Yokoyama

    Full Text Available The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections, thrombocytopenia, eczema, and high incidence of malignancy and autoimmunity. The cellular mechanisms underlying autoimmune complications in WAS have been extensively studied; however, they remain incompletely defined. We investigated the characteristics of IL-10-producing CD19+CD1dhighCD5+ B cells (CD1dhighCD5+ Breg obtained from Was gene knockout (WKO mice and found that their numbers were significantly lower in these mice compared to wild type (WT controls. Moreover, we found a significant age-dependent reduction of the percentage of IL-10-expressing cells in WKO CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells as compared to age-matched WT control mice. CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice did not suppress the in vitro production of inflammatory cytokines from activated CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice displayed a basal activated phenotype which may prevent normal cellular responses, among which is the expression of IL-10. These defects may contribute to the susceptibility to autoimmunity with age in patients with WAS.

  3. Age-Dependent Defects of Regulatory B Cells in Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Gene Knockout Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Yoshizaki, Ayumi; Simon, Karen L.; Kirby, Martha R.; Anderson, Stacie M.; Candotti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections, thrombocytopenia, eczema, and high incidence of malignancy and autoimmunity. The cellular mechanisms underlying autoimmune complications in WAS have been extensively studied; however, they remain incompletely defined. We investigated the characteristics of IL-10-producing CD19+CD1dhighCD5+ B cells (CD1dhighCD5+ Breg) obtained from Was gene knockout (WKO) mice and found that their numbers were significantly lower in these mice compared to wild type (WT) controls. Moreover, we found a significant age-dependent reduction of the percentage of IL-10-expressing cells in WKO CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells as compared to age-matched WT control mice. CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice did not suppress the in vitro production of inflammatory cytokines from activated CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice displayed a basal activated phenotype which may prevent normal cellular responses, among which is the expression of IL-10. These defects may contribute to the susceptibility to autoimmunity with age in patients with WAS. PMID:26448644

  4. Characterization of Mn-resistant endophytic bacteria from Mn-hyperaccumulator Phytolacca americana and their impact on Mn accumulation of hybrid penisetum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Chen, Wei; He, Lin-Yan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2015-10-01

    Three hundred Mn-resistant endophytic bacteria were isolated from the Mn-hyperaccumulator, Phytolacca americana, grown at different levels of Mn (0, 1, and 10mM) stress. Under no Mn stress, 90%, 92%, and 11% of the bacteria produced indole acetic acid (IAA), siderophore, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, respectively. Under Mn stress, 68-94%, 91-92%, and 21-81% of the bacteria produced IAA, siderophore, and ACC deaminase, respectively. Greater percentages of ACC deaminase-producing bacteria were found in the Mn-treated P. americana. Furthermore, the ratios of IAA- and siderophore-producing bacteria were significantly higher in the Mn treated plant leaves, while the ratio of ACC deaminase-producing bacteria was significantly higher in the Mn treated-roots. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, Mn-resistant bacteria were affiliated with 10 genera. In experiments involving hybrid penisetum grown in soils treated with 0 and 1000mgkg(-1) of Mn, inoculation with strain 1Y31 was found to increase the root (ranging from 6.4% to 18.3%) and above-ground tissue (ranging from 19.3% to 70.2%) mass and total Mn uptake of above-ground tissues (64%) compared to the control. Furthermore, inoculation with strain 1Y31 was found to increase the ratio of IAA-producing bacteria in the rhizosphere and bulk soils of hybrid penisetum grown in Mn-added soils. The results showed the effect of Mn stress on the ratio of the plant growth-promoting factor-producing endophytic bacteria of P. americana and highlighted the potential of endophytic bacterium as an inoculum for enhanced phytoremediation of Mn-polluted soils by hybrid penisetum plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of lead resistant endophytic Bacillus sp. MN3-4 and its potential for promoting lead accumulation in metal hyperaccumulator Alnus firma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Mi-Na; Shim, Jaehong; You, Youngnam [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced Institute of Environmental and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan 570-752 (Korea, Republic of); Myung, Hyun [Department of Environment Landscape Architecture-Design, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan 570-752 (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Keuk-Soo [Department of Oriental Medicine Resources, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan 570-752 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Min [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced Institute of Environmental and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan 570-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan, E-mail: kannan@jbnu.ac.kr [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced Institute of Environmental and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan 570-752 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Byung-Taek, E-mail: btoh@jbnu.ac.kr [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced Institute of Environmental and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan 570-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endophytic Bacillus spp. have reduced the lead toxicity in Alnus firma plants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bacteria have sequestered the Pb molecules extracellularly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bacteria have increased the growth rate of plants in the presence of Pb. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize endophytic bacteria from the roots of the metal hyperaccumulator plant Alnus firma. A total of 14 bacterial endophytes were isolated from root samples and assayed for tolerance to heavy metals. Isolate MN3-4 exhibited maximum bioremoval of Pb and was subsequently identified as Bacillus sp. based on 16S rRNA sequences. The pH and initial metal concentration highly influenced the Pb bioremoval rate. The growth of isolate MN3-4 was moderately altered in the presence of metals. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, biological-transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies revealed that isolate MN3-4 had extracellularly sequestered the Pb molecules with little intracellular accumulation. Isolate MN3-4 did not harbor pbrA and pbrT genes. Moreover, isolate MN3-4 had the capacity to produce siderophores and indoleacetic acid. A root elongation assay demonstrated an increase (46.25%) in the root elongation of inoculated Brassica napus seedlings compared to that of the control plants. Obtained results pointed out that isolate MN3-4 could potentially reduce heavy metal phytotoxicity and increase Pb accumulation in A. firma plants.

  6. Cyclin-dependent Kinase 8 Module Expression Profiling Reveals Requirement of Mediator Subunits 12 and 13 for Transcription of Serpent-dependent Innate Immunity Genes in Drosophila*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuluvainen, Emilia; Hakala, Heini; Havula, Essi; Sahal Estimé, Michelle; Rämet, Mika; Hietakangas, Ville; Mäkelä, Tomi P.

    2014-01-01

    The Cdk8 (cyclin-dependent kinase 8) module of Mediator integrates regulatory cues from transcription factors to RNA polymerase II. It consists of four subunits where Med12 and Med13 link Cdk8 and cyclin C (CycC) to core Mediator. Here we have investigated the contributions of the Cdk8 module subunits to transcriptional regulation using RNA interference in Drosophila cells. Genome-wide expression profiling demonstrated separation of Cdk8-CycC and Med12-Med13 profiles. However, transcriptional regulation by Cdk8-CycC was dependent on Med12-Med13. This observation also revealed that Cdk8-CycC and Med12-Med13 often have opposite transcriptional effects. Interestingly, Med12 and Med13 profiles overlapped significantly with that of the GATA factor Serpent. Accordingly, mutational analyses indicated that GATA sites are required for Med12-Med13 regulation of Serpent-dependent genes. Med12 and Med13 were also found to be required for Serpent-activated innate immunity genes in defense to bacterial infection. The results reveal a novel role for the Cdk8 module in Serpent-dependent transcription and innate immunity. PMID:24778181

  7. Interaction of Nickel and Manganese in Accumulation and Localization in Leaves of the Ni Hyperaccumulators Alyssum murale and Alyssum corsicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadhurst, C.; Tappero, R; Maugel, T; Erbe, E; Sparks, D; Chaney, R

    2009-01-01

    The genus Alyssum contains >50 Ni hyperaccumulator species; many can achieve >2.5% Ni in dry leaf. In soils with normal Mn levels, Alyssum trichome bases were previously observed to accumulate Ni and Mn to high levels. Here we report concentration and localization patterns in A. murale and A. corsicum grown in soils with nonphytotoxic factorial additions of Ni and Mn salts. Four leaf type subsets based on size and age accumulated Ni and Mn similarly. The greatest Mn accumulation (10 times control) was observed in A. corsicum with 40 mmol Mn kg-1 and 40 mmol Ni kg-1 added to potting soil. Whole leaf Ni concentrations decreased as Mn increased. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping of whole fresh leaves showed localized in distinct high-concentration Mn spots associated with trichomes, Ni and Mn distributions were strongly spatially correlated. Standard X-ray fluorescence point analysis/mapping of cryofractured and freeze-dried samples found that Ni and Mn were co-located and strongly concentrated only in trichome bases and in cells adjacent to trichomes. Nickel concentration was also strongly spatially correlated with sulfur. Results indicate that maximum Ni phytoextraction by Alyssum may be reduced in soils with higher phytoavailable Mn, and suggest that Ni hyperaccumulation in Alyssum species may have developed from a Mn handling system.

  8. Platform dependence of inference on gene-wise and gene-set involvement in human lung development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rose; Tantisira, Kelan; Carey, Vincent; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Metje, Stephanie; Kho, Alvin T; Klanderman, Barbara J; Gaedigk, Roger; Lazarus, Ross; Mariani, Thomas J; Leeder, J Steven; Weiss, Scott T

    2009-06-19

    With the recent development of microarray technologies, the comparability of gene expression data obtained from different platforms poses an important problem. We evaluated two widely used platforms, Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 and the Illumina HumanRef-8 v2 Expression Bead Chips, for comparability in a biological system in which changes may be subtle, namely fetal lung tissue as a function of gestational age. We performed the comparison via sequence-based probe matching between the two platforms. "Significance grouping" was defined as a measure of comparability. Using both expression correlation and significance grouping as measures of comparability, we demonstrated that despite overall cross-platform differences at the single gene level, increased correlation between the two platforms was found in genes with higher expression level, higher probe overlap, and lower p-value. We also demonstrated that biological function as determined via KEGG pathways or GO categories is more consistent across platforms than single gene analysis. We conclude that while the comparability of the platforms at the single gene level may be increased by increasing sample size, they are highly comparable ontologically even for subtle differences in a relatively small sample size. Biologically relevant inference should therefore be reproducible across laboratories using different platforms.

  9. Expression of the Znt1 zinc transporter from the metal hyperaccumulator noccaea caerulescens confers enhanced zinc and cadmium tolerance and accumulation to arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Ya Fen; Hassan, Zeshan; Talukdar, S.; Schat, Henk; Aarts, Mark G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Prompt regulation of transition metal transporters is crucial for plant zinc homeostasis. NcZNT1 is one of such transporters, found in the metal hyperaccumulator Brassicaceae species Noccaea caerulescens. It is orthologous to AtZIP4 from Arabidopsis thaliana, an important actor in Zn homeostasis.

  10. Colonisation of a Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox Wulfen with indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal mixture induces changes in heavy metal and nutrient uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel-Mikus, Katarina [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pongrac, Paula [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kump, Peter [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Necemer, Marijan [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Regvar, Marjana [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: marjana.regvar@bf.uni-lj.si

    2006-01-15

    Plants of the Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox Wulfen (Brassicaceae) inoculated or not with indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal mixture were grown in a highly Cd, Zn and Pb contaminated substrate in order to evaluate the functionality of symbiosis and assess the possible impact of AM colonisation on heavy metal uptake and tolerance. The results suggest AM development in the metal hyperaccumulating T. praecox is favoured at elevated nutrient demands, e.g. during the reproductive period. AM colonisation parameters positively correlated with total soil Cd and Pb. Colonised plants showed significantly improved nutrient and a decreased Cd and Zn uptake as revealed by TRXRF, thus confirming the functionality of the symbiosis. Reduced heavy metal uptake, especially at higher soil metal contents, indicates a changed metal tolerance strategy in colonised T. praecox plants. This is to our knowledge the first report on AM colonisation of the Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator T. praecox in a greenhouse experiment. - Colonisation of a Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi resulted in improved nutrient and reduced Cd and Zn uptake.

  11. Genome-wide survey indicates diverse physiological roles of the barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) calcium-dependent protein kinase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunqiang; Wang, Qiuli; Chen, Qian; Yin, Xin; Qian, Min; Sun, Xudong; Yang, Yongping

    2017-07-13

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are crucial calcium sensors that play important roles in the regulation of plant growth and developmental processes, as well as protective responses to environmental stress. Here, we identified 28 CDPK genes from barley and cloned 5 new, full-length CDPK genes, MLOC_58648a, MLOC_19618a, MLOC_71733a, AK249361a and MLOC_4965a, using their expressed sequence tags. Phylogenetic and gene structural analyses revealed that the CDPK could be divided into four subgroups. Significant site-specific altered constraints and a high evolutionary rate may have contributed to the functional divergences among CDPK gene subfamilies. Expression profiles of different tissues and developmental stages suggested that several CDPK genes are involved in the functional development of plants. Different expression levels under a variety of abiotic stresses also indicated that the CDPK family underwent functional divergence during long-term evolution. Furthermore, several CDPK genes responded to single treatments and individual CDPK genes responded to multiple treatments, suggesting that barley CDPKs may be involved in mediating cross-talk among different signalling pathways. Our data provide an important foundation for the functional and evolutionary analyses of this important gene family in barley.

  12. Stage-dependent gene expression profiles during natural killer cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Eun-Mi; Lee, Sanggyu; Yoon, Suk-Ran; Kawamura, Toshihiko; Lee, Young-Cheol; Kim, Sangsoo; Myung, Pyung-Keun; Wang, San Ming; Choi, Inpyo

    2005-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells develop from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow. To understand the molecular regulation of NK cell development, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was applied to HSCs, NK precursor (pNK) cells, and mature NK cells (mNK) cultured without or with OP9 stromal cells. From 170,464 total individual tags from four SAGE libraries, 35,385 unique genes were identified. A set of genes was expressed in a stage-specific manner: 15 genes in HSCs, 30 genes in pNK cells, and 27 genes in mNK cells. Among them, lipoprotein lipase induced NK cell maturation and cytotoxic activity. Identification of genome-wide profiles of gene expression in different stages of NK cell development affords us a fundamental basis for defining the molecular network during NK cell development.

  13. Time-dependent regulation analysis dissects shifts between metabolic and gene-expression regulation during nitrogen starvation in baker's yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, Karen; Bouwman, Jildau; Lindenbergh, Alexander; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Bakker, Barbara M.

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent regulation analysis is a new methodology that allows us to unravel, both quantitatively and dynamically, how and when functional changes in the cell are brought about by the interplay of gene expression and metabolism. In this first experimental implementation, we dissect the initial

  14. Role of nicotine dependence in the association between the Dopamine Receptor Gene DRD3 and major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korhonen, T.; Loukola, A.; Wedenoja, J.; Nyman, E.; Latvala, A.; Broms, U.; Happola, U.; Paunio, T.; Schrage, A.J.; Vink, J.M.; Mbarek, H.; Boomsma, D.I.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Pergadia, M.L.; Madden, P.A.F.; Kaprio, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aims of this study were to analyze associations of dopamine receptor genes (DRD1-5) with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and nicotine dependence (ND), and to investigate whether ND moderates genetic influences on MDD. Methods: The sample was ascertained from the Finnish Twin Cohort.

  15. Role of Nicotine Dependence in the Association between the Dopamine Receptor Gene DRD3 and Major Depressive Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korhonen, T.; Loukola, A.; Wedenoja, J.; Nyman, E.; Latvala, A.; Broms, U.; Häppölä, A.; Paunio, T.; Schrage, A.J.; Vink, J.M.; Mbarek, H.; Boomsma, D.I.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Pergadia, M.L.; Madden, P.A.F.; Kaprio, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aims of this study were to analyze associations of dopamine receptor genes (DRD1-5 ) with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and nicotine dependence (ND), and to investigate whether ND moderates genetic influences on MDD. Methods: The sample was ascertained from the Finnish Twin Cohort.

  16. A nitrogen source-dependent inducible and repressible gene expression system in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki eFujiwara

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae is a model organism for studying the basic biology of photosynthetic organisms. The C. merolae cell is composed of an extremely simple set of organelles. The genome is completely sequenced. Gene targeting and a heat-shock inducible gene expression system has been recently established. However, a conditional gene knockdown system has not been established, which is required for the examination of function of genes that are essential to cell viability and primary mutant defects. In the current study, we first evaluated the expression of a transgene from two chromosomal neutral loci located in the intergenic region between CMD184C and CMD185C, and a region upstream of the URA5.3 gene. There was no significant difference in expression between them and this result suggests that both may be used as neutral loci. We then designed an inducible and repressible gene expression by using promoters of nitrate-assimilation genes. The expression of nitrate-assimilation genes such as NR (nitrate reductase, NIR (nitrite reductase and NRT (the nitrate/nitrite transporter are reversibly regulated by their dependence on nitrogen sources. We constructed stable strains in which a cassette containing the NR, NIR or NRT promoter and sfGFP gene was inserted in a region upstream of URA5.3 and examined the efficacy of the promoters. The NR, NIR, and NRT promoters were constitutively activated in the nitrate medium, whereas their activities were extremely low in presence of ammonium. The activation of each promoter was immediately inhibited within a period of 1 hour by the addition of ammonium. Thus, a conditional knockdown system in C. merolae was successfully established. The activity varies among the promoters, and each is selectable according to the expression level of a target gene estimated by RNA-sequencing. This method is applicable to defects in genes of interest in photosynthetic organism.

  17. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) circadian clock genes can respond rapidly to temperature in an EARLY FLOWERING 3-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Brett; Deng, Weiwei; Clausen, Jenni; Oliver, Sandra; Boden, Scott; Hemming, Megan; Trevaskis, Ben

    2016-10-01

    An increase in global temperatures will impact future crop yields. In the cereal crops wheat and barley, high temperatures accelerate reproductive development, reducing the number of grains per plant and final grain yield. Despite this relationship between temperature and cereal yield, it is not clear what genes and molecular pathways mediate the developmental response to increased temperatures. The plant circadian clock can respond to changes in temperature and is important for photoperiod-dependent flowering, and so is a potential mechanism controlling temperature responses in cereal crops. This study examines the relationship between temperature, the circadian clock, and the expression of flowering-time genes in barley (Hordeum vulgare), a crop model for temperate cereals. Transcript levels of barley core circadian clock genes were assayed over a range of temperatures. Transcript levels of core clock genes CCA1, GI, PRR59, PRR73, PRR95, and LUX are increased at higher temperatures. CCA1 and PRR73 respond rapidly to a decrease in temperature whereas GI and PRR59 respond rapidly to an increase in temperature. The response of GI and the PRR genes to changes in temperature is lost in the elf3 mutant indicating that their response to temperature may be dependent on a functional ELF3 gene. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. From synapse to nucleus: calcium-dependent gene transcription in the control of synapse development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Paul L; Greenberg, Michael E

    2008-09-25

    One of the unique characteristics of higher organisms is their ability to learn and adapt to changes in their environment. This plasticity is largely a result of the brain's ability to convert transient stimuli into long-lasting alterations in neuronal structure and function. This process is complex and involves changes in receptor trafficking, local mRNA translation, protein turnover, and new gene synthesis. Here, we review how neuronal activity triggers calcium-dependent gene expression to regulate synapse development, maturation, and refinement. Interestingly, many components of the activity-dependent gene expression program are mutated in human cognitive disorders, which suggest that this program is essential for proper brain development and function.

  19. Sex bias in copy number variation of olfactory receptor gene family depends on ethnicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh eShadravan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gender plays a pivotal role in the human genetic identity and is also manifested in many genetic disorders particularly mental retardation. In this study its effect on copy number variation (CNV, known to cause genetic disorders was explored. As the olfactory receptor (OR repertoire comprises the largest human gene family, it was selected for this study, which was carried out within and between three populations, derived from 150 individuals from the 1000 Genome Project. Analysis of 3872 CNVs detected among 791 OR loci, in which 307 loci showed CNV, revealed the following novel findings: Sex bias in CNV was significantly more prevalent in uncommon than common CNV variants of OR pseudogenes, in which the male genome showed more CNVs; and in one-copy number loss compared to complete deletion of OR pseudogenes; both findings implying a more recent evolutionary role for gender. Sex bias in copy number gain was also detected. Another novel finding was that the observed six bias was largely dependent on ethnicity and was in general absent in East Asians. Using a CNV public database for sick children (ISCA the application of these findings for improving clinical molecular diagnostics is discussed by showing an example of sex bias in CNV among kids with autism. Additional clinical relevance is discussed, as the most polymorphic CNV-enriched OR cluster in the human genome, located on chr 15q11.2, is found near the PWS/AS bi-directionally imprinted region associated with two well-known mental retardation syndromes. As olfaction represents the primitive cognition in most mammals, arguably in competition with the development of a larger brain, the extensive retention of OR pseudogenes in females of this study, might point to a parent-of-origin indirect regulatory role for OR pseudogenes in the embryonic development of human brain. Thus any perturbation in the temporal regulation of olfactory system could lead to developmental delay disorders including

  20. Sex bias in copy number variation of olfactory receptor gene family depends on ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadravan, Farideh

    2013-01-01

    Gender plays a pivotal role in the human genetic identity and is also manifested in many genetic disorders particularly mental retardation. In this study its effect on copy number variation (CNV), known to cause genetic disorders was explored. As the olfactory receptor (OR) repertoire comprises the largest human gene family, it was selected for this study, which was carried out within and between three populations, derived from 150 individuals from the 1000 Genome Project. Analysis of 3872 CNVs detected among 791 OR loci, in which 307 loci showed CNV, revealed the following novel findings: Sex bias in CNV was significantly more prevalent in uncommon than common CNV variants of OR pseudogenes, in which the male genome showed more CNVs; and in one-copy number loss compared to complete deletion of OR pseudogenes; both findings implying a more recent evolutionary role for gender. Sex bias in copy number gain was also detected. Another novel finding was that the observed sex bias was largely dependent on ethnicity and was in general absent in East Asians. Using a CNV public database for sick children (International Standard Cytogenomic Array Consortium) the application of these findings for improving clinical molecular diagnostics is discussed by showing an example of sex bias in CNV among kids with autism. Additional clinical relevance is discussed, as the most polymorphic CNV-enriched OR cluster in the human genome, located on chr 15q11.2, is found near the Prader-Willi syndrome/Angelman syndrome bi-directionally imprinted region associated with two well-known mental retardation syndromes. As olfaction represents the primitive cognition in most mammals, arguably in competition with the development of a larger brain, the extensive retention of OR pseudogenes in females of this study, might point to a parent-of-origin indirect regulatory role for OR pseudogenes in the embryonic development of human brain. Thus any perturbation in the temporal regulation of olfactory

  1. Light modulation of human sleep depends on a polymorphism in the clock gene Period3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellappa, Sarah L; Viola, Antoine U; Schmidt, Christina; Bachmann, Valérie; Gabel, Virginie; Maire, Micheline; Reichert, Carolin F; Valomon, Amandine; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Cajochen, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light powerfully modulate human physiology. However, it remains scarcely understood how NIF responses to light modulate human sleep and its EEG hallmarks, and if there are differences across individuals. Here we investigated NIF responses to light on sleep in individuals genotyped for the PERIOD3 (PER3) variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) polymorphism. Eighteen healthy young men (20-28 years; mean ± SEM: 25.9 ± 1.2) homozygous for the PER3 polymorphism were matched by age, body-mass index, and ethnicity. The study protocol comprised a balanced cross-over design during the winter, during which participants were exposed to either light of 40 lx at 6,500 K (blue-enriched) or light at 2,500 K (non-blue enriched), during 2h in the evening. Compared to light at 2,500 K, light at 6,500 K induced a significant increase in all-night NREM sleep slow-wave activity (SWA: 1.0-4.5 Hz) in the occipital cortex for PER3(5/5) individuals, but not for PER3(4/4) volunteers. Dynamics of SWA across sleep cycles revealed increased occipital NREM sleep SWA for virtually all sleep episode only for PER3(5/5) individuals. Furthermore, they experienced light at 6,500 K as significantly brighter. Intriguingly, this subjective perception of brightness significantly predicted their increased occipital SWA throughout the sleep episode. Our data indicate that humans homozygous for the PER3(5/5) allele are more sensitive to NIF light effects, as indexed by specific changes in sleep EEG activity. Ultimately, individual differences in NIF light responses on sleep may depend on a clock gene polymorphism involved in sleep-wake regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The agouti gene product inhibits lipolysis in human adipocytes via a Ca2+-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, B; Moustaid-N; Wilkison, W O; Zemel, M B

    1998-10-01

    Overexpression of the murine agouti gene results in obesity. The human homologue of agouti is expressed primarily in human adipocytes, and we have shown recombinant agouti protein to increase adipocyte intracellular Ca2+([Ca2+]i) and thereby stimulate lipogenesis. However, since recent data demonstrate that increasing adipocyte [Ca2+]i may also inhibit lipolysis, we have investigated the role of agouti-induced [Ca2+]i increases in regulating lipolysis in human adipocytes. Short-term (1 h) exposure to recombinant agouti (100 nM) protein had no effect on basal lipolysis, although longer term treatment (24 h) caused a 60% decrease in basal lipolysis (Pagouti treatment totally inhibited ACTH-induced lipolysis (Pagouti, we next determined whether agouti's antilipolytic effect is exerted through competitive antagonism of the ACTH receptor (MCR-2). Forskolin (1 microM), an adenylate cyclase activator, induced a 48% increase in lipolysis in human adipocytes (Pagouti (Pagouti is distal to the ACTH receptor. To determine the role of [Ca2+]i in the antilipolytic effect of agouti, human adipocytes were treated with KCl or arginine vasopressin to stimulate voltage- and receptor-stimulated Ca2+ influx, respectively. Both agents caused inhibition of forskolin-induced lipolysis (Pagouti's antilipolytic effect was also blocked by the Ca2+ channel blocker nitrendipine. These data demonstrate that agouti exerts a potent antilipolytic effect in human adipocytes via a Ca2+-dependent mechanism. This effect, combined with agouti-induced lipogenesis, represents a coordinate control of adipocyte lipid metabolism that may contribute to an agouti-induced obesity syndrome.

  3. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  4. Short-term striatal gene expression responses to brain-derived neurotrophic factor are dependent on MEK and ERK activation.

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    Ozgun Gokce

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is believed to be an important regulator of striatal neuron survival, differentiation, and plasticity. Moreover, reduction of BDNF delivery to the striatum has been implicated in the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease. Nevertheless, many essential aspects of BDNF responses in striatal neurons remain to be elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we assessed the relative contributions of multipartite intracellular signaling pathways to the short-term induction of striatal gene expression by BDNF. To identify genes regulated by BDNF in these GABAergic cells, we first used DNA microarrays to quantify their transcriptomic responses following 3 h of BDNF exposure. The signal transduction pathways underlying gene induction were subsequently dissected using pharmacological agents and quantitative real-time PCR. Gene expression responses to BDNF were abolished by inhibitors of TrkB (K252a and calcium (chelator BAPTA-AM and transient receptor potential cation channel [TRPC] antagonist SKF-96365. Interestingly, inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 1 and 2 (MEK1/2 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase ERK also blocked the BDNF-mediated induction of all tested BDNF-responsive genes. In contrast, inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS, phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K, and CAMK exhibited less prevalent, gene-specific effects on BDNF-induced RNA expression. At the nuclear level, the activation of both Elk-1 and CREB showed MEK dependence. Importantly, MEK-dependent activation of transcription was shown to be required for BDNF-induced striatal neurite outgrowth, providing evidence for its contribution to striatal neuron plasticity. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that the MEK/ERK pathway is a major mediator of neuronal plasticity and other important BDNF-dependent striatal functions that are fulfilled through the positive regulation of gene expression.

  5. Krüppel homolog (Kr h) is a dosage-dependent modifier of gene expression in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevolenskaya, E V; Frolov, M V; Birchler, J A

    2000-04-01

    A lethal mutation in the Krüppel homolog (Kr h) was isolated in screens of P-element insertion mutations for modifiers of white gene expression. The mutation occurs in the 5' untranslated region of the Kr h gene and causes a lightening of the eye colour for several alleles of white due to a decrease in white steady-state mRNA levels at pupal stages. Two related genes, scarlet and brown, were significantly affected as well in early pupae. Genetic analysis of different white alleles suggests that enhancer sequences are necessary for interaction with KR H. Thus, the Kr h gene is a member of the dosage-dependent hierarchy effective upon white.

  6. Growth and Metal Accumulation of an Alyssum murale Nickel Hyperaccumulator Ecotype Co-cropped with Alyssum montanum and Perennial Ryegrass in Serpentine Soil

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    Catherine Leigh Broadhurst

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The genus Alyssum (Brassicaceae contains Ni hyperaccumulators (50, many of which can achieve 30 g kg-1 Ni in dry leaf. Some Alyssum hyperaccumulators are viable candidates for commercial Ni phytoremediation and phytomining technologies. It is not known whether these species secrete organic and/or amino acids into the rhizosphere to solubilize Ni, or can make use of such acids within the soil to facilitate uptake. It has been hypothesized that in fields with mixed plant species, mobilization of metals by phytosiderophores secreted by Graminaceae plants could affect Alyssum Ni, Fe, Cu and Mn uptake.We co-cropped the Ni hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale, non-hyperaccumulator A. montanum and perennial ryegrass in a natural serpentine soil. All treatments had standard inorganic fertilization required for ryegrass growth and one treatment was compost amended. After 4 months A. murale leaves and stems contained 3600 mg kg-1 Ni which did not differ significantly with co-cropping. Overall Ni and Mn concentrations were significantly higher in A. murale than in A. montanum or L. perenne. Copper was not accumulated by either Alyssum species, but L. perenne accumulated up to 10 mg kg-1. A. montanum could not compete with either A. murale or ryegrass, and neither Alyssum species survived in the compost-amended soil. Co-cropping with ryegrass reduced Fe and Mn concentrations in A. murale but not to the extent of either increasing Ni uptake or affecting plant nutrition. The hypothesized Alyssum Ni accumulation in response to phytosiderophores secreted by co-cropped grass did not occur. Our data do not support increased mobilization of Mn by a phytosiderophore mechanism either, but the converse: mobilization of Mn by the Alyssum hyperaccumulator species significantly increased Mn levels in L. perenne. Tilling soil to maximize root penetration, adequate inorganic fertilization and appropriate plant densities are more important for developing efficient

  7. Co-inheritance of novel ATRX gene mutation and globin (α & β) gene mutations in transfusion dependent beta-thalassemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nafie, Awatif N; Borgio, J Francis; AbdulAzeez, Sayed; Al-Suliman, Ahmed M; Qaw, Fuad S; Naserullah, Zaki A; Al-Jarrash, Sana; Al-Madan, Mohammed S; Al-Ali, Rudaynah A; AlKhalifah, Mohammed A; Al-Muhanna, Fahad; Steinberg, Martin H; Al-Ali, Amein K

    2015-06-01

    α-Thalassemia X-linked mental retardation syndrome is a rare inherited intellectual disability disorder due to mutations in the ATRX gene. In our previous study of the prevalence of β-thalassemia mutations in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, we confirmed the widespread coinheritance of α-thalassemia mutation. Some of these subjects have a family history of mental retardation, the cause of which is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the presence or absence of mutations in the ATRX gene in these patients. Three exons of the ATRX gene and their flanking regions were directly sequenced. Only four female transfusion dependent β-thalassemia patients were found to be carriers of a novel mutation in the ATRX gene. Two of the ATRX gene mutations, c.623delA and c.848T>C were present in patients homozygous for IVS I-5(G→C) and homozygous for Cd39(C → T) β-thalassemia mutation, respectively. While the other two that were located in the intronic region (flanking regions), were present in patients homozygous for Cd39(C → T) β-thalassemia mutation. The two subjects with the mutations in the coding region had family members with mental retardation, which suggests that the novel frame shift mutation and the missense mutation at coding region of ATRX gene are involved in ATRX syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Candidate genes detected in transcriptome studies are strongly dependent on genetic background.

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    Pernille Sarup

    Full Text Available Whole genome transcriptomic studies can point to potential candidate genes for organismal traits. However, the importance of potential candidates is rarely followed up through functional studies and/or by comparing results across independent studies. We have analysed the overlap of candidate genes identified from studies of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster using similar technical platforms. We found little overlap across studies between putative candidate genes for the same traits in the same sex. Instead there was a high degree of overlap between different traits and sexes within the same genetic backgrounds. Putative candidates found using transcriptomics therefore appear very sensitive to genetic background and this can mask or override effects of treatments. The functional importance of putative candidate genes emerging from transcriptome studies needs to be validated through additional experiments and in future studies we suggest a focus on the genes, networks and pathways affecting traits in a consistent manner across backgrounds.

  9. Candidate Genes Detected in Transcriptome Studies are Strongly Dependent on Genetic Background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård

    2011-01-01

    identified from studies of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster using similar technical platforms. We found little overlap across studies between putative candidate genes for the same traits in the same sex. Instead there was a high degree of overlap between different traits and sexes within the same...... experiments and in future studies we suggest a focus on the genes, networks and pathways affecting traits in a consistent manner across backgrounds....

  10. Histone Acetylation Modifications Affect Tissue-Dependent Expression of Poplar Homologs of C4 Photosynthetic Enzyme Genes

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    Yuan Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications play important roles in regulating the expression of C4 photosynthetic genes. Given that all enzymes required for the C4 photosynthesis pathway are present in C3 plants, it has been hypothesized that this expression regulatory mechanism has been conserved. However, the relationship between histone modification and the expression of homologs of C4 photosynthetic enzyme genes has not been well determined in C3 plants. In the present study, we cloned nine hybrid poplar (Populus simonii × Populus nigra homologs of maize (Zea mays C4 photosynthetic enzyme genes, carbonic anhydrase (CA, pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, and investigated the correlation between the expression levels of these genes and the levels of promoter histone acetylation modifications in four vegetative tissues. We found that poplar homologs of C4 homologous genes had tissue-dependent expression patterns that were mostly well-correlated with the level of histone acetylation modification (H3K9ac and H4K5ac determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A further confirmed the role of histone acetylation in the regulation of the nine target genes. Collectively, these results suggest that both H3K9ac and H4K5ac positively regulate the tissue-dependent expression pattern of the PsnCAs, PsnPPDKs, PsnPCKs, and PsnPEPCs genes and that this regulatory mechanism seems to be conserved among the C3 and C4 species. Our findings provide new insight that will aid efforts to modify the expression pattern of these homologs of C4 genes to engineer C4 plants from C3 plants.

  11. Clonal progression during the T cell-dependent B cell antibody response depends on the immunoglobulin DH gene segment repertoire.

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    Ahmad eTrad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of the third complementarity determining region of the Ig H chain is constrained by natural selection of immunoglobulin diversity (DH sequence. To test the functional significance of this constraint in the context of thymus-dependent (TD immune responses, we immunized BALB/c mice with WT or altered DH sequence with 2-phenyloxazolone-coupled chicken serum albumin (phOx-CSA. We chose this antigen because studies of the humoral immune response to the hapten phOx were instrumental in the development of the current theoretical framework on which our understanding of the forces driving TD responses is based. To allow direct comparison, we used the classic approach of generating monoclonal Ab (mAb from various stages of the immune response to phOx to assess the effect of changing the sequence of the DH on clonal expansion, class switching and affinity maturation, which are hallmarks of TD responses. Compared to WT, TD-induced humoral IgM as well as IgG antibody production in the D-altered D-DFS and D-iD strains were significantly reduced. An increased prevalence of IgM producing hybridomas from late primary, secondary, and tertiary memory responses suggested either impaired class switch recombination (CSR or impaired clonal expansion of class switched B cells with phOx reactivity. Neither of the D-altered strains demonstrated the restriction in the VH/VL repertoire, the elimination of VH1 family-encoded antibodies, the focusing of the distribution of CDR-H3 lengths, or the selection for the normally dominant Ox1 clonotype which all are hallmarks of the anti-phOx response in WT mice. These changes in clonal selection and expansion as well as class switch recombination indicate that the genetic constitution of the DH locus, which has been selected by evolution, can strongly influence the functional outcome of a TD humoral response.

  12. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

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    van Erk Marjan J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an anti-oxidant and it can act as an anti-inflammatory agent. The aim of this study was to elucidate mechanisms and effect of curcumin in colon cancer cells using gene expression profiling. Methods Gene expression changes in response to curcumin exposure were studied in two human colon cancer cell lines, using cDNA microarrays with four thousand human genes. HT29 cells were exposed to two different concentrations of curcumin and gene expression changes were followed in time (3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours. Gene expression changes after short-term exposure (3 or 6 hours to curcumin were also studied in a second cell type, Caco-2 cells. Results Gene expression changes (>1.5-fold were found at all time points. HT29 cells were more sensitive to curcumin than Caco-2 cells. Early response genes were involved in cell cycle, signal transduction, DNA repair, gene transcription, cell adhesion and xenobiotic metabolism. In HT29 cells curcumin modulated a number of cell cycle genes of which several have a role in transition through the G2/M phase. This corresponded to a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase as was observed by flow cytometry. Functional groups with a similar expression profile included genes involved in phase-II metabolism that were induced by curcumin after 12 and 24 hours. Expression of some cytochrome P450 genes was downregulated by curcumin in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. In addition, curcumin affected expression of metallothionein genes, tubulin genes, p53 and other genes involved in colon carcinogenesis. Conclusions This study has extended knowledge on pathways or processes already reported to be affected by curcumin (cell cycle arrest, phase

  13. Genome-wide identification, characterisation and expression profiles of calcium-dependent protein kinase genes in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorowicz-Strońska, Olga; Koczyk, Grzegorz; Kaczmarek, Małgorzata; Krajewski, Paweł; Sadowski, Jan

    2017-02-01

    In plant cells, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are important sensors of Ca2+ flux resulting from various environmental stresses like cold, drought or salt stress. Previous genome sequence analysis and comparative studies in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.) defined a multi-gene family of CDPKs. Here, we identified and characterised the CDPK gene complement of the model plant, barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Comparative analysis encompassed phylogeny reconstruction based on newly available barley genome sequence, as well as established model genomes (e.g. O. sativa, A. thaliana, Brachypodium distachyon). Functional gene copies possessed characteristic CDPK domain architecture, including a serine/threonine kinase domain and four regulatory EF-hand motifs. In silico verification was followed by measurements of transcript abundance via real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The relative expression of CDPK genes was determined in the vegetative growth stage under intensifying drought stress conditions. The majority of barley CDPK genes showed distinct changes in patterns of expression during exposure to stress. Our study constitutes evidence for involvement of the barley CDPK gene complement in signal transduction pathways relating to adaptation to drought. Our bioinformatics and transcriptomic analyses will provide an important foundation for further functional dissection of the barley CDPK gene family.

  14. The Tangled Tale of Genes and Environment: Moore's The Dependent Gene: The Fallacy of “nature VS. Nurture”

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Nature–nurture views that smack of genetic determinism remain prevalent. Yet, the increasing knowledge base shows ever more clearly that environmental factors and genes form a fully interactional system at all levels. Moore's book covers the major topics of discovery and dispute, including behavior genetics and the twin studies, developmental psychobiology, and developmental systems theory. Knowledge of this larger life-sciences context for behavior principles will become increasingly importa...

  15. An Obesity-Predisposing Variant of the FTO Gene Regulates D2R-Dependent Reward Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevgi, Meltem; Rigoux, Lionel; Kühn, Anne B; Mauer, Jan; Schilbach, Leonhard; Hess, Martin E; Gruendler, Theo O J; Ullsperger, Markus; Stephan, Klaas Enno; Brüning, Jens C; Tittgemeyer, Marc

    2015-09-09

    Variations in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene are linked to obesity. However, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms by which these genetic variants influence obesity, behavior, and brain are unknown. Given that Fto regulates D2/3R signaling in mice, we tested in humans whether variants in FTO would interact with a variant in the ANKK1 gene, which alters D2R signaling and is also associated with obesity. In a behavioral and fMRI study, we demonstrate that gene variants of FTO affect dopamine (D2)-dependent midbrain brain responses to reward learning and behavioral responses associated with learning from negative outcome in humans. Furthermore, dynamic causal modeling confirmed that FTO variants modulate the connectivity in a basic reward circuit of meso-striato-prefrontal regions, suggesting a mechanism by which genetic predisposition alters reward processing not only in obesity, but also in other disorders with altered D2R-dependent impulse control, such as addiction. Significance statement: Variations in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene are associated with obesity. Here we demonstrate that variants of FTO affect dopamine-dependent midbrain brain responses and learning from negative outcomes in humans during a reward learning task. Furthermore, FTO variants modulate the connectivity in a basic reward circuit of meso-striato-prefrontal regions, suggesting a mechanism by which genetic vulnerability in reward processing can increase predisposition to obesity. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3512584-09$15.00/0.

  16. Reward-related genes and personality traits in alcohol-dependent individuals: a pilot case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgren, Sara; Berglund, Kristina; Jerlhag, Elisabet; Fahlke, Claudia; Balldin, Jan; Berggren, Ulf; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Engel, Jörgen A

    2011-01-01

    Components of the brain reward system, i.e. the mesolimbic dopamine, laterodorsal cholinergic and ghrelin signaling systems, have been implicated in alcohol reward in preclinical studies. Genetic variants of these systems have previously been linked to alcohol dependence. Here, we genotyped 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): 1 SNP in the dopamine D₂ receptor (DRD2) gene, 20 SNPs in 5 different nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit (CHRN*) genes, and 10 SNPs in the genes encoding pro-ghrelin (GHRL) and its receptor (GHSR), in a pilot study of type 1 alcoholics (n = 84) and healthy controls (n = 32). These individuals were characterized using the Temperament and Character Inventory. None of the SNPs were associated with risk of alcohol dependence in this population. The GG genotype of SNP rs13261190 in the CHRNB3 was associated with increased novelty seeking, while SNPs of the ghrelin signaling system were associated with decreased self-directedness (AA of rs495225, GHSR) and alterations in self-transcendence (AA of both rs42451 and rs35680, GHRL). In conclusion, this pilot study suggests that reward-related genes are associated with altered personality scores in type 1 alcohol dependence, which warrants future studies of these associations in larger study samples. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Altered CREB Binding to Activity-Dependent Genes in Serine Racemase Deficient Mice, a Mouse Model of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Darrick T; Coyle, Joseph T

    2017-11-27

    cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) is a transcription factor ubiquitously expressed in the brain that regulates neuroplasticity by modulating gene expression. The influx of calcium through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) is a well-defined mechanism that leads to the increased expression of CREB-dependent genes, including brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), microRNA-132, and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc). These molecules are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We previously demonstrated that serine racemase knockout (SR-/-) mice, which exhibit NMDAR hypofunction due to a lack of the forebrain NMDAR co-agonist d-serine, also have reduced expression of CREB-dependent genes in the hippocampus. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we show here that, in SR-/- mice, there is less CREB bound to the promoter regions of BDNF, microRNA-132, and Arc. These data suggest that NMDAR hypofunction in SR-/- mice leads to reduced CREB binding on known activity-dependent genes, in turn contributing to their reduced expression.

  18. Prediction of Drug Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C Depending on the IL28B Gene Polymorphism

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    Moroz L.V. Moroz L.V.

    2014-09-01

    Molecular and genetic analysis of IL28V (rs12979860 gene polymorphism, located at a distance of 3 thousand nucleotide pairs from IL28V gene, using the polymerase chain reaction allows to predict the success of combination antiviral therapy, and the presence of C/C genotype can be a predictor of sustained virological response in patients chronic hepatitis C.

  19. Sugar- and nitrogen-dependent regulation of an Amanita muscaria phenylalanine ammonium lyase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehls, U; Ecke, M; Hampp, R

    1999-03-01

    The cDNA of a key enzyme of secondary metabolism, phenylalanine ammonium lyase, was identified for an ectomycorrhizal fungus by differential screening of a mycorrhizal library. The gene was highly expressed in hyphae grown at low external monosaccharide concentrations, but its expression was 30-fold reduced at elevated concentrations. Gene repression was regulated by hexokinase.

  20. Heritability of insulin sensitivity and lipid profile depend on BMI : evidence for gene-obesity interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.; Ding, X.; Su, S.; Spector, T. D.; Mangino, M.; Iliadou, A.; Snieder, H.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence from candidate gene studies suggests that obesity may modify genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes and dyslipidaemia. On an aggregate level, gene-obesity interactions are expected to result in different heritability estimates at different obesity levels. However, this hypothesis has

  1. Combining evidence, biomedical literature and statistical dependence: new insights for functional annotation of gene sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgun Anita

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale genomic studies based on transcriptome technologies provide clusters of genes that need to be functionally annotated. The Gene Ontology (GO implements a controlled vocabulary organised into three hierarchies: cellular components, molecular functions and biological processes. This terminology allows a coherent and consistent description of the knowledge about gene functions. The GO terms related to genes come primarily from semi-automatic annotations made by trained biologists (annotation based on evidence or text-mining of the published scientific literature (literature profiling. Results We report an original functional annotation method based on a combination of evidence and literature that overcomes the weaknesses and the limitations of each approach. It relies on the Gene Ontology Annotation database (GOA Human and the PubGene biomedical literature index. We support these annotations with statistically associated GO terms and retrieve associative relations across the three GO hierarchies to emphasise the major pathways involved by a gene cluster. Both annotation methods and associative relations were quantitatively evaluated with a reference set of 7397 genes and a multi-cluster study of 14 clusters. We also validated the biological appropriateness of our hybrid method with the annotation of a single gene (cdc2 and that of a down-regulated cluster of 37 genes identified by a transcriptome study of an in vitro enterocyte differentiation model (CaCo-2 cells. Conclusion The combination of both approaches is more informative than either separate approach: literature mining can enrich an annotation based only on evidence. Text-mining of the literature can also find valuable associated MEDLINE references that confirm the relevance of the annotation. Eventually, GO terms networks can be built with associative relations in order to highlight cooperative and competitive pathways and their connected molecular functions.

  2. Insertional mutagenesis and deep profiling reveals gene hierarchies and a Myc/p53-dependent bottleneck in lymphomagenesis.

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    Camille A Huser

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Retroviral insertional mutagenesis (RIM is a powerful tool for cancer genomics that was combined in this study with deep sequencing (RIM/DS to facilitate a comprehensive analysis of lymphoma progression. Transgenic mice expressing two potent collaborating oncogenes in the germ line (CD2-MYC, -Runx2 develop rapid onset tumours that can be accelerated and rendered polyclonal by neonatal Moloney murine leukaemia virus (MoMLV infection. RIM/DS analysis of 28 polyclonal lymphomas identified 771 common insertion sites (CISs defining a 'progression network' that encompassed a remarkably large fraction of known MoMLV target genes, with further strong indications of oncogenic selection above the background of MoMLV integration preference. Progression driven by RIM was characterised as a Darwinian process of clonal competition engaging proliferation control networks downstream of cytokine and T-cell receptor signalling. Enhancer mode activation accounted for the most efficiently selected CIS target genes, including Ccr7 as the most prominent of a set of chemokine receptors driving paracrine growth stimulation and lymphoma dissemination. Another large target gene subset including candidate tumour suppressors was disrupted by intragenic insertions. A second RIM/DS screen comparing lymphomas of wild-type and parental transgenics showed that CD2-MYC tumours are virtually dependent on activation of Runx family genes in strong preference to other potent Myc collaborating genes (Gfi1, Notch1. Ikzf1 was identified as a novel collaborating gene for Runx2 and illustrated the interface between integration preference and oncogenic selection. Lymphoma target genes for MoMLV can be classified into (a a small set of master regulators that confer self-renewal; overcoming p53 and other failsafe pathways and (b a large group of progression genes that control autonomous proliferation in transformed cells. These findings provide insights into retroviral biology, human cancer

  3. Real-time PCR expression profiling of genes encoding potential virulence factors in Candida albicans biofilms: identification of model-dependent and -independent gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Řičicová Markéta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida albicans infections are often associated with biofilm formation. Previous work demonstrated that the expression of HWP1 (hyphal wall protein and of genes belonging to the ALS (agglutinin-like sequence, SAP (secreted aspartyl protease, PLB (phospholipase B and LIP (lipase gene families is associated with biofilm growth on mucosal surfaces. We investigated using real-time PCR whether genes encoding potential virulence factors are also highly expressed in biofilms associated with abiotic surfaces. For this, C. albicans biofilms were grown on silicone in microtiter plates (MTP or in the Centres for Disease Control (CDC reactor, on polyurethane in an in vivo subcutaneous catheter rat (SCR model, and on mucosal surfaces in the reconstituted human epithelium (RHE model. Results HWP1 and genes belonging to the ALS, SAP, PLB and LIP gene families were constitutively expressed in C. albicans biofilms. ALS1-5 were upregulated in all model systems, while ALS9 was mostly downregulated. ALS6 and HWP1 were overexpressed in all models except in the RHE and MTP, respectively. The expression levels of SAP1 were more pronounced in both in vitro models, while those of SAP2, SAP4 and SAP6 were higher in the in vivo model. Furthermore, SAP5 was highly upregulated in the in vivo and RHE models. For SAP9 and SAP10 similar gene expression levels were observed in all model systems. PLB genes were not considerably upregulated in biofilms, while LIP1-3, LIP5-7 and LIP9-10 were highly overexpressed in both in vitro models. Furthermore, an elevated lipase activity was detected in supernatans of biofilms grown in the MTP and RHE model. Conclusions Our findings show that HWP1 and most of the genes belonging to the ALS, SAP and LIP gene families are upregulated in C. albicans biofilms. Comparison of the fold expression between the various model systems revealed similar expression levels for some genes, while for others model-dependent expression

  4. Genes adopt non-optimal codon usage to generate cell cycle-dependent oscillations in protein levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Danon, Tamar; Christian, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    -optimal codon usage of genes expressed at this time, and lowest toward the end of G1, reflecting the optimal codon usage of G1 genes. Accordingly, protein levels of human glycyl-, threonyl-, and glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetases were found to oscillate, peaking in G2/M phase. In light of our findings, we propose...... that non-optimal (wobbly) matching codons influence protein synthesis during the cell cycle. We describe a new mathematical model that shows how codon usage can give rise to cell-cycle regulation. In summary, our data indicate that cells exploit wobbling to generate cell cycle-dependent dynamics...

  5. Gene Introgression in Weeds Depends on Initial Gene Location in the Crop: Brassica napus-Raphanus raphanistrum Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk-Chauvat, Katarzyna; Delaunay, Sabrina; Vannier, Anne; François, Caroline; Thomas, Gwenaëlle; Eber, Frédérique; Lodé, Maryse; Gilet, Marie; Huteau, Virginie; Morice, Jérôme; Nègre, Sylvie; Falentin, Cyril; Coriton, Olivier; Darmency, Henri; Alrustom, Bachar; Jenczewski, Eric; Rousseau-Gueutin, Mathieu; Chèvre, Anne-Marie

    2017-07-01

    The effect of gene location within a crop genome on its transfer to a weed genome remains an open question for gene flow assessment. To elucidate this question, we analyzed advanced generations of intergeneric hybrids, derived from an initial pollination of known oilseed rape varieties (Brassica napus, AACC, 2n = 38) by a local population of wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum, RrRr, 2n = 18). After five generations of recurrent pollination, 307 G5 plants with a chromosome number similar to wild radish were genotyped using 105 B. napus specific markers well distributed along the chromosomes. They revealed that 49.8% of G5 plants carried at least one B. napus genomic region. According to the frequency of B. napus markers (0-28%), four classes were defined: Class 1 (near zero frequency), with 75 markers covering ∼70% of oilseed rape genome; Class 2 (low frequency), with 20 markers located on 11 genomic regions; Class 3 (high frequency), with eight markers on three genomic regions; and Class 4 (higher frequency), with two adjacent markers detected on A10. Therefore, some regions of the oilseed rape genome are more prone than others to be introgressed into wild radish. Inheritance and growth of plant progeny revealed that genomic regions of oilseed rape could be stably introduced into wild radish and variably impact the plant fitness (plant height and seed number). Our results pinpoint that novel technologies enabling the targeted insertion of transgenes should select genomic regions that are less likely to be introgressed into the weed genome, thereby reducing gene flow. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. The Tangled Tale of Genes and Environment: Moore's The Dependent Gene: The Fallacy of “nature VS. Nurture”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Susan M

    2007-01-01

    Nature–nurture views that smack of genetic determinism remain prevalent. Yet, the increasing knowledge base shows ever more clearly that environmental factors and genes form a fully interactional system at all levels. Moore's book covers the major topics of discovery and dispute, including behavior genetics and the twin studies, developmental psychobiology, and developmental systems theory. Knowledge of this larger life-sciences context for behavior principles will become increasingly important as the full complexity of gene–environment relations is revealed. Behavior analysis both contributes to and gains from the larger battle for the recognition of how nature and nurture really work.

  7. Age and sex dependent changes in liver gene expression during the life cycle of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branham William S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age- and sex-related susceptibility to adverse drug reactions and disease is a key concern in understanding drug safety and disease progression. We hypothesize that the underlying suite of hepatic genes expressed at various life cycle stages will impact susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. Understanding the basal liver gene expression patterns is a necessary first step in addressing this hypothesis and will inform our assessments of adverse drug reactions as the liver plays a central role in drug metabolism and biotransformation. Untreated male and female F344 rats were sacrificed at 2, 5, 6, 8, 15, 21, 52, 78, and 104 weeks of age. Liver tissues were collected for histology and gene expression analysis. Whole-genome rat microarrays were used to query global expression profiles. Results An initial list of differentially expressed genes was selected using criteria based upon p-value (p Conclusions These results suggest an underlying role for genes in specific clusters in potentiating age- and sex-related differences in susceptibility to adverse health effects. Furthermore, such a comprehensive picture of life cycle changes in gene expression deepens our understanding and informs the utility of liver gene expression biomarkers.

  8. Transcriptional activation in Drosophila spermatogenesis involves the mutually dependent function of aly and a novel meiotic arrest gene cookie monster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianqiao; White-Cooper, Helen

    2003-02-01

    In Drosophila spermatogenesis, meiotic cell cycle progression and cellular differentiation are linked by the function of the meiotic arrest genes. The meiotic arrest genes control differentiation by regulating the transcriptional activation of many differentiation-specific genes. The meiotic arrest genes have been subdivided into aly and can classes, based on the mechanism by which they control cell cycle progression. aly has previously been shown to encode a chromatin-associated protein. We present the identification, cloning and characterisation of a novel Drosophila meiotic arrest gene, cookie monster (comr), that has a mutant phenotype indistinguishable from that of aly. A null mutant allele of comr is viable but male sterile. Mutant primary spermatocytes fail to initiate transcription of a large number of genes, and arrest before entry into the meiotic divisions. In adult males, expression of comr is testis specific, low levels of transcripts are detected at other stages of development. comr encodes a novel acidic protein, which is nuclear and primarily localised to regions of chromatin in primary spermatocytes. The nuclear localisation of Aly and Comr proteins are mutually dependent. Finally, we show that active RNA polymerase II is found in distinct domains in the nucleus that constitute a subset of the total Comr stained chromatin.

  9. The effect of mycorrhiza on the growth and elemental composition of Ni-hyperaccumulating plant Berkheya coddii Roessler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orłowska, Elżbieta; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech; Orlowski, Dariusz; Turnau, Katarzyna; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta

    2011-12-01

    The effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on growth and element uptake by Ni-hyperaccumulating plant, Berkheya coddii, was studied. Plants were grown under laboratory conditions on ultramafic soil without or with the AM fungi of different origin. The AM colonization, especially with the indigenous strain, significantly enhanced plants growth and their survival. AMF affected also the elemental concentrations that were studied with Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). AMF (i) increased K and Fe in shoots, Zn and Mn in roots, P and Ca both, in roots and shoots; (ii) decreased Mn in shoots, Co and Ni both, in shoots and roots. Due to higher biomass of mycorrhizal plants, total Ni content was up to 20 times higher in mycorrhizal plants compared to the non-mycorrhizal ones. The AMF enhancement of Ni uptake may therefore provide an improvement of a presently used technique of nickel phytomining. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sex-dependent gene expression in early brain development of chicken embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stigson Michael

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differentiation of the brain during development leads to sexually dimorphic adult reproductive behavior and other neural sex dimorphisms. Genetic mechanisms independent of steroid hormones produced by the gonads have recently been suggested to partly explain these dimorphisms. Results Using cDNA microarrays and real-time PCR we found gene expression differences between the male and female embryonic brain (or whole head that may be independent of morphological differentiation of the gonads. Genes located on the sex chromosomes (ZZ in males and ZW in females were common among the differentially expressed genes, several of which (WPKCI-8, HINT, MHM non-coding RNA have previously been implicated in avian sex determination. A majority of the identified genes were more highly expressed in males. Three of these genes (CDK7, CCNH and BTF2-P44 encode subunits of the transcription factor IIH complex, indicating a role for this complex in neuronal differentiation. Conclusion In conclusion, this study provides novel insights into sexually dimorphic gene expression in the embryonic chicken brain and its possible involvement in sex differentiation of the nervous system in birds.

  11. Intra-specific variation in Ni tolerance, accumulation and translocation patterns in the Ni-hyperaccumulator Alyssum lesbiacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamidis, G C; Aloupi, M; Kazakou, E; Dimitrakopoulos, P G

    2014-01-01

    A hydroponic experiment was conducted to investigate inter-population variation in Ni tolerance, accumulation and translocation patterns in Alyssum lesbiacum. The in vitro results were compared to field data (soil bioavailable and leaf Ni concentrations) so as to examine any potential relationship between hydroponic and natural conditions. Seeds from the four major existing populations of A. lesbiacum were used for the cultivation of plantlets in solution cultures with incrementally increasing Ni concentrations (ranging from 0 to 250 μmol L(-1) NiSO4). Ni accumulation and tolerance of shoots and roots, along with initial seed Ni concentration for each population were measured. The ratio of root or shoot length of plantlets grown in NiSO4 solutions to root or shoot lengths of plantlets grown in the control solution was used as tolerance index. For the range of metal concentrations used, A. lesbiacum presented significant inter-population variation in Ni tolerance, accumulation and translocation patterns. Initial seed Ni concentration was positively correlated to shoot Ni accumulation. A significant positive relationship between tolerance and accumulation was demonstrated. Initial seed Ni concentration along with physiological differences in xylem loading and Ni translocation of each population, appear to be the determining factors of the significant inter-population variation in Ni tolerance and accumulation. Our results highlight the inter-population variation in Ni tolerance and accumulation patterns in the Ni-hyperaccumulator A. lesbiacum and give support to the suggestion that the selection of metal hyperaccumulator species with enhanced phytoremediation efficiency should be considered at the population level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of zinc and cadmium interactions on root morphology and metal translocation in a hyperaccumulating species under hydroponic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Tingqiang, E-mail: litq@zju.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Yang Xiaoe; Lu Lingli [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Islam, Ejazul [Nuclear Institute of Agriculture, Tandojam, 48800 Hyderabad (Pakistan); He Zhenli [University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Indian River Research and Education Center, Fort Pierce, Florida 34945 (United States)

    2009-09-30

    Effects of zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) interactions on root morphology and metal translocation in the hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) and non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) of S. alfredii were investigated under hydroponic conditions. Specific root lengths (SRL), specific root surface areas (SRA) and specific root volumes (SRV) of the HE increased significantly when plant were treated with 500 {mu}M Zn or 100 {mu}M Cd + 500 {mu}M Zn, whereas these root parameters were significantly decreased for the NHE when plant were treated with 100 {mu}M Cd, 500 {mu}M Zn or 100 {mu}M Cd + 500 {mu}M Zn. SRL and SRA of the HE were mainly constituted by roots with diameter between 0.2-0.4 mm (diameter class 3 and 4) which were significantly increased in treatment of 500 {mu}M Zn or 100 {mu}M Cd + 500 {mu}M Zn, whereas in the NHE, metal treatments caused a significant decrease in SRL and SRA of the finest diameter class root (diameter between 0.1-0.3 mm). The HE of S. alfredii could maintain a fine, widely branched root system under contaminated conditions compared with the NHE. Relative root growth, net Cd uptake and translocation rate in the HE were significantly increased by adding 500 {mu}M Zn, as compared with the second growth period, where 100 {mu}M Cd was supplied alone. Cadmium and Zn concentrations in the shoots of the HE were 12-16 times and 22-27 times higher than those of the NHE under 100 {mu}M Cd + 500 {mu}M Zn combined treatment. These results indicate strong positive interactions of Zn and Cd occurred in the HE under 100 {mu}M Cd + 500 {mu}M Zn treatment and Cd uptake and translocation was enhanced by adding 500 {mu}M Zn.

  13. Thylakoid redox signals are integrated into organellar-gene-expression-dependent retrograde signalling in the prors1-1 mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eTadini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Perturbations in organellar gene expression (OGE and the thylakoid redox state (TRS activate retrograde signalling pathways that adaptively modify nuclear gene expression (NGE, according to developmental and metabolic needs. The prors1-1 mutation in Arabidopsis down-regulates the expression of the nuclear gene Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase1 (PRORS1 which acts in both plastids and mitochondria, thereby impairing protein synthesis in both organelles and triggering OGE-dependent retrograde signalling. Because the mutation also affects thylakoid electron transport, TRS-dependent signals may likewise have an impact on the changes in NGE observed in this genotype. In this study, we have investigated whether signals related to TRS are actually integrated into the OGE-dependent retrograde signalling pathway. To this end, the chaos mutation (for chlorophyll a/b binding protein harvesting-organelle specific, which shows a partial loss of PSII antennae proteins and thus a reduction in PSII light absorption capability, was introduced into the prors1-1 mutant background. The resulting double mutant displayed a prors1-1-like reduction in plastid translation rate and a chaos-like decrease in PSII antenna size, whereas the hyper-reduction of the thylakoid electron transport chain, caused by the prors1-1 mutation, was alleviated, as determined by monitoring chlorophyll (Chl fluorescence and thylakoid phosphorylation. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the nucleus-encoded photosynthesis genes down-regulated in the prors1-1 mutant are expressed at nearly wild-type rates in prors1-1 chaos leaves, and this recovery is reflected in the steady-state levels of their protein products in the chloroplast. We therefore conclude that signals related to photosynthetic electron transport and TRS, and indirectly to carbohydrate metabolism and energy balance, are indeed fed into the OGE-dependent retrograde pathway to modulate NGE and adjust the abundance of chloroplast proteins.

  14. Recovering metals from sewage sludge, waste incineration residues and similar substances with hyperaccumulative plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisser, Johannes; Gattringer, Heinz; Iordanopoulos-Kisser, Monika

    2015-04-01

    observed in so-called hyperaccumulating metalophytes, which are studied for its suitability to be incorporated in metal recovery processes of elements that diffusely occur in different waste streams. In a systematic series of tests under laboratory conditions the accumulation behaviour for many different elements including rare earth metals of a selection of candidate plants growing on sewage sludge, incineration residues and industrial leftovers was assessed (quantitavely and qualitatively). Growth performance of these plants as well as the most suitable substrate properties were evaluated. The results of this project provided the groundwork for further research and development steps that might bring to practical implementation a technological option with potentially huge benefits: The recovery of valuable metal resources from sewage sludge, incineration ashes and metal rich wastewaters by environmentally friendly and low energy means. Simultaneous decontamination of the input substrates from heavy metals, opening the possibility for these nutrient streams to be redirected to biological regeneration processes (for example use as fertilizers in agriculture) without fear of polluting soils with heavy metal loads. Generation of biomass on contaminated substrates can yield usable energy surplus through incineration during or after processing.

  15. Hyperaccumulator of Pb in native plants growing on Peruvian mine tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Jaume; Roca, Nuria; Boluda, Rafael; Tume, Pedro; Duran, Paola; Poma, Wilfredo; Sanchez, Isidoro

    2014-05-01

    samples were taken at four locations (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4) with different levels of Pb. The Pb soil content (mean ± standard deviation) in mg•kg-1 is as follows: CA1 3992 ± 301; CA2 10128 ± 2247, CA3 14197 ± 895, CA4 16060 ± 810. The non-polluted value around the mine was Pb 124 mg•kg-1. Unusual elevated concentrations of Pb (over 1000 mg kg-1) and TF greater than one were detected in shoots of 6 different plants species (Ageratina sp., Achirodine alata, Cortaderia apalothica, Epilobium denticulatum, Taraxacum officinalis and Trifolium repens). The location CA4 has the maximum content of Pb in the shoots of Ageratina sp. (5045±77 mg•kg-1), C. apalothica (3367±188 mg•kg-1), E. denticulatum (13599±848 mg•kg-1), T. officinalis (2533±47 mg•kg-1) and T. repens (2839±231 mg•kg-1). However, the BF (Bioaccumulation Factor) was smaller than one. Despite the low BF index, the great TFs for Pb indicate that these plant species effectively translocate this metal (i.e., 2.4 for Ageratina sp., 2.3 for C. apalothica, 1.6 for T. repens, 1.5 for A. alata, 1.3 for T. officinalis and 1.2 for E. denticulatum). It seems that the BF is not a reliable index when the metal soil concentration is extremely large. Controlled-environment studies must be performed to definitively confirm the Pb hyperaccumulation character of cited plant species.

  16. Dependence of colorectal cancer risk on the parent-of-origin of mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Christine M; Dowty, James G; van Vliet, Jane L; Smith, Letitia; Mead, Leeanne J; Macrae, Finlay A; St John, D James B; Giles, Graham G; Southey, Melissa C; Jenkins, Mark A; Velan, Gary M; Hopper, John L

    2011-02-01

    Genetic diseases associated with dynamic mutations in microsatellite DNA often display parent-of-origin effects (POEs) in which the risk of disease depends on the sex of the parent from whom the disease allele was inherited. Carriers of germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes have high risks of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). We investigated whether these risks depend on the parent-of-origin of the mutation. We studied 422 subjects, including 89 MMR gene mutation carriers, from 17 population-based families who were each recruited via a CRC case diagnosed before age 45 years and found to carry a MMR gene mutation. The POE hazard ratio (HR(POE)), defined to be the CRC incidence for carriers with maternally derived mutations divided by the corresponding paternal incidence, was estimated using a novel application of modified segregation analysis. HR(POE) (95% confidence interval) was estimated to be 3.2 (1.1-9.8) for males (P = 0.03) and 0.8 (0.2-2.8) for females (P = 0.5) and the corresponding cumulative risks to age 80 years were 88% (54%-100%) for male carriers with maternally derived mutations and 38-48% for all other carriers. If confirmed by larger studies, these results will have important implications for the etiology of CRC and for the clinical management of MMR gene mutation carriers. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) alters parasympathetic neuron gene expression in a time-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Adriane D; Margiotta, Joseph F

    2008-11-01

    Neuropeptides, including pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), can influence diverse cellular processes over a broad temporal range. In ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons, for example, PACAP binding to high-affinity PAC1 receptors triggers transduction cascades that both rapidly modulate nicotinic receptors and synapses and support long-term survival. Since PACAP/PAC1 signaling recruits intracellular messengers and effectors that potently alter transcription, we examined its activation of the transcription factor CREB and then tested for changes in gene expression. PACAP/PAC1 signaling rapidly induced prolonged CREB activation in CG neurons by a phospholipase C -independent mechanism supported by Ca2+-influx, adenylate cyclase, and effectors, including protein kinase C (PKC) and possibly PKA. Since PACAP is abundant in the CG and released from depolarized presynaptic terminals, it is well suited to regulate gene expression relevant to neuronal and synaptic development. Gene array screens conducted using RNA from CG cultures grown with PACAP for 1/4, 24, or 96 h revealed a time-dependent pattern of > 600 regulated transcripts, including several encoding proteins implicated in synaptic function, neuronal survival, and development. The results underscore rapid, neuromodulatory, and long-term, neurotrophic consequences of PAC1 signaling in CG neurons and suggest that PACAP exerts such diverse influences by altering the expression of specific gene transcripts in a time-dependent fashion.

  18. Graded or threshold response of the tet-controlled gene expression: all depends on the concentration of the transactivator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Niels

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, the step-wise integration of tet-dependent transactivator and tet-responsive expression unit is considered to be the most promising tool to achieve stable tet-controlled gene expression in cell populations. However, disadvantages of this strategy for integration into primary cells led us to develop an “All-In-One” vector system, enabling simultaneous integration of both components. The effect on tet-controlled gene expression was analyzed for retroviral “All-In-One” vectors expressing the M2-transactivator either under control of a constitutive or a new type of autoregulated promoter. Results Determination of luciferase activity in transduced cell populations indicated improvement of the dynamic range of gene expression for the autoregulated system. Further differences were observed regarding induction kinetics and dose–response. Most notably, introduction of the autoregulated system resulted in a threshold mode of induction, whereas the constitutive system exhibited pronounced effector-dose dependence. Conclusion Tet-regulated gene expression in the applied autoregulated system resembles a threshold mode, whereby full induction of the tet-unit can be achieved at otherwise limiting doxycycline concentrations.

  19. Cholesterol, a cell size-dependent signal that regulates glucose metabolism and gene expression in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Lay, S; Krief, S; Farnier, C; Lefrère, I; Le Liepvre, X; Bazin, R; Ferré, P; Dugail, I

    2001-05-18

    Enlarged fat cells exhibit modified metabolic capacities, which could be involved in the metabolic complications of obesity at the whole body level. We show here that sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) and its target genes are induced in the adipose tissue of several models of rodent obesity, suggesting cholesterol imbalance in enlarged adipocytes. Within a particular fat pad, larger adipocytes have reduced membrane cholesterol concentrations compared with smaller fat cells, demonstrating that altered cholesterol distribution is characteristic of adipocyte hypertrophy per se. We show that treatment with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, which mimics the membrane cholesterol reduction of hypertrophied adipocytes, induces insulin resistance. We also produced cholesterol depletion by mevastatin treatment, which activates SREBP-2 and its target genes. The analysis of 40 adipocyte genes showed that the response to cholesterol depletion implicated genes involved in cholesterol traffic (caveolin 2, scavenger receptor BI, and ATP binding cassette 1 genes) but also adipocyte-derived secretion products (tumor necrosis factor alpha, angiotensinogen, and interleukin-6) and proteins involved in energy metabolism (fatty acid synthase, GLUT 4, and UCP3). These data demonstrate that altering cholesterol balance profoundly modifies adipocyte metabolism in a way resembling that seen in hypertrophied fat cells from obese rodents or humans. This is the first evidence that intracellular cholesterol might serve as a link between fat cell size and adipocyte metabolic activity.

  20. Poplar maintains zinc homeostasis with heavy metal genes HMA4 and PCS1

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Joshua P.; Adeli, Ardeshir; Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Harkess, Richard L.; Page, Grier P.; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Schultz, Emily B.; Yuceer, Cetin

    2011-01-01

    Perennial woody species, such as poplar (Populus spp.) must acquire necessary heavy metals like zinc (Zn) while avoiding potential toxicity. Poplar contains genes with sequence homology to genes HMA4 and PCS1 from other species which are involved in heavy metal regulation. While basic genomic conservation exists, poplar does not have a hyperaccumulating phenotype. Poplar has a common indicator phenotype in which heavy metal accumulation is proportional to environmental concentrations but exce...

  1. Suicidal behavior and haplotypes of the dopamine receptor gene (DRD2 and ANKK1 gene polymorphisms in patients with alcohol dependence--preliminary report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Jasiewicz

    Full Text Available Suicide is a significant public health issue and a major cause of death throughout the world. According to WHO it accounts for almost 2% of deaths worldwide. The etiology of suicidal behavior is complex but the results of many studies suggest that genetic determinants are of significant importance. In our study,--we have analyzed selected SNPs polymorphisms in the DRD2 and ANKK1 genes in patients with alcohol dependence syndrome (169 Caucasian subjects including a subgroup of individuals (n = 61 who have experienced at least one suicide attempt. The aim of the study was to verify if various haplotypes of selected genes, comprising Taq1A, Taq1B, and Taq1D single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, play any role in the development of alcohol dependence and suicidal behavior. The control group comprised 157 unrelated individuals matched for ethnicity, gender,- and age and included no individuals with mental disorders. All subjects were recruited in the North West region of Poland. The study showed that alcohol dependent subjects with a history of at least one suicidal attempt were characterized by a significantly higher frequency of the T-G-A2 haplotype when compared to individuals in whom alcohol dependence was not associated with suicidal behavior (p = 0.006. It appears that studies based on identifying correlation between SNPs is the future for research on genetic risk factors that contribute to the development of alcohol addiction and other associated disorders. To sum up, there is a necessity to perform further research to explain dependencies between the dopaminergic system, alcohol use disorders and suicidal behavior.

  2. Epileptogenesis alters gene expression pattern in rats subjected to amygdala-dependent emotional learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majak, K; Dabrowski, M; Pitkänen, A

    2009-03-17

    Here we tested a hypothesis that epileptogenesis influences expression pattern of genes in the basolateral amygdala that are critical for fear conditioning. Whole genome molecular profiling of basolateral rat amygdala was performed to compare the transcriptome changes underlying fear learning in epileptogenic and control animals. Our analysis revealed that after fear conditioning procedure 26 genes were regulated differently in the basolateral amygdala of both groups. Thus, our study provides the first evidence that not only the damage to the neuronal pathways but also altered composition or activity level of molecular machinery responsible for formation of emotional memories within surviving pathways can contribute to impairment in emotional learning in epileptogenic animals. Understanding the function of those genes in emotional learning provides an attractive avenue for identification of novel drug targets for treatment of emotional disorders after epileptogenesis-inducing insult.

  3. The genes associated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone-dependent precocious puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Soon Hwang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human puberty is a complex, coordinated biological process with multiple levels of regulations. The timing of puberty varies greatly in children and is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. The key genes of pubertal onset, KISS1, GPR54, GNRH1 and GNRHR, may be major causal factors underlying gonadotropin-releasing hormonedependent precocious puberty (GDPP. Two gain-of-function mutations in KISS1 and GPR54 have been identified recently as genetic causes of GDPP. GNRH1 and GNRHR are also gene candidates for GDPP; however no mutations have been identified in these genes. Presently potential genetic causes like LIN28B continues to appear; many areas of research await exploration in this context. In this review, I focus primarily on the genetic causes of GDPP.

  4. Microarray-based identification of age-dependent differences in gene expression of human dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Pim; Gunn, David; McBryan, Tony; Dirks, Roeland W; van Heemst, Diana; Lim, Fei-Ling; Jochemsen, Aart G; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty; Nagel, Julia; Adams, Peter D; Tanke, Hans J; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Maier, Andrea B

    2012-07-01

    Senescence is thought to play an important role in the progressive age-related decline in tissue integrity and concomitant diseases, but not much is known about the complex interplay between upstream regulators and downstream effectors. We profiled whole genome gene expression of non-stressed and rotenone-stressed human fibroblast strains from young and oldest old subjects, and measured senescence associated β-gal activity. Microarray results identified gene sets involved in carbohydrate metabolism, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, the cell cycle, glutamate signaling, RNA-processing and mitochondrial function as being differentially regulated with chronological age. The most significantly differentially regulated mRNA corresponded to the p16 gene. p16 was then investigated using qPCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry. In conclusion, we have identified cellular pathways that are differentially expressed between fibroblast strains from young and old subjects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cloning and structural characterization of the genes coding for adenosylcobalamin-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase from Propionibacterium shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, E N; McKie, N; Davis, N K; Leadlay, P F

    1989-06-01

    The structural genes coding for both subunits of adenosylcobalamin-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase from the Gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium shermanii have been cloned, with the use of synthetic oligonucleotides as primary hybridization probes. The genes are closely linked and are transcribed in the same direction. Nucleotide sequence analysis of 4.5 kb of DNA encompassing both genes allowed us to infer the complete amino acid sequence of the two subunits: the beta-subunit is the product of the upstream gene, and consists of 638 amino acid residues (Mr 69465) and the alpha-subunit consists of 728 amino acid residues (Mr 80,147). There is a very close structural homology between the two subunits, reflecting the probable duplication of a common ancestral gene. A sequence present only in the alpha-subunit is significantly homologous to a portion of the sequence of the methylmalonyl-CoA-binding subunit of transcarboxylase from P. shermanii [Samols, Thornton, Murtif, Kumar, Haase & Wood (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 6461-6464], and this homologous region may form part of the CoA ester-binding site in both enzymes.

  6. The nitrate-reduction gene cluster components exert lineage-dependent contributions to optimization of Sinorhizobium symbiosis with soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li Xue; Li, Qin Qin; Zhang, Yun Zeng; Hu, Yue; Jiao, Jian; Guo, Hui Juan; Zhang, Xing Xing; Zhang, Biliang; Chen, Wen Xin; Tian, Chang Fu

    2017-12-01

    Receiving nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes does not guarantee rhizobia an effective symbiosis with legumes. Here, variations in gene content were determined for three Sinorhizobium species showing contrasting symbiotic efficiency on soybeans. A nitrate-reduction gene cluster absent in S. sojae was found to be essential for symbiotic adaptations of S. fredii and S. sp. III. In S. fredii, the deletion mutation of the nap (nitrate reductase), instead of nir (nitrite reductase) and nor (nitric oxide reductase), led to defects in nitrogen-fixation (Fix - ). By contrast, none of these core nitrate-reduction genes were required for the symbiosis of S. sp. III. However, within the same gene cluster, the deletion of hemN1 (encoding oxygen-independent coproporphyrinogen III oxidase) in both S. fredii and S. sp. III led to the formation of nitrogen-fixing (Fix + ) but ineffective (Eff - ) nodules. These Fix + /Eff - nodules were characterized by significantly lower enzyme activity of glutamine synthetase indicating rhizobial modulation of nitrogen-assimilation by plants. A distant homologue of HemN1 from S. sojae can complement this defect in S. fredii and S. sp. III, but exhibited a more pleotropic role in symbiosis establishment. These findings highlighted the lineage-dependent optimization of symbiotic functions in different rhizobial species associated with the same host. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Interaction-dependent gene expression in Mla-specified response to barley powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldo, Rico A; Nettleton, Dan; Wise, Roger P

    2004-09-01

    Plant recognition of pathogen-derived molecules influences attack and counterattack strategies that affect the outcome of host-microbe interactions. To ascertain the global framework of host gene expression during biotrophic pathogen invasion, we analyzed in parallel the mRNA abundance of 22,792 host genes throughout 36 (genotype x pathogen x time) interactions between barley (Hordeum vulgare) and Blumeria graminis f. sp hordei (Bgh), the causal agent of powdery mildew disease. A split-split-plot design was used to investigate near-isogenic barley lines with introgressed Mla6, Mla13, and Mla1 coiled-coil, nucleotide binding site, Leu-rich repeat resistance alleles challenged with Bgh isolates 5874 (AvrMla6 and AvrMla1) and K1 (AvrMla13 and AvrMla1). A linear mixed model analysis was employed to identify genes with significant differential expression (P value < 0.0001) in incompatible and compatible barley-Bgh interactions across six time points after pathogen challenge. Twenty-two host genes, of which five were of unknown function, exhibited highly similar patterns of upregulation among all incompatible and compatible interactions up to 16 h after inoculation (hai), coinciding with germination of Bgh conidiospores and formation of appressoria. By contrast, significant divergent expression was observed from 16 to 32 hai, during membrane-to-membrane contact between fungal haustoria and host epidermal cells, with notable suppression of most transcripts identified as differentially expressed in compatible interactions. These findings provide a link between the recognition of general and specific pathogen-associated molecules in gene-for-gene specified resistance and support the hypothesis that host-specific resistance evolved from the recognition and prevention of the pathogen's suppression of plant basal defense.

  8. TBP/TFIID-dependent activation of MyoD target genes in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecova, Barbora; Dall'Agnese, Alessandra; Madaro, Luca; Gatto, Sole; Coutinho Toto, Paula; Albini, Sonia; Ryan, Tammy; Tora, Làszlò; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2016-02-25

    Change in the identity of the components of the transcription pre-initiation complex is proposed to control cell type-specific gene expression. Replacement of the canonical TFIID-TBP complex with TRF3/TBP2 was reported to be required for activation of muscle-gene expression. The lack of a developmental phenotype in TBP2 null mice prompted further analysis to determine whether TBP2 deficiency can compromise adult myogenesis. We show here that TBP2 null mice have an intact regeneration potential upon injury and that TBP2 is not expressed in established C2C12 muscle cell or in primary mouse MuSCs. While TFIID subunits and TBP are downregulated during myoblast differentiation, reduced amounts of these proteins form a complex that is detectable on promoters of muscle genes and is essential for their expression. This evidence demonstrates that TBP2 does not replace TBP during muscle differentiation, as previously proposed, with limiting amounts of TFIID-TBP being required to promote muscle-specific gene expression.

  9. Pitx2 modulates a Tbx5-dependent gene regulatory network to maintain atrial rhythm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadadur, Rangarajan D.; Broman, Michael T.; Boukens, Bastiaan; Mazurek, Stefan R.; Yang, Xinan; van den Boogaard, Malou; Bekeny, Jenna; Gadek, Margaret; Ward, Tarsha; Zhang, Min; Qiao, Yun; Martin, James F.; Seidman, Christine E.; Seidman, Jon; Christoffels, Vincent; Efimov, Igor R.; McNally, Elizabeth M.; Weber, Christopher R.; Moskowitz, Ivan P.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm is extremely robust, generating 2 billion contraction cycles during the average human life span. Transcriptional control of cardiac rhythm is poorly understood. We found that removal of the transcription factor gene Tbx5 from the adult mouse caused primary spontaneous and sustained

  10. Pitx2 modulates a Tbx5-dependent gene regulatory network to maintain atrial rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadadur, Rangarajan D; Broman, Michael T; Boukens, Bastiaan; Mazurek, Stefan R; Yang, Xinan; van den Boogaard, Malou; Bekeny, Jenna; Gadek, Margaret; Ward, Tarsha; Zhang, Min; Qiao, Yun; Martin, James F; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jon; Christoffels, Vincent; Efimov, Igor R; McNally, Elizabeth M; Weber, Christopher R; Moskowitz, Ivan P

    2016-08-31

    Cardiac rhythm is extremely robust, generating 2 billion contraction cycles during the average human life span. Transcriptional control of cardiac rhythm is poorly understood. We found that removal of the transcription factor gene Tbx5 from the adult mouse caused primary spontaneous and sustained atrial fibrillation (AF). Atrial cardiomyocytes from the Tbx5-mutant mice exhibited action potential abnormalities, including spontaneous depolarizations, which were rescued by chelating free calcium. We identified a multitiered transcriptional network that linked seven previously defined AF risk loci: TBX5 directly activated PITX2, and TBX5 and PITX2 antagonistically regulated membrane effector genes Scn5a, Gja1, Ryr2, Dsp, and Atp2a2 In addition, reduced Tbx5 dose by adult-specific haploinsufficiency caused decreased target gene expression, myocardial automaticity, and AF inducibility, which were all rescued by Pitx2 haploinsufficiency in mice. These results defined a transcriptional architecture for atrial rhythm control organized as an incoherent feed-forward loop, driven by TBX5 and modulated by PITX2. TBX5/PITX2 interplay provides tight control of atrial rhythm effector gene expression, and perturbation of the co-regulated network caused AF susceptibility. This work provides a model for the molecular mechanisms underpinning the genetic implication of multiple AF genome-wide association studies loci and will contribute to future efforts to stratify patients for AF risk by genotype. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Fusion from myoblasts to myotubes is dependent on the rolling stone gene (rost) of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paululat, A; Burchard, S; Renkawitz-Pohl, R

    1995-08-01

    The development and differentiation of the body wall musculature in Drosophila are accompanied by changes in gene expression and cellular architecture. We isolated a Drosophila gene, termed rolling stone (rost), which, when mutated, specifically blocks the fusion of mononucleated cells to myotubes in the body wall musculature. beta 3 tubulin, which is an early marker for the onset of mesoderm differentiation, is still expressed in these cells. Gastrulation and mesoderm formation, as well as the development of the epidermis and of the central and peripheral nervous systems, appear quite normal in homozygous rolling stone embryos. Embryonic development stops shortly before hatching in a P-element-induced mutant, as well as in 16 EMS-induced alleles. In mutant embryos, other mesodermal derivatives such as the visceral mesoderm and the dorsal vessel, develop fairly normally and defects are restricted to the body wall musculature. Myoblasts remain as single mononucleated cells, which express muscle myosin, showing that the developmental program of gene expression proceeds. These myoblasts occur at positions corresponding to the locations of dorsal, ventral and pleural muscles, showing that the gene rolling stone is involved in cell fusion, a process that is independent of cell migration in these mutants. This genetic analysis has set the stage for a molecular analysis to clarify where the rolling stone action is manifested in the fusion process and thus gives insight into the complex regulating network controlling the differentiation of the body wall musculature.

  12. A substrate dependent biological containment systems for Pseudomonas putida based on the Escherichia coli gef gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Ramos, J. L.; Kaneva, Z.

    1993-01-01

    operon (Pm) and the lacI gene, encoding the Lac repressor, plus xylS2, coding for a positive regulator of Pm. In liquid culture under optimal growth conditions and in sterile and nonsterile soil microcosms, P. putida KT2440 (pWWO) bearing the containment system behaves as designed. In the presence...

  13. Tissue-Specific, Development-Dependent Phenolic Compounds Accumulation Profile and Gene Expression Pattern in Tea Plant [Camellia sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Zhao, Lei; Meng, Fei; Wang, Yunsheng; Tan, Huarong; Yang, Hua; Wei, Chaoling; Wan, Xiaochun; Gao, Liping; Xia, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Phenolic compounds in tea plant [Camellia sinensis (L.)] play a crucial role in dominating tea flavor and possess a number of key pharmacological benefits on human health. The present research aimed to study the profile of tissue-specific, development-dependent accumulation pattern of phenolic compounds in tea plant. A total of 50 phenolic compounds were identified qualitatively using liquid chromatography in tandem mass spectrometry technology. Of which 29 phenolic compounds were quantified based on their fragmentation behaviors. Most of the phenolic compounds were higher in the younger leaves than that in the stem and root, whereas the total amount of proanthocyanidins were unexpectedly higher in the root. The expression patterns of 63 structural and regulator genes involved in the shikimic acid, phenylpropanoid, and flavonoid pathways were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and cluster analysis. Based on the similarity of their expression patterns, the genes were classified into two main groups: C1 and C2; and the genes in group C1 had high relative expression level in the root or low in the bud and leaves. The expression patterns of genes in C2-2-1 and C2-2-2-1 groups were probably responsible for the development-dependent accumulation of phenolic compounds in the leaves. Enzymatic analysis suggested that the accumulation of catechins was influenced simultaneously by catabolism and anabolism. Further research is recommended to know the expression patterns of various genes and the reason for the variation in contents of different compounds in different growth stages and also in different organs. PMID:23646127

  14. Tissue-specific, development-dependent phenolic compounds accumulation profile and gene expression pattern in tea plant [Camellia sinensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaolan; Liu, Yajun; Li, Weiwei; Zhao, Lei; Meng, Fei; Wang, Yunsheng; Tan, Huarong; Yang, Hua; Wei, Chaoling; Wan, Xiaochun; Gao, Liping; Xia, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Phenolic compounds in tea plant [Camellia sinensis (L.)] play a crucial role in dominating tea flavor and possess a number of key pharmacological benefits on human health. The present research aimed to study the profile of tissue-specific, development-dependent accumulation pattern of phenolic compounds in tea plant. A total of 50 phenolic compounds were identified qualitatively using liquid chromatography in tandem mass spectrometry technology. Of which 29 phenolic compounds were quantified based on their fragmentation behaviors. Most of the phenolic compounds were higher in the younger leaves than that in the stem and root, whereas the total amount of proanthocyanidins were unexpectedly higher in the root. The expression patterns of 63 structural and regulator genes involved in the shikimic acid, phenylpropanoid, and flavonoid pathways were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and cluster analysis. Based on the similarity of their expression patterns, the genes were classified into two main groups: C1 and C2; and the genes in group C1 had high relative expression level in the root or low in the bud and leaves. The expression patterns of genes in C2-2-1 and C2-2-2-1 groups were probably responsible for the development-dependent accumulation of phenolic compounds in the leaves. Enzymatic analysis suggested that the accumulation of catechins was influenced simultaneously by catabolism and anabolism. Further research is recommended to know the expression patterns of various genes and the reason for the variation in contents of different compounds in different growth stages and also in different organs.

  15. Dose and Time Dependencies in Stress Pathway Responses during Chemical Exposure: Novel Insights from Gene Regulatory Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha M. Souza

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Perturbation of biological networks is often observed during exposure to xenobiotics, and the identification of disturbed processes, their dynamic traits, and dose–response relationships are some of the current challenges for elucidating the mechanisms determining adverse outcomes. In this scenario, reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks (GRNs from expression data may provide a system-level snapshot embedded within accurate molecular events. Here, we investigate the composition of GRNs inferred from groups of chemicals with two distinct outcomes, namely carcinogenicity [azathioprine (AZA and cyclophosphamide (CYC] and drug-induced liver injury (DILI; diclofenac, nitrofurantoin, and propylthiouracil, and a non-carcinogenic/non-DILI group (aspirin, diazepam, and omeprazole. For this, we analyzed publicly available exposed in vitro human data, taking into account dose and time dependencies. Dose–Time Network Identification (DTNI was applied to gene sets from exposed primary human hepatocytes using four stress pathways, namely endoplasmic reticulum (ER, NF-κB, NRF2, and TP53. Inferred GRNs suggested case specificity, varying in interactions, starting nodes, and target genes across groups. DILI and carcinogenic compounds were shown to directly affect all pathway-based GRNs, while non-DILI/non-carcinogenic chemicals only affected NF-κB. NF-κB-based GRNs clearly illustrated group-specific disturbances, with the cancer-related casein kinase CSNK2A1 being a target gene only in the carcinogenic group, and opposite regulation of NF-κB subunits being observed in DILI and non-DILI/non-carcinogenic groups. Target genes in NRF2-based GRNs shared by DILI and carcinogenic compounds suggested markers of hepatotoxicity. Finally, we indicate several of these group-specific interactions as potentially novel. In summary, our reversed-engineered GRNs are capable of revealing dose dependent, chemical-specific mechanisms of action in stress

  16. Dopamine D1 receptor gene variation modulates opioid dependence risk by affecting transition to addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhu

    Full Text Available Dopamine D1 receptor (DRD1 modulates opioid reinforcement, reward, and opioid-induced neuroadaptation. We propose that DRD1 polymorphism affects susceptibility to opioid dependence (OD, the efficiency of transition to OD, and opioid-induced pleasure response. We analyzed potential association between seven DRD1 polymorphisms with the following traits: duration of transition from the first use to dependence (DTFUD, subjective pleasure responses to opioid on first use and post-dependence use, and OD risk in 425 Chinese with OD and 514 healthy controls. DTFUD and level of pleasure responses were examined using a semi-structured interview. The DTFUD of opioid addicts ranged from 5 days to 11 years. Most addicts (64.0% reported non-comfortable response upon first opioid use, while after dependence, most addicts (53.0% felt strong opioid-induced pleasure. Survival analysis revealed a correlation of prolonged DTFUD with the minor allele-carrying genotypes of DRD1 rs4532 (hazard ratios (HR = 0.694; p = 0.001 and rs686 (HR = 0.681, p = 0.0003. Binary logistic regression indicated that rs10063995 GT genotype (vs. GG+TT, OR = 0.261 could predict decreased pleasure response to first-time use and the minor alleles of rs686 (OR = 0.535 and rs4532 (OR = 0.537 could predict decreased post-dependence pleasure. Moreover, rs686 minor allele was associated with a decreased risk for rapid transition from initial use to dependence (DTFUD≤30 days; OR = 0.603 or post-dependence euphoria (OR = 0.603 relative to major allele. In conclusion, DRD1 rs686 minor allele decreases the OD risk by prolonging the transition to dependence and attenuating opioid-induced pleasure in Chinese.

  17. Dopamine D1 receptor gene variation modulates opioid dependence risk by affecting transition to addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Yan, Chun-xia; Wen, Yi-chong; Wang, Jiayin; Bi, Jinbo; Zhao, Ya-ling; Wei, Lai; Gao, Cheng-ge; Jia, Wei; Li, Sheng-bin

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine D1 receptor (DRD1) modulates opioid reinforcement, reward, and opioid-induced neuroadaptation. We propose that DRD1 polymorphism affects susceptibility to opioid dependence (OD), the efficiency of transition to OD, and opioid-induced pleasure response. We analyzed potential association between seven DRD1 polymorphisms with the following traits: duration of transition from the first use to dependence (DTFUD), subjective pleasure responses to opioid on first use and post-dependence use, and OD risk in 425 Chinese with OD and 514 healthy controls. DTFUD and level of pleasure responses were examined using a semi-structured interview. The DTFUD of opioid addicts ranged from 5 days to 11 years. Most addicts (64.0%) reported non-comfortable response upon first opioid use, while after dependence, most addicts (53.0%) felt strong opioid-induced pleasure. Survival analysis revealed a correlation of prolonged DTFUD with the minor allele-carrying genotypes of DRD1 rs4532 (hazard ratios (HR) = 0.694; p = 0.001) and rs686 (HR = 0.681, p = 0.0003). Binary logistic regression indicated that rs10063995 GT genotype (vs. GG+TT, OR = 0.261) could predict decreased pleasure response to first-time use and the minor alleles of rs686 (OR = 0.535) and rs4532 (OR = 0.537) could predict decreased post-dependence pleasure. Moreover, rs686 minor allele was associated with a decreased risk for rapid transition from initial use to dependence (DTFUD≤30 days; OR = 0.603) or post-dependence euphoria (OR = 0.603) relative to major allele. In conclusion, DRD1 rs686 minor allele decreases the OD risk by prolonging the transition to dependence and attenuating opioid-induced pleasure in Chinese.

  18. Changes of global gene expression and secondary metabolite accumulation during light-dependent Aspergillus nidulans development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Özgür; Feussner, Kirstin; Dumkow, Marc; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Braus, Gerhard H

    2016-02-01

    Fungal development and secondary metabolite production are coordinated by regulatory complexes as the trimeric velvet complex. Light accelerates asexual but decreases sexual development of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Changes in gene expression and secondary metabolite accumulation in response to environmental stimuli have been the focus of many studies, but a comprehensive comparison during entire development is lacking. We compared snapshots of transcript and metabolite profiles during fungal development in dark or light. Overall 2.014 genes corresponding to 19% of the genome were differentially expressed when submerged vegetative hyphae were compared to surface development. Differentiation was preferentially asexual in light or preferentially sexual connected to delayed asexual development in dark. Light induces significantly gene expression within the first 24-48h after the transfer to surfaces. Many light induced genes are also expressed in dark after a delay of up to two days, which might be required for preparation of enhanced sexual development. Darkness results in a massive transcriptional reprogramming causing a peak of lipid-derived fungal pheromone synthesis (psi factors) during early sexual development and the expression of genes for cell-wall degradation presumably to mobilize the energy for sexual differentiation. Accumulation of secondary metabolites like antitumoral terrequinone A or like emericellamide start under light conditions, whereas the mycotoxin sterigmatocystin or asperthecin and emodin appear under dark conditions during sexual development. Amino acid synthesis and pool rapidly drop after 72-96h in dark. Subsequent initiation of apoptotic cell-death pathways in darkness happens significantly later than in light. This illustrates that fungal adaptation in differentiation and secondary metabolite production to light conditions requires the reprogramming of one fifth of the potential of its genome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  19. Myocardin-dependent Activation of the CArG Box-rich Smooth Muscle γ-Actin Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiang; Taurin, Sebastien; Sethakorn, Nan; Long, Xiaochun; Imamura, Masaaki; Wang, Da-Zhi; Zimmer, Warren E.; Dulin, Nickolai O.; Miano, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor that binds a 10-bp element known as the CArG box, located in the proximal regulatory region of hundreds of target genes. SRF activates target genes in a cell- and context-dependent manner by assembling unique combinations of cofactors over CArG elements. One particularly strong SRF cofactor, myocardin (MYOCD), acts as a component of a molecular switch for smooth muscle cell (SMC) differentiation by activating cytoskeletal and contractile genes harboring SRF-binding CArG elements. Here we report that the human ACTG2 promoter, containing four conserved CArG elements, displays SMC-specific basal activity and is highly induced in the presence of MYOCD. Stable transfection of a non-SMC cell type with Myocd elicits elevations in endogenous Actg2 mRNA. Gel shift and luciferase assays reveal a strong bias for MYOCD-dependent transactivation through CArG2 of the human ACTG2 promoter. Substitution of CArG2 with other CArGs, including a consensus CArG element, fails to reconstitute full MYOCD-dependent ACTG2 promoter stimulation. Mutation of an adjacent binding site for NKX3.1 reduces MYOCD-dependent transactivation of the ACTG2 promoter. Co-immunoprecipitation, glutathione S-transferase pulldown, and luciferase assays show a physical and functional association between MYOCD and NKX3.1; no such functional relationship is evident with the related NKX2.5 transcription factor despite its interaction with MYOCD. These results demonstrate the ability of MYOCD to discriminate among several juxtaposed CArG elements, presumably through its novel partnership with NKX3.1, to optimally transactivate the human ACTG2 promoter. PMID:19797053

  20. Enhancement of cell proliferation in various mammalian cell lines by gene insertion of a cyclin-dependent kinase homolog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantopoulos Konstantinos

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomics tools, particularly DNA microarrays, have found application in a number of areas including gene discovery and disease characterization. Despite the vast utility of these tools, little work has been done to explore the basis of distinct cellular properties, especially those important to biotechnology such as growth. And so, with the intent of engineering cell lines by manipulating the expression of these genes, anchorage-independent and anchorage-dependent HeLa cells, displaying markedly different growth characteristics, were analyzed using DNA microarrays. Results Two genes, cyclin-dependent kinase like 3 (cdkl3 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit (cox15, were up-regulated in the faster growing, anchorage-independent (suspension HeLa cells relative to the slower growing, anchorage-dependent (attached HeLa cells. Enhanced expression of either gene in the attached HeLa cells resulted in elevated cell proliferation, though insertion of cdkl3 had a greater impact than that of cox15. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis indicated that cells with an insert of cdkl3 were able to transition from the G0/G1 phases to the S phase faster than control cells. In turn, expression of cox15 was seen to increase the maximum viable cell numbers achieved relative to the control, and to a greater extent than cdkl3. Quantitatively similar results were obtained with two Human Embryonic Kidney-293 (HEK-293 cell lines and a Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell line. Additionally, HEK-293 cells secreting adipocyte complement-related protein of 30 kDa (acrp30 exhibited a slight increase in specific protein production and higher total protein production in response to the insertion of either cdkl3 or cox15. Conclusion These results are consistent with previous studies on the functionalities of cdkl3 and cox15. For instance, the effect of cdkl3 on cell growth is consistent with its homology to the cdk3 gene which is involved in G1 to S phase transition

  1. RNA-seq transcriptional profiling of Leishmania amazonensis reveals an arginase-dependent gene expression regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Ide Aoki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania is a protozoan parasite that alternates its life cycle between the sand-fly vector and the mammalian host. This alternation involves environmental changes and leads the parasite to dynamic modifications in morphology, metabolism, cellular signaling and regulation of gene expression to allow for a rapid adaptation to new conditions. The L-arginine pathway in L. amazonensis is important during the parasite life cycle and interferes in the establishment and maintenance of the infection in mammalian macrophages. Host arginase is an immune-regulatory enzyme that can reduce the production of nitric oxide by activated macrophages, directing the availability of L-arginine to the polyamine pathway, resulting in parasite replication. In this work, we performed transcriptional profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in L. amazonensis wild-type (La-WT versus L. amazonensis arginase knockout (La-arg- promastigotes and axenic amastigotes.A total of 8253 transcripts were identified in La-WT and La-arg- promastigotes and axenic amastigotes, about 60% of them codifying hypothetical proteins and 443 novel transcripts, which did not match any previously annotated genes. Our RNA-seq data revealed that 85% of genes were constitutively expressed. The comparison of transcriptome and metabolome data showed lower levels of arginase and higher levels of glutamate-5-kinase in La-WT axenic amastigotes compared to promastigotes. The absence of arginase activity in promastigotes increased the levels of pyrroline 5-carboxylate reductase, but decreased the levels of arginosuccinate synthase, pyrroline 5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, acetylornithine deacetylase and spermidine synthase transcripts levels. These observations can explain previous metabolomic data pointing to the increase of L-arginine, citrulline and L-glutamate and reduction of aspartate, proline, ornithine and putrescine. Altogether, these results indicate that arginase activity is important

  2. RNA-seq transcriptional profiling of Leishmania amazonensis reveals an arginase-dependent gene expression regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Juliana Ide; Muxel, Sandra Marcia; Zampieri, Ricardo Andrade; Laranjeira-Silva, Maria Fernanda; Müller, Karl Erik; Nerland, Audun Helge; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria

    2017-10-01

    Leishmania is a protozoan parasite that alternates its life cycle between the sand-fly vector and the mammalian host. This alternation involves environmental changes and leads the parasite to dynamic modifications in morphology, metabolism, cellular signaling and regulation of gene expression to allow for a rapid adaptation to new conditions. The L-arginine pathway in L. amazonensis is important during the parasite life cycle and interferes in the establishment and maintenance of the infection in mammalian macrophages. Host arginase is an immune-regulatory enzyme that can reduce the production of nitric oxide by activated macrophages, directing the availability of L-arginine to the polyamine pathway, resulting in parasite replication. In this work, we performed transcriptional profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in L. amazonensis wild-type (La-WT) versus L. amazonensis arginase knockout (La-arg-) promastigotes and axenic amastigotes. A total of 8253 transcripts were identified in La-WT and La-arg- promastigotes and axenic amastigotes, about 60% of them codifying hypothetical proteins and 443 novel transcripts, which did not match any previously annotated genes. Our RNA-seq data revealed that 85% of genes were constitutively expressed. The comparison of transcriptome and metabolome data showed lower levels of arginase and higher levels of glutamate-5-kinase in La-WT axenic amastigotes compared to promastigotes. The absence of arginase activity in promastigotes increased the levels of pyrroline 5-carboxylate reductase, but decreased the levels of arginosuccinate synthase, pyrroline 5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, acetylornithine deacetylase and spermidine synthase transcripts levels. These observations can explain previous metabolomic data pointing to the increase of L-arginine, citrulline and L-glutamate and reduction of aspartate, proline, ornithine and putrescine. Altogether, these results indicate that arginase activity is important in Leishmania

  3. Elemental distribution in reproductive and neural organs of the Epilachna nylanderi (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a phytophage of nickel hyperaccumulator Berkheya coddii (Asterales: Asteraceae) by micro-PIXE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta; Orłowska, Elżbieta; Augustyniak, Maria; Nakonieczny, Mirosław; Tarnawska, Monika; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech; Migula, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of metal hyperaccumulation by plants is often explained by a pathogen or herbivore defense hypothesis. However, some insects feeding on metal hyperaccumulating plants are adapted to the high level of metals in plant tissues. Former studies on species that feed on the leaves of Berkheya coddii Roessler 1958 (Asteraceae), a nickel-hyperaccumulating plant, demonstrated several protective mechanisms involved in internal distribution, immobilization, and elimination of Ni from the midgut and Malpighian tubules. These species are mainly coleopterans, including the lady beetle, Epilachna nylanderi (Mulsant 1850) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), collected from the ultramafic ecosystem near Barberton in South Africa. By performing particle-induced X-ray emission microanalysis elemental microanalysis (PIXE), this study examined whether Ni may be harmful to internal body systems that decide on insect reactivity (central nervous system [CNS]), their reproduction, and the relationships between Ni and other micronutrients. Data on elemental distribution of nine selected elements in target organs of E. nylanderi were compared with the existing data for other insect species adapted to the excess of metals. Micro-PIXE maps of seven regions of the CNS showed Ni mainly in the neural connectives, while cerebral ganglia were better protected. Concentrations of other bivalent metals were lower than those of Ni. Testis, compared with other reproductive organs, showed low amounts of Ni. Zn was effectively regulated at physiological dietary levels. In insects exposed to excess dietary Zn, it was also accumulated in the reproductive organs. Comparison of E. nylanderii with other insects that ingest hyperaccumulating plants, especially chrysomelid Chrysolina clathrata (Clark) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), showed lower protection of the CNS and reproductive organs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  4. Both heavy metal-amendment of soil and aphid-infestation increase Cd and Zn concentrations in phloem exudates of a metal-hyperaccumulating plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolpe, Clemens; Giehren, Franziska; Krämer, Ute; Müller, Caroline

    2017-07-01

    Plants that are able to hyperaccumulate heavy metals show increased concentrations of these metals in their leaf tissue. However, little is known about the concentrations of heavy metals and of organic defence metabolites in the phloem sap of these plants in response to either heavy metal-amendment of the soil or biotic challenges such as aphid-infestation. In this study, we investigated the effects of heavy metal-exposure and of aphid-infestation on phloem exudate composition of the metal hyperaccumulator species Arabidopsis halleri L. O'Kane & Al-Shehbaz (Brassicaceae). The concentrations of elements and of organic defence compounds, namely glucosinolates, were measured in phloem exudates of young and old (mature) leaves of plants challenged either by amendment of the soil with cadmium and zinc and/or by an infestation with the generalist aphid Myzus persicae. Metal-amendment of the soil led to increased concentrations of Cd and Zn, but also of two other elements and one indole glucosinolate, in phloem exudates. This enhanced defence in the phloem sap of heavy metal-hyperaccumulating plants can thus potentially act as effective protection against aphids, as predicted by the elemental defence hypothesis. Aphid-infestation also caused enhanced Cd and Zn concentrations in phloem exudates. This result provides first evidence that metal-hyperaccumulating plants can increase heavy metal concentrations tissue-specifically in response to an attack by phloem-sucking herbivores. Overall, the concentrations of most elements, including the heavy metals, and glucosinolates were higher in phloem exudates of young leaves than in those of old leaves. This defence distribution highlights that the optimal defence theory, which predicts more valuable tissue to be better defended, is applicable for both inorganic and organic defences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Three LIF-dependent signatures and gene clusters with atypical expression profiles, identified by transcriptome studies in mouse ES cells and early derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummel Oliver

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse embryonic stem (ES cells remain pluripotent in vitro when grown in the presence of the cytokine Leukaemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF. Identification of LIF targets and of genes regulating the transition between pluripotent and early differentiated cells is a critical step for understanding the control of ES cell pluripotency. Results By gene profiling studies carried out with mRNAs from ES cells and their early derivatives treated or not with LIF, we have identified i LIF-dependent genes, highly expressed in pluripotent cells, whose expression level decreases sharply upon LIF withdrawal [Pluri genes], ii LIF induced genes [Lifind genes] whose expression is differentially regulated depending upon cell context and iii genes specific to the reversible or irreversible committed states. In addition, by hierarchical gene clustering, we have identified, among eight independent gene clusters, two atypical groups of genes, whose expression level was highly modulated in committed cells only. Computer based analyses led to the characterization of different sub-types of Pluri and Lifind genes, and revealed their differential modulation by Oct4 or Nanog master genes. Individual knock down of a selection of Pluri and Lifind genes leads to weak changes in the expression of early differentiation markers, in cell growth conditions in which these master genes are still expressed. Conclusion We have identified different sets of LIF-regulated genes depending upon the cell state (reversible or irreversible commitment, which allowed us to present a novel global view of LIF responses. We are also reporting on the identification of genes whose expression is strictly regulated during the commitment step. Furthermore, our studies identify sub-networks of genes with a restricted expression in pluripotent ES cells, whose down regulation occurs while the master knot (composed of OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG is still expressed and which might be down

  6. Interaction of G-protein βγ complex with chromatin modulates GPCR-dependent gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anushree Bhatnagar

    Full Text Available Heterotrimeric G-protein signal transduction initiated by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs in the plasma membrane is thought to propagate through protein-protein interactions of subunits, Gα and Gβγ in the cytosol. In this study, we show novel nuclear functions of Gβγ through demonstrating interaction of Gβ(2 with integral components of chromatin and effects of Gβ(2 depletion on global gene expression. Agonist activation of several GPCRs including the angiotensin II type 1 receptor specifically augmented Gβ(2 levels in the nucleus and Gβ(2 interacted with specific nucleosome core histones and transcriptional modulators. Depletion of Gβ(2 repressed the basal and angiotensin II-dependent transcriptional activities of myocyte enhancer factor 2. Gβ(2 interacted with a sequence motif that was present in several transcription factors, whose genome-wide binding accounted for the Gβ(2-dependent regulation of approximately 2% genes. These findings suggest a wide-ranging mechanism by which direct interaction of Gβγ with specific chromatin bound transcription factors regulates functional gene networks in response to GPCR activation in cells.

  7. Mutational analysis of the mycobacteriophage BPs promoter PR reveals context-dependent sequences for mycobacterial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Lauren M; Hatfull, Graham F

    2014-10-01

    The PR promoter of mycobacteriophage BPs directs early lytic gene expression and is under the control of the BPs repressor, gp33. Reporter gene fusions showed that PR has modest activity in an extrachromosomal context but has activity that is barely detectable in an integrated context, even in the absence of its repressor. Mutational dissection of PR showed that it uses a canonical -10 hexamer recognized by SigA, and mutants with mutations to the sequence 5'-TATAMT had the greatest activities. It does not contain a 5'-TGN-extended -10 sequence, although mutants with mutations creating an extended -10 sequence had substantially increased promoter activity. Mutations in the -35 hexamer also influenced promoter activity but were strongly context dependent, and similar substitutions in the -35 hexamer differentially affected promoter activity, depending on the -10 and extended -10 motifs. This warrants caution in the construction of synthetic promoters or the bioinformatic prediction of promoter activity. Combinations of mutations throughout PR generated a calibrated series of promoters for expression of stably integrated recombinant genes in both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis, with maximal promoter activity being more than 2-fold that of the strong hsp60 promoter. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. The Gene Regulatory Network of Lens Induction Is Wired through Meis-Dependent Shadow Enhancers of Pax6.

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    Barbora Antosova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lens induction is a classical developmental model allowing investigation of cell specification, spatiotemporal control of gene expression, as well as how transcription factors are integrated into highly complex gene regulatory networks (GRNs. Pax6 represents a key node in the gene regulatory network governing mammalian lens induction. Meis1 and Meis2 homeoproteins are considered as essential upstream regulators of Pax6 during lens morphogenesis based on their interaction with the ectoderm enhancer (EE located upstream of Pax6 transcription start site. Despite this generally accepted regulatory pathway, Meis1-, Meis2- and EE-deficient mice have surprisingly mild eye phenotypes at placodal stage of lens development. Here, we show that simultaneous deletion of Meis1 and Meis2 in presumptive lens ectoderm results in arrested lens development in the pre-placodal stage, and neither lens placode nor lens is formed. We found that in the presumptive lens ectoderm of Meis1/Meis2 deficient embryos Pax6 expression is absent. We demonstrate using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP that in addition to EE, Meis homeoproteins bind to a remote, ultraconserved SIMO enhancer of Pax6. We further show, using in vivo gene reporter analyses, that the lens-specific activity of SIMO enhancer is dependent on the presence of three Meis binding sites, phylogenetically conserved from man to zebrafish. Genetic ablation of EE and SIMO enhancers demostrates their requirement for lens induction and uncovers an apparent redundancy at early stages of lens development. These findings identify a genetic requirement for Meis1 and Meis2 during the early steps of mammalian eye development. Moreover, they reveal an apparent robustness in the gene regulatory mechanism whereby two independent "shadow enhancers" maintain critical levels of a dosage-sensitive gene, Pax6, during lens induction.

  9. Cellular phenotype-dependent and -independent effects of vitamin C on the renewal and gene expression of mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Ming Kuo

    Full Text Available Vitamin C has been shown to delay the cellular senescence and was considered a candidate for chemoprevention and cancer therapy. To understand the reported contrasting roles of vitamin C: growth-promoting in the primary cells and growth-inhibiting in cancer cells, primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF and their isogenic spontaneously immortalized fibroblasts with unlimited cell division potential were used as the model pair. We used microarray gene expression profiling to show that the immortalized MEF possess human cancer gene expression fingerprints including a pattern of up-regulation of inflammatory response-related genes. Using the MEF model, we found that a physiological treatment level of vitamin C (10(-5 M, but not other unrelated antioxidants, enhanced cell growth. The growth-promoting effect was associated with a pattern of enhanced expression of cell cycle- and cell division-related genes in both primary and immortalized cells. In the immortalized MEF, physiological treatment levels of vitamin C also enhanced the expression of immortalization-associated genes including a down-regulation of genes in the extracellular matrix functional category. In contrast, confocal immunofluorescence imaging of the primary MEF suggested an increase in collagen IV protein upon vitamin C treatment. Similar to the cancer cells, the growth-inhibitory effect of the redox-active form of vitamin C was preferentially observed in immortalized MEF. All effects of vitamin C required its intracellular presence since the transporter-deficient SVCT2-/- MEF did not respond to vitamin C. SVCT2-/- MEF divided and became immortalized readily indicating little dependence on vitamin C for the cell division. Immortalized SVCT2-/- MEF required higher concentration of vitamin C for the growth inhibition compared to the immortalized wildtype MEF suggesting an intracellular vitamin C toxicity. The relevance of our observation in aging and human cancer prevention was

  10. Natural Variation in the VELVET Gene bcvel1 Affects Virulence and Light-Dependent Differentiation in Botrytis cinerea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Julia; Pradier, Jean-Marc; Simon, Adeline; Traeger, Stefanie; Moraga, Javier; Collado, Isidro González; Viaud, Muriel; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is an aggressive plant pathogen causing gray mold disease on various plant species. In this study, we identified the genetic origin for significantly differing phenotypes of the two sequenced B. cinerea isolates, B05.10 and T4, with regard to light-dependent differentiation, oxalic acid (OA) formation and virulence. By conducting a map-based cloning approach we identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in an open reading frame encoding a VELVET gene (bcvel1). The SNP in isolate T4 results in a truncated protein that is predominantly found in the cytosol in contrast to the full-length protein of isolate B05.10 that accumulates in the nuclei. Deletion of the full-length gene in B05.10 resulted in the T4 phenotype, namely light-independent conidiation, loss of sclerotial development and oxalic acid production, and reduced virulence on several host plants. These findings indicate that the identified SNP represents a loss-of-function mutation of bcvel1. In accordance, the expression of the B05.10 copy in T4 rescued the wild-type/B05.10 phenotype. BcVEL1 is crucial for full virulence as deletion mutants are significantly hampered in killing and decomposing plant tissues. However, the production of the two best known secondary metabolites, the phytotoxins botcinic acid and botrydial, are not affected by the deletion of bcvel1 indicating that other factors are responsible for reduced virulence. Genome-wide expression analyses of B05.10- and Δbcvel1-infected plant material revealed a number of genes differentially expressed in the mutant: while several protease- encoding genes are under-expressed in Δbcvel1 compared to the wild type, the group of over-expressed genes is enriched for genes encoding sugar, amino acid and ammonium transporters and glycoside hydrolases reflecting the response of Δbcvel1 mutants to nutrient starvation conditions. PMID:23118899

  11. Models of Aire-dependent gene regulation for thymic negative selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina eDanso-Abeam

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE gene lead to Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy Syndrome type 1 (APS1, characterized by the development of multi-organ autoimmune damage. The mechanism by which defects in AIRE result in autoimmunity has been the subject of intense scrutiny. At the cellular level, the working model explains most of the clinical and immunological characteristics of APS1, with AIRE driving the expression of tissue restricted antigens (TRAs in the epithelial cells of the thymic medulla. This TRA expression results in effective negative selection of TRA-reactive thymocytes, preventing autoimmune disease. At the molecular level, the mechanism by which AIRE initiates TRA expression in the thymic medulla remains unclear. Multiple different models for the molecular mechanism have been proposed, ranging from classical transcriptional activity, to random induction of gene expression, to epigenetic tag recognition effect, to altered cell biology. In this review, we evaluate each of these models and discuss their relative strengths and weaknesses.

  12. Cre-dependent selection yields AAV variants for widespread gene transfer to the adult brain

    OpenAIRE

    Deverman, Benjamin E.; Pravdo, Piers L.; Simpson, Bryan P.; Kumar, Sripriya Ravindra; Chan, Ken Y.; Banerjee, Abhik; Wu, Wei-Li; Yang, Bin; Huber, Nina; Pasca, Sergiu P.; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) are commonly used vehicles for in vivo gene transfer 1-6 . However, the tropism repertoire of naturally occurring AAVs is limited, prompting a search for novel AAV capsids with desired characteristics 7-13 . Here we describe a capsid selection method, called Cre-recombination-based AAV targeted evolution (CREATE), that enables the development of AAV capsids that more efficiently transduce defined Cre-expressing cell populations in vivo. We use CREA...

  13. Models of Aire-Dependent Gene Regulation for Thymic Negative Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Danso-Abeam, Dina; Humblet-Baron, Stephanie; Dooley, James; Liston, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene lead to autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1 (APS1), characterized by the development of multi-organ autoimmune damage. The mechanism by which defects in AIRE result in autoimmunity has been the subject of intense scrutiny. At the cellular level, the working model explains most of the clinical and immunological characteristics of APS1, with AIRE driving the expression of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in the epithelial cells of the...

  14. Novel genes involved in pathophysiology of gonadotropin-dependent adrenal tumors in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doroszko, Milena; Chrusciel, Marcin; Belling, Kirstine González-Izarzugaza

    2017-01-01

    reported Gata4 and Lhcgr, we found up-regulated Esr1, Prlr-rs1, and down-regulated Grb10, Mmp24, Sgcd, Rerg, Gnas, Nfatc2, Gnrhr, Igf2 in inhα/Tag adrenal tumors. Sex-steroidogenic enzyme genes expression (Srd5a1, Cyp19a1) was up-regulated in tumors, but adrenal-specific steroidogenic enzyme (Cyp21a1, Cyp......11b1, Cyp11b2) down-regulated. We localized novel Lhcgr transcripts in adrenal cortex parenchyma and in non-steroidogenic A cells, in GDX WT and in intact WT mice. We identified up-regulated Esr1 as a potential novel biomarker of gonadectomy-induced adrenocortical tumors in inhα/Tag mice presenting...... with an inverted adrenal-to-gonadal steroidogenic gene expression profile. A putative normal adrenal remodeling or tumor suppressor role of the down-regulated genes (e.g. Grb10, Rerg, Gnas, and Nfatc2) in the tumors remains to be addressed....

  15. Growth-phase-dependent gene expression profiling of poplar (Populus alba x Populus tremula var. glandulosa) suspension cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoshin; Bae, Eun-Kyung; Park, So-Young; Sjödin, Andreas; Lee, Jae-Soon; Noh, Eun-Woon; Jansson, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    Complex sequences of morphological and biochemical changes occur during the developmental course of a batch plant cell culture. However, little information is available about the changes in gene expression that could explain these changes, because of the difficulties involved in isolating specific cellular events or developmental phases in the overlapping phases of cell growth. In an attempt to obtain such information we have examined the global growth phase-dependent gene expression of poplar cells in suspension cultures by cDNA microarray analysis. Our results reveal that significant changes occur in the expression of genes with functions related to protein synthesis, cell cycling, hormonal responses and cell wall biosynthesis, as cultures progress from initiation to senescence, that are highly correlated with observed developmental and physiological changes in the cells. Genes encoding protein kinases, calmodulin and proteins involved in both ascorbate metabolism and water-limited stress responses also showed strong stage-specific expression patterns. Our report provides fundamental information on molecular mechanisms that control cellular changes throughout the developmental course of poplar cell cultures.

  16. RAP-PCR fingerprinting reveals time-dependent expression of development-related genes following differentiation process of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tianpei; Yu, Xiaomin; Gelbič, Ivan; Guan, Xiong

    2015-09-01

    Gene expression profiles are important data to reveal the functions of genes putatively involved in crucial biological processes. RNA arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (RAP-PCR) and specifically primed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were combined to screen differentially expressed genes following development of a commercial Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain 8010 (serotype 3a3b). Six differentially expressed transcripts (RAP1 to RAP6) were obtained. RAP1 encoded a putative triple helix repeat-containing collagen or an exosporium protein H related to spore pathogenicity. RAP2 was homologous to a ClpX protease and an ATP-dependent protease La (LonB), which likely acted as virulence factors. RAP3 was homologous to a beta subunit of propionyl-CoA carboxylase required for the development of Myxococcus xanthus. RAP4 had homology to a quinone oxidoreductase involved in electron transport and ATP formation. RAP5 showed significant homology to a uridine kinase that mediates phosphorylation of uridine and azauridine. RAP6 shared high sequence identity with 3-methyl-2-oxobutanoate-hydroxymethyltransferase (also known as ketopantoate hydroxymethyltransferase or PanB) involved in the operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The findings described here would help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation process of B. thuringiensis and unravel novel pathogenic genes.

  17. A Rabbit Model for Testing Helper-Dependent Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Therapy for Vein Graft Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianxiang Bi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery bypass vein grafts are a mainstay of therapy for human atherosclerosis. Unfortunately, the long-term patency of vein grafts is limited by accelerated atherosclerosis. Gene therapy, directed at the vein graft wall, is a promising approach for preventing vein graft atherosclerosis. Because helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd efficiently transduces grafted veins and confers long-term transgene expression, HDAd is an excellent candidate for delivery of vein graft-targeted gene therapy. We developed a model of vein graft atherosclerosis in fat-fed rabbits and demonstrated long-term (≥20 weeks persistence of HDAd genomes after graft transduction. This model enables quantitation of vein graft hemodynamics, wall structure, lipid accumulation, cellularity, vector persistence, and inflammatory markers on a single graft. Time-course experiments identified 12 weeks after transduction as an optimal time to measure efficacy of gene therapy on the critical variables of lipid and macrophage accumulation. We also used chow-fed rabbits to test whether HDAd infusion in vein grafts promotes intimal growth and inflammation. HDAd did not increase intimal growth, but had moderate—yet significant—pro-inflammatory effects. The vein graft atherosclerosis model will be useful for testing HDAd-mediated gene therapy; however, pro-inflammatory effects of HdAd remain a concern in developing HDAd as a therapy for vein graft disease.

  18. METABOLIC PARAMETERS CONCENTRATIONS IN BLOOD SERUM OF CZECH PIED BULLS DEPENDING ON SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISM OF LEPTIN GENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Pavlík

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to test hypothesis, that the leptin gene single nucleotide polymorphism (C/T giving missense mutation (Arg25Cys has an effect on concentration of blood serum total cholesterol, beta-hydroxybutyrate and urea in cattle. The experiment were performed in 58 Czech Pied bulls at 240 ± 9 days of age, which were divided in three experimental groups depending on different leptin genotypes (CC, n=28; CT, n=21; TT, n=9. Resulting genotypes in the exon 2 were CC (48.3%, CT (36.2%, and TT (15.5%. There were no differences in serum total cholesterol, urea, beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations among the genotypes. Based on our results we may assume that analysed SNP of leptin gene have no effect on nutritional status and energy balance in fattened cattle.

  19. TSHZ1-dependent gene regulation is essential for olfactory bulb development and olfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ragancokova, D.; Rocca, E.; Oonk, A.M.M.; Schulz, H.; Rohde, E.; Bednarsch, J.; Feenstra, I.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Wende, H.; Garratt, A.N.

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) receives odor information from the olfactory epithelium and relays this to the olfactory cortex. Using a mouse model, we found that development and maturation of OB interneurons depends on the zinc finger homeodomain factor teashirt zinc finger family member 1 (TSHZ1). In

  20. Copy-number and gene dependency analysis reveals partial copy loss of wild-type SF3B1 as a novel cancer vulnerability. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer, and results in widespread somatic copy number alterations. We used a genome-scale shRNA viability screen in human cancer cell lines to systematically identify genes that are essential in the context of particular copy-number alterations (copy-number associated gene dependencies). The most enriched class of copy-number associated gene dependencies was CYCLOPS (Copy-number alterations Yielding Cancer Liabilities Owing to Partial losS) genes, and spliceosome components were the most prevalent.

  1. Two mechanisms for putrescine-dependent transcriptional expression of the putrescine aminotransferase gene, ygjG, in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Sik; Shin, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2014-09-01

    In this study, on evaluating the physiological function and mechanism of putrescine, we found that putrescine supplementation (1 mM) increases transcription of the putrescine aminotransferase gene, ygjG. Putrescine-dependent expression was confirmed by measuring β-galactosidase activity and with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. To understand the role of putrescine in ygjG expression, we genetically characterized and found that a knockout mutation in an alternative sigma factor, rpoS, abolished putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression. In the rpoS mutant, RpoS overexpression complemented the mutant phenotype. However, RpoS overexpression induced ygjG-lacZ expression with putrescine supplementation but not without supplementation. We also found that the loss of putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression induced by rpoS was completely restored under nitrogen-starvation conditions. The putrescine-dependent expression of ygjG-lacZ under this condition was clearly dependent on another alternative sigma factor, rpoN, and its cognate activator ntrC. These results show that rpoS is required for putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression, but the effect of putrescine on this expression is not caused by simple modulation of RpoS synthesis. Putrescine-dependent expression of ygjG-lacZ was controlled by at least two sigma factors: rpoS under excess nitrogen conditions and rpoN under nitrogen-starvation conditions. These results suggest that putrescine plays an important role in the nitrogen regulation system.

  2. The age dependency of gene expression for plasma lipids, lipoproteins, and apolipoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snieder, H.; Doornen, L.J.P. van; Boomsma, D.I. [Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and disentangle the genetic and nongenetic causes of stability and change in lipids and (apo)lipoproteins that occur during the lifespan. Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides, apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1), apolipoprotein B (ApoB), and lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) were measured in a group of 160 middle-aged parents and their twin offspring (first project) and in a group of 203 middle-aged twin pairs (second project). Combining the data of both projects enabled the estimation of the extent to which measured lipid parameters are influenced by different genes in adolescence and adulthood. To that end, an extended quantitative genetic model was specified, which allowed the estimation of heritabilities for each sex and generation separately. Heritabilities were similar for both sexes and both generations. Larger variances in the parental generation could be ascribed to proportional increases in both unique environmental and additive genetic variance from childhood to adulthood, which led to similar heritability estimates in adolescent and middle-aged twins. Although the magnitudes of heritabilities were similar across generations, results showed that, for total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, and LDL, partly different genes are expressed in adolescence compared to adulthood. For triglycerides, only 46% of the genetic variance was common to both age groups; for total cholesterol this was 80%. Intermediate values were found for HDL (66%) and LDL (76%). For ApoA1, ApoB, and Lp(a), the same genes seem to act in both generations. 56 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. The mammalian cervical vertebrae blueprint depends on the T (brachyury) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromik, Andreas; Ulrich, Reiner; Kusenda, Marian; Tipold, Andrea; Stein, Veronika M; Hellige, Maren; Dziallas, Peter; Hadlich, Frieder; Widmann, Philipp; Goldammer, Tom; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Rehage, Jürgen; Segelke, Dierck; Weikard, Rosemarie; Kühn, Christa

    2015-03-01

    A key common feature all but three known mammalian genera is the strict seven cervical vertebrae blueprint, suggesting the involvement of strong conserving selection forces during mammalian radiation. This is further supported by reports indicating that children with cervical ribs die before they reach reproductive age. Hypotheses were put up, associating cervical ribs (homeotic transformations) to embryonal cancer (e.g., neuroblastoma) or ascribing the constraint in cervical vertebral count to the development of the mammalian diaphragm. Here, we describe a spontaneous mutation c.196A > G in the Bos taurus T gene (also known as brachyury) associated with a cervical vertebral homeotic transformation that violates the fundamental mammalian cervical blueprint, but does not preclude reproduction of the affected individual. Genome-wide mapping, haplotype tracking within a large pedigree, resequencing of target genome regions, and bioinformatic analyses unambiguously confirmed the mutant c.196G allele as causal for this previously unknown defect termed vertebral and spinal dysplasia (VSD) by providing evidence for the mutation event. The nonsynonymous VSD mutation is located within the highly conserved T box of the T gene, which plays a fundamental role in eumetazoan body organization and vertebral development. To our knowledge, VSD is the first unequivocally approved spontaneous mutation decreasing cervical vertebrae number in a large mammal. The spontaneous VSD mutation in the bovine T gene is the first in vivo evidence for the hypothesis that the T protein is directly involved in the maintenance of the mammalian seven-cervical vertebra blueprint. It therefore furthers our knowledge of the T-protein function and early mammalian notochord development. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. Nidogen-1 regulates laminin-1-dependent mammary-specific gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujuguet, Philippe; Simian, Marina; Liaw, Jane; Timpl, Rupert; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J..

    2000-02-01

    Nidogen-1 (entactin) acts as a bridge between the extracellular matrix molecules laminin-1 and type IV collagen, and thus participates in the assembly of basement membranes. To investigate the role of nidogen-1 in regulating cell-type-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium, we designed a culture microecosystem in which each component, including epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, lactogenic hormones and extracellular matrix, could be controlled. We found that primary and established mesenchymal and myoepithelial cells synthesized and secreted nidogen-1, whereas expression was absent in primary and established epithelial cells. In an epithelial cell line containing mesenchymal cells, nidogen-1 was produced by the mesenchymal cells but deposited between the epithelial cells. In this mixed culture, mammary epithelial cells express b-casein in the presence of lactogenic hormones. Addition of either laminin-1 plus nidogen-1, or laminin-1 alone to mammary epithelial cells induced b- casein production. We asked whether recombinant nidogen-1 alone could signal directly for b-casein. Nidogen-1 did not induce b-casein synthesis in epithelial cells, but it augmented the inductive capacity of laminin-1. These data suggest that nidogen-1 can cooperate with laminin-1 to regulate b-casein expression. Addition of full length nidogen-1 to the mixed cultures had no effect on b-casein gene expression; however, a nidogen-1 fragment containing the laminin-1 binding domain, but lacking the type IV collagen-binding domain, had a dominant negative effect on b-casein expression. These data point to a physiological role for nidogen-1 in the basement membrane-induced gene expression by epithelial cells.

  5. Interleukin-6 upregulates paraoxonase 1 gene expression via an AKT/NF-κB-dependent pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chi-Chih [Department of Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Chi-Mei [Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chiu-Yuan [Graduate Institute of Natural Healing Sciences, Nanhua University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Chen, Tzu-Hsiu, E-mail: hsiu@mail.chna.edu.tw [Department of Health and Nutrition, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Shih-Lan, E-mail: h2326@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chi Nan University, Puli, Nantou, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •IL-6 could induce PON1 gene expression. •IL-6 increased NF-κB protein expression and NF-κB-p50 and -p65 subunits nuclear translocation. •IL-6-induced PON1 up-regulation was through an AKT/NF-κB pathway. -- Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and atherosclerosis-related inflammation. In this study, human hepatoma HepG2 cell line was used as a hepatocyte model to examine the effects of the pro-inflammatory cytokines on PON1 expression. The results showed that IL-6, but not TNF-α and IL-1β, significantly increased both the function and protein level of PON1; data from real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that the IL-6-induced PON1 expression occurred at the transcriptional level. Increase of IκB kinase activity and IκB phosphorylation, and reduction of IκB protein level were also observed in IL-6-treated HepG2 cells compared with untreated culture. This event was accompanied by increase of NF-κB-p50 and -p65 nuclear translocation. Moreover, treatment with IL-6 augmented the DNA binding activity of NF-κB. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activation by PDTC and BAY 11-7082, markedly suppressed the IL-6-mediated PON1 expression. In addition, IL-6 increased the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase B (PKB, AKT). An AKT inhibitor LY294002 effectively suppressed IKK/IκB/NF-κB signaling and PON1 gene expression induced by IL-6. Our findings demonstrate that IL-6 upregulates PON1 gene expression through an AKT/NF-κB signaling axis in human hepatocyte-derived HepG2 cell line.

  6. Chilling-dependent release of seed and bud dormancy in peach associates to common changes in gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Leida

    Full Text Available Reproductive meristems and embryos display dormancy mechanisms in specialized structures named respectively buds and seeds that arrest the growth of perennial plants until environmental conditions are optimal for survival. Dormancy shows common physiological features in buds and seeds. A genotype-specific period of chilling is usually required to release dormancy by molecular mechanisms that are still poorly understood. In order to find common transcriptional pathways associated to dormancy release, we analyzed the chilling-dependent expression in embryos of certain genes that were previously found related to dormancy in flower buds of peach. We propose the presence of short and long-term dormancy events affecting respectively the germination rate and seedling development by independent mechanisms. Short periods of chilling seem to improve germination in an abscisic acid-dependent manner, whereas the positive effect of longer cold treatments on physiological dwarfing coincides with the accumulation of phenylpropanoids in the seed.

  7. Chilling-Dependent Release of Seed and Bud Dormancy in Peach Associates to Common Changes in Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbona, Vicent; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Llácer, Gerardo; Badenes, María Luisa; Ríos, Gabino

    2012-01-01

    Reproductive meristems and embryos display dormancy mechanisms in specialized structures named respectively buds and seeds that arrest the growth of perennial plants until environmental conditions are optimal for survival. Dormancy shows common physiological features in buds and seeds. A genotype-specific period of chilling is usually required to release dormancy by molecular mechanisms that are still poorly understood. In order to find common transcriptional pathways associated to dormancy release, we analyzed the chilling-dependent expression in embryos of certain genes that were previously found related to dormancy in flower buds of peach. We propose the presence of short and long-term dormancy events affecting respectively the germination rate and seedling development by independent mechanisms. Short periods of chilling seem to improve germination in an abscisic acid-dependent manner, whereas the positive effect of longer cold treatments on physiological dwarfing coincides with the accumulation of phenylpropanoids in the seed. PMID:22590512

  8. TIEG1-null tenocytes display age-dependent differences in their gene expression, adhesion, spreading and proliferation properties

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    Haddad, Oualid; Gumez, Laurie [Laboratoire de Biomecanique et Bioingenierie UMR CNRS 6600, Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Compiegne (France); Hawse, John R.; Subramaniam, Malayannan; Spelsberg, Thomas C. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Bensamoun, Sabine F., E-mail: sabine.bensamoun@utc.fr [Laboratoire de Biomecanique et Bioingenierie UMR CNRS 6600, Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Compiegne (France)

    2011-07-15

    The remodeling of extracellular matrix is a crucial mechanism in tendon development and the proliferation of fibroblasts is a key factor in this process. The purpose of this study was to further elucidate the role of TIEG1 in mediating important tenocyte properties throughout the aging process. Wildtype and TIEG1 knockout tenocytes adhesion, spreading and proliferation were characterized on different substrates (fibronectin, collagen type I, gelatin and laminin) and the expression levels of various genes known to be involved with tendon development were analyzed by RT-PCR. The experiments revealed age-dependent and substrate-dependent properties for both wildtype and TIEG1 knockout tenocytes. Taken together, our results indicate an important role for TIEG1 in regulating tenocytes adhesion, spreading, and proliferation throughout the aging process. Understanding the basic mechanisms of TIEG1 in tenocytes may provide valuable information for treating multiple tendon disorders.

  9. Light-quality and temperature-dependent CBF14 gene expression modulates freezing tolerance in cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Aliz; Boldizsár, Ákos; Ádám, Éva; Kozma-Bognár, László; Majláth, Imre; Båga, Monica; Tóth, Balázs; Chibbar, Ravindra; Galiba, Gábor

    2016-03-01

    C-repeat binding factor 14 (CBF14) is a plant transcription factor that regulates a set of cold-induced genes, contributing to enhanced frost tolerance during cold acclimation. Many CBF genes are induced by cool temperatures and regulated by day length and light quality, which affect the amount of accumulated freezing tolerance. Here we show that a low red to far-red ratio in white light enhances CBF14 expression and increases frost tolerance at 15°C in winter Triticum aesitivum and Hordeum vulgare genotypes, but not in T. monococcum (einkorn), which has a relatively low freezing tolerance. Low red to far-red ratio enhances the expression of PHYA in all three species, but induces PHYB expression only in einkorn. Based on our results, a model is proposed to illustrate the supposed positive effect of phytochrome A and the negative influence of phytochrome B on the enhancement of freezing tolerance in cereals in response to spectral changes of incident light. CBF-regulon, barley, cereals, cold acclimation, freezing tolerance, light regulation, low red/far-red ratio, phytochrome, wheat. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. PITX2-dependent gene regulation in atrial fibrillation and rhythm control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, Fahima; Kirchhof, Paulus; Fabritz, Larissa

    2017-06-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia. Better prevention and treatment of AF are needed to reduce AF-associated morbidity and mortality. There are several major mechanisms that cause AF in patients, including a genetic predisposition to develop AF. Genome-wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with AF populations, with the strongest hits clustering on chromosome 4q25, close to the gene for the homeobox transcription factor PITX2. The effect of these common gene variants on cardiac PITX2 mRNA is currently under study. PITX2 protein regulates right-left differentiation of the embryonic heart, thorax and aorta. PITX2 is expressed in the adult left atrium, but much less so in other heart chambers. Pitx2 deficiency results in electrical and structural remodelling, and impaired repair of the heart in murine models, all of which may influence AF through divergent mechanisms. PITX2 levels and single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 4q25 may also be a predictor of the effectiveness of anti-arrhythmic drug therapy. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  11. PITX2‐dependent gene regulation in atrial fibrillation and rhythm control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, Fahima; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia. Better prevention and treatment of AF are needed to reduce AF‐associated morbidity and mortality. There are several major mechanisms that cause AF in patients, including a genetic predisposition to develop AF. Genome‐wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with AF populations, with the strongest hits clustering on chromosome 4q25, close to the gene for the homeobox transcription factor PITX2. The effect of these common gene variants on cardiac PITX2 mRNA is currently under study. PITX2 protein regulates right–left differentiation of the embryonic heart, thorax and aorta. PITX2 is expressed in the adult left atrium, but much less so in other heart chambers. Pitx2 deficiency results in electrical and structural remodelling, and impaired repair of the heart in murine models, all of which may influence AF through divergent mechanisms. PITX2 levels and single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 4q25 may also be a predictor of the effectiveness of anti‐arrhythmic drug therapy. PMID:28217939

  12. Nucleotide Pool Depletion Induces G-Quadruplex-Dependent Perturbation of Gene Expression

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    Charikleia Papadopoulou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide pool imbalance has been proposed to drive genetic instability in cancer. Here, we show that slowing replication forks by depleting nucleotide pools with hydroxyurea (HU can also give rise to both transient and permanent epigenetic instability of a reporter locus, BU-1, in DT40 cells. HU induces stochastic formation of Bu-1low variants in dividing cells, which have lost the H3K4me3 present in untreated cells. This instability is potentiated by an intragenic G quadruplex, which also promotes local H2Ax phosphorylation and transient heterochromatinization. Genome-wide, gene expression changes induced by HU significantly overlap with those resulting from loss of the G4-helicases FANCJ, WRN, and BLM. Thus, the effects of global replication stress induced by nucleotide pool depletion can be focused by local replication impediments caused by G quadruplex formation to induce epigenetic instability and changes in gene expression, a mechanism that may contribute to selectable transcriptional changes in cancer.

  13. Cre-dependent selection yields AAV variants for widespread gene transfer to the adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deverman, Benjamin E; Pravdo, Piers L; Simpson, Bryan P; Kumar, Sripriya Ravindra; Chan, Ken Y; Banerjee, Abhik; Wu, Wei-Li; Yang, Bin; Huber, Nina; Pasca, Sergiu P; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2016-02-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) are commonly used vehicles for in vivo gene transfer. However, the tropism repertoire of naturally occurring AAVs is limited, prompting a search for novel AAV capsids with desired characteristics. Here we describe a capsid selection method, called Cre recombination-based AAV targeted evolution (CREATE), that enables the development of AAV capsids that more efficiently transduce defined Cre-expressing cell populations in vivo. We use CREATE to generate AAV variants that efficiently and widely transduce the adult mouse central nervous system (CNS) after intravenous injection. One variant, AAV-PHP.B, transfers genes throughout the CNS with an efficiency that is at least 40-fold greater than that of the current standard, AAV9 (refs. 14,15,16,17), and transduces the majority of astrocytes and neurons across multiple CNS regions. In vitro, it transduces human neurons and astrocytes more efficiently than does AAV9, demonstrating the potential of CREATE to produce customized AAV vectors for biomedical applications.

  14. Dietary protein intake affects expression of genes for lipid metabolism in porcine skeletal muscle in a genotype-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; He, Lingyun; Tan, Bie; Deng, Jinping; Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Yinghui; Geng, Meimei; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-04-14

    Skeletal muscle is a major site for the oxidation of fatty acids (FA) in mammals, including humans. Using a swine model, we tested the hypothesis that dietary protein intake regulates the expression of key genes for lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. A total of ninety-six barrows (forty-eight pure-bred Bama mini-pigs (fatty genotype) and forty-eight Landrace pigs (lean genotype)) were fed from 5 weeks of age to market weight. Pigs of fatty or lean genotype were randomly assigned to one of two dietary treatments (low- or adequate-protein diet), with twenty-four individually fed pigs per treatment. Our data showed that dietary protein levels affected the expression of genes involved in the anabolism and catabolism of lipids in the longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles in a genotype-dependent manner. Specifically, Bama mini-pigs had more intramuscular fat, SFA and MUFA, as well as elevated mRNA expression levels of lipogenic genes, compared with Landrace pigs. In contrast, Bama mini-pigs had lower mRNA expression levels of lipolytic genes than Landrace pigs fed an adequate-protein diet in the growing phase. These data are consistent with higher white-fat deposition in Bama mini-pigs than in Landrace pigs. In conclusion, adequate provision of dietary protein (amino acids) plays an important role in regulating the expression of key lipogenic genes, and the growth of white adipose tissue, in a genotype- and tissue-specific manner. These findings have important implications for developing novel dietary strategies in pig production.

  15. Selection-, age-, and exercise-dependence of skeletal muscle gene expression patterns in a rat model of metabolic fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yu-Yu; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Qi, Nathan R; Treutelaar, Mary K; Burant, Charles F; Li, Jun Z

    2016-11-01

    Intrinsic aerobic exercise capacity can influence many complex traits including obesity and aging. To study this connection we established two rat lines by divergent selection of untrained aerobic capacity. After 32 generations the high capacity runners (HCR) and low capacity runners (LCR) differed in endurance running distance and body fat, blood glucose, other health indicators, and natural life span. To understand the interplay among genetic differences, chronological age, and acute exercise we performed microarray-based gene expression analyses in skeletal muscle with a 2×2×2 design to simultaneously compare HCR and LCR, old and young animals, and rest and exhaustion. Transcripts for mitochondrial function are expressed higher in HCRs than LCRs at both rest and exhaustion and for both age groups. Expression of cell adhesion and extracellular matrix genes tend to decrease with age. This and other age effects are more prominent in LCRs than HCRs, suggesting that HCRs have a slower aging process and this may be partly due to their better metabolic health. Strenuous exercise mainly affects transcription regulation and cellular response. The effects of any one factor often depend on the other two. For example, there are ∼140 and ∼110 line-exercise "interacting" genes for old and young animals, respectively. Many genes highlighted in our study are consistent with prior reports, but many others are novel. The gene- and pathway-level statistics for the main effects, either overall or stratified, and for all possible interactions, represent a rich reference dataset for understanding the interdependence among lines, aging, and exercise. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Identification, expression and interaction analyses of calcium-dependent protein kinase (CPK) genes in canola (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanfeng; Liu, Wu-Zhen; Zhang, Yupeng; Deng, Min; Niu, Fangfang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Boya; Liang, Wanwan; Deyholos, Michael K; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2014-03-19

    Canola (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oil-producing crops in China and worldwide. The yield and quality of canola is frequently threatened by environmental stresses including drought, cold and high salinity. Calcium is a well-known ubiquitous intracellular secondary messenger in plants. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) are Ser/Thr protein kinases found only in plants and some protozoans. CPKs are Ca2+ sensors that have both Ca2+ sensing function and kinase activity within a single protein and play crucial roles in plant development and responses to various environmental stresses. In this study, we mined the available expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of B. napus and identified a total of 25 CPK genes, among which cDNA sequences of 23 genes were successfully cloned from a double haploid cultivar of canola. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that they could be clustered into four subgroups. The subcellular localization of five selected BnaCPKs was determined using green fluorescence protein (GFP) as the reporter. Furthermore, the expression levels of 21 BnaCPK genes in response to salt, drought, cold, heat, abscisic acid (ABA), low potassium (LK) and oxidative stress were studied by quantitative RT-PCR and were found to respond to multiple stimuli, suggesting that canola CPKs may be convergence points of different signaling pathways. We also identified and cloned five and eight Clade A basic leucine zipper (bZIP) and protein phosphatase type 2C (PP2C) genes from canola and, using yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), determined the interaction between individual BnaCPKs and BnabZIPs or BnaPP2Cs (Clade A). We identified novel, interesting interaction partners for some of the BnaCPK proteins. We present the sequences and characterization of CPK gene family members in canola for the first time. This work provides a foundation for further crop improvement and improved understanding of signal transduction in plants.

  17. Analysis of promoter elements involved in the transcriptional initiation of RpoS-dependent Borrelia burgdorferi genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, Christian H; Caimano, Melissa J; Radolf, Justin D

    2004-11-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, encodes an RpoS ortholog (RpoS(Bb)) that controls the temperature-inducible differential expression of at least some of the spirochete's lipoprotein genes, including ospC and dbpBA. To begin to dissect the determinants of RpoS(Bb) recognition of, and selectivity for, its dependent promoters, we linked a green fluorescent protein reporter to the promoter regions of several B. burgdorferi genes with well-characterized expression patterns. Consistent with the expression patterns of the native genes/proteins in B. burgdorferi strain 297, we found that expression of the ospC, dbpBA, and ospF reporters in the spirochete was RpoS(Bb) dependent, while the ospE and flaB reporters were RpoS(Bb) independent. To compare promoter recognition by RpoS(Bb) with that of the prototype RpoS (RpoS(Ec)), we also introduced our panel of constructs into Escherichia coli. In this surrogate, maximal expression from the ospC, dbpBA, and ospF promoters clearly required RpoS, although in the absence of RpoS(Ec) the ospF promoter was weakly recognized by another E. coli sigma factor. Furthermore, RpoS(Bb) under the control of an inducible promoter was able to complement an E. coli rpoS mutant, although RpoS(Ec) and RpoS(Bb) each initiated greater activity from their own dependent promoters than they did from those of the heterologous sigma factor. Genetic analysis of the ospC promoter demonstrated that (i) the T(-14) in the presumptive -10 region plays an important role in sigma factor recognition in both organisms but is not as critical for transcriptional initiation by RpoS(Bb) as it is for RpoS(Ec); (ii) the nucleotide at the -15 position determines RpoS or sigma(70) selectivity in E. coli but does not serve the same function in B. burgdorferi; and (iii) the 110-bp region upstream of the core promoter is not required for RpoS(Ec)- or RpoS(Bb)-dependent activity in E. coli but is required for maximal expression from this promoter in

  18. The architecture and ppGpp-dependent expression of the primary transcriptome of Salmonella Typhimurium during invasion gene expression

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    Ramachandran Vinoy K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasion of intestinal epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium requires expression of the extracellular virulence gene expression programme (STEX, activation of which is dependent on the signalling molecule guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp. Recently, next-generation transcriptomics (RNA-seq has revealed the unexpected complexity of bacterial transcriptomes and in this report we use differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq to define the high-resolution transcriptomic architecture of wild-type S. Typhimurium and a ppGpp null strain under growth conditions which model STEX. In doing so we show that ppGpp plays a much wider role in regulating the S. Typhimurium STEX primary transcriptome than previously recognised. Results Here we report the precise mapping of transcriptional start sites (TSSs for 78% of the S. Typhimurium open reading frames (ORFs. The TSS mapping enabled a genome-wide promoter analysis resulting in the prediction of 169 alternative sigma factor binding sites, and the prediction of the structure of 625 operons. We also report the discovery of 55 new candidate small RNAs (sRNAs and 302 candidate antisense RNAs (asRNAs. We discovered 32 ppGpp-dependent alternative TSSs and determined the extent and level of ppGpp-dependent coding and non-coding transcription. We found that 34% and 20% of coding and non-coding RNA transcription respectively was ppGpp-dependent under these growth conditions, adding a further dimension to the role of this remarkable small regulatory molecule in enabling rapid adaptation to the infective environment. Conclusions The transcriptional architecture of S. Typhimurium and finer definition of the key role ppGpp plays in regulating Salmonella coding and non-coding transcription should promote the understanding of gene regulation in this important food borne pathogen and act as a resource for future research.

  19. The NF1 gene contains hotspots for L1 endonuclease-dependent de novo insertion.

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    Katharina Wimmer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Long interspersed (L1 and Alu elements are actively amplified in the human genome through retrotransposition of their RNA intermediates by the -100 still retrotranspositionally fully competent L1 elements. Retrotransposition can cause inherited disease if such an element is inserted near or within a functional gene. Using direct cDNA sequencing as the primary assay for comprehensive NF1 mutation analysis, we uncovered in 18 unrelated index patients splicing alterations not readily explained at the genomic level by an underlying point-mutation or deletion. Improved PCR protocols avoiding allelic drop-out of the mutant alleles uncovered insertions of fourteen Alu elements, three L1 elements, and one poly(T stretch to cause these splicing defects. Taken together, the 18 pathogenic L1 endonuclease-mediated de novo insertions represent the largest number of this type of mutations characterized in a single human gene. Our findings show that retrotransposon insertions account for as many as -0.4% of all NF1 mutations. Since altered splicing was the main effect of the inserted elements, the current finding was facilitated by the use of RNA-based mutation analysis protocols, resulting in improved detection compared to gDNA-based approaches. Six different insertions clustered in a relatively small 1.5-kb region (NF1 exons 21(16-23(18 within the 280-kb NF1 gene. Furthermore, three different specific integration sites, one of them located in this cluster region, were each used twice, i.e. NM_000267.3(NF1:c.1642-1_1642 in intron 14(10c, NM_000267.3(NF1:c.2835_2836 in exon 21(16, and NM_000267.3(NF1:c.4319_4320 in exon 33(25. Identification of three loci that each served twice as integration site for independent retrotransposition events as well as 1.5-kb cluster region harboring six independent insertions supports the notion of non-random insertion of retrotransposons in the human genome. Currently, little is known about which features make sites

  20. Developmental pathways from child maltreatment to adolescent marijuana dependence: Examining moderation by FK506 binding protein 5 gene (FKBP5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Elizabeth D; Rogosch, Fred A; Cicchetti, Dante

    2015-11-01

    The current study examined the prospective association between child maltreatment and the development of substance use disorder in adolescence with the aim of investigating pathways underlying this relation, as well as genetic moderation of these developmental mechanisms. Specifically, we tested whether youth who experienced maltreatment prior to age 8 were at risk for the development of marijuana dependence in adolescence by way of a childhood externalizing pathway and a childhood internalizing pathway. Moreover, we tested whether variation in FK506 binding protein 5 gene (FKBP5) CATT haplotype moderated these pathways. The participants were 326 children (n =179 maltreated; n = 147 nonmaltreated) assessed across two waves of data collection (childhood: ages 7-9 and adolescence: ages 15-18). Results indicated that higher levels of child externalizing symptoms significantly mediated the effect of child maltreatment on adolescent marijuana dependence symptoms for individuals with one or two copies of the FKBP5 CATT haplotype only. We did not find support for an internalizing pathway from child maltreatment to adolescent marijuana dependence, nor did we find evidence of moderation of the internalizing pathway by FKBP5 haplotype variation. Findings extend previous research by demonstrating that whether a maltreated child will traverse an externalizing pathway toward substance use disorder in adolescence is dependent on FKBP5 genetic variation.

  1. Gene Delivery Particle Engineering Strategies for Shape-dependent Targeting of Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozielski, Kristen L; Sitti, Metin

    2017-01-01

    Successful gene delivery requires overcoming both systemic and intracellular obstacles before the nucleic acid cargo can successfully reach its tissue and subcellular target location. Materials & Methods: Non-viral mechanisms to enable targeting while avoiding off-target delivery have arisen via biological, chemical, and physical engineering strategies. Herein we will discuss the physical parameters in particle design that promote tissue- and cell-targeted delivery of genetic cargo. We will discuss systemic concerns, such as circulation, tissue localization, and clearance, as well as cell-scale obstacles, such as cellular uptake and nucleic acid packaging. In particular, we will focus on engineering particle shape and size in order to enhance delivery and promote precise targeting. We will also address methods to program or change particle shape in situ using environmentally triggered cues. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Differential neonatal testosterone imprinting of GH-dependent liver proteins and genes in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, María Cecilia; Luque, Guillermina María; Ornstein, Ana María; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia

    2010-12-01

    Abnormal exposure to steroid hormones within a critical developmental period elicits permanent alterations in female reproductive physiology in rodents, but the impact on the female GH axis and the underlying sexual differences in hepatic enzymes have not been described in detail. We have investigated the effect of neonatal androgenization of female mice (achieved by s.c. injection of 100 μg testosterone propionate (TP) on the day of birth: TP females) on the GHRH-somatostatin-GH axis and downstream GH targets, which included female and male predominant liver enzymes and secreted proteins. At 4 months of age, an organizational effect of neonatal testosterone was evidenced on hypothalamic Ghrh mRNA level but not on somatostatin (stt) mRNA level. Ghrh mRNA levels were higher in males than in females, but not in TP females. Increased expression in TP females correlated with increased pituitary GH content and somatotrope population, increased serum and liver IGF-I concentration, and ultimately higher body weight. Murine urinary proteins (MUPs) that were excreted at higher levels in male urine, and whose expression requires pulsatile occupancy of liver GH receptors, were not modified in TP females and neither was liver Mup 1/2/6/8 mRNA expression. Furthermore, a male predominant liver gene (Cyp2d9) was not masculinized in TP females either, whereas two female predominant genes (Cyp2b9 and Cyp2a4) were defeminized. These data support the hypothesis that neonatal steroid exposure contributes to the remodeling of the GH axis and defeminization of hepatic steroid-metabolizing enzymes, which may compromise liver physiology.

  3. Hypocotyl Transcriptome Reveals Auxin Regulation of Growth-Promoting Genes through GA-Dependent and -Independent Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillejo, Cristina; Sartor, Ryan; Bialy, Agniezska; Sun, Tai-ping; Estelle, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Many processes critical to plant growth and development are regulated by the hormone auxin. Auxin responses are initiated through activation of a transcriptional response mediated by the TIR1/AFB family of F-box protein auxin receptors as well as the AUX/IAA and ARF families of transcriptional regulators. However, there is little information on how auxin regulates a specific cellular response. To begin to address this question, we have focused on auxin regulation of cell expansion in the Arabidopsis hypocotyl. We show that auxin-mediated hypocotyl elongation is dependent upon the TIR1/AFB family of auxin receptors and degradation of AUX/IAA repressors. We also use microarray studies of elongating hypocotyls to show that a number of growth-associated processes are activated by auxin including gibberellin biosynthesis, cell wall reorganization and biogenesis, and others. Our studies indicate that GA biosynthesis is required for normal response to auxin in the hypocotyl but that the overall transcriptional auxin output consists of PIF-dependent and -independent genes. We propose that auxin acts independently from and interdependently with PIF and GA pathways to regulate expression of growth-associated genes in cell expansion. PMID:22590525

  4. Urolithin A suppresses the proliferation of endometrial cancer cells by mediating estrogen receptor-α-dependent gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jo-Hsin; Aguilera-Barrantes, Irene; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Sheng, Xiugui; Wang, Li-Shu; Stoner, Gary D; Huang, Yi-Wen

    2016-11-01

    Obese and overweight women are at high risk of developing endometrial cancer; indeed, many of endometrial cancer patients are obese. The increased number and size of adipocytes due to obesity elevate levels of circulating estrogens that stimulate cell proliferation in the endometrium. However, black raspberries are a promising approach to preventing endometrial cancer. We examined 17 black raspberry constituents and metabolites (10 μM or 10 μg/mL, 48 h) for their ability to prevent endometrial cancer cells from proliferating. Urolithin A (UA) was most able to suppress proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner (p endometrial cancer cells. UA enhanced the expression of ERβ, PGR, pS2, GREB1 while inhibiting the expression of ERα and GRIP1. Coincubating UA-treated cells with the estrogen antagonist ICI182,780 abolished UA's estrogenic effects. Knocking down ERα suppressed PGR, pS2, and GREB gene expression but increased GRIP1 expression. Thus, UA's actions appear to be mediated through ERα. This study suggests that UA modulates ERα-dependent gene expression, thereby inhibiting endometrial cancer proliferation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The DNA2 nuclease/helicase is an estrogen-dependent gene mutated in breast and ovarian cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Carmit; Kornowski, Maya; Benvenisty, Avraham; Shahar, Amit; Masury, Hadas; Ben-Porath, Ittai; Ravid, Tommer; Arbel-Eden, Ayelet; Goldberg, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer, is commonly caused by failures in the DNA damage response. Here we conducted a bioinformatical screen to reveal DNA damage response genes that are upregulated by estrogen and highly mutated in breast and ovarian cancers. This screen identified 53 estrogen-dependent cancer genes, some of which are novel. Notably, the screen retrieved 9 DNA helicases as well as 5 nucleases. DNA2, which functions as both a helicase and a nuclease and plays a role in DNA repair and replication, was retrieved in the screen. Mutations in DNA2, found in estrogen-dependent cancers, are clustered in the helicase and nuclease domains, suggesting activity impairment. Indeed, we show that mutations found in ovarian cancers impair DNA2 activity. Depletion of DNA2 in cells reduces their tumorogenicity in mice. In human, high expression of DNA2 correlates with poor survival of estrogen receptor-positive patients but not of estrogen receptor-negative patients. We also demonstrate that depletion of DNA2 in cells reduces proliferation, while addition of estrogen restores proliferation. These findings suggest that cells responding to estrogen will proliferate despite being impaired in DNA2 activity, potentially promoting genomic instability and triggering cancer development. PMID:25238049

  6. Tolerance of Deregulated G1/S Transcription Depends on Critical G1/S Regulon Genes to Prevent Catastrophic Genome Instability

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    Catia Caetano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Expression of a G1/S regulon of genes that are required for DNA replication is a ubiquitous mechanism for controlling cell proliferation; moreover, the pathological deregulated expression of E2F-regulated G1/S genes is found in every type of cancer. Cellular tolerance of deregulated G1/S transcription is surprising because this regulon includes many dosage-sensitive proteins. Here, we used the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe to investigate this issue. We report that deregulating the MBF G1/S regulon by eliminating the Nrm1 corepressor increases replication errors. Homology-directed repair proteins, including MBF-regulated Ctp1CtIP, are essential to prevent catastrophic genome instability. Surprisingly, the normally inconsequential MBF-regulated S-phase cyclin Cig2 also becomes essential in the absence of Nrm1. This requirement was traced to cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition of the MBF-regulated Cdc18Cdc6 replication origin-licensing factor. Collectively, these results establish that, although deregulation of G1/S transcription is well tolerated by cells, nonessential G1/S target genes become crucial for preventing catastrophic genome instability.

  7. A novel calcium-dependent protein kinase gene from Populus euphratica, confers both drought and cold stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinhuan; Xue, Bin; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2013-11-22

    Populus species are the most important timber trees over the Northern hemisphere. Most of them are cold- and drought-sensitive except the Populus euphratica Oliv. Here, a calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) gene cloned from P. euphratica, designated as PeCPK10, was rapidly induced by salt, cold, and drought stresses. The protein encoded by PeCPK10 was localized within the nucleus and cytosol, which may be important for its specific regulation in cellular functions. To elucidate the physiological functions of PeCPK10, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing PeCPK10. The results showed that PeCPK10-transgenic lines experienced better growth than vector control plants when treated with drought. Stronger abscisic acid-induced promotion of stomatal closing has been showed in transgenic lines. Particularly, overexpression of PeCPK10 showed enhanced freezing tolerance. Constitutive expression of PeCPK10 enhanced the expression of several abscisic acid-responsive genes and multiple abiotic stress-responsive genes such as RD29B and COR15A. Accordingly, a positive regulator responsive to cold and drought stresses in P. euphratica is proposed. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genistein: a novel anthocyanin synthesis promoter that directly regulates biosynthetic genes in red cabbage in a light-dependent way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Genistein (GNT, an isoflavone, is used in the clinical treatment of various health disorders. GNT is found in primary food source plants and some medical plants. However, studies on the functions of GNT in plants are rarely reported. In this study, we demonstrated that GNT plays an important role in promoting anthocyanin accumulation in red cabbage. GNT solutions (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mg/L as foliar fertilizers were applied to red cabbage. Consequently, anthocyanin accumulation in red cabbage increased in a light-dependent manner. GNT solution at 30 mg/L exhibited the optimal effect on anthocyanin accumulation, which was twice that of the control. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that GNT application upregulated the expression of all structural genes, contributing to anthocyanin biosynthesis under light conditions. Under dark conditions, GNT exerted no significant promotive effect on anthocyanin accumulation; only early biosynthetic genes of anthocyanin biosynthesis responded to GNT. The promotive effect of GNT on anthocyanin biosynthesis is directly attributable to the regulation of structural gene expression. Transcription factors exhibited no response to GNT. The levels of anthocyanin in red cabbage positively correlated with the enzyme activities of antioxidant systems. This finding correlation suggested that the promotive effect of GNT on anthocyanin levels was correlated with improved antioxidant activity in the red cabbage.

  9. Biocontrol of tomato wilt disease by Bacillus subtilis isolates from natural environments depends on conserved genes mediating biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Yan, Fang; Chai, Yunrong; Liu, Hongxia; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus subtilis and other Bacilli have long been used as biological control agents against plant bacterial diseases but the mechanisms by which the bacteria confer protection are not well understood. Our goal in this study was to isolate strains of B. subtilis that exhibit high levels of biocontrol efficacy from natural environments and to investigate the mechanisms by which these strains confer plant protection. We screened a total of 60 isolates collected from various locations across China and obtained six strains that exhibited above 50% biocontrol efficacy on tomato plants against the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum under greenhouse conditions. These wild strains were able to form robust biofilms both in defined medium and on tomato plant roots and exhibited strong antagonistic activities against various plant pathogens in plate assays. We show that plant protection by those strains depended on widely conserved genes required for biofilm formation, including regulatory genes and genes for matrix production. We provide evidence suggesting that matrix production is critical for bacterial colonization on plant root surfaces. Finally, we have established a model system for studies of B. subtilis-tomato plant interactions in protection against a plant pathogen. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Biocontrol of tomato wilt disease by Bacillus subtilis isolates from natural environments depends on conserved genes mediating biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongxia; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard; Guo, Jian-hua

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacillus subtilis and other Bacilli have long been used as biological control agents against plant bacterial diseases but the mechanisms by which the bacteria confer protection are not well understood. Our goal in this study was to isolate strains of B. subtilis that exhibit high levels of biocontrol efficacy from natural environments and to investigate the mechanisms by which these strains confer plant protection. We screened a total of sixty isolates collected from various locations across China and obtained six strains that exhibited above 50% biocontrol efficacy on tomato plants against the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum under greenhouse conditions. These wild strains were able to form robust biofilms both in defined medium and on tomato plant roots and exhibited strong antagonistic activities against various plant pathogens in plate assays. We show that plant protection by those strains depended on widely conserved genes required for biofilm formation, including regulatory genes and genes for matrix production. We provide evidence suggesting that matrix production is critical for bacterial colonization on plant root surfaces. Finally, we have established a model system for studies of B. subtilis-tomato plant interactions in protection against a plant pathogen. PMID:22934631

  11. Induction of immune tolerance to FIX following muscular AAV gene transfer is AAV-dose/FIX-level dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Meagan E; Zhuo, Jiacai; Bharadwaj, Arpita S; Chao, Hengjun

    2009-05-01

    Direct intramuscular injection (IM) of adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been proven a safe and potentially efficient procedure for gene therapy of many genetic diseases including hemophilia B. It is, however, contentious whether high antigen level induces tolerance or immunity to coagulation factor IX (FIX) following IM of AAV. We recently reported induction of FIX-specific immune tolerance by IM of AAV serotype one (AAV1) vector in mice. We hypothesize that the expression of high levels of FIX is critical to induction of FIX tolerance. In this study, we investigated the correlation among AAV dose, FIX expression, and tolerance induction. We observed that induction of immune tolerance or immunity to FIX was dependent on the dose of AAV1-human FIX (hFIX) given and the level of FIX antigen expressed in both normal and hemophilia mice. We then defined the minimum AAV1-hFIX dose and the lowest level of FIX needed for FIX tolerance. Different from hepatic AAV-hFIX gene transfer, we found that FIX tolerance induced by IM of AAV1 was not driven by regulatory T cells. These results provided further insight into the mechanism(s) of FIX tolerance, contributing to development of hemophilia gene therapy, and optimization of FIX tolerance induction protocols.

  12. The wine yeast strain-dependent expression of genes implicated in sulfide production in response to nitrogen availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Ferreira, Ana; Barbosa, Catarina; Jimenez-Marti, Elena; Del Olmo, Marcel Li; Mendes-Faia, Arlete

    2010-09-01

    Sulfur metabolism in S. cerevisiae is well established, but the mechanisms underlying the formation of sulfide remain obscure. Here we investigated by real time RT-PCR the dependence of expression levels of MET3, MET5/ECM17, MET10, MET16 and MET17 along with SSU1 on nitrogen availability in two wine yeast strains that produce divergent sulfide profiles. MET3 was the most highly expressed of the genes studied in strain PYCC4072, and SSU1 in strain UCD522. Strains behaved differently according to the sampling times, with UCD522 and PYCC4072 showing the highest expression levels at 120h and 72h, respectively. In the presence of 267mg assimilable N/l, the genes were more highly expressed in strain UCD522 than in PYCC4072. MET5/ECM17 and MET17 were only weakly expressed in both strains under any condition tested. MET10 and SSU1 in both strains, but MET16 only in PYCC4072, were consistently up-regulated when sulfide production was inhibited. This study illustrates that strain genotype could be important in determining enzyme activities and therefore the rate of sulfide liberation. This linkage, for some yeast strains, of sulfide production to expression levels of genes associated to sulfate assimilation and sulfur amino acid biosynthesis could be relevant for defining new strategies for genetic improvement of wine yeasts.

  13. Recognition specificity and RAR1/SGT1 dependence in barley Mla disease resistance genes to the powdery mildew fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qian-Hua; Zhou, Fasong; Bieri, Stephane; Haizel, Thomas; Shirasu, Ken; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2003-03-01

    A large number of resistance specificities to the powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei map to the barley Mla locus. This complex locus harbors multiple members of three distantly related gene families that encode proteins that contain an N-terminal coiled-coil (CC) structure, a central nucleotide binding (NB) site, a Leu-rich repeat (LRR) region, and a C-terminal non-LRR (CT) region. We identified Mla12, which encodes a CC-NB-LRR-CT protein that shares 89 and 92% identical residues with the known proteins MLA1 and MLA6. Slow Mla12-triggered resistance was altered dramatically to a rapid response by overexpression of Mla12. A series of reciprocal domains swaps between MLA1 and MLA6 identified in each protein recognition domain for cognate powdery mildew fungus avirulence genes (AvrMla1 and AvrMla6). These domains were within different but overlapping LRR regions and the CT part. Unexpectedly, MLA chimeras that confer AvrMla6 recognition exhibited markedly different dependence on Rar1, a gene required for the function of some but not all Mla resistance specificities. Furthermore, uncoupling of MLA6-specific function from RAR1 also uncoupled the response from SGT1, a protein known to associate physically with RAR1. Our findings suggest that differences in the degree of RAR1 dependence of different MLA immunity responses are determined by intrinsic properties of MLA variants and place RAR1/SGT1 activity downstream of and/or coincident with the action of resistance protein-containing recognition complexes.

  14. Gene expression reveals evidence for EGFR-dependent proximal-distal limb patterning in a myriapod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ralf

    2017-05-01

    Evolution of segmented limbs is one of the key innovations of Arthropoda, allowing development of functionally specific specialized head and trunk appendages, a major factor behind their unmatched evolutionary success. Proximodistal limb patterning is controlled by two regulatory networks in the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster, and other insects. The first is represented by the function of the morphogens Wingless (Wg) and Decapentaplegic (Dpp); the second by the EGFR-signaling cascade. While the role of Wg and Dpp has been studied in a wide range of arthropods representing all main branches, that is, Pancrustacea (= Hexapoda + Crustacea), Myriapoda and Chelicerata, investigation of the potential role of EGFR-signaling is restricted to insects (Hexapoda). Gene expression analysis of Egfr, its potential ligands, and putative downstream factors in the pill millipede Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda), reveals that-in at least mandibulate arthropods-EGFR-signaling is likely a conserved regulatory mechanism in proximodistal limb patterning. © 2017 The Authors. Evolution and Development Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Signalling pathways in UHRF1-dependent regulation of tumor suppressor genes in cancer

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    Mahmoud Alhosin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs through DNA methylation and histone changes is a main hallmark of cancer. Ubiquitin-like with PHD and RING Finger domains 1 (UHRF1 is a potent oncogene overexpressed in various solid and haematological tumors and its high expression levels are associated with decreased expression of several TSGs including p16 INK4A , BRCA1, PPARG and KiSS1. Using its several functional domains, UHRF1 creates a strong coordinated dialogue between DNA methylation and histone post-translation modification changes causing the epigenetic silencing of TSGs which allows cancer cells to escape apoptosis. To ensure the silencing of TSGs during cell division, UHRF1 recruits several enzymes including histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1, DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 and histone lysine methyltransferases G9a and Suv39H1 to the right place at the right moment. Several in vitro and in vivo works have reported the direct implication of the epigenetic player UHRF1 in tumorigenesis through the repression of TSGs expression and suggested UHRF1 as a promising target for cancer treatment. This review describes the molecular mechanisms underlying UHRF1 regulation in cancer and discusses its importance as a therapeutic target to induce the reactivation of TSGs and subsequent apoptosis.

  16. The hedgehog pathway gene shifted functions together with the hmgcr-dependent isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway to orchestrate germ cell migration.

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    Girish Deshpande

    Full Text Available The Drosophila embryonic gonad is assembled from two distinct cell types, the Primordial Germ Cells (PGCs and the Somatic Gonadal Precursor cells (SGPs. The PGCs form at the posterior of blastoderm stage embryos and are subsequently carried inside the embryo during gastrulation. To reach the SGPs, the PGCs must traverse the midgut wall and then migrate through the mesoderm. A combination of local repulsive cues and attractive signals emanating from the SGPs guide migration. We have investigated the role of the hedgehog (hh pathway gene shifted (shf in directing PGC migration. shf encodes a secreted protein that facilitates the long distance transmission of Hh through the proteoglycan matrix after it is released from basolateral membranes of Hh expressing cells in the wing imaginal disc. shf is expressed in the gonadal mesoderm, and loss- and gain-of-function experiments demonstrate that it is required for PGC migration. Previous studies have established that the hmgcr-dependent isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway plays a pivotal role in generating the PGC attractant both by the SGPs and by other tissues when hmgcr is ectopically expressed. We show that production of this PGC attractant depends upon shf as well as a second hh pathway gene gγ1. Further linking the PGC attractant to Hh, we present evidence indicating that ectopic expression of hmgcr in the nervous system promotes the release/transmission of the Hh ligand from these cells into and through the underlying mesodermal cell layer, where Hh can contact migrating PGCs. Finally, potentiation of Hh by hmgcr appears to depend upon cholesterol modification.

  17. Identification, molecular cloning and expression analysis of five RNA-dependent RNA polymerase genes in Salvia miltiorrhiza.

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    Fenjuan Shao

    Full Text Available RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs act as key components of the small RNA biogenesis pathways and play significant roles in post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS and antiviral defense. However, there is no information about the RDR gene family in Salvia miltiorrhiza, an emerging model medicinal plant with great economic value. Through genome-wide predication and subsequent molecular cloning, five full-length S. miltiorrhiza RDR genes, termed SmRDR1-SmRDR5, were identified. The length of SmRDR cDNAs varies between 3,262 (SmRDR5 and 4,130 bp (SmRDR3. The intron number of SmRDR genes varies from 3 (SmRDR1, SmRDR3 and SmRDR4 to 17 (SmRDR5. All of the deduced SmRDR protein sequences contain the conserved RdRp domain. Moreover, SmRDR2 and SmRDR4 have an additional RRM domain. Based on the phylogenetic tree constructed with sixteen RDRs from Arabidopsis, rice and S. miltiorrhiza, plant RDRs may be divided into four groups (RDR1-RDR4. The RDR1 group contains an AtRDR and an OsRDR, while includes two SmRDRs. On the contrary, the RDR3 group contains three AtRDRs and two OsRDRs, but has only one SmRDR. SmRDRs were differentially expressed in flowers, leaves, stems and roots of S. miltiorrhiza and responsive to methyl jasmonate treatment and cucumber mosaic virus infection. The results suggest the involvement of RDRs in S. miltiorrhiza development and response to abiotic and biotic stresses. It provides a foundation for further studying the regulation and biological functions of SmRDRs and the biogenesis pathways of small RNAs in S. miltiorrhiza.

  18. DREAM mediates cAMP-dependent, Ca2+-induced stimulation of GFAP gene expression and regulates cortical astrogliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebolla, Beatriz; Fernández-Pérez, Antonio; Perea, Gertrudis; Araque, Alfonso; Vallejo, Mario

    2008-06-25

    In the developing mouse brain, once the generation of neurons is mostly completed during the prenatal period, precisely coordinated signals act on competent neural precursors to direct their differentiation into astrocytes, which occurs mostly after birth. Among these signals, those provided by neurotrophic cytokines and bone morphogenetic proteins appear to have a key role in triggering the neurogenic to gliogenic switch and in regulating astrocyte numbers. In addition, we have reported previously that the neurotrophic peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is able to promote astrocyte differentiation of cortical precursors via activation of a cAMP-dependent pathway. Signals acting on progenitor cells of the developing cortex to generate astrocytes activate glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene expression, but the transcriptional mechanisms that regulate this activation are unclear. Here, we identify the previously known transcriptional repressor downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) as an activator of GFAP gene expression. We found that DREAM occupies specific sites on the GFAP promoter before and after differentiation is initiated by exposure of cortical progenitor cells to PACAP. PACAP raises intracellular calcium concentration via a mechanism that requires cAMP, and DREAM-mediated transactivation of the GFAP gene requires the integrity of calcium-binding domains. Cortical progenitor cells from dream(-/-) mice fail to express GFAP in response to PACAP. Moreover, the neonatal cortex of dream(-/-) mice exhibits a reduced number of astrocytes and increased number of neurons. These results identify the PACAP-cAMP-Ca(2+)-DREAM cascade as a new pathway to activate GFAP gene expression during astrocyte differentiation.

  19. Variation in regulator of G-protein signaling 17 gene (RGS17 is associated with multiple substance dependence diagnoses

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    Zhang Huiping

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RGS17 and RGS20 encode two members of the regulator of G-protein signaling RGS-Rz subfamily. Variation in these genes may alter their transcription and thereby influence the function of G protein-coupled receptors, including opioid receptors, and modify risk for substance dependence. Methods The association of 13 RGS17 and eight RGS20 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was examined with four substance dependence diagnoses (alcohol (AD, cocaine (CD, opioid (OD or marijuana (MjD] in 1,905 African Americans (AAs: 1,562 cases and 343 controls and 1,332 European Americans (EAs: 981 cases and 351 controls. Analyses were performed using both χ2 tests and logistic regression analyses that covaried sex, age, and ancestry proportion. Correlation of genotypes and mRNA expression levels was assessed by linear regression analyses. Results Seven RGS17 SNPs showed a significant association with at least one of the four dependence traits after a permutation-based correction for multiple testing (0.003≤Pempirical≤0.037. The G allele of SNP rs596359, in the RGS17 promoter region, was associated with AD, CD, OD, or MjD in both populations (0.005≤Pempirical≤0.019. This allele was also associated with significantly lower mRNA expression levels of RGS17 in YRI subjects (P = 0.002 and non-significantly lower mRNA expression levels of RGS17 in CEU subjects (P = 0.185. No RGS20 SNPs were associated with any of the four dependence traits in either population. Conclusions This study demonstrated that variation in RGS17 was associated with risk for substance dependence diagnoses in both AA and EA populations.

  20. Development-dependent changes in the tight DNA-protein complexes of barley on chromosome and gene level

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    Juodka Benediktas

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tightly bound to DNA proteins (TBPs is a protein group that remains attached to DNA with covalent or non-covalent bonds after its deproteinisation. The functional role of this group is as yet not completely understood. The main goal of this study was to evaluate tissue specific changes in the TBP distribution in barley genes and chromosomes in different phases of shoot and seed development. We have: 1. investigated the TBP distribution along Amy32b and Bmy1 genes encoding low pI α-amylase A and endosperm specific β-amylase correspondingly using oligonucleotide DNA arrays; 2. characterized the polypeptide spectrum of TBP and proteins with affinity to TBP-associated DNA; 3. localized the distribution of DNA complexes with TBP (TBP-DNA on barley 1H and 7H chromosomes using mapped markers; 4. compared the chromosomal distribution of TBP-DNA complexes to the distribution of the nuclear matrix attachment sites. Results In the Amy32b gene transition from watery ripe to the milky ripeness stage of seed development was followed by the decrease of TBP binding along the whole gene, especially in the promoter region and intron II. Expression of the Bmy1 gene coupled to ripening was followed by release of the exon III and intron III sequences from complexes with TBPs. Marker analysis revealed changes in the association of chromosome 1H and 7H sites with TBPs between first leaf and coleoptile and at Zadoks 07 and Zadoks 10 stages of barley shoot development. Tight DNA-protein complexes of the nuclear matrix and those detected by NPC-chromatography were revealed as also involved in tissue- and development-dependent transitions, however, in sites different from TBP-DNA interactions. The spectrum of TBPs appeared to be organ and developmental-stage specific. Development of the first leaf and root system (from Zadoks 07 to Zadoks 10 stage was shown as followed by a drastic increase in the TBP number in contrast to coleoptile, where the

  1. The Burkholderia bcpAIOB Genes Define Unique Classes of Two-Partner Secretion and Contact Dependent Growth Inhibition Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa S.; Garcia, Erin C.; Cotter, Peggy A.

    2012-01-01

    Microbes have evolved many strategies to adapt to changes in environmental conditions and population structures, including cooperation and competition. One apparently competitive mechanism is contact dependent growth inhibition (CDI). Identified in Escherichia coli, CDI is mediated by Two–Partner Secretion (TPS) pathway proteins, CdiA and CdiB. Upon cell contact, the toxic C-terminus of the TpsA family member CdiA, called the CdiA-CT, inhibits the growth of CDI− bacteria. CDI+ bacteria are protected from autoinhibition by an immunity protein, CdiI. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that CDI systems are widespread amongst α, β, and γ proteobacteria and that the CdiA-CTs and CdiI proteins are highly variable. CdiI proteins protect against CDI in an allele-specific manner. Here we identify predicted CDI system-encoding loci in species of Burkholderia, Ralstonia and Cupriavidus, named bcpAIOB, that are distinguished from previously-described CDI systems by gene order and the presence of a small ORF, bcpO, located 5′ to the gene encoding the TpsB family member. A requirement for bcpO in function of BcpA (the TpsA family member) was demonstrated, indicating that bcpAIOB define a novel class of TPS system. Using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, we show that these genes are expressed in a probabilistic manner during culture of Burkholderia thailandensis in liquid medium. The bcpAIOB genes and extracellular DNA were required for autoaggregation and adherence to an abiotic surface, suggesting that CDI is required for biofilm formation, an activity not previously attributed to CDI. By contrast to what has been observed in E. coli, the B. thailandensis bcpAIOB genes only mediated interbacterial competition on a solid surface. Competition occurred in a defined spatiotemporal manner and was abrogated by allele-specific immunity. Our data indicate that the bcpAIOB genes encode distinct classes of CDI and TPS systems that appear to function in

  2. The Burkholderia bcpAIOB genes define unique classes of two-partner secretion and contact dependent growth inhibition systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa S; Garcia, Erin C; Cotter, Peggy A

    2012-01-01

    Microbes have evolved many strategies to adapt to changes in environmental conditions and population structures, including cooperation and competition. One apparently competitive mechanism is contact dependent growth inhibition (CDI). Identified in Escherichia coli, CDI is mediated by Two-Partner Secretion (TPS) pathway proteins, CdiA and CdiB. Upon cell contact, the toxic C-terminus of the TpsA family member CdiA, called the CdiA-CT, inhibits the growth of CDI(-) bacteria. CDI(+) bacteria are protected from autoinhibition by an immunity protein, CdiI. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that CDI systems are widespread amongst α, β, and γ proteobacteria and that the CdiA-CTs and CdiI proteins are highly variable. CdiI proteins protect against CDI in an allele-specific manner. Here we identify predicted CDI system-encoding loci in species of Burkholderia, Ralstonia and Cupriavidus, named bcpAIOB, that are distinguished from previously-described CDI systems by gene order and the presence of a small ORF, bcpO, located 5' to the gene encoding the TpsB family member. A requirement for bcpO in function of BcpA (the TpsA family member) was demonstrated, indicating that bcpAIOB define a novel class of TPS system. Using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, we show that these genes are expressed in a probabilistic manner during culture of Burkholderia thailandensis in liquid medium. The bcpAIOB genes and extracellular DNA were required for autoaggregation and adherence to an abiotic surface, suggesting that CDI is required for biofilm formation, an activity not previously attributed to CDI. By contrast to what has been observed in E. coli, the B. thailandensis bcpAIOB genes only mediated interbacterial competition on a solid surface. Competition occurred in a defined spatiotemporal manner and was abrogated by allele-specific immunity. Our data indicate that the bcpAIOB genes encode distinct classes of CDI and TPS systems that appear to function in sociomicrobiological

  3. Development of suitable hydroponics system for phytoremediation of arsenic-contaminated water using an arsenic hyperaccumulator plant Pteris vittata.

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    Huang, Yi; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Inoue, Chihiro; Endo, Ginro

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we found that high-performance hydroponics of arsenic hyperaccumulator fern Pteris vittata is possible without any mechanical aeration system, if rhizomes of the ferns are kept over the water surface level. It was also found that very low-nutrition condition is better for root elongation of P. vittata that is an important factor of the arsenic removal from contaminated water. By the non-aeration and low-nutrition hydroponics for four months, roots of P. vittata were elongated more than 500 mm. The results of arsenate phytofiltration experiments showed that arsenic concentrations in water declined from the initial concentrations (50 μg/L, 500 μg/L, and 1000 μg/L) to lower than the detection limit (0.1 μg/L) and about 80% of arsenic removed was accumulated in the fern fronds. The improved hydroponics method for P. vittata developed in this study enables low-cost phytoremediation of arsenic-contaminated water and high-affinity removal of arsenic from water.

  4. Effects of arsenate, chromate, and sulfate on arsenic and chromium uptake and translocation by arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Letúzia Maria; Ma, Lena Q; Santos, Jorge A G; Guilherme, Luiz R G; Lessl, Jason T

    2014-01-01

    We investigated effects of arsenate (AsV), chromate (CrVI) and sulfate on As and Cr uptake and translocation by arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV), which was exposed to AsV, CrVI and sulfate at 0, 0.05, 0.25 or 1.25 mM for 2-wk in hydroponic system. PV was effective in accumulating large amounts of As (4598 and 1160 mg/kg in the fronds and roots at 0.05 mM AsV) and Cr (234 and 12,630 mg/kg in the fronds and roots at 0.05 mM CrVI). However, when co-present, AsV and CrVI acted as inhibitors, negatively impacting their accumulation in PV. Arsenic accumulation in the fronds was reduced by 92% and Cr by 26%, indicating reduced As and Cr translocation. However, addition of sulfate increased uptake and translocation of As by 26-28% and Cr by 1.63 fold. This experiment demonstrated that As and Cr inhibited each other in uptake and translocation by PV but sulfate enhanced As and Cr uptake and translocation by PV. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Arsenic-induced plant growth of arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata: Impact of arsenic and phosphate rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong-He; Yang, Guang-Mei; Fu, Jing-Wei; Guan, Dong-Xing; Chen, Yanshan; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-04-01

    Phosphate rock (PR) has been shown to promote plant growth and arsenic (As) uptake by As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV). However, little is known about its behaviors in agricultural soils. In this study, impact of 50 mg kg(-1) As and/or 1.5% PR amendment on plant As accumulation and growth was investigated by growing PV for 90 d in three agricultural soils. While As amendment significantly increased plant As uptake and substantially promoted PV growth, the opposite was observed with PR amendment. Arsenic amendment increased plant frond As from 16.9-265 to 961-6017 mg kg(-1),whereas PR amendment lowered frond As to 10.2-216 mg kg(-1). The As-induced plant growth stimulation was 69-71%. While PR amendment increased plant Ca and P uptake, As amendment showed opposite results. The PV biomass was highly correlated with plant As at r = 0.82, but with weak correlations with plant Ca or P at r PV growth, probably independent of Ca or P uptake, 2) PR amendment didn't enhance plant growth or As uptake by PV in agricultural soils with adequate available P, and 3) PV effluxed arsenite (AsIII) growing in agricultural soils. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Arsenic transformation and plant growth promotion characteristics of As-resistant endophytic bacteria from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia-Yi; Han, Yong-He; Chen, Yanshan; Zhu, Ling-Jia; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-02-01

    The ability of As-resistant endophytic bacteria in As transformation and plant growth promotion was determined. The endophytes were isolated from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV) after growing for 60 d in a soil containing 200 mg kg(-1) arsenate (AsV). They were isolated in presence of 10 mM AsV from PV roots, stems, and leaflets, representing 4 phyla and 17 genera. All endophytes showed at least one plant growth promoting characteristics including IAA synthesis, siderophore production and P solubilization. The root endophytes had higher P solubilization ability than the leaflet (60.0 vs. 18.3 mg L(-1)). In presence of 10 mM AsV, 6 endophytes had greater growth than the control, suggesting As-stimulated growth. Furthermore, root endophytes were more resistant to AsV while the leaflet endophytes were more tolerant to arsenite (AsIII), which corresponded to the dominant As species in PV tissues. Bacterial As resistance was positively correlated to their ability in AsV reduction but not AsIII oxidation. The roles of those endophytes in promoting plant growth and As resistance in P. vittata warrant further investigation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. STUDIES REGARDING THE CHELATE-INDUCED HYPERACCUMULATION OF CU AND FE USING LOLIUM PERENNE SPECIES IN MINING AREAS

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    ANCA-DIANA PRICOP

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The plant capacity to absorb high amounts of metal for a short period of time is the major factor that influences the efficiency of phytoextraction. The hyperaccumulating plants uptake high amounts in their tissues correlated to the metal concentrations in soil. Chelating agents have the capacity to induce the metal accumulation in biomass. They increase metal bioavailability for plants by releasing the metal in accessible forms. The present study emphasizes that in the case of EDTA use, the obtained biomass is smaller compared to the other variants, showing a lower tolerance to this chelating agent of Lolium perenne species. Cu and Fe phytoextraction by Lolium perenne species is higher in the case of EDTA use. Cu bioaccumulation has higher values in variants with compost-sterile mixture ratio of 1:4 in comparison with Fe. In the case of the best compost-sterile mixture ratio of 1:3 the highest biomass is obtained in all the variants, biosolids’ effect being stronger compared to the chelating agent.

  8. Impaired leaf CO2 diffusion mediates Cd-induced inhibition of photosynthesis in the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Picris divaricata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lu; Ying, Rong-Rong; Jiang, Dan; Zeng, Xiao-Wen; Morel, Jean-Louis; Tang, Ye-Tao; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2013-12-01

    Mechanisms of cadmium (Cd)-induced inhibition of photosynthesis in the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Picris divaricata were investigated using photosynthesis limitation analysis. P. divaricata seedlings were grown in nutrient solution containing 0, 5, 10, 25, 50, or 75 μM Cd for 2 weeks. Total limitations to photosynthesis (TL) increased from 0% at 5 μM Cd to 68.8% at 75 μM Cd. CO2 diffusional limitation (DL) made the largest contribution to TL, accounting for 93-98% of TL in the three highest Cd treatments, compared to just 2-7% of TL attributable to biochemical limitation (BL). Microscopic imaging revealed significantly decreased stomatal density and mesophyll thickness in the three highest Cd treatments. Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters related to photosynthetic biochemistry (Fv/Fm, NPQ, ΦPSII, and qP) were not significantly decreased by increased Cd supply. Our results suggest that increased DL in leaves is the main cause of Cd-induced inhibition of photosynthesis in P. divaricata, possibly due to suppressed function of mesophyll and stomata. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence showed that Cd supply had little effect on photochemistry parameters, suggesting that the PSII reaction centers are not a main target of Cd inhibition of photosynthesis in P. divaricata. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Tolerance and hyperaccumulation of a mixture of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Hg, and Zn) by four aquatic macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Hernández, Jorge Alberto; Amaya-Chávez, Araceli; Balderas-Hernández, Patricia; Roa-Morales, Gabriela; González-Rivas, Nelly; Balderas-Plata, Miguel Ángel

    2017-03-04

    In the present investigation, four macrophytes, namely Typha latifolia (L.), Lemna minor (L.), Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms-Laubach, and Myriophyllum aquaticum (Vell.) Verdc, were evaluated for their heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Hg, and Zn) hyperaccumulation potential under laboratory conditions. Tolerance analyses were performed for 7 days of exposure at five different treatments of the metals mixture (Cu(+2), Hg(+2), Pb(+2), and Zn(+2)). The production of chlorophyll and carotenoids was determined at the end of each treatment. L. minor revealed to be sensitive, because it did not survive in all the tested concentrations after 72 hours of exposure. E. crassipes and M. aquaticum displayed the highest tolerance to the metals mixture. For the most tolerant species of aquatic macrophytes, The removal kinetics of E. crassipes and M. aquaticum was carried out, using the following mixture of metals: Cu (0.5 mg/L) and Hg, Pb, and Zn 0.25 mg/L. The obtained results revealed that E. crassipes can remove 99.80% of Cu, 97.88% of Pb, 99.53% of Hg, and 94.37% of Zn. M. aquaticum withdraws 95.2% of Cu, 94.28% of Pb, 99.19% of Hg, and 91.91% of Zn. The obtained results suggest that these two species of macrophytes could be used for the phytoremediation of this mixture of heavy metals from the polluted water bodies.

  10. The nuclear transcription factor PKNOX2 is a candidate gene for substance dependence in European-origin women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Substance dependence or addiction is a complex environmental and genetic disorder that results in serious health and socio-economic consequences. Multiple substance dependence categories together, rather than any one individual addiction outcome, may explain the genetic variability of such disorder. In our study, we defined a composite substance dependence phenotype derived from six individual diagnoses: addiction to nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, opiates or other drugs as a whole. Using data from several genomewide case-control studies, we identified a strong (Odds ratio  = 1.77 and significant (p-value = 7E-8 association signal with a novel gene, PBX/knotted 1 homeobox 2 (PKNOX2, on chromosome 11 with the composite phenotype in European-origin women. The association signal is not as significant when individual outcomes for addiction are considered, or in males or African-origin population. Our findings underscore the importance of considering multiple addiction types and the importance of considering population and gender stratification when analyzing data with heterogeneous population.

  11. Regulation of serum response factor-dependent gene expression by proteasome inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbo, Nathan; Qin, Yimin; Taurin, Sebastien; Hogarth, D Kyle; Kreutz, Barry; Dulin, Nickolai O

    2005-03-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) is activated by contractile and hypertrophic agonists, such as endothelin-1 (ET1) to stimulate expression of cytoskeletal proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). While studying the regulation of smooth muscle alpha-actin (SMA) expression at the level of protein stability, we discovered that inhibition of proteasome-dependent protein degradation by N-benzoyloxycarbonyl (Z)-Leu-Leu-leucinal (MG132) or lactacystin (LC) did not enhance the levels of SMA, but, unexpectedly, attenuated SMA expression in response to ET1, without affecting the viability of VSMCs. Down-regulation of SMA protein by MG132 or LC occurred at the level of SMA transcription and via the inhibition of SRF activity. By contrast, MG132 and LC potentiated the activity of activator protein-1 transcription factor. Regulation of SRF by MG132 was not related to inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB, an established target of proteasome inhibitors, and was not mediated by protein kinase A, a powerful regulator of SRF activity. Signaling studies indicate that inhibition of ET1-induced SRF activity by MG132 occurs at the level downstream of heterotrimeric G proteins Gq/11 and G13, of small GTPase RhoA, and of actin dynamics but at the level of SRF-DNA binding. MG132 treatment did not result in ubiquitination or accumulation of SRF. By contrast, the levels of c-Jun were rapidly increased upon incubation of cells with MG132, and ectopic overexpression of c-Jun mimicked the effect of MG132 on SRF activity. Together, these data suggest that inhibition of proteasome results in down-regulation of SMA expression via up-regulation of c-Jun and repression of SRF activity at the level of DNA binding.

  12. Age-dependent Hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase Gene Expression and Activity in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Neumann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTUDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs are important phase II drug metabolism enzymes. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between age and changes in mRNA expression and activity of major human hepatic UGTs, as well as to understand the potential regulatory mechanism underlying this relationship. Using previously generated data, we investigated age-dependent mRNA expression levels of 11 hepatic UGTs (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A5, UGT1A6, UGT1A9, UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 and 16 transcription factors (AHR, AR, CAR, ESR2, FXR, GCCR, HNF1a, HNF3a, HNF3b, HNF4a, PPARA, PPARG, PPARGC, PXR, SP1, and STAT3 in liver tissue of donors (n = 38 ranging from 0 to 25 years of age. We also examined the correlation between age and microsomal activities using 14 known UGT drug substrates in the liver samples (n = 19 of children donors. We found a statistically significant increase (nominal p < 0.05 in the expression of UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A5, UGT1A6, UGT2B7 and UGT2B17, as well as glucuronidation activities of serotonin, testosterone, and vorinostat during the first 25 years of life. Expression of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1 and pregnane X receptor (PXR, two strong UGT transcriptional regulators, were significantly correlated with both age and UGT mRNA expression (p ≤ 0.05. These results suggest that both UGT expression and activity increase during childhood and adolescence, possibly driven in part by hormonal signaling. Our findings may help explain inter-patient variability in response to medications among children.

  13. Lactobacillus acidophilus induces virus immune defence genes in murine dendritic cells by a Toll-like receptor-2-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Gudrun Margarethe; Rasmussen, Simon; Hjerrild Zeuthen, L.

    2010-01-01

    -regulation of type I interferons (IFNs), we hypothesized that the strong IL-12-inducing capacity of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM in murine bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) is caused by an up-regulation of IFN-beta, which subsequently induces IL-12 and the double-stranded RNA binding Toll-like receptor-3...... (TLR-3). The expression of the genes encoding IFN-beta, TLR-3, IL-12 and IL-10 in DCs upon stimulation with L. acidophilus NCFM was determined. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM induced a much stronger expression of Ifn-beta, Il-12 and Il-10 compared with the synthetic double-stranded RNA ligand Poly I......Lactobacilli are probiotics that, among other health-promoting effects, have been ascribed immunostimulating and virus-preventive properties. Certain Lactobacillus spp. have been shown to possess strong interleukin-12 (IL-12) -inducing properties. As IL-12 production depends on the up...

  14. Sequence analysis of dolphin ferritin H and L subunits and possible iron-dependent translational control of dolphin ferritin gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki Yukako

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-storage protein, ferritin plays a central role in iron metabolism. Ferritin has dual function to store iron and segregate iron for protection of iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species. Tissue ferritin is composed of two kinds of subunits (H: heavy chain or heart-type subunit; L: light chain or liver-type subunit. Ferritin gene expression is controlled at translational level in iron-dependent manner or at transcriptional level in iron-independent manner. However, sequencing analysis of marine mammalian ferritin subunits has not yet been performed fully. The purpose of this study is to reveal cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits, and demonstrate the possibility of expression of these subunits, especially H subunit, by iron. Methods Sequence analyses of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits were performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR fragments from cDNAs generated via reverse transcription-PCR of leukocyte total RNA prepared from blood samples of six different dolphin species (Pseudorca crassidens, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens, Grampus griseus, Globicephala macrorhynchus, Tursiops truncatus, and Delphinapterus leucas. The putative iron-responsive element sequence in the 5'-untranslated region of the six different dolphin species was revealed by direct sequencing of PCR fragments obtained using leukocyte genomic DNA. Results Dolphin H and L subunits consist of 182 and 174 amino acids, respectively, and amino acid sequence identities of ferritin subunits among these dolphins are highly conserved (H: 99–100%, (99→98 ; L: 98–100%. The conserved 28 bp IRE sequence was located -144 bp upstream from the initiation codon in the six different dolphin species. Conclusion These results indicate that six different dolphin species have conserved ferritin sequences, and suggest that these genes are iron-dependently expressed.

  15. Codon 972 polymorphism in the insulin receptor substrate-1 gene, obesity, and risk of noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigal, R.J.; Doria, A.; Warram, J.H.; Krolewski, A.S. [Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Because of the role of insulin receptor substrate-1 in insulin action, the insulin receptor substrate-1 gene is a candidate gene for noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Modest associations between NIDDM and a GGG-AGG single base substitution (corresponding to a glycine-arginine amino acid substitution) in codon 972 of the gene have been found, but none reached statistical significance. To examine further how large a proportion of NIDDM cases could be caused by the mutation, we performed a stratified analysis combining the results from the 6 earlier studies and those from our panel of 192 unrelated NIDDM subjects and 104 healthy controls. In addition, we looked for a possibility that the codon 972 mutation plays a role only in the presence of certain conditions. Genomic DNA samples obtained from NIDDM cases and healthy controls were genotyped using a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism protocol modified for genomic DNA. The GGG{r_arrow}AGG substitution was found in 5.7% of the diabetic subjects (11 of 192) and 6.9% of the controls (7 of 104). The difference between groups was not statistically significant, and it was not different from the results of other studies. The Mantel-Haenszel summary odds ratio across all studies was 1.49 (P < 0.05; 95% confidence intervals, 1.01-2.2). This summary odds ratio is consistent with a small proportion of NIDDM cases ({approximately}3%) being caused by the mutation. Exploratory subgroup analyses on our panel suggested a clustering of NIDDM, the codon 972 mutation, and overweight, raising the hypothesis that the mutation may predispose to NIDDM only in the presence of excess body weight. 9 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Altered expression of circadian clock gene, mPer1, in mouse brain and kidney under morphine dependence and withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yuhui

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Every physiological function in the human body exhibits some form of circadian rhythmicity. Under pathological conditions, however, circadian rhythmicity may be dusrupted. Patients infected with HIV or addicted to drugs of abuse often suffer from sleep disorders and altered circadian rhythms. Early studies in Drosophila suggested that drug seeking behavior might be related to the expression of certain circadian clock genes. Our previous research showed that conditioned place preference with morphine treatment was altered in mice lacking the Period-1 (mPer1 circadian clock gene. Thus, we sought to investigate whether morphine treatment could alter the expression of mPer1, especially in brain regions outside the SCN and in peripheral tissues. Our results using Western blot analysis showed that the mPER1 immunoreactivity exhibited a strong circadian rhythm in the brains of the control (Con, morphine-dependent (MD, and morphine-withdrawal (MW mice. However, the phase of the circadian rhythm of mPER1 expression in the brains of MD mice significantly differed from that of the Con mice (p mPer1 may vary among different organs, resulting in desynchronization of circadian function between the SCN and peripheral organs.

  17. Improved detection of deletions and duplications in the DMD gene using the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansović, Ivona; Barišić, Ingeborg; Dumić, Katja

    2013-04-01

    The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay is the most powerful tool in screening for deletions and duplications in the dystrophin gene in patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD). The efficacy of the assay was validated by testing 20 unrelated male patients with DMD/BMD who had already been screened by multiplex PCR (mPCR). We detected two duplications that had been missed by mPCR. In one DMD patient showing an ambiguous MLPA result, a novel mutation (c.3808_3809insG) was identified. MLPA improved the mutation detection rate of mPCR by 15 %. The results of our study (1) confirmed MLPA to be the method of choice for detecting DMD gene rearrangements in DMD/BMD patients, (2) showed that ambiguous MLPA amplification products should be verified by other methods, and (3) indicated that the MLPA method could be used in screening even for small mutations located in the probe-binding regions.

  18. Isolation, expression and functional analysis of a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene from maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junguang; Dong, Zhigang; Jia, Zhiwei; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Guoying

    2010-02-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) in plants have been reported to be involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and antiviral defense. In this report, an RdRP gene from maize (ZmRdRP1) was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and RT-PCR. The mRNA of ZmRdRP1 was composed of 3785 nucleotides, including a 167 nt 5' untranslated region (UTR), a 291 nt 3'UTR and a 3327 nt open reading frame (ORF), which encodes a putative protein of 1108 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 126.9 kDa and a predicated isoelectric point (pI) of 8.37. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that ZmRdRP1 was elicited by salicylic acid (SA) treatment, methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment and sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) infection. We silenced ZmRdRP1 by constitutively expressing an inverted-repeat fragment of ZmRdRP1 (ir-RdRP1) in transgenic maize plants. Further studies revealed that the ir-RdRP1 transgenic plants were more susceptible to SCMV infection than wild type plants. Virus-infected transgenic maize plants developed more serious disease symptoms and accumulated more virus than wild type plants. These findings suggested that ZmRdRP1 was involved in antiviral defense in maize.

  19. A reliable measure of similarity based on dependency for short time series: an application to gene expression networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldman Gustavo H

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray techniques have become an important tool to the investigation of genetic relationships and the assignment of different phenotypes. Since microarrays are still very expensive, most of the experiments are performed with small samples. This paper introduces a method to quantify dependency between data series composed of few sample points. The method is used to construct gene co-expression subnetworks of highly significant edges. Results The results shown here are for an adapted subset of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression data set with low temporal resolution and poor statistics. The method reveals common transcription factors with a high confidence level and allows the construction of subnetworks with high biological relevance that reveals characteristic features of the processes driving the organism adaptations to specific environmental conditions. Conclusion Our method allows a reliable and sophisticated analysis of microarray data even under severe constraints. The utilization of systems biology improves the biologists ability to elucidate the mechanisms underlying celular processes and to formulate new hypotheses.

  20. Varietal Dependence of GLVs Accumulation and LOX-HPL Pathway Gene Expression in Four Vitis vinifera Wine Grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xu; Xu, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Ke-Ji; Zhu, Bao-Qing; Lan, Yi-Bin; Duan, Chang-Qing; Pan, Qiu-Hong

    2016-11-23

    Variety is one of the major factors influencing grape and wine aromatic characteristics. Green leaf volatiles (GLVs), derived from lipoxygenase-hydroperoxides lyase (LOX-HPL) pathway, are important components for the aromatic quality of grapes and wines. However, the varietal difference regarding GLVs accumulation and related gene expression are poorly studied. This work exhibited that the accumulation of various GLVs and the expression of LOX-HPL pathway genes in four Vitis vinifera wine grape cultivars: Syrah, Muscat Tchervine, Gewürztraminer and Chardonnay. The results showed a variety dependence of GLVs profile. Muscat Tchervine harvested grapes contained less C6 aldehydes and the most abundant esters, which corresponded to very low VvLOXA and VvHPL1 expression abundance as well as high VvAAT transcript in this variety. High expression level of both VvLOXA and VvHPL1 paralleled with higher level of C6 aldehydes together with higher alcohols in Syrah grape. Gewürztraminer and Chardonnay grapes had high aldehydes and alcohols as well as low esters, which were resulted from their higher expression level of VvLOXA or VvHPL1 and lower VvAAT. From these above corresponding relations, it is concluded that VvLOXA, VvHPL1 and VvAAT in the LOX-HPL pathway are targets for altering GLVs composition in the grape varieties.

  1. Female house sparrows "count on" male genes: experimental evidence for MHC-dependent mate preference in birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biard Clotilde

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Females can potentially assess the quality of potential mates using their secondary sexual traits, and obtain "good genes" that increase offspring fitness. Another potential indirect benefit from mating preferences is genetic compatibility, which does not require extravagant or viability indicator traits. Several studies with mammals and fish indicate that the genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC influence olfactory cues and mating preferences, and such preferences confer genetic benefits to offspring. We investigated whether individual MHC diversity (class I influences mating preferences in house sparrows (Passer domesticus. Results Overall, we found no evidence that females preferred males with high individual MHC diversity. Yet, when we considered individual MHC allelic diversity of the females, we found that females with a low number of alleles were most attracted to males carrying a high number of MHC alleles, which might reflect a mating-up preference by allele counting. Conclusions This is the first experimental evidence for MHC-dependent mating preferences in an avian species to our knowledge. Our findings raise questions about the underlying mechanisms through which birds discriminate individual MHC diversity among conspecifics, and they suggest a novel mechanism through which mating preferences might promote the evolution of MHC polymorphisms and generate positive selection for duplicated MHC loci.

  2. Female house sparrows "count on" male genes: experimental evidence for MHC-dependent mate preference in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggio, Matteo; Biard, Clotilde; Penn, Dustin J; Hoi, Herbert

    2011-02-14

    Females can potentially assess the quality of potential mates using their secondary sexual traits, and obtain "good genes" that increase offspring fitness. Another potential indirect benefit from mating preferences is genetic compatibility, which does not require extravagant or viability indicator traits. Several studies with mammals and fish indicate that the genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) influence olfactory cues and mating preferences, and such preferences confer genetic benefits to offspring. We investigated whether individual MHC diversity (class I) influences mating preferences in house sparrows (Passer domesticus). Overall, we found no evidence that females preferred males with high individual MHC diversity. Yet, when we considered individual MHC allelic diversity of the females, we found that females with a low number of alleles were most attracted to males carrying a high number of MHC alleles, which might reflect a mating-up preference by allele counting. This is the first experimental evidence for MHC-dependent mating preferences in an avian species to our knowledge. Our findings raise questions about the underlying mechanisms through which birds discriminate individual MHC diversity among conspecifics, and they suggest a novel mechanism through which mating preferences might promote the evolution of MHC polymorphisms and generate positive selection for duplicated MHC loci.

  3. Lack of association between alcohol-dependence and D3 dopamine receptor gene in three independent samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorwood, P.; Feingold, J. [Universite Paris VII (France); Ades, J. [Paris Hospital Louis Mourier (France)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    Numerous studies on the involvement of dopamine receptors in the genetics of alcoholism focused on associations between a polymorphism of the D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) gene and alcohol dependence. However, the results of these studies are conflicting. Another receptor, the D3 dopamine receptor (DRD3), may be of additional interest since it is specifically located in the limbic area, and in particular in the nucleus accumbens which plays a significant role in the reward process of addiction behavior. We thus tested the association in three independent samples of alcoholic patients, with different origins and various inclusion criteria. No difference in the DRD3 gene polymorphism emerged between controls and alcoholic patients, regardless of their origin, inclusion criteria, or presence or absence of the DRD2 TaqI A1-allele. Despite the fact that more information could have been considered and that association studies provide limited information, there is good evidence that this DRD3 polymorphism does not play a major role in the genetic component of alcoholism. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of Chromatin States Reveals Distinct Mechanisms of Sex-Dependent Gene Regulation in Male and Female Mouse Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugathan, Aarathi

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin state maps were developed to elucidate sex differences in chromatin structure and their impact on sex-differential chromatin accessibility and sex-biased gene expression in mouse liver. Genes in active, inactive, and poised chromatin states exhibited differential responsiveness to ligand-activated nuclear receptors and distinct enrichments for functional gene categories. Sex-biased genes were clustered by chromatin environments and mapped to DNase-hypersensitive sites (DHS) classified by sex bias in chromatin accessibility and enhancer modifications. Results were integrated with genome-wide binding data for five transcription factors implicated in growth hormone-regulated, sex-biased liver gene expression, leading to the following findings. (i) Sex-biased DHS, but not sex-biased genes, are frequently characterized by sex-differential chromatin states, indicating distal regulation. (ii) Trimethylation of histone H3 at K27 (H3K27me3) is a major sex-biased repressive mark at highly female-biased but not at highly male-biased genes. (iii) FOXA factors are associated with sex-dependent chromatin opening at male-biased but not female-biased regulatory sites. (iv) Sex-biased STAT5 binding is enriched at sex-biased DHS marked as active enhancers and preferentially targets sex-biased genes with sex-differences in local chromatin marks. (v) The male-biased repressor BCL6 preferentially targets female-biased genes and regulatory sites in a sex-independent chromatin state. (vi) CUX2, a female-specific repressor of male-biased genes, also activates strongly female-biased genes, in association with loss of H3K27me3 marks. Chromatin states are thus a major determinant of sex-biased chromatin accessibility and gene expression, with FOXA pioneer factors proposed to confer sex-dependent chromatin opening and STAT5, but not BCL6, regulating sex-biased genes by binding to sites in a sex-biased chromatin state. PMID:23836885

  5. Gene expression analysis of a panel of cell lines that differentially restrict HIV-1 CA mutants infection in a cyclophilin a-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav B Shah

    Full Text Available HIV-1 replication is dependent on binding of the viral capsid to the host protein cyclophilin A (CypA. Interference with cyclophilin A binding, either by mutations in the HIV-1 capsid protein (CA or by the drug cyclosporine A (CsA, inhibits HIV-1 replication in cell culture. Resistance to CsA is conferred by A92E or G94D substitutions in CA. The mutant viruses are also dependent on CsA for their replication. Interestingly, infection of some cell lines by these mutants is enhanced by CsA, while infection of others is not affected by the drug. The cells are thus termed nonpermissive and permissive, respectively, for infection by CsA-dependent mutants. The mechanistic basis for the cell type dependence is not well understood, but has been hypothesized to result from a dominant-acting host factor that blocks HIV-1 infection by a mechanism that requires CypA binding to the viral capsid. In an effort to identify a CypA-dependent host restriction factor, we adopted a strategy involving comparative gene expression analysis in three permissive and three non-permissive cell types. We ranked the genes based on their relative overexpression in non-permissive cell types compared to the permissive cell types. Based on specific selection criteria, 26 candidate genes were selected and targeted using siRNA in nonpermissive (HeLa cells. Depletion of none of the selected candidate genes led to the reversal of CsA-dependent phenotype of the A92E mutant. Our data suggest that none of the 26 genes tested is responsible for the dependence of the A92E mutant on CsA. Our study provides gene expression data that may be useful for future efforts to identify the putative CypA-dependent HIV-1 restriction factor and in studies of other cell-specific phenotypes.

  6. Manganese (Mn) stress toward hyperaccumulators plants combination (HPC) using Jatropha curcas and lamtoro gung (L. leucocephala) in mychorrizal addition on soybean (Glycine max) seedling stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, Tania Sylviana; Zahroh, Tata Taqiyyatuz; Merindasya, Mirza; Masfaridah, Ririn; Hartanti, Dyah Ayu Sri; Arum, Sekar; Nurhatika, Sri; Muhibuddin, Anton; Surtiningsih, Tini; Arifiyanto, Achmad

    2017-06-01

    Heavy metals were a metal bracket which had a specific gravity greater than 5 g / cm3. Manganese was one of them because it has a specific gravity of 7.4 g / cm3. Together with widespread cases of soil contamination caused by heavy metals as well as increased development of the science of breeding ground rapidly, then the alternative rehabilitation techniques were relatively cheap and effective it needs to be developed and even some cases of contaminated management soil using a combination of plants with microorganisms to be more effective. Thus it was necessary to develop research on plants that were able to accumulate heavy metals and other toxic materials, such as Mn so that the land becomes safe for health and the environment. Based on above reason this research aimed to see the influence of hyperaccumulators combination of plants using Jatropha curcas and lamtoro gung (L. leucocephala) in mychorrizal addition to stressed by manganese (Mn) on soybean (Glycine max). Observations of growth, chlorophyll content and heavy metals analysis performed on nine treatments (P1-P9) and one control (P0). The results showed a combination of hyperaccumulators under mychorrizal helped overcome the stress of manganese (Mn) in the leaves of soybean (G. max). It gave an influence on the number of leaves and chlorophyll content of soybean (G. max), but no effect performed on the height and the roots of soybean (G. max). The use of plants in small amounts hyperaccumulators (P1;1 jatropha and 1 lamtoro) was sufficient to cope with stress of Mn in the leaves of soybean (G. max).

  7. Dual influence of the yeast Cat1p (Snf1p) protein kinase on carbon source-dependent transcriptional activation of gluconeogenic genes by the regulatory gene CAT8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahner, A; Schöler, A; Martens, E; Gollwitzer, B; Schüller, H J

    1996-06-15

    The CSRE (carbon source-responsive element) is a sequence motif responsible for the transcriptional activation of gluconeogenic structural genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have isolated a regulatory gene, DIL1 (derepression of isocitrate lyase, = CAT8), which is specifically required for derepression of CSRE-dependent genes. Expression of CAT8 is carbon source regulated and requires a functional Cat1p (Snf1p) protein kinase. The derepression defect of CAT8 in a cat1 mutant could be suppressed by a mutant Mig1p repressor protein. Derepression of CAT8 also requires a functional HAP2 gene, suggesting a regulatory connection between respiratory and gluconeogenic genes. Carbon source-dependent protein-CSRE complexes detected in a gel retardation analysis with wild-type extracts were absent in cat8 mutant extracts. However, similar experiments with an epitope-tagged CAT8 gene product in the presence of tag-specific antibodies gave evidence against a direct binding of Cat8p to the CSRE. A constitutively expressed GAL4-CAT8 fusion gene revealed a carbon source-dependent transcriptional activation of a UAS(GAL)-containing reporter gene. Activation mediated by Cat8p was no longer detectable in a cat1 mutant. Thus, biosynthetic control of CAT8 as well as transcriptional activation by Cat8p requires a functional Cat1p protein kinase. A model proposing CAT8 as a specific activator of a transcription factor(s) binding to the CSRE is discussed.

  8. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae histone chaperone Rtt106 mediates the cell cycle recruitment of SWI/SNF and RSC to the HIR-dependent histone genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Monica E; Flaherty, Kacie; Prochasson, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, three out of the four histone gene pairs (HTA1-HTB1, HHT1-HHF1, and HHT2-HHF2) are regulated by the HIR co-repressor complex. The histone chaperone Rtt106 has recently been shown to be present at these histone gene loci throughout the cell cycle in a HIR- and Asf1-dependent manner and involved in their transcriptional repression. The SWI/SNF and RSC chromatin remodeling complexes are both recruited to the HIR-dependent histone genes; SWI/SNF is required for their activation in S phase, whereas RSC is implicated in their repression outside of S phase. Even though their presence at the histone genes is dependent on the HIR complex, their specific recruitment has not been well characterized. In this study we focused on characterizing the role played by the histone chaperone Rtt106 in the cell cycle-dependent recruitment of SWI/SNF and RSC complexes to the histone genes. Using GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays, we showed that Rtt106 physically interacts with both the SWI/SNF and RSC complexes in vitro and in vivo. We then investigated the function of this interaction with respect to the recruitment of these complexes to HIR-dependent histone genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP), we found that Rtt106 is important for the recruitment of both SWI/SNF and RSC complexes to the HIR-dependent histone genes. Furthermore, using synchronized cell cultures, we showed by ChIP assays that the Rtt106-dependent SWI/SNF recruitment to these histone gene loci is cell cycle regulated and restricted to late G1 phase just before the peak of histone gene expression in S phase. Overall, these data strongly suggest that the interaction between the histone chaperone Rtt106 and both the SWI/SNF and RSC chromatin remodeling complexes is important for the cell cycle regulated recruitment of these two complexes to the HIR-dependent histone genes.

  9. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae histone chaperone Rtt106 mediates the cell cycle recruitment of SWI/SNF and RSC to the HIR-dependent histone genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica E Ferreira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, three out of the four histone gene pairs (HTA1-HTB1, HHT1-HHF1, and HHT2-HHF2 are regulated by the HIR co-repressor complex. The histone chaperone Rtt106 has recently been shown to be present at these histone gene loci throughout the cell cycle in a HIR- and Asf1-dependent manner and involved in their transcriptional repression. The SWI/SNF and RSC chromatin remodeling complexes are both recruited to the HIR-dependent histone genes; SWI/SNF is required for their activation in S phase, whereas RSC is implicated in their repression outside of S phase. Even though their presence at the histone genes is dependent on the HIR complex, their specific recruitment has not been well characterized. In this study we focused on characterizing the role played by the histone chaperone Rtt106 in the cell cycle-dependent recruitment of SWI/SNF and RSC complexes to the histone genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays, we showed that Rtt106 physically interacts with both the SWI/SNF and RSC complexes in vitro and in vivo. We then investigated the function of this interaction with respect to the recruitment of these complexes to HIR-dependent histone genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP, we found that Rtt106 is important for the recruitment of both SWI/SNF and RSC complexes to the HIR-dependent histone genes. Furthermore, using synchronized cell cultures, we showed by ChIP assays that the Rtt106-dependent SWI/SNF recruitment to these histone gene loci is cell cycle regulated and restricted to late G1 phase just before the peak of histone gene expression in S phase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, these data strongly suggest that the interaction between the histone chaperone Rtt106 and both the SWI/SNF and RSC chromatin remodeling complexes is important for the cell cycle regulated recruitment of these two complexes to the HIR-dependent histone genes.

  10. The caste- and age-specific expression signature of honeybee heat shock genes shows an alternative splicing-dependent regulation of Hsp90.

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    Aamodt, Randi M

    2008-11-01

    I report the investigation of the age- and caste-specific expression patterns of eight genes involved in protein maintenance and repair in wing muscle tissue of the honeybee Apis mellifera. mRNA levels of seven heat shock genes and the protein repair gene pcmt (encoding L-isoaspartyl-O-methyltransferase) were measured in a comparative study of queens and ageing workers. Two hsp90 orthologs, transcribed from the same locus, showed different age- and caste-dependent expression patterns suggesting an alternative splicing-dependent regulatory mechanism. One transcript showed decreasing expression levels with worker age and four times higher levels in queens than workers on average, while the other variant had much higher and even expression levels. An hsp22-like gene was sevenfold upregulated in workers from the newly emerged-stage and showed an age-dependent decreasing slope for the subsequent stages. Honeybee ageing seems therefore not to be accompanied by increase in the heat shock response at the level of gene expression. The method used provides very sensitive measurements of a limited number of genes, and this study is one of the first of the regulation of expression of protein protection and repair genes during aging, performed in an un-manipulated model organisms living in a natural environment.

  11. DNA microarray data integration by ortholog gene analysis reveals potential molecular mechanisms of estrogen-dependent growth of human uterine fibroids

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    Shou Jianyong

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uterine fibroids or leiomyoma are a common benign smooth muscle tumor. The tumor growth is well known to be estrogen-dependent. However, the molecular mechanisms of its estrogen-dependency is not well understood. Methods Differentially expressed genes in human uterine fibroids were either retrieved from published papers or from our own statistical analysis of downloaded array data. Probes for the same genes on different Affymetrix chips were mapped based on probe comparison information provided by Affymetrix. Genes identified by two or three array studies were submitted for ortholog analysis. Human and rat ortholog genes were identified by using ortholog gene databases, HomoloGene and TOGA and were confirmed by synteny analysis with MultiContigView tool in the Ensembl genome browser. Results By integrated analysis of three recently published DNA microarray studies with human tissue, thirty-eight genes were found to be differentially expressed in the same direction in fibroid compared to adjacent uterine myometrium by at least two research groups. Among these genes, twelve with rat orthologs were identified as estrogen-regulated from our array study investigating uterine expression in ovariectomized rats treated with estrogen. Functional and pathway analyses of the twelve genes suggested multiple molecular mechanisms for estrogen-dependent cell survival and tumor growth. Firstly, estrogen increased expression of the anti-apoptotic PCP4 gene and suppressed the expression of growth inhibitory receptors PTGER3 and TGFBR2. Secondly, estrogen may antagonize PPARγ signaling, thought to inhibit fibroid growth and survival, at two points in the PPAR pathway: 1 through increased ANXA1 gene expression which can inhibit phospholipase A2 activity and in turn decrease arachidonic acid synthesis, and 2 by decreasing L-PGDS expression which would reduce synthesis of PGJ2, an endogenous ligand for PPARγ. Lastly, estrogen affects retinoic

  12. Microbial siderophores and root exudates enhanced goethite dissolution and Fe/As uptake by As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

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    Liu, Xue; Fu, Jing-Wei; Da Silva, Evandro; Shi, Xiao-Xia; Cao, Yue; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Chen, Yanshan; Ma, Lena Q

    2017-04-01

    Arsenic (As) in soils is often adsorbed on Fe-(hydro)oxides surface, rendering them more resistant to dissolution, which is undesirable for phytoremediation of As-contaminated soils. Arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata prefers to grow in calcareous soils where available Fe and As are low. To elucidate its mechanisms of acquiring Fe and As from insoluble sources in soils, we investigated dissolution of goethite with pre-adsorbed arsenate (AsV; As-goethite) in presence of four organic ligands, including two root exudates (oxalate and phytate, dominant in P. vittata) and two microbial siderophores (PG12-siderophore and desferrioxamine B). Their presence increased As solubilization from As-goethite from 0.03 to 0.27-5.33 mg L-1 compared to the control. The siderophore/phytate bi-ligand treatment released 7.42 mg L-1 soluble Fe, which was 1.2-fold that of the sum of siderophore and phytate, showing a synergy in promoting As-goethite dissolution. In the ligand-mineral-plant system, siderophore/phytate was most effective in releasing As and Fe from As-goethite. Moreover, the continuous plant uptake induced more As-goethite dissolution. The continued release of As and Fe significantly enhanced their plant uptake (from 0.01 to 0.43 mg plant-1 As and 2.7-14.8 mg plant-1 Fe) and plant growth (from 1.2 to 3.1 g plant-1 fw) in P. vittata. Since microbial siderophores and root exudates often coexist in soil rhizosphere, their synergy in enhancing dissolution of insoluble As-Fe minerals may play an important role in efficient phytoremediation of As-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of Y-box binding protein 1 as a core regulator of MEK/ERK pathway-dependent gene signatures in colorectal cancer cells.

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    Karsten Jürchott

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional signatures are an indispensible source of correlative information on disease-related molecular alterations on a genome-wide level. Numerous candidate genes involved in disease and in factors of predictive, as well as of prognostic, value have been deduced from such molecular portraits, e.g. in cancer. However, mechanistic insights into the regulatory principles governing global transcriptional changes are lagging behind extensive compilations of deregulated genes. To identify regulators of transcriptome alterations, we used an integrated approach combining transcriptional profiling of colorectal cancer cell lines treated with inhibitors targeting the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK/RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, computational prediction of regulatory elements in promoters of co-regulated genes, chromatin-based and functional cellular assays. We identified commonly co-regulated, proliferation-associated target genes that respond to the MAPK pathway. We recognized E2F and NFY transcription factor binding sites as prevalent motifs in those pathway-responsive genes and confirmed the predicted regulatory role of Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX1 by reporter gene, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. We also validated the MAPK-dependent gene signature in colorectal cancers and provided evidence for the association of YBX1 with poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. This suggests that MEK/ERK-dependent, YBX1-regulated target genes are involved in executing malignant properties.

  14. QTL dynamics for fruit firmness and softening around an ethylene-dependent polygalacturonase gene in apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.).

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    Costa, Fabrizio; Peace, Cameron P; Stella, Sara; Serra, Sara; Musacchi, Stefano; Bazzani, Micaela; Sansavini, Silviero; Van de Weg, W Eric

    2010-06-01

    Apple fruit are well known for their storage life, although a wide range of flesh softening occurs among cultivars. Loss of firmness is genetically coordinated by the action of several cell wall enzymes, including polygalacturonase (PG) which depolymerizes cell wall pectin. By the analysis of 'Fuji' (Fj) and 'Mondial Gala' (MG), two apple cultivars characterized by a distinctive ripening behaviour, the involvement of Md-PG1 in the fruit softening process was confirmed to be ethylene dependent by its transcript being down-regulated by 1-methylcyclopropene treatment in MG and in the low ethylene-producing cultivar Fj. Comparing the PG sequence of MG and Fj, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was discovered. Segregation of the Md-PG1(SNP) marker within a full-sib population, obtained by crossing Fj and MG, positioned Md-PG1 in the linkage group 10 of MG, co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) identified for fruit firmness in post-harvest ripening. Fruit firmness and softening analysed in different stages, from harvest to post-storage, determined a shift of the QTL from the top of this linkage group to the bottom, where Md-ACO1, a gene involved in ethylene biosynthesis in apple, is mapped. This PG-ethylene-related gene has beeen positioned in the apple genome on chromosome 10, which contains several QTLs controlling fruit firmness and softening, and the interplay among the allelotypes of the linked loci should be considered in the design of a marker-assisted selection breeding scheme for apple texture.

  15. Exposure to diverse antimicrobials induces the expression of qnrB1, qnrD and smaqnr genes by SOS-dependent regulation.

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    Briales, A; Rodriguez-Martinez, J M; Velasco, C; Machuca, J; Díaz de Alba, P; Blazquez, J; Pascual, A

    2012-12-01

    Direct SOS-dependent regulation of qnrB genes by fluoroquinolones mediated by LexA was reported. The smaqnr gene, on the Serratia marcescens chromosome, and qnrD both contain a putative LexA box. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether smaqnr or qnrD genes are induced via SOS-dependent mechanisms, and to investigate whether other antimicrobial agents induce qnrB, qnrD and smaqnr expression. RT-PCR was used to evaluate qnrB1, qnrD and smaqnr expression. Different concentrations of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and ceftazidime were evaluated as inducers. Additionally, the promoter regions of qnrB1, qnrD and smaqnr were fused transcriptionally to green fluorescent protein and used in reporter gene assays. Disc diffusion assays with different antimicrobial agents were used to detect induction. Measurements of transcriptional induction by ciprofloxacin were carried out using a plate reader. RT-PCR assays showed that qnrB1, qnrD and smaqnr were induced at different concentrations of ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin and ceftazidime, increasing transcription 1.5- to 16.3-fold compared with basal expression, and depending on the antimicrobial agent and promoter analysed. The reporter gene assays showed that the qnrB1, qnrD and smaqnr genes were induced by ciprofloxacin, as expected, but also by ceftazidime, ampicillin and trimethoprim in Escherichia coli wild-type strains, but not in the recA-deficient E. coli HB101. Induction was not evident for imipenem or gentamicin. β-Lactams and trimethoprim, along with fluoroquinolones, induce transcription of qnrB, qnrD and smaqnr genes using SOS-dependent regulation. These results show the direct SOS-dependent regulation of a low-level fluoroquinolone resistance mechanism in response to other antimicrobials.

  16. Cold-dependent alternative splicing of a Jumonji C domain-containing gene MtJMJC5 in Medicago truncatula.

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    Shen, Yingfang; Wu, Xiaopei; Liu, Demei; Song, Shengjing; Liu, Dengcai; Wang, Haiqing

    2016-05-27

    Histone methylation is an epigenetic modification mechanism that regulates gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Jumonji C domain-containing demethylases are involved in removal of methyl groups at lysine or arginine residues. The JmjC domain-only member, JMJ30/JMJD5 of Arabidopsis, is a component of the plant circadian clock. Although some plant circadian clock genes undergo alternative splicing in response to external cues, there is no evidence that JMJ30/JMJD5 is regulated by alternative splicing. In this study, the expression of an Arabidopsis JMJ30/JMJD5 ortholog in Medicago truncatula, MtJMJC5, in response to circadian clock and abiotic stresses were characterized. The results showed that MtJMJC5 oscillates with a circadian rhythm, and undergoes cold specifically induced alternative splicing. The cold-induced alternative splicing could be reversed after ambient temperature returning to the normal. Sequencing results revealed four alternative splicing RNA isoforms including a full-length authentic protein encoding variant, and three premature termination condon-containing variants due to alternative 3' splice sites at the first and second intron. Under cold treatment, the variants that share a common 3' alternative splicing site at the second intron were intensively up-regulated while the authentic protein encoding variant and the premature termination condon-containing variant only undergoing a 3' alternative splicing at the first intron were down regulated. Although all the premature termination condon-harboring alternative splicing variants were sensitive to nonsense-mediated decay, the premature termination codon-harboring alternative splicing variants sharing the 3' alternative splicing site at the second intron showed less sensitivity than the one only containing the 3' alternative slicing site at the first intron under cold treatment. These results suggest that the cold-dependent alternative splicing of MtJMJC5 is likely a species or genus

  17. Genes associated with honey bee behavioral maturation affect clock-dependent and -independent aspects of daily rhythmic activity in fruit flies.

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    Fu, Chen; Whitfield, Charles W

    2012-01-01

    In the honey bee, the age-related and socially regulated transition of workers from in-hive task performance (e.g., caring for young) to foraging (provisioning the hive) is associated with changes in many behaviors including the 24-hour pattern of rhythmic activity. We have previously shown that the hive-bee to forager transition is associated with extensive changes in brain gene expression. In this study, we test the possible function of a subset of these genes in daily rhythmic activity pattern using neural-targeted RNA interference (RNAi) of an orthologous gene set in Drosophila melanogaster. Of 10 genes tested, knockdown of six affected some aspect of locomotor activity under a 12 h:h light:dark regime (LD). Inos affected anticipatory activity preceding lights-off, suggesting a possible clock-dependent function. BM-40-SPARC, U2af50 and fax affected peak activity at dawn without affecting anticipation or overall inactivity (proportion of 15-min intervals without activity), suggesting that these effects may depend on the day-night light cycle. CAH1 affected overall inactivity. The remaining gene, abl, affected peak activity levels but was not clearly time-of-day-specific. No gene tested affected length of period or strength of rhythmicity in constant dark (DD), suggesting that these genes do not act in the core clock. Taking advantage of Drosophila molecular genetic tools, our study provides an important step in understanding the large set of gene expression changes that occur in the honey bee transition from hive bee to forager. We show that orthologs of many of these genes influence locomotor activity in Drosophila, possibly through both clock-dependent and -independent pathways. Our results support the importance of both circadian clock and direct environmental stimuli (apart from entrainment) in shaping the bee's 24-hour pattern of activity. Our study also outlines a new approach to dissecting complex behavior in a social animal.

  18. Genes associated with honey bee behavioral maturation affect clock-dependent and -independent aspects of daily rhythmic activity in fruit flies.

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    Chen Fu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the honey bee, the age-related and socially regulated transition of workers from in-hive task performance (e.g., caring for young to foraging (provisioning the hive is associated with changes in many behaviors including the 24-hour pattern of rhythmic activity. We have previously shown that the hive-bee to forager transition is associated with extensive changes in brain gene expression. In this study, we test the possible function of a subset of these genes in daily rhythmic activity pattern using neural-targeted RNA interference (RNAi of an orthologous gene set in Drosophila melanogaster. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of 10 genes tested, knockdown of six affected some aspect of locomotor activity under a 12 h:h light:dark regime (LD. Inos affected anticipatory activity preceding lights-off, suggesting a possible clock-dependent function. BM-40-SPARC, U2af50 and fax affected peak activity at dawn without affecting anticipation or overall inactivity (proportion of 15-min intervals without activity, suggesting that these effects may depend on the day-night light cycle. CAH1 affected overall inactivity. The remaining gene, abl, affected peak activity levels but was not clearly time-of-day-specific. No gene tested affected length of period or strength of rhythmicity in constant dark (DD, suggesting that these genes do not act in the core clock. SIGNIFICANCE: Taking advantage of Drosophila molecular genetic tools, our study provides an important step in understanding the large set of gene expression changes that occur in the honey bee transition from hive bee to forager. We show that orthologs of many of these genes influence locomotor activity in Drosophila, possibly through both clock-dependent and -independent pathways. Our results support the importance of both circadian clock and direct environmental stimuli (apart from entrainment in shaping the bee's 24-hour pattern of activity. Our study also outlines a new approach to dissecting complex

  19. Role of CK2-dependent phosphorylation of Ifh1 and Crf1 in transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung Sup; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2016-08-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Fhl1 is involved in the regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes through interaction with either its coactivator Ifh1 or corepressor Crf1, depending on nutrient conditions. Interaction of Fhl1 with Ifh1 or Crf1 is achieved through a forkhead-associated (FHA) domain of Fhl1, which binds to forkhead-binding (FHB) domains of Ifh1 and Crf1. Here, we demonstrate that CK2-dependent phosphorylation of T681 and T348 residues, located in the FHB domains of Ifh1 and Crf1, respectively, provides binding sites for the FHA domain of Fhl1. Cells expressing Ifh1(T681A) mutant showed reduced association of Ifh1 at the RP gene promoters and decreased levels of RP gene transcripts, thereby reducing the growth rate. On the other hand, cells expressing Crf1(T348A) showed a defect in repressing RP gene transcription upon inhibition of target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) by rapamycin treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest the mechanisms by which CK2-dependent recruitment of Ifh1 and Crf1 at the RP gene promoters governs the transcription of RP genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression of HMA4 cDNAs of the zinc hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens from endogenous NcHMA4 promoters does not complement the zinc-deficiency phenotype of the Arabidopsis thaliana hma2hma4 double mutant

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    Mazhar eIqbal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Noccaea caerulescens (Nc exhibits a very high constitutive expression of the heavy metal transporting ATPase, HMA4, as compared to the non-hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis thaliana (At, due to copy number expansion and altered cis-regulation. We screened a BAC library for HMA4 and found that HMA4 is triplicated in the genome of a N. caerulescens accession from a former Zn mine near La Calamine (LC, Belgium. We amplified multiple HMA4 promoter sequences from three calamine N. caerulescens accessions, and expressed AtHMA4 and different NcHMA4 cDNAs under At and Nc HMA4 promoters in the A. thaliana (Col hma2hma4 double mutant. Transgenic lines expressing HMA4 under the At promoter were always fully complemented for root-to-shoot Zn translocation and developed normally at a 2- µM Zn supply, whereas the lines expressing HMA4 under Nc promoters usually showed only slightly enhanced root to shoot Zn translocation rates in comparison with the double mutant, probably owing to ectopic expression in the roots, respectively. When expression of the Zn deficiency responsive marker gene ZIP4 was tested, the transgenic lines expressing AtHMA4 under an NcHMA4-1-LC promoter showed on average a 7-fold higher expression in the leaves, in comparison with the double hma2hma4 mutant, showing that this construct aggravated, rather than alleviated the severity of foliar Zn deficiency in the mutant, possible owing to expression in the leaf mesophyll.

  1. Novel insight into vascular, stress, and auxin-dependent and -independent gene expression programs in strawberry, a non-climacteric fruit.

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    Aharoni, Asaph; Keizer, Leopold C P; Van Den Broeck, Hetty C; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Bois, Gregory; Smit, Patrick; De Vos, Ric C H; O'Connell, Ann P

    2002-07-01

    Using cDNA microarrays, a comprehensive investigation of gene expression was carried out in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) fruit to understand the flow of events associated with its maturation and non-climacteric ripening. We detected key processes and novel genes not previously associated with fruit development and ripening, related to vascular development, oxidative stress, and auxin response. Microarray analysis during fruit development and in receptacle and seed (achene) tissues established an interesting parallelism in gene expression between the transdifferentiation of tracheary elements in Zinnia elegans and strawberry. One of the genes, CAD, common to both systems and encoding the lignin-related protein cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, was immunolocalized to immature xylem cells of the vascular bundles in the strawberry receptacle. To examine the importance of oxidative stress in ripening, gene expression was compared between fruit treated on-vine with a free radical generator and non-treated fruit. Of 46 genes induced, 20 were also ripening regulated. This might suggest that active gene expression is induced to cope with oxidative stress conditions during ripening or that the strawberry ripening transcriptional program is an oxidative stress-induced process. To gain insight into the hormonal control of non-climacteric fruit ripening, an additional microarray experiment was conducted comparing gene expression in fruit treated exogenously with auxin and control fruit. Novel auxin-dependent genes and processes were identified in addition to transcriptional programs acting independent of auxin mainly related to cell wall metabolism and stress response.

  2. A tandem sequence motif acts as a distance-dependent enhancer in a set of genes involved in translation by binding the proteins NonO and SFPQ

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    Roepcke Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioinformatic analyses of expression control sequences in promoters of co-expressed or functionally related genes enable the discovery of common regulatory sequence motifs that might be involved in co-ordinated gene expression. By studying promoter sequences of the human ribosomal protein genes we recently identified a novel highly specific Localized Tandem Sequence Motif (LTSM. In this work we sought to identify additional genes and LTSM-binding proteins to elucidate potential regulatory mechanisms. Results Genome-wide analyses allowed finding a considerable number of additional LTSM-positive genes, the products of which are involved in translation, among them, translation initiation and elongation factors, and 5S rRNA. Electromobility shift assays then showed specific signals demonstrating the binding of protein complexes to LTSM in ribosomal protein gene promoters. Pull-down assays with LTSM-containing oligonucleotides and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis identified the related multifunctional nucleotide binding proteins NonO and SFPQ in the binding complex. Functional characterization then revealed that LTSM enhances the transcriptional activity of the promoters in dependency of the distance from the transcription start site. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the power of bioinformatic analyses for the identification of biologically relevant sequence motifs. LTSM and the here found LTSM-binding proteins NonO and SFPQ were discovered through a synergistic combination of bioinformatic and biochemical methods and are regulators of the expression of a set of genes of the translational apparatus in a distance-dependent manner.

  3. Intrinsic androgen-dependent gene expression patterns revealed by comparison of genital fibroblasts from normal males and individuals with complete and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome

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    Schweikert Hans-Udo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better understand the molecular programs of normal and abnormal genital development, clear-cut definition of androgen-dependent gene expression patterns, without the influence of genotype (46, XX vs. 46, XY, is warranted. Previously, we have identified global gene expression profiles in genital-derived fibroblasts that differ between 46, XY males and 46, XY females with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS due to inactivating mutations of the androgen receptor (AR. While these differences could be due to cell autonomous changes in gene expression induced by androgen programming, recent work suggests they could also be influenced by the location from which the fibroblasts were harvested (topology. To minimize the influence of topology, we compared gene expression patterns of fibroblasts derived from identical urogenital anlagen: the scrotum in normally virilized 46, XY males and the labia majora from completely feminized 46, XY individuals with CAIS. Results 612 transcripts representing 440 unique genes differed significantly in expression levels between scrotum and CAIS labia majora, suggesting the effects of androgen programming. While some genes coincided with those we had identified previously (TBX3, IGFBP5, EGFR, CSPG2, a significant number did not, implying that topology had influenced gene expression in our previous experiments. Supervised clustering of gene expression data derived from a large set of fibroblast cultures from individuals with partial AIS revealed that the new, topology controlled data set better classified the specimens. Conclusion Inactivating mutations of the AR, in themselves, appear to induce lasting changes in gene expression in cultured fibroblasts, independent of topology and genotype. Genes identified are likely to be relevant candidates to decipher androgen-dependent normal and abnormal genital development.

  4. The Varicella-Zoster Virus Immediate-Early 63 protein affects chromatin controlled gene transcription in a cell-type dependent manner

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    Bontems Sébastien

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Varicella Zoster Virus Immediate Early 63 protein (IE63 has been shown to be essential for VZV replication, and critical for latency establishment. The activity of the protein as a transcriptional regulator is not fully clear yet. Using transient transfection assays, IE63 has been shown to repress viral and cellular promoters containing typical TATA boxes by interacting with general transcription factors. Results In this paper, IE63 regulation properties on endogenous gene expression were evaluated using an oligonucleotide-based micro-array approach. We found that IE63 modulates the transcription of only a few genes in HeLa cells including genes implicated in transcription or immunity. Furthermore, we showed that this effect is mediated by a modification of RNA POL II binding on the promoters tested and that IE63 phosphorylation was essential for these effects. In MeWo cells, the number of genes whose transcription was modified by IE63 was somewhat higher, including genes implicated in signal transduction, transcription, immunity, and heat-shock signalling. While IE63 did not modify the basal expression of several NF-κB dependent genes such as IL-8, ICAM-1, and IκBα, it modulates transcription of these genes upon TNFα induction. This effect was obviously correlated with the amount of p65 binding to the promoter of these genes and with histone H3 acetylation and HDAC-3 removal. Conclusion While IE63 only affected transcription of a small number of cellular genes, it interfered with the TNF-inducibility of several NF-κB dependent genes by the accelerated resynthesis of the inhibitor IκBα.

  5. Penicillin production in industrial strain Penicillium chrysogenum P2niaD18 is not dependent on the copy number of biosynthesis genes.

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    Ziemons, Sandra; Koutsantas, Katerina; Becker, Kordula; Dahlmann, Tim; Kück, Ulrich

    2017-02-16

    Multi-copy gene integration into microbial genomes is a conventional tool for obtaining improved gene expression. For Penicillium chrysogenum, the fungal producer of the beta-lactam antibiotic penicillin, many production strains carry multiple copies of the penicillin biosynthesis gene cluster. This discovery led to the generally accepted view that high penicillin titers are the result of multiple copies of penicillin genes. Here we investigated strain P2niaD18, a production line that carries only two copies of the penicillin gene cluster. We performed pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), quantitative qRT-PCR, and penicillin bioassays to investigate production, deletion and overexpression strains generated in the P. chrysogenum P2niaD18 background, in order to determine the copy number of the penicillin biosynthesis gene cluster, and study the expression of one penicillin biosynthesis gene, and the penicillin titer. Analysis of production and recombinant strain showed that the enhanced penicillin titer did not depend on the copy number of the penicillin gene cluster. Our assumption was strengthened by results with a penicillin null strain lacking pcbC encoding isopenicillin N synthase. Reintroduction of one or two copies of the cluster into the pcbC deletion strain restored transcriptional high expression of the pcbC gene, but recombinant strains showed no significantly different penicillin titer compared to parental strains. Here we present a molecular genetic analysis of production and recombinant strains in the P2niaD18 background carrying different copy numbers of the penicillin biosynthesis gene cluster. Our analysis shows that the enhanced penicillin titer does not strictly depend on the copy number of the cluster. Based on these overall findings, we hypothesize that instead, complex regulatory mechanisms are prominently implicated in increased penicillin biosynthesis in production strains.

  6. A Central Nervous System-Dependent Intron-Embedded Gene Encodes a Novel Murine Fyn Binding Protein.

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    Noureddine Ben Khalaf

    Full Text Available The interplay between the nervous and immune systems is gradually being unraveled. We previously reported in the mouse the novel soluble immune system factor ISRAA, whose activation in the spleen is central nervous system-dependent. We also showed that ISRAA plays a role in modulating anti-infection immunity. Herein, we report the genomic description of the israa locus, along with some insights into the structure-function relationship of the protein. Our findings revealed that israa is nested within intron 6 of the mouse zmiz1 gene. Protein sequence analysis revealed a typical SH2 binding motif (Y102TEV, with Fyn being the most likely binding partner. Docking simulation showed a favorable conformation for the ISRAA-Fyn complex, with a specific binding mode for the binding of the YTEV motif to the SH2 domain. Experimental studies showed that in vitro, recombinant ISRAA is phosphorylated by Fyn at tyrosine 102. Cell transfection and pull-down experiments revealed Fyn as a binding partner of ISRAA in the EL4 mouse T-cell line. Indeed, we demonstrated that ISRAA downregulates T-cell activation and the phosphorylation of an activation tyrosine (Y416 of Src-family kinases in mouse splenocytes. Our observations highlight ISRAA as a novel Fyn binding protein that is likely to be involved in a signaling pathway driven by the nervous system.

  7. AfAP2-1, An Age-Dependent Gene of Aechmea fasciata, Responds to Exogenous Ethylene Treatment

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    Ming Lei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Bromeliaceae family is one of the most morphologically diverse families with a pantropical distribution. To schedule an appropriate flowering time for bromeliads, ethylene is commonly used to initiate flower development in adult plants. However, the mechanism by which ethylene induces flowering in adult bromeliads remains unknown. Here, we identified an APETALA2 (AP2-like gene, AfAP2-1, in Aechmea fasciata. AfAP2-1 contains two AP2 domains and is a nuclear-localized protein. It functions as a transcriptional activator, and the activation domain is located in the C-terminal region. The expression level of AfAP2-1 is higher in juvenile plants than in adult plants, and the AfAP2-1 transcript level was rapidly and transiently reduced in plants treated with exogenous ethylene. Overexpression of AfAP2-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana results in an extremely delayed flowering phenotype. These results suggested that AfAP2-1 responds to ethylene and is a putative age-dependent flowering regulator in A. fasciata.

  8. AfAP2-1, An Age-Dependent Gene of Aechmea fasciata, Responds to Exogenous Ethylene Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ming; Li, Zhi-Ying; Wang, Jia-Bin; Fu, Yun-Liu; Ao, Meng-Fei; Xu, Li

    2016-02-27

    The Bromeliaceae family is one of the most morphologically diverse families with a pantropical distribution. To schedule an appropriate flowering time for bromeliads, ethylene is commonly used to initiate flower development in adult plants. However, the mechanism by which ethylene induces flowering in adult bromeliads remains unknown. Here, we identified an APETALA2 (AP2)-like gene, AfAP2-1, in Aechmea fasciata. AfAP2-1 contains two AP2 domains and is a nuclear-localized protein. It functions as a transcriptional activator, and the activation domain is located in the C-terminal region. The expression level of AfAP2-1 is higher in juvenile plants than in adult plants, and the AfAP2-1 transcript level was rapidly and transiently reduced in plants treated with exogenous ethylene. Overexpression of AfAP2-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana results in an extremely delayed flowering phenotype. These results suggested that AfAP2-1 responds to ethylene and is a putative age-dependent flowering regulator in A. fasciata.

  9. Activity-Dependent NPAS4 Expression and the Regulation of Gene Programs Underlying Plasticity in the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando Maya-Vetencourt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The capability of the brain to change functionally in response to sensory experience is most active during early stages of development but it decreases later in life when major alterations of neuronal network structures no longer take place in response to experience. This view has been recently challenged by experimental strategies based on the enhancement of environmental stimulation levels, genetic manipulations, and pharmacological treatments, which all have demonstrated that the adult brain retains a degree of plasticity that allows for a rewiring of neuronal circuitries over the entire life course. A hot spot in the field of neuronal plasticity centres on gene programs that underlie plastic phenomena in adulthood. Here, I discuss the role of the recently discovered neuronal-specific and activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 as a critical mediator of plasticity in the nervous system. A better understanding of how modifications in the connectivity of neuronal networks occur may shed light on the treatment of pathological conditions such as brain damage or disease in adult life, some of which were once considered untreatable.

  10. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuhong; Cela, Racel G; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential "cure." Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained.

  11. The dependence of quorum sensing in Serratia marcescens JG on the transcription of luxS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shu-Jing; Liu, Yu-Chen; Sun, Jiao; Zhu, Hu

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria communicate with one another using chemical signal molecules. This phenomenon termed quorum sensing enables the bacteria to monitor the environment for other bacteria and to alter behavior on a population-wide scale in response to cell density. Serratia marcescens JG, a quorum sensing bacterium, can secrete a furanosyl borate diester autoinducer (AI-2) in the exponential phase of growth. In this study, to further investigate the regulation of AI-2 production in S. marcescens JG, the pfs and luxS promoter fusions to an operon luxCDABE reporter were constructed in a low-copy-number vector pBR322K, which allows an examination of transcription of the genes in the pathway for signal synthesis. The results show that the luxS expression is constitutive, and the transcription of luxS is tightly correlated with AI-2 production in S. marcescens JG because the peaks of AI-2 production and transcriptional level of luxS appear at the same time point. The close relation of the profiles of luxS transcription and AI-2 production was also confirmed with real-time PCR technology. These results support the hypothesis that the quorum sensing in S. marcescens JG is luxS dependent.

  12. PARP1-dependent eviction of the linker histone H1 mediates immediate early gene expression during neuronal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Ito, Kenji; Sailaja, Badi Sri; Biran, Alva; Nissim-Rafinia, Malka; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Brown, David T; Takizawa, Takumi; Meshorer, Eran

    2017-12-28

    Neuronal stimulation leads to immediate early gene (IEG) expression through calcium-dependent mechanisms. In recent years, considerable attention has been devoted to the transcriptional responses after neuronal stimulation, but relatively little is known about the changes in chromatin dynamics that follow neuronal activation. Here, we use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, biochemical fractionations, and chromatin immunoprecipitation to show that KCl-induced depolarization in primary cultured cortical neurons causes a rapid release of the linker histone H1 from chromatin, concomitant with IEG expression. H1 release is repressed by PARP inhibition, PARP1 deletion, a non-PARylatable H1, as well as phosphorylation inhibitions and a nonphosphorylatable H1, leading to hindered IEG expression. Further, H1 is replaced by PARP1 on IEG promoters after neuronal stimulation, and PARP inhibition blocks this reciprocal binding response. Our results demonstrate the relationship between neuronal excitation and chromatin plasticity by identifying the roles of polyadenosine diphosphate ribosylation and phosphorylation of H1 in regulating H1 chromatin eviction and IEG expression in stimulated neurons. © 2018 Azad et al.

  13. Modulation of thyroid hormone-dependent gene expression in Xenopus laevis by INhibitor of Growth (ING) proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbing, Caren C; Wagner, Mary J; Pettem, Katherine; Johnston, Jill; Heimeier, Rachel A; Veldhoen, Nik; Jirik, Frank R; Shi, Yun-Bo; Browder, Leon W

    2011-01-01

    INhibitor of Growth (ING) proteins belong to a large family of plant homeodomain finger-containing proteins important in epigenetic regulation and carcinogenesis. We have previously shown that ING1 and ING2 expression is regulated by thyroid hormone (TH) during metamorphosis of the Xenopus laevis tadpole. The present study investigates the possibility that ING proteins modulate TH action. Tadpoles expressing a Xenopus ING2 transgene (Trans(ING2)) were significantly smaller than tadpoles not expressing the transgene (Trans(GFP)). When exposed to 10 nM 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T(3)), premetamorphic Trans(ING2) tadpoles exhibited a greater reduction in tail, head, and brain areas, and a protrusion of the lower jaw than T(3)-treated Trans(GFP) tadpoles. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) demonstrated elevated TH receptor β (TRβ) and TH/bZIP transcript levels in Trans(ING2) tadpole tails compared to Trans(GFP) tadpoles while TRα mRNAs were unaffected. In contrast, no difference in TRα, TRβ or insulin-like growth factor (IGF2) mRNA abundance was observed in the brain between Trans(ING2) and Trans(GFP) tadpoles. All of these transcripts, except for TRα mRNA in the brain, were inducible by the hormone in both tissues. Oocyte transcription assays indicated that ING proteins enhanced TR-dependent, T(3)-induced TRβ gene promoter activity. Examination of endogenous T(3)-responsive promoters (TRβ and TH/bZIP) in the tail by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that ING proteins were recruited to TRE-containing regions in T(3)-dependent and independent ways, respectively. Moreover, ING and TR proteins coimmunoprecipitated from tail protein homogenates derived from metamorphic climax animals. We show for the first time that ING proteins modulate TH-dependent responses, thus revealing a novel role for ING proteins in hormone signaling. This has important implications for understanding hormone influenced disease states and suggests that the

  14. Dose-dependent effects of dietary fat on development of obesity in relation to intestinal differential gene expression in C57BL/6J mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole J W de Wit

    Full Text Available Excessive intake of dietary fat is known to be a contributing factor in the development of obesity. In this study, we determined the dose-dependent effects of dietary fat on the development of this metabolic condition with a focus on changes in gene expression in the small intestine. C57BL/6J mice were fed diets with either 10, 20, 30 or 45 energy% (E% derived from fat for four weeks (n = 10 mice/diet. We found a significant higher weight gain in mice fed the 30E% and 45E% fat diet compared to mice on the control diet. These data indicate that the main shift towards an obese phenotype lies between a 20E% and 30E% dietary fat intake. Analysis of differential gene expression in the small intestine showed a fat-dose dependent gradient in differentially expressed genes, with the highest numbers in mice fed the 45E% fat diet. The main shift in fat-induced differential gene expression was found between the 30E% and 45E% fat diet. Furthermore, approximately 70% of the differentially expressed genes were changed in a fat-dose dependent manner. Many of these genes were involved in lipid metabolism-related processes and were already differentially expressed on a 30E% fat diet. Taken together, we conclude that up to 20E% of dietary fat, the small intestine has an effective 'buffer capacity' for fat handling. From 30E% of dietary fat, a switch towards an obese phenotype is triggered. We further speculate that especially fat-dose dependently changed lipid metabolism-related genes are involved in development of obesity.

  15. Regulation of per and cry genes reveals a central role for the D-box enhancer in light-dependent gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Mracek

    Full Text Available Light serves as a key environmental signal for synchronizing the circadian clock with the day night cycle. The zebrafish represents an attractive model for exploring how light influences the vertebrate clock mechanism. Direct illumination of most fish tissues and cell lines induces expression of a broad range of genes including DNA repair, stress response and key clock genes. We have previously identified D- and E-box elements within the promoter of the zebrafish per2 gene that together direct light-induced gene expression. However, is the combined regulation by E- and D-boxes a general feature for all light-induced gene expression? We have tackled this question by examining the regulation of additional light-inducible genes. Our results demonstrate that with the exception of per2, all other genes tested are not induced by light upon blocking of de novo protein synthesis. We reveal that a single D-box serves as the principal light responsive element within the cry1a promoter. Furthermore, upon inhibition of protein synthesis D-box mediated gene expression is abolished while the E-box confers light driven activation as observed in the per2 gene. Given the existence of different photoreceptors in fish cells, our results implicate the D-box enhancer as a general convergence point for light driven signaling.

  16. Regulation of per and cry genes reveals a central role for the D-box enhancer in light-dependent gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mracek, Philipp; Santoriello, Cristina; Idda, M Laura; Pagano, Cristina; Ben-Moshe, Zohar; Gothilf, Yoav; Vallone, Daniela; Foulkes, Nicholas S

    2012-01-01

    Light serves as a key environmental signal for synchronizing the circadian clock with the day night cycle. The zebrafish represents an attractive model for exploring how light influences the vertebrate clock mechanism. Direct illumination of most fish tissues and cell lines induces expression of a broad range of genes including DNA repair, stress response and key clock genes. We have previously identified D- and E-box elements within the promoter of the zebrafish per2 gene that together direct light-induced gene expression. However, is the combined regulation by E- and D-boxes a general feature for all light-induced gene expression? We have tackled this question by examining the regulation of additional light-inducible genes. Our results demonstrate that with the exception of per2, all other genes tested are not induced by light upon blocking of de novo protein synthesis. We reveal that a single D-box serves as the principal light responsive element within the cry1a promoter. Furthermore, upon inhibition of protein synthesis D-box mediated gene expression is abolished while the E-box confers light driven activation as observed in the per2 gene. Given the existence of different photoreceptors in fish cells, our results implicate the D-box enhancer as a general convergence point for light driven signaling.

  17. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  18. The catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase induces expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive enhancer elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabowol, K T; Fink, J S; Gilman, M Z; Walsh, D A; Goodman, R H; Feramisco, J R

    1988-11-03

    Transcriptional regulation of eukaryotic genes by cyclic AMP requires a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (A kinase). Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain how the holoenzyme of the A kinase induces transcription. The regulatory subunits of the A kinase, which bind cAMP and DNA, and have amino-acid homology with the Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein could directly stimulate gene expression. Alternatively, phosphorylation by the catalytic subunits could induce transcription by activating proteins involved in gene transcription. To distinguish between these models, we microinjected purified preparations of the catalytic and regulatory subunits of A kinase into tissue culture cells and monitored expression of a stably integrated fusion gene containing a cAMP-responsive human promoter fused to a bacterial reporter gene, or of the endogenous c-fos gene. The catalytic subunit stimulated expression of these genes, whereas the regulatory subunit did not. These results indicate that the catalytic subunit of A kinase is sufficient to induce expression of two cAMP-responsive genes, without increasing levels of cAMP.

  19. Protein Biochemistry and Expression Regulation of Cadmium/Zinc Pumping ATPases in the Hyperaccumulator Plants Arabidopsis halleri and Noccaea caerulescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Mishra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available P1B-ATPases are decisive for metal accumulation phenotypes, but mechanisms of their regulation are only partially understood. Here, we studied the Cd/Zn transporting ATPases NcHMA3 and NcHMA4 from Noccaea caerulescens as well as AhHMA3 and AhHMA4 from Arabidopsis halleri. Protein biochemistry was analyzed on HMA4 purified from roots of N. caerulescens in active state. Metal titration of NcHMA4 protein with an electrochromic dye as charge indicator suggested that HMA4 reaches maximal ATPase activity when all internal high-affinity Cd2+ binding sites are occupied. Although HMA4 was reported to be mainly responsible for xylem loading of heavy metals for root to shoot transport, the current study revealed high expression of NcHMA4 in shoots as well. Further, there were additional 20 and 40 kD fragments at replete Zn2+ and toxic Cd2+, but not at deficient Zn2+ concentrations. Altogether, the protein level expression analysis suggested a more multifunctional role of NcHMA4 than previously assumed. Organ-level transcription analysis through quantitative PCR of mRNA in N. caerulescens and A. halleri confirmed the strong shoot expression of both NcHMA4 and AhHMA4. Further, in shoots NcHMA4 was more abundant in 10 μM Zn2+ and AhHMA4 in Zn2+ deficiency. In roots, NcHMA4 was up-regulated in response to deficient Zn2+ when compared to replete Zn2+ and toxic Cd2+ treatment. In both species, HMA3 was much more expressed in shoots than in roots, and HMA3 transcript levels remained rather constant regardless of Zn2+ supply, but were up-regulated by 10 μM Cd2+. Analysis of cellular expression by quantitative mRNA in situ hybridisation showed that in A. halleri, both HMA3 and HMA4 mRNA levels were highest in the mesophyll, while in N. caerulescens they were highest in the bundle sheath of the vein. This is likely related to the different final storage sites for hyperaccumulated metals in both species: epidermis in N. caerulescens, mesophyll in A. halleri.

  20. Genes involved in the copper-dependent regulation of soluble methane monooxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath): cloning, sequencing and mutational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csáki, Róbert; Bodrossy, Levente; Klem, József; Murrell, J Colin; Kovács, Kornél L

    2003-07-01

    The key enzyme in methane metabolism is methane monooxygenase (MMO), which catalyses the oxidation of methane to methanol. Some methanotrophs, including Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), possess two distinct MMOs. The level of copper in the environment regulates the biosynthesis of the MMO enzymes in these methanotrophs. Under low-copper conditions, soluble MMO (sMMO) is expressed and regulation takes place at the level of transcription. The structural genes of sMMO were previously identified as mmoXYBZ, mmoD and mmoC. Putative transcriptional start sites, containing a sigma(70)- and a sigma(N)-dependent motif, were identified in the 5' region of mmoX. The promoter region of mmoX was mapped using truncated 5' end regions fused to a promoterless green fluorescent protein gene. A 9.5 kb region, adjacent to the sMMO structural gene cluster, was analysed. Downstream (3') from the last gene of the operon, mmoC, four ORFs were found, mmoG, mmoQ, mmoS and mmoR. mmoG shows significant identity to the large subunit of the bacterial chaperonin gene, groEL. In the opposite orientation, two genes, mmoQ and mmoS, showed significant identity to two-component sensor-regulator system genes. Next to mmoS, a gene encoding a putative sigma(N)-dependent transcriptional activator, mmoR was identified. The mmoG and mmoR genes were mutated by marker-exchange mutagenesis and the effects of these mutations on the expression of sMMO was investigated. sMMO transcription was impaired in both mutants. These results indicate that mmoG and mmoR are essential for the expression of sMMO in Mc. capsulatus (Bath).

  1. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of grapefruit with the wild-type and mutant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase genes of Citrus tristeza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus paradisi Macf. cv. Duncan was transformed with constructs coding for the wild-type and mutant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) for exploring replicase-mediated pathogen-derived resistance (RM-PDR). The RdRp gene was amplified from CTV genome and used to gener...

  2. Molecular network, pathway, and functional analysis of time-dependent gene changes associated with pancreatic cancer susceptibility to oncolytic vaccinia virotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our study reveals the ability to assess time-dependent changes in gene expression patterns in pancreatic cancer cells associated with infection and susceptibility to vaccinia viruses. This suggests that molecular assays may be useful to develop safer and more efficacious oncolyticvirotherapies and support the idea that these treatments may target pathways implicated in pancreatic cancer resistance to conventional therapies.

  3. CTX-M-1 β-lactamase expression in Escherichia coli is dependent on cefotaxime concentration, growth phase and gene location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Thea S. B.; Overgaard, Martin; Nielsen, Søren S.

    2015-01-01

    blaCTX-M-1 mRNA expression and CTX-M-1 protein levels were dependent on cefotaxime concentration, growth phase and gene location. These results provide insight into the expression of cephalosporin resistance in CTX-M-1-producing E. coli, improving our understanding of the relationship between...

  4. Dose-dependent effects of dietary fat on development of obesity in relation to intestinal differential gene expression in C57BL/6J mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de Nicole; Boekschoten, Mark; Bachmair, Eva-Maria; Hooiveld, Guido; Groot, de Philip; Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel; Hannelore, Daniel; Muller, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Excessive intake of dietary fat is known to be a contributing factor in the development of obesity. In this study, we determined the dose-dependent effects of dietary fat on the development of this metabolic condition with a focus on changes in gene expression in the small intestine. C57BL/6J mice

  5. Alternative promoters and repetitive DNA elements define the species-dependent tissue-specific expression of the FMO1 genes of human and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Elizabeth A; Chandan, Pritpal; Stevanovic-Walker, Milena; Edwards, Mina; Phillips, Ian R

    2007-09-15

    In humans, expression of the FMO1 (flavin-containing mono-oxygenase 1) gene is silenced postnatally in liver, but not kidney. In adult mouse, however, the gene is active in both tissues. We investigated the basis of this species-dependent tissue-specific transcription of FMO1. Our results indicate the use of three alternative promoters. Transcription of the gene in fetal human and adult mouse liver is exclusively from the P0 promoter, whereas in extra-hepatic tissues of both species, P1 and P2 are active. Reporter gene assays showed that the proximal P0 promoters of human (hFMO1) and mouse (mFmo1) genes are equally effective. However, sequences upstream (-2955 to -506) of the proximal P0 of mFmo1 increased reporter gene activity 3-fold, whereas hFMO1 upstream sequences (-3027 to -541) decreased reporter gene activity by 75%. Replacement of the upstream sequence of human P0 with the upstream sequence of mouse P0 increased activity of the human proximal P0 8-fold. Species-specific repetitive elements are present immediately upstream of the proximal P0 promoters. The human gene contains five LINE (long-interspersed nuclear element)-1-like elements, whereas the mouse gene contains a poly A region, an 80-bp direct repeat, an LTR (long terminal repeat), a SINE (short-interspersed nuclear element) and a poly T tract. The rat and rabbit FMO1 genes, which are expressed in adult liver, lack some (rat) or all (rabbit) of the elements upstream of mouse P0. Thus silencing of FMO1 in adult human liver is due apparently to the presence upstream of the proximal P0 of L1 (LINE-1) elements rather than the absence of retrotransposons similar to those found in the mouse gene.

  6. An intact SAM-dependent methyltransferase fold is encoded by the human endothelin-converting enzyme-2 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tempel, W.; Wu, H.; Dombrovsky, L.; Zeng, H.; Loppnau, P.; Zhu, H.; Plotnikov, A.N.; Bochkarev, A.; (Toronto)

    2010-08-17

    A recent survey of protein expression patterns in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) has identified ece2 (chromosome: 3; Locations: 3q27.1) as the most significantly downregulated gene within the tested group. ece2 encodes endothelin-converting enzyme ECE2, a metalloprotease with a role in neuropeptide processing. Deficiency in the highly homologous ECE1 has earlier been linked to increased levels of AD-related {beta}-amyloid peptide in mice, consistent with a role for ECE in the degradation of that peptide. Initially, ECE2 was presumed to resemble ECE1, in that it comprises a single transmembrane region of {approx}20 residues flanked by a small amino-terminal cytosolic segment and a carboxy-terminal lumenar peptidase domain. The carboxy-terminal domain has significant sequence similarity to both neutral endopeptidase, for which an X-ray structure has been determined, and Kell blood group protein. After their initial discovery, multiple isoforms of ECE1 and ECE2 were discovered, generated by alternative splicing of multiple exons. The originally described ece2 transcript, RefSeq NM{_}174046, contains the amino-terminal cytosolic portion followed by the transmembrane region and peptidase domain (Fig. 1, isoform B). Another ece2 transcript, available from the Mammalian Gene Collection under MGC2408 (Fig. 1, isoform C), RefSeq accession NM{_}032331, is predicted to be translated into a 255 residue peptide with low but detectable sequence similarity to known S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases (SAM-MTs), such as the hypothetical protein TT1324 from Thermus thermophilis, PDB code 2GS9, which shares 30% amino acid sequence identity with ECE2 over 138 residues of the sequence. Intriguingly, another 'elongated' ece2 transcript (Fig. 1, isoform A) (RefSeq NM{_}014693) contains an amino-terminal portion of the putative SAM-MT domain, the transmembrane domain, and the protease domain. This suggests the possibility for coexistence of

  7. Cloning and expression of the gene for a vanadium-dependent bromoperoxidase from a marine macro-alga, Corallina pilulifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonishi, M; Kuwamoto, S; Inoue, H; Wever, R; Ohshiro, T; Izumi, Y; Tanabe, T

    1998-05-22

    The cDNAs for a vanadium-dependent bromoperoxidase were cloned from a marine macro-alga, Corallina pilulifera. The open reading frame of one clone (bpo1) encoded a protein of 598 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 65312 Da in good agreement with that of 64 kDa determined for the native enzyme. The deduced amino acid sequence coincided well with partial sequences of peptide fragments of the enzyme. From the same cDNA library we also isolated another cDNA clone (bpo2) encoding a protein of 597 amino acids with an identity of about 90% to BPO1, suggesting a genetic diversity of the bromoperoxidase gene of C. pilulifera growing in a relatively narrow area. The carboxy-terminal 123 residues of the enzyme (BPO1) showed an identity of 45% to that of the marine macro-alga Ascophillum nodosum. The homology search of the sequences of bromoperoxidases from C. pilulifera (this study) and A. nodostum, and chloroperoxidase from the fungus Curvularia inaequalis indicated highly conserved sequences PxYxSGHA and LxxxxAxxRxxxGxHxxxD. Furthermore, it was found that the histidine residue directly bound to vanadium, other residues building up the metal center and catalytic histidine residue forming the active site of the chloroperoxidase from C. inaequalis are conserved in the primary structure of the bromoperoxidase from C. pilulifera. The cloned hpol was introduced into Escherichia coli, and the expressed PO1 was purified from the recombinant strain. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified BPO1 was identical to the deduced sequence from the cDNA except the N-terminal methionine.

  8. Shear stress induction of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene is calcium-dependent but not calcium-activated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Z; Zhang, Z; Ranjan, V; Diamond, S L

    1997-05-01

    Arterial levels of shear stress (25 dynes/cm2) can elevate constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene expression in cultured endothelial cells (Ranjan et al., 1995). By PhosphorImaging of Northern blots, we report that the eNOS/glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) messenger RNA (mRNA) ratio in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) increased by 4.8- and 7.95-fold after 6-hr shear stress exposure of 4 and 25 dynes/cm2, respectively. Incubation of BAEC with dexamethasone (1 microM) had no effect on shear stress induction of eNOS mRNA. Buffering of intracellular calcium in BAEC with bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, tetra(acetoxymethyl)-ester (BAPTA/AM) reduced shear stress induction of eNOS mRNA by 70%. Yet, stimulation of BAEC with ionomycin (0.1-1.0 microM) for 6-24 hr to elevate intracellular calcium had no effect on eNOS mRNA. These studies indicated that the shear stress induction of eNOS mRNA was a calcium-dependent, but not calcium-activated, process. Shear stress was a very potent and rapid inducer of the eNOS mRNA, which could not be mimicked with phorbol myristrate acetate or endotoxin. Inhibition of tyrosine kinases with genistein (10 microM) or tyrphostin B46 (10 microM) or inhibition of G-protein signaling with guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP-betaS) (600 microM, 6-hr preincubation) did not block the shear stress elevation of eNOS mRNA.

  9. Stimulation of androgen-dependent gene expression by the adrenal precursors dehydroepiandrosterone and androstenedione in the rat ventral prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrie, C.; Simard, J.; Zhao, H.F.; Belanger, A.; Pelletier, G.; Labrie, F. (Laval Univ. Medical Center, Quebec (Canada))

    1989-06-01

    Androgens play a major role in the development, growth, and function of accessory sexual organs, especially the prostate. However, the testis is not the sole source of circulating androgens in man, since the adrenal gland secretes dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulfate, and androstenedione (delta 4-dione) in large quantities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of plasma concentrations of DHEA and delta 4-dione similar to those found in adult man on sensitive and specific markers of androgen action in the rat ventral prostate. In addition to ventral prostate weight, we have measured the steady state levels of the mRNAs encoding the C1 component of rat prostatic binding protein (PBP-C1) and spermine-binding protein (SBP) using 35S-labeled cDNA probes for in situ hybridization. One week after castration, ventral prostate weight fell 84%, while prostatic 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and androgen-dependent mRNAs were undetectable. When administered via Silastic implants to castrated adult rats for 1 week, plasma concentrations of 1.37 +/- 0.06 ng/ml DHEA or 0.43 +/- 0.08 ng/ml delta 4-dione independently caused increases in ventral prostate weight to 33% and 65% of normal values, respectively. The same plasma levels of DHEA and delta 4-dione resulted in high intraprostatic levels of DHT to 1.19 +/- 0.34 and 3.66 +/- 0.89 ng/g tissue, respectively. Furthermore, DHEA caused an increase in the steady state levels of PBP-C1 and SBP mRNAs to 50% and 57% of the normal state, respectively, while delta 4-dione caused increases corresponding to 80% and 119% of control values, respectively. Castrated adult rats receiving testosterone at a concentration of 1.66 +/- 0.37 ng/ml plasma maintained normal ventral prostate weight and gene expression levels.

  10. An in vitro transposon system for highly regulated gene expression: construction of Escherichia coli strains with arabinose-dependent growth at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, A J; Haigh, R; Williams, P; O'Connor, C D

    2001-12-12

    Placing a gene of interest under the control of an inducible promoter greatly aids the purification, localization and functional analysis of proteins but usually requires the sub-cloning of the gene of interest into an appropriate expression vector. Here, we describe an alternative approach employing in vitro transposition of Tn Omega P(BAD) to place the highly regulable, arabinose inducible P(BAD) promoter upstream of the gene to be expressed. The method is rapid, simple and facilitates the optimization of expression by producing constructs with variable distances between the P(BAD) promoter and the gene. To illustrate the use of this approach, we describe the construction of a strain of Escherichia coli in which growth at low temperatures on solid media is dependent on threshold levels of arabinose. Other uses of the transposable promoter are also discussed.

  11. Cannabis-Dependence Risk Relates to Synergism between Neuroticism and Proenkephalin SNPs Associated with Amygdala Gene Expression: Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Jacobs, Michelle M.; Yiannoulos, Georgia; Roussos, Panos; Bitsios, Panos; Nomura, Yoko; Liu, Xun; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Many young people experiment with cannabis, yet only a subgroup progress to dependence suggesting individual differences that could relate to factors such as genetics and behavioral traits. Dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) and proenkephalin (PENK) genes have been implicated in animal studies with cannabis exposure. Whether polymorphisms of these genes are associated with cannabis dependence and related behavioral traits is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Healthy young adults (18–27 years) with cannabis dependence and without a dependence diagnosis were studied (N = 50/group) in relation to a priori-determined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the DRD2 and PENK genes. Negative affect, Impulsive Risk Taking and Neuroticism-Anxiety temperamental traits, positive and negative reward-learning performance and stop-signal reaction times were examined. The findings replicated the known association between the rs6277 DRD2 SNP and decisions associated with negative reinforcement outcomes. Moreover, PENK variants (rs2576573 and rs2609997) significantly related to Neuroticism and cannabis dependence. Cigarette smoking is common in cannabis users, but it was not associated to PENK SNPs as also validated in another cohort (N = 247 smokers, N = 312 non-smokers). Neuroticism mediated (15.3%–19.5%) the genetic risk to cannabis dependence and interacted with risk SNPs, resulting in a 9-fold increase risk for cannabis dependence. Molecular characterization of the postmortem human brain in a different population revealed an association between PENK SNPs and PENK mRNA expression in the central amygdala nucleus emphasizing the functional relevance of the SNPs in a brain region strongly linked to negative affect. Conclusions/Significance Overall, the findings suggest an important role for Neuroticism as an endophenotype linking PENK polymorphisms to cannabis-dependence vulnerability synergistically amplifying the apparent genetic risk. PMID:22745721

  12. GCN-2 dependent inhibition of protein synthesis activates osmosensitive gene transcription via WNK and Ste20 kinase signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Elaine Choung-Hee; Strange, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Increased gpdh-1 transcription is required for accumulation of the organic osmolyte glycerol and survival of Caenorhabditis elegans during hypertonic stress. Our previous work has shown that regulators of gpdh-1 (rgpd) gene knockdown constitutively activates gpdh-1 expression. Fifty-five rgpd genes play essential roles in translation suggesting that inhibition of protein synthesis is an important signal for regulating osmoprotective gene transcription. We demonstrate here that translation is ...

  13. Transient Nod factor-dependent gene expression in the nodulation-competent zone of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Satomi; Reid, Dugald E; Lorenc, Michał T; Stiller, Jiri; Edwards, David; Gresshoff, Peter M; Ferguson, Brett J

    2012-10-01

    All lateral organ development in plants, such as nodulation in legumes, requires the temporal and spatial regulation of genes and gene networks. A total mRNA profiling approach using RNA-seq to target the specific soybean (Glycine max) root tissues responding to compatible rhizobia [i.e. the Zone Of Nodulation (ZON)] revealed a large number of novel, often transient, mRNA changes occurring during the early stages of nodulation. Focusing on the ZON enabled us to discard the majority of root tissues and their developmentally diverse gene transcripts, thereby highlighting the lowly and transiently expressed nodulation-specific genes. It also enabled us to concentrate on a precise moment in early nodule development at each sampling time. We focused on discovering genes regulated specifically by the Bradyrhizobium-produced Nod factor signal, by inoculating roots with either a competent wild-type or incompetent mutant (nodC(-) ) strain of Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Collectively, 2915 genes were identified as being differentially expressed, including many known soybean nodulation genes. A number of unknown nodulation gene candidates and soybean orthologues of nodulation genes previously reported in other legume species were also identified. The differential expression of several candidates was confirmed and further characterized via inoculation time-course studies and qRT-PCR. The expression of many genes, including an endo-1,4-β-glucanase, a cytochrome P450 and a TIR-LRR-NBS receptor kinase, was transient, peaking quickly during the initiation of nodule ontogeny. Additional genes were found to be down-regulated. Significantly, a set of differentially regulated genes acting in the gibberellic acid (GA) biosynthesis pathway was discovered, suggesting a novel role of GAs in nodulation. © 2012 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Direct visualization of electroporation-assisted in vivo gene delivery to tumors using intravital microscopy – spatial and time dependent distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dachs Gabi U

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electroporation is currently receiving much attention as a way to increase drug and DNA delivery. Recent studies demonstrated the feasibility of electrogene therapy using a range of therapeutic genes for the treatment of experimental tumors. However, the transfection efficiency of electroporation-assisted DNA delivery is still low compared to viral methods and there is a clear need to optimize this approach. In order to optimize treatment, knowledge about spatial and time dependency of gene expression following delivery is of utmost importance in order to improve gene delivery. Intravital microscopy of tumors growing in dorsal skin fold window chambers is a useful method for monitoring gene transfection, since it allows non-invasive dynamic monitoring of gene expression in tumors in a live animal. Methods Intravital microscopy was used to monitor real time spatial distribution of the green fluorescent protein (GFP and time dependence of transfection efficiency in syngeneic P22 rat tumor model. DNA alone, liposome-DNA complexes and electroporation-assisted DNA delivery using two different sets of electric pulse parameters were compared. Results Electroporation-assisted DNA delivery using 8 pulses, 600 V/cm, 5 ms, 1 Hz was superior to other methods and resulted in 22% increase in fluorescence intensity in the tumors up to 6 days post-transfection, compared to the non-transfected area in granulation tissue. Functional GFP was detected within 5 h after transfection. Cells expressing GFP were detected throughout the tumor, but not in the surrounding tissue that was not exposed to electric pulses. Conclusions Intravital microscopy was demonstrated to be a suitable method for monitoring time and spatial distribution of gene expression in experimental tumors and provided evidence that electroporation-assisted gene delivery using 8 pulses, 600 V/cm, 5 ms, 1 Hz is an effective method, resulting in early onset and homogenous

  15. The Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus resistance genes Ty-1 and Ty-3 are allelic and code for DFDGD-class RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten G Verlaan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Disease incited by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV causes huge losses in tomato production worldwide and is caused by different related begomovirus species. Breeding for TYLCV resistance has been based on the introgression of multiple resistance genes originating from several wild tomato species. In this study we have fine-mapped the widely used Solanum chilense-derived Ty-1 and Ty-3 genes by screening nearly 12,000 plants for recombination events and generating recombinant inbred lines. Multiple molecular markers were developed and used in combination with disease tests to fine-map the genes to a small genomic region (approximately 70 kb. Using a Tobacco Rattle Virus-Virus Induced Gene Silencing approach, the resistance gene was identified. It is shown that Ty-1 and Ty-3 are allelic and that they code for a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR belonging to the RDRγ type, which has an atypical DFDGD motif in the catalytic domain. In contrast to the RDRα type, characterized by a catalytic DLDGD motif, no clear function has yet been described for the RDRγ type, and thus the Ty-1/Ty-3 gene unveils a completely new class of resistance gene. Although speculative, the resistance mechanism of Ty-1/Ty-3 and its specificity towards TYLCV are discussed in light of the function of the related RDRα class in the amplification of the RNAi response in plants and transcriptional silencing of geminiviruses in plants.

  16. Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP): a case study for highly conserved chordata-specific genes shaping the brain and mutated in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozes, Illana; Yeheskel, Adva; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada

    2015-01-01

    The recent finding of activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) as a protein decreased in serum of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to controls, alongside with the discovery of ADNP mutations in autism and coupled with the original description of cancer mutations, ignited an interest for a comparative analysis of ADNP with other AD/autism/cancer-associated genes. We strive toward a better understanding of the molecular structure of key players in psychiatric/neurodegenerative diseases including autism, schizophrenia, and AD. This article includes data mining and bioinformatics analysis on the ADNP gene and protein, in addition to other related genes, with emphasis on recent literature. ADNP is discovered here as unique to chordata with specific autism mutations different from cancer-associated mutation. Furthermore, ADNP exhibits similarities to other cancer/autism-associated genes. We suggest that key genes, which shape and maintain our brain and are prone to mutations, are by in large unique to chordata. Furthermore, these brain-controlling genes, like ADNP, are linked to cell growth and differentiation, and under different stress conditions may mutate or exhibit expression changes leading to cancer propagation. Better understanding of these genes could lead to better therapeutics.

  17. Assessment and validation of a suite of reverse transcription-quantitative PCR reference genes for analyses of density-dependent behavioural plasticity in the Australian plague locust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, Marie-Pierre; Tohidi-Esfahani, Donya; Dodgson, Tim; Blondin, Laurence; Ponton, Fleur; Cullen, Darron; Simpson, Stephen J; Sword, Gregory A

    2011-02-16

    The Australian plague locust, Chortoicetes terminifera, is among the most promising species to unravel the suites of genes underling the density-dependent shift from shy and cryptic solitarious behaviour to the highly active and aggregating gregarious behaviour that is characteristic of locusts. This is because it lacks many of the major phenotypic changes in colour and morphology that accompany phase change in other locust species. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is the most sensitive method available for determining changes in gene expression. However, to accurately monitor the expression of target genes, it is essential to select an appropriate normalization strategy to control for non-specific variation between samples. Here we identify eight potential reference genes and examine their expression stability at different rearing density treatments in neural tissue of the Australian plague locust. Taking advantage of the new orthologous DNA sequences available in locusts, we developed primers for genes encoding 18SrRNA, ribosomal protein L32 (RpL32), armadillo (Arm), actin 5C (Actin), succinate dehydrogenase (SDHa), glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase (GAPDH), elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a) and annexin IX (AnnIX). The relative transcription levels of these eight genes were then analyzed in three treatment groups differing in rearing density (isolated, short- and long-term crowded), each made up of five pools of four neural tissue samples from 5th instar nymphs. SDHa and GAPDH, which are both involved in metabolic pathways, were identified as the least stable in expression levels, challenging their usefulness in normalization. Based on calculations performed with the geNorm and NormFinder programs, the best combination of two genes for normalization of gene expression data following crowding in the Australian plague locust was EF1a and Arm. We applied their use to studying a target gene that encodes a Ca2+ binding glycoprotein

  18. Assessment and validation of a suite of reverse transcription-quantitative PCR reference genes for analyses of density-dependent behavioural plasticity in the Australian plague locust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blondin Laurence

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Australian plague locust, Chortoicetes terminifera, is among the most promising species to unravel the suites of genes underling the density-dependent shift from shy and cryptic solitarious behaviour to the highly active and aggregating gregarious behaviour that is characteristic of locusts. This is because it lacks many of the major phenotypic changes in colour and morphology that accompany phase change in other locust species. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR is the most sensitive method available for determining changes in gene expression. However, to accurately monitor the expression of target genes, it is essential to select an appropriate normalization strategy to control for non-specific variation between samples. Here we identify eight potential reference genes and examine their expression stability at different rearing density treatments in neural tissue of the Australian plague locust. Results Taking advantage of the new orthologous DNA sequences available in locusts, we developed primers for genes encoding 18SrRNA, ribosomal protein L32 (RpL32, armadillo (Arm, actin 5C (Actin, succinate dehydrogenase (SDHa, glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase (GAPDH, elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a and annexin IX (AnnIX. The relative transcription levels of these eight genes were then analyzed in three treatment groups differing in rearing density (isolated, short- and long-term crowded, each made up of five pools of four neural tissue samples from 5th instar nymphs. SDHa and GAPDH, which are both involved in metabolic pathways, were identified as the least stable in expression levels, challenging their usefulness in normalization. Based on calculations performed with the geNorm and NormFinder programs, the best combination of two genes for normalization of gene expression data following crowding in the Australian plague locust was EF1a and Arm. We applied their use to studying a target gene

  19. Temperature-dependent sex-reversal by a transformer-2 gene-edited mutation in the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianwei; Handler, Alfred M

    2017-09-28

    Female to male sex reversal was achieved in an emerging agricultural insect pest, Drosophila suzukii, by creating a temperature-sensitive point mutation in the sex-determination gene, transformer-2 (tra-2), using CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) homology-directed repair gene-editing. Ds-tra-2 ts2 mutants developed as normal fertile XX and XY adults at permissive temperatures below 20 °C, but at higher restrictive temperatures (26 to 29 °C) chromosomal XX females developed as sterile intersexuals with a predominant male phenotype, while XY males developed with normal morphology, but were sterile. The temperature-dependent function of the Ds-TRA-2 ts2 protein was also evident by the up- and down-regulation of female-specific Ds-Yolk protein 1 (Ds-Yp1) gene expression by temperature shifts during adulthood. This study confirmed the temperature-dependent function of a gene-edited mutation and provides a new method for the more general creation of conditional mutations for functional genomic analysis in insects, and other organisms. Furthermore, it provides a temperature-dependent system for creating sterile male populations useful for enhancing the efficacy of biologically-based programs, such as the sterile insect technique (SIT), to control D. suzukii and other insect pest species of agricultural and medical importance.

  20. Novel Insight into Vascular, Stress and Auxin Dependent and Independent Gene Expression Programs in Strawberry, a Non-Climacteric Fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aharoni, A.; Keizer, L.C.P.; Broeck, van den H.C.; Bois, G.; Smit, P.; Vos, de R.C.H.

    2002-01-01

    Using cDNA microarrays, a comprehensive investigation of gene expression was carried out in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) fruit to understand the flow of events associated with its maturation and non-climacteric ripening. We detected key processes and novel genes not previously associated with

  1. Generational association studies of dopaminergic genes in reward deficiency syndrome (RDS) subjects: selecting appropriate phenotypes for reward dependence behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Chen, Amanda L C; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Chen, Thomas J H; Lubar, Joel; White, Nancy; Lubar, Judith; Bowirrat, Abdalla; Braverman, Eric; Schoolfield, John; Waite, Roger L; Downs, Bernard W; Madigan, Margaret; Comings, David E; Davis, Caroline; Kerner, Mallory M; Knopf, Jennifer; Palomo, Tomas; Giordano, John J; Morse, Siobhan A; Fornari, Frank; Barh, Debmalya; Femino, John; Bailey, John A

    2011-12-01

    Abnormal behaviors involving dopaminergic gene polymorphisms often reflect an insufficiency of usual feelings of satisfaction, or Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS). RDS results from a dysfunction in the "brain reward cascade," a complex interaction among neurotransmitters (primarily dopaminergic and opioidergic). Individuals with a family history of alcoholism or other addictions may be born with a deficiency in the ability to produce or use these neurotransmitters. Exposure to prolonged periods of stress and alcohol or other substances also can lead to a corruption of the brain reward cascade function. We evaluated the potential association of four variants of dopaminergic candidate genes in RDS (dopamine D1 receptor gene [DRD1]; dopamine D2 receptor gene [DRD2]; dopamine transporter gene [DAT1]; dopamine beta-hydroxylase gene [DBH]). We genotyped an experimental group of 55 subjects derived from up to five generations of two independent multiple-affected families compared to rigorously screened control subjects (e.g., N = 30 super controls for DRD2 gene polymorphisms). Data related to RDS behaviors were collected on these subjects plus 13 deceased family members. Among the genotyped family members, the DRD2 Taq1 and the DAT1 10/10 alleles were significantly (at least p spurious results. Utilization of a nonspecific "reward" phenotype may be a paradigm shift in future association and linkage studies involving dopaminergic polymorphisms and other neurotransmitter gene candidates.

  2. Long-chain acyl-CoA-dependent regulation of gene expression in bacteria, yeast and mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, P N; Færgeman, Nils J.; DiRusso, C C

    2000-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, genes encoding peroxisomal proteins are activated in response to exogenously supplied fatty acids. In contrast, growth of yeast cells in media containing exogenous fatty acids results in repression of a number of genes, including that encoding the delta9-fatty acid desaturase (OLE1...

  3. Response to desmopressin is strongly dependent on F8 gene mutation type in mild and moderate haemophilia A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C.M. Stoof (Carina); Y.V. Sanders (Yvonne); F. Petrij; M.H. Cnossen (Marjon); M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek); F.W.G. Leebeek (Frank); M.J.H.A. Kruip (Marieke)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDesmopressin causes two- to six-fold increase of factor VIII (FVIII) in mild or moderate haemophilia A patients. However, responses are variable and little is known whether this is associated with F8 gene mutation. The study objective was to assess the relationship between F8 gene

  4. Successful pod infections by Moniliophthora roreri result in differential Theobroma cacao gene expression depending on the clone's level of tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shahin S; Melnick, Rachel L; Crozier, Jayne; Phillips-Mora, Wilberth; Strem, Mary D; Shao, Jonathan; Zhang, Dapeng; Sicher, Richard; Meinhardt, Lyndel; Bailey, Bryan A

    2014-09-01

    An understanding of the tolerance mechanisms of Theobroma cacao used against Moniliophthora roreri, the causal agent of frosty pod rot, is important for the generation of stable disease-tolerant clones. A comparative view was obtained of transcript populations of infected pods from two susceptible and two tolerant clones using RNA sequence (RNA-Seq) analysis. A total of 3009 transcripts showed differential expression among clones. KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes indicated shifts in 152 different metabolic pathways between the tolerant and susceptible clones. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time qRT-PCR) analyses of 36 genes verified the differential expression. Regression analysis validated a uniform progression in gene expression in association with infection levels and fungal loads in the susceptible clones. Expression patterns observed in the susceptible clones diverged in tolerant clones, with many genes showing higher expression at a low level of infection and fungal load. Principal coordinate analyses of real-time qRT-PCR data separated the gene expression patterns between susceptible and tolerant clones for pods showing malformation. Although some genes were constitutively differentially expressed between clones, most results suggested that defence responses were induced at low fungal load in the tolerant clones. Several elicitor-responsive genes were highly expressed in tolerant clones, suggesting rapid recognition of the pathogen and induction of defence genes. Expression patterns suggested that the jasmonic acid-ethylene- and/or salicylic acid-mediated defence pathways were activated in the tolerant clones, being enhanced by reduced brassinosteroid (BR) biosynthesis and catabolic inactivation of both BR and abscisic acids. Finally, several genes associated with hypersensitive response-like cell death were also induced in tolerant clones. © 2014

  5. Identification of Novel Signal Transduction, Immune Function, and Oxidative Stress Genes and Pathways by Topiramate for Treatment of Methamphetamine Dependence Based on Secondary Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhua Niu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTopiramate (TPM is suggested to be a promising medication for treatment of methamphetamine (METH dependence, but the molecular basis remains to be elucidated.MethodsAmong 140 METH-dependent participants randomly assigned to receive either TPM (N = 69 or placebo (N = 71 in a previously conducted randomized controlled trial, 50 TPM- and 49 placebo-treated participants had a total 212 RNA samples available at baseline, week 8, and week 12 time points. Following our primary analysis of gene expression data, we reanalyzed the microarray expression data based on a latent class analysis of binary secondary outcomes during weeks 1–12 that provided a classification of 21 responders and 31 non-responders with consistent responses at both time points.ResultsBased on secondary outcomes, 1,381, 576, 905, and 711 differentially expressed genes at nominal P values < 0.05 were identified in responders versus non-responders for week 8 TPM, week 8 placebo, week 12 TPM, and week 12 placebo groups, respectively. Among 1,381 genes identified in week 8 TPM responders, 359 genes were identified in both week 8 and week 12 TPM groups, of which 300 genes were exclusively detected in TPM responders. Of them, 32 genes had nominal P values < 5 × 10−3 at either week 8 or week 12 and false discovery rates < 0.15 at both time points with consistent directions of gene expression changes, which include GABARAPL1, GPR155, and IL15RA in GABA receptor signaling that represent direct targets for TPM. Analyses of these 300 genes revealed 7 enriched pathways belonging to neuronal function/synaptic plasticity, signal transduction, inflammation/immune function, and oxidative stress response categories. No pathways were enriched for 72 genes exclusively detected in both week 8 and week 12 placebo groups.ConclusionThis secondary analysis study of gene expression data from a TPM clinical trial not only yielded consistent results with those of primary

  6. Comparative analyses of genotype dependent expressed sequence tags and stress-responsive transcriptome of chickpea wilt illustrate predicted and unexpected genes and novel regulators of plant immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakraborty Niranjan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ultimate phenome of any organism is modulated by regulated transcription of many genes. Characterization of genetic makeup is thus crucial for understanding the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity, evolution and response to intra- and extra-cellular stimuli. Chickpea is the world's third most important food legume grown in over 40 countries representing all the continents. Despite its importance in plant evolution, role in human nutrition and stress adaptation, very little ESTs and differential transcriptome data is available, let alone genotype-specific gene signatures. Present study focuses on Fusarium wilt responsive gene expression in chickpea. Results We report 6272 gene sequences of immune-response pathway that would provide genotype-dependent spatial information on the presence and relative abundance of each gene. The sequence assembly led to the identification of a CaUnigene set of 2013 transcripts comprising of 973 contigs and 1040 singletons, two-third of which represent new chickpea genes hitherto undiscovered. We identified 209 gene families and 262 genotype-specific SNPs. Further, several novel transcription regulators were identified indicating their possible role in immune response. The transcriptomic analysis revealed 649 non-cannonical genes besides many unexpected candidates with known biochemical functions, which have never been associated with pathostress-responsive transcriptome. Conclusion Our study establishes a comprehensive catalogue of the immune-responsive root transcriptome with insight into their identity and function. The development, detailed analysis of CaEST datasets and global gene expression by microarray provide new insight into the commonality and diversity of organ-specific immune-responsive transcript signatures and their regulated expression shaping the species specificity at genotype level. This is the first report on differential transcriptome of an unsequenced genome during

  7. Comparative analyses of genotype dependent expressed sequence tags and stress-responsive transcriptome of chickpea wilt illustrate predicted and unexpected genes and novel regulators of plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Nasheeman; Ghai, Deepali; Barman, Pranjan; Basu, Swaraj; Gangisetty, Nagaraju; Mandal, Mihir K; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2009-09-05

    The ultimate phenome of any organism is modulated by regulated transcription of many genes. Characterization of genetic makeup is thus crucial for understanding the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity, evolution and response to intra- and extra-cellular stimuli. Chickpea is the world's third most important food legume grown in over 40 countries representing all the continents. Despite its importance in plant evolution, role in human nutrition and stress adaptation, very little ESTs and differential transcriptome data is available, let alone genotype-specific gene signatures. Present study focuses on Fusarium wilt responsive gene expression in chickpea. We report 6272 gene sequences of immune-response pathway that would provide genotype-dependent spatial information on the presence and relative abundance of each gene. The sequence assembly led to the identification of a CaUnigene set of 2013 transcripts comprising of 973 contigs and 1040 singletons, two-third of which represent new chickpea genes hitherto undiscovered. We identified 209 gene families and 262 genotype-specific SNPs. Further, several novel transcription regulators were identified indicating their possible role in immune response. The transcriptomic analysis revealed 649 non-cannonical genes besides many unexpected candidates with known biochemical functions, which have never been associated with pathostress-responsive transcriptome. Our study establishes a comprehensive catalogue of the immune-responsive root transcriptome with insight into their identity and function. The development, detailed analysis of CaEST datasets and global gene expression by microarray provide new insight into the commonality and diversity of organ-specific immune-responsive transcript signatures and their regulated expression shaping the species specificity at genotype level. This is the first report on differential transcriptome of an unsequenced genome during vascular wilt.

  8. Antimicrobial medium- and long-chain free fatty acids prevent PrfA-dependent activation of virulence genes in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternkopf Lillebæk, Eva Maria; Lambert Nielsen, Stine; Scheel Thomasen, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    of virulence factors required for bacterial entry, intracellular replication and cell-to-cell spread. PrfA-dependent activation of virulence genes occurs primarily in the blood and during intracellular infection. In contrast, PrfA does not play a significant role in regulation of virulence gene expression......The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the invasive disease listeriosis. Infection by L. monocytogenes involves bacterial crossing of the intestinal barrier and intracellular replication in a variety of host cells. The PrfA protein is the master regulator...

  9. Identification and validation of heavy metal and radionuclide hyperaccumulating terrestrial plant species. Quarterly technical progress report, March 20, 1997--June 19, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochian, L.

    1997-11-01

    This laboratory has been involved in a collaborative project focusing on a range of issues related to the phytoremediation of heavy metal-and radionuclide- contaminated soils. While much of the research has been fundamental in nature, involving physiological and molecular characterizations of the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation in plants, the laboratory is also investigating more practical issues related to phytoremediation. A central issue in this latter research has been the identification of amendments capable of increasing the bioavailability and subsequent phytoextraction of radionuclides. The results described here detail these efforts for uranium and Cs-137. A study was also conducted on a Cs-137 contaminated site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), which allowed application of the laboratory and greenhouse results to a field setting.

  10. Identification and validation of heavy metal and radionuclide hyperaccumulating terrestrial plant species, Quarterly technical progress report, December 20, 1995--March 20, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochian, L.; Brady, D.; Last, M.; Ebbs, S.

    1995-12-01

    Although the period covered by this progress report began on December 20, 1994, which was the date that DOE approved the Interagency Agreement, the agreement was not approved by USDA until January 9, 1995 and the first scientists working on the project were not hired until February 1, 1995. The first goal of the research supported by the Interagency Agreement is to use hydroponic techniques to identify plant species and genotypes with potential for heavy metal hyperaccumulation for planting on a test site at Silverbow Creek and for radionuclide ({sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs) accumulation on a test site at INEL, Idaho, later this year. The second goal of this research is to identify soil amendment procedures that will enhance the bioavailability of heavy metals and radionuclides in the soil without increasing the movement of the contaminants of concern (COC`s) into the groundwater. Our initial research covered in this report focuses on the first goal.

  11. Counter regulation of ECRG4 gene expression by hypermethylation-dependent inhibition and the Sp1 transcription factor-dependent stimulation of the c2orf40 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Xitong; Zeng, Xiaorong; Coimbra, Raul; Eliceiri, Brian P; Baird, Andrew

    2017-12-15

    The human cytokine precursor ECRG4 has been associated with multiple physiological, developmental and pathophysiological processes involving cell proliferation, cell migration, innate immunity, inflammation, cancer progression and metastases. Although down-regulation of ECRG4 gene expression has been largely attributed to hypermethylation of CpG islands in the 5'untranslated region of the ECRG4 promoter, the mechanisms that underlie the dynamics of its regulation have never been systematically described. Here we show that the ECRG4 gene is widely expressed in human tissues and report that its core promoter lies between the -780 to +420 base pairs relative to the ATG start codon of the ECRG4 open reading frame. This sequence, which contains several CpG islands, also includes multiple overlapping Sp1 consensus binding sequences and a putative binding site for NF-kB activation. 5'RACE of mRNA derived from human leukocytes shows that ECRG4 transcription initiates from the guanidine at -11 from the initiation ATG of the ECRG4 open reading frame. While there is no canonical TATA- or CAAT-boxes proximal to this translational initiation site, there is a distal TATA-sequence in the 5'UTR. This region was identified as the sequence targeted by hypermethylation because in vitro methylation of plasmids encoding the ECRG4 promoter abolish promoter activity and the treatment of Jurkat cells (which naturally express ECRG4) with the methylation inhibitor 5-AzaC, increases endogenous ECRG4 expression. Because ChIP assays show that Sp1 binds the ECRG4 promoter, that forced Sp1 expression trans-activates the ECRG4 promoter and Sp1 inhibition with mithramycin inhibits ECRG4 expression, we conclude that the dynamic positive and negative regulatory elements controlling ECRG4 expression include a counter regulation between promoter methylation and Sp1 activation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Hox gene expression in the embryonic genital system of the sea turtle Lepidochelys olivacea (Eschscholt, 1829), a species with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes-Romero, Itzel; Merchant-Larios, Horacio; García-Gasca, Alejandra

    2010-09-01

    Hox genes are conserved transcription factors which regulate embryonic morphogenesis and differentiation. For the first time, we examined the quantitative and spatial expression of two Hox 5' genes, HoxD11 and HoxA13, in the developing genital system of the olive ridley Lepidochelys olivacea, a species with temperature-dependent sex determination. Quantitative and spatial expression patterns of both genes suggest a role in the female pathway rather than the male pathway. For instance, both genes, especially HoxA13, were expressed in the undifferentiated gonad during the thermosensitive period at a female promoting temperature, and downregulated in the differentiated gonad. By contrast, expression of both genes was low in gonads incubated at a male promoting temperature and did not change significantly in the differentiated gonad. Furthermore, we found high expression levels of HoxA13 in the paramesonephric duct at the male promoting temperature but not at the female promoting temperature, suggesting a role for this Hox gene in the partial regression of the Müllerian duct in males. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. RAR1 and NDR1 contribute quantitatively to disease resistance in Arabidopsis, and their relative contributions are dependent on the R gene assayed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero, Pablo; Merritt, Peter; Sadanandom, Ari; Shirasu, Ken; Innes, Roger W; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2002-05-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes mediate specific pathogen recognition, leading to a successful immune response. Downstream responses include ion fluxes, an oxidative burst, transcriptional reprogramming, and, in many cases, hypersensitive cell death at the infection site. We used a transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the bacterial avirulence gene avrRpm1 under the control of a steroid-inducible promoter to select for mutations in genes required for RPM1-mediated recognition and signal transduction. We identified an allelic series of eight mutants that also were allelic to the previously identified pbs2 mutation. Positional cloning revealed this gene to be AtRAR1, the Arabidopsis ortholog of barley RAR1, a known mediator of R function. AtRAR1 is required for both full hypersensitive cell death and complete disease resistance mediated by many, but not all, tested R genes. Double mutant analysis of Atrar1 in combination with the R signal intermediate ndr1 suggests that AtRAR1 and NDR1 can operate in both linear and parallel signaling events, depending on the R gene function triggered. In Atrar1 null plants, the levels of RPM1-myc are reduced severely, suggesting that AtRAR1 may regulate R protein stability or accumulation.

  14. Polycomb Group Protein Displacement and Gene Activation through MSK-Dependent H3K27me3S28 Phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehani, Simmi Suman; Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi; Dietrich, Nikolaj

    2010-01-01

    cells and during differentiation. How the Polycomb group (PcG) target genes are regulated by environmental cues and signaling pathways is quite unexplored. Here, we show that the mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK), through a mechanism that involves promoter recruitment, histone H3K27me3S28...... phosphorylation, and displacement of PcG proteins, lead to gene activation. We present evidence that the H3K27me3S28 phosphorylation is functioning in response to stress signaling, mitogenic signaling, and retinoic acid (RA)-induced neuronal differentiation. We propose that MSK-mediated H3K27me3S28...... phosphorylation serves as a mechanism to activate a subset of PcG target genes determined by the biological stimuli and thereby modulate the gene expression program determining cell fate....

  15. Dependence of exogenous SERCA gene expression on coxsackie adenovirus receptor levels in neonatal and adult cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbilla, Carlota; Ma, Hailun; Seth, Malini; Inesi, Giuseppe

    2003-07-15

    We demonstrate that the efficiency of adenovirus-assisted exogenous Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) and reporter (EGFP) gene expression is much higher in primary cultures of myocytes from neonatal rat hearts, than in primary cultures of myocytes from adult rat hearts. In this respect, the neonatal myocytes behave similarly to the established COS-1 cell line. This difference is related to the level of coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) that affects cell penetration and expression level of exogenous genes, and explains variations in the observed consequences of exposure to adenovirus vector carrying SERCA cDNA. Awareness of these differences should be highly advantageous in complementary studies of exogenous gene expression in neonatal and adult myocytes. It should also be advantageous in evaluating conditions yielding optimal ratios of functional benefits over possible toxic effects upon exogenous SERCA gene delivery to cardiac muscle.

  16. VaCPK20, a calcium-dependent protein kinase gene of wild grapevine Vitis amurensis Rupr., mediates cold and drought stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovina, Alexandra S; Kiselev, Konstantin V; Khristenko, Valeriya S; Aleynova, Olga A

    2015-08-01

    Abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity, cold and heat, are major environmental factors that limit crop productivity. Vitis amurensis Rupr. is a wild grapevine species displaying a high level of abiotic and biotic stress resistance. Protein kinases, including Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), are known to mediate plant acclimation to various environmental changes. However, the functions of most grape CDPKs have not been clarified. A recent CDPK gene expression analysis revealed that 10 CDPK genes of V. amurensis were up-regulated under different abiotic stress treatments. The expression of the VaCPK20 gene was significantly up-regulated under low and high temperature stress in V. amurensis. In the current study, the effects of overexpressing the VaCPK20 gene in callus cell lines of V. amurensis and transgenic plants of A. thaliana on their responses to abiotic stresses were investigated. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing the VaCPK20 gene showed higher tolerance to freezing and drought stresses, and transgenic grape cell cultures overexpressing the VaCPK20 gene showed higher resistance to cold stress in comparison with the controls transformed by the "empty" vector. Heat and salt stress resistance of the transgenic V. amurensis calli and A. thaliana was comparable to that of the wild type and vector controls. Overexpression of the VaCPK20 gene increased the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as COR47, NHX1, KIN1, or ABF3, in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants under non-stress conditions, after freezing, and under drought stress. The results imply that VaCPK20 may act as a regulatory factor involved in cold and drought stress response pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Genome-wide Identification and Expression Analysis of Calcium-dependent Protein Kinase and Its Closely Related Kinase Genes in Capsicum annuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hanyang ecai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As Ca2+ sensors and effectors, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs play important roles in regulating the downstream components of calcium signaling, which are ubiquitously involved in plant growth, development, and response to environmental cues. However, no CDPKs have been characterized in Capsicum annuum thus far. Herein, a comprehensive analysis of genes encoding pepper CDPKs and CDPK-related protein kinases (CRKs was performed, and 31 CDPK genes and five closely related kinase genes were identified, which were phylogenetically divided into four distinct subfamilies and unevenly distributed across nine chromosomes. Conserved sequence and exon-intron structures were found to be shared by pepper CDPKs within the same subfamily, and the expansion of the CaCPK family in pepper was found to be due to segmental duplication events. Five CDPKs in the Capsicum annuum variety CM334 were found to be mutated in the Chiltepin variety, and one CDPK present in CM334 was lost in Chiltepin. The majority of CDPK and CRK genes were expressed in different pepper tissues and developmental stages, and 10, 12, and eight CDPK genes were transcriptionally modified by salt, heat, and Ralstonia solanacearum stresses, respectively. Furthermore, these genes were found to respond specifically to one stress as well as respond synergistically to two stresses or three stresses, suggesting that these CDPK genes might be involved in the specific or synergistic response of pepper to salt, heat, and R. solanacearum. Our results lay the foundation for future functional characterization of pepper CDPK and its closely related gene families.

  18. A Cyclin Dependent Kinase Regulatory Subunit (CKS) Gene of Pigeonpea Imparts Abiotic Stress Tolerance and Regulates Plant Growth and Development in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha R.; Khareedu, Venkateswara R.

    2017-01-01

    Frequent climatic changes in conjunction with other extreme environmental factors are known to affect growth, development and productivity of diverse crop plants. Pigeonpea, a major grain legume of the semiarid tropics, endowed with an excellent deep-root system, is known as one of the important drought tolerant crop plants. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are core cell cycle regulators and play important role in different aspects of plant growth and development. The cyclin-dependent kinase regulatory subunit gene (CKS) was isolated from the cDNA library of pigeonpea plants subjected to drought stress. Pigeonpea CKS (CcCKS) gene expression was detected in both the root and leaf tissues of pigeonpea and was upregulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), mannitol, NaCl and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. The overexpression of CcCKS gene in Arabidopsis significantly enhanced tolerance of transgenics to drought and salt stresses as evidenced by different physiological parameters. Under stress conditions, transgenics showed higher biomass, decreased rate of water loss, decreased MDA levels, higher free proline contents, and glutathione levels. Moreover, under stress conditions transgenics exhibited lower stomatal conductance, lower transpiration, and higher photosynthetic rates. However, under normal conditions, CcCKS-transgenics displayed decreased plant growth rate, increased cell size and decreased stomatal number compared to those of wild-type plants. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that CcCKS could regulate the expression of both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent genes associated with abiotic stress tolerance as well as plant growth and development. As such, the CcCKS seems promising and might serve as a potential candidate gene for enhancing the abiotic stress tolerance of crop plants. PMID:28239388

  19. A Cyclin Dependent Kinase Regulatory Subunit (CKS) Gene of Pigeonpea Imparts Abiotic Stress Tolerance and Regulates Plant Growth and Development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha R; Khareedu, Venkateswara R

    2017-01-01

    Frequent climatic changes in conjunction with other extreme environmental factors are known to affect growth, development and productivity of diverse crop plants. Pigeonpea, a major grain legume of the semiarid tropics, endowed with an excellent deep-root system, is known as one of the important drought tolerant crop plants. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are core cell cycle regulators and play important role in different aspects of plant growth and development. The cyclin-dependent kinase regulatory subunit gene (CKS) was isolated from the cDNA library of pigeonpea plants subjected to drought stress. Pigeonpea CKS (CcCKS) gene expression was detected in both the root and leaf tissues of pigeonpea and was upregulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), mannitol, NaCl and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. The overexpression of CcCKS gene in Arabidopsis significantly enhanced tolerance of transgenics to drought and salt stresses as evidenced by different physiological parameters. Under stress conditions, transgenics showed higher biomass, decreased rate of water loss, decreased MDA levels, higher free proline contents, and glutathione levels. Moreover, under stress conditions transgenics exhibited lower stomatal conductance, lower transpiration, and higher photosynthetic rates. However, under normal conditions, CcCKS-transgenics displayed decreased plant growth rate, increased cell size and decreased stomatal number compared to those of wild-type plants. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that CcCKS could regulate the expression of both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent genes associated with abiotic stress tolerance as well as plant growth and development. As such, the CcCKS seems promising and might serve as a potential candidate gene for enhancing the abiotic stress tolerance of crop plants.

  20. Activity-dependent calcium signaling and ERK-MAP kinases in neurons: a link to structural plasticity of the nucleus and gene transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, J Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-05-01

    Activity-dependent gene expression is important for the formation and maturation of neuronal networks, neuronal survival and for plastic modifications within mature networks. At the level of individual neurons, expression of new protein is required for dendritic branching, synapse formation and elimination. Experience-driven synaptic activity induces membrane depolarization, which in turn evokes intracellular calcium transients that are decoded according to their source and strength by intracellular calcium sensing proteins. In order to activate the gene transcription machinery of the cell, calcium signals have to be conveyed from the site of their generation in the cytoplasm to the cell nucleus. This can occur via a variety of mechanisms and with different kinetics depending on the source and amplitude of calcium influx. One mechanism involves the propagation of calcium itself, leading to nuclear calcium transients that subsequently activate transcription. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade represents a second central signaling module that transduces information from the site of calcium signal generation at the plasma membrane to the nucleus. Nuclear signaling of the MAPK cascades catalyzes the phosphorylation of transcription factors but also regulates gene transcription more globally at the level of chromatin remodeling as well as through its recently identified role in the modulation of nuclear shape. Here we discuss the possible mechanisms by which the MAPKs ERK1 and ERK2, activated by synaptically evoked calcium influx, can signal to the nucleus and regulate gene transcription. Moreover, we describe how MAPK-dependent structural plasticity of the nuclear envelope enhances nuclear calcium signaling and suggest possible implications for the regulation of gene transcription in the context of nuclear geometry. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. RNA processing factors Swd2.2 and Sen1 antagonize RNA Pol III-dependent transcription and the localization of condensin at Pol III genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legros, Pénélope; Malapert, Amélie; Niinuma, Sho; Bernard, Pascal; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Condensin-mediated chromosome condensation is essential for genome stability upon cell division. Genetic studies have indicated that the association of condensin with chromatin is intimately linked to gene transcription, but what transcription-associated feature(s) direct(s) the accumulation of condensin remains unclear. Here we show in fission yeast that condensin becomes strikingly enriched at RNA Pol III-transcribed genes when Swd2.2 and Sen1, two factors involved in the transcription process, are simultaneously deleted. Sen1 is an ATP-dependent helicase whose orthologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae contributes both to terminate transcription of some RNA Pol II transcripts and to antagonize the formation of DNA:RNA hybrids in the genome. Using two independent mapping techniques, we show that DNA:RNA hybrids form in abundance at Pol III-transcribed genes in fission yeast but we demonstrate that they are unlikely to faciliate the recruitment of condensin. Instead, we show that Sen1 forms a stable and abundant complex with RNA Pol III and that Swd2.2 and Sen1 antagonize both the interaction of RNA Pol III with chromatin and RNA Pol III-dependent transcription. When Swd2.2 and Sen1 are lacking, the increased concentration of RNA Pol III and condensin at Pol III-transcribed genes is accompanied by the accumulation of topoisomerase I and II and by local nucleosome depletion, suggesting that Pol III-transcribed genes suffer topological stress. We provide evidence that this topological stress contributes to recruit and/or stabilize condensin at Pol III-transcribed genes in the absence of Swd2.2 and Sen1. Our data challenge the idea that a processive RNA polymerase hinders the binding of condensin and suggest that transcription-associated topological stress could in some circumstances facilitate the association of condensin.

  2. Computational Prediction and Experimental Verification of the Gene Encoding the NAD+/NADP+-Dependent Succinate Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrer, Tobias; Chen, Lifeng; Sauer, Uwe; Vitkup, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Although NAD+-dependent succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity was first described in Escherichia coli more than 25 years ago, the responsible gene has remained elusive so far. As an experimental proof of concept for a gap-filling algorithm for metabolic networks developed earlier, we demonstrate here that the E. coli gene yneI is responsible for this activity. Our biochemical results demonstrate that the yneI-encoded succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase can use either NAD+ or NADP+ to oxidize succinate semialdehyde to succinate. The gene is induced by succinate semialdehyde, and expression data indicate that yneI plays a unique physiological role in the general nitrogen metabolism of E. coli. In particular, we demonstrate using mutant growth experiments that the yneI gene has an important, but not essential, role during growth on arginine and probably has an essential function during growth on putrescine as the nitrogen source. The NADP+-dependent succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity encoded by the functional homolog gabD appears to be important for nitrogen metabolism under N limitation conditions. The yneI-encoded activity, in contrast, functions primarily as a valve to prevent toxic accumulation of succinate semialdehyde. Analysis of available genome sequences demonstrated that orthologs of both yneI and gabD are broadly distributed across phylogenetic space. PMID:17873044

  3. Weak Organic Acids Decrease Borrelia burgdorferi Cytoplasmic pH, Eliciting an Acid Stress Response and Impacting RpoN- and RpoS-Dependent Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Dulebohn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi survives in its tick vector, Ixodes scapularis, or within various hosts. To transition between and survive in these distinct niches, B. burgdorferi changes its gene expression in response to environmental cues, both biochemical and physiological. Exposure of B. burgdorferi to weak monocarboxylic organic acids, including those detected in the blood meal of fed ticks, decreased the cytoplasmic pH of B. burgdorferi in vitro. A decrease in the cytoplasmic pH induced the expression of genes encoding enzymes that have been shown to restore pH homeostasis in other bacteria. These include putative coupled proton/cation exchangers, a putative Na+/H+ antiporter, a neutralizing buffer transporter, an amino acid deaminase and a proton exporting vacuolar-type VoV1 ATPase. Data presented in this report suggested that the acid stress response triggered the expression of RpoN- and RpoS-dependent genes including important virulence factors such as outer surface protein C (OspC, BBA66, and some BosR (Borreliaoxidative stress regulator-dependent genes. Because the expression of virulence factors, like OspC, are so tightly connected by RpoS to general cellular stress responses and cell physiology, it is difficult to separate transmission-promoting conditions in what is clearly a multifactorial and complex regulatory web.

  4. Integrating mRNA and miRNA Weighted Gene Co-Expression Networks with eQTLs in the Nucleus Accumbens of Subjects with Alcohol Dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mamdani

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption is known to lead to gene expression changes in the brain. After performing weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA on genome-wide mRNA and microRNA (miRNA expression in Nucleus Accumbens (NAc of subjects with alcohol dependence (AD; N = 18 and of matched controls (N = 18, six mRNA and three miRNA modules significantly correlated with AD were identified (Bonferoni-adj. p≤ 0.05. Cell-type-specific transcriptome analyses revealed two of the mRNA modules to be enriched for neuronal specific marker genes and downregulated in AD, whereas the remaining four mRNA modules were enriched for astrocyte and microglial specific marker genes and upregulated in AD. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated that neuronal specific modules were enriched for genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction and MAPK signaling. Glial-specific modules were predominantly enriched for genes involved in processes related to immune functions, i.e. cytokine signaling (all adj. p≤ 0.05. In mRNA and miRNA modules, 461 and 25 candidate hub genes were identified, respectively. In contrast to the expected biological functions of miRNAs, correlation analyses between mRNA and miRNA hub genes revealed a higher number of positive than negative correlations (χ2 test p≤ 0.0001. Integration of hub gene expression with genome-wide genotypic data resulted in 591 mRNA cis-eQTLs and 62 miRNA cis-eQTLs. mRNA cis-eQTLs were significantly enriched for AD diagnosis and AD symptom counts (adj. p = 0.014 and p = 0.024, respectively in AD GWAS signals in a large, independent genetic sample from the Collaborative Study on Genetics of Alcohol (COGA. In conclusion, our study identified putative gene network hubs coordinating mRNA and miRNA co-expression changes in the NAc of AD subjects, and our genetic (cis-eQTL analysis provides novel insights into the etiological mechanisms of AD.

  5. Dose-dependent Toxicity of Humanized Renilla reniformis GFP (hrGFP Limits Its Utility as a Reporter Gene in Mouse Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay M Wallace

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy has historically focused on delivering protein-coding genes to target cells or tissues using a variety of vectors. In recent years, the field has expanded to include gene-silencing strategies involving delivery of noncoding inhibitory RNAs, such as short hairpin RNAs or microRNAs (miRNAs. Often called RNA interference (RNAi triggers, these small inhibitory RNAs are difficult or impossible to visualize in living cells or tissues. To circumvent this detection problem and ensure efficient delivery in preclinical studies, vectors can be engineered to coexpress a fluorescent reporter gene to serve as a marker of transduction. In this study, we set out to optimize adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors capable of delivering engineered miRNAs and green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter genes to skeletal muscle. Although the more broadly utilized enhanced GFP (eGFP gene derived from the jellyfish, Aequorea victoria was a conventional choice, we were concerned about some previous studies suggesting this protein was myotoxic. We thus opted to test vectors carrying the humanized Renilla reniformis-derived GFP (hrGFP gene, which has not seen as extensive usage as eGFP but was purported to be a safer and less cytotoxic alternative. Employing AAV6 vector dosages typically used in preclinical gene transfer studies (3×1010 –1 × 1011 particles, we found that hrGFP caused dose-dependent myopathy when delivered to wild-type (wt mouse muscle, whereas identical titers of AAV6 carrying eGFP were relatively benign. Dose de-escalation at or below 8 × 109 AAV particles effectively reduced or eliminated hrGFP-associated myotoxicity, but also had dampening effects on green fluorescence and miRNA-mediated gene silencing in whole muscles. We conclude that hrGFP is impractical for use as a transduction marker in preclinical, AAV-based RNA interference therapy studies where adult mouse muscle is the target organ. Moreover, our data support that eGFP is superior

  6. Growth phase-dependent activation of nitr